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1

ICF Consulting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

prepared by a research team led by Francisco Silva of ICF Consulting. The work was guided by a task group chaired by Gary McVoy which included Jock Conyngham, Timothy Granata,

unknown authors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

ICF Annual Report 1997  

SciTech Connect

The continuing objective of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL's) Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program is the demonstration of thermonuclear fusion ignition and energy gain in the laboratory and to support the nuclear weapons program in its use of ICF facilities. The underlying theme of all ICF activities as a science research and development program is the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Defense Programs (DP) science-based Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP). The mission of the US Inertial Fusion Program is twofold: (1) to address high-energy-density physics issues for the SSP and (2) to develop a laboratory microfusion capability for defense and energy applications. In pursuit of this mission, the ICF Program has developed a state-of-the-art capability to investigate high-energy-density physics in the laboratory. The near-term goals pursued by the ICF Program in support of its mission are demonstrating fusion ignition in the laboratory and expanding the Program's capabilities in high-energy-density science. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) project is a cornerstone of this effort.

Correll, D

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Annual Energy Outlook 2012  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

case Other projections (million short tons) (quadrillion Btu) EVA a IHSGI INFORUM IEA b Exxon- Mobil c BP b (million short tons) (quadrillion Btu) 2015 Production 1,084 993 20.24...

4

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

Monthly and yearly energy forecasts, analysis of energy topics, ... IEA (Current Policies Scenario)--107.60--135.70--145.00----INFORUM--111.26--136.77--149.55----IHSGI:

5

Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During its 1996 winter study JASON reviewed the DOE Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program. This included the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and proposed studies. The result of the review was to comment on the role of the ICF program in support of the DOE Science Based Stockpile Stewardship program.

Hammer, D.; Dyson, F.; Fortson, N.; Novick, B.; Panofsky, W.; Rosenbluth, M.; Treiman, S.; York, H.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

ICF International | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ICF International ICF International Jump to: navigation, search Name ICF International Address 9300 Lee Highway, Fairfax, VA 22031-1207 USA Place Washington, District of Columbia Stock Symbol NASDAQ:ICFI Year founded 1969 Number of employees 1001-5000 References http://www.icfi.com/ No information has been entered for this organization. Add Organization Contents 1 Organization Overview 1.1 Markets 2 Resources 2.1 Programs 3 References Organization Overview "ICF International partners with government and commercial clients to deliver professional services and technology solutions in the energy, environment, and infrastructure; health, social programs, and consumer/financial; and public safety and defense markets." Markets Aviation Climate Community Development Defense Education

7

ICF program annual report, 1988--89  

SciTech Connect

This report contains discussions on the following topics: Target Physics; Nova Experiments; Nova Laser Science and Technology; Target Science and Technology; Advanced Drivers; and ICF Applications.

Not Available

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Nuclear diagnostics in support of ICF experiments  

SciTech Connect

As the yields of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments increase to NIF levels new diagnostic techniques for studying details of fusion burn behavior will become feasible. The new techniques will provide improved measurements of fusion burn temperature and history. Improved temperature measurements might be achieved with magnetic spectroscopy of fusion neutrons. High-bandwidth fusion reaction history will be measured with fusion-specific {gamma}-ray diagnostics. Additional energy-resolved {gamma}-ray might be able to study a selection of specific behaviors during fusion burn. Present ICF yields greater than 10{sup 13} neutrons are sufficient to demonstrate the basic methods that underlie the new techniques. As ICF yields increase, the diagnostics designs adjusted accordingly in order to provide clear and specific data on fusion burn performance.

Moran, M.J.; Hall, J.

1996-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

9

ICF and IFE Research at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

concepts for ICF ignition E14220b Summary · The baseline direct-drive ignition target for the NIF) will allow direct-drive ignition experiments while NIF is configured for indirect drive. · A new high Fusion Energy (IFE). ICF physics validation is required for IFE. #12;The NIF symmetric direct-drive point

10

The Inforum LIFT Model  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

personal consumption transportation energy use (gasoline and oil). Electric power - Fossil fuels consumption by electric utilities. Ratios are used to relate LIFT...

11

Field Validation of ICF Residential Building Air-Tightness  

SciTech Connect

Recent advances in home construction methods have made considerable progress in addressing energy savings issues. Certain methods are potentially capable of tightening the building envelope, consequently reducing air leakage and minimizing heating and air conditioning related energy losses. Insulated concrete form (ICF) is an economically viable alternative to traditional woodframe construction. Two homes, one of wood-frame, the other of ICF construction, were studied. Standard air leakage testing procedures were used to compare air tightness characteristics achieved by the two construction types. The ICF home showed consistently lower values for air leakage in these tests. The buildings otherwise provided similar data during testing, suggesting that the difference in values is due to greater airtight integrity of the ICF construction method. Testing on more homes is necessary to be conclusive. However, ICF construction shows promise as a tighter building envelope construction method.

Sacs, I.; Ternes, M.P.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

The physics of radiation driven ICF hohlraums  

SciTech Connect

On the Nova Laser at LLNL, we have recently demonstrated many of the key elements required for assuring that the next proposed laser, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will drive an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) target to ignition. The target uses the recently declassified indirect drive (sometimes referred to as {open_quotes}radiation drive{close_quotes}) approach which converts laser light to x-rays inside a gold cylinder, which then acts as an x-ray {open_quotes}oven{close_quotes} (called a hohlraum) to drive the fusion capsule in its center. On Nova we`ve demonstrated good understanding of the temperatures reached in hohlraums and of the ways to control the uniformity with which the x-rays drive the spherical fusion capsules. In this lecture we briefly review the fundamentals of ICF, and describe the capsule implosion symmetry advantages of the hohlraum approach. We then concentrate on a quantitative understanding of the scaling of radiation drive with hohlraum size and wall material, and with laser pulse length and power. We demonstrate that coupling efficiency of x-ray drive to the capsule increases as we proceed from Nova to the NIF and eventually to a reactor, thus increasing the gain of the system.

Rosen, M.D.

1995-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

13

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. Comparisons of electricity projections, 2025, 2035, and 2040 1. Comparisons of electricity projections, 2025, 2035, and 2040 (billion kilowatthours, except where noted) Other projections Projection 2011 AEO2013 Reference case EVA IHSGI INFORUM ICF NREL 2025 2026 Average end-use price (2011 cents per kilowatthour)a 9.9 9.5 -- 11.2 10.0 -- 10.4 Residential 11.7 11.6 -- 13.3 11.8 -- -- Commercial 10.2 9.7 -- 11.6 10.3 -- -- Industrial 6.8 6.5 -- 7.6 6.8 -- -- Total generation including CHP plus imports 4,130 4,612 4,570 5,207 4,296 4,860 4,693 Coal 1,730 1,727 1,726 1,605 -- -- 1,860 Petroleum 28 18 -- 33 -- -- 0 Natural gasb 1,000 1,252 1,387 1,732 -- -- 1,041 Nuclear 790 912 890 923 -- -- 794 Hydroelectric/otherc 544 681 567 852 -- -- 997

14

U.S. Energy Information Administration | Annual Energy Outlook 2013  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Table 14. Comparisons of coal projections, 2011-2040 (million short tons, except where noted) Projection 2011 AEO2013 Reference case Other projections (million short tons) (quadrillion Btu) EVA a ICF b IHSGI INFORUM IEA Exxon- Mobil c (million short tons) (quadrillion Btu) 2025 Production 1,096 1,113 22.54 958 1,104 1,107 1,061 -- -- East of the Mississippi 456 447 -- 402 445 -- -- -- -- West of the Mississippi 639 666 -- 556 659 -- -- -- -- Consumption Electric power 929 929 17.66 786 939 864 -- -- 13 Coke plants 21 22 0.58 22 15 19 -- -- -- Coal-to-liquids -- 6 -- -- 36 -- -- -- -- Other industrial/buildings 49 53 1.69 d 29 72 44 1.96 d -- -- Total consumption (quadrillion Btu) 19.66 -- 19.35 -- -- 18.34 -- -- 13 Total consumption (million short tons) 999 1,010 -- 836 1,061 927 1,015 e -- -- Net coal exports (million short tons) 96 124 -- 118 43 181 46 -- --

15

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1. Comparisons of electricity projections, 2025, 2035, and 2040 1. Comparisons of electricity projections, 2025, 2035, and 2040 (billion kilowatthours, except where noted) Other projections Projection 2011 AEO2013 Reference case EVA IHSGI INFORUM ICF NREL 2025 2026 Average end-use price (2011 cents per kilowatthour)a 9.9 9.5 -- 11.2 10.0 -- 10.4 Residential 11.7 11.6 -- 13.3 11.8 -- -- Commercial 10.2 9.7 -- 11.6 10.3 -- -- Industrial 6.8 6.5 -- 7.6 6.8 -- -- Total generation including CHP plus imports 4,130 4,612 4,570 5,207 4,296 4,860 4,693 Coal 1,730 1,727 1,726 1,605 -- -- 1,860 Petroleum 28 18 -- 33 -- -- 0 Natural gasb 1,000 1,252 1,387 1,732 -- -- 1,041 Nuclear 790 912 890 923 -- -- 794 Hydroelectric/otherc 544 681 567 852 -- -- 997

16

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

2. Comparisons of natural gas projections, 2025, 2035, and 2040 2. Comparisons of natural gas projections, 2025, 2035, and 2040 (trillion cubic feet, except where noted) Other projections Projection 2011 AEO2013 Reference case IHSGI EVA ICF ExxonMobil INFORUM 2025 Dry gas productiona 23.00 28.59 32.29 29.86b 32.39 -- 26.26 Net imports 1.95 -1.58 -1.45 1.05 -0.63 -- -- Pipeline 1.67 -0.52 -- 2.21 0.60 -- -- LNG 0.28 -1.06 -- -1.16 -1.23 -- -- Consumption 24.37 26.87 30.87 31.49 30.34c 29.00c 23.61d Residential 4.72 4.44 4.58 4.98 5.05 7.00f 4.84 Commercial 3.16 3.35 3.23 3.33 3.01 -- 3.42 Industrialf 6.77 7.82 7.31 8.23 8.79 9.00 7.07 Electricity generatorsg 7.60 8.45 12.57 11.75 10.83 13.00 8.28 Othersh 2.11 2.81 3.19 3.20 2.66 0.00i --

17

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

134.50 140.00 INFORUM 91.78 105.84 113.35 117.83 116.76 IHSGI 99.16 72.89 87.19 95.65 98.08 Purvin & Gertz 98.75 103.77 106.47 107.37 107.37 SEER 94.20 101.57 107.13 111.26 121.94...

18

Effect of inactive impurities on the burning of ICF targets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The efficiency of thermonuclear burning of the spherical deuterium-tritium (DT) plasma of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets in the presence of low-Z impurities (such as lithium, carbon, or beryllium) with arbitrary concentrations is investigated. The effect of impurities produced due to the mixing of the thermonuclear fuel with the material of the structural elements of the target during its compression on the process of target burning is studied, and the possibility of using solid noncryogenic thermonuclear fuels in ICF targets is analyzed. Analytical dependences of the ignition energy and target thermonuclear gain on the impurity concentration are obtained. The models are constructed for homogeneous and inhomogeneous plasmas for the case in which the burning is initiated in the central heated region of the target and then propagates into the surrounding relatively cold fuel. Two possible configurations of an inhomogeneous plasma, namely, an isobaric configuration formed in the case of spark ignition of the target and an isochoric configuration formed in the case of fast ignition, are considered. The results of numerical simulations of the burning of the DT plasma of ICF targets in a wide range of impurity concentrations are presented. The simulations were performed using the TEPA one-dimensional code, in which the thermonuclear burning kinetics is calculated by the Monte Carlo method. It is shown that the strongest negative effect related to the presence of impurities is an increase in the energy of target ignition. It is substantiated that the most promising solid noncryogenic fuel is DT hydride of beryllium (BeDT). The requirements to the plasma parameters at which BeDT can be used as a fuel in noncryogenic ICF targets are determined. Variants of using noncryogenic targets with a solid thermonuclear fuel are proposed.

Gus'kov, S. Yu. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Il'in, D. V.; Sherman, V. E. [St. Petersburg State Engineering Institute (Russian Federation)

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

19

Hybrid-drive implosion system for ICF targets  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hybrid-drive implosion systems (20,40) for ICF targets (10,22,42) are described which permit a significant increase in target gain at fixed total driver energy. The ICF target is compressed in two phases, an initial compression phase and a final peak power phase, with each phase driven by a separate, optimized driver. The targets comprise a hollow spherical ablator (12) surroundingly disposed around fusion fuel (14). The ablator is first compressed to higher density by a laser system (24), or by an ion beam system (44), that in each case is optimized for this initial phase of compression of the target. Then, following compression of the ablator, energy is directly delivered into the compressed ablator by an ion beam driver system (30,48) that is optimized for this second phase of operation of the target. The fusion fuel (14) is driven, at high gain, to conditions wherein fusion reactions occur. This phase separation allows hydrodynamic efficiency and energy deposition uniformity to be individually optimized, thereby securing significant advantages in energy gain. In additional embodiments, the same or separate drivers supply energy for ICF target implosion.

Mark, James W. (Danville, CA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Hybrid-drive implosion system for ICF targets  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hybrid-drive implosion systems for ICF targets are described which permit a significant increase in target gain at fixed total driver energy. The ICF target is compressed in two phases, an initial compression phase and a final peak power phase, with each phase driven by a separate, optimized driver. The targets comprise a hollow spherical ablator surroundingly disposed around fusion fuel. The ablator is first compressed to higher density by a laser system, or by an ion beam system, that in each case is optimized for this initial phase of compression of the target. Then, following compression of the ablator, energy is directly delivered into the compressed ablator by an ion beam driver system that is optimized for this second phase of operation of the target. The fusion fuel is driven, at high gain, to conditions wherein fusion reactions occur. This phase separation allows hydrodynamic efficiency and energy deposition uniformity to be individually optimized, thereby securing significant advantages in energy gain. In additional embodiments, the same or separate drivers supply energy for ICF target implosion. 3 figs.

Mark, J.W.K.

1987-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ihsgi inforum icf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Pulsed power drivers for ICF and high energy density physics  

SciTech Connect

Nanosecond Pulsed Power Science and Technology has its origins in the 1960s and over the past decade has matured into a flexible and robust discipline capable of addressing key physics issues of importance to ICF and high Energy Density Physics. The major leverage provided by pulsed power is its ability to generate and deliver high energy and high power at low cost and high efficiency. A low-cost, high-efficiency driver is important because of the very large capital investment required for multi-megajoule ignition-class systems. High efficiency is of additional importance for a commercially viable inertial fusion energy option. Nanosecond pulsed power has been aggressively and successfully developed at Sandia over the past twenty years. This effort has led to the development of unique multi-purpose facilities supported by highly capable diagnostic, calculational and analytic capabilities. The Sandia Particle-beam Fusion Program has evolved as part of an integrated national ICF Program. It applies the low-cost, high-efficiency leverage provided by nanosecond pulsed power systems to the longer-term goals of the national program, i.e., the Laboratory Microfusion Facility and Inertial Fusion Energy. A separate effort has led to the application of nanosecond pulsed power to the generation of intense, high-energy laboratory x-ray sources for application to x-ray laser and radiation effects science research. Saturn is the most powerful of these sources to date. It generates {approximately}500 kilojoules of x-rays from a magnetically driven implosion (Z-pinch). This paper describes results of x-ray physics experiments performed on Saturn, plans for a new Z-pinch drive capability for PBFA-II, and a design concept for the proposed {approximately}15 MJ Jupiter facility. The opportunities for ICF-relevant research using these facilities will also be discussed.

Ramirez, J.J.; Matzen, M.K.; McDaniel, D.H.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

22

The Prospects for High-Yield ICF with a Z-Pinch Driven Dynamic Hohlraum  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent success with the Sandia Z machine has renewed interest in utilizing fast z-pinenes for ICF. One promising concept places the ICF capsule internal to the imploding z-pinch. At machine parameters relevant to achieving high yield, the imploding z-pinch mass has sufficient opacity to trap radiation giving rise to a dynamic hohlraum. The concept utilizes a 12 MJ, 54 MA z-pinch driver producing a capsule drive temperature exceeding 300 eV to realize a 550 MJ thermonuclear yield. They present the current high-yield design and its development that supports high-yield ICF with a z-pinch driven dynamic hohlraum.

CHANDLER, GORDON A.; CHRIEN, R.; COOPER, GARY WAYNE; DERZON, MARK S.; DOUGLAS, MELISSA R.; HEBRON, DAVID E.; LASH, JOEL S.; LEEPER, RAMON J.; MATZEN, M. KEITH; MEHLHORN, THOMAS A.; NASH, THOMAS J.; OLSON, RICHARD E.; PETERSON, D.L.; RUIZ, CARLOS L.; SANFORD, THOMAS W. L.; SLUTZ, STEPHEN A.

1999-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

23

The VISTA spacecraft: Advantages of ICF (Inertial Confinement Fusion) for interplanetary fusion propulsion applications  

SciTech Connect

Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) is an attractive engine power source for interplanetary manned spacecraft, especially for near-term missions requiring minimum flight duration, because ICF has inherent high power-to-mass ratios and high specific impulses. We have developed a new vehicle concept called VISTA that uses ICF and is capable of round-trip manned missions to Mars in 100 days using A.D. 2020 technology. We describe VISTA's engine operation, discuss associated plasma issues, and describe the advantages of DT fuel for near-term applications. Although ICF is potentially superior to non-fusion technologies for near-term interplanetary transport, the performance capabilities of VISTA cannot be meaningfully compared with those of magnetic-fusion systems because of the lack of a comparable study of the magnetic-fusion systems. We urge that such a study be conducted.

Orth, C.D.; Klein, G.; Sercel, J.; Hoffman, N.; Murray, K.; Chang-Diaz, F.

1987-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

24

Core science and technology development plan for indirect-drive ICF ignition. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

To define the development work needed to support inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program goals, the authors have assembled this Core Science and Technology (CS and T) Plan that encompasses nearly all science research and technology development in the ICF program. The objective of the CS and T Plan described here is to identify the development work needed to ensure the success of advanced ICF facilities, in particular the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This plan is intended as a framework to facilitate planning and coordination of future ICF programmatic activities. The CS and T Plan covers all elements of the ICF program including laser technology, optic manufacturing, target chamber, target diagnostics, target design and theory, target components and fabrication, and target physics experiments. The CS and T Plan has been divided into these seven different technology development areas, and they are used as level-1 categories in a work breakdown structure (WBS) to facilitate the organization of all activities in this plan. The scope of the CS and T Plan includes all research and development required to support the NIF leading up to the activation and initial operation as an indirect-drive facility. In each of the CS and T main development areas, the authors describe the technology and issues that need to be addressed to achieve NIF performance goals. To resolve all issues and achieve objectives, an extensive assortment of tasks must be performed in a coordinated and timely manner. The authors describe these activities and present planning schedules that detail the flow of work to be performed over a 10-year period corresponding to estimated time needed to demonstrate fusion ignition with the NIF. Besides the benefits to the ICF program, the authors also discuss how the commercial sector and the nuclear weapons science may profit from the proposed research and development program.

Powell, H.T.; Kilkenny, J.D. [eds.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

OMEGA ICF experiments and preparation for direct drive ignition on NIF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OMEGA ICF experiments and preparation for direct drive ignition on NIF R.L. McCrorya , R.E. Bahra) is investigating various theoretical aspects of a direct drive National Ignition Facility (NIF) ignition target equivalent to those planned for the NIF. The current experimental studies on OMEGA address the essential

26

The Development of Indirect Drive ICF and the Countdown to Ignition Experiments on the NIF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Development of Indirect Drive ICF and the Countdown to Ignition Experiments on the NIF Maxwell Prize Address APS Division of Plasma Physics Meeting November 15, 2007 John Lindl NIF and Photon Science.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 #12;The NIF

27

Fast-ion spectrometry of ICF implosions and laser-foil experiments at the omega and MTW laser facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fast ions generated from laser-plasma interactions (LPI) have been used to study inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions and laser-foil interactions. LPI, which vary in nature depending on the wavelength and intensity ...

Sinenian, Nareg

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Inference of ICF Implosion Core Mix using Experimental Data and Theoretical Mix Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mixing between fuel and shell materials in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) implosion cores is a current topic of interest. The goal of this work was to design direct-drive ICF experiments which have varying levels of mix, and subsequently to extract information on mixing directly from the experimental data using spectroscopic techniques. The experimental design was accomplished using hydrodynamic simulations in conjunction with Haan's saturation model, which was used to predict the mix levels of candidate experimental configurations. These theoretical predictions were then compared to the mixing information which was extracted from the experimental data, and it was found that Haan's mix model performed well in predicting trends in the width of the mix layer. With these results, we have contributed to an assessment of the range of validity and predictive capability of the Haan saturation model, as well as increased our confidence in the methods used to extract mixing information from experimental data.

Welser-Sherrill, L; Haynes, D A; Mancini, R C; Cooley, J H; Tommasini, R; Golovkin, I E; Sherrill, M E; Haan, S W

2008-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

29

Absence of molecular deuterium dissociation during room-temperature permeation into polystyrene ICF target shells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Polystyrene microshells filled with deuterium and tritium gas are important target shells for inertially confined fusion (ICF) and are particularly promising for target containing spin-polarized hydrogens fuels. A currently active approach to the latter uses polarized D in HD, in a method which requires preservation of the high purity of the initially prepared HD (very low specified H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} concentrations). This would not be possible if dissociation should occur during permeation into the target shells. We have thus tested polystyrene shells using a novel method which employs very pure polystyrene shells using a novel method which employs very pure ortho-D{sub 2} as the test gas. An upper limit of 6 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} was deduced for the dissociation of D{sub 2} upon room temperature permeation through an approximately 8 um wall of polystyrene, clearing the way for use of polystyrene target shells for ICF fusion experiments with spin-polarized hydrogens fuels. 19 refs., 1 fig.

Honig, A.; Alexander, N.; Fan, Q. (Syracuse Univ., NY (USA). Dept. of Physics); Gram, R.; Kim, H. (Rochester Univ., NY (USA). Lab. for Laser Energetics)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

EIA - Annual Energy Outlook 2009 - Comparison with Other Projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Comparison with Other Projections Comparison with Other Projections Annual Energy Outlook 2009 with Projections to 2030 Comparison with Other Projections Only IHS Global Insight (IHSGI) produces a comprehensive energy projection with a time horizon similar to that of AEO2009. Other organizations, however, address one or more aspects of the U.S. energy market. The most recent projection from IHSGI, as well as others that concentrate on economic growth, international oil prices, energy consumption, electricity, natural gas, petroleum, and coal, are compared here with the AEO2009 projections. Economic Growth Projections of the average annual real GDP growth rate for the United States from 2007 through 2010 range from 0.2 percent to 3.1 percent (Table 15). Real GDP grows at an annual rate of 0.6 percent in the AEO2009 reference case over the period, significantly lower than the projections made by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), and the Social Security Administration (SSA)—although not all of those projections have been updated to take account of the current economic downturn. The AEO2009 projection is slightly lower than the projection by IHSGI and slightly higher than the projection by the Interindustry Forecasting Project at the University of Maryland (INFORUM). In March 2009, the consensus Blue Chip projection was for 2.2-percent average annual growth from 2007 to 2010.

31

EIA - AEO2010 - Comparison With Other Projections  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Comparison With Other Projections Comparison With Other Projections Annual Energy Outlook 2010 with Projections to 2035 Comparison With Other Projections Only IHS Global Insights, Inc. (IHSGI) produces a comprehensive energy projection with a time horizon similar to that of AEO2010. Other organizations, however, address one or more aspects of the U.S. energy market. The most recent projection from IHSGI, as well as others that concentrate on economic growth, international oil prices, energy consumption, electricity, natural gas, petroleum, and coal, are compared here with the AEO2010 projections. Economic growth Projections of the average annual growth rate of real GDP in the United States from 2008 to 2018 range from 2.1 percent to 2.8 percent (Table 9). In the AEO2010 Reference case, real GDP grows by an average of 2.2 percent per year over the period, lower than projected by the Office of Management and Budget (OMB), the Congressional Budget Office (CBO), the Social Security Administration (SSA), and the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS)—although none of those projections has been updated since August 2009. The AEO2010 projection is similar to the IHSGI projection and slightly higher than projections by the Interindustry Forecasting Project at the University of Maryland (INFORUM). In March 2009, the consensus Blue Chip projection was for 2.2-percent average annual growth from 2008 to 2018.

32

The Edward Teller medal lecture: The evolution toward Indirect Drive and two decades of progress toward ICF ignition and burn  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1972, I joined the Livermore ICF Theory and Target Design group led by John Nuckolls, shortly after publication of John`s seminal Nature article on ICF. My primary role, working with others in the target design program including Mordy Rosen, Steve Haan, and Larry Suter, has been as a target designer and theorist who utilized the LASNEX code to perform numerical experiments, which along with analysis of laboratory and underground thermonuclear experiments allowed me to develop a series of models and physical insights which have been used to set the direction and priorities of the Livermore program. I have had the good fortune of working with an outstanding team of scientists who have established LLNL as the premier ICF laboratory in the world. John Emmett and the LLNL Laser Science team were responsible for developing a series of lasers from Janus to Nova which have given LLNL unequaled facilities. George Zimmerman and the LASNEX group developed the numerical models essential for projecting future performance and requirements as well as for designing and analyzing the experiments. Bill Kruer, Bruce Langdon and others in the plasma theory group developed the fundamental understanding of laser plasma interactions which have played such an important role in ICF. And a series of experiment program leaders including Mike Campbell and Joe Kilkenny and their laser experimental teams developed the experimental techniques and diagnostic capabilities which have allowed us to c increasingly complex and sophisticated experiments.

Lindl, J.D.

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Inference of ICF implosion core mix using experimental data and theoretical mix modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mixing between fuel and shell materials in Inertial Confinement Fusion (lCF) implosion cores is a current topic of interest. The goal of this work was to design direct-drive ICF experiments which have varying levels of mix, and subsequently to extract information on mixing directly from the experimental data using spectroscopic techniques. The experimental design was accomplished using hydrodynamic simulations in conjunction with Haan's saturation model, which was used to predict the mix levels of candidate experimental configurations. These theoretical predictions were then compared to the mixing information which was extracted from the experimental data, and it was found that Haan's mix model predicted trends in the width of the mix layer as a function of initial shell thickness. These results contribute to an assessment of the range of validity and predictive capability of the Haan saturation model, as well as increasing confidence in the methods used to extract mixing information from experimental data.

Sherrill, Leslie Welser [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Haynes, Donald A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cooley, James H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sherrill, Manolo E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mancini, Roberto C [UNR; Tommasini, Riccardo [LLNL; Golovkin, Igor E [PRISM COMP. SCIENCES; Haan, Steven W [LLNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Using gamma-ray emission to measure areal density of ICF capsules  

SciTech Connect

Fusion neutrons streaming from a burning ICF capsule generate gamma rays via nuclear inelastic scattering in the ablator of the capsule. The intensity of gamma-ray emission is proportional to the product of the ablator areal density ('{rho}R') and the yield of fusion neutrons, so by detecting the gamma rays we can infer the ablator areal density, provided we also have a measurement of the capsule's total neutron yield. In plastic-shell capsules, for example, {sup 12}C nuclei emit gamma rays at 4.44 MeV after excitation by 14.1-MeV neutrons from D+T fusion. These gamma rays can be measured by the Gamma Reaction History (GRH) experiment being built at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A linear error analysis indicates the chief sources of uncertainty in inferred areal density.

Hoffman, Nelson M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wilson, Douglas C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hermann, Hans W [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Young, Carlton S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Inertial confinement fusion. ICF quarterly report, October 1993--December 1993, Volume 4, Number 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the 1990 National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report of its review of the U.S. Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program, it was recommended that a high priority be placed on completing the Precision Nova Project and its associated experimental campaign. Since fiscal year 1990, the lab has therefore campaigned vigorously on Nova and in its supporting laboratories to develop the Precision Nova capabilities needed to perform the stressful target experiments recommended in the 1990 NAS report. The activities to enable these experiments have been directed at improvements in three areas - the Nova laser, target fabrication capabilities, and target diagnostics. As summarized in the five articles in this report, the Precision Nova improvements have been successfully completed. These improvements have had a positive impact on target performance and on the ability to diagnose the results, as evidenced by the HEP-1 experimental results. The five articles generally concentrate on improvements to the capabilities rather than on the associated target physics experiments. Separate abstracts are included for each paper.

Powell, H.T.; Schleich, D.P.; Murphy, P.W. [eds.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

The measurement and analysis of wavefront structure from large aperture ICF optics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the techniques, developed over the past year, for high spatial resolution measurement and analysis of the transmitted and/or reflected wavefront of large aperture ICF optical components. Parts up to 400 mm {times} 750 mm have been measured and include: laser slabs, windows, KDP crystals and lenses. The measurements were performed using state-of-the-art commercial phase shifting interferometers at a wavelength of 633 {mu}m. Both 1 and 2-D Fourier analysis have been used to characterize the wavefront; specifically the Power Spectral Density, (PSD), function was calculated. The PSDs of several precision optical components will be shown. The PSD(V) is proportional to the (amplitude){sup 2} of components of the Fourier frequency spectrum. The PSD describes the scattered intensity and direction as a function of scattering angle in the wavefront. The capability of commercial software is limited to 1-D Fourier analysis only. We are developing our own 2-D analysis capability in support of work to revise specifications for NIF optics. 2-D analysis uses the entire wavefront phase map to construct 2D PSD functions. We have been able to increase the signal-to-noise relative to 1-D and can observe very subtle wavefront structure.

Wolfe, C.R.; Lawson, J.K.

1995-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

37

White Paper on Ion Beam Transport for ICF: Issues, R&D Need,and Tri-Lab Plans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To date, most resources for ion beam fusion have been devoted to development of accelerators and target physics; relatively few resources have gone into ion beam transport development. Because of theoretical studies and substantial experience with electron beam transport, the ion beam transport community is now poised to develop and optimize ion beam transport for ICF. Because of this Tri-Lab effort, a path for coordinated development of ion beam transport has been established. The rate of progress along this path will now be determined largely by the availability of resources.

Olson, C.; Lee, E.; Langdon, B.

2005-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

38

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Release Date: June 2013 | Release Date: June 2013 | Report Number: DOE/EIA-0383(2012) Acronyms List of Acronyms AB Assembly Bill IHSGI IHS Global Insight AB32 California Assembly Bill 32 INFORUM Interindustry Forecasting Project at the University of Maryland ACI Activated carbon injection IOU Invester-owned utility AEO Annual Energy Outlook IREC Interstate Renewable Energy Council AEO2012 Annual Energy Outlook 2012 ITC Investment tax credit ANWR Arctic National Wildlife Refuge LCFS Low Carbon Fuel Standard ARRA2009 American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 LDV Light-duty vehicle ASHRAE American Society of Heating, Refrigerating, and Air-Conditioning Engineers LED Light-emitting diode Blue Chip Blue Chip Consensus LFMM Liquid Fuels Market Module

39

Comparison of electric and magnetic quadrupole focusing for the low energy end of an induction-linac-ICF (Inertial-Confinement-Fusion) driver  

SciTech Connect

This report compares two physics designs of the low energy end of an induction linac-ICF driver: one using electric quadrupole focusing of many parallel beams followed by transverse combining; the other using magnetic quadrupole focusing of fewer beams without beam combining. Because of larger head-to-tail velocity spread and a consequent rapid current amplification in a magnetic focusing channel, the overall accelerator size of the design using magnetic focusing is comparable to that using electric focusing.

Kim, C.H.

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

History of HERMES III diode to z-pinch breakthrough and beyond : learning about pulsed power and z-pinch ICF.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

HERMES III and Z are two flagship accelerators of Sandia's pulsed-power program developed to generate intense-ray fields for the study of nuclear radiation effects, and to explore high energy-density physics (including the production of intense x-ray fields for Inertia Confinement Fusion [ICF]), respectively. A diode at the exit of HERMES III converts its 20-MeV electron beam into-rays. In contrast, at the center of Z, a z-pinch is used to convert its 20-MA current into an intense burst of x-rays. Here the history of how the HERMES III diode emerged from theoretical considerations to actual hardware is discussed. Next, the reverse process of how the experimental discovery of wire-array stabilization in a z-pinch, led to a better theory of wirearray implosions and its application to one of the ICF concepts on Z--the DH (Dynamic Hohlraum) is reviewed. Lastly, the report concludes with how the unexpected axial radiation asymmetry measured in the DH is understood. The first discussion illustrates the evolution of physics from theory-to-observationto- refinement. The second two illustrate the reverse process of observationto- theory-to refinement. The histories are discussed through the vehicle of my research at Sandia, illustrating the unique environment Sandia provides for personal growth and development into a scientific leader.

Sanford, Thomas W. L.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ihsgi inforum icf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

History of HERMES III diode to z-pinch breakthrough and beyond : learning about pulsed power and z-pinch ICF.  

SciTech Connect

HERMES III and Z are two flagship accelerators of Sandia's pulsed-power program developed to generate intense-ray fields for the study of nuclear radiation effects, and to explore high energy-density physics (including the production of intense x-ray fields for Inertia Confinement Fusion [ICF]), respectively. A diode at the exit of HERMES III converts its 20-MeV electron beam into-rays. In contrast, at the center of Z, a z-pinch is used to convert its 20-MA current into an intense burst of x-rays. Here the history of how the HERMES III diode emerged from theoretical considerations to actual hardware is discussed. Next, the reverse process of how the experimental discovery of wire-array stabilization in a z-pinch, led to a better theory of wirearray implosions and its application to one of the ICF concepts on Z--the DH (Dynamic Hohlraum) is reviewed. Lastly, the report concludes with how the unexpected axial radiation asymmetry measured in the DH is understood. The first discussion illustrates the evolution of physics from theory-to-observationto- refinement. The second two illustrate the reverse process of observationto- theory-to refinement. The histories are discussed through the vehicle of my research at Sandia, illustrating the unique environment Sandia provides for personal growth and development into a scientific leader.

Sanford, Thomas W. L.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

ICF Overview and Capabilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Toshiba (0.7 kW) JX Nippon Oil (0.75 kW) Panasonic (1 kW) Europe IC Engines ... of CHP Improved outlook for domestic natural gas supplies ...

2012-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

43

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

0. Comparisons of energy consumption by sector projections, 2025, 2035, and 2040 0. Comparisons of energy consumption by sector projections, 2025, 2035, and 2040 (quadrillion Btu) Sector AEO2013 Reference INFORUM IHSGI ExxonMobil IEA 2011 Residential 11.3 11.5 10.8 -- -- Residential excluding electricity 6.4 6.6 6.0 5.0 -- Commercial 8.6 8.6 8.5 -- -- Commercial excluding electricity 4.1 4.1 4.0 4.0 -- Buildings sector 19.9 20.1 19.3 -- 19.3a Industrial 24.0 23.6 -- -- 23.7a Industrial excluding electricity 20.7 20.2 -- 20.0 -- Lossesb 0.7 -- -- -- -- Natural gas feedstocks 0.5 -- -- -- -- Industrial removing losses and feedstocks 22.9 -- 21.7 -- -- Transportation 27.1 27.2 26.2 27.0 23.1a Electric power 39.4 39.2 40.5 37.0 37.2a Less: electricity demandc 12.7 12.8 12.7 -- 15.0a

44

Foam shell cryogenic ICF target  

SciTech Connect

A uniform cryogenic layer of DT fuel is maintained in a fusion target having a low density, small pore size, low Z rigid foam shell saturated with liquid DT fuel. Capillary action prevents gravitational slumping of the fuel layer. The saturated shell may be cooled to produce a solid fuel layer.

Darling, Dale H. (Pleasanton, CA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Advanced ignition options for laser ICF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Rochester and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory #12;FSC · With day-one hardware, the NIF can explore high-gain shock ignition - Polar Shock Ignition (uses half the NIF beams to drive the implosion: multi-FM or 2D-SSD (talk by J. Soures at this meeting) The NIF can explore advanced ignition options

46

ICF Program Status SNL Z Facility UR/LLE OMEGA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the NIF Project National Nuclear Security Administration September 28, 2006 #12;2 Key points · A new fusion and high energy density physics · OMEGA EP; Z/ZR; NIF and ignition; petawatt capabilities;... · Ignition and applications planned for NIF; integrated program of "non- ignition" experiments

47

Overview of Fission Safety for Laser ICF Fission Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser Fusion-Fission Hybrid / Eighteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (Part 2)

Per F. Peterson; Edward Blandford; Christhian Galvez

48

Design alternatives for cryogenic beryllium windows in an ICF cryostat  

SciTech Connect

We propose three backup design options for the cryogenic beryllium windows in a cryostat. The first, a beryllium flange option, reduces peak tensile stresses to 1/3 of that in the original design. The second, a fiberglass flange option, reduces peak tensile stresses to 1/2 of that in the original design and is also low cost. A third option, replacing the beryllium windows with spherical Mylar caps, would require a development program. Even though Mylar has been used previously at cryogenic temperature, this option is still considered unreliable. The near-zero ductility of beryllium at cryogenic temperature makes the reduction of peak tensile stresses particularly desirable. The orginal window design did function satisfactorily and the backup options were not needed. However, these options remain open for possible incorporation in future cryostat designs.

Pitts, J.H.; Landon, P.R.; Gerhard, M.A.

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Mach-Zehnder Fiber-Optic Links for ICF Diagnostics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes the operation and evolution of Mach-Zehnder links for single-point detectors in inertial confinement fusion experimental facilities, based on the Gamma Reaction History (GRH) diagnostic at the National Ignition Facility.

Miller, E. K., Hermann, H. W.

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Thermal Infrared Exposure of Cryogenic Indirect Drive ICF Targets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Cryogenic inertial confinement fusion targets at the National Ignition Facility and the Laser Megajoule will be protected from thermal infrared radiation by a cold shroud. As the shroud is removed just before the laser pulse, infrared radiation will heat and possibly degrade the symmetry of the solid hydrogen fuel layer. A lumped component mathematical model has been constructed to calculate how long an indirect drive target can be exposed to thermal radiation before the fuel layer degrades. The allowed exposure time sets the maximum shroud removal time and therefore has important implications for the design of the cryogenic shroud systems. The model predicts that the maximum exposure time is approximately 0.18 s for plastic capsules inside hohlraums with transparent laser entrance holes. By covering the laser entrance holes with a partially reflective coating, the exposure time can be increased to approximately 1 s. The exposure time can be increased to about 2 s by using beryllium capsules. Several other design concepts could increase the exposure time even further. Lengthening of the allowed exposure time to 1 s or longer could allow a significant cost savings for the shroud system.

London, R A; Moody, J D; Sanchez, J J; Sater, J D; Haid, B J; Bittner, D N

2005-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

51

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

data were converted at 8.162674 barrels per metric ton. One metric ton equals 1,000 kilograms. bFor INFORUM, liquids demand data were converted from quadrillion Btus to barrels...

52

The ICF, Inc. coal and electric utilities model : an analysis and evaluation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

v.1. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is sponsoring a series of evaluations of important energy policy and electric utility industry models by the MIT Energy Model Analysis Program (EMAP). The subject of this ...

Wood, David O.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Low Mode Control of Cryogenic ICF Fuel Layers Using Infrared Heating  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Infrared heating has been demonstrated as an effective technique to smooth solid hydrogen layers inside transparent cryogenic inertial confinement fusion capsules. Control of the first two Legendre modes of the fuel thickness perturbations using two infrared beams injected into a hohlraum was predicted by modeling and experimentally demonstrated. In the current work, we use coupled ray tracing and heat transfer simulations to explore a wider range of control of long scale length asymmetries. We demonstrate several scenarios to control the first four Legendre modes in the fuel layer using four beams. With such a system, it appears possible to smooth both short and long scale length fuel thickness variations in transparent indirect drive inertial confinement fusion targets.

London, R A; Kozioziemski, B J; Marinak, M M; Kerbel, G D; Bittner, D N

2005-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

54

Experimental Studies of ICF Indirect-Drive Be and High Density C Candidate Ablators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To validate our modeling of the macroscopic and microscopic hydrodynamic and equation of state response of these candidate ablators to NIC-relevant x-ray drive, a multi-lab experimental program has been verifying the behavior of these new ablators. First, the pressures for onset and termination of melt for both Be and HDC under single or double shock drive has been measured at the Z and Omega facilities. Second, the level and effect of hard x-ray preheat has been quantified in scaled experiments at the Omega facility. Third, a long planar x-ray drive has been developed to check 2D and 3D perturbation growth at the ablation front upon acceleration. The concept has been extended to study growth at and near the ablator-ice interface upon deceleration. In addition, experimental designs for validating the expected low level of perturbation seeding due to possible residual microstructure after melt during first and second shock transit in Be and HDC have been completed. Results so far suggest both Be and HDC can remain ablator choices and have guided pulse shaping designs.

Landen, O L; Bradley, D K; Braun, D G; A.Smalyuk, V; Hicks, D G; Celliers, P M; Prisbrey, S; Page, R; Boehly, T R; Haan, S W; Munro, D H; Wallace, R G; Nikroo, A; Hamza, A; Biener, J; Wild, C; Woerner, E; Olson, R E; Rochau, G A; Knudson, M; Wilson, D C; Robey, H F; Collins, G W; Ho, D; Edwards, J; Marinak, M M; Hammel, B A; Meyerhofer, D D; MacGowan, B J

2007-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

55

A Solvent Cleaning Process for the Outer Surface of Plastic ICF Capsules  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Selected papers from 20th Target Fabrication Meeting, May 20-24, 2012, Santa Fe, NM, Guest Editor: Robert C. Cook

S. H. Baxamusa; S. D. Bhandarkar; J. L. Reynolds; B. Maranville; J. Horner; D. C. Mason; C. L. Heinbockel; N. A. Antipa; A. D. Conder

56

Electron generation and transport in intense relativistic laser-plasma interactions relevant to fast ignition ICF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ix Figure 1.10: (a) The NIF ignition scale cone-guided FINational Ignition Facility (NIF) experiments will focus onthe injection Figure 1.10: (a) The NIF ignition scale cone-

Ma, Tammy Yee Wing

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Overview of ICF Program SNL Z Facility UR/LLE OMEGA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fusion and the NIF Project National Nuclear Security Administration December 5, 2007 #12;2 Agenda · Mission/Strategic Objectives · National Ignition Facility (NIF) · National Ignition Campaign (NIC · The National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser is on track for completion in FY09. · The National Ignition Campaign

58

High order resolution of the Maxwell-Fokker-Planck-Landau model intended for ICF applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high order, deterministic direct numerical method is proposed for the non-relativistic 2D"xx3D"v Vlasov-Maxwell system, coupled with Fokker-Planck-Landau collision operators. The magnetic field is perpendicular to the 2D"x plane surface of computation, ... Keywords: Electron transport, Energy deposition, Fokker-Planck-Landau, High order numerical scheme, Inertial confinement regime, Magnetic field

Roland Duclous; Bruno Dubroca; Francis Filbet; Vladimir Tikhonchuk

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

KrF laser path to high gain ICF (inertial confinement fusion) laboratory microfusion facility  

SciTech Connect

The krypton-fluoride laser has many desirable features for inertial confinement fusion. Because it is a gas laser capable of operation with high efficiency, it is the only known laser candidate capable of meeting the driver requirements for inertial fusion energy (IFE) production. Los Alamos National Laboratory has defined a program plan to develop KrF lasers for IFE production. This plan develops the KrF laser and demonstrates the target performance in single-pulse facilities. A 100-kJ Laser Target Test Facility (LTTF) is proposed as the next step, to be followed by a 3 to 10-MJ Laboratory Microfusion Facility (LMF). The LTTF will resolve many target physics issues and accurately define the driver energy required for the LMF. It is also proposed that the technology development for IFE, such as the high-efficiency, high-reliability, repetitively pulsed driver, the reactor, mass production of targets, and the mechanism of injecting targets be developed in parallel with the single-pulse facilities. 11 refs., 4 figs.

Harris, D.B.; Sullivan, J.A.; Figueiro, J.F.; Cartwright, D.C.; McDonald, T.E.; Hauer, A.A.; Coggeshall, S.V.; Younger, S.M.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Turbostar: An ICF Reactor using Both Direct and Thermal Power Conversion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fusion Reactor DesignI / Proceedings of the Seveth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (Reno, Nevada, June 1519, 1986)

John H. Pitts

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ihsgi inforum icf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Electron generation and transport in intense relativistic laser-plasma interactions relevant to fast ignition ICF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

surroundings, then the blackbody radiation emitted will bespectral bright- ness of blackbody radiation is given as [3

Ma, Tammy Yee Wing

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

The effects of pre-mix on burn in ICF capsules D C Wilson1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.S.A. dcw@lanl.gov Abstract. Directly driven implosions at the Omega laser have tested the effects of pre

63

LA-UR-00-4391 ICF and Radiation Physics Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PI: Cris Barnes, (505)665-5687, cbarnes@lanl.gov PD: Doug Wilson, (505)667-6154, dcw Development PI: Cris Barnes, (505)665-5687, cbarnes@lanl.gov PD: Doug Wilson, (505)667-6154, dcw

Barnes, Cris W.

64

White Light Interferometry for the Optical Characterization of Transparent ICF Shells (A25055)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proc. Of 16th Target Fabrication Specialist's Meeting, Scottsdale, Arizona, 2005, To Be Published In Fusion Sci. And Technol.16th Target Fabrication Specialists Meeting Scottsdale Arizona, US, 2005999611260

Stephens, R.B.

2005-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

65

Quantitative Analysis of Backlit Shadowgraphy as a Diagnostic of Hydrogen Ice Surface Quality in ICF Capsules  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This document presents the Integrated Safety Management System (ISMS) Description for the Superblock non-reactor nuclear facilities-Tritium Facility (Building 331), Plutonium Facility (Building 332), and Building 334--at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Building 332 is a Nuclear Hazard Category 2 facility, while Buildings 331 and 334 are Category 3 facilities in accordance with DOE STD-1027, DOE STD-3009, and DOE Order 5480.23. In implementing the Superblock ISMS Description, a graded approach is used--the Category 2 nuclear facility description provides more detail than those for the Category 3 nuclear facilities.

Koch, J.A.; Sater, J.; Bernat, T.; Bittner, D.; Collins, G.; Hammel, B; Lee, Y.; Mackinnon, A.

1999-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

66

Electron Generation and Transport in Intense Relativistic Laser-Plasma Interactions Relevant to Fast Ignition ICF  

SciTech Connect

The reentrant cone approach to Fast Ignition, an advanced Inertial Confinement Fusion scheme, remains one of the most attractive because of the potential to efficiently collect and guide the laser light into the cone tip and direct energetic electrons into the high density core of the fuel. However, in the presence of a preformed plasma, the laser energy is largely absorbed before it can reach the cone tip. Full scale fast ignition laser systems are envisioned to have prepulses ranging between 100 mJ to 1 J. A few of the imperative issues facing fast ignition, then, are the conversion efficiency with which the laser light is converted to hot electrons, the subsequent transport characteristics of those electrons, and requirements for maximum allowable prepulse this may put on the laser system. This dissertation examines the laser-to-fast electron conversion efficiency scaling with prepulse for cone-guided fast ignition. Work in developing an extreme ultraviolet imager diagnostic for the temperature measurements of electron-heated targets, as well as the validation of the use of a thin wire for simultaneous determination of electron number density and electron temperature will be discussed.

Ma, T

2010-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

67

Innovative high pressure gas MEM's based neutron detector for ICF and active SNM detection.  

SciTech Connect

An innovative helium3 high pressure gas detection system, made possible by utilizing Sandia's expertise in Micro-electrical Mechanical fluidic systems, is proposed which appears to have many beneficial performance characteristics with regards to making these neutron measurements in the high bremsstrahlung and electrical noise environments found in High Energy Density Physics experiments and especially on the very high noise environment generated on the fast pulsed power experiments performed here at Sandia. This same system may dramatically improve active WMD and contraband detection as well when employed with ultrafast (10-50 ns) pulsed neutron sources.

Martin, Shawn Bryan; Derzon, Mark Steven; Renzi, Ronald F.; Chandler, Gordon Andrew

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Nd:Glass Laser Design for Laser ICF Fission Energy (LIFE)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Laser Fusion-Fission Hybrid / Eighteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (Part 2)

John Caird et al.

69

ICF Program StatusSNL Z Facility UR/LLE OMEGA Presented to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the NIF Project National Nuclear Security Administration October 12, 2005 #12;2 Key points · The stockpile-based stewardship program will enable this transformation #12;National Nuclear Security Administration Office Acting Director Scott L. Samuelson NA-162 NA-10 National Nuclear Security Administration Office

70

Design of a streaked radiography instrument for ICF ablator tuning measurements  

SciTech Connect

A streaked radiography diagnostic has been proposed as a technique to determine the ablator mass remaining in an inertial confinement fusion ignition capsule at peak velocity. This instrument, the 'HXRI-5', has been designed to fit within a National Ignition Facility Diagnostic Instrument Manipulator. The HXRI-5 will be built at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and initial testing will be done at the SNL Z-Beamlet Facility. In this paper, we will describe the National Ignition Campaign requirements for this diagnostic, the instrument design, and the planned test experiments.

Olson, R. E.; Geissel, M.; Kellogg, J. W.; Bennett, G. R.; Edens, A. D.; Atherton, B. W.; Leeper, R. J. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Hicks, D. G.; Spears, B. K.; Celliers, P. M.; Holder, J. P.; Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

71

White Paper on Ion Beam Transport for ICF: Issues, R&D Need, and Tri-Lab Plans  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL/PUP-928 HI FAN 1484 White Paper on Ion Beam Transportbegin preparation of this white paper on ion beam transport.each Laboratory This white paper is a result of that meeting

Olson, C.; Lee, E.; Langdon, B.

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Forming and smoothing D{sub 2} and HD layers for ICF by infra-red heating  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We describe a technique to form and smooth uniform solid D{sub 2}, HD or DT layers for inertial confinement fusion targets. Pumping the infrared (IR) collision induced vibration-rotation band generates a bulk heating of the solid. Shadowgraphs reveal that this bulk heat quickly redistributes the solid into a relatively uniform layer depending on the IR intensity profile. Measured redistribution time constants are used to determine the conversion efficiency of IR light into bulk heat. Phase shifting interferometry reveals that the surface roughness decreases with increasing IR heating.

Collins, G.W.; Tiszauer, D.; Feit, M.; Mapoles, E.R.; Bernat, T.P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Bittner, D.N.; Monsler, E. [Schafer (W.J.) Associates, Inc., Livermore, CA (United States)

1996-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

73

The Edward Teller medal lecture: The evolution toward indirect drive and two decades of progress toward ICF ignition and burn  

SciTech Connect

A memorial lecture reviews the achievements of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in the indirect drive for the inertial confinement fusion from 1972 to 1994. The main subjects have been the target physics (the laser and ion drive) in various geometries, the study of instabilities, and the gain calculations. The results allow to achieve extremely reproducible implosions at the Nova facilities. (AIP) [copyright] [ital American] [ital Institute] [ital of] [ital Physics] 1994

Lindl, J.D. (Lawerence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States) Eleventh International Workshop on Laser Interaction, Monterey California (United States))

1994-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

74

Modifying the Pore Size of Resorcinol Formaldehyde, Aerogels for Fabrication of Hollow Spheres for Direct Drive ICF Experiments (A26323)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proc. Of 2008 Materials Society Fall Meeting, Boston, Massachusetts (2008)Materials Research Society Fall Meeting(2008) Boston Massachusetts, US, 2008999617825

Paguio, R.R.

2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

75

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Pub  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Comparison with other projections Comparison with other projections Only IHS Global Insight (IHSGI) produces a comprehensive energy projection with a time horizon similar to that of the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 (AEO2013). Other organizations, however, address one or more aspects of the U.S. energy market. The most recent projection from IHSGI, as well as others that concentrate on economic growth, international oil prices, energy consumption, electricity, natural gas, petroleum, and coal, are compared here with the AEO2013 Reference case. 1. Economic growth The range of projected economic growth in the outlooks included in the comparison tends to be wider over the first 5 years of the projection than over a longer period, because the group of variables-such as population, productivity, and labor force growth-that influence long-run economic

76

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Pub  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Comparison with other projections Comparison with other projections Only IHS Global Insight (IHSGI) produces a comprehensive energy projection with a time horizon similar to that of Annual Energy Outlook2011 (AEO2011). Other organizations, however, address one or more aspects of the U.S. energy market. The most recent projection from IHSGI, as well as others that concentrate on economic growth, international oil prices, energy consumption, electricity, natural gas, petroleum, and coal, are compared here with the AEO2011 Reference case. 1. Economic growth The range of projected economic growth tends to be wider for the earlier years of the projection period and then narrows in the long run, because the group of conceptsâ€"such as population, productivity, and labor force growthâ€"that explain long-run growth trends is smaller than the

77

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Pub  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Changes AEO 2011 Comparison with other projections Changes AEO 2011 Comparison with other projections Only IHS Global Insight (IHSGI) produces a comprehensive energy projection with a time horizon similar to that of the Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (AEO2012). Other organizations, however, address one or more aspects of the U.S. energy market. The most recent projection from IHSGI, as well as others that concentrate on economic growth, international oil prices, energy consumption, electricity, natural gas, petroleum, and coal, are compared here with the AEO2012 Reference case. 1. Economic growth The range of projected economic growth in the outlooks included in the comparison tends to be wider over the first 5 years of the projection period than over a longer period, because the group of variables-such as

78

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Pub  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Changes AEO 2011 Comparison with other projections Changes AEO 2011 Comparison with other projections Only IHS Global Insight (IHSGI) produces a comprehensive energy projection with a time horizon similar to that of the Annual Energy Outlook 2013 (AEO2013). Other organizations, however, address one or more aspects of the U.S. energy market. The most recent projection from IHSGI, as well as others that concentrate on economic growth, international oil prices, energy consumption, electricity, natural gas, petroleum, and coal, are compared here with the AEO2013 Reference case. 1. Economic growth The range of projected economic growth in the outlooks included in the comparison tends to be wider over the first 5 years of the projection than over a longer period, because the group of variables-such as population,

79

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY CORNING INCORPORATED FOR...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

fused silica transmissive optics utilized in advanced Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) laser systems. The present cost of laser optics used in the ICF laser system is between...

80

By-Products Utilization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as sodium bicarbonate, soda ash, trona, or nahcalite (ICF Northwest, 1988). By-products generated

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ihsgi inforum icf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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81

PLEASE SCROLL DOWN FOR ARTICLE This article was downloaded by: [OHSU Science & Engineering Library  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

such as sodium bicarbonate, soda ash, trona, or nahcalite (ICF Northwest, 1988). By-products generated

Leen, Todd K.

82

Comparison and Physical Interpretation of MCNP and TART Neutron and Gamma Monte Carlo Shielding Calculations for a Heavy-Ion ICF System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

et al. , HYLIFE-II: a molten-salt inertial fusion energyHYLIFE-II, a mixture of molten salts made of F , L i , L i2], the liquid used is a molten salt made of F , L i , L i ,

Mainardi, E.; Premuda, F.; Lee, E.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Z-Pinch Generated X-Rays in Static-Wall Hohlraum Geometry Demonstrate Potential for Indirect-Drive ICF Studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Hohlraums of full ignition scale (6-mm diameter by 7-mm length) have been heated by x-rays from a z-pinch magnet on Z to a variety of temperatures and pulse shapes which can be used to simulate the early phases of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) temperature drive. The pulse shape is varied by changing the on-axis target of the z pinch in a static-wall-hohlraum geometry. A 2-{micro}m-thick walled Cu cylindrical target of 8-mm diameter filled with 10 mg/cm{sup 3} CH, for example, produces foot-pulse conditions of {approx}85 eV for a duration of {approx}10 ns, while a solid cylindrical target of 5-mm diameter and 14-mg/cm{sup 3} CH generates first-step-pulse conditions of {approx}122 eV for a duration of a few ns. Alternatively, reducing the hohlraum size (to 4-mm diameter by 4-mm length) with the latter target has increased the peak temperature to {approx}150 eV, which is characteristic of a second-step-pulse temperature. In general, the temperature T of these x-ray driven hohlraums is in agreement with the Planckian relation T{approx}(P/A){sup 1/4}. P is the measured x-ray input power and A is the surface area of the hohlraum. Fully-integrated 2-D radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of the z pinch and subsequent hohlraum heating show plasma densities within the useful volume of the hohlraums to be on the order of air or less.

BOWERS,RICHARD; CHANDLER,GORDON A.; HEBRON,DAVID E.; LEEPER,RAMON J.; MATUSLKA,WALTER; MOCK,RAYMOND CECIL; NASH,THOMAS J.; OLSON,CRAIG L.; PETERSON,BOB; PETERSON,DARRELL; RUGGLES,LAURENCE E.; SANFORD,THOMAS W. L.; SIMPSON,WALTER W.; STRUVE,KENNETH W.; VESEY,ROGER A.

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Characterization of the deuteron beam current in a linear accelerator for nuclear-diagnostic calibrations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) research, passive detection systems are often required in several applications for observing fusion-product spectra from an ICF-capsule implosion. These detection devices can be calibrated ...

Denis, Daniel (Daniel B.)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

FLY ASH GENERATION AND UTILIZATION -AN OVERVIEW* Tarun R. Naik, Ph.D., P.E.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

a sodium-based sorbent such as sodium bicarbonate, soda ash, trona, or nahcalite (ICF Northwest, 1988). By

Wisconsin-Milwaukee, University of

86

Inertial confinement fusion quarterly report, April--June 1994. Volume 4, Number 3  

SciTech Connect

This issue of the ICF Quarterly contains six articles covering a wide range of activities within the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program. It concentrates on target design; theoretical spectral analysis of ICF capsule surfaces; laser fusion experimental methods; and an alternative ICF design, based on ultrafast, ultrapowerful lasers. A key issue for the success of the ICF process is the hydrodynamic stability of the imploding capsule. There are two primary sources of instability growth in the ICF process: (1) asymmetries in the x-ray flux that drive the compression lead to asymmetric in the imploding surface; (2) imperfections on the capsule surface can grow into large perturbations, degrading the capsule performance. In recent years, a great deal of effort, both experimentally and theoretically, has been spent to enhance the Program`s ability to measure, model, and minimize instability growth during an implosion. Four the articles in this issue discuss this subject.

Shaw, M.J. [ed.

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Summary of research for the Inertial Confinement Fusion Program at Los Alamos National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect

The information presented in this report is a summary of the status of the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory as of February 1985. This report contains material on the existing high-power CO/sub 2/ laser driver (Antares), the program to determine the potential of KrF as an ICF driver, heavy-ion accelerators as drivers for ICF, target fabrication for ICF, and a summary of our understanding of laser-plasma interactions. A classified companion report contains material on our current understanding of capsule physics and lists the contributions to the Laboratory's weapons programs made by the ICF program. The information collected in these two volumes is meant to serve as a report on the status of some of the technological components of the Los Alamos ICF program rather than a detailed review of specific technical issues.

Cartwright, D.C. (comp.)

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Introduction  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Electric Transmission in the West Electric Transmission in the West Planning  Siting  Issues February 7, 2012 2  What does Transmission Look Like?  Why is Transmission Important?  Transmission Planning  Transmission Siting  Select Transmission Issues  References Presentation Content © 2010 ICF International. All rights reserved. What does Transmission Look Like? © 2010 ICF International. All rights reserved. WHAT DOES ELECTRIC TRANSMISSION LOOK LIKE 4  Provide affordable/reliable electricity  Implement public policies - Renewable energy (RPS, PTC, ITC) Why is Transmission Important? © 2010 ICF International. All rights reserved. Renewable Portfolio Standards WHY IS TRANSMISSION IMPORTANT 5 Transmission Planning © 2010 ICF International. All rights reserved.

89

Savings estimates for the United States Environmental Protection Agency?s ENERGY STAR voluntary product labeling program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for an Energy Efficient Economy, Washington, DC. August.Washington DC: American Council for an Energy EfficientDivision, ENERGY STAR Program. Washington, DC. June. ICF

Sanchez, Marla Christine

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

CHARACTERIZING COSTS, SAVINGS AND BENEFITS OF A SELECTION OF ENERGY EFFICIENT EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES IN THE UNITED STATES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Characterization: Gas Turbines. Arlington, VA: ICF: Energy21, 191-237. Diesel & Gas Turbine Worldwide. (2006).Order Survey. Diesel & Gas Turbine Worldwide. (2007). 2007

Xu, T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

LLNL Director Search  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integration Directorate Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory John Edwards Associate NIF Director for ICF & HED NIF & Photon Science Directorate Lawrence Livermore National...

92

Inertial Confinement Fusion Annual Report 1997  

SciTech Connect

The ICF Annual Report provides documentation of the achievements of the LLNL ICF Program during the fiscal year by the use of two formats: (1) an Overview that is a narrative summary of important results for the fiscal year and (2) a compilation of the articles that previously appeared in the ICF Quarterly Report that year. Both the Overview and Quarterly Report are also on the Web at http://lasers.llnl.gov/lasers/pubs/icfq.html. Beginning in Fiscal Year 1997, the fourth quarter issue of the ICF Quarterly was no longer printed as a separate document but rather included in the ICF Annual. This change provided a more efficient process of documenting our accomplishments with-out unnecessary duplication of printing. In addition we introduced a new document, the ICF Program Monthly Highlights. Starting with the September 1997 issue and each month following, the Monthly Highlights will provide a brief description of noteworthy activities of interest to our DOE sponsors and our stakeholders. The underlying theme for LLNL's ICF Program research continues to be defined within DOE's Defense Programs missions and goals. In support of these missions and goals, the ICF Program advances research and technology development in major interrelated areas that include fusion target theory and design, target fabrication, target experiments, and laser and optical science and technology. While in pursuit of its goal of demonstrating thermonuclear fusion ignition and energy gain in the laboratory, the ICF Program provides research and development opportunities in fundamental high-energy-density physics and supports the necessary research base for the possible long-term application of inertial fusion energy for civilian power production. ICF technologies continue to have spin-off applications for additional government and industrial use. In addition to these topics, the ICF Annual Report covers non-ICF funded, but related, laser research and development and associated applications. We also provide a short summary of the quarterly activities within Nova laser operations, Beamlet laser operations, and National Ignition Facility laser design. LLNL's ICF Program falls within DOE's national ICF program, which includes the Nova and Beamlet (LLNL), OMEGA (University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics), Nike (Naval Research Laboratory), and Trident (Los Alamos National Laboratory) laser facilities. The Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator (Z) and Saturn pulsed-power facilities are at Sandia National Laboratories. General Atomics, Inc., develops and provides many of the targets for the above experimental facilities. Many of the ICF Annual Report articles are co-authored with our colleagues from these other ICF institutions.

Correll, D

1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Basic ReseaRch DiRections  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Beams FRM Faraday Rotation Measure GA General Atomics GRB Gamma Ray Burst HED High Energy Density IAW Ion Acoustic Wave ICF Inertial Confinement Fusion ISAC Isotope...

94

Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion | National Nuclear Security...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

required to support the nuclear weapon stockpile. ICF's experimental capabilities are an essential component of the overall NNSA plan to manage the assessment of nuclear...

95

EPA ENERGY STAR: Tackling Growth in Home Electronics and Small Appliances  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ICF Consulting. 2003. Energy Star Market Penetration ReportConsulting. . 2004. Energy Star Market Penetration Reportmarket data. Figure 4. ENERGY STAR Market Penetration ENERGY

Sanchez, Marla Christine

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Calendar Year 2009 Program Benefits for ENERGY STAR Labeled Products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use.Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use.ICF Consulting. 2003. Energy Star Market Penetration Report

Homan, Gregory K

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Savings estimates for the United States Environmental Protection Agency?s ENERGY STAR voluntary product labeling program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use.Administration, Office of Energy Markets and End Use.ICF Consulting. 2003. Energy Star Market Penetration Report

Sanchez, Marla Christine

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

ENERGY STAR Performance Contracting Best Practices  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contracting Best Practices Prepared for: U.S. Environmental Protection Agency ENERGY STAR Buildings Prepared by: ICF International National Association of Energy Services...

99

Argonne Accelerator Institute  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

HEARTHFIRE - Inertial Confinement Fusion (1974 - 1980 at Argonne) At Argonne, the concept of using intense pulsed proton or deuteron beams for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) of...

100

THE DEVELOPMENT OF HEAVY-ION ACCELERATORS AS DRIVERS FOR INERTIALLY CONFINED FUSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The f a s t breeder reactor should in theory solve the fuellight water reactors. The ICF driver could, in theory, serve

Herrmannsfeldt, W.b.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ihsgi inforum icf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ELECTRICITY ADVISORY COMMITTEE...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PARTICIPANTS (CONT'D): WILL AGATE PIDC ANGIE BEEHLER Walmart GIL BINDEWALD DOE-OE PETER BONNER ICF International ANJAN BOSE DOE CLARK BRUNO Anbaric Transmission ERICH...

102

Long-Term U.S. Energy Outlook: Different Perspectives  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Paul Holtberg, Moderator Paul Holtberg, Moderator April 26, 2011 | Washington, D.C. Long-Term U.S. Energy Outlook: Different Perspectives Speakers 2 Paul Holtberg, 2011 EIA Energy Conference Washington, D.C., April 26, 2011 * John Conti, Assistant Administrator of Energy Analysis, Energy Information Administration * Mark Finley, General Manager, Global Energy Markets and U.S. Economics, BP * Douglas Meade, Director of Research, INFORUM Forecasts/projections and uncertainty 3 Paul Holtberg, 2011 EIA Energy Conference Washington, D.C., April 26, 2011 * Forecast or projections? * Know your analyst * Tools * Uncertainty - Basic underlying trends (e.g., population growth, economic growth, social norms) - Technology (e.g., new technologies, improved technology, breakthroughs vs. evolutionary, new applications)

103

Development of nuclear diagnostics for the National Ignition Facility ,,invited...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

July 2006; published online 5 October 2006 The National Ignition Facility NIF will provide up to 1.8 MJ of laser energy for imploding inertial confinement fusion ICF targets. Ignited NIF targets are expected of nuclear diagnostics in ICF experiments. In 2005, the suite of nuclear-ignition diagnostics for the NIF

104

Inertial confinement fusion quarterly report, July--September 1994. Volume 4, Number 4  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ICF Quarterly continues with six articles in this issue describing recent developments in the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The topics include plasma characterization, production of millimeter scale-length plasmas for studying laser-plasma instabilities, hohlraum physics, three-dimensional hydrodynamic modeling, crystal growth, and laser-beam smoothing.

Honea, E. [ed.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

SAFIRE user's manual  

SciTech Connect

Analytical models for scaling the cost and performance of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) electric-power plants have been developed and incorporated into the SAFIRE code. SAFIRE denotes systems analysis for ICF reactor economics. This volume, Volume 2, describes the subroutines, COMMON blocks, file handling, and input and output variables of the code. (WRF)

Glasgow, B.B.; Meier, W.R.

1987-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

106

Inertial Confinement Fusion quarterly report, April--June 1995. Volume 5, No. 3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ICF Quarterly Reports is published four times each fiscal year by the Inertial Confinement Fusion Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The journal reports selected current research within the ICF Program. Major areas of investigation presented here include fusion target theory and design, target fabrication, target experiments, and laser and optical science and technology.

NONE

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

107

Market Assessments of Non-Road Electrotechnologies for Air Quality Improvement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Past studies conducted by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and ICF International (ICF) have revealed opportunities to reduce emissions and fuel consumption of non-road vehicles and stationary goods-moving equipment by converting them to electric drive. These studies have shown that electrically driven non-road equipment can lessen the environmental impact of user operations and reduce end-user ...

2012-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

108

Sea state monitoring using coastal GNSS-R  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report on a coastal experiment to study GPS L1 reflections. The campaign was carried out at the Barcelona Port breaker and dedicated to the development of sea-state retrieval algorithms. An experimental system built for this purpose collected and processed GPS data to automatically generate a times series of the interferometric complex field (ICF). The ICF was analyzed off line and compared to a simple developed model that relates ICF coherence time to the ratio of significant wave height (SWH) and mean wave period (MWP). The analysis using this model showed good consistency between the ICF coherence time and nearby oceanographic buoy data. Based on this result, preliminary conclusions are drawn on the potential of coastal GNSS-R for sea state monitoring using semi-empirical modeling to relate GNSS-R ICF coherence time to SWH.

Soulat, F; Germain, O; Lopez-Dekker, P; Taani, M; Ruffini, G

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Instability Versus Equilibrium Propagation of a Laser Beam in Plasma Pavel M. Lushnikov1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [1]. NIF's plasma environment, in the indirect drive approach to ICF, has that of actual experiments, as in the idealized ``top hat'' model of NIF optics: j ^EEkj const; k

Lushnikov, Pavel

110

Diode-pumped solid-state laser drivers for inertial fusion energy  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews work on flashlamp-pumped solid state lasers and discusses diode-pumped solid state lasers, the Mercury laser in particular. It also discusses ICF lasers beyond Mercury.

Bibeau, C; Marshall, C D; Payne, S A; Powell, H T

1998-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

111

Spectrum and conversion efficiency measurements of suprathermal electrons from relativistic laser plasma interactions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fast Ignition is an alternative scheme for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) that uses a petawatt laser to ignite a hot spot in precompressed fuel. The laser delivers its energy into relativistic electrons at the critical ...

Chen, Cliff D. (Cliff Ding Yu)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

RussiaSNL2-web.indd  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

of short pulse petawatt (PW) lasers (like Z-PW at Sandia) used for creating pulsed electron, ion, or x-ray beams for inertial confi nement fusion (ICF) experimental diagnostics...

113

Northeast United States U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricit...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

model of the North American gas market operated by ICF International and is used to forecast supply, demand, pipeline flows, and prices. See the Appendix for a description of...

114

Shock convergence and mix dynamics in inertial confinement fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the phenomena of shock propagation and of turbulent mix induced by Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability growth is of critical importance for ignition and high gain in inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Capsule ...

Rygg, James Ryan

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Home Performance with ENERGY STAR - Webinar Slides  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Existing Homes Efficiency - If You Want BetterBuildings - Go with HPwES Home Performance with ENERGY STAR August 5, 2010 Chandler von Schrader, EPA Casey Murphy, ICF Int'l Matthew...

116

Laser Program annual report 1987  

SciTech Connect

This report discusses the following topics: target design and experiments; target materials development; laboratory x-ray lasers; laser science and technology; high-average-power solid state lasers; and ICF applications studies.

O'Neal, E.M.; Murphy, P.W.; Canada, J.A.; Kirvel, R.D.; Peck, T.; Price, M.E.; Prono, J.K.; Reid, S.G.; Wallerstein, L.; Wright, T.W. (eds.)

1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Inertial-confinement-fusion targets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets are made as simple flat discs, as hollow shells or as complicated multilayer structures. Many techniques have been devised for producing the targets. Glass and metal shells are made by using drop and bubble techniques. Solid hydrogen shells are also produced by adapting old methods to the solution of modern problems. Some of these techniques, problems and solutions are discussed. In addition, the applications of many of the techniques to fabrication of ICF targets is presented.

Hendricks, C.D.

1981-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

118

Pulsed power considerations for electron beam pumped krypton fluoride lasers for inertial confinement fusion applications  

SciTech Connect

The Los Alamos National Laboratory inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program is developing the krypton-fluoride excimer laser for use as an ICF driver. The KrF laser has a number of inherent characteristics that make it a promising driver candidate, such as short wavelength (0.25 {mu}m), broad bandwidth to target (>100 cm{sup {minus}1}), pulse-shaping with high dynamic range, and the potential for high overall efficiency (>5%) and repetitive operation. The large KrF laser amplifiers needed for ICF drivers are electron-beam pumped. A key issue for all laser ICF drivers is cost, and a leading cost component of a KrF laser driver is associated with the pulsed power and electron diode. Therefore, the efficient generation of electron beams is a high priority. The Los Alamos ICF program is investigating pulsed-power and diode designs and technologies to further the development of affordable KrF laser ICF drivers. 12 refs., 8 figs.

Rose, E.A.; McDonald, T.E.; Rosocha, L.A.; Harris, D.B.; Sullivan, J.A. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (USA)); Smith, I.D. (Pulse Sciences, Inc., San Leandro, CA (USA))

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Estimates of emergency operating capacity in U.S. manufacturing industries: 1994--2005  

SciTech Connect

To develop integrated policies for mobilization preparedness, planners require estimates and projections of available productive capacity during national emergency conditions. This report develops projections of national emergency operating capacity (EOC) for 458 US manufacturing industries at the 4-digit Standard Industrial Classification (SIC) level. These measures are intended for use in planning models that are designed to predict the demands for detailed industry sectors that would occur under conditions such as a military mobilization or a major national disaster. This report is part of an ongoing series of studies prepared by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to support mobilization planning studies of the Federal Emergency Planning Agency/US Department of Defense (FEMA/DOD). Earlier sets of EOC estimates were developed in 1985 and 1991. This study presents estimates of EOC through 2005. As in the 1991 study, projections of capacity were based upon extrapolations of equipment capital stocks. The methodology uses time series regression models based on industry data to obtain a response function of industry capital stock to levels of industrial output. The distributed lag coefficients of these response function are then used with projected outputs to extrapolate the 1994 level of EOC. Projections of industrial outputs were taken from the intermediate-term forecast of the US economy prepared by INFORUM (Interindustry Forecasting Model, University of Maryland) in the spring of 1996.

Belzer, D.B.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Estimated radiactive and shock loading of fusion reactor armor  

SciTech Connect

Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is of interest as a source of neutrons for proliferation-resistant and high burn-up fission reactor designs. ICF is a transient process, each implosion leading to energy release over a short period, with a continuous series of ICF operations needed to drive the fission reactor. ICF yields energy in the form of MeV-range neutrons and ions, and thermal x-rays. These radiations, particularly the thermal x-rays, can deposit a pulse of energy in the wall of the ICF chamber, inducing loading by isochoric heating (i.e. at constant volume before the material can expand) or by ablation of material from the surface. The explosion of the hot ICF system, and the compression of any fill material in the chamber, may also result in direct mechanical loading by a blast wave (decaying shock) reaching the chamber wall. The chamber wall must be able to survive the repetitive loading events for long enough for the reactor to operate economically. It is thus necessary to understand the loading induced by ICF systems in possible chamber wall designs, and to predict the response and life time of the wall. Estimates are given for the loading induced in the wall armor of the fusion chamber caused by ablative thermal radiation from the fusion plasma and by the hydrodynamic shock. Taking a version of the LIFE design as an example, the ablation pressure was estimated to be {approx}0.6 GPa with an approximately exponential decay with time constant {approx}0.6 ns. Radiation hydrodynamics simulations suggested that ablation of the W armor should be negligible.

Swift, D C

2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ihsgi inforum icf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Comparison of Vehicle Efficiency Technology Attributes and Synergy Estimates  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Analyzing the future fuel economy of light-duty vehicles (LDVs) requires detailed knowledge of the vehicle technologies available to improve LDV fuel economy. The National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) has been relying on technology data from a 2001 National Academy of Sciences (NAS) study (NAS 2001) on corporate average fuel economy (CAFE) standards, but the technology parameters were updated in the new proposed rulemaking (EPA and NHTSA 2009) to set CAFE and greenhouse gas standards for the 2011 to 2016 period. The update is based largely on an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) analysis of technology attributes augmented by NHTSA data and contractor staff assessments. These technology cost and performance data were documented in the Draft Joint Technical Support Document (TSD) issued by EPA and NHTSA in September 2009 (EPA/NHTSA 2009). For these tasks, the Energy and Environmental Analysis (EEA) division of ICF International (ICF) examined each technology and technology package in the Draft TSD and assessed their costs and performance potential based on U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) program assessments. ICF also assessed the technologies? other relevant attributes based on data from actual production vehicles and from recently published technical articles in engineering journals. ICF examined technology synergy issues through an ICF in-house model that uses a discrete parameter approach.

Duleep, G.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Indian Country Solar Energy Potential Estimates & DOE IE Updates  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Potential for Renewable Energy Potential for Renewable Energy Development on Tribal Lands October 2012 1 Introduction * The DOE Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs (OI) requested ICF International (ICF) to identify areas within Tribal Lands that have a strong potential for renewable energy generation (solar and wind) as a source of Tribal revenue within the geographic area covered by the Western Electric Coordination Council (WECC) transmission grid * ICF used a combination of geospatial modeling and power flow modeling to identify sites where: - Conditions are optimal for solar or wind generation - Access to high-voltage transmission lines is favorable - Transmission upgrade costs would be minimal 2 Geospatial Analysis Phase I: Identify Potential Sites * Obtained GIS layers (e.g., wind/solar resources, transmission

123

Inertial Confinement Fusion Quarterly Report: April--June 1993. Volume 3, Number 3  

SciTech Connect

This issue of the ICF Quarterly contains six articles describing recent advances in Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program. The current emphasis of the ICF program is in support of DOE`s National Ignition Facility (NIF) initiative for demonstrating ignition and gain with a 1-2 MJ glass laser. The articles describe recent Nova experiments and investigations tailored towards enhancing understanding of the key physics and technological issues for the NIF. Titles of the articles are: development of large-aperture KDP crystals; inner-shell photo-ionized X-ray lasers; X-ray radiographic measurements of radiation-driven shock and interface motion in solid density materials; the role of nodule defects in laser-induced damage of multilayer optical coatings; techniques for Mbar to near-Gbar equation-of-state measurements with the Nova laser; parametric instabilities and laser-beam smoothing.

MacGowan, B.J.; Kotowski, M.; Schleich, D. [eds.

1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor with direct electric generation by magnetic flux compression  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a laser or particle-beam-driven fusion reactor system which takes maximum advantage of both the very short pulsed nature of the energy release of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and the very small volumes within which the thermonuclear burn takes place. The pulsed nature of ICF permits dynamic direct energy conversion schemes such as magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generation and magnetic flux compression; the small volumes permit very compact blanket geometries. By fully exploiting these characteristics of ICF, it is possible to design a fusion reactor with exceptionally high power density, high net electric efficiency, and low neutron-induced radioactivity. The invention includes a compact blanket design and method and apparatus for obtaining energy utilizing the compact blanket.

Lasche, G.P.

1983-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

125

Prompt Beta Spectroscopy as a Diagnostic for Mix in Ignited NIF Capsules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) technology is designed to drive deuterium-tritium (DT) internal confinement fusion (ICF) targets to ignition using indirect radiation from laser beam energy captured in a hohlraum. Hydrodynamical instabilities at interfaces in the ICF capsule leading to mix between the DT fue l and the ablator shell material are of fundamental physical interest and can affect the performance characteristics of the capsule. In this Letter we describe new radiochemical diagnostics for mix processes in ICF capsules with plastic or Be (0.9%Cu) ablator shells. Reactions of high-energy tritons with shell material produce high-energy $\\beta$-emitters. We show that mix between the DT fuel and the shell material enhances high-energy prompt beta emission from these reactions by more than an order of magnitude over that expected in the absence of mix.

A. C. Hayes; G. Jungman; J. C. Solem; P. A. Bradley; R. S. Rundberg

2004-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

126

Inertial Confinement Fusion and the National Ignition Facility (NIF)  

SciTech Connect

Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) seeks to provide sustainable fusion energy by compressing frozen deuterium and tritium fuel to extremely high densities. The advantages of fusion vs. fission are discussed, including total energy per reaction and energy per nucleon. The Lawson Criterion, defining the requirements for ignition, is derived and explained. Different confinement methods and their implications are discussed. The feasibility of creating a power plant using ICF is analyzed using realistic and feasible numbers. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is shown as a significant step forward toward making a fusion power plant based on ICF. NIF is the worlds largest laser, delivering 1.8 MJ of energy, with a peak power greater than 500 TW. NIF is actively striving toward the goal of fusion energy. Other uses for NIF are discussed.

Ross, P.

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

127

Facilities | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Inertial Confinement Fusion Inertial Confinement Fusion Facilities Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Office of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation > Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion > Facilities Facilities Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion, Facilities ICF operates a set of world-class experimental facilities to create HEDP conditions and to obtain quantitative data in support of its numerous stockpile stewardship-related activities. To learn about three high energy experimental facilities and two small lasers that provide ICF capabilities, select the links below. National Ignition Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory OMEGA and OMEGA EP, University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics Z Machine, Sandia National Laboratories

128

VISTA -- A Vehicle for Interplanetary Space Transport Application Powered by Inertial Confinement Fusion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) is an ideal technology to power self-contained single-stage piloted (manned) spacecraft within the solar system because of its inherently high power/mass ratios and high specific impulses (i.e., high exhaust velocities). These technological advantages are retained when ICF is utilized with a magnetic thrust chamber, which avoids the plasma thermalization and resultant degradation of specific impulse that are unavoidable with the use of mechanical thrust chambers. We started with Rod Hyde's 1983 description of an ICF-powered engine concept using a magnetic thrust chamber, and conducted a more detailed systems study to develop a viable, realistic, and defensible spacecraft concept based on ICF technology projected to be available in the first half of the 21st century. The results include an entirely new conical spacecraft conceptual design utilizing near-existing radiator technology. We describe the various vehicle systems for this new concept, estimate the missions performance capabilities for general missions to the planets within the solar system, and describe in detail the performance for the baseline mission of a piloted roundtrip to Mars with a 100-ton payload. For this mission, we show that roundtrips totaling {ge}145 days are possible with advanced DT fusion technology and a total (wet) spacecraft mass of about 6000 metric tons. Such short-duration missions are advantageous to minimize the known cosmic-radiation hazards to astronauts, and are even more important to minimize the physiological deteriorations arising from zero gravity. These ICF-powered missions are considerably faster than those available using chemical or nuclear-electric-propulsion technologies with minimum-mass vehicle configurations. VISTA also offers onboard artificial gravity and propellant-based shielding from cosmic rays, thus reducing the known hazards and physiological deteriorations to insignificant levels. We emphasize, however, that the degree to which an ICF-powered vehicle can outperform a vehicle using any other realistic technology depends on the degree to which terrestrial-based ICF research can develop the necessary energy gain from ICF targets. With aggressive progress in such terrestrial research, VISTA will be able to make roundtrip missions to Pluto in {approx}7 years, and missions to points just beyond the solar system within a human lifetime.

Orth, C D

2005-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

129

Consequences of intensity constraints on inertial confinement fusion  

SciTech Connect

It is shown that the conflicting requirements of high implosion efficiency (low corona temperature) and adequate energy transport (high corona temperature) can, together with other effects, limit useful infrared light intensities to values on the order of 100 Tw/cm/sup 2/. Increased interest in ultraviolet lasers, for which this intensity constraint is expected to be less severe, and the entry of charged-particle drivers in the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) competition are consequences of this limitation. Analytical results based on a simple model are presented which show how the gain of an ICF target is modified by the existence of an arbitrary intensity constraint.

Kidder, R.E.

1979-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

130

Particle-beam fusion research facilities at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Sandia research in inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) is based on pulse-power capabilities that grew out of earlier developments of intense relativistic electron-beam (e-beam) radiation sources for weapon effects studies. ICF involves irradiating a deuterium-tritium pellet with either laser light or particle beams until the center of the pellet is compressed and heated to the point of nuclear fusion. This publication focuses on the use of particle beams to achieve fusion, and on the various facilities that are used in support of the particle-beam fusion (PBF) program.

1980-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

131

Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition and High Yield Campaign  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

November 21, 2003 #12;2 Statements to FESAC IFE panel 10/28/03 · Ignition is a major goal for NNSA supports OFES's mission and OFES use of NNSA's ICF facilities is accepted · Defense Programs reserves right: Provide mission need report for the proposed OMEGA Extended Performance project. · October 2002: NNSA

132

Activities of the High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3-4, 2008 Livermore, CA on behalf of the HEDLP FESAC subpanel #12;"joint HEDLP program [OFES+NNSA and 28 contributed talks M. Donovan (NNSA) NNSA perspective G. Nardella (OFES) OFES perspective HEDLP #12;IFE HEDLP science: conventional and alternative concepts · Conventional ICF (NNSA funded

133

Plasma Jet Driven Magneto-Inertial Fusion (PJMIF)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Security, LLC for NNSA LA-UR-11-07030 #12;Plasma jet experiments can provide cm National Security, LLC for NNSA Imploding plasma liner formed by 30 merging plasma jets with 1.5 MJ, LLC for NNSA MIF ICF Basko et al., Nucl. Fusion, 2000 Magnetic field reduces thermal transport

134

Weapons Activities/ Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2012 Congressional Budget Campaign and a major goal for National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The ICF Campaign supports the NNSA's Stockpile Stewardship Program. The NIF provides NNSA extraordinary opportunities for scientific progress and discovery in the areas

135

Production of hollow aerogel microspheres  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for making hollow aerogel microspheres of 800-1200 .mu. diameter and 100-300 .mu. wall thickness by forming hollow alcogel microspheres during the sol/gel process in a catalytic atmosphere and capturing them on a foam surface containing catalyst. Supercritical drying of the formed hollow alcogel microspheres yields hollow aerogel microspheres which are suitable for ICF targets.

Upadhye, Ravindra S. (Pleasanton, CA); Henning, Sten A. (Dalby, SE)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

National Utility Financial Statement model (NUFS). Volume III of III: software description. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This volume contains a description of the software comprising the National Utility Financial Statement Model (NUFS). This is the third of three volumes describing NUFS provided by ICF Incorporated under contract DEAC-01-79EI-10579. The three volumes are entitled: model overview and description, user's guide, and software guide.

Not Available

1981-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

137

John Lindl and Bruce Hammel Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Advances in Indirect Drive ICF Target Physics Presentation to 20th IAEA Fusion Energy Conference #12;NIF in Inertial Confinement Fusion Inertial Confinement Fusion uses direct or indirect drive to couple driver by cold, dense main fuel Direct Drive Hot spot (10 keV) Cold, dense main fuel (200-1000 g/cm3) Indirect

138

Final Technical Report of DE-FG02-06ER54789 Current-Driven Filament Instabilities in Relativistic Plasmas  

SciTech Connect

This grant has supported a study of some fundamental problems in current- and flowdriven instabilities in plasmas and their applications in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and astrophysics. It addressed current-driven instabilities and their roles in fast ignition, and flow-driven instabilities and their applications in astrophysics.

Ren, Chuang

2013-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

139

FPEOS: A First-Principles Equation of State Table of Deuterium for Inertial Confinement Fusion Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FPEOS: A First-Principles Equation of State Table of Deuterium for Inertial Confinement Fusion) Understanding and designing inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions through radiation- hydrodynamics. To minimize the drive energy for ignition, the imploding shell of DT- fuel needs to be kept as cold

Militzer, Burkhard

140

Plasma-Density Determination from X-Ray Radiography of Laser-Driven Spherical Implosions F. J. Marshall, P. W. McKenty, J. A. Delettrez, R. Epstein, J. P. Knauer, and V. A. Smalyuk  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to sampling the areal density at the time of fusion particle production. In non-igniting capsules, the cold, R. D. Petrasso, and F. H. Se´guin Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute confinement fusion (ICF) relies on the com- pression of spherical targets by means of a high power driver

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ihsgi inforum icf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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141

THE CONCEPT OF ISOCHORIC CENTRAL SPARK IGNITION AND ITS FUEL GAIN IN INERTIAL FUSION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 THE CONCEPT OF ISOCHORIC CENTRAL SPARK IGNITION AND ITS FUEL GAIN IN INERTIAL FUSION of the best methods in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is the concept of central spark ignition, consisting of two distinct regions named as hot and cold regions and formed by hydro-dynamical implosion of fuel

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

142

NNSA Defense Programs Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition and High Yield Campaign  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the NIF Project #12;2 Outline · National Nuclear Security Administration · ICF Campaign and Stewardship overview · NIF Use Plan ­ Defense Science Board review (Ignition 2010) · Recent progress ­ NIF, OMEGA, Z Confinement Fusion Acting Director Dr. Richard K. Thorpe NA-161 Office of the NIF Project Acting Director

143

Physics of short-wavelength-laser design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The physics and design of vuv and soft x-ray lasers pumped by ICF class high intensity infrared laser drivers are described (for example, the SHIVA laser facility at LLNL). Laser design and physics issues are discussed in the case of a photoionization pumping scheme involving Ne II and line pumping schemes involving H-like and He-like neon.

Hagelstein, P.L.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Progress in Direct-Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Temperature Radius Massdensity Hot spot Burn wave Ablator DT ice #12;A-beam smoothing is critical to ICF ignition I1771 EO phase modulator Grating Amplifiers Grating Focusing optics Angular dispersion f Oscillator Phase Plates1 Measured far field of an OMEGA indirect-drive phase plate

145

Production of hollow aerogel microspheres  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for making hollow aerogel microspheres of 800--1200{mu} diameter and 100--300{mu} wall thickness by forming hollow alcogel microspheres during the sol/gel process in a catalytic atmosphere and capturing them on a foam surface containing catalyst. Supercritical drying of the formed hollow alcogel microspheres yields hollow aerogel microspheres which are suitable for ICF targets.

Upadhye, R.S.; Henning, S.A.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

146

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Research and Development Division FINAL PROJECT REPORT THE VALUE OF NATURAL GAS STORAGE-2013-131 Prepared for: California Energy Commission Prepared by: ICF International #12;PREPARED BY: Primary Author: California Energy Commission David Michel Contract Manager Fernando Pina Office Manager Energy Systems

147

FCI in France status and perspective  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

response from the nuclear industry : fission and fusion Energy GENIII EPR GENIV ASTRID HiPER - ??? DEMO and durable supply of energy (AREVA, GDF SUEZ, TOTAL...) · Proposes scientific programs to ANR · ...In · ICF for energy : a place in the French energy vision ? · LMJ / PETAL a key facility for the IFE

148

Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 544 (2005) 225235 Neutralized transport experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear Instruments and Methods in Physics Research A 544 (2005) 225­235 Neutralized transport. Good agreement has been observed with theory and experiment throughout the study. r 2005 Elsevier B a reactor chamber to an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target. The present generation of indirect

Gilson, Erik

149

Past, present and future of laser fusion research  

SciTech Connect

The concept of laser fusion was devised very shortly after the invention of laser. In 1972, the Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University was established by the author in accordance with the Edward Teller{close_quote}s special lecture on {open_quote}{open_quote}New Internal Combustion Engine{close_quote}{close_quote} for IQEC at Montreal which predicted the implosion fusion. In 1975 we invented the so called indirect drive fusion concept {open_quote}{open_quote}Cannonball Target{close_quote}{close_quote} which became later to be recognize as a same concept of {open_quote}{open_quote}Hohlraum Target{close_quote}{close_quote} from Livermore. As well known, ICF research in the US had been veiled for a long time due to the defense classification. While researchers from Japan, Germany and elsewhere have concentrated the efforts to investigate the inertial fusion energy which seems to be very interesting for a future civil energy. They were publishing their own works not only on the direct implosion scheme but also the indirect implosion experiment. These advanced results often frustrated the US researchers who were not allowed to talk about the details of their works. In 1988, international members of the ICF research society including the US scientists gathered together at ECLIM to discuss the necessity of freedom in the ICF research and concluded to make a statement {open_quote}{open_quote}Madrid Manifest{close_quote}{close_quote} which requested the declassification of the ICF research internationally. After 6 years of halt, the US DOE decided to declassify portions of the program as a part of secretary Hazel O{close_quote}Leary{close_quote}s openness initiative. The first revealed presentation from the US was done at Seville 1994, which however were well known already. Classification impeded the progress by restricting the flow of information and did not allow the ICF work to compete by the open scientific security. (Abstract Truncated)

Yamanaka, C. [Institute for Laser Technology, Yamadaoka Suita, Osaka 565, Himeji Institute of Technology, Shosha Himeji 671 (Japan)

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

The proceedings of the 1st international workshop on laboratory astrophysics experiments with large lasers  

SciTech Connect

The world has stood witness to the development of a number of highly sophisticated and flexible, high power laser facilities (energies up to 50 kJ and powers up to 50 TW), driven largely by the world-wide effort in inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The charter of diagnosing implosions with detailed, quantitative measurements has driven the ICF laser facilities to be exceedingly versatile and well equipped with diagnostics. Interestingly, there is considerable overlap in the physics of ICF and astrophysics. Both typically involve compressible radiative hydrodynamics, radiation transport, complex opacities, and equations of state of dense matter. Surprisingly, however, there has been little communication between these two communities to date. With the recent declassification of ICF in the USA, and the approval to commence with construction of the next generation ``superlasers``, the 2 MJ National Ignition Facility in the US, and its equivalent, the LMJ laser in France, the situation is ripe for change. . Given the physics similarities that exist between ICF and astrophysics, one strongly suspects that there should exist regions of overlap where supporting research on the large lasers could be beneficial to the astrophysics community. As a catalyst for discussions to this end, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory sponsored this workshop. Approximately 100 scientists attended from around the world, representing eight countries: the USA, Canada, UK, France, Germany, Russia, Japan, and Israel. A total of 30 technical papers were presented. The two day workshop was divided into four sessions, focusing on nonlinear hydrodynamics, radiative hydrodynamics, radiation transport, and atomic physics-opacities. Copies of the presentations are contained in these proceedings.

Remington, B.A.; Goldstein, W.H. [eds.] [eds.

1996-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

151

D-Cluster Converter Foil for Laser-Accelerated Deuteron Beams: Towards Deuteron-Beam-Driven Fast Ignition  

SciTech Connect

Fast Ignition (FI) uses Petawatt laser generated particle beam pulse to ignite a small volume called a pre-compressed Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) target, and is the favored method to achieve the high energy gain per target burn needed for an attractive ICF power plant. Ion beams such as protons, deuterons or heavier carbon ions are especially appealing for FI as they have relative straight trajectory, and easier to focus on the fuel capsule. But current experiments have encountered problems with the converter-foil which is irradiated by the Petawatt laser to produce the ion beams. The problems include depletion of the available ions in the convertor foils, and poor energy efficiency (ion beam energy/ input laser energy). We proposed to develop a volumetrically-loaded ultra-high-density deuteron deuterium cluster material as the basis for converter-foil for deuteron beam generation. The deuterons will fuse with the ICF DT while they slow down, providing an extra bonus energy gain in addition to heating the hot spot. Also, due to the volumetric loading, the foil will provide sufficient energetic deuteron beam flux for hot spot ignition, while avoiding the depletion problem encountered by current proton-driven FI foils. After extensive comparative studies, in Phase I, high purity PdO/Pd/PdO foils were selected for the high packing fraction D-Cluster converter foils. An optimized loading process has been developed to increase the cluster packing fraction in this type of foil. As a result, the packing fraction has been increased from 0.1% to 10%meeting the original Phase I goal and representing a significant progress towards the beam intensities needed for both FI and pulsed neutron applications. Fast Ignition provides a promising approach to achieve high energy gain target performance needed for commercial Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). This is now a realistic goal for near term in view of the anticipated ICF target burn at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in CA within a year. This will usher in the technology development Phase of ICF after years of research aimed at achieving breakeven experiment. Methods to achieve the high energy gain needed for a competitive power plant will then be a key developmental issue, and our D-cluster target for Fast Ignition (FI) is expected to meet that need.

Miley, George H.

2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

152

Analysis of the Technical and Economic Potential for Mid-Scale Distributed Wind  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of the Technical and Analysis of the Technical and Economic Potential for Mid-Scale Distributed Wind December 2007 - October 31, 2008 R. Kwartin, A. Wolfrum, K. Granfield, A. Kagel, and A. Appleton ICF International Fairfax, Virginia Subcontract Report NREL/SR-500-44280 December 2008 An Analysis of the Technical and Economic Potential for Mid-Scale Distributed Wind December 2007 - October 31, 2008 R. Kwartin, A. Wolfrum, K. Granfield, A. Kagel, and A. Appleton ICF International Fairfax, Virginia NREL Technical Monitor: T. Forsyth Prepared under Subcontract No. AAM-8-89001-01 Subcontract Report NREL/SR-500-44280 December 2008 National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard, Golden, Colorado 80401-3393 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy

153

Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost and Performance Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies Rick Tidball, Joel Bluestein, Nick Rodriguez, and Stu Knoke ICF International Fairfax, Virginia Subcontract Report NREL/SR-6A20-48595 November 2010 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. National Renewable Energy Laboratory 1617 Cole Boulevard Golden, Colorado 80401 303-275-3000 * www.nrel.gov Contract No. DE-AC36-08GO28308 Cost and Performance Assumptions for Modeling Electricity Generation Technologies Rick Tidball, Joel Bluestein, Nick Rodriguez, and Stu Knoke ICF International Fairfax, Virginia NREL Technical Monitor: Jordan Macknick

154

Microsoft Word - Smart Grid Economic Impact Report  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor ICF International, nor any of their employees, make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information apparatus, product or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by tradename, trademark, manufacturer or otherwise doe not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation or favoring by the United States Government or any agency thereof, or ICF International. The views and opinions of

155

Microsoft Word - NIF Industry Day Agenda  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Department of Energy Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Washington, DC 20585 National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) National Ignition Facility (NIF) Target Fabrication Industry Day at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Agenda 9:00 - 9:15 Welcome and orientation Mr. Roger Lewis, Assistant Deputy Administrator for Research, Development, Test Capabilities and Evaluation (Acting), NNSA Mr. John Post, Assistant Principal Associate Director, NIF and Photon Science, LLNL 9:15 - 9:30 Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program, current and future status Mr. Roger Lewis 9:30 -10:30 National Ignition Facility (NIF), introduction and overview Mr. John Post 10:30 - 11:30 NIF/ICF Targets - Introduction, current technical requirements, anticipated future

156

Methodology and Analysis Monthly Natural Gas Gross Production Report  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Methodology and Analysis Methodology and Analysis Methodology and Analysis 1 Methodology: Description of the sampling and estimating methodologies implemented in April 2010 PDF 2 Review Results: Description of the problem and the alternative methodologies tested PDF 3 2009 Revisions: A comparison of the current methodology estimates to the previous estimates PDF 4 ICF International Review: ICF International's review paper given to the American Statistical Association Committee on Energy Statistics PDF 5 Other Sources: EIA-914 Estimates Compared with Other sources PDF 6 Issues: EIA-914 Sample and Model Issues PDF 7 Data Analysis: EIA-914 Final Clearance Package October 2006 PDF 8 Revision Policy: EIA-914 and Natural Gas Monthly Revision Policy March 2007 PDF 9 Commercial Data Sources:

157

Direct-Drive Inertial Fusion Research at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics: A Review  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews the status of direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). LLE's goal is to demonstrate direct-drive ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) by 2014. Baseline "all-DT" NIF direct-drive ignition target designs have been developed that have a predicted gain of 45 (1-D) at a NIF drive energy of ~1.6 MJ. Significantly higher gains are calculated for targets that include a DT-wicked foam ablator. This paper also reviews the results of both warm fuel and initial cryogenic-fuel spherical target implosion experiments carried out on the OMEGA UV laser. The results of these experiments and design calculations increase confidence that the NIF direct-drive ICF ignition goal will be achieved.

McCrory, R.L.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Loucks, S.J.; Skupsky, S.; Bahr, R.E.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T.R.; Craxton, R.S.; Collins, T.J.B.; Delettrez, J.A.; Donaldson, W.R.; Epstein, R.; Fletcher, K.A.; Freeman, C.; Frenje, J.A.; Glebov, V.Yu.; Goncharov, V.N.; Harding, D.R.; Jaanimagi, P.A.; Keck, R.L.; Kelly, J.H.; Kessler, T.J.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Knauer, J.P.; Li, C.K.; Lund, L.D.; Marozas, J.A.; McKenty, P.W.; Marshall, F.J.; Morse, S.F.B.; Padalino, S.; Petrasso, R.D.; Radha, P.B.; Regan, S.P.; Roberts, S.; Sangster, T.C.; Seguin, F.H.; Seka, W.; Smalyuk, V.A.; Soures, J.M.; Stoeckl, C.; Thorp, K.A.; Yaakobi, B.; Zuegel, J.D.

2010-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

158

Coated foams, preparation, uses and articles  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hydrophobic cellular material is coated with a thin hydrophilic polymer skin which stretches tightly over the foam but which does not fill the cells of the foam, thus resulting in a polymer-coated foam structure having a smoothness which was not possible in the prior art. In particular, when the hydrophobic cellular material is a specially chosen hydrophobic polymer foam and is formed into arbitrarily chosen shapes prior to the coating with hydrophilic polymer, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets of arbitrary shapes can be produced by subsequently coating the shapes with metal or with any other suitable material. New articles of manufacture are produced, including improved ICF targets, improved integrated circuits, and improved solar reflectors and solar collectors. In the coating method, the cell size of the hydrophobic cellular material, the viscosity of the polymer solution used to coat, and the surface tension of the polymer solution used to coat are all very important to the coating.

Duchane, D.V.; Barthell, B.L.

1982-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

159

Method of forming a continuous polymeric skin on a cellular foam material  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hydrophobic cellular material is coated with a thin hydrophilic polymer skin which stretches tightly over the outer surface of the foam but which does not fill the cells of the foam, thus resulting in a polymer-coated foam structure having a smoothness which was not possible in the prior art. In particular, when the hydrophobic cellular material is a specially chosen hydrophobic polymer foam and is formed into arbitrarily chosen shapes prior to the coating with hydrophilic polymer, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets of arbitrary shapes can be produced by subsequently coating the shapes with metal or with any other suitable material. New articles of manufacture are produced, including improved ICF targets, improved integrated circuits, and improved solar reflectors and solar collectors. In the coating method, the cell size of the hydrophobic cellular material, the viscosity of the polymer solution used to coat, and the surface tensin of the polymer solution used to coat are all very important to the coating.

Duchane, David V. (Los Alamos, NM); Barthell, Barry L. (Los Alamos, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

New AB-Thermonuclear Reactor for Aerospace  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are two main methods of nulcear fusion: inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and magnetic confinement fusion (MCF). Existing thermonuclear reactors are very complex, expensive, large, and heavy. They cannot achieve the Lawson creterion. The author offers an innovation. ICF has on the inside surface of the shell-shaped combustion chamber a covering of small Prism Reflectors (PR) and plasma reflector. These prism reflectors have a noteworthy advantage, in comparison with conventional mirror and especially with conventional shell: they multi-reflect the heat and laser radiation exactly back into collision with the fuel target capsule (pellet). The plasma reflector reflects the Bremsstrahlung radiation. The offered innovation decreases radiation losses, creates significant radiation pressure and increases the reaction time. The Lawson criterion increases by hundreds of times. The size, cost, and weight of a typical installation will decrease by tens of times. The author is researching the efficiency of these i...

Bolonkin, Alexander

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ihsgi inforum icf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Performance requirements of an inertial-fusion-energy source for hydrogen production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Performance of an inertial fusion system for the production of hydrogen is compared to a tandem-mirror-system hydrogen producer. Both systems use the General Atomic sulfur-iodine hydrogen-production cycle and produce no net electric power to the grid. An ICF-driven hydrogen producer will have higher system gains and lower electrical-consumption ratios than the design point for the tandem-mirror system if the inertial-fusion-energy gain eta Q > 8.8. For the ICF system to have a higher hydrogen production rate per unit fusion power than the tandem-mirror system requires that eta Q > 17. These can be achieved utilizing realistic laser and pellet performances.

Hovingh, J.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) and the issue of nonproliferation. Final study  

SciTech Connect

NIF, the next step proposed by DOE in a progression of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) facilities, is expected to reach the goal of ICF capsule ignition in the laboratory. This report is in response to a request of a Congressman that DOE resolve the question of whether NIF will aid or hinder U.S. nonproliferation efforts. Both technical and policy aspects are addressed, and public participation was part of the decision process. Since the technical proliferation concerns at NIF are manageable and can be made acceptable, and NIF can contribute positively to U.S. arms control and nonproliferation policy goals, it is concluded that NIF supports the nuclear nonproliferation objectives of the United States.

1995-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

163

ITER: The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and the nuclear weapons proliferation implications of thermonuclear-fusion energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper contains two parts: (I) A list of "points" highlighting the strategic-political and military-technical reasons and implications of the very probable siting of ITER (the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) in Japan, which should be confirmed sometimes in early 2004. (II) A technical analysis of the nuclear weapons proliferation implications of inertial- and magnetic-confinement fusion systems substantiating the technical points highlighted in the first part, and showing that while full access to the physics of thermonuclear weapons is the main implication of ICF, full access to large-scale tritium technology is the main proliferation impact of MCF. The conclusion of the paper is that siting ITER in a country such as Japan, which already has a large separated-plutonium stockpile, and an ambitious laser-driven ICF program (comparable in size and quality to those of the United States or France) will considerably increase its latent (or virtual) nuclear weapons proliferation status, and fo...

Gsponer, A; Gsponer, Andre; Hurni, Jean-Pierre

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

STATEMENT OF CONSIDERATIONS REQUEST BY CORNING INCORPORATED FOR AN ADVANCE WAIVER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

WAIVER WAIVER OF DOMESTIC AND FOREIGN PATENT RIGHTS UNDER DOE CONTRACT NO. B29143; DOE WAIVER NO. W(A)-95-029 The Petitioner, Corning Incorporated, has requested an Advance Waiver of the Government's domestic and foreign rights to inventions made under the above cited research and development contract (R&D Contract). The objective of the R&D Contract issued by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) on behalf of DP-11 is to reduce the costs associated with the manufacturing of large size high quality fused silica transmissive optics utilized in advanced Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) laser systems. The present cost of laser optics used in the ICF laser system is between $1.7/cm 3 to $2.0/cm 3 . After completion of the R&D Contract, it is believed that a 50% reduction in cost for the

165

EIA-914 Review April 2010  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Results of the EIA-914 Review Results of the EIA-914 Review April 2010 Background In January 2009, in Texas, there was a significant change from the December 2008 production estimate. Most of the change was due to the annual update of the sample and estimation process, not a real change in production. A few months later, it became apparent that a growing difference between the EIA-914 based production estimates and estimates publish by the State of Texas had occurred in the latter part of 2008. These two situations prompted EIA to initiate an outside review of the EIA-914 methodologies. ICF International was contracted to review the entire EIA-914 program. ICF was directed to review the areas listed below, identify any problems or concerns, and suggest remedies or

166

The Standard Energy Efficiency Database Platform  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SEED: The Standard Energy SEED: The Standard Energy Efficiency Database Platform Bill Prindle Bill Prindle ICF International William.prindle@icfi.com 202-492-9698 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: Data invisibility is a fundamental barrier in building end-use markets. Measuring and recognizing efficiency in U.S. buildings requires standardizing our energy data infrastructure via software conventions. Impact of Project: SEED is intended to provide public

167

Microsoft Word - Wind Report Final June 15 2010.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

B B EIA Task Order No. DE-DT0000804, Subtask 3 The Cost and Performance of Distributed Wind Turbines, 2010-35 Final Report June 2010 Prepared for: Office of Integrated Analysis & Forecasting U.S. Energy Information Administration Prepared by: ICF International Contact: Robert Kwartin T: (703) 934-3586 E: RKwartin@icfi.com ii Table of Contents Executive Summary ..................................................................................................................... iv Introduction ................................................................................................................................... v 1. Technology Overview............................................................................................................1

168

Microsoft Word - PV Report v20.doc  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

A A EIA Task Order No. DE-DT0000804, Subtask 3 Photovoltaic (PV) Cost and Performance Characteristics for Residential and Commercial Applications Final Report August 2010 Prepared for: Office of Integrated Analysis and Forecasting U.S. Energy Information Administration Prepared by: ICF International Contact: Robert Kwartin T: (703) 934-3586 E: rkwartin@icfi.com ii Table of Contents Executive Summary ...................................................................................................................... v 1. Introduction ...........................................................................................................................1 1.1 Objective ....................................................................................................................1

169

The Standard Energy Efficiency Database Platform  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SEED: The Standard Energy SEED: The Standard Energy Efficiency Database Platform Bill Prindle Bill Prindle ICF International William.prindle@icfi.com 202-492-9698 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem Statement: Data invisibility is a fundamental barrier in building end-use markets. Measuring and recognizing efficiency in U.S. buildings requires standardizing our energy data infrastructure via software conventions. Impact of Project: SEED is intended to provide public

170

2010 Vehicle Technologies Market Report  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

This page intenti onally left blank. 2010 Vehicle Technologies Market Report i Primary Authors: Jacob Ward U.S. Department of Energy Stacy Davis Oak Ridge National Laboratory With Contributions From: Bill Batten (Eaton), Susan Diegel (ORNL) Vinod Duggal (Cummins), K.G. Duleep (ICF), Richard Smith (ORNL), Skip Yeakel (Volvo) Graphic Design: Debbie Bain (ORNL) Contents ABOUT THE REPORT ............................................................ ii EXECUTIVE SUMMARY .........................................................iii Transportation accounts for 28.5% of total U.S. energy

171

Overview of the VISTA Spacecraft Concept Powered by Inertial Confinement Fusion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

VISTA was conceived through a detailed systems analysis as a viable, realistic, and defensible spacecraft concept based on advanced ICF technology but existing or near-term technology for other systems. It is a conical self-contained single-stage piloted spacecraft in which a magnetic thrust chamber directs the plasma emissions from inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets into a rearward exhaust. VISTA's propulsion system is therefore unique because it is based on (1) a rather mature technology (ICF), which is known to work with sufficient driver input; (2) direct heating of all expellant by the fusion process, thus providing high mass flow rates without significant degradation of jet efficiency; and (3) a magnetic thrust chamber, which avoids the plasma thermalization and resultant degradation of specific impulse that are unavoidable with the use of mechanical thrust chambers. VISTA therefore has inherently high power/mass ratios and high specific impulses. With advanced ICF technology, ultra-fast roundtrips (RTs) to objects within the solar system are possible (e.g., {ge}145 days RT to Mars, {ge}7 years RT to Pluto). Such short-duration missions are imperative to minimize the human physiological deteriorations arising from zero gravity and the cosmic-radiation. In addition, VISTA offers on-board artificial gravity and propellant-based shielding from cosmic rays, thus reducing the physiological deteriorations to insignificant levels. In this paper, we give an overview of the various vehicle systems for this concept, estimate the general missions performance capabilities for interplanetary missions, and describe in detail the performance for the baseline mission of a piloted roundtrip to Mars with a 100-ton payload. Items requiring further research include a reduction of the wet mass from its baseline value of 6,000 metric tons, and the development of fast ignition or its equivalent to provide target gains in excess of several hundred. With target gains well above several hundred, there is no other known technology that can compete with VISTA's performance.

Orth, C D

2000-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

172

Design and reality for NIF ignition targets  

SciTech Connect

Advances in ICF experiments and modeling have led to improved understanding of the growth of instabilities during capsule implosion and the effects on capsule performance. This has led to more refined specifications on the characteristics of igniting capsules, all of which have solid D-T fuel layers. These specifications involve a trade-off between the interior ice surface structure, outer capsule surface structure, and time-dependent drive asymmetry.

Bernat, T.P.

1996-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

173

Inertial Fusion in NNSA N AT I O N AL N U C L E AR S E C U R I T Y AD M I N I S T R AT I O N OFFICE OF DEFENSE PROGRAMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Inertial Fusion in NNSA N AT I O N AL N U C L E AR S E C U R I T Y AD M I N I S T R AT I O N, 2012 #12;2 ICF Program is critically important element of NNSA's Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP to the Editor from Tom D'Agostino (NNSA Administrator) & Parney Albright (LLNL Director) stated NIF's primary

174

Inertial Confinement Fusion quarterly report, October--December 1994. Volume 5, No. 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ICF quarterly report is published by the Inertial Confinement Fusion Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Topics included in this issue include: system description and initial performance results for beamlet, design and performance of the beamlet amplifiers and optical switch, beamlet pulse-generation and wavefront-control system, large-aperture, high- damage-threshold optics for beamlet, beamlet pulsed power system, beamlet laser diagnostics, and beam propagation and frequency conversion modeling for the beamlet laser.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Inertial Confinement Fusion quarterly report, January--March 1995. Volume 5, No. 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ICF quarterly report is published by the Inertial Confinement Fusion Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Topics included this quarter include: the role of the National Ignition Facility in the development of Inertial Confinement Fusion, laser-plasma interactions in large gas-filled hohlraums, evolution of solid-state induction modulators for a heavy-ion recirculator, the National Ignition Facility project, and terminal-level relaxation in Nd-doped laser material.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Transparent electrode for optical switch  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates generally to optical switches and techniques for applying a voltage to an electro-optical crystal, and more particularly, to transparent electodes for an optical switch. System architectures for very large inertial confinement fusion (ICF) lasers require active optical elements with apertures on the order of one meter. Large aperture optical switches are needed for isolation of stages, switch-out from regenerative amplifier cavities and protection from target retroreflections.

Goldhar, J.; Henesian, M.A.

1984-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

177

National Utility Financial Statement model (NUFS). Volume II of III: user's guide. Final report  

SciTech Connect

This volume is a User's Guide for the National Utility Financial Statement Model (NUFS). This is the second of three volumes describing NUFS provided by ICF Incorporated under contract DEAC01-79EI10579. The three volumes are entitled: Model Overview and Description; User's Guide; and Software Description. This volume describes each necessary input file, discusses user options, and describes the job stream necessary to run the model.

1981-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

178

Inertial confinement fusion: present status and future potential  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Power from inertial confinement fusion holds much promise for society. This paper points out many of the benefits relative to combustion of hydrocarbon fuels and fission power. Potential problems are also identified and put in perspective. The progress toward achieving inertial fusion power is described and results of recent work at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory are presented. Key phenomenological uncertainties are described and experimental goals for the Nova laser system are given. Several ICF reactor designs are discussed.

Hogan, W.J.

1984-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

179

Overview of the dynamic-hohlraum x-ray source at Sandia National Laboratories.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Progress in understanding the physics of Dynamic-Hohlraums is reviewed for a system capable of generating 10 TW of axial radiation for high temperature (>200 eV) radiation-flow experiments and ICF capsule implosions. 2D magneto-hydrodynamic simulation comparisons with data show the need to include wire initiation physics and subsequent discrete wire dynamics in the simulations if a predictive capability is to be achieved.

Sanford, Thomas W. L.

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Laser fusion monthly -- August 1980  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the monthly progress for the laser fusion research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. First it gives facilities report for both the Shiva and Argus projects. Topics discussed include; laser system for the Nova Project; the fusion experiments analysis facility; optical/x-ray streak camera; Shiva Dante System temporal response; 2{omega}{sub 0} experiment; and planning for an ICF engineering test facility.

Ahlstrom, H.G. [ed.

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

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181

OMEGA FY13 HED requests - LANL  

SciTech Connect

This is a summary of scientific work to be performed on the OMEGA laser system located at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics in Rochester New York. The work is funded through Science and ICF Campagins and falls under the category of laser-driven High-Energy Density Physics experiments. This summary is presented to the Rochester scheduling committee on an annual basis for scheduling and planning purposes.

Workman, Jonathan B [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Loomis, Eric N [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

182

Financial constraints in capacity planning: a national utility regulatory model (NUREG). Volume III of III: software description. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume is the software description for the National Utility Regulatory Model (NUREG). This is the third of three volumes provided by ICF under contract number DEAC-01-79EI-10579. These three volumes are: a manual describing the NUREG methodology; a users guide; and a description of the software. This manual describes the software which has been developed for NUREG. This includes a listing of the source modules. All computer code has been written in FORTRAN.

None

1981-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

183

ORIGINAL INVESTIGATION Increased cortical inhibition deficits in first-episode  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

# The Author(s) 2009. This article is published with open access at Springerlink.com Rationale/objectives There is a high prevalence of substance use disorder (SUD) in first-episode schizophrenia (SZ), but its contribution to the underlying SZ pathophysiology remains unclear. Several studies using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) have observed abnormalities in human motor cortex (M1) excitability in SZ. Studies on cortical excitability comparing SZ patients with and without comorbid substance abuse are lacking. Methods A total of 29 first-episode SZ patients participated in this study; 12 had a history of comorbid cannabis abuse (SZ-SUD) and 17 did not (SZ-NSUD). We applied TMS to right and left M1 areas to assess the resting motor threshold (RMT), short-interval cortical inhibition (SICI), intracortical facilitation (ICF), and the contralateral cortical silent period (CSP). Results In SICI and ICF conditions, right M1 stimulation led to significantly higher motor evoked potential ratios in SZ-SUD compared to SZ-NSUD. This suggests lower cortical inhibition and increased ICF in first-episode SZ T. Wobrock and A. Hasan contributed equally.

N. Lang; U. K. H. Ecker

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Investigation of radial wire arrays for inertial confinement fusion and radiation effects science.  

SciTech Connect

Radial wire arrays provide an alternative x-ray source for Z-pinch driven Inertial Confinement Fusion. These arrays, where wires are positioned radially outwards from a central cathode to a concentric anode, have the potential to drive a more compact ICF hohlraum. A number of experiments were performed on the 7MA Saturn Generator. These experiments studied a number of potential risks in scaling radial wire arrays up from the 1MA level, where they have been shown to provide similar x-ray outputs to larger diameter cylindrical arrays, to the higher current levels required for ICF. Data indicates that at 7MA radial arrays can obtain higher power densities than cylindrical wire arrays, so may be of use for x-ray driven ICF on future facilities. Even at the 7MA level, data using Saturn's short pulse mode indicates that a radial array should be able to drive a compact hohlraum to temperatures {approx}92eV, which may be of interest for opacity experiments. These arrays are also shown to have applications to jet production for laboratory astrophysics. MHD simulations require additional physics to match the observed behavior.

Serrano, Jason Dimitri; Bland, Simon Nicholas (Imperial College, London); McBride, Ryan D.; Chittenden, Jeremy Paul (Imperial College, London); Suzuki-Vidal, Francisco Andres (Imperial College, London); Jennings, Christopher A.; Hall, Gareth Neville (Imperial College, London); Ampleford, David J.; Peyton, Bradley Philip; Lebedev, Sergey V. (Imperial College, London); Cleveland, Monica; Rogers, Thomas John; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Coverdale, Christine Anne; Jones, Brent Manley; Jones, Michael C.

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Revista Mexicana de Astronoma y Astrofsica, 38, 97109 (2002) CHEMICAL ABUNDANCES OF NGC 5461 AND NGC 5471 DERIVED FROM ECHELLE SPECTROPHOTOMETRY  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Presentamos espectrofotometra de alta resolucin de NGC 5461 y NGC 5471, dos regiones H II gigantes en la galaxia M101. Los datos se obtuvieron con el telescopio de 2.1 m del Observatorio Astronmico Nacional en San Pedro Mrtir, Baja California. Medimos las intensidades de un conjunto de lneas de recombinacin de hidrgeno y de helio, as como lneas prohibidas de un gran nmero de iones. Calculamos las condiciones fsicas en las dos nebulosas y calculamos las abundancias qumicas totales tomando en cuenta las abundancias inicas observadas as como las no observadas; estas ltimas las estimamos a partir de factores de correccin de ionizacin (icf s). Para NGC 5461 los icf s se basan en un modelo detallado de fotoionizacin diseado especficamente para este objeto (Luridiana & Peimbert 2001), mientras que para NGC 5471 se obtuvieron a partir de un modelo de fotoionizacin para NGC 2363 (Luridiana, Peimbert, & Leitherer 1999), regin que muestra un grado de ionizacin muy semejante al de NGC 5471. Los icf s as determinados los comparamos con aquellos que se obtienen a partir de las frmulas de Mathis & Rosa (1991). Dicha comparacin muestra importantes discrepancias

V. Luridiana; C. Esteban; M. Peimbert; A. Peimbert

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Magnetized target fusion and fusion propulsion.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Magnetized target fusion (MTF) is a thermonuclear fusion concept that is intermediate between the two mainline approaches, magnetic confinement and inertial confinement fusion (MCF and ICF). MTF incorporates some aspects of each and offers advantages over each of the mainline approaches. First, it provides a means of reducing the driver power requirements, thereby admitting a wider range of drivers than ICF. Second, the magnetic field is only used for insulation, not confinement, and the plasma is wall confined, so that plasma instabilities are traded in for hydrodynamic instabilities. However, the degree of compression required to reach fusion conditions is lower than for ICF, so that hydrodynamic instabilities are much less threatening. The standoff driver innovation proposes to dynamically form the target plasma and a gaseous shell that compresses and confines the target plasma. Therefore, fusion target fabrication is traded in for a multiplicity of plasma guns, which must work in synchrony. The standoff driver embodiment of MTF leads to a fusion propulsion system concept that is potentially compact and lightweight. We will discuss the underlying physics of MTF and some of the details of the fusion propulsion concept using the standoff driver approach. We discuss here the optimization of an MTF target design for space propulsion.

Kirkpatrick, R. C. (Ronald C.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

HYPERFUSE: a hypervelocity inertial confinement system for fusion energy production and fission waste transmutation  

SciTech Connect

Parametric system studies of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor system to transmute fission products from an LWR economy have been carried out. The ICF reactors would produce net power in addition to transmuting fission products. The particular ICF concept examined is an impact fusion approach termed HYPERFUSE, in which hypervelocity pellets, traveling on the order of 100 to 300 km/sec, collide with each other or a target block in a reactor chamber and initiate a thermonuclear reaction. The DT fusion fuel is contained in a shell of the material to be transmuted, e.g., /sup 137/Cs, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 129/I, /sup 99/Tc, etc. The 14-MeV fusion neutrons released during the pellet burn cause transmutation reactions (e.g., (n,2n), (n,..cap alpha..), (n,..gamma..), etc.) that convert the long-lived fission products (FP's) either to stable products or to species that decay with a short half-life to a stable product. The transmutation parametric studies conclude that the design of the hypervelocity projectiles should emphasize the achievement of high densities in the transmutation regions (greater than the DT fusion fuel density), as well as the DT ignition and burn criterion (rho R=1.0 to 3.0) requirements.

Makowitz, H.; Powell, J.R.; Wiswall, R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Internal cycle modeling and environmental assessment of multiple cycle consumer products  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dynamic flow models are presented for remanufactured, reused or recycled products. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Early loss and stochastic return are included for fast and slow cycling products. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The reuse-to-input flow ratio (Internal Cycle Factor, ICF) is determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The cycle rate, which is increasing with the ICF, monitors eco-performance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Early internal cycle losses diminish the ICF, the cycle rate and performance. - Abstract: Dynamic annual flow models incorporating consumer discard and usage loss and featuring deterministic and stochastic end-of-cycle (EOC) return by the consumer are developed for reused or remanufactured products (multiple cycle products, MCPs), including fast and slow cycling, short and long-lived products. It is shown that internal flows (reuse and overall consumption) increase proportionally to the dimensionless internal cycle factor (ICF) which is related to environmental impact reduction factors. The combined reuse/recycle (or cycle) rate is shown capable for shortcut, albeit effective, monitoring of environmental performance in terms of waste production, virgin material extraction and manufacturing impacts of all MCPs, a task, which physical variables (lifetime, cycling frequency, mean or total number of return trips) and conventional rates, via which environmental policy has been officially implemented (e.g. recycling rate) cannot accomplish. The cycle rate is shown to be an increasing (hyperbolic) function of ICF. The impact of the stochastic EOC return characteristics on total reuse and consumption flows, as well as on eco-performance, is assessed: symmetric EOC return has a small, positive effect on performance compared to deterministic, while early shifted EOC return is more beneficial. In order to be efficient, environmental policy should set higher minimum reuse targets for higher trippage MCPs. The results may serve for monitoring, flow accounting and comparative eco-assessment of MCPs. They may be useful in identifying reachable and efficient reuse/recycle targets for consumer products and in planning return via appropriate labelling and digital coding for enhancing environmental performance, while satisfying consumer demand.

Tsiliyannis, C.A., E-mail: anion@otenet.gr [ANION Environmental Ltd., 26 Lykoudi Str., Athens 11141 (Greece)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

189

The ePLAS Code for Ignition Studies  

SciTech Connect

Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) presents unique opportunities for the extraction of clean energy from Fusion. Intense lasers and particle beams can create and interact with such plasmas, potentially yielding sufficient energy to satisfy all our national needs. However, few models are available to help aid the scientific community in the study and optimization of such interactions. This project enhanced and disseminated the computer code ePLAS for the early understanding and control of Ignition in ICF. ePLAS is a unique simulation code that tracks the transport of laser light to a target, the absorption of that light resulting in the generation and transport of hot electrons, and the heating and flow dynamics of the background plasma. It uses an implicit electromagnetic field-solving method to greatly reduce computing demands, so that useful target interaction studies can often be completed in 15 minutes on a portable 2.1 GHz PC. The code permits the rapid scoping of calculations for the optimization of laser target interactions aimed at fusion. Recent efforts have initiated the use of analytic equations of state (EOS), K-alpha image rendering graphics, allocatable memory for source-free usage, and adaption to the latest Mac and Linux Operating Systems. The speed and utility of ePLAS are unequaled in the ICF simulation community. This project evaluated the effects of its new EOSs on target heating, compared fluid and particle models for the ions, initiated the simultaneous use of both ion models in the code, and studied long time scale 500 ps hot electron deposition for shock ignition. ePLAS has been granted EAR99 export control status, permitting export without a license to most foreign countries. Beta-test versions of ePLAS have been granted to several Universities and Commercial users. The net Project was aimed at achieving early success in the laboratory ignition of thermonuclear targets and the mastery of controlled fusion power for the nation.

Mason, Rodney J

2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

190

HYPERFUSE: a hypervelocity inertial confinement system for fusion energy production and fission waste transmutation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Parametric system studies of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor system to transmute fission products from a LWR economy have been carried out. The ICF reactors would produce net power in addition to transmuting fission products. The particular ICF concept examined is an impact fusion approach termed HYPERFUSE, in which hypervelocity pellets, traveling on the order of 100 to 300 km/sec, collide with each other or a target block in a reactor chamber and initiate a thermonuclear reaction. The DT fusion fuel is contained in a shell of the material to be transmuted, e.g., /sup 137/Cs, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 129/I, /sup 99/Tc, etc. The 14-MeV fusion neutrons released during the pellet burn cause transmutation reactions (e.g., (n,2n), (n,..cap alpha..), (n,..gamma..), etc.) that convert the long-lived fission products (FP's) either to stable products or to species that decay with a short half-life to a stable product. The transmutation parametric studies conclude that the design of the hypervelocity projectiles should emphasize the achievement of high densities in the transmutation regions (greater than the DT fusion fuel density), as well as the DT ignition and burn criterion (rho R = 1.0 to 3.0) requirements. These studies also indicate that masses on the order of 1.0 g at densities of rho greater than or equal to 500.0 g/cm/sup 3/ are required for a practical fusion-based fission product transmutation system.

Makowitz, H.; Powell, J.R.; Wiswall, R.

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

DOI-BLM-CA-C050-2009-0005-EA | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

-EA -EA Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-CA-C050-2009-0005-EA EA at Geysers Geothermal Area for Geothermal/Well Field Engineered Geothermal Enhancement System Demonstration Project General NEPA Document Info Energy Sector Geothermal energy Environmental Analysis Type EA Applicant AltaRock Energy Inc Consultant ICF International Geothermal Area Geysers Geothermal Area Project Location California Project Phase Geothermal/Well Field Techniques Development Drilling Time Frame (days) NEPA Process Time 155 Participating Agencies Lead Agency BLM Funding Agency DOE Managing District Office BLM Central California District Office Managing Field Office BLM Ukiah Field Office Funding Agencies none provided

192

DOE/EA-1680: Environmental Assessment and Initial Study/Proposed Mitigated Negative Declaration (March 2009)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Engineered Geothermal Enhancement Engineered Geothermal Enhancement System Demonstration Project Environmental Assessment and Initial Study/Proposed Mitigated Negative Declaration March 2009 Prepared for The Bureau of Land Management 2550 North State Street Ukiah, CA 95482 Northern California Power Agency 651 Commerce Drive Roseville, CA 95678 Prepared by ICF Jones & Stokes 630 K Street, Suite 400 Sacramento, CA 95814 Environmental Assessment and Initial Study/Proposed Mitigated Negative Declaration Engineered Geothermal Enhancement System Demonstration Project March 2009 i Table of Contents Page Table of Contents ........................................................................................................................................... i List of Figures .............................................................................................................................................. iv

193

On the Utility of Antiprotons as Drivers for Inertial Confinement Fusion  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

By contrast to the large mass, complexity and recirculating power of conventional drivers for inertial confinement fusion (ICF), antiproton annihilation offers a specific energy of 90MJ/{micro}g and thus a unique form of energy packaging and delivery. In principle, antiproton drivers could provide a profound reduction in system mass for advanced space propulsion by ICF. We examine the physics underlying the use of antiprotons ({bar p}) to drive various classes of high-yield ICF targets by the methods of volumetric ignition, hotspot ignition and fast ignition. The useable fraction of annihilation deposition energy is determined for both {bar p}-driven ablative compression and {bar p}-driven fast ignition, in association with 0-D and 1-D target burn models. Thereby, we deduce scaling laws for the number of injected antiprotons required per capsule, together with timing and focal spot requirements. The kinetic energy of the injected antiproton beam required to penetrate to the desired annihilation point is always small relative to the deposited annihilation energy. We show that heavy metal seeding of the fuel and/or ablator is required to optimize local deposition of annihilation energy and determine that a minimum of {approx}3x10{sup 15} injected antiprotons will be required to achieve high yield (several hundred megajoules) in any target configuration. Target gains - i.e., fusion yields divided by the available p - {bar p} annihilation energy from the injected antiprotons (1.88GeV/{bar p}) - range from {approx}3 for volumetric ignition targets to {approx}600 for fast ignition targets. Antiproton-driven ICF is a speculative concept, and the handling of antiprotons and their required injection precision - temporally and spatially - will present significant technical challenges. The storage and manipulation of low-energy antiprotons, particularly in the form of antihydrogen, is a science in its infancy and a large scale-up of antiproton production over present supply methods would be required to embark on a serious R&D program for this application.

Perkins, L J; Orth, C D; Tabak, M

2003-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

194

Process for manufacture of inertial confinement fusion targets and resulting product  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ICF target comprising a spherical pellet of fusion fuel surrounded by a concentric shell; and a process for manufacturing the same which includes the steps of forming hemispheric shells of a silicon or other substrate material, adhering the shell segments to each other with a fuel pellet contained concentrically therein, then separating the individual targets from the parent substrate. Formation of hemispheric cavities by deposition or coating of a mold substrate is also described. Coatings or membranes may also be applied to the interior of the hemispheric segments prior to joining.

Masnari, Nino A. (Ann Arbor, MI); Rensel, Walter B. (Ann Arbor, MI); Robinson, Merrill G. (Ann Arbor, MI); Solomon, David E. (Ann Arbor, MI); Wise, Kensall D. (Ann Arbor, MI); Wuttke, Gilbert H. (Ypsilanti Township, Washtenaw County, MI)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

The First Experiments on the National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A first set of laser-plasma interaction, hohlraum energetics and hydrodynamic experiments have been performed using the first 4 beams of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), in support of indirect drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and High Energy Density Physics (HEDP). In parallel, a robust set of optical and x-ray spectrometers, interferometer, calorimeters and imagers have been activated. The experiments have been undertaken with laser powers and energies of up to 8 TW and 17 kJ in flattop and shaped 1-9 ns pulses focused with various beam smoothing options.

Landen, O L; Glenzer, S; Froula, D; Dewald, E; Suter, L J; Schneider, M; Hinkel, D; Fernandez, J; Kline, J; Goldman, S; Braun, D; Celliers, P; Moon, S; Robey, H; Lanier, N; Glendinning, G; Blue, B; Wilde, B; Jones, O; Schein, J; Divol, L; Kalantar, D; Campbell, K; Holder, J; MacDonald, J; Niemann, C; Mackinnon, A; Collins, R; Bradley, D; Eggert, J; Hicks, D; Gregori, G; Kirkwood, R; Young, B; Foster, J; Hansen, F; Perry, T; Munro, D; Baldis, H; Grim, G; Heeter, R; Hegelich, B; Montgomery, D; Rochau, G; Olson, R; Turner, R; Workman, J; Berger, R; Cohen, B; Kruer, W; Langdon, B; Langer, S; Meezan, N; Rose, H; Still, B; Williams, E; Dodd, E; Edwards, J; Monteil, M; Stevenson, M; Thomas, B; Coker, R; Magelssen, G; Rosen, P; Stry, P; Woods, D; Weber, S; Alvarez, S; Armstrong, G; Bahr, R; Bourgade, J; Bower, D; Celeste, J; Chrisp, M; Compton, S; Cox, J; Constantin, C; Costa, R; Duncan, J; Ellis, A; Emig, J; Gautier, C; Greenwood, A; Griffith, R; Holdner, F; Holtmeier, G; Hargrove, D; James, T; Kamperschroer, J; Kimbrough, J; Landon, M; Lee, D; Malone, R; May, M; Montelongo, S; Moody, J; Ng, E; Nikitin, A; Pellinen, D; Piston, K; Poole, M; Rekow, V; Rhodes, M; Shepherd, R; Shiromizu, S; Voloshin, D; Warrick, A; Watts, P; Weber, F; Young, P; Arnold, P; Atherton, L J; Bardsley, G; Bonanno, R; Borger, T; Bowers, M; Bryant, R; Buckman, S; Burkhart, S; Cooper, F; Dixit, S; Erbert, G; Eder, D; Ehrlich, B; Felker, B; Fornes, J; Frieders, G; Gardner, S; Gates, C; Gonzalez, M; Grace, S; Hall, T; Haynam, C; Heestand, G; Henesian, M; Hermann, M; Hermes, G; Huber, S; Jancaitis, K; Johnson, S; Kauffman, B; Kelleher, T; Kohut, T; Koniges, A E; Labiak, T; Latray, D; Lee, A; Lund, D; Mahavandi, S; Manes, K R; Marshall, C; McBride, J; McCarville, T; McGrew, L; Menapace, J; Mertens, E; Munro, D; Murray, J; Neumann, J; Newton, M; Opsahl, P; Padilla, E; Parham, T; Parrish, G; Petty, C; Polk, M; Powell, C; Reinbachs, I; Rinnert, R; Riordan, B; Ross, G; Robert, V; Tobin, M; Sailors, S; Saunders, R; Schmitt, M; Shaw, M; Singh, M; Spaeth, M; Stephens, A; Tietbohl, G; Tuck, J; Van Wonterghem, B; Vidal, R; Wegner, P; Whitman, P; Williams, K; Winward, K; Work, K

2005-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

196

A 1. 5--4 Kelvin detachable cold-sample transfer system: Application to inertially confined fusion with spin-polarized hydrogens fuels  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A compact cold-transfer apparatus for engaging and retrieving samples at liquid helium temperatures (1.5--4K), maintaining the samples at such temperatures for periods of hours, and subsequently inserting them in diverse apparatuses followed by disengagement, is described. The properties of several thermal radiation-insulating shrouds, necessary for very low sample temperatures, are presented. The immediate intended application is transportable target-shells containing highly spin-polarized deuterons in solid HD or D{sub 2} for inertially confined fusion (ICF) experiments. The system is also valuable for unpolarized high-density fusion fuels, as well as for other applications which are discussed. 9 refs., 6 figs.

Alexander, N.; Barden, J.; Fan, Q.; Honig, A.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Modeling Compressed Turbulence  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From ICE to ICF, the effect of mean compression or expansion is important for predicting the state of the turbulence. When developing combustion models, we would like to know the mix state of the reacting species. This involves density and concentration fluctuations. To date, research has focused on the effect of compression on the turbulent kinetic energy. The current work provides constraints to help development and calibration for models of species mixing effects in compressed turbulence. The Cambon, et al., re-scaling has been extended to buoyancy driven turbulence, including the fluctuating density, concentration, and temperature equations. The new scalings give us helpful constraints for developing and validating RANS turbulence models.

Israel, Daniel M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

198

Next-generation laser for Inertial Confinement Fusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on the progress in developing and building the Mercury laser system as the first in a series of a new generation of diode- pumped solid-state Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) lasers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Mercury will be the first integrated demonstration of a scalable laser architecture compatible with advanced high energy density (HED) physics applications. Primary performance goals include 10% efficiencies at 10 Hz and a 1-10 ns pulse with 1 omega energies of 100 J and with 2 omega/3 omega frequency conversion.

Marshall, C.D.; Deach, R.J.; Bibeau, C. [and others

1997-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

199

Report from the Integrated Modeling Panel at the Workshop on the Science of Ignition on NIF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This section deals with multiphysics radiation hydrodynamics codes used to design and simulate targets in the ignition campaign. These topics encompass all the physical processes they model, and include consideration of any approximations necessary due to finite computer resources. The section focuses on what developments would have the highest impact on reducing uncertainties in modeling most relevant to experimental observations. It considers how the ICF codes should be employed in the ignition campaign. This includes a consideration of how the experiments can be best structured to test the physical models the codes employ.

Marinak, M; Lamb, D

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

200

Laser Program annual report 1984  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Laser Program Annual Report is part of the continuing series of reports documenting the progress of the unclassified Laser Fusion Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). As in previous years, the report is organized programmatically. The first section is an overview of the basic goals and directions of the LLNL Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program, and highlights the year's important accomplishments. Sections 2 through 7 provide the detailed information on the various program elements: Laser Systems and Operations, Target Design, Target Fabrication, Laser Experiments and Advanced Diagnostics, Advanced Laser Development, and Applications of Inertial Confinement Fusion. Individual sections will be indexed separately. 589 refs., 333 figs., 25 tabs.

Rufer, M.L.; Murphy, P.W. (eds.)

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ihsgi inforum icf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Economic incentives for the reduction of hazardous wastes. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The report presents the results of ICF, Inc.'s analysis for developing a state economic incentive program for reducing the amount and toxicity of hazardous wastes generated in California. The economic incentive mechanisms studied were: grants; loan guarantees; interest subsidies; state-issued loans; tax credits; and depreciation deductions. Based on an analysis of existing barriers to waste reduction and the alternative incentive mechanisms, the study recommends the use of grants to encourage waste audits, information dissemination, and research, development, and demonstration of waste reduction technologies.

Not Available

1985-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

202

WINDOW-WALL INTERFACE CORRECTION FACTORS: THERMAL MODELING OF INTEGRATED FENESTRATION AND OPAQUE ENVELOPE SYSTEMS FOR IMPROVED PREDICTION OF ENERGY USE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The boundary conditions for thermal modeling of fenestration systems assume an adiabatic condition between the fenestration system installed and the opaque envelope system. This theoretical adiabatic boundary condition may not be appropriate owing to heat transfer at the interfaces, particularly for aluminum- framed windows affixed to metal- framed walls. In such scenarios, the heat transfer at the interface may increase the discrepancy between real world thermal indices and laboratory measured or calculated indices based on NFRC Rating System.This paper discusses the development of window-wall Interface Correction Factors (ICF) to improve energy impacts of building envelope systems

Bhandari, Mahabir S [ORNL; Ravi, Dr. Srinivasan [University of Florida, Gainesville

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Research and Development of Information on Geothermal Direct Heat Application Projects  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the first annual report of ICF's geothermal R&D project for the Department of Energy's Idaho Operations Office. The overall objective of this project is to compile, analyze, and report on data from geothermal direct heat application projects. Ultimately, this research should convey the information developed through DOE's and Program Opportunity Notice (PON) activities as well as through other pioneering geothermal direct heat application projects to audiences which can use the early results in new, independent initiatives. A key audience is potential geothermal investors.

Hederman, William F., Jr.; Cohen, Laura A.

1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Massachusetts New Homes with ENERGY STAR | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Massachusetts New Homes with ENERGY STAR Massachusetts New Homes with ENERGY STAR Massachusetts New Homes with ENERGY STAR < Back Eligibility Construction Residential Savings Category Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial Weatherization Commercial Heating & Cooling Design & Remodeling Maximum Rebate $8,000 Program Info Funding Source Energy Efficiency Fund (Public Benefits Fund) Expiration Date 12/2013 State Massachusetts Program Type State Rebate Program Rebate Amount Varies depending on type of housing (single or multi-family) and level achieved Provider ICF International Program Incentives may change in 2013; contact the program administrators to confirm. In Massachusetts, home builders constructing new homes in territories of sponsoring utilities and energy efficiency service providers* can receive

205

Magneized target fusion: An overview of the concept  

SciTech Connect

Magnetized target fusion (MTF) seeks to take advantage of the reduction of thermal conductivity through the application of a strong magneticfield and thereby ease the requirements for reaching fusion conditions in a thermonuclear (TN) fusion fuel. A potentially important benefit of the strong field in the partial trapping of energetic charged particles to enhance energy deposition by the TN fusion reaction products. The essential physics is described. MTF appears to lead to fusion targets that require orders of magnitude less power and intensity for fusion ignition than currently proposed (unmagnetized) inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets do, making some very energetic pulsed power drivers attractive for realizing controlled fusion.

Kirkpatrick, R.C.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

206

Partnering with Utilities Part 2: Advanced Topics for Local Governments in Creating Successful Partnerships with Utilities to Deliver Energy Efficiency Programs  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2 - Advanced 2 - Advanced Topics for Local Governments in Creating Successful Partnerships with Utilities to Deliver Energy Efficiency Programs Jennifer Clymer, ICF International Neal De Snoo, Berkeley, CA Dan Schoenholz, Fremont, CA Catherine Squire & Gina Blus, PG&E Jon Ippel, Orlando, FL Cameron Saulsby, Orlando Utilities Commission November 30, 2011 2 | TAP Webinar eere.energy.gov What is TAP? DOE's Technical Assistance Program (TAP) supports the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program (EECBG) and the State Energy Program (SEP) by providing state, local, and tribal officials the tools and resources needed to implement successful and sustainable clean energy programs.

207

Laser Program annual report, 1985  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This volume presents the unclassified activities and accomplishments of the Inertial Confinement Fusion and Advanced Laser Development elements of the Laser Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the calendar year 1985. This report has been organized into major sections that correspond to our principal technical activities. Section 1 provides an overview. Section 2 comprises work in target theory, design, and code development. Target development and fabrication and the related topics in materials science are contained in Section 3. Section 4 presents work in experiments and diagnostics and includes developments in data acquisition and management capabilities. In Section 5 laser system (Nova) operation and maintenance are discussed. Activities related to supporting laser and optical technologies are described in Section 6. Basic laser research and development is reported in Section 7. Section 8 contains the results of studies in ICF applications where the work reported deals principally with the production of electric power with ICF. Finally, Section 9 is a comprehensive discussion of work to date on solid state lasers for average power applications. Individual sections, two through nine, have been cataloged separately.

Rufer, M.L.; Murphy, P.W. (eds.)

1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Computational and experimental investigation of magnetized target fusion  

SciTech Connect

In Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF), a preheated and magnetized target plasma is hydrodynamically compressed to fusion conditions. Because the magnetic field suppresses losses by electron thermal conduction in the fuel during the target implosion heating process, the compression may be over a much longer time scale than in traditional inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Bigger targets and much lower initial target densities than in ICF can be used, reducing radiative energy losses. Therefore, ``liner-on-plasma`` compressions, driven by relatively inexpensive electrical pulsed power, may be practical. Potential MTF target plasmas must meet minimum temperature, density, and magnetic field starting conditions, and must remain relatively free of high-Z radiation-cooling-enhancing contaminants. At Los Alamos National Laboratory, computational and experimental research is being pursued into MTF target plasmas, such as deuterium-fiber-initiated Z-pinches, and the Russian-originated MAGO plasma. In addition, liner-on-plasma compressions of such target plasmas to fusion conditions are being computationally modeled, and experimental investigation of such heavy liner implosions has begun. The status of the research will be presented.

Sheehey, P.T.; Guzik, J.A.; Kirkpatrick, R.C.; Lindemuth, I.R.; Scudder, D.W.; Shlachter, J.S.; Wysocki, F.J.

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Radiation in molecular dynamic simulations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hot dense radiative (HDR) plasmas common to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and stellar interiors have high temperature (a few hundred eV to tens of keV), high density (tens to hundreds of g/cc) and high pressure (hundreds of Megabars to thousands of Gigabars). Typically, such plasmas undergo collisional, radiative, atomic and possibly thermonuclear processes. In order to describe HDR plasmas, computational physicists in ICF and astrophysics use atomic-scale microphysical models implemented in various simulation codes. Experimental validation of the models used to describe HDR plasmas are difficult to perform. Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the many-body interactions of plasmas is a promising approach to model validation but, previous work either relies on the collisionless approximation or ignores radiation. We present a new numerical simulation technique to address a currently unsolved problem: the extension of molecular dynamics to collisional plasmas including emission and absorption of radiation. The new technique passes a key test: it relaxes to a blackbody spectrum for a plasma in local thermodynamic equilibrium. This new tool also provides a method for assessing the accuracy of energy and momentum exchange models in hot dense plasmas. As an example, we simulate the evolution of non-equilibrium electron, ion, and radiation temperatures for a hydrogen plasma using the new molecular dynamics simulation capability.

Glosli, J; Graziani, F; More, R; Murillo, M; Streitz, F; Surh, M

2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

210

Pulsed power supply for Nova Upgrade. Final report, August 1, 1991 to March 31, 1992  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work carried out at the Center for Electromechanics at The University of Texas at Austin (CEM-UT). A baseline design of the Nova Upgrade has been completed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The Nova Upgrade is an 18 beamline Nd: glass laser design utilizing fully relayed 4x4 30 cm aperture segmented optical components. The laser thus consists of 288 independent beamlets nominally producing 1.5 to 2.0 MJ of 0.35 {mu}m light in a 3 to 5 ns pulse. The laser design is extremely flexible and will allow a wide range of pulses to irradiate ICF targets. This facility will demonstrate ignition/gain and the scientific feasibility of ICF for energy and defense applications. The pulsed power requirements for the Nova Upgrade are given. CEM-UT was contracted to study and develop a design for a homopolar generator/inductor (HPG/inductor) opening switch system which would satisfy the pulsed power supply requirements of the Nova Upgrade. The Nd:glass laser amplifiers used in the Nova Upgrade will be powered by light from xenon flashlamps. The pulsed power supply for the Nova Upgrade powers the xenon flashlamps. This design and study was for a power supply to drive flashlamps.

Bacon, J.L.; Kajs, J.P.; Walls, A.; Weldon, W.F.; Zowarka, R.C. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (US). Center for Electromechanics] [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (US). Center for Electromechanics

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

211

Re: LNG Export Authorization Process Dear Secretary Moniz:  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The American Petroleum Institute (API) is a national trade association representing more than 500 member companies involved in all aspects of the oil and natural gas industry in the United States. Our members include owners and operators of liquefied natural gas (LNG) import and export facilities in the United States and around the world, as well as owners and operators of LNG vessels, global LNG traders, and manufacturers of essential technology and equipment used all along the LNG value chain. Our members also have extensive experience with the drilling and completion techniques used in shale gas development and in producing Americas natural gas resources in a safe and environmentally responsible manner. From the outset, API has been an active stakeholder engaged with the Department of Energy (DOE) in its review of pending and anticipated LNG export applications, including the Departments study of the economic impacts of LNG exports (2012 LNG Export Study), and has provided constructive comments and input at every possible opportunity. For example, API engaged ICF International to conduct its own analysis of the economic impacts of LNG exports, a copy of which is enclosed for your review. Just as the DOEs 2012 LNG Export Study found, ICF International concluded that the net effects on U.S. GDP and employment from LNG exports are projected to be positive while having only moderate impacts on

Jack N. Gerard; Via E-mail; The Honorable; Ernest Moniz

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Neutron detectors for fusion reaction-rate measurements  

SciTech Connect

Fusion reactions in an inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) target filled with deuterium or a deuterium/tritium fuel release nearly monoenergetic neutrons. Because most the neutrons leave the compressed target without collision, they preserve reaction-rate information as they travel radially outward from their point of origin. Three fast, neutron detector techniques, each capable of measuring the fusion reaction-rate of ICF targets, have been demonstrated. The most advanced detector is based on the fast rise-time of a commercial plastic scintillator material (BC-422) which acts as a neutron-to-light converter. Signals, which are recorded with a fast optical streak camera, have a resolution of 25 ps. Good signals can be recorded for targets producing only 5 x 10{sup 7} DT neutrons. Two other detectors use knock-on collisions between neutrons and protons in a thin polyethylene (CH{sub 2}) converter. In one, the converter is placed in front of the photocathode of an x-ray streak camera. Recoil protons pass through the photocathode and knock out electrons which are accelerated and deflected to produce a signal. Resolutions < 25 ps are possible. In the other, the converter is placed in front of a microchannel plate (MCP) with a gated microstrip. Recoil protons eject electrons from the gold layer forming the microstrip. If a gate pulse is present, the signal is amplified. Present gate times are about 80 ps.

Lerche, R.A.; Phillion, D.W.; Landen, O.L.; Murphy, T.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Jaanimagi, P.A. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States). Laboratory for Laser Energetics

1994-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

213

Using high-intensity laser-generated energetic protons to radiograph directly driven implosions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The recent development of petawatt-class lasers with kilojoule-picosecond pulses, such as OMEGA EP [L. Waxer et al., Opt. Photonics News 16, 30 (2005)], provides a new diagnostic capability to study inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) and high-energy-density (HED) plasmas. Specifically, petawatt OMEGA EP pulses have been used to backlight OMEGA implosions with energetic proton beams generated through the target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) mechanism. This allows time-resolved studies of the mass distribution and electromagnetic field structures in ICF and HED plasmas. This principle has been previously demonstrated using Vulcan to backlight six-beam implosions [A. J. Mackinnon et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 045001 (2006)]. The TNSA proton backlighter offers better spatial and temporal resolution but poorer spatial uniformity and energy resolution than previous D{sup 3}He fusion-based techniques [C. Li et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 10E725 (2006)]. A target and the experimental design technique to mitigate potential problems in using TNSA backlighting to study full-energy implosions is discussed. The first proton radiographs of 60-beam spherical OMEGA implosions using the techniques discussed in this paper are presented. Sample radiographs and suggestions for troubleshooting failed radiography shots using TNSA backlighting are given, and future applications of this technique at OMEGA and the NIF are discussed.

Zylstra, A. B.; Li, C. K.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Stoeckl, C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Nilson, P.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Le Pape, S.; Mackinnon, A.; Patel, P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

214

Reduction of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability growth with cocktail color irradiation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel method for reducing the Rayleigh-Taylor instability (RTI) growth in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets is reported. It is well known that high-density compression of ICF targets is potentially prevented by the RTI. Previous studies [K. Shigemori et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 250 (1997), S. G. Glendinning et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 3318 (1997), and H. Azechi et al., Phys. Plasmas 4, 4079 (1997)] have indicated that nonlocal electron heat transport enhances the effect on the ablative stabilization of the RTI growth with long wavelength laser irradiation. Planar target experiments, using a small fraction of a long wavelength laser ({lambda}=0.53 or 1.05 {mu}m) in addition to the main drive laser ({lambda}=0.35 {mu}m), were conducted to verify the RTI reduction by inducing the effect of the nonlocal electron heat transport. The measured RTI growth rate for this ''cocktail-color'' laser irradiation was clearly reduced from that for the ''single-color'' short-wavelength laser irradiation. The experimental growth factors are in good agreement with the ablative RTI formula coupled with a one-dimensional Fokker-Planck simulation code.

Otani, K.; Shigemori, K.; Sakaiya, T.; Fujioka, S.; Sunahara, A.; Nakai, M.; Shiraga, H.; Azechi, H.; Mima, K. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-Oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

215

Inertial fusion with ultra-powerful lasers  

SciTech Connect

Ultra-high intensity lasers can be used to ignite ICF capsules with a few tens of kilojoules of light and can lead to high gain with as little as 100 kilojoules of incident laser light. We propose a scheme with three phases. First, a capsule is imploded as in the conventional approach to inertial fusion to assemble a high density fuel configuration. Second, a hole is bored through capsule corona composed of ablated material, pushing critical density close to the high density core of the capsule, by employing the ponderomotive force associated with high intensity laser light. Finally, the fuel is ignited by suprathermal electrons, produced in the high intensity laser plasma interactions, which propagate from critical density to this high density core. This paper reviews two models of energy gain in ICF capsules and explains why ultra-high intensity lasers allow access to the model producing the higher gains. This new scheme also drastically reduces the difficulty of the implosion and thereby allows lower quality fabrication and less stringent beam quality and symmetry requirements from the implosion driver. The difficulty of the fusion scheme is transferred to the technological difficulty of producing the ultra-high-intensity laser and of transporting this energy to the fuel.

Tabak, M.; Hammer, J.; Glinsky, M.; Kruer, W.; Wilks, S.; Woodworth, J.; Campbell, E.M.; Perry, M.D.; Mason, R.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Nebular Abundance Errors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The errors inherent to the use of the standard "ionization correction factor" ("i_CF") method of calculating nebular conditions and relative abundances of H, He, N, O, Ne, S, and Ar in emission line nebulae have been investigated under conditions typical for planetary nebulae. The photoionization code CLOUDY was used to construct a series of model nebulae with properties spanning the range typical of PNe. Its radial "profiles" of bright, frequently observed optical emission lines were then summed over a variety of "apertures" to generate sets of emission line measurements. These resulting line ratios were processed using the i_CF method to "derive" nebular conditions and abundances. We find that for lines which are summed over the entire nebula the i_CF-derived abundances differ from the input abundances by less than 5% for He and O up to 25% or more for Ne, S, and Ar. For resolved observations, however, the discrepancies are often much larger and are systematically variable with radius. This effect is especially pronounced in low-ionization zones where nitrogen and oxygen are neutral or once-ionized such as in FLIERs, ansae and ionization fronts. We argue that the reports of stellar-enriched N in the FLIERs of several PNe are probably specious.

J. Alexander; B. Balick

1997-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

217

Status of LDRD-DR 20070518 development of a magnetically driven target for thermo-nuclear burn studies (u)  

SciTech Connect

This project is developing a magnetically driven cylindrical confinement system for the creation of a small region of material existing under extreme conditions. Using a Ranchero High Explosive Pulsed Power generator (HEPP) with maximum current ranging from 25- 50 MA depending on the load, a current driven Al cylinder will impact a series of nested, less massive Au shells. Each subsequent shell's inner surface velocity will increase due to it's smaller mass by the ratio 2.01( 1+ m{sub i+ 1}/m i), along with radial convergence. Attaining this ideal result requires highly efficient energy transfer which in turn requires plastic cushions. The final velocity of the last sequential shell will be used to drive a central experimental package in which extreme material conditions will be produced. The inexpensive nature of HEPP and the extreme conditions attainable allow many studies to be conducted in regimes not currently available in the laboratory. One potential central experimental package consists of a cylindrical Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) target; a cylindrical Au pusher surrounding frozen DT. This target is used as a design tool. The ICF conditions achieved with such a target would be similar to those created in a double shell ignition capsule at the National Ignition Facility. The system being developed has a range of potential applications.

Watt, Robert G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Atchison, W L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Colgate, S A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gofoeth, J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Griego, J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Guzik, J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Holtkamp, D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Idzorek, G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kirkpatrick, R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menikoff, R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Meyer, R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oona, H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reardon, P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rousculp, C L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sgro, A G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tabaka, L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Office of Inspector General audit report on ``The U.S. Department of Energy`s X-Change 1997: The global D and D marketplace conference``  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy and Florida International University (FIU), a state university, cosponsored the X-Change 1997: The Global D and D Marketplace conference (X-Change Conference) that was held December 1--5, 1997, in Miami, Florida. The purpose of the conference was to disseminate information on decontamination and decommissioning problems, solutions, and technologies to an international audience of government, industry, and academia. Through a contract with the Department, FIU was responsible for conference planning, organization, and logistical support. FIU awarded a subcontract to ICF, Inc. to work on the conference. ICF, Inc. is a major Department contractor with responsibilities for projects at Hanford, Argonne National laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory. The audit objectives were to determine whether FIU had controls in place to ensure that public funds were used appropriately, and whether fiscal practices associated with the conference were consistent with Government requirements and Department policy. FIU implemented accounting and budget mechanisms to identify and control the sources and uses of funds. However, the absence of a Departmental policy on funding conferences resulted in questionable fiscal practices associated with the conference. These are discussed.

1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Precision Manufacturing of Inertial Confinement Fusion Double Shell Laser Targets for OMEGA  

SciTech Connect

Double shell targets have been built by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments on the Omega laser at the University of Rochester and as a prelude to similar experiments on NIF. Of particular interest to ICF studies are high-precision double shell implosion targets for demonstrating thermonuclear ignition without the need for cryogenic preparation. Because the ignition tolerance to interface instabilities is rather low, the manufacturing requirements for smooth surface finishes and shell concentricity are particularly strict. This paper describes a deterministic approach to manufacturing and controlling error sources in each component. Included is the design philosophy of why certain manufacturing techniques were chosen to best reduce the errors within the target. The manufacturing plan developed for this effort created a deterministic process that, once proven, is repeatable. By taking this rigorous approach to controlling all error sources during the manufacture of each component and during assembly, we have achieved the overall 5 {micro}m dimensional requirement with sub-micron surface flaws. Strengths and weaknesses of the manufacturing process will be discussed.

Amendt, P A; Bono, M J; Hibbard, R L; Castro, C; Bennett, D W

2003-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

220

New AB-Thermonuclear Reactor for Aerospace  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

There are two main methods of nulcear fusion: inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and magnetic confinement fusion (MCF). Existing thermonuclear reactors are very complex, expensive, large, and heavy. They cannot achieve the Lawson creterion. The author offers an innovation. ICF has on the inside surface of the shell-shaped combustion chamber a covering of small Prism Reflectors (PR) and plasma reflector. These prism reflectors have a noteworthy advantage, in comparison with conventional mirror and especially with conventional shell: they multi-reflect the heat and laser radiation exactly back into collision with the fuel target capsule (pellet). The plasma reflector reflects the Bremsstrahlung radiation. The offered innovation decreases radiation losses, creates significant radiation pressure and increases the reaction time. The Lawson criterion increases by hundreds of times. The size, cost, and weight of a typical installation will decrease by tens of times. The author is researching the efficiency of these innovations. Keywords: Thermonuclear reactor, Multi-reflex AB-thermonuclear reactor, aerospace thermonuclear engine. This work is presented as paper AIAA-2006-7225 to Space-2006 Conference, 19-21 September, 2006, San Jose, CA, USA.

Alexander Bolonkin

2007-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ihsgi inforum icf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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221

ITER: The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and the Nuclear Weapons Proliferation Implications of Thermonuclear-Fusion Energy Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper contains two parts: (I) A list of points highlighting the strategic-political and militarytechnical reasons and implications of the very probable siting of ITER (the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) in Japan, which should be confirmed sometimes in early 2004. (II) A technical analysis of the nuclear weapons proliferation implications of inertial- and magnetic-confinement fusion systems substantiating the technical points highlighted in the first part, and showing that while full access to the physics of thermonuclear weapons is the main implication of ICF, full access to large-scale tritium technology is the main proliferation impact of MCF. The conclusion of the paper is that siting ITER in a country such as Japan, which already has a large separated-plutonium stockpile, and an ambitious laser-driven ICF program (comparable in size and quality to those of the United States or France) will considerably increase its latent (or virtual) nuclear weapons proliferation status, and foster further nuclear proliferation throughout the world. The safety and environmental problems related to the operation of largescale fusion facilities such as ITER (which contain massive amounts of hazardous and/or radioactive materials such as tritium, lithium, and beryllium, as well as neutron-activated structural materials) are not addressed in this paper.

Andr Gsponer; Jean-pierre Hurni

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Measured Cooling Performance of Two-story Homes in Dallas, Texas; Insulated Concrete Form Versus Frame Construction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Four occupied homes near Dallas, Texas were monitored to compare heating and cooling energy use. Two homes were built with typical wood frame construction, the other two with insulated concrete form (ICF) construction. Remote data loggers collected average hourly indoor and outdoor temperature, relative humidity, furnace runtime fraction, total building electrical energy and HVAC energy use. The loggers recorded data from November 1999 through August 2000. Results show that insulated concrete form construction can reduce cooling energy use 17 to 19% in two-story homes in the north Texas climate. Two adjustments to the measured data were made to compensate for differences between the homes: (1) cooling energy use was normalized to remove the impact of miscellaneous energy use that introduces heat into the home (e.g. lights & appliances), and (2) duct leakage differences simulated in a DOE2-based software reduced the measured savings for ICF construction by 4%. Other differences noted between the homes that were not quantified included occupant impacts, exterior wall color (or absorptance) and an attic radiant barrier absent in one of the homes.

Chasar, D.; Moyer, N.; Rudd, A. F.; Parker, D.; Chandra, S.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Reduced Variance for Material Sources in Implicit Monte Carlo  

SciTech Connect

Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC), a time-implicit method due to Fleck and Cummings, is used for simulating supernovae and inertial confinement fusion (ICF) systems where x-rays tightly and nonlinearly interact with hot material. The IMC algorithm represents absorption and emission within a timestep as an effective scatter. Similarly, the IMC time-implicitness splits off a portion of a material source directly into the radiation field. We have found that some of our variance reduction and particle management schemes will allow large variances in the presence of small, but important, material sources, as in the case of ICF hot electron preheat sources. We propose a modification of our implementation of the IMC method in the Jayenne IMC Project. Instead of battling the sampling issues associated with a small source, we bypass the IMC implicitness altogether and simply deterministically update the material state with the material source if the temperature of the spatial cell is below a user-specified cutoff. We describe the modified method and present results on a test problem that show the elimination of variance for small sources.

Urbatsch, Todd J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

224

Heat transfer in inertial confinement fusion reactor systems  

SciTech Connect

The transfer of energy produced by the interaction of the intense pulses of short-ranged fusion microexplosion products with materials is one of the most difficult problems in inertially-confined fusion (ICF) reactor design. The short time and deposition distance for the energy results in local peak power densities on the order of 10/sup 18/ watts/m/sup 3/. High local power densities may cause change of state or spall in the reactor materials. This will limit the structure lifetimes for ICF reactors of economic physical sizes, increasing operating costs including structure replacement and radioactive waste management. Four basic first wall protection methods have evolved: a dry-wall, a wet-wall, a magnetically shielded wall, and a fluid wall. These approaches are distinguished by the way the reactor wall interfaces with fusion debris as well as the way the ambient cavity conditions modify the fusion energy forms and spectra at the first wall. Each of these approaches requires different heat transfer considerations.

Hovingh, J.

1979-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

225

Preparing for Ignition Experiments on the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a 192-beam Nd-glass laser facility presently under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for performing ignition experiments for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and experiments studying high energy density (HED) science. NIF will produce 1.8 MJ, 500 TW of ultraviolet light ({lambda} = 351 nm) making it the world's largest and most powerful laser system. NIF will be the world's preeminent facility for the study of matter at extreme temperatures and densities for producing and developing ICF. The ignition studies will be an essential step in developing inertial fusion energy (IFE). the NIF Project is over 93% complete and scheduled for completion in 2009. Experiments using one beam have demonstrated that NIF can meet all of its performance goals. A detailed plan called the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) has been developed to begin ignition experiments in 2010. The plan includes the target physics and the equipment such as diagnostics, cryogenic target manipulator and user optics required for the ignition experiment. Target designs have been developed that calculate to ignite at energy as low as 1 MJ. Plans are under way to make NIF a national user facility for experiments on HED physics and nuclear science, including experiments relevant to the development of IFE.

Moses, E; Meier, W

2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

226

Research Councils UK Energy Programme www.rcuk.ac.uk/energy Executive Summary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy source are major and the timescales are long and uncertain. Fusion is likely to contribute to energy systems after 2050. The potential of fusion energy to contribute as a major component of the future global energy system is sufficiently large that it should be pursued in the UK; this is an area of international excellence in terms of research and skilled people in the UK which is contributing to a global challenge. It needs continued funding for the long term, even when difficult financial choices are being made. A high-level schematic of the possible UK programme over the next 20 years is given below. In magnetic confinement fusion (MCF) the continued exploitation of JET, particularly through its ITER-like wall (~2011) and a proposed tritium campaign (~2013) mean that it is still highly relevant for validating ITER physics issues. However, towards the end of the next decade, JET will have closed, or be winding down, and global attention will turn to ITER as the next stage of the fusion fast track commences, but ITER alone will not be sufficient to realise fusion power and technology and materials development will also be crucial. Through an upgraded MAST, the UK can play a leading role in the development of a Component Test Facility (CTF) which may be important in reducing the risk for construction of the fusion demonstration reactor (DEMO), the step following ITER. The role for the UK in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) over the next 20 years is strongly tied to what happens at the US Department of Energys National Ignition Facility (NIF) in the next 2-3 years. The UK has displayed an impressive capability in coordinating the European ICF area through its leadership of the HiPER project and it would be most effective if this were to develop into a global collaboration to develop a plan to exploit NIF ignition towards fusion energy. The UK should continue to contribute to world-class research and international leadership in both MCF and ICF, particularly developing the technology pathway. We should maximise opportunities for global collaboration and develop a common programme between MCF and

unknown authors

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) A Path to Fusion Energy  

SciTech Connect

Fusion energy has long been considered a promising clean, nearly inexhaustible source of energy. Power production by fusion micro-explosions of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets has been a long term research goal since the invention of the first laser in 1960. The NIF is poised to take the next important step in the journey by beginning experiments researching ICF ignition. Ignition on NIF will be the culmination of over thirty years of ICF research on high-powered laser systems such as the Nova laser at LLNL and the OMEGA laser at the University of Rochester as well as smaller systems around the world. NIF is a 192 beam Nd-glass laser facility at LLNL that is more than 90% complete. The first cluster of 48 beams is operational in the laser bay, the second cluster is now being commissioned, and the beam path to the target chamber is being installed. The Project will be completed in 2009 and ignition experiments will start in 2010. When completed NIF will produce up to 1.8 MJ of 0.35 {micro}m light in highly shaped pulses required for ignition. It will have beam stability and control to higher precision than any other laser fusion facility. Experiments using one of the beams of NIF have demonstrated that NIF can meet its beam performance goals. The National Ignition Campaign (NIC) has been established to manage the ignition effort on NIF. NIC has all of the research and development required to execute the ignition plan and to develop NIF into a fully operational facility. NIF will explore the ignition space, including direct drive, 2{omega} ignition, and fast ignition, to optimize target efficiency for developing fusion as an energy source. In addition to efficient target performance, fusion energy requires significant advances in high repetition rate lasers and fusion reactor technology. The Mercury laser at LLNL is a high repetition rate Nd-glass laser for fusion energy driver development. Mercury uses state-o-the art technology such as ceramic laser slabs and light diode pumping for improved efficiency and thermal management. Progress in NIF, NIC, Mercury, and the path forward for fusion energy will be presented.

Moses, E

2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

228

Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Warm Dense Matter  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Warm Dense Matter Print Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Warm Dense Matter Print Being neither solid, liquid, gas, nor plasma, warm dense matter (WDM) occupies a no man's land in the map of material phases. Its temperature can range between that of planetary cores (tens of thousands K) to that of stellar cores (hundreds of thousands K). Not only is it prevalent throughout the universe, it is relevant to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and material performance under extreme conditions. However, because of its extreme temperatures and pressures, WDM tends to be drastically transient and thus difficult to study in the laboratory. Now, researchers have set up ultrafast x-ray absorption spectroscopy at the ALS to measure the electronic structure of WDMs, demonstrating that fast-changing electron temperatures of matter under extreme conditions can be determined with picosecond resolution.

229

Partnering with Utilities Part 1: Successful Partnerships and Lessons from the Field  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1: 1: Successful Partnerships and Lessons from the Field Jennifer Clymer, ICF International Philip LaMay, Allegheny County, PA Christian Williss, Denver, CO Sharon Procopio, Denver, CO September 22, 2011 2 | TAP Webinar eere.energy.gov What is TAP? DOE's Technical Assistance Program (TAP) supports the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program (EECBG) and the State Energy Program (SEP) by providing state, local, and tribal officials the tools and resources needed to implement successful and sustainable clean energy programs. 3 | TAP Webinar eere.energy.gov * The Department of Energy's (DOE) Technical Assistance Program (TAP) is transitioning to a new era of assistance to state and local governments with a reduced set of resources beginning the week of September 30, 2011.

230

Thailand-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Thailand-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Thailand-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Thailand-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Agency/Company /Organization ICF International, United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Partner USFS, EPA, United States Department of State Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://www.LowEmissionsAsia.or Country Thailand South-Eastern Asia References USAID LEAD Program[1] The Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) program is a regional US Agency for International Development (USAID) activity that supports developing countries in Asia to achieve long-term, transformative development and accelerate sustainable, climate-resilient economic growth while slowing the

231

Property:StockSymbol | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

StockSymbol StockSymbol Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Pages using the property "StockSymbol" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) A A.O. Smith + AOS + AAON + AAON + Alterra Power + MGMXF + Ameresco, Inc. + AMRC + Applied Materials + AMAT + Archer Daniels Midland + ADM + Autodesk + ADSK + C China Integrated Energy + CBEH + E EEMAP, Inc. + N/A + EnerNOC + ENOC + Evergreen Solar, Inc. + ESLR + ExxonMobil + XOM + G General Electric + GE + Geothermal Resources Council + Geothermal Resources Council + Goodwill Instrument + TPE 2423 + GreenShift Corporation + GERS.OB + Gulfsands Petroleum + AIM:GPX + H Helix Wind Corp. + HLXW + I ICF International + NASDAQ:ICFI + J Johnson Controls + JCI + M Molycorp Inc. + MCP +

232

Large Power Transformers and the U.S. Electric Grid  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration Infrastructure Security and Energy Restoration Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability U.S. Department of Energy LARGE POWER TRANSFORMERS AND THE U.S. ELECTRIC GRID Large Power Transformers and the U.S. Electric Grid i This page intentionally left blank. Large Power Transformers and the U.S. Electric Grid DOE / OE / ISER June 2012 ii FOR FURTHER INFORMATION This report was prepared by the Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability under the direction of Patricia Hoffman, Assistant Secretary, and William Bryan, Deputy Assistant Secretary. Specific questions about information in this report may be directed to Dr. Kenneth Friedman, Senior Policy Advisor (kenneth.friedman@hq.doe.gov). Tiffany Y. Choi of ICF International contributed to this report.

233

Microsoft PowerPoint - PortfolioManager_Webinar_4Feb10_Updated  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water and Energy Use in Portfolio Manager & the C&W EC Challenge Water and Energy Use in Portfolio Manager & the C&W EC Challenge Training Webinar Feb4th, 2010 2 Presentation Team EPA ENERGY STAR Alyssa Quarforth, Program Manager, Commercial Property Markets Andrew Schulte, ICF International in support of ENERGY STAR C&W Client Solutions Eleni Reed, Director, Sustainability Strategies 3 Agenda Training Objectives Background (C&W) ENERGY STAR Program C&W Energy Efficiency & Water Efficiency Policies C&W Environmental Challenge requirements Benchmarking 201 (EPA ENERGY STAR) Sharing data with the C&W Master Account Tracking metrics for Environmental Challenge Frequently asked questions on benchmarking and Portfolio Manager 4 Training Objectives Review C&W procedures for tracking energy

234

Nepal-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nepal-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Nepal-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Nepal-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Agency/Company /Organization ICF International, United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Partner USFS, EPA, United States Department of State Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://www.LowEmissionsAsia.or Country Nepal Southern Asia References USAID LEAD Program[1] The Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) program is a regional US Agency for International Development (USAID) activity that supports developing countries in Asia to achieve long-term, transformative development and accelerate sustainable, climate-resilient economic growth while slowing the

235

Vietnam-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Vietnam-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Vietnam-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Vietnam-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Agency/Company /Organization ICF International, United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Partner USFS, EPA, United States Department of State Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://www.LowEmissionsAsia.or Country Vietnam South-Eastern Asia References USAID LEAD Program[1] The Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) program is a regional US Agency for International Development (USAID) activity that supports developing countries in Asia to achieve long-term, transformative development and accelerate sustainable, climate-resilient economic growth while slowing the

236

Malaysia-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Malaysia-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Malaysia-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Malaysia-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Agency/Company /Organization ICF International, United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Partner USFS, EPA, United States Department of State Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://www.LowEmissionsAsia.or Country Malaysia South-Eastern Asia References USAID LEAD Program[1] The Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) program is a regional US Agency for International Development (USAID) activity that supports developing countries in Asia to achieve long-term, transformative development and accelerate sustainable, climate-resilient economic growth while slowing the

237

Papua New Guinea-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Papua New Guinea-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Papua New Guinea-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Papua New Guinea-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Agency/Company /Organization ICF International, United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Partner USFS, EPA, United States Department of State Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://www.LowEmissionsAsia.or Country Papua New Guinea Melanesia References USAID LEAD Program[1] The Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) program is a regional US Agency for International Development (USAID) activity that supports developing countries in Asia to achieve long-term, transformative development and accelerate sustainable, climate-resilient economic growth while slowing the

238

National Ignition Facility & Photon Science - Bringing Star Power to Earth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NIF Go NIF Go LLNL Logo Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory LLNL Home NIF Home LIFE Home Jobs Site Map Contact News Press Releases In the News Status Update Media Assistance About Us National Ignition Facility About NIF How NIF Works The Seven Wonders of NIF Building NIF An Engineering Marvel NIFFY Early Light Collaborators Status Visiting NIF Missions National Security Energy for the Future Understanding the Universe People The People of NIF Awards NIF Professor Sabbatical Opportunities NIF Online Store Programs National Ignition Campaign How to Make a Star (ICF) Target Physics Target Fabrication Cryogenic Target System Diagnostics Participants Photon Science & Applications Advanced Optics Advanced Radiography Directed Energy Fusion Energy Inertial Fusion Energy How IFE Works Science at the Extremes

239

Insulation Strategies to Meet Upcoming Code and Above Code Programs  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Insulation Strategies to Meet Insulation Strategies to Meet Upcoming Code and Above Code Programs 1 Christopher Little, BASF Corporation, Center for Building Excellence 3/2/2012 Presentation Overview Innovative insulating & wall assembly strategies  Typical assembly  New innovations  Features & benefits of each 2 3/2/2012 Typical Site Built Residential Wall Concept: Site built wood frame wall with exterior sheathing and batt insulation Components:  Exterior Finish (bulk moisture control)  Building wrap  Exterior sheathing 2x4 Studs @16" O.C.  Batt Insulation (+/- 3.7 R per inch)  Gypsum board Benefits: Relatively low cost ICF Site-built 3 3/2/2012 Typical Site Built Residential Wall Key performance deficiencies  Low effective R-value  Difficulty meeting IECC 2012 R-value

240

Building Green in Greensburg: Greensburg State Bank  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Greensburg State Bank Greensburg State Bank When a tornado leveled 95% of Greensburg, the only thing left of Greensburg State Bank was the original vault. So the bank was rebuilt on its original site and re-opened for business just one year later. It was the second commercial building in Greensburg to do so. The new bank boasts a variety of green building features including an east-west building orientation that maximizes natural daylight inside, insulated concrete form (ICF) construction for an energy- efficient building envelope, and a high efficiency heating and cooling system. ENERGY EFFICIENCY FEATURES * An east-west building orientation maximizes natural daylighting in the interior and reduces the wall area on the east and west that the sun can heat up, decreasing the need for cooling

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ihsgi inforum icf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

2013 Propane Market Outlook  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

3 3 Propane Market Outlook Assessment of Key Market Trends, Threats, and Opportunities Facing the Propane Industry Through 2020 P R E S E N T E D B Y : Prepared for the Propane Education & Research Council (PERC) by: ICF International, Inc. 9300 Lee Highway Fairfax, VA 22031 Tel (703) 218-2758 www.icfi.com Principal Authors: Mr. Michael Sloan msloan@icfi.com Mr. Warren Wilczewski wwilczewski@icfi.com Propane Market Outlook at a Glance ¡ Total consumer propane sales declined by more than 17 percent between 2009 and 2012, including 3.3 percent in 2011 and 10 to 12 percent in 2012. The declines in 2011 and 2012 were due primarily to much warmer than normal weather, as well as the impact of higher propane prices and continuing efficiency trends. Sales are expected to rebound in 2013 with a return to more

242

Indonesia-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Indonesia-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Indonesia-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Agency/Company /Organization ICF International, United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Partner USFS, EPA, United States Department of State Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://www.LowEmissionsAsia.or Country Indonesia South-Eastern Asia References USAID LEAD Program[1] The Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) program is a regional US Agency for International Development (USAID) activity that supports developing countries in Asia to achieve long-term, transformative development and

243

Microsoft Word - Defense Science Quarterly 11-08 v2.doc  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

December 2008 December 2008 Defense Science Quarterly Inside This Issue 1 Message from the Director 2 The National Boost Initiative 3 HEDP to Support Our Understanding of Radiation Flow 4 Publication Highlights 5 Awards and Highlights Message from the Director Chris Deeney, Defense Science Division It's been another productive year. I am so proud of the progress we have made this year - boost, DARHT, energy-balance, JASPER... The list is too long to go through. Thank you. My father had a simple piece of advice that he used to give me: "leave a place better than you found it!" In October 2008 the Science and ICF campaigns left stockpile stewardship better than it was in October 2007. How do I know? Well here are some

244

Property:NEPA Consultant | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Consultant Consultant Jump to: navigation, search Property Name NEPA Consultant Property Type Page Pages using the property "NEPA Consultant" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) B BLM-NV-WN-ES-08-01-1310, NV-020-08-01 + Environmental Management Associates + C CA-017-05-051 + Environmental Management Associates, Inc. + CA-067-2006-12 + Environmental Management Associates, Inc. + CA-170-02-15 + EMA Associates + CA-670-2010-107 + NA + CA-670-2010-CX + NA + CA-96062042 + MHA Environmental Consulting, Inc. + D DOE-EA-1621 + MHA Environmental Consulting + DOE-EA-1733 + RMT Inc + DOE-EIS-0298 + Environmental Management Associates, Inc. + DOI-BLM-CA-C050-2009-0005-EA + ICF International + DOI-BLM-CA-EA-2002-??? + MHA Environmental Consulting, Inc. +

245

EIA 914 Survey … Investigation of Alternate Methods and Data Sources  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1 September 2009 1 1 September 2009 1 EIA 914 Survey - Investigation of Alternate Methods and Data Sources Prepared for: Meeting of the American Statistical Association (ASA) Committee on Energy Statistics with the Energy Information Administration (EIA) October 1 and 2, 2009 Washington, D.C. Prepared by: ICF International Bill Pepper, Asa Janney, and Harry Vidas This is a working document prepared for the Energy Information Administration (EIA) in order to solicit advice and comment on statistical matters from the American Statistical Association Committee on Energy Statistics. This topic will be discussed at EIA's fall 2009 meeting with the Committee to be held on October 1, 2009. 11 September 2009 2 This report summarizes our progress to date on improving the sampling and estimation procedures of the

246

Philippines-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Philippines-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Philippines-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Philippines-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Agency/Company /Organization ICF International, United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Partner USFS, EPA, United States Department of State Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://www.LowEmissionsAsia.or Country Philippines South-Eastern Asia References USAID LEAD Program[1] The Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) program is a regional US Agency for International Development (USAID) activity that supports developing countries in Asia to achieve long-term, transformative development and accelerate sustainable, climate-resilient economic growth while slowing the

247

Laos-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Laos-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Laos-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Laos-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Agency/Company /Organization ICF International, United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Partner USFS, EPA, United States Department of State Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://www.LowEmissionsAsia.or Country Laos South-Eastern Asia References USAID LEAD Program[1] The Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) program is a regional US Agency for International Development (USAID) activity that supports developing countries in Asia to achieve long-term, transformative development and accelerate sustainable, climate-resilient economic growth while slowing the

248

The National Ignition Facility Status and Plans for Laser Fusion and High-Energy-Density Experimental Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) currently under construction at the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a 192-beam, 1.8-megajoule, 500-terawatt, 351-nm laser for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high-energy-density experimental studies. NIF is being built by the Department of Energy and the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA) to provide an experimental test bed for the U.S. Stockpile Stewardship Program to ensure the country's nuclear deterrent without underground nuclear testing. The experimental program will encompass a wide range of physical phenomena from fusion energy production to materials science. Of the roughly 700 shots available per year, about 10% will be dedicated to basic science research. Laser hardware is modularized into line replaceable units (LRUs) such as deformable mirrors, amplifiers, and multi-function sensor packages that are operated by a distributed computer control system of nearly 60,000 control points. The supervisory control roo...

Moses, E I

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Time resolved side scatter diagnostics at NOVA  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Side scattering of the radiation during the interaction of a laser beam with the long scale length plasma in hohlraum is a difficult problem of relevance to the viability of ICF. It is important to measure the absolute amount of the laser side scatter as well as the angular distribution of that scatter. The OSA diagnostics has been implemented on NOVA to measure these quantities. We have implemented a fiber-optically coupled streak camera to measure the temporally and angularly resolved side scatter radiation at 351 nm at 9 different angles. Filtered PIN diodes were positioned at 31 various angles in the E-field planed and B-field plane of the incident probe beam to sample and measure the scattered radiation at the 351 nm wavelength of the probe. The diode data was used to calibrate the Brillouin power received by the 9 strategically located fiber optic channels. This presentation will describe the OSA and associated diagnostics.

Kyrala, G.A.; Evans, S.C.; Jimerson, J.R.; Fernandez, J.C.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Dual microchannel plate module for a gated monochromatic x-ray imager  

SciTech Connect

Development and testing of a dual microchannel plate (MCP) module to be used in the national Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program has recently been completed. The MCP module is a key component of a new monochromatic x-ray imaging diagnostic which is designed around a 4 channel Kirkpatrick-Baez microscope and diffraction crystals which is located at University of Rochester`s Omega laser system. The MCP module has two separate MCP regions with centers spaced 53 mm apart. Each region contains a 25 mm MCP proximity focused to a P-11 phosphor coated fiberoptic faceplate. The two L/D = 40, MCPs have a 10.2 mm wide, 8 ohm stripline constructed of 500 nm Copper overcoated with 100 nm Gold. A 4 kV, 150 ps electrical pulse provides an optical gatewidth of 80 ps and spatial resolution has been measured at 20 1p/mm.

Oertel, J.A.; Archuleta, T.; Peterson, C.G. [and others

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Laser program annual report 1983  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the 1983 Laser Program Annual Report we present the accomplishments and unclassified activities of the Laser Program at Lawrence Livermore National laboratory (LLNL) for the year 1983. It should be noted that the report, of necessity, is a summary, and more detailed expositions of the research can be found in the many publications and reports authored by staff members in the Laser Program. The purpose of this report is to present our work in a brief form, but with sufficient depth to provide an overview of the analytical and experimental aspects of the LLNL Inertial-Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program. The format of this report is basically the same as that of previous years. Section 1 is an overview and highlights the important accomplishments and directions of the Program. Sections 2 through 7 provide the detailed information on the various major parts of the Program: Laser Systems and Operations, Target Design, Target Fabrication, Fusion Experiments, Laser Research and Development, and Energy Applications.

Hendricks, C.D.; Rufer, M.L.; Murphy, P.W. (eds.)

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Measuring the absolute DT neutron yield using the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF  

SciTech Connect

A Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been installed and extensively used on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum from inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. From the neutron spectrum measured with the MRS, many critical implosion parameters are determined including the primary DT neutron yield, the ion temperature, and the down-scattered neutron yield. As the MRS detection efficiency is determined from first principles, the absolute DT neutron yield is obtained without cross-calibration to other techniques. The MRS primary DT neutron measurements at OMEGA and the NIF are shown to be in excellent agreement with previously established yield diagnostics on OMEGA, and with the newly commissioned nuclear activation diagnostics on the NIF.

Mackinnon, A; Casey, D; Frenje, J A; Johnson, M G; Seguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Y; Katz, J; Knauer, J; Meyerhofer, D; Sangster, T; Bionta, R; Bleuel, D; Hachett, S P; Hartouni, E; Lepape, S; Mckernan, M; Moran, M; Yeamans, C

2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

253

Interactive tools designed to study mix in inertial confinement fusion implosions  

SciTech Connect

Graphical user interface tools have been built in IDL to study mix in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosion cores. FLAME (Fall-Line Analysis Mix Evaluator), a code which investigates yield degradation due to mix , was designed to post-process 1D hydrodynamic simulation output by implementing a variety of mix models. Three of these mix models are based on the physics of the fall-line. In addition, mixing data from other sources can be incorporated into the yield degradation analysis. Two independent tools called HAME (Haan Analysis Mix Evaluator) and YAME (Youngs Analysis Mix Evaluator) were developed to calculate the spatial extent of the mix region according to the Haan saturation model and Youngs' phenomenological model, respectively. FLAME facilitates a direct comparison to experimental data. The FLAME, HAME, and YAME interfaces are user-friendly, flexible, and platform-independent.

Welser-sherrill, Leslie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cooley, James H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wilson, Doug C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

FY96-98 Summary Report Mercury: Next Generation Laser for High Energy Density Physics SI-014  

SciTech Connect

The scope of the Mercury Laser project encompasses the research, development, and engineering required to build a new generation of diode-pumped solid-state lasers for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). The Mercury Laser will be the first integrated demonstration of laser diodes, crystals, and gas cooling within a scalable laser architecture. This report is intended to summarize the progress accomplished during the first three years of the project. Due to the technological challenges associated with production of 900 nm diode-bars, heatsinks, and high optical-quality Yb:S-FAP crystals, the initial focus of the project was primarily centered on the R&D in these three areas. During the third year of the project, the R&D continued in parallel with the development of computer codes, partial activation of the laser, component testing, and code validation where appropriate.

Bayramian, A.; Beach, R.; Bibeau, C.; Chanteloup, J.-C.; Ebbers, C.; Emanuel, M.; Freitas, B.; Fulkerson, S.; Kanz, K.; Hinz, A.; Marshall, C.; Mills, S.; Nakano, H.; Orth, C.; Rothenberg, J.; Schaffers, K.; Seppala, L.; Skidmore, J.; Smith, L.; Sutton, S.; Telford, S.; Zapata, L.

2000-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

255

FY96-98 Summary Report Mercury: Next Generation Laser for High Energy Density Physics SI-014  

SciTech Connect

The scope of the Mercury Laser project encompasses the research, development, and engineering required to build a new generation of diode-pumped solid-state lasers for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). The Mercury Laser will be the first integrated demonstration of laser diodes, crystals, and gas cooling within a scalable laser architecture. This report is intended to summarize the progress accomplished during the first three years of the project. Due to the technological challenges associated with production of 900 nm diode-bars, heatsinks, and high optical-quality Yb:S-FAP crystals, the initial focus of the project was primarily centered on the R&D in these three areas. During the third year of the project, the R&D continued in parallel with the development of computer codes, partial activation of the laser, component testing, and code validation where appropriate.

Bayramian, A; Beach, R; Bibeau, C; Chanteloup, J; Ebbers, C; Emanuel, M; Freitas, B; Fulkerson, S; Kanz, K; Hinz, A; Marshall, C; Mills, S; Nakano, H; Orth, C; Rothenberg, J; Schaffers, K; Seppala, L; Skidmore, I; Smith, L; Sutton, S; Telford, S; Zapata, L

2000-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

256

Laser fusion driven breeder design study. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results of the Laser Fusion Breeder Design Study are given. This information primarily relates to the conceptual design of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) breeder reactor (or fusion-fission hybrid) based upon the HYLIFE liquid metal wall protection concept developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The blanket design for this breeder is optimized to both reduce fissions and maximize the production of fissile fuel for subsequent use in conventional light water reactors (LWRs). When the suppressed fission blanket is compared with its fast fission counterparts, a minimal fission rate in the blanket results in a unique reactor safety advantage for this concept with respect to reduced radioactive inventory and reduced fission product decay afterheat in the event of a loss-of-coolant-accident.

Berwald, D.H.; Massey, J.V.

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

FABRICATION OF A NEW TYPE OF DOUBLE SHELL TARGET HAVING A PVA INNER LAYER  

SciTech Connect

OAK-B135 The General Atomics Target Fabrication team was tasked in FY03, under its ICF Target Support contract, to make a new type of double-shell target. its specifications called for the outer shell to have an inner lining of PVA (poly(vinyl alcohol)) that would keep the xenon gas fill from occupying the target wall. The inner shell consisted of a glass shell coated with 2000 {angstrom} of silver and filled with 9 atm of deuterium. Furthermore, the delivery deadline was less than seven weeks away. This paper describes the fielding of this double-shell target, made possible through the combined efforts of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and General Atomics target fabrication specialists.

STEINMAN,D.A; WALLACE,R; GRANT,S.E; HOPPE,M.L; SMITH,JR.J.N

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Experimental Program to Elucidate and Control Stimulated Brillouin and Raman Backscattering in Long-Scale Plasmas  

SciTech Connect

Laser-plasma instability is a serious concern for indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF), where laser beams illuminate the interior of a cavity (called a hohlraum) to produce X-rays to drive the implosion of a fusion capsule. Stimulated Raman and Brillouin backscattering (SRS and SBS) could result in unacceptably high laser reflectivities. Unfortunately, it is impossible at present to fully simulate these processes realistically. The authors experimental program aims to understand these instabilities by pursuing a dual strategy. (1) They use a gas-filled hohlraum design, which best approaches ignition-hohlraum conditions, on the Nova laser to identify important non linear trends. (2) They are shifting towards more fundamental experiments with a nearly diffraction-limited interaction laser beam illuminating extremely well characterized plasmas on the Trident laser facility at Los Alamos to probe the relevant fundamental processes.

Fernandez, J.C.; Cobble, J.A.; Montgomery, D.S.; Wilke, M.D.

1998-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

259

Inertial fusion target development for ignition and energy  

SciTech Connect

The target needs of the next ICF experiments that will lead toward ignition and energy are different from those of today`s experiments. The future experiments on OMEGA Upgrade, GEKKO XII Upgrade, the National Ignition Facility and Megajoule will need large, precise, cryogenic targets. Development is needed on a number of aspects of these targets, including shell fabrication, characterization, cryogenic layering and target handling. However, coordinated R and D programs are in place and work is in process to carry out the needed development. It is vital to the success of inertial fusion that this work be sustained. Coordinated effort, like the National Cryogenic Target Program in the USA, will help make the development activities as efficient and effective as possible, and should be encouraged.

Schultz, K.R. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Norimatsu, T. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Laser Engineering

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Cross calibration of AGFA-D7 x-ray film against direct exposure film from 2 to 8.5 keV using laser generated x-rays  

SciTech Connect

Direct exposure film (DEF) is being discontinued. DEF film has been the workhorse in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research and is used to record x-ray images and spectra. A previous search for a replacement [K. M. Chandler et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 76, 113111 (2005)] did not consider AGFA film. We present comparisons using the results of measurements using AGFA-D7 film, XAR, TMG, and Biomax-MS films in the same spectrometer recording a gold spectrum in the 2-4 keV range and the iron spectrum in the 5-8.5 keV range. AGFA film was found to have some unique properties useful in x-ray spectroscopy and imaging, especially when signal strength is not a concern.

Kyrala, George A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2006-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ihsgi inforum icf" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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261

Ultra-low density microcellular polymer foam and method  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ultra-low density, microcellular open-celled polymer foam and a method for making such foam are disclosed. A polymer is dissolved in a heated solution consisting essentially of at least one solvent for the dissolution of the polymer in the heated solution and the phase inversion of the dissolved polymer to a liquid gel upon sufficient cooling of the heated solution. The heated solution is contained in a containment means provided with a nucleating promoting means having a relatively rough surface formed of fixed nucleating sites. The heated solution is cooled for a period of time sufficient to form a liquid gel of the polymer by phase inversion. From the gel, a porous foam having a density of less than about 12.0 mg/cm{sup 3} and open porosity provided by well interconnected strut morphology is formed. These foams can be used for ICF targets.

Simandl, R.F.; Brown, J.D.

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

262

Scientific applications for high-energy lasers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The convergence of numerous factors makes the time ripe for the development of a community of researchers to use the high-energy laser for scientific investigations. This document attempts to outline the steps necessary to access high-energy laser systems and create a realistic plan to implement usage. Since an academic/scientific user community does not exist in the USA to any viable extent, we include information on present capabilities at the Nova laser. This will briefly cover laser performance and diagnostics and a sampling of some current experimental projects. Further, to make the future possibilities clearer, we will describe the proposed next- generation high-energy laser, named for its inertial fusion confinement (ICF) goal, the multi-megaJoule, 500-teraWatt National Facility, or NIF.

Lee, R.W. [comp.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Compression molding of aerogel microspheres  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An aerogel composite material produced by compression molding of aerogel microspheres (powders) mixed together with a small percentage of polymer binder to form monolithic shapes in a cost-effective manner. The aerogel composites are formed by mixing aerogel microspheres with a polymer binder, placing the mixture in a mold and heating under pressure, which results in a composite with a density of 50-800 kg/m.sup.3 (0.05-0.80 g/cc). The thermal conductivity of the thus formed aerogel composite is below that of air, but higher than the thermal conductivity of monolithic aerogels. The resulting aerogel composites are attractive for applications such as thermal insulation since fabrication thereof does not require large and expensive processing equipment. In addition to thermal insulation, the aerogel composites may be utilized for filtration, ICF target, double layer capacitors, and capacitive deionization.

Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Hrubesh, Lawrence W. (Pleasanton, CA)

1998-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

264

Compression molding of aerogel microspheres  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An aerogel composite material produced by compression molding of aerogel microspheres (powders) mixed together with a small percentage of polymer binder to form monolithic shapes in a cost-effective manner is disclosed. The aerogel composites are formed by mixing aerogel microspheres with a polymer binder, placing the mixture in a mold and heating under pressure, which results in a composite with a density of 50--800 kg/m{sup 3} (0.05--0.80 g/cc). The thermal conductivity of the thus formed aerogel composite is below that of air, but higher than the thermal conductivity of monolithic aerogels. The resulting aerogel composites are attractive for applications such as thermal insulation since fabrication thereof does not require large and expensive processing equipment. In addition to thermal insulation, the aerogel composites may be utilized for filtration, ICF target, double layer capacitors, and capacitive deionization. 4 figs.

Pekala, R.W.; Hrubesh, L.W.

1998-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

265

Pulse shaping system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Temporally shaped electrical waveform generation provides electrical waveforms suitable for driving an electro-optic modulator (EOM) which produces temporally shaped optical laser pulses for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research. The temporally shaped electrical waveform generation is carried out with aperture coupled transmission lines having an input transmission line and an aperture coupled output transmission line, along which input and output pulses propagate in opposite directions. The output electrical waveforms are shaped principally due to the selection of coupling aperture width, in a direction transverse to the lines, which varies along the length of the line. Specific electrical waveforms, which may be high voltage (up to kilovolt range), are produced and applied to the EOM to produce specifically shaped optical laser pulses. 8 figs.

Skeldon, M.D.; Letzring, S.A.

1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

266

A New Gated X-Ray Detector for the Orion Laser Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gated X-Ray Detectors (GXD) are considered the work-horse target diagnostic of the laser based inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program. Recently, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has constructed three new GXDs for the Orion laser facility at the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) in the United Kingdom. What sets these three new instruments apart from the what has previously been constructed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is: improvements in detector head microwave transmission lines, solid state embedded hard drive and updated control software, and lighter air box design and other incremental mechanical improvements. In this paper we will present the latest GXD design enhancements and sample calibration data taken on the Trident laser facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory using the newly constructed instruments.

Clark, David D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aragonez, Robert J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Archuleta, Thomas N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fatherley, Valerie E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hsu, Albert H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jorgenson, H. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mares, Danielle [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oertel, John A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oades, Kevin [Atomic Weapons Establishment; Kemshall, Paul [Atomic Weapons Establishment; Thomas, Philip [Atomic Weapons Establishment; Young, Trevor [Atomic Weapons Establishment; Pederson, Neal [VI Control Systems

2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

267

Pulse shaping system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Temporally shaped electrical waveform generation provides electrical waveforms suitable for driving an electro-optic modulator (EOM) which produces temporally shaped optical laser pulses for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research. The temporally shaped electrical waveform generation is carried out with aperture coupled transmission lines having an input transmission line and an aperture coupled output transmission line, along which input and output pulses propagate in opposite directions. The output electrical waveforms are shaped principally due to the selection of coupling aperture width, in a direction transverse to the lines, which varies along the length of the line. Specific electrical waveforms, which may be high voltage (up to kilovolt range), are produced and applied to the EOM to produce specifically shaped optical laser pulses.

Skeldon, Mark D. (Penfield, NY); Letzring, Samuel A. (Jemez Springs, NM)

1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

268

Bangladesh-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Bangladesh-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Bangladesh-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Bangladesh-Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Agency/Company /Organization ICF International, United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Partner USFS, EPA, United States Department of State Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://www.LowEmissionsAsia.or Country Bangladesh Southern Asia References USAID LEAD Program[1] The Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) program is a regional US Agency for International Development (USAID) activity that supports developing countries in Asia to achieve long-term, transformative development and accelerate sustainable, climate-resilient economic growth while slowing the

269

K DOE/ER/72018~9  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

.^ay^4l.« XlUU..,^!^.:.^ .^ay^4l.« XlUU..,^!^.:.^ K DOE/ER/72018~9 DE92 007472 Ninth Progress Report for the Division of Basic Energy Sciences Department of Energy, Contract DOE EY 76-S-03-0034, P.A. 218 (includes results of the last three years) MULTIHETEROMACROCYCLES THAT COMPLEX METAL IONS PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: INSTITUTIONAL AFFILIATION: REPORTING PERIOD: DATE OF THIS REPORT: Donald J. Cram, Professor of Chemistry Department of Chemistry University of California at Los Angeles 405 Hilgard Avenue Los Angeles, California 90024 1 May 1980-30 April 1983 15 September 1982 Prepared for the Department of Energy, Division of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. DOE EY 76 5 03 0Q3/I, P.A. 218, A^^S '7Ce/K 'i^c:,f 5?, DISTRlBUTIOfSi OF THIS DOCUMENT \B UNuiMiTED DISCLAIMER

270

Fudge: a high-bandwidth fusion diagnostic of the NIF  

SciTech Connect

Diagnostics for the National Ignition Facility (NIF)/Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program must include good characterization of the fusion source. Ideally, diagnostics would measure the spatially-resolved history of the fusion reaction rate and temperature. Existing diagnostics can satisfy this goal only partially. One class of new techniques that could play a major role in high-yield diagnostics is measurements based on fusion {gamma} rays. The Fusion Diagnostic Gamma Experiment (FUDGE) can be used to perform energy-resolved measurements of (D,T) fusion reaction rates This diagnostic is based on the 16 7-MeV {gamma} rays that are produced by (D,T) fusion. The {gamma} rays are free of spectral dispersion and can be detected with a high bandwidth Cherenkov detector. A simple magnetic monochromator selects signals from the 16 7-MeV {gamma} rays and reduces background signals from non-fusion {gamma} rays.

Moran, M. J., LLNL

1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

271

Environmental and industrial applications of pulsed power systems  

SciTech Connect

The technology base formed by the development of high peak power simulators, laser drivers, free electron lasers (FEL`s), and Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) drivers from the early 60`s through the late 80`s is being extended to high average power short-pulse machines with the capabilities of performing new roles in environmental cleanup applications and in supporting new types of industrial manufacturing processes. Some of these processes will require very high average beam power levels of hundreds of kilowatts to perhaps megawatts. In this paper we briefly discuss new technology capabilities and then concentrate on specific application areas that may benefit from the high specific energies and high average powers attainable with short-pulse machines.

Neau, E.L.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Ten-Inch Manipulator-Based Neutron Temporal Diagnostic for Cryogenic Experiments on OMEGA  

SciTech Connect

Measurements of the neutron emission from inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions provide important information about target performance that can be compared directly with numerical models. For ''warm'' target experiments on LLE's OMEGA the neutron temporal diagnostic (NTD), originally developed at LLNL, is used to measure the neutron burn history with high resolution and timing accuracy. Due to the standoff required by the cryogenic target handling system, NTD is mechanically incompatible with cryogenic target experiments. This presentation describes a new cryogenic- compatible neutron temporal diagnostic (cryoNTD), which has been designed for LLE's standard ten-inch-manipulator (TIM) diagnostic inserters. First experimental results of the performance of the cryoNTD compared to NTD on warm direct-drive implosions and on cryogenic implosions will be presented.

Stoeckl, C.; Glebov, V.Yu.; Roberts, S.; Sangster, T.C.; Lerche, R.A.; Griffith, R.L.; Sorce, C.

2003-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

273

Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Development (LEAD) Program Development (LEAD) Program (Redirected from Low Emission Asian Development (LEAD) Program) Jump to: navigation, search Name Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Agency/Company /Organization ICF International, United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Partner USFS, EPA, United States Department of State Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://www.LowEmissionsAsia.or Country Bangladesh, Cambodia, India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Nepal, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, Melanesia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia

274

Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Jump to: navigation, search Name Low Emissions Asian Development (LEAD) Program Agency/Company /Organization ICF International, United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Partner USFS, EPA, United States Department of State Sector Climate, Energy, Land Topics Background analysis, Low emission development planning, -LEDS Website http://www.LowEmissionsAsia.or Country Bangladesh, Cambodia, India, Indonesia, Laos, Malaysia, Nepal, Papua New Guinea, Philippines, Thailand, Vietnam Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, Southern Asia, Melanesia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia, South-Eastern Asia References LEAD Program[1]

275

Inertial Confinement Fusion R&D and Nuclear Proliferation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a few months, or a few years, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory may achieve fusion gain using 192 powerful lasers to generate x-rays that will compress and heat a small target containing isotopes of hydrogen. This event would mark a major milestone after decades of research on inertial confinement fusion (ICF). It might also mark the beginning of an accelerated global effort to harness fusion energy based on this science and technology. Unlike magnetic confinement fusion (ITER, 2011), in which hot fusion fuel is confined continuously by strong magnetic fields, inertial confinement fusion involves repetitive fusion explosions, taking advantage of some aspects of the science learned from the design and testing of hydrogen bombs. The NIF was built primarily because of the information it would provide on weapons physics, helping the United States to steward its stockpile of nuclear weapons without further underground testing. The U.S. National Academies' National Research Council is now hosting a study to assess the prospects for energy from inertial confinement fusion. While this study has a classified sub-panel on target physics, it has not been charged with examining the potential nuclear proliferation risks associated with ICF R&D. We argue here that this question urgently requires direct and transparent examination, so that means to mitigate risks can be assessed, and the potential residual risks can be balanced against the potential benefits, now being assessed by the NRC. This concern is not new (Holdren, 1978), but its urgency is now higher than ever before.

Robert J. Goldston

2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

276

Inertial confinement fusion target component fabrication and technology development support: Annual report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1994  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On December 30, 1990, the US Department of Energy entered into a contract with General Atomics (GA) to be the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support contractor. During the period, GA was assigned 17 tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion program and its laboratories. This year they achieved full production capabilities for the micromachining, dimensional characterization and gold plating of hohlraums. They fabricated and delivered 726 gold-plated mandrels of 27 different types to LLNL and 48 gold-plated mandrels of two different types to LANL. They achieved full production capabilities in composite capsule production ad delivered in excess of 240 composite capsules. They continuously work to improve performance and capabilities. They were also directed to dismantle, remove, and disposition all equipment at the previous contractor (KMSF) that had radioactive contamination levels low enough that they could be exposed to the general public without radiological constraints. GA was also directed to receive and store the tritium fill equipment. They assisted LANL in the development of techniques for characterization of opaque targets. They developed deuterated and UV-opaque polymers for use by the University of Rochester`s Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE) and devised a triple-orifice droplet generator to demonstrate the controlled-mass nature of the microencapsulation process. The ICF program is anticipating experiments at NIF and the Omega Upgrade. Both facilities will require capsules containing layered D{sub 2} or D-T fuel. They continued engineering and assembly of equipment for a cryogenic target handling system for UR/LLE that will fill, transport, layer, and characterize targets filled with cryogenic deuterium or deuterium-tritium fuel, and insert these cryogenic targets into the OMEGA Upgrade target chamber for laser implosion experiments.

Hoppe, M. [ed.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Literature Review on the Effects of Prescription Fire on theEcology of Site 300  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has historically conducted prescription burns across approximately 2,000 acres of Site 300 on an annual basis to safeguard test facilities and operations from the risk of wildfire encroachment. Prescription burns began in 1960, and although fire frequency varies among the designated burn areas, all have been burned at least once. A patchwork of native perennial grassland communities and associated special-status plant and animal populations occur onsite in many areas that have been receiving these treatments. Because the size and locations of prescription burns may shift in coming years, an evaluation is warranted to determine how these shifts may affect listed biota, including rare plants, and the distinct ecological conditions present on the site. This report presents the results of a literature review conducted by ICF International (ICF) to collect basic information on native perennial grasslands in California, the influence of fire on these grasslands, and management tools for restoring and maintaining them. The objective of this study was to review the scientific literature on California native grasslands and summarize the current state of knowledge pertaining to the possible effects -- both beneficial and detrimental -- of prescribed fire on the ecology of Site 300. The results of this review are intended to inform future management practices that may be carried out at Site 300 to maintain the plant and wildlife communities and to ensure that the ecological conditions benefit the special-status species that inhabit the Site. This review is also intended to identify a study approach to investigate changes over the next 10 years in the burned areas and in areas where burning will be discontinued.

Preston, R

2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

278

Ignition and Inertial Confinement Fusion at The National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most powerful laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and for studying high-energy-density (HED) science, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF is now conducting experiments to commission the laser drive, the hohlraum and the capsule and to develop the infrastructure needed to begin the first ignition experiments in FY 2010. Demonstration of ignition and thermonuclear burn in the laboratory is a major NIF goal. NIF will achieve this by concentrating the energy from the 192 beams into a mm{sup 3}-sized target and igniting a deuterium-tritium mix, liberating more energy than is required to initiate the fusion reaction. NIF's ignition program is a national effort managed via the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The NIC has two major goals: execution of DT ignition experiments starting in FY2010 with the goal of demonstrating ignition and a reliable, repeatable ignition platform by the conclusion of the NIC at the end of FY2012. The NIC will also develop the infrastructure and the processes required to operate NIF as a national user facility. The achievement of ignition at NIF will demonstrate the scientific feasibility of ICF and focus worldwide attention on laser fusion as a viable energy option. A laser fusion-based energy concept that builds on NIF, known as LIFE (Laser Inertial Fusion Energy), is currently under development. LIFE is inherently safe and can provide a global carbon-free energy generation solution in the 21st century. This paper describes recent progress on NIF, NIC, and the LIFE concept.

Moses, E

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Uniform DT 3T burn: computations and sensitivities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A numerical model was developed in C to integrate the nonlinear deutrium-tritium (DT) burn equations in a three temperature (3T) approximation for spatially uniform test problems relevant to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). Base model results are in excellent agreement with standard 3T results. Data from NDI, SESAME, and TOPS databases is extracted to create fits for the reaction rate parameter, the Planck opacity, and the coupling frequencies of the plasma temperatures. The impact of different fits (e.g., TOPS versus SESAME opacity data, higher order polynomial fits ofNDI data for the reaction rate parameter) were explored, and sensitivity to several model inputs are presented including: opacity data base, Coulomb logarithm, and Bremsstrahlung. Sensitivity to numerical integration time step size, and the relative insensitivity to the discretized numerics and numerical integration method was demonstrated. Variations in the IC for densities and temperatures were explored, showing similar DT burn profiles in most cases once ignition occurs. A coefficient multiplying the Compton coupling term (default, A = 1) can be adjusted to approximate results from more sophisticated models. The coefficient was reset (A = 0.4) to match the maximum temperatures resulting from standard multi-group simulations of the base case test problem. Setting the coefficient to a larger value, (A = 0.6) matches maximum ion temperatures in a kinetic simulation of a high density ICF-like regime. Matching peak temperatures does not match entire temperature-time profiles, indicating the Compton coefficient is density and time dependent as the photon distribution evolves. In the early time burn during the ignition of the DT, the present model with modified Compton coupling provides a very simple method to obtain a much improved match to the more accurate solution from the multi-group radiation model for these DT burn regimes.

Vold, Erik [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hryniw, Natalia [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hansen, Jon A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kesler, Leigh A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Li, Frank [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2011-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

280

Radiation in Particle Simulations  

SciTech Connect

Hot dense radiative (HDR) plasmas common to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and stellar interiors have high temperature (a few hundred eV to tens of keV), high density (tens to hundreds of g/cc) and high pressure (hundreds of megabars to thousands of gigabars). Typically, such plasmas undergo collisional, radiative, atomic and possibly thermonuclear processes. In order to describe HDR plasmas, computational physicists in ICF and astrophysics use atomic-scale microphysical models implemented in various simulation codes. Experimental validation of the models used to describe HDR plasmas are difficult to perform. Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the many-body interactions of plasmas is a promising approach to model validation but, previous work either relies on the collisionless approximation or ignores radiation. We present four methods that attempt a new numerical simulation technique to address a currently unsolved problem: the extension of molecular dynamics to collisional plasmas including emission and absorption of radiation. The first method applies the Lienard-Weichert solution of Maxwell's equations for a classical particle whose motion is assumed to be known. The second method expands the electromagnetic field in normal modes (planewaves in a box with periodic boundary-conditions) and solves the equation for wave amplitudes coupled to the particle motion. The third method is a hybrid molecular dynamics/Monte Carlo (MD/MC) method which calculates radiation emitted or absorbed by electron-ion pairs during close collisions. The fourth method is a generalization of the third method to include small clusters of particles emitting radiation during close encounters: one electron simultaneously hitting two ions, two electrons simultaneously hitting one ion, etc. This approach is inspired by the virial expansion method of equilibrium statistical mechanics. Using a combination of these methods we believe it is possible to do atomic-scale particle simulations of fusion ignition plasmas including the important effects of radiation emission and absorption.

More, R; Graziani, F; Glosli, J; Surh, M

2010-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

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281

Parametric instabilities in laser/matter interaction: from noise levels to relativistic regimes  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this LDRD was the study of parametric instabilities on a laser-produced plasma, addressing crucial issues affecting the coupling between the laser and the plasma. We have made very good progress during these three years, in advancing our understanding in many different fronts. Progress was made in both theoretical and experimental areas. The coupling of high-power laser light to a plasma through scattering instabilities is still one of the most complex processes in laser-plasma interaction physics. In spite of the relevance of these parametric processes to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and all other situations where a high-power laser beam couples to a plasma, many aspects of the interaction remain unexplained, even after many years of intensive experimental and theoretical efforts. Important instabilities under study are stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS), stimulated Raman scattering (SRS), and the Langmuir decay instability (LDI). The study of these instabilities is further complicated by the competition and interplay between them, and, in the case of ICF, by the presence of multiple overlapping interaction beams. Stimulated Brillouin scattering consists of the decay of the incident electromagnetic (EM) wave into a scattered EM wave and an ion acoustic wave (IAW). Similarly, SRS consists of the decay of the incident EM wave into a scattered EM wave and an electron plasma wave (EPW). Langmuir decay instability is the further decay of an EPW into a secondary EPW and an IAW. The principal areas of research covered during this three-year period were the following: a) Modeling of Parametric Instabilities in Speckles b) Langmuir Decay Instability c) Non Maxwellian Plasmas d) Multiple Interaction Beams e) SBS from Speckle Distributions.

Baldis, H A; Kruer, W L; Labaune, C L

1999-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

282

Parametric cost analysis of a HYLIFE-II power plant  

SciTech Connect

The SAFIRE (Systems Analysis for ICF Reactor Economics) code was adapted to model a power plant using a HYLIFE-II reactor chamber. The code was then used to examine the dependence of the plant capital costs and busbar cost of electricity (COE) on a variety of design parameters (type of driver, chamber repetition rate, and net electric power). The results show the most attractive operating space for each set of driver/target assumptions and quantify the benefits of improvements in key design parameters. The base case plant was a 1,000 MWe plant containing a reactor vessel driven by an induction linac heavy ion accelerator run at 7.3 Hz with a driver energy of 5 MJ and a target yield of 370 MJ. The total direct cost for this plant was 2,800 M$ (where all $ in this paper are 1988$s), and the COE was 9 {cents}/KW*hour. The COE and total capital costs for the base plant assumptions for a 1,000 MWe plant are approximately independent of chosen repetition rate for all repetition rates between 4 and 10 Hz. For comparison, the COE for a coal or future fission plant would be 4.5--5.5 {cents}/KW*hour. The COE for a 1,000 MWe plant could be reduced to 7.6 {cents}/KW*hour by using advanced targets and could be cut to 6.8 {cents}/KW*hour with conventional targets if the driver cost could be cut in half. There is a large economy of scale with heavy ion driven ICF plants; a 5,000 MWe plant with one heavy ion driver and either one or two HYLIFE-II chambers would have a COE of only 4.4 {cents}/KW*hour.

Bieri, R.L. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (USA) Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (USA))

1990-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

283

Inertial confinement fusion target component fabrication and technology development support. Annual report, October 1, 1996--September 30, 1997  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the technical activities of the period October 1, 1996 through September 30, 1997. During this period, GA and their partner Schafer Corporation were assigned 13 formal tasks in support of the ICF program and its five laboratories. A portion of the effort on these tasks included providing direct {open_quotes}Onsite Support{close_quotes} at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Sandia National Laboratory Albuquerque (SNLA). Over 700 gold-plated hohlraum mandrels were fabricated and delivered to LLNL, LANL and SNLA. More than 1600 glass and plastic target capsules were produced for LLNL, LANL, SNLA and University of Rochester/Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE). Nearly 2000 various target foils and films were delivered for Naval Research Lab (NRL) and UR/LLE in FY97. This report describes these target fabrication activities and the target fabrication and characterization development activities that made the deliveries possible. The ICF program is anticipating experiments at the OMEGA laser and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) which will require targets containing cryogenic layered D{sub 2} or deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel. This project is part of the National Cryogenic Target Program and support experiments at LLNL and LANL to generate and characterize cryogenic layers for these targets. During FY97, significant progress was made in the design and component testing of the OMEGA Cryogenic Target System that will field cryogenic targets on OMEGA. This included major design changes, reduction in equipment, and process simplifications. This report summarizes and documents the technical progress made on these tasks.

Gibson, J. [ed.

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Particle beam fusion research at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Sandia`s Particle Beam Fusion Program is investigating several driver options, based on pulsed power technology, with the goal of demonstrating a practical ignitor for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Reactors. The interrelated aspects of power conditioning and compression, beam-target interaction, and target ignition are being studied. The issues of efficiency, reliability and multiple pulse capability are being integrated into the program to provide a viable approach to an experimental power reactor. On a shorter time scale the authors expect to derive important military-related benefits from attendant research and facility development. The two most important advantages of pulsed power driven fusion are the inherent low cost and high efficiency of high current particle accelerators. However, comparison of the relative merits of particle beams and focused laser beams must include many other factors such as beam transport, and target coupling, as well as target design and fabrication. These issues are being investigated to determine if the perceived practical benefits of particle beam fusion can indeed be realized. The practical considerations are exemplified in a comparison of the leading ICF drivers. The plan being followed by Sandia involves using the Electron Beam Fusion Accelerator (EBFA) to meet three objectives by 1985: significant burn using EBFA 1, net energy gain based on an upgrade of EBFA to the 2 megajoule (MJ) level (EBFA 2), and demonstration of a single module of EBFA 2 operated in the repetitive pulse mode. These goals are dependent, of course, on success in solving several key technical problems under investigation. If these technical problems can be solved, then practical applications to fusion power could be considered. The potential for these applications has been studied using economic models that allow one to derive the cost of power based on various assumptions.

1978-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

285

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) and the National Ignition Campaign (NIC)  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most powerful laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and experiments studying high-energy-density (HED) science, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). NIF construction was certified by the Department of Energy as complete on March 27, 2009. NIF, a 192-beam Nd:glass laser facility, will ultimately produce 1.8-MJ, 500-TW of 351-nm third-harmonic, ultraviolet light. On March 10, 2009, total 192-beam energy of 1.1 MJ was demonstrated; this is approximately 30 times more energy than ever produced in an ICF laser system. The principal goal of NIF is to achieve ignition of a deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel capsule and provide access to HED physics regimes needed for experiments related to national security, fusion energy and broader frontier scientific exploration. NIF experiments in support of indirect-drive ignition began in August 2009. These first experiments represent the next phase of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The NIC is a national effort to achieve fusion ignition and is coordinated through a detailed execution plan that includes the science, technology, and equipment. Equipment required for ignition experiments includes diagnostics, a cryogenic target manipulator, and user optics. Participants in this effort include LLNL, General Atomics (GA), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Energetics (LLE). The primary goal for NIC is to have all of the equipment operational, integrated into the facility, and ready to begin a credible ignition campaign in 2010. With NIF now operational, the long-sought goal of achieving self-sustained nuclear fusion and energy gain in the laboratory is much closer to realization. Successful demonstration of ignition and net energy gain on NIF will be a major step towards demonstrating the feasibility of Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) and will likely focus the world's attention on the possibility of an ICF energy option. NIF experiments to demonstrate ignition and gain will use central-hot-spot (CHS) ignition, where a spherical fuel capsule is simultaneously compressed and ignited. The scientific basis for CHS has been intensively developed. Achieving ignition with CHS will open the door for other advanced concepts, such as the use of high-yield pulses of visible wavelength rather than ultraviolet and Fast Ignition concepts. Moreover, NIF will have important scientific applications in such diverse fields as astrophysics, nuclear physics and materials science. The NIC will develop the full set of capabilities required to operate NIF as a major national and international user facility. A solicitation for NIF frontier science experiments is planned for summer 2009. This paper summarizes the design, performance, and status of NIF and plans for the NIF ignition experimental program. A brief summary of the overall NIF experimental program is also presented.

Moses, E

2009-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

286

IGNITION AND FRONTIER SCIENCE ON THE NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most powerful laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and experiments studying high-energy-density (HED) science, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF construction Project was certified by the Department of Energy as complete on March 30, 2009. NIF, a 192-beam Nd-glass laser facility, will produce 1.8 MJ, 500 TW of light at the third-harmonic, ultraviolet light of 351 nm. On March 10, 2009, a total 192-beam energy of 1.1 MJ was demonstrated; this is approximately 30 times more energy than ever produced in an ICF laser system. The principal goal of NIF is to achieve ignition of a deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel capsule and provide access to HED physics regimes needed for experiments related to national security, fusion energy and for broader frontier scientific exploration. NIF experiments in support of indirect drive ignition will begin in FY2009. These first experiments represent the next phase of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The NIC is a 1.7 billion dollar national effort to achieve fusion ignition and is coordinated through a detailed execution plan that includes the science, technology, and equipment. Equipment required for ignition experiments include diagnostics, cryogenic target manipulator, and user optics. Participants in this effort include LLNL, General Atomics (GA), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Energetics (LLE). The primary goal for NIC is to have all of the equipment operational and integrated into the facility and be ready to begin a credible ignition campaign in 2010. With NIF now operational, the long-sought goal of achieving self-sustained nuclear fusion and energy gain in the laboratory is much closer to realization. Successful demonstration of ignition and net energy gain on NIF will be a major step towards demonstrating the feasibility of Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) and will likely focus the world's attention on the possibility of an ICF energy option. NIF experiments to demonstrate ignition and gain will use central-hot-spot (CHS) ignition, where a spherical fuel capsule is simultaneously compressed and ignited. The scientific basis for CHS has been intensively developed and has high probability of success. Achieving ignition with CHS will open the door for other advanced concepts, such as the use of high-yield pulses of visible wavelength rather than ultraviolet and Fast Ignition concepts. Moreover, NIF will have important scientific applications in such diverse fields as astrophysics, nuclear physics and materials science. The NIC will develop the full set of capabilities required to operate NIF as a major national and international user facility. A solicitation for NIF frontier science experiments to be conducted by the academic community is planned for summer 2009. This paper summarizes the design, performance, and status of NIF, experimental plans for NIC, and will present a brief discussion of the unparalleled opportunities to explore frontier basic science that will be available on the NIF.

Moses, E

2009-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

287

2-20 ns interframe time 2-frame 6.151 keV x-ray imaging on the recently upgraded Z Accelerator: A progress report  

SciTech Connect

When used for the production of an x-ray imaging backlighter source on Sandia National Laboratories' recently upgraded 26 MA Z Accelerator, the terawatt-class, multikilojoule, 526.57 nm Z-Beamlet laser (ZBL) [P. K. Rambo et al., Appl. Opt. 44, 2421 (2005)], in conjunction with the 6.151 keV (1s{sup 2}-1s2p triplet line of He-like Mn) curved-crystal imager [D. B. Sinars et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75, 3672 (2004); G. R. Bennett et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 10E322 (2006)], is capable of providing a high quality x radiograph per Z shot for inertial confinement fusion (ICF), complex hydrodynamics, and other high-energy-density physics experiments. For example, this diagnostic has recently afforded microgram-scale mass perturbation measurements on an imploding ignition-scale 1 mg ICF capsule [G. R. Bennett et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 99, 205003 (2007)], where the perturbation was initiated by a surrogate deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel fill tube. Using an angle-time multiplexing technique, ZBL now has the capability to provide two spatially and temporally separated foci in the Z chamber, allowing 'two-frame' imaging to be performed, with an interframe time range of 2-20 ns. This multiplexing technique allows the full area of the four-pass amplifiers to be used for the two pulses, rather than split the amplifiers effectively into two rectangular sections, with one leg delayed with respect to the other, which would otherwise double the power imposed onto the various optics thereby halving the damage threshold, for the same irradiance on target. The 6.151 keV two frame technique has recently been used to image imploding wire arrays, using a 7.3 ns interframe time. The diagnostic will soon be converted to operate with p-rather than s-polarized laser light for enhanced laser absorption in the Mn foil, plus other changes (e.g., operation at the possibly brighter 6.181 keV Mn 1s{sup 2}-1s2p singlet line), to increase x-ray yields. Also, a highly sensitive inline multiframe ultrafast (1 ns gate time) digital x-ray camera is being developed [G. R. Bennett et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 10E322 (2006)] to extend the system to 'four-frame' and markedly improve the signal-to-noise ratio. [At present, time-integrating Fuji BAS-TR2025 image plate (scanned with a Fuji BAS-5000 device) forms the time-integrated image-plane detector.].

Bennett, G. R.; Smith, I. C.; Shores, J. E.; Sinars, D. B.; Robertson, G.; Atherton, B. W.; Jones, M. C.; Porter, J. L. [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1193 (United States)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

288

Estimating uncertainty of inference for validation  

SciTech Connect

We present a validation process based upon the concept that validation is an inference-making activity. This has always been true, but the association has not been as important before as it is now. Previously, theory had been confirmed by more data, and predictions were possible based on data. The process today is to infer from theory to code and from code to prediction, making the role of prediction somewhat automatic, and a machine function. Validation is defined as determining the degree to which a model and code is an accurate representation of experimental test data. Imbedded in validation is the intention to use the computer code to predict. To predict is to accept the conclusion that an observable final state will manifest; therefore, prediction is an inference whose goodness relies on the validity of the code. Quantifying the uncertainty of a prediction amounts to quantifying the uncertainty of validation, and this involves the characterization of uncertainties inherent in theory/models/codes and the corresponding data. An introduction to inference making and its associated uncertainty is provided as a foundation for the validation problem. A mathematical construction for estimating the uncertainty in the validation inference is then presented, including a possibility distribution constructed to represent the inference uncertainty for validation under uncertainty. The estimation of inference uncertainty for validation is illustrated using data and calculations from Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). The ICF measurements of neutron yield and ion temperature were obtained for direct-drive inertial fusion capsules at the Omega laser facility. The glass capsules, containing the fusion gas, were systematically selected with the intent of establishing a reproducible baseline of high-yield 10{sup 13}-10{sup 14} neutron output. The deuterium-tritium ratio in these experiments was varied to study its influence upon yield. This paper on validation inference is the first in a series of inference uncertainty estimations. While the methods demonstrated are primarily statistical, these do not preclude the use of nonprobabilistic methods for uncertainty characterization. The methods presented permit accurate determinations for validation and eventual prediction. It is a goal that these methods establish a standard against which best practice may evolve for determining degree of validation.

Booker, Jane M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Langenbrunner, James R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hemez, Francois M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ross, Timothy J [UNM

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

289

RR UECX I DEUEetdJ16 T LEMON7 ILL =@I9 V  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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290

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8. Comparisons of average annual economic growth projections, 8. Comparisons of average annual economic growth projections, 2011-2040 Average annual percentage growth rates Projection 2011-2015 2011-2025 2025-2040 2011-2040 AEO2013 (Reference case) 2.5 2.6 2.4 2.5 AEO2012 (Reference case)a 2.7 2.6 2.5 2.6 IHS Global Insight (August 2012 2.5 2.6 2.5 2.5 OMB (January 2013)a 2.2 2.8 -- -- CBO (February 2013)a 2.6 2.7 -- -- NFORUM (November 2012) 2.6 2.6 2.4 2.5 Social Security Administration (August 2012) 2.9 2.7 2.2 2.4 IEA (2012)b 2.5 2.6 -- 2.4 Blue Chip Consensus (October 2012)a 2.4 2.5 -- -- Exxon/Mobil -- 2.5 2.2 2.4 ICF International -- -- -- 2.6 Oxford Economics Group (January 2013) 2.7 2.7 2.6 2.6 -- = not reported or not applicable. a OMB, CBO, and Blue Chip forecasts end in 2022, and growth rates cited are for 2011-2022. AEO2012 projections end in 2035, and growth rates cited are for 2011-2035.

291

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

8. Comparisons of average annual economic growth projections, 8. Comparisons of average annual economic growth projections, 2011-2040 Average annual percentage growth rates Projection 2011-2015 2011-2025 2025-2040 2011-2040 AEO2013 (Reference case) 2.5 2.6 2.4 2.5 AEO2012 (Reference case)a 2.7 2.6 2.5 2.6 IHS Global Insight (August 2012 2.5 2.6 2.5 2.5 OMB (January 2013)a 2.2 2.8 -- -- CBO (February 2013)a 2.6 2.7 -- -- NFORUM (November 2012) 2.6 2.6 2.4 2.5 Social Security Administration (August 2012) 2.9 2.7 2.2 2.4 IEA (2012)b 2.5 2.6 -- 2.4 Blue Chip Consensus (October 2012)a 2.4 2.5 -- -- Exxon/Mobil -- 2.5 2.2 2.4 ICF International -- -- -- 2.6 Oxford Economics Group (January 2013) 2.7 2.7 2.6 2.6 -- = not reported or not applicable. a OMB, CBO, and Blue Chip forecasts end in 2022, and growth rates cited are for 2011-2022. AEO2012 projections end in 2035, and growth rates cited are for 2011-2035.

292

Micro -Thermonuclear AB-Reactors for Aerospace  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The author offers several innovations that he first suggested publicly early in 1983 for the AB multi-reflex engine, space propulsion, getting energy from plasma, etc. (see: A. Bolonkin, Non-Rocket Space Launch and Flight, Elsevier, London, 2006, Chapters 12, 3A). It is the micro-thermonuclear AB-Reactors. That is new micro-thermonuclear reactor with very small fuel pellet that uses plasma confinement generated by multi-reflection of laser beam or its own magnetic field. The Lawson criterion increases by hundreds of times. The author also suggests a new method of heating the power-making fuel pellet by outer electric current as well as new direct method of transformation of ion kinetic energy into harvestable electricity. These offered innovations dramatically decrease the size, weight and cost of thermonuclear reactor, installation, propulsion system and electric generator. Non-industrial countries can produce these researches and constructions. Currently, the author is researching the efficiency of these innovations for two types of the micro-thermonuclear reactors: multi-reflection reactor (ICF) and self-magnetic reactor (MCF).

Alexander Bolonkin

2007-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

293

Parameter Studies for the VISTA Spacecraft Concept  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The baseline design for the VISTA spacecraft concept employs a diode-pumped solid-state laser (DPSSL) driver. This type of driver is now under development at LLNL and elsewhere as an extension of the mature solid-state (glass) laser technology developed for terrestrial applications of inertial confinement fusion (ICF). A DPSSL is repratable up to at least 30 Hz, and has an efficiency soon to be experimentally verified of at least 10%. By using a detailed systems code including the essential physics of a DPSSL, we have run parameter studies for the baseline roundtrip (RT) to Mars with a 100-ton payload. We describe the results of these studies as a function of the optimized (minimum) RT flight duration. We also demonstrate why DT fuel gives the best performance, although DD, D3He, or even antimatter can be used, and why DT-ignited DD is probably the fuel most preferred. We also describe the overall power flow, showing where the fusion energy is ultimately utilized, and estimate the variation in performance to the planets dictated by variations in target gain and other parameters.

Orth, C D

2000-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

294

Foreign Oil Dependence  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Public transportation provides greater freedom, access, opportunity and choice for Americans from all walks of life and from all across the country. Ridership is up 25.1 percent since 1995, and the millions of Americans who use public transportation each weekday know it saves money and gasoline. This independent analysis looks for the first time at what public transportation saves both for individual households and for the nation as a whole. In addition, it explores a possible future where many more Americans would have the choice to take public transportation. It was commissioned from ICF International by the American Public Transportation Association. Public Transportation Reduces U.S. Foreign Oil Dependence Using conservative assumptions, the study found that current public transportation usage reduces U.S. gasoline consumption by 1.4 billion gallons each year. In concrete terms, that means: 108 million fewer cars filling up almost 300,000 every day. 34 fewer supertankers leaving the Middle East one every 11 days.

Linda Bailey

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

The National Ignition Facility: Status and Plans for Laser Fusion and High-Energy-Density Experimental Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) currently under construction at the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a 192-beam, 1.8-megajoule, 500-terawatt, 351-nm laser for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high-energy-density experimental studies. NIF is being built by the Department of Energy and the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA) to provide an experimental test bed for the U.S. Stockpile Stewardship Program to ensure the country's nuclear deterrent without underground nuclear testing. The experimental program will encompass a wide range of physical phenomena from fusion energy production to materials science. Of the roughly 700 shots available per year, about 10% will be dedicated to basic science research. Laser hardware is modularized into line replaceable units (LRUs) such as deformable mirrors, amplifiers, and multi-function sensor packages that are operated by a distributed computer control system of nearly 60,000 control points. The supervisory control room presents facility-wide status and orchestrates experiments using operating parameters predicted by physics models. A network of several hundred front-end processors (FEPs) implements device control. The object-oriented software system is implemented in the Ada and Java languages and emphasizes CORBA distribution of reusable software objects. NIF is currently scheduled to provide first light in 2004 and will be completed in 2008.

E. I. Moses

2001-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

296

The Neutron Imaging Diagnostic at NIF  

SciTech Connect

A neutron imaging diagnostic has recently been commissioned at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This new system is an important diagnostic tool for inertial fusion studies at the NIF for measuring the size and shape of the burning DT plasma during the ignition stage of ICF implosions. The imaging technique utilizes a pinhole neutron aperture, placed between the neutron source and a neutron detector. The detection system measures the two dimensional distribution of neutrons passing through the pinhole. This diagnostic has been designed to collect two images at two times. The long flight path for this diagnostic, 28 m, results in a chromatic separation of the neutrons, allowing the independently timed images to measure the source distribution for two neutron energies. Typically the first image measures the distribution of the 14 MeV neutrons and the second image of the 6-12 MeV neutrons. The combination of these two images has provided data on the size and shape of the burning plasma within the compressed capsule, as well as a measure of the quantity and spatial distribution of the cold fuel surrounding this core.

Merrill, F E; Buckles, R; Clark, D; Danly, C R; Drury, O B; Dzenitis, J M; Fatherly, V E; Fittinghoff, D N; Gallegos, R; Grim, G P; Guler, N; Loomis, E N; Lutz, S; Malone, R M; Martinson, D D; Mares, D; Morley, D J; Morgan, G L; Oertel, J A; Tregillis, I L; Volegov, P L; Weiss, P B; Wilde, C H

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

The Neutron Imaging System Fielded at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

A neutron imaging diagnostic has recently been commissioned at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This new system is an important diagnostic tool for inertial fusion studies at the NIF for measuring the size and shape of the burning DT plasma during the ignition stage of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) implosions. The imaging technique utilizes a pinhole neutron aperture, placed between the neutron source and a neutron detector. The detection system measures the two dimensional distribution of neutrons passing through the pinhole. This diagnostic has been designed to collect two images at two times. The long flight path for this diagnostic, 28 m, results in a chromatic separation of the neutrons, allowing the independently timed images to measure the source distribution for two neutron energies. Typically the first image measures the distribution of the 14 MeV neutrons and the second image of the 6-12 MeV neutrons. The combination of these two images has provided data on the size and shape of the burning plasma within the compressed capsule, as well as a measure of the quantity and spatial distribution of the cold fuel surrounding this core.

Merrill, F E; Buckles, R; Clark, D D; Danly, C R; Drury, O B; Dzenitis, J M; Fatherley, V E; Fittinghoff, D N; Gallegos, R; Grim, G P; Guler, N; Loomis, E N; Lutz, S; Malone, R M; Martinson, D D; Mares, D; Morley, D J; Morgan, G L; Oertel, J A; Tregillis, I L; Volegov, P L; Weiss, P B; Wilde, C H

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

The neutron imaging diagnostic at NIF (invited)  

SciTech Connect

A neutron imaging diagnostic has recently been commissioned at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This new system is an important diagnostic tool for inertial fusion studies at the NIF for measuring the size and shape of the burning DT plasma during the ignition stage of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) implosions. The imaging technique utilizes a pinhole neutron aperture, placed between the neutron source and a neutron detector. The detection system measures the two dimensional distribution of neutrons passing through the pinhole. This diagnostic has been designed to collect two images at two times. The long flight path for this diagnostic, 28 m, results in a chromatic separation of the neutrons, allowing the independently timed images to measure the source distribution for two neutron energies. Typically the first image measures the distribution of the 14 MeV neutrons and the second image of the 6-12 MeV neutrons. The combination of these two images has provided data on the size and shape of the burning plasma within the compressed capsule, as well as a measure of the quantity and spatial distribution of the cold fuel surrounding this core.

Merrill, F. E.; Clark, D. D.; Danly, C. R.; Drury, O. B.; Fatherley, V. E.; Gallegos, R.; Grim, G. P.; Guler, N.; Loomis, E. N.; Martinson, D. D.; Mares, D.; Morley, D. J.; Morgan, G. L.; Oertel, J. A.; Tregillis, I. L.; Volegov, P. L.; Wilde, C. H.; Wilson, D. C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Bower, D.; Dzenitis, J. M. [Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

299

LANL C10.2 Projects in FY13  

SciTech Connect

LANL has two projects in C10.2: Defect-Induced Mix Experiment (DIME) (ongoing, several runs at Omega; NIF shots this summer); and Shock/Shear (tested at Omega for two years; NIF shots in second half of FY13). Each project is jointly funded by C10.2, other C10 MTEs, and Science Campaigns. DIME is investigating 4{pi} and feature-induced mix in spherically convergent ICF implosions by using imaging of the mix layer. DIME prepared for NIF by demonstrating its PDD mix platform on Omega including imaging mid-Z doped layers and defects. DIME in FY13 will focus on PDD symmetry-dependent mix and moving burn into the mix region for validation of mix/burn models. Re-Shock and Shear are two laser-driven experiments designed to study the turbulent mixing of materials. In FY-2012 43 shear and re-shock experimental shots were executed on the OMEGA laser and a complete time history obtained for both. The FY-2013 goal is to transition the experiment to NIF where the larger scale will provide a longer time period for mix layer growth.

Batha, Steven H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fincke, James R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schmitt, Mark J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

300

Imaging of High-Energy X-Ray Emission from Cryogenic Thermonuclear Fuel Implosions on the NIF  

SciTech Connect

Accurately assessing and optimizing the implosion performance of inertial confinement fusion capsules is a crucial step to achieving ignition on the NIF. We have applied differential filtering (matched Ross filter pairs) to provide spectrally resolved time-integrated absolute x-ray self-emission images of the imploded core of cryogenic layered targets. Using bremsstrahlung assumptions, the measured absolute x-ray brightness allows for the inference of electron temperature, electron density, hot spot mass, mix mass, and pressure. Current inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments conducted on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) seek to indirectly drive a spherical implosion, compressing and igniting a deuterium-tritium fuel. This DT fuel capsule is cryogenically prepared as a solid ice layer surrounded by a low-Z ablator material. Ignition will occur when the hot spot approaches sufficient temperature ({approx}3-4 keV) and {rho}R ({approx}0.3 g/cm{sup 2}) such that alpha deposition can further heat the hot spot and generate a self-sustaining burn wave. During the implosion, the fuel mass becomes hot enough to emit large amounts of x-ray radiation, the spectra and spatial variation of which contains key information that can be used to evaluate the implosion performance. The Ross filter diagnostic employs differential filtering to provide spectrally resolved, time-integrated, absolute x-ray self-emission images of the imploded core of cryogenic layered targets.

Ma, T

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

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301

Trident as an ultrahigh irradiance laser  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Trident Nd:glass ICF laser at Los Alamos may be operated in a mode that produces high ultrashort pulses by the chirp/compression method. The 125-ps pulses from a standard moderated, ND:YLF oscillator are first frequency-broadened to 3-nm bandwidth, chirped in a quartz fiber, and then compressed with a grating pair to 1.5 ps. A second quartz fiber then provides nonlinear polarization rotation for background and satellite suppression and to further broaden the spectrum to >7 nm. Pulses are chirped again to 1 ns width with a second grating pair and amplified in a ND:YAG pumped Ti:sapphire regenerative amplifier. Millijoule-level output is then amplified through the existing phosphate glass Trident amplifier chain before compression to =}1 J with excellent beam quality and contrast ratio is routinely produced by compressing after three rod amplifier stages. Higher energies are possible by compression further along the amplifier chain. Simultaneous use of long ({approximately}1 ns) pulses for plasma formation is also possible.

Johnson, R.P.; Moncur, N.K.; Cobble, J.A.; Watt, R.G.; Gibson, R.B.

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

National Ignition Facility project acquisition plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this National Ignition Facility Acquisition Plan is to describe the overall procurement strategy planned for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project. The scope of the plan describes the procurement activities and acquisition strategy for the following phases of the NIF Project, each of which receives either plant and capital equipment (PACE) or other project cost (OPC) funds: Title 1 and 2 design and Title 3 engineering (PACE); Optics manufacturing facilitization and pilot production (OPC); Convention facility construction (PACE); Procurement, installation, and acceptance testing of equipment (PACE); and Start-up (OPC). Activities that are part of the base Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program are not included in this plan. The University of California (UC), operating Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Lockheed-Martin, which operates Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR-LLE), will conduct the acquisition of needed products and services in support of their assigned responsibilities within the NIF Project structure in accordance with their prime contracts with the Department of Energy (DOE). LLNL, designated as the lead Laboratory, will have responsibility for all procurements required for construction, installation, activation, and startup of the NIF.

Callaghan, R.W.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Intense ion beam research at Los Alamos  

SciTech Connect

Two new interdisciplinary programs are underway at Los Alamos involving the physics and technology of intense light ion beams. In contrast to high-power ICF applications, the LANL effort concentrates on the development of relatively low-voltage (50 to 800 kV) and long-pulsewidth (0.1 to 1 {mu}s) beams. The first program involves the 1.2 MV, 300-kJ Anaconda generator which has been fitted with an extraction ion diode. Long pulsewidth ion beams have been accelerated, propagated, and extracted for a variety of magnetic field conditions. The primary application of this beam is the synthesis of novel materials. Initial experiments on the congruent evaporative deposition of metallic and ceramic thin films are reported. The second program involves the development of a 120-keV, 50-kA, 1-{mu}s proton beam for the magnetic fusion program as an ion source for an intense diagnostic neutral beam. Ultra-bright, pulsed neutral beams will be required to successfully measure ion temperatures and thermalized alpha particle energy distributions in large, dense, ignited tokamaks such as ITER.

Rej, D.J.; Bartsch, R.R.; Davis, H.A.; Faehl, R.J.; Gautier, D.C.; Greenly, J.B.; Henins, I.; Linton, T.W.; Muenchausen, R.E.; Waganaar, W.J.

1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Intense ion beam research at Los Alamos  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two new interdisciplinary programs are underway at Los Alamos involving the physics and technology of intense light ion beams. In contrast to high-power ICF applications, the LANL effort concentrates on the development of relatively low-voltage (50 to 800 kV) and long-pulsewidth (0.1 to 1 {mu}s) beams. The first program involves the 1.2 MV, 300-kJ Anaconda generator which has been fitted with an extraction ion diode. Long pulsewidth ion beams have been accelerated, propagated, and extracted for a variety of magnetic field conditions. The primary application of this beam is the synthesis of novel materials. Initial experiments on the congruent evaporative deposition of metallic and ceramic thin films are reported. The second program involves the development of a 120-keV, 50-kA, 1-{mu}s proton beam for the magnetic fusion program as an ion source for an intense diagnostic neutral beam. Ultra-bright, pulsed neutral beams will be required to successfully measure ion temperatures and thermalized alpha particle energy distributions in large, dense, ignited tokamaks such as ITER.

Rej, D.J.; Bartsch, R.R.; Davis, H.A.; Faehl, R.J.; Gautier, D.C.; Greenly, J.B.; Henins, I.; Linton, T.W.; Muenchausen, R.E.; Waganaar, W.J.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Sensitivity of NIF-scale backlit thin shell implosions to hohlraum symmetry in the foot of the ignition drive pulse  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A necessary condition for igniting indirectly-driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) spherical capsules on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is controlling drive flux asymmetry to the 1% level time-integrated over the pulse and with Hauer, N. Delamater, D. Ress et al. Rev. Sci. Instrum. 66, 672-7 (1995)], the midportion ({approx} 2-10 ns) has been shown to be amenable to detection by the in-flight shape of x-ray backlit thin shell capsules [Pollaine et. al., Physics of Plasmas 8 2357 (2001)]. In this paper, we present sensitivity studies conducted on the University of Rochester's OMEGA laser of the thin shell symmetry measurement technique at near NIF-scale for two candidate capsule ablator materials, Ge-doped CH and Cu-doped Be. These experiments use both point and area backlighting to cast 4.7 keV radiographs of thin 1.4 mm initial-diameter Ge-doped CH and Cu-doped Be shells when converged a factor of {approx} 0.5 x in radius. Distortions in the position of the transmission limb of the shells resulting from drive asymmetries are measured to an accuracy of a few {micro}ms, meeting requirements. The promising results to date allow us to compare measured and predicted distortions and by inference drive asymmetries for the first 4 asymmetry modes as a function of hohlraum illumination conditions.

Kirkwood, R K; Milovich, J; Bradley, D K; Schmitt, M; Goldman, S R; Kalantar, D H; Meeker, D; Jones, O S; Pollaine, S M; Amendt, P A; Dewald, E; Edwards, J; Landen, O L; Nikroo, A

2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

306

Contracts and management services site support program plan WBS 6.10.14  

SciTech Connect

Contracts and Management Services is recognized as the central focal point for programs having company or sitewide application in pursuit of the Hanford Missions`s financial and operational objectives. Contracts and Management Services actively pursues cost savings and operational efficiencies through: Management Standards by ensuring all employees have an accessible, integrated system of clear, complete, accurate, timely, and useful management control policies and procedures; Contract Reform by restructuring the contract, organization, and cost accounting systems to refocus Hanford contract activities on output products; Systems and Operations Evaluation by directing the Cost Reduction program, Great Ideas, and Span of Management activities; Program Administration by enforcing conditions of Accountability (whether DEAR-based or FAR-based) for WHC, BCSR, ICF KH, and BHI; Contract Performance activities; chairing the WHC Cost Reduction Review Board; and analyzing companywide Performance Measures; Data Standards and Administration by establishing and directing the company data management program; giving direction to the major RL programs and mission areas for implementation of cost-effective and efficient data management practices; directing all operations, application, and interfaces contained within the Hanford PeopleCore System; directing accomplishment and delivery of TPA data management milestones; and directing the sitewide data management processes for Data Standards and the Data Directory.

Knoll, J.M. Jr.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Neutron spectrometry - An essential tool for diagnosing implosions at the National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DT neutron yield (Y{sub n}), ion temperature (T{sub i}) and down-scatter ratio (dsr) determined from measured neutron spectra are essential metrics for diagnosing the performance of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A suite of neutron-Time-Of-Flight (nTOF) spectrometers and a Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) have been implemented in different locations around the NIF target chamber, providing good implosion coverage and the redundancy required for reliable measurements of Yn, Ti and dsr. From the measured dsr value, an areal density ({rho}R) is determined from the relationship {rho}R{sub tot} (g/cm{sup 2}) = (20.4 {+-} 0.6) x dsr{sub 10-12 MeV}. The proportionality constant is determined considering implosion geometry, neutron attenuation and energy range used for the dsr measurement. To ensure high accuracy in the measurements, a series of commissioning experiments using exploding pushers have been used for in situ calibration. The spectrometers are now performing to the required accuracy, as indicated by the good agreement between the different measurements over several commissioning shots. In addition, recent data obtained with the MRS and nTOFs indicate that the implosion performance of cryogenically layered DT implosions, characterized by the experimental Ignition Threshold Factor (ITFx) which is a function of dsr (or fuel {rho}R) and Y{sub n}, has improved almost two orders of magnitude since the first shot in September, 2010.

Mackinnon, A J; Johnson, M G; Frenje, J A; Casey, D T; Li, C K; Seguin, F H; Petrasso, R; Ashabranner, R; Cerjan, C; Clancy, T J; Bionta, R; Bleuel, D; Bond, E J; Caggiano, J A; Capenter, A; Eckart, M J; Edwards, M J; Friedrich, S; Glenzer, S H; Haan, S W; Hartouni, E P; Hatarik, R; Hachett, S P; McKernan, M; Jones, O; Lepape, S; Lerche, R A; Landen, O L; Moran, M; Moses, E; Munro, D; McNaney, J; Rygg, J R; Sepke, S; Spears, B; Springer, P; Yeamans, C; Farrell, M; Kilkenny, J D; Nikroo, A; Paguio, R; Knauer, J; Glebov, V; Sangster, T; Betti, R; Stoeckl, C; Magoon, J; Shoup, M J; Grim, G P; Moran, G L; Murphy, T J; Leeper, R J; Ruiz, C

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

308

Mechanism for magnetic field generation and growth in Rayleigh-Taylor unstable inertial confinement fusion plasmas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities (RTI) in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions are expected to generate magnetic fields at the gas-ice interface and at the ice-ablator interface. The focus here is on the gas-ice interface where the temperature gradient is the largest. A Hall-MHD model is used to study the magnetic field generation and growth for 2-D single-mode and multimode RTI in a stratified two-fluid plasma, the two fluids being ions and electrons. Self-generated magnetic fields are observed and these fields grow as the RTI progresses via the {nabla}n{sub e} Multiplication-Sign {nabla}T{sub e} term in the generalized Ohm's law. Srinivasan et al.[Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 165002 (2012)] present results of the magnetic field generation and growth, and some scaling studies in 2-dimensions. The results presented here study the mechanism behind the magnetic field generation and growth, which is related to fluid vorticity generation by RTI. The magnetic field wraps around the bubbles and spikes and concentrates in flux bundles at the perturbed gas-ice interface where fluid vorticity is large. Additionally, the results of Srinivasan et al.[Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 165002 (2012)] are described in greater detail. Additional scaling studies are performed to determine the growth of the self-generated magnetic field as a function of density, acceleration, perturbation wavelength, Atwood number, and ion mass.

Srinivasan, Bhuvana; Tang Xianzhu [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2012-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

309

O-d energetics scaling models for Z-pinch-driven hohlraums  

SciTech Connect

Wire array Z-pinches on the Z accelerator provide the most intense laboratory source of soft x-rays in the world. The unique combination of a highly-Planckian radiation source with high x-ray production efficiency (15% wall plug), large x-ray powers and energies ( >150 TW, {ge}1 MJ in 7 ns), large characteristic hohlraum volumes (0.5 to >10 cm{sup 3}), and long pulse-lengths (5 to 20 ns) may make Z-pinches a good match to the requirements for driving high-yield scale ICF capsules with adequate radiation symmetry and margin. The Z-pinch driven hohlraum approach of Hammer and Porter [Phys.Plasmas, 6, 2129(1999)] may provide a conservative and robust solution to the requirements for high yield, and is currently being studied on the Z accelerator. This paper describes a multiple region, 0-d hohlraum energetic model for Z-pinch driven hohlraums in four configurations. The authors observe consistency between the models and the measured x-ray powers and hohlraum wall temperatures to within {+-}20% in flux, for the four configurations.

CUNEO,MICHAEL E.; VESEY,ROGER A.; HAMMER,J.H.; PORTER,JOHN L.

2000-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

310

Heavy ion fusion accelerator research (HIFAR) half-year report: October 1, 1986-March 31, 1987  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For this report we have collected the papers presented by the HIFAR group at the IEEE Particle Accelerator Conference held in Washington, DC, on March 16-19, 1987, which essentially coincides with the end of the reporting period. In addition, we report on research to determine the cause of the failures of Re-X insulator that are used as the high-voltage feed-through for the electrostatic quadrupoles on MBE-4. This report contains papers on the following topics: LBL multiple beam experiments, pulsers for the induction linac experiment (MBE-4), HIF insulator failure, experimental measurement of emittance growth in mismatched space-charge dominated beams, the effect of nonlinear forces on coherently oscillating space-charge dominated beams, space-charge effects in a bending magnet system, transverse combining of nonrelativistic beams in a multiple beam induction linac, comparison of electric and magnetic quadrupole focusing for the low energy end of an induction-linac-ICF driver. Eight individual papers have been indexed separately. (LSP)

Not Available

1987-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Will NIF Work  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is vital that new clean and abundant sources of energy be developed for the sustainability of modern society. Nuclear fusion of the hydrogen isotopes deuterium and tritium, if successful, might make a major contribution toward satisfying this need. The U.S. has an important effort aimed at achieving practical inertial confinement fusion, ICF, which has been under development for decades at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a giant laser to multiply-shock and thus quasi-isentropically compress a capsule of deuterium-tritium (DT) to high density and temperature, where the fusion rate is proportional to density squared times temperature to the fourth power. The principal problem that must be solved for NIF to work successfully is elimination of the Rayleigh-Tailor (R-T) instability that originates from the interface between the solid shell and the DT fuel within it. The R-T instability poisons the fusion reaction by reducing the temperature of the DT achieved ...

Nellis, W J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Laser Inertial Fusion Energy Control Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) facility point design is being developed at LLNL to support an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) based energy concept. This will build upon the technical foundation of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most energetic laser system. NIF is designed to compress fusion targets to conditions required for thermonuclear burn. The LIFE control systems will have an architecture partitioned by sub-systems and distributed among over 1000's of front-end processors, embedded controllers and supervisory servers. LIFE's automated control subsystems will require interoperation between different languages and target architectures. Much of the control system will be embedded into the subsystem with well defined interface and performance requirements to the supervisory control layer. An automation framework will be used to orchestrate and automate start-up and shut-down as well as steady state operation. The LIFE control system will be a high parallel segmented architecture. For example, the laser system consists of 384 identical laser beamlines in a 'box'. The control system will mirror this architectural replication for each beamline with straightforward high-level interface for control and status monitoring. Key technical challenges will be discussed such as the injected target tracking and laser pointing feedback. This talk discusses the the plan for controls and information systems to support LIFE.

Marshall, C; Carey, R; Demaret, R; Edwards, O; Lagin, L; Van Arsdall, P

2011-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

313

Optical Comb Generation for Streak Camera Calibration for Inertial Confinement Fusion Experiments  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is coming on-line to support physics experimentation for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and Stockpile Stewardship (SS). Optical streak cameras are an integral part of the experimental diagnostics instrumentation at NIF. To accurately reduce streak camera data a highly accurate temporal calibration is required. This article describes a technique for simultaneously generating a precise +/- 2 ps optical marker pulse (fiducial reference) and trains of precisely timed, short-duration optical pulses (so-called comb pulse trains) that are suitable for the timing calibrations. These optical pulse generators are used with the LLNL optical streak cameras. They are small, portable light sources that, in the comb mode, produce a series of temporally short, uniformly spaced optical pulses, using a laser diode source. Comb generators have been produced with pulse-train repetition rates up to 10 GHz at 780 nm, and somewhat lower frequencies at 664 nm. Individual pulses can be as short as 25-ps FWHM. Signal output is via a fiber-optic connector on the front panel of the generator box. The optical signal is transported from comb generator to streak camera through multi-mode, graded-index optical fiber.

Ronald Justin, Terence Davies, Frans Janson, Bruce Marshall, Perry Bell, Daniel Kalantar, Joseph Kimbrough, Stephen Vernon, Oliver Sweningsen

2008-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

314

Stress evaluation of the primary tank of a double-shell underground storage tank facility  

SciTech Connect

A facility called the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) is being designed at the Department of Energy`s Hanford site. The MWTF is expected to be completed in 1998 and will consist of six underground double-shell waste storage tanks and associated systems. These tanks will provide safe and environmentally acceptable storage capacity to handle waste generated during single-shell and double-shell tank safety mitigation and remediation activities. This paper summarizes the analysis and qualification of the primary tank structure of the MWTF, as performed by ICF Kaiser Hanford during the latter phase of Title 1 (Preliminary) design. Both computer finite element analysis (FEA) and hand calculations methods based on the so-called Tank Seismic Experts Panel (TSEP) Guidelines were used to perform the analysis and evaluation. Based on the evaluations summarized in this paper, it is concluded that the primary tank structure of the MWTF satisfies the project design requirements. In addition, the hand calculations performed using the methodologies provided in the TSEP Guidelines demonstrate that, except for slosh height, the capacities exceed the demand. The design accounts for the adverse effect of the excessive slosh height demand, i.e., inadequate freeboard, by increasing the hydrodynamic wall and roof pressures appropriately, and designing the tank for such increased pressures.

Atalay, M.B. [ICF Kaiser Engineers, Inc., Oakland, CA (United States); Stine, M.D. [ICF Kaiser Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Farnworth, S.K. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Improved recovery from Gulf of Mexico reservoirs. Quarterly status report, January 1--March 31, 1996  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

On February 18, 1992, Louisiana State University with two technical subcontractors, BDM, Inc. and ICF, Inc., began a research program to estimate the potential oil and gas reserve additions that could result from the application of advanced secondary and enhanced oil recovery technologies and the exploitation of undeveloped and attic oil zones in the Gulf of Mexico oil fields that are related to piercement salt domes. This project is a one year continuation of this research and will continue work in reservoir description, extraction processes, and technology transfer. Detailed data will be collected for two previously studies reservoirs: a South Marsh Island reservoir operated by Taylor Energy and one additional Gulf of Mexico reservoir operated by Mobil. Additional reservoirs identified during the project will also be studied if possible. Data collected will include reprocessed 2-D seismic data, newly acquired 3-D data, fluid data, fluid samples, pressure data, well test data, well logs, and core data/samples. The new data will be used to refine reservoir and geologic characterization of these reservoirs. Further laboratory investigation will provide additional simulation input data in the form of PVT properties, relative permeabilities, capillary pressure, and water compatibility. Geological investigations will be conducted to refine the models of mud-rich submarine fan architectures used by seismic analysts and reservoir engineers. Research on advanced reservoir simulation will also be conducted. This report describes a review of fine-grained submarine fans and turbidite systems.

Kimbrell, W.C.; Bassiouni, Z.A.; Bourgoyne, A.T.

1996-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

316

PBFA II lithium beam characterization from inner-shell x-ray images  

SciTech Connect

The Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator (PBFA II) is not driving targets with ICF-relevant lithium ion beams. During the most recent lithium beam target series, time-integrated x-ray pinhole cameras viewed the ion-induced inner-shell x-ray fluorescence from the central gold cone target and a titanium-coated strip. Ion beam profiles at a nominal 10 mm radius and fixed azimuthal direction were obtained from images of the Ti K{sub {alpha}}, fluorescence of a Ti-coated Al diagnostic wire. The gold cone gave us beam profiles at a nominal 3 mm radius and at all azimuthal angles from the Au L{sub {alpha}} fluorescence. From these profiles, we obtained the ion beam vertical focus position, full-width-at-half-maximum, and the degree of azimuthal uniformity for the lithium target shots. For these initial results, beam steering problems were evident. Azimuthal uniformity was measured from the ion beam footprint on the outer Au case (predominantly Au L{sub {alpha}}) of the hohlraum target and were found to be in the same range (up to 30%) as for previous proton beam target series. We then present plans for Li beam diagnostics for an upcoming target experimental series.

Moats, A.R.; Derzon, M.S.; Chandler, G.A.; Dukart, R.J.; Haill, T.A.

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Analysis of the effects of section 29 tax credits on reserve additions and production of gas from unconventional resources  

SciTech Connect

Federal tax credits for production of natural gas from unconventional resources can stimulate drilling and reserves additions at a relatively low cost to the Treasury. This report presents the results of an analysis of the effects of a proposed extension of the Section 29 alternative fuels production credit specifically for unconventional gas. ICF Resources estimated the net effect of the extension of the credit (the difference between development activity expected with the extension of the credit and that expected if the credit expires in December 1990 as scheduled). The analysis addressed the effect of tax credits on project economics and capital formation, drilling and reserve additions, production, impact on the US and regional economies, and the net public sector costs and incremental revenues. The analysis was based on explicit modeling of the three dominant unconventional gas resources: Tight sands, coalbed methane, and Devonian shales. It incorporated the most current data on resource size, typical well recoveries and economics, and anticipated activity of the major producers. Each resource was further disaggregated for analysis based on distinct resource characteristics, development practices, regional economics, and historical development patterns.

Not Available

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

National Ignition Facility Project Completion and Control System Status  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system providing a scientific center to study inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. Completed in 2009, NIF is a stadium-sized facility containing a 1.8-MJ, 500-TW 192-beam ultraviolet laser and target chamber. A cryogenic tritium target system and suite of optical, X-ray and nuclear diagnostics will support experiments in a strategy to achieve fusion ignition starting in 2010. Automatic control of NIF is performed by the large-scale Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS), which is implemented by 2 MSLOC of Java and Ada running on 1300 front-end processors and servers. The ICCS framework uses CORBA distribution for interoperation between heterogeneous languages and computers. Laser setup is guided by a physics model and shots are coordinated by data-driven distributed workflow engines. The NIF information system includes operational tools and a peta-scale repository for provisioning experimental results. This paper discusses results achieved and the effort now underway to conduct full-scale operations and prepare for ignition.

Van Arsdall, P J; Azevedo, S G; Beeler, R G; Bryant, R M; Carey, R W; Demaret, R D; Fisher, J M; Frazier, T M; Lagin, L J; Ludwigsen, A P; Marshall, C D; Mathisen, D G; Reed, R K

2009-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

319

Implementation and Validation of the BHR Turbulence Model in the FLAG Hydrocode  

SciTech Connect

The BHR-2 turbulence model, developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory for variable density and compressible flows, is implemented in an Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian hydrocode, FLAG. The BHR-2 formulation is discussed, with emphasis on its connection to multi-component flow formulations that underlie FLAG's treatment of multi-species flow. One-dimensional and two-dimensional validation tests are performed and compared to experiment and Eulerian simulations. Turbulence is an often studied and ubiquitous phenomenon in nature, and modeling its effects is essential in many practical applications. Specifically the behavior of turbulence in the presence of strong density gradients and compressibility is of fundamental importance in applications ranging from Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) [1], supernovae [2], and atmospheric flows. The BHR closure approach [3] seeks to model the physical processes at work in variable density turbulence including Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) [4], Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) [5], and Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) [6], driven turbulence. The effectiveness of the BHR-2 implementation has been demonstrated for variable density mixing in the KH, RT, and RM cases in an Eulerian framework [7]. The primary motivation of the present work is to implement the BHR-2 turbulence model in the Arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian (ALE) hydrodynamics code FLAG. The goal is not only to demonstrate results in agreement with previous Eulerian calculations, but also document behavior that arises from the underlying differences in code philosophy.

Denissen, Nicholas A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fung, Jimmy [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reisner, Jon M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Andrews, Malcolm J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

320

Inertial confinement fusion reaction chamber and power conversion system study. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report summarizes the results of the second year of a two-year study on the design and evaluation of the Cascade concept as a commercial inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor. We developed a reactor design based on the Cascade reaction chamber concept that would be competitive in terms of both capital and operating costs, safe and environmentally acceptable in terms of hazard to the public, occupational exposure and radioactive waste production, and highly efficient. The Cascade reaction chamber is a double-cone-shaped rotating drum. The granulated solid blanket materials inside the rotating chamber are held against the walls by centrifugal force. The fusion energy is captured in a blanket of solid carbon, BeO, and LiAlO/sub 2/ granules. These granules are circulated to the primary side of a ceramic heat exchanger. Primary-side granule temperatures range from 1285 K at the LiAlO/sub 2/ granule heat exchanger outlet to 1600 K at the carbon granule heat exchanger inlet. The secondary side consists of a closed-cycle gas turbine power conversion system with helium working fluid, operating at 1300 K peak outlet temperature and achieving a thermal power conversion efficiency of 55%. The net plant efficiency is 49%. The reference design is a plant producing 1500 MW of D-T fusion power and delivering 815 MW of electrical power for sale to the utility grid. 88 refs., 44 figs., 47 tabs.

Maya, I.; Schultz, K.R.; Bourque, R.F.; Cheng, E.T.; Creedon, R.L.; Norman, J.H.; Price, R.J.; Porter, J.; Schuster, H.L.; Simnad, M.J.

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

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321

Inertial fusion program, January 1-June 30, 1979  

SciTech Connect

Progress in the development of high-energy short-pulse carbon dioxide laser systems for fusion research is reported. Improvements are outlined for the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Gemini System, which permitted over 500 shots in support of 10 different target experiments; the transformation of our eight-beam system, Helios, from a developmental to an operational facility that is capable of irradiating targets on a routine basis is described; and progress made toward completion of Antares, our 100- to 200-TW target irradiation system, is detailed. Investigations of phenomena such as phase conjugation by degenerate four-wave mixing and its applicability to laser fusion systems, and frequency multiplexing as a means toward multipulse energy extraction are summarized. Also discussed are experiments with targets designed for adiabatic compression. Progress is reported in the development of accurate diagnostics, especially for the detection of expanding ions, of neutron yield, and of x-ray emission. Significant advances in our theoretical efforts are summarized, such as the adaptation of our target design codes for use with the CRAY-1 computer, and new results leading to a better understanding of implosion phenomena are reported. The results of various fusion reactor studies are summarized, including the development of an ICF reactor blanket that offers a promising alternative to the usual lithium blanket, and the formulation of a capital-cost data base for laser fusion reactors to permit meaningful comparisons with other technologies.

Skoberne, F. (comp.)

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Article on Trident Laser Facility for NA-11 Stockpile Stewardship Quarterly  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Trident Intermediate-Scale Laser Facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory is an extremely versatile Nd:glass laser system dedicated to high energy density laboratory physics and weapons physics research and fundamental laser-matter interactions. Trident is a three-beam, 200 J/beam at the second harmonic for glass (527 nm wavelength), facility with tremendous flexibility and high beam quality. Pulse durations varying over 6 orders of magnitude, from 0.5 picoseconds to 1.0 microsecs, can be directed to either of two different target chambers with changeable illumination geometries, including the ability to achieve near-diffraction limited focus. This provides a unique range of capability at one facility from sub-picosecond pulses (and high-intensity laser science) to nanosecond pulses (and LPI physics relevant to ICF) to microsecond pulses (and driving flyer plates for supported shock dynamic materials science.) When in short-pulse mode (less than picosecond pulse), a single beam can provide up to 200 TW of power with uniquely controllable and measured pre-pulse contrast of 10 orders of magnitude. A recent external capability review at Los Alamos concluded that 'Trident is generating excellent, cutting edge science and is a leading intermediate scale laser system worldwide.'

Barnes, Cris W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

323

Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility thermal hydraulic analysis for Title II design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this work was to provide the thermal hydraulic analysis for the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) Title II design. Temperature distributions throughout the tank structure were calculated for subsequent use in the structural analysis and in the safety evaluation. Calculated temperatures of critical areas were compared to design allowables. Expected operating parameters were calculated for use in the ventilation system design and in the environmental impact documentation. The design requirements were obtained from the MWTF Functional Design Criteria (FDC). The most restrictive temperature limit given in the FDC is the 200 limit for the haunch and dome steel and concrete. The temperature limit for the rest of the primary and secondary tanks and concrete base mat and supporting pad is 250 F. Also, the waste should not be allowed to boil. The tank geometry was taken from ICF Kaiser Engineers Hanford drawing ES-W236A-Z1, Revision 1, included here in Appendix B. Heat removal rates by evaporation from the waste surface were obtained from experimental data. It is concluded that the MWTF tank cooling system will meet the design temperature limits for the design heat load of 700,000 Btu/h, even if cooling flow is lost to the annulus region, and temperatures change very slowly during transients due to the high heat capacity of the tank structure and the waste. Accordingly, transients will not be a significant operational problem from the viewpoint of meeting the specified temperature limits.

Cramer, E.R.

1994-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

324

Energetics of Multiple-Ion Species Hohlraum Plasmas  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A study of the laser-plasma interaction processes in multiple-ion species plasmas has been performed in plasmas that are created to emulate the plasma conditions in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion targets. Gas-filled hohlraums with densities of xe22/cc are heated to Te=3keV and backscattered laser light is measured by a suite of absolutely calibrated backscatter diagnostics. Ion Landau damping is increased by adding hydrogen to the CO2/CF4 gas fill. We find that the backscatter from stimulated Brillouin scattering is reduced is monotonically reduced with increasing damping, demonstrating that Landau damping is the controlling damping mechanism in ICF relevant high-electron temperature plasmas. The reduction in backscatter is accompanied by a comparable increase in both transmission of a probe beam and an increased hohlraum radiation temperature, showing that multiple-ion species plasmas improve the overall hohlraum energetics/performance. Comparison of the experimental data to linear gain calculations as well as detailed full-scale 3D laser-plasma interaction simulations show quantitative agreement. Our findings confirm the importance of Landau damping in controlling backscatter from high-electron temperature hohlraum plasmas and have lead to the inclusion of multi-ion species plasmas in the hohlraum point design for upcoming ignition campaigns at the National Ignition Facility.

Neumayer, P; Berger, R; Callahan, D; Divol, L; Froula, D; London, R; MacGowan, B J; Meezan, N; Michel, P; Ross, J S; Sorce, C; Widmann, K; Suter, L; Glenzer, S H

2007-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

325

Development of X-ray Tracer Diagnostics for Radiatively-Driven Copper-Doped Beryllium Ablators. NLUF FY1999 Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report covers the fiscal year 1999 portion of our ongoing project to develop tracer spectral diagnostics of ablator conditions in the hohlraum radiation environment. The overall goal of the experimental campaign is to measure the turn-on times of K{sub a} absorption features from tracers buried in planar witness plates. The tracers are thin and at a specific, known depth in the witness plates so that the turn-on times are indicators of the arrival of the Marshak wave at the specified depths. Ultimately, we intend to compare the delay in the turn-on times of the tracer signals between doped and undoped ablator materials, and thus study the effect of ablator dopants on the Marshak wave velocity. During FY 1999, our primary goal was to simply measure an absorption signal, matching tracer depth to drive temperature and testing the overall feasibility of our experimental scheme. In indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) energy is deposited rapidly on the outside of a spherical capsule, ablating the outer layers of the capsule and compressing the interior. If this process is carefully controlled, then hydrogen fuel at the center of the capsule can be compressed and heated such that fusion reactions may proceed. The efficiency of the compression depends crucially on the time-dependent energy deposition onto the ablator material on the outside of the capsule. The nature of this coupling can be controlled through the use of ablator dopants, which modify the density and opacity of the ablator layer. Clearly, it is crucial to the success of indirect-drive ICF to have a means for testing the effects of ablator dopants, and more generally for having a diagnostic that is capable of determining time-dependent ablator properties. To this end, we are adapting tracer spectroscopy techniques to make time-dependent measurements of the ionization state of planar ablator materials mounted on the sides of hohlraums. Specifically, we are doing backlighter point-projection spectroscopy of K{sub a} features from tracers placed in the interiors of planar witness plates made of ablator materials. As the radiation wave, or Marshak wave, diffuses into the ablator material it drives a shock ahead of it. When the shock arrives at a given point in the witness plate it heats the tracer to roughly 20 eV. Soon after, the radiation wave arrives, heating the tracer to well above 100 eV nearly instantaneously. Thus, the ''turn-on'' of tracer absorption from high ionization states is an indicator that the radiation wave has arrived at the tracer. Furthermore, the time-dependent ionization balance in the tracer is, our simulations show, indicative of the efficiency with which the radiation field couples to the ablator material. Note that this technique holds out the possibility of making a determination of the instantaneous impact of the radiation field on the ablator physics, as opposed to something like a shock breakout measurement, in which the observed signal reflects the integrated time-history of the impact of the radiation field on the ablator.

Cohen, David H.; MacFarlane, Joseph J.; Wang, Ping; Jaanimagi, Paul A.; Oertel, John; Magelssen, Glenn; Landen, Otto L.; Back, Christina A.; Olson, Richard E.; Bailey, James E.

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Analysis of Filesystem Utilization by the ?Ensemble of Models? Approach (U)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In order to execute Uncertainty Quantification (UQ) studies, the number of reads placed on the filesystem will increase. This document works through the file I/O for a climatology UQ study. The utilization of the filesystem for the above discussed will be similar for ICF and Stockpile Stewardship applications. The current state of the art for the quantification of uncertainty of a multi-physics simulation code is the utilization of an ensemble of models approach. As an overview of the ensemble of models approach, a set of uncertain input parameters is identified along with an identified set of observational and output parameters. The model is computed n number of times with each ensemble simulation using a unique set of parametric combinations of input parameters thereby creating an ensemble of simulations. Response surface models (also known as statistical emulator models, surrogate models, or meta models) are trained using the ensemble results. The response models are then convolved with observational data to further constrain input parameters and to create uncertainty bounds on the model outputs. Using the Community Climate System Model (CCSM) specifically the atmospheric component of CCSM, the Community Atmospheric Model (CAM), as the model of interest, this document provides a rough model of the demands on a filesystem that is needed to execute a UQ study on CAM. Each ensemble simulation consists of 12 simulation years and uses 384 processors on the Atlas machine. The LLNL UQ Pipeline is LLNL's standard tool to execute UQ studies. The UQ Pipeline possesses the capability to execute the ensemble simulations on LLNL's diverse set of HPC environments, produce response models, generate uncertainty bounds, and analyze the results. The process executing the LLNL UQ Pipeline is run on a different compute node from the set of concurrent, executing ensemble simulations.

Domyancic, D

2010-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

327

The National Ignition Facility and the Path to Fusion Energy  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is operational and conducting experiments at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental facility with 192 beams capable of delivering 1.8 megajoules of 500-terawatt ultraviolet laser energy, over 60 times more energy than any previous laser system. The NIF can create temperatures of more than 100 million degrees and pressures more than 100 billion times Earth's atmospheric pressure. These conditions, similar to those at the center of the sun, have never been created in the laboratory and will allow scientists to probe the physics of planetary interiors, supernovae, black holes, and other phenomena. The NIF's laser beams are designed to compress fusion targets to the conditions required for thermonuclear burn, liberating more energy than is required to initiate the fusion reactions. Experiments on the NIF are focusing on demonstrating fusion ignition and burn via inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The ignition program is conducted via the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) - a partnership among LLNL, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics, and General Atomics. The NIC program has also established collaborations with the Atomic Weapons Establishment in the United Kingdom, Commissariat a Energie Atomique in France, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and many others. Ignition experiments have begun that form the basis of the overall NIF strategy for achieving ignition. Accomplishing this goal will demonstrate the feasibility of fusion as a source of limitless, clean energy for the future. This paper discusses the current status of the NIC, the experimental steps needed toward achieving ignition and the steps required to demonstrate and enable the delivery of fusion energy as a viable carbon-free energy source.

Moses, E

2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

328

ENERGY STAR Enterprise Storage Draft Specification Framework  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This document describes the key building blocks that form the basis for every ENERGY STAR specification; these items are intended to provide the framework around which the EPA can develop an effective energy efficiency program for Enterprise Storage. The principal objectives for this ENERGY STAR specification are threefold: (1) to encourage widespread adoption of appropriate hardware and software strategies to improve energy efficiency in enterprise storage systems, (2) to provide purchasers with the means to identify the most energy efficient enterprise storage solutions for their specific end-use application, and (3) to provide tools and information to designers and mangers looking to improve the efficiency of data center operations. The purpose of each building block is provided under the subheadings below, along with EPAs preliminary thoughts on how each may ultimately be incorporated into the Version 1.0 Enterprise Storage specification. At the end of each section are a series of questions aimed at generating discussion about the proposed approach. Please note that this document is not intended to be a comprehensive review of the ENERGY STAR perspective on enterprise storage, rather it serves as a starting point for EPAs specification development efforts. Stakeholders are encouraged to provide feedback on the specific concepts and definitions presented in this document, and are also welcome to submit comments of a more general nature. Communication between EPA and industry stakeholders is critical to the success of the ENERGY STAR program, especially in this early stage of the specification development process. Any and all creative suggestions for improvements to the basic ENERGY STAR approach outlined in this document will be considered for inclusion in subsequent draft and final specifications. ENERGY STAR representatives are available for additional technical discussions with interested parties at any time during the specification development process. Please contact Steve Pantano, ICF International, at

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Sensitivity of NIF-scale backlit thin shell implosions to hohlraum symmetry in the foot of the ignition drive pulse  

SciTech Connect

A necessary condition for igniting indirectly-driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) spherical capsules on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is controlling drive flux asymmetry to the 1% level time-integrated over the pulse and with < 10%/ns swings during the pulse [J. D. Lindl et al., 'The Physics Basis for Ignition using Indirect Drive Targets on the National Ignition Facility', Physics of Plasmas 11, 339 (2003)]. While drive symmetry during the first 2 ns of the pulse can be inferred by using the re-emission pattern from a surrogate high Z sphere [E. Dewald et al. to be published in Rev. Sci. Inst.] and symmetry during the last 5 ns inferred from the shape of fully imploded capsules [A. Hauer, N. Delamater, D. Ress et al. Rev. Sci. Instrum. 66, 672-7 (1995)], the midportion ({approx} 2-10 ns) has been shown to be amenable to detection by the in-flight shape of x-ray backlit thin shell capsules [Pollaine et. al., Physics of Plasmas 8 2357 (2001)]. In this paper, we present sensitivity studies conducted on the University of Rochester's OMEGA laser of the thin shell symmetry measurement technique at near NIF-scale for two candidate capsule ablator materials, Ge-doped CH and Cu-doped Be. These experiments use both point and area backlighting to cast 4.7 keV radiographs of thin 1.4 mm initial-diameter Ge-doped CH and Cu-doped Be shells when converged a factor of {approx} 0.5 x in radius. Distortions in the position of the transmission limb of the shells resulting from drive asymmetries are measured to an accuracy of a few {micro}ms, meeting requirements. The promising results to date allow us to compare measured and predicted distortions and by inference drive asymmetries for the first 4 asymmetry modes as a function of hohlraum illumination conditions.

Kirkwood, R K; Milovich, J; Bradley, D K; Schmitt, M; Goldman, S R; Kalantar, D H; Meeker, D; Jones, O S; Pollaine, S M; Amendt, P A; Dewald, E; Edwards, J; Landen, O L; Nikroo, A

2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

330

Aurora status and plans  

SciTech Connect

Aurora is a short wavelength (248 nm) 10 to kJ KrF laser systems in the ICF program at Los Alamos National Laboratory. It is both an experiment in driver technology and a means for studying target performance using KrF laser light. Both features will be used to help evaluate the uv excimer laser as a viable fusion driver. The system has been designed to employ several electron-beam pumped amplifiers in series, with a final aperture of one meter square, to amplify 96 angularly mulitplexed 5 ns beamlets to the 10 kJ level. In Phase I, 48 of these beamlets are brought to target by demultiplexing and focusing with f26 optics. The beamlet ensemble, contained within an f1.9 bundle, is focused as a single beam;however, pointing is done individually. Spot size in the target plane is variable from 0.1-4 mm, with maximum averaged intensity of )similarreverse arrowto) 4 x 10/sup 15/ Wcm/sup 2/. The illumination geometry is designed specifically for several classes of important target physics experiments. These include: energy flow, symmetry and preheat studies related to indirectly driven targets;x-ray conversion and plasma coupling characterization on disc targets, and hydrodynamic instability studies in planar geometry. System integration is proceeding toward initial target experiments in )similarreverse arrowto) late 1988. Ninety-six beam amplification through the penultimate amplifier has been obtained at the sub-kJ level. Installation of beam train optics is proceeding, and the target system vacuum envelope is in place. 18 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs

Kristal, R.; Blair, L.S.; Burrows, M.D.; Cartwright, D.C.; Goldstone, P.D.; Greene, D.P.; Hanlon, J.A.; Hauer, A.; Kang, M.; Kortegaard, B.L.

1987-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Inertial Confinement Fusion quarterly report, January-March 1998, volume 8, number 2  

SciTech Connect

The coupling of laser light with plasmas is one of the key physics issues for the use of high-power lasers for inertial fusion, high-energy-density physics, and scientific stockpile stewardship. The coupling physics is extremely rich and challenging, particularly in the large plasmas to be accessed on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The coupling mechanisms span the gamut from classical inverse bremsstrahlung absorption to a variety of nonlinear optical processes. These include stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) from electron plasma waves, stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) from ion sound waves, resonant decay into electron plasma and ion sound waves, and laser beam filamentation. These processes depend on laser intensity and produce effects such as changes in the efficiency and location of the energy deposition or generation of a component of very energetic electrons, which can preheat capsules. Coupling physics issues have an extremely high leverage. The coupling models are clearly very important ingredients for detailed calculations of laser-irradiated target behavior. Improved understanding and models enable a more efficient use of laser facilities, which becomes even more important as these facilities become larger and more expensive. Advances in the understanding also allow a more timely and cost-effective identification of new applications of high-power lasers, such as for generation of high-temperature hohlraums and compact x-ray sources, or for discovery of advanced fusion schemes. Finally, the interaction of intense electromagnetic waves with ionized media is a fundamental topic of interest to numerous areas of applied science and is an excellent test bed for advancing plasma science and computational modeling of complex phenomena. This issue of the ICF Quarterly Report is dedicated to laser--plasma interactions. The eight articles present a cross section of the broad progress in understanding the key interaction issues, such as laser beam bending, spraying, and scattering, as well as scaling the Nova results to NIF.

Kruer, W

1998-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

332

On the control of filamentation of intense laser beams propagating in underdense plasma  

SciTech Connect

In indirect drive ICF ignition designs, the laser energy is delivered into the hohlraum through the laser entrance holes (LEH), which are sized as small as practicable to minimize X-ray radiation losses. On the other hand, deleterious laser plasma processes, such as filamentation and stimulated back-scatter, typically increase with laser intensity. Ideally, therefore, the laser spot shape should be a close fit to the LEH, with uniform (envelope) intensity in the spot and minimal energy at larger radii spilling onto the LEH material. This keeps the laser intensity as low as possible consistent with the area of the LEH aperture and the power requirements of the design. This can be achieved (at least for apertures significantly larger than the laser's aberrated focal spot) by the use of custom-designed phase plates. However, outfitting the 192 beam (National Ignition facility) NIF laser with multiple sets of phase plates optimized for a variety of different LEH aperture sizes is an expensive proposition. It is thus important to assess the impact on laser-plasma interaction processes of using phase plates with a smaller than optimum focal spot (or even no phase plates at all!) and then de-focusing the beam to expand it to fill the LEH and lower its intensity. We find significant effects from the lack of uniformity of the laser envelope out of the focal plane, from changes in the characteristic sizes of the laser speckle, and on the efficacy of additional polarization and/or SSD beam smoothing. We quantify these effects with analytic estimates and simulations using our laser plasma interaction code pF3D.

Williams, E A

2005-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

333

Universal Product Design: Transforming User Activity Into Product Function  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Many people have disabilities and would like to have all of the amenities typical of daily life. Universal product design is important in designing for the disabled and creating user-friendly products for all people. The goal of this thesis is to develop a universal product method by understanding how user activity closely resembles product function. The research results include a twenty product pair study in which a universal and typical product were compared. An activity diagram and functional model for each product in the product pair were the design tools used for this comparison. User activities were used to cluster product function changes. In addition, design changes such as functional, morphological and parametric were identified between the universal and typical product. The result was an action-function diagram showing the clusters and design changes for all of the twenty product pairs. An interactive GUI universal product design repository detailing the information from the action-function diagrams was created and used for eventual modification of typical products to make them universal. A universal product family was created using a user-centric universal design method developed because of the universal product design repository. Furthermore, user disability ratings from the ICF helped to expand the database and make creation of a universal product family more focused on levels of disability. The useful application of the research will be in developing a universal design method for product designers and engineers. This method will be broken down into a design structure matrix representation of functions from a universal product family of household kitchen appliances. In addition, an embodied concept for a product family consisting of existing accessible dispensers will be used to validate the universal design method developed from the twenty product study. Both case studies will serve as an example of how to extend universal design principles to a wide range of consumer product categories.

Kostovich, Vincent

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

State and National Energy and Environmental Risk Analysis Systems for underground injection control. Summary annual report, April 1992--April 1993  

SciTech Connect

ICF Resources` project, entitled {open_quotes}State and National Energy and Environmental Risk Analysis Systems for Underground Injection Control{close_quotes} includes two primary tasks (development of state and national systems respectively) and a technology transfer element. The state system was designed to assist states with data management related to underground injection control (UIC). However, during the current period, external changes (primarily pending regulatory changes at the federal level) have made the risk assessment protocol aspect of the state system of increased importance relative to data management. This protocol would assess the relative risk of groundwater contamination due to UIC activities in various areas of the state. The risk assessment system could be used to assist states in allocating scarce resources and potentially could form the analytical basis of a state variance program to respond to pending federal regulatory changes. Consequently, a substantial portion of the effort to date has been focused on this aspect of the project, The national energy and environmental risk analysis system (EERAS) is designed to enhance DOE`s analytical capabilities. This concept will be demonstrated using UIC data. The initial system design for EERAS has been completed but may be revised based on input from DOE and on the pending UIC regulatory changes. Data have been collected and organized and can be input once the file structure is finalized. The further development options for EERAS defined as part of this project will allow for the full development of the system beyond the current prototype phase which will enhance DOE`s analytical capabilities for responding to regulatory initiatives and for evaluating the benefits of risk-based regulatory approaches.

Haas, M.R.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

A SUB-GRID VOLUME-OF-FLUIDS (VOF) MODEL FOR MIXING IN RESOLVED SCALE AND IN UNRESOLVED SCALE COMPUTATIONS  

SciTech Connect

A sub-grid mix model based on a volume-of-fluids (VOF) representation is described for computational simulations of the transient mixing between reactive fluids, in which the atomically mixed components enter into the reactivity. The multi-fluid model allows each fluid species to have independent values for density, energy, pressure and temperature, as well as independent velocities and volume fractions. Fluid volume fractions are further divided into mix components to represent their 'mixedness' for more accurate prediction of reactivity. Time dependent conversion from unmixed volume fractions (denoted cf) to atomically mixed (af) fluids by diffusive processes is represented in resolved scale simulations with the volume fractions (cf, af mix). In unresolved scale simulations, the transition to atomically mixed materials begins with a conversion from unmixed material to a sub-grid volume fraction (pf). This fraction represents the unresolved small scales in the fluids, heterogeneously mixed by turbulent or multi-phase mixing processes, and this fraction then proceeds in a second step to the atomically mixed fraction by diffusion (cf, pf, af mix). Species velocities are evaluated with a species drift flux, {rho}{sub i}u{sub di} = {rho}{sub i}(u{sub i}-u), used to describe the fluid mixing sources in several closure options. A simple example of mixing fluids during 'interfacial deceleration mixing with a small amount of diffusion illustrates the generation of atomically mixed fluids in two cases, for resolved scale simulations and for unresolved scale simulations. Application to reactive mixing, including Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF), is planned for future work.

VOLD, ERIK L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; SCANNAPIECO, TONY J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

336

Development of a natural Gas Systems Analysis Model (GSAM). Annual report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lacking a detailed characterization of the resource base and a comprehensive borehole-to-burnertip evaluation model of the North American natural gas system, past R&D, tax and regulatory policies have been formulated without a full understanding of their likely direct and indirect impacts on future gas supply and demand. The recent disappearance of the deliverability surplus, pipeline deregulation, and current policy debates about regulatory initiatives in taxation, environmental compliance and leasing make the need for a comprehensive gas evaluation system critical. Traditional econometric or highly aggregated energy models are increasingly regarded as unable to incorporate available geologic detail and explicit technology performance and costing algorithms necessary to evaluate resource-technology-economic interactions in a market context. The objective of this research is to create a comprehensive, non-proprietary, microcomputer model of the North American natural gas system. GSAM explicitly evaluates the key components of the natural gas system, including resource base, exploration and development, extraction technology performance and costs, transportation and storage and end use. The primary focus is the detailed characterization of the resource base at the reservoir and sub-reservoir level and the impact of alternative extraction technologies on well productivity and economics. GSAM evaluates the complex interactions of current and alternative future technology and policy initiatives in the context of the evolving gas markets. Scheduled for completion in 1995, a prototype is planned for early 1994. ICF Resources reviewed relevant natural gas upstream, downstream and market models to identify appropriate analytic capabilities to incorporate into GSAM. We have reviewed extraction technologies to better characterize performance and costs in terms of GSAM parameters.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

LLNL Contribution to LLE FY09 Annual Report: NIC and HED Results  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In FY09, LLNL led 238 target shots on the OMEGA Laser System. Approximately half of these LLNL-led shots supported the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The remainder was dedicated to experiments for the high-energy-density stewardship experiments (HEDSE). Objectives of the LLNL led NIC campaigns at OMEGA included: (1) Laser-plasma interaction studies in physical conditions relevant for the NIF ignition targets; (2) Demonstration of Tr = 100 eV foot symmetry tuning using a reemission sphere; (3) X-ray scattering in support of conductivity measurements of solid density Be plasmas; (4) Experiments to study the physical properties (thermal conductivity) of shocked fusion fuels; (5) High-resolution measurements of velocity nonuniformities created by microscopic perturbations in NIF ablator materials; (6) Development of a novel Compton Radiography diagnostic platform for ICF experiments; and (7) Precision validation of the equation of state for quartz. The LLNL HEDSE campaigns included the following experiments: (1) Quasi-isentropic (ICE) drive used to study material properties such as strength, equation of state, phase, and phase-transition kinetics under high pressure; (2) Development of a high-energy backlighter for radiography in support of material strength experiments using Omega EP and the joint OMEGA-OMEGA-EP configuration; (3) Debris characterization from long-duration, point-apertured, point-projection x-ray backlighters for NIF radiation transport experiments; (4) Demonstration of ultrafast temperature and density measurements with x-ray Thomson scattering from short-pulse laser-heated matter; (5) The development of an experimental platform to study nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) physics using direct-drive implosions; (6) Opacity studies of high-temperature plasmas under LTE conditions; and (7) Characterization of copper (Cu) foams for HEDSE experiments.

Heeter, R F; Landen, O L; Hsing, W W; Fournier, K B

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

LIFAC Demonstration at Richmond Power and Light Whitewater Valley Unit No. 2 Volume II: Project Performance and Economics  

SciTech Connect

The C1ean Coal Technology (CCT) Program has been recognized in the National Energy Strategy as a major initiative whereby coal will be able to reach its full potential as a source of energy for the nation and the international marketplace. Attainment of this goal depends upon the development of highly efficient, environmentally sound, competitive coal utilization technologies responsive to diverse energy markets and varied consumer needs. The CCT Program is an effort jointly funded by government and industry whereby the most promising of the advanced coal-based technologies are being moved into the marketplace through demonstration. The CCT Program is being implemented through a total of five competitive solicitations. LIFAC North America, a joint venture partnership of ICF Kaiser Engineers, Inc., and Tampella Power Corporation, is currently demonstrating the LIFAC flue gas desulfurization technology developed by Tampella Power. This technology provides sulfur dioxide emission control for power plants, especially existing facilities with tight space limitations. Sulfur dioxide emissions are expected to be reduced by up to 85% by using limestone as a sorbent. The LIFAC technology is being demonstrated at Whitewater Valley Unit No. 2, a 60-MW coal-fired power plant owned and operated by Richmond Power and Light (RP&L) and located in Richmond, Indiana. The Whitewater plant consumes high-sulfur coals, with sulfur contents ranging from 2.0-2.9 $ZO. The project, co-funded by LIFAC North America and DOE, is being conducted with the participation of Richmond Power and Light, the State of Indiana, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and the Black Beauty Coal Company. The project has a total cost of $21.4 million and a duration of 48 months from the preliminary design phase through the testing program.

None

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

High-Pressure Multi-Mbar Conductivity Experiments on Hydrogen: The Quest for Solid Metallic Hydrogen  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Ultra-dense hydrogen has long been the subject of intense experimental and theoretical research due to the fascinating physics which arises from this supposedly simple system. The properties of ultra-dense hydrogen also have important implications for planetary physics, since the interiors of the giant planets Jupiter and Saturn are believed to consist of cores of dense, metallic hydrogen. Finally, ultra-dense hydrogen is of direct programmatic interest, and multiple-shock compression experiments on hydrogen to the metallic state have stimulated the accelerated development of new hydrogen equation-of-state (EOS) models used for ICF and other applications. The focus of our research has often been described as the ''Holy Grail'' of high-pressure physics research: The metallization of solid hydrogen. Metallic hydrogen has long been considered to be the prototypical system for the study of insulator-to-metal (I-M) transitions. Although metallic hydrogen (Z=1) may superficially appear to be a very simple material, it is in fact an extremely challenging system for theoretical analysis due to the presence of large zero-point atomic motions and the complete absence of any core electrons. Thus, solid metallic hydrogen promises to be a fascinating material. Among its predicted properties is the possibility of being a high temperature superconductor with a critical temperature T{sub c} of the order of {approx} 100K [1]. The successful metallization of solid hydrogen would be a groundbreaking scientific discovery and open up new frontiers in science and possibly technology as well.

Jackson, D

2007-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

340

Pulsed power -- Research and technology at Sandia National Laboratories  

SciTech Connect

Over the past 15 years, steady and sometimes exciting progress has been made in the hybrid technology called Pulsed Power. Based on both electrical engineering and physics, pulsed power involves the generation, modification, and use of electrical pulses up to the multitrillion-watt and multimillion-volt ranges. The final product of these powerful pulses can take diverse forms--hypervelocity projectiles or imploding liners, energetic and intense particle beams, X-ray and gamma-ray pulses, laser light beams that cover the spectrum from ultraviolet to infrared, or powerful microwave bursts. At first, the needs of specific applications largely shaped research and technology in this field. New the authors are beginning to see the reverse--new applications arising from technical capabilities that until recently were though impossible. Compressing and heating microscopic quantities of matter until they reach ultra-high energy density represents one boundary of their scientific exploration. The other boundary might be a defensive weapon that can project vast amounts of highly directed energy over long distances. Other applications of the technology may range from the use of electron beams to sterilize sewage, to laboratory simulation of radiation effects on electronics, to electromagnetic launchings of projectiles into earth or into solar orbits. Eventually the authors hope to use pulsed power to produce an inexhaustible supply of energy by means of inertial confinement fusion (ICF)--a technique for heating and containing deuterium-tritium fuel through compression. Topics covered here are: (1) inertial confinement fusion; (2) simulation technology; (3) development of new technology; and (4) application to directed energy technologies.

1981-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

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341

Improved recovery from Gulf of Mexico reservoirs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gulf of Mexico Basin offers the greatest near-term potential for reducing the future decline in domestic oil and gas production. The Basin is less mature than productive on-shore areas, large unexplored areas remain, and there is great potential for reducing bypassed oil in known fields. Much of the remaining oil in the offshore is trapped in formations that are extremely complex due to intrusions Of salt domes. Recently, however, significant innovations have been made in seismic processing and reservoir simulation. In addition, significant advances have been made in deviated and horizontal drilling technologies. Effective application of these technologies along with improved integrated resource management methods offer opportunities to significantly increase Gulf of Mexico production, delay platform abandonments, and preserve access to a substantial remaining oil target for both exploratory drilling and advanced recovery processes. On February 18, 1992, Louisiana State University (the Prime Contractor) with two technical subcontractors, BDNL Inc. and ICF, Inc., began a research program to estimate the potential oil and gas reserve additions that could result from the application of advanced secondary and enhanced oil recovery technologies and the exploitation of undeveloped and attic oil zones in the Gulf of Mexico oil fields that are related to piercement salt dornes. This project is a one year continuation of this research and will continue work in reservoir description, extraction processes, and technology transfer. Detailed data will be collected for two previously studied reservoirs: a South Marsh Island reservoir operated by Taylor Energy and a South Pelto reservoir operated by Mobil. This data will include reprocessed 2-D seismic data, newly acquired 3-D data, fluid data, fluid samples, pressure data, well test data, well logs, and core data/samples. Geologic data is being compiled; extraction research has not begun.

Schenewerk, P.

1995-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

342

Hot-spot mix in ignition-scale implosions on the NIF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ignition of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target depends on the formation of a central hot spot with sufficient temperature and areal density. Radiative and conductive losses from the hot spot can be enhanced by hydrodynamic instabilities. The concentric spherical layers of current National Ignition Facility (NIF) ignition targets consist of a plastic ablator surrounding a thin shell of cryogenic thermonuclear fuel (i.e., hydrogen isotopes), with fuel vapor filling the interior volume [S. W. Haan et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 051001 (2011)]. The Rev. 5 ablator is doped with Ge to minimize preheat of the ablator closest to the DT ice caused by Au M-band emission from the hohlraum x-ray drive [D. S. Clark et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 052703 (2010)]. Richtmyer-Meshkov and Rayleigh-Taylor hydrodynamic instabilities seeded by high-mode () ablator-surface perturbations can cause Ge-doped ablator to mix into the interior of the shell at the end of the acceleration phase [B. A. Hammel et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 056310 (2011)]. As the shell decelerates, it compresses the fuel vapor, forming a hot spot. K-shell line emission from the ionized Ge that has penetrated into the hot spot provides an experimental signature of hot-spot mix. The Ge emission from tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) and deuterium-tritium (DT) cryogenic targets and gas-filled plastic-shell capsules, which replace the THD layer with a mass-equivalent CH layer, was examined. The inferred amount of hot-spot-mix mass, estimated from the Ge K-shell line brightness using a detailed atomic physics code [J. J. MacFarlane et al., High Energy Density Phys. 3, 181 (2006)], is typically below the 75-ng allowance for hot-spot mix [S. W. Haan et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 051001 (2011)]. Predictions of a simple mix model, based on linear growth of the measured surface-mass modulations, are consistent with the experimental results.

Regan, S. P.; Epstein, R.; McCrory, R. L.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Hammel, B. A.; Suter, L. J.; Ralph, J.; Scott, H.; Barrios, M. A.; Bradley, D. K.; Callahan, D. A.; Cerjan, C.; Collins, G. W.; Dixit, S. N.; Doeppner, T.; Edwards, M. J.; Farley, D. R.; Glenn, S.; Glenzer, S. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

343

Producing KDP and DKDP crystals for the NIF laser  

SciTech Connect

The cost and physics requirements of the NIF have established two important roles for potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals. 1. To extract more laser energy per unit of flashlamp light and laser glass, the NIF has adopted a multipass architecture as shown in Figure 1. Light is injected in the transport spatial filter, first traverses the power amplifiers, and then is directed to main amplifiers, where it makes four passes before being redirected through the power amplifiers towards the target. To enable the multipass of the main amplifiers, a KDP-containing Pockels cell rotates the polarization of the beam to make it either transmit through or reflect off a polarizer held at Brewster's angle within the main laser cavity. If transmitted, the light reflects off a mirror and makes another pass through the cavity. If reflected, it proceeds through the power amplifier to the target. the original seed crystal as the pyramid faces grow. Unfortunately, this pyramidal growth is very slow, and it takes about two years to grow a crystal to NIF size. To provide more programmatic flexibility and reduce costs in the long run, we have developed an alternative technology commonly called rapid growth. Through a combination of higher temperatures and higher supersaturation of the growth solution, a NIF-size boule can be grown in 1 to 2 months from a small ''point'' seed. However, growing boules of adequate size is not sufficient. Care must be taken to prevent inclusions of growth solution and incorporation of atomically substituted 2. Implosions for ICF work far better at shorter wavelengths due to less generation of hot electrons, which preheat the fuel and make it harder to compress. Compromising between optic lifetime and implosion efficiency, both Nova and the NIF operate at a tripled frequency of the 1053-nm fundamental frequency of a neodymium glass laser. This tripling is accomplished by two crystals, one made of KDP and one made of deuterated KDP (DKDP). The first one mixes two 1053-nm photons to make 526-nm light, and the second one combines a residual 1053-nm photon with a 526-nm photon to make 351-nm light.

Atherton, L J; Burnham, A K; Combs, R C; Couture, S A; De Yoreo, J J; Hawley-Fedder, R A; Montesant, R C; Robey, H F; Runkel, M; Staggs, M; Wegner, P J; Yan, M; Zaitseva, N P

1999-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

344

Concepts for fabrication of inertial fusion energy targets  

SciTech Connect

Future inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plants will have a Target Fabrication Facility (TFF) that must produce approximately 500,000 targets per day. To achieve a relatively low cost of electricity, the cost to produce these targets will need to be less than approximately $0.25 per target. In this paper the status on the development of concepts for a TFF to produce targets for a heavy ion fusion (HIF) reactor, such as HYLIFE II, and a laser direct drive fusion reactor such as Sombrero, is discussed. The baseline target that is produced in the HIF TFF is similar to the close-coupled indirect drive target designed by Callahan-Miller and Tabak at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory. This target consists of a cryogenic hohlraum that is made of a metal case and a variety of metal foams and metal-doped organic foams. The target contains a DT-filled CH capsule. The baseline direct drive target is the design developed by Bodner and coworkers at Naval Research Laboratory. HIF targets can be filled with DT before or after assembly of the capsule into the hohlraum. Assembly of targets before filling allows assembly operations to be done at room temperature, but tritium inventories are much larger due to the large volume that the hohlraum occupies in the fill system. Assembly of targets cold after filling allows substantial reduction in tritium inventory, but this requires assembly of targets at cryogenic temperature. A model being developed to evaluate the tritium inventories associated with each of the assembly and fill options indicates that filling targets before assembling the capsule into the hohlraum, filling at temperatures as high as possible, and reducing dead-volumes in the fill system as much as possible offers the potential to reduce tritium inventories to acceptable levels. Use of enhanced DT ice layering techniques, such as infrared layering can reduce tritium inventories significantly by reducing the layering time and therefore the number of capsules being layered. Current processes for fabrication of ICF capsules can most likely be easily scaled up to produce capsules at rates needed for an IFE plant.

Nobile, A. (Arthur), Jr.; Hoffer, J. K. (James K.); Gobby, P. L. (Peter L.); Steckle, W. P. (Warren P.), Jr.; Goodin, D. T. (Daniel T.); Besenbruch, G. E. (Gottfried E.); Schultz, K. R. (Kenneth R.)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

CHP REGIONAL APPLICATION CENTERS: ACTIVITIES AND SELECTED RESULTS  

SciTech Connect

Between 2001 and 2005, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) created a set of eight Regional Application Centers (RACs) to facilitate the development and deployment of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) technologies. By utilizing the thermal energy that is normally wasted when electricity is produced at central generating stations, Combined Heat and Power installations can save substantial amounts of energy compared to more traditional technologies. In addition, the location of CHP facilities at or near the point of consumption greatly reduces or eliminates electric transmission and distribution losses. The regional nature of the RACs allows each one to design and provide services that are most relevant to the specific economic and market conditions in its particular geographic area. Between them, the eight RACs provide services to all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Through the end of the federal 2009 fiscal year (FY 2009), the primary focus of the RACs was on providing CHP-related information to targeted markets, encouraging the creation and adoption of public policies and incentives favorable to CHP, and providing CHP users and prospective users with technical assistance and support on specific projects. Beginning with the 2010 fiscal year, the focus of the regional centers broadened to include district energy and waste heat recovery and these entities became formally known as Clean Energy Application Centers, as required by the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007. In 2007, ORNL led a cooperative effort to establish metrics to quantify the RACs accomplishments. That effort began with the development of a detailed logic model describing RAC operations and outcomes, which provided a basis for identifying important activities and accomplishments to track. A data collection spreadsheet soliciting information on those activities for FY 2008 and all previous years of RAC operations was developed and sent to the RACs in the summer of 2008. This represents the first systematic attempt at RAC program measurement in a manner consistent with approaches used for other efforts funded by DOE's Industrial Technologies Program (ITP). In addition, data on CHP installations and associated effects were collected for the same years from a state-by-state database maintained for DOE by ICF international. A report documenting the findings of that study was produced in September, 2009. The purpose of the current report is to present the findings from a new study of RAC activities and accomplishments which examined what the Centers did in FY 2009, the last year in which they concentrated exclusively on CHP technologies. This study focused on identifying and describing RAC activities and was not designed to measure how those efforts influenced CHP installations or other outcomes.

Schweitzer, Martin [ORNL

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

High Temperature Dynamic Hohlraums on the Pulsed Power Driver Z  

SciTech Connect

In the concept of the dynamic hohlraum an imploding z-pinch is optically thick to its own radiation. Radiation may be trapped inside the pinch to give a radiation temperature inside the pinch greater than that outside the pinch. The radiation is typically produced by colliding an outer Z-pinch liner onto an inner liner. The collision generates a strongly radiating shock, and the radiation is trapped by the outer liner. As the implosion continues after the collision the radiation temperature may continue to increase due to ongoing PdV (pressure times change in volume) work done by the implosion. In principal the radiation temperature may increase to the point at which the outer liner burns through, becomes optically thin, and no longer traps the radiation. One application of the dynamic hohlraum is to drive an ICF (inertial confinement fusion) pellet with the trapped radiation field. Members of the dynamic hohlraum team at Sandia National Labs have used the pulsed power driver Z (20 LMA, 100 ns) to create a dynamic hohlraum with temperature linearly ramping from 100 to 180 eV over 5 ns. On this shot zp214 a nested tungsten wire array of 4 and 2 cm diameters with masses of 2 and 1 mg imploded onto a 2.5 mg plastic annulus at 5 mm diameter. The current return can on this shot was slotted. It is likely the radiation temperature may be increased to over 200 CV by stabilizing the pinch with a solid current return can. A current return can with 9 slots imprints 9 filaments onto the imploding pinch. This degrades the optical trapping and the quality of the liner collision. A 1.6 mm diameter capsule situated inside this dynamic hohlraum of zp214 would see 15 kJ of radiation impinging on its surface before the pinch itself collapses to a 1.6 mm diameter. Dynamic hohlraum shots including pellets are scheduled to take place on Z in September of 1998.

Armijo, J.; Chandler, G.A.; Cooper, G.; Derzon, M.S.; Fehl, D.; Gilliland, T.; Hawn, R.; Hebron, D.; Hurst, M.; Jobe, D.; Lash, J.; Lazier, S.; Leeper, R.; McGurn, J.; McKenney, J.; Mock, R.; Nash, T.J.; Nielsen, D.; Ruiz, C.; Ryan, P.; Seaman, J.F.; Torres, J.

1999-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

347

High-temperature dynamic hohlraums on the pulsed power driver {ital Z}  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the concept of the dynamic hohlraum an imploding Z pinch is optically thick to its own radiation. Radiation may be trapped inside the pinch to give a radiation temperature inside the pinch greater than that outside the pinch. The radiation is typically produced by colliding an outer Z-pinch liner onto an inner liner. The collision generates a strongly radiating shock, and the radiation is trapped by the outer liner. As the implosion continues after the collision, the radiation temperature may continue to increase due to ongoing PdV (pressure times change in volume) work done by the implosion. In principal, the radiation temperature may increase to the point at which the outer liner burns through, becomes optically thin, and no longer traps the radiation. One application of the dynamic hohlraum is to drive an ICF (inertial confinement fusion) pellet with the trapped radiation field. Members of the dynamic hohlraum team at Sandia National Labs have used the pulsed power driver {ital Z} (20 MA, 100 ns) to create a dynamic hohlraum with temperature linearly ramping from 100 to 180 eV over 5 ns. On this shot zp214 a nested tungsten wire array of 4 and 2 cm diam with masses of 2 and 1 mg imploded onto a 2.5 mg plastic annulus at 5 mm diam. The current return can on this shot was slotted. It is likely the radiation temperature may be increased to over 200 eV by stabilizing the pinch with a solid current return can. A current return can with nine slots imprints nine filaments onto the imploding pinch. This degrades the optical trapping and the quality of the liner collision. A 1.6 mm diam capsule situated inside this dynamic hohlraum of zp214 would see 15 kJ of radiation impinging on its surface before the pinch itself collapses to a 1.6 mm diam. Dynamic hohlraum shots including pellets were scheduled to take place on {ital Z} in September of 1998. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

Nash, T.J.; Derzon, M.S.; Chandler, G.A.; Leeper, R.; Fehl, D.; Lash, J.; Ruiz, C.; Cooper, G.; Seaman, J.F.; McGurn, J.; Lazier, S.; Torres, J.; Jobe, D.; Gilliland, T.; Hurst, M.; Mock, R.; Ryan, P.; Nielsen, D.; Armijo, J.; McKenney, J.; Hawn, R.; Hebron, D. [Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); MacFarlane, J.J. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States)] [University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin 53705 (United States); Petersen, D.; Bowers, R.; Matuska, W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Ryutov, D.D. [Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)] [Lawrence Livermore Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

1999-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Progress Toward Ignition on the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The principal approach to ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is indirect drive. A schematic of an ignition target is shown in Figure 1. The laser beams are focused through laser entrance holes at each end of a high-Z cylindrical case, or hohlraum. The lasers irradiate the hohlraum walls producing x-rays that ablate and compress the fuel capsule in the center of the hohlraum. The hohlraum is made of Au, U, or other high-Z material. For ignition targets, the hohlraum is {approx}0.5 cm diameter by {approx}1 cm in length. The hohlraum absorbs the incident laser energy producing x-rays for symmetrically imploding the capsule. The fuel capsule is a {approx}2-mm-diameter spherical shell of CH, Be, or C filled with DT fuel. The DT fuel is in the form of a cryogenic layer on the inside of the capsule. X-rays ablate the outside of the capsule, producing a spherical implosion. The imploding shell stagnates in the center, igniting the DT fuel. NIC has overseen installation of all of the hardware for performing ignition experiments, including commissioning of approximately 50 diagnostic systems in NIF. The diagnostics measure scattered optical light, x-rays from the hohlraum over the energy range from 100 eV to 500 keV, and x-rays, neutrons, and charged particles from the implosion. An example of a diagnostic is the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) built by a collaboration of scientists from MIT, UR-LLE, and LLNL shown in Figure 2. MRS measures the neutron spectrum from the implosion, providing information on the neutron yield and areal density that are metrics of the quality of the implosion. Experiments on NIF extend ICF research to unexplored regimes in target physics. NIF can produce more than 50 times the laser energy and more than 20 times the power of any previous ICF facility. Ignition scale hohlraum targets are three to four times larger than targets used at smaller facilities, and the ignition drive pulses are two to five times longer. The larger targets and longer pulse lengths produce unique plasma conditions for laser-plasma instabilities that could reduce hohlraum coupling efficiency. Initial experiments have demonstrated efficient coupling of laser energy to x-rays. X-ray drive greater than 300 eV has been measured in gas-filled ignition hohlraum and shows the expected scaling with laser energy and hohlraum scale size. Experiments are now optimizing capsule implosions for ignition. Ignition conditions require assembling the fuel with sufficient density and temperature for thermonuclear burn. X-rays ablate the outside of the capsule, accelerating and spherically compressing the capsule for assembling the fuel. The implosion stagnates, heating the central core and producing a hot spot that ignites and burns the surrounding fuel. The four main characteristics of the implosion are shell velocity, central hot spot shape, fuel adiabat, and mix. Experiments studying these four characteristics of implosions are used to optimize the implosion. Integrated experiments using cryogenic fuel layer experiments demonstrate the quality of the implosion as the optimization experiments progress. The final compressed fuel conditions are diagnosed by measuring the x-ray emission from the hot core and the neutrons and charged particles produced in the fusion reactions. Metrics of the quality of the implosion are the neutron yield and the shell areal density, as well as the size and shape of the core. The yield depends on the amount of fuel in the hot core and its temperature and is a gauge of the energy coupling to the fuel. The areal density, the density of the fuel times its thickness, diagnoses the fuel assembly, which is measured using the fraction of neutrons that are down scattered passing through the dense shell. The yield and fraction of down scattered neutrons, or shell rho-r, from the cryogenic layered implosions are shown in Figure 3. The different sets of data represent results after a series of implosion optimization experiments. Both yield and areal density show significant increases as a result of the optimiza

Kauffman, R L

2011-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

349

Westinghouse Hanford Company health and safety performance report  

SciTech Connect

Topping the list of WHC Safety recognition during this reporting period is a commendation received from the National Safety Council (NSC). The NSC bestowed their Award of Honor upon WHC for significant reduction of incidence rates during CY 1995. The award is based upon a reduction of 48 % or greater in cases involving days away from work, a 30 % or greater reduction in the number of days away, and a 15% or greater reduction in the total number of occupational injuries and illnesses. (page 2-1). A DOE-HQ review team representing the Office of Envirorunent, Safety and Health (EH), visited the Hanford Site during several weeks of the quarter. Ile 40-member Safety Management Evaluation Team (SMET) assessed WHC in the areas of management responsibility, comprehensive requirements, and competence commensurate with responsibility. As part of their new approach to oversight, they focused on the existence of management systems and programs (comparable approach to VPP). Plant/project areas selected for review within WHC were PFP, B Plant/WESF, Tank Farms, and K-Basins (page 2-2). Effective safety meetings, prejob safety meetings, etc., are a cornerstone of any successful safety program. In an effort to improve the reporting of safety meetings, the Safety/Security Meeting Report form was revised. It now provides a mechanism for recording and tracking safety issues (page 2-4). WHC has experienced an increase in the occupational injury and illness incidence rates during the first quarter of CY 1996. Trends show this increase can be partially attributed to inattention to workplace activities due 0999to the uncertainty Hanford employees currently face with recent reduction of force, reorganization, and reengineering efforts (page 2-7). The cumulative CY 1995 lost/restricted workday case incidence rate for the first quarter of CY 1996 (1.28) is 25% below the DOE CY 1991-93 average (1.70). However, the incidence rate increased 24% from the CY 1995 rate of 1.03 (page 2-8). The reengineering of the Radiological Control organization has resulted in an increase in the availability of personnel to help facilities with the procurement and use of practical ALARA measures. In addition, there seems to be more awareness of the need to use ALARA, resulting in a significant increase in the number of calls received by the ALARA Program Office for help in solving radiological problems (page 1-3). The Figure 3-2-1 chart data includes WHC, BCSR, and ICF KH employee exposure. The first quarter CY 1996 results represent the exposure of 1,913 quarterly-badged employees and an average of 846 monthly-badged employees. There were three instances of potential loss of contamination control during the calendar quarter involving three workers where internal dosimetry follow-up was performed. No intakes of contamination were detected (page 3-6). There were five skin contaminations and 18 clothing contaminations reported during this quarter in all WHC-managed facilities/areas. This represents an improvement in performance compared to the first quarter of CY 1995 (page 3-9). A monthly average of 76 Radiological Problem Reports (RPR) was issued during the first quarter of CY 1996 for a total issuance of 227 RPRS. The monthly average for the same quarter in CY 1995 was 76; a total of 228 for the quarter (Figure 3-5-1). At the end of March, WHC Dosimetry was monitoring the following employees/sub- contractors: 631 monthly standard dosimeters, 251 monthly combination dosimeters, 1,386 quarterly standard dosimeters, 472 quarterly combination dosimeters, and 3,716 annual dosimeters. During this period, Dosimetry had 987 requests for changes to the frequency, and terminated 731 dosimetry records.

Rogers, L.

1996-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

350

Experimental Investigation of the Effect of Initial Conditions on Rayleigh-Taylor Instability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental study of the effect of initial conditions on the development of Rayleigh Taylor Instabilities (RTI) at low Atwood numbers (order of 10-4) was performed in the water channel facility at TAMU. Initial conditions of the flow were generated using a controllable, highly reliable Servo motor. The uniqueness of the study is the systems capability of generating the required initial conditions precisely as compared to the previous endeavors. Backlit photography was used for imaging and ensemble averaging of the images was performed to study mixing width characteristics in different regimes of evolution of Rayleigh-Taylor Instability (RTI). High-speed imaging of the flows was performed to provide insights into the growth of bubble and spikes in the linear and non-linear regime of instability development. RTI are observed in astrophysics, geophysics and in many instances in nature. The vital role of RTI in the feasibility and efficiency of the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiment warrants a comprehensive study of the effect of mixing characteristics of RTI and its dependence on defining parameters. With this broader objective in perspective, the objectives of this present investigation were mainly threefold: First was the validation of the novel setup of the Water channel system. Towards this objective, validation of Servo motor, splitter plate thickness effects, density and temperature measurements and single-mode experiments were performed. The second objective was to study the mixing and growth characteristics of binary and multi-mode initial perturbations seeking an explanation of behavior of the resultant flow structures by performing the first ever set of such highly controlled experiments. The first-ever set of experiments with highly controlled multi-mode initial conditions was performed. The final objective of this study was to measure and compare the bubble and spike velocities with single-mode initial conditions with existing analytical models. The data derived from these experiments would qualitatively and quantitatively enhance the understanding of dependence of mixing width on parametric initial conditions. The knowledge would contribute towards a generalized theory for RTI mixing with specified dependence on various parameters, which has a wide range of applications. The system setup was validated to provide a reliable platform for the novel multi-modal experiments to be performed in the future. It was observed that the ensemble averaged mixing width of the binary system does not vary significantly with the phase-difference between the modes of a binary mode initial condition experiment, whereas it varies with the amplitudes of the component modes. In the exponential and non-linear regimes of evolution, growth rates of multi-mode perturbations were found to be higher than the component modes, whereas saturation growth rates correspond to the dominant wavelength. Quadratic saturation growth rate constants, alpha were found to be about 0.07 0.01 for binary and multi modes whereas single-mode data measured alpha about 0.06 0.01. High-speed imaging was performed to measure bubble and spike amplitudes to obtain velocities and growth rates. It was concluded that higher temporal and spatial resolution was required for accurate measurement. The knowledge gained from the above study will facilitate a better understanding of the physics underlying Rayleigh-Taylor instability. The results of this study will also help validating numerical models for simulation of this instability, thereby providing predictive capability for more complex configurations.

Kuchibhatla, Sarat Chandra

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Preliminary Neutronics Design Studies for a Molten Salt Blanket LIFE Engine  

SciTech Connect

The Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion Fission Energy (LIFE) Program being developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) aims to design a hybrid fission-fusion subcritical nuclear engine that uses a laser-driven Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) system to drive a subcritical fission blanket. This combined fusion-fission hybrid system could be used for generating electricity, material transmutation or incineration, or other applications. LIFE does not require enriched fuel since it is a sub-critical system and LIFE can sustain power operation beyond the burnup levels at which typical fission reactors need to be refueled. In light of these factors, numerous options have been suggested and are being investigated. Options being investigated include fueling LIFE engines with spent nuclear fuel to aid in disposal/incineration of commercial spent nuclear fuel or using depleted uranium or thorium fueled options to enhance proliferation resistance and utilize non-fissile materials [1]. LIFE engine blanket designs using a molten salt fuel system represent one area of investigation. Possible applications of a LIFE engine with a molten salt blanket include uses as a spent nuclear fuel burner, fissile fuel breeding platform, and providing a backup alternative to other LIFE engine blanket designs using TRISO fuel particles in case the TRISO particles are found to be unable to withstand the irradiation they will be subjected to. These molten salts consist of a mixture of LiF with UF{sub 4} or ThF{sub 4} or some combination thereof. Future systems could look at using PuF{sub 3} or PuF{sub 4} as well, though no work on such system with initial plutonium loadings has been performed for studies documented in this report. The purpose of this report is to document preliminary neutronics design studies performed to support the development of a molten salt blanket LIFE engine option, as part of the LIFE Program being performed at Lawrence Livermore National laboratory. Preliminary design studies looking at fast ignition and hot spot ignition fusion options are documented, along with limited scoping studies performed to investigate other options of interest that surfaced during the main design effort. Lastly, side studies that were not part of the main design effort but may alter future work performed on LIFE engine designs are shown. The majority of all work reported in this document was performed during the Molten Salt Fast Ignition Moderator Study (MSFIMS) which sought to optimize the amount of moderator mixed into the molten salt region in order to produce the most compelling design. The studies in this report are of a limited scope and are intended to provide a preliminary neutronics analysis of the design concepts described herein to help guide decision processes and explore various options that a LIFE engine with a molten salt blanket might enable. None of the designs shown in this report, even reference cases selected for detailed description and analysis, have been fully optimized. The analyses were performed primarily as a neutronics study, though some consultation was made regarding thermal-hydraulic and structural concerns during both scoping out an initial model and subsequent to identifying a neutronics-based reference case to ensure that the design work contained no glaring mechanical or thermal issues that would preclude its feasibility. Any analyses and recommendations made in this report are either primarily or solely from the point of view of LIFE neutronics and ignore other fundamental issues related to molten salt fuel blankets such as chemical processing feasibility and political feasibility of a molten salt system.

Powers, J

2008-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

352

Proposed Laser-Based HED physics experiments for Stockpile Stewardship  

SciTech Connect

An analysis of the scientific areas in High Energy Density (HED) physics that underpin the enduring LANL mission in Stockpile Stewardship (SS) has identified important research needs that are not being met. That analysis has included the work done as part of defining the mission need for the High Intensity Laser Laboratory (HILL) LANL proposal to NNSA, LDRD DR proposal evaluations, and consideration of the Predictive Capability Framework and LANL NNSA milestones. From that evaluation, we have identified several specific and scientifically-exciting experimental concepts to address those needs. These experiments are particularly responsive to physics issues in Campaigns 1 and 10. These experiments are best done initially at the LANL Trident facility, often relying on the unique capabilities available there, although there are typically meritorious extensions envisioned at future facilities such as HILL, or the NIF once the ARC short-pulse laser is available at sufficient laser intensity. As the focus of the LANL HEDP effort broadens from ICF ignition of the point design at the conclusion of the National Ignition Campaign, into a more SS-centric effort, it is useful to consider these experiments, which address well-defined issues, with specific scientific hypothesis to test or models to validate or disprove, via unit-physics experiments. These experiments are in turn representative of a possible broad experimental portfolio to elucidate the physics of interest to these campaigns. These experiments, described below, include: (1) First direct measurement of the evolution of particulates in isochorically heated dense plasma; (2) Temperature relaxation measurements in a strongly-coupled plasma; (3) Viscosity measurements in a dense plasma; and (4) Ionic structure factors in a dense plasma. All these experiments address scientific topics of importance to our sponsors, involve excellent science at the boundaries of traditional fields, utilize unique capabilities at LANL, and contribute to the Campaign milestone in 2018. Given their interdisciplinary nature, it is not surprising that these research needs are not being addressed by the other excellent high-energy density physics (HEDP) facilities coming on line, facilities aimed squarely at more established fields and missions. Although energy rich, these facilities deliver radiation (e.g., particle beams for isochoric heating) over a timescale that is too slow in these unit physics experiments to eliminate hydrodynamic evolution of the target plasma during the time it is being created. A theme shared by all of these experiments is the need to quickly create a quasi-homogeneous 'initial state' whose properties and evolution we wish to study. Otherwise, we cannot create unit experiments to isolate the physics of interest and validate the models in our codes, something that cannot be done with the integrated experiments often done in HED. Moreover, these experiments in some cases involve combinations of solid and plasmas, or matter in the warm-dense matter state, where neither the theoretical approximations of solid state or of fully-ionized weakly-coupled plasmas can be used. In all cases, the capability of 'isochoric heating' ('flash' heating at constant density) is important. In some cases, the ability to selectively heat to different degrees different species within a target, whether mixed or adjacent to each other, is critical for the experiment. This capability requires the delivery of very high power densities, which require the conversion of the laser into very short and intense pulses of secondary radiation (electrons, ions, neutrons, x-rays). Otherwise, there is no possibility of a clean experiment to constrain the models, in the cases there are any, or inform the creation of one. Another typical requirement of these experiments is the ability to probe these exotic extreme conditions of matter with flexible and diverse sources of secondary radiation. Without a high-intensity high-power laser with some unique attributes available on Trident today (e.g., ultra-high laser-puls

Benage, John F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Albright, Brian J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fernandez, Juan C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

353

Recyclable transmission line (RTL) and linear transformer driver (LTD) development for Z-pinch inertial fusion energy (Z-IFE) and high yield.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Z-Pinch Inertial Fusion Energy (Z-IFE) complements and extends the single-shot z-pinch fusion program on Z to a repetitive, high-yield, power plant scenario that can be used for the production of electricity, transmutation of nuclear waste, and hydrogen production, all with no CO{sub 2} production and no long-lived radioactive nuclear waste. The Z-IFE concept uses a Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) accelerator, and a Recyclable Transmission Line (RTL) to connect the LTD driver to a high-yield fusion target inside a thick-liquid-wall power plant chamber. Results of RTL and LTD research are reported here, that include: (1) The key physics issues for RTLs involve the power flow at the high linear current densities that occur near the target (up to 5 MA/cm). These issues include surface heating, melting, ablation, plasma formation, electron flow, magnetic insulation, conductivity changes, magnetic field diffusion changes, possible ion flow, and RTL mass motion. These issues are studied theoretically, computationally (with the ALEGRA and LSP codes), and will work at 5 MA/cm or higher, with anode-cathode gaps as small as 2 mm. (2) An RTL misalignment sensitivity study has been performed using a 3D circuit model. Results show very small load current variations for significant RTL misalignments. (3) The key structural issues for RTLs involve optimizing the RTL strength (varying shape, ribs, etc.) while minimizing the RTL mass. Optimization studies show RTL mass reductions by factors of three or more. (4) Fabrication and pressure testing of Z-PoP (Proof-of-Principle) size RTLs are successfully reported here. (5) Modeling of the effect of initial RTL imperfections on the buckling pressure has been performed. Results show that the curved RTL offers a much greater buckling pressure as well as less sensitivity to imperfections than three other RTL designs. (6) Repetitive operation of a 0.5 MA, 100 kV, 100 ns, LTD cavity with gas purging between shots and automated operation is demonstrated at the SNL Z-IFE LTD laboratory with rep-rates up to 10.3 seconds between shots (this is essentially at the goal of 10 seconds for Z-IFE). (7) A single LTD switch at Tomsk was fired repetitively every 12 seconds for 36,000 shots with no failures. (8) Five 1.0 MA, 100 kV, 100 ns, LTD cavities have been combined into a voltage adder configuration with a test load to successfully study the system operation. (9) The combination of multiple LTD coaxial lines into a tri-plate transmission line is examined. The 3D Quicksilver code is used to study the electron flow losses produced near the magnetic nulls that occur where coax LTD lines are added together. (10) Circuit model codes are used to model the complete power flow circuit with an inductive isolator cavity. (11) LTD architectures are presented for drivers for Z-IFE and high yield. A 60 MA LTD driver and a 90 MA LTD driver are proposed. Present results from all of these power flow studies validate the whole LTD/RTL concept for single-shot ICF high yield, and for repetitive-shot IFE.

Sharpe, Robin Arthur; Kingsep, Alexander S. (Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia); Smith, David Lewis; Olson, Craig Lee; Ottinger, Paul F. (Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC); Schumer, Joseph Wade (Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC); Welch, Dale Robert (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Kim, Alexander (High Currents Institute, Tomsk, Russia); Kulcinski, Gerald L. (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Kammer, Daniel C. (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Rose, David Vincent (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Nedoseev, Sergei L. (Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia); Pointon, Timothy David; Smirnov, Valentin P. (Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia); Turgeon, Matthew C.; Kalinin, Yuri G. (Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia); Bruner, Nichelle "Nicki" (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Barkey, Mark E. (University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL); Guthrie, Michael (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Thoma, Carsten (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Genoni, Tom C. (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Langston, William L.; Fowler, William E.; Mazarakis, Michael Gerrassimos

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Simulations of Turbulent Flows with Strong Shocks and Density Variations: Final Report  

SciTech Connect

The target of this SciDAC Science Application was to develop a new capability based on high-order and high-resolution schemes to simulate shock-turbulence interactions and multi-material mixing in planar and spherical geometries, and to study Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov turbulent mixing. These fundamental problems have direct application in high-speed engineering flows, such as inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsule implosions and scramjet combustion, and also in the natural occurrence of supernovae explosions. Another component of this project was the development of subgrid-scale (SGS) models for large-eddy simulations of flows involving shock-turbulence interaction and multi-material mixing, that were to be validated with the DNS databases generated during the program. The numerical codes developed are designed for massively-parallel computer architectures, ensuring good scaling performance. Their algorithms were validated by means of a sequence of benchmark problems. The original multi-stage plan for this five-year project included the following milestones: 1) refinement of numerical algorithms for application to the shock-turbulence interaction problem and multi-material mixing (years 1-2); 2) direct numerical simulations (DNS) of canonical shock-turbulence interaction (years 2-3), targeted at improving our understanding of the physics behind the combined two phenomena and also at guiding the development of SGS models; 3) large-eddy simulations (LES) of shock-turbulence interaction (years 3-5), improving SGS models based on the DNS obtained in the previous phase; 4) DNS of planar/spherical RM multi-material mixing (years 3-5), also with the two-fold objective of gaining insight into the relevant physics of this instability and aiding in devising new modeling strategies for multi-material mixing; 5) LES of planar/spherical RM mixing (years 4-5), integrating the improved SGS and multi-material models developed in stages 3 and 5. This final report is outlined as follows. Section 2 shows an assessment of numerical algorithms that are best suited for the numerical simulation of compressible flows involving turbulence and shock phenomena. Sections 3 and 4 deal with the canonical shock-turbulence interaction problem, from the DNS and LES perspectives, respectively. Section 5 considers the shock-turbulence inter-action in spherical geometry, in particular, the interaction of a converging shock with isotropic turbulence as well as the problem of the blast wave. Section 6 describes the study of shock-accelerated mixing through planar and spherical Richtmyer-Meshkov mixing as well as the shock-curtain interaction problem In section 7 we acknowledge the different interactions between Stanford and other institutions participating in this SciDAC project, as well as several external collaborations made possible through it. Section 8 presents a list of publications and presentations that have been generated during the course of this SciDAC project. Finally, section 9 concludes this report with the list of personnel at Stanford University funded by this SciDAC project.

Sanjiva Lele

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Unit physics testing of a mix model in an eulerian fluid computation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A K-L turbulence mix model driven with a drag-buoyancy source term is tested in an Eulerian code in a series of basic unit-physics tests, as part of a mix validation milestone. The model and the closure coefficient values are derived in the work of Dimonte-Tipton [D-T] in Phys.Flu.18, 085101 (2006), and many of the test problems were reported there, where the mix model operated in Lagrange computations. The drag-buoyancy K-L mix model was implemented within the Eulerian code framework by A.J. Scannapieco. Mix model performance is evaluated in terms of mix width growth rates compared to experiments in select regimes. Results in our Eulerian code are presented for several unit-physics I-D test problems including the decay of homogeneous isotropic turbulence (HIT), Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) unstable mixing, shock amplification of initial turbulence, Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) mixing in several single shock test cases and in comparison to two RM experiments including re-shock (Vetter-Sturtevant and Poggi, et.al.). Sensitivity to model parameters, to Atwood number, and to initial conditions are examined. Results here are in good agreement in some tests (HIT, RT) with the previous results reported for the mix model in the Lagrange calculations. The HIT turbulent decay agrees closely with analytic expectations, and the RT growth rate matches experimental values for the default values of the model coefficients proposed in [D-T]. Results for RM characterized with a power law growth rate differ from the previous mix model work but are still within the range for reasonable agreement with experiments. Sensitivity to IC values in the RM studies are examined; results are sensitive to initial values of L[t=O], which largely determines the RM mix layer growth rate, and generally differs from the IC values used in the RT studies. Result sensitivity to initial turbulence, K[t=O], is seen to be small but significant above a threshold value. Initial conditions can be adjusted so that single shock RM mix width results match experiments but we have not been able to obtain a good match for first shock and re-shock growth rates in the same experiment with a single set of parameters and Ie. Problematic issues with KH test problems are described. Resolution studies for an RM test problem show the K-L mix growth rate decreases as it converges at a supra-linear rate, and, convergence requires a fine grid (on the order of 10 microns). For comparison, a resolution study of a second mix model [Scannapieco and Cheng, Phys.Lett.A, 299(1),49, (2002)] acting on a two fluid interface problem was examined. The mix in this case was found to increase with grid resolution at low to moderate resolutions, but converged at comparably fine resolutions. In conclusion, these tests indicate that the Eulerian code K-L model, using the Dimonte Tipton default model closure coefficients, achieve reasonable results across many of the unit-physics experimental conditions. However, we were unable to obtain good matches simultaneously for shock and re-shock mix in a single experiment. Results are sensitive to initial conditions in the regimes under study, with different IC best suited to RT or RM mix. It is reasonable to expect IC sensitivity in extrapolating to high energy density regimes, or to experiments with deceleration due to arbitrary combinations of RT and RM. As a final comparison, the atomically generated mix fraction and the mix width were each compared for the K-L mix model and the Scannapieco model on an identical RM test problem. The Scannapieco mix fraction and width grow linearly. The K-L mix fraction and width grow with the same power law exponent, in contrast to expectations from analysis. In future work it is proposed to do more head-to-head comparisons between these two models and other mix model options on a full suite of physics test problems, such as interfacial deceleration due to pressure build-up during an idealized ICF implosion.

Vold, Erik [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Douglass, Rod [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

The Complete Burning of Weapons Grade Plutonium and Highly Enriched Uranium with (Laser Inertial Fusion-Fission Energy) LIFE Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) project, a laser-based Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiment designed to achieve thermonuclear fusion ignition and burn in the laboratory, is under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and will be completed in April of 2009. Experiments designed to accomplish the NIF's goal will commence in late FY2010 utilizing laser energies of 1 to 1.3 MJ. Fusion yields of the order of 10 to 20 MJ are expected soon thereafter. Laser initiated fusion-fission (LIFE) engines have now been designed to produce nuclear power from natural or depleted uranium without isotopic enrichment, and from spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors without chemical separation into weapons-attractive actinide streams. A point-source of high-energy neutrons produced by laser-generated, thermonuclear fusion within a target is used to achieve ultra-deep burn-up of the fertile or fissile fuel in a sub-critical fission blanket. Fertile fuels including depleted uranium (DU), natural uranium (NatU), spent nuclear fuel (SNF), and thorium (Th) can be used. Fissile fuels such as low-enrichment uranium (LEU), excess weapons plutonium (WG-Pu), and excess highly-enriched uranium (HEU) may be used as well. Based upon preliminary analyses, it is believed that LIFE could help meet worldwide electricity needs in a safe and sustainable manner, while drastically shrinking the nation's and world's stockpile of spent nuclear fuel and excess weapons materials. LIFE takes advantage of the significant advances in laser-based inertial confinement fusion that are taking place at the NIF at LLNL where it is expected that thermonuclear ignition will be achieved in the 2010-2011 timeframe. Starting from as little as 300 to 500 MW of fusion power, a single LIFE engine will be able to generate 2000 to 3000 MWt in steady state for periods of years to decades, depending on the nuclear fuel and engine configuration. Because the fission blanket in a fusion-fission hybrid system is subcritical, a LIFE engine can burn any fertile or fissile nuclear material, including unenriched natural or depleted U and SNF, and can extract a very high percentage of the energy content of its fuel resulting in greatly enhanced energy generation per metric ton of nuclear fuel, as well as nuclear waste forms with vastly reduced concentrations of long-lived actinides. LIFE engines could thus provide the ability to generate vast amounts of electricity while greatly reducing the actinide content of any existing or future nuclear waste and extending the availability of low cost nuclear fuels for several thousand years. LIFE also provides an attractive pathway for burning excess weapons Pu to over 99% FIMA (fission of initial metal atoms) without the need for fabricating or reprocessing mixed oxide fuels (MOX). Because of all of these advantages, LIFE engines offer a pathway toward sustainable and safe nuclear power that significantly mitigates nuclear proliferation concerns and minimizes nuclear waste. An important aspect of a LIFE engine is the fact that there is no need to extract the fission fuel from the fission blanket before it is burned to the desired final level. Except for fuel inspection and maintenance process times, the nuclear fuel is always within the core of the reactor and no weapons-attractive materials are available outside at any point in time. However, an important consideration when discussing proliferation concerns associated with any nuclear fuel cycle is the ease with which reactor fuel can be converted to weapons usable materials, not just when it is extracted as waste, but at any point in the fuel cycle. Although the nuclear fuel remains in the core of the engine until ultra deep actinide burn up is achieved, soon after start up of the engine, once the system breeds up to full power, several tons of fissile material is present in the fission blanket. However, this fissile material is widely dispersed in millions of fuel pebbles, which can be tagged as individual accountable items, and thus made difficult to diver

Farmer, J C; Diaz de la Rubia, T; Moses, E

2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

357

LIFE Materials: Overview of Fuels and Structural Materials Issues Volume 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) project, a laser-based Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiment designed to achieve thermonuclear fusion ignition and burn in the laboratory, is under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and will be completed in April of 2009. Experiments designed to accomplish the NIF's goal will commence in late FY2010 utilizing laser energies of 1 to 1.3 MJ. Fusion yields of the order of 10 to 20 MJ are expected soon thereafter. Laser initiated fusion-fission (LIFE) engines have now been designed to produce nuclear power from natural or depleted uranium without isotopic enrichment, and from spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors without chemical separation into weapons-attractive actinide streams. A point-source of high-energy neutrons produced by laser-generated, thermonuclear fusion within a target is used to achieve ultra-deep burn-up of the fertile or fissile fuel in a sub-critical fission blanket. Fertile fuels including depleted uranium (DU), natural uranium (NatU), spent nuclear fuel (SNF), and thorium (Th) can be used. Fissile fuels such as low-enrichment uranium (LEU), excess weapons plutonium (WG-Pu), and excess highly-enriched uranium (HEU) may be used as well. Based upon preliminary analyses, it is believed that LIFE could help meet worldwide electricity needs in a safe and sustainable manner, while drastically shrinking the nation's and world's stockpile of spent nuclear fuel and excess weapons materials. LIFE takes advantage of the significant advances in laser-based inertial confinement fusion that are taking place at the NIF at LLNL where it is expected that thermonuclear ignition will be achieved in the 2010-2011 timeframe. Starting from as little as 300 to 500 MW of fusion power, a single LIFE engine will be able to generate 2000 to 3000 MWt in steady state for periods of years to decades, depending on the nuclear fuel and engine configuration. Because the fission blanket in a fusion-fission hybrid system is subcritical, a LIFE engine can burn any fertile or fissile nuclear material, including un-enriched natural or depleted U and SNF, and can extract a very high percentage of the energy content of its fuel resulting in greatly enhanced energy generation per metric ton of nuclear fuel, as well as nuclear waste forms with vastly reduced concentrations of long-lived actinides. LIFE engines could thus provide the ability to generate vast amounts of electricity while greatly reducing the actinide content of any existing or future nuclear waste and extending the availability of low cost nuclear fuels for several thousand years. LIFE also provides an attractive pathway for burning excess weapons Pu to over 99% FIMA (fission of initial metal atoms) without the need for fabricating or reprocessing mixed oxide fuels (MOX). Because of all of these advantages, LIFE engines offer a pathway toward sustainable and safe nuclear power that significantly mitigates nuclear proliferation concerns and minimizes nuclear waste. An important aspect of a LIFE engine is the fact that there is no need to extract the fission fuel from the fission blanket before it is burned to the desired final level. Except for fuel inspection and maintenance process times, the nuclear fuel is always within the core of the reactor and no weapons-attractive materials are available outside at any point in time. However, an important consideration when discussing proliferation concerns associated with any nuclear fuel cycle is the ease with which reactor fuel can be converted to weapons usable materials, not just when it is extracted as waste, but at any point in the fuel cycle. Although the nuclear fuel remains in the core of the engine until ultra deep actinide burn up is achieved, soon after start up of the engine, once the system breeds up to full power, several tons of fissile material is present in the fission blanket. However, this fissile material is widely dispersed in millions of fuel pebbles, which can be tagged as individual accountable items, and thus made difficult to dive

Farmer, J

2008-09-08T23:59:59.000Z