Sample records for ihsgi inforum icf

  1. The Inforum LIFT Model

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro IndustriesTownDells,1Stocks Nov-14Total DeliveredPrincipalNumberAugust7,Biofuels:Inforum

  2. ICF Facilities | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Defense Programs Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation Inertial Confinement Fusion ICF Facilities ICF Facilities Nike mirror array and lens array ICF operates a set...

  3. Equilibrium ignition for ICF capsules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lackner, K.S.; Colgate, S.A.; Johnson, N.L.; Kirkpatrick, R.C.; Menikoff, R.; Petschek, A.G.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    There are two fundamentally different approaches to igniting DT fuel in an ICF capsule which can be described as equilibrium and hot spot ignition. In both cases, a capsule which can be thought of as a pusher containing the DT fuel is imploded until the fuel reaches ignition conditions. In comparing high-gain ICF targets using cryogenic DT for a pusher with equilibrium ignition targets using high-Z pushers which contain the radiation. The authors point to the intrinsic advantages of the latter. Equilibrium or volume ignition sacrifices high gain for lower losses, lower ignition temperature, lower implosion velocity and lower sensitivity of the more robust capsule to small fluctuations and asymmetries in the drive system. The reduction in gain is about a factor of 2.5, which is small enough to make the more robust equilibrium ignition an attractive alternative.

  4. ICF program annual report, 1988--89

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains discussions on the following topics: Target Physics; Nova Experiments; Nova Laser Science and Technology; Target Science and Technology; Advanced Drivers; and ICF Applications.

  5. ICF International | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are being directedAnnual SiteofEvaluatingGroup | OpenHunan Runhua New Energy DevelopmentListI Sol VenturesICF

  6. icf

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA Approved:AdministrationAnalysisDarby Dietrich5 |0/%2A0/%2Agtri |8/%2A7/%2A

  7. Fuel temperature determination for ICF microspheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, D.B.; Giovanielli, D.V.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The common heuristic expression for estimating thermonuclear burn in ICF microspheres far from bootstrap heating is often used for inversion to obtain peak temperatures from experimental data. It contains an ad hoc or fitted parameter and lacks some parameters of obvious influence in actual systems. We present an alternative expression, which may be usefully inverted and does not suffer these defects.

  8. aperture icf optics: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    aperture icf optics First Page Previous Page 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Advanced Optics Experiments Using...

  9. Tritium and plutonium production as a step toward ICF commercialization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pendergrass, J.H.; Dudziak, D.J.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The feasibility of a combined special nuclear materials (SNM) production plant/engineering test facility (ETF) with reduced pellet and driver performance requirements as a step toward commercialization of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is examined. Blanket design and tritium production cost studies, the status of R and D programs, and the ETF role are emphasized.

  10. Contributions to the Genesis and Progress of ICF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nuckolls, J H

    2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) has progressed from the detonation of large-scale fusion explosions initiated by atomic bombs in the early 1950s to final preparations for initiating small-scale fusion explosions with giant lasers. The next major step after ignition will be development of high performance targets that can be initiated with much smaller, lower cost lasers. In the 21st century and beyond, ICF's grand challenge is to develop practical power plants that generate low cost, clean, inexhaustible fusion energy. In this chapter, I first describe the origin in 1960-61 of ICF target concepts, early speculations on laser driven 'Thermonuclear Engines' for power production and rocket propulsion, and encouraging large-scale nuclear explosive experiments conducted in 1962. Next, I recall the 40-year, multi-billion dollar ignition campaign - to develop a matched combination of sufficiently high-performance implosion lasers and sufficiently stable targets capable of igniting small fusion explosions. I conclude with brief comments on the NIF ignition campaign and very high-performance targets, and speculations on ICF's potential in a centuries-long Darwinian competition of future energy systems. My perspectives in this chapter are those of a nuclear explosive designer, optimistic proponent of ICF energy, and Livermore Laboratory leader. The perspectives of Livermore's post 1970 laser experts and builders, and laser fusion experimentalists are provided in a chapter written by John Holzrichter, a leading scientist and leader in Livermore's second generation laser fusion program. In a third chapter, Ray Kidder, a theoretical physicist and early laser fusion pioneer, provides his perspectives including the history of the first generation laser fusion program he led from 1962-1972.

  11. Effect of inactive impurities on the burning of ICF targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gus'kov, S. Yu. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Il'in, D. V.; Sherman, V. E. [St. Petersburg State Engineering Institute (Russian Federation)

    2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The efficiency of thermonuclear burning of the spherical deuterium-tritium (DT) plasma of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets in the presence of low-Z impurities (such as lithium, carbon, or beryllium) with arbitrary concentrations is investigated. The effect of impurities produced due to the mixing of the thermonuclear fuel with the material of the structural elements of the target during its compression on the process of target burning is studied, and the possibility of using solid noncryogenic thermonuclear fuels in ICF targets is analyzed. Analytical dependences of the ignition energy and target thermonuclear gain on the impurity concentration are obtained. The models are constructed for homogeneous and inhomogeneous plasmas for the case in which the burning is initiated in the central heated region of the target and then propagates into the surrounding relatively cold fuel. Two possible configurations of an inhomogeneous plasma, namely, an isobaric configuration formed in the case of spark ignition of the target and an isochoric configuration formed in the case of fast ignition, are considered. The results of numerical simulations of the burning of the DT plasma of ICF targets in a wide range of impurity concentrations are presented. The simulations were performed using the TEPA one-dimensional code, in which the thermonuclear burning kinetics is calculated by the Monte Carlo method. It is shown that the strongest negative effect related to the presence of impurities is an increase in the energy of target ignition. It is substantiated that the most promising solid noncryogenic fuel is DT hydride of beryllium (BeDT). The requirements to the plasma parameters at which BeDT can be used as a fuel in noncryogenic ICF targets are determined. Variants of using noncryogenic targets with a solid thermonuclear fuel are proposed.

  12. Hybrid-drive implosion system for ICF targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mark, J.W.K.

    1987-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Hybrid-drive implosion systems for ICF targets are described which permit a significant increase in target gain at fixed total driver energy. The ICF target is compressed in two phases, an initial compression phase and a final peak power phase, with each phase driven by a separate, optimized driver. The targets comprise a hollow spherical ablator surroundingly disposed around fusion fuel. The ablator is first compressed to higher density by a laser system, or by an ion beam system, that in each case is optimized for this initial phase of compression of the target. Then, following compression of the ablator, energy is directly delivered into the compressed ablator by an ion beam driver system that is optimized for this second phase of operation of the target. The fusion fuel is driven, at high gain, to conditions wherein fusion reactions occur. This phase separation allows hydrodynamic efficiency and energy deposition uniformity to be individually optimized, thereby securing significant advantages in energy gain. In additional embodiments, the same or separate drivers supply energy for ICF target implosion. 3 figs.

  13. Hybrid-drive implosion system for ICF targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mark, James W. (Danville, CA)

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hybrid-drive implosion systems (20,40) for ICF targets (10,22,42) are described which permit a significant increase in target gain at fixed total driver energy. The ICF target is compressed in two phases, an initial compression phase and a final peak power phase, with each phase driven by a separate, optimized driver. The targets comprise a hollow spherical ablator (12) surroundingly disposed around fusion fuel (14). The ablator is first compressed to higher density by a laser system (24), or by an ion beam system (44), that in each case is optimized for this initial phase of compression of the target. Then, following compression of the ablator, energy is directly delivered into the compressed ablator by an ion beam driver system (30,48) that is optimized for this second phase of operation of the target. The fusion fuel (14) is driven, at high gain, to conditions wherein fusion reactions occur. This phase separation allows hydrodynamic efficiency and energy deposition uniformity to be individually optimized, thereby securing significant advantages in energy gain. In additional embodiments, the same or separate drivers supply energy for ICF target implosion.

  14. X-ray ablation measurements and modeling for ICF applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, A.T.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    X-ray ablation of material from the first wall and other components of an ICF (Inertial Confinement Fusion) chamber is a major threat to the laser final optics. Material condensing on these optics after a shot may cause damage with subsequent laser shots. To ensure the successful operation of the ICF facility, removal rates must be predicted accurately. The goal for this dissertation is to develop an experimentally validated x-ray response model, with particular application to the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Accurate knowledge of the x-ray and debris emissions from ICF targets is a critical first step in the process of predicting the performance of the target chamber system. A number of 1-D numerical simulations of NIF targets have been run to characterize target output in terms of energy, angular distribution, spectrum, and pulse shape. Scaling of output characteristics with variations of both target yield and hohlraum wall thickness are also described. Experiments have been conducted at the Nova laser on the effects of relevant x-ray fluences on various materials. The response was diagnosed using post-shot examinations of the surfaces with scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope instruments. Judgments were made about the dominant removal mechanisms for each material. Measurements of removal depths were made to provide data for the modeling. The finite difference ablation code developed here (ABLATOR) combines the thermomechanical response of materials to x-rays with models of various removal mechanisms. The former aspect refers to energy deposition in such small characteristic depths ({approx} micron) that thermal conduction and hydrodynamic motion are significant effects on the nanosecond time scale. The material removal models use the resulting time histories of temperature and pressure-profiles, along with ancillary local conditions, to predict rates of surface vaporization and the onset of conditions that would lead to spallation.

  15. Overview of ICF Program SNL Z Facility UR/LLE OMEGA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of ignition in the laboratory is a crucial goal for NNSA Defense Programs Mission of NNSA ICF Campaign Provide operations #12;13 Direct Drive is an important part of the NNSA ignition program A Saturn target comprising

  16. Type C investigation of electrical fabrication projects in ICF Kaiser shops

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huckfeldt, R.A.

    1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A Type C Investigation Board was convened to investigate an electrical miswiring problem found during the operation of the electrical distribution trailer for the TWRS Rotary Mode Core Sampling Truck {number_sign}2. The trailer was designed by WHC and fabricated ICF KH on site for use in the Characterization Program. This problem resulted in a serious safety hazard since the support truck frame/chassis became electrically energized. This final report provides results of the ``Type C Investigation, Electrical Fabrication Projects in ICF KH Shops, June, 1995.`` It contains the investigation scope, executive summary, relevant facts, analysis, conclusions and corrective actions. DOE Order 5484.1, ``Environmental Protection, Safety and Health Protection Information Reporting Requirements,`` was followed in preparation of this report. Because the incident was electrical in nature and involved both Westinghouse Hanford Company and ICF Kaiser Hanford organizations, the board included members from both contractors and members with considerable electrical expertise.

  17. Core science and technology development plan for indirect-drive ICF ignition. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powell, H.T.; Kilkenny, J.D. [eds.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To define the development work needed to support inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program goals, the authors have assembled this Core Science and Technology (CS and T) Plan that encompasses nearly all science research and technology development in the ICF program. The objective of the CS and T Plan described here is to identify the development work needed to ensure the success of advanced ICF facilities, in particular the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This plan is intended as a framework to facilitate planning and coordination of future ICF programmatic activities. The CS and T Plan covers all elements of the ICF program including laser technology, optic manufacturing, target chamber, target diagnostics, target design and theory, target components and fabrication, and target physics experiments. The CS and T Plan has been divided into these seven different technology development areas, and they are used as level-1 categories in a work breakdown structure (WBS) to facilitate the organization of all activities in this plan. The scope of the CS and T Plan includes all research and development required to support the NIF leading up to the activation and initial operation as an indirect-drive facility. In each of the CS and T main development areas, the authors describe the technology and issues that need to be addressed to achieve NIF performance goals. To resolve all issues and achieve objectives, an extensive assortment of tasks must be performed in a coordinated and timely manner. The authors describe these activities and present planning schedules that detail the flow of work to be performed over a 10-year period corresponding to estimated time needed to demonstrate fusion ignition with the NIF. Besides the benefits to the ICF program, the authors also discuss how the commercial sector and the nuclear weapons science may profit from the proposed research and development program.

  18. Charged particle driver for ICF using an accelerated, focused compact torus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meeker, D.J.; Hammer, J.H.; Hartman, C.W.

    1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the status of evaluating an accelerated and focused compact torus as a driver for ICF. We are studying the acceleration and focusing aspects experimentally in the RACE facility, a recently completed ring generator coupled to a 260 kJ acceleration bank. Compact torus and ICF target interaction is being investigated with PIC codes and LASNEX, a 2D magneto-hydrodynamics code. Final conditions required of the CT are discussed as well as coupling issues such as superthermal electron production. We conclude with an economic evaluation of a few 100 MW reactor driven by a compact torus. 9 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  19. The development and application of advanced analytical methods to commercial ICF reactor chambers. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cousseau, P.; Engelstad, R.; Henderson, D.L. [and others

    1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress is summarized in this report for each of the following tasks: (1) multi-dimensional radiation hydrodynamics computer code development; (2) 2D radiation-hydrodynamic code development; (3) ALARA: analytic and Laplacian adaptive radioactivity analysis -- a complete package for analysis of induced activation; (4) structural dynamics modeling of ICF reactor chambers; and (5) analysis of self-consistent target chamber clearing.

  20. ICF Program StatusSNL Z Facility UR/LLE OMEGA Presented to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ICF Program StatusSNL Z Facility UR/LLE OMEGA Presented to: Fusion Power Associates Annual Meeting on planned path · High energy density physics is recognized as an important and emerging scientific field · NAS, OSTP reports · Budget outlook remains tight · FY2006 appropriation · Outyear plans #12

  1. ORAL REFERENCE: ICF100152OR EFFECTS OF DIFFUSION ON INTERFACIAL FRACTURE OF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volinsky, Alex A.

    annealing, lead-frame bonding and service at elevated temperature, diffusion and segregation changeORAL REFERENCE: ICF100152OR EFFECTS OF DIFFUSION ON INTERFACIAL FRACTURE OF MULTILAYER HYBRID-0959 **University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 ABSTRACT In this study, the effect of diffusion on gold

  2. Inertial confinement fusion. 1995 ICF annual report, October 1994--September 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL`s) Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program is a Department of Energy (DOE) Defense Program research and advanced technology development program focused on the goal of demonstrating thermonuclear fusion ignition and energy gain in the laboratory. During FY 1995, the ICF Program continued to conduct ignition target physics optimization studies and weapons physics experiments in support of the Defense Program`s stockpile stewardship goals. It also continued to develop technologies in support of the performance, cost, and schedule goals of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project. The NIF is a key element of the DOE`s Stockpile Stewardship and Management Program. In addition to its primary Defense Program goals, the ICF Program provides research and development opportunities in fundamental high-energy-density physics and supports the necessary research base for the possible long-term application to inertial fusion energy (IFE). Also, ICF technologies have had spin-off applications for industrial and governmental use. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  3. Fast-ion spectrometry of ICF implosions and laser-foil experiments at the omega and MTW laser facilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sinenian, Nareg

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fast ions generated from laser-plasma interactions (LPI) have been used to study inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions and laser-foil interactions. LPI, which vary in nature depending on the wavelength and intensity ...

  4. SAFIRE: A systems analysis code for ICF (inertial confinement fusion) reactor economics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCarville, T.J.; Meier, W.R.; Carson, C.F.; Glasgow, B.B.

    1987-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The SAFIRE (Systems Analysis for ICF Reactor Economics) code incorporates analytical models for scaling the cost and performance of several inertial confinement fusion reactor concepts for electric power. The code allows us to vary design parameters (e.g., driver energy, chamber pulse rate, net electric power) and evaluate the resulting change in capital cost of power plant and the busbar cost of electricity. The SAFIRE code can be used to identify the most attractive operating space and to identify those design parameters with the greatest leverage for improving the economics of inertial confinement fusion electric power plants.

  5. Recent progress on the Los Alamos Aurora ICF (inertial confinement fusion) laser system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosocha, L.A.; Blair, L.S.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Aurora is the Los Alamos short-pulse, high-power, krypton-fluoride laser system. It serves as an end-to-end technology demonstration prototype for large-scale ultraviolet laser systems for short wavelength inertial confinement fusion (ICF) investigations. The system is designed to employ optical angular multiplexing and serial amplification by electron-beam-driven KrF laser amplifiers to deliver stacked, 248-nm, 5-ns duration multikilojoule laser pulses to ICF-relevant targets. This paper presents a summary of the Aurora system and a discussion of the progress achieved in the construction and integration of the laser system. We concentrate on the main features of the following major system components: front-end lasers, amplifier train, multiplexer, optical relay train, demultiplexer, and the associated optical alignment system. During the past year, two major construction and integration tasks have been accomplished. The first task is the demonstration of 96-beam multiplexing and amplified energy extraction, as evidenced by the integrated operation of the front end, the multiplexer (12-fold and 8-fold encoders), the optical relay train, and three electron-beam-driven amplifiers. The second task is the assembly and installation of the demultiplexer optical hardware, which consists of over 300 optical components ranging in size from several centimeters square to over a meter square. 13 refs., 13 figs.

  6. Preparation of germanium doped plasma polymerized coatings as ICF target ablators

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brusasco, R.M.; Saculla, M.D.; Cook, R.C.

    1994-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Targets for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) utilize an organic (CH) ablator coating prepared by plasma polymerization. Some of these experiments require a mid-Z dopant in the ablator coating to modify the opacity of the shell. Bromine had been used in the past, but the surface finish of brominated CH degrades rapidly with time upon exposure to air. This paper describes the preparation and characterization of plasma polymer layers containing germanium as a dopant at concentrations of between 1.25 and 2.25 atom percent. The coatings are stable in air and have an rms surface roughness of 7--9 nm (modes 10--1,000) which is similar to that obtained with undoped coatings. High levels of dopant result in cracking of the inner mandrel during target assembly. Possible explanations for the observed cracking behavior will be discussed.

  7. Inference of ICF implosion core mix using experimental data and theoretical mix modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherrill, Leslie Welser [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Haynes, Donald A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cooley, James H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sherrill, Manolo E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mancini, Roberto C [UNR; Tommasini, Riccardo [LLNL; Golovkin, Igor E [PRISM COMP. SCIENCES; Haan, Steven W [LLNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mixing between fuel and shell materials in Inertial Confinement Fusion (lCF) implosion cores is a current topic of interest. The goal of this work was to design direct-drive ICF experiments which have varying levels of mix, and subsequently to extract information on mixing directly from the experimental data using spectroscopic techniques. The experimental design was accomplished using hydrodynamic simulations in conjunction with Haan's saturation model, which was used to predict the mix levels of candidate experimental configurations. These theoretical predictions were then compared to the mixing information which was extracted from the experimental data, and it was found that Haan's mix model predicted trends in the width of the mix layer as a function of initial shell thickness. These results contribute to an assessment of the range of validity and predictive capability of the Haan saturation model, as well as increasing confidence in the methods used to extract mixing information from experimental data.

  8. High-Temperature Carbon-Irradiation Issues for the Sombrero ICF Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T. Munsat

    1999-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to assess the feasibility of carbon materials for the first-wall of the Sombrero KrF laser-driven ICF fusion reactor, published experimental results relating to mechanical and thermal properties of graphites and carbon-fiber-composites (CFC's) under neutron irradiation and high heat loads are reviewed. Results are compared to published design requirements for the Sombrero ICF reactor, with particular attention to three separate issues of concern: 1. Erosion rates of the first wall are highly sensitive to the thermal conductivity value, which is itself environment-sensitive (radiation and high temperature). Erosion rates at the first wall are calculated using a high-temperature post-irradiation conductivity value of 50 W/m*K, with complete erosion of the first wall layer predicted within 14 months Sombrero full-power operation (f.p.o.), illustrating the sensitivity of erosion rates to thermal conductivity assumptions. 2. Radiation-induced swelling in 2-D and 'pseudo 3-D' CFC's is consistently {approx}20% under high-temperature neutron damage of 5 dpa (4 months f.p.o.). This level of swelling would pose technical challenges to the engineering of the target chamber modules. 3. Total tritium retention is predicted to be {approx} 0.5 to 5 kg in the Sombrero chamber within 8 months f.p.o., which may call into question safety-status assumptions of the CFC-based chamber design. These results indicate the urgency of high-temperature neutron-irradiation tests of fully symmetric 3-D CFC's in order to support the plausibility of a carbon first-wall IFE chamber such as proposed for Sombrero.

  9. Experimental techniques for measuring Rayleigh-Taylor instability in inertial confinement fusion (ICF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smalyuk, V A

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability is one of the major concerns in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) because it amplifies target modulations in both acceleration and deceleration phases of implosion, which leads to shell disruption and performance degradation of imploding targets. This article reviews experimental results of the RT growth experiments performed on OMEGA laser system, where targets were driven directly with laser light. RT instability was studied in the linear and nonlinear regimes. The experiments were performed in acceleration phase, using planar and spherical targets, and in deceleration phase of spherical implosions, using spherical shells. Initial target modulations consisted of 2-D pre-imposed modulations, and 2-D and 3-D modulations imprinted on targets by the non-uniformities in laser drive. In planar geometry, the nonlinear regime was studied using 3-D modulations with broadband spectra near nonlinear saturation levels. In acceleration-phase, the measured modulation Fourier spectra and nonlinear growth velocities are in good agreement with those predicted by Haan's model [Haan S W 1989 Phys. Rev. A 39 5812]. In a real-space analysis, the bubble merger was quantified by a self-similar evolution of bubble size distributions [Oron D et al 2001 Phys. Plasmas 8, 2883]. The 3-D, inner-surface modulations were measured to grow throughout the deceleration phase of spherical implosions. RT growth rates are very sensitive to the drive conditions, therefore they can be used to test and validate drive physics in hydrodynamic codes used to design ICF implosions. Measured growth rates of pre-imposed 2-D target modulations below nonlinear saturation levels were used to validate non-local thermal electron transport model in laser-driven experiments.

  10. Progress in Z-Pinch driven dynamic-hohlraums for high-temperature radiation-flow and ICF experiments at Sandia National Laboratories.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, James E.; Haines, Malcolm G. (Imperial College, London, United Kingdom); Chandler, Gordon Andrew; Bliss, David Emery; Olson, Richard Edward; Sanford, Thomas W. L.; Olson, Craig Lee; Nash, Thomas J.; Ruiz, Carlos L.; Matzen, Maurice Keith; Idzorek, George C. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Stygar, William A.; Apruzese, John P. (Naval Research Laboratory, Washington DC); Cuneo, Michael Edward; Cooper, Gary Wayne (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Chittenden, Jeremy Paul (Imperial College, London, United Kingdom); Chrien, Robert E. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Slutz, Stephen A.; Mock, Raymond Cecil; Leeper, Ramon Joe; Sarkisov, Gennady Sergeevich (Ktech Corporation, Albuquerque, NM); Peterson, Darrell L. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM); Lemke, Raymond William; Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; Roderick, Norman Frederick (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Watt, Robert G. (Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New MM)

    2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress in understanding the physics of dynamic-hohlraums is reviewed for a system capable of generating 13 TW of axial radiation for high temperature (>200 eV) radiation-flow experiments and ICF capsule implosions.

  11. Ion microtomography (IMT) and particle-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) analysis direct drive of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antolak, A.J.; Pontau, A.E.; Morse, D.H. (Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States)); Weirup, D.L.; Heikkinen, D.W.; Hornady, R.S. (Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)); Cholewa, M.; Bench, G.S.; Legge, G.J.F. (Melbourne Univ. (Australia). Micro Analytical Research Centre)

    1991-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The complementary techniques of ion microtomography (IMT) and particle-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) are used to provide micro-characterization of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets for density uniformity, sphericity, and trace element spatial distributions. ICF target quality control in the laser fusion program is important to ensure that the energy deposition from the lasers results in uniform compression and minimization of Taylor-Rayleigh instabilities. We obtain 1% density determinations using IMT with spatial resolution approaching two microns. Utilizing PIXE, we can map out dopant and impurity distributions with elemental detection sensitivities on the order of a few ppm. We present examples of IMT and PIXE analyses performed on several ICF targets.

  12. Density Functional and ab Initio Investigation of CF2ICF2I and CF2CF2I Radicals in Gas and Solution Phases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ihee, Hyotcherl

    -18 studies have been made to investigate their electronic structure and photodissociation dynamics. Both calculations of CF2ICF2I and · CF2CF2I, model systems in reaction dynamics, in the gas phase and methanol and potentially their reaction dynamics as well as provides a good model system for quantum chemical calculations

  13. Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition and High Yield Campaign The Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition and High Yield (ICF) Campaign supports the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , and effective nuclear weapons stockpile without underground testing. It supports stockpile assessment in simulations is essential to having confidence in them. More than 99 percent of the energy from a nuclear criticality is attained. The ICF program operates and conducts experiments in facilities that can create

  14. Laser-induced magnetic fields in ICF capsules, Final Report, DE-FG02-08ER85128, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindman, Erick L

    2009-11-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser-induced magnetic fields in ICF capsules Final Report, DE-FG02-08ER85128, Phase 1 E. L. LINDMAN, Otowi Technical Services, Los Alamos, NM. The performance of an inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) capsule can be improved by inserting a magnetic field into it before compressing it [Kirkpatrick, et al., Fusion Technol. 27, 205 (1995)]. To obtain standoff in an ICF power generator, a method of inserting the field without the use of low-inductance leads attached to the capsule is desired. A mechanism for generating such a field using a laser was discovered in Japan [Sakagami, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 42, 839 (1979), Kolodner and Yablonovitch, Phys. Rev. Lett. 43, 1402 (1979)] and studied at Los Alamos in the 1980s [M. A. Yates, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 49, 1702 (1982); Forslund and Brackbill, Phys. Rev. Lett. 48, 1614 (1982)]. In this mechanism, a p-polarized laser beam strikes a solid target producing hot electrons that are accelerated away from the target surface by resonant absorption. An electric field is created that returns the hot electrons to the target. But, they do not return to the target along the same trajectory on which they left. The resulting current produces a toroidal magnetic field that was observed to spread over a region outside the hot spot with a radius of a millimeter. No experimental measurements of the magnetic field strength were performed. Estimates from computer simulation suggest that field strengths in the range of 1 to 10 Mega gauss (100 to 1000 Tesla) were obtained outside of the laser spot. To use this mechanism to insert a magnetic field into an ICF capsule, the capsule must be redesigned. In one approach, a central conductor is added, a toroidal gap is cut in the outer wall and the DT fuel is frozen on the inner surface of the capsule. The capsule is dropped into the reaction chamber and struck first with the laser that generates the magnetic field. The laser hot spot is positioned at the center of the toroidal gap. As the magnetic field spreads from the hot spot over the surface that contains the toroidal gap, it will propagate through the gap and set up a steady state in the capsule. The main compression is then initiated. First, it closes the gap and crow-bars the field, then it compresses the fuel to ignition. In addition to this application, we discuss the use of this mechanism to induce Mega-gauss fields in laboratory apparatus for measurements of the effects of large magnetic fields on material samples. A preliminary target design for this purpose is presented. It is made of high-density material with no hydrogen surface contamination to minimize fast ion losses and to minimize x-ray preheat of the sample (the material, whose magnetic properties are to be measured). In it, the gap is designed to allow the magnetic field to move into the interior of the target while minimizing the flow of hot electrons into the interior. By adjusting the size of the gap as well as its configuration, the hot electron effects can be minimized. Since the strength of the magnetic field depends on the radial distance to the sample from the center of the conductor carrying the return current, the sample is located at a point of minimum conductor radius. This location also minimizes the effects on the measurement of any hot electrons that flow into the interior. Useful experiments can be accomplished with the “seed” field alone in this geometry. Compressing the capsule after the insertion of the seed field may allow experiments with even larger magnetic fields. We have used computer-simulation techniques to address a number of issues. Our conclusions include: • This magnetic-field generating mechanism is a viable method for generating magnetic fields in ICF targets and for laboratory experiments. • Useful experiments on material samples can be done with the seed field of 1 to10 Mega gauss (100 to 1000 Tesla) and higher magnetic fields can be obtained by subsequently compressing the capsule. • The results reported here can be studied experimentally with a modest CO2 laser that emits 4.5 J of ene

  15. Temperature-dependent tensile strength, surface roughness diagnostics, and magnetic support and positioning of polymer ICF shells. Final report, October 1, 1993--April 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Honig, A.

    1995-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

    During the course of this grant, we perfected emissivity and accommodation coefficient measurements on polymer ICF shells in the temperature range 250 to 350 K. Values for polystyrene shells are generally between 10{sup -2} and 10{sup -3}, which are very advantageous for ICF at cryogenic temperatures. Preliminary results on Br doped target shells indicate an accommodation coefficient, presumably associated with surface roughness on an atomic scale, about an order of magnitude larger than for ordinary polystyrene target shells. We also constructed apparatus with optical access for low temperature tensile strength and emissivity measurements, and made preliminary tests on this system. Magnetic shells were obtained both from GDP coating and from doping styrene with 10 manometer size ferromagnetic particles. The magnetic properties were measured through electron spin resonance (ESR). These experiments confirm the applicability of the Curie law, and establish the validity of using ESR measurements to determine shell temperature in the low temperature regime from 4K to 250K, thus complementing our presently accessible range. The high electron spin densities (> 10{sup 20}/CM{sup 3}) suggest magnetic levitation should be feasible at cryogenic temperatures. This work has resulted in two conference presentations, a Technical Report, a paper to be published in Fusion Technology, and a Master`s Thesis.

  16. History of HERMES III diode to z-pinch breakthrough and beyond : learning about pulsed power and z-pinch ICF.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanford, Thomas W. L.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    HERMES III and Z are two flagship accelerators of Sandia's pulsed-power program developed to generate intense-ray fields for the study of nuclear radiation effects, and to explore high energy-density physics (including the production of intense x-ray fields for Inertia Confinement Fusion [ICF]), respectively. A diode at the exit of HERMES III converts its 20-MeV electron beam into-rays. In contrast, at the center of Z, a z-pinch is used to convert its 20-MA current into an intense burst of x-rays. Here the history of how the HERMES III diode emerged from theoretical considerations to actual hardware is discussed. Next, the reverse process of how the experimental discovery of wire-array stabilization in a z-pinch, led to a better theory of wirearray implosions and its application to one of the ICF concepts on Z--the DH (Dynamic Hohlraum) is reviewed. Lastly, the report concludes with how the unexpected axial radiation asymmetry measured in the DH is understood. The first discussion illustrates the evolution of physics from theory-to-observationto- refinement. The second two illustrate the reverse process of observationto- theory-to refinement. The histories are discussed through the vehicle of my research at Sandia, illustrating the unique environment Sandia provides for personal growth and development into a scientific leader.

  17. How ICF Works

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHallNotSeventy years ofHonors Memberscience /

  18. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    geothermal, wood, wood waste, all municipal waste, landfill gas, other biomass, solar, wind, pumped storage, and fuel cells. h IHSGI cumulative capacity retirements are...

  19. icf | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over OurThe Iron4 Self-Scrubbing:,, , .,Shreve; University67Hybridicf | National Nuclear

  20. Published in Proceedings of the InForum'99 Conference Collaborative Management Environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Potok, Thomas E.

    the Department of Energy (DOE). The initial results of the system usage are very positive. To date, information technologies, the system fulfills an important role as a cost-efficient enterprise information system to do so, for U.S. Government Purposes. maintenance of traditional enterprise information systems

  1. ICF Reports | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Twitter Youtube Flickr RSS People Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure...

  2. ICF Reports | National Nuclear Security Administration

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645U.S. DOE Office of Science (SC) EnvironmentalGyroSolé(tm)Hydrogen Storage inChang Curriculum

  3. ICF Facilities | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOn AprilA groupTubahq.na.gov Office ofDepartmentAdministrationto Submit a

  4. ICF basics, NIF and IFE Mark C. Herrmann

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Laboratory under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48. Thanks to Bruce Hammel, John Lindl, and Ed Moses

  5. ICF Program Status SNL Z Facility UR/LLE OMEGA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : · Continue to deliver products to DoD. · Eliminate backlog of surveillance units in FY 2007. · Accelerate dismantlement of retired weapons by 49% from FY 2006 to FY 2007. · Deliver B61-ALT357 First Production Unit (FPU existing oil/water wall (8/24/06 ­ 9/18/06) Remove existing hardware (7/27/06 ­ 8/23/06) Construct new oil

  6. Isothermal model of ICF burn with finite alpha range treatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galloway, Conner Daniel (Conner Daniel Cross)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple model for simulating deuterium tritium burn in inertial confinement fusion capsules is developed. The model, called the Isothermal Rarefaction Model, is zero dimensional (represented as ordinary differential ...

  7. IN-FORUM http://www.in-forum.com/articles/index.cfm?id=98107§ion=Opinion 1 of 2 7/20/2005 2:44 PM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Patzek, Tadeusz W.

    Archive Company Site Ethics Code E-Mail Index InfoGuide Newspapers in Education Public Notices Resources) as if it is the gospel truth. Pimentel's studies have been routinely discredited by officials from the Departments

  8. Ion kinetic effects on the ignition and burn in ICF Ion kinetic effects on the ignition and burn of ICF targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and burn of the thermonuclear fuel in inertial confinement fusion pellets at the ion kinetic level to treat fusion products (suprathermal -particles) in a self-consistent manner with the thermal bulk enhancement of fusion products leads to a significant reduction of the fusion yield. I. MOTIVATION AND CONTEXT

  9. Electron Generation and Transport in Intense Relativistic Laser-Plasma Interactions Relevant to Fast Ignition ICF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, T

    2010-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The reentrant cone approach to Fast Ignition, an advanced Inertial Confinement Fusion scheme, remains one of the most attractive because of the potential to efficiently collect and guide the laser light into the cone tip and direct energetic electrons into the high density core of the fuel. However, in the presence of a preformed plasma, the laser energy is largely absorbed before it can reach the cone tip. Full scale fast ignition laser systems are envisioned to have prepulses ranging between 100 mJ to 1 J. A few of the imperative issues facing fast ignition, then, are the conversion efficiency with which the laser light is converted to hot electrons, the subsequent transport characteristics of those electrons, and requirements for maximum allowable prepulse this may put on the laser system. This dissertation examines the laser-to-fast electron conversion efficiency scaling with prepulse for cone-guided fast ignition. Work in developing an extreme ultraviolet imager diagnostic for the temperature measurements of electron-heated targets, as well as the validation of the use of a thin wire for simultaneous determination of electron number density and electron temperature will be discussed.

  10. Electron generation and transport in intense relativistic laser-plasma interactions relevant to fast ignition ICF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Tammy Yee Wing

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    achieving controlled thermonuclear fusion, we’re also ex-and densi- ties that thermonuclear fusion between the D and

  11. Application of Spatially Resolved High Resolution Crystal Spectrometry to ICF Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenneth W. Hill, et. al.

    2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    High resolution (?/?#3;? ~ 10 000) 1D imaging x-ray spectroscopy using a spherically bent crystal and a 2D hybrid pixel array detector is used world wide for Doppler measurements of ion-temperature and plasma flow-velocity profiles in magnetic confinement fusion plasmas. Meter sized plasmas are diagnosed with cm spatial resolution and 10 ms time resolution. This concept can also be used as a diagnostic of small sources, such as inertial confinement fusion plasmas and targets on x-ray light source beam lines, with spatial resolution of micrometers, as demonstrated by laboratory experiments using a 250-?m 55 Fe source, and by ray-tracing calculations. Throughput calculations agree with measurements, and predict detector counts in the range 10-8 -10-6 times source x-rays, depending on crystal reflectivity and spectrometer geometry. Results of the lab demonstrations, application of the technique to the National Ignition Facility (NIF), and predictions of performance on NIF will be presented.

  12. KrF laser path to high gain ICF (inertial confinement fusion) laboratory microfusion facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, D.B.; Sullivan, J.A.; Figueiro, J.F.; Cartwright, D.C.; McDonald, T.E.; Hauer, A.A.; Coggeshall, S.V.; Younger, S.M.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The krypton-fluoride laser has many desirable features for inertial confinement fusion. Because it is a gas laser capable of operation with high efficiency, it is the only known laser candidate capable of meeting the driver requirements for inertial fusion energy (IFE) production. Los Alamos National Laboratory has defined a program plan to develop KrF lasers for IFE production. This plan develops the KrF laser and demonstrates the target performance in single-pulse facilities. A 100-kJ Laser Target Test Facility (LTTF) is proposed as the next step, to be followed by a 3 to 10-MJ Laboratory Microfusion Facility (LMF). The LTTF will resolve many target physics issues and accurately define the driver energy required for the LMF. It is also proposed that the technology development for IFE, such as the high-efficiency, high-reliability, repetitively pulsed driver, the reactor, mass production of targets, and the mechanism of injecting targets be developed in parallel with the single-pulse facilities. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  13. Electron generation and transport in intense relativistic laser-plasma interactions relevant to fast ignition ICF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Tammy Yee Wing

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mason, and R. L. Morse, Thermonuclear burn characteristicsachieving controlled thermonuclear fusion, we’re also ex-and densi- ties that thermonuclear fusion between the D and

  14. The ICF, Inc. coal and electric utilities model : an analysis and evaluation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, David O.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    v.1. The Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) is sponsoring a series of evaluations of important energy policy and electric utility industry models by the MIT Energy Model Analysis Program (EMAP). The subject of this ...

  15. High-Temperature Carbon-Irradiation Issues for the Sombrero ICF Reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in any graphitic material including polycrystalline and carbon-fiber composite materials. The exact (609) 243-2418 #12;2 Abstract In order to assess the feasibility of carbon materials for the first and thermal properties of graphites and carbon-fiber-composites (CFC's) under neutron irradiation and high

  16. Electron generation and transport in intense relativistic laser-plasma interactions relevant to fast ignition ICF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Tammy Yee Wing

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    9 µm. The thin aluminum and polyimide filter is designed towith 2100 - 2500 ? A of polyimide, effectively operate as NDµm size resolution and a polyimide/aluminum filter, viewing

  17. Innovative high pressure gas MEM's based neutron detector for ICF and active SNM detection.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Shawn Bryan; Derzon, Mark Steven; Renzi, Ronald F.; Chandler, Gordon Andrew

    2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An innovative helium3 high pressure gas detection system, made possible by utilizing Sandia's expertise in Micro-electrical Mechanical fluidic systems, is proposed which appears to have many beneficial performance characteristics with regards to making these neutron measurements in the high bremsstrahlung and electrical noise environments found in High Energy Density Physics experiments and especially on the very high noise environment generated on the fast pulsed power experiments performed here at Sandia. This same system may dramatically improve active WMD and contraband detection as well when employed with ultrafast (10-50 ns) pulsed neutron sources.

  18. Electron generation and transport in intense relativistic laser-plasma interactions relevant to fast ignition ICF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Tammy Yee Wing

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultra-Short Pulse, Ultra-High In- tensity Lasers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .ignition), an ultra-intense short pulse laser is brought inof the ultra-high intensity, short-pulse laser has opened up

  19. Electron generation and transport in intense relativistic laser-plasma interactions relevant to fast ignition ICF

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Tammy Yee Wing

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transport of Energy by Ultra-Intense Laser-Generated tronsof Energy by Ultra-Intense Laser-Generated Electrons inUltra-High In- tensity Lasers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

  20. PowerPoint Presentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    relevance to Astrophysics and Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Afterglow of gamma ray bursts Hot electron transport for Fast Igniter -- ICF Characteristics of CFI...

  1. A technique for extending by ?10{sup 3} the dynamic range of compact proton spectrometers for diagnosing ICF implosions on the National Ignition Facility and OMEGA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sio, H., E-mail: hsio@mit.edu; Séguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Wedge Range Filter (WRF) proton spectrometers are routinely used on OMEGA and the NIF for diagnosing ?R and ?R asymmetries in direct- and indirect-drive implosions of D{sup 3}He-, D{sub 2}-, and DT-gas-filled capsules. By measuring the optical opacity distribution in CR-39 due to proton tracks in high-yield applications, as opposed to counting individual tracks, WRF dynamic range can be extended by 10{sup 2} for obtaining the spectral shape, and by 10{sup 3} for mean energy (?R) measurement, corresponding to proton fluences of 10{sup 8} and 10{sup 9} cm{sup ?2}, respectively. Using this new technique, ?R asymmetries can be measured during both shock and compression burn (proton yield ?10{sup 8} and ?10{sup 12}, respectively) in 2-shock National Ignition Facility implosions with the standard WRF accuracy of ±?10 mg/cm{sup 2}.

  2. Z-Pinch Generated X-Rays in Static-Wall Hohlraum Geometry Demonstrate Potential for Indirect-Drive ICF Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BOWERS,RICHARD; CHANDLER,GORDON A.; HEBRON,DAVID E.; LEEPER,RAMON J.; MATUSLKA,WALTER; MOCK,RAYMOND CECIL; NASH,THOMAS J.; OLSON,CRAIG L.; PETERSON,BOB; PETERSON,DARRELL; RUGGLES,LAURENCE E.; SANFORD,THOMAS W. L.; SIMPSON,WALTER W.; STRUVE,KENNETH W.; VESEY,ROGER A.

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hohlraums of full ignition scale (6-mm diameter by 7-mm length) have been heated by x-rays from a z-pinch magnet on Z to a variety of temperatures and pulse shapes which can be used to simulate the early phases of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) temperature drive. The pulse shape is varied by changing the on-axis target of the z pinch in a static-wall-hohlraum geometry. A 2-{micro}m-thick walled Cu cylindrical target of 8-mm diameter filled with 10 mg/cm{sup 3} CH, for example, produces foot-pulse conditions of {approx}85 eV for a duration of {approx}10 ns, while a solid cylindrical target of 5-mm diameter and 14-mg/cm{sup 3} CH generates first-step-pulse conditions of {approx}122 eV for a duration of a few ns. Alternatively, reducing the hohlraum size (to 4-mm diameter by 4-mm length) with the latter target has increased the peak temperature to {approx}150 eV, which is characteristic of a second-step-pulse temperature. In general, the temperature T of these x-ray driven hohlraums is in agreement with the Planckian relation T{approx}(P/A){sup 1/4}. P is the measured x-ray input power and A is the surface area of the hohlraum. Fully-integrated 2-D radiation-hydrodynamic simulations of the z pinch and subsequent hohlraum heating show plasma densities within the useful volume of the hohlraums to be on the order of air or less.

  3. Characterization of the deuteron beam current in a linear accelerator for nuclear-diagnostic calibrations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denis, Daniel (Daniel B.)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) research, passive detection systems are often required in several applications for observing fusion-product spectra from an ICF-capsule implosion. These detection devices can be calibrated ...

  4. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Pub

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    increases to 20metric ton (2012 dollars) in 2040 2. EVA and ICF include a carbon pollution standard for new plants. ICF also includes a carbon cap-and-trade program beginning...

  5. PERSISTENT SURVEILLANCE FOR PIPELINE PROTECTION AND THREAT INTERDICTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , ~1/4 PhD's - Specialized equipment - ISO 9001:2008 · Leveraged expertise from ICF to IFE · Target fab

  6. The Inhomogeneous Structure of Water at Ambient Conditions

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafetyTed5,AuditTheImpactInforum LIFT Model

  7. The Initiation of Bacterial DNA Replication

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafetyTed5,AuditTheImpactInforum LIFT ModelThe

  8. The Initiation of Bacterial DNA Replication

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafetyTed5,AuditTheImpactInforum LIFT ModelTheThe

  9. The Initiation of Bacterial DNA Replication

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafetyTed5,AuditTheImpactInforum LIFT

  10. The Initiation of Bacterial DNA Replication

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafetyTed5,AuditTheImpactInforum LIFTThe

  11. The Instrumental Function of the X-ray Imaging Crystal Spectrometer on Alcator C-Mod

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafetyTed5,AuditTheImpactInforum

  12. The Intelligence Behind the Robotic-Enabled System | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What'sis Taking Over Our InstagramStructureProposedPAGESafetyTed5,AuditTheImpactInforumIntelligence

  13. ITP Distributed Energy: Combined Heat and Power Market Assessment...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Governor COMBINED HEAT AND POWER MARKET ASSESSMENT Prepared For: California Energy Commission Public Interest Energy Research Program Prepared By: ICF International,...

  14. SNRE MS and MLA Career Information From 2009-2010 the School of Natural Resources and Environment graduated 122 MS and MLA students.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Edwards, Paul N.

    , Davis (Program Manager, Sustainable Transportation Energy Pathways Program) Private Apex Wind Energy International (LCA Specialist) H.T. Harvey and Associates (Landscape Design Intern*) ICF International (Impacts

  15. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Nelson...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Case study of Nelson Construction, who worked with the Building America research partner Building Science Corporation to design ten HERS 53 homes with ICF foundations,...

  16. Trident | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Defense Programs Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation Inertial Confinement Fusion ICF Facilities Trident Trident Fred Archuleta working in the main laser bay of...

  17. OMEGA and OMEGA EP | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Defense Programs Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation Inertial Confinement Fusion ICF Facilities OMEGA and OMEGA EP OMEGA and OMEGA EP OMEGA amplifiers Two glass...

  18. Z Machine | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Defense Programs Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation Inertial Confinement Fusion ICF Facilities Z Machine Z Machine Air-gas breakdown when Z Machine at Sandia...

  19. DOE Announces Webinars on Alternative Fuel Online Tools and Resources...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    will present an overview of updates and new tools that have recently been added to the Energy Department's Alternative Fuels Data Center (AFDC). Alexis Schayowitz, from ICF...

  20. actinide burning lead: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    on the ignition and burn of ICF targets Mathematics Websites Summary: and burn of the thermonuclear fuel in inertial confinement fusion pellets at the ion kinetic level to...

  1. aerospace system test reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    methods of nulcear fusion: inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and magnetic confinement fusion (MCF). Existing thermonuclear reactors are very complex, expensive, large, and...

  2. anuclear research reactor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    methods of nulcear fusion: inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and magnetic confinement fusion (MCF). Existing thermonuclear reactors are very complex, expensive, large, and...

  3. CHARACTERIZING COSTS, SAVINGS AND BENEFITS OF A SELECTION OF ENERGY EFFICIENT EMERGING TECHNOLOGIES IN THE UNITED STATES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, T.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Characterization: Gas Turbines. Arlington, VA: ICF: Energy21, 191-237. Diesel & Gas Turbine Worldwide. (2006).Order Survey. Diesel & Gas Turbine Worldwide. (2007). 2007

  4. FUSION POWER ASSOCIATES Annual Meeting and Symposium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    :00 NNSA ICF Strategy ­ Kirk Levedahl, NNSA 9:30 Near-Term Issues for ICF­ David Meyerhofer and Riccardo

  5. CHP: A Technical & Economic Compliance Strategy - SEE Action...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    and Bruce Hedman, ICF International, is from the January 17, 2012, SEE Action IEECHP Webinar 1: EPA's Air Regulations and CHP. chpcompliancecutticaandhedman.pdf More...

  6. Coordination of Retail Demand Response with Midwest ISO Markets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bharvirkar, Ranjit

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    MISO, 2006) 2: MISO Reliability "Footprint" (Source: ICF,for power. Figure 2: MISO Reliability "Footprint" (Source:resources as part of the MISO reliability planning process.

  7. National Alternative Fuels Training Consortium (NAFTC) Clean...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Association www.electricdrive.org * ICF International, Inc. www.icif.com * Gas Technology Institute, Inc. www.gastechnology.org * Sustainable Biodiesel Alliance http:...

  8. Tribal Renewable Energy Solutions and Partnerships: Collaborating...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Program: Chris Tuttle, U.S. Department of Agriculture Renewable Energy and Transmission Potential in Indian Country Analysis: Robert Hegner, ICF International Wind Development:...

  9. Inertial Confinement Fusion quarterly report, April--June 1995. Volume 5, No. 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The ICF Quarterly Reports is published four times each fiscal year by the Inertial Confinement Fusion Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The journal reports selected current research within the ICF Program. Major areas of investigation presented here include fusion target theory and design, target fabrication, target experiments, and laser and optical science and technology.

  10. JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE Colloque C7, suppl6ment au n012, Tome 49, d6cembre 1988

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    is necessary for the economy of the power plant run by an ICF reactor. In Fig. 1 we show the electrical power flow in an ICF power plant. Article published online by EDP Sciences and available at http volume et celui relatif h l'ignition centrale. Ce dernier est superieur au precedent. Une simulation

  11. Validation of GATE 6.1 for targeted radiotherapy of metastic melanoma I-labeled benzamide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Validation of GATE 6.1 for targeted radiotherapy of metastic melanoma using 131 I for the treatment of malignant melanoma after injection of a new specific radiopharmaceutical labeled with iodine, named ICF01012, selected to treat35 the malignant melanoma [Chezal et al 2008]. 131 I-labeled ICF01012

  12. Development of multichannel low-energy neutron spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arikawa, Y., E-mail: arikawa-y@ile.osaka-u.ac.jp; Nagai, T.; Abe, Y.; Kojima, S.; Sakata, S.; Inoue, H.; Utsugi, M.; Iwasa, Y.; Sarukura, N.; Nakai, M.; Shiraga, H.; Fujioka, S.; Azechi, H. [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Murata, T. [Kumamoto University, 2-40-1 Kurokami, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A multichannel low-energy neutron spectrometer for down-scattered neutron (DSN) measurements in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments has been developed. Our compact-size 256-channel lithium-glass-scintillator-based spectrometer has been implemented and tested in ICF experiments with the GEKKO XII laser. We have performed time calibration of the 256-channel analog-to-digital convertor system used for DSN measurements via X-ray pulse signals. We have clearly observed the DD-primary fusion neutron signal and have successfully studied the detector's impulse response. Our detector is soon to be implemented in future ICF experiments.

  13. PLASMA-PHYSICS-21 Heavy ion driven reactor-size double shell inertial fusion targets*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. C. Serna Moreno; N. A. Tahir; J. J. López Cela; A. R. Piriz; D. H. H. Hoffmann

    Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) is considered as an alternative to Magnetic Confinement Fusion to achieve controlled thermonuclear fusion. The main goal is to exploit the energy released from thermonuclear fusion reactions

  14. Plasma Xray Spectra Analysis Using Genetic Algorithms Igor E. Golovkin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louis, Sushil J.

    to provide insight into studying the possibility of controlled thermonuclear fusion. In many cases during Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments. The idea is the following: given a physics model

  15. Plasma X-ray Spectra Analysis Using Genetic Algorithms Igor E. Golovkin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Louis, Sushil J.

    to provide insight into studying the possibility of controlled thermonuclear fusion. In many during Inertial Con nement Fusion (ICF) experiments. The idea is the following: given a physics model

  16. Environmental implications of trade liberalization on North American transport services: the case of the trucking sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fernandez, Linda

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2005). NAFTA/Mexican Truck Emissions Overview, Sacramento,helped the ICF calculate truck emissions factors to indicateJ. (2005). Mexican truck idling emissions at the El Paso-

  17. Coupled modes analysis of SRS backscattering, with Langmuir decay and possible cascadings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Salcedo, Ante, 1969-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent experiments aimed at understanding stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in ICF laser-plasma interactions, suggest that SRS is coupled to the Langmuir decay interaction (LDI). The effects of LDI on the saturation of the ...

  18. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home: Healthy Efficient Homes - Spirit...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    basement walls are ICF plus two 2-inch layers of EPS. The house also has a mini-split heat pump, fresh air fan intake, and a solar hot water heater. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home:...

  19. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study, Manatee County Habitat...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    R-23 ICF walls, a spray-foamed sealed attic, solar hot water, and a ducted mini-split heat pump. Manatee County Habitat for Humanity - Ellenton, FL More Documents & Publications...

  20. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Greenhill Contracting...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    have R-22 ICF walls, R-20 closed-cell spray foam under the slab, a ground-source heat pump with desuperheater for hot water, triple-pane windows, very tight air sealing (0.14...

  1. Investigation and characterization of single hot spot laser-plasma interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Focia, Ronald J

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Control of parametric laser-plasma interactions (LPI) is essential to the success of inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Through a research collaboration with the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), we have had the ...

  2. Building America Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Southeast...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    describing a Habitat for Humanity home in coastal Florida with ICF walls, ducts in the thermal envelope in a furred-up ceiling chase, and HERS 49 without PV. Southeast Volusia:...

  3. LLE Review 101 (October-December 2004)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shmayda, W.T., editor

    2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering October to December 2004, highlights the significance of shaped adiabats to inertial confinement fusion. Theory suggests that inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules compressed by shaped adiabats will exhibit improved hydrodynamic stability.

  4. Laser Program annual report 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Neal, E.M.; Murphy, P.W.; Canada, J.A.; Kirvel, R.D.; Peck, T.; Price, M.E.; Prono, J.K.; Reid, S.G.; Wallerstein, L.; Wright, T.W. (eds.)

    1989-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the following topics: target design and experiments; target materials development; laboratory x-ray lasers; laser science and technology; high-average-power solid state lasers; and ICF applications studies.

  5. An improved method for measuring the absolute DD neutron yield and calibrating neutron time-of-flight detectors in inertial confinement fusion experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waugh, C. (Caleb Joseph)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the establishment of nuclear physics in the early 1900's and the development of the hydrogen bomb in the 1950's, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) has been an important field in physics. Funded largely though the ...

  6. Studies of ion kinetic effects in shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions at OMEGA and the NIF and magnetic reconnection using laser-produced plasmas at OMEGA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Michael Jonathan

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of ion kinetic effects during the shock-convergence phase of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions and magnetic reconnection in strongly-driven, laser-produced plasmas have been facilitated by the use of ...

  7. Implementation of scattering pinhole diagnostic for detection of fusion products on CR-39 at high particle fluence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Orozco, David, S.B. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments use solid-state nuclear track detector CR-39 as a means to detect different types of nuclear products. Until recently, it was difficult to use CR-39 in experiments with ...

  8. Vlasov simulations of kinetic enhancement of Raman backscatter in laser fusion plasmas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Strozzi, D. J. (David J.)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) is studied in plasmas relevant to inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The Eulerian Vlasov-Maxwell code ELVIS was developed and run for this purpose. Plasma waves are heavily Landau damped ...

  9. The Vlasov-Maxwell system with strong initial magnetic field. Guiding-center approximation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bostan, Mihai

    @univ-fcomte.fr 1 #12;duction through the thermonuclear fusion process. Two ways are currently explored for this: the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and the magnetic confinement fusion (MCF). The magnetic confinement

  10. Determination of the deuterium-tritium branching ratio based on inertial confinement fusion implosions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosenberg, Michael Jonathan

    The deuterium-tritium (D-T) ?-to-neutron branching ratio [[superscript 3]H(d,?)[superscript 5]He/[superscript 3]H(d,n)[superscript 4]He] was determined under inertial confinement fusion (ICF) conditions, where the ...

  11. Spectrum and conversion efficiency measurements of suprathermal electrons from relativistic laser plasma interactions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Cliff D. (Cliff Ding Yu)

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fast Ignition is an alternative scheme for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) that uses a petawatt laser to ignite a hot spot in precompressed fuel. The laser delivers its energy into relativistic electrons at the critical ...

  12. Building America Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Southeast...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Florida with ICF walls, ducts in the thermal envelope in a furred-up ceiling chase, and HERS 49 without PV. Southeast Volusia: Habitat for Humanity - Edgewater, Florida More...

  13. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Devoted...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    who worked with Building America research partner WSU Extension Energy Office to design HERS-54 duplexes with ICF walls, high-efficiency mini-split heat pumps, ERVs, and a...

  14. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study, Weiss Building & Development...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    River Forest, IL that scored HERS 17 without PV. This 4,763 ft2 custom passive house has R-54 ICF walls, a vented attic with R-100 blown fiberglass, plus R-40 rigid EPS under the...

  15. STATE OF CALIFORNIA THE RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND BROWN, Governor NOTICE OF PROPOSED AWARD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Technical Support and Training for Electricity Supply Analysis 800-10-801 Proposed Contractor: Aspen,400,000.00 BIDDER FINAL SCORE Aspen Environmental Group 561.2 ICF International 556.6 EnerNex 436* Quanta Technology 0% 0 360 4 Aspen Environmental 548 0% 0 0% 0 2% 13.2 0% 0 561.2 1 ICF International 516 0% 0 5% 27

  16. INFORME ANUAL 2011 INSTITUTO DE CIENCIAS FSICAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MejĂ­a-Monasterio, Carlos

    - INFORME ANUAL 2011 INSTITUTO DE CIENCIAS FĂŤSICAS UNIVERSIDAD NACIONAL AUTĂ?NOMA DE MĂ?XICO 1 #12;INTRODUCCIĂ?N El Instituto de Ciencias FĂ­sicas de la UNAM (ICF) fue creado por el Consejo Universitario el 29 de septiembre de 2006. El ICF surge como una transformaciĂłn del Centro de Ciencias FĂ­sicas (CCF) que iniciĂł sus

  17. Comparison of Vehicle Efficiency Technology Attributes and Synergy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duleep, G.

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Analyzing the future fuel economy of light-duty vehicles (LDVs) requires detailed knowledge of the vehicle technologies available to improve LDV fuel economy. The National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) has been relying on technology data from a 2001 National Academy of Sciences (NAS) study (NAS 2001) on corporate average fuel economy (CAFE) standards, but the technology parameters were updated in the new proposed rulemaking (EPA and NHTSA 2009) to set CAFE and greenhouse gas standards for the 2011 to 2016 period. The update is based largely on an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) analysis of technology attributes augmented by NHTSA data and contractor staff assessments. These technology cost and performance data were documented in the Draft Joint Technical Support Document (TSD) issued by EPA and NHTSA in September 2009 (EPA/NHTSA 2009). For these tasks, the Energy and Environmental Analysis (EEA) division of ICF International (ICF) examined each technology and technology package in the Draft TSD and assessed their costs and performance potential based on U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) program assessments. ICF also assessed the technologies? other relevant attributes based on data from actual production vehicles and from recently published technical articles in engineering journals. ICF examined technology synergy issues through an ICF in-house model that uses a discrete parameter approach.

  18. Design review plan for Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (Project W-236A)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renfro, G.G.

    1994-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan describes how the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) Project conducts reviews of design media; describes actions required by Project participants; and provides the methodology to ensure that the design is complete, meets the technical baseline of the Project, is operable and maintainable, and is constructable. Project W-236A is an integrated project wherein the relationship between the operating contractor and architect-engineer is somewhat different than that of a conventional project. Working together, Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and ICF Karser Hanford (ICF KH) have developed a relationship whereby ICF KH performs extensive design reviews and design verification. WHC actively participates in over-the-shoulder reviews during design development, performs a final review of the completed design, and conducts a formal design review of the Safety Class I, ASME boiler and Pressure Vessel Code items in accordance with WHC-CM-6-1, Standard Engineering Practices.

  19. Laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor with direct electric generation by magnetic flux compression

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lasche, G.P.

    1983-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a laser or particle-beam-driven fusion reactor system which takes maximum advantage of both the very short pulsed nature of the energy release of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and the very small volumes within which the thermonuclear burn takes place. The pulsed nature of ICF permits dynamic direct energy conversion schemes such as magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generation and magnetic flux compression; the small volumes permit very compact blanket geometries. By fully exploiting these characteristics of ICF, it is possible to design a fusion reactor with exceptionally high power density, high net electric efficiency, and low neutron-induced radioactivity. The invention includes a compact blanket design and method and apparatus for obtaining energy utilizing the compact blanket.

  20. Inertial Confinement Fusion and the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, P.

    2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) seeks to provide sustainable fusion energy by compressing frozen deuterium and tritium fuel to extremely high densities. The advantages of fusion vs. fission are discussed, including total energy per reaction and energy per nucleon. The Lawson Criterion, defining the requirements for ignition, is derived and explained. Different confinement methods and their implications are discussed. The feasibility of creating a power plant using ICF is analyzed using realistic and feasible numbers. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is shown as a significant step forward toward making a fusion power plant based on ICF. NIF is the world’s largest laser, delivering 1.8 MJ of energy, with a peak power greater than 500 TW. NIF is actively striving toward the goal of fusion energy. Other uses for NIF are discussed.

  1. Prompt Beta Spectroscopy as a Diagnostic for Mix in Ignited NIF Capsules

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. C. Hayes; G. Jungman; J. C. Solem; P. A. Bradley; R. S. Rundberg

    2004-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) technology is designed to drive deuterium-tritium (DT) internal confinement fusion (ICF) targets to ignition using indirect radiation from laser beam energy captured in a hohlraum. Hydrodynamical instabilities at interfaces in the ICF capsule leading to mix between the DT fue l and the ablator shell material are of fundamental physical interest and can affect the performance characteristics of the capsule. In this Letter we describe new radiochemical diagnostics for mix processes in ICF capsules with plastic or Be (0.9%Cu) ablator shells. Reactions of high-energy tritons with shell material produce high-energy $\\beta$-emitters. We show that mix between the DT fuel and the shell material enhances high-energy prompt beta emission from these reactions by more than an order of magnitude over that expected in the absence of mix.

  2. Ion microtomography and particle-induced x-ray emission analysis of direct drive inertial confinement fusion targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antolak, A.J.; Pontau, A.E.; Morse, D.H. (Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)); Weirup, D.L.; Heikkinen, D.W. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)); Cholewa, M.; Bench, G.S.; Legge, G.J.F. (Micro Analytical Research Centre, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia))

    1992-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The complementary techniques of ion microtomography (IMT) and particle-induced x-ray emission (PIXE) are used to provide submicron-scale characterization of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets for density uniformity, sphericity, and trace-element spatial distributions. ICF target quality control in the laser fusion program is important to ensure that the energy deposition from the lasers results in uniform compression and minimization of Rayleigh--Taylor instabilities. We obtain 1% total electron density determinations using IMT with spatial resolution approaching 2 {mu}m. Utilizing PIXE, we can map out dopant and impurity distributions with elemental detection sensitivities on the order of a few parts per million. We present examples of ICF target characterization by IMT and PIXE in order to demonstrate their potential impact in assessing target fabrication processes.

  3. Condensed hydrogen for thermonuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kucheyev, S. O.; Hamza, A. V. [Nanoscale Synthesis and Characterization Laboratory, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) power, in either pure fusion or fission-fusion hybrid reactors, is a possible solution for future world's energy demands. Formation of uniform layers of a condensed hydrogen fuel in ICF targets has been a long standing materials physics challenge. Here, we review the progress in this field. After a brief discussion of the major ICF target designs and the basic properties of condensed hydrogens, we review both liquid and solid layering methods, physical mechanisms causing layer nonuniformity, growth of hydrogen single crystals, attempts to prepare amorphous and nanostructured hydrogens, and mechanical deformation behavior. Emphasis is given to current challenges defining future research areas in the field of condensed hydrogens for fusion energy applications.

  4. Manufactured solutions for the three-dimensional Euler equations with relevance to Inertial Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waltz, J., E-mail: jwaltz@lanl.gov [Computational Physics Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Canfield, T.R. [Theoretical Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Morgan, N.R. [Computational Physics Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States); Risinger, L.D.; Wohlbier, J.G. [Computational and Computer Sciences Division, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a set of manufactured solutions for the three-dimensional (3D) Euler equations. The purpose of these solutions is to allow for code verification against true 3D flows with physical relevance, as opposed to 3D simulations of lower-dimensional problems or manufactured solutions that lack physical relevance. Of particular interest are solutions with relevance to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) capsules. While ICF capsules are designed for spherical symmetry, they are hypothesized to become highly 3D at late time due to phenomena such as Rayleigh–Taylor instability, drive asymmetry, and vortex decay. ICF capsules also involve highly nonlinear coupling between the fluid dynamics and other physics, such as radiation transport and thermonuclear fusion. The manufactured solutions we present are specifically designed to test the terms and couplings in the Euler equations that are relevant to these phenomena. Example numerical results generated with a 3D Finite Element hydrodynamics code are presented, including mesh convergence studies.

  5. Metallic coating of microspheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyer, S.F.

    1980-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Extremely smooth, uniform metal coatings of micrometer thicknesses on microscopic glass spheres (microspheres) are often needed as targets for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. The first part of this paper reviews those methods used successfully to provide metal coated microspheres for ICF targets, including magnetron sputtering, electro- and electroless plating, and chemical vapor pyrolysis. The second part of this paper discusses some of the critical aspects of magnetron sputter coating of microspheres, including substrate requirements, the sticking of microspheres during coating (preventing a uniform coating), and the difficulties in growing the desired dense, smooth, uniform microstructure on continuously moving spherical substrates.

  6. Properties of lead-lithium solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, N.J.; Darnell, A.; Blink, J.A.

    1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lead-lithium solutions are of interest to liquid metal wall ICF reactor designers because Pb may be present to some extent in both heavy ion beam and laser-driven ICF targets; therefore, Pb will be present as an impurity in a flowing lithium wall. In addition, Pb-Li solutions containing approx. 80 a/o Pb are a strong candidate for a heavy ion beam driven HYLIFE converter and a viable alternative to a pure Li wall for a laser driven converter. The properties of Pb-Li solutions including the effect of hydrogen impurities are reviewed, and the reactor design implications are discussed.

  7. 283-E and 283-W hazards assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutton, L.N.

    1994-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the hazards assessment for the 200 area water treatment plants 283-E and 283-W located on the US DOE Hanford Site. Operation of the water treatment plants is the responsibility of ICF Kaiser Hanford Company (ICF KH). This hazards assessment was conducted to provide emergency planning technical basis for the water treatment plants. This document represents an acceptable interpretation of the implementing guidance document for DOE ORDER 5500.3A which requires an emergency planning hazards assessment for each facility that has the potential to reach or exceed the lowest level emergency classification.

  8. Status of Z-Pinch Research Fusion Power Associates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    energy is the goal · Status of Z-pinch IFE ­ No funding; IFE science and technology research "on hold" · Update on refurbished Z · Update on pulsed power ICF · Advances in pulsed power technology #12;3 The Z-pinch1 Status of Z-Pinch Research Fusion Power Associates Annual Meeting and Symposium Oak Ridge

  9. IFE Target Fabrication, Delivery, and Cost Estimates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    synergism but key differences that lead to specific technologies Heavy Ion Fusion Laser Fusion Z-Pinch IFE of this talk....... 1. IFE target technology builds upon the larger ICF program - Not starting from "zero" for IFE - Large effort for NIC fosters efficiency (e.g., foam shells) 2. The recent IFE target technology

  10. STATE OF CALIFORNIA NATURAL RESOURCES AGENCY EDMUND G. BROWN JR., Governor CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Proposers competed in the following project categories: 1) Water and Wastewater; 2) Data Centers; 3) Customer-Side Electricity Storage; and 4) Industrial Energy Efficiency Projects. For ETDG II, the minimum as an Intermediary Wastewater Treatment Step $1,418,800 $1,418,800 $568,800 Awardee 3 ICF International Data Center

  11. Current-Driven Filament Instabilities in Relativistic Plasmas. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chuang Ren

    2013-02-13T23:59:59.000Z

    This grant has supported a study of some fundamental problems in current- and flow-driven instabilities in plasmas and their applications in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and astrophysics. It addressed current-driven instabilities and their roles in fast ignition, and flow-driven instabilities and their applications in astrophysics.

  12. GAS DYNAMICS IN THE CENTRAL CAVITY OF THE HYLlFE-ll REACTORt Xiang M. Chen, Virgil E. Schrock and Per F. Peterson

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley Berkeley, CA 94720 (510)642-2652 ABSTRACT The HYLIFE-II ICF reactor uses molten salt Flibe (Li2Be), a time varying mesh spacing is adapted. The equation of state for Flibe vapor is used in the calculation radiation heat transfer, the current calculation results give a conservative estimation ofthe shock strength

  13. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Sector

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Social Security Administration (August 2012) 2.9 2.7 2.2 2.4 IEA (2012)b 2.5 2.6 -- 2.4 Blue Chip Consensus (October 2012)a 2.4 2.5 -- -- ExxonMobil -- 2.5 2.2 2.4 ICF...

  14. Lasers and Inertial Confinement Fusion in the United States

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    thermonuclear device began the Inertial Confinement Fusion Era I1860 · StanislawUlamandEdward Teller developedLasers and Inertial Confinement Fusion in the United States R. L. McCrory Director and Vice Provost confinement fusion (ICF) has grown as successively larger lasers have been built I1859 · The

  15. Electron-ion thermal equilibration after spherical shock collapse J. R. Rygg,* J. A. Frenje, C. K. Li, F. H. Sguin, and R. D. Petrasso

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    August 2009 A comprehensive set of dual nuclear product observations provides a snapshot of imploding, spherically conver- gent shocks are formed by the rapid deposition of energy in the form of lasers direct . In both cases, ICF implosion de- sign and performance is deeply affected by the speed and heating

  16. PROGRESS IN EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF CURRENT FILAMENTATION INSTABILITY*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    . Simulations were conducted with the particle-in-cell code QuickPIC for e- beam and plasma parameters of the instability. Preliminary results from phase one will be presented along with the progress and diagnostic the compression and ignition of the fuel pellet is accomplished in a single process. The ability to separate ICF

  17. FCI in France status and perspective

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    is a credible alternate energy source complimentary with magnetic fusion not a competition. #12;A global · ICF for energy : a place in the French energy vision ? · LMJ / PETAL a key facility for the IFE and Bordeaux) · LCD/ENSMA Energie[J] [ps] GW TW LOA Pico 2000 Nano 2000PW / LIL CEA/DSM CELIA Alise ELI 0,01 0

  18. Weapons Activities/ Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Facility (NIF) will extend HEDP experiments to include access to thermonuclear burn conditions's Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) through three strategic objectives: Achieve thermonuclear ignition thermonuclear ignition to the national nuclear weapons program was one of the earliest motivations of the ICF

  19. J. Fluid Mech. (2007), vol. 579, pp. 481492. c 2007 Cambridge University Press doi:10.1017/S0022112007005599 Printed in the United Kingdom

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchemin, Laurent

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (ICF) the high fuel density which is required for nuclear burning can be obtained by implodingJ. Fluid Mech. (2007), vol. 579, pp. 481­492. c 2007 Cambridge University Press doi:10.1017/S model, called the sharp boundary model (SBM), consisting of two fluids of constant density separated

  20. Plasma Jet Driven Magneto-Inertial Fusion (PJMIF)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    National Security, LLC for NNSA LA-UR-11-07030 #12;Plasma jet experiments can provide cm National Security, LLC for NNSA Imploding plasma liner formed by 30 merging plasma jets with 1.5 MJ, LLC for NNSA MIF ICF Basko et al., Nucl. Fusion, 2000 Magnetic field reduces thermal transport

  1. FY06 Energy and Water Development Appropriations House Senate Conference Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of ITER. The GAO shall also evaluate the opportunities to leverage the National Nuclear Security Confinement Fusion (ICF) Ignition and High Yield.--The conference agreement includes $549 time in the future. Ignition.--The conference agreement recommends $75,615,000, the same as budget

  2. Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition and High Yield Campaign

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : Provide mission need report for the proposed OMEGA Extended Performance project. · October 2002: NNSA November 21, 2003 #12;2 Statements to FESAC IFE panel 10/28/03 · Ignition is a major goal for NNSA supports OFES's mission and OFES use of NNSA's ICF facilities is accepted · Defense Programs reserves right

  3. A compact proton spectrometer for measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum from which yield and R are determined in thin-shell inertial-confinement-fusion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A compact proton spectrometer for measurement of the absolute DD proton spectrum from which yield for extending by 103 the dynamic range of compact proton spectrometers for diagnosing ICF implosions. Sci. Instrum. 85, 063502 (2014); 10.1063/1.4880203 D 3 He -proton emission imaging for inertial

  4. pour obtenir le titre de DOCTEUR DE L'ECOLE POLYTECHNIQUE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    . The achievement of controlled thermonuclear fusion in laboratory typically involves the use of a deuterium (D confinement fusion (ICF) and, in specific, to the fast ignitor scheme. This fusion scheme involves likewise energetic resources. Nuclear fusion, the natural process producing energy in the stars (Bethe, 1939), is one

  5. Nuclear diagnostics for inertial confinement fusion implosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, T.J.

    1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This abstract contains viewgraphs on nuclear diagnostic techniques for inertial confinement fusion implosions. The viewgraphs contain information on: reactions of interest in ICF; advantages and disadvantages of these methods; the properties nuclear techniques can measure; and some specifics on the detectors used.

  6. Basics of Inertial Confinement Fusion NIF and Photon Science Directorate Chief Scientist

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ICF Implosion Space at 100 km Air Water Weapon Test 100x lead density #12;Rocket-like implosion for Efficient absorption Cryogenic Fuel for Efficient compression There are two principal approaches description of x-ray target performance (Laser-plasma interactions are treated separately with codes which

  7. Journal of Nuclear Materials 122 & 123 (1984) 1459-1465 North-Holland. Amsterdam

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harilal, S. S.

    EFFECTS AND EROSION RATES FROM X-RAY ENERGY DEPOSITION IN ICF REACTOR FIRST WALLS Ahmed M. HASSANEIN The deposition of x-ray energy resulting from the microexplosion i.oan inertial confinement fusion reactor-ray energies and spectra are calculated. Softer x-ray energy spectra absorbed very near the surface are found

  8. 1991 US-Japan workshop on Nuclear Fusion in Dense Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ichimaru, S. (ed.) (Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics); Tajima, T. (ed.) (Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies)

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The scientific areas covered at the Workshop may be classified into the following subfields: (1) basic theory of dense plasma physics and its interface with atomic physics and nuclear physics; (2) physics of dense z-pinches, ICF plasmas etc; (3) stellar interior plasmas; (4) cold fusion; and (5) other dense plasmas.

  9. 1991 US-Japan workshop on Nuclear Fusion in Dense Plasmas. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ichimaru, S. [ed.] [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Dept. of Physics; Tajima, T. [ed.] [Texas Univ., Austin, TX (United States). Inst. for Fusion Studies

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The scientific areas covered at the Workshop may be classified into the following subfields: (1) basic theory of dense plasma physics and its interface with atomic physics and nuclear physics; (2) physics of dense z-pinches, ICF plasmas etc; (3) stellar interior plasmas; (4) cold fusion; and (5) other dense plasmas.

  10. Dependence of Shell Mix on Feedthrough in Direct Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion S. P. Regan, J. A. Delettrez, V. N. Goncharov, F. J. Marshall, J. M. Soures, V. A. Smalyuk, P. B. Radha, B. Yaakobi,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    shell target containing thermonuclear fuel is imploded [1,2]. During an implosion of a D2 or DT gas throughout the implosion up to stagnation [12]. The thermonuclear fusion rate in the resulting central hot importance to ICF and the ultimate goal of thermonuclear ignition in the laboratory. The strategy to control

  11. RAPID COMMUNICATIONS PHYSICAL REVIEW C 85, 061601(R) (2012)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , USA C. J. Horsfield, M. S. Rubery, and W. J. Garbett Atomic Weapons Establishment, Aldermaston thresholds. These measurements of the D-T branching ratio in an ICF environment test several theoretical interest from a nuclear physics perspective. The fusion of D and T produces an excited 5 He nucleus, which

  12. Westinghouse Hanford Company Pollution Prevention Program Implementation Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Floyd, B.C.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan documents Westinghouse Hanford Company`s (WHC) Pollution Prevention (P2) (formerly Waste Minimization) program. The program includes WHC; BCS Richland, Inc. (BCSR); and ICF Kaiser Hanford Company (ICF KH). The plan specifies P2 program activities and schedules for implementing the Hanford Site Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness (WMin/P2) Program Plan requirements (DOE 1994a). It is intended to satisfy the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and other legal requirements that are discussed in both the Hanford Site WMin/P2 plan and paragraph C of this plan. As such, the Pollution Prevention Awareness Program required by DOE Order 5400.1 (DOE 1988) is included in the WHC P2 program. WHC, BCSR, and ICF KH are committed to implementing an effective P2 program as identified in the Hanford Site WMin/P2 Plan. This plan provides specific information on how the WHC P2 program will develop and implement the goals, activities, and budget needed to accomplish this. The emphasis has been to provide detailed planning of the WHC P2 program activities over the next 3 years. The plan will guide the development and implementation of the program. The plan also provides background information on past program activities. Because the plan contains greater detail than in the past, activity scope and implementation schedules may change as new priorities are identified and new approaches are developed and realized. Some activities will be accelerated, others may be delayed; however, all of the general program elements identified in this plan and contractor requirements identified in the Site WMin/P2 plan will be developed and implemented during the next 3 years. This plan applies to all WHC, BCSR, and ICF KH organizations and subcontractors. It will be distributed to those with defined responsibilities in this plan; and the policy, goals, objectives, and strategy of the program will be communicated to all WHC, BCSR, and ICF KH employees.

  13. Progress in the pulsed power Inertial Confinement Fusion program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quintenz, J.P.; Matzen, M.K.; Mehlhorn, T.A. [and others

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pulsed power accelerators are being used in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) research. In order to achieve our goal of a fusion yield in the range of 200 - 1000 MJ from radiation-driven fusion capsules, it is generally believed that {approx}10 MJ of driver energy must be deposited within the ICF target in order to deposit {approx}1 MJ of radiation energy in the fusion capsule. Pulsed power represents an efficient technology for producing both these energies and these radiation environments in the required short pulses (few tens of ns). Two possible approaches are being developed to utilize pulsed power accelerators in this effort: intense beams of light ions and z- pinches. This paper describes recent progress in both approaches. Over the past several years, experiments have successfully answered many questions critical to ion target design. Increasing the ion beam power and intensity are our next objectives. Last year, the Particle Beam Fusion Accelerator H (PBFA II) was modified to generate ion beams in a geometry that will be required for high yield applications. This 2048 modification has resulted in the production of the highest power ion beam to be accelerated from an extraction ion diode. We are also evaluating fast magnetically-driven implosions (z-pinches) as platforms for ICF ablator physics and EOS experiments. Z-pinch implosions driven by the 20 TW Saturn accelerator have efficiently produced high x- ray power (> 75 TW) and energy (> 400 kJ). Containing these x-ray sources within a hohlraum produces a unique large volume (> 6000 mm{sup 3}), long lived (>20 ns) radiation environment. In addition to studying fundamental ICF capsule physics, there are several concepts for driving ICF capsules with these x-ray sources. Progress in increasing the x-ray power on the Saturn accelerator and promise of further increases on the higher power PBFA II accelerator will be described.

  14. The proceedings of the 1st international workshop on laboratory astrophysics experiments with large lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Remington, B.A.; Goldstein, W.H. [eds.] [eds.

    1996-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The world has stood witness to the development of a number of highly sophisticated and flexible, high power laser facilities (energies up to 50 kJ and powers up to 50 TW), driven largely by the world-wide effort in inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The charter of diagnosing implosions with detailed, quantitative measurements has driven the ICF laser facilities to be exceedingly versatile and well equipped with diagnostics. Interestingly, there is considerable overlap in the physics of ICF and astrophysics. Both typically involve compressible radiative hydrodynamics, radiation transport, complex opacities, and equations of state of dense matter. Surprisingly, however, there has been little communication between these two communities to date. With the recent declassification of ICF in the USA, and the approval to commence with construction of the next generation ``superlasers``, the 2 MJ National Ignition Facility in the US, and its equivalent, the LMJ laser in France, the situation is ripe for change. . Given the physics similarities that exist between ICF and astrophysics, one strongly suspects that there should exist regions of overlap where supporting research on the large lasers could be beneficial to the astrophysics community. As a catalyst for discussions to this end, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory sponsored this workshop. Approximately 100 scientists attended from around the world, representing eight countries: the USA, Canada, UK, France, Germany, Russia, Japan, and Israel. A total of 30 technical papers were presented. The two day workshop was divided into four sessions, focusing on nonlinear hydrodynamics, radiative hydrodynamics, radiation transport, and atomic physics-opacities. Copies of the presentations are contained in these proceedings.

  15. D-Cluster Converter Foil for Laser-Accelerated Deuteron Beams: Towards Deuteron-Beam-Driven Fast Ignition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miley, George H.

    2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Fast Ignition (FI) uses Petawatt laser generated particle beam pulse to ignite a small volume called a pre-compressed Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) target, and is the favored method to achieve the high energy gain per target burn needed for an attractive ICF power plant. Ion beams such as protons, deuterons or heavier carbon ions are especially appealing for FI as they have relative straight trajectory, and easier to focus on the fuel capsule. But current experiments have encountered problems with the 'converter-foil' which is irradiated by the Petawatt laser to produce the ion beams. The problems include depletion of the available ions in the convertor foils, and poor energy efficiency (ion beam energy/ input laser energy). We proposed to develop a volumetrically-loaded ultra-high-density deuteron deuterium cluster material as the basis for converter-foil for deuteron beam generation. The deuterons will fuse with the ICF DT while they slow down, providing an extra 'bonus' energy gain in addition to heating the hot spot. Also, due to the volumetric loading, the foil will provide sufficient energetic deuteron beam flux for 'hot spot' ignition, while avoiding the depletion problem encountered by current proton-driven FI foils. After extensive comparative studies, in Phase I, high purity PdO/Pd/PdO foils were selected for the high packing fraction D-Cluster converter foils. An optimized loading process has been developed to increase the cluster packing fraction in this type of foil. As a result, the packing fraction has been increased from 0.1% to 10% - meeting the original Phase I goal and representing a significant progress towards the beam intensities needed for both FI and pulsed neutron applications. Fast Ignition provides a promising approach to achieve high energy gain target performance needed for commercial Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). This is now a realistic goal for near term in view of the anticipated ICF target burn at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in CA within a year. This will usher in the technology development Phase of ICF after years of research aimed at achieving breakeven experiment. Methods to achieve the high energy gain needed for a competitive power plant will then be a key developmental issue, and our D-cluster target for Fast Ignition (FI) is expected to meet that need.

  16. LLE 2008 annual report, October 2007 - September 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2009-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The research program at the University of Rochester’s Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) focuses on inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research supporting the goal of achieving ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This program includes the full use of the OMEGA EP Laser System. Within the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), LLE is the lead laboratory for the validation of the performance of cryogenic target implosions, essential to all forms of ICF ignition. LLE has taken responsibility for a number of critical elements within the Integrated Experimental Teams (IET’s) supporting the demonstration of indirect-drive ignition on the NIF and is the lead laboratory for the validation of the polardrive approach to ignition on the NIF. LLE is also developing, testing, and building a number of diagnostics to be deployed on the NIF for the NIC.

  17. NIF: IFE applications, waste management and environmental impacts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lazaro, M.A.; Kirchner, F.R. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Miley, G.H.; Petra, M. [Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (United States). Fusion Studies Lab.

    1996-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Although many energy sources have been suggested for the future, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) has been demonstrated as scientifically feasible and deserves support for continued development. The National Ignition Facility (NIF), proposed by US DOE, is a next step in that direction. NIF would use ICF technology to achieve ignition and energy gain that would allow the development and continued support of national security and other civilian applications including inertial fusion energy power plants. NIF would also guarantee US leadership in dense plasma research. Four sites are being considered for NIF: LLNL, Los Alamos, Sandia, and two NTS sites. An environmental evaluation was performed which considered all impacts. This paper provides the results of the waste management analyses conducted on the proposed NIF sites. Overall, the proposed construction and operation of NIF should qualify it as a low-hazard, non-nuclear radiological facility with minor onsite and negligible offsite environmental impacts.

  18. Coated foams, preparation, uses and articles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duchane, D.V.; Barthell, B.L.

    1982-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrophobic cellular material is coated with a thin hydrophilic polymer skin which stretches tightly over the foam but which does not fill the cells of the foam, thus resulting in a polymer-coated foam structure having a smoothness which was not possible in the prior art. In particular, when the hydrophobic cellular material is a specially chosen hydrophobic polymer foam and is formed into arbitrarily chosen shapes prior to the coating with hydrophilic polymer, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets of arbitrary shapes can be produced by subsequently coating the shapes with metal or with any other suitable material. New articles of manufacture are produced, including improved ICF targets, improved integrated circuits, and improved solar reflectors and solar collectors. In the coating method, the cell size of the hydrophobic cellular material, the viscosity of the polymer solution used to coat, and the surface tension of the polymer solution used to coat are all very important to the coating.

  19. INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharp, W. M.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Barnard, J. J.; Cohen, R. H.; Dorf, M. A.; Lund, S. M.; Perkins, L. J.; Terry, M. R.; Logan, B. G.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Faltens, A.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J. Y.; Kwan, J. W.; Lee, E. P.; Lidia, S. M.; Ni, P. A.; Reginato, L. L.; Roy, P. K.; Seidl, P. A.; Takakuwa, J. H.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W. L.; Davidson, R. C.; Gilson, E. P.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Qin, H.; Startsev, E.; Haber, I.; Kishek, R. A.; Koniges, A. E.

    2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Intense heavy-ion beams have long been considered a promising driver option for inertial-fusion energy production. This paper briefly compares inertial confinement fusion (ICF) to the more-familiar magnetic-confinement approach and presents some advantages of using beams of heavy ions to drive ICF instead of lasers. Key design choices in heavy-ion fusion (HIF) facilities are discussed, particularly the type of accelerator. We then review experiments carried out at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) over the past thirty years to understand various aspects of HIF driver physics. A brief review follows of present HIF research in the US and abroad, focusing on a new facility, NDCX-II, being built at LBNL to study the physics of warm dense matter heated by ions, as well as aspects of HIF target physics. Future research directions are briefly summarized.

  20. ADVANCED FUSION TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL REPORT TO THE US DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    PROJECT STAFF

    2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    OAK A271 ADVANCED FUSION TECHNOLOGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ANNUAL REPORT TO THE US DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY. The General Atomics (GA) Advanced Fusion Technology Program seeks to advance the knowledge base needed for next-generation fusion experiments, and ultimately for an economical and environmentally attractive fusion energy source. To achieve this objective, they carry out fusion systems design studies to evaluate the technologies needed for next-step experiments and power plants, and they conduct research to develop basic and applied knowledge about these technologies. GA's Advanced Fusion Technology program derives from, and draws on, the physics and engineering expertise built up by many years of experience in designing, building, and operating plasma physics experiments. The technology development activities take full advantage of the GA DIII-D program, the DIII-D facility and the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program and the ICF Target Fabrication facility.

  1. Measurement and simulation of jet mass caused by a high-aspect ratio hole perturbation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keiter, Paul A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cooley, James H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wilson, D C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kyrala, George A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Blue, Brent E [LLNL; Edwards, J [LLNL; Elliott, James B [LLNL; Robey, H F [LLNL; Spears, B [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsule performance can be negatively impacted by the presence of hydrodynamic instabilities. To perform a gas fill on an ICF capsule, current plans involve drilling a small hole and inserting a fill tube to inject the gas mixture into the capsule. This introduces a perturbation on the capsule, which can seed hydrodynamic instabilities. The small hole can cause jetting of the shell material into the gas, which might adversely affect the capsule performance. We have performed simulations and experiments to study the hydrodynamic evolution of jets from high-aspect ratio holes, such as the fill tube hole. Although simulations using cold materials overpredict the amount of mass in the jet, when a reasonable amount of preheat (<1 eV) is introduced, the simulations are in better agreement with the experiment.

  2. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) and the issue of nonproliferation. Final study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

    NIF, the next step proposed by DOE in a progression of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) facilities, is expected to reach the goal of ICF capsule ignition in the laboratory. This report is in response to a request of a Congressman that DOE resolve the question of whether NIF will aid or hinder U.S. nonproliferation efforts. Both technical and policy aspects are addressed, and public participation was part of the decision process. Since the technical proliferation concerns at NIF are manageable and can be made acceptable, and NIF can contribute positively to U.S. arms control and nonproliferation policy goals, it is concluded that NIF supports the nuclear nonproliferation objectives of the United States.

  3. LLE 2007 Annual Report, October 2006 – September 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2008-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The laser-fusion research program at the University of Rochester’s Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) is focused on the National Nuclear Security Administration’s (NNSA’s) Campaign-10 inertial confinement fusion (ICF) ignition and experimental support technology, operation of facilities (OMEGA), and the construction of OMEGA EP—a high energy petawatt laser system. While LLE is the lead laboratory for research into the direct-drive approach to ICF ignition, it also takes a lead role in certain indirect-drive tasks within the National Ignition Campaign. During this past year progress in the laser-fusion research program was made in three principal areas: OMEGA direct drive and indirect-drive experiments and targets; development of diagnostics for experiments on OMEGA, OMEGA EP, and the National Ignition Facility (NIF); and theoretical analysis and design efforts aimed at improving direct-drive-ignition capsule designs and advanced ignition concepts such as fast ignition and shock ignition.

  4. Method of forming a continuous polymeric skin on a cellular foam material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duchane, David V. (Los Alamos, NM); Barthell, Barry L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrophobic cellular material is coated with a thin hydrophilic polymer skin which stretches tightly over the outer surface of the foam but which does not fill the cells of the foam, thus resulting in a polymer-coated foam structure having a smoothness which was not possible in the prior art. In particular, when the hydrophobic cellular material is a specially chosen hydrophobic polymer foam and is formed into arbitrarily chosen shapes prior to the coating with hydrophilic polymer, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets of arbitrary shapes can be produced by subsequently coating the shapes with metal or with any other suitable material. New articles of manufacture are produced, including improved ICF targets, improved integrated circuits, and improved solar reflectors and solar collectors. In the coating method, the cell size of the hydrophobic cellular material, the viscosity of the polymer solution used to coat, and the surface tensin of the polymer solution used to coat are all very important to the coating.

  5. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies: Froth flotation. Quarterly technical progress report No. 14, January 1, 1992--March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to develop additional confidence in the conceptual design of the advanced froth flotation circuit, a 2-3 TPH Proof-of-Concept (POC) facility was necessary. During operation of this facility, the ICF KE team will demonstrate the ability of the conceptual flowsheets to meet the program goals of maximum pyritic sulfur reduction coupled with maximum energy recovery on three DOE specified coals. The POC circuit was designed to be integrated into the Ohio Coal Development`s facility near Beverly, Ohio. OCDO`s facility will provide the precleaning unit operations and ICF KE will add the advanced froth flotation circuitry. The work in this task will include the POC conceptual design, flowsheet development, equipment list, fabrication and construction drawings, procurement specifications and bid packages and a facilities.

  6. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies: Froth flotation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to develop additional confidence in the conceptual design of the advanced froth flotation circuit, a 2-3 TPH Proof-of-Concept (POC) facility was necessary. During operation of this facility, the ICF KE team will demonstrate the ability of the conceptual flowsheets to meet the program goals of maximum pyritic sulfur reduction coupled with maximum energy recovery on three DOE specified coals. The POC circuit was designed to be integrated into the Ohio Coal Development's facility near Beverly, Ohio. OCDO's facility will provide the precleaning unit operations and ICF KE will add the advanced froth flotation circuitry. The work in this task will include the POC conceptual design, flowsheet development, equipment list, fabrication and construction drawings, procurement specifications and bid packages and a facilities.

  7. Veil of secrecy is lifted from parts of Livermore's laser fusion program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levi, B.G.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thanks to the [open quotes]openness initiative[close quotes] of Secretary Hazel O'Leary of the Department of Energy, results of experiments on inertial confinement done at the Nova facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory will soon begin to be published in four papers dealing with such fundamental parameters as target size, material and cavity temperature. Livermore has concentrated on a particular scheme called indirect-drive ICF, in which the fuel pellet is placed inside a cylindrical cavity that has holes at both ends. This cavity is known as a hohlraum. Demonstrating the feasibility of indirect-drive ICF is expected to be a major focus of the National Ignition Facility, a proposed $1 billion project featuring a 1-2-MJ laser that is still awaiting the endorsement of the Department of Energy. 6 refs., 2 figs.

  8. Proceedings of the twelfth target fabrication specialists` meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Research in fabrication for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) comprises at least three broad categories: targets for high energy density physics on existing drivers, ignition capsule fabrication, and cryogenic fuel layer formation. The latter two are being pursued primarily for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Scientists from over 14 laboratories, universities, and businesses contributed over 100 papers on all aspects of ICF target fabrication. The NIF is well along in construction and photos of poured concrete and exposed steel added to the technical excitement. It was clear from the meeting that there has been significant progress toward the fabrication of an ignition target for NIF and that new techniques are resulting in higher quality targets for high energy density research.

  9. MODELING 0F PAH TRANSPORT IN SOILS AND GROUNDWATER 0. BOLII-(-I), C. Rollin(1), H. Baroudi(1) ; M. Garcia(2) ; A. L. Emonet(3), M. Bues(3) ; P. Le Thiez(4) ;

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    -en-Halatte, France, tel : 33 3 44 55 64 96, fax : 33 3 44 55 65 56, e-mail : Olivier.bour@ineris.fr, Claire Priest Cedex tel : 06 61 10 96 75, e-mail : tblondel@aol.com, (6) ANTEA, 3 avenue C Guillemin, BP 6119, 45061 Orl ans Cedex 2, tel : 33 2 38 64 38 23, e-mail: j.schwartz@antea.brgm.fr, (7) ICF, 14 30 rue

  10. Transparent electrode for optical switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldhar, J.; Henesian, M.A.

    1984-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention relates generally to optical switches and techniques for applying a voltage to an electro-optical crystal, and more particularly, to transparent electodes for an optical switch. System architectures for very large inertial confinement fusion (ICF) lasers require active optical elements with apertures on the order of one meter. Large aperture optical switches are needed for isolation of stages, switch-out from regenerative amplifier cavities and protection from target retroreflections.

  11. Inertial confinement fusion quarterly report, October--December 1992. Volume 3, No. 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixit, S.N. [ed.

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report contains papers on the following topics: The Beamlet Front End: Prototype of a new pulse generation system;imaging biological objects with x-ray lasers; coherent XUV generation via high-order harmonic generation in rare gases; theory of high-order harmonic generation; two-dimensional computer simulations of ultra- intense, short-pulse laser-plasma interactions; neutron detectors for measuring the fusion burn history of ICF targets; the recirculator; and lasnex evolves to exploit computer industry advances.

  12. Inertial Fusion in NNSA N AT I O N AL N U C L E AR S E C U R I T Y AD M I N I S T R AT I O N OFFICE OF DEFENSE PROGRAMS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Inertial Fusion in NNSA N AT I O N AL N U C L E AR S E C U R I T Y AD M I N I S T R AT I O N, 2012 #12;2 ICF Program is critically important element of NNSA's Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP to the Editor from Tom D'Agostino (NNSA Administrator) & Parney Albright (LLNL Director) stated NIF's primary

  13. INFORME ANUAL 2009 INSTITUTO DE CIENCIAS FSICAS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MejĂ­a-Monasterio, Carlos

    INFORME ANUAL 2009 INSTITUTO DE CIENCIAS FĂŤSICAS UNIVERSIDAD NACIONAL AUTĂ?NOMA DE MĂ?XICO 1 #12 13 BiofĂ­sica y Ciencia de Materiales 13 FĂ­sica AtĂłmica Molecular y Ă?ptica Experimentales 13 FĂ­sica Correos electrĂłnicos 99 3 #12;INTRODUCCIĂ?N El Instituto de Ciencias FĂ­sicas de la UNAM (ICF) fue creado

  14. Developing inertial fusion energy - Where do we go from here?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, W.R.; Logan, G.

    1996-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Development of inertial fusion energy (IFE) will require continued R&D in target physics, driver technology, target production and delivery systems, and chamber technologies. It will also require the integration of these technologies in tests and engineering demonstrations of increasing capability and complexity. Development needs in each of these areas are discussed. It is shown how IFE development will leverage off the DOE Defense Programs funded inertial confinement fusion (ICF) work.

  15. Project management plan for Contract Management Information System (CONTRACT)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Severud, K.J.

    1995-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The office of the Vice President of A/E Construction for ICF Kaiser has requested that OSHA compliance statistics be made available to management for companies subcontracting to the ICF Kaiser Company. In addition, a need to better manage contract administrative data for the Contracts Administration and the Construction Management Projects organizations has been identified. The Contract Management Information System is being developed to achieve these objectives. This document provides a Project Management Plan for development of the Contract Management Administration System (CONTRACT) by Design Services DAD/CAE Support. The Project Management Plan describes the project work breakdown structure, safety and quality considerations, with associated cost, schedule and project management information. The CONTRACT System is intended to aid the ICF Kaiser divisions with tracking of A/E subcontractor information to include general contract administration information used by the Contracts Administration organization, contract and safety performance data used by the Construction Management Projects and office of the organization and Vice President of A/E Construction.

  16. AXIS: An instrument for imaging Compton radiographs using the Advanced Radiography Capability on the NIF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, G. N., E-mail: hall98@llnl.gov; Izumi, N.; Tommasini, R.; Carpenter, A. C.; Palmer, N. E.; Zacharias, R.; Felker, B.; Holder, J. P.; Allen, F. V.; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D.; Montesanti, R.; Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Compton radiography is an important diagnostic for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF), as it provides a means to measure the density and asymmetries of the DT fuel in an ICF capsule near the time of peak compression. The AXIS instrument (ARC (Advanced Radiography Capability) X-ray Imaging System) is a gated detector in development for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), and will initially be capable of recording two Compton radiographs during a single NIF shot. The principal reason for the development of AXIS is the requirement for significantly improved detection quantum efficiency (DQE) at high x-ray energies. AXIS will be the detector for Compton radiography driven by the ARC laser, which will be used to produce Bremsstrahlung X-ray backlighter sources over the range of 50 keV–200 keV for this purpose. It is expected that AXIS will be capable of recording these high-energy x-rays with a DQE several times greater than other X-ray cameras at NIF, as well as providing a much larger field of view of the imploded capsule. AXIS will therefore provide an image with larger signal-to-noise that will allow the density and distribution of the compressed DT fuel to be measured with significantly greater accuracy as ICF experiments are tuned for ignition.

  17. Safety and quality management and administration Fiscal Year 1995 site support program plan WBS 6.7.2.6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagan, J.W.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The mission of the Emergency, Safety, and Quality Services (ESQ) management and Program Integration is to provide leadership for the ESQ Department, coordinate business management activities of the ESQ department, and the programs it supports, as well as to plan organize, direct, and control other activities that require department-wide coordination. Primary activities include providing strategic and business planning and reporting support to ESQ management; developing and documenting ESQ management systems and procedures; coordinating ESQ`s self-assessment and Award Fee self evaluation efforts; coordinating the ESQ departments`s communication, total quality, cost savings, and productivity efforts; and tracking ESQ commitments and staffing data. This program element also provides program direction and performance assessment for the ESH&Q division of ICF KH. The ESH&Q Division educates ICF KH management and employees to protect personnel and the environment; identifies, interprets and inspects to requirements; provides administrative and field support; performs final acceptance of construction; assesses effectiveness of ICF KH programs and processes, and performs baseline ESH&Q assessments.

  18. The ePLAS Code for Ignition Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, Rodney J

    2012-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) presents unique opportunities for the extraction of clean energy from Fusion. Intense lasers and particle beams can create and interact with such plasmas, potentially yielding sufficient energy to satisfy all our national needs. However, few models are available to help aid the scientific community in the study and optimization of such interactions. This project enhanced and disseminated the computer code ePLAS for the early understanding and control of Ignition in ICF. ePLAS is a unique simulation code that tracks the transport of laser light to a target, the absorption of that light resulting in the generation and transport of hot electrons, and the heating and flow dynamics of the background plasma. It uses an implicit electromagnetic field-solving method to greatly reduce computing demands, so that useful target interaction studies can often be completed in 15 minutes on a portable 2.1 GHz PC. The code permits the rapid scoping of calculations for the optimization of laser target interactions aimed at fusion. Recent efforts have initiated the use of analytic equations of state (EOS), K-alpha image rendering graphics, allocatable memory for source-free usage, and adaption to the latest Mac and Linux Operating Systems. The speed and utility of ePLAS are unequaled in the ICF simulation community. This project evaluated the effects of its new EOSs on target heating, compared fluid and particle models for the ions, initiated the simultaneous use of both ion models in the code, and studied long time scale 500 ps hot electron deposition for shock ignition. ePLAS has been granted EAR99 export control status, permitting export without a license to most foreign countries. Beta-test versions of ePLAS have been granted to several Universities and Commercial users. The net Project was aimed at achieving early success in the laboratory ignition of thermonuclear targets and the mastery of controlled fusion power for the nation.

  19. Formation of imploding plasma liners for fundamental HEDP studies and MIF Standoff Driver Concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassibry, Jason [Univ. of AL in Huntsville; Hatcher, Richard [Univ. of AL in Huntsville; Stanic, Milos [Univ. of AL in Huntsville

    2013-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The disciplines of High Energy Density Physics (HEDP) and Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) are characterized by hypervelocity implosions and strong shocks. The Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) is focused on reaching HEDP and/or ICF relevant regimes in excess of 1 Mbar peak pressure by the merging and implosion of discrete plasma jets, as a potentially efficient path towards these extreme conditions in a laboratory. In this work we have presented the first 3D simulations of plasma liner, formation, and implosion by the merging of discrete plasma jets in which ionization, thermal conduction, and radiation are all included in the physics model. The study was conducted by utilizing a smoothed particle hydrodynamics code (SPHC) and was a part of the plasma liner experiment (PLX). The salient physics processes of liner formation and implosion are studied, namely vacuum propagation of plasma jets, merging of the jets (liner forming), implosion (liner collapsing), stagnation (peak pressure), and expansion (rarefaction wave disassembling the target). Radiative transport was found to significantly reduce the temperature of the liner during implosion, thus reducing the thermal leaving more pronounced gradients in the plasma liner during the implosion compared with ideal hydrodynamic simulations. These pronounced gradients lead to a greater sensitivity of initial jet geometry and symmetry on peak pressures obtained. Accounting for ionization and transport, many cases gave higher peak pressures than the ideal hydrodynamic simulations. Scaling laws were developed accordingly, creating a non-dimensional parameter space in which performance of an imploding plasma jet liner can be estimated. It is shown that HEDP regimes could be reached with ~ 5 MJ of liner energy, which would translate to roughly 10 to 20 MJ of stored (capacitor) energy. This is a potentially significant improvement over the currently available means via ICF of achieving HEDP and nuclear fusion relevant parameters.

  20. Fast ignition of inertial confinement fusion targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gus'kov, S. Yu., E-mail: guskov@sci.lebedev.ru [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2013-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Results of studies on fast ignition of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets are reviewed. The aspects of the fast ignition concept, which consists in the separation of the processes of target ignition and compression due to the synchronized action of different energy drivers, are considered. Criteria for the compression ratio and heating rate of a fast ignition target, the energy balance, and the thermonuclear gain are discussed. The results of experimental and theoretical studies of the heating of a compressed target by various types of igniting drivers, namely, beams of fast electrons and light ions produced under the action of a petawatt laser pulse on the target, a heavy-ion beam generated in the accelerator, an X-ray pulse, and a hydrodynamic flow of laser-accelerated matter, are analyzed. Requirements to the igniting-driver parameters that depend on the fast ignition criteria under the conditions of specific target heating mechanisms, as well as possibilities of practical implementation of these requirements, are discussed. The experimental programs of various laboratories and the prospects of practical implementation of fast ignition of ICF targets are reviewed. To date, fast ignition is the most promising method for decreasing the ignition energy and increasing the thermonuclear gain of an ICF plasma. A large number of publications have been devoted to investigations of this method and adjacent problems of the physics of igniting drivers and their interaction with plasma. This review presents results of only some of these studies that, in the author's opinion, allow one to discuss in detail the main physical aspects of the fast ignition concept and understand the current state and prospects of studies in this direction.

  1. Approximate models for the ion-kinetic regime in inertial-confinement-fusion capsule implosions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hoffman, Nelson M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)] (ORCID:000000030178767X); Zimmerman, George B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Molvig, Kim [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rinderknecht, Hans G. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Rosenberg, Michael J. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Albright, B. J. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Simakov, Andrei N. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Sio, Hong [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States)] (ORCID:000000017274236X); Zylstra, Alex B. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Johnson, Maria Gatu [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Séguin, Fredrick H. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Frenje, Johan A. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States)] (ORCID:0000000168460378); Li, C. K. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Petrasso, Richard D. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States)] (ORCID:0000000258834054); Higdon, David M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Srinivasan, Gowri [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Glebov, Vladimir Yu. [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Stoeckl, Christian [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Seka, Wolf [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States); Sangster, T. Craig [Univ. of Rochester, NY (United States)] (ORCID:0000000340402672)

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    “Reduced” (i.e., simplified or approximate) ion-kinetic (RIK) models in radiation-hydrodynamic simulations permit a useful description of inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) implosions where kinetic deviations from hydrodynamic behavior are important. For implosions in or near the kinetic regime (i.e., when ion mean free paths are comparable to the capsule size), simulations using a RIK model give a detailed picture of the time- and space-dependent structure of imploding capsules, allow an assessment of the relative importance of various kinetic processes during the implosion, enable explanations of past and current observations, and permit predictions of the results of future experiments. The RIK simulation method described here uses moment-based reduced kinetic models for transport of mass, momentum, and energy by long-mean-free-path ions, a model for the decrease of fusion reactivity owing to the associated modification of the ion distribution function, and a model of hydrodynamic turbulent mixing. The transport models are based on local gradient-diffusion approximations for the transport of moments of the ion distribution functions, with coefficients to impose flux limiting or account for transport modification. After calibration against a reference set of ICF implosions spanning the hydrodynamic-to-kinetic transition, the method has useful, quantifiable predictive ability over a broad range of capsule parameter space. Calibrated RIK simulations show that an important contributor to ion species separation in ICF capsule implosions is the preferential flux of longer-mean-free-path species out of the fuel and into the shell, leaving the fuel relatively enriched in species with shorter mean free paths. Also, the transport of ion thermal energy is enhanced in the kinetic regime, causing the fuel region to have a more uniform, lower ion temperature, extending over a larger volume, than implied by clean simulations. We expect that the success of our simple approach will motivate continued theoretical research into the development of first-principles-based, comprehensive, self-consistent, yet useable models of kinetic multispecies ion behavior in ICF plasmas.

  2. United States - Thailand (Siam) relations 1937-1954

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mosman, Timothy John

    1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    :lance of independence by an accom. , od- tion r:. 1th '-he J. . p nese occup='tion i. hai relations uith the United States, ;, hich ?as attacked on t no same 'ay becaa'e diiiicult clio strained;. hen th United Stat. s ente=taine; no ic!ea of reacl". ing any accom... unforiuna-cIy p ove~. ' ineffectual a id too late. Japanese po". ier seemed! i re- sistible, and chen. exerted or Decem!aer 7, 1941, the Tilal government c!ecided after only a '" -icf defiance to rego- tiatc a cease-fire and attempt io preserve a emi...

  3. Min-max control design for large angle maneuvers of flexible spacecraft

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Cheolho

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    usiug the ICF approxiusation method is [M]J = (4. 7) Define the A[M] is 6[M] = e([i1~I] ? [M] J) 0 M, ] (4. 8) where e is the scaling factor to control the magnitude of A[M]. In this case, the state space fornr is z=Az+Bu (4. 9) where 0 I ? M... ( ber) gP Shankar P. Bhattacharyy (Member) Srinivas R. Vadali (Member) /Ye~- gc'g Walter E. Haisler (Head of Department) December 1991 ABSTRACT Min-Max Control Design for Large Angle Maneuvers of Flexible Spacecraft(December 1991) Cheolho I...

  4. Report from the Integrated Modeling Panel at the Workshop on the Science of Ignition on NIF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marinak, M; Lamb, D

    2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

    This section deals with multiphysics radiation hydrodynamics codes used to design and simulate targets in the ignition campaign. These topics encompass all the physical processes they model, and include consideration of any approximations necessary due to finite computer resources. The section focuses on what developments would have the highest impact on reducing uncertainties in modeling most relevant to experimental observations. It considers how the ICF codes should be employed in the ignition campaign. This includes a consideration of how the experiments can be best structured to test the physical models the codes employ.

  5. Experimental and numerical investigation of shock wave propagation through complex geometry, gas continuous, two-phase media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, J. Chien-Chih [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The work presented here investigates the phenomenon of shock wave propagation in gas continuous, two-phase media. The motivation for this work stems from the need to understand blast venting consequences in the HYLIFE inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor. The HYLIFE concept utilizes lasers or heavy ion beams to rapidly heat and compress D-T targets injected into the center of a reactor chamber. A segmented blanket of failing molten lithium or Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4} (Flibe) jets encircles the reactors central cavity, shielding the reactor structure from radiation damage, absorbing the fusion energy, and breeding more tritium fuel.

  6. Modeling Compressed Turbulence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Israel, Daniel M. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    From ICE to ICF, the effect of mean compression or expansion is important for predicting the state of the turbulence. When developing combustion models, we would like to know the mix state of the reacting species. This involves density and concentration fluctuations. To date, research has focused on the effect of compression on the turbulent kinetic energy. The current work provides constraints to help development and calibration for models of species mixing effects in compressed turbulence. The Cambon, et al., re-scaling has been extended to buoyancy driven turbulence, including the fluctuating density, concentration, and temperature equations. The new scalings give us helpful constraints for developing and validating RANS turbulence models.

  7. Research and Development of Information on Geothermal Direct Heat Application Projects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hederman, William F., Jr.; Cohen, Laura A.

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the first annual report of ICF's geothermal R&D project for the Department of Energy's Idaho Operations Office. The overall objective of this project is to compile, analyze, and report on data from geothermal direct heat application projects. Ultimately, this research should convey the information developed through DOE's and Program Opportunity Notice (PON) activities as well as through other pioneering geothermal direct heat application projects to audiences which can use the early results in new, independent initiatives. A key audience is potential geothermal investors.

  8. Process for manufacture of inertial confinement fusion targets and resulting product

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Masnari, Nino A. (Ann Arbor, MI); Rensel, Walter B. (Ann Arbor, MI); Robinson, Merrill G. (Ann Arbor, MI); Solomon, David E. (Ann Arbor, MI); Wise, Kensall D. (Ann Arbor, MI); Wuttke, Gilbert H. (Ypsilanti Township, Washtenaw County, MI)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An ICF target comprising a spherical pellet of fusion fuel surrounded by a concentric shell; and a process for manufacturing the same which includes the steps of forming hemispheric shells of a silicon or other substrate material, adhering the shell segments to each other with a fuel pellet contained concentrically therein, then separating the individual targets from the parent substrate. Formation of hemispheric cavities by deposition or coating of a mold substrate is also described. Coatings or membranes may also be applied to the interior of the hemispheric segments prior to joining.

  9. Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF): Principles, Status, and International Collaboration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkpatrick, R.C.

    1998-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetized target fusion (MTF) is an approach to thermonuclear fusion that is intermediate between the two extremes of inertial and magnetic confinement. Target plasma preparation is followed by compression to fusion conditions. The use of a magnetic field to reduce electron thermal conduction and potentially enhance DT alpha energy deposition allows the compression rate to be drastically reduced relative to that for inertial confinement fusion. This leads to compact systems with target driver power and intensity requirements that are orders of magnitude lower than for ICF. A liner on plasma experiment has been proposed to provide a firm proof of principle for MTF.

  10. Laser Program annual report 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rufer, M.L.; Murphy, P.W. (eds.)

    1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Laser Program Annual Report is part of the continuing series of reports documenting the progress of the unclassified Laser Fusion Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). As in previous years, the report is organized programmatically. The first section is an overview of the basic goals and directions of the LLNL Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program, and highlights the year's important accomplishments. Sections 2 through 7 provide the detailed information on the various program elements: Laser Systems and Operations, Target Design, Target Fabrication, Laser Experiments and Advanced Diagnostics, Advanced Laser Development, and Applications of Inertial Confinement Fusion. Individual sections will be indexed separately. 589 refs., 333 figs., 25 tabs.

  11. Next-generation laser for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, C.D.; Deach, R.J.; Bibeau, C. [and others

    1997-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We report on the progress in developing and building the Mercury laser system as the first in a series of a new generation of diode- pumped solid-state Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) lasers at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Mercury will be the first integrated demonstration of a scalable laser architecture compatible with advanced high energy density (HED) physics applications. Primary performance goals include 10% efficiencies at 10 Hz and a 1-10 ns pulse with 1 omega energies of 100 J and with 2 omega/3 omega frequency conversion.

  12. Approximate models for the ion-kinetic regime in inertial-confinement-fusion capsule implosions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hoffman, Nelson M.; Zimmerman, George B.; Molvig, Kim; Rinderknecht, Hans G.; Rosenberg, Michael J.; Albright, B. J.; Simakov, Andrei N.; Sio, Hong; Zylstra, Alex B.; Johnson, Maria Gatu; et al

    2015-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    “Reduced” (i.e., simplified or approximate) ion-kinetic (RIK) models in radiation-hydrodynamic simulations permit a useful description of inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) implosions where kinetic deviations from hydrodynamic behavior are important. For implosions in or near the kinetic regime (i.e., when ion mean free paths are comparable to the capsule size), simulations using a RIK model give a detailed picture of the time- and space-dependent structure of imploding capsules, allow an assessment of the relative importance of various kinetic processes during the implosion, enable explanations of past and current observations, and permit predictions of the results of future experiments. The RIK simulation method describedmore »here uses moment-based reduced kinetic models for transport of mass, momentum, and energy by long-mean-free-path ions, a model for the decrease of fusion reactivity owing to the associated modification of the ion distribution function, and a model of hydrodynamic turbulent mixing. The transport models are based on local gradient-diffusion approximations for the transport of moments of the ion distribution functions, with coefficients to impose flux limiting or account for transport modification. After calibration against a reference set of ICF implosions spanning the hydrodynamic-to-kinetic transition, the method has useful, quantifiable predictive ability over a broad range of capsule parameter space. Calibrated RIK simulations show that an important contributor to ion species separation in ICF capsule implosions is the preferential flux of longer-mean-free-path species out of the fuel and into the shell, leaving the fuel relatively enriched in species with shorter mean free paths. Also, the transport of ion thermal energy is enhanced in the kinetic regime, causing the fuel region to have a more uniform, lower ion temperature, extending over a larger volume, than implied by clean simulations. We expect that the success of our simple approach will motivate continued theoretical research into the development of first-principles-based, comprehensive, self-consistent, yet useable models of kinetic multispecies ion behavior in ICF plasmas.« less

  13. ITER: The International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor and the Nuclear Weapons Proliferation Implications of Thermonuclear-Fusion Energy Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    André Gsponer; Jean-pierre Hurni

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper contains two parts: (I) A list of “points ” highlighting the strategic-political and militarytechnical reasons and implications of the very probable siting of ITER (the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor) in Japan, which should be confirmed sometimes in early 2004. (II) A technical analysis of the nuclear weapons proliferation implications of inertial- and magnetic-confinement fusion systems substantiating the technical points highlighted in the first part, and showing that while full access to the physics of thermonuclear weapons is the main implication of ICF, full access to large-scale tritium technology is the main proliferation impact of MCF. The conclusion of the paper is that siting ITER in a country such as Japan, which already has a large separated-plutonium stockpile, and an ambitious laser-driven ICF program (comparable in size and quality to those of the United States or France) will considerably increase its latent (or virtual) nuclear weapons proliferation status, and foster further nuclear proliferation throughout the world. The safety and environmental problems related to the operation of largescale fusion facilities such as ITER (which contain massive amounts of hazardous and/or radioactive materials such as tritium, lithium, and beryllium, as well as neutron-activated structural materials) are not addressed in this paper.

  14. Empirical assessment of the detection efficiency of CR-39 at high proton fluence and a compact, proton detector for high-fluence applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Seguin, F. H.; Waugh, C. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Orozco, D.; Frenje, J. A.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Sio, H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Sinenian, N.; et al

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detectors are widely used in physics and in many inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, and under ideal conditions these detectors have 100% detection efficiency for ~0.5–8 MeV protons. When the fluence of incident particles becomes too high, overlap of particle tracks leads to under-counting at typical processing conditions (5 h etch in 6N NaOH at 80 °C). Short etch times required to avoid overlap can cause under-counting as well, as tracks are not fully developed. Experiments have determined the minimum etch times for 100% detection of 1.7–4.3-MeV protons and established that for 2.4-MeV protons, relevant formore »detection of DD protons, the maximum fluence that can be detected using normal processing techniques is ?3 × 106 cm–2. A CR-39-based proton detector has been developed to mitigate issues related to high particle fluences on ICF facilities. Using a pinhole and scattering foil several mm in front of the CR-39, proton fluences at the CR-39 are reduced by more than a factor of ~50, increasing the operating yield upper limit by a comparable amount.« less

  15. Overview of LANL short-pulse ion acceleration activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flippo, Kirk A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schmitt, Mark J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Offermann, Dustin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cobble, James A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gautier, Donald [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kline, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Workman, Jonathan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Archuleta, Fred [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gonzales, Raymond [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hurry, Thomas [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Johnson, Randall [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Letzring, Samuel [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Montgomery, David [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reid, Sha-Marie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shimada, Tsutomu [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gaillard, Sandrine A [UNIV OF NEVADA; Sentoku, Yasuhiko [UNIV OF NEVADA; Bussman, Michael [FORSCHUNGZENTRUM DRESDEN; Kluge, Thomas [FORSCHUNGZENTRUM DRESDEN; Cowan, Thomas E [FORSCHUNGZENTRUM DRESDEN; Rassuchine, Jenny M [FORSCHUNGZENTRUM DRESDEN; Lowenstern, Mario E [UNIV OF MICHIGAN; Mucino, J Eduardo [UNIV OF MICHIGAN; Gall, Brady [UNIV OF MISSOURI; Korgan, Grant [NANOLABZ, RENO; Malekos, Steven [NANOLABZ, RENO; Adams, Jesse [NANOLABZ, RENO; Bartal, Teresa [UCSD; Chawla, Surgreev [UCSD; Higginson, Drew [UCSD; Beg, Farhat [UCSD; Nilson, Phil [LLE, ROCHESTER; MacPhee, Andrew [LLNL; Le Pape, Sebastien [LLNL; Hey, Daniel [LLNL; MacKinnon, Andy [LLNL; Geissel, Mattias [SNL; Schollmeier, Marius [SNL; Stephens, Rich [GENERAL ATOMICS, SAN DIEGO

    2009-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    An overview of Los Alamos National Laboratory's activities related to short-pulse ion acceleration is presented. LANL is involved is several projects related to Inertial Confinement Fusion (Fast Ignition) and Laser-Ion Acceleration. LANL has an active high energy X-ray backlighter program for radiographing ICF implosions and other High Energy Density Laboratory Physics experiments. Using the Trident 200TW laser we are currently developing high energy photon (>10 keV) phase contrast imaging techniques to be applied on Omega and the NIF. In addition we are engaged in multiple programs in laser ion acceleration to boost the ion energies and efficiencies for various potential applications including Fast Ignition, active material interrogation, and medical applications. Two basic avenues to increase ion performance are currently under study: one involves ultra-thin targets and the other involves changing the target geometry. We have recently had success in boosting proton energies above 65 MeV into the medical application range. Highlights covered in the presentation include: The Trident Laser System; X-ray Phase Contrast Imaging for ICF and HEDLP; Improving TNSA Ion Acceleration; Scaling Laws; Flat Targets; Thin Targets; Cone Targets; Ion Focusing;Trident; Omega EP; Scaling Comparisons; and, Conclusions.

  16. Decay radioactivity induced in plasma-facing materials by deutrium-tritium neutrons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kumar, A.; Abdou, M.A.; Youssef, M.Z. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Ikeda, Y.; Konno, C.; Kosako, K.; Oyama, Y.; Nakamura, T.; Maekawa, H. [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Ibaraki (Japan)

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Deuterium-tritium (D-T) neutron-induced radioactivity constitutes one of the foremost issues in fusion reactor design. Designers have been using radioactivity codes and associated nuclear data libraries for nucleonic designs of fusion reactors. However, in the past, there was hardly any experimental validation of these codes/libraries. An elaborate, experimental program was initiated in 1988 under a U.S. Department of Energy/Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute collaborative program to validate the radioactivity codes/libraries. As many as 14 neutron energy spectra were covered for a number of materials. The analyses of the isotopic activities of the irradiated materials using the activation cross-section libraries of four leading radioactivity codes, i.e., ACT4/THIDA-1, REAC-3. DKR-ICF; and RACC, have shown large discrepancies among the calculations on one hand and between the calculations and the measurements, on the other. Vanadium, Co, Ni, Zn, Zr, Mo, In, Sn, and W each count the largest number of discrepant isotopic activities. In addition to providing detailed results of the status of predictability of individual isotopic activities using the ACT4, REAC-3, DKR-ICF, and RACC activation cross-section libraries, safety factors cum quality factors characterizing each library are presented and discussed. The related issues of confidence level and associated uncertainty are also highlighted. 37 refs., 112 figs., 24 tabs.

  17. Building America Case Study: Lancaster County Career and Technology Center Green Home 3, Mt Joy, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transitioning from standard light frame to a thermal mass wall system in a high performance home will require a higher level of design integration with the mechanical systems. The much higher mass in the ICF wall influences heat transfer through the wall and affects how the heating and cooling system responds to changing outdoor conditions. This is even more important for efficient, low-load homes with efficient heat pump systems in colder climates where the heating and cooling peak loads are significantly different from standard construction.This report analyzes a range of design features and component performance estimates in an effort to select practical, cost-effective solutions for high performance homes in a cold climate. Of primary interest is the influence of the ICF walls on developing an effective air sealing strategy and selecting an appropriate heating and cooling equipment type and capacity. The domestic water heating system is analyzed for costs and savings to investigate options for higher efficiency electric water heating. A method to ensure mechanical ventilation air flows is examined. The final solution package includes high-R mass walls, very low infiltration rates, multi-stage heat pump heating, solar thermal domestic hot water system, and energy recovery ventilation. This solution package can be used for homes to exceed 2012 International Energy Conservation Code requirements throughout all climate zones and achieves the DOE Challenge Home certification.

  18. Insulated Concrete Form Walls Integrated With Mechanical Systems in a Cold Climate Test House

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mallay, D.; Wiehagen, J.

    2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transitioning from standard light frame to a thermal mass wall system in a high performance home will require a higher level of design integration with the mechanical systems. The much higher mass in the ICF wall influences heat transfer through the wall and affects how the heating and cooling system responds to changing outdoor conditions. This is even more important for efficient, low-load homes with efficient heat pump systems in colder climates where the heating and cooling peak loads are significantly different from standard construction. This report analyzes a range of design features and component performance estimates in an effort to select practical, cost-effective solutions for high performance homes in a cold climate. Of primary interest is the influence of the ICF walls on developing an effective air sealing strategy and selecting an appropriate heating and cooling equipment type and capacity. The domestic water heating system is analyzed for costs and savings to investigate options for higher efficiency electric water heating. A method to ensure mechanical ventilation air flows is examined. The final solution package includes high-R mass walls, very low infiltration rates, multi-stage heat pump heating, solar thermal domestic hot water system, and energy recovery ventilation. This solution package can be used for homes to exceed 2012 International Energy Conservation Code requirements throughout all climate zones and achieves the DOE Challenge Home certification.

  19. Radiation in molecular dynamic simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glosli, J; Graziani, F; More, R; Murillo, M; Streitz, F; Surh, M

    2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Hot dense radiative (HDR) plasmas common to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and stellar interiors have high temperature (a few hundred eV to tens of keV), high density (tens to hundreds of g/cc) and high pressure (hundreds of Megabars to thousands of Gigabars). Typically, such plasmas undergo collisional, radiative, atomic and possibly thermonuclear processes. In order to describe HDR plasmas, computational physicists in ICF and astrophysics use atomic-scale microphysical models implemented in various simulation codes. Experimental validation of the models used to describe HDR plasmas are difficult to perform. Direct Numerical Simulation (DNS) of the many-body interactions of plasmas is a promising approach to model validation but, previous work either relies on the collisionless approximation or ignores radiation. We present a new numerical simulation technique to address a currently unsolved problem: the extension of molecular dynamics to collisional plasmas including emission and absorption of radiation. The new technique passes a key test: it relaxes to a blackbody spectrum for a plasma in local thermodynamic equilibrium. This new tool also provides a method for assessing the accuracy of energy and momentum exchange models in hot dense plasmas. As an example, we simulate the evolution of non-equilibrium electron, ion, and radiation temperatures for a hydrogen plasma using the new molecular dynamics simulation capability.

  20. Laser Program annual report, 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rufer, M.L.; Murphy, P.W. (eds.)

    1986-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume presents the unclassified activities and accomplishments of the Inertial Confinement Fusion and Advanced Laser Development elements of the Laser Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the calendar year 1985. This report has been organized into major sections that correspond to our principal technical activities. Section 1 provides an overview. Section 2 comprises work in target theory, design, and code development. Target development and fabrication and the related topics in materials science are contained in Section 3. Section 4 presents work in experiments and diagnostics and includes developments in data acquisition and management capabilities. In Section 5 laser system (Nova) operation and maintenance are discussed. Activities related to supporting laser and optical technologies are described in Section 6. Basic laser research and development is reported in Section 7. Section 8 contains the results of studies in ICF applications where the work reported deals principally with the production of electric power with ICF. Finally, Section 9 is a comprehensive discussion of work to date on solid state lasers for average power applications. Individual sections, two through nine, have been cataloged separately.

  1. New AB-Thermonuclear Reactor for Aerospace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2007-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

    There are two main methods of nulcear fusion: inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and magnetic confinement fusion (MCF). Existing thermonuclear reactors are very complex, expensive, large, and heavy. They cannot achieve the Lawson creterion. The author offers an innovation. ICF has on the inside surface of the shell-shaped combustion chamber a covering of small Prism Reflectors (PR) and plasma reflector. These prism reflectors have a noteworthy advantage, in comparison with conventional mirror and especially with conventional shell: they multi-reflect the heat and laser radiation exactly back into collision with the fuel target capsule (pellet). The plasma reflector reflects the Bremsstrahlung radiation. The offered innovation decreases radiation losses, creates significant radiation pressure and increases the reaction time. The Lawson criterion increases by hundreds of times. The size, cost, and weight of a typical installation will decrease by tens of times. The author is researching the efficiency of these innovations. Keywords: Thermonuclear reactor, Multi-reflex AB-thermonuclear reactor, aerospace thermonuclear engine. This work is presented as paper AIAA-2006-7225 to Space-2006 Conference, 19-21 September, 2006, San Jose, CA, USA.

  2. Inertial-confinement fusion-reactor dry-wall study. Final report, 13 August 1981-31 March 1983. Report WAESD-TR-83-0010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sucov, E.W.

    1983-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Westinghouse ICF Dry Wall Study was undertaken (1) to explore the practical implications of using a Ta coating to protect the steel first wall of an ICF reactor against the power pulses from the explosions of a pellet containing Ta as the heavy element and (2) to determine if a feasible design for improved safety and lower cost in a blanket could be developed using solid lithium compound in place of liquid lithium as the tritium breeder. Three coating techniques were examined; plasma spray, chemical vapor deposition and explosive bonding. An evaporation code and a sputtering code which were developed at LANL, were used to calculate the loss rate of Ta due to these processes after each pellet explosion. A simulation experiment to verify the CHART D calculations was investigated. Sources of pulsed x-rays and ions to simulate the debris from each pellet explosion were identified. The CANDID code was developed to permit evaluation of candidate metals for coating the steel based on criteria such as surface and bulk temperature rise, thermal stress in the creating layer and evaporation rate. Material properties were stored in the memory and were called upon to calculate evaluation algorithms. Of twenty original candidates, six remain: Re, Ir, Mo, Cr, W, Ta and Nb. Further evaluation would include parameters such as cost, manufacturability, radioactive decay rate, etc.

  3. Office of Inspector General audit report on ``The U.S. Department of Energy`s X-Change 1997: The global D and D marketplace conference``

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1998-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy and Florida International University (FIU), a state university, cosponsored the X-Change 1997: The Global D and D Marketplace conference (X-Change Conference) that was held December 1--5, 1997, in Miami, Florida. The purpose of the conference was to disseminate information on decontamination and decommissioning problems, solutions, and technologies to an international audience of government, industry, and academia. Through a contract with the Department, FIU was responsible for conference planning, organization, and logistical support. FIU awarded a subcontract to ICF, Inc. to work on the conference. ICF, Inc. is a major Department contractor with responsibilities for projects at Hanford, Argonne National laboratory and Los Alamos National Laboratory. The audit objectives were to determine whether FIU had controls in place to ensure that public funds were used appropriately, and whether fiscal practices associated with the conference were consistent with Government requirements and Department policy. FIU implemented accounting and budget mechanisms to identify and control the sources and uses of funds. However, the absence of a Departmental policy on funding conferences resulted in questionable fiscal practices associated with the conference. These are discussed.

  4. Pulsed power supply for Nova Upgrade. Final report, August 1, 1991 to March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bacon, J.L.; Kajs, J.P.; Walls, A.; Weldon, W.F.; Zowarka, R.C. [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (US). Center for Electromechanics] [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (US). Center for Electromechanics

    1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes work carried out at the Center for Electromechanics at The University of Texas at Austin (CEM-UT). A baseline design of the Nova Upgrade has been completed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The Nova Upgrade is an 18 beamline Nd: glass laser design utilizing fully relayed 4x4 30 cm aperture segmented optical components. The laser thus consists of 288 independent beamlets nominally producing 1.5 to 2.0 MJ of 0.35 {mu}m light in a 3 to 5 ns pulse. The laser design is extremely flexible and will allow a wide range of pulses to irradiate ICF targets. This facility will demonstrate ignition/gain and the scientific feasibility of ICF for energy and defense applications. The pulsed power requirements for the Nova Upgrade are given. CEM-UT was contracted to study and develop a design for a homopolar generator/inductor (HPG/inductor) opening switch system which would satisfy the pulsed power supply requirements of the Nova Upgrade. The Nd:glass laser amplifiers used in the Nova Upgrade will be powered by light from xenon flashlamps. The pulsed power supply for the Nova Upgrade powers the xenon flashlamps. This design and study was for a power supply to drive flashlamps.

  5. Impact of x-ray dose on the response of CR-39 to 1-5.5 MeV alphas

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rojas-Herrera, J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Zylstra, A. B.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Orozco, D.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sio, H.; Seguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; et al

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CR-39 nuclear track detector is used in many nuclear diagnostics #12;fielded at inertial con#12;nement fusion (ICF) facilities. Large x-ray uences generated by ICF experiments may impact the CR-39 response to incident charged particles. To determine the impact of x-ray exposure on the CR-39 response to alpha particles, a thick-target bremsstrahlung x-ray generator was used to expose CR-39 to various doses of 8 keV Cu-K?#11; and K#12;? x-rays. The CR-39 detectors were then exposed to 1-5.5 MeV alphas from an Am-241 source. The regions of the CR-39 exposed to x-rays showed a smaller track diameter than those not exposed tomore »x-rays: for example, a dose of 3.0#6; ± 0.1 Gy causes a decrease of (19 ± #6;2)% in the track diameter of a 5.5 MeV alpha particle, while a dose of 60.0 ± #6;1.3 Gy results in a decrease of (45 ± #6;5)% in the track diameter. The reduced track diameters were found to be predominantly caused by a comparable reduction in the bulk etch rate of the CR-39 with x-ray dose. A residual eff#11;ect depending on alpha particle energy is characterized using an empirical formula.« less

  6. On the transport coefficients of hydrogen in the inertial confinement fusion regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lambert, Flavien; Recoules, Vanina; Decoster, Alain; Clerouin, Jean [CEA, DAM, DIF, F-91297 Arpajon (France); Desjarlais, Michael [Pulsed Power Sciences Center, Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Ab initio molecular dynamics is used to compute the thermal and electrical conductivities of hydrogen from 10 to 160 g cm{sup -3} and temperatures up to 800 eV, i.e., thermodynamical conditions relevant to inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The ionic structure is obtained using molecular dynamics simulations based on an orbital-free treatment for the electrons. The transport properties were computed using ab initio simulations in the DFT/LDA approximation. The thermal and electrical conductivities are evaluated using Kubo-Greenwood formulation. Particular attention is paid to the convergence of electronic transport properties with respect to the number of bands and atoms. These calculations are then used to check various analytical models (Hubbard's, Lee-More's and Ichimaru's) widely used in hydrodynamics simulations of ICF capsule implosions. The Lorenz number, which is the ratio between thermal and electrical conductivities, is also computed and compared to the well-known Wiedemann-Franz law in different regimes ranging from the highly degenerate to the kinetic one. This allows us to deduce electrical conductivity from thermal conductivity for analytical model. We find that the coupling of Hubbard and Spitzer models gives a correct description of the behavior of electrical and thermal conductivities in the whole thermodynamic regime.

  7. Tail-ion transport and Knudsen layer formation in the presence of magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmit, P. F. [Sandia National Laboratories, MS 1186, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1186 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, MS 1186, P.O. Box 5800, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-1186 (United States); Molvig, Kim; Nakhleh, C. W. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS B259, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratory, MS B259, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Knudsen layer losses of tail fuel ions could reduce significantly the fusion reactivity of highly compressed cylindrical and spherical targets in inertial confinement fusion (ICF). With the class of magnetized ICF targets in mind, the effect of embedded magnetic fields on Knudsen layer formation is investigated for the first time. The modified energy scaling of ion diffusivity in magnetized hot spots is found to suppress the preferential losses of tail-ions perpendicular to the magnetic field lines to a degree that the tail distribution can be at least partially, if not fully, restored. Two simple threshold conditions are identified leading to the restoration of fusion reactivity in magnetized hot spots. A kinetic equation for tail-ion transport in the presence of a magnetic field is derived, and solutions to the equation are obtained numerically in simulations. Numerical results confirm the validity of the threshold conditions for restored reactivity and identify two different asymptotic regimes of the fusion fuel. While Knudsen layer formation is shown to be suppressed entirely in strongly magnetized cylindrical hot spot cavities, uniformly magnetized spherical cavities demonstrate remnant, albeit reduced, levels of tail-ion depletion.

  8. Status of LDRD-DR 20070518 development of a magnetically driven target for thermo-nuclear burn studies (u)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watt, Robert G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Atchison, W L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Colgate, S A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Goforth, J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Griego, J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Guzik, J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Holtkamp, D [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Idzorek, G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kirkpatrick, R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Menikoff, R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Meyer, R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oona, H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reardon, P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rousculp, C L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Sgro, A G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tabaka, L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is developing a magnetically driven cylindrical confinement system for the creation of a small region of material existing under extreme conditions. Using a Ranchero High Explosive Pulsed Power generator (HEPP) with maximum current ranging from 25- 50 MA depending on the load, a current driven Al cylinder will impact a series of nested, less massive Au shells. Each subsequent shell's inner surface velocity will increase due to it's smaller mass by the ratio 2.01( 1+ m{sub i+ 1}/m i), along with radial convergence. Attaining this ideal result requires highly efficient energy transfer which in turn requires plastic cushions. The final velocity of the last sequential shell will be used to drive a central experimental package in which extreme material conditions will be produced. The inexpensive nature of HEPP and the extreme conditions attainable allow many studies to be conducted in regimes not currently available in the laboratory. One potential central experimental package consists of a cylindrical Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) target; a cylindrical Au pusher surrounding frozen DT. This target is used as a design tool. The ICF conditions achieved with such a target would be similar to those created in a double shell ignition capsule at the National Ignition Facility. The system being developed has a range of potential applications.

  9. Fusion-neutron-yield, activation measurements at the Z accelerator: Design, analysis, and sensitivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hahn, K. D., E-mail: kdhahn@sandia.gov; Ruiz, C. L.; Fehl, D. L.; Chandler, G. A.; Knapp, P. F.; Smelser, R. M.; Torres, J. A. [Sandia National Laboratories, Diagnostics and Target Physics, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States)] [Sandia National Laboratories, Diagnostics and Target Physics, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); Cooper, G. W.; Nelson, A. J. [Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States)] [Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87131 (United States); Leeper, R. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratories, Plasma Physics Group, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] [Los Alamos National Laboratories, Plasma Physics Group, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a general methodology to determine the diagnostic sensitivity that is directly applicable to neutron-activation diagnostics fielded on a wide variety of neutron-producing experiments, which include inertial-confinement fusion (ICF), dense plasma focus, and ion beam-driven concepts. This approach includes a combination of several effects: (1) non-isotropic neutron emission; (2) the 1/r{sup 2} decrease in neutron fluence in the activation material; (3) the spatially distributed neutron scattering, attenuation, and energy losses due to the fielding environment and activation material itself; and (4) temporally varying neutron emission. As an example, we describe the copper-activation diagnostic used to measure secondary deuterium-tritium fusion-neutron yields on ICF experiments conducted on the pulsed-power Z Accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories. Using this methodology along with results from absolute calibrations and Monte Carlo simulations, we find that for the diagnostic configuration on Z, the diagnostic sensitivity is 0.037% ± 17% counts/neutron per cm{sup 2} and is ? 40% less sensitive than it would be in an ideal geometry due to neutron attenuation, scattering, and energy-loss effects.

  10. Empirical assessment of the detection efficiency of CR-39 at high proton fluence and a compact, proton detector for high-fluence applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Seguin, F. H.; Waugh, C. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Orozco, D.; Frenje, J. A.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Sio, H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Stoeckl, C.; Hohenberger, M.; Sangster, T. C.; LePape, S.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Bionta, R. M.; Landen, O. L.; Zacharias, R. A.; Kim, Y.; Herrmann, H. W.; Kilkenny, J. D.

    2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detectors are widely used in physics and in many inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, and under ideal conditions these detectors have 100% detection efficiency for ~0.5–8 MeV protons. When the fluence of incident particles becomes too high, overlap of particle tracks leads to under-counting at typical processing conditions (5 h etch in 6N NaOH at 80 °C). Short etch times required to avoid overlap can cause under-counting as well, as tracks are not fully developed. Experiments have determined the minimum etch times for 100% detection of 1.7–4.3-MeV protons and established that for 2.4-MeV protons, relevant for detection of DD protons, the maximum fluence that can be detected using normal processing techniques is ?3 × 106 cm–2. A CR-39-based proton detector has been developed to mitigate issues related to high particle fluences on ICF facilities. Using a pinhole and scattering foil several mm in front of the CR-39, proton fluences at the CR-39 are reduced by more than a factor of ~50, increasing the operating yield upper limit by a comparable amount.

  11. Impact of x-ray dose on the response of CR-39 to 1-5.5 MeV alphas

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rojas-Herrera, J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Zylstra, A. B.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Orozco, D.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sio, H.; Seguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2015-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The CR-39 nuclear track detector is used in many nuclear diagnostics #12;fielded at inertial con#12;nement fusion (ICF) facilities. Large x-ray uences generated by ICF experiments may impact the CR-39 response to incident charged particles. To determine the impact of x-ray exposure on the CR-39 response to alpha particles, a thick-target bremsstrahlung x-ray generator was used to expose CR-39 to various doses of 8 keV Cu-K?#11; and K#12;? x-rays. The CR-39 detectors were then exposed to 1-5.5 MeV alphas from an Am-241 source. The regions of the CR-39 exposed to x-rays showed a smaller track diameter than those not exposed to x-rays: for example, a dose of 3.0#6; ± 0.1 Gy causes a decrease of (19 ± #6;2)% in the track diameter of a 5.5 MeV alpha particle, while a dose of 60.0 ± #6;1.3 Gy results in a decrease of (45 ± #6;5)% in the track diameter. The reduced track diameters were found to be predominantly caused by a comparable reduction in the bulk etch rate of the CR-39 with x-ray dose. A residual eff#11;ect depending on alpha particle energy is characterized using an empirical formula.

  12. National Ignition Facility Quality Assurance Program Plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolfe, C.R.; Yatabe, J.

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a key constituent of the Department of Energy`s Stockpile Stewardship Program. The NIF will use inertial confinement fusion (ICF) to produce ignition and energy gain in ICF targets, and will perform weapons physics and high-energy- density experiments in support of national security and civilian objectives. The NIF Project is a national facility involving the collaboration of several DOE laboratories and subcontractors, including Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE). The primary mission of the NIF Project is the construction and start-up operation of laser-based facilities that will demonstrate fusion ignition in the laboratory to provide nuclear-weapons-related physics data, and secondarily, to propagate fusion burn aimed at developing a potential source of civilian energy. To support the accomplishment of this very important mission, the LLNL Laser Directorate created the NIF Project Office to organize and bring about the Project. The NIF Project Office has established this Quality Assurance Program to ensure its success. This issue of the Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) adds the requirements for the conduct of Title 11 design, construction, procurement, and Title III engineering. This QAPP defines and describes the program-the management system-for specifying, achieving, and assuring the quality of all NIF Project work consistent with the policies of the Laboratory and the Laser Directorate.

  13. Z, ZX, and X-1: A Realistic Path to High Fusion Yield

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    COOK, DONALD L.

    1999-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Z-pinches now constitute the most energetic and powerful sources of x-rays available by a large margin. The Z accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories has produced 1.8 MJ of x-ray energy, 280 TW of power, and hohlraum temperatures of 200 eV. These advances are being applied to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments on Z. The requirements for high fusion yield are exemplified in the target to be driven by the X-1 accelerator. X-1 will drive two z-pinches, each producing 7 MJ of x-ray energy and about 1000 TW of x-ray power. Together, these radiation sources will heat a hohlraum containing the 4-mm diameter ICF capsule to a temperature exceeding 225 eV for about 10 ns, with the pulse shape required to drive the capsule to high fusion yield, in the range of 200--1000 MJ. Since X-1 consists of two identical accelerators, it is possible to mitigate the technical risk of high yield by constructing one accelerator. This accelerator, ZX, will bridge the gap from Z to X-1 by driving an integrated target experiment with a very efficient energy source, ZX will also provide experimental condition that the full specifications of the X-1 accelerator for high yield are achievable, and that a realistic path to high fission yield exists.

  14. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) A Path to Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moses, E

    2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Fusion energy has long been considered a promising clean, nearly inexhaustible source of energy. Power production by fusion micro-explosions of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets has been a long term research goal since the invention of the first laser in 1960. The NIF is poised to take the next important step in the journey by beginning experiments researching ICF ignition. Ignition on NIF will be the culmination of over thirty years of ICF research on high-powered laser systems such as the Nova laser at LLNL and the OMEGA laser at the University of Rochester as well as smaller systems around the world. NIF is a 192 beam Nd-glass laser facility at LLNL that is more than 90% complete. The first cluster of 48 beams is operational in the laser bay, the second cluster is now being commissioned, and the beam path to the target chamber is being installed. The Project will be completed in 2009 and ignition experiments will start in 2010. When completed NIF will produce up to 1.8 MJ of 0.35 {micro}m light in highly shaped pulses required for ignition. It will have beam stability and control to higher precision than any other laser fusion facility. Experiments using one of the beams of NIF have demonstrated that NIF can meet its beam performance goals. The National Ignition Campaign (NIC) has been established to manage the ignition effort on NIF. NIC has all of the research and development required to execute the ignition plan and to develop NIF into a fully operational facility. NIF will explore the ignition space, including direct drive, 2{omega} ignition, and fast ignition, to optimize target efficiency for developing fusion as an energy source. In addition to efficient target performance, fusion energy requires significant advances in high repetition rate lasers and fusion reactor technology. The Mercury laser at LLNL is a high repetition rate Nd-glass laser for fusion energy driver development. Mercury uses state-o-the art technology such as ceramic laser slabs and light diode pumping for improved efficiency and thermal management. Progress in NIF, NIC, Mercury, and the path forward for fusion energy will be presented.

  15. Pulse shaping system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skeldon, M.D.; Letzring, S.A.

    1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Temporally shaped electrical waveform generation provides electrical waveforms suitable for driving an electro-optic modulator (EOM) which produces temporally shaped optical laser pulses for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research. The temporally shaped electrical waveform generation is carried out with aperture coupled transmission lines having an input transmission line and an aperture coupled output transmission line, along which input and output pulses propagate in opposite directions. The output electrical waveforms are shaped principally due to the selection of coupling aperture width, in a direction transverse to the lines, which varies along the length of the line. Specific electrical waveforms, which may be high voltage (up to kilovolt range), are produced and applied to the EOM to produce specifically shaped optical laser pulses. 8 figs.

  16. Pulse shaping system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skeldon, Mark D. (Penfield, NY); Letzring, Samuel A. (Jemez Springs, NM)

    1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Temporally shaped electrical waveform generation provides electrical waveforms suitable for driving an electro-optic modulator (EOM) which produces temporally shaped optical laser pulses for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research. The temporally shaped electrical waveform generation is carried out with aperture coupled transmission lines having an input transmission line and an aperture coupled output transmission line, along which input and output pulses propagate in opposite directions. The output electrical waveforms are shaped principally due to the selection of coupling aperture width, in a direction transverse to the lines, which varies along the length of the line. Specific electrical waveforms, which may be high voltage (up to kilovolt range), are produced and applied to the EOM to produce specifically shaped optical laser pulses.

  17. Investigations of the Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov Instabilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Riccardo Bonazza; Mark Anderson; Jason Oakley

    2008-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The present program is centered on the experimental study of shock-induced interfacial fluid instabilities. Both 2-D (near-sinusoids) and 3-D (spheres) initial conditions are studied in a large, vertical square shock tube facility. The evolution of the interface shape, its distortion, the modal growth rates and the mixing of the fluids at the interface are all objectives of the investigation. In parallel to the experiments, calculations are performed using the Raptor code, on platforms made available by LLNL. These flows are of great relevance to both ICF and stockpile stewardship. The involvement of four graduate students is in line with the national laboratories' interest in the education of scientists and engineers in disciplines and technologies consistent with the labs' missions and activities.

  18. Penetrating radiation impact on NIF final optic components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, C.D.; Speth, J.A.; DeLoach, L.D.; Payne, S.A.

    1996-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Goal of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is to achieve thermonuclear ignition in a laboratory environment in inertial confinement fusion (ICF). This will enable NIF to service the DOE stockpile stewardship management program, inertial fusion energy goals, and advance scientific frontiers. All of these applications will make use of the extreme conditions that the facility will create in the target chamber. In the case of a prospected 20 MJ yield scenario, NIF will produce 10{sup 19} neutrons with DT fusion 14 MeV energy per neutron. There will also be high-energy x rays as well as solid, liquid, and gaseous target debris produced either directly or indirectly by the inertial confinement fusion process. A critical design issue is the protection of the final optical components as well as sophisticated target diagnostics in such a harsh environment.

  19. Ignition of deuterium-tritium fuel targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Musinski, D.L.; Mruzek, M.T.

    1991-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a method of igniting a deuterium-tritium ICF fuel target to obtain fuel burn in which the fuel target initially includes a hollow spherical shell having a frozen layer of DT material at substantially uniform thickness and cryogenic temperature around the interior surface of the shell. The target is permitted to free-fall through a target chamber having walls heated by successive target ignitions, so that the target is uniformly heated during free-fall to at least partially melt the frozen fuel layer and form a liquid single-phase layer or a mixed liquid/solid bi-phase layer of substantially uniform thickness around the interior shell surface. The falling target is then illuminated from exteriorly of the chamber while the fuel layer is at substantially uniformly single or bi-phase so as to ignite the fuel layer and release energy therefrom. 5 figures.

  20. Laser program annual report 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendricks, C.D.; Rufer, M.L.; Murphy, P.W. (eds.)

    1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the 1983 Laser Program Annual Report we present the accomplishments and unclassified activities of the Laser Program at Lawrence Livermore National laboratory (LLNL) for the year 1983. It should be noted that the report, of necessity, is a summary, and more detailed expositions of the research can be found in the many publications and reports authored by staff members in the Laser Program. The purpose of this report is to present our work in a brief form, but with sufficient depth to provide an overview of the analytical and experimental aspects of the LLNL Inertial-Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program. The format of this report is basically the same as that of previous years. Section 1 is an overview and highlights the important accomplishments and directions of the Program. Sections 2 through 7 provide the detailed information on the various major parts of the Program: Laser Systems and Operations, Target Design, Target Fabrication, Fusion Experiments, Laser Research and Development, and Energy Applications.

  1. Ignition of deuterium-trtium fuel targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Musinski, Donald L. (Saline, MI); Mruzek, Michael T. (Britton, MI)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of igniting a deuterium-tritium ICF fuel target to obtain fuel burn in which the fuel target initially includes a hollow spherical shell having a frozen layer of DT material at substantially uniform thickness and cryogenic temperature around the interior surface of the shell. The target is permitted to free-fall through a target chamber having walls heated by successive target ignitions, so that the target is uniformly heated during free-fall to at least partially melt the frozen fuel layer and form a liquid single-phase layer or a mixed liquid/solid bi-phase layer of substantially uniform thickness around the interior shell surface. The falling target is then illuminated from exteriorly of the chamber while the fuel layer is at substantially uniformly single or bi-phase so as to ignite the fuel layer and release energy therefrom.

  2. Fusion reactor control study. Volume 4: inertial confinement reactors. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, F.R.; Fisher, J.L.; Madden, P.A.

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor control investigated concepts of the type intended to be driven by laser, electron, or light-ion pulsed energy beams. The study delineates the major reactor control functions, the methods and techniques advanced so far to perform those functions, and the problems, uncertainties, and issues associated with their possible implementation. The perceived shortcomings of some proposed methods of beam/target interaction initiated a search for potentially better solutions to the guidance/pointing/tracking control problem. A preliminary study of a new scheme to accomplish this most important control function is described. The simulated performance of the concept, which involves the active control of the intensity of a laser tube through which the fuel pellet travels to the target point, is encouraging. However, it is concluded that a more detailed study including experimental verification is required to establish the practicality of the concept.

  3. Impacts of new coal-using technologies on coal markets and electric utilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stauffer, C.H.

    1982-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ICF's Coal and Electric Utilities Model (CEUM) was used to make forecasts on the impact of new coal technologies and markets and utilities. The new technologies include the gasifier/ combined cycle (GCC), the atmospheric fluidized bed combustor (AFBC), and the retrofit of synthetic coal-fluids on advanced combined cycle capacity. National production by the year 2000 will increase slightly. Impact of technology will be negligible due to the offsetting effects of GCC (it uses less coal) and synthetic coal fluids. Regional production will increase in synthetic coal fluid regions, decrease in sulphur coal regions. In utilities, coal additions by GCC are favored in the east, by AFBC in the west. SO/sub 2/ emissions will start to decline in 1995, NOx emissions will continue to rise, but not as sharply. Overall costs of utilities are expected to fall slightly by the year 2010.

  4. Interactive tools designed to study mix in inertial confinement fusion implosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welser-sherrill, Leslie [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cooley, James H [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wilson, Doug C [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical user interface tools have been built in IDL to study mix in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosion cores. FLAME (Fall-Line Analysis Mix Evaluator), a code which investigates yield degradation due to mix , was designed to post-process 1D hydrodynamic simulation output by implementing a variety of mix models. Three of these mix models are based on the physics of the fall-line. In addition, mixing data from other sources can be incorporated into the yield degradation analysis. Two independent tools called HAME (Haan Analysis Mix Evaluator) and YAME (Youngs Analysis Mix Evaluator) were developed to calculate the spatial extent of the mix region according to the Haan saturation model and Youngs' phenomenological model, respectively. FLAME facilitates a direct comparison to experimental data. The FLAME, HAME, and YAME interfaces are user-friendly, flexible, and platform-independent.

  5. Progress in the title I design of the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paisner, J.A.; Hogan, W.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project officially began in December of 1995. In October of 1996, advanced conceptual design studies, complete environmental impact study, facilitization of the manufacturing capabilities of optics vendors began. The Title I preliminary engineering design had not yet began until the end of December, but it is expected to be on schedule. It is expected that the conventional facilities design will be completed first. The Independent Cost Estimate (ICF) process will begin after the facilities design is complete. Other elements of the design will be submitted in one- or two-week intervals. This phase method of completing Title I was also used at the end of Complete Design Report and proved to be efficient. 9 refs., 11 figs.

  6. Laser fusion driven breeder design study. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berwald, D.H.; Massey, J.V.

    1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The results of the Laser Fusion Breeder Design Study are given. This information primarily relates to the conceptual design of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) breeder reactor (or fusion-fission hybrid) based upon the HYLIFE liquid metal wall protection concept developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The blanket design for this breeder is optimized to both reduce fissions and maximize the production of fissile fuel for subsequent use in conventional light water reactors (LWRs). When the suppressed fission blanket is compared with its fast fission counterparts, a minimal fission rate in the blanket results in a unique reactor safety advantage for this concept with respect to reduced radioactive inventory and reduced fission product decay afterheat in the event of a loss-of-coolant-accident.

  7. Laser-sheet imaging of HE-driven interfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benjamin, R.F.; Rightley, P.M.; Kinkead, S.; Martin, R.A.; Critchfield, R.; Sandoval, D.L.; Holmes, R.; Gorman, T.

    1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The authors made substantial progress in developing the MILSI (Multiple Imaging of Laser-Sheet Illumination) technique for high explosive (HE)-driven fluid interfaces. They observed the instability, but have not yet measured the instability growth rate. They developed suitable sample containers and optical systems for studying the Rightmyer-Meshkov instability of perturbed water/bromoform interfaces and they successfully fielded the new MILSI diagnostic at two firing-site facilities. The problem continues to be of central importance to the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and weapons physics communities.

  8. Laser Machining For Fabrication Of Hohlraums And Capsules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shirk, M D; Kelly, B T; Haynes, S M; Stuart, B C; Sanchez, J J; Moody, J D; Cook, R C

    2005-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Laser machining technology has been used to demonstrate the ability to rapidly perform jobs on all aspects of ICF targets. Lasers are able to rapidly perform modifications and repairs to the gold metal parts on hohlraums, make cuts in the delicate polymer parts of the hohlraum, and drill holes in the capsules to enable them to be filled with fuel. Lasers investigated in this work include 193 nm ArF and 248 nm KrF excimers and 810 nm chirped-pulse amplification Ti:Sapphire lasers. The excimer lasers showed a definite advantage in drilling and machining of polymeric materials and the ultrashort infrared pulses of the Ti:Sapphire laser were far better for the gold structures.

  9. The effect of 150?m expandable graphite on char expansion of intumescent fire retardant coating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ullah, Sami, E-mail: samichemist1@gmail.com; Shariff, A. M., E-mail: azmish@petronas.com.my, E-mail: azmibustam@petronas.com.my; Bustam, M. A., E-mail: azmish@petronas.com.my, E-mail: azmibustam@petronas.com.my [Research Center for Carbon Dioxide Capture, Department of Chemical Engineering, Universiti Techologi PETRONAS, Bandar Sri Iskandar, Tronoh 31750 Perak (Malaysia); Ahmad, Faiz, E-mail: faizahmadster@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Universiti Techologi PETRONAS, Bandar Sri Iskandar, Tronoh 31750 Perak (Malaysia)

    2014-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Intumescent is defined as the swelling of certain substances to insulate the underlying substrate when they are heated. In this research work the effect of 150?m expandable graphite (EG) was studied on char expansion, char morphology and char composition of intumescent coating formulations (ICFs). To study the expansion and thermal properties of the coating, nine different formulations were prepared. The coatings were tested at 500 °C for one hour and physically were found very stable and well bound with the steel substrate. The morphology was studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The char composition was analysed by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) techniques. EG above than 10.8wt% expands the char abruptly with uniform network structure and affect the outer surface of the char.

  10. Nonlinear Electron Heat Conduction Equation and Self similar method for 1-D Thermal Waves in Laser Heating of Solid Density DT Fuel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Mohammadian Pourtalari; M. A. Jafarizadeh; M. Ghoranneviss

    2011-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Electron heat conduction is one of the ways that energy transports in laser heating of fusible target material. The aim of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) is to show that the thermal conductivity is strongly dependent on temperature and the equation of electron heat conduction is a nonlinear equation. In this article, we solve the one-dimensional (1-D) nonlinear electron heat conduction equation with a self-similar method (SSM). This solution has been used to investigate the propagation of 1-D thermal wave from a deuterium-tritium (DT) plane source which occurs when a giant laser pulse impinges onto a DT solid target. It corresponds to the physical problem of rapid heating of a boundary layer of material in which the energy of laser pulse is released in a finite initial thickness.

  11. Studies of parallel algorithms for the solution of a Fokker-Planck equation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deck, D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Samba, G. [CEA/CEL-V, Villeneuve St. Georges (France). Dept. de Mathematiques Appliquees

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The study of laser-created plasmas often requires the use of a kinetic model rather than a hydrodynamic one. This model change occurs, for example, in the hot spot formation in an ICF experiment or during the relaxation of colliding plasmas. When the gradients scalelengths or the size of a given system are not small compared to the characteristic mean-free-path, we have to deal with non-equilibrium situations, which can be described by the distribution functions of every species in the system. We present here a numerical method in plane or spherical 1-D geometry, for the solution of a Fokker-Planck equation that describes the evolution of stich functions in the phase space. The size and the time scale of kinetic simulations require the use of Massively Parallel Computers (MPP). We have adopted a message-passing strategy using Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM).

  12. Nuclear Probing of Dense Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richard Petrasso

    2007-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The object of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is to compress a fuel capsule to a state with high enough density and temperature to ignite, starting a self-sustaining fusion burn that consumes much of the fuel and releases a large amount of energy. The national ICF research program is trying to reach this goal, especially through experiments at the OMEGA laser facility of the University of Rochester Laboratory of Laser Energetics (LLE), planned experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and experimental and theoretical work at other national laboratories. The work by MIT reported here has played several important roles in this national program. First, the development of new and improved charged-particle-based plasma diagnostics has allowed the gathering of new and unique diagnostic information about the implosions of fuel capsules in ICF experiments, providing new means for evaluating experiments and for studying capsule implosion dynamics. Proton spectrometers have become the standard for evaluating the mass assembly in compressed capsules in experiments at OMEGA; the measured energy downshift of either primary or secondary D3He fusion protons to determines the areal density, or ?R, of imploded capsules. The Proton Temporal Diagnostic measures the time history of fusion burn, and multiple proton emission imaging cameras reveal the 3-D spatial distribution of fusion burn. A new compact neutron spectrometer, for measuring fusion yield, is described here for the first time. And of especially high importance to future work is the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS), which is a neutron spectrometer that will be used to study a range of important performance parameters in future experiments at the NIF. A prototype is currently being prepared for testing at OMEGA, using a magnet funded by this grant. Second, MIT has used these diagnostic instruments to perform its own physics experiments and analysis with implosions at OMEGA, to provide essential data to other experimenters at LLE, and to work collaboratively with researchers from all the national laboratories (including LLNL, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratory). Some of the implosion dynamics physics studies reported here involve the relationships between drive asymmetries and implosion asymmetries (in terms of both mass assembly and fusion burn); the time evolution of mass assembly and mass asymmetries; the behavior of shock coalescence; and the nature of fuel-shell mix. Third, the MIT program has provided unique educational and research opportunities for both graduate and undergraduate students. The graduate students are deeply engaged in every aspect of our research program, and spend considerable time at OMEGA working on experiments and working with our collaborators from OMEGA and from the National Labs. Many undergraduates have gotten a taste of ICF research, sometimes making significant contributions. We believe that the introduction of energetic and gifted students to the challenging problems of this field and the excitement of the national lab environment leads naturally to the infusion of bright, talented young scientists into our field, and several PhD recipients from this group have become important forces in the field. Finally, this work has provided the foundation for continuing advances during upcoming research, with other experimental and theoretical studies of implosion dynamics. In addition to the continuing application of diagnostic instrumentation used during this grant, important contributions will be made with new diagnostics such as the MRS and with new techniques based on the knowledge obtained here, such as proton radiography.

  13. Technical documentation in support of the project-specific analysis for construction and operation of the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lazaro, M.A.; Vinikour, W. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Environmental Assessment Div.; Allison, T. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States). Decision and Information Sciences Div.] [and others

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document provides information that supports or supplements the data and impact analyses presented in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project-Specific Analysis (PSA). The purposes of NIF are to achieve fusion ignition in the laboratory for the first time with inertial confinement fusion (ICF) technology and to conduct high- energy-density experiments ins support of national security and civilian application. NIF is an important element in the DOE`s science-based SSM Program, a key mission of which is to ensure the reliability of the nation`s enduring stockpile of nuclear weapons. NIF would also advance the knowledge of basic and applied high-energy- density science and bring the nation a large step closer to developing fusion energy for civilian use. The NIF PSA includes evaluations of the potential environmental impacts of constructing and operating the facility at one of five candidate site and for two design options.

  14. A New Gated X-Ray Detector for the Orion Laser Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, David D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aragonez, Robert J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Archuleta, Thomas N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fatherley, Valerie E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hsu, Albert H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jorgenson, H. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mares, Danielle [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oertel, John A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oades, Kevin [Atomic Weapons Establishment; Kemshall, Paul [Atomic Weapons Establishment; Thomas, Philip [Atomic Weapons Establishment; Young, Trevor [Atomic Weapons Establishment; Pederson, Neal [VI Control Systems

    2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    Gated X-Ray Detectors (GXD) are considered the work-horse target diagnostic of the laser based inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program. Recently, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has constructed three new GXDs for the Orion laser facility at the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) in the United Kingdom. What sets these three new instruments apart from the what has previously been constructed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is: improvements in detector head microwave transmission lines, solid state embedded hard drive and updated control software, and lighter air box design and other incremental mechanical improvements. In this paper we will present the latest GXD design enhancements and sample calibration data taken on the Trident laser facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory using the newly constructed instruments.

  15. Compression molding of aerogel microspheres

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pekala, R.W.; Hrubesh, L.W.

    1998-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    An aerogel composite material produced by compression molding of aerogel microspheres (powders) mixed together with a small percentage of polymer binder to form monolithic shapes in a cost-effective manner is disclosed. The aerogel composites are formed by mixing aerogel microspheres with a polymer binder, placing the mixture in a mold and heating under pressure, which results in a composite with a density of 50--800 kg/m{sup 3} (0.05--0.80 g/cc). The thermal conductivity of the thus formed aerogel composite is below that of air, but higher than the thermal conductivity of monolithic aerogels. The resulting aerogel composites are attractive for applications such as thermal insulation since fabrication thereof does not require large and expensive processing equipment. In addition to thermal insulation, the aerogel composites may be utilized for filtration, ICF target, double layer capacitors, and capacitive deionization. 4 figs.

  16. Compression molding of aerogel microspheres

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pekala, Richard W. (Pleasant Hill, CA); Hrubesh, Lawrence W. (Pleasanton, CA)

    1998-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

    An aerogel composite material produced by compression molding of aerogel microspheres (powders) mixed together with a small percentage of polymer binder to form monolithic shapes in a cost-effective manner. The aerogel composites are formed by mixing aerogel microspheres with a polymer binder, placing the mixture in a mold and heating under pressure, which results in a composite with a density of 50-800 kg/m.sup.3 (0.05-0.80 g/cc). The thermal conductivity of the thus formed aerogel composite is below that of air, but higher than the thermal conductivity of monolithic aerogels. The resulting aerogel composites are attractive for applications such as thermal insulation since fabrication thereof does not require large and expensive processing equipment. In addition to thermal insulation, the aerogel composites may be utilized for filtration, ICF target, double layer capacitors, and capacitive deionization.

  17. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies: Froth flotation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) awarded a contract entitled Engineering Development of Advanced Physical Fine Coal Cleaning Technology - Froth Flotation'', to ICF Kaiser Engineers with the following team members, Ohio Coal Development Office, Babcock and Wilcox, Consolidation Coal Company, Eimco Process Equipment Company, Illinois State Geological Survey, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Process Technology, Inc. This document a quarterly report prepared in accordance with the project reporting requirements covering the period from July 1, 1992 to September 30, 1992. This report provides a summary of the technical work undertaken during this period, highlighting the major results. A brief description of the work done prior to this quarter is provided in this report under the task headings.

  18. Engineering development of advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies: Froth flotation. Quarterly technical progress report No. 15, April 1, 1992--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy (DOE) awarded a contract entitled ``Engineering Development of Advanced Physical Fine Coal Cleaning Technology - Froth Flotation``, to ICF Kaiser Engineers with the following team members, Ohio Coal Development Office, Babcock and Wilcox, Consolidation Coal Company, Eimco Process Equipment Company, Illinois State Geological Survey, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, Process Technology, Inc. This document a quarterly report prepared in accordance with the project reporting requirements covering the period from July 1, 1992 to September 30, 1992. This report provides a summary of the technical work undertaken during this period, highlighting the major results. A brief description of the work done prior to this quarter is provided in this report under the task headings.

  19. Literature Review on the Effects of Prescription Fire on theEcology of Site 300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preston, R

    2011-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has historically conducted prescription burns across approximately 2,000 acres of Site 300 on an annual basis to safeguard test facilities and operations from the risk of wildfire encroachment. Prescription burns began in 1960, and although fire frequency varies among the designated burn areas, all have been burned at least once. A patchwork of native perennial grassland communities and associated special-status plant and animal populations occur onsite in many areas that have been receiving these treatments. Because the size and locations of prescription burns may shift in coming years, an evaluation is warranted to determine how these shifts may affect listed biota, including rare plants, and the distinct ecological conditions present on the site. This report presents the results of a literature review conducted by ICF International (ICF) to collect basic information on native perennial grasslands in California, the influence of fire on these grasslands, and management tools for restoring and maintaining them. The objective of this study was to review the scientific literature on California native grasslands and summarize the current state of knowledge pertaining to the possible effects -- both beneficial and detrimental -- of prescribed fire on the ecology of Site 300. The results of this review are intended to inform future management practices that may be carried out at Site 300 to maintain the plant and wildlife communities and to ensure that the ecological conditions benefit the special-status species that inhabit the Site. This review is also intended to identify a study approach to investigate changes over the next 10 years in the burned areas and in areas where burning will be discontinued.

  20. Advances in Inertial Confinement Fusion at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moses, E

    2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The 192-beam National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, CA, is now operational and conducting experiments. NIF, the flagship facility of the U.S. Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program, will achieve high-energy-density conditions never previously obtained in the laboratory - temperatures over 100 million K, densities of 1,000 g/cm3, and pressures exceeding 100 billion atmospheres. Such conditions exist naturally only in the interiors of the stars and during thermonuclear burn. Demonstration of ignition and thermonuclear burn in the laboratory is a major NIF goal. To date, the NIF laser has demonstrated all pulse shape, beam quality, energy, and other specifications required to meet the ignition challenge. On March 10, 2009, the NIF laser delivered 1.1 MJ of ultraviolet laser energy to target chamber center, approximately 30 times more energy than any previous facility. The ignition program at NIF is the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), a national collaboration for ignition experimentation with participation from General Atomics, LLNL, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). The achievement of ignition at NIF will demonstrate the scientific feasibility of ICF and focus worldwide attention on fusion as a viable energy option. A particular energy concept under investigation is the LIFE (Laser Inertial Fusion Energy) scheme. The LIFE engine is inherently safe, minimizes proliferation concerns associated with the nuclear fuel cycle, and can provide a sustainable carbon-free energy generation solution in the 21st century. This talk will describe NIF and its potential as a user facility and an experimental platform for high-energy-density science, NIC, and the LIFE approach for clean, sustainable energy.

  1. Maintenance and operations contractor plan for transition to the project Hanford management contract (PHMC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waite, J.L.

    1996-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This plan has been developed by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), and its subcontractors ICF Kaiser Hanford (ICF KH) and BCS Richland, Inc. (BCSR), at the direction of the US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL). WHC and its subcontractors are hereafter referred to as the Maintenance and Operations (M and O) Contractor. The plan identifies actions involving the M and O Contractor that are critical to (1) prepare for a smooth transition to the Project Hanford Management Contractor (PHMC), and (2) support and assist the PHMC and RL in achieving transition as planned, with no or minimal impact to ongoing baseline activities. The plan is structured around two primary phases. The first is the pre-award phase, which started in mid-February 1996 and is currently scheduled to be completed on June 1, 1996, at which time the contract is currently planned to be awarded. The second is the follow-on four-month post-award phase from June 1, 1996, until October 1, 1996. Considering the magnitude and complexity of the scope of work being transitioned, completion in four months will require significant effort by all parties. To better ensure success, the M and O Contractor has developed a pre-award phase that is intended to maximize readiness for transition. Priority is given to preparation for facility assessments and processing of personnel, as these areas are determined to be on the critical path for transition. In addition, the M and O Contractor will put emphasis during the pre-award phase to close out open items prior to contract award, to include grievances, employee concerns, audit findings, compliance issues, etc.

  2. Inertial Confinement Fusion R&D and Nuclear Proliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert J. Goldston

    2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

    In a few months, or a few years, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory may achieve fusion gain using 192 powerful lasers to generate x-rays that will compress and heat a small target containing isotopes of hydrogen. This event would mark a major milestone after decades of research on inertial confinement fusion (ICF). It might also mark the beginning of an accelerated global effort to harness fusion energy based on this science and technology. Unlike magnetic confinement fusion (ITER, 2011), in which hot fusion fuel is confined continuously by strong magnetic fields, inertial confinement fusion involves repetitive fusion explosions, taking advantage of some aspects of the science learned from the design and testing of hydrogen bombs. The NIF was built primarily because of the information it would provide on weapons physics, helping the United States to steward its stockpile of nuclear weapons without further underground testing. The U.S. National Academies' National Research Council is now hosting a study to assess the prospects for energy from inertial confinement fusion. While this study has a classified sub-panel on target physics, it has not been charged with examining the potential nuclear proliferation risks associated with ICF R&D. We argue here that this question urgently requires direct and transparent examination, so that means to mitigate risks can be assessed, and the potential residual risks can be balanced against the potential benefits, now being assessed by the NRC. This concern is not new (Holdren, 1978), but its urgency is now higher than ever before.

  3. SU-E-T-24: A Simple Correction-Based Method for Independent Monitor Unit (MU) Verification in Monte Carlo (MC) Lung SBRT Plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pokhrel, D; Badkul, R; Jiang, H; Estes, C; Kumar, P; Wang, F [UniversityKansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS (United States)

    2014-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Lung-SBRT uses hypo-fractionated dose in small non-IMRT fields with tissue-heterogeneity corrected plans. An independent MU verification is mandatory for safe and effective delivery of the treatment plan. This report compares planned MU obtained from iPlan-XVM-Calgorithm against spreadsheet-based hand-calculation using most commonly used simple TMR-based method. Methods: Treatment plans of 15 patients who underwent for MC-based lung-SBRT to 50Gy in 5 fractions for PTV V100%=95% were studied. ITV was delineated on MIP images based on 4D-CT scans. PTVs(ITV+5mm margins) ranged from 10.1- 106.5cc(average=48.6cc). MC-SBRT plans were generated using a combination of non-coplanar conformal arcs/beams using iPlan XVM-Calgorithm (BrainLAB iPlan ver.4.1.2) for Novalis-TX consisting of micro-MLCs and 6MV-SRS (1000MU/min) beam. These plans were re-computed using heterogeneity-corrected Pencil-Beam (PB-hete) algorithm without changing any beam parameters, such as MLCs/MUs. Dose-ratio: PB-hete/MC gave beam-by-beam inhomogeneity-correction-factors (ICFs):Individual Correction. For independent-2nd-check, MC-MUs were verified using TMR-based hand-calculation and obtained an average ICF:Average Correction, whereas TMR-based hand-calculation systematically underestimated MC-MUs by ?5%. Also, first 10 MC-plans were verified with an ion-chamber measurement using homogenous phantom. Results: For both beams/arcs, mean PB-hete dose was systematically overestimated by 5.5±2.6% and mean hand-calculated MU systematic underestimated by 5.5±2.5% compared to XVMC. With individual correction, mean hand-calculated MUs matched with XVMC by - 0.3±1.4%/0.4±1.4 for beams/arcs, respectively. After average 5% correction, hand-calculated MUs matched with XVMC by 0.5±2.5%/0.6±2.0% for beams/arcs, respectively. Smaller dependence on tumor volume(TV)/field size(FS) was also observed. Ion-chamber measurement was within ±3.0%. Conclusion: PB-hete overestimates dose to lung tumor relative to XVMC. XVMC-algorithm is much more-complex and accurate with tissues-heterogeneities. Measurement at machine is time consuming and need extra resources; also direct measurement of dose for heterogeneous treatment plans is not clinically practiced, yet. This simple correction-based method was very helpful for independent-2nd-check of MC-lung-SBRT plans and routinely used in our clinic. A look-up table can be generated to include TV/FS dependence in ICFs.

  4. IGNITION AND FRONTIER SCIENCE ON THE NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moses, E

    2009-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most powerful laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and experiments studying high-energy-density (HED) science, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF construction Project was certified by the Department of Energy as complete on March 30, 2009. NIF, a 192-beam Nd-glass laser facility, will produce 1.8 MJ, 500 TW of light at the third-harmonic, ultraviolet light of 351 nm. On March 10, 2009, a total 192-beam energy of 1.1 MJ was demonstrated; this is approximately 30 times more energy than ever produced in an ICF laser system. The principal goal of NIF is to achieve ignition of a deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel capsule and provide access to HED physics regimes needed for experiments related to national security, fusion energy and for broader frontier scientific exploration. NIF experiments in support of indirect drive ignition will begin in FY2009. These first experiments represent the next phase of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The NIC is a 1.7 billion dollar national effort to achieve fusion ignition and is coordinated through a detailed execution plan that includes the science, technology, and equipment. Equipment required for ignition experiments include diagnostics, cryogenic target manipulator, and user optics. Participants in this effort include LLNL, General Atomics (GA), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Energetics (LLE). The primary goal for NIC is to have all of the equipment operational and integrated into the facility and be ready to begin a credible ignition campaign in 2010. With NIF now operational, the long-sought goal of achieving self-sustained nuclear fusion and energy gain in the laboratory is much closer to realization. Successful demonstration of ignition and net energy gain on NIF will be a major step towards demonstrating the feasibility of Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) and will likely focus the world's attention on the possibility of an ICF energy option. NIF experiments to demonstrate ignition and gain will use central-hot-spot (CHS) ignition, where a spherical fuel capsule is simultaneously compressed and ignited. The scientific basis for CHS has been intensively developed and has high probability of success. Achieving ignition with CHS will open the door for other advanced concepts, such as the use of high-yield pulses of visible wavelength rather than ultraviolet and Fast Ignition concepts. Moreover, NIF will have important scientific applications in such diverse fields as astrophysics, nuclear physics and materials science. The NIC will develop the full set of capabilities required to operate NIF as a major national and international user facility. A solicitation for NIF frontier science experiments to be conducted by the academic community is planned for summer 2009. This paper summarizes the design, performance, and status of NIF, experimental plans for NIC, and will present a brief discussion of the unparalleled opportunities to explore frontier basic science that will be available on the NIF.

  5. Estimating uncertainty of inference for validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Booker, Jane M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Langenbrunner, James R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hemez, Francois M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ross, Timothy J [UNM

    2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a validation process based upon the concept that validation is an inference-making activity. This has always been true, but the association has not been as important before as it is now. Previously, theory had been confirmed by more data, and predictions were possible based on data. The process today is to infer from theory to code and from code to prediction, making the role of prediction somewhat automatic, and a machine function. Validation is defined as determining the degree to which a model and code is an accurate representation of experimental test data. Imbedded in validation is the intention to use the computer code to predict. To predict is to accept the conclusion that an observable final state will manifest; therefore, prediction is an inference whose goodness relies on the validity of the code. Quantifying the uncertainty of a prediction amounts to quantifying the uncertainty of validation, and this involves the characterization of uncertainties inherent in theory/models/codes and the corresponding data. An introduction to inference making and its associated uncertainty is provided as a foundation for the validation problem. A mathematical construction for estimating the uncertainty in the validation inference is then presented, including a possibility distribution constructed to represent the inference uncertainty for validation under uncertainty. The estimation of inference uncertainty for validation is illustrated using data and calculations from Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). The ICF measurements of neutron yield and ion temperature were obtained for direct-drive inertial fusion capsules at the Omega laser facility. The glass capsules, containing the fusion gas, were systematically selected with the intent of establishing a reproducible baseline of high-yield 10{sup 13}-10{sup 14} neutron output. The deuterium-tritium ratio in these experiments was varied to study its influence upon yield. This paper on validation inference is the first in a series of inference uncertainty estimations. While the methods demonstrated are primarily statistical, these do not preclude the use of nonprobabilistic methods for uncertainty characterization. The methods presented permit accurate determinations for validation and eventual prediction. It is a goal that these methods establish a standard against which best practice may evolve for determining degree of validation.

  6. National Ignition Facility project acquisition plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callaghan, R.W.

    1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this National Ignition Facility Acquisition Plan is to describe the overall procurement strategy planned for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project. The scope of the plan describes the procurement activities and acquisition strategy for the following phases of the NIF Project, each of which receives either plant and capital equipment (PACE) or other project cost (OPC) funds: Title 1 and 2 design and Title 3 engineering (PACE); Optics manufacturing facilitization and pilot production (OPC); Convention facility construction (PACE); Procurement, installation, and acceptance testing of equipment (PACE); and Start-up (OPC). Activities that are part of the base Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program are not included in this plan. The University of California (UC), operating Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Lockheed-Martin, which operates Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR-LLE), will conduct the acquisition of needed products and services in support of their assigned responsibilities within the NIF Project structure in accordance with their prime contracts with the Department of Energy (DOE). LLNL, designated as the lead Laboratory, will have responsibility for all procurements required for construction, installation, activation, and startup of the NIF.

  7. Cryogenic THD and DT layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Meezan, N. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Berzak Hopkins, L. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)] (ORCID:0000000291875667); Le Pape, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Divol, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); MacKinnon, A. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Döppner, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ho, D. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Jones, O. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Khan, S. F. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ma, T. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Milovich, J. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Pak, A. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ross, J. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Thomas, C. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Benedetti, L. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bradley, D. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Celliers, P. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Clark, D. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)] (ORCID:0000000272137538); Field, J. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808, USA; Haan, S. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)] (ORCID:0000000184045131); Izumi, N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kyrala, G. A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Moody, J. D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808, USA; Patel, P. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ralph, J. E. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Rygg, J. R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Sepke, S. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Spears, B. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Tommasini, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Town, R. P. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Biener, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bionta, R. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bond, E. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Caggiano, J. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Eckart, M. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Gatu Johnson, M. [MIT (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology), Cambridge, MA (United States); Grim, G. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hamza, A. V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hartouni, E. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)] (ORCID:0000000198694351); Hatarik, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Hoover, D. E. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States)] (ORCID:0000000195652551); Kilkenny, J. D. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Kozioziemski, B. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Kroll, J. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); McNaney, J. M. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Nikroo, A. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Sayre, D. B. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High Density Carbon (HDC or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations of et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] culminated in a DT layered implosion driven by a 6.8 ns, 2-shock laser pulse. This paper describes these experiments and comparisons with ICF design code simulations. Backlit radiography of a THD layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightly oblate hot spot shape. Other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. A streak camera-based hot spot self-emission diagnostic (SPIDER) showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of low quality hot spot formation. Changes to the laser pulse and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1.8 x 10ą? neutrons, 40% of the 1D simulated yield.

  8. Simulation models for computational plasma physics: Concluding report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hewett, D.W.

    1994-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    In this project, the authors enhanced their ability to numerically simulate bounded plasmas that are dominated by low-frequency electric and magnetic fields. They moved towards this goal in several ways; they are now in a position to play significant roles in the modeling of low-frequency electromagnetic plasmas in several new industrial applications. They have significantly increased their facility with the computational methods invented to solve the low frequency limit of Maxwell`s equations (DiPeso, Hewett, accepted, J. Comp. Phys., 1993). This low frequency model is called the Streamlined Darwin Field model (SDF, Hewett, Larson, and Doss, J. Comp. Phys., 1992) has now been implemented in a fully non-neutral SDF code BEAGLE (Larson, Ph.D. dissertation, 1993) and has further extended to the quasi-neutral limit (DiPeso, Hewett, Comp. Phys. Comm., 1993). In addition, they have resurrected the quasi-neutral, zero-electron-inertia model (ZMR) and began the task of incorporating internal boundary conditions into this model that have the flexibility of those in GYMNOS, a magnetostatic code now used in ion source work (Hewett, Chen, ICF Quarterly Report, July--September, 1993). Finally, near the end of this project, they invented a new type of banded matrix solver that can be implemented on a massively parallel computer -- thus opening the door for the use of all their ADI schemes on these new computer architecture`s (Mattor, Williams, Hewett, submitted to Parallel Computing, 1993).

  9. LIFAC sorbent injection desulfurization demonstration project. Final report, volume II: Project performance and economics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This publication discusses the demonstration of the LIFAC sorbent injection technology at Richmond Power and Light`s Whitewater Valley Unit No. 2, performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Program. LIFAC is a sorbent injection technology capable of removing 75 to 85 percent of a power plant`s SO{sub 2} emissions using limestone at calcium to sulfur molar ratios of between 2 and 2.5 to 1. The site of the demonstration is a coal-fired electric utility power plant located in Richmond, Indiana. The project is being conducted by LIFAC North America (LIFAC NA), a joint venture partnership of Tampella Power Corporation and ICF Kaiser Engineers, in cooperation with DOE, RP&L, and Research Institute (EPRI), the State of Indiana, and Black Beauty Coal Company. The purpose of Public Design Report Volume 2: Project Performance and Economics is to consolidate, for public use, the technical efficiency and economy of the LIFAC Process. The report has been prepared pursuant to the Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC22-90PC90548 between LIFAC NA and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  10. Flat-response x-ray-diode-detector development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tirsell, G.

    1982-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this report we discuss the design of an improved sub-nanosecond flat response x-ray diode detector needed for ICF diagnostics. This device consists of a high Z cathode and a complex filter tailored to flatten the response so that the total x-ray energy below 1.5 keV can be measured using a single detector. Three major problems have become evident as a result of our work with the original LLNL design including deviation from flatness due to a peak in the response below 200 eV, saturation at relatively low x-ray fluences, and long term gold cathode instability. We are investigating grazing incidence reflection to reduce the response below 200 eV, new high Z cathode materials for long term stability, and a new complex filter for improved flatness. Better saturation performance will require a modified XRD detector under development with reduced anode to cathode spacing and increased anode bias voltage.

  11. Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978: Natural Gas Rate Design Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    First, the comments on May 3, 1979 Notice of Inquiry of DOE relating to the Gas Utility Rate Design Study Required by Section 306 of PURPA are presented. Then, comments on the following are included: (1) ICF Gas Utility Model, Gas Utility Model Data Outputs, Scenario Design; (2) Interim Model Development Report with Example Case Illustrations; (3) Interim Report on Simulation of Seven Rate Forms; (4) Methodology for Assessing the Impacts of Alternative Rate Designs on Industrial Energy Use; (5) Simulation of Marginal-Cost-Based Natural Gas Rates; and (6) Preliminary Discussion Draft of the Gas Rate Design Study. Among the most frequent comments expressed were the following: (a) the public should be given the opportunity to review the final report prior to its submission to Congress; (b) results based on a single computer model of only four hypothetical utility situations cannot be used for policy-making purposes for individual companies or the entire gas industry; (c) there has been an unobjective treatment of traditional and economic cost rate structures; the practical difficulties and potential detrimental consequences of economic cost rates are not fully disclosed; and (d) it is erroneous to assume that end users, particularly residential customers, are influenced by price signals in the rate structure, as opposed to the total bill.

  12. Contracts and management services site support program plan WBS 6.10.14

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knoll, J.M. Jr.

    1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Contracts and Management Services is recognized as the central focal point for programs having company or sitewide application in pursuit of the Hanford Missions`s financial and operational objectives. Contracts and Management Services actively pursues cost savings and operational efficiencies through: Management Standards by ensuring all employees have an accessible, integrated system of clear, complete, accurate, timely, and useful management control policies and procedures; Contract Reform by restructuring the contract, organization, and cost accounting systems to refocus Hanford contract activities on output products; Systems and Operations Evaluation by directing the Cost Reduction program, Great Ideas, and Span of Management activities; Program Administration by enforcing conditions of Accountability (whether DEAR-based or FAR-based) for WHC, BCSR, ICF KH, and BHI; Contract Performance activities; chairing the WHC Cost Reduction Review Board; and analyzing companywide Performance Measures; Data Standards and Administration by establishing and directing the company data management program; giving direction to the major RL programs and mission areas for implementation of cost-effective and efficient data management practices; directing all operations, application, and interfaces contained within the Hanford PeopleCore System; directing accomplishment and delivery of TPA data management milestones; and directing the sitewide data management processes for Data Standards and the Data Directory.

  13. Optical Comb Generation for Streak Camera Calibration for Inertial Confinement Fusion Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald Justin, Terence Davies, Frans Janson, Bruce Marshall, Perry Bell, Daniel Kalantar, Joseph Kimbrough, Stephen Vernon, Oliver Sweningsen

    2008-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is coming on-line to support physics experimentation for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and Stockpile Stewardship (SS). Optical streak cameras are an integral part of the experimental diagnostics instrumentation at NIF. To accurately reduce streak camera data a highly accurate temporal calibration is required. This article describes a technique for simultaneously generating a precise +/- 2 ps optical marker pulse (fiducial reference) and trains of precisely timed, short-duration optical pulses (so-called “comb” pulse trains) that are suitable for the timing calibrations. These optical pulse generators are used with the LLNL optical streak cameras. They are small, portable light sources that, in the comb mode, produce a series of temporally short, uniformly spaced optical pulses, using a laser diode source. Comb generators have been produced with pulse-train repetition rates up to 10 GHz at 780 nm, and somewhat lower frequencies at 664 nm. Individual pulses can be as short as 25-ps FWHM. Signal output is via a fiber-optic connector on the front panel of the generator box. The optical signal is transported from comb generator to streak camera through multi-mode, graded-index optical fiber.

  14. Analysis of the effects of section 29 tax credits on reserve additions and production of gas from unconventional resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Federal tax credits for production of natural gas from unconventional resources can stimulate drilling and reserves additions at a relatively low cost to the Treasury. This report presents the results of an analysis of the effects of a proposed extension of the Section 29 alternative fuels production credit specifically for unconventional gas. ICF Resources estimated the net effect of the extension of the credit (the difference between development activity expected with the extension of the credit and that expected if the credit expires in December 1990 as scheduled). The analysis addressed the effect of tax credits on project economics and capital formation, drilling and reserve additions, production, impact on the US and regional economies, and the net public sector costs and incremental revenues. The analysis was based on explicit modeling of the three dominant unconventional gas resources: Tight sands, coalbed methane, and Devonian shales. It incorporated the most current data on resource size, typical well recoveries and economics, and anticipated activity of the major producers. Each resource was further disaggregated for analysis based on distinct resource characteristics, development practices, regional economics, and historical development patterns.

  15. Simulations and model of the nonlinear Richtmyer–Meshkov instability

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    None

    2010-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The nonlinear evolution of the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability is investigated using numerical simulations with the FLASH code in two-dimensions (2D). The purpose of the simulations is to develop an empiricial nonlinear model of the RM instability that is applicable to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and ejecta formation, namely, at large Atwood number A and scaled initial amplitude kho (k ? wavenumber) of the perturbation. The FLASH code is first validated with a variety of RM experiments that evolve well into the nonlinear regime. They reveal that bubbles stagnate when they grow by an increment of 2/k and that spikes accelerate for A > 0.5 due to higher harmonics that focus them. These results are then compared with a variety of nonlinear models that are based on potential flow. We find that the models agree with simulations for moderate values of A oo. Our hope is that such empirical models concisely capture the RM simulations and inspire more rigorous solutions.

  16. A novel solution to the gated x-ray detector gain droop problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oertel, J. A., E-mail: Oertel@lanl.gov; Archuleta, T. N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    2014-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Microchannel plate (MCP), microstrip transmission line based, gated x-ray detectors used at the premier ICF laser facilities have a drop in gain as a function of mircostrip length that can be greater than 50% over 40 mm. These losses are due to ohmic losses in a microstrip coating that is less than the optimum electrical skin depth. The electrical skin depth for a copper transmission line at 3 GHz is 1.2 ?m while the standard microstrip coating thickness is roughly half a single skin depth. Simply increasing the copper coating thickness would begin filling the MCP pores and limit the number of secondary electrons created in the MCP. The current coating thickness represents a compromise between gain and ohmic loss. We suggest a novel solution to the loss problem by overcoating the copper transmission line with five electrical skin depths (?6 ?m) of Beryllium. Beryllium is reasonably transparent to x-rays above 800 eV and would improve the carrier current on the transmission line. The net result should be an optically flat photocathode response with almost no measurable loss in voltage along the transmission line.

  17. Simulations of laser imprint for Nova experiments and for ignition capsules. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, S.V.; Glendinning, S.G.; Kalantar, D.H.; Key, M.H.; Remington, B.A.; Rothenberg, J.L. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Wolfrum, E. [Rutherford Appleton Lab., Chilton (United Kingdom); Verdon, C.P.; Knauer, J.P. [Rochester Univ., NY (United States). Lab. for Laser Energetics

    1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In direct drive ICF, nonuniformities in laser illumination seed ripples at the ablation front in a process called ``imprint``. These nonuniformities grow during the capsule implosion and, if initially large enough, can penetrate the capsule shell, impede ignition, or degrade burn. Imprint has been simulated for recent experiments performed on the Nova laser at LLNL examining a variety of beam smoothing conditions. Most used laser intensities similar to the early part of an ignition capsule pulse shape, 1 {approx_equal} 10{sup 13} W/cm{sup 2} . The simulations matched most of the measurements of imprint modulation. The effect of imprint upon National Ignition Facility (NIF) direct drive ignition capsules has also been simulated. Imprint is predicted to give modulation comparable to an intrinsic surface finish of {approximately}10 nm RMS. Modulation growth was examined using the Haan [Phys. Rev. A {bold 39}, 5812 (1989)] model, with linear growth factors as a function of spherical harmonic mode number obtained from an analytic dispersion relation. Ablation front amplitudes are predicted to become substantially nonlinear, so that saturation corrections are large. Direct numerical simulations of two-dimensional multimode growth were also performed. The capsule shell is predicted to remain intact, which gives a basis for believing that ignition can be achieved. 27 refs., 10 figs.

  18. Simulations of laser imprint for Nova experiments and for ignition capsules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, S.V.; Glendinning, S.G.; Kalantar, D.H.; Key, M.H.; Remington, B.A.; Rothenberg, J.E.; Wolfrum, E.; Verdon, C.P.; Knauer, J.P.

    1996-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In direct drive ICF, nonuniformities in laser illumination seed ripples at the ablation front in a process called imprint. These non nonuniformities grow during the capsule implosion and, if initially large enough, can penetrate the capsule shell, impede ignition, or degrade burn. Imprint has been simulated for recent experiments performed on the Nova laser at LLNL examining a variety of beam smoothing conditions. Most used laser intensities similar to the early part of an ignition capsule pulse shape, I=10X13 W/cm3. The simulations matched most of the measurements of imprint modulation. The effect of imprint upon National Ignition Facility (NIF) direct drive ignition capsules has also been simulated. Imprint is predicted to give modulation comparable to an intrinsic surface finish of 10 nm RMS. Modulation growth was examined using the Haan model, with linear growth as a function of spherical harmonic mode number obtained from an analytic dispersion relation. Ablation front amplitudes are predicted to become substantially nonlinear, so that saturation corrections are large. Direct numerical simulations of two- dimensional multimode growth were also performed. The capsule shell is predicted to remain intact, which gives a basis for believing that ignition can be achieved.

  19. Achieving competitive excellence in nuclear energy: The threat of proliferation; the challenge of inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nuckolls, J.H.

    1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear energy will have an expanding role in meeting the twenty-first-century challenges of population and economic growth, energy demand, and global warming. These great challenges are non-linearly coupled and incompletely understood. In the complex global system, achieving competitive excellence for nuclear energy is a multi-dimensional challenge. The growth of nuclear energy will be driven by its margin of economic advantage, as well as by threats to energy security and by growing evidence of global warming. At the same time, the deployment of nuclear energy will be inhibited by concerns about nuclear weapons proliferation, nuclear waste and nuclear reactor safety. These drivers and inhibitors are coupled: for example, in the foreseeable future, proliferation in the Middle East may undermine energy security and increase demand for nuclear energy. The Department of Energy`s nuclear weapons laboratories are addressing many of these challenges, including nuclear weapons builddown and nonproliferation, nuclear waste storage and burnup, reactor safety and fuel enrichment, global warming, and the long-range development of fusion energy. Today I will focus on two major program areas at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL): the proliferation of nuclear weapons and the development of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) energy.

  20. The performance check between whole building thermal performance criteria and exterior wall measured clear wall R-value, thermal bridging, thermal mass, and airtightness

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kosny, J.; Christian, J.E.; Desjarlais, A.O. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Buildings Technology Center; Kossecka, E. [Polish Academy of Sciences (Poland); Berrenberg, L. [American Polysteel Forms (United States)

    1998-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    At the last IEA Annex 32 meeting it was proposed that the annex develop the links between level 1 (the whole building performance) and level 2 (the envelope system). This paper provides a case study of just that type of connection. An exterior wall mockup is hot box tested and modeled in the laboratory. Measurements of the steady state and dynamic behavior of this mockup are used as the basis to define the thermal bridging, thermal mass benefit and air tightness of the whole wall system. These level two performance characteristics are related to the whole building performance. They can be analyzed by a finite difference modeling of the wall assembly. An equivalent wall theory is used to convert three dimensional heat flow to one dimensional terms that capture thermal mass effects, which in turn are used in a common whole building simulation model. This paper illustrates a performance check between the thermal performance of a Massive ICF (Insulating Concrete Form) wall system mocked up (level 2) and Whole Building Performance criteria (level 1) such as total space heating and cooling loads (thermal comfort).

  1. The National Ignition Facility: Status and Plans for Laser Fusion and High-Energy-Density Experimental Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. I. Moses

    2001-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) currently under construction at the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a 192-beam, 1.8-megajoule, 500-terawatt, 351-nm laser for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high-energy-density experimental studies. NIF is being built by the Department of Energy and the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA) to provide an experimental test bed for the U.S. Stockpile Stewardship Program to ensure the country's nuclear deterrent without underground nuclear testing. The experimental program will encompass a wide range of physical phenomena from fusion energy production to materials science. Of the roughly 700 shots available per year, about 10% will be dedicated to basic science research. Laser hardware is modularized into line replaceable units (LRUs) such as deformable mirrors, amplifiers, and multi-function sensor packages that are operated by a distributed computer control system of nearly 60,000 control points. The supervisory control room presents facility-wide status and orchestrates experiments using operating parameters predicted by physics models. A network of several hundred front-end processors (FEPs) implements device control. The object-oriented software system is implemented in the Ada and Java languages and emphasizes CORBA distribution of reusable software objects. NIF is currently scheduled to provide first light in 2004 and will be completed in 2008.

  2. Experimental and numerical investigation of shock wave propagation through complex geometry, gas continuous, two-phase media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chien-Chih Liu, J.

    1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The work presented here investigates the phenomenon of shock wave propagation in gas continuous, two-phase media. The motivation for this work stems from the need to understand blast venting consequences in the HYLIFE inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor. The HYLIFE concept utilizes lasers or heavy ion beams to rapidly heat and compress D-T targets injected into the center of a reactor chamber. A segmented blanket of falling molten lithium or Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4} (Flibe) jets encircles the reactor`s central cavity, shielding the reactor structure from radiation damage, absorbing the fusion energy, and breeding more tritium fuel. X-rays from the fusion microexplosion will ablate a thin layer of blanket material from the surfaces which face toward the fusion site. This generates a highly energetic vapor, which mostly coalesces in the central cavity. The blast expansion from the central cavity generates a shock which propagates through the segmented blanket - a complex geometry, gas-continuous two-phase medium. The impulse that the blast gives to the liquid as it vents past, the gas shock on the chamber wall, and ultimately the liquid impact on the wall are all important quantities to the HYLIFE structural designers.

  3. National Ignition Facility Project Completion and Control System Status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Arsdall, P J; Azevedo, S G; Beeler, R G; Bryant, R M; Carey, R W; Demaret, R D; Fisher, J M; Frazier, T M; Lagin, L J; Ludwigsen, A P; Marshall, C D; Mathisen, D G; Reed, R K

    2009-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system providing a scientific center to study inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. Completed in 2009, NIF is a stadium-sized facility containing a 1.8-MJ, 500-TW 192-beam ultraviolet laser and target chamber. A cryogenic tritium target system and suite of optical, X-ray and nuclear diagnostics will support experiments in a strategy to achieve fusion ignition starting in 2010. Automatic control of NIF is performed by the large-scale Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS), which is implemented by 2 MSLOC of Java and Ada running on 1300 front-end processors and servers. The ICCS framework uses CORBA distribution for interoperation between heterogeneous languages and computers. Laser setup is guided by a physics model and shots are coordinated by data-driven distributed workflow engines. The NIF information system includes operational tools and a peta-scale repository for provisioning experimental results. This paper discusses results achieved and the effort now underway to conduct full-scale operations and prepare for ignition.

  4. Development and implementation of seismic design and evaluation criteria for NIF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sommer, S.C.; MacCalden, P.B.

    1998-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is being built at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as an international research center for inertial confinement fusion (ICF). This paper will provide an overview of NIF, review NIF seismic criteria, and briefly discuss seismic analyses of NIF optical support structures that have been performed by LLNL and the Ralph M. Parsons Company, the Architect and Engineer (A&E) for NIF. The NIF seismic design and evaluation criteria is based on provisions in DOE Standard 1020 (DOE-STD-1020), the Uniform Building Code (UBC), and the LLNL Mechanical Engineering Design Safety Standards (MEDSS). Different levels of seismic requirements apply to NIF structures, systems, and components (SSCs) based on their function. The highest level of requirements are defined for optical support structures and SSCs which could influence the performance of optical support structures, while the minimum level of requirements are Performance Category 2 (PC2) requirements in DOE-STD-1020. To demonstrate that the NIF seismic criteria is satisfied, structural analyses have been performed by LLNL and Parsons to evaluate the responses of optical support structures and other SSCs to seismic-induced forces.

  5. The Neutron Imaging System Fielded at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrill, F E; Buckles, R; Clark, D D; Danly, C R; Drury, O B; Dzenitis, J M; Fatherley, V E; Fittinghoff, D N; Gallegos, R; Grim, G P; Guler, N; Loomis, E N; Lutz, S; Malone, R M; Martinson, D D; Mares, D; Morley, D J; Morgan, G L; Oertel, J A; Tregillis, I L; Volegov, P L; Weiss, P B; Wilde, C H

    2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron imaging diagnostic has recently been commissioned at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This new system is an important diagnostic tool for inertial fusion studies at the NIF for measuring the size and shape of the burning DT plasma during the ignition stage of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) implosions. The imaging technique utilizes a pinhole neutron aperture, placed between the neutron source and a neutron detector. The detection system measures the two dimensional distribution of neutrons passing through the pinhole. This diagnostic has been designed to collect two images at two times. The long flight path for this diagnostic, 28 m, results in a chromatic separation of the neutrons, allowing the independently timed images to measure the source distribution for two neutron energies. Typically the first image measures the distribution of the 14 MeV neutrons and the second image of the 6-12 MeV neutrons. The combination of these two images has provided data on the size and shape of the burning plasma within the compressed capsule, as well as a measure of the quantity and spatial distribution of the cold fuel surrounding this core.

  6. The Neutron Imaging Diagnostic at NIF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrill, F E; Buckles, R; Clark, D; Danly, C R; Drury, O B; Dzenitis, J M; Fatherly, V E; Fittinghoff, D N; Gallegos, R; Grim, G P; Guler, N; Loomis, E N; Lutz, S; Malone, R M; Martinson, D D; Mares, D; Morley, D J; Morgan, G L; Oertel, J A; Tregillis, I L; Volegov, P L; Weiss, P B; Wilde, C H

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A neutron imaging diagnostic has recently been commissioned at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This new system is an important diagnostic tool for inertial fusion studies at the NIF for measuring the size and shape of the burning DT plasma during the ignition stage of ICF implosions. The imaging technique utilizes a pinhole neutron aperture, placed between the neutron source and a neutron detector. The detection system measures the two dimensional distribution of neutrons passing through the pinhole. This diagnostic has been designed to collect two images at two times. The long flight path for this diagnostic, 28 m, results in a chromatic separation of the neutrons, allowing the independently timed images to measure the source distribution for two neutron energies. Typically the first image measures the distribution of the 14 MeV neutrons and the second image of the 6-12 MeV neutrons. The combination of these two images has provided data on the size and shape of the burning plasma within the compressed capsule, as well as a measure of the quantity and spatial distribution of the cold fuel surrounding this core.

  7. Concept to diagnose mix with imaging x-ray Thomson scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keiter, Paul A.; Gamboa, Eliseo J.; Huntington, Channing M.; Kuranz, Carolyn C. [Department of Atmospheric, Oceanic and Space Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48103 (United States)

    2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Turbulent mixing of two fluid species is a ubiquitous problem, prevalent in systems such as inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsule implosions, supernova remnants, and other astrophysical systems. In complex, high Reynolds number compressible high energy density (HED) flows such as these, hydrodynamic instabilities initiate the turbulent mixing process, which can then feedback and alter the mean hydrodynamic motion through nonlinear processes. In order to predict how these systems evolve under turbulent conditions, models are used. However, these models require detailed quantitative data to validate and constrain their detailed physics models as well as improve them. Providing this much needed data is currently at the forefront of HED research but is proving elusive due to a lack of available diagnostics capable of directly measuring detailed flow variables. Thomson scattering is a promising technique in this regard as it provides fundamental conditions of the flow ({rho}, T, Zbar) due to its direct interaction with the small scales of the fluid or plasma and was recently considered as a possible mix diagnostic. With the development of imaging x-ray Thomson scattering (IXRTS) obtaining spatial profiles of these variables is within reach. We propose a novel use of the IXRTS technique that will provide more detailed quantitative data required for model validation in mix experiments.

  8. LANL C10.2 Projects in FY13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batha, Steven H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fincke, James R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Schmitt, Mark J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    LANL has two projects in C10.2: Defect-Induced Mix Experiment (DIME) (ongoing, several runs at Omega; NIF shots this summer); and Shock/Shear (tested at Omega for two years; NIF shots in second half of FY13). Each project is jointly funded by C10.2, other C10 MTEs, and Science Campaigns. DIME is investigating 4{pi} and feature-induced mix in spherically convergent ICF implosions by using imaging of the mix layer. DIME prepared for NIF by demonstrating its PDD mix platform on Omega including imaging mid-Z doped layers and defects. DIME in FY13 will focus on PDD symmetry-dependent mix and moving burn into the mix region for validation of mix/burn models. Re-Shock and Shear are two laser-driven experiments designed to study the turbulent mixing of materials. In FY-2012 43 shear and re-shock experimental shots were executed on the OMEGA laser and a complete time history obtained for both. The FY-2013 goal is to transition the experiment to NIF where the larger scale will provide a longer time period for mix layer growth.

  9. Low-temperature chemical vapor deposition of tungsten from tungsten hexacarbonyl

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vogt, G.J.

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of tungsten from W(CO)/sub 6/ has been investigated below 670 K as an alternate process to WF/sub 6/ CVD for coating glass microspheres. The major advantages of W(CO)/sub 6/ CVD are the elimination of the HF damage to the glass microspheres and potentially a lower deposition temperature for coating DT-filled microspheres. W(CO)/sub 6/ CVD can be utilized, in principle, to coat the microspheres with 1 to 5 ..mu..m of tungsten or to flash coat the microspheres for further coating by WF/sub 6/ CVD. Test coatings were deposited in a fluidized-bed reactor with a hydrogen carrier gas. The coatings were found to contain nearly equal portions of carbon and oxygen, ranging from 16 to 25 at.% for each element. The high carbon and oxygen concentrations are believed to result principally from the physical entrapment of chemisorbed CO molecules at the surface of the growing deposit. The general quality and adhesion of the W(CO)/sub 6/-derived coatings are unsatisfactory at this time for ICF applications.

  10. Preparation and properties of polyvinyl alcohol microspheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Campbell, J.H.; Grens, J.Z.; Poco, J.F.; Ives, B.H.

    1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) microspheres, having a size range of approx.150- to 250-..mu..m diameter with 1- to 5-..mu..m wall thickness, have been fabricated using a solution droplet technique. The spheres were developed for possible use on the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program. PVA, a polymer chosen based on earlier survey work carried out at KMS Fusion, Inc., has good strength, low hydrogen permeability, is optically transparent, and water soluble. The latter property makes it safe and easy to use in our droplet generator system. A unique dual-orifice droplet generator was used to prepare the spheres. The droplet generator operating conditions and the column processing parameters were chosen using results from our 1-D model calculations as a guide. The polymer microsphere model is an extension of the model we developed to support the glass sphere production. After preparation, the spheres were physically characterized for surface quality, sphericity, wall thickness (and uniformity), and size. We also determined the buckling pressure for both uncoated and CH-coated spheres. Radiation stability to beta decay (from tritium) was evaluated by exposing the spheres to a 7-keV electron beam. The results from these and other physical property measurements are presented in this report.

  11. Simulations and model of the nonlinear Richtmyer–Meshkov instability

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dimonte, Guy; Ramaprabhu, P.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nonlinear evolution of the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability is investigated using numerical simulations with the FLASH code in two-dimensions (2D). The purpose of the simulations is to develop an empiricial nonlinear model of the RM instability that is applicable to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and ejecta formation, namely, at large Atwood number A and scaled initial amplitude kho (k ? wavenumber) of the perturbation. The FLASH code is first validated with a variety of RM experiments that evolve well into the nonlinear regime. They reveal that bubbles stagnate when they grow by an increment of 2/k and that spikes acceleratemore »for A > 0.5 due to higher harmonics that focus them. These results are then compared with a variety of nonlinear models that are based on potential flow. We find that the models agree with simulations for moderate values of A oo. Our hope is that such empirical models concisely capture the RM simulations and inspire more rigorous solutions.« less

  12. The Romelt Process -- Prospects for pig iron production in North America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, M.W. [ICF Kaiser International, Inc., Fairfax, VA (United States); Weston, T.R. [ICF Kaiser International, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The iron and steel industry in North America is undergoing dramatic changes and is being driven by three factors. First, the introduction of new technologies and pace of innovation has placed North America at the forefront of commercializing new technologies. Second, new technologies have changed the market for steelmaking raw materials and stimulated an industry-wide discussion of the ``value in use`` of scrap and scrap substitutes. Finally, an increase in environmental costs has fundamentally changed management`s view toward the environmental impact of iron and steelmaking, particularly in the integrated steel industry. This paper discusses the Romelt Process, an emerging ironmaking technology developed by the Moscow Institute for Steels and Alloys, in the context of these industry trends. ICF Kaiser, a worldwide licensee to the Romelt technology, believes that the current North American climate is probably the most conducive of all steelmaking regions to the commercialization of new technologies. Liquid or cast pig iron, the product of the Romelt Process, is the highest value feed for both the EAF and BOF steelmaking processes. In terms of environmental benefits, Romelt uses non-coking coals for its fuel and reductant, and has a proven large scale pilot plant track record in smelting both low grade fine ores and iron bearing wastes from the integrated works.

  13. Hot electron production in laser solid interactions with a controlled pre-pulse

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Culfa, O.; Tallents, G. J.; Wagenaars, E.; Ridgers, C. P.; Dance, R. J.; Rossall, A. K.; Woolsey, N. C. [York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, The University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom)] [York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, The University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); Gray, R. J.; McKenna, P. [Department of Physics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom)] [Department of Physics, SUPA, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Brown, C. D. R.; James, S. F.; Hoarty, D. J. [AWE, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom)] [AWE, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Booth, N.; Robinson, A. P. L. [CLF, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)] [CLF, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Lancaster, K. L. [York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, The University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom) [York Plasma Institute, Department of Physics, The University of York, York YO10 5DD (United Kingdom); CLF, STFC Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Pikuz, S. A. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation)] [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation); Faenov, A. Ya. [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation) [Joint Institute for High Temperatures, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 125412 (Russian Federation); Quantum Beam Science Directorate, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Kizugawa, Kyoto 619-0215 (Japan); Kampfer, T.; Schulze, K. S.; Uschmann, I. [Friedrich Schiller University of Jena, D-07743 Jena (Germany)] [Friedrich Schiller University of Jena, D-07743 Jena (Germany)

    2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Hot electron generation plays an important role in the fast ignition approach to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and other applications with ultra-intense lasers. Hot electrons of temperature up to 10–20?MeV have been produced by high contrast picosecond duration laser pulses focussed to intensities of ?10{sup 20}?W cm{sup ?2} with a deliberate pre-pulse on solid targets using the Vulcan Petawatt Laser facility. We present measurements of the number and temperature of hot electrons obtained using an electron spectrometer. The results are correlated to the density scale length of the plasma produced by a controlled pre-pulse measured using an optical probe diagnostic. 1D simulations predict electron temperature variations with plasma density scale length in agreement with the experiment at shorter plasma scale lengths (<7.5?m), but with the experimental temperatures (13–17?MeV) dropping below the simulation values (20–25?MeV) at longer scale lengths. The experimental results show that longer interaction plasmas produced by pre-pulses enable significantly greater number of hot electrons to be produced.

  14. New model of calculating the energy transfer efficiency for the spherical theta-pinch device

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, G; Loisch, G; Xiao, G; Jacoby, J; Weyrich, K; Li, Y; Zhao, Y

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ion-beam-plasma-interaction plays an important role in the field of Warm Dense Matter (WDM) and Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). A spherical theta pinch is proposed to act as a plasma target in various applications including a plasma stripper cell. One key parameter for such applications is the free electron density. A linear dependency of this density to the amount of energy transferred into the plasma from an energy storage was found by C. Teske. Since the amount of stored energy is known, the energy transfer efficiency is a reliable parameter for the design of a spherical theta pinch device. The traditional two models of energy transfer efficiency are based on assumptions which comprise the risk of systematical errors. To obtain precise results, this paper proposes a new model without the necessity of any assumption to calculate the energy transfer efficiency for an inductively coupled plasma device. Further, a comparison of these three different models is given at a fixed operation voltage for the full ...

  15. Laser Inertial Fusion Energy Control Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marshall, C; Carey, R; Demaret, R; Edwards, O; Lagin, L; Van Arsdall, P

    2011-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) facility point design is being developed at LLNL to support an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) based energy concept. This will build upon the technical foundation of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most energetic laser system. NIF is designed to compress fusion targets to conditions required for thermonuclear burn. The LIFE control systems will have an architecture partitioned by sub-systems and distributed among over 1000's of front-end processors, embedded controllers and supervisory servers. LIFE's automated control subsystems will require interoperation between different languages and target architectures. Much of the control system will be embedded into the subsystem with well defined interface and performance requirements to the supervisory control layer. An automation framework will be used to orchestrate and automate start-up and shut-down as well as steady state operation. The LIFE control system will be a high parallel segmented architecture. For example, the laser system consists of 384 identical laser beamlines in a 'box'. The control system will mirror this architectural replication for each beamline with straightforward high-level interface for control and status monitoring. Key technical challenges will be discussed such as the injected target tracking and laser pointing feedback. This talk discusses the the plan for controls and information systems to support LIFE.

  16. Status Of The National Ignition Campaign And National Ignition Facility Integrated Computer Control System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lagin, L; Brunton, G; Carey, R; Demaret, R; Fisher, J; Fishler, B; Ludwigsen, P; Marshall, C; Reed, R; Shelton, R; Townsend, S

    2011-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a stadium-sized facility that will contains a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, ultraviolet laser system together with a 10-meter diameter target chamber with room for multiple experimental diagnostics. NIF is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system, providing a scientific center to study inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF's laser beams are designed to compress fusion targets to conditions required for thermonuclear burn. NIF is operated by the Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS) in an object-oriented, CORBA-based system distributed among over 1800 frontend processors, embedded controllers and supervisory servers. In the fall of 2010, a set of experiments began with deuterium and tritium filled targets as part of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). At present, all 192 laser beams routinely fire to target chamber center to conduct fusion and high energy density experiments. During the past year, the control system was expanded to include automation of cryogenic target system and over 20 diagnostic systems to support fusion experiments were deployed and utilized in experiments in the past year. This talk discusses the current status of the NIC and the plan for controls and information systems to support these experiments on the path to ignition.

  17. A Virtualized Computing Platform For Fusion Control Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frazier, T; Adams, P; Fisher, J; Talbot, A

    2011-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a stadium-sized facility that contains a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, ultraviolet laser system together with a 10-meter diameter target chamber with room for multiple experimental diagnostics. NIF is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system, providing a scientific center to study inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF's laser beams are designed to compress fusion targets to conditions required for thermonuclear burn, liberating more energy than required to initiate the fusion reactions. 2,500 servers, 400 network devices and 700 terabytes of networked attached storage provide the foundation for NIF's Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS) and Experimental Data Archive. This talk discusses the rationale & benefits for server virtualization in the context of an operational experimental facility, the requirements discovery process used by the NIF teams to establish evaluation criteria for virtualization alternatives, the processes and procedures defined to enable virtualization of servers in a timeframe that did not delay the execution of experimental campaigns and the lessons the NIF teams learned along the way. The virtualization architecture ultimately selected for ICCS is based on the Open Source Xen computing platform and 802.1Q open networking standards. The specific server and network configurations needed to ensure performance and high availability of the control system infrastructure will be discussed.

  18. Neutron spectrometry - An essential tool for diagnosing implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mackinnon, A J; Johnson, M G; Frenje, J A; Casey, D T; Li, C K; Seguin, F H; Petrasso, R; Ashabranner, R; Cerjan, C; Clancy, T J; Bionta, R; Bleuel, D; Bond, E J; Caggiano, J A; Capenter, A; Eckart, M J; Edwards, M J; Friedrich, S; Glenzer, S H; Haan, S W; Hartouni, E P; Hatarik, R; Hachett, S P; McKernan, M; Jones, O; Lepape, S; Lerche, R A; Landen, O L; Moran, M; Moses, E; Munro, D; McNaney, J; Rygg, J R; Sepke, S; Spears, B; Springer, P; Yeamans, C; Farrell, M; Kilkenny, J D; Nikroo, A; Paguio, R; Knauer, J; Glebov, V; Sangster, T; Betti, R; Stoeckl, C; Magoon, J; Shoup, M J; Grim, G P; Moran, G L; Murphy, T J; Leeper, R J; Ruiz, C

    2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    DT neutron yield (Y{sub n}), ion temperature (T{sub i}) and down-scatter ratio (dsr) determined from measured neutron spectra are essential metrics for diagnosing the performance of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A suite of neutron-Time-Of-Flight (nTOF) spectrometers and a Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) have been implemented in different locations around the NIF target chamber, providing good implosion coverage and the redundancy required for reliable measurements of Yn, Ti and dsr. From the measured dsr value, an areal density ({rho}R) is determined from the relationship {rho}R{sub tot} (g/cm{sup 2}) = (20.4 {+-} 0.6) x dsr{sub 10-12 MeV}. The proportionality constant is determined considering implosion geometry, neutron attenuation and energy range used for the dsr measurement. To ensure high accuracy in the measurements, a series of commissioning experiments using exploding pushers have been used for in situ calibration. The spectrometers are now performing to the required accuracy, as indicated by the good agreement between the different measurements over several commissioning shots. In addition, recent data obtained with the MRS and nTOFs indicate that the implosion performance of cryogenically layered DT implosions, characterized by the experimental Ignition Threshold Factor (ITFx) which is a function of dsr (or fuel {rho}R) and Y{sub n}, has improved almost two orders of magnitude since the first shot in September, 2010.

  19. Pulsed Power Peer Review Committee Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BLOOMQUIST,DOUGLAS D.

    2000-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1993, the Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA, PL 103-62) was enacted. GPRA, which applies to all federal programs, has three components: strategic plans, annual performance plans, and metrics to show how well annual plans are being followed. As part of meeting the GRPA requirement in FY2000, a 14-member external peer review panel (the Garwin Committee) was convened on May 17-19, 2000 to review Sandia National Laboratories' Pulsed Power Programs as a component of the Performance Appraisal Process negotiated with the Department of Energy (DOE). The scope of the review included activities in inertial confinement fission (ICF), weapon physics, development of radiation sources for weapons effects simulation, x-ray radiography, basic research in high energy density physics (HEDP), and pulsed power technology research and development. In his charge to the committee, Jeffrey Quintenz, Director of Pulsed Power Sciences (1600) asked that the review be based on four criteria (1) quality of science, technology, and engineering, (2) programmatic performance, management, and planning, (3) relevance to national needs and agency missions, and (4) performance in the operation and construction of major research facilities. In addition, specific programmatic questions were posed by the director and by the DOE-Defense Programs (DP). The accompanying report, produced as a SAND document, is the report of the committee's findings.

  20. Hanford Site Long-term Surface Barrier Development Program: Fiscal year 1994 highlights

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petersen, K.L.; Link, S.O.; Gee, G.W.

    1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Hanford Site Surface Barrier Development Program was organized in 1985 to test the effectiveness of various barrier designs in minimizing the effects of water infiltration; plant, animal and human intrusion; and wind and water erosion on buried wastes, plus preventing or minimizing the emanation of noxious gases. A team of scientists from the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and engineers from Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) direct the barrier development effort. ICF Kaiser Hanford Company, in conjunction with WHC and PNL, developed design drawings and construction specifications for a 5-acre prototype barrier. The highlight of efforts in FY 1994 was the construction of the prototype barrier. The prototype barrier was constructed on the Hanford Site at the 200 BP-1 Operable Unit of the 200 East Area. Construction was completed in August 1994 and monitoring instruments are being installed so experiments on the prototype barrier can begin in FY 1995. The purpose of the prototype barrier is to provide insights and experience with issues regarding barrier design, construction, and performance that have not been possible with individual tests and experiments conducted to date. Additional knowledge and experience was gained in FY 1994 on erosion control, physical stability, water infiltration control, model testing, Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) comparisons, biointrusion control, long-term performance, and technology transfer.

  1. Future directions in inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bodner, S.E. (Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC (United States))

    1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The author discusses future directions for the ICF program. At this time there is still uncertainty on a number of key issues necessary to decide on what type of a National Ignition Facility should be constructed. Mechanisms are in place to answer these questions. The author offers his opinions of where the program is likely to proceed. Technology wise indications are that direct drive heating has the best chance of reaching ignition and high gain. This has the advantage of making all three major user programs happy, namely weapons physics, weapons effects, and electrical energy. The demand for and price of energy in the country will have a major impact on the way the program is developed. From the laser fusion side the most promising drivers at present seem to be KrF lasers, and a major concern for these systems is whether the peak to valley nonuniformities can be reduced to the 1 to 2% level when delivered to the target in order to avoid driving instabilities.

  2. Micro -Thermonuclear AB-Reactors for Aerospace

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2007-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The author offers several innovations that he first suggested publicly early in 1983 for the AB multi-reflex engine, space propulsion, getting energy from plasma, etc. (see: A. Bolonkin, Non-Rocket Space Launch and Flight, Elsevier, London, 2006, Chapters 12, 3A). It is the micro-thermonuclear AB-Reactors. That is new micro-thermonuclear reactor with very small fuel pellet that uses plasma confinement generated by multi-reflection of laser beam or its own magnetic field. The Lawson criterion increases by hundreds of times. The author also suggests a new method of heating the power-making fuel pellet by outer electric current as well as new direct method of transformation of ion kinetic energy into harvestable electricity. These offered innovations dramatically decrease the size, weight and cost of thermonuclear reactor, installation, propulsion system and electric generator. Non-industrial countries can produce these researches and constructions. Currently, the author is researching the efficiency of these innovations for two types of the micro-thermonuclear reactors: multi-reflection reactor (ICF) and self-magnetic reactor (MCF).

  3. LLE review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keck, R.L. (ed.)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period October-December 1991, contains articles on the analysis of argon-filled target experiments, and a theoretical analysis of the impact of nonlocal heat transport in laser filamentation in plasmas. In the Advanced Technology section there is an article on mechanisms that affect thin-film conductivity, and a report on the gain characteristics of the 20-cm SSA prototype amplifier to be used in the OMEGA Upgrade. Finally, the activities of the National Laser Users Facility and the GDL and OMEGA laser facilities are summarized. Highlights of the research reported in this issue are: argon radiation from argon-filled, polymer-shell targets is used as a core-temperature diagnostic and density diagnostic of the surrounding region in a regime where the argon line radiation is strongly absorbed. A theoretical analysis of the impact of nonlocal heat transport on laser filamentation in plasmas is developed. The resulting model is compared with experimental observations and the implications for ICF are discussed. A study of thermal conductivity in thin films seeks to identify mechanisms that result in degradation of thin-film conductivity. Identifying these mechanisms can lead to changes in the thin-film manufacture that will improve their resistance to laser damage.

  4. LLE review. Quarterly report, October--December 1991: Volume 49

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keck, R.L. [ed.

    1991-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period October-December 1991, contains articles on the analysis of argon-filled target experiments, and a theoretical analysis of the impact of nonlocal heat transport in laser filamentation in plasmas. In the Advanced Technology section there is an article on mechanisms that affect thin-film conductivity, and a report on the gain characteristics of the 20-cm SSA prototype amplifier to be used in the OMEGA Upgrade. Finally, the activities of the National Laser Users Facility and the GDL and OMEGA laser facilities are summarized. Highlights of the research reported in this issue are: argon radiation from argon-filled, polymer-shell targets is used as a core-temperature diagnostic and density diagnostic of the surrounding region in a regime where the argon line radiation is strongly absorbed. A theoretical analysis of the impact of nonlocal heat transport on laser filamentation in plasmas is developed. The resulting model is compared with experimental observations and the implications for ICF are discussed. A study of thermal conductivity in thin films seeks to identify mechanisms that result in degradation of thin-film conductivity. Identifying these mechanisms can lead to changes in the thin-film manufacture that will improve their resistance to laser damage.

  5. Cryogenic THD and DT layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Meezan, N. B.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Döppner, T.; Ho, D. D.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; et al

    2015-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High Density Carbon (HDC or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations of et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] culminated in a DT layered implosion driven by a 6.8 ns, 2-shock laser pulse. This paper describes these experiments and comparisons with ICF design code simulations. Backlit radiography of a THD layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightlymore »oblate hot spot shape. Other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. A streak camera-based hot spot self-emission diagnostic (SPIDER) showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of low quality hot spot formation. Changes to the laser pulse and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1.8 x 10ą? neutrons, 40% of the 1D simulated yield.« less

  6. Inertial fusion program, January 1-June 30, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skoberne, F. (comp.)

    1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Progress in the development of high-energy short-pulse carbon dioxide laser systems for fusion research is reported. Improvements are outlined for the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Gemini System, which permitted over 500 shots in support of 10 different target experiments; the transformation of our eight-beam system, Helios, from a developmental to an operational facility that is capable of irradiating targets on a routine basis is described; and progress made toward completion of Antares, our 100- to 200-TW target irradiation system, is detailed. Investigations of phenomena such as phase conjugation by degenerate four-wave mixing and its applicability to laser fusion systems, and frequency multiplexing as a means toward multipulse energy extraction are summarized. Also discussed are experiments with targets designed for adiabatic compression. Progress is reported in the development of accurate diagnostics, especially for the detection of expanding ions, of neutron yield, and of x-ray emission. Significant advances in our theoretical efforts are summarized, such as the adaptation of our target design codes for use with the CRAY-1 computer, and new results leading to a better understanding of implosion phenomena are reported. The results of various fusion reactor studies are summarized, including the development of an ICF reactor blanket that offers a promising alternative to the usual lithium blanket, and the formulation of a capital-cost data base for laser fusion reactors to permit meaningful comparisons with other technologies.

  7. Annual Scientific Report for DE-FG03-02NA00063 Coherent imaging of laser-plasma interactions using XUV high harmonic radiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Prof. Henry C. Kapteyn

    2005-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

    In this project, we use coherent short-wavelength light generated using high-order harmonic generation as a probe of laser-plasma dynamics and phase transitions on femtosecond time-scales. The interaction of ultrashort laser pulses with materials and plasmas is relevant to stockpile stewardship, to understanding the equation of state of matter at high pressures and temperatures, and to plasma concepts such as the fast-ignitor ICF fusion concept and laser-based particle acceleration. Femtosecond laser technology makes it possible to use a small-scale setup to generate 20fs pulses with average power >10W at multiple kHz repetition rates, that can be focused to intensities in excess of 1017W/cm2. These lasers can be used either to rapidly heat materials to initiate phase transitions, or to create laser plasmas over a wide parameter space. These lasers can also be used to generate fully spatially coherent XUV beams with which to probe these materials and plasma systems. We are in process of implementing imaging studies of plasma hydrodynamics and warm, dense matter. The data will be compared with simulation codes of laser-plasma interactions, making it possible to refine and validate these codes.

  8. Position paper -- Tank ventilation system design air flow rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goolsby, G.K.

    1995-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this paper is to document a project position on required ventilation system design air flow rates for the waste storage tanks currently being designed by project W-236A, the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF). The Title 1 design primary tank heat removal system consists of two systems: a primary tank vapor space ventilation system; and an annulus ventilation system. At the conclusion of Title 1 design, air flow rates for the primary and annulus ventilation systems were 960 scfm and 4,400 scfm, respectively, per tank. These design flow rates were capable of removing 1,250,000 Btu/hr from each tank. However, recently completed and ongoing studies have resulted in a design change to reduce the extreme case heat load to 700,000 Btu/hr. This revision of the extreme case heat load, coupled with results of scale model evaporative testing performed by WHC Thermal Hydraulics, allow for a reduction of the design air flow rates for both primary and annulus ventilation systems. Based on the preceding discussion, ICF Kaiser Hanford Co. concludes that the design should incorporate the following design air flow rates: Primary ventilation system--500 scfm maximum and Annulus ventilation system--1,100 scfm maximum. In addition, the minimum air flow rates in the primary and annulus ventilation systems will be investigated during Title 2 design. The results of the Title 2 investigation will determine the range of available temperature control using variable air flows to both ventilation systems.

  9. A SUB-GRID VOLUME-OF-FLUIDS (VOF) MODEL FOR MIXING IN RESOLVED SCALE AND IN UNRESOLVED SCALE COMPUTATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VOLD, ERIK L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; SCANNAPIECO, TONY J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A sub-grid mix model based on a volume-of-fluids (VOF) representation is described for computational simulations of the transient mixing between reactive fluids, in which the atomically mixed components enter into the reactivity. The multi-fluid model allows each fluid species to have independent values for density, energy, pressure and temperature, as well as independent velocities and volume fractions. Fluid volume fractions are further divided into mix components to represent their 'mixedness' for more accurate prediction of reactivity. Time dependent conversion from unmixed volume fractions (denoted cf) to atomically mixed (af) fluids by diffusive processes is represented in resolved scale simulations with the volume fractions (cf, af mix). In unresolved scale simulations, the transition to atomically mixed materials begins with a conversion from unmixed material to a sub-grid volume fraction (pf). This fraction represents the unresolved small scales in the fluids, heterogeneously mixed by turbulent or multi-phase mixing processes, and this fraction then proceeds in a second step to the atomically mixed fraction by diffusion (cf, pf, af mix). Species velocities are evaluated with a species drift flux, {rho}{sub i}u{sub di} = {rho}{sub i}(u{sub i}-u), used to describe the fluid mixing sources in several closure options. A simple example of mixing fluids during 'interfacial deceleration mixing with a small amount of diffusion illustrates the generation of atomically mixed fluids in two cases, for resolved scale simulations and for unresolved scale simulations. Application to reactive mixing, including Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF), is planned for future work.

  10. LIFAC Demonstration at Richmond Power and Light Whitewater Valley Unit No. 2 Volume II: Project Performance and Economics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The C1ean Coal Technology (CCT) Program has been recognized in the National Energy Strategy as a major initiative whereby coal will be able to reach its full potential as a source of energy for the nation and the international marketplace. Attainment of this goal depends upon the development of highly efficient, environmentally sound, competitive coal utilization technologies responsive to diverse energy markets and varied consumer needs. The CCT Program is an effort jointly funded by government and industry whereby the most promising of the advanced coal-based technologies are being moved into the marketplace through demonstration. The CCT Program is being implemented through a total of five competitive solicitations. LIFAC North America, a joint venture partnership of ICF Kaiser Engineers, Inc., and Tampella Power Corporation, is currently demonstrating the LIFAC flue gas desulfurization technology developed by Tampella Power. This technology provides sulfur dioxide emission control for power plants, especially existing facilities with tight space limitations. Sulfur dioxide emissions are expected to be reduced by up to 85% by using limestone as a sorbent. The LIFAC technology is being demonstrated at Whitewater Valley Unit No. 2, a 60-MW coal-fired power plant owned and operated by Richmond Power and Light (RP&L) and located in Richmond, Indiana. The Whitewater plant consumes high-sulfur coals, with sulfur contents ranging from 2.0-2.9 $ZO. The project, co-funded by LIFAC North America and DOE, is being conducted with the participation of Richmond Power and Light, the State of Indiana, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), and the Black Beauty Coal Company. The project has a total cost of $21.4 million and a duration of 48 months from the preliminary design phase through the testing program.

  11. Time-resolved characterization and energy balance analysis of implosion core in shock-ignition experiments at OMEGA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Florido, R., E-mail: ricardo.florido@ulpgc.es; Mancini, R. C.; Nagayama, T. [Department of Physics, University of Nevada, Reno, Nevada 89557 (United States); Tommasini, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Delettrez, J. A.; Regan, S. P. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

    2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-resolved temperature and density conditions in the core of shock-ignition implosions have been determined for the first time. The diagnostic method relies on the observation, with a streaked crystal spectrometer, of the signature of an Ar tracer added to the deuterium gas fill. The data analysis confirms the importance of the shell attenuation effect previously noted on time-integrated spectroscopic measurements of thick-wall targets [R. Florido et al., Phys. Rev. E 83, 066408 (2011)]. This effect must be taken into account in order to obtain reliable results. The extracted temperature and density time-histories are representative of the state of the core during the implosion deceleration and burning phases. As a consequence of the ignitor shock launched by the sharp intensity spike at the end of the laser pulse, observed average core electron temperature and mass density reach T???1100?eV and ????2?g/cm{sup 3}; then temperature drops to T???920?eV while density rises to ????3.4?g/cm{sup 3} about the time of peak compression. Compared to 1D hydrodynamic simulations, the experiment shows similar maximum temperatures and smaller densities. Simulations do not reproduce all observations. Differences are noted in the heating dynamics driven by the ignitor shock and the optical depth time-history of the compressed shell. Time-histories of core conditions extracted from spectroscopy show that the implosion can be interpreted as a two-stage polytropic process. Furthermore, an energy balance analysis of implosion core suggests an increase in total energy greater than what 1D hydrodynamic simulations predict. This new methodology can be implemented in other ICF experiments to look into implosion dynamics and help to understand the underlying physics.

  12. Inertial confinement fusion. Quarterly report, July--September 1995, Volume 5, Number 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1990 National Academy of Sciences (NAS) final report recommended proceeding with the construction of a 1- to 2-MJ Nd-doped glass laser designed to achieve ignition in the laboratory (a laser originally called the Nova Upgrade, but now called the National Ignition Facility, or NIF, and envisioned as a national user facility). As a prerequisite, the report recommended completion of a series of target physics objectives on the Nova laser in use at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Meeting these objectives, which were called the Nova Technical Contract (NTC), would demonstrate (the Academy committee believed) that the physics of ignition targets was understood well enough that the laser requirements could be accurately specified. Completion of the NTC objectives was given the highest priority in the NAS report. The NAS committee also recommended a concentrated effort on advanced target design for ignition. As recommended in the report, completion of these objectives has been the joint responsibility of LLNL and the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Most of the articles in this issue of the ICF Quarterly were written jointly by scientists from both institutions. Several of the NTC objectives required the completion of improvements to Nova`s power balance and pointing accuracy and of new diagnostics and new target fabrication capabilities. These improvements were called {open_quotes}Precision Nova{close_quotes} and are documented. The original NTC objectives have been largely met. This Introduction summarizes those objectives and their motivation in the context of the requirements for ignition. The articles that follow describe the NIF ignition target designs and summarize the principal accomplishments in the various elements of the NTC.

  13. Development of a natural Gas Systems Analysis Model (GSAM). Annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lacking a detailed characterization of the resource base and a comprehensive borehole-to-burnertip evaluation model of the North American natural gas system, past R&D, tax and regulatory policies have been formulated without a full understanding of their likely direct and indirect impacts on future gas supply and demand. The recent disappearance of the deliverability surplus, pipeline deregulation, and current policy debates about regulatory initiatives in taxation, environmental compliance and leasing make the need for a comprehensive gas evaluation system critical. Traditional econometric or highly aggregated energy models are increasingly regarded as unable to incorporate available geologic detail and explicit technology performance and costing algorithms necessary to evaluate resource-technology-economic interactions in a market context. The objective of this research is to create a comprehensive, non-proprietary, microcomputer model of the North American natural gas system. GSAM explicitly evaluates the key components of the natural gas system, including resource base, exploration and development, extraction technology performance and costs, transportation and storage and end use. The primary focus is the detailed characterization of the resource base at the reservoir and sub-reservoir level and the impact of alternative extraction technologies on well productivity and economics. GSAM evaluates the complex interactions of current and alternative future technology and policy initiatives in the context of the evolving gas markets. Scheduled for completion in 1995, a prototype is planned for early 1994. ICF Resources reviewed relevant natural gas upstream, downstream and market models to identify appropriate analytic capabilities to incorporate into GSAM. We have reviewed extraction technologies to better characterize performance and costs in terms of GSAM parameters.

  14. Iterative linear solvers in a 2D radiation-hydrodynamics code: Methods and performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baldwin, C.; Brown, P.N.; Falgout, R.; Graziani, F.; Jones, J.

    1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Computer codes containing both hydrodynamics and radiation play a central role in simulating both astrophysical and inertial confinement fusion (ICF) phenomena. A crucial aspect of these codes is that they require an implicit solution of the radiation diffusion equations. The authors present in this paper the results of a comparison of five different linear solvers on a range of complex radiation and radiation-hydrodynamics problems. The linear solvers used are diagonally scaled conjugate gradient, GMRES with incomplete LU preconditioning, conjugate gradient with incomplete Cholesky preconditioning, multigrid, and multigrid-preconditioned conjugate gradient. These problems involve shock propagation, opacities varying over 5--6 orders of magnitude, tabular equations of state, and dynamic ALE (Arbitrary Lagrangian Eulerian) meshes. They perform a problem size scalability study by comparing linear solver performance over a wide range of problem sizes from 1,000 to 100,000 zones. The fundamental question they address in this paper is: Is it more efficient to invert the matrix in many inexpensive steps (like diagonally scaled conjugate gradient) or in fewer expensive steps (like multigrid)? In addition, what is the answer to this question as a function of problem size and is the answer problem dependent? They find that the diagonally scaled conjugate gradient method performs poorly with the growth of problem size, increasing in both iteration count and overall CPU time with the size of the problem and also increasing for larger time steps. For all problems considered, the multigrid algorithms scale almost perfectly (i.e., the iteration count is approximately independent of problem size and problem time step). For pure radiation flow problems (i.e., no hydrodynamics), they see speedups in CPU time of factors of {approx}15--30 for the largest problems, when comparing the multigrid solvers relative to diagonal scaled conjugate gradient.

  15. Analysis of Filesystem Utilization by the ?Ensemble of Models? Approach (U)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Domyancic, D

    2010-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to execute Uncertainty Quantification (UQ) studies, the number of reads placed on the filesystem will increase. This document works through the file I/O for a climatology UQ study. The utilization of the filesystem for the above discussed will be similar for ICF and Stockpile Stewardship applications. The current state of the art for the quantification of uncertainty of a multi-physics simulation code is the utilization of an ensemble of models approach. As an overview of the ensemble of models approach, a set of uncertain input parameters is identified along with an identified set of observational and output parameters. The model is computed n number of times with each ensemble simulation using a unique set of parametric combinations of input parameters thereby creating an ensemble of simulations. Response surface models (also known as statistical emulator models, surrogate models, or meta models) are trained using the ensemble results. The response models are then convolved with observational data to further constrain input parameters and to create uncertainty bounds on the model outputs. Using the Community Climate System Model (CCSM) specifically the atmospheric component of CCSM, the Community Atmospheric Model (CAM), as the model of interest, this document provides a rough model of the demands on a filesystem that is needed to execute a UQ study on CAM. Each ensemble simulation consists of 12 simulation years and uses 384 processors on the Atlas machine. The LLNL UQ Pipeline is LLNL's standard tool to execute UQ studies. The UQ Pipeline possesses the capability to execute the ensemble simulations on LLNL's diverse set of HPC environments, produce response models, generate uncertainty bounds, and analyze the results. The process executing the LLNL UQ Pipeline is run on a different compute node from the set of concurrent, executing ensemble simulations.

  16. Identification and Removal of High Frequency Temporal Noise in a Nd:YAG Macro-Pulse Laser Assisted with a Diagnostic Streak Camera

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kent Marlett, Bechtel Nevada; Ke-Xun Sun Bechtel Nevada

    2004-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses the use of a reference streak camera (SC) to diagnose laser performance and guide modifications to remove high frequency noise from Bechtel Nevada's long-pulse laser. The upgraded laser exhibits less than 0.1% high frequency noise in cumulative spectra, exceeding National Ignition Facility (NIF) calibration specifications. Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments require full characterization of streak cameras over a wide range of sweep speeds (10 ns to 480 ns). This paradigm of metrology poses stringent spectral requirements on the laser source for streak camera calibration. Recently, Bechtel Nevada worked with a laser vendor to develop a high performance, multi-wavelength Nd:YAG laser to meet NIF calibration requirements. For a typical NIF streak camera with a 4096 x 4096 pixel CCD, the flat field calibration at 30 ns requires a smooth laser spectrum over 33 MHz to 68 GHz. Streak cameras are the appropriate instrumentation for measuring laser amplitude noise at these very high frequencies since the upper end spectral content is beyond the frequency response of typical optoelectronic detectors for a single shot pulse. The SC was used to measure a similar laser at its second harmonic wavelength (532 nm), to establish baseline spectra for testing signal analysis algorithms. The SC was then used to measure the new custom calibration laser. In both spatial-temporal measurements and cumulative spectra, 6-8 GHz oscillations were identified. The oscillations were found to be caused by inter-surface reflections between amplifiers. Additional variations in the SC spectral data were found to result from temperature instabilities in the seeding laser. Based on these findings, laser upgrades were made to remove the high frequency noise from the laser output.

  17. LLNL Contribution to LLE FY09 Annual Report: NIC and HED Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeter, R F; Landen, O L; Hsing, W W; Fournier, K B

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In FY09, LLNL led 238 target shots on the OMEGA Laser System. Approximately half of these LLNL-led shots supported the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The remainder was dedicated to experiments for the high-energy-density stewardship experiments (HEDSE). Objectives of the LLNL led NIC campaigns at OMEGA included: (1) Laser-plasma interaction studies in physical conditions relevant for the NIF ignition targets; (2) Demonstration of Tr = 100 eV foot symmetry tuning using a reemission sphere; (3) X-ray scattering in support of conductivity measurements of solid density Be plasmas; (4) Experiments to study the physical properties (thermal conductivity) of shocked fusion fuels; (5) High-resolution measurements of velocity nonuniformities created by microscopic perturbations in NIF ablator materials; (6) Development of a novel Compton Radiography diagnostic platform for ICF experiments; and (7) Precision validation of the equation of state for quartz. The LLNL HEDSE campaigns included the following experiments: (1) Quasi-isentropic (ICE) drive used to study material properties such as strength, equation of state, phase, and phase-transition kinetics under high pressure; (2) Development of a high-energy backlighter for radiography in support of material strength experiments using Omega EP and the joint OMEGA-OMEGA-EP configuration; (3) Debris characterization from long-duration, point-apertured, point-projection x-ray backlighters for NIF radiation transport experiments; (4) Demonstration of ultrafast temperature and density measurements with x-ray Thomson scattering from short-pulse laser-heated matter; (5) The development of an experimental platform to study nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) physics using direct-drive implosions; (6) Opacity studies of high-temperature plasmas under LTE conditions; and (7) Characterization of copper (Cu) foams for HEDSE experiments.

  18. Current and Perspective Applications of Dense Plasma Focus Devices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gribkov, V. A. [A.I. Alikhanov Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics, ul. Bolshaya Cheremushkinskaya 25, 117218 Moscow (Russian Federation); Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, ul. Hery 23, Warsaw 01-497 (Poland)

    2008-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) devices' applications, which are intended to support the main-stream large-scale nuclear fusion programs (NFP) from one side (both in fundamental problems of Dense Magnetized Plasma physics and in its engineering issues) as well as elaborated for an immediate use in a number of fields from the other one, are described. In the first direction such problems as self-generated magnetic fields, implosion stability of plasma shells having a high aspect ratio, etc. are important for the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) programs (e.g. as NIF), whereas different problems of current disruption phenomenon, plasma turbulence, mechanisms of generation of fast particles and neutrons in magnetized plasmas are of great interest for the large devices of the Magnetic Plasma Confinement--MPC (e.g. as ITER). In a sphere of the engineering problems of NFP it is shown that in particular the radiation material sciences have DPF as a very efficient tool for radiation tests of prospect materials and for improvement of their characteristics. In the field of broad-band current applications some results obtained in the fields of radiation material sciences, radiobiology, nuclear medicine, express Neutron Activation Analysis (including a single-shot interrogation of hidden illegal objects), dynamic non-destructive quality control, X-Ray microlithography and micromachining, and micro-radiography are presented. As the examples of the potential future applications it is proposed to use DPF as a powerful high-flux neutron source to generate very powerful pulses of neutrons in the nanosecond (ns) range of its duration for innovative experiments in nuclear physics, for the goals of radiation treatment of malignant tumors, for neutron tests of materials of the first wall, blankets and NFP device's constructions (with fluences up to 1 dpa per a year term), and ns pulses of fast electrons, neutrons and hard X-Rays for brachytherapy.

  19. TWRS privatization support project waste characterization database development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory requested support from ICF Kaiser Hanford Company in assembling radionuclide and chemical analyte sample data and inventory estimates for fourteen Hanford underground storage tanks: 241-AN-102, -104, -105, -106, and -107, 241-AP-102, -104, and -105, 241-AW-101, -103, and -105, 241 AZ-101 and -102; and 241-C-109. Sample data were assembled for sixteen radionuclides and thirty-five chemical analytes. The characterization data were provided to Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in support of the Tank Waste Remediation Services Privatization Support Project. The purpose of this report is to present the results and document the methodology used in preparing the waste characterization information data set to support the Tank Waste Remediation Services Privatization Support Project. This report describes the methodology used in assembling the waste characterization information and how that information was validated by a panel of independent technical reviewers. Also, contained in this report are the various data sets created: the master data set, a subset, and an unreviewed data set. The master data set contains waste composition information for Tanks 241-AN-102 and -107, 241-AP-102 and -105, 241-AW-101; and 241-AZ-101 and -102. The subset contains only the validated analytical sample data from the master data set. The unreviewed data set contains all collected but unreviewed sample data for Tanks 241-AN-104, -105, and -106; 241-AP-104; 241-AW-103 and-105; and 241-C-109. The methodology used to review the waste characterization information was found to be an accurate, useful way to separate the invalid or questionable data from the more reliable data. In the future, this methodology should be considered when validating waste characterization information.

  20. CHP REGIONAL APPLICATION CENTERS: ACTIVITIES AND SELECTED RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schweitzer, Martin [ORNL

    2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Between 2001 and 2005, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) created a set of eight Regional Application Centers (RACs) to facilitate the development and deployment of Combined Heat and Power (CHP) technologies. By utilizing the thermal energy that is normally wasted when electricity is produced at central generating stations, Combined Heat and Power installations can save substantial amounts of energy compared to more traditional technologies. In addition, the location of CHP facilities at or near the point of consumption greatly reduces or eliminates electric transmission and distribution losses. The regional nature of the RACs allows each one to design and provide services that are most relevant to the specific economic and market conditions in its particular geographic area. Between them, the eight RACs provide services to all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Through the end of the federal 2009 fiscal year (FY 2009), the primary focus of the RACs was on providing CHP-related information to targeted markets, encouraging the creation and adoption of public policies and incentives favorable to CHP, and providing CHP users and prospective users with technical assistance and support on specific projects. Beginning with the 2010 fiscal year, the focus of the regional centers broadened to include district energy and waste heat recovery and these entities became formally known as Clean Energy Application Centers, as required by the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007. In 2007, ORNL led a cooperative effort to establish metrics to quantify the RACs accomplishments. That effort began with the development of a detailed logic model describing RAC operations and outcomes, which provided a basis for identifying important activities and accomplishments to track. A data collection spreadsheet soliciting information on those activities for FY 2008 and all previous years of RAC operations was developed and sent to the RACs in the summer of 2008. This represents the first systematic attempt at RAC program measurement in a manner consistent with approaches used for other efforts funded by DOE's Industrial Technologies Program (ITP). In addition, data on CHP installations and associated effects were collected for the same years from a state-by-state database maintained for DOE by ICF international. A report documenting the findings of that study was produced in September, 2009. The purpose of the current report is to present the findings from a new study of RAC activities and accomplishments which examined what the Centers did in FY 2009, the last year in which they concentrated exclusively on CHP technologies. This study focused on identifying and describing RAC activities and was not designed to measure how those efforts influenced CHP installations or other outcomes.

  1. Fast Ignition Experimental and Theoretical Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Akli, K

    2006-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We are becoming dependent on energy more today than we were a century ago, and with increasing world population and booming economies, sooner or later our energy sources will be exhausted. Moreover, our economy and welfare strongly depends on foreign oil and in the shadow of political uncertainties, there is an urgent need for a reliable, safe, and cheap energy source. Thermonuclear fusion, if achieved, is that source of energy which not only will satisfy our demand for today but also for centuries to come. Today, there are two major approaches to achieve fusion: magnetic confinement fusion (MFE) and inertial confinement fusion (ICF). This dissertation explores the inertial confinement fusion using the fast ignition concept. Unlike the conventional approach where the same laser is used for compression and ignition, in fast ignition separate laser beams are used. This dissertation addresses three very important topics to fast ignition inertial confinement fusion. These are laser-to-electron coupling efficiency, laser-generated electron beam transport, and the associated isochoric heating. First, an integrated fast ignition experiment is carried out with 0.9 kJ of energy in the compression beam and 70 J in the ignition beam. Measurements of absolute K{sub {alpha}} yield from the imploded core revealed that about 17% of the laser energy is coupled to the suprathermal electrons. Modeling of the transport of these electrons and the associated isochoric heating, with the previously determined laser-to-electron conversion efficiency, showed a maximum target temperature of 166 eV at the front where the electron flux is higher and the density is lower. The contribution of the potential, induced by charge separation, in opposing the motion of the electrons was moderate. Second, temperature sensitivity of Cu K{sub {alpha}} imaging efficiency using a spherical Bragg reflecting crystal is investigated. It was found that due to the shifting and broadening of the K{sub {alpha}} line, with increasing temperature, both the brightness and the pattern of K{sub {alpha}} intensity are affected. Finally, x-ray spectroscopy of a 500 J 0.7 ps laser-solid interactions showed the formation of a hot surface layer({approx} 1 {micro}m) at the front of the target. PIC simulations confirm surface heating.

  2. Hot-spot mix in ignition-scale implosions on the NIF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Regan, S. P.; Epstein, R.; McCrory, R. L.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Hammel, B. A.; Suter, L. J.; Ralph, J.; Scott, H.; Barrios, M. A.; Bradley, D. K.; Callahan, D. A.; Cerjan, C.; Collins, G. W.; Dixit, S. N.; Doeppner, T.; Edwards, M. J.; Farley, D. R.; Glenn, S.; Glenzer, S. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Ignition of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target depends on the formation of a central hot spot with sufficient temperature and areal density. Radiative and conductive losses from the hot spot can be enhanced by hydrodynamic instabilities. The concentric spherical layers of current National Ignition Facility (NIF) ignition targets consist of a plastic ablator surrounding a thin shell of cryogenic thermonuclear fuel (i.e., hydrogen isotopes), with fuel vapor filling the interior volume [S. W. Haan et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 051001 (2011)]. The Rev. 5 ablator is doped with Ge to minimize preheat of the ablator closest to the DT ice caused by Au M-band emission from the hohlraum x-ray drive [D. S. Clark et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 052703 (2010)]. Richtmyer-Meshkov and Rayleigh-Taylor hydrodynamic instabilities seeded by high-mode () ablator-surface perturbations can cause Ge-doped ablator to mix into the interior of the shell at the end of the acceleration phase [B. A. Hammel et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 056310 (2011)]. As the shell decelerates, it compresses the fuel vapor, forming a hot spot. K-shell line emission from the ionized Ge that has penetrated into the hot spot provides an experimental signature of hot-spot mix. The Ge emission from tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) and deuterium-tritium (DT) cryogenic targets and gas-filled plastic-shell capsules, which replace the THD layer with a mass-equivalent CH layer, was examined. The inferred amount of hot-spot-mix mass, estimated from the Ge K-shell line brightness using a detailed atomic physics code [J. J. MacFarlane et al., High Energy Density Phys. 3, 181 (2006)], is typically below the 75-ng allowance for hot-spot mix [S. W. Haan et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 051001 (2011)]. Predictions of a simple mix model, based on linear growth of the measured surface-mass modulations, are consistent with the experimental results.

  3. New photon science and extreme field physics: volumetric interaction of ultra-intense laser pulses with over-dense targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hegelich, Bjorn M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The constantly improving capabilities of ultra-high power lasers are enabling interactions of matter with ever extremer fields. As both the on target intensity and the laser contrast are increasing, new physics regimes are becoming accessible and new effects materialize, which in turn enable a host of applications. A first example is the realization of interactions in the transparent-overdense regime (TOR), which is reached by interacting a highly relativistic (a{sub 0} > 10), ultra high contrast laser pulse with a solid density, nanometer target. Here, a still overdense target is turned transparent to the laser by the relativistic mass increase of the electrons, increasing the skin depth beyond the target thickness and thus enabling volumetric interaction of the laser with the entire target instead of only a small interaction region at the critical density surface. This increases the energy coupling, enabling a range of effects, including relativistic optics and pulse shaping, mono-energetic electron acceleration, highly efficient ion acceleration in the break-out afterburner regime, the generation of relativistic and forward directed surface harmonics. In this talk we will show the theoretical framework for this regime, explored by multi-D, high resolution and high density PIC simulations as well as analytic theory and present measurements and experimental demonstrations of direct relativistic optics, relativistic HHG, electron acceleration, and BOA ion acceleration in the transparent overdense regime. These effects can in turn be used in a host of applications including laser pulse shaping, ICF diagnostics, coherent x-ray sources, and ion sources for fast ignition (IFI), homeland security applications and medical therapy. This host of applications already makes transparent-overdense regime one of general interest, a situation reinforced by the fact that the TOR target undergoes an extremely wide HEDP parameter space during interaction ranging from WDM conditions (e.g . brown dwarfs) early in the interaction to extremely high energy densities of {approx}10{sup 11} J/cm{sup 3} at peak, dropping back to the underdense but extremely hot parameter range of gamma-ray bursts. Furthermore, whereas today this regime can only be accessed on very few dedicated facilities, employing special targets and pulse cleaning technology, the next generation of laser facilities like RAL-10PW, ELI, or Gekko-Exa will operate in this regime by default, turning its understanding in a necessity rather than a curiosity.

  4. A Concept Exploration Program in Fast Ignition Inertial Fusion — Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephens, Richarad Burnite [General Atomics] [General Atomics; Freeman, Richard R. [The Ohio State University] [The Ohio State University; Van Woekom, L. D. [The Ohio State University] [The Ohio State University; Key, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; MacKinnon, Andrew J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory] [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Wei, Mingsheng [General Atomics] [General Atomics

    2014-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fast Ignition (FI) approach to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) holds particular promise for fusion energy because the independently generated compression and ignition pulses allow ignition with less compression, resulting in (potentially) higher gain. Exploiting this concept effectively requires an understanding of the transport of electrons in prototypical geometries and at relevant densities and temperatures. Our consortium, which included General Atomics (GA), The Ohio State University (OSU), the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), University of California, Davis (UC-Davis), and Princeton University under this grant (~$850K/yr) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) under a companion grant, won awards in 2000, renewed in 2005, to investigate the physics of electron injection and transport relevant to the FI concept, which is crucial to understand electron transport in integral FI targets. In the last two years we have also been preparing diagnostics and starting to extend the work to electron transport into hot targets. A complementary effort, the Advanced Concept Exploration (ACE) program for Fast Ignition, was funded starting in 2006 to integrate this understanding into ignition schemes specifically suitable for the initial fast ignition attempts on OMEGA and National Ignition Facility (NIF), and during that time these two programs have been managed as a coordinated effort. This result of our 7+ years of effort has been substantial. Utilizing collaborations to access the most capable laser facilities around the world, we have developed an understanding that was summarized in a Fusion Science & Technology 2006, Special Issue on Fast Ignition. The author lists in the 20 articles in that issue are dominated by our group (we are first authors in four of them). Our group has published, or submitted 67 articles, including 1 in Nature, 2 Nature Physics, 10 Physical Review Letters, 8 Review of Scientific Instruments, and has been invited to give numerous talks at national and international conferences (including APS-DPP, IAEA, FIW). The advent of PW capabilities – at Rutherford Appleton Lab (UK) and then at Titan (LLNL) (2005 and 2006, respectively), was a major step toward experiments in ultra-high intensity high-energy FI relevant regime. The next step comes with the activation of OMEGA EP at LLE, followed shortly by NIF-ARC at LLNL. These capabilities allow production of hot dense material for electron transport studies. In this transitional period, considerable effort has been spent in developing the necessary tools and experiments for electron transport in hot and dense plasmas. In addition, substantial new data on electron generation and transport in metallic targets has been produced and analyzed. Progress in FI detailed in §2 is related to the Concept Exploration Program (CEP) objectives; this section is a summary of the publications and presentations listed in §5. This work has benefited from the synergy with work on related Department of Energy (DOE) grants, the Fusion Science Center and the Fast Ignition Advanced Concept Exploration grant, and from our interactions with overseas colleagues, primarily at Rutherford Appleton Laboratory in the UK, and the Institute for Laser Engineering in Japan.

  5. Proposed Laser-Based HED physics experiments for Stockpile Stewardship

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benage, John F. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Albright, Brian J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fernandez, Juan C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An analysis of the scientific areas in High Energy Density (HED) physics that underpin the enduring LANL mission in Stockpile Stewardship (SS) has identified important research needs that are not being met. That analysis has included the work done as part of defining the mission need for the High Intensity Laser Laboratory (HILL) LANL proposal to NNSA, LDRD DR proposal evaluations, and consideration of the Predictive Capability Framework and LANL NNSA milestones. From that evaluation, we have identified several specific and scientifically-exciting experimental concepts to address those needs. These experiments are particularly responsive to physics issues in Campaigns 1 and 10. These experiments are best done initially at the LANL Trident facility, often relying on the unique capabilities available there, although there are typically meritorious extensions envisioned at future facilities such as HILL, or the NIF once the ARC short-pulse laser is available at sufficient laser intensity. As the focus of the LANL HEDP effort broadens from ICF ignition of the point design at the conclusion of the National Ignition Campaign, into a more SS-centric effort, it is useful to consider these experiments, which address well-defined issues, with specific scientific hypothesis to test or models to validate or disprove, via unit-physics experiments. These experiments are in turn representative of a possible broad experimental portfolio to elucidate the physics of interest to these campaigns. These experiments, described below, include: (1) First direct measurement of the evolution of particulates in isochorically heated dense plasma; (2) Temperature relaxation measurements in a strongly-coupled plasma; (3) Viscosity measurements in a dense plasma; and (4) Ionic structure factors in a dense plasma. All these experiments address scientific topics of importance to our sponsors, involve excellent science at the boundaries of traditional fields, utilize unique capabilities at LANL, and contribute to the Campaign milestone in 2018. Given their interdisciplinary nature, it is not surprising that these research needs are not being addressed by the other excellent high-energy density physics (HEDP) facilities coming on line, facilities aimed squarely at more established fields and missions. Although energy rich, these facilities deliver radiation (e.g., particle beams for isochoric heating) over a timescale that is too slow in these unit physics experiments to eliminate hydrodynamic evolution of the target plasma during the time it is being created. A theme shared by all of these experiments is the need to quickly create a quasi-homogeneous 'initial state' whose properties and evolution we wish to study. Otherwise, we cannot create unit experiments to isolate the physics of interest and validate the models in our codes, something that cannot be done with the integrated experiments often done in HED. Moreover, these experiments in some cases involve combinations of solid and plasmas, or matter in the warm-dense matter state, where neither the theoretical approximations of solid state or of fully-ionized weakly-coupled plasmas can be used. In all cases, the capability of 'isochoric heating' ('flash' heating at constant density) is important. In some cases, the ability to selectively heat to different degrees different species within a target, whether mixed or adjacent to each other, is critical for the experiment. This capability requires the delivery of very high power densities, which require the conversion of the laser into very short and intense pulses of secondary radiation (electrons, ions, neutrons, x-rays). Otherwise, there is no possibility of a clean experiment to constrain the models, in the cases there are any, or inform the creation of one. Another typical requirement of these experiments is the ability to probe these exotic extreme conditions of matter with flexible and diverse sources of secondary radiation. Without a high-intensity high-power laser with some unique attributes available on Trident today (e.g., ultra-high laser-puls

  6. Renewable Energy and Efficiency Modeling Analysis Partnership: An Analysis of How Different Energy Models Addressed a Common High Renewable Energy Penetration Scenario in 2025

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blair, N.; Jenkin, T.; Milford, J.; Short, W.; Sullivan, P.; Evans, D.; Lieberman, E.; Goldstein, G.; Wright, E.; Jayaraman, K.; Venkatech, B.; Kleiman, G.; Namovicz, C.; Smith, B.; Palmer, K.; Wiser, R.; Wood, F.

    2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The Renewable Energy and Efficiency Modeling and Analysis Partnership (REMAP) sponsors ongoing workshops to discuss individual 'renewable' technologies, energy/economic modeling, and - to some extent - policy issues related to renewable energy. Since 2002, the group has organized seven workshops, each focusing on a different renewable technology (geothermal, solar, wind, etc.). These workshops originated and continue to be run under an informal partnership of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and the American Council on Renewable Energy (ACORE). EPA originally funded the activities, but support is now shared between EPA and EERE. REMAP has a wide range of participating analysts and models/modelers that come from government, the private sector, and academia. Modelers include staff from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE), NREL, EPA, Resources for the Future (RFF), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Northeast States for Coordinated Air Use Management (NESCAUM), Regional Economic Models Inc. (REMI), ICF International, OnLocation Inc., and Boston University. The working group has more than 40 members, which also includes representatives from DOE, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS), Massachusetts Renewable Energy Trust, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), and ACORE. This report summarizes the activities and findings of the REMAP activity that started in late 2006 with a kickoff meeting, and concluded in mid-2008 with presentations of final results. As the project evolved, the group compared results across models and across technologies rather than just examining a specific technology or activity. The overall goal was to better understand how and why different energy models give similar and/or different answers in response to a set of focused energy-related questions. The focus was on understanding reasons for model differences, not on policy implications, even though a policy of high renewable penetration was used for the analysis. A group process was used to identify the potential question (or questions) to be addressed through the project. In late 2006, increasing renewable energy penetration in the electricity sector was chosen from among several options as the general policy to model. From this framework, the analysts chose a renewable portfolio standard (RPS) as the way to implement the required renewable energy market penetration in the models. An RPS was chosen because it was (i) of interest and represented the group's consensus choice, and (ii) tractable and not too burdensome for the modelers. Because the modelers and analysts were largely using their own resources, it was important to consider the degree of effort required. In fact, several of the modelers who started this process had to discontinue participation because of other demands on their time. Federal and state RPS policy is an area of active political interest and debate. Recognizing this, participants used this exercise to gain insight into energy model structure and performance. The results are not intended to provide any particular insight into policy design or be used for policy advocacy, and participants are not expected to form a policy stance based on the outcomes of the modeling. The goals of this REMAP project - in terms of the main topic of renewable penetration - were to: (1) Compare models and understand why they may give different results to the same question, (2) Improve the rigor and consistency of assumptions used across models, and (3) Evaluate the ability of models to measure the impacts of high renewable-penetration scenarios.

  7. Advanced Concept Exploration for Fast Ignition Science Program, Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephens, Richard Burnite [General Atomics; McLean, Harry M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Theobald, Wolfgang [Laboratory for Laser Energetics; Akli, Kramer U. [The Ohio State University; Beg, Farhat N. [University of California, San Diego; Sentoku, Yasuhiko [University of Nevada, Reno; Schumacher, Douglass W. [The Ohio State University; Wei, Mingsheng [General Atomics

    2013-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fast Ignition (FI) Concept for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) has the potential to provide a significant advance in the technical attractiveness of Inertial Fusion Energy reactors. FI differs from conventional “central hot spot” (CHS) target ignition by decoupling compression from heating: using a laser (or heavy ion beam or Z pinch) drive pulse (10’s of nanoseconds) to create a dense fuel and a second, much shorter (~10 picoseconds) high intensity pulse to ignite a small volume within the dense fuel. The physics of fast ignition process was the focus of our Advanced Concept Exploration (ACE) program. Ignition depends critically on two major issues involving Relativistic High Energy Density (RHED) physics: The laser-induced creation of fast electrons and their propagation in high-density plasmas. Our program has developed new experimental platforms, diagnostic packages, computer modeling analyses, and taken advantage of the increasing energy available at laser facilities to advance understanding of the fundamental physics underlying these issues. Our program had three thrust areas: • Understand the production and characteristics of fast electrons resulting from FI relevant laser-plasma interactions and their dependence on laser prepulse and laser pulse length. • Investigate the subsequent fast electron transport in solid and through hot (FI-relevant) plasmas. • Conduct and understand integrated core-heating experiments by comparison to simulations. Over the whole period of this project (three years for this contract), we have greatly advanced our fundamental understanding of the underlying properties in all three areas: • Comprehensive studies on fast electron source characteristics have shown that they are controlled by the laser intensity distribution and the topology and plasma density gradient. Laser pre-pulse induced pre-plasma in front of a solid surface results in increased stand-off distances from the electron origin to the high density target as well as large and erratic spread of the electron beam with increasing short pulse duration. We have demonstrated, using newly available higher contrast lasers, an improved energy coupling, painting a promising picture for FI feasibility. • Our detailed experiments and analyses of fast electron transport dependence on target material have shown that it is feasible to collimate fast electron beam by self-generated resistive magnetic fields in engineered targets with a rather simple geometry. Stable and collimated electron beam with spot size as small as 50-?m after >100-?m propagation distance (an angular divergence angle of 20°!) in solid density plasma targets has been demonstrated with FI-relevant (10-ps, >1-kJ) laser pulses Such collimated beam would meet the required heating beam size for FI. • Our new experimental platforms developed for the OMEGA laser (i.e., i) high resolution 8 keV backlighter platform for cone-in-shell implosion and ii) the 8 keV imaging with Cu-doped shell targets for detailed transport characterization) have enabled us to experimentally confirm fuel assembly from cone-in-shell implosion with record-high areal density. We have also made the first direct measurement of fast electron transport and spatial energy deposition in integrated FI experiments enabling the first experiment-based benchmarking of integrated simulation codes. Executing this program required a large team. It was managed as a collaboration between General Atomics (GA), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). GA fulfills its responsibilities jointly with the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), The Ohio State University (OSU) and the University of Nevada at Reno (UNR). The division of responsibility was as follows: (1) LLE had primary leadership for channeling studies and the integrated energy transfer, (2) LLNL led the development of measurement methods, analysis, and deployment of diagnostics, and (3) GA together with UCSD, OSU and UNR studied the detailed energy-transfer physics. Th

  8. Final Project Report "Advanced Concept Exploration For Fast Ignition Science Program"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STEPHENS, Richard B.; McLEAN, Harry M.; THEOBALD, Wolfgang; AKLI, Kramer; BEG, Farhat N.; SENTOKU, Yasuiko; SCHUMACHER, Douglas; WEI, Mingsheng S.

    2014-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fast Ignition (FI) Concept for Inertial Confinement Fusion has the potential to provide a significant advance in the technical attractiveness of Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) reactors. FI differs from conventional “central hot spot” (CHS) target ignition by decoupling compression from heating: using the laser (or heavy ion beam or Z pinch) drive pulse (10’s of ns) to create a dense fuel and a second, much shorter (~10 ps) high intensity pulse to ignite a small region of it. There are two major physics issues concerning this concept; controlling the laser-induced generation of large electron currents and their propagation through high density plasmas. This project has addressed these two significant scientific issues in Relativistic High Energy Density (RHED) physics. Learning to control relativistic laser matter interaction (and the limits and potential thereof) will enable a wide range of applications. While these physics issues are of specific interest to inertial fusion energy science, they are also important for a wide range of other HED phenomena, including high energy ion beam generation, isochoric heating of materials, and the development of high brightness x-ray sources. Generating, controlling, and understanding the extreme conditions needed to advance this science has proved to be challenging: Our studies have pushed the boundaries of physics understanding and are at the very limits of experimental, diagnostic, and simulation capabilities in high energy density laboratory physics (HEDLP). Our research strategy has been based on pursuing the fundamental physics underlying the Fast Ignition (FI) concept. We have performed comprehensive study of electron generation and transport in fast-ignition targets with experiments, theory, and numerical modeling. A major issue is that the electrons produced in these experiments cannot be measured directly—only effects due to their transport. We focused mainly on x-ray continuum photons from bremsstrahlung and x-ray line radiation from K-shell fluorescence. Integrated experiments, which combine target compression with short-pulse laser heating, yield additional information on target heating efficiency. This indirect way of studying the underlying behavior of the electrons must be validated with computational modeling to understand the physics and improve the design. This program execution required a large, well-organized team and it was managed by a joint Collaboration between General Atomics (GA), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). The Collaboration was formed 8 years ago to understand the physics issues of the Fast Ignition concept, building on the strengths of each partner. GA fulfills its responsibilities jointly with the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), The Ohio State University (OSU) and the University of Nevada at Reno (UNR). Since RHED physics is pursued vigorously in many countries, international researchers have been an important part of our efforts to make progress. The division of responsibility was as follows: (1) LLE had primary leadership for channeling studies and the integrated energy transfer, (2) LLNL led the development of measurement methods, analysis, and deployment of diagnostics, and (3) GA together with UCSD, OSU and UNR studied the detailed energy-transfer physics. The experimental program was carried out using the Titan laser at the Jupiter Laser Facility at LLNL, the OMEGA and OMEGA EP lasers at LLE and the Texas Petawatt laser (TPW) at UT Austin. Modeling has been pursued on large computing facilities at LLNL, OSU, and UCSD using codes developed (by us and others) within the HEDLP program, commercial codes, and by leveraging existing supercomputer codes developed by the NNSA ICF program. This Consortium brought together all the components—resources, facilities, and personnel—necessary to accomplish its aggressive goals. The ACE Program has been strongly collaborative, taking advantage of the expertise of the participating institutions to provide a research effort

  9. AVTA Federal Fleet PEV Readiness Data Logging and Characterization Study for the National Park Service: Fort Vancouver National Historic Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Schey; Jim Francfort

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, managing and operating contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory, is the lead laboratory for the U.S. Department of Energy’s Advanced Vehicle Testing. Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC contracted with Intertek Testing Services, North America (ITSNA) to collect data on federal fleet operations as part of the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity’s Federal Fleet Vehicle Data Logging and Characterization study. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity study seeks to collect data to validate the use of advanced electric drive vehicle transportation. This report focuses on the Fort Vancouver National Historic Site (FVNHS) fleet to identify daily operational characteristics of select vehicles and report findings on vehicle and mission characterizations to support the successful introduction of electric vehicles (EVs) into the agencies’ fleet. Individual observations of the selected vehicles provided the basis for recommendations related to EV adoption and whether a battery electric vehicle (BEV) or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) (collectively plug-in electric vehicles) could fulfill the mission requirements. FVNHS identified three vehicles in its fleet for consideration. While the FVNHS vehicles conduct many different missions, only two (i.e., support and pool missions) were selected by agency management to be part of this fleet evaluation. The logged vehicles included a pickup truck and a minivan. This report will show that BEVs and PHEVs are capable of performing the required missions and providing an alternative vehicle for both mission categories, because each has sufficient range for individual trips and time available each day for charging to accommodate multiple trips per day. These charging events could occur at the vehicle’s home base, high-use work areas, or in intermediate areas along routes that the vehicles frequently travel. Replacement of vehicles in the current fleet would result in significant reductions in emission of greenhouse gases and petroleum use, while also reducing fuel costs. The Vancouver, Washington area and neighboring Portland, Oregon are leaders in adoption of PEVs in the United States1. PEV charging stations, or more appropriately identified as electric vehicle supply equipment, located on the FVNHS facility would be a benefit for both FVNHS fleets and general public use. Fleet drivers and park visitors operating privately owned plug-in electric vehicles benefit by using the charging infrastructure. ITSNA recommends location analysis of the FVNHS site to identify the optimal station placement for electric vehicle supply equipment. ITSNA recognizes the support of Idaho National Laboratory and ICF International for their efforts to initiate communication with the National Parks Service and FVNHS for participation in this study. ITSNA is pleased to provide this report and is encouraged by the high interest and support from the National Park Service and FVNHS personnel

  10. Westinghouse Hanford Company health and safety performance report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rogers, L.

    1996-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Topping the list of WHC Safety recognition during this reporting period is a commendation received from the National Safety Council (NSC). The NSC bestowed their Award of Honor upon WHC for significant reduction of incidence rates during CY 1995. The award is based upon a reduction of 48 % or greater in cases involving days away from work, a 30 % or greater reduction in the number of days away, and a 15% or greater reduction in the total number of occupational injuries and illnesses. (page 2-1). A DOE-HQ review team representing the Office of Envirorunent, Safety and Health (EH), visited the Hanford Site during several weeks of the quarter. Ile 40-member Safety Management Evaluation Team (SMET) assessed WHC in the areas of management responsibility, comprehensive requirements, and competence commensurate with responsibility. As part of their new approach to oversight, they focused on the existence of management systems and programs (comparable approach to VPP). Plant/project areas selected for review within WHC were PFP, B Plant/WESF, Tank Farms, and K-Basins (page 2-2). Effective safety meetings, prejob safety meetings, etc., are a cornerstone of any successful safety program. In an effort to improve the reporting of safety meetings, the Safety/Security Meeting Report form was revised. It now provides a mechanism for recording and tracking safety issues (page 2-4). WHC has experienced an increase in the occupational injury and illness incidence rates during the first quarter of CY 1996. Trends show this increase can be partially attributed to inattention to workplace activities due 0999to the uncertainty Hanford employees currently face with recent reduction of force, reorganization, and reengineering efforts (page 2-7). The cumulative CY 1995 lost/restricted workday case incidence rate for the first quarter of CY 1996 (1.28) is 25% below the DOE CY 1991-93 average (1.70). However, the incidence rate increased 24% from the CY 1995 rate of 1.03 (page 2-8). The reengineering of the Radiological Control organization has resulted in an increase in the availability of personnel to help facilities with the procurement and use of practical ALARA measures. In addition, there seems to be more awareness of the need to use ALARA, resulting in a significant increase in the number of calls received by the ALARA Program Office for help in solving radiological problems (page 1-3). The Figure 3-2-1 chart data includes WHC, BCSR, and ICF KH employee exposure. The first quarter CY 1996 results represent the exposure of 1,913 quarterly-badged employees and an average of 846 monthly-badged employees. There were three instances of potential loss of contamination control during the calendar quarter involving three workers where internal dosimetry follow-up was performed. No intakes of contamination were detected (page 3-6). There were five skin contaminations and 18 clothing contaminations reported during this quarter in all WHC-managed facilities/areas. This represents an improvement in performance compared to the first quarter of CY 1995 (page 3-9). A monthly average of 76 Radiological Problem Reports (RPR) was issued during the first quarter of CY 1996 for a total issuance of 227 RPRS. The monthly average for the same quarter in CY 1995 was 76; a total of 228 for the quarter (Figure 3-5-1). At the end of March, WHC Dosimetry was monitoring the following employees/sub- contractors: 631 monthly standard dosimeters, 251 monthly combination dosimeters, 1,386 quarterly standard dosimeters, 472 quarterly combination dosimeters, and 3,716 annual dosimeters. During this period, Dosimetry had 987 requests for changes to the frequency, and terminated 731 dosimetry records.

  11. AVTA Federal Fleet PEV Readiness Data Logging and Characterization Study for the National Park Service: Golden Gate National Recreation Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Schey; Jim Francfort

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC, managing and operating contractor for the U.S. Department of Energy's Idaho National Laboratory, is the lead laboratory for U.S. Department of Energy Advanced Vehicle Testing. Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC contracted with Intertek Testing Services, North America (ITSNA) to collect data on federal fleet operations as part of the Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity's Federal Fleet Vehicle Data Logging and Characterization study. The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity study seeks to collect data to validate the utilization of advanced electric drive vehicle transportation. This report focuses on the Golden Gate National Recreation Area (GGNRA) fleet to identify daily operational characteristics of select vehicles and report findings on vehicle and mission characterizations to support the successful introduction of plug-in electric vehicles (PEVs) into the agencies' fleets. Individual observations of these selected vehicles provide the basis for recommendations related to electric vehicle adoption and whether a battery electric vehicle or plug-in hybrid electric vehicle (PHEV) (collectively PEVs) can fulfill the mission requirements. GGNRA identified 182 vehicles in its fleet, which are under the management of the U.S. General Services Administration. Fleet vehicle mission categories are defined in Section 4, and while the GGNRA vehicles conduct many different missions, only two (i.e., support and law enforcement missions) were selected by agency management to be part of this fleet evaluation. The selected vehicles included sedans, trucks, and sport-utility vehicles. This report will show that battery electric vehicles and/or PHEVs are capable of performing the required missions and providing an alternative vehicle for support vehicles and PHEVs provide the same for law enforcement, because each has a sufficient range for individual trips and time is available each day for charging to accommodate multiple trips per day. These charging events could occur at the vehicle home base, high-use work areas, or intermediately along routes that the vehicles frequently travel. Replacement of vehicles in the current fleet would result in significant reductions in the emission of greenhouse gases and petroleum use, while also reducing fuel costs. The San Francisco Bay Area is a leader in the adoption of PEVs in the United States. PEV charging stations, or more appropriately identified as electric vehicle supply equipment, located on the GGNRA facility would be a benefit for both GGNRA fleets and general public use. Fleet drivers and park visitors operating privately owned PEVs benefit by using the charging infrastructure. ITSNA recommends location analysis of the GGNRA site to identify the optimal placement of the electric vehicle supply equipment station. ITSNA recognizes the support of Idaho National Laboratory and ICF International for their efforts to initiate communication with the National Parks Service and GGNRA for participation in the study. ITSNA is pleased to provide this report and is encouraged by the high interest and support from the National Park Service and GGNRA personnel.

  12. Recyclable transmission line (RTL) and linear transformer driver (LTD) development for Z-pinch inertial fusion energy (Z-IFE) and high yield.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharpe, Robin Arthur; Kingsep, Alexander S. (Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia); Smith, David Lewis; Olson, Craig Lee; Ottinger, Paul F. (Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC); Schumer, Joseph Wade (Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC); Welch, Dale Robert (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Kim, Alexander (High Currents Institute, Tomsk, Russia); Kulcinski, Gerald L. (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Kammer, Daniel C. (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Rose, David Vincent (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Nedoseev, Sergei L. (Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia); Pointon, Timothy David; Smirnov, Valentin P. (Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia); Turgeon, Matthew C.; Kalinin, Yuri G. (Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia); Bruner, Nichelle "Nicki" (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Barkey, Mark E. (University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL); Guthrie, Michael (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Thoma, Carsten (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Genoni, Tom C. (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Langston, William L.; Fowler, William E.; Mazarakis, Michael Gerrassimos

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Z-Pinch Inertial Fusion Energy (Z-IFE) complements and extends the single-shot z-pinch fusion program on Z to a repetitive, high-yield, power plant scenario that can be used for the production of electricity, transmutation of nuclear waste, and hydrogen production, all with no CO{sub 2} production and no long-lived radioactive nuclear waste. The Z-IFE concept uses a Linear Transformer Driver (LTD) accelerator, and a Recyclable Transmission Line (RTL) to connect the LTD driver to a high-yield fusion target inside a thick-liquid-wall power plant chamber. Results of RTL and LTD research are reported here, that include: (1) The key physics issues for RTLs involve the power flow at the high linear current densities that occur near the target (up to 5 MA/cm). These issues include surface heating, melting, ablation, plasma formation, electron flow, magnetic insulation, conductivity changes, magnetic field diffusion changes, possible ion flow, and RTL mass motion. These issues are studied theoretically, computationally (with the ALEGRA and LSP codes), and will work at 5 MA/cm or higher, with anode-cathode gaps as small as 2 mm. (2) An RTL misalignment sensitivity study has been performed using a 3D circuit model. Results show very small load current variations for significant RTL misalignments. (3) The key structural issues for RTLs involve optimizing the RTL strength (varying shape, ribs, etc.) while minimizing the RTL mass. Optimization studies show RTL mass reductions by factors of three or more. (4) Fabrication and pressure testing of Z-PoP (Proof-of-Principle) size RTLs are successfully reported here. (5) Modeling of the effect of initial RTL imperfections on the buckling pressure has been performed. Results show that the curved RTL offers a much greater buckling pressure as well as less sensitivity to imperfections than three other RTL designs. (6) Repetitive operation of a 0.5 MA, 100 kV, 100 ns, LTD cavity with gas purging between shots and automated operation is demonstrated at the SNL Z-IFE LTD laboratory with rep-rates up to 10.3 seconds between shots (this is essentially at the goal of 10 seconds for Z-IFE). (7) A single LTD switch at Tomsk was fired repetitively every 12 seconds for 36,000 shots with no failures. (8) Five 1.0 MA, 100 kV, 100 ns, LTD cavities have been combined into a voltage adder configuration with a test load to successfully study the system operation. (9) The combination of multiple LTD coaxial lines into a tri-plate transmission line is examined. The 3D Quicksilver code is used to study the electron flow losses produced near the magnetic nulls that occur where coax LTD lines are added together. (10) Circuit model codes are used to model the complete power flow circuit with an inductive isolator cavity. (11) LTD architectures are presented for drivers for Z-IFE and high yield. A 60 MA LTD driver and a 90 MA LTD driver are proposed. Present results from all of these power flow studies validate the whole LTD/RTL concept for single-shot ICF high yield, and for repetitive-shot IFE.

  13. Simulations of Turbulent Flows with Strong Shocks and Density Variations: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanjiva Lele

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The target of this SciDAC Science Application was to develop a new capability based on high-order and high-resolution schemes to simulate shock-turbulence interactions and multi-material mixing in planar and spherical geometries, and to study Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov turbulent mixing. These fundamental problems have direct application in high-speed engineering flows, such as inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsule implosions and scramjet combustion, and also in the natural occurrence of supernovae explosions. Another component of this project was the development of subgrid-scale (SGS) models for large-eddy simulations of flows involving shock-turbulence interaction and multi-material mixing, that were to be validated with the DNS databases generated during the program. The numerical codes developed are designed for massively-parallel computer architectures, ensuring good scaling performance. Their algorithms were validated by means of a sequence of benchmark problems. The original multi-stage plan for this five-year project included the following milestones: 1) refinement of numerical algorithms for application to the shock-turbulence interaction problem and multi-material mixing (years 1-2); 2) direct numerical simulations (DNS) of canonical shock-turbulence interaction (years 2-3), targeted at improving our understanding of the physics behind the combined two phenomena and also at guiding the development of SGS models; 3) large-eddy simulations (LES) of shock-turbulence interaction (years 3-5), improving SGS models based on the DNS obtained in the previous phase; 4) DNS of planar/spherical RM multi-material mixing (years 3-5), also with the two-fold objective of gaining insight into the relevant physics of this instability and aiding in devising new modeling strategies for multi-material mixing; 5) LES of planar/spherical RM mixing (years 4-5), integrating the improved SGS and multi-material models developed in stages 3 and 5. This final report is outlined as follows. Section 2 shows an assessment of numerical algorithms that are best suited for the numerical simulation of compressible flows involving turbulence and shock phenomena. Sections 3 and 4 deal with the canonical shock-turbulence interaction problem, from the DNS and LES perspectives, respectively. Section 5 considers the shock-turbulence inter-action in spherical geometry, in particular, the interaction of a converging shock with isotropic turbulence as well as the problem of the blast wave. Section 6 describes the study of shock-accelerated mixing through planar and spherical Richtmyer-Meshkov mixing as well as the shock-curtain interaction problem In section 7 we acknowledge the different interactions between Stanford and other institutions participating in this SciDAC project, as well as several external collaborations made possible through it. Section 8 presents a list of publications and presentations that have been generated during the course of this SciDAC project. Finally, section 9 concludes this report with the list of personnel at Stanford University funded by this SciDAC project.

  14. Ion Fast Ignition-Establishing a Scientific Basis for Inertial Fusion Energy --- Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephens, Richard Burnite [General Atomics; Foord, Mark N. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory; Wei, Mingsheng [General Atomics; Beg, Farhat N. [University of California, San Diego; Schumacher, Douglass W. [The Ohio State University

    2013-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The Fast Ignition (FI) Concept for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) has the potential to provide a significant advance in the technical attractiveness of Inertial Fusion Energy reactors. FI differs from conventional ?central hot spot? (CHS) target ignition by decoupling compression from heating: using a laser (or heavy ion beam or Z pinch) drive pulse (10?s of nanoseconds) to create a dense fuel and a second, much shorter (~10 picoseconds) high intensity pulse to ignite a small volume within the dense fuel. The compressed fuel is opaque to laser light. The ignition laser energy must be converted to a jet of energetic charged particles to deposit energy in the dense fuel. The original concept called for a spray of laser-generated hot electrons to deliver the energy; lack of ability to focus the electrons put great weight on minimizing the electron path. An alternative concept, proton-ignited FI, used those electrons as intermediaries to create a jet of protons that could be focused to the ignition spot from a more convenient distance. Our program focused on the generation and directing of the proton jet, and its transport toward the fuel, none of which were well understood at the onset of our program. We have developed new experimental platforms, diagnostic packages, computer modeling analyses, and taken advantage of the increasing energy available at laser facilities to create a self-consistent understanding of the fundamental physics underlying these issues. Our strategy was to examine the new physics emerging as we added the complexity necessary to use proton beams in an inertial fusion energy (IFE) application. From the starting point of a proton beam accelerated from a flat, isolated foil, we 1) curved it to focus the beam, 2) attached the foil to a superstructure, 3) added a side sheath to protect it from the surrounding plasma, and finally 4) studied the proton beam behavior as it passed through a protective end cap into plasma. We built up, as we proceeded, a self-consistent picture of the quasi-neutral plasma jet that is the proton beam that, for the first time, included the role of the hot electrons in shaping the jet. Controlling them?through design of the accelerating surface and its connection to the surrounding superstructure?is critical; their uniform spread across the proton accelerating area is vital, but their presence in the jet opposes focus; their electron flow away from the acceleration area reduces conversion efficiency but can also increase focusing ability. The understanding emerging from our work and the improved simulation tools we have developed allow designing structures that optimize proton beams for focused heating. Our findings include: ? The achievable focus of proton beams is limited by the thermal pressure gradient in the laser-generated hot electrons that drive the process. This bending can be suppressed using a controlled flow of hot electrons along the surrounding cone wall, which induces a local transverse focusing sheath electric field. The resultant (vacuum-focused) spot can meet IFE requirements. ? Confinement of laser-generated electrons to the proton accelerating area can be achieved by supporting targets on thin struts. That increases laser-to-proton conversion energy by ~50%. As noted above, confinement should not be total; necessary hot-electron leakage into the surrounding superstructure for proton focusing can be controlled by with the strut width/number. ? Proton jets are further modified as they enter the fuel through the superstructure?s end cap. They can generate currents during that transit that further focus the proton beams. We developed a new ion stopping module for LSP code that properly accounted for changes in stopping power with ionization (e.g. temperature), and will be using it in future studies. The improved understanding, new experimental platforms, and the self-consistent modeling capability allow researchers a new ability to investigate the interaction of large ion currents with warm dense matter. That is of direct importance to the creation and investiga

  15. The Complete Burning of Weapons Grade Plutonium and Highly Enriched Uranium with (Laser Inertial Fusion-Fission Energy) LIFE Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, J C; Diaz de la Rubia, T; Moses, E

    2008-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) project, a laser-based Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiment designed to achieve thermonuclear fusion ignition and burn in the laboratory, is under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and will be completed in April of 2009. Experiments designed to accomplish the NIF's goal will commence in late FY2010 utilizing laser energies of 1 to 1.3 MJ. Fusion yields of the order of 10 to 20 MJ are expected soon thereafter. Laser initiated fusion-fission (LIFE) engines have now been designed to produce nuclear power from natural or depleted uranium without isotopic enrichment, and from spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors without chemical separation into weapons-attractive actinide streams. A point-source of high-energy neutrons produced by laser-generated, thermonuclear fusion within a target is used to achieve ultra-deep burn-up of the fertile or fissile fuel in a sub-critical fission blanket. Fertile fuels including depleted uranium (DU), natural uranium (NatU), spent nuclear fuel (SNF), and thorium (Th) can be used. Fissile fuels such as low-enrichment uranium (LEU), excess weapons plutonium (WG-Pu), and excess highly-enriched uranium (HEU) may be used as well. Based upon preliminary analyses, it is believed that LIFE could help meet worldwide electricity needs in a safe and sustainable manner, while drastically shrinking the nation's and world's stockpile of spent nuclear fuel and excess weapons materials. LIFE takes advantage of the significant advances in laser-based inertial confinement fusion that are taking place at the NIF at LLNL where it is expected that thermonuclear ignition will be achieved in the 2010-2011 timeframe. Starting from as little as 300 to 500 MW of fusion power, a single LIFE engine will be able to generate 2000 to 3000 MWt in steady state for periods of years to decades, depending on the nuclear fuel and engine configuration. Because the fission blanket in a fusion-fission hybrid system is subcritical, a LIFE engine can burn any fertile or fissile nuclear material, including unenriched natural or depleted U and SNF, and can extract a very high percentage of the energy content of its fuel resulting in greatly enhanced energy generation per metric ton of nuclear fuel, as well as nuclear waste forms with vastly reduced concentrations of long-lived actinides. LIFE engines could thus provide the ability to generate vast amounts of electricity while greatly reducing the actinide content of any existing or future nuclear waste and extending the availability of low cost nuclear fuels for several thousand years. LIFE also provides an attractive pathway for burning excess weapons Pu to over 99% FIMA (fission of initial metal atoms) without the need for fabricating or reprocessing mixed oxide fuels (MOX). Because of all of these advantages, LIFE engines offer a pathway toward sustainable and safe nuclear power that significantly mitigates nuclear proliferation concerns and minimizes nuclear waste. An important aspect of a LIFE engine is the fact that there is no need to extract the fission fuel from the fission blanket before it is burned to the desired final level. Except for fuel inspection and maintenance process times, the nuclear fuel is always within the core of the reactor and no weapons-attractive materials are available outside at any point in time. However, an important consideration when discussing proliferation concerns associated with any nuclear fuel cycle is the ease with which reactor fuel can be converted to weapons usable materials, not just when it is extracted as waste, but at any point in the fuel cycle. Although the nuclear fuel remains in the core of the engine until ultra deep actinide burn up is achieved, soon after start up of the engine, once the system breeds up to full power, several tons of fissile material is present in the fission blanket. However, this fissile material is widely dispersed in millions of fuel pebbles, which can be tagged as individual accountable items, and thus made difficult to diver

  16. LIFE Materials: Overview of Fuels and Structural Materials Issues Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, J

    2008-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) project, a laser-based Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiment designed to achieve thermonuclear fusion ignition and burn in the laboratory, is under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and will be completed in April of 2009. Experiments designed to accomplish the NIF's goal will commence in late FY2010 utilizing laser energies of 1 to 1.3 MJ. Fusion yields of the order of 10 to 20 MJ are expected soon thereafter. Laser initiated fusion-fission (LIFE) engines have now been designed to produce nuclear power from natural or depleted uranium without isotopic enrichment, and from spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors without chemical separation into weapons-attractive actinide streams. A point-source of high-energy neutrons produced by laser-generated, thermonuclear fusion within a target is used to achieve ultra-deep burn-up of the fertile or fissile fuel in a sub-critical fission blanket. Fertile fuels including depleted uranium (DU), natural uranium (NatU), spent nuclear fuel (SNF), and thorium (Th) can be used. Fissile fuels such as low-enrichment uranium (LEU), excess weapons plutonium (WG-Pu), and excess highly-enriched uranium (HEU) may be used as well. Based upon preliminary analyses, it is believed that LIFE could help meet worldwide electricity needs in a safe and sustainable manner, while drastically shrinking the nation's and world's stockpile of spent nuclear fuel and excess weapons materials. LIFE takes advantage of the significant advances in laser-based inertial confinement fusion that are taking place at the NIF at LLNL where it is expected that thermonuclear ignition will be achieved in the 2010-2011 timeframe. Starting from as little as 300 to 500 MW of fusion power, a single LIFE engine will be able to generate 2000 to 3000 MWt in steady state for periods of years to decades, depending on the nuclear fuel and engine configuration. Because the fission blanket in a fusion-fission hybrid system is subcritical, a LIFE engine can burn any fertile or fissile nuclear material, including un-enriched natural or depleted U and SNF, and can extract a very high percentage of the energy content of its fuel resulting in greatly enhanced energy generation per metric ton of nuclear fuel, as well as nuclear waste forms with vastly reduced concentrations of long-lived actinides. LIFE engines could thus provide the ability to generate vast amounts of electricity while greatly reducing the actinide content of any existing or future nuclear waste and extending the availability of low cost nuclear fuels for several thousand years. LIFE also provides an attractive pathway for burning excess weapons Pu to over 99% FIMA (fission of initial metal atoms) without the need for fabricating or reprocessing mixed oxide fuels (MOX). Because of all of these advantages, LIFE engines offer a pathway toward sustainable and safe nuclear power that significantly mitigates nuclear proliferation concerns and minimizes nuclear waste. An important aspect of a LIFE engine is the fact that there is no need to extract the fission fuel from the fission blanket before it is burned to the desired final level. Except for fuel inspection and maintenance process times, the nuclear fuel is always within the core of the reactor and no weapons-attractive materials are available outside at any point in time. However, an important consideration when discussing proliferation concerns associated with any nuclear fuel cycle is the ease with which reactor fuel can be converted to weapons usable materials, not just when it is extracted as waste, but at any point in the fuel cycle. Although the nuclear fuel remains in the core of the engine until ultra deep actinide burn up is achieved, soon after start up of the engine, once the system breeds up to full power, several tons of fissile material is present in the fission blanket. However, this fissile material is widely dispersed in millions of fuel pebbles, which can be tagged as individual accountable items, and thus made difficult to dive

  17. Unit physics testing of a mix model in an eulerian fluid computation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vold, Erik [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Douglass, Rod [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A K-L turbulence mix model driven with a drag-buoyancy source term is tested in an Eulerian code in a series of basic unit-physics tests, as part of a mix validation milestone. The model and the closure coefficient values are derived in the work of Dimonte-Tipton [D-T] in Phys.Flu.18, 085101 (2006), and many of the test problems were reported there, where the mix model operated in Lagrange computations. The drag-buoyancy K-L mix model was implemented within the Eulerian code framework by A.J. Scannapieco. Mix model performance is evaluated in terms of mix width growth rates compared to experiments in select regimes. Results in our Eulerian code are presented for several unit-physics I-D test problems including the decay of homogeneous isotropic turbulence (HIT), Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) unstable mixing, shock amplification of initial turbulence, Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) mixing in several single shock test cases and in comparison to two RM experiments including re-shock (Vetter-Sturtevant and Poggi, et.al.). Sensitivity to model parameters, to Atwood number, and to initial conditions are examined. Results here are in good agreement in some tests (HIT, RT) with the previous results reported for the mix model in the Lagrange calculations. The HIT turbulent decay agrees closely with analytic expectations, and the RT growth rate matches experimental values for the default values of the model coefficients proposed in [D-T]. Results for RM characterized with a power law growth rate differ from the previous mix model work but are still within the range for reasonable agreement with experiments. Sensitivity to IC values in the RM studies are examined; results are sensitive to initial values of L[t=O], which largely determines the RM mix layer growth rate, and generally differs from the IC values used in the RT studies. Result sensitivity to initial turbulence, K[t=O], is seen to be small but significant above a threshold value. Initial conditions can be adjusted so that single shock RM mix width results match experiments but we have not been able to obtain a good match for first shock and re-shock growth rates in the same experiment with a single set of parameters and Ie. Problematic issues with KH test problems are described. Resolution studies for an RM test problem show the K-L mix growth rate decreases as it converges at a supra-linear rate, and, convergence requires a fine grid (on the order of 10 microns). For comparison, a resolution study of a second mix model [Scannapieco and Cheng, Phys.Lett.A, 299(1),49, (2002)] acting on a two fluid interface problem was examined. The mix in this case was found to increase with grid resolution at low to moderate resolutions, but converged at comparably fine resolutions. In conclusion, these tests indicate that the Eulerian code K-L model, using the Dimonte Tipton default model closure coefficients, achieve reasonable results across many of the unit-physics experimental conditions. However, we were unable to obtain good matches simultaneously for shock and re-shock mix in a single experiment. Results are sensitive to initial conditions in the regimes under study, with different IC best suited to RT or RM mix. It is reasonable to expect IC sensitivity in extrapolating to high energy density regimes, or to experiments with deceleration due to arbitrary combinations of RT and RM. As a final comparison, the atomically generated mix fraction and the mix width were each compared for the K-L mix model and the Scannapieco model on an identical RM test problem. The Scannapieco mix fraction and width grow linearly. The K-L mix fraction and width grow with the same power law exponent, in contrast to expectations from analysis. In future work it is proposed to do more head-to-head comparisons between these two models and other mix model options on a full suite of physics test problems, such as interfacial deceleration due to pressure build-up during an idealized ICF implosion.