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  1. The Inforum LIFT Model

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Inforum LIFT Model U.S. Energy and Economic Outlook Douglas S. Meade 2011 EIA Energy Conference Overview  The Inforum LIFT Model  Treatment of energy flows and emissions in LIFT.  Calibrating to AEO  Model extensions  U.S. Energy and Macroeconomic Outlook  Modeling of energy and environmental regulation April 26, 2011 2 2011 EIA Energy Conference LIFT: An Interindustry Macro (IM) Model  Input-Output (IO) relationships form the core of LIFT, both for output and price

  2. How ICF Works

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    icf / how icf works How ICF Works Shiva Laser When the 20-beam Shiva laser was completed in 1978, it was the world's most powerful laser. It delivered more than ten kilojoules of energy in less than a billionth of a second in its first full-power firing. About the size of a football field, Shiva was the latest in a series of laser systems built over two decades, each five to ten times more powerful than its predecessor. Since the late 1940s, researchers have used magnetic fields to confine hot,

  3. ICF Annual Report 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Correll, D

    1998-06-01

    The continuing objective of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL's) Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program is the demonstration of thermonuclear fusion ignition and energy gain in the laboratory and to support the nuclear weapons program in its use of ICF facilities. The underlying theme of all ICF activities as a science research and development program is the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Defense Programs (DP) science-based Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP). The mission of the US Inertial Fusion Program is twofold: (1) to address high-energy-density physics issues for the SSP and (2) to develop a laboratory microfusion capability for defense and energy applications. In pursuit of this mission, the ICF Program has developed a state-of-the-art capability to investigate high-energy-density physics in the laboratory. The near-term goals pursued by the ICF Program in support of its mission are demonstrating fusion ignition in the laboratory and expanding the Program's capabilities in high-energy-density science. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) project is a cornerstone of this effort.

  4. icf | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    The demonstration of laboratory ignition and its use to support the... ICF Reports There are a wide variety of reports that address the world class research and experiments in ICF ...

  5. ICF International | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: ICF International Address: 9300 Lee Highway, Fairfax, VA 22031-1207 USA Place: Washington, District of Columbia Year Founded: 1969 References: http:...

  6. Nuclear Diagnostics of ICF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Izumi, N; Ierche, R A; Moran, M J; Phillips, T W; Sangster, T C; Schmid, G J; Stoyer, M A; Disdier, L; Bourgade, J L; Rouyer, A; Fisher, R K; Gerggren, R R; Caldwen, S E; Faulkner, J R; Mack, J M; Oertel, J A; Young, C S; Glebov, V Y; Jaanimagi, P A; Meyerhofer, D D; Soures, J M; Stockel, C; Frenje, J A; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D

    2001-10-18

    In inertial confinement fusion (ICF), a high temperature and high density plasma is produced by the spherical implosion of a small capsule. A spherical target capsule is irradiated uniformly by a laser beam (direct irradiation) or x-rays from a high Z enclosure (hohlraum) that is irradiated by laser or ion beams (indirect irradiation). Then high-pressure ablation of the surface causes the fuel to be accelerated inward. Thermonuclear fusion reactions begin in the center region of the capsule as it is heated to sufficient temperature (10 keV) by the converging shocks (hot spot formation). During the stagnation of the imploded shell, the fuel in the shell region is compressed to high density ({approx} 10{sup 3} times solid density in fuel region). When these conditions are established, energy released by the initial nuclear reactions in center ''hot-spot'' region can heat up the cold ''fuel'' region and cause ignition. They are developing advanced nuclear diagnostics for imploding plasmas of the ignition campaign on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The NIF is a 1.8MJ, 192-beam glass laser system that is under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. One objective of the NIF is to demonstrate ignition and gain in an inertial confinement fusion plasma. Extreme physical conditions characterize the imploded plasmas on the NIF. First, the thickness of the plasma, expressed by areal density (plasma density times radius), is large, up to {approx} 1 g/cm{sup 2}. Highly penetrating probes such as energetic neutrons, hard x-rays, or {gamma} rays are required to see deep inside the plasma. Second, the implosion time is quite short. The implosion process takes {approx} 20 ns and the duration of the fusion reaction is on the order of 100 picoseconds. To observe the time history of the nuclear reactions, time resolution better than 10 ps is required. Third, the size of the imploded plasma is quite small ({approx} 100 {micro}m). To see the shape of burning region

  7. ICF Reports | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Fusion ICF Reports There are a wide variety of reports that address the world class research and experiments in ICF being performed on behalf of the U.S. ICF Program and stockpile stewardship. Some of these reports are listed below: 2016 Inertial Confinement Fusion Program Framework, U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, May 16, 2016. DOE/NA-0044 2015 Review of the Inertial Confinement Fusion and High Energy Density Science Portfolio, U.S. Department of Energy,

  8. ICF Program Framework | National Nuclear Security Administration...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Evaluation Inertial Confinement Fusion ICF Program Framework 2016 Inertial Confinement Fusion Program Framework, U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security ...

  9. ICF program annual report, 1988--89

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-09-01

    This report contains discussions on the following topics: Target Physics; Nova Experiments; Nova Laser Science and Technology; Target Science and Technology; Advanced Drivers; and ICF Applications.

  10. ICF Facilities | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ICF operates a set of world-class experimental facilities to create HEDP conditions and to obtain quantitative data in support of its numerous stockpile stewardship-related ...

  11. icf

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    in size from a pinhead to a small pea, is filled with a mixture of two isotopes of hydrogen (deuterium (D) and tritium (T)) and is subjected to a sudden application of...

  12. icf

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    in size from a pinhead to a small pea, is filled with a mixture of two isotopes of hydrogen (deuterium (D) and tritium (T)) and is subjected to a sudden application of intense...

  13. ICF Facilities | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Facilities Nike mirror array and lens array ICF operates a set of world-class experimental facilities to create HEDP conditions and to obtain quantitative data in support of its numerous stockpile stewardship-related activities. To learn about three high energy experimental facilities and two small lasers that provide ICF capabilities, select the links below. National Ignition Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory OMEGA and OMEGA EP, University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser

  14. Wetted foam liquid fuel ICF target experiments

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Olson, R. E.; Leeper, R. J.; Yi, S. A.; Kline, J. L.; Zylstra, A. B.; Peterson, R. R.; Shah, R.; Braun, T.; Biener, J.; Kozioziemski, B. J.; et al

    2016-05-01

    Here, we are developing a new NIF experimental platform that employs wetted foam liquid fuel layer ICF capsules. We will use the liquid fuel layer capsules in a NIF sub-scale experimental campaign to explore the relationship between hot spot convergence ratio (CR) and the predictability of hot spot formation. DT liquid layer ICF capsules allow for flexibility in hot spot CR via the adjustment of the initial cryogenic capsule temperature and, hence, DT vapor density. Our hypothesis is that the predictive capability of hot spot formation is robust and 1D-like for a relatively low CR hot spot (CR~15), but willmore » become less reliable as hot spot CR is increased to CR>20. Simulations indicate that backing off on hot spot CR is an excellent way to reduce capsule instability growth and to improve robustness to low-mode x-ray flux asymmetries. In the initial experiments, we will test our hypothesis by measuring hot spot size, neutron yield, ion temperature, and burn width to infer hot spot pressure and compare to predictions for implosions with hot spot CR's in the range of 12 to 25. Larger scale experiments are also being designed, and we will advance from sub-scale to full-scale NIF experiments to determine if 1D-like behavior at low CR is retained as the scale-size is increased. The long-term objective is to develop a liquid fuel layer ICF capsule platform with robust thermonuclear burn, modest CR, and significant α-heating with burn propagation.« less

  15. Suppressed-fission ICF hybrid reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogan, W.J.; Meier, W.R.

    1986-05-20

    A suppressed-fission ICF hybrid reactor has been designed to maximize the production of /sup 233/U. In this design, Be is used as a neutron multiplier. An annular array of Be columns surrounds the fusion pulse inside the reaction chember. The Be columns consist of short cylinders of Be joined together with steel snap rings. Vertical holes in the Be carry liquid lithium coolant and steel-clad thorium fuel pins. The lithium coolant is supplied at the top of the chamber, traverses through the Be columns and exits at the bottom. The columns are attached to top and bottom plates in such a way as to tolerate radiation-induced swelling and the vibrations resulting from each fusion pulse. A thin (10 cm) liquid Li fall region protects the Be columns from direct exposure to the X-rays and debris emitted by the fuel capsule. A neutronics study of this design indicates that the specific production of /sup 233/U fuel is increased by operating at relatively large thorium volume fractions. A design at a fertile fuel fraction of 30 vol % produces a total breeding ratio of over 2.1. The /sup 6/Li to /sup 7/Li ratio is adjusted to keep the tritium breeding ratio at about 1.0. In such a reactor, about 3400 kg of /sup 233/U can be produced per full power year at a fusion power level of 800 MW. Reactor support ratios greater than 13 can be achieved, leading to beneficial results even if the fusion reactor cost is significantly greater than that of a fission reactor.

  16. Progress on achieving the ICF conditions needed for high gain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindl, J.D.

    1988-12-23

    Progress during the past two years has moved us much closer to demonstrating the scientific and technological requirements for high gain ICF in the laboratory. This progress has been made possible by operating at the third harmonic of 1..mu..m light which dramatically reduces concern about hot electrons and by advances in diagnostics such as 100 ps x-ray framing cameras which greatly increase the data available from each experiment. Making use of many of these new capabilities, major improvements in confinement conditions have been achieved for ICF implosions. In particular, in an optimized hohlraum on Nova, radiation driven implosions with convergence ratio in excess of 30 (volume compression /approximately/3 /times/ 10/sup 4/) have performed essentially as predicted by spherical implosion calculations. This paper presents these results as well as examples of advances in several other areas and discusses the implications for the future of ICF with lasers and heavy ion beam drivers. 8 refs., 10 figs.

  17. Contributions to the Genesis and Progress of ICF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nuckolls, J H

    2006-02-15

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) has progressed from the detonation of large-scale fusion explosions initiated by atomic bombs in the early 1950s to final preparations for initiating small-scale fusion explosions with giant lasers. The next major step after ignition will be development of high performance targets that can be initiated with much smaller, lower cost lasers. In the 21st century and beyond, ICF's grand challenge is to develop practical power plants that generate low cost, clean, inexhaustible fusion energy. In this chapter, I first describe the origin in 1960-61 of ICF target concepts, early speculations on laser driven 'Thermonuclear Engines' for power production and rocket propulsion, and encouraging large-scale nuclear explosive experiments conducted in 1962. Next, I recall the 40-year, multi-billion dollar ignition campaign - to develop a matched combination of sufficiently high-performance implosion lasers and sufficiently stable targets capable of igniting small fusion explosions. I conclude with brief comments on the NIF ignition campaign and very high-performance targets, and speculations on ICF's potential in a centuries-long Darwinian competition of future energy systems. My perspectives in this chapter are those of a nuclear explosive designer, optimistic proponent of ICF energy, and Livermore Laboratory leader. The perspectives of Livermore's post 1970 laser experts and builders, and laser fusion experimentalists are provided in a chapter written by John Holzrichter, a leading scientist and leader in Livermore's second generation laser fusion program. In a third chapter, Ray Kidder, a theoretical physicist and early laser fusion pioneer, provides his perspectives including the history of the first generation laser fusion program he led from 1962-1972.

  18. Effect of inactive impurities on the burning of ICF targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gus'kov, S. Yu.; Il'in, D. V.; Sherman, V. E.

    2011-12-15

    The efficiency of thermonuclear burning of the spherical deuterium-tritium (DT) plasma of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets in the presence of low-Z impurities (such as lithium, carbon, or beryllium) with arbitrary concentrations is investigated. The effect of impurities produced due to the mixing of the thermonuclear fuel with the material of the structural elements of the target during its compression on the process of target burning is studied, and the possibility of using solid noncryogenic thermonuclear fuels in ICF targets is analyzed. Analytical dependences of the ignition energy and target thermonuclear gain on the impurity concentration are obtained. The models are constructed for homogeneous and inhomogeneous plasmas for the case in which the burning is initiated in the central heated region of the target and then propagates into the surrounding relatively cold fuel. Two possible configurations of an inhomogeneous plasma, namely, an isobaric configuration formed in the case of spark ignition of the target and an isochoric configuration formed in the case of fast ignition, are considered. The results of numerical simulations of the burning of the DT plasma of ICF targets in a wide range of impurity concentrations are presented. The simulations were performed using the TEPA one-dimensional code, in which the thermonuclear burning kinetics is calculated by the Monte Carlo method. It is shown that the strongest negative effect related to the presence of impurities is an increase in the energy of target ignition. It is substantiated that the most promising solid noncryogenic fuel is DT hydride of beryllium (BeDT). The requirements to the plasma parameters at which BeDT can be used as a fuel in noncryogenic ICF targets are determined. Variants of using noncryogenic targets with a solid thermonuclear fuel are proposed.

  19. Hybrid-drive implosion system for ICF targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mark, James W.

    1988-01-01

    Hybrid-drive implosion systems (20,40) for ICF targets (10,22,42) are described which permit a significant increase in target gain at fixed total driver energy. The ICF target is compressed in two phases, an initial compression phase and a final peak power phase, with each phase driven by a separate, optimized driver. The targets comprise a hollow spherical ablator (12) surroundingly disposed around fusion fuel (14). The ablator is first compressed to higher density by a laser system (24), or by an ion beam system (44), that in each case is optimized for this initial phase of compression of the target. Then, following compression of the ablator, energy is directly delivered into the compressed ablator by an ion beam driver system (30,48) that is optimized for this second phase of operation of the target. The fusion fuel (14) is driven, at high gain, to conditions wherein fusion reactions occur. This phase separation allows hydrodynamic efficiency and energy deposition uniformity to be individually optimized, thereby securing significant advantages in energy gain. In additional embodiments, the same or separate drivers supply energy for ICF target implosion.

  20. Hybrid-drive implosion system for ICF targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mark, J.W.K.

    1987-10-14

    Hybrid-drive implosion systems for ICF targets are described which permit a significant increase in target gain at fixed total driver energy. The ICF target is compressed in two phases, an initial compression phase and a final peak power phase, with each phase driven by a separate, optimized driver. The targets comprise a hollow spherical ablator surroundingly disposed around fusion fuel. The ablator is first compressed to higher density by a laser system, or by an ion beam system, that in each case is optimized for this initial phase of compression of the target. Then, following compression of the ablator, energy is directly delivered into the compressed ablator by an ion beam driver system that is optimized for this second phase of operation of the target. The fusion fuel is driven, at high gain, to conditions wherein fusion reactions occur. This phase separation allows hydrodynamic efficiency and energy deposition uniformity to be individually optimized, thereby securing significant advantages in energy gain. In additional embodiments, the same or separate drivers supply energy for ICF target implosion. 3 figs.

  1. Hybrid-drive implosion system for ICF targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mark, James W.

    1988-08-02

    Hybrid-drive implosion systems (20,40) for ICF targets (10,22,42) are described which permit a significant increase in target gain at fixed total driver energy. The ICF target is compressed in two phases, an initial compression phase and a final peak power phase, with each phase driven by a separate, optimized driver. The targets comprise a hollow spherical ablator (12) surroundingly disposed around fusion fuel (14). The ablator is first compressed to higher density by a laser system (24), or by an ion beam system (44), that in each case is optimized for this initial phase of compression of the target. Then, following compression of the ablator, energy is directly delivered into the compressed ablator by an ion beam driver system (30,48) that is optimized for this second phase of operation of the target. The fusion fuel (14) is driven, at high gain, to conditions wherein fusion reactions occur. This phase separation allows hydrodynamic efficiency and energy deposition uniformity to be individually optimized, thereby securing significant advantages in energy gain. In additional embodiments, the same or separate drivers supply energy for ICF target implosion.

  2. X-ray ablation measurements and modeling for ICF applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, A.T.

    1996-09-01

    X-ray ablation of material from the first wall and other components of an ICF (Inertial Confinement Fusion) chamber is a major threat to the laser final optics. Material condensing on these optics after a shot may cause damage with subsequent laser shots. To ensure the successful operation of the ICF facility, removal rates must be predicted accurately. The goal for this dissertation is to develop an experimentally validated x-ray response model, with particular application to the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Accurate knowledge of the x-ray and debris emissions from ICF targets is a critical first step in the process of predicting the performance of the target chamber system. A number of 1-D numerical simulations of NIF targets have been run to characterize target output in terms of energy, angular distribution, spectrum, and pulse shape. Scaling of output characteristics with variations of both target yield and hohlraum wall thickness are also described. Experiments have been conducted at the Nova laser on the effects of relevant x-ray fluences on various materials. The response was diagnosed using post-shot examinations of the surfaces with scanning electron microscope and atomic force microscope instruments. Judgments were made about the dominant removal mechanisms for each material. Measurements of removal depths were made to provide data for the modeling. The finite difference ablation code developed here (ABLATOR) combines the thermomechanical response of materials to x-rays with models of various removal mechanisms. The former aspect refers to energy deposition in such small characteristic depths ({approx} micron) that thermal conduction and hydrodynamic motion are significant effects on the nanosecond time scale. The material removal models use the resulting time histories of temperature and pressure-profiles, along with ancillary local conditions, to predict rates of surface vaporization and the onset of conditions that would lead to spallation.

  3. Site support program plan for ICF Kaiser Hanford Company, Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-01

    This document is the general administrative plan implemented by the Hanford Site contractor, ICF Kaiser Hanford Company. It describes the mission, administrative structure, projected staffing, to be provided by the contractor. The report breaks out the work responsibilities within the different units of the company, a baseline schedule for the different groups, and a cost summary for the different operating units.

  4. Inertial confinement fusion. 1995 ICF annual report, October 1994--September 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-06-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory`s (LLNL`s) Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program is a Department of Energy (DOE) Defense Program research and advanced technology development program focused on the goal of demonstrating thermonuclear fusion ignition and energy gain in the laboratory. During FY 1995, the ICF Program continued to conduct ignition target physics optimization studies and weapons physics experiments in support of the Defense Program`s stockpile stewardship goals. It also continued to develop technologies in support of the performance, cost, and schedule goals of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project. The NIF is a key element of the DOE`s Stockpile Stewardship and Management Program. In addition to its primary Defense Program goals, the ICF Program provides research and development opportunities in fundamental high-energy-density physics and supports the necessary research base for the possible long-term application to inertial fusion energy (IFE). Also, ICF technologies have had spin-off applications for industrial and governmental use. Selected papers are indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Science and Technology Database.

  5. Inference of ICF Implosion Core Mix using Experimental Data and Theoretical Mix Modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welser-Sherrill, L; Haynes, D A; Mancini, R C; Cooley, J H; Tommasini, R; Golovkin, I E; Sherrill, M E; Haan, S W

    2008-04-30

    The mixing between fuel and shell materials in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) implosion cores is a current topic of interest. The goal of this work was to design direct-drive ICF experiments which have varying levels of mix, and subsequently to extract information on mixing directly from the experimental data using spectroscopic techniques. The experimental design was accomplished using hydrodynamic simulations in conjunction with Haan's saturation model, which was used to predict the mix levels of candidate experimental configurations. These theoretical predictions were then compared to the mixing information which was extracted from the experimental data, and it was found that Haan's mix model performed well in predicting trends in the width of the mix layer. With these results, we have contributed to an assessment of the range of validity and predictive capability of the Haan saturation model, as well as increased our confidence in the methods used to extract mixing information from experimental data.

  6. Application of Spatially Resolved High Resolution Crystal Spectrometry to ICF Plasmas

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    11 PPPL- 4811 Application of Spatially Resolved High Resolution Crystal Spectrometry to ICF Plasmas September, 2012 Kenneth W. Hill, M. Bitter, L. Delgado-Aprico, N.A. Pablant, P. Beiersdorfer, M. Schneider, K. Widmann, M. Sanchez del Rio and L. Zhang Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory Report Disclaimers Full Legal Disclaimer This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any

  7. X-ray Digital Radiography and Computed Tomography of ICF and HEDP Materials, Subassemblies and Targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, W D; Martz Jr., H E

    2006-05-31

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high energy density physics (HEDP) research are being conducted at large laser facilities, such as the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics OMEGA facility and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's (LLNL) National Ignition Facility (NIF). At such facilities, millimeter-sized targets with micrometer structures are studied in a variety of hydrodynamic, radiation transport, equation-of-state, inertial confinement fusion and high-energy density experiments. The extreme temperatures and pressures achieved in these experiments make the results susceptible to imperfections in the fabricated targets. Targets include materials varying widely in composition ({approx}3 < Z < {approx}82), density ({approx}0.03 to {approx}20 g/cm{sup 3}), geometry (planar to spherical) and embedded structures (joints to subassemblies). Fabricating these targets with structures to the tolerances required is a challenging engineering problem the ICF and HEDP community are currently undertaking. Nondestructive characterization (NDC) provides a valuable tool in material selection, component inspection, and the final pre-shot assemblies inspection. X-rays are a key method used to NDC these targets. In this paper we discuss X-ray attenuation, X-ray phase effects, and the X-ray system used, its performance and application to characterize low-temperature Raleigh-Taylor and non-cryogenic double-shell targets.

  8. Progress in laboratory high gain ICF (inertial confinement fusion): Prospects for the future

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Storm, E.; Lindl, J.D.; Campbell, E.M.; Bernat, T.P.; Coleman, L.W.; Emmett, J.L.; Hogan, W.J.; Hunt, J.T.; Krupke, W.F.; Lowdermilk, W.H.

    1988-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF), a thermonuclear reaction in a small (/approximately/5 mm diameter) fuel capsule filled with a few milligrams of deuterium and tritium, has been the subject of very fruitful experimentation since the early 1970's. High gain ICF is now on the threshold of practical applications. With a Laboratory Microfusion Facility (LMF), these applications will have major implications for national defense, basic and applied science, and power production. With a driver capable of delivering about 10 MJ in a 10-ns pulse at an intensity of /approximately/3 /times/ 10/sup 14/ W/cm/sup 2/, an appropriately configured cryogenic capsule could be compressed to a density of about 200 g/cm/sup 3/ and a temperature of 3--5 keV. Under these conditions, up to 10 mg of DT could be ignited, and with a burn efficiency of about 30%, release up to 1000 MJ of fusion energy, an energy gain of about 100. A thousand megajoules is equivalent to about one quarter ton of TNT, or about 7 gallons of oil--an amount of energy tractable under laboratory conditions and potentially very useful for a variety of applications. 61 refs., 33 figs.

  9. The Edward Teller medal lecture: The evolution toward Indirect Drive and two decades of progress toward ICF ignition and burn

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindl, J.D.

    1993-12-01

    In 1972, I joined the Livermore ICF Theory and Target Design group led by John Nuckolls, shortly after publication of John`s seminal Nature article on ICF. My primary role, working with others in the target design program including Mordy Rosen, Steve Haan, and Larry Suter, has been as a target designer and theorist who utilized the LASNEX code to perform numerical experiments, which along with analysis of laboratory and underground thermonuclear experiments allowed me to develop a series of models and physical insights which have been used to set the direction and priorities of the Livermore program. I have had the good fortune of working with an outstanding team of scientists who have established LLNL as the premier ICF laboratory in the world. John Emmett and the LLNL Laser Science team were responsible for developing a series of lasers from Janus to Nova which have given LLNL unequaled facilities. George Zimmerman and the LASNEX group developed the numerical models essential for projecting future performance and requirements as well as for designing and analyzing the experiments. Bill Kruer, Bruce Langdon and others in the plasma theory group developed the fundamental understanding of laser plasma interactions which have played such an important role in ICF. And a series of experiment program leaders including Mike Campbell and Joe Kilkenny and their laser experimental teams developed the experimental techniques and diagnostic capabilities which have allowed us to c increasingly complex and sophisticated experiments.

  10. The LLNL (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) ICF (Inertial Confinement Fusion) Program: Progress toward ignition in the Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Storm, E.; Batha, S.H.; Bernat, T.P.; Bibeau, C.; Cable, M.D.; Caird, J.A.; Campbell, E.M.; Campbell, J.H.; Coleman, L.W.; Cook, R.C.; Correll, D.L.; Darrow, C.B.; Davis, J.I.; Drake, R.P.; Ehrlich, R.B.; Ellis, R.J.; Glendinning, S.G.; Haan, S.W.; Haendler, B.L.; Hatcher, C.W.; Hatchett, S.P.; Hermes, G.L.; Hunt, J.P.; Kania, D.R.; Kauffman, R.L.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Kornblum, H.N.; Kruer, W.L.; Kyrazis, D.T.; Lane, S.M.; Laumann

    1990-10-02

    The Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has made substantial progress in target physics, target diagnostics, and laser science and technology. In each area, progress required the development of experimental techniques and computational modeling. The objectives of the target physics experiments in the Nova laser facility are to address and understand critical physics issues that determine the conditions required to achieve ignition and gain in an ICF capsule. The LLNL experimental program primarily addresses indirect-drive implosions, in which the capsule is driven by x rays produced by the interaction of the laser light with a high-Z plasma. Experiments address both the physics of generating the radiation environment in a laser-driven hohlraum and the physics associated with imploding ICF capsules to ignition and high-gain conditions in the absence of alpha deposition. Recent experiments and modeling have established much of the physics necessary to validate the basic concept of ignition and ICF target gain in the laboratory. The rapid progress made in the past several years, and in particular, recent results showing higher radiation drive temperatures and implosion velocities than previously obtained and assumed for high-gain target designs, has led LLNL to propose an upgrade of the Nova laser to 1.5 to 2 MJ (at 0.35 {mu}m) to demonstrate ignition and energy gains of 10 to 20 -- the Nova Upgrade.

  11. Experimental Study of High-Z Gas Buffers in Gas-Filled ICF Engines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rhodes, M A; Kane, J; Loosmore, G; DeMuth, J; Latkowski, J

    2010-12-03

    ICF power plants, such as the LIFE scheme at LLNL, may employ a high-Z, target-chamber gas-fill to moderate the first-wall heat-pulse due to x-rays and energetic ions released during target detonation. To reduce the uncertainties of cooling and beam/target propagation through such gas-filled chambers, we present a pulsed plasma source producing 2-5 eV plasma comprised of high-Z gases. We use a 5-kJ, 100-ns theta discharge for high peak plasma-heating-power, an electrode-less discharge for minimizing impurities, and unobstructed axial access for diagnostics and beam (and/or target) propagation studies. We will report on the plasma source requirements, design process, and the system design.

  12. Inference of ICF implosion core mix using experimental data and theoretical mix modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sherrill, Leslie Welser; Haynes, Donald A; Cooley, James H; Sherrill, Manolo E; Mancini, Roberto C; Tommasini, Riccardo; Golovkin, Igor E; Haan, Steven W

    2009-01-01

    The mixing between fuel and shell materials in Inertial Confinement Fusion (lCF) implosion cores is a current topic of interest. The goal of this work was to design direct-drive ICF experiments which have varying levels of mix, and subsequently to extract information on mixing directly from the experimental data using spectroscopic techniques. The experimental design was accomplished using hydrodynamic simulations in conjunction with Haan's saturation model, which was used to predict the mix levels of candidate experimental configurations. These theoretical predictions were then compared to the mixing information which was extracted from the experimental data, and it was found that Haan's mix model predicted trends in the width of the mix layer as a function of initial shell thickness. These results contribute to an assessment of the range of validity and predictive capability of the Haan saturation model, as well as increasing confidence in the methods used to extract mixing information from experimental data.

  13. Low density gas and foam targets for ICF long scale length plasma experiments: Fabrication & characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gobby, P.L.; Mitchell, M.A.; Eliott, N.E.; Salazar, M.A.; Fermandez, J.C.; Hsing, W.W.; Moore, J.E.; Gomez, V.M.

    1994-10-01

    Recent ICF experiments performed by the laser-matter interaction group at Los Alamos using the Nova laser to investigate long scale length plasmas required two types of special targets: gas-filled hohlraums and free-standing low density foams, both with densities in the range of 3-5 mg/cc. The mass in each case was provided by hydrogen and carbon - in the form of polymethylpentyene for the foam case and 2.2-dimethylpropane (i.e., neopentane, C{sub 5}H{sub 12}) at 1 atmosphere for the gas case. Dopants of Cl, Ti, Cr and Mn were added to the foams, while Ti and Cr coated carbon fibers were added to the hohlraums - both for isoelectronic x-ray spectroscopic temperature measurements.

  14. Experimental techniques for measuring Rayleigh-Taylor instability in inertial confinement fusion (ICF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smalyuk, V A

    2012-06-07

    Rayleigh-Taylor (RT) instability is one of the major concerns in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) because it amplifies target modulations in both acceleration and deceleration phases of implosion, which leads to shell disruption and performance degradation of imploding targets. This article reviews experimental results of the RT growth experiments performed on OMEGA laser system, where targets were driven directly with laser light. RT instability was studied in the linear and nonlinear regimes. The experiments were performed in acceleration phase, using planar and spherical targets, and in deceleration phase of spherical implosions, using spherical shells. Initial target modulations consisted of 2-D pre-imposed modulations, and 2-D and 3-D modulations imprinted on targets by the non-uniformities in laser drive. In planar geometry, the nonlinear regime was studied using 3-D modulations with broadband spectra near nonlinear saturation levels. In acceleration-phase, the measured modulation Fourier spectra and nonlinear growth velocities are in good agreement with those predicted by Haan's model [Haan S W 1989 Phys. Rev. A 39 5812]. In a real-space analysis, the bubble merger was quantified by a self-similar evolution of bubble size distributions [Oron D et al 2001 Phys. Plasmas 8, 2883]. The 3-D, inner-surface modulations were measured to grow throughout the deceleration phase of spherical implosions. RT growth rates are very sensitive to the drive conditions, therefore they can be used to test and validate drive physics in hydrodynamic codes used to design ICF implosions. Measured growth rates of pre-imposed 2-D target modulations below nonlinear saturation levels were used to validate non-local thermal electron transport model in laser-driven experiments.

  15. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratories Perspective on Code Development and High Performance Computing Resources in Support of the National HED/ICF Effort

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clouse, C. J.; Edwards, M. J.; McCoy, M. G.; Marinak, M. M.; Verdon, C. P.

    2015-07-07

    Through its Advanced Scientific Computing (ASC) and Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) code development efforts, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) provides a world leading numerical simulation capability for the National HED/ICF program in support of the Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP). In addition the ASC effort provides high performance computing platform capabilities upon which these codes are run. LLNL remains committed to, and will work with, the national HED/ICF program community to help insure numerical simulation needs are met and to make those capabilities available, consistent with programmatic priorities and available resources.

  16. Diagnostic techniques for measuring temperature transients and stress transients in the first wall of an ICF reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melamed, N.T.; Taylor, L.H.

    1983-01-01

    The primary challenge in the design of an Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) power reactor is to make the first wall survive the frequent explosions of the pellets. Westinghouse has proposed a dry wall design consisting of steel tubes coated with tantalum. This report describes the design of a test chamber and two diagnostic procedures for experimentally determining the reliability of the Westinghouse design. The test chamber simulates the x-ray and ion pulse irradiation of the wall due to a pellet explosion. The diagnostics consist of remote temperature sensing and surface deformation measurements. The chamber and diagnostics can also be used to test other first-wall designs.

  17. Laser-induced magnetic fields in ICF capsules, Final Report, DE-FG02-08ER85128, Phase 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindman, Erick L

    2009-11-05

    Laser-induced magnetic fields in ICF capsules Final Report, DE-FG02-08ER85128, Phase 1 E. L. LINDMAN, Otowi Technical Services, Los Alamos, NM. The performance of an inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) capsule can be improved by inserting a magnetic field into it before compressing it [Kirkpatrick, et al., Fusion Technol. 27, 205 (1995)]. To obtain standoff in an ICF power generator, a method of inserting the field without the use of low-inductance leads attached to the capsule is desired. A mechanism for generating such a field using a laser was discovered in Japan [Sakagami, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 42, 839 (1979), Kolodner and Yablonovitch, Phys. Rev. Lett. 43, 1402 (1979)] and studied at Los Alamos in the 1980s [M. A. Yates, et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 49, 1702 (1982); Forslund and Brackbill, Phys. Rev. Lett. 48, 1614 (1982)]. In this mechanism, a p-polarized laser beam strikes a solid target producing hot electrons that are accelerated away from the target surface by resonant absorption. An electric field is created that returns the hot electrons to the target. But, they do not return to the target along the same trajectory on which they left. The resulting current produces a toroidal magnetic field that was observed to spread over a region outside the hot spot with a radius of a millimeter. No experimental measurements of the magnetic field strength were performed. Estimates from computer simulation suggest that field strengths in the range of 1 to 10 Mega gauss (100 to 1000 Tesla) were obtained outside of the laser spot. To use this mechanism to insert a magnetic field into an ICF capsule, the capsule must be redesigned. In one approach, a central conductor is added, a toroidal gap is cut in the outer wall and the DT fuel is frozen on the inner surface of the capsule. The capsule is dropped into the reaction chamber and struck first with the laser that generates the magnetic field. The laser hot spot is positioned at the center of the toroidal gap. As the

  18. Comparison of electric and magnetic quadrupole focusing for the low energy end of an induction-linac-ICF (Inertial-Confinement-Fusion) driver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, C.H.

    1987-04-01

    This report compares two physics designs of the low energy end of an induction linac-ICF driver: one using electric quadrupole focusing of many parallel beams followed by transverse combining; the other using magnetic quadrupole focusing of fewer beams without beam combining. Because of larger head-to-tail velocity spread and a consequent rapid current amplification in a magnetic focusing channel, the overall accelerator size of the design using magnetic focusing is comparable to that using electric focusing.

  19. Sol-gel optical thin films for an advanced megajoule-class Nd:glass laser ICF-driver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Floch, H.G.; Belleville, P.F.; Pegon, P.M.; Guerain, J.

    1996-12-31

    It is well established by manufacturers and users that optical coatings are generally prepared by the well known Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) technology. In the authors` opinion sol-gel technology is an effective and competitive alternative. The aim of this paper is to emphasize on the sol-gel thin film work carried out at CEA Limeil-Valenton and concerning the technology for high power lasers. The authors will briefly discuss the chemistry of the sol-gel process, the production of optical coatings and the related deposition techniques. Finally, the paper describes performance of sol-gel optical coatings the authors have developed to fulfill the requirements of a future 1.8 MJ / 500 TW (351 nm) pulsed Nd:glass laser so-called << LMJ >> (Laser MegaJoules). This powerful laser is to be used for their national Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program, to demonstrate at the laboratory scale, ignition of deuterium-tritium fusion fuel. Moreover, the aim of this article is, hopefully, to provide a convincing argument that coatings and particularly optical coatings, are some of the useful products available from sol-gel technology, and that exciting developments in other areas than high power laser technology are almost certain to emerge within the coming decade.

  20. Sol-gel optical thin films for an advanced megajoule-class Nd:glass laser ICF-driver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Floch, H.G.; Belleville, P.F.; Pegon, P.M.; Dijonneau, C.S.; Guerain, J.

    1995-12-31

    It is well established by manufacturers and users that optical coatings are generally prepared by the well known Physical Vapor Deposition (PVD) technology. In the authors` opinion sol-gel technology is an effective and competitive alternative. The aim of this paper is to emphasize on the sol-gel thin film work carried out at Centre d`Etudes de Limeil-Valenton (CEL-V) and concerning the technology for high power lasers. The authors will briefly discuss the chemistry of the sol-gel process, the production of optical coatings and the related deposition techniques. Finally, the paper describes the preparation and performance of sol-gel optical coatings they have developed to fulfill the requirements of a future 2 MJ/500 TW (351 nm) pulsed Nd:glass laser so-called LMJ (Laser MegaJoules). This powerful laser is to be used for their national Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program, to demonstrate at the laboratory scale, ignition of deuterium-tritium fusion fuel. Moreover, the aim of this article is, hopefully, to provide a convincing argument that coatings and particularly optical coatings, are some of the useful products available from sol-gel technology, and that exciting developments in other areas are almost certain to emerge within the coming decade.

  1. History of HERMES III diode to z-pinch breakthrough and beyond : learning about pulsed power and z-pinch ICF.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanford, Thomas W. L.

    2013-04-01

    HERMES III and Z are two flagship accelerators of Sandia's pulsed-power program developed to generate intense-ray fields for the study of nuclear radiation effects, and to explore high energy-density physics (including the production of intense x-ray fields for Inertia Confinement Fusion [ICF]), respectively. A diode at the exit of HERMES III converts its 20-MeV electron beam into-rays. In contrast, at the center of Z, a z-pinch is used to convert its 20-MA current into an intense burst of x-rays. Here the history of how the HERMES III diode emerged from theoretical considerations to actual hardware is discussed. Next, the reverse process of how the experimental discovery of wire-array stabilization in a z-pinch, led to a better theory of wirearray implosions and its application to one of the ICF concepts on Z--the DH (Dynamic Hohlraum) is reviewed. Lastly, the report concludes with how the unexpected axial radiation asymmetry measured in the DH is understood. The first discussion illustrates the evolution of physics from theory-to-observationto- refinement. The second two illustrate the reverse process of observationto- theory-to refinement. The histories are discussed through the vehicle of my research at Sandia, illustrating the unique environment Sandia provides for personal growth and development into a scientific leader.

  2. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) - Pub

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    from IHSGI, as well as others that concentrate on economic growth, international oil prices, energy consumption, electricity, natural gas, petroleum, and coal, are...

  3. Foam shell cryogenic ICF target

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Darling, Dale H.

    1987-01-01

    A uniform cryogenic layer of DT fuel is maintained in a fusion target having a low density, small pore size, low Z rigid foam shell saturated with liquid DT fuel. Capillary action prevents gravitational slumping of the fuel layer. The saturated shell may be cooled to produce a solid fuel layer.

  4. Kinetic studies of ICF implosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kagan, Grigory; Herrmann, H. W.; Kim, Y. -H.; Schmitt, M. J.; Hakel, P.; Hsu, S. C.; Hoffman, N. M.; Svyatsky, D.; Baalrud, S. D.; Daligault, J. O.; Sio, H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Frenje, J. A.; Seguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Albright, B. J.; Taitano, W.; Kyrala, G. A.; Bradley, P. A.; Huang, C. -K.; McDevitt, C. J.; Chacon, L.; Srinivasan, B.; McEvoy, A. M.; Joshi, T. R.; Adams, C. S.

    2016-01-01

    Here, kinetic effects on inertial confinement fusion have been investigated. In particular, inter-ion-species diffusion and suprathermal ion distribution have been analyzed. The former drives separation of the fuel constituents in the hot reacting core and governs mix at the shell/fuel interface. The latter underlie measurements obtained with nuclear diagnostics, including the fusion yield and inferred ion burn temperatures. Basic mechanisms behind and practical consequences from these effects are discussed.

  5. Westinghouse ICF power plant study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sucov, E. W.

    1980-10-01

    In this study, two different electric power plants for the production of about 1000 MWe which were based on a CO/sub 2/ laser driver and on a heavy ion driver have been developed and analyzed. The purposes of this study were: (1) to examine in a self consistent way the technological and institutional problems that need to be confronted and solved in order to produce commercially competitive electricity in the 2020 time frame from an inertial fusion reactor, and (2) to compare, on a common basis, the consequences of using two different drivers to initiate the DT fuel pellet explosions. Analytic descriptions of size/performance/cost relationships for each of the subsystems comprising the power plant have been combined into an overall computer code which models the entire plant. This overall model has been used to conduct trade studies which examine the consequences of varying critical design values around the reference point.

  6. ICF Reports | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Plasma Science: Advancing Knowledge in the National Interest, National Research Council of the National Academies, The National Academies Press, 2007. Report of the Interagency ...

  7. Metallic and nonmetallic coatings for ICF targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendricks, C.D.; Crane, J.K.; Hsieh, E.J.; Meyer, S.F.

    1981-04-17

    Some fusion targets designed to be driven by 0.35 to 1 ..mu..m laser light are glass spheres coated with layers of various materials such as hydrocarbons, fluorocarbons, beryllium, copper, gold, platinum, etc. The glass shell, which is filled with gas, liquid or solid deuterium-tritium fuel, must have remarkably good surface and wall thickness uniformity. Methods for depositing the various materials will be discussed. They include plasma polymerization, electro-deposition, sputtering and evaporation. Many of the difficulties encountered in the coating processes are the result of coating on free spheres with very small radii - 35 to 500 micrometers. Several means of overcoming the problems will be described and experimental results presented.

  8. ICF Program Framework | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Program Framework 2016 Inertial Confinement Fusion Program Framework, U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, May 16, 2016. DOE/NA-0044

  9. Laser-driven ICF experiments: Laboratory Report No. 223

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCrory, R.L.

    1991-04-01

    Laser irradiation uniformity is a key issue and is treated in some detail. The basic irradiation uniformity requirements and practical ways of achieving these requirements are both discussed, along with two beam-smoothing techniques: induced spatial incoherence (ISI), and smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD). Experiments to measure and control the irradiation uniformity are also highlighted. Following the discussion of irradiation uniformity, a brief review of coronal physics is given, including the basic physical processes and their experimental signatures, together with a summary of pertinent diagnostics and results from experiments. Methods of determining ablation rates and thermal transport are also described. The hydrodynamics of laser-driven targets must be fully understood on the basis of experiments. Results from implosion experiments, including a brief description of the diagnostics, are presented. Future experiments aimed at determining ignition scaling and demonstrating hydrodynamically equivalent physics applicable to high-gain designs.

  10. Mach-Zehnder Fiber-Optic Links for ICF Diagnostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miller, E. K., Hermann, H. W.

    2012-11-01

    This article describes the operation and evolution of Mach-Zehnder links for single-point detectors in inertial confinement fusion experimental facilities, based on the Gamma Reaction History (GRH) diagnostic at the National Ignition Facility.

  11. Site support program plan for ICF Kaiser Hanford Company

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dieterle, S.E.

    1996-09-27

    The Fiscal Year (FY) 1997 Inftastructure Program Site Support Program Plan (SSPP) addresses the mission objectives, workscope, work breakdown structures (WBS), management approach, and resource requirements for the Infrastructure Program. Attached to the plan are appendices that provide more detailed information associated with scope definition.

  12. Recent experimental results on ICF target implosions by Z-pinch radiation sources and their relevance to ICF ignition studies.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bailey, James E.; Chandler, Gordon Andrew; Vesey, Roger Alan; Hanson, David Lester; Olson, Craig Lee; Nash, Thomas J.; Matzen, Maurice Keith; Ruiz, Carlos L.; Porter, John Larry, Jr.; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Varnum, William S.; Bennett, Guy R.; Cooper, Gary Wayne; Schroen, Diana Grace; Slutz, Stephen A.; MacFarlane, Joseph John; Leeper, Ramon Joe; Golovkin, I. E.; Mehlhorn, Thomas Alan; Mancini, Roberto Claudio

    2003-07-01

    Inertial confinement fusion capsule implosions absorbing up to 35 kJ of x-rays from a {approx}220 eV dynamic hohlraum on the Z accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories have produced thermonuclear D-D neutron yields of (2.6 {+-} 1.3) x 10{sup 10}. Argon spectra confirm a hot fuel with Te {approx} 1 keV and n{sub e} {approx} (1-2) x 10{sup 23} cm{sup -3}. Higher performance implosions will require radiation symmetry control improvements. Capsule implosions in a {approx}70 eV double-Z-pinch-driven secondary hohlraum have been radiographed by 6.7 keV x-rays produced by the Z-beamlet laser (ZBL), demonstrating a drive symmetry of about 3% and control of P{sub 2} radiation asymmetries to {+-}2%. Hemispherical capsule implosions have also been radiographed in Z in preparation for future experiments in fast ignition physics. Z-pinch-driven inertial fusion energy concepts are being developed. The refurbished Z machine (ZR) will begin providing scaling information on capsule and Z-pinch in 2006. The addition of a short pulse capability to ZBL will enable research into fast ignition physics in the combination of ZR and ZBL-petawatt. ZR could provide a test bed to study NIF-relevant double-shell ignition concepts using dynamic hohlraums and advanced symmetry control techniques in the double-pinch hohlraum backlit by ZBL.

  13. 1990s An Era of Profound and Rapid Change | OSTI, US Dept of...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at Inforum '97, providing a virtual library of energy science and technology 1997 R&D Project Summaries posted online, providing an important management resource for DOE R&D ...

  14. Microsoft Word - Final-Report-041811.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and astrophysicalflowssucha...newinertialconfinementfusion(ICF)targets requires a very ...

  15. Electron Generation and Transport in Intense Relativistic Laser-Plasma Interactions Relevant to Fast Ignition ICF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma, Tammy Yee Wing

    2010-01-01

    The reentrant cone approach to Fast Ignition, an advanced Inertial Confinement Fusion scheme, remains one of the most attractive because of the potential to efficiently collect and guide the laser light into the cone tip and direct energetic electrons into the high density core of the fuel. However, in the presence of a preformed plasma, the laser energy is largely absorbed before it can reach the cone tip. Full scale fast ignition laser systems are envisioned to have prepulses ranging between 100 mJ to 1 J. A few of the imperative issues facing fast ignition, then, are the conversion efficiency with which the laser light is converted to hot electrons, the subsequent transport characteristics of those electrons, and requirements for maximum allowable prepulse this may put on the laser system. This dissertation examines the laser-to-fast electron conversion efficiency scaling with prepulse for cone-guided fast ignition. Work in developing an extreme ultraviolet imager diagnostic for the temperature measurements of electron-heated targets, as well as the validation of the use of a thin wire for simultaneous determination of electron number density and electron temperature will be discussed.

  16. C:\\Users\\28105\\Documents\\Choi ICF\\ESPA-LPT work\\RFI\\PDF Conversions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Bob Johnson ; Jayne Harkins ; Robert S. Lynch Subject: National Power Transformer ...

  17. KrF amplifier design issues and application to ICF system design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, J.A.; Allen, G.R.; Berggren, R.R.; Czuchlewski, S.J.; Harris, D.B.; Jones, M.E.; Krohn, B.J.; Kurnit, N.A.; Leland, W.T.; Mansfield, C.; McLeod, J.; McCown, A.W.; McLeod, J.; Pendergrass, J.H.; Rose, E.A.; Rosocha, L.A.; Thomas, V.A.

    1991-01-01

    Los Alamos National Laboratory has assembled an array of experimental and theoretical tools to optimize amplifier design for future KrF lasers. The next opportunity to exercise these tools is with the design of the second generation NIKE system under construction at the Naval Research Laboratory with the collaboration of Los Alamos National Laboratory. Major issues include laser physics (energy extraction in large modules with amplified spontaneous emission) and diode performance and efficiency. High efficiency and low cost are increasingly important for larger future KrF amplifiers. In this paper we present our approach to amplifier scaling and discuss the more important design considerations for large KrF amplifiers. We point out where improvements in the fundamental data base for KrF amplifiers could lead to increased confidence in performance predictions for large amplifiers, and we address the currently unresolved issues of anomalous absorption near line center and the possibility of diode instabilities for low impedance designs. Los Alamos has designed a 100-kJ KrF laser-fusion system for both direct- and indirect-drive target physics experiments using 60-kJ amplifier modules. The design of this system will be reviewed. 38 refs., 110 figs., 3 tabs.

  18. Innovative high pressure gas MEM's based neutron detector for ICF and active SNM detection.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Shawn Bryan; Derzon, Mark Steven; Renzi, Ronald F.; Chandler, Gordon Andrew

    2007-12-01

    An innovative helium3 high pressure gas detection system, made possible by utilizing Sandia's expertise in Micro-electrical Mechanical fluidic systems, is proposed which appears to have many beneficial performance characteristics with regards to making these neutron measurements in the high bremsstrahlung and electrical noise environments found in High Energy Density Physics experiments and especially on the very high noise environment generated on the fast pulsed power experiments performed here at Sandia. This same system may dramatically improve active WMD and contraband detection as well when employed with ultrafast (10-50 ns) pulsed neutron sources.

  19. Target diagnostic technology research and development for the LLNL ICF and HED program (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bell, P.M.; Landen, O.L.; Weber, F.A.; Lowry, M.E.; Bennett, C.V.; Kimbrough, J.R.; Moody, J.D.; Holder, J.P.; Lerche, R.A.; Griffith, R.L.; Park, H.S.; Boni, R.; Jaanimagi, P.A.; Davies, T.

    2004-10-01

    The National Ignition Facility is operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The inertial confinement fusion and HED programs at LLNL have formed diagnostic research and development groups to institute improvements outside the charter of core diagnostics. We will present data from instrumentation being developed. A major portion of our work is improvements to detectors and readout systems. We have efforts related to charge-coupled device (CCD) development. Work has been done in collaboration with the University of Arizona to back thin a large format CCD device. We have developed in collaboration with a commercial vendor a large format, compact CCD system. We have coupled large format CCD systems to our optical and x-ray streak cameras leading to improvements in resolution and dynamic range. We will discuss gate width and uniformity improvements to microchannel plate-based framing cameras. We will present data from single shot data link work and discuss technology aimed at improvements of dynamic range for high-speed transient measurements from remote locations.

  20. A reduced model for the ICF gamma-ray reaction history diagnostic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmitt, Mark J; Wilson, Douglas C; Hoffman, Nelson M; Langenbrunner, Jamie R; Hermann, H W; Kim, Y H; Young, C S; Evans, S C; Cerjan, C J; Stoeffl, Wolfgang; Munro, D H; Dauffy, L S; Miller, K M; Horsfield, C J; Rubery, M S

    2009-01-01

    An analytic model for the gamma reaction history (GRH) diagnostic to be fielded on the National Ignition Facility is described. The application of the GRH diagnostic for the measurement of capsule rho-R during burn using 4.4 MeV carbon gamma rays is demonstrated by simulation.

  1. Benchmarking the x-ray phase contrast imaging for ICF DT ice characterization using roughened surrogates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dewald, E; Kozioziemski, B; Moody, J; Koch, J; Mapoles, E; Montesanti, R; Youngblood, K; Letts, S; Nikroo, A; Sater, J; Atherton, J

    2008-06-26

    We use x-ray phase contrast imaging to characterize the inner surface roughness of DT ice layers in capsules planned for future ignition experiments. It is therefore important to quantify how well the x-ray data correlates with the actual ice roughness. We benchmarked the accuracy of our system using surrogates with fabricated roughness characterized with high precision standard techniques. Cylindrical artifacts with azimuthally uniform sinusoidal perturbations with 100 um period and 1 um amplitude demonstrated 0.02 um accuracy limited by the resolution of the imager and the source size of our phase contrast system. Spherical surrogates with random roughness close to that required for the DT ice for a successful ignition experiment were used to correlate the actual surface roughness to that obtained from the x-ray measurements. When comparing average power spectra of individual measurements, the accuracy mode number limits of the x-ray phase contrast system benchmarked against surface characterization performed by Atomic Force Microscopy are 60 and 90 for surrogates smoother and rougher than the required roughness for the ice. These agreement mode number limits are >100 when comparing matching individual measurements. We will discuss the implications for interpreting DT ice roughness data derived from phase-contrast x-ray imaging.

  2. Heat-transfer limitations on pellets used in ICF reaction chambers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitts, J.H.

    1981-10-12

    A spherically-symmetric, transient heat-transfer analysis conducted on a cryogenic multiple-shelled laser-driven pellet shows that injection velocities of 300 m/s are required. Support mechanisms for the inner shells must be able not only to withstand the maximum pellet acceleration but also to dissipate the heat generated in the frozen D-T fuel. Manufacturing, storage, and acceleration of pellets are also examined and found to require a cryogenic environment.

  3. Automated fabrication, characterization and transport of ICF pellets. Final report, March 1, 1979-October 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clifford, D W; Boyd, B A; Lilienkamp, R H

    1980-12-01

    The near-term objectives of the contract were threefold: (1) evaluate techniques for the production of frozen hydrogen microspheres and demonstrate concepts for coating them; (2) develop and demonstrate an optical characterization system which could lead to automated pellet inspection; and (3) develop and demonstrate a preliminary electrostatic pellet transport control system. This report describes the equipment assembled for these experiments and the results obtained.

  4. Experimental Study of High-Z Gas Buffers in Gas-Filled ICF Engines...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    and energetic ions released during target detonation. To reduce the uncertainties of cooling and beamtarget propagation through such gas-filled chambers, we present a pulsed...

  5. Some Thoughts on the Role of non-LTE Physics in ICF (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    An effort to develop sub-critical-density high-Z metal-doped and pure metal foams as laser-driven x-ray sources is described. The main idea is that the laser beams preferentially ...

  6. Hydra modeling of experiments to study ICF capsule fill hole dynamics using surrogate targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, J B

    2007-08-27

    In this section the results of HYDRA [1] design simulations will be discussed. The simulations were conducted in two dimensional, RZ geometry, with the fill tube on axis. The radiation transport was treated in the diffusion approximation using 15 energy groups. Opacities were calculated. The equations of state (EOS) for all materials used were from a combined analytic/Thomas-Fermi EOS which uses a modified Cowan model for the ion EOS, and uses a scaled Thomas-Fermi table for the electron EOS.

  7. C:\\Users\\28105\\Documents\\Choi ICF\\ESPA-LPT work\\RFI\\PDF Conversions...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... National Grid plc and its affiliates do not accept any liability for viruses. An e-mail reply to this address may be subject to monitoring for operational reasons or lawful ...

  8. Some Thoughts on the Role of non-LTE Physics in ICF (Technical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    An effort to develop sub-critical-density high-Z metal-doped and pure metal foams as ... PLASMA DENSITY; METALS; ELECTRONS; FOAMS; DOPED MATERIALS; K SHELL; KEV RANGE; L ...

  9. Better Buildings Neighborhood Program Data & Evaluation Peer...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Information Management System (SIMS) by ICF International * For Financials and ... Information Management System), by ICF International SIMS (Sustainability ...

  10. Assessment of ion kinetic effects in shock-driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions using fusion burn imaging

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Séguin, F. H.; Amendt, P. A.; Atzeni, S.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Hoffman, N. M.; Zylstra, A. B.; Li, C. K.; Sio, H.; Gatu Johnson, M.; et al

    2015-06-02

    The significance and nature of ion kinetic effects in D³He-filled, shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions are assessed through measurements of fusion burn profiles. Over this series of experiments, the ratio of ion-ion mean free path to minimum shell radius (the Knudsen number, NK) was varied from 0.3 to 9 in order to probe hydrodynamic-like to strongly kinetic plasma conditions; as the Knudsen number increased, hydrodynamic models increasingly failed to match measured yields, while an empirically-tuned, first-step model of ion kinetic effects better captured the observed yield trends [Rosenberg et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 185001 (2014)]. Here, spatially resolved measurementsmore » of the fusion burn are used to examine kinetic ion transport effects in greater detail, adding an additional dimension of understanding that goes beyond zero-dimensional integrated quantities to one-dimensional profiles. In agreement with the previous findings, a comparison of measured and simulated burn profiles shows that models including ion transport effects are able to better match the experimental results. In implosions characterized by large Knudsen numbers (NK ~ 3), the fusion burn profiles predicted by hydrodynamics simulations that exclude ion mean free path effects are peaked far from the origin, in stark disagreement with the experimentally observed profiles, which are centrally peaked. In contrast, a hydrodynamics simulation that includes a model of ion diffusion is able to qualitatively match the measured profile shapes. Therefore, ion diffusion or diffusion-like processes are identified as a plausible explanation of the observed trends, though further refinement of the models is needed for a more complete and quantitative understanding of ion kinetic effects.« less

  11. Soft X-Ray Spectroscopic Measurements of Plasma Conditions at Early Times in ICF Experiments on OMEGA. Final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griem, Hans R.; Elton, Raymond C.

    2000-02-28

    Our previously-reported observation of a disruptive prepulse on OMEGA, possibly as large as 1% of the extreme ultraviolet (euv) radiation measured from the main pulse, has recently been substantiated by the measurement of euv absorption spectra, prior to the main pulse. The absorption features have been identified with n=2 photoionization in aluminum atoms and ions up to Al5+. Cold aluminum is originally present as a 0.0125-um thick sealant coating applied to a neon-filled (10 atm) CH microballoon, with an euv transmission at the L-absorption edge of {approx}50%. The aluminum in turn is overcoated with 2 um of Mg. The spectra which show the absorption also include continua as well as line emissions from Mg9+ to Mg11+ ions. These occur prior to the onset of laser target irradiation by at least 10 ns, and imply a prepulse irradiance of about 10{sup 12} W/cm{sup 2}. Since the neon and CH are opaque to euv radiation from the rear, a likely scenario is early (prepulse) vaporization of the outer Mg layer, perhaps in hot spots, followed by laser radiation transmitted through the thin Al layer, thereby heating the CH surface. This could provide an euv continuum backlighter for the aluminum that leads to the euv absorption features in various ionic species, perhaps from different points on the target surface.

  12. Assessment of ion kinetic effects in shock-driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions using fusion burn imaging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Séguin, F. H.; Amendt, P. A.; Atzeni, S.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Hoffman, N. M.; Zylstra, A. B.; Li, C. K.; Sio, H.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Stoeckl, C.; Seka, W.; Marshall, F. J.; Delettrez, J. A.; Sangster, T. C.; Betti, R.; Wilks, S. C.; Pino, J.; Kagan, G.; Molvig, K.; Nikroo, A.

    2015-06-02

    The significance and nature of ion kinetic effects in D³He-filled, shock-driven inertial confinement fusion implosions are assessed through measurements of fusion burn profiles. Over this series of experiments, the ratio of ion-ion mean free path to minimum shell radius (the Knudsen number, NK) was varied from 0.3 to 9 in order to probe hydrodynamic-like to strongly kinetic plasma conditions; as the Knudsen number increased, hydrodynamic models increasingly failed to match measured yields, while an empirically-tuned, first-step model of ion kinetic effects better captured the observed yield trends [Rosenberg et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 185001 (2014)]. Here, spatially resolved measurements of the fusion burn are used to examine kinetic ion transport effects in greater detail, adding an additional dimension of understanding that goes beyond zero-dimensional integrated quantities to one-dimensional profiles. In agreement with the previous findings, a comparison of measured and simulated burn profiles shows that models including ion transport effects are able to better match the experimental results. In implosions characterized by large Knudsen numbers (NK ~ 3), the fusion burn profiles predicted by hydrodynamics simulations that exclude ion mean free path effects are peaked far from the origin, in stark disagreement with the experimentally observed profiles, which are centrally peaked. In contrast, a hydrodynamics simulation that includes a model of ion diffusion is able to qualitatively match the measured profile shapes. Therefore, ion diffusion or diffusion-like processes are identified as a plausible explanation of the observed trends, though further refinement of the models is needed for a more complete and quantitative understanding of ion kinetic effects.

  13. Papers and Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    "high-foot" inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments that reached the highest ... Nature Physics Logo The ICF experiments analyzed in the Nature Physics paper were ...

  14. Microsoft Word - XML Data Services 1.10

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... (ICF) is based on pulse- power capabilities that grew out of earlier developments of intense relativistic electron- beam (e-beam) radiation sources for weapon effects studies. ICF ...

  15. Details of the response of Kodak high resolution plate to x-irradiation for the characterization of ICF targets and components

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, A.J.; Simms, R.J.

    1985-01-01

    Radiographic images are used in the characterization of Internal Confinement Fusion targets and target components. The use of this technique involves consideration of: (1) the continuum and line emission source spectra produced by a tungsten anode, (2) the attenuation of the source spectrum by material in the x-ray path, and (3) the response of the x-ray detector, a Kodak HRP (High Resolution Plate), to the incident x-ray flux. 5 refs., 4 figs.

  16. A technique for extending by ∼10{sup 3} the dynamic range of compact proton spectrometers for diagnosing ICF implosions on the National Ignition Facility and OMEGA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sio, H. Séguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2014-11-15

    Wedge Range Filter (WRF) proton spectrometers are routinely used on OMEGA and the NIF for diagnosing ρR and ρR asymmetries in direct- and indirect-drive implosions of D{sup 3}He-, D{sub 2}-, and DT-gas-filled capsules. By measuring the optical opacity distribution in CR-39 due to proton tracks in high-yield applications, as opposed to counting individual tracks, WRF dynamic range can be extended by 10{sup 2} for obtaining the spectral shape, and by 10{sup 3} for mean energy (ρR) measurement, corresponding to proton fluences of 10{sup 8} and 10{sup 9} cm{sup −2}, respectively. Using this new technique, ρR asymmetries can be measured during both shock and compression burn (proton yield ∼10{sup 8} and ∼10{sup 12}, respectively) in 2-shock National Ignition Facility implosions with the standard WRF accuracy of ±∼10 mg/cm{sup 2}.

  17. The Magnetically Driven Direct Drive Approach to Ignition: Responses to Questions by Panel 1 of the FY15 ICF Program Review.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinars, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    The long-term goal of the pulsed-­power based, magnetically driven target approach is to achieve high single­shot yields (0.5-­1 GJ per shot). This goal may take decades to achieve, but if successful we believe it would be a key capability for the Stockpile Stewardship program, as noted as far back as 1988 in the Laboratory Microfusion Capability Phase 1 (U) study. If this approach is successful, it may be possible to achieve these yields from targets absorbing up to 10 MJ in a laboratory pulsed power facility with a stored energy of roughly 130 MJ. Such a facility would be substantially cheaper, and not as complex, than the corresponding pulsed power facility required for producing comparable yields from x-ray driven capsule targets.

  18. Experimental Highlights

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    confinement fusion (ICF), as it provides a means to measure the density and asymmetries of the deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel in an ICF capsule near the time of peak compression. ...

  19. Papers and Presentations - 2016

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    One of the factors that can limit the performance of NIF inertial confinement fusion (ICF) ... of Hot-Electron Emission in a Hohlraum An ICF target showing a surrogate bismuth capsule ...

  20. fusion | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    The demonstration of laboratory ignition and its use to support the... ICF Facilities ICF operates a set of world-class experimental facilities to create HEDP conditions and to ...

  1. technology

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    1%2A en ICF Reports http:nnsa.energy.govaboutusourprogramsdefenseprogramsstockpilestewardshipinertialconfinementfusionicfreports

  2. A technique for extending by ~103 the dynamic range of compact proton spectrometers for diagnosing ICF implosions on the National Ignition Facility and OMEGAa)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sio, H.; Séguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Zylstra, A. B.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2014-11-01

    Wedge Range Filter (WRF) proton spectrometers are routinely used on OMEGA and the NIF for diagnosing ρR and ρR asymmetries in direct- and indirect-drive implosions of D3He-, D2-, and DT-gas-filled capsules. By measuring the optical opacity distribution in CR-39 due to proton tracks in high-yield applications, as opposed to counting individual tracks, WRF dynamic range can be extended by 102 for obtaining the spectral shape, and by 103 for mean energy (ρR) measurement, corresponding to proton fluences of 108 and 109 cm-2, respectively. Finally, using this new technique, ρR asymmetries can be measured during both shock and compression burn (proton yield ~108 and ~1012, respectively) in 2-shock National Ignition Facility implosions with the standard WRF accuracy of ±~10 mg/cm2.

  3. C:\Users\28105\Documents\Choi ICF\ESPA-LPT work\RFI\PDF Conversions for Phil\PDF Conversions for Phil\National Grid_Additional_RFI_Transformer Reserve.txt

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    onversions%20for%20Phil/PDF%20Conversions%20for%20Phil/National%20Grid_Additional_RFI_Transformer%20Reserve.txt[10/9/2015 1:59:21 PM] From: Lobko, William [mailto:William.Lobko@nationalgrid.com] Sent: Wednesday, October 07, 2015 2:26 PM To: LPT.RFI.2015 <LPT.RFI.2015@hq.doe.gov> Cc: Kelly, Chris <Chris.Kelly@nationalgrid.com>; Martuscello, Suzan E. <Suzan.Martuscello@nationalgrid.com> Subject: Comments to the FRN RFI on a Large Power Transformer Reserve Ms. Lippert, Additional

  4. Inertial confinement fusion quarterly report, April--June 1994. Volume 4, Number 3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaw, M.J.

    1994-06-01

    This issue of the ICF Quarterly contains six articles covering a wide range of activities within the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program. It concentrates on target design; theoretical spectral analysis of ICF capsule surfaces; laser fusion experimental methods; and an alternative ICF design, based on ultrafast, ultrapowerful lasers. A key issue for the success of the ICF process is the hydrodynamic stability of the imploding capsule. There are two primary sources of instability growth in the ICF process: (1) asymmetries in the x-ray flux that drive the compression lead to asymmetric in the imploding surface; (2) imperfections on the capsule surface can grow into large perturbations, degrading the capsule performance. In recent years, a great deal of effort, both experimentally and theoretically, has been spent to enhance the Program`s ability to measure, model, and minimize instability growth during an implosion. Four the articles in this issue discuss this subject.

  5. Insulating concrete forms: Installed cost and acoustic performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-03-01

    The NAHB Research Center conducted a study to compare the cost and performance of Insulating Concrete Form (ICF) walls to conventional wood-frame exterior walls. This report contains the results of the cost study and sound transmission tests. Three home were built and monitored. One home has an ICF plank system, one has an ICF block system, and one is of conventional 2x4 lumber construction. The homes have identical floor plans and are located side by side. The findings indicate that the labor costs for the ICFs were slightly to moderately higher than the wood framing. However, the sound tests indicate that the ICF walls perform significantly better than the wood walls when no openings were present. The report summarizes the findings and recommends ways to increase the cost-effectiveness of ICFs.

  6. futuregen | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    fusion Inertial Confinement Fusion The Office of ICF provides experimental capabilities and scientific understanding in high energy density physics (HEDP) necessary to ensure a safe, secure, and effective nuclear weapons stockpile without underground testing. The demonstration of laboratory ignition and its use to support the... ICF Facilities ICF operates a set of world-class experimental facilities to create HEDP conditions and to obtain quantitative data in support of its numerous stockpile

  7. ICYMI: Y-12 National Security Complex earns national Best Workplaces for

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Fusion ICF Reports There are a wide variety of reports that address the world class research and experiments in ICF being performed on behalf of the U.S. ICF Program and stockpile stewardship. Some of these reports are listed below: 2016 Inertial Confinement Fusion Program Framework, U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, May 16, 2016. DOE/NA-0044 2015 Review of the Inertial Confinement Fusion and High Energy Density Science Portfolio, U.S. Department of Energy,

  8. Investigating inertial confinement fusion target fuel conditions through x-ray spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hansen, Stephanie B.

    2012-05-15

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets are designed to produce hot, dense fuel in a neutron-producing core that is surrounded by a shell of compressing material. The x-rays emitted from ICF plasmas can be analyzed to reveal details of the temperatures, densities, gradients, velocities, and mix characteristics of ICF targets. Such diagnostics are critical to understand the target performance and to improve the predictive power of simulation codes.

  9. PADDs 1 and 3 Transportation Fuels Markets

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    PADDs 1 and 3 Transportation Fuels Markets A report prepared by ICF International for EIA Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 February 2016 February 2016 ICF International, LLC for EIA | PADDs 1 and 3 Transportation Fuels Markets i Acknowledgements This report was prepared by ICF International for the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) under the general guidance of Lynn Westfall, Director of Office of Energy Markets and

  10. Inertial Confinement Fusion Annual Report 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Correll, D

    1998-06-01

    The ICF Annual Report provides documentation of the achievements of the LLNL ICF Program during the fiscal year by the use of two formats: (1) an Overview that is a narrative summary of important results for the fiscal year and (2) a compilation of the articles that previously appeared in the ICF Quarterly Report that year. Both the Overview and Quarterly Report are also on the Web at http://lasers.llnl.gov/lasers/pubs/icfq.html. Beginning in Fiscal Year 1997, the fourth quarter issue of the ICF Quarterly was no longer printed as a separate document but rather included in the ICF Annual. This change provided a more efficient process of documenting our accomplishments with-out unnecessary duplication of printing. In addition we introduced a new document, the ICF Program Monthly Highlights. Starting with the September 1997 issue and each month following, the Monthly Highlights will provide a brief description of noteworthy activities of interest to our DOE sponsors and our stakeholders. The underlying theme for LLNL's ICF Program research continues to be defined within DOE's Defense Programs missions and goals. In support of these missions and goals, the ICF Program advances research and technology development in major interrelated areas that include fusion target theory and design, target fabrication, target experiments, and laser and optical science and technology. While in pursuit of its goal of demonstrating thermonuclear fusion ignition and energy gain in the laboratory, the ICF Program provides research and development opportunities in fundamental high-energy-density physics and supports the necessary research base for the possible long-term application of inertial fusion energy for civilian power production. ICF technologies continue to have spin-off applications for additional government and industrial use. In addition to these topics, the ICF Annual Report covers non-ICF funded, but related, laser research and development and associated applications. We also

  11. DOE Tour of Zero: The Hope Landing Lot 2 by Manatee County Habitat...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    7 of 11 Volunteers are trained to construct thermal blanket walls using insulated concrete form (ICF) construction with hollow rigid foam insulation blocks that are filled with...

  12. Managing Increased Charging Demand

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Managing Increased Charging Demand Carrie Giles ICF International, Supporting the Workplace Charging Challenge Workplace Charging Challenge Do you already own an EV? Are you...

  13. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... November 2015 Integrated Diagnostic Analysis of ICF Capsule Performance Cerjan, C ; Springer, P T ; Sepke, S A Full Text Available November 2012 Nuclear Plasma Interactions on ...

  14. The Standard Energy Efficiency Database Platform

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SEED: The Standard Energy Efficiency Database Platform Bill Prindle Bill Prindle ICF ... Features * SEED is built on a blank database structure for which users create their ...

  15. TITLE AUTHORS SUBJECT SUBJECT RELATED DESCRIPTION PUBLISHER AVAILABILI...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Resolution Crystal Spectrometry to ICF Plasmas Kenneth W Hill et al PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY High Temperature High Temperature High resolution D imaging x ray...

  16. Application of Spatially Resolved High Resolution Crystal Spectrometry...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Crystal Spectrometry to ICF Plasmas Kenneth W. Hill, et. al. 70 PLASMA PHYSICS AND FUSION TECHNOLOGY High Temperature High Temperature High resolution (3; 10 000) 1D...

  17. U.S. LNG Exports:

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    generated by gas- and petrochemical-related activities National study assessed LNG export impacts on three export levels: ICF Base Case (4 Bcfd) Middle Exports Case ...

  18. Integrated Codes | National Nuclear Security Administration ...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Specialized codes have detailed physics focused on unique applications (e.g., radiation transport or ICF laser-plasma interactions) or are specific applications such as problem ...

  19. Design, Assembly, and Testing of the Neutron Imaging Lens for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malone, R. M., Kaufman, M. I.

    2010-12-01

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory’s National Ignition Facility (NIF) is the world’s largest and most powerful laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and experiments studying high energy density science. Neutron imaging of ICF targets provides a powerful tool for understanding the implosion conditions of deuterium and tritium (DT) filled targets. The primary purpose of imaging ICF targets at NIF is to determine the symmetry of the fuel in an imploded ICF target. The image data are then combined with other nuclear information to gain insight into the drive laser and radiation conditions required to drive the targets to ignition.

  20. technology

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    1%2A en ICF Reports http:www.nnsa.energy.govaboutusourprogramsdefenseprogramsstockpilestewardshipinertialconfinementfusionicfreports

  1. Papers and Presentations - 2016

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Stockpile Stewardship National Security National Competitiveness Fusion and Ignition Experiments Fast Ignition Energy for the Future How to Make a Star How ICF Works Discovery ...

  2. Experimental Highlights - 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Stockpile Stewardship National Security National Competitiveness Fusion and Ignition Experiments Fast Ignition Energy for the Future How to Make a Star How ICF Works Discovery ...

  3. Robin Miles

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Stockpile Stewardship National Security National Competitiveness Fusion and Ignition Experiments Fast Ignition Energy for the Future How to Make a Star How ICF Works Discovery ...

  4. Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Warm Dense Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Not only is it prevalent throughout the universe, it is relevant to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and material performance under extreme conditions. However, because of its ...

  5. First-time measurements will advance turbulence models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    In supersonic engines, RM enhances combustion efficiency by blending the fuel and the oxidizer. In inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactions, the mixing induced by the RM ...

  6. CoMuEx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    To lead the Laboratory in its diverse activities in the areas concerning mix and turbulence under extreme conditions as related to stockpile stewardship, weapons, ICF, ...

  7. 2014 TUNL REU PROJECTS 1. Commissioning the Enge Spectrometer...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for measuring important parameters of the Deuterium-Tritium (DT) Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) plasma. ...

  8. Los Alamos physicist Hockaday

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... In 2006, she was named Deputy Associate Director of Weapons Physics and Program Director for Science and Inertial Confinement Fusion and High Yield (ICF) Campaigns. Hockaday, who ...

  9. Consolidated Resilience April Workshop Invitee List_Final for...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Principal ICF International Mike Kangior Senior Director for Resilience Policy DHS John Laws DHS Infrastructure Protection Angela Blair Program Manager, DHS Science & ...

  10. Search | National Nuclear Security Administration

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Facility history holiday honors and awards house of representatives hpc hr hrp HSEMC hydrogen i-rapter iaea icf imaging impc IND infrastructure Infrastructure & Sustainability...

  11. Types of Insulation | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Insulating Concrete Forms Insulating concrete forms (ICFs) are basically forms for poured ... Unfaced boards can then be finished with reinforced insulating cement, canvas, or ...

  12. CHP: A Technical & Economic Compliance Strategy - SEE Action...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Center, and Bruce Hedman, ICF International, is from the January 17, 2012, SEE Action IEECHP Webinar 1: EPA's Air Regulations and CHP. chpcompliancecutticaandhedman.pdf (541.99 ...

  13. Measurement of reaction-in-flight neutrons using thulium activation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE Contract Number: AC52-06NA25396 Resource Type: Conference Resource Relation: Conference: SPIE Optics & Photonics 2014 - Target Diagnostics Physics and Engineering for ICF III ...

  14. AMO Industrial Distributed Energy: Summary of EPA Final Rules...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Summary of EPA Final Rules for Air Toxic Standards for Industrial, Commercial, and Institutional (ICI) Boilers and Process Heaters ICF International for U.S. Department of Energy...

  15. Pulsed Power Technology at Sandia National Laboratories

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Technology Programs and Capabilities Experimental and Theoretical Programs Electromagnetic Technology at Sandia National Laboratories HEDP & ICF Simulation Codes ALEGRA Spect3D--A...

  16. Better Buildings Residential Network Peer Exchange Call Series...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Home Office Training & Technology * ICF International * id3A, LLC * LINC Housing * New Hampshire Electric Cooperative * NPS * Off The Grid Renovations * PG&E Energy Training ...

  17. Transmission Infrastructure Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... by new facilities; however, additional reconfiguration, integration and reliability needs may also arise - ICF International, July 2015 6 Program Process: Summary * Goal: Provide ...

  18. Exploring the Business Link Opportunity: Transmission & Clean...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Henke, Senior Vice President, ICF International Laurie Woodall, Principal, URS Phoenix ... & RENEWABLES: NEW TECHNOLOGIES & INTEGRATION PROGRAMS AND GREEN LINE DEVELOPMENT DOE ...

  19. Search for: All records | DOE PAGES

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Thomas James ; et al In magnetizing the fusion fuel in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) systems, we found that the required stagnation pressure and density can be relaxed...

  20. PROPOSED RULEMAKING MEETING

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Delivery & Energy Reliability 13 JULIE A. SMITH 14 Electricity Policy Analyst Office of ... Reliability 18 Also Present: 19 JOSHUA SMITH 20 ICF International 21 KATHERINE L. ...

  1. Prescriptive method for insulating concrete forms in residential construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vrankar, A.; Elhajj, N.

    1998-05-01

    Characterized as strong, durable, and energy-efficient, a new wall system for housing called Insulating Concrete Forms (ICFs) is emerging as an alternative to lumber wall frames. Due to rising costs and varying quality of framing lumber, home builders are increasing their use of ICFs even though added engineering costs make ICF homes slightly more expensive than homes with wood framing. To improve the affordability and acceptance of ICF homes, this report sets guidelines on the design, construction and inspection of ICF wall systems in residential construction. Based on thorough testing and research, the Prescriptive Method section of the report outlines minimum requirements for ICF systems including wall thickness, termite protection, reinforcement, lintel span, and connection requirements. It highlights construction and thermal guidelines for ICFs and explains how to apply the prescriptive requirements to one- and two-family homes. The Commentary section provides supplemental information and the engineering assumptions and methods used for the prescriptive method. Appendices contain step-by-step examples on how to apply ICF requirements when designing a home. They also contain engineering technical substantiation and metric conversion factors.

  2. Application of Spatially Resolved High Resolution Crystal Spectrometry to

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ICF Plasmas (Conference) | SciTech Connect Application of Spatially Resolved High Resolution Crystal Spectrometry to ICF Plasmas Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Application of Spatially Resolved High Resolution Crystal Spectrometry to ICF Plasmas High resolution (λ/Δ λ ~ 10 000) 1D imaging x-ray spectroscopy using a spherically bent crystal and a 2D hybrid pixel array detector is used world wide for Doppler measurements of ion-temperature and plasma flow-velocity profiles in

  3. High-performance inertial confinement fusion target implosions on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meyerhofer, D. D.; McCrory, R L; Betti, R; Boehly, T R; Casey, D T; Collins, T.J.B.; Craxton, R S; Delettrez, J A; Edgell, D H; Epstein, R; Fletcher, K A; Frenje, J A; Glebov, Y Yu; Goncharov, V N; Harding, D R; Hu, S X; Igumenshchev, I V; Knauer, J P; Li, C K; Marozas, J A; Marshall, F J; McKenty, P W; Nilson, P M; Padalino, S P; Petrasso, R D; Radha, P B; Regan, S P; Sangster, T C; Seguin, F H; Seka, W; Short, R W; Shvarts, D; Skupsky, S; Soures, J M; Stoeckl, C; Theobald, W; Yaakobi, B

    2011-04-18

    The Omega Laser Facility is used to study inertial confinement fusion (ICF) concepts. This paper describes progress in direct-drive central hot-spot (CHS) ICF, shock ignition (SI) and fast ignition (FI) since the 2008 IAEA FEC conference. CHS cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) target implosions on OMEGA have produced the highest DT areal densities yet measured in ICF implosions (~300 mg cm{sup -2}). Integrated FI experiments have shown a significant increase in neutron yield caused by an appropriately timed high-intensity, high-energy laser pulse.

  4. Development of multichannel low-energy neutron spectrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Arikawa, Y. Nagai, T.; Abe, Y.; Kojima, S.; Sakata, S.; Inoue, H.; Utsugi, M.; Iwasa, Y.; Sarukura, N.; Nakai, M.; Shiraga, H.; Fujioka, S.; Azechi, H.; Murata, T.

    2014-11-15

    A multichannel low-energy neutron spectrometer for down-scattered neutron (DSN) measurements in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments has been developed. Our compact-size 256-channel lithium-glass-scintillator-based spectrometer has been implemented and tested in ICF experiments with the GEKKO XII laser. We have performed time calibration of the 256-channel analog-to-digital convertor system used for DSN measurements via X-ray pulse signals. We have clearly observed the DD-primary fusion neutron signal and have successfully studied the detector's impulse response. Our detector is soon to be implemented in future ICF experiments.

  5. Prospects for inertial fusion as an energy source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hogan, W.J.

    1989-06-26

    Progress in the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program has been very rapid in the last few years. Target physics experiments with laboratory lasers and in underground nuclear tests have shown that the drive conditions necessary to achieve high gain can be achieved in the laboratory with a pulse-shaped driver of about 10 MJ. Requirements and designs for a Laboratory Microfusion Facility (LMF) have been formulated. Research on driver technology necessary for an ICF reactor is making progress. Prospects for ICF as an energy source are very promising. 11 refs., 5 figs.

  6. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Weiss Building & Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in River Forest, IL, that scored HERS 17 without PV. This 4,763-square-foot custom passive house has R-54 ICF walls, a vented attic with ...

  7. Building America Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Southeast Volusia Habitat for Humanity, Edgewater, Florida

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study describing a Habitat for Humanity home in coastal Florida with ICF walls, ducts in the thermal envelope in a furred-up ceiling chase, and HERS 49 without PV.

  8. DOE Tour of Zero: The Shore Road Project by Murphy Brothers Contractin...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    floor slab. 9 of 13 The ultra-efficient wall insulation consists of insulated concrete form (ICF) construction where rigid foam blocks have steel-reinforcing added and are...

  9. Engineering design and analysis of advanced physical fine coal cleaning technologies. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-08-01

    This report describes the gravity separation equipment models available in the Coal Cleaning Simulator developed by Aspen Technology, Inc. This flowsheet simulator was developed in collaboration with ICF Kaiser Engineers, a subcontractor to Aspen Technology, Inc., and CQ Inc., a subcontractor to ICF Kaiser Engineers. The algorithms and FORTRAN programs for modeling gravity separation, which include calculations for predicting process performance, and calculations for equipment sizing and costing, were developed by ICF Kaiser Engineers. Aspen Technology integrated these and other models into the ASPEN PLUS system to provide a simulator specifically tailored for modeling coal cleaning plants. ICF Kaiser Engineers also provided basic documentation for these models; Aspen Technology, Inc. has incorporated the information into this topical report. The report documents both the use and the design bases for the models, and provides to the user a good understanding of their range of applicability and limitations.

  10. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Greenhill Contracting...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    All of the homes have R-22 ICF walls, R-20 closed-cell spray foam under the slab, a ground-source heat pump with desuperheater for hot water, triple-pane windows, very tight air ...

  11. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Manatee County Habitat...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    HERS 53 without PV, HERS 23 with PV. This 1,143-square-foot affordable home has R-23 ICF walls, a spray-foamed sealed attic, solar hot water, and a ducted mini-split heat pump. ...

  12. untitled

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ... many opportunities to improve and better test the physics models that underlie ICF. ... Since the test bed for the HFM was the Au sphere experiments 17 on the University of ...

  13. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home: Healthy Efficient Homes - Spirit...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    R-23 basement walls are ICF plus two 2-inch layers of EPS. The house also has a mini-split heat pump, fresh air fan intake, and a solar hot water heater. PDF icon ...

  14. BPA-2012-01172-FOIA Request

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    *** * Name: Peter Doran Organization: ICF Address: 9300 Lee Highway Fairfax VA 22031 Phone: 7032182698 No FAX number provided Email: pdoran@icfi.com 1CUVEI) B HP, 101A OFFICE...

  15. Initial Operation of the uTCAP using H2 and D2

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    to dispose * OMEGA users wish to examine fusion reactions at D-T ratios other than 1:1 ... 5050 to satisfy inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experimental requirements * Initial ...

  16. Integrated electric power and heat planning in Russia: The fossil-nuclear tradeoff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shavel, I.H.; Blaney, J.C.

    1996-08-01

    For the Joint Energy Alternatives Study (JEAS), ICF Kaiser International was tasked to use its Integrated Planning Model (IPM{copyright}) to estimate the investment requirements for the Russian power sector. The IPM is a least-cost planning model that uses a linear programming algorithm to select investment options and to dispatch generating and load management resources to meet overall electricity demand. For the purpose, ICF was provided with input data by the five Working Groups established under the JEAS. Methodological approaches for processing and adjusting this data were specified by Working Group 5. In addition to the two Reference Cases, ICF used IPM to analyze over forty different Change Cases. For each of these cases, ICF generated summary reports on capacity additions, electric generation, and investment and system costs. These results, along with the parallel work undertaken by the Russian Energy Research Institute formed the analytical basis for the Joint Energy Alternatives Study.

  17. Calibration model for the DCXC x-ray camera

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fehl, D.L.; Chang, J.

    1980-01-01

    A physical model for the DCXC camera used in x-radiographic studies of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets is described. Empirical calibration procedures, based on pulsed, bremsstrahlung sources, are proposed.

  18. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Greenhill Contracting...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    have R-22 ICF walls, R-20 closed-cell spray foam under the slab, a ground-source heat pump with desuperheater for hot water, triple-pane windows, very tight air sealing (0.14...

  19. Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    March 19, 2013 | Author(s): Alex Friedman, LLNL | Download File: Friedman-FESNERSC-2013slides-v1a.pdf | pdf | 13 MB Kinetic Modelling in ICF March 19, 2013 | Author(s): Chuang Ren, ...

  20. Strong Coupling and Degeneracy Effects in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, S.X.; Militzer, B.; Goncharov, V.N.; Skupsky, S.

    2010-06-10

    Accurate knowledge about the equation of state (EOS) of deuterium is critical to inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Low-adiabat ICF implosions routinely access strongly coupled and degenerate plasma conditions. Using the path integral Monte Carlo method, we have derived a first-principles EOS (FPEOS) table of deuterium. It is the first ab initio EOS table which completely covers typical ICF implosion trajectory in the density and temperature ranges of rho = 0.002–1596 g/cm^3 and T = 1.35 eV–5.5 keV. Discrepancies in internal energy and pressure have been found in strongly coupled and degenerate regimes with respect to SESAME EOS. Hydrodynamics simulations of cryogenic ICF implosions using the FPEOS table have indicated significant differences in peak density, areal density, and neutron yield relative to SESAME simulations.

  1. Presentations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    March 19, 2013 | Author(s): Alex Friedman, LLNL | Download File: ndcx40g.r6000res1280ipstep5faster.mov | mov | 26 MB Kinetic Modelling in ICF March 19, 2013 | Author(s): Chuang ...

  2. Building America Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Southeast...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Case study describing a Habitat for Humanity home in coastal Florida with ICF walls, ducts in the thermal envelope in a furred-up ceiling chase, and HERS 49 without PV. PDF icon ...

  3. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Devoted Builders, LLC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2013-02-01

    Devoted Builders meets 2012 IECC insulation requirements in the cold climate with R-25 ICF walls, R-25 slab insulation and R-49 spray foam and cellulose attic floors.

  4. Plainsandeastern From: Sent: To: Cc: Subject: Attachments:

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... by Appendix 2G, a Leidos 2 page "benefit analysis" that's bereft of analysis. ls the ICF Benefits Report used as support for this project, the Leidos 2 page "analysis", or both? ...

  5. U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inspector General

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ... Recovery Act projects, and EERE wanted the expertise of ICF International, a subcontractor on the New West-Energetics contract that had provided NEPA support to EERE's HQ offices. ...

  6. Strong Coupling and Degeneracy Effects in Inertial Confinement Fusion Implosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, S. X.; Goncharov, V. N.; Skupsky, S.; Militzer, B.

    2010-06-11

    Accurate knowledge about the equation of state (EOS) of deuterium is critical to inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Low-adiabat ICF implosions routinely access strongly coupled and degenerate plasma conditions. Using the path integral Monte Carlo method, we have derived a first-principles EOS (FPEOS) table of deuterium. It is the first ab initio EOS table which completely covers typical ICF implosion trajectory in the density and temperature ranges of {rho}=0.002-1596 g/cm{sup 3} and T=1.35 eV-5.5 keV. Discrepancies in internal energy and pressure have been found in strongly coupled and degenerate regimes with respect to SESAME EOS. Hydrodynamics simulations of cryogenic ICF implosions using the FPEOS table have indicated significant differences in peak density, areal density ({rho}R), and neutron yield relative to SESAME simulations.

  7. Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun Mon Tue

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... LL58 MEC Kraus, Dominik Phase separation of hydrocarbons at conditions comparable to planetary interiors and the first shock in ICF LL71 MFX Lyubimov, Artem In-chip X-ray analysis ...

  8. New Whole-House Solutions Case Study: Nelson Construction, Farmington, Connecticut

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2012-04-01

    The builder worked with Building Science Corporation to design ten HERS 53 homes with ICF foundations, foam-sheathed above-grade walls, and high-efficiency furnaces with fresh air intake and jump ducts.

  9. Application of Spatially Resolved High Resolution Crystal Spectrometry...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    11 PPPL- 4811 Application of Spatially Resolved High Resolution Crystal Spectrometry to ICF Plasmas September, 2012 Kenneth W. Hill, M. Bitter, L. Delgado-Aprico, N.A. Pablant, P. ...

  10. Development of KrF lasers for inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, J.A.; Harris, D.B.

    1990-01-01

    Recent reviews of the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program have resulted in recommendations that promise to focus the research effort on the examination of the feasibility of pellet ignition at 1 MJ of energy on target. If successful, the next major step in the program has been defined to be the construction of an Ignition Facility. Los Alamos National Laboratory has developed a plan to reach single-pulse multimegajoule ICF facilities using the electron-beam-pumped KrF laser. The Los Alamos plan, its relation to the development of ICF for energy production, and the major features and design issues associated with ICF drivers will be covered in this presentation. 3 figs., 1 tab.

  11. Laser Program annual report 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Neal, E.M.; Murphy, P.W.; Canada, J.A.; Kirvel, R.D.; Peck, T.; Price, M.E.; Prono, J.K.; Reid, S.G.; Wallerstein, L.; Wright, T.W.

    1989-07-01

    This report discusses the following topics: target design and experiments; target materials development; laboratory x-ray lasers; laser science and technology; high-average-power solid state lasers; and ICF applications studies.

  12. LLE Review 101 (October-December 2004)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shmayda, W. T.

    2005-03-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering October to December 2004, highlights the significance of shaped adiabats to inertial confinement fusion. Theory suggests that inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules compressed by shaped adiabats will exhibit improved hydrodynamic stability.

  13. Search for: All records | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ... icf lasers (1) classical and quantumm mechanics, general physics (1) computers (1) ... Shaw, M J (2) Adams, J J (1) Adams, J. J. (1) Arnold, P A (1) Baisden, P A (1) Bliss, E S ...

  14. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Greenhill Contracting, Green Acres #20, #26, #28, New Paltz, NY

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study of three DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning custom homes in the cold climate that got a HERS of 26, 28, and 26 without PV or -3, -1, and -3.5 with PV; with R-22 ICFs, 10” ocsf plus 2.7” c ccsf in attic; ICF basements with 4.3” ccsf under slab; tri;e-pane windows; ERVs, ground source heat pumps (COP 5.7).

  15. Joe Kilkenny

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    joe kilkenny Joe Kilkenny Joe Kilkenny Chief NIF Experimentalist for Measurements National Ignition Facility Joe Kilkenny, vice president for high energy density physics at General Atomics, currently is assigned to the NIF diagnostic program as the chief NIF experimentalist for measurements. He has made major contributions to experimental inertial confinement fusion (ICF) for more than 35 years. He has some 200 refereed publications on ICF. Dr. Kilkenny was an academic at Imperial College,

  16. ICHEP_2012_MB_HRay_post.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facilities Nike mirror array and lens array ICF operates a set of world-class experimental facilities to create HEDP conditions and to obtain quantitative data in support of its numerous stockpile stewardship-related activities. To learn about three high energy experimental facilities and two small lasers that provide ICF capabilities, select the links below. National Ignition Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory OMEGA and OMEGA EP, University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser

  17. California CHP Market Assessment, July 2009 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    California CHP Market Assessment, July 2009 California CHP Market Assessment, July 2009 Presentation by ICF International to the Integrated Energy Policy Report Committee at the California Energy Commission's July 2009 Combined Heat and Power Workshop. 2009-07-15_ICF_CHP_Market_Assessment.pdf (3.08 MB) More Documents & Publications CHP Assessment, California Energy Commission, October 2009 2008 CHP Baseline Assessment and Action Plan for the California Market CHP: Connecting the Gap between

  18. Possible in-lattice confinement fusion (LCF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kawarasaki, Y.

    1996-05-01

    New scheme of a nuclear fusion reactor system is proposed, the basic concept of which comes from ingenious combination of hitherto developed techniques and verified facts; (1) so-called cold fusion (CF), (2) plasma of both magnetic confinement fusion (MCF) and inertial confinement fusion (ICF), and (3) accelerator-based D-T (D) neutron source. Through the comparison of the characteristics among ICF, LCF, and MCF, the feasibility of the LCFs is discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Introduction

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Electric Transmission in the West Planning  Siting  Issues February 7, 2012 2  What does Transmission Look Like?  Why is Transmission Important?  Transmission Planning  Transmission Siting  Select Transmission Issues  References Presentation Content © 2010 ICF International. All rights reserved. What does Transmission Look Like? © 2010 ICF International. All rights reserved. WHAT DOES ELECTRIC TRANSMISSION LOOK LIKE 4  Provide affordable/reliable electricity 

  20. DOE ZERH Case Study: Greenhill Contracting, Green Acres #20, #26, #28, New Paltz, NY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2015-09-01

    Case study of three DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning custom homes in the cold climate that got a HERS of 26, 28, and 26 without PV or -3, -1, and -3.5 with PV; with R-22 ICFs, 10” ocsf plus 2.7” c ccsf in attic; ICF basements with 4.3” ccsf under slab; tri;e-pane windows; ERVs, ground source heat pumps (COP 5.7).

  1. Effects of electron-ion temperature equilibration on inertial confinement fusion implosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Barry; Hu, S. X.

    2011-07-15

    The electron-ion temperature relaxation essentially affects both the laser absorption in coronal plasmas and the hot-spot formation in inertial confinement fusion (ICF). It has recently been reexamined for plasma conditions closely relevant to ICF implosions using either classical molecular-dynamics simulations or analytical methods. To explore the electron-ion temperature equilibration effects on ICF implosion performance, we have examined two Coulomb logarithm models by implementing them into our hydrocodes, and we have carried out hydrosimulations for ICF implosions. Compared to the Lee-More model that is currently used in our standard hydrocodes, the two models predict substantial differences in laser absorption, coronal temperatures, and neutron yields for ICF implosions at the OMEGA Laser Facility [Boehly et al. Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)]. Such effects on the triple-picket direct-drive design at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) have also been explored. Based on the validity of the two models, we have proposed a combined model of the electron-ion temperature-relaxation rate for the overall ICF plasma conditions. The hydrosimulations using the combined model for OMEGA implosions have shown {approx}6% more laser absorption, {approx}6%-15% higher coronal temperatures, and {approx}10% more neutron yield, when compared to the Lee-More model prediction. It is also noticed that the gain for the NIF direct-drive design can be varied by {approx}10% among the different electron-ion temperature-relaxation models.

  2. Estimated radiactive and shock loading of fusion reactor armor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Swift, D C

    2008-11-25

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is of interest as a source of neutrons for proliferation-resistant and high burn-up fission reactor designs. ICF is a transient process, each implosion leading to energy release over a short period, with a continuous series of ICF operations needed to drive the fission reactor. ICF yields energy in the form of MeV-range neutrons and ions, and thermal x-rays. These radiations, particularly the thermal x-rays, can deposit a pulse of energy in the wall of the ICF chamber, inducing loading by isochoric heating (i.e. at constant volume before the material can expand) or by ablation of material from the surface. The explosion of the hot ICF system, and the compression of any fill material in the chamber, may also result in direct mechanical loading by a blast wave (decaying shock) reaching the chamber wall. The chamber wall must be able to survive the repetitive loading events for long enough for the reactor to operate economically. It is thus necessary to understand the loading induced by ICF systems in possible chamber wall designs, and to predict the response and life time of the wall. Estimates are given for the loading induced in the wall armor of the fusion chamber caused by ablative thermal radiation from the fusion plasma and by the hydrodynamic shock. Taking a version of the LIFE design as an example, the ablation pressure was estimated to be {approx}0.6 GPa with an approximately exponential decay with time constant {approx}0.6 ns. Radiation hydrodynamics simulations suggested that ablation of the W armor should be negligible.

  3. Impact of first-principles properties of deuterium–tritium on inertial confinement fusion target designsa)

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hu, S. X.; Goncharov, V. N.; Boehly, T. R.; McCrory, R. L.; Skupsky, S.; Collins, L. A.; Kress, J. D.; Militizer, B.

    2015-04-20

    In this study, a comprehensive knowledge of the properties of high-energy-density plasmas is crucial to understanding and designing low-adiabat, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions through hydrodynamic simulations. Warm-dense-matter (WDM) conditions are routinely accessed by low-adiabat ICF implosions, in which strong coupling and electron degeneracy often play an important role in determining the properties of warm dense plasmas. The WDM properties of deuterium–tritium (DT) mixtures and ablator materials, such as the equation of state, thermal conductivity, opacity, and stopping power, were usually estimated by models in hydro-codes used for ICF simulations. In these models, many-body and quantum effects were only approximatelymore » taken into account in the WMD regime. Moreover, the self-consistency among these models was often missing. To examine the accuracy of these models, we have systematically calculated the static, transport, and optical properties of warm dense DT plasmas, using first-principles (FP) methods over a wide range of densities and temperatures that cover the ICF “path” to ignition. These FP methods include the path-integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) and quantum-molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations, which treat electrons with many-body quantum theory. The first-principles equation-of-state table, thermal conductivities (KQMD), and first principles opacity table of DT have been self-consistently derived from the combined PIMC and QMD calculations. They have been compared with the typical models, and their effects to ICF simulations have been separately examined in previous publications. In this paper, we focus on their combined effects to ICF implosions through hydro-simulations using these FP-based properties of DT in comparison with the usual model simulations. We found that the predictions of ICF neutron yield could change by up to a factor of –2.5; the lower the adiabat of DT capsules, the more variations in hydro

  4. Impact of first-principles properties of deuterium–tritium on inertial confinement fusion target designs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hu, Suxing X.; Goncharov, V. N.; Boehly, T. R.; McCrory, R. L.; Skupsky, S.; Collins, Lee A.; Kress, Joel David; Militzer, B.

    2015-05-01

    A comprehensive knowledge of the properties of high-energy-density plasmas is crucial to understanding and designing low-adiabat, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions through hydrodynamic simulations. Warm-dense-matter (WDM) conditions are routinely accessed by low-adiabat ICF implosions, in which strong coupling and electron degeneracy often play an important role in determining the properties of warm dense plasmas. The WDM properties of deuterium–tritium (DT) mixtures and ablator materials, such as the equation of state (EOS), thermal conductivity, opacity, and stopping power, were usually estimated by models in hydrocodes used for ICF simulations. In these models, many-body and quantum effects were only approximately taken intomore » account in the WMD regime. Moreover, the self-consistency among these models was often missing. To examine the accuracy of these models, we have systematically calculated the static, transport, and optical properties of warm dense DT plasmas, using first-principles (FP) methods over a wide range of densities and temperatures that cover the ICF “path” to ignition. These FP methods include the pathintegral Monte Carlo (PIMC) and quantum-molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations, which treat electrons with many-body quantum theory. The first-principles equation-of-state (FPEOS) table, thermal conductivities (KQMD), and first principles opacity table (FPOT) of DT have been self-consistently derived from the combined PIMC and QMD calculations. They have been compared with the typical models, and their effects to ICF simulations have been separately examined in previous publications. In this paper, we focus on their combined effects to ICF implosions through hydro-simulations using these FP-based properties of DT in comparison with the usual model simulations. We found that the predictions of ICF neutron yield could change by up to a factor of ~2.5; the lower the adiabat of DT capsules, the more variations in hydro

  5. Impact of first-principles properties of deuterium–tritium on inertial confinement fusion target designs

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hu, S. X.; Goncharov, V. N.; Boehly, T. R.; McCrory, R. L.; Skupsky, S.; Collins, L. A.; Kress, J. D.; Militizer, B.

    2015-04-20

    In this study, a comprehensive knowledge of the properties of high-energy-density plasmas is crucial to understanding and designing low-adiabat, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions through hydrodynamic simulations. Warm-dense-matter (WDM) conditions are routinely accessed by low-adiabat ICF implosions, in which strong coupling and electron degeneracy often play an important role in determining the properties of warm dense plasmas. The WDM properties of deuterium–tritium (DT) mixtures and ablator materials, such as the equation of state, thermal conductivity, opacity, and stopping power, were usually estimated by models in hydro-codes used for ICF simulations. In these models, many-body and quantum effects were only approximatelymore » taken into account in the WMD regime. Moreover, the self-consistency among these models was often missing. To examine the accuracy of these models, we have systematically calculated the static, transport, and optical properties of warm dense DT plasmas, using first-principles (FP) methods over a wide range of densities and temperatures that cover the ICF “path” to ignition. These FP methods include the path-integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) and quantum-molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations, which treat electrons with many-body quantum theory. The first-principles equation-of-state table, thermal conductivities (KQMD), and first principles opacity table of DT have been self-consistently derived from the combined PIMC and QMD calculations. They have been compared with the typical models, and their effects to ICF simulations have been separately examined in previous publications. In this paper, we focus on their combined effects to ICF implosions through hydro-simulations using these FP-based properties of DT in comparison with the usual model simulations. We found that the predictions of ICF neutron yield could change by up to a factor of –2.5; the lower the adiabat of DT capsules, the more variations in hydro

  6. Impact of first-principles properties of deuterium–tritium on inertial confinement fusion target designs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, S. X. Goncharov, V. N.; Boehly, T. R.; McCrory, R. L.; Skupsky, S.; Collins, L. A.; Kress, J. D.; Militzer, B.

    2015-05-15

    A comprehensive knowledge of the properties of high-energy-density plasmas is crucial to understanding and designing low-adiabat, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions through hydrodynamic simulations. Warm-dense-matter (WDM) conditions are routinely accessed by low-adiabat ICF implosions, in which strong coupling and electron degeneracy often play an important role in determining the properties of warm dense plasmas. The WDM properties of deuterium–tritium (DT) mixtures and ablator materials, such as the equation of state, thermal conductivity, opacity, and stopping power, were usually estimated by models in hydro-codes used for ICF simulations. In these models, many-body and quantum effects were only approximately taken into account in the WMD regime. Moreover, the self-consistency among these models was often missing. To examine the accuracy of these models, we have systematically calculated the static, transport, and optical properties of warm dense DT plasmas, using first-principles (FP) methods over a wide range of densities and temperatures that cover the ICF “path” to ignition. These FP methods include the path-integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) and quantum-molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations, which treat electrons with many-body quantum theory. The first-principles equation-of-state table, thermal conductivities (κ{sub QMD}), and first principles opacity table of DT have been self-consistently derived from the combined PIMC and QMD calculations. They have been compared with the typical models, and their effects to ICF simulations have been separately examined in previous publications. In this paper, we focus on their combined effects to ICF implosions through hydro-simulations using these FP-based properties of DT in comparison with the usual model simulations. We found that the predictions of ICF neutron yield could change by up to a factor of ∼2.5; the lower the adiabat of DT capsules, the more variations in hydro-simulations. The FP

  7. Impact of first-principles properties of deuterium–tritium on inertial confinement fusion target designs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, Suxing X.; Goncharov, V. N.; Boehly, T. R.; McCrory, R. L.; Skupsky, S.; Collins, Lee A.; Kress, Joel David; Militzer, B.

    2015-05-01

    A comprehensive knowledge of the properties of high-energy-density plasmas is crucial to understanding and designing low-adiabat, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions through hydrodynamic simulations. Warm-dense-matter (WDM) conditions are routinely accessed by low-adiabat ICF implosions, in which strong coupling and electron degeneracy often play an important role in determining the properties of warm dense plasmas. The WDM properties of deuterium–tritium (DT) mixtures and ablator materials, such as the equation of state (EOS), thermal conductivity, opacity, and stopping power, were usually estimated by models in hydrocodes used for ICF simulations. In these models, many-body and quantum effects were only approximately taken into account in the WMD regime. Moreover, the self-consistency among these models was often missing. To examine the accuracy of these models, we have systematically calculated the static, transport, and optical properties of warm dense DT plasmas, using first-principles (FP) methods over a wide range of densities and temperatures that cover the ICF “path” to ignition. These FP methods include the pathintegral Monte Carlo (PIMC) and quantum-molecular dynamics (QMD) simulations, which treat electrons with many-body quantum theory. The first-principles equation-of-state (FPEOS) table, thermal conductivities (KQMD), and first principles opacity table (FPOT) of DT have been self-consistently derived from the combined PIMC and QMD calculations. They have been compared with the typical models, and their effects to ICF simulations have been separately examined in previous publications. In this paper, we focus on their combined effects to ICF implosions through hydro-simulations using these FP-based properties of DT in comparison with the usual model simulations. We found that the predictions of ICF neutron yield could change by up to a factor of ~2.5; the lower the adiabat of DT capsules, the more variations in hydro

  8. Comparison of Vehicle Efficiency Technology Attributes and Synergy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duleep, G.

    2011-02-01

    Analyzing the future fuel economy of light-duty vehicles (LDVs) requires detailed knowledge of the vehicle technologies available to improve LDV fuel economy. The National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) has been relying on technology data from a 2001 National Academy of Sciences (NAS) study (NAS 2001) on corporate average fuel economy (CAFE) standards, but the technology parameters were updated in the new proposed rulemaking (EPA and NHTSA 2009) to set CAFE and greenhouse gas standards for the 2011 to 2016 period. The update is based largely on an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) analysis of technology attributes augmented by NHTSA data and contractor staff assessments. These technology cost and performance data were documented in the Draft Joint Technical Support Document (TSD) issued by EPA and NHTSA in September 2009 (EPA/NHTSA 2009). For these tasks, the Energy and Environmental Analysis (EEA) division of ICF International (ICF) examined each technology and technology package in the Draft TSD and assessed their costs and performance potential based on U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) program assessments. ICF also assessed the technologies? other relevant attributes based on data from actual production vehicles and from recently published technical articles in engineering journals. ICF examined technology synergy issues through an ICF in-house model that uses a discrete parameter approach.

  9. Comparison of Vehicle Efficiency Technology Attributes and Synergy Estimates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Duleep, G.

    2011-02-01

    Analyzing the future fuel economy of light-duty vehicles (LDVs) requires detailed knowledge of the vehicle technologies available to improve LDV fuel economy. The National Highway Transportation Safety Administration (NHTSA) has been relying on technology data from a 2001 National Academy of Sciences (NAS) study (NAS 2001) on corporate average fuel economy (CAFE) standards, but the technology parameters were updated in the new proposed rulemaking (EPA and NHTSA 2009) to set CAFE and greenhouse gas standards for the 2011 to 2016 period. The update is based largely on an Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) analysis of technology attributes augmented by NHTSA data and contractor staff assessments. These technology cost and performance data were documented in the Draft Joint Technical Support Document (TSD) issued by EPA and NHTSA in September 2009 (EPA/NHTSA 2009). For these tasks, the Energy and Environmental Analysis (EEA) division of ICF International (ICF) examined each technology and technology package in the Draft TSD and assessed their costs and performance potential based on U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) program assessments. ICF also assessed the technologies, other relevant attributes based on data from actual production vehicles, and recently published technical articles in engineering journals. ICF examined technology synergy issues through an ICF in-house model that uses a discrete parameter approach.

  10. An overview on incomplete fusion reaction dynamics at energy range ∼ 3-8 MeV/A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, Rahbar; Singh, D.; Ansari, M. Afzal; Kumar, Rakesh; Muralithar, S.; Golda, K. S.; Singh, R. P.; Bhowmik, R. K.; Rashid, M. H.; Guin, R.; Das, S. K.

    2014-08-14

    The information of ICF reaction has been obtained from the measurement of excitation function (EF) of ERs populated in the interaction of {sup 20}Ne and {sup 16}O on {sup 55}Mn, {sup 159}Tb and {sup 156}Gd targets. Sizable enhancement in the measured cross-sections has been observed in α-emitting channels over theoretical predictions, which has been attributed to ICF of the projectile. In order to confirm the findings of the measurements and analysis of EFs, the forward recoil range distributions of ERs populated in {sup 20}Ne+{sup 159}Tb (E ∼165MeV) and {sup 16}O+{sup 156}Gd (E ∼ 72, 82 and 93MeV) systems, have been measured. It has been observed that peaks appearing at different cumulative thicknesses in the stopping medium are related with different degree of linear momentum transfer from projectile to target nucleus by adopting the break-up fusion model consideration. In order to deduce the angular momentum involved in various CF and / or ICF reaction products, spin distribution and side-feeding intensity profiles of radio-nuclides populated via CF and ICF channels in {sup 16}O+{sup 160}Gd system at energy, E ∼ 5.6 MeV/A, have been studied. Spin distribution of ICF products are found to be distinctly different than that observed from CF products.

  11. Investigations into the seeding of instabilities due to x-ray preheat in beryllium-based inertial confinement fusion targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loomis, E. N.; Greenfield, S. R.; Johnson, R. P.; Cobble, J. A.; Luo, S. N.; Montgomery, D. S.; Marinak, M. M.

    2010-05-15

    The geometry of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules makes them susceptible to various types of hydrodynamic instabilities at different stages during an ICF implosion. From the beginnings of ICF research, it has been known that grain-level anisotropy and defects could be a significant source of instability seeding in solid beryllium capsules. We report on experiments conducted at the Trident laser facility [S. H. Batha et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 79, 10F305 (2008)] to measure dynamic surface roughening from hard x-ray preheat due to anisotropic thermal expansion. M-band emission from laser-produced gold plasma was used to heat beryllium targets with different amounts of copper doping to temperatures comparable to ICF ignition preheat levels. Dynamic roughening measurements were made on the surface away from the plasma at discrete times up to 8 ns after the beginning of the drive pulse using a surface displacement interferometer with nanometer scale sensitivity. Undoped large-grained targets were measured to roughen between 15 and 50 nm rms. Fine-grained, copper-doped targets were observed to roughen near the sensitivity limit of the interferometer. The results of this work have shed light on the effects of high-Z doping and microstructural refinement on the dynamics of differential thermal expansion and have shown that current ICF capsule designs using beryllium are very effective in reducing preheat related roughening ahead of the first shock.

  12. The search for solid state fusion lasers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weber, M.J. )

    1989-04-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research puts severe demands on the laser driver. In recent years large, multibeam Nd:glass lasers have provided a flexible experimental tool for exploring fusion target physics because of their high powers, variable pulse length and shape, wavelength flexibility using harmonic generation, and adjustable that Nd:glass lasers can be scaled up to provide a single-phase, multi-megajoule, high-gain laboratory microfusion facility, and gas-cooled slab amplifiers with laser diode pump sources are viable candidates for an efficient, high repetition rate, megawatt driver for an ICF reactor. In both applications requirements for energy storage and energy extraction drastically limit the choice of lasing media. Nonlinear optical effects and optical damage are additional design constraints. New laser architectures applicable to ICF drivers and possible laser materials, both crystals and glasses, are surveyed. 20 refs., 2 figs.

  13. Inertial Confinement Fusion and the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ross, P.

    2012-08-29

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) seeks to provide sustainable fusion energy by compressing frozen deuterium and tritium fuel to extremely high densities. The advantages of fusion vs. fission are discussed, including total energy per reaction and energy per nucleon. The Lawson Criterion, defining the requirements for ignition, is derived and explained. Different confinement methods and their implications are discussed. The feasibility of creating a power plant using ICF is analyzed using realistic and feasible numbers. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is shown as a significant step forward toward making a fusion power plant based on ICF. NIF is the world’s largest laser, delivering 1.8 MJ of energy, with a peak power greater than 500 TW. NIF is actively striving toward the goal of fusion energy. Other uses for NIF are discussed.

  14. Manufactured solutions for the three-dimensional Euler equations with relevance to Inertial Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waltz, J.; Canfield, T.R.; Morgan, N.R.; Risinger, L.D.; Wohlbier, J.G.

    2014-06-15

    We present a set of manufactured solutions for the three-dimensional (3D) Euler equations. The purpose of these solutions is to allow for code verification against true 3D flows with physical relevance, as opposed to 3D simulations of lower-dimensional problems or manufactured solutions that lack physical relevance. Of particular interest are solutions with relevance to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) capsules. While ICF capsules are designed for spherical symmetry, they are hypothesized to become highly 3D at late time due to phenomena such as Rayleigh–Taylor instability, drive asymmetry, and vortex decay. ICF capsules also involve highly nonlinear coupling between the fluid dynamics and other physics, such as radiation transport and thermonuclear fusion. The manufactured solutions we present are specifically designed to test the terms and couplings in the Euler equations that are relevant to these phenomena. Example numerical results generated with a 3D Finite Element hydrodynamics code are presented, including mesh convergence studies.

  15. Condensed hydrogen for thermonuclear fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kucheyev, S. O.; Hamza, A. V.

    2010-11-15

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) power, in either pure fusion or fission-fusion hybrid reactors, is a possible solution for future world's energy demands. Formation of uniform layers of a condensed hydrogen fuel in ICF targets has been a long standing materials physics challenge. Here, we review the progress in this field. After a brief discussion of the major ICF target designs and the basic properties of condensed hydrogens, we review both liquid and solid layering methods, physical mechanisms causing layer nonuniformity, growth of hydrogen single crystals, attempts to prepare amorphous and nanostructured hydrogens, and mechanical deformation behavior. Emphasis is given to current challenges defining future research areas in the field of condensed hydrogens for fusion energy applications.

  16. Laser or charged-particle-beam fusion reactor with direct electric generation by magnetic flux compression

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lasche, G.P.

    1983-09-29

    The invention is a laser or particle-beam-driven fusion reactor system which takes maximum advantage of both the very short pulsed nature of the energy release of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and the very small volumes within which the thermonuclear burn takes place. The pulsed nature of ICF permits dynamic direct energy conversion schemes such as magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) generation and magnetic flux compression; the small volumes permit very compact blanket geometries. By fully exploiting these characteristics of ICF, it is possible to design a fusion reactor with exceptionally high power density, high net electric efficiency, and low neutron-induced radioactivity. The invention includes a compact blanket design and method and apparatus for obtaining energy utilizing the compact blanket.

  17. Design review plan for Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (Project W-236A)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renfro, G.G.

    1994-12-20

    This plan describes how the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) Project conducts reviews of design media; describes actions required by Project participants; and provides the methodology to ensure that the design is complete, meets the technical baseline of the Project, is operable and maintainable, and is constructable. Project W-236A is an integrated project wherein the relationship between the operating contractor and architect-engineer is somewhat different than that of a conventional project. Working together, Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) and ICF Karser Hanford (ICF KH) have developed a relationship whereby ICF KH performs extensive design reviews and design verification. WHC actively participates in over-the-shoulder reviews during design development, performs a final review of the completed design, and conducts a formal design review of the Safety Class I, ASME boiler and Pressure Vessel Code items in accordance with WHC-CM-6-1, Standard Engineering Practices.

  18. FY15 LLNL OMEGA Experimental Programs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeter, R. F.; Baker, K. L.; Barrios, M. A.; Beckwith, M. A.; Casey, D. T.; Celliers, P. M.; Chen, H.; Coppari, F.; Fournier, K. B.; Fratanduono, D. E.; Frenje, J.; Huntington, C. M.; Kraus, R. G.; Lazicki, A. E.; Martinez, D. A.; McNaney, J. M.; Millot, M. A.; Pak, A. E.; Park, H. S.; Ping, Y.; Pollock, B. B.; Smith, R. F.; Wehrenberg, C. E.; Widmann, K.; Collins, G. W.; Landen, O. L.; Wan, A.; Hsing, W.

    2015-12-04

    In FY15, LLNL’s High-Energy-Density Physics (HED) and Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF-ID) programs conducted several campaigns on the OMEGA laser system and on the EP laser system, as well as campaigns that used the OMEGA and EP beams jointly. Overall these LLNL programs led 468 target shots in FY15, with 315 shots using just the OMEGA laser system, 145 shots using just the EP laser system, and 8 Joint shots using Omega and EP together. Approximately 25% of the total number of shots (56 OMEGA shots and 67 EP shots, including the 8 Joint shots) supported the Indirect Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Campaign (ICF-ID). The remaining 75% (267 OMEGA shots and 86 EP shots) were dedicated to experiments for High-Energy-Density Physics (HED). Highlights of the various HED and ICF campaigns are summarized in the following reports.

  19. SU-E-T-477: An Efficient Dose Correction Algorithm Accounting for Tissue Heterogeneities in LDR Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mashouf, S; Lai, P; Karotki, A; Keller, B; Beachey, D; Pignol, J

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Seed brachytherapy is currently used for adjuvant radiotherapy of early stage prostate and breast cancer patients. The current standard for calculation of dose surrounding the brachytherapy seeds is based on American Association of Physicist in Medicine Task Group No. 43 (TG-43 formalism) which generates the dose in homogeneous water medium. Recently, AAPM Task Group No. 186 emphasized the importance of accounting for tissue heterogeneities. This can be done using Monte Carlo (MC) methods, but it requires knowing the source structure and tissue atomic composition accurately. In this work we describe an efficient analytical dose inhomogeneity correction algorithm implemented using MIM Symphony treatment planning platform to calculate dose distributions in heterogeneous media. Methods: An Inhomogeneity Correction Factor (ICF) is introduced as the ratio of absorbed dose in tissue to that in water medium. ICF is a function of tissue properties and independent of source structure. The ICF is extracted using CT images and the absorbed dose in tissue can then be calculated by multiplying the dose as calculated by the TG-43 formalism times ICF. To evaluate the methodology, we compared our results with Monte Carlo simulations as well as experiments in phantoms with known density and atomic compositions. Results: The dose distributions obtained through applying ICF to TG-43 protocol agreed very well with those of Monte Carlo simulations as well as experiments in all phantoms. In all cases, the mean relative error was reduced by at least 50% when ICF correction factor was applied to the TG-43 protocol. Conclusion: We have developed a new analytical dose calculation method which enables personalized dose calculations in heterogeneous media. The advantages over stochastic methods are computational efficiency and the ease of integration into clinical setting as detailed source structure and tissue segmentation are not needed. University of Toronto, Natural Sciences and

  20. Science & Technology - 2016

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    may Science & Technology - 2016 May Solving the Challenges of Making Liquid-Hydrogen Targets Just like water, hydrogen can exist in three different states, or phases-solid, liquid, and gas-depending on the temperature and pressure. Both solid and liquid phases can be used in NIF inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high energy density (HED) implosions, and each has its own distictive advantages. Most NIF ICF experiments to date have relied on the formation of a thin solid layer of the

  1. Propane Market Outlook Key Market Trends, Opportunities, and Threats Facing the Consumer

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Propane Market Outlook Key Market Trends, Opportunities, and Threats Facing the Consumer Propane Industry Through 2025 Prepared for the Propane Education & Research Council (PERC) by: ICF International, Inc. 9300 Lee Highway Fairfax, VA 22031 Tel (703) 218-2758 www.icfi.com Principal Author: Mr. Michael Sloan msloan@icfi.com P R E S E N T E D B Y : Propane Market Outlook at a Glance ¡ ICF projects consumer propane sales to grow by about 800 million gallons (9 percent) between 2014 and

  2. VISTA -- A Vehicle for Interplanetary Space Transport Application Powered by Inertial Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orth, C D

    2005-03-31

    Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) is an ideal technology to power self-contained single-stage piloted (manned) spacecraft within the solar system because of its inherently high power/mass ratios and high specific impulses (i.e., high exhaust velocities). These technological advantages are retained when ICF is utilized with a magnetic thrust chamber, which avoids the plasma thermalization and resultant degradation of specific impulse that are unavoidable with the use of mechanical thrust chambers. We started with Rod Hyde's 1983 description of an ICF-powered engine concept using a magnetic thrust chamber, and conducted a more detailed systems study to develop a viable, realistic, and defensible spacecraft concept based on ICF technology projected to be available in the first half of the 21st century. The results include an entirely new conical spacecraft conceptual design utilizing near-existing radiator technology. We describe the various vehicle systems for this new concept, estimate the missions performance capabilities for general missions to the planets within the solar system, and describe in detail the performance for the baseline mission of a piloted roundtrip to Mars with a 100-ton payload. For this mission, we show that roundtrips totaling {ge}145 days are possible with advanced DT fusion technology and a total (wet) spacecraft mass of about 6000 metric tons. Such short-duration missions are advantageous to minimize the known cosmic-radiation hazards to astronauts, and are even more important to minimize the physiological deteriorations arising from zero gravity. These ICF-powered missions are considerably faster than those available using chemical or nuclear-electric-propulsion technologies with minimum-mass vehicle configurations. VISTA also offers onboard artificial gravity and propellant-based shielding from cosmic rays, thus reducing the known hazards and physiological deteriorations to insignificant levels. We emphasize, however, that the degree to

  3. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Shore Road Project - Old Greenwich, Connecticut

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-11-01

    This case study describes a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Old Greenwich, CT, that scored HERS 40 without PV and HERS 27 with PV. This 4,100 ft2 custom home has 13-inch ICF basement walls and 11-inch ICF above-grade walls with a closed-cell spray foam-insulated roof deck, and a continuously running ERV. The house has a dual-fuel heat pump, an instantaneous condensing water heater, and 4.5-kW solar shingles.

  4. Experiments at Scale with In-Situ Visualization Using ParaView/Catalyst in RAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kares, Robert John

    2014-10-31

    In this paper I describe some numerical experiments performed using the ParaView/Catalyst in-situ visualization infrastructure deployed in the Los Alamos RAGE radiation-hydrodynamics code to produce images from a running large scale 3D ICF simulation on the Cielo supercomputer at Los Alamos. The detailed procedures for the creation of the visualizations using ParaView/Catalyst are discussed and several images sequences from the ICF simulation problem produced with the in-situ method are presented. My impressions and conclusions concerning the use of the in-situ visualization method in RAGE are discussed.

  5. Direct asymmetry measurement of temperature and density spatial distributions in inertial confinement fusion plasmas from pinhole space-resolved spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagayama, T.; Mancini, R. C.; Florido, R.; Mayes, D.; Tommasini, R.; Koch, J. A.; Delettrez, J. A.; Regan, S. P.; Smalyuk, V. A.

    2014-05-15

    Two-dimensional space-resolved temperature and density images of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosion core have been diagnosed for the first time. Argon-doped, direct-drive ICF experiments were performed at the Omega Laser Facility and a collection of two-dimensional space-resolved spectra were obtained from an array of gated, spectrally resolved pinhole images recorded by a multi-monochromatic x-ray imager. Detailed spectral analysis revealed asymmetries of the core not just in shape and size but in the temperature and density spatial distributions, thus characterizing the core with an unprecedented level of detail.

  6. Magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Magnetized liner inertial fusion (MagLIF) [1] is an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) scheme using cylindrical compression of magnetized, preheated DT gas. A 10 - 30 T axial magnetic field reduces electron thermal conductivity allowing near-adiabatic compression at implosion velocities of order 100 km/s, much lower than the 300 km/s or more required for conventional ICF. Preheating to at least 100 eV ensures that keV temperatures are reached with a convergence ratio no greater than 30. The

  7. New heavy-ion-fusion accelerator research program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herrmannsfeldt, W.B.

    1983-05-01

    This paper will briefly summarize the concepts of Heavy Ion Fusion (HIF), especially those aspects that are important to its potential for generating electrical power. It will also note highlights of the various HIF programs throughout the world. Especially significant is that the US Department of Energy (DOE) plans a program, beginning in 1984, aimed at determining the feasibility of using heavy ion accelerators as drivers for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). The new program concentrates on the aspects of accelerator design that are important to ICF, and for this reason is called HIF Accelerator Research.

  8. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Shore Road Project - Old Greenwich,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Connecticut | Department of Energy Shore Road Project - Old Greenwich, Connecticut DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Shore Road Project - Old Greenwich, Connecticut Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Old Greenwich, CT, that scored HERS 40 without PV and HERS 27 with PV. This 4,100 ft2 custom home has 13-inch ICF basement walls and 11-inch insulated concrete form (ICF) above-grade walls with a closed-cell spray foam-insulated roof deck, and a continuously running energy

  9. Laser programs highlights, July--August 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Laser research at LLNL is divided into five major programmatic areas: inertial confinement fusion (ICF), uranium atomic vapor laser isotope separation (U-AVLIS), special (plutonium) isotope separation (SIS), laser technology, and advanced applications. We have made important progress this past year in each of these areas. This report covers the current state of these 5 areas.

  10. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Manatee County Habitat for Humanity, Ellenton, FL, Affordable

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Ellenton, FL, that scored HERS 53 without PV, HERS 23 with PV. This 1,143-square-foot affordable home has R-23 ICF walls, a spray-foamed sealed attic, solar hot water, and a ducted mini-split heat pump.

  11. Production of hollow aerogel microspheres

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Upadhye, Ravindra S.; Henning, Sten A.

    1993-01-01

    A method is described for making hollow aerogel microspheres of 800-1200 .mu. diameter and 100-300 .mu. wall thickness by forming hollow alcogel microspheres during the sol/gel process in a catalytic atmosphere and capturing them on a foam surface containing catalyst. Supercritical drying of the formed hollow alcogel microspheres yields hollow aerogel microspheres which are suitable for ICF targets.

  12. NIF Target Shot Metrics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    target shot metrics NIF Target Shot Metrics Exp Cap - Experimental Capability Natl Sec Appl - National Security Applications DS - Discovery Science ICF - Inertial Confinement Fusion HED - High Energy Density For internal LLNL firewall viewing - if the page is blank, please open www.google.com to flush out BCB

  13. LANL HED Programs Overview

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flippo, Kirk Adler

    2015-04-23

    The Powerpoint presentation provides an overview of High-Energy Density (HED) Physis, ICF and Burning Plasma research programs at Los Alamos National Lab. in New Mexico. Work in nuclear diagnostics is also presented, along with a summary of collaborations and upcoming projects.

  14. Laser Programs Highlights 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowdermilk, H.; Cassady, C.

    1999-12-01

    This report covers the following topics: Commentary; Laser Programs; Inertial Confinement Fusion/National Ignition Facility (ICF/NIF); Atomic Vapor Laser Isotope Separation (AVLIS); Laser Science and Technology (LS&T); Information Science and Technology Program (IS&T); Strategic Materials Applications Program (SMAP); Medical Technology Program (MTP) and Awards.

  15. Damage mechanisms avoided or managed for NIF large optics

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Manes, K. R.; Spaeth, M. L.; Adams, J. J.; Bowers, M. W.; Bude, J. D.; Carr, C. W.; Conder, A. D.; DiNicola, J. M. G.; Dixit, S. N.; Feigenbaum, E.; et al

    2016-02-09

    After every other failure mode has been considered, in the end, the high-performance limit of all lasers is set by optical damage. The demands of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) pushed lasers designed as ICF drivers into this limit from their very earliest days. The first ICF lasers were small, and their pulses were short. Their goal was to provide as much power to the target as possible. Typically, they faced damage due to high intensity on their optics. As requests for higher laser energy, longer pulse lengths, and better symmetry appeared, new kinds of damage also emerged, some of themmore » anticipated and others unexpected. This paper will discuss the various types of damage to large optics that had to be considered, avoided to the extent possible, or otherwise managed as the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser was designed, fabricated, and brought into operation. Furthermore, it has been possible for NIF to meet its requirements because of the experience gained in previous ICF systems and because NIF designers have continued to be able to avoid or manage new damage situations as they have appeared.« less

  16. Upcoming Events, Conferences and Meetings

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Jets Time: 3:30 p.m., Thursday, October 7, 2014 Place: T4 3D Simulations of OMEGA-type ICF Capsules Time: 3:30 p.m., Thursday, October 2, 2014 Place: T4 Experiments on the ...

  17. Current-Driven Filament Instabilities in Relativistic Plasmas. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chuang Ren

    2013-02-13

    This grant has supported a study of some fundamental problems in current- and flow-driven instabilities in plasmas and their applications in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and astrophysics. It addressed current-driven instabilities and their roles in fast ignition, and flow-driven instabilities and their applications in astrophysics.

  18. A measurable Lawson criterion and hydro-equivalent curves for inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, C. D.; Betti, R.

    2008-01-01

    This article demonstrates how the ignition condition (Lawson criterion) for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) can be cast in a form depending on the only two parameters of the compressed fuel assembly that can be measured with methods already in existence: the hot spot ion temperature and the total areal density.

  19. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Nelson Construction, Farmington, Connecticut

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study of Nelson Construction, who worked with the Building America research partner Building Science Corporation to design ten HERS 53 homes with ICF foundations, foam-sheathed above-grade walls, and high-effciency furnaces with fresh air intake and jump ducts.

  20. Introduction to Energy Performance Contracting

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Provides a tutorial in the fundamentals of Energy Savings Performance Contracting (ESPC) for policymakers who need to understand how ESPC fits into the broader context of energy efficiency policy and programs. Author: ICF International National Association of Energy Services Companies for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency

  1. 1991 US-Japan workshop on Nuclear Fusion in Dense Plasmas. Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ichimaru, S.; Tajima, T.

    1991-10-01

    The scientific areas covered at the Workshop may be classified into the following subfields: (1) basic theory of dense plasma physics and its interface with atomic physics and nuclear physics; (2) physics of dense z-pinches, ICF plasmas etc; (3) stellar interior plasmas; (4) cold fusion; and (5) other dense plasmas.

  2. D-Cluster Converter Foil for Laser-Accelerated Deuteron Beams: Towards Deuteron-Beam-Driven Fast Ignition

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miley, George H.

    2012-10-24

    Fast Ignition (FI) uses Petawatt laser generated particle beam pulse to ignite a small volume called a pre-compressed Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) target, and is the favored method to achieve the high energy gain per target burn needed for an attractive ICF power plant. Ion beams such as protons, deuterons or heavier carbon ions are especially appealing for FI as they have relative straight trajectory, and easier to focus on the fuel capsule. But current experiments have encountered problems with the 'converter-foil' which is irradiated by the Petawatt laser to produce the ion beams. The problems include depletion of the available ions in the convertor foils, and poor energy efficiency (ion beam energy/ input laser energy). We proposed to develop a volumetrically-loaded ultra-high-density deuteron deuterium cluster material as the basis for converter-foil for deuteron beam generation. The deuterons will fuse with the ICF DT while they slow down, providing an extra 'bonus' energy gain in addition to heating the hot spot. Also, due to the volumetric loading, the foil will provide sufficient energetic deuteron beam flux for 'hot spot' ignition, while avoiding the depletion problem encountered by current proton-driven FI foils. After extensive comparative studies, in Phase I, high purity PdO/Pd/PdO foils were selected for the high packing fraction D-Cluster converter foils. An optimized loading process has been developed to increase the cluster packing fraction in this type of foil. As a result, the packing fraction has been increased from 0.1% to 10% - meeting the original Phase I goal and representing a significant progress towards the beam intensities needed for both FI and pulsed neutron applications. Fast Ignition provides a promising approach to achieve high energy gain target performance needed for commercial Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). This is now a realistic goal for near term in view of the anticipated ICF target burn at the National Ignition

  3. D-T gamma-to-neutron branching ratio determined from inertial confinement fusion plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Y.; Mack, J. M.; Herrmann, H. W.; Young, C. S.; Hale, G. M.; Caldwell, S.; Hoffman, N. M.; Evans, S. C.; Sedillo, T. J.; McEvoy, A.; Langenbrunner, J.; Hsu, H. H.; Huff, M. A.; Batha, S.; Horsfield, C. J.; Rubery, M. S.; Garbett, W. J.; Stoeffl, W.; Grafil, E.; Bernstein, L.; and others

    2012-05-15

    A new deuterium-tritium (D-T) fusion gamma-to-neutron branching ratio [{sup 3}H(d,{gamma}){sup 5}He/{sup 3}H(d,n){sup 4}He] value of (4.2 {+-} 2.0) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -5} was recently reported by this group [Y. Kim et al. Phys. Rev. C (submitted)]. This measurement, conducted at the OMEGA laser facility located at the University of Rochester, was made for the first time using inertial confinement fusion (ICF) plasmas. Neutron-induced backgrounds are significantly reduced in these experiments as compared to traditional beam-target accelerator-based experiments due to the short pulse nature of ICF implosions and the use of gas Cherenkov {gamma}-ray detectors with fast temporal responses and inherent energy thresholds. It is expected that this ICF-based measurement will help resolve the large and long-standing inconsistencies in previously reported accelerator-based values, which vary by a factor of approximately 30. The reported value at ICF conditions was determined by averaging the results of two methods: (1) a direct measurement of ICF D-T {gamma}-ray and neutron emissions using absolutely calibrated detectors and (2) a separate cross-calibration against the better known D-{sup 3}He gamma-to-proton branching ratio [{sup 3}He(d, {gamma}){sup 5}Li/{sup 3}He(d,p){sup 4}He]. Here we include a detailed explanation of these results, and introduce as a corroborative method an in-situ{gamma}-ray detector calibration using neutron-induced {gamma}-rays. Also, by extending the established techniques to two additional series of implosions with significantly different ion temperatures, we test the branching ratio dependence on ion temperature. The data show a D-T branching ratio is nearly constant over the temperature range 2-9 keV. These studies motivate further investigation into the {sup 5}He and {sup 5}Li systems resulting from D-T and D-{sup 3}He fusion, respectively, and result in improved ICF {gamma}-ray reaction history diagnosis at the National Ignition

  4. Spallation as a dominant source of pusher-fuel and hot-spot mix in inertial confinement fusion capsules

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Orth, Charles D.

    2016-02-23

    We suggest that a potentially dominant but previously neglected source of pusher-fuel and hot-spot “mix” may have been the main degradation mechanism for fusion energy yields of modern inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules designed and fielded to achieve high yields — not hydrodynamic instabilities. This potentially dominant mix source is the spallation of small chunks or “grains” of pusher material into the fuel regions whenever (1) the solid material adjacent to the fuel changes its phase by nucleation, and (2) this solid material spalls under shock loading and sudden decompression. Finally, we describe this mix mechanism, support it with simulationsmore » and experimental evidence, and explain how to eliminate it and thereby allow higher yields for ICF capsules and possibly ignition at the National Ignition Facility.« less

  5. Effects of processing techniques on the shock response of Be

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Loomis, E.; Luo, S. N.; Paisley, D.; Swift, D.; Johnson, R.; Greenfield, S.

    2007-12-12

    Microstructural effects including material anisotropy, impurities, grain size, and texture alter a material's response to dynamic loading through wave front dispersion and inelastic processes. The spatial variations created by these effects are a challenge for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) as they may seed instabilities, which could reduce thermonuclear yield, if not controlled through material processing. To this end, laser-driven confined shock experiments have been conducted on Be to characterize its dynamic strength properties and usefulness as an ICF ablator. Disks of Be 3 mm in diameter and 100 to 250 microns thick in the form of single crystal, rolled foil, and equal channel angular extruded were dynamically loaded to 100's kbar while the material behavior was measured with in-situ diagnostics. Clear two-wave structures were observed in free surface velocity records, providing a comparison of flow stress and other dynamic properties between Be types.

  6. Target Fabrication: A View from the Users

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyrala, George A.; Balkey, Matthew M.; Barnes, Cris W.; Batha, Steven H.; Christensen, Cindy R.; Cobble, James A.; Fincke, James; Keiter, Paul; Lanier, Nicholas; Paisley, Dennis; Sorem, Michael; Swift, Damian; Workman, Jonathan

    2004-03-15

    Targets are used for a variety of purposes, but ultimately we use them to validate codes that help us predict and understand new phenomena or effects. The sophistication and complexity of High Energy Density Physics (HEDP) and Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) targets has increased in to match the advances made in modeling complex phenomena. The targets have changed from simple hohlraums, spherical geometries, and planar foils, to 3-dimensional geometries that require precision in construction, alignment, and metrology. Furthermore, material properties, such as surface morphologies and volume texture, have significant impact on the behavior of the targets and must be measured and controlled. In the following we will discuss how experimental physicists view targets and the influence that target construction has on interpreting the experimental results. We review a representative sampling of targets fabricated at the Los Alamos National Laboratory that are used in different experiments in support of ICF and HEDP.

  7. TARGET FABRICATION: A VIEW FROM THE USERS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kyrala, George A.; Balkey, Matthew M.; Batha, Steven H.; Barnes, Cris W.; Christensen, Cindy; Cobble, James; Fincke, James; Keiter, Paul; Lanier, Nicholas; Paisley, Dennis; Sorem, Michael S.; Swift, Damian; Workman, Jonathan

    2003-07-18

    Targets are used for a variety of purposes, but ultimately we use them to validate codes that help us predict and understand new phenomena or effects. The sophistication and complexity of High Energy Density Physics (HEDP) and Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) targets has increased in time to match the advances made in modeling complex phenomena. The targets have changed from simple hohlraums, spherical geometries, and planar foils, to 3-dimensional geometries that require precision in construction, alignment, and metrology. Furthermore, material properties, such as surface morphologies and volume texture, have significant impact on the behavior of the targets and must be measured and controlled. In the following we will discuss how experimental physicists view targets and the influence that target construction has on interpreting the experimental results. We review a representative sampling of targets fabricated at the Los Alamos National Laboratory that are used in different experiments in support of ICF and HEDP.

  8. Proceedings of the twelfth target fabrication specialists` meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-04-01

    Research in fabrication for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) comprises at least three broad categories: targets for high energy density physics on existing drivers, ignition capsule fabrication, and cryogenic fuel layer formation. The latter two are being pursued primarily for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Scientists from over 14 laboratories, universities, and businesses contributed over 100 papers on all aspects of ICF target fabrication. The NIF is well along in construction and photos of poured concrete and exposed steel added to the technical excitement. It was clear from the meeting that there has been significant progress toward the fabrication of an ignition target for NIF and that new techniques are resulting in higher quality targets for high energy density research.

  9. LLE 2008 annual report, October 2007 - September 2008

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2009-01-31

    The research program at the University of Rochester’s Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) focuses on inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research supporting the goal of achieving ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This program includes the full use of the OMEGA EP Laser System. Within the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), LLE is the lead laboratory for the validation of the performance of cryogenic target implosions, essential to all forms of ICF ignition. LLE has taken responsibility for a number of critical elements within the Integrated Experimental Teams (IET’s) supporting the demonstration of indirect-drive ignition on the NIF and is the lead laboratory for the validation of the polardrive approach to ignition on the NIF. LLE is also developing, testing, and building a number of diagnostics to be deployed on the NIF for the NIC.

  10. Generalized Lawson Criteria for Inertial Confinement Fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tipton, Robert E.

    2015-08-27

    The Lawson Criterion was proposed by John D. Lawson in 1955 as a general measure of the conditions necessary for a magnetic fusion device to reach thermonuclear ignition. Over the years, similar ignition criteria have been proposed which would be suitable for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) designs. This paper will compare and contrast several ICF ignition criteria based on Lawson’s original ideas. Both analytical and numerical results will be presented which will demonstrate that although the various criteria differ in some details, they are closely related and perform similarly as ignition criteria. A simple approximation will also be presented which allows the inference of each ignition parameter directly from the measured data taken on most shots fired at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) with a minimum reliance on computer simulations. Evidence will be presented which indicates that the experimentally inferred ignition parameters on the best NIF shots are very close to the ignition threshold.

  11. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) and the issue of nonproliferation. Final study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-12-19

    NIF, the next step proposed by DOE in a progression of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) facilities, is expected to reach the goal of ICF capsule ignition in the laboratory. This report is in response to a request of a Congressman that DOE resolve the question of whether NIF will aid or hinder U.S. nonproliferation efforts. Both technical and policy aspects are addressed, and public participation was part of the decision process. Since the technical proliferation concerns at NIF are manageable and can be made acceptable, and NIF can contribute positively to U.S. arms control and nonproliferation policy goals, it is concluded that NIF supports the nuclear nonproliferation objectives of the United States.

  12. A Novel Neutron Imaging Calibration System Using a Neutron Generating Accelerator Tube

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, Z., Davis, B., Tinsley, J. R., Miller, E. K.

    2009-09-04

    Neutron Imaging is a key diagnostic for use in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, and has been fielded on experiments at Omega and Z. It will also be a key diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and eventually at the Laser Megajoule in France. Most systems are based on a neutron pinhole array placed at the target chamber while it is imaged by a scintillating fiber block. The light output of this scintillator is coupled via a reducer to a fiber bundle which transports the image to a CCD camera. Alternatively some systems use optical lens assemblies to focus the light onto a camera.For ICF applications the neutron imaging systems will primarily look at 14.2 MeV neutrons. However, 2.2 MeV and 20+ MeV neutrons will also be present and will potentially provide key information.

  13. Development of nuclear diagnostics for the National Ignition Facility (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Glebov, V. Yu.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.; Roberts, S.; Barrera, C. A.; Celeste, J. R.; Cerjan, C. J.; Dauffy, L. S.; Eder, D. C.; Griffith, R. L.; Haan, S. W.; Hammel, B. A.; Hatchett, S. P.; Izumi, N.; Kimbrough, J. R.; Koch, J. A.; Landen, O. L.; Lerche, R. A.; MacGowan, B. J.

    2006-10-15

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) will provide up to 1.8 MJ of laser energy for imploding inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets. Ignited NIF targets are expected to produce up to 10{sup 19} DT neutrons. This will provide unprecedented opportunities and challenges for the use of nuclear diagnostics in ICF experiments. In 2005, the suite of nuclear-ignition diagnostics for the NIF was defined and they are under development through collaborative efforts at several institutions. This suite includes PROTEX and copper activation for primary yield measurements, a magnetic recoil spectrometer and carbon activation for fuel areal density, neutron time-of-flight detectors for yield and ion temperature, a gamma bang time detector, and neutron imaging systems for primary and downscattered neutrons. An overview of the conceptual design, the developmental status, and recent results of prototype tests on the OMEGA laser will be presented.

  14. Improved understanding of first-mall vaporization-condensation in inertial confinement fusion reactors. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orth, C.D.

    1986-08-01

    We report approximate x-ray and debris spectra emanating from a region of compressed DT fuel representing the imploded configuration of a generic direct-drive ICF reactor pellet. We show how the spectra are modified by spherical lead shields of various thicknesses placed near the pellet, and show that it is not possible to lessen the ablation of the first wall or blanket of a low-pressure ICF reactor chamber through use of such shields. Then we report that the calculated x-ray spectra alone (i.e., without the associated debris) cause vaporization of a first wall placed at a radius of 4 m that is much more than previously expected. This result increases the importance of understanding the details of the vaporization and condensation phenomena.

  15. Anisotropy of radiation emitted from planar wire arrays

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kantsyrev, V. L.; Esaulov, A. A.; Safronova, A. S.; Williamson, K. M.; Osborne, G. C.; Shrestha, I. K.; Weller, M. E.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Chuvatin, A. S.; Rudakov, L. I.; Velikovich, A.

    2013-07-15

    The planar wire array (PWA) is a promising load for new multi-source inertial confinement fusion (ICF) hohlraums [B. Jones et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 125001 (2010)]. The hohlraum radiation symmetry is an important issue for ICF. It was found that extreme ultraviolet and sub-keV photon emission from PWAs may have considerable anisotropy in the load azimuthal plane. This experimental result is obtained on the UNR 1–1.7 MA Zebra generator. The time-dependent anisotropy effect is detected. This feature is studied in 2D numerical simulations and can be explained by initial anisotropy of implosion of those non-cylindrical loads radiating essentially as surface sources in sub-keV quanta and also by radiation absorption in cold magnetized plasma tails forming in the direction of magnetic compression.

  16. Tent-induced perturbations on areal density of implosions at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tommasini, R. Field, J. E.; Hammel, B. A.; Landen, O. L.; Haan, S. W.; Aracne-Ruddle, C.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Callahan, D. A.; Dewald, E. L.; Doeppner, T.; Edwards, M. J.; Hurricane, O. A.; Izumi, N.; Jones, O. A.; Ma, T.; Meezan, N. B.; Nagel, S. R.; Rygg, J. R.; Stadermann, M.; and others

    2015-05-15

    Areal density non-uniformities seeded by time-dependent drive variations and target imperfections in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) targets can grow in time as the capsule implodes, with growth rates that are amplified by instabilities. Here, we report on the first measurements of the perturbations on the density and areal density profiles induced by the membranes used to hold the capsule within the hohlraum in indirect drive ICF targets. The measurements are based on the reconstruction of the ablator density profiles from 2D radiographs obtained using pinhole imaging coupled to area backlighting, as close as 150 ps to peak compression. Our study shows a clear correlation between the modulations imposed on the areal density and measured neutron yield, and a 3× reduction in the areal density perturbations comparing a high-adiabat vs. low-adiabat pulse shape.

  17. Reduction of solvent emissions within a paint booth

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zirps, N.A.; Wiener, R.K.; Shaver, D.K.

    1988-12-31

    ICF Technology is currently performing a waste minimization study at Vandenberg Air Force Base. As part of the study, ICF has been examining planned freon-113 usage operations within Martin Marietta`s new Titan fairing paint booths. The booths are to be used for painting payload fairing (PLF) for Titan II and Titan IV vehicles. Approximately 1,050 gallons of Freon-113 are planned for use within the paint booths. The following alternatives have been examined to reduce emissions: substitution of the primary coating with an alternative coating such as powder, waterborne, or high solids; recovery of Freon-113 vapors using carbon adsorption or condensation; and use of a different application method.

  18. LLE 2007 Annual Report, October 2006 - September 2007

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None, None

    2008-01-31

    The laser-fusion research program at the University of Rochester’s Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) is focused on the National Nuclear Security Administration’s (NNSA’s) Campaign-10 inertial confinement fusion (ICF) ignition and experimental support technology, operation of facilities (OMEGA), and the construction of OMEGA EP -- a high energy petawatt laser system. While LLE is the lead laboratory for research into the direct-drive approach to ICF ignition, it also takes a lead role in certain indirect-drive tasks within the National Ignition Campaign. During this past year progress in the laser-fusion research program was made in three principal areas: OMEGA direct drive and indirect-drive experiments and targets; development of diagnostics for experiments on OMEGA, OMEGA EP, and the National Ignition Facility (NIF); and theoretical analysis and design efforts aimed at improving direct-drive-ignition capsule designs and advanced ignition concepts such as fast ignition and shock ignition.

  19. Interplanetary space transport using inertial fusion propulsion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Orth, C.D.

    1998-04-20

    In this paper, we indicate how the great advantages that ICF offers for interplanetary propulsion can be accomplished with the VISTA spacecraft concept. The performance of VISTA is expected to surpass that from other realistic technologies for Mars missions if the energy gain achievable for ICF targets is above several hundred. Based on the good performance expected from the U. S. National Ignition Facility (NIF), the requirements for VISTA should be well within the realm of possibility if creative target concepts such as the fast ignitor can be developed. We also indicate that a 6000-ton VISTA can visit any planet in the solar system and return to Earth in about 7 years or less without any significant physiological hazards to astronauts. In concept, VISTA provides such short-duration missions, especially to Mars, that the hazards from cosmic radiation and zero gravity can be reduced to insignificant levels. VISTA therefore represents a significant step forward for space-propulsion concepts.

  20. Method of forming a continuous polymeric skin on a cellular foam material

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duchane, David V.; Barthell, Barry L.

    1985-01-01

    Hydrophobic cellular material is coated with a thin hydrophilic polymer skin which stretches tightly over the outer surface of the foam but which does not fill the cells of the foam, thus resulting in a polymer-coated foam structure having a smoothness which was not possible in the prior art. In particular, when the hydrophobic cellular material is a specially chosen hydrophobic polymer foam and is formed into arbitrarily chosen shapes prior to the coating with hydrophilic polymer, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets of arbitrary shapes can be produced by subsequently coating the shapes with metal or with any other suitable material. New articles of manufacture are produced, including improved ICF targets, improved integrated circuits, and improved solar reflectors and solar collectors. In the coating method, the cell size of the hydrophobic cellular material, the viscosity of the polymer solution used to coat, and the surface tensin of the polymer solution used to coat are all very important to the coating.

  1. INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharp, W. M.; Friedman, A.; Grote, D. P.; Barnard, J. J.; Cohen, R. H.; Dorf, M. A.; Lund, S. M.; Perkins, L. J.; Terry, M. R.; Logan, B. G.; Bieniosek, F. M.; Faltens, A.; Henestroza, E.; Jung, J. Y.; Kwan, J. W.; Lee, E. P.; Lidia, S. M.; Ni, P. A.; Reginato, L. L.; Roy, P. K.; Seidl, P. A.; Takakuwa, J. H.; Vay, J.-L.; Waldron, W. L.; Davidson, R. C.; Gilson, E. P.; Kaganovich, I. D.; Qin, H.; Startsev, E.; Haber, I.; Kishek, R. A.; Koniges, A. E.

    2011-03-31

    Intense heavy-ion beams have long been considered a promising driver option for inertial-fusion energy production. This paper briefly compares inertial confinement fusion (ICF) to the more-familiar magnetic-confinement approach and presents some advantages of using beams of heavy ions to drive ICF instead of lasers. Key design choices in heavy-ion fusion (HIF) facilities are discussed, particularly the type of accelerator. We then review experiments carried out at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) over the past thirty years to understand various aspects of HIF driver physics. A brief review follows of present HIF research in the US and abroad, focusing on a new facility, NDCX-II, being built at LBNL to study the physics of warm dense matter heated by ions, as well as aspects of HIF target physics. Future research directions are briefly summarized.

  2. Coated foams, preparation, uses and articles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duchane, D.V.; Barthell, B.L.

    1982-10-21

    Hydrophobic cellular material is coated with a thin hydrophilic polymer skin which stretches tightly over the foam but which does not fill the cells of the foam, thus resulting in a polymer-coated foam structure having a smoothness which was not possible in the prior art. In particular, when the hydrophobic cellular material is a specially chosen hydrophobic polymer foam and is formed into arbitrarily chosen shapes prior to the coating with hydrophilic polymer, inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets of arbitrary shapes can be produced by subsequently coating the shapes with metal or with any other suitable material. New articles of manufacture are produced, including improved ICF targets, improved integrated circuits, and improved solar reflectors and solar collectors. In the coating method, the cell size of the hydrophobic cellular material, the viscosity of the polymer solution used to coat, and the surface tension of the polymer solution used to coat are all very important to the coating.

  3. 6th target fabrication specialists meeting: Proceedings, June 23, 1988 Sessions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    The following papers were presented at the meeting: Laser Target Fabrication at the Naval Research Laboratory; High-Sensitivity Radiography Detects Very Small Defects in Laser Fusion Targets; Ablation Layer Coating on Inertial Fusion Targets at Laboratory for Laser Energetics; X-Ray Microscopy of Inertial Fusion Targets Using a Laser Produced Plasma as an X-Ray Source; A Study of Factors Affecting The Deposition of Smooth Plasma Polymers; Composite Foams; Low-Density Resorcinol-Formaldehyde Foams for Direct-Drive Laser ICF Targets; Low-Density Polystyrene Foams For Direct-Drive Laser ICF Targets; Characterization of Low-Density Materials and Their Precursers; and Low-Voltage Scanning Electron Microscopy of Target Materials. (JF)

  4. Measurement and simulation of jet mass caused by a high-aspect ratio pertubation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keiter, Paul A; Cooley, James; Kyrala, George; Wilson, Doug; Blue, Brent; Edwards, John; Robey, Harry; Spears, Brian

    2009-01-01

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsule performance can be negatively impacted by the presence of hydrodynamic instabilities. To perform a gas fill on an ICF capsule current plans involve drilling a small hole and inserting a fill tube to inject the gas mixture into the capsule. This introduces a perturbation on the capsule, which can seed hydrodynamic instabilities. The small hole can cause jetting of the shell material into the gas, which might adversely affect the capsule performance. We have performed simulations and experiments to study the hydrodynamic evolution of jets from high-aspect ratio holes, such as the fill tube hole. Although simulations using cold materials over predict the amount of mass in the jet, when a reasonable amount of preheat (< 1 eV) is introduced, the simulations are in better agreement with the experiment.

  5. Heavy ion induction linac drivers for inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, E.P.; Hovingh, J.

    1988-10-01

    Intense beams of high energy heavy ions (e.g., 10 GeV Hg) are an attractive option for an ICF driver because of their favorable energy deposition characteristics. The accelerator systems to produce the beams at the required power level are a development from existing technologies of the induction linac, rf linac/storage ring, and synchrotron. The high repetition rate of the accelerator systems, and the high efficiency which can be realized at high current make this approach especially suitable for commercial ICF. The present report gives a summary of the main features of the induction linac driver system, which is the approach now pursued in the USA. The main subsystems, consisting of injector, multiple beam accelerator at low and high energy, transport and pulse compression lines, and final focus are described. Scale relations are given for the current limits and other features of these subsystems. 17 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  6. eHXI: A permanently installed, hard x-ray imager for the National Ignition Facility

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Doppner, T.; Bachmann, B.; Albert, F.; Bell, P.; Burns, S.; Celeste, J.; Chow, R.; Divol, L.; Dewald, E. L.; Hohenberger, M.; et al

    2016-06-14

    We have designed and built a multi-pinhole imaging system for high energy x-rays (≥ 50 keV) that is permanently installed in the equatorial plane outside of the target chamber at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). It records absolutely-calibrated, time-integrated x-ray images with the same line-of-sight as the multi-channel, spatially integrating hard x-ray detector FFLEX [McDonald et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 75 (2004) 3753], having a side view of indirect-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosion targets. The equatorial hard x-ray imager (eHXI) has recorded images on the majority of ICF implosion experiments since May 2011. Lastly, eHXI provides valuable information onmore » hot electron distribution in hohlraum experiments, target alignment, potential hohlraum drive asymmetries and serves as a long term reference for the FFLEX diagnostics.« less

  7. Performance and Mix Measurements of Indirect Drive Cu-Doped Be Implosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casey, D.  T.; Woods, D. T.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Hurricane, O.  A.; Glebov, V.  Y.; Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Wallace, R.; Nikroo, A.; Schoff, M.; Shuldberg, C.; Wu, K. J.; Frenje, J.  A.; Landen, O.  L.; Remington, B.  A.; Glendinning, G.

    2015-05-19

    The ablator couples energy between the driver and fusion fuel in inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Because of its low opacity, high solid density, and material properties, beryllium has long been considered an ideal ablator for ICF ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility. We report here the first indirect drive Be implosions driven with shaped laser pulses and diagnosed with fusion yield at the OMEGA laser. The results show good performance with an average DD neutron yield of ~2 × 10⁹ at a convergence ratio of R₀/R ~ 10 and little impact due to the growth of hydrodynamic instabilities and mix. In addition, the effect of adding an inner liner of W between the Be and DD is demonstrated.

  8. Lintel testing for reduced shear reinforcement in insulation concrete form systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-05-01

    Historically, cast-in-place concrete for residential construction has been primarily limited to below grade applications such as footings and foundation walls. Such construction was relatively labor intensive, and, therefore was not considered a viable alternative for other parts of the building. However, the recent advent of insulating concrete form (ICF) wall construction and the Prescriptive Method for Insulating Concrete Forms in Residential Construction (Prescriptive Method) has resulted in a competitive and energy efficient alternative for above grade walls in residential construction. The purpose of this test program is to investigate the structural capacity and performance of the concrete lintels typically used in ICF construction. Lintels are reinforced concrete structural elements that support loads above openings in concrete walls.

  9. NIF and Jupiter User Group Meeting 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    workshops / user group 2014 / NIF and Jupiter User Group Meeting 2014 About the NIF and Jupiter User Group Meeting The 192-beam National Ignition Facility (NIF), the most energetic inertial confinement fusion (ICF) facility in the world, is now operational. The NIF laser's unprecedented power, precision, and reproducibility, coupled with over 50 available diagnostics and sophisticated target fabrication capability, enable a wide range of leading edge scientific experiments. Initial experiments

  10. Experimental Highlights - 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5 / may Experimental Highlights - 2015 May Climbing the Mountain of Fusion Ignition: An Interview with Omar Hurricane LLNL Distinguished Scientist Omar Hurricane, Chief Scientist for the Laboratory's Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program, is at the forefront of the drive to achieve nuclear fusion with energy gain for the first time in a laboratory. In a wide-ranging interview with NIF & Photon Science News, Hurricane outlines the NIF strategy for moving toward ignition and describes the

  11. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Clifton View Homes, Marine Drive and Port Hadlcok, Coupeville and Port Hadlock WA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study of two DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning custom homes in the marine climate that got HERS 39 and 38 without PV or HERS 2-12 and -9 with PV, with 6.5” SIP walls and 10.25” SIP roof; 11.75 ICF around slab, R-20 rigid foam under slab; radiant floor heat and passive design; air-to-water heatpump, fresh air intake with fan, triple-pane windows, 100% LED.

  12. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: TC Legend Homes, Bellingham Power House, Bellingham, WA

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study of a DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning custom home in the marine climate that got HERS 34 without PV or HERS -12 with PV, with 6” SIP walls and 10” SIP roof; R-28 ICF around slab, R-20 rigid foam under slab; radiant floor heat and passive design; air-to-water heat pump COP 4.4; HRV; earth tube ventilation; triple-pane windows, 100% LED.

  13. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: New Town Builders, Town Homes at Perrin's Row, Wheat Ridge, CO

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study of a DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning multifamily project with 26 units in the cold climate that got a HERS 54 without PV, or HERS 28 with PV, with 2x6 24” on center walls with R-23 blown fiberglass; slab foundation with R-10 rigid at slab edge; plus R-10 rigid exterior; R-22 ICF basement walls; vented attic with R-50 blown fiberglass; 92 AFUE furnace, 13 SEER AC.

  14. Laser fusion monthly -- August 1980

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahlstrom, H.G.

    1980-08-01

    This report documents the monthly progress for the laser fusion research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. First it gives facilities report for both the Shiva and Argus projects. Topics discussed include; laser system for the Nova Project; the fusion experiments analysis facility; optical/x-ray streak camera; Shiva Dante System temporal response; 2{omega}{sub 0} experiment; and planning for an ICF engineering test facility.

  15. 2015 HEDLP Awards | National Nuclear Security Administration | (NNSA)

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    5 HEDLP Awards Institution PI Title Harvard College Jacobsen, Stein From Z to Planets: Phase II Princeton University Fisch, Nathaniel Fundamental Issues in the Interaction of Intense Lasers with Plasma Massachusetts Institute of Technology Petrasso, Richard Studying Hydrodynamics, Kinetic/multi-ion Effects, and Charged-Particle Stopping in HED Plasmas and ICF Implosions at Omega, Omega-EP and at the NIF University of California, Los Angeles Joshi, Chand Development of a Broadband (40-80 KV),

  16. Papers and Presentations - 2015

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    april Papers and Presentations - 2015 April Rugby Hohlraums Join the Ignition Scrum Thinner Capsules Yield Faster Implosions Chris Barty Discusses the 'Nexawatt' Laser at SPIE Conference Near-Vacuum Hohlraums Show Promise NIF inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments typically have used plastic (CH) capsules inside gold hohlraums filled with helium at densities ranging from 0.96 to 1.6 mg/cm3. Conventional laser pulses on the order of 15 to 20 nanoseconds in length are needed to reach

  17. Developing inertial fusion energy - Where do we go from here?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meier, W.R.; Logan, G.

    1996-06-11

    Development of inertial fusion energy (IFE) will require continued R&D in target physics, driver technology, target production and delivery systems, and chamber technologies. It will also require the integration of these technologies in tests and engineering demonstrations of increasing capability and complexity. Development needs in each of these areas are discussed. It is shown how IFE development will leverage off the DOE Defense Programs funded inertial confinement fusion (ICF) work.

  18. High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program | National Nuclear Security

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Administration | (NNSA) High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program Steady advances in increasing the energy, power, and brightness of lasers and particle beams and advances in pulsed power systems have made possible the exploration of matter at extremely high energy density in the laboratory. Exciting new experimental regimes are being realized by exploiting the scientific capabilities of existing ICF Office facilities, as well as the relevant Department of Defense (DoD) and university

  19. Inertial Confinement Fusion | National Nuclear Security Administration |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    (NNSA) Evaluation Inertial Confinement Fusion Forty-eight final optic assemblies are symmetrically distributed around the upper and lower hemispheres of the target chamber (National Ignition Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) The Office of ICF provides experimental capabilities and scientific understanding in high energy density physics (HEDP) necessary to ensure a safe, secure, and effective nuclear weapons stockpile without underground testing. The demonstration of

  20. Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Warm Dense Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Spectroscopy of Warm Dense Matter Print Being neither solid, liquid, gas, nor plasma, warm dense matter (WDM) occupies a no man's land in the map of material phases. Its temperature can range between that of planetary cores (tens of thousands K) to that of stellar cores (hundreds of thousands K). Not only is it prevalent throughout the universe, it is relevant to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and material performance under extreme conditions. However, because of its extreme temperatures and

  1. High Energy Physics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Administration | (NNSA) High Energy Density Laboratory Plasmas Program Steady advances in increasing the energy, power, and brightness of lasers and particle beams and advances in pulsed power systems have made possible the exploration of matter at extremely high energy density in the laboratory. Exciting new experimental regimes are being realized by exploiting the scientific capabilities of existing ICF Office facilities, as well as the relevant Department of Defense (DoD) and university

  2. Inertial confinement fusion | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (NNSA) Evaluation Inertial Confinement Fusion Forty-eight final optic assemblies are symmetrically distributed around the upper and lower hemispheres of the target chamber (National Ignition Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory) The Office of ICF provides experimental capabilities and scientific understanding in high energy density physics (HEDP) necessary to ensure a safe, secure, and effective nuclear weapons stockpile without underground testing. The demonstration of

  3. Ignition and burn of a small magnetized fuel target

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirkpatrick, Ronald C.

    2012-06-01

    The crucial step for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is ignition, which leads to sufficiently high gain to enable design of a power producing system. Thus far, this step has not been demonstrated. Magnetized targets may provide an alternative path to ignition. In addition, the 1-D calculations presented here suggest that this approach may provide the gain and other characteristics needed for a practical fusion reactor.

  4. Transparent electrode for optical switch

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Goldhar, J.; Henesian, M.A.

    1984-10-19

    The invention relates generally to optical switches and techniques for applying a voltage to an electro-optical crystal, and more particularly, to transparent electodes for an optical switch. System architectures for very large inertial confinement fusion (ICF) lasers require active optical elements with apertures on the order of one meter. Large aperture optical switches are needed for isolation of stages, switch-out from regenerative amplifier cavities and protection from target retroreflections.

  5. First-principles equation-of-state table of deuterium for inertial confinement fusion applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, S. X.; Goncharov, V. N.; Skupsky, S.; Militzer, B.

    2011-12-01

    Understanding and designing inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions through radiation-hydrodynamics simulations relies on the accurate knowledge of the equation of state (EOS) of the deuterium and tritium fuels. To minimize the drive energy for ignition, the imploding shell of DT fuel must be kept as cold as possible. Such low-adiabat ICF implosions can access to coupled and degenerate plasma conditions, in which the analytical EOS models become inaccurate due to many-body effects. Using the path-integral Monte Carlo (PIMC) simulations we have derived a first-principles EOS (FPEOS) table of deuterium that covers typical ICF fuel conditions at densities ranging from 0.002 to 1596 g/cm{sup 3} and temperatures of 1.35 eV to 5.5 keV. We report the internal energy and the pressure and discuss the structure of the plasma in terms of pair-correlation functions. When compared with the widely used SESAME table and the revised Kerley03 table, discrepancies in the internal energy and in the pressure are identified for moderately coupled and degenerate plasma conditions. In contrast to the SESAME table, the revised Kerley03 table is in better agreement with our FPEOS results over a wide range of densities and temperatures. Although subtle differences still exist for lower temperatures (T < 10 eV) and moderate densities (1 to 10 g/cm{sup 3}), hydrodynamics simulations of cryogenic ICF implosions using the FPEOS table and the Kerley03 table have resulted in similar results for the peak density, areal density ({rho}R), and neutron yield, which differ significantly from the SESAME simulations.

  6. OMEGA FY13 HED requests - LANL

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Workman, Jonathan B; Loomis, Eric N

    2012-06-25

    This is a summary of scientific work to be performed on the OMEGA laser system located at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics in Rochester New York. The work is funded through Science and ICF Campagins and falls under the category of laser-driven High-Energy Density Physics experiments. This summary is presented to the Rochester scheduling committee on an annual basis for scheduling and planning purposes.

  7. Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Warm Dense Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Warm Dense Matter Print Being neither solid, liquid, gas, nor plasma, warm dense matter (WDM) occupies a no man's land in the map of material phases. Its temperature can range between that of planetary cores (tens of thousands K) to that of stellar cores (hundreds of thousands K). Not only is it prevalent throughout the universe, it is relevant to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and material performance under extreme conditions. However, because of its extreme

  8. Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Warm Dense Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Warm Dense Matter Print Being neither solid, liquid, gas, nor plasma, warm dense matter (WDM) occupies a no man's land in the map of material phases. Its temperature can range between that of planetary cores (tens of thousands K) to that of stellar cores (hundreds of thousands K). Not only is it prevalent throughout the universe, it is relevant to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and material performance under extreme conditions. However, because of its extreme

  9. Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Warm Dense Matter

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Warm Dense Matter Ultrafast Spectroscopy of Warm Dense Matter Print Wednesday, 25 April 2012 00:00 Being neither solid, liquid, gas, nor plasma, warm dense matter (WDM) occupies a no man's land in the map of material phases. Its temperature can range between that of planetary cores (tens of thousands K) to that of stellar cores (hundreds of thousands K). Not only is it prevalent throughout the universe, it is relevant to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and material

  10. DOE ZERH Case Study: Clifton View Homes, Marine Drive and Port Hadlcok, Coupeville and Port Hadlock WA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2015-09-01

    Case study of two DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning custom homes in the marine climate that got HERS 39 and 38 without PV or HERS 2-12 and -9 with PV, with 6.5” SIP walls and 10.25” SIP roof; 11.75 ICF around slab, R-20 rigid foam under slab; radiant floor heat and passive design; air-to-water heatpump, fresh air intake with fan, triple-pane windows, 100% LED.

  11. Kathy Prestridge-Physics' solutions for energy independence

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Kathy Prestridge Kathy Prestridge-Physics' solutions for energy independence She leads a team whose high-resolution experiments in fluid dynamics have been applied to weapon design, astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion (ICF)-the power of the sun. March 19, 2014 Kathy Prestridge In college at Princeton and then U.C. San Diego where she obtained her doctorate, Prestridge studied applied mechanics and aerospace engineering. At Los Alamos, she researches the behavior of materials in extreme

  12. Experimental Capabilities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    experimental capabilities Experimental Capabilities The National Ignition Facility is the premier high energy density science facility in the world, with laser energies 10 times greater than any other high-energy inertial confinement fusion (ICF) laser system. A major focus of NIF is a national effort to demonstrate ignition and thermonuclear burn in the laboratory. NIF also conducts a variety of experiments to study matter at the extremes, including studies of material properties,

  13. Mark Herrmann

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    mark herrmann Mark Herrmann Mark Herrmann Director, National Ignition Facility NIF Director Mark Herrmann came to LLNL in October 2014 from Sandia National Laboratories, where he served as director of the Pulsed Power Sciences Center. As the NIF Director, Herrmann works closely with the leadership of the National Nuclear Security Administration's Stockpile Stewardship Program (SSP) across the weapons complex including the national Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program, as well as the

  14. Mercury: A Diode-Pumped Solid-State Laser

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stockpile Stewardship National Security National Competitiveness Fusion and Ignition Experiments Fast Ignition Energy for the Future How to Make a Star How ICF Works Discovery Science Lab Astrophysics Nuclear Astrophysics Planetary Physics Plasma Physics Photon Science Advanced Optical Technologies Fiber Lasers Laser-Compton Light Source Technology Short-Pulse Lasers High-Powered Lasers Journal Articles home / science / photon science / highpowered lasers / mercury Mercury: A Diode-Pumped

  15. DOE Technical Assistance Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Procuring and Implementing Solar Projects on Public Buildings Sarah Truitt, NREL Kim Owens & Craig Schultz, ICF International December 8, 2010 Photo courtesy of Bella Energy 2 | TAP Webinar eere.energy.gov What is TAP? DOE's Technical Assistance Program (TAP) supports the Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant Program (EECBG) and the State Energy Program (SEP) by providing state, local, and tribal officials the tools and resources needed to implement successful and sustainable clean

  16. Development of aerogel-lined targets for inertial confinement fusion

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    experiments (Thesis/Dissertation) | SciTech Connect Thesis/Dissertation: Development of aerogel-lined targets for inertial confinement fusion experiments Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Development of aerogel-lined targets for inertial confinement fusion experiments This thesis explores the formation of ICF compatible foam layers inside of an ablator shell used for inertial confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility. In particular, the capability of p- DCPD

  17. Microsoft Word - Smart Grid Economic Impact Report

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor ICF International, nor any of their employees, make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information apparatus, product or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to

  18. CHP: A Technical & Economic Compliance Strategy - SEE Action Webinar,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    January 2012 | Department of Energy CHP: A Technical & Economic Compliance Strategy - SEE Action Webinar, January 2012 CHP: A Technical & Economic Compliance Strategy - SEE Action Webinar, January 2012 This presentation, "Industrial/Commercial/Institutional Boiler MACT - Combined Heat and Power: A Technical & Economic Compliance Strategy," by John Cuttica, Midwest Clean Energy Application Center, and Bruce Hedman, ICF International, is from the January 17, 2012, SEE

  19. Momentum Deposition in Curvilinear Coordinates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cleveland, Mathew Allen; Lowrie, Robert Byron; Rockefeller, Gabriel M.; Thompson, Kelly Glen; Wollaber, Allan Benton

    2015-08-03

    The momentum imparted into a material by thermal radiation deposition is an important physical process in astrophysics and inertial confinement fusion (ICF) simulations. In recent work we presented a new method of evaluating momentum deposition that relies on the combination of a time-averaged approximation and a numerical integration scheme. This approach robustly and efficiently evaluates the momentum deposition in spherical geometry. Future work will look to extend this approach to 2D cylindrical geometries.

  20. COLLOQUIUM: In Pursuit of Ignition on the National Ignition Facility |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Princeton Plasma Physics Lab March 26, 2014, 3:00pm to 4:30pm Colloquia MBG Auditorium COLLOQUIUM: In Pursuit of Ignition on the National Ignition Facility Dr. M. John Edwards Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Presentation: PDF icon WC26MAR2014_JEdwards.pdf The Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program is conducting experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory with the goal of igniting a propagating thermonuclear burn wave in DT fuel

  1. DOE ZERH Case Study: TC Legend Homes, Bellingham Power House, Bellingham, WA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2015-09-01

    Case study of a DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning custom home in the marine climate that got HERS 34 without PV or HERS -12 with PV, with 6” SIP walls and 10” SIP roof; R-28 ICF around slab, R-20 rigid foam under slab; radiant floor heat and passive design; air-to-water heat pump COP 4.4; HRV; earth tube ventilation; triple-pane windows, 100% LED.

  2. DOE ZERH Case Study: Mantell-Hecathorn Builders, Shenandoah Circle, Durango, CO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2015-09-01

    Case study of a DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning custom home in the cold climate that got a HERS 50 without PV, or HERS 21 with PV, with 2x6 24” on center walls with R-13 ccsf plus 3.5” blown fiberglass, plus R-10 rigid exterior; R-22 ICF basement walls; vented attic with spray foam over top plates, R-65 blown fiberglass; 96 AFUE furnace, triple-pane windows, 80% LED.

  3. DOE ZERH Case Study: New Town Builders, Town Homes at Perrin's Row, Wheat Ridge, CO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2015-09-01

    Case study of a DOE 2015 Housing Innovation Award winning multifamily project with 26 units in the cold climate that got a HERS 54 without PV, or HERS 28 with PV, with 2x6 24” on center walls with R-23 blown fiberglass; slab foundation with R-10 rigid at slab edge; plus R-10 rigid exterior; R-22 ICF basement walls; vented attic with R-50 blown fiberglass; 92 AFUE furnace, 13 SEER AC.

  4. Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Devoted Builders,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    LLC, Pasco, Washington | Department of Energy Devoted Builders, LLC, Pasco, Washington Building America Whole-House Solutions for New Homes: Devoted Builders, LLC, Pasco, Washington Case study of Devoted Builders who worked with Building America research partner WSU Extension Energy Office to design HERS-54 duplexes with ICF walls, high-efficiency mini-split heat pumps, ERVs, and a spray-foam plus blown cellulose covered ceiling deck. Devoted Builders, LLC. - Pasco, WA (664.44 KB) More

  5. Building America Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Southeast Volusia

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Habitat for Humanity, Edgewater, Florida | Department of Energy Building America Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Southeast Volusia Habitat for Humanity, Edgewater, Florida Building America Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Southeast Volusia Habitat for Humanity, Edgewater, Florida Case study describing a Habitat for Humanity home in coastal Florida with ICF walls, ducts in the thermal envelope in a furred-up ceiling chase, and HERS 49 without PV. Southeast Volusia: Habitat for Humanity -

  6. The National Ignition Facility: Studying the Stars in the Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boyd, R

    2008-09-17

    The National Ignition Facility, to be completed in 2009, will be the highest energy laser ever built. The high temperatures and densities it will produce will enable a number of experiments in inertial confinement fusion and stockpile stewardship, as well as in nuclear astrophysics, X-ray astronomy, hydrodynamics, and planetary science. The National Ignition Facility, NIF (1), located at Lawrence Livermore National Lab, (LLNL) is expected to produce inertial confinement fusion (ICF) by delivering sufficient laser energy to compress and heat a millimeter-radius pellet of DT sufficiently to produce fusion to {sup 4}He+neutron and 17.6 MeV per reaction. NIF will be completed by March, 2009, at which time a National Ignition Campaign (2), NIC, a series of experiments to optimize the ICF parameters, will begin. Although NIF is a research facility, a successful NIC would have implications for future energy sources. In addition to the goal of ICF, NIF will support programs in stockpile stewardship. However, the conditions that NIF creates will simulate those inside stars and planets sufficiently closely to provide compelling motivation for experiments in basic high-energy-density (HED) science especially, for the first time, in nuclear astrophysics.

  7. Investigation of radial wire arrays for inertial confinement fusion and radiation effects science.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serrano, Jason Dimitri; Bland, Simon Nicholas; McBride, Ryan D.; Chittenden, Jeremy Paul; Suzuki-Vidal, Francisco Andres; Jennings, Christopher A.; Hall, Gareth Neville; Ampleford, David J.; Peyton, Bradley Philip; Lebedev, Sergey V.; Cleveland, Monica; Rogers, Thomas John; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Coverdale, Christine Anne; Jones, Brent Manley; Jones, Michael C.

    2010-02-01

    Radial wire arrays provide an alternative x-ray source for Z-pinch driven Inertial Confinement Fusion. These arrays, where wires are positioned radially outwards from a central cathode to a concentric anode, have the potential to drive a more compact ICF hohlraum. A number of experiments were performed on the 7MA Saturn Generator. These experiments studied a number of potential risks in scaling radial wire arrays up from the 1MA level, where they have been shown to provide similar x-ray outputs to larger diameter cylindrical arrays, to the higher current levels required for ICF. Data indicates that at 7MA radial arrays can obtain higher power densities than cylindrical wire arrays, so may be of use for x-ray driven ICF on future facilities. Even at the 7MA level, data using Saturn's short pulse mode indicates that a radial array should be able to drive a compact hohlraum to temperatures {approx}92eV, which may be of interest for opacity experiments. These arrays are also shown to have applications to jet production for laboratory astrophysics. MHD simulations require additional physics to match the observed behavior.

  8. Safety and quality management and administration Fiscal Year 1995 site support program plan WBS 6.7.2.6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hagan, J.W.

    1994-09-01

    The mission of the Emergency, Safety, and Quality Services (ESQ) management and Program Integration is to provide leadership for the ESQ Department, coordinate business management activities of the ESQ department, and the programs it supports, as well as to plan organize, direct, and control other activities that require department-wide coordination. Primary activities include providing strategic and business planning and reporting support to ESQ management; developing and documenting ESQ management systems and procedures; coordinating ESQ`s self-assessment and Award Fee self evaluation efforts; coordinating the ESQ departments`s communication, total quality, cost savings, and productivity efforts; and tracking ESQ commitments and staffing data. This program element also provides program direction and performance assessment for the ESH&Q division of ICF KH. The ESH&Q Division educates ICF KH management and employees to protect personnel and the environment; identifies, interprets and inspects to requirements; provides administrative and field support; performs final acceptance of construction; assesses effectiveness of ICF KH programs and processes, and performs baseline ESH&Q assessments.

  9. AXIS: An instrument for imaging Compton radiographs using the Advanced Radiography Capability on the NIF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hall, G. N. Izumi, N.; Tommasini, R.; Carpenter, A. C.; Palmer, N. E.; Zacharias, R.; Felker, B.; Holder, J. P.; Allen, F. V.; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D.; Montesanti, R.; Landen, O. L.

    2014-11-15

    Compton radiography is an important diagnostic for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF), as it provides a means to measure the density and asymmetries of the DT fuel in an ICF capsule near the time of peak compression. The AXIS instrument (ARC (Advanced Radiography Capability) X-ray Imaging System) is a gated detector in development for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), and will initially be capable of recording two Compton radiographs during a single NIF shot. The principal reason for the development of AXIS is the requirement for significantly improved detection quantum efficiency (DQE) at high x-ray energies. AXIS will be the detector for Compton radiography driven by the ARC laser, which will be used to produce Bremsstrahlung X-ray backlighter sources over the range of 50 keV–200 keV for this purpose. It is expected that AXIS will be capable of recording these high-energy x-rays with a DQE several times greater than other X-ray cameras at NIF, as well as providing a much larger field of view of the imploded capsule. AXIS will therefore provide an image with larger signal-to-noise that will allow the density and distribution of the compressed DT fuel to be measured with significantly greater accuracy as ICF experiments are tuned for ignition.

  10. Absolute calibration method for laser megajoule neutron yield measurement by activation diagnostics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landoas, Olivier; Rosse, Bertrand; Briat, Michelle; Marmouget, Jean Gabriel; Varignon, Cyril; Ledoux, Xavier; Caillaud, Tony; Thfoin, Isabelle; Bourgade, Jean-Luc; Glebov, Vladimir Yu; Sangster, Thomas C.; Duffy, Tim; Disdier, Laurent

    2011-07-15

    The laser megajoule (LMJ) and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) plan to demonstrate thermonuclear ignition using inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The neutron yield is one of the most important parameters to characterize ICF experiment performance. For decades, the activation diagnostic was chosen as a reference at ICF facilities and is now planned to be the first nuclear diagnostic on LMJ, measuring both 2.45 MeV and 14.1 MeV neutron yields. Challenges for the activation diagnostic development are absolute calibration, accuracy, range requirement, and harsh environment. At this time, copper and zirconium material are identified for 14.1 MeV neutron yield measurement and indium material for 2.45 MeV neutrons. A series of calibrations were performed at Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (CEA) on a Van de Graff facility to determine activation diagnostics efficiencies and to compare them with results from calculations. The CEA copper activation diagnostic was tested on the OMEGA facility during DT implosion. Experiments showed that CEA and Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) diagnostics agree to better than 1% on the neutron yield measurement, with an independent calibration for each system. Also, experimental sensitivities are in good agreement with simulations and allow us to scale activation diagnostics for the LMJ measurement range.

  11. Internal cycle modeling and environmental assessment of multiple cycle consumer products

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tsiliyannis, C.A.

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dynamic flow models are presented for remanufactured, reused or recycled products. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Early loss and stochastic return are included for fast and slow cycling products. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The reuse-to-input flow ratio (Internal Cycle Factor, ICF) is determined. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The cycle rate, which is increasing with the ICF, monitors eco-performance. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Early internal cycle losses diminish the ICF, the cycle rate and performance. - Abstract: Dynamic annual flow models incorporating consumer discard and usage loss and featuring deterministic and stochastic end-of-cycle (EOC) return by the consumer are developed for reused or remanufactured products (multiple cycle products, MCPs), including fast and slow cycling, short and long-lived products. It is shown that internal flows (reuse and overall consumption) increase proportionally to the dimensionless internal cycle factor (ICF) which is related to environmental impact reduction factors. The combined reuse/recycle (or cycle) rate is shown capable for shortcut, albeit effective, monitoring of environmental performance in terms of waste production, virgin material extraction and manufacturing impacts of all MCPs, a task, which physical variables (lifetime, cycling frequency, mean or total number of return trips) and conventional rates, via which environmental policy has been officially implemented (e.g. recycling rate) cannot accomplish. The cycle rate is shown to be an increasing (hyperbolic) function of ICF. The impact of the stochastic EOC return characteristics on total reuse and consumption flows, as well as on eco-performance, is assessed: symmetric EOC return has a small, positive effect on performance compared to deterministic, while early shifted EOC return is more beneficial. In order to be efficient, environmental policy should set higher minimum reuse targets for higher trippage MCPs. The

  12. The ePLAS Code for Ignition Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, Rodney J

    2012-09-20

    Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) presents unique opportunities for the extraction of clean energy from Fusion. Intense lasers and particle beams can create and interact with such plasmas, potentially yielding sufficient energy to satisfy all our national needs. However, few models are available to help aid the scientific community in the study and optimization of such interactions. This project enhanced and disseminated the computer code ePLAS for the early understanding and control of Ignition in ICF. ePLAS is a unique simulation code that tracks the transport of laser light to a target, the absorption of that light resulting in the generation and transport of hot electrons, and the heating and flow dynamics of the background plasma. It uses an implicit electromagnetic field-solving method to greatly reduce computing demands, so that useful target interaction studies can often be completed in 15 minutes on a portable 2.1 GHz PC. The code permits the rapid scoping of calculations for the optimization of laser target interactions aimed at fusion. Recent efforts have initiated the use of analytic equations of state (EOS), K-alpha image rendering graphics, allocatable memory for source-free usage, and adaption to the latest Mac and Linux Operating Systems. The speed and utility of ePLAS are unequaled in the ICF simulation community. This project evaluated the effects of its new EOSs on target heating, compared fluid and particle models for the ions, initiated the simultaneous use of both ion models in the code, and studied long time scale 500 ps hot electron deposition for shock ignition. ePLAS has been granted EAR99 export control status, permitting export without a license to most foreign countries. Beta-test versions of ePLAS have been granted to several Universities and Commercial users. The net Project was aimed at achieving early success in the laboratory ignition of thermonuclear targets and the mastery of controlled fusion power for the nation.

  13. Alternative hot spot formation techniques using liquid deuterium-tritium layer inertial confinement fusion capsules

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olson, R. E.; Leeper, R. J.

    2013-09-15

    The baseline DT ice layer inertial confinement fusion (ICF) ignition capsule design requires a hot spot convergence ratio of ∼34 with a hot spot that is formed from DT mass originally residing in a very thin layer at the inner DT ice surface. In the present paper, we propose alternative ICF capsule designs in which the hot spot is formed mostly or entirely from mass originating within a spherical volume of DT vapor. Simulations of the implosion and hot spot formation in two DT liquid layer ICF capsule concepts—the DT wetted hydrocarbon (CH) foam concept and the “fast formed liquid” (FFL) concept—are described and compared to simulations of standard DT ice layer capsules. 1D simulations are used to compare the drive requirements, the optimal shock timing, the radial dependence of hot spot specific energy gain, and the hot spot convergence ratio in low vapor pressure (DT ice) and high vapor pressure (DT liquid) capsules. 2D simulations are used to compare the relative sensitivities to low-mode x-ray flux asymmetries in the DT ice and DT liquid capsules. It is found that the overall thermonuclear yields predicted for DT liquid layer capsules are less than yields predicted for DT ice layer capsules in simulations using comparable capsule size and absorbed energy. However, the wetted foam and FFL designs allow for flexibility in hot spot convergence ratio through the adjustment of the initial cryogenic capsule temperature and, hence, DT vapor density, with a potentially improved robustness to low-mode x-ray flux asymmetry.

  14. Principles of the radiative ablation modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saillard, Yves; Arnault, Philippe; Silvert, Virginie

    2010-12-15

    Indirectly driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) rests on the setting up of a radiation temperature within a laser cavity and on the optimization of the capsule implosion ablated by this radiation. In both circumstances, the ablation of an optically thick medium is at work. The nonlinear radiation conduction equations that describe this phenomenon admit different kinds of solutions called generically Marshak waves. In this paper, a completely analytic model is proposed to describe the ablation in the subsonic regime relevant to ICF experiments. This model approximates the flow by a deflagrationlike structure where Hugoniot relations are used in the stationary part from the ablation front up to the isothermal sonic Chapman-Jouguet point and where the unstationary expansion from the sonic point up to the external boundary is assumed quasi-isothermal. It uses power law matter properties. It can also accommodate arbitrary boundary conditions provided the ablation wave stays very subsonic and the surface temperature does not vary too quickly. These requirements are often met in realistic situations. Interestingly, the ablated mass rate, the ablation pressure, and the absorbed radiative energy depend on the time history of the surface temperature, not only on the instantaneous temperature values. The results compare very well with self-similar solutions and with numerical simulations obtained by hydrodynamic code. This analytic model gives insight into the physical processes involved in the ablation and is helpful for optimization and sensitivity studies in many situations of interest: radiation temperature within a laser cavity, acceleration of finite size medium, and ICF capsule implosion, for instance.

  15. Formation of imploding plasma liners for fundamental HEDP studies and MIF Standoff Driver Concept

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cassibry, Jason; Hatcher, Richard; Stanic, Milos

    2013-08-17

    The disciplines of High Energy Density Physics (HEDP) and Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) are characterized by hypervelocity implosions and strong shocks. The Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) is focused on reaching HEDP and/or ICF relevant regimes in excess of 1 Mbar peak pressure by the merging and implosion of discrete plasma jets, as a potentially efficient path towards these extreme conditions in a laboratory. In this work we have presented the first 3D simulations of plasma liner, formation, and implosion by the merging of discrete plasma jets in which ionization, thermal conduction, and radiation are all included in the physics model. The study was conducted by utilizing a smoothed particle hydrodynamics code (SPHC) and was a part of the plasma liner experiment (PLX). The salient physics processes of liner formation and implosion are studied, namely vacuum propagation of plasma jets, merging of the jets (liner forming), implosion (liner collapsing), stagnation (peak pressure), and expansion (rarefaction wave disassembling the target). Radiative transport was found to significantly reduce the temperature of the liner during implosion, thus reducing the thermal leaving more pronounced gradients in the plasma liner during the implosion compared with ideal hydrodynamic simulations. These pronounced gradients lead to a greater sensitivity of initial jet geometry and symmetry on peak pressures obtained. Accounting for ionization and transport, many cases gave higher peak pressures than the ideal hydrodynamic simulations. Scaling laws were developed accordingly, creating a non-dimensional parameter space in which performance of an imploding plasma jet liner can be estimated. It is shown that HEDP regimes could be reached with ~ 5 MJ of liner energy, which would translate to roughly 10 to 20 MJ of stored (capacitor) energy. This is a potentially significant improvement over the currently available means via ICF of achieving HEDP and nuclear fusion relevant parameters.

  16. Fast ignition of inertial confinement fusion targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gus'kov, S. Yu.

    2013-01-15

    Results of studies on fast ignition of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets are reviewed. The aspects of the fast ignition concept, which consists in the separation of the processes of target ignition and compression due to the synchronized action of different energy drivers, are considered. Criteria for the compression ratio and heating rate of a fast ignition target, the energy balance, and the thermonuclear gain are discussed. The results of experimental and theoretical studies of the heating of a compressed target by various types of igniting drivers, namely, beams of fast electrons and light ions produced under the action of a petawatt laser pulse on the target, a heavy-ion beam generated in the accelerator, an X-ray pulse, and a hydrodynamic flow of laser-accelerated matter, are analyzed. Requirements to the igniting-driver parameters that depend on the fast ignition criteria under the conditions of specific target heating mechanisms, as well as possibilities of practical implementation of these requirements, are discussed. The experimental programs of various laboratories and the prospects of practical implementation of fast ignition of ICF targets are reviewed. To date, fast ignition is the most promising method for decreasing the ignition energy and increasing the thermonuclear gain of an ICF plasma. A large number of publications have been devoted to investigations of this method and adjacent problems of the physics of igniting drivers and their interaction with plasma. This review presents results of only some of these studies that, in the author's opinion, allow one to discuss in detail the main physical aspects of the fast ignition concept and understand the current state and prospects of studies in this direction.

  17. HYPERFUSE: a hypervelocity inertial confinement system for fusion energy production and fission waste transmutation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makowitz, H.; Powell, J.R.; Wiswall, R.

    1980-01-01

    Parametric system studies of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor system to transmute fission products from a LWR economy have been carried out. The ICF reactors would produce net power in addition to transmuting fission products. The particular ICF concept examined is an impact fusion approach termed HYPERFUSE, in which hypervelocity pellets, traveling on the order of 100 to 300 km/sec, collide with each other or a target block in a reactor chamber and initiate a thermonuclear reaction. The DT fusion fuel is contained in a shell of the material to be transmuted, e.g., /sup 137/Cs, /sup 90/Sr, /sup 129/I, /sup 99/Tc, etc. The 14-MeV fusion neutrons released during the pellet burn cause transmutation reactions (e.g., (n,2n), (n,..cap alpha..), (n,..gamma..), etc.) that convert the long-lived fission products (FP's) either to stable products or to species that decay with a short half-life to a stable product. The transmutation parametric studies conclude that the design of the hypervelocity projectiles should emphasize the achievement of high densities in the transmutation regions (greater than the DT fusion fuel density), as well as the DT ignition and burn criterion (rho R = 1.0 to 3.0) requirements. These studies also indicate that masses on the order of 1.0 g at densities of rho greater than or equal to 500.0 g/cm/sup 3/ are required for a practical fusion-based fission product transmutation system.

  18. Inertial confinement fusion quarterly report: October--December 1995. Volume 6, Number 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McEachern, R.L.; Carpenter, J.; Miguel, A.; Murphy, P.; Perez, J.; Schleich, D.

    1996-07-01

    This issue presents recent results from the ICF program at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in areas ranging from cryogenics to plasma instabilities. The article ``Metastable Crystal Structures of Solid Hydrogen`` describes primarily Raman spectroscopy studies of H{sub 2} and D{sub 2} films deposited at various rates and temperatures. All ignition target designs for ICF require a cryogenic deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel layer of uniform thickness and acceptable roughness. Solid DT layers, in particular, are easier to support in the presence of gravity and self-symmetrize due to self heating from the beta decay of tritium. The roughness of these films is closely related to their crystal structure, so it is important to understand film morphology under different deposition conditions. Three articles present different approaches to the study of plasma instabilities that lead to stimulated Brillouin scattering (SBS) and stimulated Raman scattering (SRS). In ``Modeling of Self-Focusing Experiments by Beam Propagation Codes,`` the authors describe the use of computer codes to model nonlinear effects during the propagation of laser beams through optical elements. Such codes have played a key role in the design of high-power lasers for ICF, both historically and for the NIF. The article ``Optical Scatter--A Diagnostic Tool to Investigate Laser Damage in KDP and DKDP`` examines the important problem of characterizing single crystals of KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} (KDP) and deuterated KDP. These materials are used as optical switches, for frequency conversion in the Nova laser, and will be required for the NIF. The use of soft x-rays as a plasma probe is the topic of ``Soft X-Ray Interferometry.`` Interferometry of laser-produced plasmas presents a significant challenge, especially at electron densities exceeding 10{sup 20} cm{sup {minus}3}. The authors compare x-ray and optical interferometry of plasmas and show experimental results from a soft x-ray Mach-Zehnder interferometer.

  19. National Inventors Day Celebrates Our Inventors | GE Global Research

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    (NNSA) National Ignition Facility Glass amplifiers in Laser Bay 2 at the National Ignition Facility. The construction of the 192-beam 1.8 MJ UV NIF, the world's most energetic laser, was completed in March 2009. Current experiments are focusing on using the NIF laser and other ICF high energy density facilities leading to demonstrate fusion ignition and thermonuclear burn in the laboratory. The NIF is also being used to support basic science and SSP experiments. By the end of FY 2012, the

  20. National Ignition Facility | National Nuclear Security Administration |

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    (NNSA) National Ignition Facility Glass amplifiers in Laser Bay 2 at the National Ignition Facility. The construction of the 192-beam 1.8 MJ UV NIF, the world's most energetic laser, was completed in March 2009. Current experiments are focusing on using the NIF laser and other ICF high energy density facilities leading to demonstrate fusion ignition and thermonuclear burn in the laboratory. The NIF is also being used to support basic science and SSP experiments. By the end of FY 2012, the

  1. The First Experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Landen, O L; Glenzer, S; Froula, D; Dewald, E; Suter, L J; Schneider, M; Hinkel, D; Fernandez, J; Kline, J; Goldman, S; Braun, D; Celliers, P; Moon, S; Robey, H; Lanier, N; Glendinning, G; Blue, B; Wilde, B; Jones, O; Schein, J; Divol, L; Kalantar, D; Campbell, K; Holder, J; MacDonald, J; Niemann, C; Mackinnon, A; Collins, R; Bradley, D; Eggert, J; Hicks, D; Gregori, G; Kirkwood, R; Young, B; Foster, J; Hansen, F; Perry, T; Munro, D; Baldis, H; Grim, G; Heeter, R; Hegelich, B; Montgomery, D; Rochau, G; Olson, R; Turner, R; Workman, J; Berger, R; Cohen, B; Kruer, W; Langdon, B; Langer, S; Meezan, N; Rose, H; Still, B; Williams, E; Dodd, E; Edwards, J; Monteil, M; Stevenson, M; Thomas, B; Coker, R; Magelssen, G; Rosen, P; Stry, P; Woods, D; Weber, S; Alvarez, S; Armstrong, G; Bahr, R; Bourgade, J; Bower, D; Celeste, J; Chrisp, M; Compton, S; Cox, J; Constantin, C; Costa, R; Duncan, J; Ellis, A; Emig, J; Gautier, C; Greenwood, A; Griffith, R; Holdner, F; Holtmeier, G; Hargrove, D; James, T; Kamperschroer, J; Kimbrough, J; Landon, M; Lee, D; Malone, R; May, M; Montelongo, S; Moody, J; Ng, E; Nikitin, A; Pellinen, D; Piston, K; Poole, M; Rekow, V; Rhodes, M; Shepherd, R; Shiromizu, S; Voloshin, D; Warrick, A; Watts, P; Weber, F; Young, P; Arnold, P; Atherton, L J; Bardsley, G; Bonanno, R; Borger, T; Bowers, M; Bryant, R; Buckman, S; Burkhart, S; Cooper, F; Dixit, S; Erbert, G; Eder, D; Ehrlich, B; Felker, B; Fornes, J; Frieders, G; Gardner, S; Gates, C; Gonzalez, M; Grace, S; Hall, T; Haynam, C; Heestand, G; Henesian, M; Hermann, M; Hermes, G; Huber, S; Jancaitis, K; Johnson, S; Kauffman, B; Kelleher, T; Kohut, T; Koniges, A E; Labiak, T; Latray, D; Lee, A; Lund, D; Mahavandi, S; Manes, K R; Marshall, C; McBride, J; McCarville, T; McGrew, L; Menapace, J; Mertens, E; Munro, D; Murray, J; Neumann, J; Newton, M; Opsahl, P; Padilla, E; Parham, T; Parrish, G; Petty, C; Polk, M; Powell, C; Reinbachs, I; Rinnert, R; Riordan, B; Ross, G; Robert, V; Tobin, M; Sailors, S; Saunders, R; Schmitt, M; Shaw, M; Singh, M; Spaeth, M; Stephens, A; Tietbohl, G; Tuck, J; Van Wonterghem, B; Vidal, R; Wegner, P; Whitman, P; Williams, K; Winward, K; Work, K

    2005-11-11

    A first set of laser-plasma interaction, hohlraum energetics and hydrodynamic experiments have been performed using the first 4 beams of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), in support of indirect drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and High Energy Density Physics (HEDP). In parallel, a robust set of optical and x-ray spectrometers, interferometer, calorimeters and imagers have been activated. The experiments have been undertaken with laser powers and energies of up to 8 TW and 17 kJ in flattop and shaped 1-9 ns pulses focused with various beam smoothing options.

  2. Hanford Site Comprehensive site Compliance Evaluation Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tollefson, K.S.

    1997-08-05

    This document is the second annual submittal by WHC, ICF/KH, PNL and BHI and contains the results of inspections of the stormwater outfalls listed in the Hanford Site Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) (WHC 1993a) as required by General Permit No. WA-R-00-000F (WA-R-00-A17F): This report also describes the methods used to conduct the Storm Water Comprehensive Site Compliance Evaluation, as required in Part IV, Section D, {ampersand} C of the General Permit, summarizes the results of the compliance evaluation, and documents significant leaks and spills.

  3. Fast Ignitor coupling physics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, R.J.; Tabak, M.

    1997-10-01

    The Fast Ignitor is an alternate approach to ICF in which short pulse lasers are used to initiate burn at the surface of the compressed DT fuel. The aim is to avoid the need for careful central focusing of final shocks, and possibly to lower substantially the energy requirements for ignition. Ultimately, both goals may prove crucial to Science Based Stockpile Stewardship (SBSS). This will be the case should either emerging energetic needs, or finding difficulties render the presently planned radiative fusion approach to ignition with the NIF impractical. Ignition is a first step towards the achievement of substantial energy and neutron outputs for such Stewardship.

  4. Papers and Presentations - 2014

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 / december Papers and Presentations - 2014 December Studying Ion Kinetic Effects in NIF Implosions The results of an investigation of the role of kinetic and multi-ion effects on NIF implosions were reported in a Physics of Plasmas paper published online on Dec. 29. The research focused on shock-driven deuterium (D2) and deuterium-helium-three (D3He) gas-filled "exploding-pusher" inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions at NIF to assess the impact of ion kinetic effects.

  5. Financial constraints in capacity planning: a national utility regulatory model (NUREG). Volume II of III: user's guide. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-10-29

    This volume is a User's Guide to the National Utility Regulatory Model (NUREG) and its implementation of the National Coal Model. This is the second of three volumes provided by ICF under contract number DEAC-01-79EI-10579. These three volumes are: a manual describing the NUREG methodology; a users guide; and a description of the software. This manual provides a brief introduction to the National Utility Regulation Model, describes the various programs that comprise the National Utility Regulatory Model, gives sample input files, and provides information needed to run the model.

  6. WINDOW-WALL INTERFACE CORRECTION FACTORS: THERMAL MODELING OF INTEGRATED FENESTRATION AND OPAQUE ENVELOPE SYSTEMS FOR IMPROVED PREDICTION OF ENERGY USE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhandari, Mahabir S; Ravi, Dr. Srinivasan

    2012-01-01

    The boundary conditions for thermal modeling of fenestration systems assume an adiabatic condition between the fenestration system installed and the opaque envelope system. This theoretical adiabatic boundary condition may not be appropriate owing to heat transfer at the interfaces, particularly for aluminum- framed windows affixed to metal- framed walls. In such scenarios, the heat transfer at the interface may increase the discrepancy between real world thermal indices and laboratory measured or calculated indices based on NFRC Rating System.This paper discusses the development of window-wall Interface Correction Factors (ICF) to improve energy impacts of building envelope systems

  7. Approximate models for the ion-kinetic regime in inertial-confinement-fusion capsule implosions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hoffman, Nelson M.; Zimmerman, George B.; Molvig, Kim; Rinderknecht, Hans G.; Rosenberg, Michael J.; Albright, B. J.; Simakov, Andrei N.; Sio, Hong; Zylstra, Alex B.; Johnson, Maria Gatu; et al

    2015-05-19

    “Reduced” (i.e., simplified or approximate) ion-kinetic (RIK) models in radiation-hydrodynamic simulations permit a useful description of inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) implosions where kinetic deviations from hydrodynamic behavior are important. For implosions in or near the kinetic regime (i.e., when ion mean free paths are comparable to the capsule size), simulations using a RIK model give a detailed picture of the time- and space-dependent structure of imploding capsules, allow an assessment of the relative importance of various kinetic processes during the implosion, enable explanations of past and current observations, and permit predictions of the results of future experiments. The RIK simulation method describedmore » here uses moment-based reduced kinetic models for transport of mass, momentum, and energy by long-mean-free-path ions, a model for the decrease of fusion reactivity owing to the associated modification of the ion distribution function, and a model of hydrodynamic turbulent mixing. The transport models are based on local gradient-diffusion approximations for the transport of moments of the ion distribution functions, with coefficients to impose flux limiting or account for transport modification. After calibration against a reference set of ICF implosions spanning the hydrodynamic-to-kinetic transition, the method has useful, quantifiable predictive ability over a broad range of capsule parameter space. Calibrated RIK simulations show that an important contributor to ion species separation in ICF capsule implosions is the preferential flux of longer-mean-free-path species out of the fuel and into the shell, leaving the fuel relatively enriched in species with shorter mean free paths. Also, the transport of ion thermal energy is enhanced in the kinetic regime, causing the fuel region to have a more uniform, lower ion temperature, extending over a larger volume, than implied by clean simulations. We expect that the success of our simple

  8. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Healthy Efficient Homes - Spirit Lake, Iowa

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-11-01

    This case study describes a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Spirit Lake, Iowa, that scored HERS 41 without PV and HERS 28 with PV. This 3,048 ft2 custom home has advanced framed walls filled with 1.5 inches closed-cell spray foam, a vented attic with spray foam-sealed top plates and blown fiberglass over the ceiling deck. R-23 basement walls are ICF plus two 2-inch layers of EPS. The house also has a mini-split heat pump, fresh air fan intake, and a solar hot water heater.

  9. Potential Cost-Effective Opportunities for Methane Emission Abatement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warner, Ethan; Steinberg, Daniel; Hodson, Elke; Heath, Garvin

    2015-08-01

    The energy sector was responsible for approximately 84% of carbon dioxide equivalent (CO2e) greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in the U.S. in 2012 (EPA 2014a). Methane is the second most important GHG, contributing 9% of total U.S. CO2e emissions. A large portion of those methane emissions result from energy production and use; the natural gas, coal, and oil industries produce approximately 39% of anthropogenic methane emissions in the U.S. As a result, fossil-fuel systems have been consistently identified as high priority sectors to contribute to U.S. GHG reduction goals (White House 2015). Only two studies have recently attempted to quantify the abatement potential and cost associated with the breadth of opportunities to reduce GHG emissions within natural gas, oil, and coal supply chains in the United States, namely the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) (2013a) and ICF (2014). EPA, in its 2013 analysis, estimated the marginal cost of abatement for non-CO2 GHG emissions from the natural gas, oil, and coal supply chains for multiple regions globally, including the United States. Building on this work, ICF International (ICF) (2014) provided an update and re-analysis of the potential opportunities in U.S. natural gas and oil systems. In this report we synthesize these previously published estimates as well as incorporate additional data provided by ICF to provide a comprehensive national analysis of methane abatement opportunities and their associated costs across the natural gas, oil, and coal supply chains. Results are presented as a suite of marginal abatement cost curves (MACCs), which depict the total potential and cost of reducing emissions through different abatement measures. We report results by sector (natural gas, oil, and coal) and by supply chain segment - production, gathering and boosting, processing, transmission and storage, or distribution - to facilitate identification of which sectors and supply chain

  10. Process for manufacture of inertial confinement fusion targets and resulting product

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Masnari, Nino A.; Rensel, Walter B.; Robinson, Merrill G.; Solomon, David E.; Wise, Kensall D.; Wuttke, Gilbert H.

    1982-01-01

    An ICF target comprising a spherical pellet of fusion fuel surrounded by a concentric shell; and a process for manufacturing the same which includes the steps of forming hemispheric shells of a silicon or other substrate material, adhering the shell segments to each other with a fuel pellet contained concentrically therein, then separating the individual targets from the parent substrate. Formation of hemispheric cavities by deposition or coating of a mold substrate is also described. Coatings or membranes may also be applied to the interior of the hemispheric segments prior to joining.

  11. Laser Program annual report 1984

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rufer, M.L.; Murphy, P.W.

    1985-06-01

    The Laser Program Annual Report is part of the continuing series of reports documenting the progress of the unclassified Laser Fusion Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). As in previous years, the report is organized programmatically. The first section is an overview of the basic goals and directions of the LLNL Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program, and highlights the year's important accomplishments. Sections 2 through 7 provide the detailed information on the various program elements: Laser Systems and Operations, Target Design, Target Fabrication, Laser Experiments and Advanced Diagnostics, Advanced Laser Development, and Applications of Inertial Confinement Fusion. Individual sections will be indexed separately. 589 refs., 333 figs., 25 tabs.

  12. Experimental and numerical investigation of shock wave propagation through complex geometry, gas continuous, two-phase media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, J. Chien-Chih [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States)

    1993-10-01

    The work presented here investigates the phenomenon of shock wave propagation in gas continuous, two-phase media. The motivation for this work stems from the need to understand blast venting consequences in the HYLIFE inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor. The HYLIFE concept utilizes lasers or heavy ion beams to rapidly heat and compress D-T targets injected into the center of a reactor chamber. A segmented blanket of failing molten lithium or Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4} (Flibe) jets encircles the reactors central cavity, shielding the reactor structure from radiation damage, absorbing the fusion energy, and breeding more tritium fuel.

  13. Report from the Integrated Modeling Panel at the Workshop on the Science of Ignition on NIF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marinak, M; Lamb, D

    2012-07-03

    This section deals with multiphysics radiation hydrodynamics codes used to design and simulate targets in the ignition campaign. These topics encompass all the physical processes they model, and include consideration of any approximations necessary due to finite computer resources. The section focuses on what developments would have the highest impact on reducing uncertainties in modeling most relevant to experimental observations. It considers how the ICF codes should be employed in the ignition campaign. This includes a consideration of how the experiments can be best structured to test the physical models the codes employ.

  14. Approximate models for the ion-kinetic regime in inertial-confinement-fusion capsule implosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoffman, Nelson M.; Zimmerman, George B.; Molvig, Kim; Rinderknecht, Hans G.; Rosenberg, Michael J.; Albright, B. J.; Simakov, Andrei N.; Sio, Hong; Zylstra, Alex B.; Johnson, Maria Gatu; Séguin, Fredrick H.; Frenje, Johan A.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, Richard D.; Higdon, David M.; Srinivasan, Gowri; Glebov, Vladimir Yu.; Stoeckl, Christian; Seka, Wolf; Sangster, T. Craig

    2015-05-19

    “Reduced” (i.e., simplified or approximate) ion-kinetic (RIK) models in radiation-hydrodynamic simulations permit a useful description of inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) implosions where kinetic deviations from hydrodynamic behavior are important. For implosions in or near the kinetic regime (i.e., when ion mean free paths are comparable to the capsule size), simulations using a RIK model give a detailed picture of the time- and space-dependent structure of imploding capsules, allow an assessment of the relative importance of various kinetic processes during the implosion, enable explanations of past and current observations, and permit predictions of the results of future experiments. The RIK simulation method described here uses moment-based reduced kinetic models for transport of mass, momentum, and energy by long-mean-free-path ions, a model for the decrease of fusion reactivity owing to the associated modification of the ion distribution function, and a model of hydrodynamic turbulent mixing. The transport models are based on local gradient-diffusion approximations for the transport of moments of the ion distribution functions, with coefficients to impose flux limiting or account for transport modification. After calibration against a reference set of ICF implosions spanning the hydrodynamic-to-kinetic transition, the method has useful, quantifiable predictive ability over a broad range of capsule parameter space. Calibrated RIK simulations show that an important contributor to ion species separation in ICF capsule implosions is the preferential flux of longer-mean-free-path species out of the fuel and into the shell, leaving the fuel relatively enriched in species with shorter mean free paths. Also, the transport of ion thermal energy is enhanced in the kinetic regime, causing the fuel region to have a more uniform, lower ion temperature, extending over a larger volume, than implied by clean simulations. We expect that the success of our simple approach

  15. Inertial Confinement Fusion: How to Make a Star

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    icf Inertial Confinement Fusion: How to Make a Star The idea for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) grew out of the decades-long effort to generate fusion burn and gain in the laboratory. Current nuclear power plants, which use fission, or the splitting of atoms to produce energy, have been pumping out electric power for more than 50 years. But achieving nuclear fusion burn and gain has not yet been demonstrated to be viable for electricity production. For fusion burn and gain to occur, a

  16. #F1:Research on Very Low-Energy Building O&M Methods

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    #F1:Research on Very Low-Energy Building O&M Methods 2014 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Carolyn Szum, carolyn.szum@icfi.com ICF International Project Summary Timeline: Start date: 1/1/2011 Planned end date: 12/31/2015 Key Milestones 1. Completed energy benchmarking tools for hotels and commercial offices in China; 12/31/2012 2. Published research paper on construction, equipment, EE technology, and O&M characteristics of very low-energy hotels; 12/31/2013 Budget: Total DOE $

  17. igcc config | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    icf Nike Named after the Greek goddess of victory, the Nike facility includes the world's largest krypton fluoride (KrF) laser. Nike was developed primarily to investigate interactions of high intensity KrF light with matter. The target facility is well equipped for experiments on laser generated shocks,... OMEGA and OMEGA EP Two glass laser systems make up the Omega Laser Facility: the 60-beam, 30kJ UV OMEGA laser that has been operational since 1995, and the OMEGA EP addition with four new

  18. Direct Measurements of an increased threshold for stimulated Brillouin scattering with polarization smoothing in ignition hohlraum plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Froula, D; Divol, L; Berger, R L; London, R; Meezan, N; Neumayer, P; Ross, J S; Stagnito, S; Suter, L; Glenzer, S H; Strozzi, D

    2007-11-08

    We demonstrate a significant reduction of stimulated Brillouin scattering by polarization smoothing. The intensity threshold is measured to increase by a factor of 1.7 {+-} 0.2 when polarization smoothing is applied. The results were obtained in a high-temperature (T{sub 3} {approx_equal} 3 keV) hohlraum plasma where filamentation is negligible in determining the backscatter threshold. These results are explained by an analytical model relevant to ICF plasma conditions that modifies the linear gain exponent to account for polarization smoothing.

  19. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home: Healthy Efficient Homes- Spirit Lake, Iowa

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Spirit Lake, Iowa, that scored HERS 41 without PV and HERS 28 with PV. This 3,048 ft2 custom home has advanced framed walls filled with 1.5 inches closed-cell spray foam, a vented attic with spray foam-sealed top plates and blown fiberglass over the ceiling deck. R-23 basement walls are ICF plus two 2-inch layers of EPS. The house also has a mini-split heat pump, fresh air fan intake, and a solar hot water heater.

  20. Concept of operations for channel characterization and simulation of coaxial transmission channels at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Jr., Charles G.

    2015-03-23

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) executes experiments for inertial con nement fusion (ICF), world-class high energy density physics (HEDP), and critical national security missions. While the laser systems, target positioners, alignment systems, control systems, etc. enable the execution of such experiments, NIF’s utility would be greatly reduced without its suite of diagnostics. It would be e ectively “blind” to the incredible physics unleashed in its target chamber. Since NIF diagnostics are such an important part of its mission, the quality and reliability of the diagnostics, and of the data recorded from them, is crucial.

  1. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Montlake Modern - Seattle, Washington

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-11-01

    This case study describes a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Seattle, WA, that scored HERS 42 without PV and a -1 with PV. This 3,192 ft2 custom home has 6-inch SIP walls, a 12-inch SIP roof, an R-28 ICF-insulated foundation slab edge with R-20 rigid foam under the slab; an air-to-water heat pump plus radiant floor heat; 100% LED lighting; filtered-fan-powered fresh air intake; triple-pane windows, 9.7 kWh PV for electric car charging station.

  2. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Durable Energy Builders - Houston, Texas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    none,

    2014-11-01

    This case study describes a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in Houston, Texas, that scored HERS 39 without PV and HERS 29 with PV. This 5,947 ft2 custom home has 11.5-inch ICF walls. The attic is insulated along the roof line with 5 to 7 inches of open-cell spray foam. Most of the home's drinking water is supplied by a 11,500-gallon rainwater cistern. Hurricane strapping connects the roof to the walls. The triple-pane windows are impact resistant. The foundation is a raised slab.

  3. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Clifton View Homes, Whidbey Island,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    WA | Department of Energy Whidbey Island, WA DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Clifton View Homes, Whidbey Island, WA Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready home on Whidbey Island, WA, that scores HERS 37 without PV or HERS -13 with 10 kW PV, enough to power the home and an electric car. The two-story custom home has ICF below-grade walls, 6.5-inch SIP above-grade walls, a 10.25-in. SIP roof, and triple-pane windows. The home has a ground-source heat pump provides radiant floor heat

  4. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Greenhill Contracting, New Paltz, NY

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    | Department of Energy New Paltz, NY DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Greenhill Contracting, New Paltz, NY DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Greenhill Contracting, New Paltz, NY Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready home in New Paltz, NY, that achieved a HERS score of 37 without PV or 7 with 7.5-kW PV. The two-story 2,288-ft2 home is one of 9 certified homes. All of the homes have R-22 ICF walls, R-20 closed-cell spray foam under the slab, a ground-source heat pump with

  5. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: TC Legend Homes, Bellingham, WA |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Bellingham, WA DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: TC Legend Homes, Bellingham, WA DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: TC Legend Homes, Bellingham, WA Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready home in Bellingham, WA, that achieves HERS 43 without PV or HERS 13 with 3.2 kW of PV. The 1,055-ft2 two-story production home has 6-in. SIP walls, a 10-in. SIP roof, and ICF foundation walls with R-20 high-density rigid EPS foam under the slab. A single ductless heat pump heats

  6. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Weiss Building & Development LLC,

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    System Home, River Forest, IL | Department of Energy LLC, System Home, River Forest, IL DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Weiss Building & Development LLC, System Home, River Forest, IL Case study of a DOE Zero Energy Ready Home in River Forest, IL, that scored HERS 17 without PV. This 4,763-square-foot custom passive house has R-54 ICF walls, a vented attic with R-100 blown fiberglass, plus R-40 rigid EPS under the slab, triple-pane windows, two ductless mini-split heat pumps, and

  7. Fast ignition of an inertial fusion target with a solid noncryogenic fuel by an ion beam

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gus’kov, S. Yu.; Zmitrenko, N. V.; Il’in, D. V.; Sherman, V. E.

    2015-09-15

    The burning efficiency of a preliminarily compressed inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target with a solid noncryogenic fuel (deuterium-tritium beryllium hydride) upon fast central ignition by a fast ion beam is studied. The main aim of the study was to determine the extent to which the spatial temperature distribution formed under the heating of an ICF target by ion beams with different particle energy spectra affects the thermonuclear gain. The study is based on a complex numerical modeling including computer simulations of (i) the heating of a compressed target with a spatially nonuniform density and temperature distributions by a fast ion beam and (ii) the burning of the target with the initial spatial density distribution formed at the instant of maximum compression of the target and the initial spatial temperature distribution formed as a result of heating of the compressed target by the ion beam. The threshold energy of the igniting ion beam and the dependence of the thermonuclear gain on the energy deposited in the target are determined.

  8. Numerical investigation on target implosions driven by radiation ablation and shock compression in dynamic hohlraums

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xiao, Delong; Sun, Shunkai; Zhao, Yingkui; Ding, Ning; Wu, Jiming; Dai, Zihuan; Yin, Li; Zhang, Yang; Xue, Chuang

    2015-05-15

    In a dynamic hohlraum driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) configuration, the target may experience two different kinds of implosions. One is driven by hohlraum radiation ablation, which is approximately symmetric at the equator and poles. The second is caused by the radiating shock produced in Z-pinch dynamic hohlraums, only taking place at the equator. To gain a symmetrical target implosion driven by radiation ablation and avoid asymmetric shock compression is a crucial issue in driving ICF using dynamic hohlraums. It is known that when the target is heated by hohlraum radiation, the ablated plasma will expand outward. The pressure in the shocked converter plasma qualitatively varies linearly with the material temperature. However, the ablation pressure in the ablated plasma varies with 3.5 power of the hohlraum radiation temperature. Therefore, as the hohlraum temperature increases, the ablation pressure will eventually exceed the shock pressure, and the expansion of the ablated plasma will obviously weaken the shock propagation and decrease its velocity after propagating into the ablator plasma. Consequently, longer time duration is provided for the symmetrical target implosion driven by radiation ablation. In this paper these processes are numerically investigated by changing drive currents or varying load parameters. The simulation results show that a critical hohlraum radiation temperature is needed to provide a high enough ablation pressure to decelerate the shock, thus providing long enough time duration for the symmetric fuel compression driven by radiation ablation.

  9. Effects of magnetization on fusion product trapping and secondary neutron spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, Patrick F.; Schmit, Paul F.; Hansen, Stephanie B.; Gomez, Matthew R.; Hahn, Kelly D.; Sinars, Daniel Brian; Peterson, Kyle J.; Slutz, Stephen A.; Sefkow, Adam B.; Awe, Thomas James; Harding, Eric; Jennings, Christopher A.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Chandler, Gordon A.; Cooper, Gary Wayne; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Geissel, Matthias; Harvey-Thompson, Adam James; Porter, John L.; Rochau, Gregory A.; Rovang, Dean C.; Ruiz, Carlos L.; Savage, Mark E.; Smith, Ian C.; Stygar, William A.; Herrmann, Mark

    2015-05-14

    In magnetizing the fusion fuel in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) systems, we found that the required stagnation pressure and density can be relaxed dramatically. This happens because the magnetic field insulates the hot fuel from the cold pusher and traps the charged fusion burn products. This trapping allows the burn products to deposit their energy in the fuel, facilitating plasma self-heating. Here, we report on a comprehensive theory of this trapping in a cylindrical DD plasma magnetized with a purely axial magnetic field. Using this theory, we are able to show that the secondary fusion reactions can be used to infer the magnetic field-radius product, BR, during fusion burn. This parameter, not ?R, is the primary confinement parameter in magnetized ICF. Using this method, we analyze data from recent Magnetized Liner InertialFusion experiments conducted on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories. Furthermore, we show that in these experiments BR ? 0.34(+0.14/-0.06) MG cm, a ~ 14 increase in BR from the initial value, and confirming that the DD-fusion tritons are magnetized at stagnation. Lastly, this is the first experimental verification of charged burn product magnetization facilitated by compression of an initial seed magnetic flux.

  10. Simulations and model of the nonlinear Richtmyer–Meshkov instability

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Dimonte, Guy; Ramaprabhu, P.

    2010-01-21

    The nonlinear evolution of the Richtmyer-Meshkov (RM) instability is investigated using numerical simulations with the FLASH code in two-dimensions (2D). The purpose of the simulations is to develop an empiricial nonlinear model of the RM instability that is applicable to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and ejecta formation, namely, at large Atwood number A and scaled initial amplitude kho (k ≡ wavenumber) of the perturbation. The FLASH code is first validated with a variety of RM experiments that evolve well into the nonlinear regime. They reveal that bubbles stagnate when they grow by an increment of 2/k and that spikes acceleratemore » for A > 0.5 due to higher harmonics that focus them. These results are then compared with a variety of nonlinear models that are based on potential flow. We find that the models agree with simulations for moderate values of A < 0.9 and kho< 1, but not for the larger values that characterize ICF and ejecta formation. We thus develop a new nonlinear empirical model that captures the simulation results consistent with potential flow for a broader range of A and kho. Our hope is that such empirical models concisely capture the RM simulations and inspire more rigorous solutions.« less

  11. Empirical assessment of the detection efficiency of CR-39 at high proton fluence and a compact, proton detector for high-fluence applications

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Séguin, F. H.; Waugh, C. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Orozco, D.; Frenje, J. A.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Sio, H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Sinenian, N.; et al

    2014-04-14

    CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detectors are widely used in physics and in many inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, and under ideal conditions these detectors have 100% detection efficiency for ~0.5–8 MeV protons. When the fluence of incident particles becomes too high, the overlap of particle tracks leads to under-counting at typical processing conditions (5h etch in 6N NaOH at 80°C). Short etch times required to avoid overlap can cause under-counting as well, as tracks are not fully developed. Experiments have determined the minimum etch times for 100% detection of 1.7–4.3-MeV protons and established that for 2.4-MeV protons, relevant for detectionmore » of DD protons, the maximum fluence that can be detected using normal processing techniques is ≲3 ×106 cm-2. A CR-39-based proton detector has been developed to mitigate issues related to high particle fluences on ICF facilities. Using a pinhole and scattering foil several mm in front of the CR-39, proton fluences at the CR-39 are reduced by more than a factor of ~50, increasing the operating yield upper limit by a comparable amount.« less

  12. Sensitivity of inertial confinement fusion hot spot properties to the deuterium-tritium fuel adiabat

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Melvin, J.; Lim, H.; Rana, V.; Glimm, J.; Cheng, B.; Sharp, D. H.; Wilson, D. C.

    2015-02-15

    We determine the dependence of key Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) hot spot simulation properties on the deuterium-tritium fuel adiabat, here modified by addition of energy to the cold shell. Variation of this parameter reduces the simulation to experiment discrepancy in some, but not all, experimentally inferred quantities. Using simulations with radiation drives tuned to match experimental shots N120321 and N120405 from the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), we carry out sets of simulations with varying amounts of added entropy and examine the sensitivities of important experimental quantities. Neutron yields, burn widths, hot spot densities, and pressures follow a trend approaching their experimentally inferred quantities. Ion temperatures and areal densities are sensitive to the adiabat changes, but do not necessarily converge to their experimental quantities with the added entropy. This suggests that a modification to the simulation adiabat is one of, but not the only explanation of the observed simulation to experiment discrepancies. In addition, we use a theoretical model to predict 3D mix and observe a slight trend toward less mixing as the entropy is enhanced. Instantaneous quantities are assessed at the time of maximum neutron production, determined dynamically within each simulation. These trends contribute to ICF science, as an effort to understand the NIC simulation to experiment discrepancy, and in their relation to the high foot experiments, which features a higher adiabat in the experimental design and an improved neutron yield in the experimental results.

  13. Impact of x-ray dose on the response of CR-39 to 1–5.5 MeV alphas

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Rojas-Herrera, J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Zylstra, A. B.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Orozco, D.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sio, H.; Seguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; et al

    2015-03-01

    The CR-39 nuclear track detector is used in many nuclear diagnostics fielded at inertial confinement fusion (ICF) facilities. Large x-ray uences generated by ICF experiments may impact the CR-39 response to incident charged particles. To determine the impact of x-ray exposure on the CR-39 response to alpha particles, a thick-target bremsstrahlung x-ray generator was used to expose CR-39 to various doses of 8 keV Cu-Kα and Kβ x-rays. The CR-39 detectors were then exposed to 1-5.5 MeV alphas from an Am-241 source. The regions of the CR-39 exposed to x-rays showed a smaller track diameter than those not exposed tomore » x-rays: for example, a dose of 3.0 ± 0.1 Gy causes a decrease of (19 ± 2)% in the track diameter of a 5.5 MeV alpha particle, while a dose of 60.0 ± 1.3 Gy results in a decrease of (45 ± 5)% in the track diameter. The reduced track diameters were found to be predominantly caused by a comparable reduction in the bulk etch rate of the CR-39 with x-ray dose. A residual effect depending on alpha particle energy is characterized using an empirical formula.« less

  14. Laser Program annual report, 1985

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rufer, M.L.; Murphy, P.W.

    1986-11-01

    This volume presents the unclassified activities and accomplishments of the Inertial Confinement Fusion and Advanced Laser Development elements of the Laser Program at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for the calendar year 1985. This report has been organized into major sections that correspond to our principal technical activities. Section 1 provides an overview. Section 2 comprises work in target theory, design, and code development. Target development and fabrication and the related topics in materials science are contained in Section 3. Section 4 presents work in experiments and diagnostics and includes developments in data acquisition and management capabilities. In Section 5 laser system (Nova) operation and maintenance are discussed. Activities related to supporting laser and optical technologies are described in Section 6. Basic laser research and development is reported in Section 7. Section 8 contains the results of studies in ICF applications where the work reported deals principally with the production of electric power with ICF. Finally, Section 9 is a comprehensive discussion of work to date on solid state lasers for average power applications. Individual sections, two through nine, have been cataloged separately.

  15. Impact of x-ray dose on the response of CR-39 to 1–5.5 MeV alphas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rojas-Herrera, J. Rinderknecht, H. G.; Zylstra, A. B.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Orozco, D.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sio, H.; Seguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2015-03-15

    The CR-39 nuclear track detector is used in many nuclear diagnostics fielded at inertial confinement fusion (ICF) facilities. Large x-ray fluences generated by ICF experiments may impact the CR-39 response to incident charged particles. To determine the impact of x-ray exposure on the CR-39 response to alpha particles, a thick-target bremsstrahlung x-ray generator was used to expose CR-39 to various doses of 8 keV Cu-K{sub α} and K{sub β} x-rays. The CR-39 detectors were then exposed to 1–5.5 MeV alphas from an Am-241 source. The regions of the CR-39 exposed to x-rays showed a smaller track diameter than those not exposed to x-rays: for example, a dose of 3.0 ± 0.1 Gy causes a decrease of (19 ± 2)% in the track diameter of a 5.5 MeV alpha particle, while a dose of 60.0 ± 1.3 Gy results in a decrease of (45 ± 5)% in the track diameter. The reduced track diameters were found to be predominantly caused by a comparable reduction in the bulk etch rate of the CR-39 with x-ray dose. A residual effect depending on alpha particle energy is characterized using an empirical formula.

  16. Inertial-confinement fusion-reactor dry-wall study. Final report, 13 August 1981-31 March 1983. Report WAESD-TR-83-0010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sucov, E.W.

    1983-04-01

    The Westinghouse ICF Dry Wall Study was undertaken (1) to explore the practical implications of using a Ta coating to protect the steel first wall of an ICF reactor against the power pulses from the explosions of a pellet containing Ta as the heavy element and (2) to determine if a feasible design for improved safety and lower cost in a blanket could be developed using solid lithium compound in place of liquid lithium as the tritium breeder. Three coating techniques were examined; plasma spray, chemical vapor deposition and explosive bonding. An evaporation code and a sputtering code which were developed at LANL, were used to calculate the loss rate of Ta due to these processes after each pellet explosion. A simulation experiment to verify the CHART D calculations was investigated. Sources of pulsed x-rays and ions to simulate the debris from each pellet explosion were identified. The CANDID code was developed to permit evaluation of candidate metals for coating the steel based on criteria such as surface and bulk temperature rise, thermal stress in the creating layer and evaporation rate. Material properties were stored in the memory and were called upon to calculate evaluation algorithms. Of twenty original candidates, six remain: Re, Ir, Mo, Cr, W, Ta and Nb. Further evaluation would include parameters such as cost, manufacturability, radioactive decay rate, etc.

  17. Effects of magnetization on fusion product trapping and secondary neutron spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, P. F.; Schmit, P. F.; Hansen, S. B.; Gomez, M. R.; Hahn, K. D.; Sinars, D. B.; Peterson, K. J.; Slutz, S. A.; Sefkow, A. B.; Awe, T. J.; Harding, E.; Jennings, C. A.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Chandler, G. A.; Cooper, G. W.; Cuneo, M. E.; Geissel, M.; Harvey-Thompson, A. J.; Porter, J. L.; Rochau, G. A.; and others

    2015-05-15

    By magnetizing the fusion fuel in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) systems, the required stagnation pressure and density can be relaxed dramatically. This happens because the magnetic field insulates the hot fuel from the cold pusher and traps the charged fusion burn products. This trapping allows the burn products to deposit their energy in the fuel, facilitating plasma self-heating. Here, we report on a comprehensive theory of this trapping in a cylindrical DD plasma magnetized with a purely axial magnetic field. Using this theory, we are able to show that the secondary fusion reactions can be used to infer the magnetic field-radius product, BR, during fusion burn. This parameter, not ρR, is the primary confinement parameter in magnetized ICF. Using this method, we analyze data from recent Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion experiments conducted on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories. We show that in these experiments BR ≈ 0.34(+0.14/−0.06) MG · cm, a ∼ 14× increase in BR from the initial value, and confirming that the DD-fusion tritons are magnetized at stagnation. This is the first experimental verification of charged burn product magnetization facilitated by compression of an initial seed magnetic flux.

  18. Impact of x-ray dose on the response of CR-39 to 1–5.5 MeV alphas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rojas-Herrera, J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Zylstra, A. B.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Orozco, D.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sio, H.; Seguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2015-03-01

    The CR-39 nuclear track detector is used in many nuclear diagnostics fielded at inertial confinement fusion (ICF) facilities. Large x-ray uences generated by ICF experiments may impact the CR-39 response to incident charged particles. To determine the impact of x-ray exposure on the CR-39 response to alpha particles, a thick-target bremsstrahlung x-ray generator was used to expose CR-39 to various doses of 8 keV Cu-Kα and Kβ x-rays. The CR-39 detectors were then exposed to 1-5.5 MeV alphas from an Am-241 source. The regions of the CR-39 exposed to x-rays showed a smaller track diameter than those not exposed to x-rays: for example, a dose of 3.0 ± 0.1 Gy causes a decrease of (19 ± 2)% in the track diameter of a 5.5 MeV alpha particle, while a dose of 60.0 ± 1.3 Gy results in a decrease of (45 ± 5)% in the track diameter. The reduced track diameters were found to be predominantly caused by a comparable reduction in the bulk etch rate of the CR-39 with x-ray dose. A residual effect depending on alpha particle energy is characterized using an empirical formula.

  19. Overview of LANL short-pulse ion acceleration activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flippo, Kirk A.; Schmitt, Mark J.; Offermann, Dustin; Cobble, James A.; Gautier, Donald; Kline, John; Workman, Jonathan; Archuleta, Fred; Gonzales, Raymond; Hurry, Thomas; Johnson, Randall; Letzring, Samuel; Montgomery, David; Reid, Sha-Marie; Shimada, Tsutomu; Gaillard, Sandrine A.; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Bussman, Michael; Kluge, Thomas; Cowan, Thomas E.; Rassuchine, Jenny M.; Lowenstern, Mario E.; Mucino, J. Eduardo; Gall, Brady; Korgan, Grant; Malekos, Steven; Adams, Jesse; Bartal, Teresa; Chawla, Surgreev; Higginson, Drew; Beg, Farhat; Nilson, Phil; Mac Phee, Andrew; Le Pape, Sebastien; Hey, Daniel; Mac Kinnon, Andy; Geissel, Mattias; Schollmeier, Marius; Stephens, Rich

    2009-12-02

    An overview of Los Alamos National Laboratory's activities related to short-pulse ion acceleration is presented. LANL is involved is several projects related to Inertial Confinement Fusion (Fast Ignition) and Laser-Ion Acceleration. LANL has an active high energy X-ray backlighter program for radiographing ICF implosions and other High Energy Density Laboratory Physics experiments. Using the Trident 200TW laser we are currently developing high energy photon (>10 keV) phase contrast imaging techniques to be applied on Omega and the NIF. In addition we are engaged in multiple programs in laser ion acceleration to boost the ion energies and efficiencies for various potential applications including Fast Ignition, active material interrogation, and medical applications. Two basic avenues to increase ion performance are currently under study: one involves ultra-thin targets and the other involves changing the target geometry. We have recently had success in boosting proton energies above 65 MeV into the medical application range. Highlights covered in the presentation include: The Trident Laser System; X-ray Phase Contrast Imaging for ICF and HEDLP; Improving TNSA Ion Acceleration; Scaling Laws; Flat Targets; Thin Targets; Cone Targets; Ion Focusing;Trident; Omega EP; Scaling Comparisons; and, Conclusions.

  20. Implications of high-energy photons and electrons on target preheat at Z

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Derzon, M.; Nash, T.; Chandler, G.

    1998-06-01

    High-energy photons and electrons on the Z accelerator will deposit energy into a capsule and fuel; this may create a potential preheat problem for ICF. In this paper the authors discuss heating of the capsule and fuel by high-energy photons and electrons. The fuel is heated to <2 eV, in a time-integrated sense, on Z by these particles. Because peak implosion occurs at the peak in the soft x-ray emission on Z, the heating at times of interest is reduced roughly an order of magnitude to {approximately}0.2 eV for times of interest and fuel preheat from this mechanism is concluded to be small. These estimates are generated from time-integrated bremsstrahlung measurements. The uncertainty in the heating is high because the electron spectrum is not known directly, but inferred. In addition the influence of the particles between 5 keV and 60 keV is not known. Given the uncertainties the authors do not know the impact on the feasibility of internal dynamic hohlraums on z-pinch driven ICF implosions on X-1. The authors discuss these issues and suggest directions for further study.

  1. Z, ZX, and X-1: A Realistic Path to High Fusion Yield

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    COOK, DONALD L.

    1999-10-07

    Z-pinches now constitute the most energetic and powerful sources of x-rays available by a large margin. The Z accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories has produced 1.8 MJ of x-ray energy, 280 TW of power, and hohlraum temperatures of 200 eV. These advances are being applied to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments on Z. The requirements for high fusion yield are exemplified in the target to be driven by the X-1 accelerator. X-1 will drive two z-pinches, each producing 7 MJ of x-ray energy and about 1000 TW of x-ray power. Together, these radiation sources will heat a hohlraum containing the 4-mm diameter ICF capsule to a temperature exceeding 225 eV for about 10 ns, with the pulse shape required to drive the capsule to high fusion yield, in the range of 200--1000 MJ. Since X-1 consists of two identical accelerators, it is possible to mitigate the technical risk of high yield by constructing one accelerator. This accelerator, ZX, will bridge the gap from Z to X-1 by driving an integrated target experiment with a very efficient energy source, ZX will also provide experimental condition that the full specifications of the X-1 accelerator for high yield are achievable, and that a realistic path to high fission yield exists.

  2. Insulated Concrete Form Walls Integrated With Mechanical Systems in a Cold Climate Test House

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mallay, D.; Wiehagen, J.

    2014-09-01

    Transitioning from standard light frame to a thermal mass wall system in a high performance home will require a higher level of design integration with the mechanical systems. The much higher mass in the ICF wall influences heat transfer through the wall and affects how the heating and cooling system responds to changing outdoor conditions. This is even more important for efficient, low-load homes with efficient heat pump systems in colder climates where the heating and cooling peak loads are significantly different from standard construction. This report analyzes a range of design features and component performance estimates in an effort to select practical, cost-effective solutions for high performance homes in a cold climate. Of primary interest is the influence of the ICF walls on developing an effective air sealing strategy and selecting an appropriate heating and cooling equipment type and capacity. The domestic water heating system is analyzed for costs and savings to investigate options for higher efficiency electric water heating. A method to ensure mechanical ventilation air flows is examined. The final solution package includes high-R mass walls, very low infiltration rates, multi-stage heat pump heating, solar thermal domestic hot water system, and energy recovery ventilation. This solution package can be used for homes to exceed 2012 International Energy Conservation Code requirements throughout all climate zones and achieves the DOE Challenge Home certification.

  3. First-principles equation of state of polystyrene and its effect on inertial confinement fusion implosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hu, S. X.; Collins, L. A.; Goncharov, V. N.; Kress, J. D.; McCrory, R. L.; Skupsky, S.

    2015-10-14

    Obtaining an accurate equation of state (EOS) of polystyrene (CH) is crucial to reliably design inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules using CH/CH-based ablators. Thus, with first-principles calculations, we have investigated the extended EOS of CH over a wide range of plasma conditions (ρ = 0.1 to 100 g/cm3 and T = 1,000 to 4,000,000 K). When compared with the widely used SESAME-EOS table, the first-principles equation of state (FPEOS) of CH has shown significant differences in the low-temperature regime, in which strong coupling and electron degeneracy play an essential role in determining plasma properties. Hydrodynamic simulations of cryogenic target implosions on OMEGA using the FPEOS table of CH have predicted ~5% reduction in implosion velocity and ~30% decrease in neutron yield in comparison with the usual SESAME simulations. This is attributed to the ~10% lower mass ablation rate of CH predicted by FPEOS. Simulations using CH-FPEOS show better agreement with measurements of Hugoniot temperature and scattered lights from ICF implosions.

  4. Tail-ion transport and Knudsen layer formation in the presence of magnetic fields

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmit, P. F.; Molvig, Kim; Nakhleh, C. W.

    2013-11-15

    Knudsen layer losses of tail fuel ions could reduce significantly the fusion reactivity of highly compressed cylindrical and spherical targets in inertial confinement fusion (ICF). With the class of magnetized ICF targets in mind, the effect of embedded magnetic fields on Knudsen layer formation is investigated for the first time. The modified energy scaling of ion diffusivity in magnetized hot spots is found to suppress the preferential losses of tail-ions perpendicular to the magnetic field lines to a degree that the tail distribution can be at least partially, if not fully, restored. Two simple threshold conditions are identified leading to the restoration of fusion reactivity in magnetized hot spots. A kinetic equation for tail-ion transport in the presence of a magnetic field is derived, and solutions to the equation are obtained numerically in simulations. Numerical results confirm the validity of the threshold conditions for restored reactivity and identify two different asymptotic regimes of the fusion fuel. While Knudsen layer formation is shown to be suppressed entirely in strongly magnetized cylindrical hot spot cavities, uniformly magnetized spherical cavities demonstrate remnant, albeit reduced, levels of tail-ion depletion.

  5. Real viscosity effects in inertial confinement fusion target deuterium–tritium micro-implosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mason, R. J. Kirkpatrick, R. C.; Faehl, R. J.

    2014-02-15

    We report on numerical studies of real viscous effects on the implosion characteristics of imploded DT micro-targets. We use the implicit ePLAS code to perform 2D simulations of spherical and slightly ellipsoidal DT shells on DT gas filled ∼40 μm diameter voids. Before their final implosions the shells have been nearly adiabatically compressed up to 10{sup 2} or 10{sup 3} g/cm{sup 3} densities. While the use of conventional artificial viscosity can lead to high central densities for initially spherical shells, we find that a real physical viscosity from ion-ion collisions can give a high (>20 keV) central temperature but severely reduced central density (<200 g/cm{sup 3}), while the elliptical shells evidence p = 2 distortion of the heated central fuel region. These results suggest that the general use of artificial viscosities in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) modeling may have lead to overly optimistic yields for current NIF targets and that polar direct drive with more energy for the imploding capsule may be needed for ultimate ICF success.

  6. Investigation of ion kinetic effects in direct-drive exploding-pusher implosions at the NIF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenberg, M. J. Zylstra, A. B.; Séguin, F. H.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Sio, H.; Waugh, C. J.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; McKenty, P. W.; Hohenberger, M.; Radha, P. B.; Delettrez, J. A.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Betti, R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Knauer, J. P.; Sangster, T. C.; and others

    2014-12-15

    Measurements of yield, ion temperature, areal density (ρR), shell convergence, and bang time have been obtained in shock-driven, D{sub 2} and D{sup 3}He gas-filled “exploding-pusher” inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions at the National Ignition Facility to assess the impact of ion kinetic effects. These measurements probed the shock convergence phase of ICF implosions, a critical stage in hot-spot ignition experiments. The data complement previous studies of kinetic effects in shock-driven implosions. Ion temperature and fuel ρR inferred from fusion-product spectroscopy are used to estimate the ion-ion mean free path in the gas. A trend of decreasing yields relative to the predictions of 2D DRACO hydrodynamics simulations with increasing Knudsen number (the ratio of ion-ion mean free path to minimum shell radius) suggests that ion kinetic effects are increasingly impacting the hot fuel region, in general agreement with previous results. The long mean free path conditions giving rise to ion kinetic effects in the gas are often prevalent during the shock phase of both exploding pushers and ablatively driven implosions, including ignition-relevant implosions.

  7. Cryogenic tritium-hydrogen-deuterium and deuterium-tritium layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meezan, N. B. Hopkins, L. F. Berzak; Pape, S. Le; Divol, L.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Döppner, T.; Ho, D. D.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Milovich, J. L.; Pak, A. E.; Ross, J. S.; Thomas, C. A.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.; and others

    2015-06-15

    High Density Carbon (or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations of <10 ns. A series of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments in 2013 on the National Ignition Facility [Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] culminated in a deuterium-tritium (DT) layered implosion driven by a 6.8 ns, 2-shock laser pulse. This paper describes these experiments and comparisons with ICF design code simulations. Backlit radiography of a tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightly oblate hot spot shape. Other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. A streak camera-based hot spot self-emission diagnostic (SPIDER) showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of low quality hot spot formation. Changes to the laser pulse and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1.8 × 10{sup 15} neutrons, 40% of the 1D simulated yield.

  8. Reduced Variance for Material Sources in Implicit Monte Carlo

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Urbatsch, Todd J.

    2012-06-25

    Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC), a time-implicit method due to Fleck and Cummings, is used for simulating supernovae and inertial confinement fusion (ICF) systems where x-rays tightly and nonlinearly interact with hot material. The IMC algorithm represents absorption and emission within a timestep as an effective scatter. Similarly, the IMC time-implicitness splits off a portion of a material source directly into the radiation field. We have found that some of our variance reduction and particle management schemes will allow large variances in the presence of small, but important, material sources, as in the case of ICF hot electron preheat sources. We propose a modification of our implementation of the IMC method in the Jayenne IMC Project. Instead of battling the sampling issues associated with a small source, we bypass the IMC implicitness altogether and simply deterministically update the material state with the material source if the temperature of the spatial cell is below a user-specified cutoff. We describe the modified method and present results on a test problem that show the elimination of variance for small sources.

  9. Wire number dependence of the implosion dynamics, stagnation, and radiation output of tungsten wire arrays at Z driver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mazarakis, Michael G.; Stygar, William A.; Sinars, Daniel B.; Cuneo, Michael E.; Nash, Thomas J.; Chandler, Gordon A.; Keith Matzen, M.; Porter, John L.; Struve, Kenneth W.; McDaniel, Dillon H.; Deeney, Christopher E.; Douglas, Melissa R.; Chittenden, Jerry

    2011-11-15

    We report results of the experimental campaign, which studied the initiation, implosion dynamics, and radiation yield of tungsten wire arrays as a function of the wire number. The wire array dimensions and mass were those of interest for the Z-pinch driven Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program. An optimization study of the x-ray emitted peak power, rise time, and full width at half maximum was effectuated by varying the wire number while keeping the total array mass constant and equal to {approx}5.8 mg. The driver utilized was the {approx}20-MA Z accelerator before refurbishment in its usual short pulse mode of 100 ns. We studied single arrays of 20-mm diameter and 1-cm height. The smaller wire number studied was 30 and the largest 600. It appears that 600 is the highest achievable wire number with present day's technology. Radial and axial diagnostics were utilized including crystal monochromatic x-ray backlighter. An optimum wire number of {approx}375 was observed which was very close to the routinely utilized 300 for the ICF program in Sandia.

  10. The effect of turbulent kinetic energy on inferred ion temperature from neutron spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, T. J.

    2014-07-15

    Measuring the width of the energy spectrum of fusion-produced neutrons from deuterium (DD) or deuterium-tritium (DT) plasmas is a commonly used method for determining the ion temperature in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. In a plasma with a Maxwellian distribution of ion energies, the spread in neutron energy arises from the thermal spread in the center-of-mass velocities of reacting pairs of ions. Fluid velocities in ICF are of a similar magnitude as the center-of-mass velocities and can lead to further broadening of the neutron spectrum, leading to erroneous inference of ion temperature. Motion of the reacting plasma will affect DD and DT neutrons differently, leading to disagreement between ion temperatures inferred from the two reactions. This effect may be a contributor to observations over the past decades of ion temperatures higher than expected from simulations, ion temperatures in disagreement with observed yields, and different temperatures measured in the same implosion from DD and DT neutrons. This difference in broadening of DD and DT neutrons also provides a measure of turbulent motion in a fusion plasma.

  11. Empirical assessment of the detection efficiency of CR-39 at high proton fluence and a compact, proton detector for high-fluence applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenberg, M. J. Séguin, F. H.; Waugh, C. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Orozco, D.; Frenje, J. A.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Sio, H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Stoeckl, C.; Hohenberger, M.; Sangster, T. C.; LePape, S.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Bionta, R. M.; Landen, O. L.; and others

    2014-04-15

    CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detectors are widely used in physics and in many inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, and under ideal conditions these detectors have 100% detection efficiency for ∼0.5–8 MeV protons. When the fluence of incident particles becomes too high, overlap of particle tracks leads to under-counting at typical processing conditions (5 h etch in 6N NaOH at 80 °C). Short etch times required to avoid overlap can cause under-counting as well, as tracks are not fully developed. Experiments have determined the minimum etch times for 100% detection of 1.7–4.3-MeV protons and established that for 2.4-MeV protons, relevant for detection of DD protons, the maximum fluence that can be detected using normal processing techniques is ≲3 × 10{sup 6} cm{sup −2}. A CR-39-based proton detector has been developed to mitigate issues related to high particle fluences on ICF facilities. Using a pinhole and scattering foil several mm in front of the CR-39, proton fluences at the CR-39 are reduced by more than a factor of ∼50, increasing the operating yield upper limit by a comparable amount.

  12. Development of the large neutron imaging system for inertial confinement fusion experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caillaud, T.; Landoas, O.; Briat, M.; Kime, S.; Rosse, B.; Thfoin, I.; Bourgade, J. L.; Disdier, L.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Marshall, F. J.; Sangster, T. C.

    2012-03-15

    Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) requires a high resolution ({approx}10 {mu}m) neutron imaging system to observe deuterium and tritium (DT) core implosion asymmetries. A new large (150 mm entrance diameter: scaled for Laser MegaJoule [P. A. Holstein, F. Chaland, C. Charpin, J. M. Dufour, H. Dumont, J. Giorla, L. Hallo, S. Laffite, G. Malinie, Y. Saillard, G. Schurtz, M. Vandenboomgaerde, and F. Wagon, Laser and Particle Beams 17, 403 (1999)]) neutron imaging detector has been developed for such ICF experiments. The detector has been fully characterized using a linear accelerator and a {sup 60}Co {gamma}-ray source. A penumbral aperture was used to observe DT-gas-filled target implosions performed on the OMEGA laser facility. [T. R. Boehly, D. L. Brown, R. S. Craxton, R. L. Keck, J. P. Knauer, J. H. Kelly, T. J. Kessler, S. A. Kumpan, S. J. Loucks, S. A. Letzring, F. J. Marshall, R. L. McCrory, S. F. B. Morse, W. Seka, J. M. Soures, and C. P. Verdon, Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] Neutron core images of 14 MeV with a resolution of 15 {mu}m were obtained and are compared to x-ray images of comparable resolution.

  13. Using high-intensity laser-generated energetic protons to radiograph directly driven implosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zylstra, A. B.; Li, C. K.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Stoeckl, C.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Nilson, P.; Sangster, T. C.; Le Pape, S.; Mackinnon, A.; Patel, P.

    2012-01-15

    The recent development of petawatt-class lasers with kilojoule-picosecond pulses, such as OMEGA EP [L. Waxer et al., Opt. Photonics News 16, 30 (2005)], provides a new diagnostic capability to study inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) and high-energy-density (HED) plasmas. Specifically, petawatt OMEGA EP pulses have been used to backlight OMEGA implosions with energetic proton beams generated through the target normal sheath acceleration (TNSA) mechanism. This allows time-resolved studies of the mass distribution and electromagnetic field structures in ICF and HED plasmas. This principle has been previously demonstrated using Vulcan to backlight six-beam implosions [A. J. Mackinnon et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 97, 045001 (2006)]. The TNSA proton backlighter offers better spatial and temporal resolution but poorer spatial uniformity and energy resolution than previous D{sup 3}He fusion-based techniques [C. Li et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 77, 10E725 (2006)]. A target and the experimental design technique to mitigate potential problems in using TNSA backlighting to study full-energy implosions is discussed. The first proton radiographs of 60-beam spherical OMEGA implosions using the techniques discussed in this paper are presented. Sample radiographs and suggestions for troubleshooting failed radiography shots using TNSA backlighting are given, and future applications of this technique at OMEGA and the NIF are discussed.

  14. Fusion-neutron-yield, activation measurements at the Z accelerator: Design, analysis, and sensitivity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hahn, K. D. Ruiz, C. L.; Fehl, D. L.; Chandler, G. A.; Knapp, P. F.; Smelser, R. M.; Torres, J. A.; Cooper, G. W.; Nelson, A. J.; Leeper, R. J.

    2014-04-15

    We present a general methodology to determine the diagnostic sensitivity that is directly applicable to neutron-activation diagnostics fielded on a wide variety of neutron-producing experiments, which include inertial-confinement fusion (ICF), dense plasma focus, and ion beam-driven concepts. This approach includes a combination of several effects: (1) non-isotropic neutron emission; (2) the 1/r{sup 2} decrease in neutron fluence in the activation material; (3) the spatially distributed neutron scattering, attenuation, and energy losses due to the fielding environment and activation material itself; and (4) temporally varying neutron emission. As an example, we describe the copper-activation diagnostic used to measure secondary deuterium-tritium fusion-neutron yields on ICF experiments conducted on the pulsed-power Z Accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories. Using this methodology along with results from absolute calibrations and Monte Carlo simulations, we find that for the diagnostic configuration on Z, the diagnostic sensitivity is 0.037% ± 17% counts/neutron per cm{sup 2} and is ∼ 40% less sensitive than it would be in an ideal geometry due to neutron attenuation, scattering, and energy-loss effects.

  15. Innovative approaches to inertial confinement fusion reactors: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bourque, R.F.; Schultz, K.R.

    1986-11-01

    Three areas of innovative approaches to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor design are given. First, issues pertaining to the Cascade reactor concept are discussed. Then, several innovative concepts are presented which attempt to directly recover the blast energy from a fusion target. Finally, the Turbostar concept for direct recovery of that energy is evaluated. The Cascade issues discussed are combustion of the carbon granules in the event of air ingress, the use of alternate granule materials, and the effect of changes in carbon flow on details of the heat exchanger. Carbon combustion turns out to be a minor problem. Four ICF innovative concepts were considered: a turbine with ablating surfaces, a liquid piston system, a wave generator, and a resonating pump. In the final analysis, none show any real promise. The Turbostar concept of direct recovery is a very interesting idea and appeared technically viable. However, it shows no efficiency gain or any decrease in capital cost compared to reactors with conventional thermal conversion systems. Attempts to improve it by placing a close-in lithium sphere around the target to increase gas generation increased efficiency only slightly. It is concluded that these direct conversion techniques require thermalization of the x-ray and debris energy, and are Carnot limited. They therefore offer no advantage over existing and proposed methods of thermal energy conversion or direct electrical conversion.

  16. Effects of magnetization on fusion product trapping and secondary neutron spectra

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Knapp, Patrick F.; Schmit, Paul F.; Hansen, Stephanie B.; Gomez, Matthew R.; Hahn, Kelly D.; Sinars, Daniel Brian; Peterson, Kyle J.; Slutz, Stephen A.; Sefkow, Adam B.; Awe, Thomas James; et al

    2015-05-14

    In magnetizing the fusion fuel in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) systems, we found that the required stagnation pressure and density can be relaxed dramatically. This happens because the magnetic field insulates the hot fuel from the cold pusher and traps the charged fusion burn products. This trapping allows the burn products to deposit their energy in the fuel, facilitating plasma self-heating. Here, we report on a comprehensive theory of this trapping in a cylindrical DD plasma magnetized with a purely axial magnetic field. Using this theory, we are able to show that the secondary fusion reactions can be used tomore » infer the magnetic field-radius product, BR, during fusion burn. This parameter, not ρR, is the primary confinement parameter in magnetized ICF. Using this method, we analyze data from recent Magnetized Liner InertialFusion experiments conducted on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories. Furthermore, we show that in these experiments BR ≈ 0.34(+0.14/-0.06) MG · cm, a ~ 14× increase in BR from the initial value, and confirming that the DD-fusion tritons are magnetized at stagnation. Lastly, this is the first experimental verification of charged burn product magnetization facilitated by compression of an initial seed magnetic flux.« less

  17. Life-cycle cost analysis 200-West Weather Enclosure: Multi-function Waste Tank Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Umphrey, M.R.

    1995-01-16

    The Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF)will provide environmentally safe and acceptable storage capacity for handling wastes resulting from the remediation of existing single-shell and double-shell tanks on the Hanford Site. The MWTF will construct two tank farm facilities at two separate locations. A four-tank complex will be constructed in the 200-East Area of the Hanford Site; a two-tank complex will be constructed in the 200-West Area. This report documents the results of a life-cycle cost analysis performed by ICF Kaiser Hanford Company (ICF KH) for the Weather Enclosure proposed to be constructed over the 200-West tanks. Currently, all tank farm operations on the Hanford Site are conducted in an open environment, with weather often affecting tank farm maintenance activities. The Weather Enclosure is being proposed to allow year-round tank farm operation and maintenance activities unconstrained by weather conditions. Elimination of weather-related delays at the MWTF and associated facilities will reduce operational costs. The life-cycle cost analysis contained in this report analyzes potential cost savings based on historical weather information, operational and maintenance costs, construction cost estimates, and other various assumptions.

  18. Building America Case Study: Lancaster County Career and Technology Center Green Home 3, Mt Joy, Pennsylvania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2014-12-01

    Transitioning from standard light frame to a thermal mass wall system in a high performance home will require a higher level of design integration with the mechanical systems. The much higher mass in the ICF wall influences heat transfer through the wall and affects how the heating and cooling system responds to changing outdoor conditions. This is even more important for efficient, low-load homes with efficient heat pump systems in colder climates where the heating and cooling peak loads are significantly different from standard construction.This report analyzes a range of design features and component performance estimates in an effort to select practical, cost-effective solutions for high performance homes in a cold climate. Of primary interest is the influence of the ICF walls on developing an effective air sealing strategy and selecting an appropriate heating and cooling equipment type and capacity. The domestic water heating system is analyzed for costs and savings to investigate options for higher efficiency electric water heating. A method to ensure mechanical ventilation air flows is examined. The final solution package includes high-R mass walls, very low infiltration rates, multi-stage heat pump heating, solar thermal domestic hot water system, and energy recovery ventilation. This solution package can be used for homes to exceed 2012 International Energy Conservation Code requirements throughout all climate zones and achieves the DOE Challenge Home certification.

  19. New polymer target-shell properties and characterizations. Appendix A

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Honig, A.; Wei, X.; Fan, Q.; Alexander, N.; Palmer, N.

    1993-12-31

    A method for characterizing ICF target shells is presented, based on measurement of the gas released from a single shell into a small volume. It utilizes cryogenic permeation systems developed in connection with our work on ICF targets containing nuclear spin-polarized deuterium. Permeation rates for polystyrene and parylene-coated-polystyrene shells are measured at temperatures from 350K down to 180K. Burst or implosion pressure can be determined over a full temperature range down to 20K. Shell temperature is calculated from its gas leakage rate, calibrated by permeation measurements over the temperature range. Lag of shell temperature compared with sample-chamber temperature during warming of the latter is attributed to the weakness of the thermal link provided by both radiative heat transfer and free molecular conduction with small accommodation coefficients for helium and deuterium gas at the structure to which the shell is conductively linked, or at the surface of a conductively isolated shell. Quantification of this lag can provide a measure of atomic scale roughness of the shell outer surface. Also presented are reversible pre-rupture leakage phenomena for polystyrene and parylene-coated-polystyrene shells.

  20. Effects of magnetization on fusion product trapping and secondary neutron spectra

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, Patrick F.; Schmit, Paul F.; Hansen, Stephanie B.; Gomez, Matthew R.; Hahn, Kelly D.; Sinars, Daniel Brian; Peterson, Kyle J.; Slutz, Stephen A.; Sefkow, Adam B.; Awe, Thomas James; Harding, Eric; Jennings, Christopher A.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Chandler, Gordon A.; Cooper, Gary Wayne; Cuneo, Michael Edward; Geissel, Matthias; Harvey-Thompson, Adam James; Porter, John L.; Rochau, Gregory A.; Rovang, Dean C.; Ruiz, Carlos L.; Savage, Mark E.; Smith, Ian C.; Stygar, William A.; Herrmann, Mark

    2015-05-14

    In magnetizing the fusion fuel in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) systems, we found that the required stagnation pressure and density can be relaxed dramatically. This happens because the magnetic field insulates the hot fuel from the cold pusher and traps the charged fusion burn products. This trapping allows the burn products to deposit their energy in the fuel, facilitating plasma self-heating. Here, we report on a comprehensive theory of this trapping in a cylindrical DD plasma magnetized with a purely axial magnetic field. Using this theory, we are able to show that the secondary fusion reactions can be used to infer the magnetic field-radius product, BR, during fusion burn. This parameter, not ρR, is the primary confinement parameter in magnetized ICF. Using this method, we analyze data from recent Magnetized Liner InertialFusion experiments conducted on the Z machine at Sandia National Laboratories. Furthermore, we show that in these experiments BR ≈ 0.34(+0.14/-0.06) MG · cm, a ~ 14× increase in BR from the initial value, and confirming that the DD-fusion tritons are magnetized at stagnation. Lastly, this is the first experimental verification of charged burn product magnetization facilitated by compression of an initial seed magnetic flux.

  1. Status of LDRD-DR 20070518 development of a magnetically driven target for thermo-nuclear burn studies (u)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Watt, Robert G; Atchison, W L; Colgate, S A; Goforth, J; Griego, J; Guzik, J; Holtkamp, D; Idzorek, G; Kirkpatrick, R; Menikoff, R; Meyer, R; Oona, H; Reardon, P; Rousculp, C L; Sgro, A G; Tabaka, L

    2010-01-20

    This project is developing a magnetically driven cylindrical confinement system for the creation of a small region of material existing under extreme conditions. Using a Ranchero High Explosive Pulsed Power generator (HEPP) with maximum current ranging from 25- 50 MA depending on the load, a current driven Al cylinder will impact a series of nested, less massive Au shells. Each subsequent shell's inner surface velocity will increase due to it's smaller mass by the ratio 2.01( 1+ m{sub i+ 1}/m i), along with radial convergence. Attaining this ideal result requires highly efficient energy transfer which in turn requires plastic cushions. The final velocity of the last sequential shell will be used to drive a central experimental package in which extreme material conditions will be produced. The inexpensive nature of HEPP and the extreme conditions attainable allow many studies to be conducted in regimes not currently available in the laboratory. One potential central experimental package consists of a cylindrical Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) target; a cylindrical Au pusher surrounding frozen DT. This target is used as a design tool. The ICF conditions achieved with such a target would be similar to those created in a double shell ignition capsule at the National Ignition Facility. The system being developed has a range of potential applications.

  2. Pulsed power supply for Nova Upgrade. Final report, August 1, 1991 to March 31, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bacon, J.L.; Kajs, J.P.; Walls, A.; Weldon, W.F.; Zowarka, R.C.

    1992-12-31

    This report describes work carried out at the Center for Electromechanics at The University of Texas at Austin (CEM-UT). A baseline design of the Nova Upgrade has been completed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The Nova Upgrade is an 18 beamline Nd: glass laser design utilizing fully relayed 4x4 30 cm aperture segmented optical components. The laser thus consists of 288 independent beamlets nominally producing 1.5 to 2.0 MJ of 0.35 {mu}m light in a 3 to 5 ns pulse. The laser design is extremely flexible and will allow a wide range of pulses to irradiate ICF targets. This facility will demonstrate ignition/gain and the scientific feasibility of ICF for energy and defense applications. The pulsed power requirements for the Nova Upgrade are given. CEM-UT was contracted to study and develop a design for a homopolar generator/inductor (HPG/inductor) opening switch system which would satisfy the pulsed power supply requirements of the Nova Upgrade. The Nd:glass laser amplifiers used in the Nova Upgrade will be powered by light from xenon flashlamps. The pulsed power supply for the Nova Upgrade powers the xenon flashlamps. This design and study was for a power supply to drive flashlamps.

  3. A benchmark comparison of predicted x-ray and neutron doses for a nuclear effects test in the Laboratory Microfusion Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beller, D.E. ); Tobin, M.T. ); Lorence, L.J. )

    1990-09-18

    An intermediate step in the development of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) for power production will be the development and testing of a high-gain facility. One concept being considered for this facility is the Laboratory Microfusion Facility (LMF). Other projected applications of the LMF include high-energy-density physics experiments and nuclear effects testing. At the Air Force Institute of Technology (AFIT), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque (SNLA), we have been studying the use of the LMF for nuclear effects experiments. Because of the amount of energy that will be released in a high-gain ICF test and the size of the LMF, test objects could be any size from very small electronic components to large systems; and nuclear effects in the LMF may include thermal radiation, x-rays, electromagnetic pulse, gamma rays, neutrons, or others. At AFIT, LLNL, and SNLA we have been investigating a test to expose systems to high-energy x-ray pulses, and have completed predictions of x-ray fluence, dose, etc. in various conceptual LMF reactors. However, comparison of our results is more meaningful if our prediction methods produce the same results for the same design. To establish a basis for comparison, we set up a simple benchmark problem and we each computed x-ray and neutron transport. The model and codes are described and the results are compared and discussed.

  4. National Ignition Facility Quality Assurance Program Plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolfe, C.R.; Yatabe, J.

    1996-09-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a key constituent of the Department of Energy`s Stockpile Stewardship Program. The NIF will use inertial confinement fusion (ICF) to produce ignition and energy gain in ICF targets, and will perform weapons physics and high-energy- density experiments in support of national security and civilian objectives. The NIF Project is a national facility involving the collaboration of several DOE laboratories and subcontractors, including Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE). The primary mission of the NIF Project is the construction and start-up operation of laser-based facilities that will demonstrate fusion ignition in the laboratory to provide nuclear-weapons-related physics data, and secondarily, to propagate fusion burn aimed at developing a potential source of civilian energy. To support the accomplishment of this very important mission, the LLNL Laser Directorate created the NIF Project Office to organize and bring about the Project. The NIF Project Office has established this Quality Assurance Program to ensure its success. This issue of the Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) adds the requirements for the conduct of Title 11 design, construction, procurement, and Title III engineering. This QAPP defines and describes the program-the management system-for specifying, achieving, and assuring the quality of all NIF Project work consistent with the policies of the Laboratory and the Laser Directorate.

  5. Empirical assessment of the detection efficiency of CR-39 at high proton fluence and a compact, proton detector for high-fluence applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenberg, M. J.; Seguin, F. H.; Waugh, C. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Orozco, D.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Sio, H.; Zylstra, A. B.; Sinenian, N.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Stoeckl, C.; Hohenberger, M.; Sangster, T. C.; LePape, S.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Bionta, R. M.; Landen, O. L.; Zacharias, R. A.; Kim, Y.; Herrmann, H. W.; Kilkenny, J. D.

    2014-04-01

    CR-39 solid-state nuclear track detectors are widely used in physics and in many inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments, and under ideal conditions these detectors have 100% detection efficiency for ~0.58 MeV protons. When the fluence of incident particles becomes too high, overlap of particle tracks leads to under-counting at typical processing conditions (5 h etch in 6N NaOH at 80 C). Short etch times required to avoid overlap can cause under-counting as well, as tracks are not fully developed. Experiments have determined the minimum etch times for 100% detection of 1.74.3-MeV protons and established that for 2.4-MeV protons, relevant for detection of DD protons, the maximum fluence that can be detected using normal processing techniques is ?3 106 cm-2. A CR-39-based proton detector has been developed to mitigate issues related to high particle fluences on ICF facilities. Using a pinhole and scattering foil several mm in front of the CR-39, proton fluences at the CR-39 are reduced by more than a factor of ~50, increasing the operating yield upper limit by a comparable amount.

  6. First-principles equation of state of polystyrene and its effect on inertial confinement fusion implosions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Hu, S. X.; Collins, L. A.; Goncharov, V. N.; Kress, J. D.; McCrory, R. L.; Skupsky, S.

    2015-10-14

    Obtaining an accurate equation of state (EOS) of polystyrene (CH) is crucial to reliably design inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsules using CH/CH-based ablators. Thus, with first-principles calculations, we have investigated the extended EOS of CH over a wide range of plasma conditions (ρ = 0.1 to 100 g/cm3 and T = 1,000 to 4,000,000 K). When compared with the widely used SESAME-EOS table, the first-principles equation of state (FPEOS) of CH has shown significant differences in the low-temperature regime, in which strong coupling and electron degeneracy play an essential role in determining plasma properties. Hydrodynamic simulations of cryogenic target implosionsmore » on OMEGA using the FPEOS table of CH have predicted ~5% reduction in implosion velocity and ~30% decrease in neutron yield in comparison with the usual SESAME simulations. This is attributed to the ~10% lower mass ablation rate of CH predicted by FPEOS. Simulations using CH-FPEOS show better agreement with measurements of Hugoniot temperature and scattered lights from ICF implosions.« less

  7. Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) half-year report, October 1, 1988--March 31, 1989

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-06-01

    The basic objective of the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) program is to assess the suitability of heavy ion accelerators as igniters for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). A specific accelerator technology, the induction linac, has been studied at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory and has reached the point at which its viability for ICF applications can be assessed over the next few years. The HIFAR program addresses the generation of high-power, high-brightness beams of heavy ions, the understanding of the scaling laws in this novel physics regime, and the validation of new accelerator strategies, to cut costs. Key elements to be addressed include: beam quality limits set by transverse and longitudinal beam physics; development of induction accelerating modules, and multiple-beam hardware, at affordable costs; acceleration of multiple beams with current amplification --both new features in a linac -- without significant dilution of the optical quality of the beams; and final bunching, transport, and accurate focusing on a small target.

  8. Cryogenic THD and DT layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meezan, N. B.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Döppner, T.; Ho, D. D.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; Milovich, J. L.; Pak, A. E.; Ross, J. S.; Thomas, C. A.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Field, J. E.; Haan, S. W.; Izumi, N.; Kyrala, G. A.; Moody, J. D.; Patel, P. K.; Ralph, J. E.; Rygg, J. R.; Sepke, S. M.; Spears, B. K.; Tommasini, R.; Town, R. P. J.; Biener, J.; Bionta, R. M.; Bond, E. J.; Caggiano, J. A.; Eckart, M. J.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Grim, G. P.; Hamza, A. V.; Hartouni, E. P.; Hatarik, R.; Hoover, D. E.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Kozioziemski, B. J.; Kroll, J. J.; McNaney, J. M.; Nikroo, A.; Sayre, D. B.; Stadermann, M.; Wild, C.; Yoxall, B. E.; Landen, O. L.; Hsing, W. W.; Edwards, M. J.

    2015-06-02

    High Density Carbon (HDC or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations of <10 ns. A series of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments in 2013 on the National Ignition Facility [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] culminated in a DT layered implosion driven by a 6.8 ns, 2-shock laser pulse. This paper describes these experiments and comparisons with ICF design code simulations. Backlit radiography of a THD layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightly oblate hot spot shape. Other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. A streak camera-based hot spot self-emission diagnostic (SPIDER) showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of low quality hot spot formation. Changes to the laser pulse and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1.8 x 10¹⁵ neutrons, 40% of the 1D simulated yield.

  9. Cryogenic THD and DT layer implosions with high density carbon ablators in near-vacuum hohlraums

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Meezan, N. B.; Berzak Hopkins, L. F.; Le Pape, S.; Divol, L.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Döppner, T.; Ho, D. D.; Jones, O. S.; Khan, S. F.; Ma, T.; et al

    2015-06-02

    High Density Carbon (HDC or diamond) is a promising ablator material for use in near-vacuum hohlraums, as its high density allows for ignition designs with laser pulse durations of <10 ns. A series of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments in 2013 on the National Ignition Facility [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] culminated in a DT layered implosion driven by a 6.8 ns, 2-shock laser pulse. This paper describes these experiments and comparisons with ICF design code simulations. Backlit radiography of a THD layered capsule demonstrated an ablator implosion velocity of 385 km/s with a slightlymore » oblate hot spot shape. Other diagnostics suggested an asymmetric compressed fuel layer. A streak camera-based hot spot self-emission diagnostic (SPIDER) showed a double-peaked history of the capsule self-emission. Simulations suggest that this is a signature of low quality hot spot formation. Changes to the laser pulse and pointing for a subsequent DT implosion resulted in a higher temperature, prolate hot spot and a thermonuclear yield of 1.8 x 10¹⁵ neutrons, 40% of the 1D simulated yield.« less

  10. Impact of x-ray dose on the response of CR-39 to 15.5 MeV alphas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rojas-Herrera, J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Zylstra, A. B.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Orozco, D.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Sio, H.; Seguin, F. H.; Frenje, J. A.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D.

    2015-03-01

    The CR-39 nuclear track detector is used in many nuclear diagnostics #12;fielded at inertial con#12;nement fusion (ICF) facilities. Large x-ray uences generated by ICF experiments may impact the CR-39 response to incident charged particles. To determine the impact of x-ray exposure on the CR-39 response to alpha particles, a thick-target bremsstrahlung x-ray generator was used to expose CR-39 to various doses of 8 keV Cu-K?#11; and K#12;? x-rays. The CR-39 detectors were then exposed to 1-5.5 MeV alphas from an Am-241 source. The regions of the CR-39 exposed to x-rays showed a smaller track diameter than those not exposed to x-rays: for example, a dose of 3.0#6; 0.1 Gy causes a decrease of (19 #6;2)% in the track diameter of a 5.5 MeV alpha particle, while a dose of 60.0 #6;1.3 Gy results in a decrease of (45 #6;5)% in the track diameter. The reduced track diameters were found to be predominantly caused by a comparable reduction in the bulk etch rate of the CR-39 with x-ray dose. A residual eff#11;ect depending on alpha particle energy is characterized using an empirical formula.

  11. Magnetic-compression/magnetized-target fusion (MAGO/MTF): A marriage of inertial and magnetic confinement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lindemuth, I.R.; Ekdahl, C.A.; Kirkpatrick, R.C.

    1996-12-31

    Intermediate between magnetic confinement (MFE) and inertial confinement (ICF) in time and density scales is an area of research now known in the US as magnetized target fusion (MTF) and in Russian as MAGO (MAGnitnoye Obzhatiye--magnetic compression). MAGO/MTF uses a magnetic field and preheated, wall-confined plasma fusion fuel within an implodable fusion target. The magnetic field suppresses thermal conduction losses in the fuel during the target implosion and hydrodynamic compression heating process. In contrast to direct, hydrodynamic compression of initially ambient-temperature fuel (i.e., ICF), MAGO/MTF involves two steps: (a) formation of a warm (e.g., 100 eV or higher), magnetized (e.g., 100 kG) plasma within a fusion target prior to implosion; (b) subsequent quasi-adiabatic compression by an imploding pusher, of which a magnetically driven imploding liner is one example. In this paper, the authors present ongoing activities and potential future activities in this relatively unexplored area of controlled thermonuclear fusion.

  12. Compression molding of aerogel microspheres

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pekala, Richard W.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.

    1998-03-24

    An aerogel composite material produced by compression molding of aerogel microspheres (powders) mixed together with a small percentage of polymer binder to form monolithic shapes in a cost-effective manner. The aerogel composites are formed by mixing aerogel microspheres with a polymer binder, placing the mixture in a mold and heating under pressure, which results in a composite with a density of 50-800 kg/m.sup.3 (0.05-0.80 g/cc). The thermal conductivity of the thus formed aerogel composite is below that of air, but higher than the thermal conductivity of monolithic aerogels. The resulting aerogel composites are attractive for applications such as thermal insulation since fabrication thereof does not require large and expensive processing equipment. In addition to thermal insulation, the aerogel composites may be utilized for filtration, ICF target, double layer capacitors, and capacitive deionization.

  13. Simulations of Inertial Confinement Fusion Driven by a Novel Synchrotron Radiation-Based X-Ray Igniter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shlyaptsev, V; Tatchyn, R

    2004-01-13

    The advantages and challenges of using a powerful x-ray source for the fast ignition of compressed Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) targets have been considered. The requirements for such a source together with the optics to focus the x-rays onto compressed DT cores lead to a conceptual design based on Energy Recovery Linacs (ERLs) and long wigglers to produce x-ray pulses with the appropriate phase space properties. A comparative assessment of the parameters of the igniter system indicates that the technologies for building it, although expensive, are physically achievable. Our x-ray fast ignition (XFI) scheme requires substantially smaller energy for the initiation of nuclear fusion reactions than other methods.

  14. Two-plasmon decay mitigation in direct-drive inertial-confinement-fusion experiments using multilayer targets

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Follett, R. K.; Delettrez, J. A.; Edgell, D. H.; Goncharov, V. N.; Henchen, R. J.; Katz, J.; Michel, D. T.; Myatt, J. F.; Shaw, J.; Solodov, A. A.; et al

    2016-04-15

    Multilayer direct-drive inertial-confinement-fusion (ICF) targets are shown to significantly reduce two-plasmon-decay (TPD) driven hot-electron production while maintaining high hydrodynamic efficiency. Implosion experiments on the OMEGA Laser used targets with silicon layered between an inner beryllium and outer silicon-doped plastic ablator. A factor of five reduction in hot-electron generation (> 50 keV) was observed in the multilayer targets relative to pure CH targets. Three-dimensional simulations of the TPD driven hot-electron production using a laser-plasma interaction code (LPSE) that includes nonlinear and kinetic effects show excellent agreement with the measurements. As a result, the simulations suggest that the reduction in hot-electron productionmore » observed in the multilayer targets is primarily due to increased electron-ion collisional damping.« less

  15. Self-consistent inclusion of classical large-angle Coulomb collisions in plasma Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turrell, A.E. Sherlock, M.; Rose, S.J.

    2015-10-15

    Large-angle Coulomb collisions allow for the exchange of a significant proportion of the energy of a particle in a single collision, but are not included in models of plasmas based on fluids, the Vlasov–Fokker–Planck equation, or currently available plasma Monte Carlo techniques. Their unique effects include the creation of fast ‘knock-on’ ions, which may be more likely to undergo certain reactions, and distortions to ion distribution functions relative to what is predicted by small-angle collision only theories. We present a computational method which uses Monte Carlo techniques to include the effects of large-angle Coulomb collisions in plasmas and which self-consistently evolves distribution functions according to the creation of knock-on ions of any generation. The method is used to demonstrate ion distribution function distortions in an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) relevant scenario of the slowing of fusion products.

  16. RR UECX I DEUEetdJ16 T LEMON7 ILL =@I9 V

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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  17. A New Gated X-Ray Detector for the Orion Laser Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, David D.; Aragonez, Robert J.; Archuleta, Thomas N.; Fatherley, Valerie E.; Hsu, Albert H.; Jorgenson, H. J.; Mares, Danielle; Oertel, John A.; Oades, Kevin; Kemshall, Paul; Thomas, Philip; Young, Trevor; Pederson, Neal

    2012-08-08

    Gated X-Ray Detectors (GXD) are considered the work-horse target diagnostic of the laser based inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program. Recently, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has constructed three new GXDs for the Orion laser facility at the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) in the United Kingdom. What sets these three new instruments apart from the what has previously been constructed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is: improvements in detector head microwave transmission lines, solid state embedded hard drive and updated control software, and lighter air box design and other incremental mechanical improvements. In this paper we will present the latest GXD design enhancements and sample calibration data taken on the Trident laser facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory using the newly constructed instruments.

  18. Full aperture backscatter station imager diagnostics system for far-field imaging of laser plasma instabilities on Nova

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilke, M.D.; Fernandez, J.C.; Berggren, R.R.; Horton, R.F.; Montgomery, D.S.; Faulkner, J.A.; Looney, L.D.; Jimerson, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    In ICF, the understanding of laser plasma scattering processes is essential for laser target coupling and for controlling the symmetry of indirect drive implosions. The existing Nova full aperture backscatter station has been useful in understanding laser plasma instabilities occurring in hohlraums by measuring the quantity, spectral distribution, and near-field spatial distributions of Brillouin and more recently Raman backscatter. Equally important is an understanding of the far-field spatial intensity distribution which could help in understanding filamentation, threshold and saturation processes. This article describes a broadband, color-corrected far-field imager and associated diagnostics capable of imaging the source of scattered light to better than 25 {mu}m resolution. Brillouin and Raman backscatter can be imaged through the Nova beam-7 focusing lens or the imager can be used like a microscope to image side scatter from other beams. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Sol-gel optical coatings for lasers: Part 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Floch, H.G.; Belleville, P.F.; Priotton, J.J.; Pegon, P.M.; Dijonneau, C.S.; Guerain, J.

    1995-10-01

    Many manufacturers and users claim that optical coatings are best prepared by physical vapor deposition technology. Others believe that sol-gel technology is an effective and competitive alternative. This article, the first of three, emphasizes sol-gel thin-film history and relates it to high-power laser technology, chemistry of the sol-gel process, production of optical coatings and deposition techniques. The second and third articles describe the preparation and performance of antireflective and highly reflective sol-gel optical coatings, respectively, that have been developed for the 1.8-MJ/500-TW (351-nm) pulsed neodymium-glass laser. This powerful laser is to be used in France`s Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program. It will demonstrate, at the laboratory scale, ignition of deuterium-tritium fusion fuel.

  20. Progress in the title I design of the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paisner, J.A.; Hogan, W.J.

    1996-12-31

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project officially began in December of 1995. In October of 1996, advanced conceptual design studies, complete environmental impact study, facilitization of the manufacturing capabilities of optics vendors began. The Title I preliminary engineering design had not yet began until the end of December, but it is expected to be on schedule. It is expected that the conventional facilities design will be completed first. The Independent Cost Estimate (ICF) process will begin after the facilities design is complete. Other elements of the design will be submitted in one- or two-week intervals. This phase method of completing Title I was also used at the end of Complete Design Report and proved to be efficient. 9 refs., 11 figs.

  1. Insulated Concrete Form Walls Integrated With Mechanical Systems in a Cold Climate Test House

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mallay, D.; Wiehagen, J.

    2014-09-01

    Transitioning from standard light frame to a thermal mass wall system in a high performance home will require a higher level of design integration with the mechanical systems. The much higher mass in the ICF wall influences heat transfer through the wall and affects how the heating and cooling system responds to changing outdoor conditions. This is even more important for efficient, low-load homes with efficient heat pump systems in colder climates where the heating and cooling peak loads are significantly different from standard construction. This report analyzes a range of design features and component performance estimates in an effort to select practical, cost-effective solutions for high performance homes in a cold climate.

  2. One-Dimensional Lagrangian Code for Plasma Hydrodynamic Analysis of a Fusion Pellet Driven by Ion Beams.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    1986-12-01

    Version 00 The MEDUSA-IB code performs implosion and thermonuclear burn calculations of an ion beam driven ICF target, based on one-dimensional plasma hydrodynamics and transport theory. It can calculate the following values in spherical geometry through the progress of implosion and fuel burnup of a multi-layered target. (1) Hydrodynamic velocities, density, ion, electron and radiation temperature, radiation energy density, Rs and burn rate of target as a function of coordinates and time, (2) Fusion gainmore » as a function of time, (3) Ionization degree, (4) Temperature dependent ion beam energy deposition, (5) Radiation, -particle and neutron spectra as a function of time.« less

  3. Incremental cost pricing of transmission services. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    This report, prepared by ICF Resources, under a sub-contract with IT Corporation, is concerned chiefly with examining the economic concepts underlying an Incremental Cost Pricing Framework (ICPF), which is defined here as a pricing regime that takes into account several factors: economic efficiency in terms of sending the correct long-term price signals to both users and owners of transmission assets; pricing of individual services in relationship to cost causation; full recovery of costs associated with transmission service; and applicability to real-world power systems without extraordinary administrative burdens. In the course of this examination, the report makes assumptions, as necessary, and assesses the extent to which they may or may not comport with real-world conditions. It also assesses the pros and cons of different approaches to pricing various components of transmission service without making a recommendation as to the superiority of one approach over another from a public policy perspective.

  4. Interactive tools designed to study mix in inertial confinement fusion implosions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welser-sherrill, Leslie; Cooley, James H; Wilson, Doug C

    2008-01-01

    Graphical user interface tools have been built in IDL to study mix in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosion cores. FLAME (Fall-Line Analysis Mix Evaluator), a code which investigates yield degradation due to mix , was designed to post-process 1D hydrodynamic simulation output by implementing a variety of mix models. Three of these mix models are based on the physics of the fall-line. In addition, mixing data from other sources can be incorporated into the yield degradation analysis. Two independent tools called HAME (Haan Analysis Mix Evaluator) and YAME (Youngs Analysis Mix Evaluator) were developed to calculate the spatial extent of the mix region according to the Haan saturation model and Youngs' phenomenological model, respectively. FLAME facilitates a direct comparison to experimental data. The FLAME, HAME, and YAME interfaces are user-friendly, flexible, and platform-independent.

  5. Technical documentation in support of the project-specific analysis for construction and operation of the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lazaro, M.A.; Vinikour, W.; Allison, T.

    1996-09-01

    This document provides information that supports or supplements the data and impact analyses presented in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project-Specific Analysis (PSA). The purposes of NIF are to achieve fusion ignition in the laboratory for the first time with inertial confinement fusion (ICF) technology and to conduct high- energy-density experiments ins support of national security and civilian application. NIF is an important element in the DOE`s science-based SSM Program, a key mission of which is to ensure the reliability of the nation`s enduring stockpile of nuclear weapons. NIF would also advance the knowledge of basic and applied high-energy- density science and bring the nation a large step closer to developing fusion energy for civilian use. The NIF PSA includes evaluations of the potential environmental impacts of constructing and operating the facility at one of five candidate site and for two design options.

  6. NIF: Impacts of chemical accidents and comparison of chemical/radiological accident approaches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lazaro, M.A.; Policastro, A.J.; Rhodes, M.

    1996-01-12

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to construct and operate the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The goals of the NIF are to (1) achieve fusion ignition in the laboratory for the first time by using inertial confinement fusion (ICF) technology based on an advanced-design neodymium glass solid-state laser, and (2) conduct high-energy-density experiments in support of national security and civilian applications. The primary focus of this paper is worker-public health and safety issues associated with postulated chemical accidents during the operation of NIF. The key findings from the accident analysis will be presented. Although NIF chemical accidents will be emphasized, the important differences between chemical and radiological accident analysis approaches and the metrics for reporting results will be highlighted. These differences are common EIS facility and transportation accident assessments.

  7. Laser program annual report 1983

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hendricks, C.D.; Rufer, M.L.; Murphy, P.W.

    1984-06-01

    In the 1983 Laser Program Annual Report we present the accomplishments and unclassified activities of the Laser Program at Lawrence Livermore National laboratory (LLNL) for the year 1983. It should be noted that the report, of necessity, is a summary, and more detailed expositions of the research can be found in the many publications and reports authored by staff members in the Laser Program. The purpose of this report is to present our work in a brief form, but with sufficient depth to provide an overview of the analytical and experimental aspects of the LLNL Inertial-Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program. The format of this report is basically the same as that of previous years. Section 1 is an overview and highlights the important accomplishments and directions of the Program. Sections 2 through 7 provide the detailed information on the various major parts of the Program: Laser Systems and Operations, Target Design, Target Fabrication, Fusion Experiments, Laser Research and Development, and Energy Applications.

  8. Ignition of deuterium-trtium fuel targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Musinski, Donald L.; Mruzek, Michael T.

    1991-01-01

    A method of igniting a deuterium-tritium ICF fuel target to obtain fuel burn in which the fuel target initially includes a hollow spherical shell having a frozen layer of DT material at substantially uniform thickness and cryogenic temperature around the interior surface of the shell. The target is permitted to free-fall through a target chamber having walls heated by successive target ignitions, so that the target is uniformly heated during free-fall to at least partially melt the frozen fuel layer and form a liquid single-phase layer or a mixed liquid/solid bi-phase layer of substantially uniform thickness around the interior shell surface. The falling target is then illuminated from exteriorly of the chamber while the fuel layer is at substantially uniformly single or bi-phase so as to ignite the fuel layer and release energy therefrom.

  9. Ignition of deuterium-tritium fuel targets

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Musinski, D.L.; Mruzek, M.T.

    1991-08-27

    Disclosed is a method of igniting a deuterium-tritium ICF fuel target to obtain fuel burn in which the fuel target initially includes a hollow spherical shell having a frozen layer of DT material at substantially uniform thickness and cryogenic temperature around the interior surface of the shell. The target is permitted to free-fall through a target chamber having walls heated by successive target ignitions, so that the target is uniformly heated during free-fall to at least partially melt the frozen fuel layer and form a liquid single-phase layer or a mixed liquid/solid bi-phase layer of substantially uniform thickness around the interior shell surface. The falling target is then illuminated from exteriorly of the chamber while the fuel layer is at substantially uniformly single or bi-phase so as to ignite the fuel layer and release energy therefrom. 5 figures.

  10. On-demand production of uniform DT droplets using pulsed electrohydrodynamic spraying. Charged Particle Research Laboratory report No. 1-82

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, K.; Gavrilovic, P.

    1982-04-01

    A technique suitable for on-demand production of uniform DT droplets is investigated using pulsed electrohydrodynamic (EHD) spraying. Liquid hydrogen is employed as the working liquid, into which charge is injected using a sharp tungsten needle raised to high voltage. By controlling this high voltage, the amount of charge injection required for disrupting the liquid surface into a smooth liquid jet of desired size is determined. For on-demand production of the liquid jet (which breaks up into uniform droplets), high voltage pulses of appropriate height and duration are applied to the charge injection electrode. Results obtained with liquid hydrogen and liquid nitrogen are presented. Considering the potential hazard and scarcity of tritium, the present technique may prove to be particularly useful when there is a need for filling ICF targets with a controlled amount of DT micropellets.

  11. Pulse shaping system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skeldon, Mark D.; Letzring, Samuel A.

    1999-03-23

    Temporally shaped electrical waveform generation provides electrical waveforms suitable for driving an electro-optic modulator (EOM) which produces temporally shaped optical laser pulses for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research. The temporally shaped electrical waveform generation is carried out with aperture coupled transmission lines having an input transmission line and an aperture coupled output transmission line, along which input and output pulses propagate in opposite directions. The output electrical waveforms are shaped principally due to the selection of coupling aperture width, in a direction transverse to the lines, which varies along the length of the line. Specific electrical waveforms, which may be high voltage (up to kilovolt range), are produced and applied to the EOM to produce specifically shaped optical laser pulses.

  12. Pulse shaping system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Skeldon, M.D.; Letzring, S.A.

    1999-03-23

    Temporally shaped electrical waveform generation provides electrical waveforms suitable for driving an electro-optic modulator (EOM) which produces temporally shaped optical laser pulses for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research. The temporally shaped electrical waveform generation is carried out with aperture coupled transmission lines having an input transmission line and an aperture coupled output transmission line, along which input and output pulses propagate in opposite directions. The output electrical waveforms are shaped principally due to the selection of coupling aperture width, in a direction transverse to the lines, which varies along the length of the line. Specific electrical waveforms, which may be high voltage (up to kilovolt range), are produced and applied to the EOM to produce specifically shaped optical laser pulses. 8 figs.

  13. Direct Drive Heavy-Ion-Beam Inertial Fusion at High Coupling Efficiency

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Logan, B. Grant; Logan, B. Grant; Perkins, L.J.; Barnard, J.J.

    2007-06-25

    Issues with coupling efficiency, beam illumination symmetry and Rayleigh Taylor (RT) instability are discussed for spherical heavy-ion-beam-driven targets with and without hohlraums. Efficient coupling of heavy ion beams to compress direct-drive inertial fusion targets without hohlraums is found to require ion range increasing several-fold during the drive pulse. One-dimensional implosion calculations using the LASNEX ICF target physics code shows the ion range increasing four-fold during the drive pulse to keep ion energy deposition following closely behind the imploding ablation front, resulting in high coupling efficiencies (shell kinetic energy/incident beam energy of 16 to 18%). Ways to increase beam ion range while mitigating Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities are discussed for future work.

  14. Quasi-spherical direct drive fusion simulations for the Z machine and future accelerators.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    VanDevender, J. Pace; McDaniel, Dillon Heirman; Roderick, Norman Frederick; Nash, Thomas J.

    2007-11-01

    We explored the potential of Quasi-Spherical Direct Drive (QSDD) to reduce the cost and risk of a future fusion driver for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and to produce megajoule thermonuclear yield on the renovated Z Machine with a pulse shortening Magnetically Insulated Current Amplifier (MICA). Analytic relationships for constant implosion velocity and constant pusher stability have been derived and show that the required current scales as the implosion time. Therefore, a MICA is necessary to drive QSDD capsules with hot-spot ignition on Z. We have optimized the LASNEX parameters for QSDD with realistic walls and mitigated many of the risks. Although the mix-degraded 1D yield is computed to be {approx}30 MJ on Z, unmitigated wall expansion under the > 100 gigabar pressure just before burn prevents ignition in the 2D simulations. A squeezer system of adjacent implosions may mitigate the wall expansion and permit the plasma to burn.

  15. Refraction-Enhanced X-ray Radiography for Inertial Confinement Fusion and Laser-Produced Plasma Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Koch, J A; Landen, O L; Kozioziemski, B J; Izumi, N; Dewald, E L; Salmonson, J D; Hammel, B A

    2008-08-26

    We explore various laser-produced plasma and inertial-confinement fusion (ICF) applications of phase-contrast x-ray radiography, and we show how the main features of these enhancements can be considered from a geometrical optics perspective as refraction enhancements. This perspective simplifies the analysis, and often permits simple analytical formulae to be derived that predict the enhancements. We explore a raytrace approach to various material interface applications, and we explore a more general example of refractive bending of x-rays by an implosion plasma. We find that refraction-enhanced x-ray radiography of implosions may provide a means to quantify density differences across shock fronts as well as density variations caused by local heating due to high-Z dopants. We also point out that refractive bending by implosions plasmas can blur fine radiograph features, and can also provide misleading contrast information in area-backlit pinhole imaging experiments unless its effects are taken into consideration.

  16. Gated monochromatic x-ray imager

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oertel, J.A.; Archuleta, T.; Clark, L.

    1995-09-01

    We have recently developed a gated monochromatic x-ray imaging diagnostic for the national Inertial-Confinement Fusion (ICF) program. This new imaging system will be one of the primary diagnostics to be utilized on University of Rochester`s Omega laser fusion facility. The new diagnostic is based upon a Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) microscope dispersed by diffraction crystals, as first described by Marshall and Su. The dispersed images are gated by four individual proximity focused microchannel plates and recorded on film. Spectral coverage is tunable up to 8 keV, spectral resolution has been measured at 20 eV, temporal resolution is 80 ps, and spatial resolution is better than 10 {mu}m.

  17. The effect of 150?m expandable graphite on char expansion of intumescent fire retardant coating

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ullah, Sami Shariff, A. M. E-mail: azmibustam@petronas.com.my; Bustam, M. A. E-mail: azmibustam@petronas.com.my; Ahmad, Faiz

    2014-10-24

    Intumescent is defined as the swelling of certain substances to insulate the underlying substrate when they are heated. In this research work the effect of 150?m expandable graphite (EG) was studied on char expansion, char morphology and char composition of intumescent coating formulations (ICFs). To study the expansion and thermal properties of the coating, nine different formulations were prepared. The coatings were tested at 500 C for one hour and physically were found very stable and well bound with the steel substrate. The morphology was studied by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). The char composition was analysed by X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) techniques. EG above than 10.8wt% expands the char abruptly with uniform network structure and affect the outer surface of the char.

  18. Compression molding of aerogel microspheres

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pekala, R.W.; Hrubesh, L.W.

    1998-03-24

    An aerogel composite material produced by compression molding of aerogel microspheres (powders) mixed together with a small percentage of polymer binder to form monolithic shapes in a cost-effective manner is disclosed. The aerogel composites are formed by mixing aerogel microspheres with a polymer binder, placing the mixture in a mold and heating under pressure, which results in a composite with a density of 50--800 kg/m{sup 3} (0.05--0.80 g/cc). The thermal conductivity of the thus formed aerogel composite is below that of air, but higher than the thermal conductivity of monolithic aerogels. The resulting aerogel composites are attractive for applications such as thermal insulation since fabrication thereof does not require large and expensive processing equipment. In addition to thermal insulation, the aerogel composites may be utilized for filtration, ICF target, double layer capacitors, and capacitive deionization. 4 figs.

  19. The Laboratory Microfusion Facility standardized costing methodology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, D.B.; Dudziak, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    The DOE-organized Laboratory Microfusion Facility (LMF) has a goal of generation 1000 MJ of fusion yield in order to perform weapons physics experiments, simulate weapons effects, and develop high-gain inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets for military and civil applications. There are currently three options seriously being considered for the driver of this facility: KrF lasers, Nd:glass lasers, and light-ion accelerators. In order to provide a basis for comparison of the cost estimated for each of the different driver technologies, a standardized costing methodology has been devised. This methodology defines the driver-independent costs and indirect cost multipliers for the LMF to aid in the comparison of the LMF proposal cost estimates. 10 refs., 4 tabs.

  20. Quantification of the Potential Gross Economic Impacts of Five Methane Reduction Scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keyser, David; Warner, Ethan; Curley, Christina

    2015-04-23

    Methane (CH4) is a potent greenhouse gas that is released from the natural gas supply chain into the atmosphere as a result of fugitive emissions1 and venting2 . We assess five potential CH4 reduction scenarios from transmission, storage, and distribution (TS&D) using published literature on the costs and the estimated quantity of CH4 reduced. We utilize cost and methane inventory data from ICF (2014) and Warner et al. (forthcoming) as well as data from Barrett and McCulloch (2014) and the American Gas Association (AGA) (2013) to estimate that the implementation of these measures could support approximately 85,000 jobs annually from 2015 to 2019 and reduce CH4 emissions from natural gas TS&D by over 40%. Based on standard input/output analysis methodology, measures are estimated to support over $8 billion in GDP annually over the same time period and allow producers to recover approximately $912 million annually in captured gas.

  1. Blue and Green Light? Wavelength Scaling for NIF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Suter, L; Miller, M; Moody, J; Kruer, W

    2003-08-21

    Use of the National Ignition Facility to also output frequency-doubled (.53{micro}m) laser light would allow significantly more energy to be delivered to targets as well as significantly greater bandwidth for beam smoothing. This green light option could provide access to new ICF target designs and a wider range of plasma conditions for other applications. The wavelength scaling of the interaction physics is a key issue in assessing this green light option. Wavelength scaling theory based on the collisionless plasma approximation is explored, and some limitations associated with plasma collisionality are examined. Important features of the wavelength scaling are tested using the current data base, which is growing. It appears that, with modest restrictions, .53{micro}m light couples with targets as well as .35{micro}m light does. A more quantitative understanding of the beneficial effects of SSD on the interaction physics is needed for both .53{micro}m and .35{micro}m light.

  2. New applications for high average power beams

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neau, E.L.; Turman, B.N.; Patterson, E.L.

    1993-08-01

    The technology base formed by the development of high peak power simulators, laser drivers, FEL`s, and ICF drivers from the early 60`s through the late 80`s is being extended to high average power short-pulse machines with the capabilities of supporting new types of manufacturing processes and performing new roles in environmental cleanup applications. This paper discusses a process for identifying and developing possible commercial applications, specifically those requiring very high average power levels of hundreds of kilowatts to perhaps megawatts. The authors discuss specific technology requirements and give examples of application development efforts. The application development work is directed at areas that can possibly benefit from the high specific energies attainable with short pulse machines.

  3. Advances in Inertial Confinement Fusion at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moses, E

    2009-10-15

    The 192-beam National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, CA, is now operational and conducting experiments. NIF, the flagship facility of the U.S. Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program, will achieve high-energy-density conditions never previously obtained in the laboratory - temperatures over 100 million K, densities of 1,000 g/cm3, and pressures exceeding 100 billion atmospheres. Such conditions exist naturally only in the interiors of the stars and during thermonuclear burn. Demonstration of ignition and thermonuclear burn in the laboratory is a major NIF goal. To date, the NIF laser has demonstrated all pulse shape, beam quality, energy, and other specifications required to meet the ignition challenge. On March 10, 2009, the NIF laser delivered 1.1 MJ of ultraviolet laser energy to target chamber center, approximately 30 times more energy than any previous facility. The ignition program at NIF is the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), a national collaboration for ignition experimentation with participation from General Atomics, LLNL, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). The achievement of ignition at NIF will demonstrate the scientific feasibility of ICF and focus worldwide attention on fusion as a viable energy option. A particular energy concept under investigation is the LIFE (Laser Inertial Fusion Energy) scheme. The LIFE engine is inherently safe, minimizes proliferation concerns associated with the nuclear fuel cycle, and can provide a sustainable carbon-free energy generation solution in the 21st century. This talk will describe NIF and its potential as a user facility and an experimental platform for high-energy-density science, NIC, and the LIFE approach for clean, sustainable energy.

  4. Ignition and Inertial Confinement Fusion at The National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moses, E

    2009-10-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most powerful laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and for studying high-energy-density (HED) science, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF is now conducting experiments to commission the laser drive, the hohlraum and the capsule and to develop the infrastructure needed to begin the first ignition experiments in FY 2010. Demonstration of ignition and thermonuclear burn in the laboratory is a major NIF goal. NIF will achieve this by concentrating the energy from the 192 beams into a mm{sup 3}-sized target and igniting a deuterium-tritium mix, liberating more energy than is required to initiate the fusion reaction. NIF's ignition program is a national effort managed via the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The NIC has two major goals: execution of DT ignition experiments starting in FY2010 with the goal of demonstrating ignition and a reliable, repeatable ignition platform by the conclusion of the NIC at the end of FY2012. The NIC will also develop the infrastructure and the processes required to operate NIF as a national user facility. The achievement of ignition at NIF will demonstrate the scientific feasibility of ICF and focus worldwide attention on laser fusion as a viable energy option. A laser fusion-based energy concept that builds on NIF, known as LIFE (Laser Inertial Fusion Energy), is currently under development. LIFE is inherently safe and can provide a global carbon-free energy generation solution in the 21st century. This paper describes recent progress on NIF, NIC, and the LIFE concept.

  5. Inertial Confinement Fusion Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinman, D.

    1993-03-01

    On December 31, 1990, the US Department of Energy entered into a contract with General Atomics (GA) to be the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support contractor. This report documents the technical activities of the period January 1, 1991 through September 30, 1992. During this period, GA was assigned 15 tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion program and its laboratories. These tasks included Facilities Activation, Staff Development, and Capabilities Validation to establish facilities and equipment, and demonstrate capability to perform ICF target fabrication research, development and production activities. The capabilities developed and demonstrated are those needed for fabrication and precise characterization of polymer shells and polymer coatings. We made progress toward production capability for glass shells, barrier layer coatings, and gas idling of shells. We fabricated over 1000 beam diagnostic foil targets for Sandia National Laboratory Albuquerque and provided full-time on-site engineering support for target fabrication and characterization. We initiated development of methods to fabricate polymer shells by a controlled mass microencapsulation technique, and performed chemical syntheses of several chlorine- and silicon-doped polymer materials for the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE). We performed the conceptual design of a cryogenic target handling system for UR/LLE that will fill, transport, layer, and characterize targets filled with cryogenic deuterium or deuterium-tritium fuel, and insert these cryogenic targets into the OMEGA-Upgrade target chamber for laser implosion experiments. This report summarizes and documents the technical progress made on these tasks.

  6. Inertial Confinement Fusion Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support. Annual report, January 1, 1991--September 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steinman, D.

    1993-03-01

    On December 31, 1990, the US Department of Energy entered into a contract with General Atomics (GA) to be the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Target Component Fabrication and Technology Development Support contractor. This report documents the technical activities of the period January 1, 1991 through September 30, 1992. During this period, GA was assigned 15 tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion program and its laboratories. These tasks included Facilities Activation, Staff Development, and Capabilities Validation to establish facilities and equipment, and demonstrate capability to perform ICF target fabrication research, development and production activities. The capabilities developed and demonstrated are those needed for fabrication and precise characterization of polymer shells and polymer coatings. We made progress toward production capability for glass shells, barrier layer coatings, and gas idling of shells. We fabricated over 1000 beam diagnostic foil targets for Sandia National Laboratory Albuquerque and provided full-time on-site engineering support for target fabrication and characterization. We initiated development of methods to fabricate polymer shells by a controlled mass microencapsulation technique, and performed chemical syntheses of several chlorine- and silicon-doped polymer materials for the University of Rochester`s Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE). We performed the conceptual design of a cryogenic target handling system for UR/LLE that will fill, transport, layer, and characterize targets filled with cryogenic deuterium or deuterium-tritium fuel, and insert these cryogenic targets into the OMEGA-Upgrade target chamber for laser implosion experiments. This report summarizes and documents the technical progress made on these tasks.

  7. Uniform DT 3T burn: computations and sensitivities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vold, Erik; Hryniw, Natalia; Hansen, Jon A; Kesler, Leigh A; Li, Frank

    2011-01-27

    A numerical model was developed in C to integrate the nonlinear deutrium-tritium (DT) burn equations in a three temperature (3T) approximation for spatially uniform test problems relevant to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). Base model results are in excellent agreement with standard 3T results. Data from NDI, SESAME, and TOPS databases is extracted to create fits for the reaction rate parameter, the Planck opacity, and the coupling frequencies of the plasma temperatures. The impact of different fits (e.g., TOPS versus SESAME opacity data, higher order polynomial fits ofNDI data for the reaction rate parameter) were explored, and sensitivity to several model inputs are presented including: opacity data base, Coulomb logarithm, and Bremsstrahlung. Sensitivity to numerical integration time step size, and the relative insensitivity to the discretized numerics and numerical integration method was demonstrated. Variations in the IC for densities and temperatures were explored, showing similar DT burn profiles in most cases once ignition occurs. A coefficient multiplying the Compton coupling term (default, A = 1) can be adjusted to approximate results from more sophisticated models. The coefficient was reset (A = 0.4) to match the maximum temperatures resulting from standard multi-group simulations of the base case test problem. Setting the coefficient to a larger value, (A = 0.6) matches maximum ion temperatures in a kinetic simulation of a high density ICF-like regime. Matching peak temperatures does not match entire temperature-time profiles, indicating the Compton coefficient is density and time dependent as the photon distribution evolves. In the early time burn during the ignition of the DT, the present model with modified Compton coupling provides a very simple method to obtain a much improved match to the more accurate solution from the multi-group radiation model for these DT burn regimes.

  8. Understanding reliability and some limitations of the images and spectra reconstructed from a multi-monochromatic x-ray imager

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nagayama, T.; Mancini, R. C.; Mayes, D.; Tommasini, R.; Florido, R.

    2015-11-15

    Temperature and density asymmetry diagnosis is critical to advance inertial confinement fusion (ICF) science. A multi-monochromatic x-ray imager (MMI) is an attractive diagnostic for this purpose. The MMI records the spectral signature from an ICF implosion core with time resolution, 2-D space resolution, and spectral resolution. While narrow-band images and 2-D space-resolved spectra from the MMI data constrain temperature and density spatial structure of the core, the accuracy of the images and spectra depends not only on the quality of the MMI data but also on the reliability of the post-processing tools. Here, we synthetically quantify the accuracy of images and spectra reconstructed from MMI data. Errors in the reconstructed images are less than a few percent when the space-resolution effect is applied to the modeled images. The errors in the reconstructed 2-D space-resolved spectra are also less than a few percent except those for the peripheral regions. Spectra reconstructed for the peripheral regions have slightly but systematically lower intensities by ∼6% due to the instrumental spatial-resolution effects. However, this does not alter the relative line ratios and widths and thus does not affect the temperature and density diagnostics. We also investigate the impact of the pinhole size variation on the extracted images and spectra. A 10% pinhole size variation could introduce spatial bias to the images and spectra of ∼10%. A correction algorithm is developed, and it successfully reduces the errors to a few percent. It is desirable to perform similar synthetic investigations to fully understand the reliability and limitations of each MMI application.

  9. Inertial confinement fusion target component fabrication and technology development support. Annual report, October 1, 1996--September 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, J. [ed.

    1998-03-01

    This report documents the technical activities of the period October 1, 1996 through September 30, 1997. During this period, GA and their partner Schafer Corporation were assigned 13 formal tasks in support of the ICF program and its five laboratories. A portion of the effort on these tasks included providing direct {open_quotes}Onsite Support{close_quotes} at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Sandia National Laboratory Albuquerque (SNLA). Over 700 gold-plated hohlraum mandrels were fabricated and delivered to LLNL, LANL and SNLA. More than 1600 glass and plastic target capsules were produced for LLNL, LANL, SNLA and University of Rochester/Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE). Nearly 2000 various target foils and films were delivered for Naval Research Lab (NRL) and UR/LLE in FY97. This report describes these target fabrication activities and the target fabrication and characterization development activities that made the deliveries possible. The ICF program is anticipating experiments at the OMEGA laser and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) which will require targets containing cryogenic layered D{sub 2} or deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel. This project is part of the National Cryogenic Target Program and support experiments at LLNL and LANL to generate and characterize cryogenic layers for these targets. During FY97, significant progress was made in the design and component testing of the OMEGA Cryogenic Target System that will field cryogenic targets on OMEGA. This included major design changes, reduction in equipment, and process simplifications. This report summarizes and documents the technical progress made on these tasks.

  10. Inertial confinement fusion target component fabrication and technology development support: Annual report, October 1, 1997--September 30, 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, J. [ed.

    1998-12-01

    During this period, General Atomics (GA) and their partner Schafer Corporation were assigned 17 formal tasks in support of the Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program and its five laboratories. A portion of the effort on these tasks included providing direct ``On-site Support`` at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), and Sandia National Laboratory Albuquerque (SNLA). They fabricated and delivered over 1,200 hohlraum mandrels and numerous other micromachined components to LLNL, LANL, and SNLA. They produced more than 1,300 glass and plastic target capsules for LLNL, LANL, SNLA, and the University of Rochester/Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR/LLE). They also delivered nearly 2,000 various target foils and films for Naval Research Lab (NRL) and UR/LLE in FY98. This report describes these target fabrication activities and the target fabrication and characterization development activities that made the deliveries possible. During FY98, great progress was made by the GA/Schafer-UR/LLE-LANL team in the design, procurement, installation, and testing of the OMEGA Cryogenic Target System (OCTS) that will field cryogenic targets on OMEGA. The design phase was concluded for all components of the OCTS and all major components were procured and nearly all were fabricated. Many of the components were assembled and tested, and some have been shipped to UR/LLE. The ICF program is anticipating experiments at the OMEGA laser and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) which will require targets containing cryogenic layered D{sub 2} or deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel. They are part of the National Cryogenic Target Program and support experiments at LLNL and LANL to generate and characterize cryogenic layers for these targets. They also contributed cryogenic support and developed concepts for NIF cryogenic targets. This report summarizes and documents the technical progress made on these tasks.

  11. Maintenance and operations contractor plan for transition to the project Hanford management contract (PHMC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Waite, J.L.

    1996-04-12

    This plan has been developed by Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), and its subcontractors ICF Kaiser Hanford (ICF KH) and BCS Richland, Inc. (BCSR), at the direction of the US Department of Energy (DOE), Richland Operations Office (RL). WHC and its subcontractors are hereafter referred to as the Maintenance and Operations (M and O) Contractor. The plan identifies actions involving the M and O Contractor that are critical to (1) prepare for a smooth transition to the Project Hanford Management Contractor (PHMC), and (2) support and assist the PHMC and RL in achieving transition as planned, with no or minimal impact to ongoing baseline activities. The plan is structured around two primary phases. The first is the pre-award phase, which started in mid-February 1996 and is currently scheduled to be completed on June 1, 1996, at which time the contract is currently planned to be awarded. The second is the follow-on four-month post-award phase from June 1, 1996, until October 1, 1996. Considering the magnitude and complexity of the scope of work being transitioned, completion in four months will require significant effort by all parties. To better ensure success, the M and O Contractor has developed a pre-award phase that is intended to maximize readiness for transition. Priority is given to preparation for facility assessments and processing of personnel, as these areas are determined to be on the critical path for transition. In addition, the M and O Contractor will put emphasis during the pre-award phase to close out open items prior to contract award, to include grievances, employee concerns, audit findings, compliance issues, etc.

  12. Inertial Confinement Fusion R&D and Nuclear Proliferation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robert J. Goldston

    2011-04-28

    In a few months, or a few years, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory may achieve fusion gain using 192 powerful lasers to generate x-rays that will compress and heat a small target containing isotopes of hydrogen. This event would mark a major milestone after decades of research on inertial confinement fusion (ICF). It might also mark the beginning of an accelerated global effort to harness fusion energy based on this science and technology. Unlike magnetic confinement fusion (ITER, 2011), in which hot fusion fuel is confined continuously by strong magnetic fields, inertial confinement fusion involves repetitive fusion explosions, taking advantage of some aspects of the science learned from the design and testing of hydrogen bombs. The NIF was built primarily because of the information it would provide on weapons physics, helping the United States to steward its stockpile of nuclear weapons without further underground testing. The U.S. National Academies' National Research Council is now hosting a study to assess the prospects for energy from inertial confinement fusion. While this study has a classified sub-panel on target physics, it has not been charged with examining the potential nuclear proliferation risks associated with ICF R&D. We argue here that this question urgently requires direct and transparent examination, so that means to mitigate risks can be assessed, and the potential residual risks can be balanced against the potential benefits, now being assessed by the NRC. This concern is not new (Holdren, 1978), but its urgency is now higher than ever before.

  13. Highly lead-loaded red plastic scintillators as an X-ray imaging system for the Laser Mega Joule

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamel, M.; Normand, S.; Turk, G.; Darbon, S.

    2011-07-01

    The scope of this project intends to record spatially resolved images of core shape and size of a DT micro-balloon during Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments at Laser Mega Joule facility (LMJ). We need to develop an X-ray imaging system which can operate in the radiative background generated by an ignition shot of ICF. The scintillator is a part of the imaging system and has to gather a compromise of scintillating properties (scintillating efficiency, decay time, emission wavelength) so as to both operate in the hard radiative environment and to allow the acquisition of spatially resolved images. Inorganic scintillators cannot be used because no compromise can be found regarding the expected scintillating properties, most of them are not fast enough and emit blue light. Organic scintillators are generally fast, but present low X-ray absorption in the 10 to 40 keV range, that does not permit the acquisition of spatially resolved images. To this aim, we have developed highly lead-loaded and red-fluorescent fast plastic scintillators. Such a combination is not currently available via scintillator suppliers, since they propose only blue-fluorescent plastic scintillators doped with up to 12%w Pb. Thus, incorporation ratio up to 27%w Pb has been reached in our laboratory, which can afford a plastic scintillator with an outstanding Z{sub eff} close to 50. X-rays in the 10 to 40 keV range can thus be detected with a higher probability of photoelectric effect than for classic organic scintillators, such as NE102. The strong orange-red fluorescence can be filtered, so that we can eliminate residual Cerenkov light, generated by {gamma}-ray absorption in glass parts of the imaging system. Decay times of our scintillators evaluated under UV excitation were estimated to be in the range 10 to 13 ns. (authors)

  14. Progress in the development of the MARBLE platform for studying thermonuclear burn in the presence of heterogeneous mix on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Murphy, T. J.; Douglas, M. R.; Fincke, J. R.; Olson, R. E.; Cobble, J. A.; Haines, B. M.; Hamilton, C. E.; Lee, M. N.; Oertel, J. A.; Parra-Vasquez, N. A. G.; et al

    2016-05-01

    Mix of ablator material into fuel of an ICF capsule adds non-burning material, diluting the fuel and reducing burn. The amount of the reduction is dependent in part on the morphology of the mix. A probability distribution function (PDF) burn model has been developed [6] that utilizes the average concentration of mixed materials as well as the variance in this quantity across cells provided by the BHR turbulent transport model [3] and its revisions [4] to describe the mix in terms of a PDF of concentrations of fuel and ablator material, and provides the burn rate in mixed material. Workmore » is underway to develop the MARBLE ICF platform for use on the National Ignition Facility in experiments to quantify the influence of heterogeneous mix on fusion burn. This platform consists of a plastic (CH) capsule filled with a deuterated plastic foam (CD) with a density of a few tens of milligrams per cubic centimeter, with tritium gas filling the voids in the foam. This capsule will be driven using x-ray drive on NIF, and the resulting shocks will induce turbulent mix that will result in the mixing of deuterium from the foam with the tritium gas. In order to affect the morphology of the mix, engineered foams with voids of diameter up to 100 microns will be utilized. The degree of mix will be determined from the ratio of DT to DD neutron yield. As the mix increases, the yield from reactions between the deuterium of the CD foam with tritium from the gas will increase. Lastly, the ratio of DT to DD neutrons will be compared to a variation of the PDF burn model that quantifies reactions from initially separated reactants.« less

  15. Literature Review on the Effects of Prescription Fire on theEcology of Site 300

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Preston, R

    2011-03-14

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has historically conducted prescription burns across approximately 2,000 acres of Site 300 on an annual basis to safeguard test facilities and operations from the risk of wildfire encroachment. Prescription burns began in 1960, and although fire frequency varies among the designated burn areas, all have been burned at least once. A patchwork of native perennial grassland communities and associated special-status plant and animal populations occur onsite in many areas that have been receiving these treatments. Because the size and locations of prescription burns may shift in coming years, an evaluation is warranted to determine how these shifts may affect listed biota, including rare plants, and the distinct ecological conditions present on the site. This report presents the results of a literature review conducted by ICF International (ICF) to collect basic information on native perennial grasslands in California, the influence of fire on these grasslands, and management tools for restoring and maintaining them. The objective of this study was to review the scientific literature on California native grasslands and summarize the current state of knowledge pertaining to the possible effects -- both beneficial and detrimental -- of prescribed fire on the ecology of Site 300. The results of this review are intended to inform future management practices that may be carried out at Site 300 to maintain the plant and wildlife communities and to ensure that the ecological conditions benefit the special-status species that inhabit the Site. This review is also intended to identify a study approach to investigate changes over the next 10 years in the burned areas and in areas where burning will be discontinued.

  16. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) and the National Ignition Campaign (NIC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moses, E

    2009-09-17

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most powerful laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and experiments studying high-energy-density (HED) science, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). NIF construction was certified by the Department of Energy as complete on March 27, 2009. NIF, a 192-beam Nd:glass laser facility, will ultimately produce 1.8-MJ, 500-TW of 351-nm third-harmonic, ultraviolet light. On March 10, 2009, total 192-beam energy of 1.1 MJ was demonstrated; this is approximately 30 times more energy than ever produced in an ICF laser system. The principal goal of NIF is to achieve ignition of a deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel capsule and provide access to HED physics regimes needed for experiments related to national security, fusion energy and broader frontier scientific exploration. NIF experiments in support of indirect-drive ignition began in August 2009. These first experiments represent the next phase of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The NIC is a national effort to achieve fusion ignition and is coordinated through a detailed execution plan that includes the science, technology, and equipment. Equipment required for ignition experiments includes diagnostics, a cryogenic target manipulator, and user optics. Participants in this effort include LLNL, General Atomics (GA), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Energetics (LLE). The primary goal for NIC is to have all of the equipment operational, integrated into the facility, and ready to begin a credible ignition campaign in 2010. With NIF now operational, the long-sought goal of achieving self-sustained nuclear fusion and energy gain in the laboratory is much closer to realization. Successful demonstration of ignition and net energy gain on NIF will be a major step towards demonstrating the feasibility of Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) and will likely

  17. IGNITION AND FRONTIER SCIENCE ON THE NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moses, E

    2009-06-22

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most powerful laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and experiments studying high-energy-density (HED) science, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF construction Project was certified by the Department of Energy as complete on March 30, 2009. NIF, a 192-beam Nd-glass laser facility, will produce 1.8 MJ, 500 TW of light at the third-harmonic, ultraviolet light of 351 nm. On March 10, 2009, a total 192-beam energy of 1.1 MJ was demonstrated; this is approximately 30 times more energy than ever produced in an ICF laser system. The principal goal of NIF is to achieve ignition of a deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel capsule and provide access to HED physics regimes needed for experiments related to national security, fusion energy and for broader frontier scientific exploration. NIF experiments in support of indirect drive ignition will begin in FY2009. These first experiments represent the next phase of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The NIC is a 1.7 billion dollar national effort to achieve fusion ignition and is coordinated through a detailed execution plan that includes the science, technology, and equipment. Equipment required for ignition experiments include diagnostics, cryogenic target manipulator, and user optics. Participants in this effort include LLNL, General Atomics (GA), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Energetics (LLE). The primary goal for NIC is to have all of the equipment operational and integrated into the facility and be ready to begin a credible ignition campaign in 2010. With NIF now operational, the long-sought goal of achieving self-sustained nuclear fusion and energy gain in the laboratory is much closer to realization. Successful demonstration of ignition and net energy gain on NIF will be a major step towards demonstrating the feasibility of

  18. Recent advances in theoretical and numerical studies of wire array Z-pinch in the IAPCM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ding, Ning Zhang, Yang Xiao, Delong Wu, Jiming Huang, Jun Yin, Li Sun, Shunkai Xue, Chuang Dai, Zihuan Ning, Cheng Shu, Xiaojian Wang, Jianguo Li, Hua

    2014-12-15

    Fast Z-pinch has produced the most powerful X-ray radiation source in laboratory and also shows the possibility to drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF). Recent advances in wire-array Z-pinch researches at the Institute of Applied Physics and Computational Mathematics are presented in this paper. A typical wire array Z-pinch process has three phases: wire plasma formation and ablation, implosion and the MRT instability development, stagnation and radiation. A mass injection model with azimuthal modulation coefficient is used to describe the wire initiation, and the dynamics of ablated plasmas of wire-array Z-pinches in (r, θ) geometry is numerically studied. In the implosion phase, a two-dimensional(r, z) three temperature radiation MHD code MARED has been developed to investigate the development of the Magneto-Rayleigh-Taylor(MRT) instability. We also analyze the implosion modes of nested wire-array and find that the inner wire-array is hardly affected before the impaction of the outer wire-array. While the plasma accelerated to high speed in the implosion stage stagnates on the axis, abundant x-ray radiation is produced. The energy spectrum of the radiation and the production mechanism are investigated. The computational x-ray pulse shows a reasonable agreement with the experimental result. We also suggest that using alloyed wire-arrays can increase multi-keV K-shell yield by decreasing the opacity of K-shell lines. In addition, we use a detailed circuit model to study the energy coupling between the generator and the Z-pinch implosion. Recently, we are concentrating on the problems of Z-pinch driven ICF, such as dynamic hohlraum and capsule implosions. Our numerical investigations on the interaction of wire-array Z-pinches on foam convertors show qualitative agreements with experimental results on the “Qiangguang I” facility. An integrated two-dimensional simulation of dynamic hohlraum driven capsule implosion provides us the physical insights of wire

  19. Fabrication and testing of gas-filled targets for large-scale plasma experiments on nova

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stone, G.F.; Rivers, C.J.; Spragge, M.R.; Wallace, R.J.

    1996-06-01

    The proposed next-generation ICF facility, the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is designed to produce energy gain from x-ray heated {open_quotes}indirect-drive{close_quotes} fuel capsules. For indirect-drive targets, laser light heats the inside of the Au hohlraum wall and produces x rays which in turn heat and implode the capsule to produce fusion conditions in the fuel. Unlike Nova targets, in NIF-scale targets laser light will propagate through several millimeters of gas, producing a plasma, before impinging upon the Au hohlraum wall. The purpose of the gas-produced plasma is to provide sufficient pressure to keep the radiating Au surface from expanding excessively into the hohlraum cavity. Excessive expansion of the Au wall interacts with the laser pulse and degrades the drive symmetry of the capsule implosion. The authors have begun an experimental campaign on the Nova laser to study the effect of hohlraum gas on both laser-plasma interaction and implosion symmetry. In their current NIF target design, the calculated plasma electron temperature is T{sub e} {approx} 3 keV and the electron density is N{sub e} {approx} 10{sup 21}cm{sup {minus}3}.

  20. Status Of The National Ignition Campaign And National Ignition Facility Integrated Computer Control System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lagin, L; Brunton, G; Carey, R; Demaret, R; Fisher, J; Fishler, B; Ludwigsen, P; Marshall, C; Reed, R; Shelton, R; Townsend, S

    2011-03-18

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a stadium-sized facility that will contains a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, ultraviolet laser system together with a 10-meter diameter target chamber with room for multiple experimental diagnostics. NIF is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system, providing a scientific center to study inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF's laser beams are designed to compress fusion targets to conditions required for thermonuclear burn. NIF is operated by the Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS) in an object-oriented, CORBA-based system distributed among over 1800 frontend processors, embedded controllers and supervisory servers. In the fall of 2010, a set of experiments began with deuterium and tritium filled targets as part of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). At present, all 192 laser beams routinely fire to target chamber center to conduct fusion and high energy density experiments. During the past year, the control system was expanded to include automation of cryogenic target system and over 20 diagnostic systems to support fusion experiments were deployed and utilized in experiments in the past year. This talk discusses the current status of the NIC and the plan for controls and information systems to support these experiments on the path to ignition.

  1. Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility thermal hydraulic analysis for Title II design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cramer, E.R.

    1994-11-10

    The purpose of this work was to provide the thermal hydraulic analysis for the Multi-Function Waste Tank Facility (MWTF) Title II design. Temperature distributions throughout the tank structure were calculated for subsequent use in the structural analysis and in the safety evaluation. Calculated temperatures of critical areas were compared to design allowables. Expected operating parameters were calculated for use in the ventilation system design and in the environmental impact documentation. The design requirements were obtained from the MWTF Functional Design Criteria (FDC). The most restrictive temperature limit given in the FDC is the 200 limit for the haunch and dome steel and concrete. The temperature limit for the rest of the primary and secondary tanks and concrete base mat and supporting pad is 250 F. Also, the waste should not be allowed to boil. The tank geometry was taken from ICF Kaiser Engineers Hanford drawing ES-W236A-Z1, Revision 1, included here in Appendix B. Heat removal rates by evaporation from the waste surface were obtained from experimental data. It is concluded that the MWTF tank cooling system will meet the design temperature limits for the design heat load of 700,000 Btu/h, even if cooling flow is lost to the annulus region, and temperatures change very slowly during transients due to the high heat capacity of the tank structure and the waste. Accordingly, transients will not be a significant operational problem from the viewpoint of meeting the specified temperature limits.

  2. LIFAC sorbent injection desulfurization demonstration project. Final report, volume II: Project performance and economics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-01-01

    This publication discusses the demonstration of the LIFAC sorbent injection technology at Richmond Power and Light`s Whitewater Valley Unit No. 2, performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy`s (DOE) Clean Coal Technology Program. LIFAC is a sorbent injection technology capable of removing 75 to 85 percent of a power plant`s SO{sub 2} emissions using limestone at calcium to sulfur molar ratios of between 2 and 2.5 to 1. The site of the demonstration is a coal-fired electric utility power plant located in Richmond, Indiana. The project is being conducted by LIFAC North America (LIFAC NA), a joint venture partnership of Tampella Power Corporation and ICF Kaiser Engineers, in cooperation with DOE, RP&L, and Research Institute (EPRI), the State of Indiana, and Black Beauty Coal Company. The purpose of Public Design Report Volume 2: Project Performance and Economics is to consolidate, for public use, the technical efficiency and economy of the LIFAC Process. The report has been prepared pursuant to the Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC22-90PC90548 between LIFAC NA and the U.S. Department of Energy.

  3. A Virtualized Computing Platform For Fusion Control Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frazier, T; Adams, P; Fisher, J; Talbot, A

    2011-03-18

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a stadium-sized facility that contains a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, ultraviolet laser system together with a 10-meter diameter target chamber with room for multiple experimental diagnostics. NIF is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system, providing a scientific center to study inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. NIF's laser beams are designed to compress fusion targets to conditions required for thermonuclear burn, liberating more energy than required to initiate the fusion reactions. 2,500 servers, 400 network devices and 700 terabytes of networked attached storage provide the foundation for NIF's Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS) and Experimental Data Archive. This talk discusses the rationale & benefits for server virtualization in the context of an operational experimental facility, the requirements discovery process used by the NIF teams to establish evaluation criteria for virtualization alternatives, the processes and procedures defined to enable virtualization of servers in a timeframe that did not delay the execution of experimental campaigns and the lessons the NIF teams learned along the way. The virtualization architecture ultimately selected for ICCS is based on the Open Source Xen computing platform and 802.1Q open networking standards. The specific server and network configurations needed to ensure performance and high availability of the control system infrastructure will be discussed.

  4. Concept to diagnose mix with imaging x-ray Thomson scattering

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keiter, Paul A.; Gamboa, Eliseo J.; Huntington, Channing M.; Kuranz, Carolyn C.

    2012-10-15

    Turbulent mixing of two fluid species is a ubiquitous problem, prevalent in systems such as inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsule implosions, supernova remnants, and other astrophysical systems. In complex, high Reynolds number compressible high energy density (HED) flows such as these, hydrodynamic instabilities initiate the turbulent mixing process, which can then feedback and alter the mean hydrodynamic motion through nonlinear processes. In order to predict how these systems evolve under turbulent conditions, models are used. However, these models require detailed quantitative data to validate and constrain their detailed physics models as well as improve them. Providing this much needed data is currently at the forefront of HED research but is proving elusive due to a lack of available diagnostics capable of directly measuring detailed flow variables. Thomson scattering is a promising technique in this regard as it provides fundamental conditions of the flow ({rho}, T, Zbar) due to its direct interaction with the small scales of the fluid or plasma and was recently considered as a possible mix diagnostic. With the development of imaging x-ray Thomson scattering (IXRTS) obtaining spatial profiles of these variables is within reach. We propose a novel use of the IXRTS technique that will provide more detailed quantitative data required for model validation in mix experiments.

  5. Heavy ion fusion accelerator research (HIFAR) half-year report: October 1, 1986-March 31, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-04-01

    For this report we have collected the papers presented by the HIFAR group at the IEEE Particle Accelerator Conference held in Washington, DC, on March 16-19, 1987, which essentially coincides with the end of the reporting period. In addition, we report on research to determine the cause of the failures of Re-X insulator that are used as the high-voltage feed-through for the electrostatic quadrupoles on MBE-4. This report contains papers on the following topics: LBL multiple beam experiments, pulsers for the induction linac experiment (MBE-4), HIF insulator failure, experimental measurement of emittance growth in mismatched space-charge dominated beams, the effect of nonlinear forces on coherently oscillating space-charge dominated beams, space-charge effects in a bending magnet system, transverse combining of nonrelativistic beams in a multiple beam induction linac, comparison of electric and magnetic quadrupole focusing for the low energy end of an induction-linac-ICF driver. Eight individual papers have been indexed separately. (LSP)

  6. PRODUCTION OF HIGHER STRENGTH THIN WALLED GLOW DISCHARGE POLYMER SHELLS FOR CRYOGENIC EXPERIMENTS AT OMEGA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NIKROO,A; CZECHOWICZ,DG; CASTILLO,ER; PONTELANDOLFO,JM

    2002-04-01

    OAK A271 PRODUCTION OF HIGHER STRENGTH THIN WALLED GLOW DISCHARGE POLYMER SHELLS FOR CRYOGENIC EXPERIMENTS AT OMEGA. Thin walled polymer shells are needed for OMEGA cryogenic laser experiments. These capsules need to be about 900 {micro}m in diameter and as thin as possible (approx 1-2 {micro}m), while having enough strength to be filled with DT as fast as possible to about 1000 atm. The authors have found that by optimizing the coating parameters in the glow discharge polymer (GDP) deposition system, traditionally used for making ICF targets, they can routinely make robust, {approx} 1.5 {micro}m thick, 900 {micro}m diameter GDP shells with buckle strengths of over 0.3 atm. This is twice the strength of shells made prior to the optimization and is comparable to values quoted for polyimide shells. In addition, these shells were found to be approximately three times more permeable and over 20% denser than previously made GDP shells. The combination of higher strength and permeability is ideal for direct drive cryogenic targets at OMEGA. Shells as thin as 0.5 {micro}m have been made. In this paper, the authors discuss the shell fabrication process, effects of modifying various GDP deposition parameters on shell properties and chemical composition.

  7. Development and implementation of seismic design and evaluation criteria for NIF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sommer, S.C.; MacCalden, P.B.

    1998-03-17

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is being built at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) as an international research center for inertial confinement fusion (ICF). This paper will provide an overview of NIF, review NIF seismic criteria, and briefly discuss seismic analyses of NIF optical support structures that have been performed by LLNL and the Ralph M. Parsons Company, the Architect and Engineer (A&E) for NIF. The NIF seismic design and evaluation criteria is based on provisions in DOE Standard 1020 (DOE-STD-1020), the Uniform Building Code (UBC), and the LLNL Mechanical Engineering Design Safety Standards (MEDSS). Different levels of seismic requirements apply to NIF structures, systems, and components (SSCs) based on their function. The highest level of requirements are defined for optical support structures and SSCs which could influence the performance of optical support structures, while the minimum level of requirements are Performance Category 2 (PC2) requirements in DOE-STD-1020. To demonstrate that the NIF seismic criteria is satisfied, structural analyses have been performed by LLNL and Parsons to evaluate the responses of optical support structures and other SSCs to seismic-induced forces.

  8. Full aperture backscatter station imager (FABSI) diagnostics system for far-field imaging of laser plasma instabilities on Nova

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilke, M.D.; Fernandez, J.C.; Berggren, R.R.; Montgomery, D.; Faulkner, J.; Looney, L.; Jimerson, J.; Horton, R.F.

    1996-06-01

    In ICF, the understanding of laser plasma scattering processes is essential for laser target coupling and in controlling the symmetry of indirect drive implosions. The existing Nova Full Aperture Backscatter Station (FABS) has been useful in understanding laser plasma instabilities occurring in hohlraums by measuring the quantity, spectral distribution and near-field spatial distributions of Brillouin and more recently Raman backscatter. Equally important is an understanding of the farfield spatial intensity distribution which provides information on density, temperature and velocity gradient distributions, and which affect capsule implosion symmetry in hohlraums. Such information could potentially help in understanding processes such as filamentation and saturation mechanism. This paper describes a broad-band, color-corrected far-field imager and associated diagnostics capable of imaging the source of scattered light to better than 25 {micro}m resolution. The imager can either image Brillouin or Raman backscatter through the Nova beam 7 focusing lens or be used like a microscope to image side scatter from other beams.

  9. Pulsed power peer review committee report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2004-08-01

    As part of meeting the GRPA (Government Performance and Results Act) requirements and to provide input to Sandia's annual Performance Evaluation Assessment Report (PEAR) to the National Nuclear Security Administration in FY2004, a 14-member external review committee chaired by Dr. Alvin Trivelpiece was convened by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) on May 4-6, 2004 to review Sandia National Laboratories' Pulsed Power Programs. The scope of the review included activities in high energy density physics (HEDP), inertial confinement fusion (ICF), radiation/weapon physics, the petawatt laser initiative (PW) and fast ignition, equation-of state studies, radiation effects science and lethality, x-ray radiography, ZR development, basic research and pulsed power technology research and development, as well as electromagnetics and work for others. In his charge to the Committee, Dr. Jeffrey P. Quintenz, Director of Pulsed Power Sciences (Org. 1600) asked that the evaluation and feedback be based on three criteria: (1) quality of technical activities in science, technology, and engineering, (2) programmatic performance, management, and planning, and (3) relevance to national needs and agency missions. In addition, the director posed specific programmatic questions. The accompanying report, produced as a SAND document, is the report of the Committee's finding.

  10. Large-area sol-gel highly-reflective coatings processed by the dipping technique

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Belleville, P.; Pegon, P.

    1997-12-01

    The Centre d`Etudes de Limeil-Valenton is currently involved in a project which consists of the construction of a 2 MJ/500TW (351-nm) pulsed Nd:glass laser devoted to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) research. With 240 laser beams, the proposed megajoule-class laser conceptual design necessitates 44-cm x 2 44-cm x 6-cm cavity-end mirrors (1053-nm) representing more than 50-m{sup 2} of coated area. These dielectric mirrors are made of quaterwave stacks of SiO{sub 2} and ZrO{sub 2}-PVP (PolyVinylPyrrolidone) and are prepared from colloidal suspensions (sols) using the sol-gel route. After a sustained search effort. we have prepared (SiO{sub 2}/ZrO{sub 2}-PVP){sup 10} mirrored coatings with up to 99% reflection at 1053-nm and for different incidence use. Adequate laser-conditioned damage thresholds ranging 14 - 15 J/cm{sup 2} at 1053-nm wavelength and with 3-ns pulse duration were achieved. Large-area mirrors with good coating uniformity and weak edge-effect were produced by dip-coating at room temperature and atmospheric pressure.

  11. Pollution Prevention Successes Database (P2SDb) user guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-01

    When Pollution Prevention Opportunity Assessments (P2OAs) were launched at the Hanford Site during the summer of 1994, the first comment received from those using them expressed the desire for a method to report assessments electronically. As a temporary measure, macros were developed for use on word processing systems, but a more formal database was obviously needed. Additionally, increased DOE and Washington state reporting requirements for pollution prevention suggested that a database system would streamline the reporting process. The Pollution Prevention Group of Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC) contracted with the Data Automation Engineering Department from ICF Kaiser Hanford Company (ICFKH) to develop the system. The scope was to develop a database that will track P2OAs conducted by the facilities and contractors at the Hanford Site. It will also track pollution prevention accomplishments that are not the result of P2OAs and document a portion of the Process Waste Assessments conducted in the past. To accommodate the above criteria, yet complete the system in a timely manner, the Pollution Prevention Successes Database (P2SDb) is being implemented in three phases. The first phase will automate the worksheets to provide both input and output of the data associated with the worksheets. The second phase will automate standard summary reports and ad hoc reports. The third phase will provide automated searching of the database to facilitate the sharing of pollution prevention experiences among various users. This User`s Guide addresses only the Phase 1 system.

  12. Inertial fusion program, January 1-June 30, 1979

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Skoberne, F.

    1981-06-01

    Progress in the development of high-energy short-pulse carbon dioxide laser systems for fusion research is reported. Improvements are outlined for the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Gemini System, which permitted over 500 shots in support of 10 different target experiments; the transformation of our eight-beam system, Helios, from a developmental to an operational facility that is capable of irradiating targets on a routine basis is described; and progress made toward completion of Antares, our 100- to 200-TW target irradiation system, is detailed. Investigations of phenomena such as phase conjugation by degenerate four-wave mixing and its applicability to laser fusion systems, and frequency multiplexing as a means toward multipulse energy extraction are summarized. Also discussed are experiments with targets designed for adiabatic compression. Progress is reported in the development of accurate diagnostics, especially for the detection of expanding ions, of neutron yield, and of x-ray emission. Significant advances in our theoretical efforts are summarized, such as the adaptation of our target design codes for use with the CRAY-1 computer, and new results leading to a better understanding of implosion phenomena are reported. The results of various fusion reactor studies are summarized, including the development of an ICF reactor blanket that offers a promising alternative to the usual lithium blanket, and the formulation of a capital-cost data base for laser fusion reactors to permit meaningful comparisons with other technologies.

  13. Single-shot Zeff dense plasma diagnostic through simultaneous refraction and attenuation measurements with a Talbot–Lau x-ray moiré deflectometer

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Valdivia, M. P.; Stutman, D.; Finkenthal, M.

    2015-03-23

    The Talbot–Lau x-ray moiré deflectometer is a powerful plasma diagnostic capable of delivering simultaneous refraction and attenuation information through the accurate detection of x-ray phase shift and intensity. The diagnostic can provide the index of refraction n = 1 - δ + iβ of an object (dense plasma, for example) placed in the x-ray beam by independently measuring both δ and β, which are directly related to the electron density ne and the attenuation coefficient μ, respectively. Since δ and β depend on the effective atomic number Zeff, a map can be obtained from the ratio between phase and absorptionmore » images acquired in a single shot. The Talbot–Lau x-ray moiré deflectometer and its corresponding data acquisition and processing are briefly described to illustrate how the above is achieved; Zeff values of test objects within the 4–12 range were obtained experimentally through simultaneous refraction and attenuation measurements. We show that Zeff mapping of objects does not require previous knowledge of sample length or shape. The determination of Zeff from refraction and attenuation measurements with Moiré deflectometry could be of high interest to various domains of HED research, such as shocked materials and ICF experiments, as well as material science and NDT.« less

  14. In-Situ Visualization Experiments with ParaView Cinema in RAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kares, Robert John

    2015-10-15

    A previous paper described some numerical experiments performed using the ParaView/Catalyst in-situ visualization infrastructure deployed in the Los Alamos RAGE radiation-hydrodynamics code to produce images from a running large scale 3D ICF simulation. One challenge of the in-situ approach apparent in these experiments was the difficulty of choosing parameters likes isosurface values for the visualizations to be produced from the running simulation without the benefit of prior knowledge of the simulation results and the resultant cost of recomputing in-situ generated images when parameters are chosen suboptimally. A proposed method of addressing this difficulty is to simply render multiple images at runtime with a range of possible parameter values to produce a large database of images and to provide the user with a tool for managing the resulting database of imagery. Recently, ParaView/Catalyst has been extended to include such a capability via the so-called Cinema framework. Here I describe some initial experiments with the first delivery of Cinema and make some recommendations for future extensions of Cinema’s capabilities.

  15. Acceptance test report for core sample trucks 3 and 4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Corbett, J.E.

    1996-04-10

    The purpose of this Acceptance Test Report is to provide documentation for the acceptance testing of the rotary mode core sample trucks 3 and 4, designated as HO-68K-4600 and HO-68K-4647, respectively. This report conforms to the guidelines established in WHC-IP-1026, ``Engineering Practice Guidelines,`` Appendix M, ``Acceptance Test Procedures and Reports.`` Rotary mode core sample trucks 3 and 4 were based upon the design of the second core sample truck (HO-68K-4345) which was constructed to implement rotary mode sampling of the waste tanks at Hanford. Successful completion of acceptance testing on June 30, 1995 verified that all design requirements were met. This report is divided into four sections, beginning with general information. Acceptance testing was performed on trucks 3 and 4 during the months of March through June, 1995. All testing was performed at the ``Rock Slinger`` test site in the 200 West area. The sequence of testing was determined by equipment availability, and the initial revision of the Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) was used for both trucks. Testing was directed by ICF-KH, with the support of WHC Characterization Equipment Engineering and Characterization Project Operations. Testing was completed per the ATP without discrepancies or deviations, except as noted.

  16. Ignition threshold for non-Maxwellian plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hay, Michael J.; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2015-11-15

    An optically thin p-{sup 11}B plasma loses more energy to bremsstrahlung than it gains from fusion reactions, unless the ion temperature can be elevated above the electron temperature. In thermal plasmas, the temperature differences required are possible in small Coulomb logarithm regimes, characterized by high density and low temperature. Ignition could be reached more easily if the fusion reactivity can be improved with nonthermal ion distributions. To establish an upper bound for the potential utility of a nonthermal distribution, we consider a monoenergetic beam with particle energy selected to maximize the beam-thermal reactivity. Comparing deuterium-tritium (DT) and p-{sup 11}B, the minimum Lawson criteria and minimum ρR required for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) volume ignition are calculated with and without the nonthermal feature. It turns out that channeling fusion alpha energy to maintain such a beam facilitates ignition at lower densities and ρR, improves reactivity at constant pressure, and could be used to remove helium ash. On the other hand, the reactivity gains that could be realized in DT plasmas are significant, the excess electron density in p-{sup 11}B plasmas increases the recirculated power cost to maintain a nonthermal feature and thereby constrains its utility to ash removal.

  17. The Neutron Imaging Diagnostic at NIF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrill, F E; Buckles, R; Clark, D; Danly, C R; Drury, O B; Dzenitis, J M; Fatherly, V E; Fittinghoff, D N; Gallegos, R; Grim, G P; Guler, N; Loomis, E N; Lutz, S; Malone, R M; Martinson, D D; Mares, D; Morley, D J; Morgan, G L; Oertel, J A; Tregillis, I L; Volegov, P L; Weiss, P B; Wilde, C H

    2012-10-01

    A neutron imaging diagnostic has recently been commissioned at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This new system is an important diagnostic tool for inertial fusion studies at the NIF for measuring the size and shape of the burning DT plasma during the ignition stage of ICF implosions. The imaging technique utilizes a pinhole neutron aperture, placed between the neutron source and a neutron detector. The detection system measures the two dimensional distribution of neutrons passing through the pinhole. This diagnostic has been designed to collect two images at two times. The long flight path for this diagnostic, 28 m, results in a chromatic separation of the neutrons, allowing the independently timed images to measure the source distribution for two neutron energies. Typically the first image measures the distribution of the 14 MeV neutrons and the second image of the 6-12 MeV neutrons. The combination of these two images has provided data on the size and shape of the burning plasma within the compressed capsule, as well as a measure of the quantity and spatial distribution of the cold fuel surrounding this core.

  18. Lifetime survivability of contaminated target-chamber optics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rainer, F.; Anderson, A.; Burnham, A.; Milam, D.; Turner, R.

    1996-11-01

    Target chambers used for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) expose laser optics to a very hostile environment, not only from high-fluence laser irradiation but also x-ray irradiation and particulate debris from targets and chamber wall materials. Expendable debris shields provide the first line of defense to more costly optics upstream in the laser beam path to contaminants generated within the target chamber. However, the replacement of a large number of debris shields is also an expensive proposition so that extending their usable lifetime within the chamber is important. We have conducted tests to show that optics can both be cleaned and damaged by laser irradiation at 355 nm after being contaminated with potential chamber-wall materials such as B{sub 4}C and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}. Such optics can survive from one to hundreds of laser shots, depending on degree of contamination and laser fluence levels. Similarly, we have studied the survivability of optics that have been exposed to direct contamination from representative target materials irradiated in the target chamber. We have also studied the effects on optics that were not directly exposed to targets, yet received secondary exposure from the above directly-exposed samples.

  19. LLE Review Quarterly Report (July-September 2001). Volume 88

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hinterman, Thomas H.

    2001-09-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering July-September 2001, features an article by C. Stoeckl, V. Yu. Glebov, J. D. Zuegel, and D. D. Meyerhofer (p. 171) that describes a simple, low-cost, wide dynamic-range, neutron bang time (NBT) detector. This instrument complements the capabilities of the streak camera-based neutron temporal diagnostic (NTD), which is also installed on the OMEGA laser. The new NBT measures the neutron bang time of D2- and DT-filled inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosion capsules at neutron yields between 107 and 1011 with an absolute timing accuracy of better than100 ps. This level of accuracy allows the modeling of the implosions to be effectively guided using hydrocode calculations. Other articles in this volume include: Functional Damage Thresholds of Hafnia/Silica Coating Designs for the NIF Laser; High-Gain Direct-Drive Target Designs for the national Ignition Facility; Ultrafast Optoelectronic Interface for Digital Superconducting Electronics; Optimizing the Fabrication of Polyimide Shells; LLE's Summer High School Research Program; FY01 Laser Facility Report; and, National Laser Users' Facility News.

  20. Optical Comb Generation for Streak Camera Calibration for Inertial Confinement Fusion Experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ronald Justin, Terence Davies, Frans Janson, Bruce Marshall, Perry Bell, Daniel Kalantar, Joseph Kimbrough, Stephen Vernon, Oliver Sweningsen

    2008-09-18

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is coming on-line to support physics experimentation for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) programs in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and Stockpile Stewardship (SS). Optical streak cameras are an integral part of the experimental diagnostics instrumentation at NIF. To accurately reduce streak camera data a highly accurate temporal calibration is required. This article describes a technique for simultaneously generating a precise +/- 2 ps optical marker pulse (fiducial reference) and trains of precisely timed, short-duration optical pulses (so-called “comb” pulse trains) that are suitable for the timing calibrations. These optical pulse generators are used with the LLNL optical streak cameras. They are small, portable light sources that, in the comb mode, produce a series of temporally short, uniformly spaced optical pulses, using a laser diode source. Comb generators have been produced with pulse-train repetition rates up to 10 GHz at 780 nm, and somewhat lower frequencies at 664 nm. Individual pulses can be as short as 25-ps FWHM. Signal output is via a fiber-optic connector on the front panel of the generator box. The optical signal is transported from comb generator to streak camera through multi-mode, graded-index optical fiber.

  1. Surface roughness statistics and temperature step stress effects for D-T solid layers equilibrated inside a 2 mm beryllium torus

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheliak, J.D.; Hoffer, J.K.

    1998-12-31

    Solid D-T layers are equilibrated inside a 2 mm diameter beryllium toroidal cell at temperatures ranging from 19.0 K to 19.6 K, using the beta-layering process. The experimental runs consists of multiple cycles of rapid- or slow-freezing of the initially liquid D-T charge, followed by a lengthy period of beta-layering equilibration, terminated by melting the layer. The temperature was changed in discrete steps at the end of some equilibration cycles in an attempt to simulate actual ICF target conditions. High-precision images of the D-T solid-vapor interface were analyzed to yield the surface roughness {sigma}{sub mns} as a sum of modal contributions. Results show an overage {sigma}{sub mns} of 1.3 {+-} 0.3 {micro}m for layers equilibrated at 19.0 K and show an inverse dependence of {sigma}{sub mns} on equilibration temperature up to 19.525 K. Inducing sudden temperature perturbations lowered {sigma}{sub mns} to 1.0 {+-} 0.05 {micro}m.

  2. Safety overview of the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brereton, S.J.; McLouth, L.; Odell, B.; Singh, M.; Tobin, M.; Trent, M.

    1996-05-23

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a proposed US Department of Energy inertial confinement laser fusion facility. The candidate sites for locating the NIF are: Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratory, the Nevada Test Site, and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), the preferred site. The NIF will operate by focusing 192 laser beams onto a tiny deuterium- tritium target located at the center of a spherical target chamber. The NIF mission is to achieve inertial confinement fusion (ICF) ignition, access physical conditions in matter of interest to nuclear weapons physics, provide an above ground simulation capability for nuclear weapons effects testing, and contribute to the development of inertial fusion for electrical power production. The NIF has been classified as a radiological, low hazard facility on the basis of a preliminary hazards analysis and according to the DOE methodology for facility classification. This requires that a safety analysis be prepared under DOE Order 5481.1B, Safety Analysis and Review System. A draft Preliminary Safety Analysis Report (PSAR) has been written, and this will be finalized later in 1996. This paper summarizes the safety issues associated with the operation of the NIF. It provides an overview of the hazards, estimates maximum routine and accidental exposures for the preferred site of LLNL, and concludes that the risks from NIF operations are low.

  3. Pulsed Power Peer Review Committee Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BLOOMQUIST,DOUGLAS D.

    2000-12-01

    In 1993, the Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA, PL 103-62) was enacted. GPRA, which applies to all federal programs, has three components: strategic plans, annual performance plans, and metrics to show how well annual plans are being followed. As part of meeting the GRPA requirement in FY2000, a 14-member external peer review panel (the Garwin Committee) was convened on May 17-19, 2000 to review Sandia National Laboratories' Pulsed Power Programs as a component of the Performance Appraisal Process negotiated with the Department of Energy (DOE). The scope of the review included activities in inertial confinement fission (ICF), weapon physics, development of radiation sources for weapons effects simulation, x-ray radiography, basic research in high energy density physics (HEDP), and pulsed power technology research and development. In his charge to the committee, Jeffrey Quintenz, Director of Pulsed Power Sciences (1600) asked that the review be based on four criteria (1) quality of science, technology, and engineering, (2) programmatic performance, management, and planning, (3) relevance to national needs and agency missions, and (4) performance in the operation and construction of major research facilities. In addition, specific programmatic questions were posed by the director and by the DOE-Defense Programs (DP). The accompanying report, produced as a SAND document, is the report of the committee's findings.

  4. The Neutron Imaging System Fielded at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrill, F E; Buckles, R; Clark, D D; Danly, C R; Drury, O B; Dzenitis, J M; Fatherley, V E; Fittinghoff, D N; Gallegos, R; Grim, G P; Guler, N; Loomis, E N; Lutz, S; Malone, R M; Martinson, D D; Mares, D; Morley, D J; Morgan, G L; Oertel, J A; Tregillis, I L; Volegov, P L; Weiss, P B; Wilde, C H

    2012-08-01

    A neutron imaging diagnostic has recently been commissioned at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This new system is an important diagnostic tool for inertial fusion studies at the NIF for measuring the size and shape of the burning DT plasma during the ignition stage of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) implosions. The imaging technique utilizes a pinhole neutron aperture, placed between the neutron source and a neutron detector. The detection system measures the two dimensional distribution of neutrons passing through the pinhole. This diagnostic has been designed to collect two images at two times. The long flight path for this diagnostic, 28 m, results in a chromatic separation of the neutrons, allowing the independently timed images to measure the source distribution for two neutron energies. Typically the first image measures the distribution of the 14 MeV neutrons and the second image of the 6-12 MeV neutrons. The combination of these two images has provided data on the size and shape of the burning plasma within the compressed capsule, as well as a measure of the quantity and spatial distribution of the cold fuel surrounding this core.

  5. A novel solution to the gated x-ray detector gain droop problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oertel, J. A. Archuleta, T. N.

    2014-11-15

    Microchannel plate (MCP), microstrip transmission line based, gated x-ray detectors used at the premier ICF laser facilities have a drop in gain as a function of mircostrip length that can be greater than 50% over 40 mm. These losses are due to ohmic losses in a microstrip coating that is less than the optimum electrical skin depth. The electrical skin depth for a copper transmission line at 3 GHz is 1.2 μm while the standard microstrip coating thickness is roughly half a single skin depth. Simply increasing the copper coating thickness would begin filling the MCP pores and limit the number of secondary electrons created in the MCP. The current coating thickness represents a compromise between gain and ohmic loss. We suggest a novel solution to the loss problem by overcoating the copper transmission line with five electrical skin depths (∼6 μm) of Beryllium. Beryllium is reasonably transparent to x-rays above 800 eV and would improve the carrier current on the transmission line. The net result should be an optically flat photocathode response with almost no measurable loss in voltage along the transmission line.

  6. Experimental and numerical investigation of shock wave propagation through complex geometry, gas continuous, two-phase media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chien-Chih Liu, J.

    1993-12-31

    The work presented here investigates the phenomenon of shock wave propagation in gas continuous, two-phase media. The motivation for this work stems from the need to understand blast venting consequences in the HYLIFE inertial confinement fusion (ICF) reactor. The HYLIFE concept utilizes lasers or heavy ion beams to rapidly heat and compress D-T targets injected into the center of a reactor chamber. A segmented blanket of falling molten lithium or Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4} (Flibe) jets encircles the reactor`s central cavity, shielding the reactor structure from radiation damage, absorbing the fusion energy, and breeding more tritium fuel. X-rays from the fusion microexplosion will ablate a thin layer of blanket material from the surfaces which face toward the fusion site. This generates a highly energetic vapor, which mostly coalesces in the central cavity. The blast expansion from the central cavity generates a shock which propagates through the segmented blanket - a complex geometry, gas-continuous two-phase medium. The impulse that the blast gives to the liquid as it vents past, the gas shock on the chamber wall, and ultimately the liquid impact on the wall are all important quantities to the HYLIFE structural designers.

  7. Vorticity dynamics after the shock–turbulence interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Livescu, Daniel; Ryu, Jaiyoung

    2015-07-23

    In this article, the interaction of a shock wave with quasi-vortical isotropic turbulence (IT) represents a basic problem for studying some of the phenomena associated with high speed flows, such as hypersonic flight, supersonic combustion and Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). In general, in practical applications, the shock width is much smaller than the turbulence scales and the upstream turbulent Mach number is modest. In this case, recent high resolution shock-resolved Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) (Ryu and Livescu, J Fluid Mech 756, R1, 2014) show that the interaction can be described by the Linear Interaction Approximation (LIA). Using LIA to alleviate the need to resolve the shock, DNS post-shock data can be generated at much higher Reynolds numbers than previously possible. Here, such results with Taylor Reynolds number approximately 180 are used to investigate the changes in the vortical structure as a function of the shock Mach number, Ms, up to Ms = 10. It is shown that, as Ms increases, the shock interaction induces a tendency towards a local axisymmetric state perpendicular to the shock front, which has a profound influence on the vortex-stretching mechanism and divergence of the Lamb vector and, ultimately, on the flow evolution away from the shock.

  8. LANL C10.2 Projects in FY13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batha, Steven H.; Fincke, James R.; Schmitt, Mark J.

    2012-06-07

    LANL has two projects in C10.2: Defect-Induced Mix Experiment (DIME) (ongoing, several runs at Omega; NIF shots this summer); and Shock/Shear (tested at Omega for two years; NIF shots in second half of FY13). Each project is jointly funded by C10.2, other C10 MTEs, and Science Campaigns. DIME is investigating 4{pi} and feature-induced mix in spherically convergent ICF implosions by using imaging of the mix layer. DIME prepared for NIF by demonstrating its PDD mix platform on Omega including imaging mid-Z doped layers and defects. DIME in FY13 will focus on PDD symmetry-dependent mix and moving burn into the mix region for validation of mix/burn models. Re-Shock and Shear are two laser-driven experiments designed to study the turbulent mixing of materials. In FY-2012 43 shear and re-shock experimental shots were executed on the OMEGA laser and a complete time history obtained for both. The FY-2013 goal is to transition the experiment to NIF where the larger scale will provide a longer time period for mix layer growth.

  9. High-density carbon ablator experiments on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacKinnon, A. J. Meezan, N. B.; Ross, J. S.; Le Pape, S.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Divol, L.; Ho, D.; Milovich, J.; Pak, A.; Ralph, J.; Döppner, T.; Patel, P. K.; Thomas, C.; Tommasini, R.; Haan, S.; MacPhee, A. G.; McNaney, J.; Caggiano, J.; Hatarik, R.; Bionta, R.; and others

    2014-05-15

    High Density Carbon (HDC) is a leading candidate as an ablator material for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) capsules in x-ray (indirect) drive implosions. HDC has a higher density (3.5 g/cc) than plastic (CH, 1 g/cc), which results in a thinner ablator with a larger inner radius for a given capsule scale. This leads to higher x-ray absorption and shorter laser pulses compared to equivalent CH designs. This paper will describe a series of experiments carried out to examine the feasibility of using HDC as an ablator using both gas filled hohlraums and lower density, near vacuum hohlraums. These experiments have shown that deuterium (DD) and deuterium-tritium gas filled HDC capsules driven by a hohlraum filled with 1.2 mg/cc He gas, produce neutron yields a factor of 2× higher than equivalent CH implosions, representing better than 50% Yield-over-Clean (YoC). In a near vacuum hohlraum (He = 0.03 mg/cc) with 98% laser-to-hohlraum coupling, such a DD gas-filled capsule performed near 1D expectations. A cryogenic layered implosion version was consistent with a fuel velocity = 410 ± 20 km/s with no observed ablator mixing into the hot spot.

  10. New compact hohlraum configuration research at the 1.7 MA Z-pinch generator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kantsyrev, V. L. Shrestha, I. K.; Esaulov, A. A.; Safronova, A. S.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Osborne, G. C.; Astanovitsky, A. L.; Weller, M. E.; Stafford, A.; Schultz, K. A.; Cooper, M. C.; Chuvatin, A. S.; Rudakov, L. I.; Velikovich, A. L.; Cuneo, M. E.; Jones, B.; Vesey, R. A.

    2014-12-15

    A new compact Z-pinch x-ray hohlraum design with parallel-driven x-ray sources was experimentally demonstrated in a full configuration with a central target and tailored shine shields (to provide a symmetric temperature distribution on the target) at the 1.7 MA Zebra generator. This presentation reports on the joint success of two independent lines of research. One of these was the development of new sources – planar wire arrays (PWAs). PWAs turned out to be a prolific radiator. Another success was the drastic improvement in energy efficiency of pulsed-power systems, such as the Load Current Multiplier (LCM). The Zebra/LCM generator almost doubled the plasma load current to 1.7 MA. The two above-mentioned innovative approaches were used in combination to produce a new compact hohlraum design for ICF, as jointly proposed by SNL and UNR. Good agreement between simulated and measured radiation temperature of the central target is shown. Experimental comparison of PWAs with planar foil liners (PFL) - another viable alternative to wire array loads at multi-MA generators show promising data. Results of research at the University of Nevada Reno allowed for the study of hohlraum coupling physics at University-scale generators. The advantages of new hohlraum design applications for multi-MA facilities with W or Au double PWAs or PFL x-ray sources are discussed.

  11. The neutron imaging diagnostic at NIF (invited)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merrill, F. E.; Clark, D. D.; Danly, C. R.; Drury, O. B.; Fatherley, V. E.; Gallegos, R.; Grim, G. P.; Guler, N.; Loomis, E. N.; Martinson, D. D.; Mares, D.; Morley, D. J.; Morgan, G. L.; Oertel, J. A.; Tregillis, I. L.; Volegov, P. L.; Wilde, C. H.; Wilson, D. C.; Bower, D.; Dzenitis, J. M.; and others

    2012-10-15

    A neutron imaging diagnostic has recently been commissioned at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This new system is an important diagnostic tool for inertial fusion studies at the NIF for measuring the size and shape of the burning DT plasma during the ignition stage of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) implosions. The imaging technique utilizes a pinhole neutron aperture, placed between the neutron source and a neutron detector. The detection system measures the two dimensional distribution of neutrons passing through the pinhole. This diagnostic has been designed to collect two images at two times. The long flight path for this diagnostic, 28 m, results in a chromatic separation of the neutrons, allowing the independently timed images to measure the source distribution for two neutron energies. Typically the first image measures the distribution of the 14 MeV neutrons and the second image of the 6-12 MeV neutrons. The combination of these two images has provided data on the size and shape of the burning plasma within the compressed capsule, as well as a measure of the quantity and spatial distribution of the cold fuel surrounding this core.

  12. Phase-contrast imaging using ultrafast x-rays in laser-shocked materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Workman, Jonathan B; Cobble, James A; Flippo, Kirk; Gautier, Donald C; Montgomery, David S; Offermann, Dustin T

    2010-01-01

    High-energy x-rays, > 10-keV, can be efficiently produced from ultrafast laser target interactions with many applications to dense target materials in Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and High-Energy Density Physics (HEDP). These same x-rays can also be applied to measurements of low-density materials inside high-density hohlraum environments. In the experiments presented, high-energy x-ray images of laser-shocked polystyrene are produced through phase contrast imaging. The plastic targets are nominally transparent to traditional x-ray absorption but show detailed features in regions of high density gradients due to refractive effects often called phase contrast imaging. The 200-TW Trident laser is used both to produce the x-ray source and to shock the polystyrene target. X-rays at 17-keV produced from 2-ps, 100-J laser interactions with a 12-micron molybdenum wire are used to produce a small source size, required for optimizing refractive effects. Shocks are driven in the 1-mm thick polystyrene target using 2-ns, 250-J, 532-nm laser drive with phase plates. X-ray images of shocks compare well to 1-D hydro calculations, HELIOS-CR.

  13. Determination of laser damage initiation probability and growth on fused silica scratches

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Norton, M A; Carr, C W; Cross, D A; Negres, R A; Bude, J D; Steele, W A; Monticelli, M V; Suratwala, T I

    2010-10-26

    Current methods for the manufacture of optical components inevitably leaves a variety of sub-surface imperfections including scratches of varying lengths and widths on even the finest finishes. It has recently been determined that these finishing imperfections are responsible for the majority of laser-induced damage for fluences typically used in ICF class lasers. We have developed methods of engineering subscale parts with a distribution of scratches mimicking those found on full scale fused silica parts. This much higher density of scratches provides a platform to measure low damage initiation probabilities sufficient to describe damage on large scale optics. In this work, damage probability per unit scratch length was characterized as a function of initial scratch width and post fabrication processing including acid-based etch mitigation processes. The susceptibility of damage initiation density along scratches was found to be strongly affected by the post etching material removal and initial scratch width. We have developed an automated processing procedure to document the damage initiations per width and per length of theses scratches. We show here how these tools can be employed to provide predictions of the performance of full size optics in laser systems operating at 351 nm. In addition we use these tools to measure the growth rate of a damage site initiated along a scratch and compare this to the growth measured on an isolated damage site.

  14. Vorticity dynamics after the shock–turbulence interaction

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Livescu, Daniel; Ryu, Jaiyoung

    2015-07-23

    In this article, the interaction of a shock wave with quasi-vortical isotropic turbulence (IT) represents a basic problem for studying some of the phenomena associated with high speed flows, such as hypersonic flight, supersonic combustion and Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). In general, in practical applications, the shock width is much smaller than the turbulence scales and the upstream turbulent Mach number is modest. In this case, recent high resolution shock-resolved Direct Numerical Simulations (DNS) (Ryu and Livescu, J Fluid Mech 756, R1, 2014) show that the interaction can be described by the Linear Interaction Approximation (LIA). Using LIA to alleviatemore » the need to resolve the shock, DNS post-shock data can be generated at much higher Reynolds numbers than previously possible. Here, such results with Taylor Reynolds number approximately 180 are used to investigate the changes in the vortical structure as a function of the shock Mach number, Ms, up to Ms = 10. It is shown that, as Ms increases, the shock interaction induces a tendency towards a local axisymmetric state perpendicular to the shock front, which has a profound influence on the vortex-stretching mechanism and divergence of the Lamb vector and, ultimately, on the flow evolution away from the shock.« less

  15. Progress toward high-gain laser fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Storm, E.

    1988-09-28

    A 1985-1986 Review of the US inertial confinement fusion program by the National Academy of Sciences concluded that five more years might be required to obtain enough data to determine the future course of the program. Since then, data from the Nova laser and from the Halite/Centurion program have resolved most of the outstanding problems identified by the NAS review. In particular, we now believe that we can produce a sufficiently uniform target; that we can keep the energy content in hot electrons and high-energy photons low enough (/approximately/1--10% of drive energy, depending on target design) and achieve enough pulse-shaping accuracy (/approximately/10%, with a dynamic range of 100:1) to keep the fuel on a near-Fermi-degenerate adiabat; that we can produce an /approximately/100-Mbar pressure pulse of sufficient uniformity (/approximately/1%), and can we control hydrodynamic instabilities so that the mix of the pusher into the hot spot is low enough to permit marginal ignition. These results are sufficiently encouraging that the US Department of Energy is planning to complete a 10-MJ laboratory microfusion facility to demonstrate high-gain ICF in the laboratory within a decade. 22 refs., 1 fig.

  16. Achieving competitive excellence in nuclear energy: The threat of proliferation; the challenge of inertial confinement fusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nuckolls, J.H.

    1994-06-01

    Nuclear energy will have an expanding role in meeting the twenty-first-century challenges of population and economic growth, energy demand, and global warming. These great challenges are non-linearly coupled and incompletely understood. In the complex global system, achieving competitive excellence for nuclear energy is a multi-dimensional challenge. The growth of nuclear energy will be driven by its margin of economic advantage, as well as by threats to energy security and by growing evidence of global warming. At the same time, the deployment of nuclear energy will be inhibited by concerns about nuclear weapons proliferation, nuclear waste and nuclear reactor safety. These drivers and inhibitors are coupled: for example, in the foreseeable future, proliferation in the Middle East may undermine energy security and increase demand for nuclear energy. The Department of Energy`s nuclear weapons laboratories are addressing many of these challenges, including nuclear weapons builddown and nonproliferation, nuclear waste storage and burnup, reactor safety and fuel enrichment, global warming, and the long-range development of fusion energy. Today I will focus on two major program areas at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL): the proliferation of nuclear weapons and the development of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) energy.

  17. Energetics of Multiple-Ion Species Hohlraum Plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neumayer, P; Berger, R; Callahan, D; Divol, L; Froula, D; London, R; MacGowan, B J; Meezan, N; Michel, P; Ross, J S; Sorce, C; Widmann, K; Suter, L; Glenzer, S H

    2007-11-05

    A study of the laser-plasma interaction processes in multiple-ion species plasmas has been performed in plasmas that are created to emulate the plasma conditions in indirect drive inertial confinement fusion targets. Gas-filled hohlraums with densities of xe22/cc are heated to Te=3keV and backscattered laser light is measured by a suite of absolutely calibrated backscatter diagnostics. Ion Landau damping is increased by adding hydrogen to the CO2/CF4 gas fill. We find that the backscatter from stimulated Brillouin scattering is reduced is monotonically reduced with increasing damping, demonstrating that Landau damping is the controlling damping mechanism in ICF relevant high-electron temperature plasmas. The reduction in backscatter is accompanied by a comparable increase in both transmission of a probe beam and an increased hohlraum radiation temperature, showing that multiple-ion species plasmas improve the overall hohlraum energetics/performance. Comparison of the experimental data to linear gain calculations as well as detailed full-scale 3D laser-plasma interaction simulations show quantitative agreement. Our findings confirm the importance of Landau damping in controlling backscatter from high-electron temperature hohlraum plasmas and have lead to the inclusion of multi-ion species plasmas in the hohlraum point design for upcoming ignition campaigns at the National Ignition Facility.

  18. Single-shot Zeff dense plasma diagnostic through simultaneous refraction and attenuation measurements with a Talbot–Lau x-ray moiré deflectometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Valdivia, M. P.; Stutman, D.; Finkenthal, M.

    2015-03-23

    The Talbot–Lau x-ray moiré deflectometer is a powerful plasma diagnostic capable of delivering simultaneous refraction and attenuation information through the accurate detection of x-ray phase shift and intensity. The diagnostic can provide the index of refraction n = 1 - δ + iβ of an object (dense plasma, for example) placed in the x-ray beam by independently measuring both δ and β, which are directly related to the electron density ne and the attenuation coefficient μ, respectively. Since δ and β depend on the effective atomic number Zeff, a map can be obtained from the ratio between phase and absorption images acquired in a single shot. The Talbot–Lau x-ray moiré deflectometer and its corresponding data acquisition and processing are briefly described to illustrate how the above is achieved; Zeff values of test objects within the 4–12 range were obtained experimentally through simultaneous refraction and attenuation measurements. We show that Zeff mapping of objects does not require previous knowledge of sample length or shape. The determination of Zeff from refraction and attenuation measurements with Moiré deflectometry could be of high interest to various domains of HED research, such as shocked materials and ICF experiments, as well as material science and NDT.

  19. The Romelt Process -- Prospects for pig iron production in North America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thompson, M.W.; Weston, T.R.

    1997-12-31

    The iron and steel industry in North America is undergoing dramatic changes and is being driven by three factors. First, the introduction of new technologies and pace of innovation has placed North America at the forefront of commercializing new technologies. Second, new technologies have changed the market for steelmaking raw materials and stimulated an industry-wide discussion of the ``value in use`` of scrap and scrap substitutes. Finally, an increase in environmental costs has fundamentally changed management`s view toward the environmental impact of iron and steelmaking, particularly in the integrated steel industry. This paper discusses the Romelt Process, an emerging ironmaking technology developed by the Moscow Institute for Steels and Alloys, in the context of these industry trends. ICF Kaiser, a worldwide licensee to the Romelt technology, believes that the current North American climate is probably the most conducive of all steelmaking regions to the commercialization of new technologies. Liquid or cast pig iron, the product of the Romelt Process, is the highest value feed for both the EAF and BOF steelmaking processes. In terms of environmental benefits, Romelt uses non-coking coals for its fuel and reductant, and has a proven large scale pilot plant track record in smelting both low grade fine ores and iron bearing wastes from the integrated works.

  20. Pulsed Power Peer Review Committee Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BLOOMQUIST, DOUGLAS D.

    2002-10-01

    In 1993, the Government Performance and Results Act (GPRA, PL 103-62) was enacted. GPRA, which applies to all federal programs, has three components: strategic plans, annual performance plans, and metrics to show how well annual plans are being followed. As part of meeting the GRPA requirement in FY2002, a 15-member external review committee chaired by Dr. Alvin Trivelpiece (the Trivelpiece Committee) was convened by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) on May 7-9, 2002 to review Sandia National Laboratories' Pulsed Power Programs as a component of the Performance Appraisal Process negotiated with the National Nuclear Security Administration of the Department of Energy (NNSA/DOE). The scope of the review included activities in high energy density physics (HEDP), inertial confinement fusion (ICF), radiation/weapon physics, the petawatt laser initiative (PW) and fast ignition, equation-of-state studies, radiation effects science and lethality, x-ray radiography, ZR development, basic research and pulsed power technology research and development, as well as electromagnetics and work for others. In his charge to the Committee, Dr. Jeffrey P. Quintenz, Director of Pulsed Power Sciences (Org. 1600) asked that the evaluation and feedback be based on three criteria: (1) quality of technical activities in science, technology, and engineering, (2) programmatic performance, management, and planning, and (3) relevance to national needs and agency missions. In addition, the director posed specific programmatic questions. The accompanying report, produced as a SAND document, is the report of the Committee's finding.

  1. National Ignition Facility project acquisition plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Callaghan, R.W.

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this National Ignition Facility Acquisition Plan is to describe the overall procurement strategy planned for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project. The scope of the plan describes the procurement activities and acquisition strategy for the following phases of the NIF Project, each of which receives either plant and capital equipment (PACE) or other project cost (OPC) funds: Title 1 and 2 design and Title 3 engineering (PACE); Optics manufacturing facilitization and pilot production (OPC); Convention facility construction (PACE); Procurement, installation, and acceptance testing of equipment (PACE); and Start-up (OPC). Activities that are part of the base Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program are not included in this plan. The University of California (UC), operating Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Lockheed-Martin, which operates Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR-LLE), will conduct the acquisition of needed products and services in support of their assigned responsibilities within the NIF Project structure in accordance with their prime contracts with the Department of Energy (DOE). LLNL, designated as the lead Laboratory, will have responsibility for all procurements required for construction, installation, activation, and startup of the NIF.

  2. Nonlinear phenomena in RF wave propagation in magnetized plasma: A review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Porkolab, Miklos

    2015-12-10

    Nonlinear phenomena in RF wave propagation has been observed from the earliest days in basic laboratory experiments going back to the 1960s [1], followed by observations of parametric instability (PDI) phenomena in large scale RF heating experiments in magnetized fusion plasmas in the 1970s and beyond [2]. Although not discussed here, the importance of PDI phenomena has also been central to understanding anomalous absorption in laser-fusion experiments (ICF) [3]. In this review I shall discuss the fundamentals of nonlinear interactions among waves and particles, and in particular, their role in PDIs. This phenomenon is distinct from quasi-linear phenomena that are often invoked in calculating absorption of RF power in wave heating experiments in the core of magnetically confined plasmas [4]. Indeed, PDIs are most likely to occur in the edge of magnetized fusion plasmas where the electron temperature is modest and hence the oscillating quiver velocity of charged particles can be comparable to their thermal speeds. Specifically, I will review important aspects of PDI theory and give examples from past experiments in the ECH/EBW, lower hybrid (LHCD) and ICRF/IBW frequency regimes. Importantly, PDI is likely to play a fundamental role in determining the so-called “density limit” in lower hybrid experiments that has persisted over the decades and still central to understanding present day experiments [5-7].

  3. Lasers, extreme UV and soft X-ray

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nilsen, Joseph

    2015-09-20

    Three decades ago, large ICF lasers that occupied entire buildings were used as the energy sources to drive the first X-ray lasers. Today X-ray lasers are tabletop, spatially coherent, high-repetition rate lasers that enable many of the standard optical techniques such as interferometry to be extended to the soft X-ray regime between wavelengths of 10 and 50 nm. Over the last decade X-ray laser performance has been improved by the use of the grazing incidence geometry, diode-pumped solid-state lasers, and seeding techniques. The dominant X-ray laser schemes are the monopole collisional excitation lasers either driven by chirped pulse amplification (CPA) laser systems or capillary discharge. The CPA systems drive lasing in neon-like or nickel-like ions, typically in the 10 – 30 nm range, while the capillary system works best for neon-like argon at 46.9 nm. Most researchers use nickel-like ion lasers near 14 nm because they are well matched to the Mo:Si multilayer mirrors that have peak reflectivity near 13 nm and are used in many applications. As a result, the last decade has seen the birth of the X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) that can reach wavelengths down to 0.15 nm and the inner-shell Ne laser at 1.46 nm.

  4. Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978: Natural Gas Rate Design Study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1980-05-01

    First, the comments on May 3, 1979 Notice of Inquiry of DOE relating to the Gas Utility Rate Design Study Required by Section 306 of PURPA are presented. Then, comments on the following are included: (1) ICF Gas Utility Model, Gas Utility Model Data Outputs, Scenario Design; (2) Interim Model Development Report with Example Case Illustrations; (3) Interim Report on Simulation of Seven Rate Forms; (4) Methodology for Assessing the Impacts of Alternative Rate Designs on Industrial Energy Use; (5) Simulation of Marginal-Cost-Based Natural Gas Rates; and (6) Preliminary Discussion Draft of the Gas Rate Design Study. Among the most frequent comments expressed were the following: (a) the public should be given the opportunity to review the final report prior to its submission to Congress; (b) results based on a single computer model of only four hypothetical utility situations cannot be used for policy-making purposes for individual companies or the entire gas industry; (c) there has been an unobjective treatment of traditional and economic cost rate structures; the practical difficulties and potential detrimental consequences of economic cost rates are not fully disclosed; and (d) it is erroneous to assume that end users, particularly residential customers, are influenced by price signals in the rate structure, as opposed to the total bill.

  5. LLE review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keck, R.L.

    1991-01-01

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period October-December 1991, contains articles on the analysis of argon-filled target experiments, and a theoretical analysis of the impact of nonlocal heat transport in laser filamentation in plasmas. In the Advanced Technology section there is an article on mechanisms that affect thin-film conductivity, and a report on the gain characteristics of the 20-cm SSA prototype amplifier to be used in the OMEGA Upgrade. Finally, the activities of the National Laser Users Facility and the GDL and OMEGA laser facilities are summarized. Highlights of the research reported in this issue are: argon radiation from argon-filled, polymer-shell targets is used as a core-temperature diagnostic and density diagnostic of the surrounding region in a regime where the argon line radiation is strongly absorbed. A theoretical analysis of the impact of nonlocal heat transport on laser filamentation in plasmas is developed. The resulting model is compared with experimental observations and the implications for ICF are discussed. A study of thermal conductivity in thin films seeks to identify mechanisms that result in degradation of thin-film conductivity. Identifying these mechanisms can lead to changes in the thin-film manufacture that will improve their resistance to laser damage.

  6. LLE review. Quarterly report, October--December 1991: Volume 49

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Keck, R.L.

    1991-12-31

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering the period October-December 1991, contains articles on the analysis of argon-filled target experiments, and a theoretical analysis of the impact of nonlocal heat transport in laser filamentation in plasmas. In the Advanced Technology section there is an article on mechanisms that affect thin-film conductivity, and a report on the gain characteristics of the 20-cm SSA prototype amplifier to be used in the OMEGA Upgrade. Finally, the activities of the National Laser Users Facility and the GDL and OMEGA laser facilities are summarized. Highlights of the research reported in this issue are: argon radiation from argon-filled, polymer-shell targets is used as a core-temperature diagnostic and density diagnostic of the surrounding region in a regime where the argon line radiation is strongly absorbed. A theoretical analysis of the impact of nonlocal heat transport on laser filamentation in plasmas is developed. The resulting model is compared with experimental observations and the implications for ICF are discussed. A study of thermal conductivity in thin films seeks to identify mechanisms that result in degradation of thin-film conductivity. Identifying these mechanisms can lead to changes in the thin-film manufacture that will improve their resistance to laser damage.

  7. Inertial confinement fusion reaction chamber and power conversion system study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maya, I.; Schultz, K.R.; Battaglia, J.M.; Buksa, J.J.; Creedson, R.L.; Erlandson, O.D.; Levine, H.E.; Roelant, D.F.; Sanchez, H.W.; Schrader, S.A.

    1984-09-01

    GA Technologies has developed a conceptual ICF reactor system based on the Cascade rotating-bed reaction chamber concept. Unique features of the system design include the use of low activation SiC in a reaction chamber constructed of box-shaped tiles held together in compression by prestressing tendons to the vacuum chamber. Circulating Li/sub 2/O granules serve as the tritium breeding and energy transport material, cascading down the sides of the reaction chamber to the power conversion system. The total tritium inventory of the system is 6 kg; tritium recovery is accomplished directly from the granules via the vacuum system. A system for centrifugal throw transport of the hot Li/sub 2/O granules from the reaction chamber to the power conversion system has been developed. A number of issues were evaluated during the course of this study. These include the response of first-layer granules to the intense microexplosion surface heat flux, cost effective fabrication of Li/sub 2/O granules, tritium inventory and recovery issues, the thermodynamics of solids-flow options, vacuum versus helium-medium heat transfer, and the tradeoffs of capital cost versus efficiency for alternate heat exchange and power conversion system option. The resultant design options appear to be economically competitive, safe, and environmentally attractive.

  8. Lasers, extreme UV and soft X-ray

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Nilsen, Joseph

    2015-09-20

    Three decades ago, large ICF lasers that occupied entire buildings were used as the energy sources to drive the first X-ray lasers. Today X-ray lasers are tabletop, spatially coherent, high-repetition rate lasers that enable many of the standard optical techniques such as interferometry to be extended to the soft X-ray regime between wavelengths of 10 and 50 nm. Over the last decade X-ray laser performance has been improved by the use of the grazing incidence geometry, diode-pumped solid-state lasers, and seeding techniques. The dominant X-ray laser schemes are the monopole collisional excitation lasers either driven by chirped pulse amplification (CPA)more » laser systems or capillary discharge. The CPA systems drive lasing in neon-like or nickel-like ions, typically in the 10 – 30 nm range, while the capillary system works best for neon-like argon at 46.9 nm. Most researchers use nickel-like ion lasers near 14 nm because they are well matched to the Mo:Si multilayer mirrors that have peak reflectivity near 13 nm and are used in many applications. As a result, the last decade has seen the birth of the X-ray free electron laser (XFEL) that can reach wavelengths down to 0.15 nm and the inner-shell Ne laser at 1.46 nm.« less

  9. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) Diagnostic Set at the Completion of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) September 2013

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kilkenny, J.; Bell, P. E.; Bradley, D. K.; Bleuel, D. L.; Caggiano, J. A.; Dewald, E. L.; Hsing, W.; Kalantar, H.; Kauffman, R.; Moody, J. D.; Schneider, M. B.; Shaughnessy, D. A.; Shelton, R. T.; Yeamans, C. B.; Batha, S. H.; Grim, G. P.; Herrmann, H. W.; Merrill, F. E.; Leeper, R. J.; Sangster, T. C.; Edgell, D. H.; Glebov, V. Y.; Regan, S. P.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Petrasso, R. D.; Rindernecht, H. G.; Zylstra, A. B.; Cooper, G. W.; Ruiz, C.

    2015-01-05

    At the completion of the National Ignition Campaign NIF had about 36 different types of diagnostics. These were based on several decades of development on Nova and OMEGA and involved the whole US ICF community. A plan for a limited of NIF Diagnostics was documented by the Joint Central Diagnostic Team in the NIF Conceptual Design Report in 1994. These diagnostics and many more were installed diagnostics by two decades later. We give a short description of each of the 36 different types of NIC diagnostics grouped by the function of the diagnostics, namely target drive, target response and target assembly, stagnation and burn. A comparison of NIF diagnostics with the Nova diagnostics shows that the NIF diagnostic capability is broadly equivalent to that of Nova’s in 1999. NIF diagnostics have a much greater degree of automation and rigor than Nova’s and the NIF diagnostic suite incorporates some scientific innovation compared to Nova and OMEGA namely one much higher speed x-ray imager. Directions for future NIF diagnostics are discussed.

  10. High-density carbon ablator experiments on the National Ignition Facilitya)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacKinnon, A. J.; Meezan, N. B.; Ross, J. S.; Le Pape, S.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Divol, L.; Ho, D.; Milovich, J.; Pak, A.; Ralph, J.; Döppner, T.; Patel, P. K.; Thomas, C.; Tommasini, R.; Haan, S.; MacPhee, A. G.; McNaney, J.; Caggiano, J.; Hatarik, R.; Bionta, R.; Ma, T.; Spears, B.; Rygg, J. R.; Benedetti, L. R.; Town, R. P. J.; Bradley, D. K.; Dewald, E. L.; Fittinghoff, D.; Jones, O. S.; Robey, H. R.; Moody, J. D.; Khan, S.; Callahan, D. A.; Hamza, A.; Biener, J.; Celliers, P. M.; Braun, D. G.; Erskine, D. J.; Prisbrey, S. T.; Wallace, R. J.; Kozioziemski, B.; Dylla-Spears, R.; Sater, J.; Collins, G.; Storm, E.; Hsing, W.; Landen, O.; Atherton, J. L.; Lindl, J. D.; Edwards, M. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu-Johnson, M.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R.; Rinderknecht, H.; Rosenberg, M.; Séguin, F. H.; Zylstra, A.; Knauer, J. P.; Grim, G.; Guler, N.; Merrill, F.; Olson, R.; Kyrala, G. A.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Nikroo, A.; Moreno, K.; Hoover, D. E.; Wild, C.; Werner, E.

    2014-05-01

    High Density Carbon (HDC) is a leading candidate as an ablator material for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) capsules in x-ray (indirect) drive implosions. HDC has a higher density (3.5 g/cc) than plastic (CH, 1 g/cc), which results in a thinner ablator with a larger inner radius for a given capsule scale. This leads to higher x-ray absorption and shorter laser pulses compared to equivalent CH designs. This paper will describe a series of experiments carried out to examine the feasibility of using HDC as an ablator using both gas filled hohlraums and lower density, near vacuum hohlraums. These experiments have shown that deuterium (DD) and deuterium-tritium gas filled HDC capsules driven by a hohlraum filled with 1.2 mg/cc He gas, produce neutron yields a factor of 2× higher than equivalent CH implosions, representing better than 50% Yield-over-Clean (YoC). In a near vacuum hohlraum (He = 0.03 mg/cc) with 98% laser-to-hohlraum coupling, such a DD gas-filled capsule performed near 1D expectations. A cryogenic layered implosion version was consistent with a fuel velocity = 410 ± 20 km/s with no observed ablator mixing into the hot spot.

  11. Direct-drive inertial confinement fusion: A review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craxton, R. S.; Anderson, K. S.; Boehly, T. R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Harding, D. R.; Knauer, J. P.; McKenty, P. W.; Myatt, J. F.; Short, R. W.; Skupsky, S.; Theobald, W.; Collins, T. J. B.; Delettrez, J. A.; Hu, S. X.; Marozas, J. A.; Maximov, A. V.; Michel, D. T.; Radha, P. B.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; and others

    2015-11-15

    The direct-drive, laser-based approach to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is reviewed from its inception following the demonstration of the first laser to its implementation on the present generation of high-power lasers. The review focuses on the evolution of scientific understanding gained from target-physics experiments in many areas, identifying problems that were demonstrated and the solutions implemented. The review starts with the basic understanding of laser–plasma interactions that was obtained before the declassification of laser-induced compression in the early 1970s and continues with the compression experiments using infrared lasers in the late 1970s that produced thermonuclear neutrons. The problem of suprathermal electrons and the target preheat that they caused, associated with the infrared laser wavelength, led to lasers being built after 1980 to operate at shorter wavelengths, especially 0.35 μm—the third harmonic of the Nd:glass laser—and 0.248 μm (the KrF gas laser). The main physics areas relevant to direct drive are reviewed. The primary absorption mechanism at short wavelengths is classical inverse bremsstrahlung. Nonuniformities imprinted on the target by laser irradiation have been addressed by the development of a number of beam-smoothing techniques and imprint-mitigation strategies. The effects of hydrodynamic instabilities are mitigated by a combination of imprint reduction and target designs that minimize the instability growth rates. Several coronal plasma physics processes are reviewed. The two-plasmon–decay instability, stimulated Brillouin scattering (together with cross-beam energy transfer), and (possibly) stimulated Raman scattering are identified as potential concerns, placing constraints on the laser intensities used in target designs, while other processes (self-focusing and filamentation, the parametric decay instability, and magnetic fields), once considered important, are now of lesser concern for mainline

  12. Direct-drive inertial confinement fusion: A review

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Craxton, R. S.; Anderson, K. S.; Boehly, T. R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Harding, D. R.; Knauer, J. P.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Myatt, J. F.; et al

    2015-11-25

    In this study, the direct-drive, laser-based approach to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is reviewed from its inception following the demonstration of the first laser to its implementation on the present generation of high-power lasers. The review focuses on the evolution of scientific understanding gained from target-physics experiments in many areas, identifying problems that were demonstrated and the solutions implemented. The review starts with the basic understanding of laser–plasma interactions that was obtained before the declassification of laser-induced compression in the early 1970s and continues with the compression experiments using infrared lasers in the late 1970s that produced thermonuclear neutrons. Themore » problem of suprathermal electrons and the target preheat that they caused, associated with the infrared laser wavelength, led to lasers being built after 1980 to operate at shorter wavelengths, especially 0.35 um—the third harmonic of the Nd:glass laser—and 0.248 um (the KrF gas laser). The main physics areas relevant to direct drive are reviewed. The primary absorption mechanism at short wavelengths is classical inverse bremsstrahlung. Nonuniformities imprinted on the target by laser irradiation have been addressed by the development of a number of beam-smoothing techniques and imprint-mitigation strategies. The effects of hydrodynamic instabilities are mitigated by a combination of imprint reduction and target designs that minimize the instability growth rates. Several coronal plasma physics processes are reviewed. The two-plasmon–decay instability, stimulated Brillouin scattering (together with cross-beam energy transfer), and (possibly) stimulated Raman scattering are identified as potential concerns, placing constraints on the laser intensities used in target designs, while other processes (self-focusing and filamentation, the parametric decay instability, and magnetic fields), once considered important, are now of lesser

  13. 44th Annual Anomalous Absorption Conference

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beg, Farhat

    2014-03-03

    Conference Grant Report July 14, 2015 Submitted to the U. S. Department of Energy Attn: Dr. Sean Finnegan By the University of California, San Diego 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, California 92093 On behalf of the 44th Annual Anomalous Absorption Conference 8-13 June 2014, in Estes Park, Colorado Support Requested: $10,100 Amount expended: $3,216.14 Performance Period: 1 March 20 14 to 28 February 20 15 Principal Investigator Dr. Farhat Beg Center for Energy Research University of California, San Diego 9500 Gilman Drive La Jolla, California 92093-0417 858-822-1266 (telephone) 858-534-4543 (fax) fbeg@ucsd.edu Administrative Point of Contact: Brandi Pate, 858-534-0851, blpate®ucsd.edu I. Background The forty-fourth Anomalous Absorption Conference was held in Estes Park, Colorado from June 5-8, 2014 (aac2014.ucsd.edu). The first Anomalous Absorption Conference was held in 1971 to assemble experts in the poorly understood area of laser-plasma absorption. The goal of that conference was to address the anomalously large laser absorption seen in plasma experiments with respect to the laser absorption predicted by linear plasma theory. Great progress in this research area has been made in the decades since that first meeting, due in part to the scientific interactions that have occurred annually at this conference. Specifically, this includes the development of nonlinear laser-plasma theory and the simulation of laser interactions with plasmas. Each summer since that first meeting, this week-long conference has been held at unique locations in North America as a scientific forum for intense scientific exchanges relevant to the interaction of laser radiation with plasmas. Responsibility for organizing the conference has traditional rotated each year between the major Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) laboratories and universities including LANL, LLNL, LLE, UCLA UC Davis and NRL. As the conference has matured over the past four decades, its technical footprint has expanded

  14. An Analytical Impact Assessment Framework for Wildlife to Inform the Siting and Permitting of Wind Energy Facilities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwartz, Jesse D.M.

    2013-01-01

    In the United States overall electrical generation capacity is expected to increase by 10-25 gigawatts (GW) per year to meet increases in demand. Wind energy is a key component of state and federal renewable energy standards, and central to the Department of Energy’s 20% by 2030 wind production goals. Increased wind energy development may present increased resource conflict with avian wildlife, and environmental permitting has been identified as a potential obstacle to expansion in the sector. ICF developed an analytical framework to help applicants and agencies examine potential impacts in support of facility siting and permitting. A key objective of our work was to develop a framework that is scalable from the local to the national level, and one that is generalizable across the different scales at which biological communities operate – from local influences to meta-populations. The intent was to allow natural resource managers to estimate the cumulative impacts of turbine strikes and habitat changes on long-term population performance in the context of a species demography, genetic potential, and life history. We developed three types of models based on our literature review and participation in the scientific review processes. First, the conceptual model was developed as a general description of the analytical framework. Second, we developed the analytical framework based on the relationships between concepts, and the functions presented in the scientific literature. Third, we constructed an application of the model by parameterizing the framework using data from and relevant to the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area (APWRA), and an existing golden eagle population model. We developed managed source code, database create statements, and written documentation to allow for the reproduction of each phase of the analysis. ICF identified a potential template adaptive management system in the form of the US Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) Adaptive Harvest

  15. Direct-drive inertial confinement fusion: A review

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Craxton, R. S.; Anderson, K. S.; Boehly, T. R.; Goncharov, V. N.; Harding, D. R.; Knauer, J. P.; McCrory, R. L.; McKenty, P. W.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Myatt, J. F.; Schmitt, A. J.; Sethian, J. D.; Short, R. W.; Skupsky, S.; Theobald, W.; Kruer, W. L.; Tanaka, K.; Betti, R.; Collins, T. J. B.; Delettrez, J. A.; Hu, S. X.; Marozas, J. A.; Maximov, A. V.; Michel, D. T.; Radha, P. B.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Seka, W.; Solodov, A. A.; Soures, J. M.; Stoeckl, C.; Zuegel, J. D.

    2015-11-25

    In this study, the direct-drive, laser-based approach to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) is reviewed from its inception following the demonstration of the first laser to its implementation on the present generation of high-power lasers. The review focuses on the evolution of scientific understanding gained from target-physics experiments in many areas, identifying problems that were demonstrated and the solutions implemented. The review starts with the basic understanding of laser–plasma interactions that was obtained before the declassification of laser-induced compression in the early 1970s and continues with the compression experiments using infrared lasers in the late 1970s that produced thermonuclear neutrons. The problem of suprathermal electrons and the target preheat that they caused, associated with the infrared laser wavelength, led to lasers being built after 1980 to operate at shorter wavelengths, especially 0.35 um—the third harmonic of the Nd:glass laser—and 0.248 um (the KrF gas laser). The main physics areas relevant to direct drive are reviewed. The primary absorption mechanism at short wavelengths is classical inverse bremsstrahlung. Nonuniformities imprinted on the target by laser irradiation have been addressed by the development of a number of beam-smoothing techniques and imprint-mitigation strategies. The effects of hydrodynamic instabilities are mitigated by a combination of imprint reduction and target designs that minimize the instability growth rates. Several coronal plasma physics processes are reviewed. The two-plasmon–decay instability, stimulated Brillouin scattering (together with cross-beam energy transfer), and (possibly) stimulated Raman scattering are identified as potential concerns, placing constraints on the laser intensities used in target designs, while other processes (self-focusing and filamentation, the parametric decay instability, and magnetic fields), once considered important, are now of lesser concern for

  16. The National Ignition Facility and the Path to Fusion Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moses, E

    2011-07-26

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is operational and conducting experiments at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental facility with 192 beams capable of delivering 1.8 megajoules of 500-terawatt ultraviolet laser energy, over 60 times more energy than any previous laser system. The NIF can create temperatures of more than 100 million degrees and pressures more than 100 billion times Earth's atmospheric pressure. These conditions, similar to those at the center of the sun, have never been created in the laboratory and will allow scientists to probe the physics of planetary interiors, supernovae, black holes, and other phenomena. The NIF's laser beams are designed to compress fusion targets to the conditions required for thermonuclear burn, liberating more energy than is required to initiate the fusion reactions. Experiments on the NIF are focusing on demonstrating fusion ignition and burn via inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The ignition program is conducted via the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) - a partnership among LLNL, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics, and General Atomics. The NIC program has also established collaborations with the Atomic Weapons Establishment in the United Kingdom, Commissariat a Energie Atomique in France, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and many others. Ignition experiments have begun that form the basis of the overall NIF strategy for achieving ignition. Accomplishing this goal will demonstrate the feasibility of fusion as a source of limitless, clean energy for the future. This paper discusses the current status of the NIC, the experimental steps needed toward achieving ignition and the steps required to demonstrate and enable the delivery of fusion energy as a viable carbon-free energy source.

  17. Shell stability and conditions analyzed using a new method of extracting shell areal density maps from spectrally resolved images of direct-drive inertial confinement fusion implosions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Johns, H. M.; Mancini, R. C.; Nagayama, T.; Mayes, D. C.; Tommasini, R.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Regan, S. P.; Delettrez, J. A.

    2016-01-25

    In warm target direct-drive ICF implosion experiments performed at the OMEGA laser facility, plastic microballoons doped with a titanium tracer layer in the shell and filled with deuterium gas were imploded using a low-adiabat shaped laser pulse. Continuum radiation emitted in the core is transmitted through the tracer layer and the resulting spectrum recorded with a gated multi-monochromatic x-ray imager (MMI). Titanium K-shell line absorption spectra observed in the data are due to transitions in L-shell titanium ions driven by the backlighting continuum. The MMI data consist of an array of spectrally resolved images of the implosion. These 2-D space-resolvedmore » titanium spectral features constrain the plasma conditions and areal density of the titanium doped region of the shell. The MMI data were processed to obtain narrow-band images and space resolved spectra of titanium spectral features. Shell areal density maps, ρL(x,y), extracted using a new method using both narrow-band images and space resolved spectra are confirmed to be consistent within uncertainties. We report plasma conditions in the titanium-doped region of electron temperature (Te) = 400±28eV, electron number density (Ne) = 8.5x1024±2.5x1024 cm-3, and average areal density <ρR> = 86±7mg/cm2. Fourier analysis of areal density maps reveals shell modulations caused by hydrodynamic instability growth near the fuel-shell interface in the deceleration phase. We observe significant structure in modes l = 2-9, dominated by l = 2. We extract a target breakup fraction of 7.1±1.5% from our Fourier analysis. A new method for estimating mix width is evaluated against existing literature and our target breakup fraction. We estimate a mix width of 10.5±1μm.« less

  18. Roughness Optimization at High Modes for GDP CHx Microshells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Theobald, M.; Dumay, B.; Chicanne, C.; Barnouin, J.; Legaie, O.; Baclet, P.

    2004-03-15

    For the ''Megajoule'' Laser (LMJ) facility of the CEA, amorphous hydrogenated carbon (a-C:H) is the nominal ablator to be used for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments. These capsules contain the fusible deuterium-tritium mixture to achieve ignition. Coatings are prepared by glow discharge polymerization (GDP) with trans-2-butene and hydrogen. The films properties have been investigated. Laser fusion targets must have optimized characteristics: a diameter of about 2.4 mm for LMJ targets, a thickness up to 175 {mu}m, a sphericity and a thickness concentricity better than 99% and an outer and an inner roughness lower than 20 nm at high modes. The surface finish of these laser fusion targets must be extremely smooth to minimize hydrodynamic instabilities.Movchan and Demchishin, and later Thornton introduced a structure zone model (SZM) based on both evaporated and sputtered metals. They investigated the influence of base temperature and the sputtering gas pressure on structure and properties of thick polycrystalline coatings of nickel, titanium, tungsten, aluminum oxide. An original cross-sectional analysis by atomic force microscopy (AFM) allows amorphous materials characterization and permits to make an analogy between the amorphous GDP material and the existing model (SZM). The purpose of this work is to understand the relationship between the deposition parameters, the growing structures and the surface roughness.The coating structure as a function of deposition parameters was first studied on plane silicon substrates and then optimized on PAMS shells. By adjusting the coating parameters, the structures are modified, and in some case, the high modes roughness decreases dramatically.

  19. An Invariant-Preserving ALE Method for Solids under Extreme Conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sambasivan, Shiv Kumar; Christon, Mark A

    2012-07-17

    We are proposing a fundamentally new approach to ALE methods for solids undergoing large deformation due to extreme loading conditions. Our approach is based on a physically-motivated and mathematically rigorous construction of the underlying Lagrangian method, vector/tensor reconstruction, remapping, and interface reconstruction. It is transformational because it deviates dramatically from traditionally accepted ALE methods and provides the following set of unique attributes: (1) a three-dimensional, finite volume, cell-centered ALE framework with advanced hypo-/hyper-elasto-plastic constitutive theories for solids; (2) a new physically and mathematically consistent reconstruction method for vector/tensor fields; (3) advanced invariant-preserving remapping algorithm for vector/tensor quantities; (4) moment-of-fluid (MoF) interface reconstruction technique for multi-material problems with solids undergoing large deformations. This work brings together many new concepts, that in combination with emergent cell-centered Lagrangian hydrodynamics methods will produce a cutting-edge ALE capability and define a new state-of-the-art. Many ideas in this work are new, completely unexplored, and hence high risk. The proposed research and the resulting algorithms will be of immediate use in Eulerian, Lagrangian and ALE codes under the ASC program at the lab. In addition, the research on invariant preserving reconstruction/remap of tensor quantities is of direct interest to ongoing CASL and climate modeling efforts at LANL. The application space impacted by this work includes Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF), Z-pinch, munition-target interactions, geological impact dynamics, shock processing of powders and shaped charges. The ALE framework will also provide a suitable test-bed for rapid development and assessment of hypo-/hyper-elasto-plastic constitutive theories. Today, there are no invariant-preserving ALE algorithms for treating solids with large deformations. Therefore

  20. Radiation sources with planar wire arrays and planar foils for inertial confinement fusion and high energy density physics research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kantsyrev, V. L.; Safronova, A. S.; Esaulov, A. A.; Shrestha, I.; Astanovitsky, A.; Osborne, G. C.; Shlyaptseva, V. V.; Weller, M. E.; Keim, S.; Stafford, A.; Cooper, M.; Chuvatin, A. S.; Rudakov, L. I.; Velikovich, A. L.

    2014-03-15

    This article reports on the joint success of two independent lines of research, each of them being a multi-year international effort. One of these is the development of innovative sources, such as planar wire arrays (PWAs). PWAs turned out to be a prolific radiator, which act mainly as a resistor, even though the physical mechanism of efficient magnetic energy conversion into radiation still remains unclear. We review the results of our extensive studies of PWAs. We also report the new results of the experimental comparison PWAs with planar foil liners (another promising alternative to wire array loads at multi-mega-ampere generators). Pioneered at UNR, the PWA Z-pinch loads have later been tested at the Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) on the Saturn generator, on GIT-12 machine in Russia, and on the QiangGuang-1 generator in China, always successfully. Another of these is the drastic improvement in energy efficiency of pulsed-power systems, which started in early 1980s with Zucker's experiments at Naval Research Laboratory (NRL). Successful continuation of this approach was the Load Current Multiplier (LCM) proposed by Chuvatin in collaboration with Rudakov and Weber from NRL. The 100?ns LCM was integrated into the Zebra generator, which almost doubled the plasma load current, from 0.9 to 1.7 MA. The two above-mentioned innovative approaches were used in combination to produce a new compact hohlraum radiation source for ICF, as jointly proposed by SNL and UNR [Jones et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 125001 (2010)]. The first successful proof-of-the-principle experimental implementation of new hohlraum concept at university-scale generator Zebra/LCM is demonstrated. A numerical simulation capability with VisRaD code (from PRISM Co.) established at UNR allowed for the study of hohlraum coupling physics and provides the possibility of optimization of a new hohlraum. Future studies are discussed.

  1. Identification and Removal of High Frequency Temporal Noise in a Nd:YAG Macro-Pulse Laser Assisted with a Diagnostic Streak Camera

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kent Marlett, Bechtel Nevada; Ke-Xun Sun Bechtel Nevada

    2004-09-23

    This paper discusses the use of a reference streak camera (SC) to diagnose laser performance and guide modifications to remove high frequency noise from Bechtel Nevada's long-pulse laser. The upgraded laser exhibits less than 0.1% high frequency noise in cumulative spectra, exceeding National Ignition Facility (NIF) calibration specifications. Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiments require full characterization of streak cameras over a wide range of sweep speeds (10 ns to 480 ns). This paradigm of metrology poses stringent spectral requirements on the laser source for streak camera calibration. Recently, Bechtel Nevada worked with a laser vendor to develop a high performance, multi-wavelength Nd:YAG laser to meet NIF calibration requirements. For a typical NIF streak camera with a 4096 x 4096 pixel CCD, the flat field calibration at 30 ns requires a smooth laser spectrum over 33 MHz to 68 GHz. Streak cameras are the appropriate instrumentation for measuring laser amplitude noise at these very high frequencies since the upper end spectral content is beyond the frequency response of typical optoelectronic detectors for a single shot pulse. The SC was used to measure a similar laser at its second harmonic wavelength (532 nm), to establish baseline spectra for testing signal analysis algorithms. The SC was then used to measure the new custom calibration laser. In both spatial-temporal measurements and cumulative spectra, 6-8 GHz oscillations were identified. The oscillations were found to be caused by inter-surface reflections between amplifiers. Additional variations in the SC spectral data were found to result from temperature instabilities in the seeding laser. Based on these findings, laser upgrades were made to remove the high frequency noise from the laser output.

  2. Time-resolved characterization and energy balance analysis of implosion core in shock-ignition experiments at OMEGA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Florido, R. Mancini, R. C.; Nagayama, T.; Tommasini, R.; Delettrez, J. A.; Regan, S. P.

    2014-10-15

    Time-resolved temperature and density conditions in the core of shock-ignition implosions have been determined for the first time. The diagnostic method relies on the observation, with a streaked crystal spectrometer, of the signature of an Ar tracer added to the deuterium gas fill. The data analysis confirms the importance of the shell attenuation effect previously noted on time-integrated spectroscopic measurements of thick-wall targets [R. Florido et al., Phys. Rev. E 83, 066408 (2011)]. This effect must be taken into account in order to obtain reliable results. The extracted temperature and density time-histories are representative of the state of the core during the implosion deceleration and burning phases. As a consequence of the ignitor shock launched by the sharp intensity spike at the end of the laser pulse, observed average core electron temperature and mass density reach T ∼ 1100 eV and ρ ∼ 2 g/cm{sup 3}; then temperature drops to T ∼ 920 eV while density rises to ρ ∼ 3.4 g/cm{sup 3} about the time of peak compression. Compared to 1D hydrodynamic simulations, the experiment shows similar maximum temperatures and smaller densities. Simulations do not reproduce all observations. Differences are noted in the heating dynamics driven by the ignitor shock and the optical depth time-history of the compressed shell. Time-histories of core conditions extracted from spectroscopy show that the implosion can be interpreted as a two-stage polytropic process. Furthermore, an energy balance analysis of implosion core suggests an increase in total energy greater than what 1D hydrodynamic simulations predict. This new methodology can be implemented in other ICF experiments to look into implosion dynamics and help to understand the underlying physics.

  3. LLNL Contribution to LLE FY09 Annual Report: NIC and HED Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Heeter, R F; Landen, O L; Hsing, W W; Fournier, K B

    2009-10-01

    In FY09, LLNL led 238 target shots on the OMEGA Laser System. Approximately half of these LLNL-led shots supported the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The remainder was dedicated to experiments for the high-energy-density stewardship experiments (HEDSE). Objectives of the LLNL led NIC campaigns at OMEGA included: (1) Laser-plasma interaction studies in physical conditions relevant for the NIF ignition targets; (2) Demonstration of Tr = 100 eV foot symmetry tuning using a reemission sphere; (3) X-ray scattering in support of conductivity measurements of solid density Be plasmas; (4) Experiments to study the physical properties (thermal conductivity) of shocked fusion fuels; (5) High-resolution measurements of velocity nonuniformities created by microscopic perturbations in NIF ablator materials; (6) Development of a novel Compton Radiography diagnostic platform for ICF experiments; and (7) Precision validation of the equation of state for quartz. The LLNL HEDSE campaigns included the following experiments: (1) Quasi-isentropic (ICE) drive used to study material properties such as strength, equation of state, phase, and phase-transition kinetics under high pressure; (2) Development of a high-energy backlighter for radiography in support of material strength experiments using Omega EP and the joint OMEGA-OMEGA-EP configuration; (3) Debris characterization from long-duration, point-apertured, point-projection x-ray backlighters for NIF radiation transport experiments; (4) Demonstration of ultrafast temperature and density measurements with x-ray Thomson scattering from short-pulse laser-heated matter; (5) The development of an experimental platform to study nonlocal thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) physics using direct-drive implosions; (6) Opacity studies of high-temperature plasmas under LTE conditions; and (7) Characterization of copper (Cu) foams for HEDSE experiments.

  4. Mechanical failure characterization of optical components caused by laser induced damage initiated at contaminants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Faux, D. R., LLNL

    1997-12-01

    The goal of this research is to quantify by numerical techniques the effects of surface and subsurface absorbing defects on damage initiation and growth in high power laser optical components. The defects include laser absorbing spots (e.g., surface particulate contamination) and surface damage regions (e.g., micro-cracks and voids) which are present due to environmental exposure and fabrication processes. This report focuses on three sources of contamination that can cause damage to optical components: (1) Front surface particle contamination, (2) Back surface particle contamination, and (3) Subsurface particle contamination. The DYNA2D (non-linear structural mechanics) code was used to model the growth of damage in the glass substrate. The damage in the nominally transparent glass substrate as a result of front surface particle contamination was found to be dependent on the magnitude of the resultant pressure pulse applied to the particle and the initial area of contact between the particle and glass substrate. The pressures generated from a back surface particle being blown off the surface provided sufficient loading to severely damage (crack) the glass substrate. A subsurface Ceria dioxide particle showed a strong surface interaction that influenced the formation and direction of the damage (cracking) that ultimately resulted in the blow-out of the damaged material leaving a relatively clean crater in the glass. Crater shape and size was determined. Since fused silica is the most transparent, and therefore laser damage resistant, of the optical materials, it is used for the most at-risk optical elements. The present studies are for a fused silica substrate. Some oxides such as Ceria are transparent in the infrared and visible, but absorbing in the UV part of the spectrum. Because ICF lasers like NIF use frequency tripling, effects of such oxides must be included.

  5. Status of target physics for inertial confinement fusion: Report on the review at DOE Headquarters, Germantown, MD on November 14--17, 1988

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-03-09

    A four day review to assess the status of target physics of inertial confinement fusion was held at US Department of Energy (DOE) Headquarters on November 14--17, 1988. This review completes the current series of reviews of the inertial fusion program elements to assess the status of the data base for a decision to proceed with the proposed Laboratory Microfusion Facility (LMF) that is being planned. In addition to target physics, the program elements that have been reviewed previously include the driver technology development for KrF and solid-state lasers, and the light-on beam pulsed power system. This series of reviews was undertaken for internal DOE assessment in anticipation of the ICF program review mandated by the Congress in 1988 to be completed in 1990 to assess the significance and implications of the progress that has been realized in the laboratory and the underground Halite/Centurion experiments. For this target physics review, both the direct and the indirect drive approaches were considered. The principal issues addressed in this review were: Is the present target physics data base adequate for a decision to proceed with design and construction of LMF now as opposed to continue planning activities at this time What specific additional target physics data are desirable to reduce the risk for a DOE decision to construct an LMF What is the role for continuation of Halite/Centurion experiments What priority should be given to the direct drive approach Are the program elements optimally structured to resolve the critical issues for an LMF decision Specific findings relating to these five issues are summarized in the following.

  6. Configuring the National Ignition Facility for direct-drive experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eimerl, D.

    1995-07-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a project whose primary mission is to provide an above-ground experimental capability for maintaining nuclear competence and weapons effects simulation, and to pursue the achievement of fusion ignition utilizing solid state lasers as the energy driver. In this facility a large number of laser beams are focused onto a small target located at the center of a spherical target chamber. The laser energy is delivered in a few billionths of a second, raising the temperature and density of the nuclear materials in the target to levels where significant thermonuclear energy is released. The thermonuclear reaction proceeds very rapidly, so that the target materials remain confined by their own inertia during the thermonuclear reaction. This type of approach is called inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The proposed project is described in a conceptual design report (CDR) that was released in May 1994. Early in FY95, a collaboration between the University of Rochester and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was established to study reconfiguring the NIF to accommodate direct-drive experiments. The present paper is a report to the scientific community, primarily the scientists and engineers working on the design of the NIF. It represents results from work in progress, specifically work completed by the end of the second quarter FY95. This report has two main sections. The first describes the target requirements on the laser drive, and the second part describes how the NIF laser can be configured to accommodate both indirect and direct drive. The report includes a description of the scientific basis for these conclusions. Though a complete picture does not exist, the present understanding is sufficient to conclude that the primary target requirements and laser functional requirements for indirect and direct drive are quite compatible. It is evidently straightforward to reconfigure the NIF to accommodate direct and indirect drive.

  7. Review of Reactivity Experiments for Lithium Ternary Alloys

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jolodosky, A.; Bolind, A.; Fratoni, M.

    2015-09-28

    Lithium is often the preferred choice as breeder and coolant in fusion blankets as it offers high tritium breeding, excellent heat transfer and corrosion properties, and most importantly, it has very high tritium solubility and results in very low levels of tritium permeation throughout the facility infrastructure. However, lithium metal vigorously reacts with air and water and exacerbates plant safety concerns. Consequently, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is attempting to develop a lithium-based alloy—most likely a ternary alloy—which maintains the beneficial properties of lithium (e.g. high tritium breeding and solubility) while reducing overall flammability concerns for use in the blanket of an inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant. The LLNL concept employs inertial confinement fusion (ICF) through the use of lasers aimed at an indirect-driven target composed of deuterium-tritium fuel. The fusion driver/target design implements the same physics currently experimented at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The plant uses lithium in both the primary coolant and blanket; therefore, lithium related hazards are of primary concern. Reducing chemical reactivity is the primary motivation for the development of new lithium alloys, and it is therefore important to come up with proper ways to conduct experiments that can physically study this phenomenon. This paper will start to explore this area by outlining relevant past experiments conducted with lithium/air reactions and lithium/water reactions. Looking at what was done in the past will then give us a general idea of how we can setup our own experiments to test a variety of lithium alloys.

  8. Ultrashort x-ray backlighters and applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Umstadter, D., University of Michigan

    1997-08-01

    Previously, using ultrashort laser pulses focused onto solid targets, we have experimentally studied a controllable ultrafast broadband radiation source in the extreme ultraviolet for time-resolved dynamical studies in ultrafast science [J. Workman, A. Maksimchuk, X. Llu, U. Ellenberger, J. S. Coe, C.-Y. Chien, and D. Umstadter, ``Control of Bright Picosecond X-Ray Emission from Intense Sub- Picosecond Laser-Plasma Interactions,`` Phys. Rev. Lett. 75, 2324 (1995)]. Once armed with a bright ultrafast broadband continuum x-ray source and appropriate detectors, we used the source as a backlighter to study a remotely produced plasma. The application of the source to a problem relevant to high-density matter completes the triad: creating and controlling, efficiently detecting, and applying the source. This work represented the first use of an ultrafast laser- produced x-ray source as a time-resolving probe in an application relevant to atomic, plasma and high-energy-density matter physics. Using the x-ray source as a backlighter, we adopted a pump-probe geometry to investigate the dynamic changes in electronic structure of a thin metallic film as it is perturbed by an ultrashort laser pulse. Because the laser deposits its energy in a skin depth of about 100 {Angstrom} before expansion occurs, up to gigabar pressure shock waves lasting picosecond in duration have been predicted to form in these novel plasmas. This raises the possibility of studying high- energy-density matter relevant to inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and astrophysics in small-scale laboratory experiments. In the past, time-resolved measurements of K-edge shifts in plasmas driven by nanosecond pulses have been used to infer conditions in highly compressed materials. In this study, we used 100-fs laser pulses to impulsively drive shocks into a sample (an untamped 1000 {Angstrom} aluminum film on 2000 {Angstrom} of parylene-n), measuring L-edge shifts.

  9. Report on the B-Fields at NIF Workshop Held at LLNL October 12-13, 2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fournier, K. B.; Moody, J. D.

    2015-12-13

    A national ICF laboratory workshop on requirements for a magnetized target capability on NIF was held by NIF at LLNL on October 12 and 13, attended by experts from LLNL, SNL, LLE, LANL, GA, and NRL. Advocates for indirect drive (LLNL), magnetic (Z) drive (SNL), polar direct drive (LLE), and basic science needing applied B (many institutions) presented and discussed requirements for the magnetized target capabilities they would like to see. 30T capability was most frequently requested. A phased operation increasing the field in steps experimentally can be envisioned. The NIF management will take the inputs from the scientific community represented at the workshop and recommend pulse-powered magnet parameters for NIF that best meet the collective user requests. In parallel, LLNL will continue investigating magnets for future generations that might be powered by compact laser-B-field generators (Moody, Fujioka, Santos, Woolsey, Pollock). The NIF facility engineers will start to analyze compatibility of the recommended pulsed magnet parameters (size, field, rise time, materials) with NIF chamber constraints, diagnostic access, and final optics protection against debris in FY16. The objective of this assessment will be to develop a schedule for achieving an initial Bfield capability. Based on an initial assessment, room temperature magnetized gas capsules will be fielded on NIF first. Magnetized cryo-ice-layered targets will take longer (more compatibility issues). Magnetized wetted foam DT targets (Olson) may have somewhat fewer compatibility issues making them a more likely choice for the first cryo-ice-layered target fielded with applied Bz.

  10. LIDAR Thomson scattering for advanced tokamaks. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molvik, A.W.; Lerche, R.A.; Nilson, D.G.

    1996-03-18

    The LIDAR Thomson Scattering for Advanced Tokamaks project made a valuable contribution by combining LLNL expertise from the MFE Program: tokamak design and diagnostics, and the ICF Program and Physics Dept.: short-pulse lasers and fast streak cameras. This multidisciplinary group evaluated issues involved in achieving a factor of 20 higher high spatial resolution (to as small as 2-3 mm) from the present state of the art in LIDAR Thomson scattering, and developed conceptual designs to apply LIDAR Thomson scattering to three tokamaks: Upgraded divertor measurements in the existing DIII-D tokamak; Both core and divertor LIDAR Thomson scattering in the proposed (now cancelled) TPX; and core, edge, and divertor LIDAR Thomson scattering on the presently planned International Tokamak Experimental Reactor, ITER. Other issues were evaluated in addition to the time response required for a few millimeter spatial resolution. These include the optimum wavelength, 100 Hz operation of the laser and detectors, minimizing stray light - always the Achilles heel of Thomson scattering, and time dispersion in optics that could prevent good spatial resolution. Innovative features of our work included: custom short pulsed laser concepts to meet specific requirements, use of a prism spectrometer to maintain a constant optical path length for high temporal and spatial resolution, the concept of a laser focus outside the plasma to ionize gas and form an external fiducial to use in locating the plasma edge as well as to spread the laser energy over a large enough area of the inner wall to avoid laser ablation of wall material, an improved concept for cleaning windows between shots by means of laser ablation, and the identification of a new physics issue - nonlinear effects near a laser focus which could perturb the plasma density and temperature that are to be measured.

  11. LLE Review 114 (January-March 2008)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zuegel, J.D.

    2008-07-30

    This volume of the LLE Review, covering January-March 2008, features 'Cryogenic Targets: Current Status and Future Development', by D. R. Harding, D. H. Edgell, M. D. Wittman, L. M. Elasky, S. J. Verbridge, A. J. Weaver, L. D. Lund, W. Seka, W. T. Shmayda, R. T. Janezic, M. J. Shoup III, M. Moore, R. Junquist, and A. V. Okishev. In this article (p. 57), the authors report on the status of layering cryogenic DT and D{sub 2} targets at LLE for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets. This critical effort achieves the important milestone of routinely providing cryogenic DT targets that meet the 1.0-{micro}m (rms) OMEGA ice-quality-surface specification. The best D{sub 2}-ice layers produced so far (rms roughness of 1.1 {micro}m) are approaching the quality typically achieved in DT targets. Efforts to improve the consistency of this process are reported along with investigations supporting the National Ignition Campaign studying issues relevant to indirect-drive and direct-drive cryogenic targets. Additional highlights of recent research presented in this issue include the following: (1) an improved laser speckle smoothing scheme that augments the current NIF 1-D SSD system by using multiple-FM modulators (MultiFM 1-D SSD) (p. 73). With a judicious choice of modulator frequencies, MultiFM 1-D SSD smoothes resonances produced at the higher spatial frequencies and can attain similar or even faster smoothing rates compared to the baseline NIF 2-D SSD system. DRACO simulations have shown that MultiFM 1-D SSD beam smoothing is sufficient for the direct-drive-ignition targets and pulse shapes analyzed thus far, and may even allow reducing the bandwidth enough to eliminate the need for dual-tripler frequency conversion on the NIF. (2) describes a time-gated, monoenergetic proton radiography that provides unique measurements of implosion dynamics of spherical targets in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) (p. 81). Radiographs obtained at different implosion times

  12. Hot-spot mix in ignition-scale implosions on the NIF

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Regan, S. P.; Epstein, R.; McCrory, R. L.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Hammel, B. A.; Suter, L. J.; Ralph, J.; Scott, H.; Barrios, M. A.; Bradley, D. K.; Callahan, D. A.; Cerjan, C.; Collins, G. W.; Dixit, S. N.; Doeppner, T.; Edwards, M. J.; Farley, D. R.; Glenn, S.; Glenzer, S. H.; and others

    2012-05-15

    Ignition of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target depends on the formation of a central hot spot with sufficient temperature and areal density. Radiative and conductive losses from the hot spot can be enhanced by hydrodynamic instabilities. The concentric spherical layers of current National Ignition Facility (NIF) ignition targets consist of a plastic ablator surrounding a thin shell of cryogenic thermonuclear fuel (i.e., hydrogen isotopes), with fuel vapor filling the interior volume [S. W. Haan et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 051001 (2011)]. The Rev. 5 ablator is doped with Ge to minimize preheat of the ablator closest to the DT ice caused by Au M-band emission from the hohlraum x-ray drive [D. S. Clark et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 052703 (2010)]. Richtmyer-Meshkov and Rayleigh-Taylor hydrodynamic instabilities seeded by high-mode () ablator-surface perturbations can cause Ge-doped ablator to mix into the interior of the shell at the end of the acceleration phase [B. A. Hammel et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 056310 (2011)]. As the shell decelerates, it compresses the fuel vapor, forming a hot spot. K-shell line emission from the ionized Ge that has penetrated into the hot spot provides an experimental signature of hot-spot mix. The Ge emission from tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) and deuterium-tritium (DT) cryogenic targets and gas-filled plastic-shell capsules, which replace the THD layer with a mass-equivalent CH layer, was examined. The inferred amount of hot-spot-mix mass, estimated from the Ge K-shell line brightness using a detailed atomic physics code [J. J. MacFarlane et al., High Energy Density Phys. 3, 181 (2006)], is typically below the 75-ng allowance for hot-spot mix [S. W. Haan et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 051001 (2011)]. Predictions of a simple mix model, based on linear growth of the measured surface-mass modulations, are consistent with the experimental results.

  13. New photon science and extreme field physics: volumetric interaction of ultra-intense laser pulses with over-dense targets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hegelich, Bjorn M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-11-24

    The constantly improving capabilities of ultra-high power lasers are enabling interactions of matter with ever extremer fields. As both the on target intensity and the laser contrast are increasing, new physics regimes are becoming accessible and new effects materialize, which in turn enable a host of applications. A first example is the realization of interactions in the transparent-overdense regime (TOR), which is reached by interacting a highly relativistic (a{sub 0} > 10), ultra high contrast laser pulse with a solid density, nanometer target. Here, a still overdense target is turned transparent to the laser by the relativistic mass increase of the electrons, increasing the skin depth beyond the target thickness and thus enabling volumetric interaction of the laser with the entire target instead of only a small interaction region at the critical density surface. This increases the energy coupling, enabling a range of effects, including relativistic optics and pulse shaping, mono-energetic electron acceleration, highly efficient ion acceleration in the break-out afterburner regime, the generation of relativistic and forward directed surface harmonics. In this talk we will show the theoretical framework for this regime, explored by multi-D, high resolution and high density PIC simulations as well as analytic theory and present measurements and experimental demonstrations of direct relativistic optics, relativistic HHG, electron acceleration, and BOA ion acceleration in the transparent overdense regime. These effects can in turn be used in a host of applications including laser pulse shaping, ICF diagnostics, coherent x-ray sources, and ion sources for fast ignition (IFI), homeland security applications and medical therapy. This host of applications already makes transparent-overdense regime one of general interest, a situation reinforced by the fact that the TOR target undergoes an extremely wide HEDP parameter space during interaction ranging from WDM conditions

  14. CHP REGIONAL APPLICATION CENTERS: ACTIVITIES AND SELECTED RESULTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schweitzer, Martin

    2010-08-01

    represents the first systematic attempt at RAC program measurement in a manner consistent with approaches used for other efforts funded by DOE's Industrial Technologies Program (ITP). In addition, data on CHP installations and associated effects were collected for the same years from a state-by-state database maintained for DOE by ICF international. A report documenting the findings of that study was produced in September, 2009. The purpose of the current report is to present the findings from a new study of RAC activities and accomplishments which examined what the Centers did in FY 2009, the last year in which they concentrated exclusively on CHP technologies. This study focused on identifying and describing RAC activities and was not designed to measure how those efforts influenced CHP installations or other outcomes.

  15. Progress Toward Ignition on the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kauffman, R L

    2011-10-17

    The principal approach to ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is indirect drive. A schematic of an ignition target is shown in Figure 1. The laser beams are focused through laser entrance holes at each end of a high-Z cylindrical case, or hohlraum. The lasers irradiate the hohlraum walls producing x-rays that ablate and compress the fuel capsule in the center of the hohlraum. The hohlraum is made of Au, U, or other high-Z material. For ignition targets, the hohlraum is {approx}0.5 cm diameter by {approx}1 cm in length. The hohlraum absorbs the incident laser energy producing x-rays for symmetrically imploding the capsule. The fuel capsule is a {approx}2-mm-diameter spherical shell of CH, Be, or C filled with DT fuel. The DT fuel is in the form of a cryogenic layer on the inside of the capsule. X-rays ablate the outside of the capsule, producing a spherical implosion. The imploding shell stagnates in the center, igniting the DT fuel. NIC has overseen installation of all of the hardware for performing ignition experiments, including commissioning of approximately 50 diagnostic systems in NIF. The diagnostics measure scattered optical light, x-rays from the hohlraum over the energy range from 100 eV to 500 keV, and x-rays, neutrons, and charged particles from the implosion. An example of a diagnostic is the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) built by a collaboration of scientists from MIT, UR-LLE, and LLNL shown in Figure 2. MRS measures the neutron spectrum from the implosion, providing information on the neutron yield and areal density that are metrics of the quality of the implosion. Experiments on NIF extend ICF research to unexplored regimes in target physics. NIF can produce more than 50 times the laser energy and more than 20 times the power of any previous ICF facility. Ignition scale hohlraum targets are three to four times larger than targets used at smaller facilities, and the ignition drive pulses are two to five times longer. The larger

  16. Advanced Concept Exploration for Fast Ignition Science Program, Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephens, Richard Burnite; McLean, Harry M.; Theobald, Wolfgang; Akli, Kramer U.; Beg, Farhat N.; Sentoku, Yasuhiko; Schumacher, Douglass W.; Wei, Mingsheng

    2013-09-04

    The Fast Ignition (FI) Concept for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) has the potential to provide a significant advance in the technical attractiveness of Inertial Fusion Energy reactors. FI differs from conventional “central hot spot” (CHS) target ignition by decoupling compression from heating: using a laser (or heavy ion beam or Z pinch) drive pulse (10’s of nanoseconds) to create a dense fuel and a second, much shorter (~10 picoseconds) high intensity pulse to ignite a small volume within the dense fuel. The physics of fast ignition process was the focus of our Advanced Concept Exploration (ACE) program. Ignition depends critically on two major issues involving Relativistic High Energy Density (RHED) physics: The laser-induced creation of fast electrons and their propagation in high-density plasmas. Our program has developed new experimental platforms, diagnostic packages, computer modeling analyses, and taken advantage of the increasing energy available at laser facilities to advance understanding of the fundamental physics underlying these issues. Our program had three thrust areas: • Understand the production and characteristics of fast electrons resulting from FI relevant laser-plasma interactions and their dependence on laser prepulse and laser pulse length. • Investigate the subsequent fast electron transport in solid and through hot (FI-relevant) plasmas. • Conduct and understand integrated core-heating experiments by comparison to simulations. Over the whole period of this project (three years for this contract), we have greatly advanced our fundamental understanding of the underlying properties in all three areas: • Comprehensive studies on fast electron source characteristics have shown that they are controlled by the laser intensity distribution and the topology and plasma density gradient. Laser pre-pulse induced pre-plasma in front of a solid surface results in increased stand-off distances from the electron origin to the high density

  17. Proposed Laser-Based HED physics experiments for Stockpile Stewardship

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benage, John F.; Albright, Brian J.; Fernandez, Juan C.

    2012-09-04

    An analysis of the scientific areas in High Energy Density (HED) physics that underpin the enduring LANL mission in Stockpile Stewardship (SS) has identified important research needs that are not being met. That analysis has included the work done as part of defining the mission need for the High Intensity Laser Laboratory (HILL) LANL proposal to NNSA, LDRD DR proposal evaluations, and consideration of the Predictive Capability Framework and LANL NNSA milestones. From that evaluation, we have identified several specific and scientifically-exciting experimental concepts to address those needs. These experiments are particularly responsive to physics issues in Campaigns 1 and 10. These experiments are best done initially at the LANL Trident facility, often relying on the unique capabilities available there, although there are typically meritorious extensions envisioned at future facilities such as HILL, or the NIF once the ARC short-pulse laser is available at sufficient laser intensity. As the focus of the LANL HEDP effort broadens from ICF ignition of the point design at the conclusion of the National Ignition Campaign, into a more SS-centric effort, it is useful to consider these experiments, which address well-defined issues, with specific scientific hypothesis to test or models to validate or disprove, via unit-physics experiments. These experiments are in turn representative of a possible broad experimental portfolio to elucidate the physics of interest to these campaigns. These experiments, described below, include: (1) First direct measurement of the evolution of particulates in isochorically heated dense plasma; (2) Temperature relaxation measurements in a strongly-coupled plasma; (3) Viscosity measurements in a dense plasma; and (4) Ionic structure factors in a dense plasma. All these experiments address scientific topics of importance to our sponsors, involve excellent science at the boundaries of traditional fields, utilize unique capabilities at LANL

  18. Simulations of Turbulent Flows with Strong Shocks and Density Variations: Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sanjiva Lele

    2012-10-01

    The target of this SciDAC Science Application was to develop a new capability based on high-order and high-resolution schemes to simulate shock-turbulence interactions and multi-material mixing in planar and spherical geometries, and to study Rayleigh-Taylor and Richtmyer-Meshkov turbulent mixing. These fundamental problems have direct application in high-speed engineering flows, such as inertial confinement fusion (ICF) capsule implosions and scramjet combustion, and also in the natural occurrence of supernovae explosions. Another component of this project was the development of subgrid-scale (SGS) models for large-eddy simulations of flows involving shock-turbulence interaction and multi-material mixing, that were to be validated with the DNS databases generated during the program. The numerical codes developed are designed for massively-parallel computer architectures, ensuring good scaling performance. Their algorithms were validated by means of a sequence of benchmark problems. The original multi-stage plan for this five-year project included the following milestones: 1) refinement of numerical algorithms for application to the shock-turbulence interaction problem and multi-material mixing (years 1-2); 2) direct numerical simulations (DNS) of canonical shock-turbulence interaction (years 2-3), targeted at improving our understanding of the physics behind the combined two phenomena and also at guiding the development of SGS models; 3) large-eddy simulations (LES) of shock-turbulence interaction (years 3-5), improving SGS models based on the DNS obtained in the previous phase; 4) DNS of planar/spherical RM multi-material mixing (years 3-5), also with the two-fold objective of gaining insight into the relevant physics of this instability and aiding in devising new modeling strategies for multi-material mixing; 5) LES of planar/spherical RM mixing (years 4-5), integrating the improved SGS and multi-material models developed in stages 3 and 5. This final report is

  19. Renewable Energy and Efficiency Modeling Analysis Partnership: An Analysis of How Different Energy Models Addressed a Common High Renewable Energy Penetration Scenario in 2025

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Blair, N.; Jenkin, T.; Milford, J.; Short, W.; Sullivan, P.; Evans, D.; Lieberman, E.; Goldstein, G.; Wright, E.; Jayaraman, K.; Venkatech, B.; Kleiman, G.; Namovicz, C.; Smith, B.; Palmer, K.; Wiser, R.; Wood, F.

    2009-09-30

    The Renewable Energy and Efficiency Modeling and Analysis Partnership (REMAP) sponsors ongoing workshops to discuss individual 'renewable' technologies, energy/economic modeling, and - to some extent - policy issues related to renewable energy. Since 2002, the group has organized seven workshops, each focusing on a different renewable technology (geothermal, solar, wind, etc.). These workshops originated and continue to be run under an informal partnership of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), the Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and the American Council on Renewable Energy (ACORE). EPA originally funded the activities, but support is now shared between EPA and EERE. REMAP has a wide range of participating analysts and models/modelers that come from government, the private sector, and academia. Modelers include staff from the Energy Information Administration (EIA), the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE), NREL, EPA, Resources for the Future (RFF), Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Northeast States for Coordinated Air Use Management (NESCAUM), Regional Economic Models Inc. (REMI), ICF International, OnLocation Inc., and Boston University. The working group has more than 40 members, which also includes representatives from DOE, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS), Massachusetts Renewable Energy Trust, Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), and ACORE. This report summarizes the activities and findings of the REMAP activity that started in late 2006 with a kickoff meeting, and concluded in mid-2008 with presentations of final results. As the project evolved, the group compared results across models and across technologies rather than just examining a specific technology or activity. The overall goal was to better understand how and why different energy models give similar and

  20. AVTA Federal Fleet PEV Readiness Data Logging and Characterization Study for the National Park Service: Fort Vancouver National Historic Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Schey; Jim Francfort

    2014-03-01

    significant reductions in emission of greenhouse gases and petroleum use, while also reducing fuel costs. The Vancouver, Washington area and neighboring Portland, Oregon are leaders in adoption of PEVs in the United States1. PEV charging stations, or more appropriately identified as electric vehicle supply equipment, located on the FVNHS facility would be a benefit for both FVNHS fleets and general public use. Fleet drivers and park visitors operating privately owned plug-in electric vehicles benefit by using the charging infrastructure. ITSNA recommends location analysis of the FVNHS site to identify the optimal station placement for electric vehicle supply equipment. ITSNA recognizes the support of Idaho National Laboratory and ICF International for their efforts to initiate communication with the National Parks Service and FVNHS for participation in this study. ITSNA is pleased to provide this report and is encouraged by the high interest and support from the National Park Service and FVNHS personnel

  1. AVTA Federal Fleet PEV Readiness Data Logging and Characterization Study for the National Park Service: Golden Gate National Recreation Area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Schey; Jim Francfort

    2014-03-01

    could occur at the vehicle home base, high-use work areas, or intermediately along routes that the vehicles frequently travel. Replacement of vehicles in the current fleet would result in significant reductions in the emission of greenhouse gases and petroleum use, while also reducing fuel costs. The San Francisco Bay Area is a leader in the adoption of PEVs in the United States. PEV charging stations, or more appropriately identified as electric vehicle supply equipment, located on the GGNRA facility would be a benefit for both GGNRA fleets and general public use. Fleet drivers and park visitors operating privately owned PEVs benefit by using the charging infrastructure. ITSNA recommends location analysis of the GGNRA site to identify the optimal placement of the electric vehicle supply equipment station. ITSNA recognizes the support of Idaho National Laboratory and ICF International for their efforts to initiate communication with the National Parks Service and GGNRA for participation in the study. ITSNA is pleased to provide this report and is encouraged by the high interest and support from the National Park Service and GGNRA personnel.

  2. Preliminary Neutronics Design Studies for a Molten Salt Blanket LIFE Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Powers, J

    2008-10-23

    The Laser Inertial Confinement Fusion Fission Energy (LIFE) Program being developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) aims to design a hybrid fission-fusion subcritical nuclear engine that uses a laser-driven Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) system to drive a subcritical fission blanket. This combined fusion-fission hybrid system could be used for generating electricity, material transmutation or incineration, or other applications. LIFE does not require enriched fuel since it is a sub-critical system and LIFE can sustain power operation beyond the burnup levels at which typical fission reactors need to be refueled. In light of these factors, numerous options have been suggested and are being investigated. Options being investigated include fueling LIFE engines with spent nuclear fuel to aid in disposal/incineration of commercial spent nuclear fuel or using depleted uranium or thorium fueled options to enhance proliferation resistance and utilize non-fissile materials [1]. LIFE engine blanket designs using a molten salt fuel system represent one area of investigation. Possible applications of a LIFE engine with a molten salt blanket include uses as a spent nuclear fuel burner, fissile fuel breeding platform, and providing a backup alternative to other LIFE engine blanket designs using TRISO fuel particles in case the TRISO particles are found to be unable to withstand the irradiation they will be subjected to. These molten salts consist of a mixture of LiF with UF{sub 4} or ThF{sub 4} or some combination thereof. Future systems could look at using PuF{sub 3} or PuF{sub 4} as well, though no work on such system with initial plutonium loadings has been performed for studies documented in this report. The purpose of this report is to document preliminary neutronics design studies performed to support the development of a molten salt blanket LIFE engine option, as part of the LIFE Program being performed at Lawrence Livermore National laboratory

  3. Neutronics Evaluation of Lithium-Based Ternary Alloys in IFE Blankets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jolodosky, A.; Fratoni, M.

    2015-09-22

    , low electrical conductivity and therefore low MHD pressure drop, low chemical reactivity, and extremely low tritium inventory; the addition of sodium (FLiNaBe) has been considered because it retains the properties of FliBe but also lowers the melting point. Although many of these blanket concepts are promising, challenges still remain. The limited amount of beryllium available poses a problem for ceramic breeders such as the HCPB. FLiBe and FLiNaBe are highly viscous and have a low thermal conductivity. Lithium lead possesses a poor thermal conductivity which can cause problems in both DCLL and LiPb blankets. Additionally, the tritium permeation from these two blankets into plant components can be a problem and must be reduced. Consequently, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is attempting to develop a lithium-based alloy—most likely a ternary alloy—which maintains the beneficial properties of lithium (e.g. high tritium breeding and solubility) while reducing overall flammability concerns for use in the blanket of an inertial fusion energy (IFE) power plant. The LLNL concept employs inertial confinement fusion (ICF) through the use of lasers aimed at an indirect-driven target composed of deuterium-tritium fuel. The fusion driver/target design implements the same physics currently experimented at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The plant uses lithium in both the primary coolant and blanket; therefore, lithium-related hazards are of primary concern. Although reducing chemical reactivity is the primary motivation for the development of new lithium alloys, the successful candidates will have to guarantee acceptable performance in all their functions. The scope of this study is to evaluate the neutronics performance of a large number of lithium-based alloys in the blanket of the IFE engine and assess their properties upon activation. This manuscript is organized as follows: Section 12 presents the models and methodologies used for the analysis; Section

  4. Recyclable transmission line (RTL) and linear transformer driver (LTD) development for Z-pinch inertial fusion energy (Z-IFE) and high yield.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharpe, Robin Arthur; Kingsep, Alexander S. (Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia); Smith, David Lewis; Olson, Craig Lee; Ottinger, Paul F. (Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC); Schumer, Joseph Wade (Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC); Welch, Dale Robert (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Kim, Alexander (High Currents Institute, Tomsk, Russia); Kulcinski, Gerald L. (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Kammer, Daniel C. (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Rose, David Vincent (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Nedoseev, Sergei L. (Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia); Pointon, Timothy David; Smirnov, Valentin P.; Turgeon, Matthew C.; Kalinin, Yuri G. (Kurchatov Institute, Moscow, Russia); Bruner, Nichelle "Nicki" (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Barkey, Mark E. (University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL); Guthrie, Michael (University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI); Thoma, Carsten (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Genoni, Tom C. (Voss Scientific, Albuquerque, NM); Langston, William L.; Fowler, William E.; Mazarakis, Michael Gerrassimos

    2007-01-01

    demonstrated at the SNL Z-IFE LTD laboratory with rep-rates up to 10.3 seconds between shots (this is essentially at the goal of 10 seconds for Z-IFE). (7) A single LTD switch at Tomsk was fired repetitively every 12 seconds for 36,000 shots with no failures. (8) Five 1.0 MA, 100 kV, 100 ns, LTD cavities have been combined into a voltage adder configuration with a test load to successfully study the system operation. (9) The combination of multiple LTD coaxial lines into a tri-plate transmission line is examined. The 3D Quicksilver code is used to study the electron flow losses produced near the magnetic nulls that occur where coax LTD lines are added together. (10) Circuit model codes are used to model the complete power flow circuit with an inductive isolator cavity. (11) LTD architectures are presented for drivers for Z-IFE and high yield. A 60 MA LTD driver and a 90 MA LTD driver are proposed. Present results from all of these power flow studies validate the whole LTD/RTL concept for single-shot ICF high yield, and for repetitive-shot IFE.

  5. A Concept Exploration Program in Fast Ignition Inertial Fusion — Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephens, Richarad Burnite; Freeman, Richard R.; Van Woekom, L. D.; Key, M.; MacKinnon, Andrew J.; Wei, Mingsheng

    2014-02-27

    The Fast Ignition (FI) approach to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) holds particular promise for fusion energy because the independently generated compression and ignition pulses allow ignition with less compression, resulting in (potentially) higher gain. Exploiting this concept effectively requires an understanding of the transport of electrons in prototypical geometries and at relevant densities and temperatures. Our consortium, which included General Atomics (GA), The Ohio State University (OSU), the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), University of California, Davis (UC-Davis), and Princeton University under this grant (~$850K/yr) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) under a companion grant, won awards in 2000, renewed in 2005, to investigate the physics of electron injection and transport relevant to the FI concept, which is crucial to understand electron transport in integral FI targets. In the last two years we have also been preparing diagnostics and starting to extend the work to electron transport into hot targets. A complementary effort, the Advanced Concept Exploration (ACE) program for Fast Ignition, was funded starting in 2006 to integrate this understanding into ignition schemes specifically suitable for the initial fast ignition attempts on OMEGA and National Ignition Facility (NIF), and during that time these two programs have been managed as a coordinated effort. This result of our 7+ years of effort has been substantial. Utilizing collaborations to access the most capable laser facilities around the world, we have developed an understanding that was summarized in a Fusion Science & Technology 2006, Special Issue on Fast Ignition. The author lists in the 20 articles in that issue are dominated by our group (we are first authors in four of them). Our group has published, or submitted 67 articles, including 1 in Nature, 2 Nature Physics, 10 Physical Review Letters, 8 Review of Scientific Instruments, and has been invited to

  6. The Complete Burning of Weapons Grade Plutonium and Highly Enriched Uranium with (Laser Inertial Fusion-Fission Energy) LIFE Engine

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, J C; Diaz de la Rubia, T; Moses, E

    2008-12-23

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) project, a laser-based Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiment designed to achieve thermonuclear fusion ignition and burn in the laboratory, is under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and will be completed in April of 2009. Experiments designed to accomplish the NIF's goal will commence in late FY2010 utilizing laser energies of 1 to 1.3 MJ. Fusion yields of the order of 10 to 20 MJ are expected soon thereafter. Laser initiated fusion-fission (LIFE) engines have now been designed to produce nuclear power from natural or depleted uranium without isotopic enrichment, and from spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors without chemical separation into weapons-attractive actinide streams. A point-source of high-energy neutrons produced by laser-generated, thermonuclear fusion within a target is used to achieve ultra-deep burn-up of the fertile or fissile fuel in a sub-critical fission blanket. Fertile fuels including depleted uranium (DU), natural uranium (NatU), spent nuclear fuel (SNF), and thorium (Th) can be used. Fissile fuels such as low-enrichment uranium (LEU), excess weapons plutonium (WG-Pu), and excess highly-enriched uranium (HEU) may be used as well. Based upon preliminary analyses, it is believed that LIFE could help meet worldwide electricity needs in a safe and sustainable manner, while drastically shrinking the nation's and world's stockpile of spent nuclear fuel and excess weapons materials. LIFE takes advantage of the significant advances in laser-based inertial confinement fusion that are taking place at the NIF at LLNL where it is expected that thermonuclear ignition will be achieved in the 2010-2011 timeframe. Starting from as little as 300 to 500 MW of fusion power, a single LIFE engine will be able to generate 2000 to 3000 MWt in steady state for periods of years to decades, depending on the nuclear fuel and engine configuration. Because the fission blanket in a fusion

  7. LIFE Materials: Overview of Fuels and Structural Materials Issues Volume 1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, J

    2008-09-08

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) project, a laser-based Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) experiment designed to achieve thermonuclear fusion ignition and burn in the laboratory, is under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and will be completed in April of 2009. Experiments designed to accomplish the NIF's goal will commence in late FY2010 utilizing laser energies of 1 to 1.3 MJ. Fusion yields of the order of 10 to 20 MJ are expected soon thereafter. Laser initiated fusion-fission (LIFE) engines have now been designed to produce nuclear power from natural or depleted uranium without isotopic enrichment, and from spent nuclear fuel from light water reactors without chemical separation into weapons-attractive actinide streams. A point-source of high-energy neutrons produced by laser-generated, thermonuclear fusion within a target is used to achieve ultra-deep burn-up of the fertile or fissile fuel in a sub-critical fission blanket. Fertile fuels including depleted uranium (DU), natural uranium (NatU), spent nuclear fuel (SNF), and thorium (Th) can be used. Fissile fuels such as low-enrichment uranium (LEU), excess weapons plutonium (WG-Pu), and excess highly-enriched uranium (HEU) may be used as well. Based upon preliminary analyses, it is believed that LIFE could help meet worldwide electricity needs in a safe and sustainable manner, while drastically shrinking the nation's and world's stockpile of spent nuclear fuel and excess weapons materials. LIFE takes advantage of the significant advances in laser-based inertial confinement fusion that are taking place at the NIF at LLNL where it is expected that thermonuclear ignition will be achieved in the 2010-2011 timeframe. Starting from as little as 300 to 500 MW of fusion power, a single LIFE engine will be able to generate 2000 to 3000 MWt in steady state for periods of years to decades, depending on the nuclear fuel and engine configuration. Because the fission blanket in a fusion

  8. Final Project Report "Advanced Concept Exploration For Fast Ignition Science Program"

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    STEPHENS, Richard B.; McLEAN, Harry M.; THEOBALD, Wolfgang; AKLI, Kramer; BEG, Farhat N.; SENTOKU, Yasuiko; SCHUMACHER, Douglas; WEI, Mingsheng S.

    2014-01-31

    and x-ray line radiation from K-shell fluorescence. Integrated experiments, which combine target compression with short-pulse laser heating, yield additional information on target heating efficiency. This indirect way of studying the underlying behavior of the electrons must be validated with computational modeling to understand the physics and improve the design. This program execution required a large, well-organized team and it was managed by a joint Collaboration between General Atomics (GA), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), and the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). The Collaboration was formed 8 years ago to understand the physics issues of the Fast Ignition concept, building on the strengths of each partner. GA fulfills its responsibilities jointly with the University of California, San Diego (UCSD), The Ohio State University (OSU) and the University of Nevada at Reno (UNR). Since RHED physics is pursued vigorously in many countries, international researchers have been an important part of our efforts to make progress. The division of responsibility was as follows: (1) LLE had primary leadership for channeling studies and the integrated energy transfer, (2) LLNL led the development of measurement methods, analysis, and deployment of diagnostics, and (3) GA together with UCSD, OSU and UNR studied the detailed energy-transfer physics. The experimental program was carried out using the Titan laser at the Jupiter Laser Facility at LLNL, the OMEGA and OMEGA EP lasers at LLE and the Texas Petawatt laser (TPW) at UT Austin. Modeling has been pursued on large computing facilities at LLNL, OSU, and UCSD using codes developed (by us and others) within the HEDLP program, commercial codes, and by leveraging existing supercomputer codes developed by the NNSA ICF program. This Consortium brought together all the components—resources, facilities, and personnel—necessary to accomplish its aggressive goals. The ACE Program has been strongly collaborative

  9. Ion Fast Ignition-Establishing a Scientific Basis for Inertial Fusion Energy --- Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephens, Richard Burnite; Foord, Mark N.; Wei, Mingsheng; Beg, Farhat N.; Schumacher, Douglass W.

    2013-10-31

    The Fast Ignition (FI) Concept for Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) has the potential to provide a significant advance in the technical attractiveness of Inertial Fusion Energy reactors. FI differs from conventional ?central hot spot? (CHS) target ignition by decoupling compression from heating: using a laser (or heavy ion beam or Z pinch) drive pulse (10?s of nanoseconds) to create a dense fuel and a second, much shorter (~10 picoseconds) high intensity pulse to ignite a small volume within the dense fuel. The compressed fuel is opaque to laser light. The ignition laser energy must be converted to a jet of energetic charged particles to deposit energy in the dense fuel. The original concept called for a spray of laser-generated hot electrons to deliver the energy; lack of ability to focus the electrons put great weight on minimizing the electron path. An alternative concept, proton-ignited FI, used those electrons as intermediaries to create a jet of protons that could be focused to the ignition spot from a more convenient distance. Our program focused on the generation and directing of the proton jet, and its transport toward the fuel, none of which were well understood at the onset of our program. We have developed new experimental platforms, diagnostic packages, computer modeling analyses, and taken advantage of the increasing energy available at laser facilities to create a self-consistent understanding of the fundamental physics underlying these issues. Our strategy was to examine the new physics emerging as we added the complexity necessary to use proton beams in an inertial fusion energy (IFE) application. From the starting point of a proton beam accelerated from a flat, isolated foil, we 1) curved it to focus the beam, 2) attached the foil to a superstructure, 3) added a side sheath to protect it from the surrounding plasma, and finally 4) studied the proton beam behavior as it passed through a protective end cap into plasma. We built up, as we proceeded