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1

National Ignition Facility (NIF): Under Pressure: Ramp-Compression...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Ignition Facility (NIF): Under Pressure: Ramp-Compression Smashes Record American Fusion News Category: National Ignition Facility Link: National Ignition Facility (NIF):...

2

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) A Path to Fusion Energy  

SciTech Connect

Fusion energy has long been considered a promising clean, nearly inexhaustible source of energy. Power production by fusion micro-explosions of inertial confinement fusion (ICF) targets has been a long term research goal since the invention of the first laser in 1960. The NIF is poised to take the next important step in the journey by beginning experiments researching ICF ignition. Ignition on NIF will be the culmination of over thirty years of ICF research on high-powered laser systems such as the Nova laser at LLNL and the OMEGA laser at the University of Rochester as well as smaller systems around the world. NIF is a 192 beam Nd-glass laser facility at LLNL that is more than 90% complete. The first cluster of 48 beams is operational in the laser bay, the second cluster is now being commissioned, and the beam path to the target chamber is being installed. The Project will be completed in 2009 and ignition experiments will start in 2010. When completed NIF will produce up to 1.8 MJ of 0.35 {micro}m light in highly shaped pulses required for ignition. It will have beam stability and control to higher precision than any other laser fusion facility. Experiments using one of the beams of NIF have demonstrated that NIF can meet its beam performance goals. The National Ignition Campaign (NIC) has been established to manage the ignition effort on NIF. NIC has all of the research and development required to execute the ignition plan and to develop NIF into a fully operational facility. NIF will explore the ignition space, including direct drive, 2{omega} ignition, and fast ignition, to optimize target efficiency for developing fusion as an energy source. In addition to efficient target performance, fusion energy requires significant advances in high repetition rate lasers and fusion reactor technology. The Mercury laser at LLNL is a high repetition rate Nd-glass laser for fusion energy driver development. Mercury uses state-o-the art technology such as ceramic laser slabs and light diode pumping for improved efficiency and thermal management. Progress in NIF, NIC, Mercury, and the path forward for fusion energy will be presented.

Moses, E

2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

3

Inertial Confinement Fusion and the National Ignition Facility (NIF)  

SciTech Connect

Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) seeks to provide sustainable fusion energy by compressing frozen deuterium and tritium fuel to extremely high densities. The advantages of fusion vs. fission are discussed, including total energy per reaction and energy per nucleon. The Lawson Criterion, defining the requirements for ignition, is derived and explained. Different confinement methods and their implications are discussed. The feasibility of creating a power plant using ICF is analyzed using realistic and feasible numbers. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is shown as a significant step forward toward making a fusion power plant based on ICF. NIF is the world’s largest laser, delivering 1.8 MJ of energy, with a peak power greater than 500 TW. NIF is actively striving toward the goal of fusion energy. Other uses for NIF are discussed.

Ross, P.

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

4

Diagnosing implosion performance at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) by means of neutron spectrometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diagnosing implosion performance at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) by means of neutron.1088/0029-5515/53/4/043014 Diagnosing implosion performance at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) by means of neutron spectrometry J at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) provides essential information about the implosion performance. From

5

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) and the National Ignition Campaign (NIC)  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most powerful laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and experiments studying high-energy-density (HED) science, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). NIF construction was certified by the Department of Energy as complete on March 27, 2009. NIF, a 192-beam Nd:glass laser facility, will ultimately produce 1.8-MJ, 500-TW of 351-nm third-harmonic, ultraviolet light. On March 10, 2009, total 192-beam energy of 1.1 MJ was demonstrated; this is approximately 30 times more energy than ever produced in an ICF laser system. The principal goal of NIF is to achieve ignition of a deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel capsule and provide access to HED physics regimes needed for experiments related to national security, fusion energy and broader frontier scientific exploration. NIF experiments in support of indirect-drive ignition began in August 2009. These first experiments represent the next phase of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The NIC is a national effort to achieve fusion ignition and is coordinated through a detailed execution plan that includes the science, technology, and equipment. Equipment required for ignition experiments includes diagnostics, a cryogenic target manipulator, and user optics. Participants in this effort include LLNL, General Atomics (GA), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Energetics (LLE). The primary goal for NIC is to have all of the equipment operational, integrated into the facility, and ready to begin a credible ignition campaign in 2010. With NIF now operational, the long-sought goal of achieving self-sustained nuclear fusion and energy gain in the laboratory is much closer to realization. Successful demonstration of ignition and net energy gain on NIF will be a major step towards demonstrating the feasibility of Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) and will likely focus the world's attention on the possibility of an ICF energy option. NIF experiments to demonstrate ignition and gain will use central-hot-spot (CHS) ignition, where a spherical fuel capsule is simultaneously compressed and ignited. The scientific basis for CHS has been intensively developed. Achieving ignition with CHS will open the door for other advanced concepts, such as the use of high-yield pulses of visible wavelength rather than ultraviolet and Fast Ignition concepts. Moreover, NIF will have important scientific applications in such diverse fields as astrophysics, nuclear physics and materials science. The NIC will develop the full set of capabilities required to operate NIF as a major national and international user facility. A solicitation for NIF frontier science experiments is planned for summer 2009. This paper summarizes the design, performance, and status of NIF and plans for the NIF ignition experimental program. A brief summary of the overall NIF experimental program is also presented.

Moses, E

2009-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

6

Imaging VISAR diagnostic for the National Ignition Facility (NIF)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) requires diagnostics to analyze high-energy density physics experiments. A VISAR (Velocity Interferometry System for Any Reflector) diagnostic has been designed to measure shock velocities, shock breakout times, and shock emission of targets with sizes from 1 to 5 mm. An 8-inch-diameter fused silica triplet lens collects light at f/3 inside the 30-foot-diameter vacuum chamber. The optical relay sends the image out an equatorial port, through a 2-inch-thick vacuum window, and into two interferometers. A 60-kW VISAR probe laser operates at 659.5 nm with variable pulse width. Special coatings on the mirrors and cutoff filters are used to reject the NIF drive laser wavelengths and to pass a band of wavelengths for VISAR, passive shock breakout light, or thermal imaging light (bypassing the interferometers). The first triplet can be no closer than 500 mm from the target chamber center and is protected from debris by a blast window that is replaced after every event. The front end of the optical relay can be temporarily removed from the equatorial port, allowing other experimenters to use that port. A unique resolution pattern has been designed to validate the VISAR diagnostic before each use. All optical lenses are on kinematic mounts so that the pointing accuracy of the optical axis can be checked. Seven CCD cameras monitor the diagnostic alignment.

Malone, R M; Bower, J R; Bradley, D K; Capelle, G A; Celeste, J R; Celliers, P M; Collins, G W; Eckart, M J; Eggert, J H; Frogget, B C; Guyton, R L; Hicks, D G; Kaufman, M I; MacGowan, B J; Montelongo, S; Ng, E W; Robinson, R B; Tunnell, T W; Watts, P W; Zapata, P G

2004-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

7

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) and the issue of nonproliferation. Final study  

SciTech Connect

NIF, the next step proposed by DOE in a progression of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) facilities, is expected to reach the goal of ICF capsule ignition in the laboratory. This report is in response to a request of a Congressman that DOE resolve the question of whether NIF will aid or hinder U.S. nonproliferation efforts. Both technical and policy aspects are addressed, and public participation was part of the decision process. Since the technical proliferation concerns at NIF are manageable and can be made acceptable, and NIF can contribute positively to U.S. arms control and nonproliferation policy goals, it is concluded that NIF supports the nuclear nonproliferation objectives of the United States.

1995-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

8

Fielding of an Imaging VISAR Diagnostic at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) requires diagnostics to analyze high-energy density physics experiments. As a core NIF early light diagnostic, this system measures shock velocities, shock breakout times, and shock emission of targets with sizes from 1 to 5 mm. A 659.5 nm VISAR probe laser illuminates the target. An 8-inch-diameter fused silica triplet lens collects light at f/3 inside the 33-foot-diameter vacuum chamber. The optical relay sends the image out an equatorial port, through a 2-inch-thick vacuum window, and into two VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) interferometers. Both streak cameras and CCD cameras record the images. Total track is 75 feet. The front end of the optical relay can be temporarily removed from the equatorial port, allowing for other experimenters to use that port. The first triplet can be no closer than 500 mm from the target chamber center and is protected from debris by a blast window that is replaced after every event. Along with special coatings on the mirrors, cutoff filters reject the NIF drive laser wavelengths and pass a band of wavelengths for VISAR, for passive shock breakout light, or for thermal imaging light (bypassing the interferometers). Finite Element Analysis was performed on all mounting structures. All optical lenses are on kinematic mounts, so that the pointing accuracy of the optical axis can be checked. A two-color laser alignment scheme is discussed.

Malone, R; Bower, J; Capelle, G; Celeste, J; Celliers, P; Frogget, B C; Guyton, R L; Kauffman, M; Lare, G; Lee, T; MacGowan, B; Montelongo, S; Thomas, T; Tunnell, T; Watts, P

2004-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

9

Overview of the Gamma Reaction History Diagnostic for the National Ignition Facility (NIF)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) has a need for measuring gamma radiation as part of a nuclear diagnostic program. A new gamma-detection diagnostic uses 90º off-axis parabolic mirrors to relay Cherenkov light from a volume of pressurized gas. This nonimaging optical system has the high-speed detector placed at a stop position with the Cherenkov light delayed until after the prompt gammas have passed through the detector. Because of the wavelength range (250 to 700 nm), the optical element surface finish was a key design constraint. A cluster of four channels (each set to a different gas pressure) will collect the time histories for different energy ranges of gammas.

Malone, R M; Frogget, B C; Kaufman, M I; Tibbitts, A; Tunnell, T W; Evans, S C; Herrmann, H W; Kim, Y H; Mack, J M; Young, C S; McGillivray, K D; Palagi, M J

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

The National Ignition Facility and the Ignition Campaign  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(atm-s) Indirect drive on the NIF is within a factor of 2-3 of the conditions required for ignition Callahan -- AAAS, February 14-18, 2013 82013-047661s2.ppt NIF Ignition #12;2013-047661s2.ppt Callahan -- AAAS and initiated operation of NIF as the world's premier HED science facility Story of NIF and Ignition 102013

11

Target Diagnostic Instrument-Based Controls Framework for the National Ignition Facility (NIF)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The extreme physics of targets shocked by NIF's 192-beam laser are observed by a diverse suite of diagnostics including optical backscatter, time-integrated and gated X-ray sensors, and laser velocity interferometry. Diagnostics to diagnose fusion ignition implosion and neutron emissions are being planned. Many diagnostics will be developed by collaborators at other sites, but ad hoc controls could lead to unreliable and costly operations. An instrument-based controls (I-BC) framework for both hardware and software facilitates development and eases integration. Each complex diagnostic typically uses an ensemble of electronic instruments attached to sensors, digitizers, cameras, and other devices. In the I-BC architecture each instrument is interfaced to a low-cost Windows XP processor and Java application. Each instrument is aggregated with others as needed in the supervisory system to form an integrated diagnostic. The Java framework provides data management, control services and operator GUI generation. I-BCs are reusable by replication and reconfiguration for specific diagnostics in XML. Advantages include minimal application code, easy testing, and better reliability. Collaborators save costs by assembling diagnostics with existing I-BCs. This paper discusses target diagnostic instrumentation used on NIF and presents the I-BC architecture and framework.

Shelton, R T; O'Brien, D W; Kamperschroer, J H; Nelson, J R

2007-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

12

OMEGA ICF experiments and preparation for direct drive ignition on NIF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OMEGA ICF experiments and preparation for direct drive ignition on NIF R.L. McCrorya , R.E. Bahra) is investigating various theoretical aspects of a direct drive National Ignition Facility (NIF) ignition target equivalent to those planned for the NIF. The current experimental studies on OMEGA address the essential

13

UCRL-PRES-225531 National ignition facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Title Page UCRL-PRES-225531 #12;National ignition facility #12;NIF is 705,000 #12;NIF laser system #12;NIF us 885 #12;NIF-0506-11956 Laser bay 2 #12;Switchyard 2 #12;Target chamber in the air #12 experiments on NIF have demonstrated #12;21 1 MJ shaping results: Comparison of requested vs measured 3 pulse

14

The National Ignition Facility: Status of Construction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bruce Warner Deputy Associate Director, NIF Programs Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory October 11, 2005 #12;NIF-0605-10997 27EIM/cld NIF-0605-10997-L2 27EIM/cld P LLNLLLNL P9266 #12;NIF-0605-10997 27EIM/cld NIF-0605-10997-L28 27EIM/cld P LLNLLLNL National Ignition FacilityNational Ignition Facility P9292 San

15

Combining a thermal-imaging diagnostic with an existing imaging VISAR diagnostic at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical diagnostics are currently being designed to analyze high-energy density physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Two independent line-imaging Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) interferometers have been fielded to measure shock velocities, breakout times, and emission of targets having sizes of 1-5 mm. An 8-inch-diameter, fused silica triplet lens collects light at f/3 inside the 30-foot-diameter NIF vacuum chamber. VISAR recordings use a 659.5-nm probe laser. By adding a specially coated beam splitter to the interferometer table, light at wavelengths from 540 to 645 nm is spilt into a thermal-imaging diagnostic. Because fused silica lenses are used in the first triplet relay, the intermediate image planes for different wavelengths separate by considerable distances. A corrector lens on the interferometer table reunites these separated wavelength planes to provide a good image. Thermal imaging collects light at f/5 from a 2-mm object placed at Target Chamber Center (TCC). Streak cameras perform VISAR and thermal-imaging recording. All optical lenses are on kinematic mounts so that pointing accuracy of the optical axis may be checked. Counter-propagating laser beams (orange and red) are used to align both diagnostics. The red alignment laser is selected to be at the 50 percent reflection point of the beam splitter. This alignment laser is introduced at the recording streak cameras for both diagnostics and passes through this special beam splitter on its way into the NIF vacuum chamber.

Malone, R; Celeste, J; Celliers, P; Frogget, B; Guyton, R L; Kaufman, M; Lee, T; MacGowan, B; Ng, E W; Reinbachs, I P; Robinson, R B; Seppala, L; Tunnell, T W; Watts, P

2005-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

16

Combining a thermal-imaging diagnostic with an existing imaging VISAR diagnostic at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Optical diagnostics are currently being designed to analyze high-energy density physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Two independent line-imaging Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) interferometers have been fielded to measure shock velocities, breakout times, and emission of targets having sizes of 1–5 mm. An 8-inch-diameter, fused silica triplet lens collects light at f/3 inside the 30-foot-diameter NIF vacuum chamber. VISAR recordings use a 659.5-nm probe laser. By adding a specially coated beam splitter to the interferometer table, light at wavelengths from 540 to 645 nm is spilt into a thermal-imaging diagnostic. Because fused silica lenses are used in the first triplet relay, the intermediate image planes for different wavelengths separate by considerable distances. A corrector lens on the interferometer table reunites these separated wavelength planes to provide a good image. Thermal imaging collects light at f/5 from a 2-mm object placed at Target Chamber Center (TCC). Streak cameras perform VISAR and thermal-imaging recording. All optical lenses are on kinematic mounts so that pointing accuracy of the optical axis may be checked. Counter-propagating laser beams (orange and red) are used to align both diagnostics. The red alignment laser is selected to be at the 50 percent reflection point of the beam splitter. This alignment laser is introduced at the recording streak cameras for both diagnostics and passes through this special beam splitter on its way into the NIF vacuum chamber.

Robert M. Malone; John R. Celesteb; Peter M. Celliers; Brent C. Froggeta; Robert L. Guyton; Morris I. Kaufman; Tony L. Lee; Brian J. MacGowan; Edmund W. Ng; Imants P. Reinbachs; Ronald B. Robinson; Lynn G. Seppala; Tom W. Tunnell; Phillip W. Watts

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

The velocity campaign for ignition on NIF  

SciTech Connect

Achieving inertial confinement fusion ignition requires a symmetric, high velocity implosion. Experiments show that we can reach 95 {+-} 5% of the required velocity by using a 420 TW, 1.6 MJ laser pulse. In addition, experiments with a depleted uranium hohlraum show an increase in capsule performance which suggests an additional 18 {+-} 5 {mu}m/ns of velocity with uranium hohlraums over gold hohlraums. Combining these two would give 99 {+-} 5% of the ignition velocity. Experiments show that we have the ability to tune symmetry using crossbeam transfer. We can control the second Legendre mode (P2) by changing the wavelength separation between the inner and outer cones of laser beams. We can control the azimuthal m = 4 asymmetry by changing the wavelength separation between the 23.5 and 30 degree beams on NIF. This paper describes our 'first pass' tuning the implosion velocity and shape on the National Ignition Facility laser [Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas, 16, 041006 (2009)].

Callahan, D. A.; Meezan, N. B.; Glenzer, S. H.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Celeste, J. R.; Celliers, P. M.; Dixit, S. N.; Doeppner, T.; Dzentitis, E. G.; Glenn, S.; Haan, S. W.; Haynam, C. A.; Hicks, D. G.; Hinkel, D. E.; Jones, O. S.; Landen, O. L.; London, R. A.; MacPhee, A. G. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

18

Development of nuclear diagnostics for the National Ignition Facility ,,invited...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

July 2006; published online 5 October 2006 The National Ignition Facility NIF will provide up to 1.8 MJ of laser energy for imploding inertial confinement fusion ICF targets. Ignited NIF targets are expected of nuclear diagnostics in ICF experiments. In 2005, the suite of nuclear-ignition diagnostics for the NIF

19

Optical alignment techniques for line-imaging velocity interferometry and line-imaging self-emission of targets at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) requires optical diagnostics for measuring shock velocities in shock physics experiments. The nature of the NIF facility requires the alignment of complex three-dimensional optical systems of very long distances. Access to the alignment mechanisms can be limited, and any alignment system must be operator friendly. The Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) measures shock velocities, shock breakout times, and emission of 1- to 5-mm targets at a location remote to the NIF target chamber. Three optical systems using the same vacuum chamber port each have a total track of 21 m. All optical lenses are on kinematic mounts or sliding rails, enabling pointing accuracy of the optical axis to be checked. Counter-propagating laser beams (orange and red) align these diagnostics to a listing of tolerances. Movable aperture cards, placed before and after lens groups, show the spread of alignment spots created by the orange and red alignment lasers. Optical elements include 1-in. to 15-in. diameter mirrors, lenses with up to 10.5-in. diameters, beamsplitters, etalons, dove prisms, filters, and pellicles. Alignment of more than 75 optical elements must be verified before each target shot. Archived images from eight alignment cameras prove proper alignment before each shot.

Malone, Robert; Celeste, John; Celliers, Peter; Frogget, Brent; Robert Guyton,,; Kaufman, Morris; Lee, Tony; MacGowan, Brian; Ng, Edmend; Reinbachs, Imants; Robinson, Ronald; Tunnell, Thomas; Watts, Phillip

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Optical Alignment Techniques for Line-Imaging Velocity Interferometry and Line-Imaging Self-Emission of Targets at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) requires optical diagnostics for measuring shock velocities in shock physics experiments. The nature of the NIF facility requires the alignment of complex three-dimensional optical systems of very long distances. Access to the alignment mechanisms can be limited, and any alignment system must be operator friendly. The Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector measures shock velocities, shock breakout times, and emission of 1- to 5-mm targets at a location remote to the NIF target chamber. Three optical systems using the same vacuum chamber port each have a total track of 21 meters. All optical lenses are on kinematic mounts or sliding rails, enabling pointing accuracy of the optical axis to be checked. Counter-propagating laser beams (orange and red) align these diagnostics to a listing of tolerances. Movable aperture cards, placed before and after lens groups, show the spread of alignment spots created by the orange and red alignment lasers. Optical elements include 1-in. to 15-in. diameter mirrors, lenses with up to 10.5-in. diameters, beamsplitters, etalons, dove prisms, filters, and pellicles. Alignment of more than 75 optical elements must be verified before each target shot. Archived images from eight alignment cameras prove proper alignment before each shot.

Malone, R M; Celeste, J R; Celliers, P M; Frogget, B .; Guyton, R L; Kaufman, M I; Lee, T L; MacGowan, B J; Ng, E W; Reinbachs, I P; Robinson, R B; Tunnell, T W; Watts, P W

2007-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ignition facility nif" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Target Diagnostics Supports NIF's Path to Ignition  

SciTech Connect

The physics requirements derived from the National Ignition Facility (NIF) experimental campaigns are leading to a wide variety of target diagnostics. Software development for the control and analysis of these diagnostics is included in the NIF Integrated Computer Control System, Diagnostic Control System and Data Visualization. These projects implement the configuration, controls, data analysis and visual representation of most of these diagnostics. To date, over 40 target diagnostics have been developed to support NIF experiments. In 2011 diagnostics were developed or enhanced to measure Ignition performance in a high neutron yield environment. Performance is optimized around four key variables: Adiabat (a) which is the strength and timing of four shocks delivered to the target, Velocity (V) of the imploding target, Mix (M) is the uniformity of the burn, and the Shape (S) of the imploding Deuterium Tritium (DT) hot spot. The diagnostics used to measure each of these parameters is shown in figure 1. Adiabat is measured using the Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector (VISAR) diagnostic consisting of three streak cameras. To provide for more accurate adiabat measurements the VISAR streak cameras were enhanced in FY11 with a ten comb fiducial signal controller to allow for post shot correction of the streak camera sweep non-linearity. Mix is measured by the Neutron Time of Flight (NTOF) and Radiochemical Analysis of Gaseous Samples (RAGS) diagnostics. To accommodate high neutron yield shots, NTOF diagnostic controls are being modified to use Mach Zehnder interferometer signals to allow the digitizers to be moved from near the target chamber to the neutron shielded diagnostic mezzanine. In December 2011 the first phase of RAGS diagnostic commissioning will be completed. This diagnostic will analyze the tracers that are added to NIF target capsules that undergo nuclear reactions during the shot. These gases are collected and purified for nuclear counting by the RAGS system. Three new instrument controllers were developed and commissioned to support this diagnostic. A residual-gas analyzer (RGA) instrument measures the gas content at various points in the system. The Digital Gamma Spectrometer instrument measures the radiological spectrum of the decaying gas isotopes. A final instrument controller was developed to interface to a PLC based Gas collection system. In order to support the implosion velocity measurements an additional Gated X-ray Detector (GXD) diagnostic was tested and commissioned. This third GXD views the target through a slit contained in its snout and allows the other GXD diagnostics to be used for measuring the shape on the same shot. In order to measure the implosion shape in a high neutron environment, Actide Readout In A Neutron Environment (ARIANE) and Neutron Imaging (NI) diagnostics were commissioned. The controls for ARIANE, a fixed port gated x-ray imager, contain a neutron shielded camera and micro channel plate pulser with its neutron sensitive electronics located in the diagnostic mezzanine. The NI diagnostic is composed of two Spectral Instruments SI-1000 cameras located 20M from the target and provides neutron images of the DT hot spot for high yield shots. The development and commissioning of these new or enhanced diagnostics in FY11 have provided meaningful insight that facilitates the optimization of the four key Ignition variables. In FY12 they will be adding three new diagnostics and enhancing four existing diagnostics in support of the continuing optimization series of campaigns.

Shelton, R

2011-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

22

Planning for the National Ignition Campaign on NIF Presentation to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Planning for the National Ignition Campaign on NIF Presentation to Fusion Power Associates Annual Meeting Dec 3-4, 2008 Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory John Lindl NIF Programs Chief Scientist a clearly defined path forward to achievement of ignition on NIF ·An extensive scientific data base forms

23

Ignition and Inertial Confinement Fusion at The National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most powerful laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and for studying high-energy-density (HED) science, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF is now conducting experiments to commission the laser drive, the hohlraum and the capsule and to develop the infrastructure needed to begin the first ignition experiments in FY 2010. Demonstration of ignition and thermonuclear burn in the laboratory is a major NIF goal. NIF will achieve this by concentrating the energy from the 192 beams into a mm{sup 3}-sized target and igniting a deuterium-tritium mix, liberating more energy than is required to initiate the fusion reaction. NIF's ignition program is a national effort managed via the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The NIC has two major goals: execution of DT ignition experiments starting in FY2010 with the goal of demonstrating ignition and a reliable, repeatable ignition platform by the conclusion of the NIC at the end of FY2012. The NIC will also develop the infrastructure and the processes required to operate NIF as a national user facility. The achievement of ignition at NIF will demonstrate the scientific feasibility of ICF and focus worldwide attention on laser fusion as a viable energy option. A laser fusion-based energy concept that builds on NIF, known as LIFE (Laser Inertial Fusion Energy), is currently under development. LIFE is inherently safe and can provide a global carbon-free energy generation solution in the 21st century. This paper describes recent progress on NIF, NIC, and the LIFE concept.

Moses, E

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Preparing for Ignition Experiments on the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a 192-beam Nd-glass laser facility presently under construction at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) for performing ignition experiments for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and experiments studying high energy density (HED) science. NIF will produce 1.8 MJ, 500 TW of ultraviolet light ({lambda} = 351 nm) making it the world's largest and most powerful laser system. NIF will be the world's preeminent facility for the study of matter at extreme temperatures and densities for producing and developing ICF. The ignition studies will be an essential step in developing inertial fusion energy (IFE). the NIF Project is over 93% complete and scheduled for completion in 2009. Experiments using one beam have demonstrated that NIF can meet all of its performance goals. A detailed plan called the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) has been developed to begin ignition experiments in 2010. The plan includes the target physics and the equipment such as diagnostics, cryogenic target manipulator and user optics required for the ignition experiment. Target designs have been developed that calculate to ignite at energy as low as 1 MJ. Plans are under way to make NIF a national user facility for experiments on HED physics and nuclear science, including experiments relevant to the development of IFE.

Moses, E; Meier, W

2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

25

National Ignition Facility Title II Design Plan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This National Ignition Facility (NIF) Title II Design Plan defines the work to be performed by the NIF Project Team between November 1996, when the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) reviewed Title I design and authorized the initiation of Title H design and specific long-lead procurements, and September 1998, when Title 11 design will be completed.

Kumpan, S

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

National Ignition Facility faces an uncertain future David Kramer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the National Ignition Facility to achieve a self-sustaining fusion reaction fell short. Now NIF stands to lose that were specified for NIF when the massive laser facility was ap- proved for construction in 1996. President Obama's fiscal year 2014 budget request calls for the end of NIF support for experiments proposed

27

Gamma Bang Time/Reaction History Diagnostics for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Using 90-degree Off-axis Parabolic Mirrors  

SciTech Connect

Gas Cherenkov detectors (GCD) have been used to convert fusion gamma into photons to achieve gamma bang time (GBT) and reaction history measurements. The GCD designed for Omega used Cassegrain reflector optics in order to fit inside a 10-inch manipulator. A novel design for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) using 90º off-axis parabolic (OAP) mirrors will increase light collection efficiency from fusion gammas and achieve minimum time dispersion. The broadband Cherenkov light (from 200 to 800 nm) is relayed into a high-speed detector using three parabolic mirrors. Because light is collected from many source planes throughout the CO2 gas volume, the detector is positioned at the stop position rather than an image position. The stop diameter and its position are independent of the light-generation location along the gas cell. The current design collects light from a 100-mm-diameter by 500-mm-long gas volume. Optical ray tracings demonstrate how light can be collected from different angled trajectories of the Compton electrons as they fly through the CO2 gas volume. A cluster of four channels will allow for increased dynamic range, as well as different gamma energy threshold sensitivities.

R.M. Malone, H.W. Herrmann, J.M. Mack, C.S. Young, W. Stoeffl

2008-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Gamma Bang Time/Reaction History Diagnostics for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Using 90-degree Off-axis Parabolic Mirrors  

SciTech Connect

Gas Cherenkov detectors (GCD) have been used to convert fusion gamma into photons to achieve gamma bang time (GBT) and reaction history measurements. The GCD designed for Omega used Cassegrain reflector optics in order to fit inside a ten-inch manipulator. A novel design for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) using 90º Off-Axis Parabolic (OAP) mirrors will increase light collection efficiency from fusion gammas and achieve minimum time dispersion. The broadband Cherenkov light (from 200 to 800 nm) is relayed into a high-speed detector using three parabolic mirrors. Because light is collected from many source planes throughout the CO2 gas volume, the detector is positioned at the stop position rather than an image position. The stop diameter and its position are independent of the light-generation location along the gas cell. The current design collects light from a 100-mm diameter by 500-mm-long gas volume. Optical ray tracings demonstrate how light can be collected from different angled trajectories of the Compton electrons as they fly through the CO2 gas volume. A cluster of four channels will allow for increased dynamic range as well as different gamma energy threshold sensitivities. 52.70.La, 29.40.Ka, 42.15.Eq, 07.60.-j, 07.85.-m

H.W. Herrmann, R.M. Malone, W. Stoeffl, J.M. Mack, C.S. Young

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

IGNITION AND FRONTIER SCIENCE ON THE NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most powerful laser system for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and experiments studying high-energy-density (HED) science, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF construction Project was certified by the Department of Energy as complete on March 30, 2009. NIF, a 192-beam Nd-glass laser facility, will produce 1.8 MJ, 500 TW of light at the third-harmonic, ultraviolet light of 351 nm. On March 10, 2009, a total 192-beam energy of 1.1 MJ was demonstrated; this is approximately 30 times more energy than ever produced in an ICF laser system. The principal goal of NIF is to achieve ignition of a deuterium-tritium (DT) fuel capsule and provide access to HED physics regimes needed for experiments related to national security, fusion energy and for broader frontier scientific exploration. NIF experiments in support of indirect drive ignition will begin in FY2009. These first experiments represent the next phase of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The NIC is a 1.7 billion dollar national effort to achieve fusion ignition and is coordinated through a detailed execution plan that includes the science, technology, and equipment. Equipment required for ignition experiments include diagnostics, cryogenic target manipulator, and user optics. Participants in this effort include LLNL, General Atomics (GA), Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Sandia National Laboratory (SNL), and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Energetics (LLE). The primary goal for NIC is to have all of the equipment operational and integrated into the facility and be ready to begin a credible ignition campaign in 2010. With NIF now operational, the long-sought goal of achieving self-sustained nuclear fusion and energy gain in the laboratory is much closer to realization. Successful demonstration of ignition and net energy gain on NIF will be a major step towards demonstrating the feasibility of Inertial Fusion Energy (IFE) and will likely focus the world's attention on the possibility of an ICF energy option. NIF experiments to demonstrate ignition and gain will use central-hot-spot (CHS) ignition, where a spherical fuel capsule is simultaneously compressed and ignited. The scientific basis for CHS has been intensively developed and has high probability of success. Achieving ignition with CHS will open the door for other advanced concepts, such as the use of high-yield pulses of visible wavelength rather than ultraviolet and Fast Ignition concepts. Moreover, NIF will have important scientific applications in such diverse fields as astrophysics, nuclear physics and materials science. The NIC will develop the full set of capabilities required to operate NIF as a major national and international user facility. A solicitation for NIF frontier science experiments to be conducted by the academic community is planned for summer 2009. This paper summarizes the design, performance, and status of NIF, experimental plans for NIC, and will present a brief discussion of the unparalleled opportunities to explore frontier basic science that will be available on the NIF.

Moses, E

2009-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

30

NIF achieves record laser energy in pursuit of fusion ignition | National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

achieves record laser energy in pursuit of fusion ignition | National achieves record laser energy in pursuit of fusion ignition | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > NIF achieves record laser energy in pursuit ... NIF achieves record laser energy in pursuit of fusion ignition Posted By Office of Public Affairs NNSA Blog The NNSA's National Ignition Facility (NIF) surpassed a critical

31

Summary of Blast Shield and Material Testing for Development of Solid Debris Collection at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)  

SciTech Connect

The ability to collect solid debris from the target chamber following a NIF shot has application for both capsule diagnostics, particularly for fuel-ablator mix, and measuring cross sections relevant to the Stockpile Stewardship program and nuclear astrophysics. Simulations have shown that doping the capsule with up to 10{sup 15} atoms of an impurity not otherwise found in the capsule does not affect its performance. The dopant is an element that will undergo nuclear activations during the NIF implosion, forming radioactive species that can be collected and measured after extraction from the target chamber. For diagnostics, deuteron or alpha induced reactions can be used to probe the fuel-ablator mix. For measuring neutron cross sections, the dopant should be something that is sensitive to the 14 MeV neutrons produced through the fusion of deuterium and tritium. Developing the collector is a challenge due to the extreme environment of the NIF chamber. The collector surface is exposed to a large photon flux from x-rays and unconverted laser light before it is exposed to a debris wind that is formed from vaporized material from the target chamber center. The photons will ablate the collector surface to some extent, possibly impeding the debris from reaching the collector and sticking. In addition, the collector itself must be mechanically strong enough to withstand the large amount of energy it will be exposed to, and it should be something that will be easy to count and chemically process. In order to select the best material for the collector, a variety of different metals have been tested in the NIF chamber. They were exposed to high-energy laser shots in order to evaluate their postshot surface characterization, morphology, degree of melt, and their ability to retain debris from the chamber center. The first set of samples consisted of 1 mm thick pieces of aluminum that had been fielded in the chamber as blast shields protecting the neutron activation diagnostic. Ten of these pieces were fielded at the equator and one was fielded on the pole. The shields were analyzed using a combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), x-ray fluorescence (XRF), neutron activation analysis (NAA) and chemical leaching followed by mass spectrometry. On each shield, gold debris originating from the gold hohlraum was observed, as well as large quantities of debris that were present in the center of the target chamber at the time of the shot (i.e., stainless steel, indium, copper, etc.) Debris was visible in the SEM as large blobs or splats of material that had encountered the surface of the aluminum and stuck. The aluminum itself had obviously melted and condensed, and some of the large debris splats arrived after the surface had already hardened. Melt depth was determined by cross sectioning the pieces and measuring the melted surface layers via SEM. After the SEM analysis was completed, the pieces were sent for NAA at the USGS reactor and were analyzed by U. Greife at the Colorado School of Mines. The NAA showed that the majority of gold mass present on the shields was not in the form of large blobs and splats, but was present as small particulates that had most likely formed as condensed vapor. Further analysis showed that the gold was entrained in the melted aluminum surface layers and did not extend down into the bulk of the aluminum. Once the gold mass was accounted for from the NAA, it was determined that the aluminum fielded at the equator was collecting a fraction of the total gold hohlraum mass equivalent to 120% {+-} 10% of the solid angle subtended by the shield. The attached presentation has more information on the results of the aluminum blast shield analysis. In addition to the information given in the presentation, the surfaces of the shields have been chemically leached and submitted for mass spectrometric analysis. The results from that analysis are expected to arrive after the due date of this report and will be written up at a later time. Based on the results of the aluminum b

Shaughnessy, D A; Gostic, J M; Moody, K J; Grant, P M; Lewis, L A; Hutcheon, I D

2011-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

32

Preparation for Ignition Experiments on the NIF Fusion Power Associates Annual Meeting  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Preparation for Ignition Experiments on the NIF Fusion Power Associates Annual Meeting December 4-5, 2007 John Lindl NIF and Photon Science Directorate Chief Scientist Lawrence Livermore National chance for ignition in early NIF operations · The initial ignition experiments only scratch the surface

33

National Ignition Facility & Photon Science - Bringing Star Power to Earth  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NIF Go NIF Go LLNL Logo Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory LLNL Home NIF Home LIFE Home Jobs Site Map Contact News Press Releases In the News Status Update Media Assistance About Us National Ignition Facility About NIF How NIF Works The Seven Wonders of NIF Building NIF An Engineering Marvel NIFFY Early Light Collaborators Status Visiting NIF Missions National Security Energy for the Future Understanding the Universe People The People of NIF Awards NIF Professor Sabbatical Opportunities NIF Online Store Programs National Ignition Campaign How to Make a Star (ICF) Target Physics Target Fabrication Cryogenic Target System Diagnostics Participants Photon Science & Applications Advanced Optics Advanced Radiography Directed Energy Fusion Energy Inertial Fusion Energy How IFE Works Science at the Extremes

34

Microsoft Word - NIF Industry Day Agenda  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Washington, DC 20585 National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) National Ignition Facility (NIF) Target...

35

Design and reality for NIF ignition targets  

SciTech Connect

Advances in ICF experiments and modeling have led to improved understanding of the growth of instabilities during capsule implosion and the effects on capsule performance. This has led to more refined specifications on the characteristics of igniting capsules, all of which have solid D-T fuel layers. These specifications involve a trade-off between the interior ice surface structure, outer capsule surface structure, and time-dependent drive asymmetry.

Bernat, T.P.

1996-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

36

Stockpile Stewardship and the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's most energetic laser system, is operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Since the completion of the construction project in March 2009, NIF has completed nearly 150 target experiments for the National Ignition Campaign (NIC), High Energy Density Stewardship Science (HEDSS) in the areas of radiation transport, material dynamics at high pressure in the solid state, as well as fundamental science and other national security missions. NIF capabilities and infrastructure are in place to support all of its missions with over 50 X-ray, optical and nuclear diagnostic systems and the ability to shoot cryogenic targets and DT layered capsules. NIF is now qualified for use of tritium and other special materials as well as to perform high yield experiments and classified experiments. DT implosions with record indirect-drive neutron yield of 4.5 x 10{sup 14} neutrons have been achieved. A series of 43 experiments were successfully executed over a 27-day period, demonstrating the ability to perform precise experiments in new regimes of interest to HEDSS. This talk will provide an update of the progress on the NIF capabilities, NIC accomplishments, as well as HEDSS and fundamental science experimental results and an update of the experimental plans for the coming year.

Moses, E

2012-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

37

National Ignition Facility project acquisition plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this National Ignition Facility Acquisition Plan is to describe the overall procurement strategy planned for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Project. The scope of the plan describes the procurement activities and acquisition strategy for the following phases of the NIF Project, each of which receives either plant and capital equipment (PACE) or other project cost (OPC) funds: Title 1 and 2 design and Title 3 engineering (PACE); Optics manufacturing facilitization and pilot production (OPC); Convention facility construction (PACE); Procurement, installation, and acceptance testing of equipment (PACE); and Start-up (OPC). Activities that are part of the base Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) Program are not included in this plan. The University of California (UC), operating Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Lockheed-Martin, which operates Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) and the University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics (UR-LLE), will conduct the acquisition of needed products and services in support of their assigned responsibilities within the NIF Project structure in accordance with their prime contracts with the Department of Energy (DOE). LLNL, designated as the lead Laboratory, will have responsibility for all procurements required for construction, installation, activation, and startup of the NIF.

Callaghan, R.W.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Electron generation and transport in intense relativistic laser-plasma interactions relevant to fast ignition ICF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ix Figure 1.10: (a) The NIF ignition scale cone-guided FINational Ignition Facility (NIF) experiments will focus onthe injection Figure 1.10: (a) The NIF ignition scale cone-

Ma, Tammy Yee Wing

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

The Development of Indirect Drive ICF and the Countdown to Ignition Experiments on the NIF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Development of Indirect Drive ICF and the Countdown to Ignition Experiments on the NIF Maxwell Prize Address APS Division of Plasma Physics Meeting November 15, 2007 John Lindl NIF and Photon Science.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 #12;The NIF

40

Shock Timing Techniques for Ignition Capsules on the NIF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results from a series of shock trajectory measurements in planar liquid deuterium targets will set the pulse shape they use for ignition capsules at the National Ignition Facility. They discuss outstanding issues for this concept, in particular, ideas for certifying that the drive on a planar sample is the same as on a spherical capsule.

Munro, D H; Haan, S W; Collins, G W; Celliers, P M

2003-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ignition facility nif" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Design of a deuterium and tritium-ablator shock ignition target for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

Shock ignition presents a viable path to ignition and high gain on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In this paper, we describe the development of the 1D design of 0.5 MJ class, all-deuterium and tritium (fuel and ablator) shock ignition target that should be reasonably robust to Rayleigh-Taylor fluid instabilities, mistiming, and hot electron preheat. The target assumes 'day one' NIF hardware and produces a yield of 31 MJ with reasonable allowances for laser backscatter, absorption efficiency, and polar drive power variation. The energetics of polar drive laser absorption require a beam configuration with half of the NIF quads dedicated to launching the ignitor shock, while the remaining quads drive the target compression. Hydrodynamic scaling of the target suggests that gains of 75 and yields 70 MJ may be possible.

Terry, Matthew R.; Perkins, L. John; Sepke, Scott M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Ave., Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

42

Target Visualization at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

As the National Ignition Facility continues its campaign to achieve ignition, new methods and tools will be required to measure the quality of the targets used to achieve this goal. Techniques have been developed to measure target surface features using a phase-shifting diffraction interferometer and Leica Microsystems confocal microscope. Using these techniques we are able to produce a detailed view of the shell surface, which in turn allows us to refine target manufacturing and cleaning processes. However, the volume of data produced limits the methods by which this data can be effectively viewed by a user. This paper introduces an image-based visualization system for data exploration of target shells at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. It aims to combine multiple image sets into a single visualization to provide a method of navigating the data in ways that are not possible with existing tools.

Potter, D

2011-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

43

Analysis of the National Ignition Facility Ignition Hohlraum Energetics Experiments  

SciTech Connect

A series of forty experiments on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. I. Moses et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 041006 (2009)] to study energy balance and implosion symmetry in reduced- and full-scale ignition hohlraums was shot at energies up to 1.3 MJ. This paper reports the findings of the analysis of the ensemble of experimental data obtained that has produced an improved model for simulating ignition hohlraums. Last year the first observation in a NIF hohlraum of energy transfer between cones of beams as a function of wavelength shift between those cones was reported [P. Michel, et al, Phys of Plasmas, 17, 056305, (2010)]. Detailed analysis of hohlraum wall emission as measured through the laser entrance hole (LEH) has allowed the amount of energy transferred versus wavelength shift to be quantified. The change in outer beam brightness is found to be quantitatively consistent with LASNEX [G. B. Zimmerman and W. L. Kruer, Comments Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 2, 51 (1975)] simulations using the predicted energy transfer when possible saturation of the plasma wave mediating the transfer is included. The effect of the predicted energy transfer on implosion symmetry is also found to be in good agreement with gated x-ray framing camera images. Hohlraum energy balance, as measured by x-ray power escaping the LEH, is quantitatively consistent with revised estimates of backscatter and incident laser energy combined with a more rigorous non-local-thermodynamic-equilibrium atomic physics model with greater emissivity than the simpler average-atom model used in the original design of NIF targets.

Town, R J; Rosen, M D; Michel, P A; Divol, L; Moody, J D; Kyrala, G A; Schneider, M B; Kline, J L; Thomas, C A; Milovich, J L; Callahan, D A; Meezan, N B; Hinkel, D E; Williams, E A; Berger, R L; Edwards, M J; Suter, L J; Haan, S W; Lindl, J D; Dixit, S; Glenzer, S H; Landen, O L; Moses, E I; Scott, H A; Harte, J A; Zimmerman, G B

2010-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

44

National Ignition Facility Target Chamber  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On June 11, 1999 the Department of Energy dedicated the single largest piece of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California. The ten (10) meter diameter aluminum target high vacuum chamber will serve as the working end of the largest laser in the world. The output of 192 laser beams will converge at the precise center of the chamber. The laser beams will enter the chamber in two by two arrays to illuminate 10 millimeter long gold cylinders called hohlraums enclosing 2 millimeter capsule containing deuterium, tritium and isotopes of hydrogen. The two isotopes will fuse, thereby creating temperatures and pressures resembling those found only inside stars and in detonated nuclear weapons, but on a minute scale. The NIF Project will serve as an essential facility to insure safety and reliability of our nation's nuclear arsenal as well as demonstrating inertial fusion's contribution to creating electrical power. The paper will discuss the requirements that had to be addressed during the design, fabrication and testing of the target chamber. A team from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and LLNL with input from industry performed the configuration and basic design of the target chamber. The method of fabrication and construction of the aluminum target chamber was devised by Pitt-Des Moines, Inc. (PDM). PDM also participated in the design of the chamber in areas such as the Target Chamber Realignment and Adjustment System, which would allow realignment of the sphere laser beams in the event of earth settlement or movement from a seismic event. During the fabrication of the target chamber the sphericity tolerances had to be addressed for the individual plates. Procedures were developed for forming, edge preparation and welding of individual plates. Construction plans were developed to allow the field construction of the target chamber to occur parallel to other NIF construction activities. This was necessary to achieve the overall schedule. Plans had to be developed for the precise location and alignment of laser beam ports. Upon completion of the fabrication of the aluminum target chamber in a temporary structure the 130 ton sphere was moved from the temporary construction enclosure to its final location in the target building. Prior to the installation of a concrete shield and after completion of the welding of the chamber penetrations vacuum leak checking was performed to insure the vacuum integrity of target chamber. The entire spherical chamber external surface supports a 40 cm thick reinforced concrete shield after installation in the target building. The final task is a total survey of the laser ports and the contour machining of spacer plates so that laser devices attached to these ports meet the alignment criteria.

Wavrik, R W; Cox, J R; Fleming, P J

2000-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

45

The National Ignition Facility and the Path to Fusion Energy  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is operational and conducting experiments at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental facility with 192 beams capable of delivering 1.8 megajoules of 500-terawatt ultraviolet laser energy, over 60 times more energy than any previous laser system. The NIF can create temperatures of more than 100 million degrees and pressures more than 100 billion times Earth's atmospheric pressure. These conditions, similar to those at the center of the sun, have never been created in the laboratory and will allow scientists to probe the physics of planetary interiors, supernovae, black holes, and other phenomena. The NIF's laser beams are designed to compress fusion targets to the conditions required for thermonuclear burn, liberating more energy than is required to initiate the fusion reactions. Experiments on the NIF are focusing on demonstrating fusion ignition and burn via inertial confinement fusion (ICF). The ignition program is conducted via the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) - a partnership among LLNL, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Sandia National Laboratories, University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics, and General Atomics. The NIC program has also established collaborations with the Atomic Weapons Establishment in the United Kingdom, Commissariat a Energie Atomique in France, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, and many others. Ignition experiments have begun that form the basis of the overall NIF strategy for achieving ignition. Accomplishing this goal will demonstrate the feasibility of fusion as a source of limitless, clean energy for the future. This paper discusses the current status of the NIC, the experimental steps needed toward achieving ignition and the steps required to demonstrate and enable the delivery of fusion energy as a viable carbon-free energy source.

Moses, E

2011-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

46

NIST: NIF - Neutron Imaging Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 1 above) is located at Beam Tube 2 (BT-2 ... Figure 2. Plan view of the neutron imaging facility ... still a significant amount of high energy neutrons and ...

47

The national ignition facility: early operational experience with a large Ada control system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) currently under construction at the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt laser being built by the Department of Energy and the National ...

Robert W. Carey; Paul J. Van Arsdall; John P. Woodruff

2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Prompt Beta Spectroscopy as a Diagnostic for Mix in Ignited NIF Capsules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) technology is designed to drive deuterium-tritium (DT) internal confinement fusion (ICF) targets to ignition using indirect radiation from laser beam energy captured in a hohlraum. Hydrodynamical instabilities at interfaces in the ICF capsule leading to mix between the DT fue l and the ablator shell material are of fundamental physical interest and can affect the performance characteristics of the capsule. In this Letter we describe new radiochemical diagnostics for mix processes in ICF capsules with plastic or Be (0.9%Cu) ablator shells. Reactions of high-energy tritons with shell material produce high-energy $\\beta$-emitters. We show that mix between the DT fuel and the shell material enhances high-energy prompt beta emission from these reactions by more than an order of magnitude over that expected in the absence of mix.

A. C. Hayes; G. Jungman; J. C. Solem; P. A. Bradley; R. S. Rundberg

2004-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

49

The National Ignition Facility: The Path to a Carbon-Free Energy Future  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF), the world's largest and most energetic laser system, is now operational at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). The NIF will enable exploration of scientific problems in national strategic security, basic science and fusion energy. One of the early NIF goals centers on achieving laboratory-scale thermonuclear ignition and energy gain, demonstrating the feasibility of laser fusion as a viable source of clean, carbon-free energy. This talk will discuss the precision technology and engineering challenges of building the NIF and those we must overcome to make fusion energy a commercial reality.

Stolz, C J

2011-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

50

Princeton Plasma Physics Lab - National Ignition Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

national-ignition-facility National Ignition Facility en Summary of Assessment of Prospects for Inertial Fusion Energy http:www.pppl.govnode1361

51

Progress Toward Ignition on the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The principal approach to ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is indirect drive. A schematic of an ignition target is shown in Figure 1. The laser beams are focused through laser entrance holes at each end of a high-Z cylindrical case, or hohlraum. The lasers irradiate the hohlraum walls producing x-rays that ablate and compress the fuel capsule in the center of the hohlraum. The hohlraum is made of Au, U, or other high-Z material. For ignition targets, the hohlraum is {approx}0.5 cm diameter by {approx}1 cm in length. The hohlraum absorbs the incident laser energy producing x-rays for symmetrically imploding the capsule. The fuel capsule is a {approx}2-mm-diameter spherical shell of CH, Be, or C filled with DT fuel. The DT fuel is in the form of a cryogenic layer on the inside of the capsule. X-rays ablate the outside of the capsule, producing a spherical implosion. The imploding shell stagnates in the center, igniting the DT fuel. NIC has overseen installation of all of the hardware for performing ignition experiments, including commissioning of approximately 50 diagnostic systems in NIF. The diagnostics measure scattered optical light, x-rays from the hohlraum over the energy range from 100 eV to 500 keV, and x-rays, neutrons, and charged particles from the implosion. An example of a diagnostic is the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) built by a collaboration of scientists from MIT, UR-LLE, and LLNL shown in Figure 2. MRS measures the neutron spectrum from the implosion, providing information on the neutron yield and areal density that are metrics of the quality of the implosion. Experiments on NIF extend ICF research to unexplored regimes in target physics. NIF can produce more than 50 times the laser energy and more than 20 times the power of any previous ICF facility. Ignition scale hohlraum targets are three to four times larger than targets used at smaller facilities, and the ignition drive pulses are two to five times longer. The larger targets and longer pulse lengths produce unique plasma conditions for laser-plasma instabilities that could reduce hohlraum coupling efficiency. Initial experiments have demonstrated efficient coupling of laser energy to x-rays. X-ray drive greater than 300 eV has been measured in gas-filled ignition hohlraum and shows the expected scaling with laser energy and hohlraum scale size. Experiments are now optimizing capsule implosions for ignition. Ignition conditions require assembling the fuel with sufficient density and temperature for thermonuclear burn. X-rays ablate the outside of the capsule, accelerating and spherically compressing the capsule for assembling the fuel. The implosion stagnates, heating the central core and producing a hot spot that ignites and burns the surrounding fuel. The four main characteristics of the implosion are shell velocity, central hot spot shape, fuel adiabat, and mix. Experiments studying these four characteristics of implosions are used to optimize the implosion. Integrated experiments using cryogenic fuel layer experiments demonstrate the quality of the implosion as the optimization experiments progress. The final compressed fuel conditions are diagnosed by measuring the x-ray emission from the hot core and the neutrons and charged particles produced in the fusion reactions. Metrics of the quality of the implosion are the neutron yield and the shell areal density, as well as the size and shape of the core. The yield depends on the amount of fuel in the hot core and its temperature and is a gauge of the energy coupling to the fuel. The areal density, the density of the fuel times its thickness, diagnoses the fuel assembly, which is measured using the fraction of neutrons that are down scattered passing through the dense shell. The yield and fraction of down scattered neutrons, or shell rho-r, from the cryogenic layered implosions are shown in Figure 3. The different sets of data represent results after a series of implosion optimization experiments. Both yield and areal density show significant increases as a result of the optimiza

Kauffman, R L

2011-10-17T23:59:59.000Z

52

Shock timing on the National Ignition Facility: First Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental campaign to tune the initial shock compression sequence of capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) was initiated in late 2010. The experiments use a NIF ignition-scale hohlraum and capsule that employs a reentrant cone to provide optical access to the shocks as they propagate in the liquid deuterium-filled capsule interior. The strength and timing of the shock sequence is diagnosed with velocity interferometry that provides target performance data used to set the pulse shape for ignition capsule implosions that follow. From the start, these measurements yielded significant new information on target performance, leading to improvements in the target design. We describe the results and interpretation of the initial tuning experiments.

Celliers, P M; Robey, H F; Boehly, T R; Alger, E; Azevedo, S; Berzins, L V; Bhandarkar, S D; Bowers, M W; Brereton, S J; Callahan, D; Castro, C; Chandrasekaran, H; Choate, C; Clark, D; Coffee, K R; Datte, P S; Dewald, E L; DiNicola, P; Dixit, S; Doeppner, T; Dzenitis, E; Edwards, M J; Eggert, J H; Fair, J; Farley, D R; Frieders, G; Gibson, C R; Giraldez, E; Haan, S; Haid, B; Hamza, A V; Haynam, C; Hicks, D G; Holunga, D M; Horner, J B; Jancaitis, K; Jones, O S; Kalantar, D; Kline, J L; Krauter, K G; Kroll, J J; LaFortune, K N; Pape, S L; Malsbury, T; Maypoles, E R; Milovich, J L; Moody, J D; Moreno, K; Munro, D H; Nikroo, A; Olson, R E; Parham, T; Pollaine, S; Radousky, H B; Ross, G F; Sater, J; Schneider, M B; Shaw, M; Smith, R F; Thomas, C A; Throop, A; Town, R J; Trummer, D; Van Wonterghem, B M; Walters, C F; Widmann, K; Widmayer, C; Young, B K; Atherton, L J; Collins, G W; Landen, O L; Lindl, J D; MacGowan, B J; Meyerhofer, D D; Moses, E I

2011-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

53

Radiochemistry: A versatile diagnostic for the NIF ignition campaign  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to provide quick, clear, concise information about radiochemical diagnostics for the NIF program. Radiochemistry is perhaps the most versatile, flexible and dynamic of all nuclear diagnostics because it provides quantitative data on multiple capsule performance parameters such as mix, asymmetry of implosion, shell and fuel {rho}R, yield, neutron spectral information, high energy neutron information, fill tube jets, charged particle stopping, and the fission yield of the hohlraum by employing a variety of nuclear reactions on materials either present naturally in the capsule or specifically doped into the capsule. The choice and location of the doped material, together with the specific nuclear reaction used to produce a measurable product nuclide or ratio of nuclides, provides significant diagnostic information on the performance of the capsule during the experiment. The nature of the experiment, design of the capsule including fuel(s), and desired diagnostic information would dictate the radiochemical dopants used on any given shot--not all reactions would be possible nor monitored on any given experiment. Some of this diagnostic information is obtainable with other diagnostics, for example, the neutron yield is measured using Cu-activation pucks or nTOF. The unique niche of radiochemistry, for which few other measurements are currently planned, is the quantification of ablator/fuel mix. This diagnostic can supply complementary information on ablator {rho}R, asymmetry and unique information on mix--three of the four important concerns of the ignition campaign. This paper will not discuss the additional nuclear chemistry and physics possible by utilizing radiochemistry collection and similar nuclear reactions.

Stoyer, M A; Cerjan, C J; Moody, K J; Hoffman, R D; Bernstein, L A; Shaughnessy, D A

2008-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

54

National Ignition Facility Project Completion and Control System Status  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is the world's largest and most energetic laser experimental system providing a scientific center to study inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and matter at extreme energy densities and pressures. Completed in 2009, NIF is a stadium-sized facility containing a 1.8-MJ, 500-TW 192-beam ultraviolet laser and target chamber. A cryogenic tritium target system and suite of optical, X-ray and nuclear diagnostics will support experiments in a strategy to achieve fusion ignition starting in 2010. Automatic control of NIF is performed by the large-scale Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS), which is implemented by 2 MSLOC of Java and Ada running on 1300 front-end processors and servers. The ICCS framework uses CORBA distribution for interoperation between heterogeneous languages and computers. Laser setup is guided by a physics model and shots are coordinated by data-driven distributed workflow engines. The NIF information system includes operational tools and a peta-scale repository for provisioning experimental results. This paper discusses results achieved and the effort now underway to conduct full-scale operations and prepare for ignition.

Van Arsdall, P J; Azevedo, S G; Beeler, R G; Bryant, R M; Carey, R W; Demaret, R D; Fisher, J M; Frazier, T M; Lagin, L J; Ludwigsen, A P; Marshall, C D; Mathisen, D G; Reed, R K

2009-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

55

The National Ignition Facility: The Path to Ignition, High Energy Density Science and Inertial Fusion Energy  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, CA, is a Nd:Glass laser facility capable of producing 1.8 MJ and 500 TW of ultraviolet light. This world's most energetic laser system is now operational with the goals of achieving thermonuclear burn in the laboratory and exploring the behavior of matter at extreme temperatures and energy densities. By concentrating the energy from its 192 extremely energetic laser beams into a mm{sup 3}-sized target, NIF can produce temperatures above 100 million K, densities of 1,000 g/cm{sup 3}, and pressures 100 billion times atmospheric pressure - conditions that have never been created in a laboratory and emulate those in the interiors of planetary and stellar environments. On September 29, 2010, NIF performed the first integrated ignition experiment which demonstrated the successful coordination of the laser, the cryogenic target system, the array of diagnostics and the infrastructure required for ignition. Many more experiments have been completed since. In light of this strong progress, the U.S. and the international communities are examining the implication of achieving ignition on NIF for inertial fusion energy (IFE). A laser-based IFE power plant will require a repetition rate of 10-20 Hz and a 10% electrical-optical efficiency laser, as well as further advances in large-scale target fabrication, target injection and tracking, and other supporting technologies. These capabilities could lead to a prototype IFE demonstration plant in 10- to 15-years. LLNL, in partnership with other institutions, is developing a Laser Inertial Fusion Energy (LIFE) baseline design and examining various technology choices for LIFE power plant This paper will describe the unprecedented experimental capabilities of the NIF, the results achieved so far on the path toward ignition, the start of fundamental science experiments and plans to transition NIF to an international user facility providing access to researchers around the world. The paper will conclude with a discussion of LIFE, its development path and potential to enable a carbon-free clean energy future.

Moses, E

2011-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

56

Power conditioning development for the National Ignition Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a high energy glass laser system and target chamber that will be used for research in inertial confinement fusion. The 192 beams of the NIF laser system are pumped by over 8600 Xenon flashlamps. The power conditioning system for NIF must deliver nearly 300 MJ of energy to the flashlamps in a cost effective and reliable manner. The present system design has over 200 capacitive energy storage modules that store approximately 1.7 MJ each and deliver that energy through a single switch assembly to 20 parallel sets of two series flashlamps. Although there are many possible system designs, few will meet the aggressive cost goals necessary to make the system affordable. Sandia National Laboratory (SNL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) are developing the system and component technologies that will be required to build the power conditioning system for the National Ignition Facility. This paper will describe the ongoing development activities for the NIF power conditioning system.

Newton, M.A.; Larson, D.W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Wilson, J.M.; Harjes, H.C.; Savage, M.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Anderson, R.L. [American Controls, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States)

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

NIF achieves record laser energy in pursuit of fusion ignition...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

achieves record laser energy in pursuit of fusion ignition | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the...

58

June 11, 1999: National Ignition Facility  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

June 11, 1999Secretary Richardson dedicates the National Ignition Facility target chamber at DOE's Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

59

Demonstration of the shock-timing technique for ignition targets on the National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A high-performance inertial confinement fusion capsule is compressed by multiple shock waves before it implodes. To minimize the entropy acquired by the fuel, the strength and timing of those shock waves must be accurately controlled. Ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will employ surrogate targets designed to mimic ignition targets while making it possible to measure the shock velocities inside the capsule. A series of experiments on the OMEGA laser facility [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] validated those targets and the diagnostic techniques proposed. Quartz was selected for the diagnostic window and shock-velocity measurements were demonstrated in Hohlraum targets heated to 180 eV. Cryogenic experiments using targets filled with liquid deuterium further demonstrated the entire timing technique in a Hohlraum environment. Direct-drive cryogenic targets with multiple spherical shocks were used to further validate this technique, including convergence effects at relevant pressures (velocities) and sizes. These results provide confidence that shock velocity and timing can be measured in NIF ignition targets, allowing these critical parameters to be optimized.

Boehly, T. R.; Hu, S. X.; Morozas, J. A.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14645 (United States); Munro, D.; Celliers, P. M.; Hicks, D. G.; Collins, G. W.; Robey, H. F.; Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Olson, R. E. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); Goncharov, V. N. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14645 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, New York 14645 (United States); Meyerhofer, D. D. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14645 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Rochester, New York 14645 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, New York 14645 (United States)

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

60

National Ignition Facility computational fluid dynamics modeling and light fixture case studies  

SciTech Connect

This report serves as a guide to the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) as a design tool for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) program Title I and Title II design phases at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. In particular, this report provides general guidelines on the technical approach to performing and interpreting any and all CFD calculations. In addition, a complete CFD analysis is presented to illustrate these guidelines on a NIF-related thermal problem.

Martin, R.; Bernardin, J.; Parietti, L.; Dennison, B.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ignition facility nif" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Sensitivity of NIF-scale backlit thin shell implosions to hohlraum symmetry in the foot of the ignition drive pulse  

SciTech Connect

A necessary condition for igniting indirectly-driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) spherical capsules on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is controlling drive flux asymmetry to the 1% level time-integrated over the pulse and with < 10%/ns swings during the pulse [J. D. Lindl et al., 'The Physics Basis for Ignition using Indirect Drive Targets on the National Ignition Facility', Physics of Plasmas 11, 339 (2003)]. While drive symmetry during the first 2 ns of the pulse can be inferred by using the re-emission pattern from a surrogate high Z sphere [E. Dewald et al. to be published in Rev. Sci. Inst.] and symmetry during the last 5 ns inferred from the shape of fully imploded capsules [A. Hauer, N. Delamater, D. Ress et al. Rev. Sci. Instrum. 66, 672-7 (1995)], the midportion ({approx} 2-10 ns) has been shown to be amenable to detection by the in-flight shape of x-ray backlit thin shell capsules [Pollaine et. al., Physics of Plasmas 8 2357 (2001)]. In this paper, we present sensitivity studies conducted on the University of Rochester's OMEGA laser of the thin shell symmetry measurement technique at near NIF-scale for two candidate capsule ablator materials, Ge-doped CH and Cu-doped Be. These experiments use both point and area backlighting to cast 4.7 keV radiographs of thin 1.4 mm initial-diameter Ge-doped CH and Cu-doped Be shells when converged a factor of {approx} 0.5 x in radius. Distortions in the position of the transmission limb of the shells resulting from drive asymmetries are measured to an accuracy of a few {micro}ms, meeting requirements. The promising results to date allow us to compare measured and predicted distortions and by inference drive asymmetries for the first 4 asymmetry modes as a function of hohlraum illumination conditions.

Kirkwood, R K; Milovich, J; Bradley, D K; Schmitt, M; Goldman, S R; Kalantar, D H; Meeker, D; Jones, O S; Pollaine, S M; Amendt, P A; Dewald, E; Edwards, J; Landen, O L; Nikroo, A

2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

62

NIF-0205-10331 Clean Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

P8430 #12;NIF-0205-10331 15EIM/sb P8434 Clean Energy: Humankind's Challenge #12;The National Ignition Facility P8435NIF-0105-10154-r2 31EIM/sb Magnetic Fusion Energy Inertial Fusion Energy Biggest;Could we build a miniature sun on earth? Could we build a miniature sun on earth? NIF-0205-10343 P8481

63

National Ignition Facility and Managing Location, Component, and State  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory is a stadium-sized facility that contains a 192-beam, 1.8-Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, ultraviolet laser system coupled with a 10-meter diameter target chamber. There are over 6,200 Line Replaceable Units (LRUs) comprised of more than 104,000 serialized parts that make up the NIF. Each LRU is a modular unit typically composed of a mechanical housing, laser optics (glass, lenses, or mirrors), and utilities. To date, there are more than 120,000 data sets created to characterize the attributes of these parts. Greater than 51,000 Work Permits have been issued to install, maintain, and troubleshoot the components. One integrated system is used to manage these data, and more. The Location Component and State (LoCoS) system is a web application built using Java Enterprise Edition technologies and is accessed by over 1,200 users. It is either directly or indirectly involved with each aspect of NIF work activity, and interfaces with ten external systems including the Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS) and the Laser Performance Operations Model (LPOM). Besides providing business functionality, LoCoS also acts as the NIF enterprise service bus. In this role, numerous integration approaches had to be adopted including: file exchange, database sharing, queuing, and web services in order to accommodate various business, technical, and security requirements. Architecture and implementation decisions are discussed.

Foxworthy, C; Fung, T; Beeler, R; Li, J; Dugorepec, J; Chang, C

2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

64

Sensitivity of NIF-scale backlit thin shell implosions to hohlraum symmetry in the foot of the ignition drive pulse  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A necessary condition for igniting indirectly-driven inertial confinement fusion (ICF) spherical capsules on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is controlling drive flux asymmetry to the 1% level time-integrated over the pulse and with Hauer, N. Delamater, D. Ress et al. Rev. Sci. Instrum. 66, 672-7 (1995)], the midportion ({approx} 2-10 ns) has been shown to be amenable to detection by the in-flight shape of x-ray backlit thin shell capsules [Pollaine et. al., Physics of Plasmas 8 2357 (2001)]. In this paper, we present sensitivity studies conducted on the University of Rochester's OMEGA laser of the thin shell symmetry measurement technique at near NIF-scale for two candidate capsule ablator materials, Ge-doped CH and Cu-doped Be. These experiments use both point and area backlighting to cast 4.7 keV radiographs of thin 1.4 mm initial-diameter Ge-doped CH and Cu-doped Be shells when converged a factor of {approx} 0.5 x in radius. Distortions in the position of the transmission limb of the shells resulting from drive asymmetries are measured to an accuracy of a few {micro}ms, meeting requirements. The promising results to date allow us to compare measured and predicted distortions and by inference drive asymmetries for the first 4 asymmetry modes as a function of hohlraum illumination conditions.

Kirkwood, R K; Milovich, J; Bradley, D K; Schmitt, M; Goldman, S R; Kalantar, D H; Meeker, D; Jones, O S; Pollaine, S M; Amendt, P A; Dewald, E; Edwards, J; Landen, O L; Nikroo, A

2008-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

65

Frequency converter development for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The design of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) incorporates a type I/type II third harmonic generator to convert the 1.053-{micro}m fundamental wavelength of the laser amplifier to a wavelength of 0.351 {micro}m for target irradiation. To understand and control the tolerances in the converter design, we have developed a comprehensive error budget that accounts for effects that are known to influence conversion efficiency, including variations in amplitude and phase of the incident laser pulse, temporal bandwidth of the incident laser pulse, crystal surface figure and bulk non-uniformities, angular alignment errors, Fresnel losses, polarization errors and crystal temperature variations. The error budget provides specifications for the detailed design of the NIF final optics assembly (FOA) and the fabrication of optical components. Validation is accomplished through both modeling and measurement, including full-scale Beamlet tests of a 37-cm aperture frequency converter in a NIF prototype final optics cell. The prototype cell incorporates full-perimeter clamping to support the crystals, and resides in a vacuum environment as per the NIF design.

Auerbach, J M; Barker, C E; Burkhart, S C; Couture, S A; DeYoreo, J J; Hackel, L A; Hibbard, R L; Liou, L W; Norton, M A; Wegner, P J; Whitman, P A

1998-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

66

The First Experiments on the National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A first set of laser-plasma interaction, hohlraum energetics and hydrodynamic experiments have been performed using the first 4 beams of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), in support of indirect drive Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) and High Energy Density Physics (HEDP). In parallel, a robust set of optical and x-ray spectrometers, interferometer, calorimeters and imagers have been activated. The experiments have been undertaken with laser powers and energies of up to 8 TW and 17 kJ in flattop and shaped 1-9 ns pulses focused with various beam smoothing options.

Landen, O L; Glenzer, S; Froula, D; Dewald, E; Suter, L J; Schneider, M; Hinkel, D; Fernandez, J; Kline, J; Goldman, S; Braun, D; Celliers, P; Moon, S; Robey, H; Lanier, N; Glendinning, G; Blue, B; Wilde, B; Jones, O; Schein, J; Divol, L; Kalantar, D; Campbell, K; Holder, J; MacDonald, J; Niemann, C; Mackinnon, A; Collins, R; Bradley, D; Eggert, J; Hicks, D; Gregori, G; Kirkwood, R; Young, B; Foster, J; Hansen, F; Perry, T; Munro, D; Baldis, H; Grim, G; Heeter, R; Hegelich, B; Montgomery, D; Rochau, G; Olson, R; Turner, R; Workman, J; Berger, R; Cohen, B; Kruer, W; Langdon, B; Langer, S; Meezan, N; Rose, H; Still, B; Williams, E; Dodd, E; Edwards, J; Monteil, M; Stevenson, M; Thomas, B; Coker, R; Magelssen, G; Rosen, P; Stry, P; Woods, D; Weber, S; Alvarez, S; Armstrong, G; Bahr, R; Bourgade, J; Bower, D; Celeste, J; Chrisp, M; Compton, S; Cox, J; Constantin, C; Costa, R; Duncan, J; Ellis, A; Emig, J; Gautier, C; Greenwood, A; Griffith, R; Holdner, F; Holtmeier, G; Hargrove, D; James, T; Kamperschroer, J; Kimbrough, J; Landon, M; Lee, D; Malone, R; May, M; Montelongo, S; Moody, J; Ng, E; Nikitin, A; Pellinen, D; Piston, K; Poole, M; Rekow, V; Rhodes, M; Shepherd, R; Shiromizu, S; Voloshin, D; Warrick, A; Watts, P; Weber, F; Young, P; Arnold, P; Atherton, L J; Bardsley, G; Bonanno, R; Borger, T; Bowers, M; Bryant, R; Buckman, S; Burkhart, S; Cooper, F; Dixit, S; Erbert, G; Eder, D; Ehrlich, B; Felker, B; Fornes, J; Frieders, G; Gardner, S; Gates, C; Gonzalez, M; Grace, S; Hall, T; Haynam, C; Heestand, G; Henesian, M; Hermann, M; Hermes, G; Huber, S; Jancaitis, K; Johnson, S; Kauffman, B; Kelleher, T; Kohut, T; Koniges, A E; Labiak, T; Latray, D; Lee, A; Lund, D; Mahavandi, S; Manes, K R; Marshall, C; McBride, J; McCarville, T; McGrew, L; Menapace, J; Mertens, E; Munro, D; Murray, J; Neumann, J; Newton, M; Opsahl, P; Padilla, E; Parham, T; Parrish, G; Petty, C; Polk, M; Powell, C; Reinbachs, I; Rinnert, R; Riordan, B; Ross, G; Robert, V; Tobin, M; Sailors, S; Saunders, R; Schmitt, M; Shaw, M; Singh, M; Spaeth, M; Stephens, A; Tietbohl, G; Tuck, J; Van Wonterghem, B; Vidal, R; Wegner, P; Whitman, P; Williams, K; Winward, K; Work, K

2005-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

67

Hot-spot mix in ignition-scale implosions on the NIF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ignition of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) target depends on the formation of a central hot spot with sufficient temperature and areal density. Radiative and conductive losses from the hot spot can be enhanced by hydrodynamic instabilities. The concentric spherical layers of current National Ignition Facility (NIF) ignition targets consist of a plastic ablator surrounding a thin shell of cryogenic thermonuclear fuel (i.e., hydrogen isotopes), with fuel vapor filling the interior volume [S. W. Haan et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 051001 (2011)]. The Rev. 5 ablator is doped with Ge to minimize preheat of the ablator closest to the DT ice caused by Au M-band emission from the hohlraum x-ray drive [D. S. Clark et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 052703 (2010)]. Richtmyer-Meshkov and Rayleigh-Taylor hydrodynamic instabilities seeded by high-mode () ablator-surface perturbations can cause Ge-doped ablator to mix into the interior of the shell at the end of the acceleration phase [B. A. Hammel et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 056310 (2011)]. As the shell decelerates, it compresses the fuel vapor, forming a hot spot. K-shell line emission from the ionized Ge that has penetrated into the hot spot provides an experimental signature of hot-spot mix. The Ge emission from tritium-hydrogen-deuterium (THD) and deuterium-tritium (DT) cryogenic targets and gas-filled plastic-shell capsules, which replace the THD layer with a mass-equivalent CH layer, was examined. The inferred amount of hot-spot-mix mass, estimated from the Ge K-shell line brightness using a detailed atomic physics code [J. J. MacFarlane et al., High Energy Density Phys. 3, 181 (2006)], is typically below the 75-ng allowance for hot-spot mix [S. W. Haan et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 051001 (2011)]. Predictions of a simple mix model, based on linear growth of the measured surface-mass modulations, are consistent with the experimental results.

Regan, S. P.; Epstein, R.; McCrory, R. L.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Hammel, B. A.; Suter, L. J.; Ralph, J.; Scott, H.; Barrios, M. A.; Bradley, D. K.; Callahan, D. A.; Cerjan, C.; Collins, G. W.; Dixit, S. N.; Doeppner, T.; Edwards, M. J.; Farley, D. R.; Glenn, S.; Glenzer, S. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

68

Groundbreaking at National Ignition Facility | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > Groundbreaking at National Ignition Facility...

69

Charged-particle spectroscopy for diagnosing shock R and strength in NIF implosions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Charged-particle spectroscopy for diagnosing shock R and strength in NIF implosions A. B. Zylstra shock R and strength in NIF implosionsa) A. B. Zylstra,1,b) J. A. Frenje,1 F. H. Séguin,1 M. J to the National Ignition Facility (NIF) as a National Ignition Campaign diagnostic. The WRF measures the spectrum

70

Overview of ICF Program SNL Z Facility UR/LLE OMEGA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fusion and the NIF Project National Nuclear Security Administration December 5, 2007 #12;2 Agenda · Mission/Strategic Objectives · National Ignition Facility (NIF) · National Ignition Campaign (NIC · The National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser is on track for completion in FY09. · The National Ignition Campaign

71

Overview and Status of the Power Conditioning System for the National Ignition Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) Power Conditioning System (PCS) is a modular capacitive energy storage system that provides over 34 kilojoules of energy to each of the nearly 8000 flashlamps in the NIF laser. Up to 400 megajoules of energy can be stored in the NIF PCS system, discharged through spark gaps and delivered to the flashlamps through a coaxial transmission line system requiring nearly 100 miles of high-voltage cable. The NIF PCS has been under development for nearly 4 years. During this time, the system was developed and designed by Sandia National Laboratory in Albuquerque, NM (SNLA) in conjunction with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Extensive reliability testing was performed at SNLA on the First Article NIF Test Module (FANTM) test facility and design improvements were implemented based on FANTM test results, leading to the final design presently undergoing system reliability testing at LLNL. Low-cost energy-storage capacitors, charging power supplies, and reliable, fault-tolerant components were developed through partnerships with numerous contractors. Extensive reliability and fault testing of components has also been performed. This paper will provide an overview of the many efforts that have culminated in the final design of the NIF PCS. The PCS system design will be described and the cost tradeoffs discussed. Plans for fabrication and installation of the NIF PCS system over the next 6 years will be presented.

Newton, M A; Fulkerson, E S; Hulsey, S D; Kamm, R E; Pendleton, D L; Petersen, D E; Smith, C R; Ullery, G T; McKay, P F; Moore, W B; Muirhead, D A

2001-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

72

Asymmetric directly driven capsule implosions: Modeling and experiments-A requirement for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

Direct-drive experiments at the University of Rochester's OMEGA laser [T. R. Boehly, R. L. McCrory, C. P. Verdon et al., Fusion Eng. Des. 44, 35 (1999)] have been performed to prototype eventual campaigns on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. I. Moses and C. R. Wuest, Fusion Sci. Technol. 43, 420 (2003)] to investigate the mixing of target materials. Spherical-implosion targets with equatorial defects have been irradiated with polar direct drive, a requirement for direct-drive experiments at NIF. The physics question addressed by these results is whether simulations can match data on 0th-order hydrodynamics and implosion symmetry, the most basic implosion features, with and without the defect. The successful testing of hydrodynamic simulations leads to better designs for experiments and guides accurate planning for polar-direct-drive-ignition studies on the NIF platform.

Cobble, J. A.; Murphy, T. J.; Schmitt, M. J.; Bradley, P. A.; Krashenninikova, N. S.; Obrey, K. A.; Hsu, S. C.; Tregillis, I. L.; Magelssen, G. R.; Wysocki, F. J.; Batha, S. H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mail Stop E527, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

73

Video Gallery of the National Ignition Facility  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

NIF houses the world’s largest and highest-energy laser, which has the goal of achieving nuclear fusion and energy gain in the laboratory for the first time - in essence, creating a miniature star on Earth. NIF, a program of the DOE National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) focuses the intense energy of 192 giant laser beams on a BB-sized target filled with hydrogen fuel, fusing the hydrogen atoms' nuclei and releasing many times more energy than it took to initiate the fusion reaction. NIF is capable of creating temperatures and pressures similar to those that exist only in the cores of stars and giant planets and inside nuclear weapons. Achieving nuclear fusion in the laboratory is at the heart of three complementary missions: 1) Helping ensure the nation’s security without nuclear weapons testing; 2) Blazing the path to a safe, virtually unlimited, carbon-free energy future; and 3) Achieving breakthroughs in a wide variety of scientific disciplines, including astrophysics, materials science, the use of lasers in medicine, radioactive and hazardous waste treatment, particle physics and X-ray and neutron science [taken, with editing, from https://lasers.llnl.gov/about/]. NIF’s Video Gallery presents several narrated clips from the construction phase and short videos about the science behind NIF. These include, “The Power of Light,” “From the Sun to a Sun,” and “A Legacy of Lasers.” One of the videos allows the user to watch a synthetic seed crystal grow into an 800 pound potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystal for use in the facility. The most unique clip is “Stellar Gest,” the narration of a poem by Charan Sue Wollard, Poet Laureate for the city of Livermore, home of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory and NIF.

74

On the Fielding of a High Gain, Shock-Ignited Target on the National Ignitiion Facility in the Near Term  

SciTech Connect

Shock ignition, a new concept for igniting thermonuclear fuel, offers the possibility for a near-term ({approx}3-4 years) test of high gain inertial confinement fusion on the National Ignition Facility at less than 1MJ drive energy and without the need for new laser hardware. In shock ignition, compressed fusion fuel is separately ignited by a strong spherically converging shock and, because capsule implosion velocities are significantly lower than those required for conventional hotpot ignition, fusion energy gains of {approx}60 may be achievable on NIF at laser drive energies around {approx}0.5MJ. Because of the simple all-DT target design, its in-flight robustness, the potential need for only 1D SSD beam smoothing, minimal early time LPI preheat, and use of present (indirect drive) laser hardware, this target may be easier to field on NIF than a conventional (polar) direct drive hotspot ignition target. Like fast ignition, shock ignition has the potential for high fusion yields at low drive energy, but requires only a single laser with less demanding timing and spatial focusing requirements. Of course, conventional symmetry and stability constraints still apply. In this paper we present initial target performance simulations, delineate the critical issues and describe the immediate-term R&D program that must be performed in order to test the potential of a high gain shock ignition target on NIF in the near term.

Perkins, L J; Betti, R; Schurtz, G P; Craxton, R S; Dunne, A M; LaFortune, K N; Schmitt, A J; McKenty, P W; Bailey, D S; Lambert, M A; Ribeyre, X; Theobald, W R; Strozzi, D J; Harding, D R; Casner, A; Atzemi, S; Erbert, G V; Andersen, K S; Murakami, M; Comley, A J; Cook, R C; Stephens, R B

2010-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

75

The Neutron Imaging System Fielded at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

A neutron imaging diagnostic has recently been commissioned at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This new system is an important diagnostic tool for inertial fusion studies at the NIF for measuring the size and shape of the burning DT plasma during the ignition stage of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) implosions. The imaging technique utilizes a pinhole neutron aperture, placed between the neutron source and a neutron detector. The detection system measures the two dimensional distribution of neutrons passing through the pinhole. This diagnostic has been designed to collect two images at two times. The long flight path for this diagnostic, 28 m, results in a chromatic separation of the neutrons, allowing the independently timed images to measure the source distribution for two neutron energies. Typically the first image measures the distribution of the 14 MeV neutrons and the second image of the 6-12 MeV neutrons. The combination of these two images has provided data on the size and shape of the burning plasma within the compressed capsule, as well as a measure of the quantity and spatial distribution of the cold fuel surrounding this core.

Merrill, F E; Buckles, R; Clark, D D; Danly, C R; Drury, O B; Dzenitis, J M; Fatherley, V E; Fittinghoff, D N; Gallegos, R; Grim, G P; Guler, N; Loomis, E N; Lutz, S; Malone, R M; Martinson, D D; Mares, D; Morley, D J; Morgan, G L; Oertel, J A; Tregillis, I L; Volegov, P L; Weiss, P B; Wilde, C H

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

"New Results from the National Ignition Facility", Dr. John Lindl...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dr. John Lindl, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Since completion of the NIF construction project in March 2009, a wide variety of diagnostics, facility...

77

2011 Status of the Automatic Alignment System for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

Automated alignment for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) is accomplished using a large-scale parallel control system that directs 192 laser beams along the 300-m optical path. The beams are then focused down to a 50-micron spot in the middle of the target chamber. The entire process is completed in less than 50 minutes. The alignment system commands 9,000 stepping motors for highly accurate adjustment of mirrors and other optics. 41 control loops per beamline perform parallel processing services running on a LINUX cluster to analyze high-resolution images of the beams and their references. This paper describes the status the NIF automatic alignment system and the challenges encountered as NIF development has transitioned from building the laser, to becoming a research project supporting a 24 hour, 7 day laser facility. NIF is now a continuously operated system where performance monitoring is increasingly more critical for operation, maintenance, and commissioning tasks. Equipment wear and the effects of high energy neutrons from fusion experiments are issues which alter alignment efficiency and accuracy. New sensors needing automatic alignment assistance are common. System modifications to improve efficiency and accuracy are prevalent. Handling these evolving alignment and maintenance needs while minimizing the impact on NIF experiment schedule is expected to be an on-going challenge for the planned 30 year operational life of NIF.

Wilhelmsen, K; Awwal, A; Burkhart, S; McGuigan, D; Kamm, V M; Leach, R; Lowe-Webb, R; Wilson, R

2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

78

A soft x-ray transmission grating imaging-spectrometer for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

A soft x-ray transmission grating spectrometer has been designed for use on high energy-density physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF); coupled to one of the NIF gated x-ray detectors (GXD) it records sixteen time-gated spectra between 250 and 1000eV with 100ps temporal resolution. The trade-off between spectral and spatial resolution leads to an optimized design for measurement of emission around the peak of a 100-300eV blackbody spectrum. Performance qualification results from the NIF, the Trident Laser Facility and VUV beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), evidence a <100{micro}m spatial resolution in combination with a source-size limited spectral resolution that is <10eV at photon energies of 300eV.

Moore, A S; Guymer, T M; Kline, J L; Morton, J; Taccetti, M; Lanier, N E; Bentley, C; Workman, J; Peterson, B; Mussack, K; Cowan, J; Prasad, R; Richardson, M; Burns, S; Kalantar, D H; Benedetti, L R; Bell, P; Bradley, D; Hsing, W; Stevenson, M

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

A soft x-ray transmission grating imaging-spectrometer for the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

A soft x-ray transmission grating spectrometer has been designed for use on high energy-density physics experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF); coupled to one of the NIF gated x-ray detectors it records 16 time-gated spectra between 250 and 1000 eV with 100 ps temporal resolution. The trade-off between spectral and spatial resolution leads to an optimized design for measurement of emission around the peak of a 100-300 eV blackbody spectrum. Performance qualification results from the NIF, the Trident Laser Facility and vacuum ultraviolet beamline at the National Synchrotron Light Source, evidence a <100 {mu}m spatial resolution in combination with a source-size limited spectral resolution that is <10 eV at photon energies of 300 eV.

Moore, A. S.; Guymer, T. M.; Morton, J.; Bentley, C.; Stevenson, M. [Directorate Science and Technology, AWE Aldermaston, Reading, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Kline, J. L.; Taccetti, M.; Lanier, N. E.; Workman, J.; Peterson, B.; Mussack, K.; Cowan, J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Prasad, R.; Richardson, M.; Burns, S.; Kalantar, D. H.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bell, P.; Bradley, D.; Hsing, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551-0808 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

80

ENERGY PARTITIONING, ENERGY COUPLING (EPEC) EXPERIMENTS AT THE NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The energy-partitioning, energy-coupling (EPEC) experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) will simultaneously measure the coupling of energy into both ground shock and air-blast overpressure from a laser-driven target. The source target for the experiment is positioned at a known height above the ground-surface simulant and is heated by four beams from NIF. The resulting target energy density and specific energy are equal to those of a low-yield nuclear device. The ground-shock stress waves and atmospheric overpressure waveforms that result in our test system are hydrodynamically scaled analogs of seismic and air-blast phenomena caused by a nuclear weapon. In what follows, we discuss the motivation for our investigation and briefly describe NIF. Then, we introduce the EPEC experiments, including diagnostics, in more detail.

Fournier, K B; Brown, C G; May, M J; Dunlop, W H; Compton, S M; Kane, J O; Mirkarimi, P B; Guyton, R L; Huffman, E

2012-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ignition facility nif" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Initial Activation and Operation of the Power Conditioning System for the National Ignition Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The NIF Power Conditioning System (PCS) resides in four Capacitor Bays, supplying energy to the Master and Power Amplifiers which reside in the two adjacent laser bays. Each capacitor bay will initially house 48 individual power conditioning modules, shown in Figure 2, with space reserved for expansion to 54 modules. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) Power Conditioning System (PCS) is a modular capacitive energy storage system that will be capable of storing nearly 400 MJ of electrical energy and delivering that energy to the nearly 8000 flashlamps in the NIF laser. The first sixteen modules of the power conditioning system have been built, tested and installed. Activation of the first nine power conditioning modules has been completed and commissioning of the first ''bundle'' of laser beamlines has begun. This paper will provide an overview of the power conditioning system design and describe the status and results of initial testing and activation of the first ''bundle'' of power conditioning modules.

Newton, M A; Kamm, R E; Fulkerson, E S; Hulsey, S D; Lao, N; Parrish, G L; Pendleton, D L; Petersen, D E; Polk, M; Tuck, J M; Ullery, G T; Moore, W B

2003-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

82

Shock timing on the National Ignition Facility: the first precision tuning series  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ignition implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [Lindl et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)] are driven with a very carefully tailored sequence of four shock waves that must be timed to very high precision in order to keep the fuel on a low adiabat. The first series of precision tuning experiments on NIF have been performed. These experiments use optical diagnostics to directly measure the strength and timing of all four shocks inside the hohlraum-driven, cryogenic deuterium-filled capsule interior. The results of these experiments are presented demonstrating a significant decrease in the fuel adiabat over previously un-tuned implosions. The impact of the improved adiabat on fuel compression is confirmed in related deuterium-tritium (DT) layered capsule implosions by measurement of fuel areal density (rR), which show the highest fuel compression (rR {approx} 1.0 g/cm{sup 2}) measured to date.

Robey, H F; Celliers, P M; Kline, J L; Mackinnon, A J

2011-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

83

Nuclear Physics using NIF  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is the world's premier inertial confinement fusion facility designed to achieve sustained thermonuclear burn (ignition) through the compression of hydrogen isotopic fuels to densities in excess of 10{sup 3} g/cm{sup 3} and temperatures in excess of 100 MK. These plasma conditions are very similar to those found in the cores of Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars where the s-process takes place, but with a neutron fluence per year 10{sup 4} times greater than a star. These conditions make NIF an excellent laboratory to measure s-process (n,{gamma}) cross sections in a stellar-like plasma for the first time. Starting in Fall 2009, NIF has been operating regularly with 2-4 shots being performed weekly. These experiments have allowed the first in situ calibration of the detectors and diagnostics needed to measure neutron capture, including solid debris collection and prompt {gamma}-ray detection. In this paper I will describe the NIF facility and capsule environment and present two approaches for measuring s-process neutron capture cross sections using NIF.

Bernstein, L A; Bleuel, D L; Caggiano, J A; Cerjan, C; Gostic, J; Hatarik, R; Hartouni, E; Hoffman, R D; Sayre, D; Schneider, D G; Shaughnessy, D; Stoeffl, W; Yeamans, C; Greife, U; Larson, R; Hudson, M; Herrmann, H; Kim, Y H; Young, C S; Mack, J; Wilson, D; Batha, S; Hoffman, N; Langenbrunner, J; Evans, S

2011-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

84

Assessment and Mitigation of Diagnostic-Generated Electromagnetic Interference at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

Electromagnetic interference (EMI) is an ever-present challenge at laser facilities such as the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The major source of EMI at such facilities is laser-target interaction that can generate intense electromagnetic fields within, and outside of, the laser target chamber. In addition, the diagnostics themselves can be a source of EMI, even interfering with themselves. In this paper we describe EMI generated by ARIANE and DIXI, present measurements, and discuss effects of the diagnostic-generated EMI on ARIANE's CCD and on a PMT nearby DIXI. Finally we present some of the efforts we have made to mitigate the effects of diagnostic-generated EMI on NIF diagnostics.

Brown, C G; Ayers, M J; Felker, B; Ferguson, W; Holder, J P; Nagel, S R; Piston, K W; Simanovskaia, N; Throop, A L; Chung, M; Hilsabeck, T

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

85

Software solutions manage the definition, operation, maintenance and configuration control of the National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is the world's largest laser composed of millions of individual parts brought together to form one massive assembly. Maintaining control of the physical definition, status and configuration of this structure is a monumental undertaking yet critical to the validity of the shot experiment data and the safe operation of the facility. The NIF business application suite of software provides the means to effectively manage the definition, build, operation, maintenance and configuration control of all components of the National Ignition Facility. State of the art Computer Aided Design software applications are used to generate a virtual model and assemblies. Engineering bills of material are controlled through the Enterprise Configuration Management System. This data structure is passed to the Enterprise Resource Planning system to create a manufacturing bill of material. Specific parts are serialized then tracked along their entire lifecycle providing visibility to the location and status of optical, target and diagnostic components that are key to assessing pre-shot machine readiness. Nearly forty thousand items requiring preventive, reactive and calibration maintenance are tracked through the System Maintenance & Reliability Tracking application to ensure proper operation. Radiological tracking applications ensure proper stewardship of radiological and hazardous materials and help provide a safe working environment for NIF personnel.

Dobson, D; Churby, A; Krieger, E; Maloy, D; White, K

2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

86

Groundbreaking at National Ignition Facility | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Groundbreaking at National Ignition Facility | National Nuclear Security Groundbreaking at National Ignition Facility | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > Groundbreaking at National Ignition Facility Groundbreaking at National Ignition Facility May 29, 1997 Livermore, CA Groundbreaking at National Ignition Facility

87

National Ignition Facility Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement to the Stockpile Stewardship and Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) was prepared pursuant to a Joint Stipulation and Order approved and entered as an order of the court on October 27, 1997, in partial settlement of the lawsuit Civ. No. 97-936 (SS) (D.D.C.), ''Natural Resources Defense Council [NRDC] et al. v. Richardson et al.'' The Joint Stipulation and Order is reproduced at the end of this document as Attachment 1. In the Joint Stipulation and Order, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) agreed to prepare an SEIS to the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Stockpile Stewardship and Management (SSM PEIS) (DOE/EIS-0236, DOE 1996a) to evaluate the reasonably foreseeable significant adverse environmental impacts of continuing to construct and of operating the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California, with respect to any potential or confirmed contamination in the area by hazardous, toxic, and/or radioactive materials. On September 25, 1998, DOE announced in the ''Federal Register'' the agency's intent to prepare this SEIS for the NIF portion (Volume III, Appendix I) of the SSM PEIS. DOE's need for preparation of this SEIS, consistent with the previously established need for NIF (DOE 1996a, Appendix I), is to determine how the results of characterization studies completed pursuant to the Joint Stipulation and Order should affect the manner in which DOE proceeds with the construction and operation of NIF. On August 5, 1999, DOE issued an amended Notice of Intent to prepare this SEIS, which incorporated changes in schedule resulting from new relevant information. The SSM PEIS addressed alternative plans for DOE's defense program activities related to nuclear weapons stockpile issues at several DOE laboratories, including LLNL. The environmental consequences of construction and operation of NIF were addressed in detail in SSM PEIS Volume III, Appendix I, entitled ''National Ignition Facility Project Specific Analysis'' (NIF PSA). The Record of Decision (ROD) for the SSM PEIS was published in the ''Federal Register'' on December 26, 1996 (61 FR 68014). In the ROD, DOE announced its decision to construct and operate NIF at LLNL. The NIF is an experimental facility that would use laser light to initiate a fusion reaction in very small quantities of hydrogen by a process known as inertial confinement fusion. The start of physical construction of NIF was authorized on March 7, 1997, and groundbreaking for the NIF occurred on May 29, 1997. Construction of the NIF is ongoing; the conventional facilities are over 94% complete and are expected to be completed in late 2001.

N /A

2001-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

88

Precision Shock Tuning on the National Ignition Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ignition implosions on the National Ignition Facility [ J.?D. Lindl et al. Phys. Plasmas 11 339 (2004)] are underway with the goal of compressing deuterium-tritium fuel to a sufficiently high areal density (?R) to sustain ...

Frenje, Johan A.

89

Senate targets fusion, backs NIF  

SciTech Connect

This article discusses a budget approved by the Senate Appropriations Committee which funds the fusion program even lower than the drastically reduced level the House approved in July. Work on the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) would continue but the Tokamak Physics Experiment would be halted. At the same time, the Senate bill allots money to start work on the National Ignition Facility (NIF).

Lawler, A.

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Diagnosing inertial confinement fusion implosions at OMEGA and the NIF Using novel neutron spectrometry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A novel neutron spectrometer, called the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS), was designed, built, and implemented on the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the neutron spectra from ...

Casey, Daniel Thomas

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

News ScienceInsider Physics Fusion "Breakthrough" at NIF? Uh, Not Really ... AAAS.ORG FEEDBACK HELP LIBRARIANS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

News » ScienceInsider » Physics » Fusion "Breakthrough" at NIF? Uh, Not Really ... AAAS FollowFollow @danclery@danclery 10 October 2013 12:15 pm Fusion "Breakthrough" at NIF? Uh, Not Really on a report on the BBC News website. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National

92

National Ignition Facility monthly status report-January 2000  

SciTech Connect

The Project provides for the design, procurement, construction, assembly, installation, and acceptance testing of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), an experimental inertial confinement fusion facility intended to achieve controlled thermonuclear fusion in the laboratory by imploding a small capsule containing a mixture of the hydrogen isotopes deuterium and tritium. The NIF will be constructed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Livermore, California as determined by the Record of Decision made on December 19, 1996, as a part of the Stockpile Stewardship and Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement. Safety: On January 13, 2000, a worker received a back injury when a 42-in.-diameter duct fell during installation. He was taken by helicopter to the hospital and released on January 16, 2000. All work in the area was suspended, and the construction contractors went through a thorough safety review before work was started. A DOE occurrence report was filed. An independent LLNL Incident Analysis Team is reviewing the cause of the accident and will report out on March 1. A Project management review team is reviewing construction line management and safety support and will also report out on March 1. Several changes in work planning and site management have been incorporated to increase site safety. Technical Status: The general status of the technologies underlying the NIF Project remains satisfactory. The issues currently being addressed are (1) cleanliness for installation, assembly, and activation of the laser system by Systems Engineering; (2) laser glass--a second pilot run at one of the two commercial suppliers is ongoing; and (3) operational costs associated with final optics assembly (FOA) optics components--methods are being developed to mitigate 3 {omega}damage and resolve beam rotation issues. Schedule: The completion of the Title II design of laser equipment is now approximately 80% complete. The Beampath Infrastructure System is on the critical schedule path. The procurement strategy is being evaluated by commercial construction management and Architectural/Engineering (A/E) contractors with a report presented to a panel of independent experts, the Beampath Infrastructure System Implementation Review Committee Advisory Group who wrote a set of recommendations for proceeding with this critical path activity. In January, a briefing was given to DOE Oakland (OAK) Field Manager who then arranged briefings for the DOE OAK Procurement organization with the LLNL Procurement organization to review the proposed procurement strategies. The next step is to review the strategy with DOE Headquarters (HQ) procurement. The construction status of the Conventional Facilities at the end of January is 83% complete and is projected to finish within budget and on schedule. Cost: The NIF Project Total Project Cost (TPC) is $1.2B. The Project has obligated 73% of the TPC funds. The remaining contingency is $21.8M. Because of schedule delays and projected increases in the design, construction management, assembly, and installation of the system infrastructure, cost growth of the TPC is anticipated and will remain a major concern until the budget rebaseline process is completed.

Moses, E

2000-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

93

The Radiochemical Analysis of Gaseous Samples (RAGS) Apparatus for Nuclear Diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The RAGS (Radiochemical Analysis of Gaseous Samples) diagnostic apparatus was recently installed at the National Ignition Facility. Following a NIF shot, RAGS is used to pump the gas load from the NIF chamber for purification and isolation of the noble gases. After collection, the activated gaseous species are counted via gamma spectroscopy for measurement of the capsule areal density and fuel-ablator mix. Collection efficiency was determined by injecting a known amount of {sup 135}Xe into the NIF chamber, which was then collected with RAGS. Commissioning was performed with an exploding pusher capsule filled with isotopically enriched {sup 124}Xe and {sup 126}Xe added to the DT gas fill. Activated xenon species were recovered post-shot and counted via gamma spectroscopy. Results from the collection and commissioning tests are presented. The performance of RAGS allows us to establish a noble gas collection method for measurement of noble gas species produced via neutron and charged particle reactions in a NIF capsule.

Shaughnessy, D A; Velsko, C A; Jedlovec, D R; Yeamans, C B; Moody, K J; Tereshatov, E; Stoeffl, W; Riddle, A

2012-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

94

Implosion dynamics measurements at the National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements have been made of the in-flight dynamics of imploding capsules indirectly driven by laser energies of 1-1.7 MJ at the National Ignition Facility [Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)]. These experiments were part of the National Ignition Campaign [Landen et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 051002 (2011)] to iteratively optimize the inputs required to achieve thermonuclear ignition in the laboratory. Using gated or streaked hard x-ray radiography, a suite of ablator performance parameters, including the time-resolved radius, velocity, mass, and thickness, have been determined throughout the acceleration history of surrogate gas-filled implosions. These measurements have been used to establish a dynamically consistent model of the ablative drive history and shell compressibility throughout the implosion trajectory. First results showed that the peak velocity of the original 1.3-MJ Ge-doped polymer (CH) point design using Au hohlraums reached only 75% of the required ignition velocity. Several capsule, hohlraum, and laser pulse changes were then implemented to improve this and other aspects of implosion performance and a dedicated effort was undertaken to test the sensitivity of the ablative drive to the rise time and length of the main laser pulse. Changing to Si rather than Ge-doped inner ablator layers and increasing the pulse length together raised peak velocity to 93% {+-} 5% of the ignition goal using a 1.5 MJ, 420 TW pulse. Further lengthening the pulse so that the laser remained on until the capsule reached 30% (rather than 60%-70%) of its initial radius, reduced the shell thickness and improved the final fuel {rho}R on companion shots with a cryogenic hydrogen fuel layer. Improved drive efficiency was observed using U rather than Au hohlraums, which was expected, and by slowing the rise time of laser pulse, which was not. The effect of changing the Si-dopant concentration and distribution, as well as the effect of using a larger initial shell thickness were also examined, both of which indicated that instabilities seeded at the ablation front are a significant source of hydrodynamic mix into the central hot spot. Additionally, a direct test of the surrogacy of cryogenic fuel layered versus gas-filled targets was performed. Together all these measurements have established the fundamental ablative-rocket relationship describing the dependence of implosion velocity on fractional ablator mass remaining. This curve shows a lower-than-expected ablator mass at a given velocity, making the capsule more susceptible to feedthrough of instabilities from the ablation front into the fuel and hot spot. This combination of low velocity and low ablator mass indicates that reaching ignition on the NIF will require >20 {mu}m ({approx}10%) thicker targets and laser powers at or beyond facility limits.

Hicks, D. G.; Meezan, N. B.; Dewald, E. L.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Callahan, D. A.; Doeppner, T.; Benedetti, L. R.; Bradley, D. K.; Celliers, P. M.; Clark, D. S.; Di Nicola, P.; Dixit, S. N.; Dzenitis, E. G.; Eggert, J. E.; Farley, D. R.; Glenn, S. M.; Glenzer, S. H.; Hamza, A. V.; Heeter, R. F.; Holder, J. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

95

Microsoft Word - NIF Industry Day Agenda  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Department of Energy Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Washington, DC 20585 National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) National Ignition Facility (NIF) Target Fabrication Industry Day at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Agenda 9:00 - 9:15 Welcome and orientation Mr. Roger Lewis, Assistant Deputy Administrator for Research, Development, Test Capabilities and Evaluation (Acting), NNSA Mr. John Post, Assistant Principal Associate Director, NIF and Photon Science, LLNL 9:15 - 9:30 Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program, current and future status Mr. Roger Lewis 9:30 -10:30 National Ignition Facility (NIF), introduction and overview Mr. John Post 10:30 - 11:30 NIF/ICF Targets - Introduction, current technical requirements, anticipated future

96

Assembling and Installing LRUs for NIF  

SciTech Connect

Within the 192 National Ignition Facility (NIF) beamlines, there are over 7000 large (40 x 40 cm) optical components, including laser glass, mirrors, lenses, and polarizers. These optics are held in large opto-mechanical assemblies called line-replaceable units (LRUs). Each LRU has strict specifications with respect to cleanliness, alignment, and wavefront so that once activated, each NIF beamline will meet its performance requirements. NIF LRUs are assembled, tested, and refurbished in on-site cleanroom facilities. The assembled LRUs weigh up to 1800 kilograms, and are about the size of a phone booth. They are transported in portable clean canisters and inserted into the NIF beampath using robotic transporters. This plug and play design allows LRUs to be easily removed from the beampath for maintenance or upgrades. Commissioning of the first NIF quad, an activity known as NIF Early Light (NEL), has validated LRU designs and architecture, as well as demonstrated that LRUs can be assembled and installed as designed. Furthermore, it has served to develop key processes and tools forming the foundation for NIF s long-term LRU production and maintenance strategy. As we look forward to building out the rest of NIF, the challenge lies in scaling up the production rate while maintaining quality, implementing process improvements, and fully leveraging the learning and experience gained from NEL. This paper provides an overview of the facilities, equipment and processes used to assemble and install LRUs in NIF.

Bonanno, R E

2003-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

97

Summary of the first neutron image data collected at the National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A summary of data and results from the first neutron images produced by the National Ignition Facility (NIF), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA, USA are presented. An overview of the neutron imaging technique is presented, as well as a synopsis of the data collected and measurements made to date. Data form directly driven, DT filled microballoons, as well as, indirectly driven, cryogenically layered ignition experiments are presented. The data presented show that the primary cores from directly driven implosions are approximately twice as large, 64 {+-} 3 {mu}m, as indirect cores 25 {+-} 4 and 29 {+-} 4 {mu}m and more asymmetric, P2/P0 = 47% vs. -14% and 7%. Further, comparison with the size and shape of X-ray image data on the same implosions show good agreement, indicating X-ray emission is dominated by the hot regions of the implosion.

Grim, G P; Archuleta, T N; Aragonez, R J; Atkinson, D P; Batha, S H; Barrios, M A; Bower, D E; Bradley, D K; Buckles, R A; Clark, D D; Clark, D J; Cradick, J R; Danly, C; Drury, O B; Fatherley, V E; Finch, J P; Garcia, F P; Gallegos, R A; Guler, N; Glenn, S M; Hsu, A H; Izumi, N; Jaramillo, S A; Kyrala, G A; Pape, S L; Loomis, E N; Mares, D; Martinson, D D; Ma, T; MacKinnon, A J; Merrill, F E; Morgan, G L; Munson, C; Murphy, T J; Polk, P J; Schmidt, D W; Tommasini, T; Tregillis, I L; Valdez, A C; Volegov, P L; Wang, T F; Wilde, C H; Wilke, M D; Wilson, D C; Dzenitis, J M; Felker, B; Fittinghoff, D N; Frank, M; Liddick, S N; Moran, M J; Roberson, G P; Weiss, P B; Kauffman, M I; Lutz, S S; Malone, R M; Traille, A

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

The magnetic recoil spectrometer for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum at OMEGA and the NIF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the NIF D. T. Casey, J. A. Frenje, M. Gatu Johnson, F. H. Séguin, C. K. Li et al. Citation: Rev. Sci for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum at OMEGA and the NIF D. T. Casey,1,a) J. A. Frenje,1 M. Gatu used at both the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the absolute

99

Status of the US National Inertial Fusion ProgramSNL Z Facility UR/LLE OMEGA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for inertial fusion and high energy density physics · NIF 81% complete, first ignition experiments planned Ignition Facility is 85 % complete NIF concentrates 1.8 Mega Joules of energy into a mm3 size target -- it needs to be flush left -- keep horizontal within Title/Logo limits at the top #12;7 NIF has executed

100

The Radiochemical Analysis of Gaseous Samples (RAGS) apparatus for nuclear diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility (invited)  

SciTech Connect

The Radiochemical Analysis of Gaseous Samples (RAGS) diagnostic apparatus was recently installed at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). Following a NIF shot, RAGS is used to pump the gas load from the NIF chamber for purification and isolation of the noble gases. After collection, the activated gaseous species are counted via gamma spectroscopy for measurement of the capsule areal density and fuel-ablator mix. Collection efficiency was determined by injecting a known amount of {sup 135}Xe into the NIF chamber, which was then collected with RAGS. Commissioning was performed with an exploding pusher capsule filled with isotopically enriched {sup 124}Xe and {sup 126}Xe added to the DT gas fill. Activated xenon species were recovered post-shot and counted via gamma spectroscopy. Results from the collection and commissioning tests are presented. The performance of RAGS allows us to establish a noble gas collection method for measurement of noble gas species produced via neutron and charged particle reactions in a NIF capsule.

Shaughnessy, D. A.; Velsko, C. A.; Jedlovec, D. R.; Yeamans, C. B.; Moody, K. J.; Tereshatov, E.; Stoeffl, W.; Riddle, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, PO Box 808, L-236, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ignition facility nif" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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101

AN UPDATE ON NIF PULSED POWER  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a 192-beam laser fusion driver operating at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. NIF relies on three large-scale pulsed power systems to achieve its goals: the Power Conditioning Unit (PCU), which provides flashlamp excitation for the laser's injection system; the Power Conditioning System (PCS), which provides the multi-megajoule pulsed excitation required to drive flashlamps in the laser's optical amplifiers; and the Plasma Electrode Pockels Cell (PEPC), which enables NIF to take advantage of a fourpass main amplifier. Years of production, installation, and commissioning of the three NIF pulsed power systems are now complete. Seven-day-per-week operation of the laser has commenced, with the three pulsed power systems providing routine support of laser operations. We present the details of the status and operational experience associated with the three systems along with a projection of the future for NIF pulsed power.

Arnold, P A; James, G F; Petersen, D E; Pendleton, D L; McHale, G B; Barbosa, F; Runtal, A S; Stratton, P L

2009-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

102

X-ray conversion efficiency in vacuum hohlraum experiments at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

X-ray fluxes measured in the first 96 and 192 beam vacuum hohlraum experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) were significantly higher than predicted by computational simulations employing XSN average atom atomic physics and highly flux-limited electron heat conduction. For agreement with experimental data, it was found that the coronal plasma emissivity must be simulated with a detailed configuration accounting model that accounts for x-ray emission involving all of the significant ionization states. It was also found that an electron heat conduction flux limit of f= 0.05 is too restrictive, and that a flux limit of f= 0.15 results in a much better match with the NIF vacuum hohlraum experimental data. The combination of increased plasma emissivity and increased electron heat conduction in this new high flux hohlraum model results in a reduction in coronal plasma energy and, hence, an explanation for the high ({approx}85%-90%) x-ray conversion efficiencies observed in the 235 < T{sub r} < 345 eV NIF vacuum hohlraum experiments.

Olson, R. E. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States); Suter, L. J.; Callahan, D. A.; Rosen, M. D.; Dixit, S. N.; Landen, O. L.; Meezan, N. B.; Moody, J. D.; Thomas, C. A.; Warrick, A.; Widmann, K.; Williams, E. A.; Glenzer, S. H. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Kline, J. L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

"Basic Research Directions Workshop on User Science at the National Ignition Facility"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

#12;Strong NIF shot demand reflects scientific opportunities discussed in recent federal reports 2Keane--CIS Technical Review, April 13-15, 2011NIF-0311-21167.ppt The importance of access to NNSA facilities is emphasized in these reports- NIF is developing processes and infrastructure to support

104

Director of the National Ignition Facility, Lawrence Livermore National  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Director of the National Ignition Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Director of the National Ignition Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Who We Are > In The Spotlight > Edward Moses Director of the National Ignition Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

105

Neutron spectrometry - An essential tool for diagnosing implosions at the National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DT neutron yield (Y{sub n}), ion temperature (T{sub i}) and down-scatter ratio (dsr) determined from measured neutron spectra are essential metrics for diagnosing the performance of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) implosions at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). A suite of neutron-Time-Of-Flight (nTOF) spectrometers and a Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) have been implemented in different locations around the NIF target chamber, providing good implosion coverage and the redundancy required for reliable measurements of Yn, Ti and dsr. From the measured dsr value, an areal density ({rho}R) is determined from the relationship {rho}R{sub tot} (g/cm{sup 2}) = (20.4 {+-} 0.6) x dsr{sub 10-12 MeV}. The proportionality constant is determined considering implosion geometry, neutron attenuation and energy range used for the dsr measurement. To ensure high accuracy in the measurements, a series of commissioning experiments using exploding pushers have been used for in situ calibration. The spectrometers are now performing to the required accuracy, as indicated by the good agreement between the different measurements over several commissioning shots. In addition, recent data obtained with the MRS and nTOFs indicate that the implosion performance of cryogenically layered DT implosions, characterized by the experimental Ignition Threshold Factor (ITFx) which is a function of dsr (or fuel {rho}R) and Y{sub n}, has improved almost two orders of magnitude since the first shot in September, 2010.

Mackinnon, A J; Johnson, M G; Frenje, J A; Casey, D T; Li, C K; Seguin, F H; Petrasso, R; Ashabranner, R; Cerjan, C; Clancy, T J; Bionta, R; Bleuel, D; Bond, E J; Caggiano, J A; Capenter, A; Eckart, M J; Edwards, M J; Friedrich, S; Glenzer, S H; Haan, S W; Hartouni, E P; Hatarik, R; Hachett, S P; McKernan, M; Jones, O; Lepape, S; Lerche, R A; Landen, O L; Moran, M; Moses, E; Munro, D; McNaney, J; Rygg, J R; Sepke, S; Spears, B; Springer, P; Yeamans, C; Farrell, M; Kilkenny, J D; Nikroo, A; Paguio, R; Knauer, J; Glebov, V; Sangster, T; Betti, R; Stoeckl, C; Magoon, J; Shoup, M J; Grim, G P; Moran, G L; Murphy, T J; Leeper, R J; Ruiz, C

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

106

National Ignition Facility makes history with record 500 terawatt...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Ignition Facility makes history with record 500 terawatt shot Breanna Bishop, LLNL, (925) 423-9802, bishop33@llnl.gov Printer-friendly The preamplifiers of the National...

107

IMPACT OF TARGET MATERIAL ACTIVATION ON PERSONNEL EXPOSURE AND RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINATION IN THE NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed activation analyses are performed for the different materials under consideration for use in the target capsules and hohlraums used during the ignition campaign on the National Ignition Facility. Results of the target material activation were additionally used to estimate the levels of contamination within the NIF target chamber and the workplace controls necessary for safe operation. The analysis examined the impact of using Be-Cu and Ge-doped CH capsules on the external dose received by workers during maintenance activities. Five days following a 20 MJ shot, dose rates inside the Target Chamber (TC) due to the two proposed capsule materials are small ({approx} 1 {micro}rem/h). Gold and depleted-uranium (DU) are considered as potential hohlraum materials. Following a shot, gold will most probably get deposited on the TC first wall. On the other hand, while noble-gas precursors from the DU are expected to stay in the TC, most of the noble gases are pumped out of the chamber and end up on the cryopumps. The dose rates inside the TC due to activated gold or DU, at 5 days following a 20 MJ shot, are about 1 mrem/h. Dose rates in the vicinity of the cryo-pumps (containing noble 'fission' gases) drop-off to about 1 mrem/h during the first 12 hours following the shot. Contamination from activation of NIF targets will result in the NIF target chamber exceeding DOE surface contamination limits. Objects removed from the TC will need to be managed as radioactive material. However, the results suggest that airborne contamination from resuspension of surface contamination will not be significant and is at levels that can be managed by negative ventilation when accessing the TC attachments.

Khater, H; Epperson, P; Thacker, R; Beale, R; Kohut, T; Brereton, S

2009-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

108

Activation of Air and Utilities in the National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed 3-D modeling of the NIF facility is developed to accurately simulate the radiation environment within the NIF. Neutrons streaming outside the NIF Target Chamber will activate the air present inside the Target Bay and the Ar gas inside the laser tubes. Smaller levels of activity are also generated in the Switchyard air and in the Ar portion of the SY laser beam path. The impact of neutron activation of utilities located inside the Target Bay is analyzed for variety of shot types. The impact of activating TB utilities on dose received by maintenance personnel post-shot is analyzed. The current NIF facility model includes all important features of the Target Chamber, shielding system, and building configuration. Flow of activated air from the Target Bay is controlled by the HVAC system. The amount of activated Target Bay air released through the stack is very small and does not pose significant hazard to personnel or the environment. Activation of Switchyard air is negligible. Activation of Target Bay utilities result in a manageable dose rate environment post high yield (20 MJ) shots. The levels of activation generated in air and utilities during D-D and THD shots are small and do not impact work planning post shots.

Khater, H; Pohl, B; Brererton, S

2010-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

109

Report from the Integrated Modeling Panel at the Workshop on the Science of Ignition on NIF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This section deals with multiphysics radiation hydrodynamics codes used to design and simulate targets in the ignition campaign. These topics encompass all the physical processes they model, and include consideration of any approximations necessary due to finite computer resources. The section focuses on what developments would have the highest impact on reducing uncertainties in modeling most relevant to experimental observations. It considers how the ICF codes should be employed in the ignition campaign. This includes a consideration of how the experiments can be best structured to test the physical models the codes employ.

Marinak, M; Lamb, D

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

110

Comparison of Raman Scattering Measurements and Modeling in NIF Ignition Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent NIF indirect-drive experiments have shown significant Raman scattering from the inner beams. NIF data has motivated improvements to rad-hydro modeling, leading to the 'high flux model' [M. D. Rosen et al., HEDP 7, 180 (2011)]. Cross-beam energy transfer [P. A. Michel et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 056305 (2010] in the laser entrance hole is an important tool for achieving round implosions, and is uniformly distributed across the laser spot in rad-hydro simulations (but not necessarily in experiments). We find the Raman linear gain spectra computed with these plasma conditions agree well in time-dependent peak wavelength with the measured data, especially when overlapping laser-beam intensities are used. More detailed, spatially non-uniform modeling of the cross-beam transfer has been performed. The resulting gains better follow the time history of the measured backscatter. We shall present the impact of spatially non-uniform energy transfer on SRS gain. This metric is valid when amplification is in a linear regime, and so we shall also present an assessment of whether electron trapping in Langmuir waves can play a role in these shots.

Strozzi, D J; Hinkel, D E; Williams, E A; Town, R J; Michel, P A; Divol, L; Berger, R L; Moody, J D

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

111

Experimental validation of a diagnostic technique for tuning the fourth shock timing on National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Capsule implosions on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [Lindl et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)] will be driven with a carefully tailored sequence of four shock waves that must be timed to very high precision in order to keep the fuel on a low adiabat. The Hohlraum conditions present during the first three shocks allow for a very accurate and direct diagnosis of the strength and timing of each individual shock by velocity interferometry. Experimental validation of this diagnostic technique on the OMEGA Laser Facility [Boehly et al., Opt. Commun. 133, 495 (1997)] has been reported in [Boehly et al., Phys. Plasmas 16, 056302 (2009)]. The Hohlraum environment present during the launch and propagation of the final shock, by contrast, is much more severe and will not permit diagnosis by the same technique. A new, closely related technique has been proposed for measuring and tuning the strength and timing of the fourth shock. Experiments to test this technique under NIF-relevant conditions have also been performed on OMEGA. The result of these experiments and a comparison to numerical simulations is presented, validating this concept.

Robey, H. F.; Celliers, P. M.; Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Boehly, T. R.; Meyerhofer, D. D. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, Rochester, New York 14645 (United States); Olson, R. E. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87123 (United States); Nikroo, A. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92186 (United States)

2010-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

112

The National Ignition Facility Status and Plans for Laser Fusion and High-Energy-Density Experimental Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) currently under construction at the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a 192-beam, 1.8-megajoule, 500-terawatt, 351-nm laser for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high-energy-density experimental studies. NIF is being built by the Department of Energy and the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA) to provide an experimental test bed for the U.S. Stockpile Stewardship Program to ensure the country's nuclear deterrent without underground nuclear testing. The experimental program will encompass a wide range of physical phenomena from fusion energy production to materials science. Of the roughly 700 shots available per year, about 10% will be dedicated to basic science research. Laser hardware is modularized into line replaceable units (LRUs) such as deformable mirrors, amplifiers, and multi-function sensor packages that are operated by a distributed computer control system of nearly 60,000 control points. The supervisory control roo...

Moses, E I

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

The Design and Implementation of the Integrated Timing System to be Used in the National Ignition Facility  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility, or NIF, currently under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory will contain the world's most powerful laser. By the year 2003 the NIF laser will be a research tool allowing scientists a glimpse into plasma interactions that are equivalent to those found in the center of the sun. Every eight hours the NIF will generate 1.8 MJ of 351-nm light carried by 192 pulsed laser beams and focus it onto a pea-sized target. This will result in a fusion reaction between two isotopes of hydrogen, creating for a few hundred picoseconds stellar conditions. Synchronizing the beams and diagnosing the fusion reaction requires generation and delivery of over 1000 precisely timed triggers to a multitude of systems. The NIF Integrated Timing System (ITS) was developed to provide reliable, accurately timed triggers that allow each client system to operate independently during periods of shot preparation and maintenance, yet be coordinated to a few tens of picoseconds during the experiment. The ITS applies technologies developed for fiber communications and Two-Way Time Transfer, and integrates them by way of a computer communications network to achieve distributed control, dynamically configurable coordination and independent among timing channels, and integrated self-diagnostics.

Coutts, G.W.; Wiedwald, J.D.; Sewall, N.; Lagin, L.

1999-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

114

The National Ignition Facility National Ignition Campaign Short Pulse Lasers High-Average-Power Laser  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Average-Power Laser NIF-1005-11471 07BEW/dj P9765 Agenda #12;P9516NIF-0805-11197 01EIM/dj Stockpile Stewardship #12;P9504NIF-0404-08345r2 27EIM/ld Basic Science and Cosmology #12;NIF-0702-05346rIFSA Fusion Energy Campaign and point design NIF-0305-10564 23MLS/cld P8719 The NIF Laser User Optics Physics Operations

115

Polar-drive designs for optimizing neutron yields on the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

Polar-drive designs are proposed for producing symmetric implosions of thin-shell, DT gas-filled targets leading to high fusion-neutron yields for neutron-diagnostic development. The designs can be implemented as soon as the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [E. M. Campbell and W. J. Hogan, Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 41, B39 (1999)] is operational as they use indirect-drive phase plates. Two-dimensional simulations using the hydrodynamics code SAGE [R. S. Craxton and R. L. McCrory, J. Appl. Phys. 56, 108 (1984)] have shown that good low-mode uniformity can be obtained by choosing combinations of pointing and defocusing of the beams, including pointing offsets of individual beams within some of the NIF laser-beam quads. The optimizations have been carried out for total laser energies ranging from 350 kJ to 1.5 MJ, enabling the optimum pointing and defocusing parameters to be determined through interpolation for any given laser energy in this range. Neutron yields in the range of 10{sup 15}-10{sup 16} are expected.

Cok, A. M.; Craxton, R. S.; McKenty, P. W. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, 250 East River Road, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

116

The National Ignition Facility: Status and Plans for Laser Fusion and High-Energy-Density Experimental Studies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) currently under construction at the University of California Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is a 192-beam, 1.8-megajoule, 500-terawatt, 351-nm laser for inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and high-energy-density experimental studies. NIF is being built by the Department of Energy and the National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA) to provide an experimental test bed for the U.S. Stockpile Stewardship Program to ensure the country's nuclear deterrent without underground nuclear testing. The experimental program will encompass a wide range of physical phenomena from fusion energy production to materials science. Of the roughly 700 shots available per year, about 10% will be dedicated to basic science research. Laser hardware is modularized into line replaceable units (LRUs) such as deformable mirrors, amplifiers, and multi-function sensor packages that are operated by a distributed computer control system of nearly 60,000 control points. The supervisory control room presents facility-wide status and orchestrates experiments using operating parameters predicted by physics models. A network of several hundred front-end processors (FEPs) implements device control. The object-oriented software system is implemented in the Ada and Java languages and emphasizes CORBA distribution of reusable software objects. NIF is currently scheduled to provide first light in 2004 and will be completed in 2008.

E. I. Moses

2001-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

117

"Defense-in-Depth" Laser Safety and the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is the largest and most energetic laser in the world contained in a complex the size of a football stadium. From the initial laser pulse, provided by telecommunication style infrared nanoJoule pulsed lasers, to the final 192 laser beams (1.8 Mega Joules total energy in the ultraviolet) converging on a target the size of a pencil eraser, laser safety is of paramount concern. In addition to this, there are numerous high-powered (Class 3B and 4) diagnostic lasers in use that can potentially send their laser radiation travelling throughout the facility. With individual beam paths of up to 1500 meters and a workforce of more than one thousand, the potential for exposure is significant. Simple laser safety practices utilized in typical laser labs just don't apply. To mitigate these hazards, NIF incorporates a multi layered approach to laser safety or 'Defense in Depth.' Most typical high-powered laser operations are contained and controlled within a single room using relatively simplistic controls to protect both the worker and the public. Laser workers are trained, use a standard operating procedure, and are required to wear Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) such as Laser Protective Eyewear (LPE) if the system is not fully enclosed. Non-workers are protected by means of posting the room with a warning sign and a flashing light. In the best of cases, a Safety Interlock System (SIS) will be employed which will 'safe' the laser in the case of unauthorized access. This type of laser operation is relatively easy to employ and manage. As the operation becomes more complex, higher levels of control are required to ensure personnel safety. Examples requiring enhanced controls are outdoor and multi-room laser operations. At the NIF there are 192 beam lines and numerous other Class 4 diagnostic lasers that can potentially deliver their hazardous energy to locations far from the laser source. This presents a serious and complex potential hazard to personnel. Because of this, a multilayered approach to safety is taken. This paper presents the philosophy and approach taken at the NIF in the multi-layered 'defense-in-depth' approach to laser safety.

King, J J

2010-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

118

An initial assessment of three-dimensional polar direct drive capsule asymmetries for implosions at the National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) provides a unique opportunity to study implosion physics with nuclear yield. The use of polar direct drive (PDD) [A. M. Cok, R. S. Craxton, and P. W. McKenty, Phys. Plasmas 15, 082705 (2008)] provides a simple platform for the experimental studies without expensive optics upgrades to NIF. To determine the optimum PDD laser pointing geometry on NIF and provide a baseline for validating inertial confinement fusion codes against experiments for symmetric and asymmetric implosions, computer simulations using the 3D radiation-hydrodynamics code hydra[M. M. Marinak, R. E. Tipton, O. L. Landen, T. J. Murphy, P. Amendt, S. W. Haan, S. P. Hatchett, C. J. Keane, R. McEachern, and R. Wallace, Phys. Plasmas 3, 2070 (1996)] were preformed. The upper hemisphere of a DT-filled CH capsule was imploded by 96 NIF beams in a PDD configuration. Asymmetries in both polar and equatorial directions around the capsule were observed, with the former dominating the latter. Analysis of the simulation results indicates that the lack of symmetry in the initial power density profile (during the first 200 ps of the implosion) is a primary cause of late-time asymmetry in the implosion as well as decreased yield. By adjusting the laser pointings, the symmetry and total neutron yield were improved. Simulations with dropped quads (four of the NIF laser system's 192 beamlines) without repointing worsen the overall symmetry by a factor of 10 (with respect to rms radial variation around the capsule) and reduce neutron yield by a factor of 2. Both of these degraded implosion characteristics are restored by azimuthal repointing of the remaining quads.

Krasheninnikova, Natalia S.; Finnegan, Sean M.; Schmitt, Mark J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

119

Heating National Ignition Facility, Realistic Financial Planning...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Essential Lessons Learned Report Apr 2010.pdf More Documents & Publications Highly Enriched Uranium Materials Facility, Major Design Changes Late...Lessons Learned Report, NNSA,...

120

National Ignition Facility | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Office of Research, Development, Test Capabilities and Evaluation > Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion > Facilities >...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ignition facility nif" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Laser fusion experiment yields record energy at NIF | National Nuclear  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Laser fusion experiment yields record energy at NIF | National Nuclear Laser fusion experiment yields record energy at NIF | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Laser fusion experiment yields record energy at NIF Laser fusion experiment yields record energy at NIF Posted By Office of Public Affairs Lawrence Livermore's National Ignition Facility (NIF) recently focused all

122

NIF Target Chamber Dedicated | National Nuclear Security Administration  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NIF Target Chamber Dedicated | National Nuclear Security Administration NIF Target Chamber Dedicated | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > NIF Target Chamber Dedicated NIF Target Chamber Dedicated June 11, 1999 Livermore, CA NIF Target Chamber Dedicated Secretary Richardson dedicates the National Ignition Facility target

123

Laser fusion experiment yields record energy at NIF | National Nuclear  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laser fusion experiment yields record energy at NIF | National Nuclear Laser fusion experiment yields record energy at NIF | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > Laser fusion experiment yields record energy at NIF Laser fusion experiment yields record energy at NIF Posted By Office of Public Affairs Lawrence Livermore's National Ignition Facility (NIF) recently focused all

124

Orchestrating shots for the national ignition racility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF), currently under construction at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, is a stadium-sized facility containing a 192-beam, 1.8 Megajoule, 500-Terawatt, ultra-violet laser system together with a 10-meter diameter ... Keywords: Ada95, CORBA, XML, architecture, concurrency, data driven, framework, java, model-based, multi-threaded, state machine, workflow

David G. Mathisen; Robert W. Carey

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Ignition on the National Ignition Facility: A Path Towards Inertial Fusion Energy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to Arial 18 pt bold Name here Title or division here Date 00, 2008 LLNL-PRES-407907 #12;NIF-1208-15666.ppt Moses_Fusion Power Associates, 12/03/08 2 Two major possibilities for fusion energy #12;NIF-1208-15666.ppt Moses_Fusion Power Associates, 12/03/08 3 The NIF is nearing completion and will be conducting

126

Calibration of X-ray detectors in the 8 to 115 keV energy range and their application to diagnostics on the National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The calibration of X-ray diagnostics is of paramount importance to the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). National Security Technologies LLC (NSTec) fills this need by providing a wide variety of calibration and diagnostic development services in support of the ongoing research efforts at NIF. The X-ray source in the High Energy X-ray lab utilizes induced fluorescence in a variety of metal foils to produce a beam of characteristic X rays ranging from 8 to 111 keV. Presented are the methods used for calibrating a High Purity Germanium detector, which has been absolutely calibrated using radioactive check sources, compared against a silicon photodiode calibrated at Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB). Also included is a limited presentation of results from the recent calibration of the upgraded Filter Fluorescer X ray Spectrometer.

J. J. Lee, M. J. Haugh, G. LaCaille, and P. Torres

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

HYDROGEN IGNITION MECHANISM FOR EXPLOSIONS IN NUCLEAR FACILITY PIPE SYSTEMS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hydrogen and oxygen generation due to the radiolysis of water is a recognized hazard in pipe systems used in the nuclear industry, where the accumulation of hydrogen and oxygen at high points in the pipe system is expected, and explosive conditions exist. Pipe ruptures at nuclear facilities were attributed to hydrogen explosions inside pipelines, in nuclear facilities, i.e., Hamaoka, Nuclear Power Station in Japan, and Brunsbuettel in Germany. Prior to these accidents an ignition source for hydrogen was questionable, but these accidents, demonstrated that a mechanism was, in fact, available to initiate combustion and explosion. Hydrogen explosions may occur simultaneously with water hammer accidents in nuclear facilities, and a theoretical mechanism to relate water hammer to hydrogen deflagrations and explosions is presented herein.

Leishear, R

2010-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

128

Will NIF Work  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is vital that new clean and abundant sources of energy be developed for the sustainability of modern society. Nuclear fusion of the hydrogen isotopes deuterium and tritium, if successful, might make a major contribution toward satisfying this need. The U.S. has an important effort aimed at achieving practical inertial confinement fusion, ICF, which has been under development for decades at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a giant laser to multiply-shock and thus quasi-isentropically compress a capsule of deuterium-tritium (DT) to high density and temperature, where the fusion rate is proportional to density squared times temperature to the fourth power. The principal problem that must be solved for NIF to work successfully is elimination of the Rayleigh-Tailor (R-T) instability that originates from the interface between the solid shell and the DT fuel within it. The R-T instability poisons the fusion reaction by reducing the temperature of the DT achieved ...

Nellis, W J

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

NIF Projects Controls and Information Systems Software Quality Assurance Plan  

SciTech Connect

Quality achievement for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) is the responsibility of the NIF Projects line organization as described in the NIF and Photon Science Directorate Quality Assurance Plan (NIF QA Plan). This Software Quality Assurance Plan (SQAP) is subordinate to the NIF QA Plan and establishes quality assurance (QA) activities for the software subsystems within Controls and Information Systems (CIS). This SQAP implements an activity level software quality assurance plan for NIF Projects as required by the LLNL Institutional Software Quality Assurance Program (ISQAP). Planned QA activities help achieve, assess, and maintain appropriate quality of software developed and/or acquired for control systems, shot data systems, laser performance modeling systems, business applications, industrial control and safety systems, and information technology systems. The objective of this SQAP is to ensure that appropriate controls are developed and implemented for management planning, work execution, and quality assessment of the CIS organization's software activities. The CIS line organization places special QA emphasis on rigorous configuration control, change management, testing, and issue tracking to help achieve its quality goals.

Fishler, B

2011-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

130

Update on NIF and NIC Presentation to  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Update on NIF and NIC Presentation to TOFE 2012, Nashville August 30, 2012 Mike Dunne Director, Laser Fusion Energy #12;NIF is the culmination of a decades-long effort to demonstrate fusion ignition and energy gain 22012-030585.ppt #12;Dunne--CLEO 2012, San Jose, May 10, 2012 32012-030585.ppt The NIF

131

Scanned NIF2.pub  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Status of the National Ignition Facility Status of the National Ignition Facility Project DOE/IG-0598 April 2003 National Ignition Facility Details of Finding ....................................................................... 1 Appendix Scope and Methodology ............................................................ 4 TABLE OF CONTENTS STATUS OF THE NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY PROJECT Page 1 Background Construction of the National Ignition Facility, a 192-beamline 1.8 megajoule laser being built by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (Livermore), began in 1997. The project is comprised of six major components: conventional facility; laser system; target experimental system; integrated computers and controls; assembly, installation, and refurbishment equipment; and utilities. To manage the

132

Visualization of Target Inspection data at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

As the National Ignition Facility continues its campaign to achieve ignition, new methods and tools will be required to measure the quality of the target capsules used to achieve this goal. Techniques have been developed to measure capsule surface features using a phase-shifting diffraction interferometer and Leica Microsystems confocal microscope. These instruments produce multi-gigabyte datasets which consist of tens to hundreds of files. Existing software can handle viewing a small subset of an entire dataset, but none can view a dataset in its entirety. Additionally, without an established mode of transport that keeps the target capsules properly aligned throughout the assembly process, a means of aligning the two dataset coordinate systems is needed. The goal of this project is to develop web based software utilizing WebGL which will provide high level overview visualization of an entire dataset, with the capability to retrieve finer details on demand, in addition to facilitating alignment of multiple datasets with one another based on common features that have been visually identified by users of the system.

Potter, D; Antipa, N

2012-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

133

Charged-particle spectroscopy for diagnosing shock {rho}R and strength in NIF implosions  

SciTech Connect

The compact Wedge Range Filter (WRF) proton spectrometer was developed for OMEGA and transferred to the National Ignition Facility (NIF) as a National Ignition Campaign diagnostic. The WRF measures the spectrum of protons from D-{sup 3}He reactions in tuning-campaign implosions containing D and {sup 3}He gas; in this work we report on the first proton spectroscopy measurement on the NIF using WRFs. The energy downshift of the 14.7-MeV proton is directly related to the total {rho}R through the plasma stopping power. Additionally, the shock proton yield is measured, which is a metric of the final merged shock strength.

Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Seguin, F. H.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Rinderknecht, H. G.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Casey, D. T.; Sinenian, N.; Manuel, M. J.-E.; Waugh, C. J.; Sio, H. W.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Friedrich, S.; Knittel, K.; Bionta, R.; McKernan, M.; Callahan, D.; Collins, G. W.; Dewald, E. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

134

Advanced ignition options for laser ICF  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

University of Rochester and Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory #12;FSC · With day-one hardware, the NIF can explore high-gain shock ignition - Polar Shock Ignition (uses half the NIF beams to drive the implosion: multi-FM or 2D-SSD (talk by J. Soures at this meeting) The NIF can explore advanced ignition options

135

Physics Experiments on NIF  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344 ! LLNL Progress towards Ignition & Weapons Physics Experiments on NIF Presentation to: SEAB October 12, 2011 Ed Moses Director, NIF and Photon Science LLNL-PRES-506751 May 30, 2011 Moses_BOG_92811 NIF has broad array of technical and operational capabilities Moses_BOG_92811 Moses_BOG_92811 Laser bay NIF-0210-18489.ppt Moses presentation to Professor Mohamed Abdou, Neil Morley, Alice Ying, Robert Reed UCLA 5 Moses_All_Hands_100511 We are steadily increasing the laser energy and power available for ignition experiments: fy09 Moses_All_Hands_100511 We are steadily increasing the laser energy and power available for ignition experiments: fy10

136

Cryogenic thermonuclear fuel implosions on the National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The first inertial confinement fusion implosion experiments with equimolar deuterium-tritium thermonuclear fuel have been performed on the National Ignition Facility. These experiments use 0.17 mg of fuel with the potential for ignition and significant fusion yield conditions. The thermonuclear fuel has been fielded as a cryogenic layer on the inside of a spherical plastic capsule that is mounted in the center of a cylindrical gold hohlraum. Heating the hohlraum with 192 laser beams for a total laser energy of 1.6 MJ produces a soft x-ray field with 300 eV temperature. The ablation pressure produced by the radiation field compresses the initially 2.2-mm diameter capsule by a factor of 30 to a spherical dense fuel shell that surrounds a central hot-spot plasma of 50 {mu}m diameter. While an extensive set of x-ray and neutron diagnostics has been applied to characterize hot spot formation from the x-ray emission and 14.1 MeV deuterium-tritium primary fusion neutrons, thermonuclear fuel assembly is studied by measuring the down-scattered neutrons with energies in the range of 10 to 12 MeV. X-ray and neutron imaging of the compressed core and fuel indicate a fuel thickness of (14 {+-} 3) {mu}m, which combined with magnetic recoil spectrometer measurements of the fuel areal density of (1 {+-} 0.09) g cm{sup -2} result in fuel densities approaching 600 g cm{sup -3}. The fuel surrounds a hot-spot plasma with average ion temperatures of (3.5 {+-} 0.1) keV that is measured with neutron time of flight spectra. The hot-spot plasma produces a total fusion neutron yield of 10{sup 15} that is measured with the magnetic recoil spectrometer and nuclear activation diagnostics that indicate a 14.1 MeV yield of (7.5{+-}0.1) Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 14} which is 70% to 75% of the total fusion yield due to the high areal density. Gamma ray measurements provide the duration of nuclear activity of (170 {+-} 30) ps. These indirect-drive implosions result in the highest areal densities and neutron yields achieved on laser facilities to date. This achievement is the result of the first hohlraum and capsule tuning experiments where the stagnation pressures have been systematically increased by more than a factor of 10 by fielding low-entropy implosions through the control of radiation symmetry, small hot electron production, and proper shock timing. The stagnation pressure is above 100 Gbars resulting in high Lawson-type confinement parameters of P{tau} Asymptotically-Equal-To 10 atm s. Comparisons with radiation-hydrodynamic simulations indicate that the pressure is within a factor of three required for reaching ignition and high yield. This will be the focus of future higher-velocity implosions that will employ additional optimizations of hohlraum, capsule and laser pulse shape conditions.

Glenzer, S. H.; Callahan, D. A.; MacKinnon, A. J.; Alger, E. T.; Berger, R. L.; Bernstein, L. A.; Bleuel, D. L.; Bradley, D. K.; Burkhart, S. C.; Burr, R.; Caggiano, J. A.; Castro, C.; Choate, C.; Clark, D. S.; Celliers, P.; Cerjan, C. J.; Collins, G. W.; Dewald, E. L.; DiNicola, P.; DiNicola, J. M. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

137

Convective heating analysis of an IFE target in a high temperature, low Reynolds number xenon environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the National Ignition Facility (NIF),” Proceedings of 9 ththe National Ignition Facility (NIF),” Proceedings of 9 thFacility, NIF ..

Holdener, Dain Steffen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

California’s Energy Future: The View to 2050 - Summary Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Ignition Facility (NIF) and its associated researchdiode LWR Light water reactor NIF National Ignition Facility

Yang, Christopher

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

California's Energy Future - The View to 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Ignition Facility (NIF) and its associated researchdiode LWR Light water reactor NIF National Ignition Facility

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

NIF Warehouse Group celebrates 15 injury-free years | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

every component that has gone into the construction of NIF, installation of the laser systems and the conduct of the National Ignition Campaign. A celebration was held on...

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141

Focus on NIF May 2001  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility, a stadium-size, 192-beam laser, is an essential tool for maintaining the safety and reliability of our nuclear weapons, harnessing fusion energy for future generations, and unlocking the origins of the universe. In the FY2001 Energy and Water Appropriations Act (FPN00-48), Congress appropriated $199.1 million for the continued construction of NIF. Immediately, $130 million became available. After March 31, 2001, $69.1 million was to be made available only after Department of Energy certification to Congress regarding six specific points: (1) recommend an appropriate path forward for the project; (2) certify that all established project and scientific milestones are on schedule and cost; (3) conduct 1st and 2nd quarter project reviews in FY01 and determine the project is on schedule and cost; (4) study alternatives to a 192-beam ignition facility for the stockpile stewardship program (SSP); (5) implement an integrated cost-schedule earned-value project control system; and (6) create a five-year budget plan for the SSP.

Warner, B

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Adaptation of a cubic smoothing spline algortihm for multi-channel data stitching at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

Some diagnostics at the National Ignition Facility (NIF), including the Gamma Reaction History (GRH) diagnostic, require multiple channels of data to achieve the required dynamic range. These channels need to be stitched together into a single time series, and they may have non-uniform and redundant time samples. We chose to apply the popular cubic smoothing spline technique to our stitching problem because we needed a general non-parametric method. We adapted one of the algorithms in the literature, by Hutchinson and deHoog, to our needs. The modified algorithm and the resulting code perform a cubic smoothing spline fit to multiple data channels with redundant time samples and missing data points. The data channels can have different, time-varying, zero-mean white noise characteristics. The method we employ automatically determines an optimal smoothing level by minimizing the Generalized Cross Validation (GCV) score. In order to automatically validate the smoothing level selection, the Weighted Sum-Squared Residual (WSSR) and zero-mean tests are performed on the residuals. Further, confidence intervals, both analytical and Monte Carlo, are also calculated. In this paper, we describe the derivation of our cubic smoothing spline algorithm. We outline the algorithm and test it with simulated and experimental data.

Brown, C; Adcock, A; Azevedo, S; Liebman, J; Bond, E

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

143

DOE/EIS-0236-S1F; National Ignition Facility Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement to the Stockpile Stewardship and Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (January 2001)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SUMMARY SUMMARY 1 This Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) was prepared pursuant to a Joint Stipulation and Order approved and entered as an order of the court on October 27, 1997, in partial settlement of the lawsuit Civ. No. 97-936 (SS) (D.D.C.), Natural Resources Defense Council [NRDC] et al. v. Richardson et al. The Joint Stipulation and Order is reproduced at the end of this document as Attachment 1. In the Joint Stipulation and Order, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) agreed to prepare an SEIS to the Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement for Stockpile Stewardship and Management (SSM PEIS) (DOE/EIS-0236, DOE 1996a) to evaluate the reasonably foreseeable significant adverse environmental impacts of continuing to construct and of operating the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National

144

Target Diagnostic Control System Implementation for the National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The extreme physics of targets shocked by NIF's 192-beam laser are observed by a diverse suite of diagnostics. Many diagnostics are being developed by collaborators at other sites, but ad hoc controls could lead to unreliable and costly operations. A Diagnostic Control System (DCS) framework for both hardware and software facilitates development and eases integration. Each complex diagnostic typically uses an ensemble of electronic instruments attached to sensors, digitizers, cameras, and other devices. In the DCS architecture each instrument is interfaced to a low-cost Windows XP processor and Java application. Each instrument is aggregated with others as needed in the supervisory system to form an integrated diagnostic. The Java framework provides data management, control services and operator GUI generation. DCS instruments are reusable by replication with reconfiguration for specific diagnostics in XML. Advantages include minimal application code, easy testing, and high reliability. Collaborators save costs by assembling diagnostics with existing DCS instruments. This talk discusses target diagnostic instrumentation used on NIF and presents the DCS architecture and framework.

Shelton, R T; Kamperschroer, J H; Lagin, L J; Nelson, J R; O'Brien, D W

2010-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

145

Ignition Capsules with Aerogel-Supported Liquid DT Fuel For The National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

For high repetition-rate fusion power plant applications, capsules with aerogel-supported liquid DT fuel can have much reduced fill time compared to {beta}-layering a solid DT fuel layer. The melting point of liquid DT can be lowered once liquid DT is embedded in an aerogel matrix, and the DT vapor density is consequently closer to the desired density for optimal capsule design requirement. We present design for NIF-scale aerogel-filled capsules based on 1-D and 2-D simulations. An optimal configuration is obtained when the outer radius is increased until the clean fuel fraction is within 65-75% at peak velocity. A scan (in ablator and fuel thickness parameter space) is used to optimize the capsule configurations. The optimized aerogel-filled capsule has good low-mode robustness and acceptable high-mode mix.

Ho, D D; Salmonson, J D; Clark, D S; Lindl, J D; Haan, S W; Amendt, P; Wu, K J

2011-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

146

NIF ICCS Test Controller for Automated & Manual Testing  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS) is a large (1.5 MSLOC), hierarchical, distributed system that controls all aspects of the NIF laser [1]. The ICCS team delivers software updates to the NIF facility throughout the year to support shot operations and commissioning activities. In 2006, there were 48 releases of ICCS: 29 full releases, 19 patches. To ensure the quality of each delivery, thousands of manual and automated tests are performed using the ICCS Test Controller test infrastructure. The TestController system provides test inventory management, test planning, automated test execution and manual test logging, release testing summaries and test results search, all through a web browser interface. Automated tests include command line based frameworks server tests and Graphical User Interface (GUI) based Java tests. Manual tests are presented as a checklist-style web form to be completed by the tester. The results of all tests, automated and manual, are kept in a common repository that provides data to dynamic status reports. As part of the 3-stage ICCS release testing strategy, the TestController system helps plan, evaluate and track the readiness of each release to the NIF facility.

Zielinski, J S

2007-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

147

DOE/EIS-0236, Oakland Operations Office, National Ignition Facility Final  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

DOE/EIS-0236, Oakland Operations Office, National Ignition Facility DOE/EIS-0236, Oakland Operations Office, National Ignition Facility Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement to the Stockpile Stewardship and Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Volume II: Response to Public Comments (January 2 DOE/EIS-0236, Oakland Operations Office, National Ignition Facility Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement to the Stockpile Stewardship and Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement Volume II: Response to Public Comments (January 2 DOE issued the Draft SEIS for public review and comment by mailings to stakeholders and by announcements in the Federal Register (FR) on November 5, 1999, (64 FR 60430) (Attachment 4 of Volume I) and on November 12, 1999 (64 FR 61635) correcting a document title (Attachment 5 of Volume I). On

148

X-Ray Diffraction on NIF  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is currently a 192 beam, 1.6 MJ laser. NIF Ramp-Compression Experiments have already made the relevant exo-planet pressure range from 1 to 50 Mbar accessible. We Proposed to Study Carbon Phases by X-Ray Diffraction on NIF. Just a few years ago, ultra-high pressure phase diagrams for materials were very 'simple'. New experiments and theories point out surprising and decidedly complex behavior at the highest pressures considered. High pressures phases of aluminum are also predicted to be complex. Recent metadynamics survey of carbon proposed a dynamic pathway among multiple phases. We need to develop diagnostics and techniques to explore this new regime of highly compressed matter science. X-Ray Diffraction - Understand the phase diagram/EOS/strength/texture of materials to 10's of Mbar. Strategy and physics goals: (1) Powder diffraction; (2) Begin with diamond; (3) Continue with metals etc.; (4) Explore phase diagrams; (5) Develop liquid diffraction; and (6) Reduce background/improve resolution.

Eggert, J H; Wark, J

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

149

X-ray Streak Camera Cathode Development and Timing Accuracy of the 4w UV Fiducial System at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The convergent ablator experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are designed to measure the peak velocity and remaining ablator mass of an indirectly driven imploding capsule. Such a measurement can be performed using an x-ray source to backlight the capsule and an x-ray streak camera to record the capsule as it implodes. The ultimate goal of this experiment is to achieve an accuracy of 2% in the velocity measurement, which translates to a {+-}2 ps temporal accuracy over any 300 ps interval for the streak camera. In order to achieve this, a 4-{omega} (263nm) temporal fiducial system has been implemented for the x-ray streak camera at NIF. Aluminum, Titanium, Gold and Silver photocathode materials have been tested. Aluminum showed the highest quantum efficiency, with five times more peak signal counts per fiducial pulse when compared to Gold. The fiducial pulse data was analyzed to determine the centroiding a statistical accuracy for incident laser pulse energies of 1 and 10 nJ, showing an accuracy of {+-}1.6 ps and {+-}0.7 ps respectively.

Opachich, Y P; Palmer, N; Homoelle, D; Hatch, B W; Bell, P; Bradley, D; Kalantar, D; Browning, D; Landen, O

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

150

X-ray streak camera cathode development and timing accuracy of the 4{omega} ultraviolet fiducial system at the National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The convergent ablator experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) are designed to measure the peak velocity and remaining ablator mass of an indirectly driven imploding capsule. Such a measurement can be performed using an x-ray source to backlight the capsule and an x-ray streak camera to record the capsule as it implodes. The ultimate goal of this experiment is to achieve an accuracy of 2% in the velocity measurement, which translates to a {+-}2 ps temporal accuracy over any 300 ps interval for the streak camera. In order to achieve this, a 4{omega} (263 nm) temporal fiducial system has been implemented for the x-ray streak camera at NIF. Aluminum, titanium, gold, and silver photocathode materials have been tested. Aluminum showed the highest relative quantum efficiency, with five times more peak signal counts per fiducial pulse when compared to Gold. The fiducial pulse data were analyzed to determine the centroiding statistical accuracy for incident laser pulse energies of 1 and 10 nJ, showing an accuracy of {+-}1.6 ps and {+-}0.7 ps, respectively.

Opachich, Y. P.; Palmer, N.; Homoelle, D.; Hatch, B.; Bell, P.; Bradley, D.; Kalantar, D.; Browning, D.; Landen, O. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Zuegel, J. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

151

Testing a new NIF neutron time-of-flight detector with a bibenzyl scintillator on OMEGA  

SciTech Connect

A new neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) detector with a bibenzyl crystal as a scintillator has been designed and manufactured for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This detector will replace a nTOF20-Spec detector with an oxygenated xylene scintillator currently operational on the NIF to improve the areal-density measurements. In addition to areal density, the bibenzyl detector will measure the D-D and D-T neutron yield and the ion temperature of indirect- and direct-drive-implosion experiments. The design of the bibenzyl detector and results of tests on the OMEGA Laser System are presented.

Glebov, V. Yu.; Forrest, C.; Knauer, J. P.; Pruyne, A.; Romanofsky, M.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M. J. III; Stoeckl, C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States); Caggiano, J. A.; Carman, M. L.; Clancy, T. J.; Hatarik, R.; McNaney, J.; Zaitseva, N. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

152

The Neutron Imaging Diagnostic at NIF  

SciTech Connect

A neutron imaging diagnostic has recently been commissioned at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This new system is an important diagnostic tool for inertial fusion studies at the NIF for measuring the size and shape of the burning DT plasma during the ignition stage of ICF implosions. The imaging technique utilizes a pinhole neutron aperture, placed between the neutron source and a neutron detector. The detection system measures the two dimensional distribution of neutrons passing through the pinhole. This diagnostic has been designed to collect two images at two times. The long flight path for this diagnostic, 28 m, results in a chromatic separation of the neutrons, allowing the independently timed images to measure the source distribution for two neutron energies. Typically the first image measures the distribution of the 14 MeV neutrons and the second image of the 6-12 MeV neutrons. The combination of these two images has provided data on the size and shape of the burning plasma within the compressed capsule, as well as a measure of the quantity and spatial distribution of the cold fuel surrounding this core.

Merrill, F E; Buckles, R; Clark, D; Danly, C R; Drury, O B; Dzenitis, J M; Fatherly, V E; Fittinghoff, D N; Gallegos, R; Grim, G P; Guler, N; Loomis, E N; Lutz, S; Malone, R M; Martinson, D D; Mares, D; Morley, D J; Morgan, G L; Oertel, J A; Tregillis, I L; Volegov, P L; Weiss, P B; Wilde, C H

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

The neutron imaging diagnostic at NIF (invited)  

SciTech Connect

A neutron imaging diagnostic has recently been commissioned at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This new system is an important diagnostic tool for inertial fusion studies at the NIF for measuring the size and shape of the burning DT plasma during the ignition stage of Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) implosions. The imaging technique utilizes a pinhole neutron aperture, placed between the neutron source and a neutron detector. The detection system measures the two dimensional distribution of neutrons passing through the pinhole. This diagnostic has been designed to collect two images at two times. The long flight path for this diagnostic, 28 m, results in a chromatic separation of the neutrons, allowing the independently timed images to measure the source distribution for two neutron energies. Typically the first image measures the distribution of the 14 MeV neutrons and the second image of the 6-12 MeV neutrons. The combination of these two images has provided data on the size and shape of the burning plasma within the compressed capsule, as well as a measure of the quantity and spatial distribution of the cold fuel surrounding this core.

Merrill, F. E.; Clark, D. D.; Danly, C. R.; Drury, O. B.; Fatherley, V. E.; Gallegos, R.; Grim, G. P.; Guler, N.; Loomis, E. N.; Martinson, D. D.; Mares, D.; Morley, D. J.; Morgan, G. L.; Oertel, J. A.; Tregillis, I. L.; Volegov, P. L.; Wilde, C. H.; Wilson, D. C. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Bower, D.; Dzenitis, J. M. [Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

The magnetic recoil spectrometer for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum at OMEGA and the NIF  

SciTech Connect

The neutron spectrum produced by deuterium-tritium (DT) inertial confinement fusion implosions contains a wealth of information about implosion performance including the DT yield, ion-temperature, and areal-density. The Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been used at both the OMEGA laser facility and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) to measure the absolute neutron spectrum from 3 to 30 MeV at OMEGA and 3 to 36 MeV at the NIF. These measurements have been used to diagnose the performance of cryogenic target implosions to unprecedented accuracy. Interpretation of MRS data requires a detailed understanding of the MRS response and background. This paper describes ab initio characterization of the system involving Monte Carlo simulations of the MRS response in addition to the commission experiments for in situ calibration of the systems on OMEGA and the NIF.

Casey, D. T.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Seguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Magoon, J.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M.; Ulreich, J. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Ashabranner, R. C.; Bionta, R. M.; Carpenter, A. C.; Felker, B.; Khater, H. Y.; LePape, S.; MacKinnon, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

2013-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

155

AN UPDATE ON THE STATUS OF THE NIF POWER CONDITIONING SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) Power Conditioning System provides the pulsed excitation required to drive flashlamps in the laser's optical amplifiers. Modular in design, each of the 192 Main Energy Storage Modules (MESMs) stores up to 2.2 MJ of electrical energy in its capacitor bank before delivering the energy to 20 pairs of flashlamps in a 400 {micro}s pulse (10% power points). The peak current of each MESM discharge is 0.5 MA. Production, installation, commissioning and operation of the NIF Power Conditioning continue to progress rapidly, with the goals of completing accelerated production and commissioning by early 2008, while maintaining an aggressive operation schedule. To date, more than 97% of the required modules have been assembled, shipped and installed in the facility, representing more that 380 MJ of stored energy available for driving NIF flashlamps. The MESMs have displayed outstanding reliability during daily, multiple-shift operations.

Arnold, P A; Hulsey, S; Ullery, G T; Petersen, D E; Pendleton, D L; Ollis, C W; Newton, M A; Harwell, T; Cordoza, D; Hadovski, L

2007-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

156

Target Diagnostic Instrument-Based Controls Framework for the National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NIF target diagnostics are being developed to observe and measure the extreme physics of targets irradiated by the 192-beam laser. The response time of target materials can be on the order of 100ps--the time it takes light to travel 3 cm--temperatures more than 100 times hotter than the surface of the sun, and pressures that exceed 109 atmospheres. Optical and x-ray diagnostics were developed and fielded to observe and record the results of the first 4-beam experiments at NIF. Hard and soft x-ray spectra were measured, and time-integrated and gated x-ray images of hydrodynamics experiments were recorded. Optical diagnostics recorded backscatter from the target, and VISAR laser velocimetry measurements were taken of laser-shocked target surfaces. Additional diagnostics are being developed and commissioned to observe and diagnose ignition implosions, including various neutron and activation diagnostics. NIF's diagnostics are being developed at LLNL and with collaborators at other sites. To accommodate the growing number of target diagnostics, an Instrument-Based Controls hardware-software framework has been developed to facilitate development and ease integration into the NIF Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS). Individual WindowsXP PC controllers for each digitizer, power supply and camera (i.e., instruments) execute controls software unique to each instrument model. Each hardware-software controller manages a single instrument, in contrast to the complexity of combining all the controls software needed for a diagnostic into a single controller. Because of this simplification, controllers can be more easily tested on the actual hardware, evaluating all normal and off-normal conditions. Each target diagnostic is then supported by a number of instruments, each with its own hardware-software instrument-based controller. Advantages of the instrument-based control architecture and framework include reusability, testability, and improved reliability of the deployed hardware and software. Since the same instruments are commonly used on many different diagnostics, the controllers are reusable by replicating the hardware and software as a unit and reconfiguring the controller using configuration files for the specific diagnostic. Diagnostics are fully integrated and interoperable with ICCS supervisory and shot controls using these configuration files to drive the diagnostics' instrument-based controllers.

Shelton, R; O'Brien, D; Nelson, J; Kamperschroer, J

2007-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

157

Status of the National Ignition Facility Project, IG-0598 | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

conventional facility; laser system; target experimental system; integrated computers and controls; assembly, installation, and refurbishment equipment; and utilities. To...

158

Pathway from the National Ignition Facility to an operational LIFE power plant  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

next step, after NIF, is construction of a full-scale power plant NIF-1111-23807.ppt 4 #12 delivery #12;7NIF-1111-23807.ppt #12;Principle of LIFE plant operation Heat transfer DT fuel cycle for high plant availability NIF-based fusion performance, with low tritium inventory in the plant

159

Use of the target diagnostic control system in the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The extreme physics of targets shocked by NIF's 192-beam laser are observed by a diverse suite of diagnostics including optical backscatter, time-integrated, time resolved and gated X-ray sensors, laser velocity interferometry, and neutron time of flight. Diagnostics to diagnose fusion ignition implosion and neutron emissions have been developed. A Diagnostic Control System (DCS) for both hardware and software facilitates development and eases integration. Each complex diagnostic typically uses an ensemble of electronic instruments attached to sensors, digitizers, cameras, and other devices. In the DCS architecture each instrument is interfaced to a low-cost Window XP processor and Java application. Instruments are aggregated as needed in the supervisory system to form an integrated diagnostic. The Java framework provides data management, control services and operator GUI generation. During the past several years, over thirty-six diagnostics have been deployed using this architecture in support of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC). The DCS architecture facilitates the expected additions and upgrades to diagnostics as more experiments are performed. This paper presents the DCS architecture, framework and our experiences in using it during the NIC to operate, upgrade and maintain a large set of diagnostic instruments.

Shelton, R; Lagin, L; Nelson, J

2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

160

Nuclear diagnostics for the National Ignition Facility ,,invited... Thomas J. Murphy,a)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nuclear diagnostics for the National Ignition Facility ,,invited... Thomas J. Murphy,a) Cris W unprecedented opportunities for the use of nuclear diagnostics in inertial confinement fusion experiments to produce up to 1019 DT neutrons. In addition to a basic set of nuclear diagnostics based on previous

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ignition facility nif" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

The NIF 4.5-m nTOF Detectors  

SciTech Connect

The first several campaigns of laser fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) included a family of high-sensitivity scintillator/photodetector neutron-time-of-flight (nTOF) detectors for measuring DD and DT neutron yields. The detectors provided consistent neutron yield benchmarks from below 1E9 (DD) to nearly 1E15 (DT). The detectors demonstrated DT yield measurement precisions better than 5%, but the absolute accuracy relies on cross calibration with independent measurements of absolute neutron yield. The 4.5-m nTOF data have provided a useful testbed for testing improvements in nTOF data processing, especially with respect to improving the accuracies of the detector impulse response functions. The resulting improvements in data analysis methods have produced more accurate results. In summary, results from the NIF 4.5-m nTOF detectors have provided consistent measurements of DD and DT neutron yields from laser-fusion implosions.

Moran, M J; Bond, E J; Clancy, T J; Eckart, M J; Khater, H Y; Glebov, V Y

2012-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

162

Measuring the absolute DT neutron yield using the Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF  

SciTech Connect

A Magnetic Recoil Spectrometer (MRS) has been installed and extensively used on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum from inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. From the neutron spectrum measured with the MRS, many critical implosion parameters are determined including the primary DT neutron yield, the ion temperature, and the down-scattered neutron yield. As the MRS detection efficiency is determined from first principles, the absolute DT neutron yield is obtained without cross-calibration to other techniques. The MRS primary DT neutron measurements at OMEGA and the NIF are shown to be in excellent agreement with previously established yield diagnostics on OMEGA, and with the newly commissioned nuclear activation diagnostics on the NIF.

Mackinnon, A; Casey, D; Frenje, J A; Johnson, M G; Seguin, F H; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Glebov, V Y; Katz, J; Knauer, J; Meyerhofer, D; Sangster, T; Bionta, R; Bleuel, D; Hachett, S P; Hartouni, E; Lepape, S; Mckernan, M; Moran, M; Yeamans, C

2012-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

163

Shock Timing Technique for the NIF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Among the final shots at the Nova laser was a series testing the VISAR technique that will be the primary diagnostic for timing the shocks in a NIF ignition capsule. At Nova, the VISAR technique worked over the range of shock strengths and with the precision required for the NIF shock timing job--shock velocities in liquid D{sub 2} from 12 {micro}m/ns to 65 {micro}m/ns with better than 2% accuracy. VISAR images showed stronger shocks overtaking weaker ones, which is the basis of the plan for setting the pulse shape for the NIF ignition campaign. The technique is so precise that VISAR measurements may also play a role in certifying beam-to-beam and shot-to-shot repeatability of NIF laser pulses.

Munro, D.H.; Celliers, P.M.; Collins, G.W.; Gold, D.M.; DaSilva, L.B.; Haan, S.W.; Cauble, R.C.; Hammel, B.A.; Hsing, W.W.

2000-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

164

The National Ignition Facility Data Requirements Tim Frazier and Alice Koniges, LLNL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ignition Facility Data Requirements Ignition Facility Data Requirements Tim Frazier and Alice Koniges, LLNL SC08 BOF: Computing with Massive and Persistent Data LLNL-PRES-408909. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52- 07NA27344 2 Target chamber One Terabyte of data to be downloaded in ~50 Minutes for each shot. 5 Full Aperture Backscatter Diagnostic Instrument Manipulator (DIM) Diagnostic Instrument Manipulator (DIM) X-ray imager Streaked x-ray detector VISAR Velocity Measurements Static x-ray imager FFLEX Hard x-ray spectrometer Near Backscatter Imager DANTE Soft x-ray temperature Diagnostic Alignment System Cross Timing System Each Diagnostic Produces Data that Requires Analysis 6 Tools are being built to manage and integrate:

165

A HYDROGEN IGNITION MECHANISM FOR EXPLOSIONS IN NUCLEAR FACILITY PIPING SYSTEMS  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen explosions may occur simultaneously with water hammer accidents in nuclear facilities, and a theoretical mechanism to relate water hammer to hydrogen deflagrations and explosions is presented herein. Hydrogen and oxygen generation due to the radiolysis of water is a recognized hazard in pipe systems used in the nuclear industry, where the accumulation of hydrogen and oxygen at high points in the pipe system is expected, and explosive conditions may occur. Pipe ruptures in nuclear reactor cooling systems were attributed to hydrogen explosions inside pipelines, i.e., Hamaoka, Nuclear Power Station in Japan, and Brunsbuettel in Germany. Prior to these accidents, an ignition source for hydrogen was not clearly demonstrated, but these accidents demonstrated that a mechanism was, in fact, available to initiate combustion and explosion. A new theory to identify an ignition source and explosion cause is presented here, and further research is recommended to fully understand this explosion mechanism.

Leishear, R.

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

166

The Gated X-ray Detector for the National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two new gated x-ray imaging cameras have recently been designed, constructed and delivered to the National Ignition Facility in Livermore, CA. These Gated X-ray Detectors are each designed to fit within an aluminum airbox with a large capacity cooling plane and are fitted with an array of environmental housekeeping sensors. These instruments are significant different from earlier generations of gated x-ray images due in parts to an innovative impendence matching scheme, advanced phosphor screens, pulsed phosphor circuits, precision assembly fixturing, unique system monitoring and complete remote computer control. Preliminary characterization has shown repeatable uniformity between imaging strips, improved spatial resolution and no detectable impendence reflections.

Oertel, J A; Barnes, C; Archuleta, T; Casper, L; Fatherley, V; Heinrichs, T; King, R; Landers, D; Lopez, F; Sanchez, P; Sandoval, G; Schrank, L; Walsh, P; Bell, P; Brown, M; Costa, R; Holder, J; Montalongo, S; Pederson, N

2006-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

167

Measuring the absolute deuterium-tritium neutron yield using the magnetic recoil spectrometer at OMEGA and the NIF  

SciTech Connect

A magnetic recoil spectrometer (MRS) has been installed and extensively used on OMEGA and the National Ignition Facility (NIF) for measurements of the absolute neutron spectrum from inertial confinement fusion implosions. From the neutron spectrum measured with the MRS, many critical implosion parameters are determined including the primary DT neutron yield, the ion temperature, and the down-scattered neutron yield. As the MRS detection efficiency is determined from first principles, the absolute DT neutron yield is obtained without cross-calibration to other techniques. The MRS primary DT neutron measurements at OMEGA and the NIF are shown to be in excellent agreement with previously established yield diagnostics on OMEGA, and with the newly commissioned nuclear activation diagnostics on the NIF.

Casey, D. T.; Frenje, J. A.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Seguin, F. H.; Li, C. K.; Petrasso, R. D. [Plasma Science and Fusion Center, MIT, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Glebov, V. Yu.; Katz, J.; Knauer, J. P.; Meyerhofer, D. D.; Sangster, T. C. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, UR, Rochester, New York 14623 (United States); Bionta, R. M.; Bleuel, D. L.; Doeppner, T.; Glenzer, S.; Hartouni, E.; Hatchett, S. P.; Le Pape, S.; Ma, T.; MacKinnon, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

168

Assessment and Mitigation of Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) Impacts at Short-pulse Laser Facilities  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) will be impacted by electromagnetic pulse (EMP) during normal long-pulse operation, but the largest impacts are expected during short-pulse operation utilizing the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC). Without mitigation these impacts could range from data corruption to hardware damage. We describe our EMP measurement systems on Titan and NIF and present some preliminary results and thoughts on mitigation.

Brown, Jr., C G; Bond, E; Clancy, T; Dangi, S; Eder, D C; Ferguson, W; Kimbrough, J; Throop, A

2010-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

169

Assessment and Mitigation of Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) Impacts at Short-pulse Laser Facilities  

SciTech Connect

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) will be impacted by electromagnetic pulse (EMP) during normal long-pulse operation, but the largest impacts are expected during short-pulse operation utilizing the Advanced Radiographic Capability (ARC). Without mitigation these impacts could range from data corruption to hardware damage. We describe our EMP measurement systems on Titan and NIF and present some preliminary results and thoughts on mitigation.

Brown, Jr., C G; Bond, E; Clancy, T; Dangi, S; Eder, D C; Ferguson, W; Kimbrough, J; Throop, A

2009-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

170

NNSA Defense Programs Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition and High Yield Campaign  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the NIF Project #12;2 Outline · National Nuclear Security Administration · ICF Campaign and Stewardship overview · NIF Use Plan ­ Defense Science Board review (Ignition 2010) · Recent progress ­ NIF, OMEGA, Z Confinement Fusion Acting Director Dr. Richard K. Thorpe NA-161 Office of the NIF Project Acting Director

171

A spheromak ignition experiment reusing Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) equipment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on available experimental results and theory, a scenario is presented to achieve ohmic ignition in a spheromak by slow ({approximately} 10 sec.) helicity injection using power from the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) substation. Some of the other parts needed (vacuum vessel, coils, power supplies, pumps, shielded building space) might also be obtained from MFTF or other salvage, as well as some components needed for intermediate experiments for additional verification of the concept (especially confinement scaling). The proposed ignition experiment would serve as proof-of-principle for the spheromak DT fusion reactor design published by Hagenson and Krakowski, with a nuclear island cost about ten times less than a tokamak of comparable power. Designs at even higher power density and lower cost might be possible using Christofilos` concept of a liquid lithium blanket. Since all structures would be protected from neutrons by the lithium blanket and the tritium inventory can be reduced by continuous removal from the liquid blanket, environmental and safety characteristics appear to be favorable.

Fowler, T.K.

1993-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

172

ICF Program Status SNL Z Facility UR/LLE OMEGA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the NIF Project National Nuclear Security Administration September 28, 2006 #12;2 Key points · A new fusion and high energy density physics · OMEGA EP; Z/ZR; NIF and ignition; petawatt capabilities;... · Ignition and applications planned for NIF; integrated program of "non- ignition" experiments

173

Critical issues for high-brightness heavy-ion beams -- prioritized  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Ignition Facility (NIF) will provide motivation toobtaining funding for the NIF, the Large Hadron Collider (

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Science on high-energy lasers: From today to the NIF  

SciTech Connect

This document presents both a concise definition of the current capabilities of high energy lasers and a description of capabilities of the NIF (National Ignition Facility). Five scientific areas are discussed (Astrophysics, Hydrodynamics, Material Properties, Plasma Physics, Radiation Sources, and Radiative Properties). In these five areas we project a picture of the future based on investigations that are being carried on today. Even with this very conservative approach we find that the development of new higher energy lasers will make many extremely exciting areas accessible to us.

Lee, R.W.; Petrasso, R.; Falcone, R.W.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Fudge: a high-bandwidth fusion diagnostic of the NIF  

SciTech Connect

Diagnostics for the National Ignition Facility (NIF)/Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program must include good characterization of the fusion source. Ideally, diagnostics would measure the spatially-resolved history of the fusion reaction rate and temperature. Existing diagnostics can satisfy this goal only partially. One class of new techniques that could play a major role in high-yield diagnostics is measurements based on fusion {gamma} rays. The Fusion Diagnostic Gamma Experiment (FUDGE) can be used to perform energy-resolved measurements of (D,T) fusion reaction rates This diagnostic is based on the 16 7-MeV {gamma} rays that are produced by (D,T) fusion. The {gamma} rays are free of spectral dispersion and can be detected with a high bandwidth Cherenkov detector. A simple magnetic monochromator selects signals from the 16 7-MeV {gamma} rays and reduces background signals from non-fusion {gamma} rays.

Moran, M. J., LLNL

1998-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

176

Study of the neutron damage on electronics at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The NIF environment is very complex leading to a large and non trivial radiation background. A shield surrounding the electronics is required to lower the neutron background to less than 1e7 n/cm{sup 2}. Moving electronics to behind the 6 foot-thick target bay wall is the best shield.

Dauffy, L S; Mcnaney, J M; Khater, H Y

2010-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

177

Imaging of High-Energy X-Ray Emission from Cryogenic Thermonuclear Fuel Implosions on the NIF  

SciTech Connect

Accurately assessing and optimizing the implosion performance of inertial confinement fusion capsules is a crucial step to achieving ignition on the NIF. We have applied differential filtering (matched Ross filter pairs) to provide spectrally resolved time-integrated absolute x-ray self-emission images of the imploded core of cryogenic layered targets. Using bremsstrahlung assumptions, the measured absolute x-ray brightness allows for the inference of electron temperature, electron density, hot spot mass, mix mass, and pressure. Current inertial confinement fusion (ICF) experiments conducted on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) seek to indirectly drive a spherical implosion, compressing and igniting a deuterium-tritium fuel. This DT fuel capsule is cryogenically prepared as a solid ice layer surrounded by a low-Z ablator material. Ignition will occur when the hot spot approaches sufficient temperature ({approx}3-4 keV) and {rho}R ({approx}0.3 g/cm{sup 2}) such that alpha deposition can further heat the hot spot and generate a self-sustaining burn wave. During the implosion, the fuel mass becomes hot enough to emit large amounts of x-ray radiation, the spectra and spatial variation of which contains key information that can be used to evaluate the implosion performance. The Ross filter diagnostic employs differential filtering to provide spectrally resolved, time-integrated, absolute x-ray self-emission images of the imploded core of cryogenic layered targets.

Ma, T

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

DOE/EIS-0236-S1; National Ignition Facility Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement to the SSM PEIS, October 1999  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

National Ignition Facility Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement to the SSM PEIS Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Oakland Operations Office Oakland, California October 1999 [This page intentionally left blank.] iii COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy TITLE: National Ignition Facility Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement to the SSM PEIS CONTACT: For additional information on For general information on the NEPA this statement write or call: process at DOE, write or call: Mr. Richard Scott, Document Manager Ms. Carol M. Borgstrom, Director U.S. Department of Energy, L-293 Office of NEPA Policy and Assistance, EH-42 7000 East Avenue, P.O. Box 808 U.S. Department of Energy Livermore, CA 94550 1000 Independence Avenue, SW

179

Optical design of the National Ignition Facility main laser and switchyard/target area beam transport system  

SciTech Connect

The optical design of the main laser and transport mirror sections of the National Ignition Facility are described. For the main laser the configuration, layout constraints, multiple beam arrangement, pinhole layout and beam paths, clear aperture budget, ray trace models, alignment constraints, lens designs, wavefront performance, and pupil aberrations are discussed. For the transport mirror system the layout, alignment controls and clear aperture budget are describe

English, R E; Korniski, R J; Miller, J L; Rodgers, J M

1998-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

180

NIF special equipment construction health and safety plan  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this plan is to identify how the construction and deployment activities of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Special Equipment (SE) will be safely executed. This plan includes an identification of (1) the safety-related responsibilities of the SE people and their interaction with other organizations involved; (2) safety related requirements, policies, and documentation; (3) a list of the potential hazards unique to SE systems and the mechanisms that will be implemented to control them to acceptable levels; (4) a summary of Environmental Safety and Health (ES&H) training requirements; and (5) requirements of contractor safety plans that will be developed and used by all SE contractors participating in site activities. This plan is a subsidiary document to the NIF Construction Safety Program (CSP) and is intended to compliment the requirements stated therein with additional details specific to the safety needs of the SE construction-related activities. If a conflict arises between these two documents, the CSP will supersede. It is important to note that this plan does not list all of the potential hazards and their controls because the design and safety analysis process is still ongoing. Additional safety issues win be addressed in the Final Safety Analysis Report, Operational Safety Procedures (OSPs), and other plans and procedures as described in Section 3.0 of this plan.

Sawicki, R.H.

1997-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ignition facility nif" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Progress on Converting a NIF Quad to Eight, Petawatt Beams for Advanced Radiography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We are converting a quad of NIF beamlines into eight, short-pulse (1-50 ps), petawatt-class beams for advanced radiography and fast ignition experiments. This paper describes progress toward completing this project.

Crane, J K

2009-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

182

NIST: NIF - Neutron Tomography  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... can be made. The technique is similar to CAT scans, and is based on the Filtered Back Projection Algorithm. The NIF has ...

183

Performance Improvements to the Neutron Imaging System at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

A team headed by LANL and including many members from LLNL and NSTec LO and NSTec LAO fielded a neutron imaging system (NIS) at the National Ignition Facility at the start of 2011. The NIS consists of a pinhole array that is located 32.5 cm from the source and that creates an image of the source in a segmented scintillator 28 m from the source. The scintillator is viewed by two gated, optical imaging systems: one that is fiber coupled, and one that is lens coupled. While there are a number of other pieces to the system related to pinhole alignment, collimation, shielding and data acquisition, those pieces are discussed elsewhere and are not relevant here. The system is operational and has successfully obtained data on more that ten imaging shots. This remainder of this whitepaper is divided in five main sections. In Section II, we identify three critical areas of improvement that we believe should be pursued to improve the performance of the system for future experiments: spatial resolution, temporal response and signal-to-noise ratio. In Section III, we discuss technologies that could be used to improve these critical performance areas. In Section IV, we describe a path to evolve the current system to achieve improved performance with minimal impact on the ability of the system to operate on shots. In Section V, we discuss the abilities, scope and timescales of the current teams and the Commissariat energie atomique (CEA). In Section VI, we summarize and make specific recommendations for collaboration on improvements to the NIS.

Fittinghoff, D N; Bower, D E; Drury, O B; Dzenitis, J M; Hatarik, R; Merrill, F E; Grim, G P; Wilde, C H; Wilson, D C; Landoas, O; Caillaud, T; Bourgade, J; Buckles, R A; Lee, J; Weiss, P B

2011-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

184

Autonomous monitoring of control hardware to predict off-normal conditions using NIF automatic Alignment Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a high power laser system capable of supporting high-energy-density experimentation as a user facility for the next 30 years. In order to maximize the facility availability, preventive maintenance enhancements are being introduced into the system. An example of such an enhancement is a camera-based health monitoring system, integrated into the automated alignment system, which provides an opportunity to monitor trends in measurements such as average beam intensity, size of the beam, and pixel saturation. The monitoring system will generate alerts based on observed trends in measurements to allow scheduled pro-active maintenance before routine off-normal detection stops system operations requiring unscheduled intervention.

Awwal, A; Wilhelmsen, K; Leach, R; Kamm, V M; Burkhart, S; Lowe-Webb, R; Cohen, S

2011-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

185

Interactive Game for Teaching Laser Amplification Used at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project was to create an interactive game to expose high school students to concepts in laser amplification by demonstrating the National Ignition Facility's main amplifier at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. To succeed, the game had to be able to communicate effectively the basic concepts of laser amplification as accurately as possible and to be capable of exposing as many students as possible. Since concepts need to be communicated in a way that students understand, the Science Content Standards for California Public Schools were used to make assumptions about high school students knowledge of light. Effectively communicating a new concept necessitates the omission on terminology and symbolism. Therefore, creating a powerful experience was ideal for communicating this material. Various methods of reinforcing this experience ranging from color choice to abstractions kept the student focused on the game to maximize concept retention. The program was created in Java to allow the creation of a Java Applet that can be embedded onto a webpage, which is a perfect medium for mass exposure. Because a game requires interaction, the game animations had to be easily manipulated to enable the program to respond to user input. Image sprites, as opposed to image folders, were used in these animations to minimize the number of Hypertext Transfer Protocol connections, and thus, significantly reduce the transfer time of necessary animation files. These image sprites were loaded and cropped into a list of animation frames. Since the caching of large transition animations caused the Java Virtual Machine to run out of memory, large animations were implemented as animated Graphics Interchange Format images since transitions require no interaction, and thus, no frame manipulation was needed. This reduced the animation's memory footprint. The first version of this game was completed during this project. Future work for the project could include the creation of focus groups to assess the effectiveness of communicating material through an interactive game. Numerical assessments programmed into the game could also be used to collect statistics that reflect difficulty or level of frustration that students experience.

Lin, E

2009-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

186

Interactive Game for Teaching Laser Amplification Used at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The purpose of this project was to create an interactive game to expose high school students to concepts in laser amplification by demonstrating the National Ignition Facility's main amplifier at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. To succeed, the game had to be able to communicate effectively the basic concepts of laser amplification as accurately as possible and to be capable of exposing as many students as possible. Since concepts need to be communicated in a way that students understand, the Science Content Standards for California Public Schools were used to make assumptions about high school students knowledge of light. Effectively communicating a new concept necessitates the omission on terminology and symbolism. Therefore, creating a powerful experience was ideal for communicating this material. Various methods of reinforcing this experience ranging from color choice to abstractions kept the student focused on the game to maximize concept retention. The program was created in Java to allow the creation of a Java Applet that can be embedded onto a webpage, which is a perfect medium for mass exposure. Because a game requires interaction, the game animations had to be easily manipulated to enable the program to respond to user input. Image sprites, as opposed to image folders, were used in these animations to minimize the number of Hypertext Transfer Protocol connections, and thus, significantly reduce the transfer time of necessary animation files. These image sprites were loaded and cropped into a list of animation frames. Since the caching of large transition animations caused the Java Virtual Machine to run out of memory, large animations were implemented as animated Graphics Interchange Format images since transitions require no interaction, and thus, no frame manipulation was needed. This reduced the animation's memory footprint. The first version of this game was completed during this project. Future work for the project could include the creation of focus groups to assess the effectiveness of communicating material through an interactive game. Numerical assessments programmed into the game could also be used to collect statistics that reflect difficulty or level of frustration that students experience.

Lin, E

2009-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

187

Target diagnostic control system implementation for the National Ignition Facility (invited)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The extreme physics of targets shocked by NIF's 192-beam laser is observed by a diverse suite of diagnostics. Many diagnostics are being developed by collaborators at other sites, but ad hoc controls could lead to unreliable and costly operations. A diagnostic control system (DCS) framework for both hardware and software facilitates development and eases integration. Each complex diagnostic typically uses an ensemble of electronic instruments attached to sensors, digitizers, cameras, and other devices. In the DCS architecture each instrument is interfaced to a low-cost WINDOWS XP processor and JAVA application. Each instrument is aggregated with others as needed in the supervisory system to form an integrated diagnostic. The JAVA framework provides data management, control services, and operator graphical user interface generation. DCS instruments are reusable by replication with reconfiguration for specific diagnostics in extensible markup language. Advantages include minimal application code, easy testing, and high reliability. Collaborators save costs by assembling diagnostics with existing DCS instruments. This talk discusses target diagnostic instrumentation used on NIF and presents the DCS architecture and framework.

Shelton, R. T.; Kamperschroer, J. H.; Lagin, L. J.; Nelson, J. R.; O'Brien, D. W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

188

NDCX-II project commencing at LBNL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

facility is Livermore’s National Ignition Facility (NIF).NIF is expected to establish the fundamental feasibility of

Friedman, Alex

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Temporal multiplexing for economical measurement of power versus time on NIF  

SciTech Connect

The researchers have designed an economical device to measure the power time history in the National Ignition Facility`s (NIF) 192 beam laser. The heart of the system is a commercial, high-speed, four-channel digitizer with a 15,000 point record length. Samples of several beams are taken with fiberoptic pickoffs, separated in time with appropriate fiberoptic delays and presented to high-speed vacuum photodiodes, which convert the samples to electrical signals for the digitizer. Amplitude and time multiplexing are used to cover the required dynamic range and to record 12 samples on the digitizer, making the cost per sample competitive with alternative approaches. Forty-eight digitizers can record the required three samples from each of the 192 beams. An additional similar but lower bandwidth system is used to record the backreflected light from the main laser amplifiers and elsewhere. The recording electronics are discussed in detail.

Thomas, S.; Boyd, B.; Davis, D.T.; Hall, B.

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

STATUS OF THE NIF POWER CONDITIONING SYSTEM  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The NIF Power Conditioning System provides the pulsed excitation required to drive flashlamps in the laser's optical amplifiers. Modular in design, each of the 192 Main Energy Storage Modules (MESMs) storage up to 2.2 MJ of electrical energy in its capacitor bank before delivering the energy to 20 pairs of flashlamps in a 400 {micro}s pulse (10% power points). The peak current of each MESM discharge is 0.5 MA. Production, installation, commissioning and operation of the NIF Power Conditioning continue to progress rapidly, with the goals of completing accelerated production in late 2007 and finishing commissioning by early 2008, all the while maintaining an aggressive operations schedule. To date, more than 80% of the required modules have been assembled, shipped and installed in the facility, representing more that 240 MJ of stored energy available for driving NIF flashlamps. The MESMs have displayed outstanding reliability during daily, multiple-shift operations.

Arnold, P; Hulsey, S; Ullery, G; Petersen, D; Pendleton, D; Ollis, C; Newton, M

2007-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

191

Core science and technology development plan for indirect-drive ICF ignition. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

To define the development work needed to support inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program goals, the authors have assembled this Core Science and Technology (CS and T) Plan that encompasses nearly all science research and technology development in the ICF program. The objective of the CS and T Plan described here is to identify the development work needed to ensure the success of advanced ICF facilities, in particular the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This plan is intended as a framework to facilitate planning and coordination of future ICF programmatic activities. The CS and T Plan covers all elements of the ICF program including laser technology, optic manufacturing, target chamber, target diagnostics, target design and theory, target components and fabrication, and target physics experiments. The CS and T Plan has been divided into these seven different technology development areas, and they are used as level-1 categories in a work breakdown structure (WBS) to facilitate the organization of all activities in this plan. The scope of the CS and T Plan includes all research and development required to support the NIF leading up to the activation and initial operation as an indirect-drive facility. In each of the CS and T main development areas, the authors describe the technology and issues that need to be addressed to achieve NIF performance goals. To resolve all issues and achieve objectives, an extensive assortment of tasks must be performed in a coordinated and timely manner. The authors describe these activities and present planning schedules that detail the flow of work to be performed over a 10-year period corresponding to estimated time needed to demonstrate fusion ignition with the NIF. Besides the benefits to the ICF program, the authors also discuss how the commercial sector and the nuclear weapons science may profit from the proposed research and development program.

Powell, H.T.; Kilkenny, J.D. [eds.

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Gamma bang time/reaction history diagnostics for the National Ignition Facility using 90 deg. off-axis parabolic mirrors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gas Cherenkov detectors (GCDs) have been used to convert fusion gamma into photons to achieve gamma bang time and reaction history measurements. The GCDs designed for OMEGA used Cassegrain reflector optics in order to fit inside a 10 in. manipulator. A novel design for the National Ignition Facility using 90 deg. off-axis parabolic mirrors will increase light collection efficiency from fusion gammas and achieve minimum time dispersion. The broadband Cherenkov light (from 200 to 800 nm) is relayed into a high-speed detector using three parabolic mirrors. Because light is collected from many source planes throughout the CO{sub 2} gas volume, the detector is positioned at the stop position rather than at an image position. The stop diameter and its position are independent of the light-generation location along the gas cell. The current design collects light from a 100 mm diameter by 500 mm long gas volume. Optical ray tracings demonstrate how light can be collected from different angled trajectories of the Compton electrons as they fly through the CO{sub 2} gas volume. A cluster of four channels will allow for increased dynamic range as well as for different gamma energy threshold sensitivities.

Malone, R. M. [National Security Technologies, P.O. Box 809, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States); Herrmann, H. W.; Mack, J. M.; Young, C. S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Stoeffl, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, California 94551 (United States)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

193

Laser Ignition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ignition Laser Ignition A first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel...

194

Conceptual Design - Polar Drive Ignition Campaign  

SciTech Connect

The Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester is proposing a collaborative effort with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratories (LANL), the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), and General Atomics (GA) with the goal of developing a cryogenic polar drive (PD) ignition platform on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The scope of this proposed project requires close discourse among theorists, experimentalists, and laser and system engineers. This document describes how this proposed project can be broken into a series of parallel independent activities that, if implemented, could deliver this goal in the 2017 timeframe. This Conceptual Design document is arranged into two sections: mission need and design requirements. Design requirements are divided into four subsystems: (1) A point design that details the necessary target specifications and laser pulse requirements; (2) The beam smoothing subsystem that describes the MultiFM 1D smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD); (3) New optical elements that include continuous phase plates (CPP's) and distributed polarization rotators (DPR's); and (4) The cryogenic target handling and insertion subsystem, which includes the design, fabrication, testing, and deployment of a dedicated PD ignition target insertion cryostat (PD-ITIC). This document includes appendices covering: the primary criteria and functional requirements, the system design requirements, the work breakdown structure, the target point design, the experimental implementation plan, the theoretical unknowns and technical implementation risks, the estimated cost and schedule, the development plan for the DPR's, the development plan for MultiFM 1D SSD, and a list of acronym definitions. While work on the facility modifications required for PD ignition has been in progress for some time, some of the technical details required to define the specific modifications for a Conceptual Design Review (CDR) remain to be defined. In all cases, the facility modifications represent functional changes to existing systems or capabilities. The bulk of the scope yet to be identified is associated with the DPR's and MultiFM beam smoothing. Detailed development plans for these two subsystems are provided in Appendices H and I; additional discussion of subsystem requirements based on the physics of PD ignition is given in Section 3. Accordingly, LLE will work closely with LLNL to develop detailed conceptual designs for the PD-specific facility modifications, including assessments of the operational impact of implementation (e.g., changing optics for direct rather than indirect-drive illumination and swapping from a hohlraum-based ITIC to one that supports PD). Furthermore, the experimental implementation plan represents the current best understanding of the experimental campaigns required to achieve PD ignition. This plan will evolve based on the lessons learned from the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) and ongoing indirect-drive ignition experiments. The plan does not take the operational realities of the PD configuration into account; configuration planning for the proposed PD experiments is beyond the scope of this document.

Hansen, R

2012-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

195

Conceptual Design - Polar Drive Ignition Campaign  

SciTech Connect

The Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester is proposing a collaborative effort with Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Los Alamos National Laboratories (LANL), the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL), and General Atomics (GA) with the goal of developing a cryogenic polar drive (PD) ignition platform on the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The scope of this proposed project requires close discourse among theorists, experimentalists, and laser and system engineers. This document describes how this proposed project can be broken into a series of parallel independent activities that, if implemented, could deliver this goal in the 2017 timeframe. This Conceptual Design document is arranged into two sections: mission need and design requirements. Design requirements are divided into four subsystems: (1) A point design that details the necessary target specifications and laser pulse requirements; (2) The beam smoothing subsystem that describes the MultiFM 1D smoothing by spectral dispersion (SSD); (3) New optical elements that include continuous phase plates (CPP's) and distributed polarization rotators (DPR's); and (4) The cryogenic target handling and insertion subsystem, which includes the design, fabrication, testing, and deployment of a dedicated PD ignition target insertion cryostat (PD-ITIC). This document includes appendices covering: the primary criteria and functional requirements, the system design requirements, the work breakdown structure, the target point design, the experimental implementation plan, the theoretical unknowns and technical implementation risks, the estimated cost and schedule, the development plan for the DPR's, the development plan for MultiFM 1D SSD, and a list of acronym definitions. While work on the facility modifications required for PD ignition has been in progress for some time, some of the technical details required to define the specific modifications for a Conceptual Design Review (CDR) remain to be defined. In all cases, the facility modifications represent functional changes to existing systems or capabilities. The bulk of the scope yet to be identified is associated with the DPR's and MultiFM beam smoothing. Detailed development plans for these two subsystems are provided in Appendices H and I; additional discussion of subsystem requirements based on the physics of PD ignition is given in Section 3. Accordingly, LLE will work closely with LLNL to develop detailed conceptual designs for the PD-specific facility modifications, including assessments of the operational impact of implementation (e.g., changing optics for direct rather than indirect-drive illumination and swapping from a hohlraum-based ITIC to one that supports PD). Furthermore, the experimental implementation plan represents the current best understanding of the experimental campaigns required to achieve PD ignition. This plan will evolve based on the lessons learned from the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) and ongoing indirect-drive ignition experiments. The plan does not take the operational realities of the PD configuration into account; configuration planning for the proposed PD experiments is beyond the scope of this document.

Hansen, R

2012-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

196

Parametic Study of the current limit within a single driver-scale transport beam line of an induction Linac for Heavy Ion Fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Agency, Vienna (1995) [12] NIF official website:http://www.llnl.gov/nif/ [13] T. J. Dolan, Fusion Research -National Ignition Facility (NIF), the largest laser system

Prost, Lionel Robert

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Laser Inertial Fusion-based Energy: Neutronic Design Aspects of a Hybrid Fusion-Fission Nuclear Energy System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Example of NIF fusion target hohlraum with multiple beamsimilar to those used on NIF. . . . . Overview of LFFHNES Nuclear Energy System NIF National Ignition Facility ODS

Kramer, Kevin James

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Large Scale Computing and Storage Requirements for Fusion Energy Sciences Research  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Ignition Facility (NIF) coming online, this is theof SRS/2wp instabilities in NIF relevant regimes. However,parameters relevant to NIF. There are important questions

Gerber, Richard

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

DEVELOPMENT OF SOLID COLLECTION DIAGNOSTICS ON NIF THROUGH BLAST SHIELD ANALYSIS  

SciTech Connect

Radiochemical analysis of post-shot debris inside the National Ignition Facility (NIF) target chamber can help determine various diagnostic parameters associated with the implosion efficiency of the fusion capsule. This capability is limited by the amount of target isotope that can be loaded inside the capsule ablator without affecting performance and the collection efficiency of the capsule debris after implosion. Prior to designing a collection system, the chemical nature and distribution of the debris inside the chamber must be determined and analysis methods developed. The focus of our current work has been on determining the elemental composition and distribution of debris on various blast shields and witness plates that were exposed to the chamber during ignition shots that occurred in 2009. These passive collection plates were used to develop both non-destructive and chemical analysis techniques to determine debris composition and melt depth at various shot energy profiles. A summary of these data will be presented along with our current strategy for the 2011 campaign.

Gostic, J M; Shaughnessy, D A; Grant, P M; Hutcheon, I D; Lewis, L A; Moody, K J

2011-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

200

Deuterium-tritium neutron yield measurements with the 4.5 m neutron-time-of-flight detectors at NIF  

SciTech Connect

The first several campaigns of laser fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) included a family of high-sensitivity scintillator/photodetector neutron-time-of-flight (nTOF) detectors for measuring deuterium-deuterium (DD) and DT neutron yields. The detectors provided consistent neutron yield (Y{sub n}) measurements from below 10{sup 9} (DD) to nearly 10{sup 15} (DT). The detectors initially demonstrated detector-to-detector Y{sub n} precisions better than 5%, but lacked in situ absolute calibrations. Recent experiments at NIF now have provided in situ DT yield calibration data that establish the absolute sensitivity of the 4.5 m differential tissue harmonic imaging (DTHI) detector with an accuracy of {+-}10% and precision of {+-}1%. The 4.5 m nTOF calibration measurements also have helped to establish improved detector impulse response functions and data analysis methods, which have contributed to improving the accuracy of the Y{sub n} measurements. These advances have also helped to extend the usefulness of nTOF measurements of ion temperature and downscattered neutron ratio (neutron yield 10-12 MeV divided by yield 13-15 MeV) with other nTOF detectors.

Moran, M. J.; Bond, E. J.; Clancy, T. J.; Eckart, M. J.; Khater, H. Y. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Glebov, V. Yu. [Laboratory for Laser Energetics, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York 14623-1299 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ignition facility nif" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Comparison of the Recently proposed Super Marx Generator Approach to Thermonuclear Ignition with the DT Laser Fusion-Fission Hybrid Concept by the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The recently proposed Super Marx generator pure deuterium micro-detonation ignition concept is compared to the Lawrence Livermore National Ignition Facility (NIF) Laser DT fusion-fission hybrid concept (LiFE) [1]. In a Super Marx generator a large number of ordinary Marx generators charge up a much larger second stage ultra-high voltage Marx generator, from which for the ignition of a pure deuterium micro-explosion an intense GeV ion beam can be extracted. A typical example of the LiFE concept is a fusion gain of 30, and a fission gain of 10, making up for a total gain of 300, with about 10 times more energy released into fission as compared to fusion. This means a substantial release of fission products, as in fusion-less pure fission reactors. In the Super Marx approach for the ignition of a pure deuterium micro-detonation a gain of the same magnitude can in theory be reached [2]. If feasible, the Super Marx generator deuterium ignition approach would make lasers obsolete as a means for the ignition of ther...

Winterberg, Friedwardt

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Laser Ignition  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laser Ignition Laser Ignition Laser Ignition A first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Laser Ignition A first excitation laser or other excitation light source is used in tandem with an ignitor laser to provide a compact, durable, engine deployable fuel ignition laser system. Reliable fuel ignition is provided over a wide range of fuel conditions by using a single remote excitation light source for one or more small lasers located proximate to one or more fuel combustion zones. In two embodiments the beam from the excitation light source is split with a portion of it going to the ignitor laser and a second portion

203

Numerical and experimental studies of IFE target layering in a cryogenic fluidized bed  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the target surface for NIF (National Ignition Facility)Max size Isolated defect NIF point design spec GDP chips,on the target surface for NIF (National Ignition Facility)

Boehm, Kurt Julian

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Investigation of the dynamics and emission characteristics of x-pinch plasmas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and L. J. Suter, Update on NIF Indirect Drive IgnitionIgnition Facility’s (NIF) [6-1] Inertial Confinementrestrictions associated with NIF shells, DT-ice filled

Haas, David Michael

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

LLNL-PRES-421079 NIF-1109-17901  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LLNL-PRES-421079 #12;NIF-1109-17901 Lasers Moses, Fusion Power Associates 2 #12;NIF-1109-17901 NIF concentrates all 192 beam energy in a football stadium-sized fac. Moses, Fusion Power Associates 3 #12;NIF-1109-17901 Moses, Fusion Power Associates 4 NIF Missions #12;NIF-1109-17901 Moses, Fusion Power Associates 5 #12

206

NIF-0607-13692.ppt NIF Town Hall Meeting, June 16, 2007 1 Title page -APS, Orlando, FL, November 13,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NIF-0607-13692.ppt NIF Town Hall Meeting, June 16, 2007 1 Title page - APS, Orlando, FL, November, December 4, 2007, Edward I. Moses, NIC Director #12;NIF-0607-13692.ppt NIF Town Hall Meeting, June 16, 2007 on the Cosmos Limitless Clean Energy Eye on the Cosmos #12;NIF-0607-13692.ppt NIF Town Hall Meeting, June 16

207

NIF's Operations Support Building awarded LEED certification...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NIF's Operations Support Building awarded LEED certification | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the...

208

A novel particle time of flight diagnostic for measurements of shock- and compression-bang times in D{sup 3}He and DT implosions at the NIF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The particle-time-of-flight (pTOF) diagnostic, fielded alongside a wedge range-filter (WRF) proton spectrometer, will provide an absolute timing for the shock-burn weighted {rho}R measurements that will validate the modeling of implosion dynamics at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In the first phase of the project, pTOF has recorded accurate bang times in cryogenic DT, DT exploding pusher, and D{sup 3}He implosions using DD or DT neutrons with an accuracy better than {+-}70 ps. In the second phase of the project, a deflecting magnet will be incorporated into the pTOF design for simultaneous measurements of shock- and compression-bang times in D{sup 3}He-filled surrogate implosions using D{sup 3}He protons and DD-neutrons, respectively.

Rinderknecht, H. G.; Johnson, M. Gatu; Zylstra, A. B.; Sinenian, N.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Waugh, C. J.; Li, C. K.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Rygg, J. R.; Kimbrough, J. R.; MacPhee, A.; Collins, G. W.; Hicks, D.; Mackinnon, A.; Bell, P.; Bionta, R.; Clancy, T.; Zacharias, R. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

209

DOE/EIS-0236-S1; National Ignition Facility Draft Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement to the SSM PEIS, October 1999  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 3 East Avenue S o u t h e r n P a c i f i c R . R . A r r o y o S e c o 580 Vasco Road Patterson Pass Road Greenville Road Arroyo Las Positas S o u t h L i v e r m o r e A v e n u e A r r o y o M o c h o 0 Scale: Miles 1 0.5 Springtown Tesla Road A r r o y o La s P o si ta s Sandia National Laboratories Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 0 1 2 Scale: Kilometers N MLA11861 * * Indicates approximate location of the NIF construction area. FIGURE 3.1 Surface Water Features near Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory 3-7 FIGURE 3.3 Eastern Portion of the Livermore Site Showing Groundwater Wells and Approximate Area Containing VOCs over the Maximum Contaminant Levels in 1998 3-11 MLA6906 PCB (ppm) Tritium (pCi/g) Freon 11 (ppb) Carbon tetrachloride (ppb) PCE (ppb) TCE (ppb) 1x10 -1 1x10 0 1x10 1 1x10 2 1x10 3 1x10 4 1x10 5 18 0.53 520 23 1,600 6,100 540 EPA Industrial PRG

210

DOE/EIS-0236-S1F; National Ignition Facility Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement to the Stockpile Stewardship and Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement (January 2001)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

I: Main Text I: Main Text Prepared by U.S. Department of Energy Oakland Operations Office Oakland, California January 2001 [This page intentionally left blank] iii COVER SHEET RESPONSIBLE AGENCY: U.S. Department of Energy TITLE: National Ignition Facility Final Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement to the Stockpile Stewardship and Management Programmatic Environmental Impact Statement CONTACT: For additional information on For general information on the NEPA this statement, write or call: process at DOE, write or call: Mr. Richard Scott, Document Manager Ms. Carol M. Borgstrom, Director U.S. Department of Energy, L-467 Office of NEPA Policy and Compliance, EH-42 7000 East Avenue, P.O. Box 808 U.S. Department of Energy Livermore, CA 94550 1000 Independence Avenue, SW Telephone: (925) 423-3022

211

DOE Selects Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC to Manage...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

enterprise-wide activities; completing construction of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and operating NIF as a national user facility to support NNSA missions as well as the...

212

TRIDENT high-energy-density facility experimental capabilities and diagnostics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The newly upgraded TRIDENT high-energy-density (HED) facility provides high-energy short-pulse laser-matter interactions with powers in excess of 200 TW and energies greater than 120 J. In addition, TRIDENT retains two long-pulse (nanoseconds to microseconds) beams that are available for simultaneous use in either the same experiment or a separate one. The facility's flexibility is enhanced by the presence of two separate target chambers with a third undergoing commissioning. This capability allows the experimental configuration to be optimized by choosing the chamber with the most advantageous geometry and features. The TRIDENT facility also provides a wide range of standard instruments including optical, x-ray, and particle diagnostics. In addition, one chamber has a 10 in. manipulator allowing OMEGA and National Ignition Facility (NIF) diagnostics to be prototyped and calibrated.

Batha, S. H.; Aragonez, R.; Archuleta, F. L.; Archuleta, T. N.; Benage, J. F.; Cobble, J. A.; Cowan, J. S.; Fatherley, V. E.; Flippo, K. A.; Gautier, D. C.; Gonzales, R. P.; Greenfield, S. R.; Hegelich, B. M.; Hurry, T. R.; Johnson, R. P.; Kline, J. L.; Letzring, S. A.; Loomis, E. N.; Lopez, F. E.; Luo, S. N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, P.O. Box 1663, MS E526, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] (and others)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

213

NIF Experiments Presentation by Omar Hurricane | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

by Omar Hurricane NIF Experiments Presentation by Omar Hurricane Hurricane-LLNL-SEAB.10.11.pdf More Documents & Publications NIF Presentation by Ed Moses Summary Minutes of...

214

NIF Target Chamber Dedicated | National Nuclear Security Administratio...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Our History > NNSA Timeline > NIF Target Chamber Dedicated NIF Target...

215

PPPL delivers a plasma source that will enable high-power beam...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

on the accelerator will complement research under way at the National Ignition Facility (NIF), part of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Scientists at NIF are seeking to...

216

A novel particle Time Of Flight (pTOF) diagnostic for measurements of shock- and compression-bang times in D3He and DT implosions at the NIF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The particle-time-of-flight (pTOF) diagnostic, fielded alongside a Wedge Range-Filter (WRF) proton spectrometer, will provide an absolute timing for the shock-burn weighted {rho}R measurements that will validate the modeling of implosion dynamics at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). In the first phase of the project, pTOF has recorded accurate bang times in cryogenic DT, DT-Exploding Pusher and D{sup 3}He implosions using DD or DT neutrons with an accuracy better than {+-}70 ps. In the second phase of the project, a deflecting magnet will be incorporated into the pTOF design for simultaneous measurements of shock- and compression-bang times in D{sup 3}He-filled surrogate implosions using D{sup 3}He protons and DD-neutrons, respectively.

Mackinnon, A; Rinderknecht, H G; Johnson, M G; Zylstra, A B; Sinenian, N; Rosenbergh, M J; Frenje, J A; Waugh, C J; Li, C K; Seguin, F H; Petrasso, R; Rygg, J R; Kline, J; Doeppner, T; Park, H S; Landen, O; Lepape, S; Meezan, N; Kilkenny, J; Glebov, V Y; Sangster, T; Stoeckl, C; Olson, R

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

217

CHARACTERIZATION OF THE ADVANCED RADIOGRAPHIC CAPABILITY FRONT END ON NIF  

SciTech Connect

We have characterized the Advanced Radiographic Capability injection laser system and demonstrated that it meets performance requirements for upcoming National Ignition Facility fusion experiments. Pulse compression was achieved with a scaled down replica of the meter-scale grating ARC compressor and sub-ps pulse duration was demonstrated at the Joule-level.

Haefner, C; Heebner, J; Dawson, J; Fochs, S; Shverdin, M; Crane, J K; Kanz, V K; Halpin, J; Phan, H; Sigurdsson, R; Brewer, W; Britten, J; Brunton, G; Clark, W; Messerly, M J; Nissen, J D; Nguyen, H; Shaw, B; Hackel, R; Hermann, M; Tietbohl, G; Siders, C W; Barty, C J

2009-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

218

Reconfigurable Assembly Station for Precision Manufacture of Nuclear Fusion Ignition Targets  

SciTech Connect

This paper explores the design and testing of a reconfigurable assembly station developed for assembling the inertial confinement nuclear fusion ignition targets that will be fielded in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) laser [1]. The assembly station, referred to as the Flexible Final Assembly Machine (FlexFAM) and shown in Figure 1, is a companion system to the earlier Final Assembly Machine (FAM) [2]. Both machines consist of a manipulator system integrated with an optical coordinate measuring machine (OCMM). The manipulator system has six groups of stacked axis used to manipulate the millimeter-sized target components with submicron precision, and utilizes the same force and torque feedback sensing as the FAM. Real-time dimensional metrology is provided by the OCMM's vision system and through-the-lens (TTL) laser-based height measuring probe. The manually actuated manipulator system of the FlexFAM provides a total of thirty degrees-of-freedom to the target components being assembled predominantly in a cubic centimeter work zone.

Castro, C; Montesanti, R C; Taylor, J S; Hamza, A V; Dzenitis, E G

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

219

Imaging of high-energy x-ray emission from cryogenic thermonuclear fuel implosions on the NIF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurately assessing and optimizing the implosion performance of inertial confinement fusion capsules is a crucial step to achieving ignition on the NIF. We have applied differential filtering (matched Ross filter pairs) to provide broadband time-integrated absolute x-ray self-emission images of the imploded core of cryogenic layered implosions. This diagnostic measures the temperature- and density-sensitive bremsstrahlung emission and provides estimates of hot spot mass, mix mass, and pressure.

Ma, T.; Izumi, N.; Tommasini, R.; Bradley, D. K.; Bell, P.; Cerjan, C. J.; Dixit, S.; Doeppner, T.; Jones, O.; Landen, O. L.; LePape, S.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Park, H.-S.; Patel, P. K.; Prasad, R. R.; Ralph, J.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Springer, P. T.; Suter, L.; Town, R. P. J. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); and others

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

220

Laser-Driven Hydrodynamic Experiments in the Turbulent Plasma Regime: from OMEGA to NIF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

There is a great deal of interest in studying the evolution of hydrodynamic phenomena in high energy density plasmas that have transitioned beyond the initial phases of instability into a fully developed turbulent state. Motivation for this study arises both in fusion plasmas as well as in numerous astrophysical applications where the understanding of turbulent mixing is essential. Double-shell ignition targets, for example, are subject to large growth of short wavelength perturbations on both surfaces of the high-Z inner shell. These perturbations, initiated by Richtmyer-Meshkov and Rayleigh-Taylor instabilities, can transition to a turbulent state and will lead to deleterious mixing of the cooler shell material with the hot burning fuel. In astrophysical plasmas, due to the extremely large scale, turbulent hydrodynamic mixing is also of widespread interest. The radial mixing that occurs in the explosion phase of core-collapse supernovae is an example that has received much attention in recent years and yet remains only poorly understood. In all of these cases, numerical simulation of the flow field is very difficult due to the large Reynolds number and corresponding wide range of spatial scales characterizing the plasma. Laboratory experiments on high energy density facilities that can access this regime are therefore of great interest. Experiments exploring the transition to turbulence that are currently being conducted on the Omega laser will be described. We will also discuss experiments being planned for the initial commissioning phases of the NIF as well as the enhanced experimental parameter space that will become available, as additional quads are made operational.

Robey, H F; Miles, A R; Hansen, J F; Blue, B E; Drake, R P

2003-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ignition facility nif" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Alternate Alpha Induced Reactions for NIF Radiochemistry  

SciTech Connect

Radiochemical analysis of NIF capsule residues has been identified as a potential diagnostic of NIF capsule performance. In particular, alpha-induced nuclear reactions that occur on tracer elements added to the NIF capsule have been shown through simulation to be a very sensitive diagnostic for mix. The short range of the alpha particles makes them representative of the hot spot where they are created through the fusion of deuterium and tritium. Reactions on elements doped into the innermost part of the capsule ablator would therefore be sensitive to material that had mixed into the hot spot. Radiochemical determinations of activated detector elements may perhaps be the only true measure of mix that occurs in a NIF capsule, particularly in cases when the capsule fails.

Shaughnessy, D A; Moody, K J; Bernstein, L A

2010-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

222

Fnr Is required for NifL-dependent oxygen control of nif gene expression in Klebsiella pneumoniae  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In Klebsiella pneumoniae, NifA-dependent transcription of nitrogen fixation (nif) genes is inhibited by NifL in response to molecular oxygen and combined nitrogen. We recently showed that K. pneumoniae NifL is a flavoprotein, which apparently senses oxygen through a redox-sensitive, conformational change. We have now studied the oxygen regulation of NifL activity in Escherichia coli and K. pneumoniae strains by monitoring its inhibition of NifA-mediated expression of K. pneumoniae ø(nifH?-?lacZ) fusions in different genetic backgrounds. Strains of both organisms carrying fnr null mutations failed to release NifL inhibition of NifA transcriptional activity under oxygen limitation: nif induction was similar to the induction under aerobic conditions. When the transcriptional regulator Fnr was synthesized from a plasmid, it was able to complement, i.e., to relieve NifL inhibition in the fnr mutant backgrounds. Hence, Fnr appears to be involved, directly or indirectly, in NifL-dependent oxygen regulation of nif gene expression in K. pneumoniae. The data indicate that in the absence of Fnr, NifL apparently does not receive the signal for anaerobiosis. We therefore hypothesize that in the absence of oxygen, Fnr, as the primary oxygen sensor, activates transcription of a gene or genes whose product or products function to relieve NifL inhibition by reducing the flavin adenine dinucleotide cofactor under oxygen-limiting conditions. In diazotrophic proteobacteria, transcription of the nitrogen

Roman Grabbe; Kai Klopprogge; Ruth; A. Schmitz

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Direct-Drive Inertial Confinement Fusion Research at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

beams Relative size 240 ft National Ignition Facility (NIF) 1.8 MJ 192 beams NIF The National Ignition (NIF) is predicted to achieve high-gain (~40). · Direct drive targets are predicted to ignite on the NIF while it is in x-ray-drive configuration with polar direct drive (PDD). · Fully integrated fast

224

UCRL-PRES-226054 Application of MCNP, Tart and Mercury  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ignition Facility (NIF) Scott McKinley Dermott E. Cullen Jeffery F. Latkowski Richard Procassini Kenneth M, 2006 ANS 2006 Winter Meeting 2 UCRL-PRES-226054 NIF Facility The National Ignition Facility (NIF Laboratory. NIF's arena-sized building houses 192 laser beams designed to deliver 1.8 megajoules

Cullen, Red

225

UCRL-ABS-221988 Application of MCNP, MERCURY and TART to Calculation of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Facility (NIF) Shielding by Scott McKinley Dermott E. Cullen Jeffery F. Latkowski Richard Procassini of MCNP, MERCURY and TART to Calculation of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) Shielding by Scott Mc://www.llnl.gov/cullen1/NIF-Shield.htm Abstract The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a multi- billion dollar laser

Cullen, Red

226

A New Gated X-Ray Detector for the Orion Laser Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Gated X-Ray Detectors (GXD) are considered the work-horse target diagnostic of the laser based inertial confinement fusion (ICF) program. Recently, Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has constructed three new GXDs for the Orion laser facility at the Atomic Weapons Establishment (AWE) in the United Kingdom. What sets these three new instruments apart from the what has previously been constructed for the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is: improvements in detector head microwave transmission lines, solid state embedded hard drive and updated control software, and lighter air box design and other incremental mechanical improvements. In this paper we will present the latest GXD design enhancements and sample calibration data taken on the Trident laser facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory using the newly constructed instruments.

Clark, David D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Aragonez, Robert J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Archuleta, Thomas N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Fatherley, Valerie E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hsu, Albert H. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Jorgenson, H. J. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mares, Danielle [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oertel, John A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Oades, Kevin [Atomic Weapons Establishment; Kemshall, Paul [Atomic Weapons Establishment; Thomas, Philip [Atomic Weapons Establishment; Young, Trevor [Atomic Weapons Establishment; Pederson, Neal [VI Control Systems

2012-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

227

R. L. McCrory Professor of Physics and Astronomy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Associates Meeting Washington, DC 5­6 December 2012 Progress Toward Polar-Drive Ignition for the NIF 0 50 100 demonstrating direct-drive ignition on the NIF is being made · Polardrive(PD) will allow for direct-drive­ignition experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in the x-ray-drive configuration · OMEGAdirect

228

NIF sets records for target shots, wavelength changes | National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > NIF sets records for target shots, wavelength changes NIF sets records for target shots,...

229

NIF Presentation by Ed Moses | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NIF Presentation by Ed Moses NIF Presentation by Ed Moses Moses-LLNL-SEAB-10.11.pdf More Documents & Publications Summary Minutes of the Secretary of Energy Advisory Board Public...

230

TRISO Fuel Performance: Modeling, Integration into Mainstream Design Studies, and Application to a Thorium-fueled Fusion-Fission Hybrid Blanket  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

11]. . Illustration of a NIF fusion target holhraumThe National Ignition Facility (NIF) at LLNL should soonFigure 1.10: Illustration of a NIF fusion target holhraum

Powers, Jeffrey

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Instability Versus Equilibrium Propagation of a Laser Beam in Plasma Pavel M. Lushnikov1,2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) [1]. NIF's plasma environment, in the indirect drive approach to ICF, has that of actual experiments, as in the idealized ``top hat'' model of NIF optics: j ^EEkj const; k

Lushnikov, Pavel

232

INERTIAL FUSION DRIVEN BY INTENSE HEAVY-ION BEAMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

National Ignition Facility (NIF) is beginning to testdriver, like that used in NIF, is well- suited. However,use in power plants. The NIF neodymium-glass lasers are less

Sharp, W. M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

House Appropriations Committee'Report FY04 Energy and Water Development Act  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the NIF project and expects NNSA to focus on the core NIF projdct to maintain cost and schedule of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), the same as the budget request." M. Haynes #12;

234

Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Environment Feature Stories Public Reading Room: Environmental Documents, Reports LANL Home Phonebook Calendar Video About Operational Excellence Facilities Facilities...

235

March, 2010 NIFS Administrative Council External Peer Review Committee  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

21 2010 3 March, 2010 NIFS Administrative Council External Peer Review Committee NIFS Peer DEMO LHD V NIFS-HEAT W Y Li MHD Er2O3 Li Li-Pb FlibeF-BeF2 #12;10 V 4 FlibeF-BeF2 been invoked to enhance the electron current in V3Ga. In the NIFS engineering research, the main goals

Ito, Atsushi

236

INTRODUCTION Neural intermediate filaments (NIF) containing one or more of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INTRODUCTION Neural intermediate filaments (NIF) containing one or more of five different types, NIF possess common structural features, including a conserved alpha-helical central rod domain of NIF in the presence of NF-L (Zackroff et al., 1982; Hisanaga and Hirokawa, 1988; Balin and Lee, 1991

Goldman, Robert D.

237

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Regulation of nif gene expression and the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Regulation of nif gene expression and the energetics of N2 fixation over the diel importance in biogeochemical cycling of nitrogen. We analyzed the levels of nif transcripts of Synechococcus ecotypes, NifH subunit and nitrogenase activity over the diel cycle in the microbial mat of an alkaline hot

238

Two Residues in the T-loop of GlnK Determine NifL-dependent Nitrogen Control of nif Gene Expression*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two Residues in the T-loop of GlnK Determine NifL-dependent Nitrogen Control of nif Gene Expression NifL-mediated inhibition of NifA activity in response to the nitrogen status, and GlnB, when expressed heterologous system, in which K. pneumoniae nifLA is expressed in E. coli, to investigate the impor- tance

Merrick, Mike

239

NIF PEPC Mechanical Test Stand Safety Note  

SciTech Connect

The NIF PEPC Mechanical Test Stand is to be used in the building 432. Building 432 is being used to test components and processes for NIF. The test stand is to be bolted to the floor. The test stand provides a platform from which the PEPC kinematic repeatability and vibrational characteristics of the PEPC LRU can be tested. The test stand will allow user access to the LRU to install instrumentation and to make adjustments to the kinematics. The mechanical test stand is designed to hold the 1700 lb. PEPC LRU.

Trent, J W

1998-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

240

D-Cluster Converter Foil for Laser-Accelerated Deuteron Beams: Towards Deuteron-Beam-Driven Fast Ignition  

SciTech Connect

Fast Ignition (FI) uses Petawatt laser generated particle beam pulse to ignite a small volume called a pre-compressed Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) target, and is the favored method to achieve the high energy gain per target burn needed for an attractive ICF power plant. Ion beams such as protons, deuterons or heavier carbon ions are especially appealing for FI as they have relative straight trajectory, and easier to focus on the fuel capsule. But current experiments have encountered problems with the “converter-foil” which is irradiated by the Petawatt laser to produce the ion beams. The problems include depletion of the available ions in the convertor foils, and poor energy efficiency (ion beam energy/ input laser energy). We proposed to develop a volumetrically-loaded ultra-high-density deuteron deuterium cluster material as the basis for converter-foil for deuteron beam generation. The deuterons will fuse with the ICF DT while they slow down, providing an extra “bonus” energy gain in addition to heating the hot spot. Also, due to the volumetric loading, the foil will provide sufficient energetic deuteron beam flux for “hot spot” ignition, while avoiding the depletion problem encountered by current proton-driven FI foils. After extensive comparative studies, in Phase I, high purity PdO/Pd/PdO foils were selected for the high packing fraction D-Cluster converter foils. An optimized loading process has been developed to increase the cluster packing fraction in this type of foil. As a result, the packing fraction has been increased from 0.1% to 10%—meeting the original Phase I goal and representing a significant progress towards the beam intensities needed for both FI and pulsed neutron applications. Fast Ignition provides a promising approach to achieve high energy gain target performance needed for commercial Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF). This is now a realistic goal for near term in view of the anticipated ICF target burn at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) in CA within a year. This will usher in the technology development Phase of ICF after years of research aimed at achieving breakeven experiment. Methods to achieve the high energy gain needed for a competitive power plant will then be a key developmental issue, and our D-cluster target for Fast Ignition (FI) is expected to meet that need.

Miley, George H.

2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ignition facility nif" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Laser preheat enhanced ignition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for enhancing fuel ignition performance by preheating the fuel with laser light at a wavelength that is absorbable by the fuel prior to ignition with a second laser is provided.

Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Capsule performance optimization in the National Ignition Campaign  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A capsule performance optimization campaign will be conducted at the National Ignition Facility [G. H. Miller et al., Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)] to substantially increase the probability of ignition by laser-driven hohlraums [J. D. Lindl et al., Phys. Plasmas 11, 339 (2004)]. The campaign will experimentally correct for residual uncertainties in the implosion and hohlraum physics used in our radiation-hydrodynamic computational models before proceeding to cryogenic-layered implosions and ignition attempts. The required tuning techniques using a variety of ignition capsule surrogates have been demonstrated at the OMEGA facility under scaled hohlraum and capsule conditions relevant to the ignition design and shown to meet the required sensitivity and accuracy. In addition, a roll-up of all expected random and systematic uncertainties in setting the key ignition laser and target parameters due to residual measurement, calibration, cross-coupling, surrogacy, and scale-up errors has been derived that meets the required budget.

Landen, O. L.; Bradley, D. K.; Braun, D. G.; Callahan, D. A.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W.; Dewald, E. L.; Divol, L.; Glenzer, S. H.; Hamza, A.; Hicks, D. G.; Izumi, N.; Jones, O. S.; Kirkwood, R. K.; Michel, P.; Milovich, J.; Munro, D. H.; Robey, H. F.; Spears, B. K.; Thomas, C. A. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2010-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

243

The use of cloned nif regulatory elements from Klebsiella pneumoniae to examine nif regulation in Azotobacter vinelandii  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Regulatory genes controlling nifexpression and also nifpromoters fused to lacZ from Klebsiella pneumoniae were cloned on wide-host-range plasmids and introduced into Azotobacter vinelandii to compare regulation of nif expression in the two organisms. A low-copy-number plasmid carrying K. pneumoniae nijA corrected an A. vinelandii Nif- regulatory mutation, whereas a plasmid carrying ntrC did not. A high-copy-number plasmid carrying K. pneumoniae nifL eliminated nifexpression in K. pneumoniae but not in A. vinelandii. K. pneumoniae nifL- and nifF-lac2 fusions were expressed strongly in A. vinelandii and were not repressed by ammonium. A nifH-lac2 fusion was not expressed in any conditions in this background except very weakly when K. pneumoniae nifA was also present. The implications of these findings are discussed.

Kennedy; Martin H. Drummond

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Thermal ignition combustion system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The thermal ignition combustion system comprises means for providing walls defining an ignition chamber, the walls being made of a material having a thermal conductivity greater than 20 W/m C and a specific heat greater than 480 J/kg C with the ignition chamber being in constant communication with the main combustion chamber, means for maintaining the temperature of the walls above a threshold temperature capable of causing ignition of a fuel, and means for conducting fuel to the ignition chamber. 8 figs.

Kamo, R.; Kakwani, R.M.; Valdmanis, E.; Woods, M.E.

1988-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

245

Indirect Drive Warm-Loaded Ignition Target Design  

SciTech Connect

This document summarizes the Indirect Drive Warm-Loaded Ignition Target design. These targets either use a fill tube or the capsule is strong enough to withstand the room temperature pressure of the DT fuel. Only features that affect the design of the NIF Cryogenic Target System (NCTS) are presented. The design presented is the current thinking and may evolve further. The NCTS should be designed to accommodate a range of targets and target scales, as described here. The interface location between the target and the NCTS cryostat is at the target base / gripper joint, the tamping gas gland/gland joint, and the electrical plug/receptacle joint.

Bernat, T P; Gibson, C R

2004-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

246

NIF's Operations Support Building awarded LEED certification | National  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

NIF's Operations Support Building awarded LEED certification | National NIF's Operations Support Building awarded LEED certification | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > NNSA Blog > NIF's Operations Support Building awarded LEED certification NIF's Operations Support Building awarded LEED certification Posted By Office of Public Affairs

247

Assembly and Repair of Membrane-Bound Electron Transport Complexes similar to NifS than is Slr0387, but shows strong  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Assembly and Repair of Membrane-Bound Electron Transport Complexes similar to NifS than is Slr0387 in the maturation of FeS proteins. We found that under some conditions the Synechocystis NifU-like protein can oxidation of the cysteine side chains at NifU. The same reaction might have occurred in lysed chloroplasts

248

Compact Ignition Tokamak Program: issues to be resolved by January  

SciTech Connect

This Compact Ignition Tokamak Program report addresses unresolved issues concerning: concept configuration; design space characterization; facility/device layouts; auxiliary system development; cost; R and D; and alternate sites. (JDB)

Flanagan, C.A.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facilities Facilities Facilities LANL's mission is to develop and apply science and technology to ensure the safety, security, and reliability of the U.S. nuclear deterrent; reduce global threats; and solve other emerging national security and energy challenges. Contact Operator Los Alamos National Laboratory (505) 667-5061 Some LANL facilities are available to researchers at other laboratories, universities, and industry. Unique facilities foster experimental science, support LANL's security mission DARHT accelerator DARHT's electron accelerators use large, circular aluminum structures to create magnetic fields that focus and steer a stream of electrons down the length of the accelerator. Tremendous electrical energy is added along the way. When the stream of high-speed electrons exits the accelerator it is

250

National Ignition Campaign (NIC) Precision Tuning Series Shock Timing Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of precision shock timing experiments have been performed on NIF. These experiments continue to adjust the laser pulse shape and employ the adjusted cone fraction (CF) in the picket (1st 2 ns of the laser pulse) as determined from the re-emit experiment series. The NIF ignition laser pulse is precisely shaped and consists of a series of four impulses, which drive a corresponding series of shock waves of increasing strength to accelerate and compress the capsule ablator and fuel layer. To optimize the implosion, they tune not only the strength (or power) but also, to sub-nanosecond accuracy, the timing of the shock waves. In a well-tuned implosion, the shock waves work together to compress and heat the fuel. For the shock timing experiments, a re-entrant cone is inserted through both the hohlraum wall and the capsule ablator allowing a direct optical view of the propagating shocks in the capsule interior using the VISAR (Velocity Interferometer System for Any Reflector) diagnostic from outside the hohlraum. To emulate the DT ice of an ignition capsule, the inside of the cone and the capsule are filled with liquid deuterium.

Robey, H F; Celliers, P M

2011-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

251

Sandia National Laboratories: Working at the Livermore Valley...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

such as the Combustion Research Facility (CRF), the National Ignition Facility (NIF), and long-standing leadership in state-of-the art computing systems. Transportation...

252

NNSA's Summary of Experiments Conducted in Support of Stockpile...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Test (DARHT) facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory, National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and the Z machine at Sandia National...

253

ROTC Day participants discuss role science, engineering will...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Affairs for LLNL. The afternoon involved tours of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), the High Explosive Application Facility (HEAF) and the National Atmospheric Release...

254

Ignition Rate Measurement of Laser-Ignited Coals  

SciTech Connect

We established a novel experiment to study the ignition of pulverized coals under conditions relevant to utility boilers. Specifically, we determined the ignition mechanism of pulverized-coal particles under various conditions of particle size, coal type, and freestream oxygen concentration. We also measured the ignition rate constant of a Pittsburgh #8 high-volatile bituminous coal by direct measurement of the particle temperature at ignition, and incorporating this measurement into a mathematical model for the ignition process. The model, called Distributed Activation Energy Model of Ignition, was developed previously by our group to interpret conventional drop-tube ignition experiments, and was modified to accommodate the present study.

John C. Chen; Vinayak Kabadi

1997-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

255

PERSISTENT SURVEILLANCE FOR PIPELINE PROTECTION AND THREAT INTERDICTION  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

investment in lab facilities (Omega-EP, Z/PW,NIF and smaller facilities (Titan, Trident Upgrade relevant conditions FIREX-1 ZR and Petawatt NIF/ARC Omega-EP #12;FI benefits from international R&D effortsChallenge is to be ready -- an ignition/gain experiment in 2012 on NIF requires successful sub ignition on Omega EP

256

First results from cryogenic target implosions on OMEGAa... C. Stoeckl,b)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ignition Facility NIF W. J. Hogan, E. I. Moses, B. E. Warner et al., Nucl. Fusion 41, 567 2001 . Polymer. These initial results are encouraging for future cryogenic implosions on OMEGA and the NIF. © 2002 American design for the National Ignition Facility NIF 1 is a thick cryogenic DT-ice layer enclosed in a thin CH

257

Hohlraum Designs for High Velocity Implosions on NIF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we compare experimental shock and capsule trajectories to design calculations using the radiation-hydrodynamics code HYDRA. The measured trajectories from surrogate ignition targets are consistent with reducing the x-ray flux on the capsule by about 85%. A new method of extracting the radiation temperature as seen by the capsule from x-ray intensity and image data shows that about half of the apparent 15% flux deficit in the data with respect to the simulations can be explained by HYDRA overestimating the x-ray flux on the capsule. The National Ignition Campaign (NIC) point-design target is designed to reach a peak fuel-layer velocity of 370 km/s by ablating 90% of its plastic (CH) ablator. The 192-beam National Ignition Facility laser drives a gold hohlraum to a radiation temperature (T{sub RAD}) of 300 eV with a 20 ns-long, 420 TW, 1.3 MJ laser pulse. The hohlraum x-rays couple to the CH ablator in order to apply the required pressure to the outside of the capsule. In this paper, we compare experimental measurements of the hohlraum T{sub RAD} and the implosion trajectory with design calculations using the code hydra. The measured radial positions of the leading shock wave and the unablated shell are consistent with simulations in which the x-ray flux on the capsule is artificially reduced by 85%. We describe a new method of inferring the T{sub RAD} seen by the capsule from time-dependent x-ray intensity data and static x-ray images. This analysis shows that hydra overestimates the x-ray flux incident on the capsule by {approx}8%.

Meezan, N B; Hicks, D G; Callahan, D A; Olson, R E; Schneider, M S; Thomas, C A; Robey, H F; Celliers, P M; Kline, J K; Dixit, S N; Michel, P A; Jones, O S; Clark, D S; Ralph, J E; Doeppner, T; MacKinnon, A J; Haan, S W; Landen, O L; Glenzer, S H; Suter, L J; Edwards, M J; Macgowan, B J; Lindl, J D; Atherton, L J

2011-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

258

UNIXUNIXUNIXUNIX((((OpenSSHOpenSSHOpenSSHOpenSSH)))) (gw.ps.nifs.ac.jp) RSA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pdf SSH SSH SSH UNIXUNIXUNIXUNIX((((OpenSSHOpenSSHOpenSSHOpenSSH)))) ssh (gw.ps.nifsTerm: New connection TCP/IP gw.ps.nifs.ac.jp %ssh (-i ) (-l ) gw.ps.nifs.ac.jp The authenticity of host 'gw.ps.nifs.ps.nifs.ac.jp,133.75.37.11' (RSA) to the list of known hosts. Enter passphrase for key '/home

Ito, Atsushi

259

NIF-0708-14946_Koniges_Poster_final  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Gold foil Laser Aerogel collectors Target positioner NIF-0708-14946 This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National...

260

NIF sets records for target shots, wavelength changes | National...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Cebreros tests the activation of the target shroud The NIF team completed a record 28 laser shots on targets last month, along with two shots without targets. January also saw a...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ignition facility nif" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Experimental Studies of Convection Effects in a Cryogenic NIF Ignition Target  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We describe experiments which investigate convection effects on hydrogen ice layers in a transparent CH capsule suspended with a fill-tube. These experiments validate simulations which show that unmitigated convection from the hohlraum fill gas can produce significant distortions to the cryogenic hydrogen ice layer. Experimental results show good agreement with thermal simulations which include conduction and convection.

Moody, J D; Sanchez, J J; Bittner, D N; Giedt, W H; London, R L; Sater, J D; Burmann, J A; Jones, R L

2003-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

262

OMEGA: A NEW COLD X-RAY SIMULATION FACILITY FOR THE EVALUATION OF OPTICAL COATINGS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We report on recent progress for the development of a new cold X-ray optical test capability using the Omega Facility located at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester. These tests were done on the 30 kJ OMEGA laser at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE) at the University of Rochester, Rochester, NY. We conducted a six-shot series called OMEGA II on 14 July 2006 in one eight-hour day (supported by the Defense Threat Reduction Agency). The initial testing was performed using simple protected gold optical coatings on fused silica substrates. PUFFTFT analyses were completed and the specimen's thermal lateral stress and transverse stress conditions were calculated and interpreted. No major anomalies were detected. Comparison of the pre- and posttest reflective measurements coupled with the TFCALC analyses proved invaluable in guiding the analyses and interpreting the observed damage. The Omega facility is a high quality facility for performing evaluation of optical coatings and coupons and provides experience for the development of future National Ignition Facility (NIF) testing.

Fisher, J H; Newlander, C D; Fournier, K B; Beutler, D E; Coverdale, C A; May, M J; Tobin, M; Davis, J F; Shiekh, D

2007-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

263

Cryogenic DT and D2 targets for inertial confinement fusiona... T. C. Sangster,b  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Facility NIF W. J. Hogan et al., Nucl. Fusion 41, 567 2001 are based on a spherical ablator containing most of the critical fabrication tolerances for ignition on the NIF. At the University of Rochester required for ignition on the NIF. At LLE, these cryogenic DT and D2 capsules are being imploded

264

Geoff Brumfiel NATURE | NEWS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

at the US National Ignition Facility (NIF) have been working flat out to focus 192 laser beams on a gold (see `The NIF's fusion strategy'). The goal of the National Ignition Campaign (NIC) is reflected in its, NIF officials say, could pave the way to developing a power plant that would implode nearly 1

265

1  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the field of physics, Martin helped design targets for National Ignition Facility (NIF) last year. "This is one of the coolest things I've done here," Martin said. The NIF is...

266

Bruce E. Warner Deputy Associate Director  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 2003 Presentation to Fusion Power Associates Annual Meeting and Symposium NIF: Transition to a Target. #12;P6030NIF-0703-07093_72 08EIM/tr #12;The National Ignition Facility Agenda NIF-0803-07128-r2(L1) 07 spots 250 to 350 microns NIF-0101-00062 Energy Power Wavelength Pulse length Pulse shape 1.8 Megajoules

267

University of California Lawrence Livermore  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and the Inertial Fusion Energy Program #12;Outline of Talk · The National Ignition Facility (NIF) · Indirect Drive activated for experiments #12;NIF Target Chamber upper hemisphere #12;First four NIF beams installed and operational #12;Target positioner and alignment system inside target chamber #12;#12;NIF has begun

268

Dilation x-ray imager a new/faster gated x-ray imager for the NIF  

SciTech Connect

As the yield on implosion shots increases it is expected that the peak x-ray emission reduces to a duration with a FWHM as short as 20 ps for {approx}7 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 18} neutron yield. However, the temporal resolution of currently used gated x-ray imagers on the NIF is 40-100 ps. We discuss the benefits of the higher temporal resolution for the NIF and present performance measurements for dilation x-ray imager, which utilizes pulse-dilation technology [T. J. Hilsabeck et al., Rev. Sci. Instrum. 81, 10E317 (2010)] to achieve x-ray imaging with temporal gate times below 10 ps. The measurements were conducted using the COMET laser, which is part of the Jupiter Laser Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

Nagel, S. R.; Bell, P. M.; Bradley, D. K.; Ayers, M. J.; Barrios, M. A.; Felker, B.; Smith, R. F.; Collins, G. W.; Jones, O. S.; Piston, K.; Raman, K. S. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, 7000 East Avenue, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Hilsabeck, T. J.; Kilkenny, J. D.; Chung, T.; Sammuli, B. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Hares, J. D.; Dymoke-Bradshaw, A. K. L. [Kentech Instruments Ltd., Wallingford, Oxfordshire OX10 (United Kingdom)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

269

National Ignition Facility | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Join Our Mailing List A Collaborative National Center for Fusion & Plasma Research Search form Search Search Home About Overview Learn More Visiting PPPL History...

270

NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Join Our Mailing List A Collaborative National Center for Fusion & Plasma Research Search form Search Search Home About Overview Learn More Visiting PPPL History...

271

DOE and Fusion Links | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

United States Sites General Atomics (GA) MIT Plasma Science and Fusion Center U.S. ITER National Ignition Facility (NIF) American Fusion News International Sites Australian...

272

EIS-0236-S1: DOE Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) for the National Ignition Facility(NIF) Project Specific Analysis portion (Volume III, Appendix I) of the Stockpile...

273

Vintage DOE: What is Fusion | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

the time this video was made. Among the latest advancements, the Department of Energy's NIF laser located at the National Ignition Facility in California recently set two new...

274

NNSA Announces 2013 Sustainability Awards | Y-12 National Security...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Pollution Prevention: Active Risk Management at LLNL's National Ignition Facility (NIF) Results in Lower Consumption and Less Waste. (Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory)...

275

Exploring Plasma Science Advances from Fusion Findings to Astrophysica...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

was shown for inertial confinement fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the DOE's Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Speakers noted that producing...

276

EIS-0236: Record of Decision | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

(DOE), is issuing this Record of Decision (ROD) for the National Ignition Facility (NIF), a key component of DOE's science-based stewardship of the nation's nuclear weapons...

277

EIS-0236-S1: Stockpile Stewardship and Management | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

impacts of continuing to construct and of operating the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California, with...

278

Basics of Inertial Confinement Fusion NIF and Photon Science Directorate Chief Scientist  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Basics of Inertial Confinement Fusion John Lindl NIF and Photon Science Directorate Chief Scientist (NIC) · Opportunities for the future on NIF #12;Fusion can be accomplished in three different ways density) 102 103 104 105 500 50 5 0.5 Capsule energy (KJ) NIF Relaxed pressure and stability requirements

279

IFE Chamber Technology Testing Program In NIF and Chamber Development Test Plan Mohamed A. Abdou  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IFE Chamber Technology Testing Program In NIF and Chamber Development Test Plan Mohamed A. Abdou chamber technology testing program in NIF involoving: criteria for evaluation prior to NIF testing were addressed in this paper. In order to maximize the benefits of testing program

Abdou, Mohamed

280

Abstract--Time-driven Switching (TDS) networks with non-immediate forwarding (NIF) provides scheduling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract-- Time-driven Switching (TDS) networks with non-immediate forwarding (NIF) provides that with NIF scheduling complexity may grow exponentially. Efficiently finding a schedule from an exponential formulation of the NIF scheduling problem, under a wide variety of networking requirements, then introduces

Baldi, Mario

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ignition facility nif" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Engines - Spark Ignition Engines  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spark Ignition Engines Spark Ignition Engines Thomas Wallner and omni engine Thomas Wallner and the omnivorous engine Background Today the United States import more than 60% of its crude oil and petroleum products. Transportation accounts for a major portion of these imports. Research in this field is focused on reducing the dependency on foreign oil by increasing the engine efficiency on the one hand and blending gasoline with renewable domestic fuels, such as ethanol, on the other. Argonne's Research The main focus of research is on evaluation of advanced combustion concepts and effects of fuel properties on engine efficiency, performance and emissions. The platforms used are a single-cylinder research engine as well as an automotive-size four-cylinder engine with direct fuel injection.

282

Burner ignition system  

SciTech Connect

An electronic ignition system for a gas burner is battery operated. The battery voltage is applied through a DC-DC chopper to a step-up transformer to charge a capacitor which provides the ignition spark. The step-up transformer has a significant leakage reactance in order to limit current flow from the battery during initial charging of the capacitor. A tank circuit at the input of the transformer returns magnetizing current resulting from the leakage reactance to the primary in succeeding cycles. An SCR in the output circuit is gated through a voltage divider which senses current flow through a flame. Once the flame is sensed, further sparks are precluded. The same flame sensor enables a thermopile driven main valve actuating circuit. A safety valve in series with the main gas valve responds to a control pressure thermostatically applied through a diaphragm. The valve closes after a predetermined delay determined by a time delay orifice if the pilot gas is not ignited.

Carignan, Forest J. (Bedford, MA)

1986-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

283

Exploring the Fast Ignition Approach to Fusion Energy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Probably the most famous equation in physics is Einstein's E=mc{sup 2}, which was contained within his fifth and final paper that was published in 1905. It is this relationship between energy ( E) and mass ( m) that the fusion process exploits to generate energy. When two isotopes of hydrogen (normally Deuterium and Tritium (DT)) fuse they form helium and a neutron. In this process some of the mass of the hydrogen is converted into energy. In the fast ignition approach to fusion a large driver (such as the NIF laser) is used to compress the DT fuel to extremely high densities and then is ''sparked'' by a high intensity, short-pulse laser. The short-pulse laser energy is converted to an electron beam, which then deposits its energy in the DT fuel. The energy of the electrons in this beam is so large that the electron's mass is increased according to Einstein theory of relativity. Understanding the transport of this relativistic electron beam is critical to the success of fast ignition and is the subject of this poster.

Town, R J; Chung, H; Cottrill, L A; Foord, M; Hatchett, S P; Key, M H; Langdon, A B; Lasinski, B F; Lund, S; Mackinnon, A J; McCandless, B C; Patel, P K; Sharp, W L; Snavely, R A; Still, C H; Tabak, M

2005-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

284

NIF Large Optics Metrology Software: Description and Algorithms  

SciTech Connect

Several software packages have been developed for use by NIF large optics vendors during production of NIF optics. These packages allow specific comparison of the interferometer measurements done on optics against the wavefront requirements for those optics, as given on relevant drawings. This document outlines the various packages, and their specific applications, and describes in some detail the calculational algorithms used. It is intended as the primary reference document for the codes (aside from the source codes themselves). In order to ensure good laser beam quality, NIF requires that all large optics be measured with an interferometer to monitor how that optic will affect beam wavefront quality and focusability. Various specifications for transmitted wavefront (TWF) and reflected wavefront (RWF) for the full-aperture parts, and for various sub-apertures, are given on the large optics drawings. For reference, a summary of the various specifications for the NIF large optics is given in Figure 1. Each large optic in production will be measured against some of these specifications. Other specifications will be monitored in a 'process validation' fashion by measuring a representative sample of parts to assure the process is yielding parts which pass specification. This document will focus on the specifications requiring measurements on every part. This document will not go into detail concerning the procedures and limitations of the measurements themselves.

Williams, W H

2002-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

285

Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition and High Yield Campaign  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

November 21, 2003 #12;2 Statements to FESAC IFE panel 10/28/03 · Ignition is a major goal for NNSA supports OFES's mission and OFES use of NNSA's ICF facilities is accepted · Defense Programs reserves right: Provide mission need report for the proposed OMEGA Extended Performance project. · October 2002: NNSA

286

Installation of a magnetic spectrometer on the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. HEDP facilities ­ The National Ignition Facility (NIF) ­ OMEGA laser 3. Known nuclear reactions used-36 cm-2 s-1) NIF OMEGA p p p d 3He p p p d 3He 4He p p 6Be ve e+ ve e+ g g Nucleosynthesis of light facilities ­ The National Ignition Facility (NIF) ­ OMEGA laser 3. Known nuclear reactions used to probe HEDP

287

IGNITION IMPROVEMENT OF LEAN NATURAL GAS MIXTURES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report describes work performed during a thirty month project which involves the production of dimethyl ether (DME) on-site for use as an ignition-improving additive in a compression-ignition natural gas engine. A single cylinder spark ignition engine was converted to compression ignition operation. The engine was then fully instrumented with a cylinder pressure transducer, crank shaft position sensor, airflow meter, natural gas mass flow sensor, and an exhaust temperature sensor. Finally, the engine was interfaced with a control system for pilot injection of DME. The engine testing is currently in progress. In addition, a one-pass process to form DME from natural gas was simulated with chemical processing software. Natural gas is reformed to synthesis gas (a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide), converted into methanol, and finally to DME in three steps. Of additional benefit to the internal combustion engine, the offgas from the pilot process can be mixed with the main natural gas charge and is expected to improve engine performance. Furthermore, a one-pass pilot facility was constructed to produce 3.7 liters/hour (0.98 gallons/hour) DME from methanol in order to characterize the effluent DME solution and determine suitability for engine use. Successful production of DME led to an economic estimate of completing a full natural gas-to-DME pilot process. Additional experimental work in constructing a synthesis gas to methanol reactor is in progress. The overall recommendation from this work is that natural gas to DME is not a suitable pathway to improved natural gas engine performance. The major reasons are difficulties in handling DME for pilot injection and the large capital costs associated with DME production from natural gas.

Jason M. Keith

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Plasma jet ignition device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ignition device of the plasma jet type is disclosed. The device has a cylindrical cavity formed in insulating material with an electrode at one end. The other end of the cylindrical cavity is closed by a metal plate with a small orifice in the center which plate serves as a second electrode. An arc jumping between the first electrode and the orifice plate causes the formation of a highly-ionized plasma in the cavity which is ejected through the orifice into the engine cylinder area to ignite the main fuel mixture. Two improvements are disclosed to enhance the operation of the device and the length of the plasma plume. One improvement is a metal hydride ring which is inserted in the cavity next to the first electrode. During operation, the high temperature in the cavity and the highly excited nature of the plasma breaks down the metal hydride, liberating hydrogen which acts as an additional fuel to help plasma formation. A second improvement consists of a cavity insert containing a plurality of spaced, metal rings. The rings act as secondary spark gap electrodes reducing the voltage needed to maintain the initial arc in the cavity.

McIlwain, Michael E. (Franklin, MA); Grant, Jonathan F. (Wayland, MA); Golenko, Zsolt (North Reading, MA); Wittstein, Alan D. (Fairfield, CT)

1985-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

289

NAS/NAE Committee on the Prospects for IFE Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Polar-Drive Ignition on the NIF J. D. Zuegel University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics 0 0 be tested on the NIF with a few modest modifications to the facility · Beam-smoothingimprovements: ­ Multi modifications to the NIF facility ­ Beamsmoothingisonlyrequiredatthebeginningofthelaserpulse, which minimizes

290

NATURE | NEWS Laser fusion nears crucial milestone  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the National Ignition Facility (NIF) finally lives up to its name. The facility, which boasts the world releasing more energy than will go into the shot. NIF's managers think that the end of their two of Energy (DOE) will be ready to develop it into an economically viable energy source? And if so, is NIF

291

Hard x-ray (>100 keV) imager to measure hot electron preheat for indirectly driven capsule implosions on the NIF  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have fielded a hard x-ray (>100 keV) imager with high aspect ratio pinholes to measure the spatially resolved bremsstrahlung emission from energetic electrons slowing in a plastic ablator shell during indirectly driven implosions at the National Ignition Facility. These electrons are generated in laser plasma interactions and are a source of preheat to the deuterium-tritium fuel. First measurements show that hot electron preheat does not limit obtaining the fuel areal densities required for ignition and burn.

Doeppner, T.; Dewald, E. L.; Divol, L.; Thomas, C. A.; Burns, S.; Celliers, P. M.; Izumi, N.; LaCaille, G.; McNaney, J. M.; Prasad, R. R.; Robey, H. F.; Glenzer, S. H.; Landen, O. L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94551 (United States); Kline, J. L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

292

Producing KDP and DKDP crystals for the NIF laser  

SciTech Connect

The cost and physics requirements of the NIF have established two important roles for potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals. 1. To extract more laser energy per unit of flashlamp light and laser glass, the NIF has adopted a multipass architecture as shown in Figure 1. Light is injected in the transport spatial filter, first traverses the power amplifiers, and then is directed to main amplifiers, where it makes four passes before being redirected through the power amplifiers towards the target. To enable the multipass of the main amplifiers, a KDP-containing Pockels cell rotates the polarization of the beam to make it either transmit through or reflect off a polarizer held at Brewster's angle within the main laser cavity. If transmitted, the light reflects off a mirror and makes another pass through the cavity. If reflected, it proceeds through the power amplifier to the target. the original seed crystal as the pyramid faces grow. Unfortunately, this pyramidal growth is very slow, and it takes about two years to grow a crystal to NIF size. To provide more programmatic flexibility and reduce costs in the long run, we have developed an alternative technology commonly called rapid growth. Through a combination of higher temperatures and higher supersaturation of the growth solution, a NIF-size boule can be grown in 1 to 2 months from a small ''point'' seed. However, growing boules of adequate size is not sufficient. Care must be taken to prevent inclusions of growth solution and incorporation of atomically substituted 2. Implosions for ICF work far better at shorter wavelengths due to less generation of hot electrons, which preheat the fuel and make it harder to compress. Compromising between optic lifetime and implosion efficiency, both Nova and the NIF operate at a tripled frequency of the 1053-nm fundamental frequency of a neodymium glass laser. This tripling is accomplished by two crystals, one made of KDP and one made of deuterated KDP (DKDP). The first one mixes two 1053-nm photons to make 526-nm light, and the second one combines a residual 1053-nm photon with a 526-nm photon to make 351-nm light.

Atherton, L J; Burnham, A K; Combs, R C; Couture, S A; De Yoreo, J J; Hawley-Fedder, R A; Montesant, R C; Robey, H F; Runkel, M; Staggs, M; Wegner, P J; Yan, M; Zaitseva, N P

1999-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

293

Maintenance FUSION IGNITION RESEARCH EXPERIMENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to refine the system details, interfaces and the requirements for remote handling. Table 1. FIRE RadialInsulation Enclosure Remote Maintenance Module FUSION IGNITION RESEARCH EXPERIMENT SYSTEM objectives and subsystem requirements in an arrangement that allows remote maintenance of in

294

TOWARD A STANDARD IGNITION SOURCE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and ignited with a small propane torch. The top center ofhead is supplied with propane. In these experiments allin the pre-mixed mode with propane alone to simulate trash

Volkingburg, David R. Van

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Prediction of ignition of glass-metal mixture  

SciTech Connect

The integral fast reactor concept developed by Argonne National Laboratory includes on-site processing and recycling of discharged core and blanket fuel materials. The process will be demonstrated using the fuel cycle facility (FCF) located at ANL's Idaho facility. One of the processing steps is the casting of metal-fuel alloy slugs. Although alternate techniques are being developed, the current reference calls for casting the metal into quartz molds. During the slug demolding process, however, some of the fuel alloy remains attached to the quartz and becomes waste. Other finely divided particles of alloy from this operation also become mixed with the glass-fuel waste. This waste material is temporarily stored in cylindrical cans filled with argon gas to prevent oxidation and pyrophoric ignition. However, this mixture may come into contact with air as result of an accident and ignite. The ignition of the mixture depends significantly on the heat transfer characteristics of the waste can, which loses heat to the environment by natural convection and radiation. Heat is generated in the fuel by self-heating due both to its plutonium content and residual fission products and by heating due to oxidation. If the heat generation rate is higher than the heat loss rate, the system may experience a breakaway oxidation reaction, which is termed ignition.

Parlatan, Y. (Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge (United States)); Charak, I. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Page Name: Subject/Program/Project, Acronym: Los Alamos National...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

in off-site, state-of-the-art experimental facilities at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and the OMEGA laser facility in Rochester, New York. Featured science Fusion target...

297

Facilities | National Nuclear Security Administration  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Inertial Confinement Fusion Inertial Confinement Fusion Facilities Home > About Us > Our Programs > Defense Programs > Office of Research, Development, Test, and Evaluation > Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion > Facilities Facilities Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion, Facilities ICF operates a set of world-class experimental facilities to create HEDP conditions and to obtain quantitative data in support of its numerous stockpile stewardship-related activities. To learn about three high energy experimental facilities and two small lasers that provide ICF capabilities, select the links below. National Ignition Facility, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory OMEGA and OMEGA EP, University of Rochester Laboratory for Laser Energetics Z Machine, Sandia National Laboratories

298

1st NIFS-CRC Int. Symp. and 1st Korea-Japan WS, 5/20-22, 2007  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1st NIFS-CRC Int. Symp. and 1st Korea-Japan WS, 5/20-22, 2007 1 Excitation of atomic hydrogen at metal surfaces promoted by proton motion Daiji Kato NIFS #12;1st NIFS-CRC Int. Symp. and 1st Korea of the excited state formation. · Conclusion #12;1st NIFS-CRC Int. Symp. and 1st Korea-Japan WS, 5/20-22, 2007 3

Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory

299

FABRICATION OF WINDOW SADDLES FOR NIF CRYOGENIC HOHLRAUMS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OAK-B135 A planar diagnostic viewing port attached to the cylindrical wall of the NIF cryogenic hohlraum requires a saddle-like transition piece. While the basic design of this window saddle is straightforward, its fabrication is not, given the scale and precision of the component. They solved the problem through the use of a two segment copper mandrel to electroform the gold window saddle. The segments were micro-machined using a combination of single-point diamond turning and single point diamond milling. These processes as well as the electroplating conditions, final machining and mandrel removal are described in this paper.

GIRALDEZ,E; KAAE,J.L

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

29 JANUARY 2010 VOL 327 SCIENCE www.sciencemag.org514 NEWS OF THE WEEK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

with CERN's setbacks in mind, those in charge of the National Ignition Facility (NIF), a huge laser published online this week by Science (www. sciencemag.org/cgi/content/ abstract/1185634), NIF researchers of RutherfordAppleton Laboratory near Oxford, U.K. NIF is the sledgehammer to crack a nut, writ huge (Science

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ignition facility nif" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

www.sciencemag.org SCIENCE VOL 328 16 APRIL 2010 293 NEWSOF THEWEEK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

U.S. government audit of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National science if Congress gives it a chance to flex its muscles. NIF's 192 lasers focus on a thimble to shoot at full energy. Congress funded NIF to fire at 1.8 megajoules (MJ). But GAO found that problems

302

Peter A. Norreys Professor of Inertial Fusion Science,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Campaign · "Science of Ignition on the NIF" Workshop · Central Laser Facility / ORION #12;Universities: LLNL NIF Point Design #12;Cryogenic target & shield #12;Target Gain G is NOT a physics parameter (CH or Be) NIF 1MJ Indirect Drive Design Laser energy = 1MJ Fuel kinetic energy = 10kJ Total

303

Summary talk to 21st IAEA FEC, Chendu, 2006 Inertial fusion advance  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DT) will be demonstrated by using National Ignition Facility (NIF) in USA and Mega Joule Laser (LMJ is expected in the indirect-driver implosion on the NIF with the conventional scheme based on a central hot for inertial fusion Except for laser drivers such as NIF and LMJ etc., the Z- pinch drivers and the heavy ion

304

21 SEPTEMBER 2012 VOL 337 SCIENCE www.sciencemag.org1444 NEWS&ANALYSIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. The National Ignition Facility (NIF), a $3.5 billion laser fusion lab in California, looks certain to miss its more energy than was put in to make it happen. This milestone is considered key for NIF's twin goals at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the home of NIF, are playing down the significance of the end

305

Joseph Kilkenny Presented to: MIT-PSFC's IAP Open House, January 10, 2013  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Joseph Kilkenny Presented to: MIT-PSFC's IAP Open House, January 10, 2013 V. P. General Atomics NIF on the National Ignition Facility: theory and experiment advance science #12;NIF-1111-23687 Moses_ John Szymanski & Pat Falcone, Nov. 15, 2011 2 #12;NIF-1111-23687 Moses_ John Szymanski & Pat Falcone, Nov. 15, 2011 3

306

Characterization of a NifS-Like Chloroplast Protein from Arabidopsis. Implications for Its Role in Sulfur and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Characterization of a NifS-Like Chloroplast Protein from Arabidopsis. Implications for Its Role 611­0011, Japan (S.-I.K., H.M., N.E., T.K.) NifS-like proteins catalyze the formation of elemental and characterize chloroplast NifS-like proteins. Using seleno-Cys as a substrate, it was found that 25% to 30

307

Laser ablation based fuel ignition  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

There is provided a method of fuel/oxidizer ignition comprising: (a) application of laser light to a material surface which is absorptive to the laser radiation; (b) heating of the material surface with the laser light to produce a high temperature ablation plume which emanates from the heated surface as an intensely hot cloud of vaporized surface material; and (c) contacting the fuel/oxidizer mixture with the hot ablation cloud at or near the surface of the material in order to heat the fuel to a temperature sufficient to initiate fuel ignition. 3 figs.

Early, J.W.; Lester, C.S.

1998-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

308

Surface breakdown igniter for mercury arc devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Surface breakdown igniter comprises a semiconductor of medium resistivity which has the arc device cathode as one electrode and has an igniter anode electrode so that when voltage is applied between the electrodes a spark is generated when electrical breakdown occurs over the surface of the semiconductor. The geometry of the igniter anode and cathode electrodes causes the igniter discharge to be forced away from the semiconductor surface.

Bayless, John R. (Malibu, CA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Examining the function of the residue C207 in the cysteine desulfurase reaction of an essential NifS-like protein from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NifS-like protein from Synechocystis PCC6803 Anthony Paul Trace, McNair Scholar, Pennsylvania State analysis showed the NifS protein is essential to the production of many metalloenzymes, specifically iron Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 encodes three NifS-like proteins: Slr0077, Slr0387, and Sll0704. Genetic experiments

Omiecinski, Curtis

310

Capsule implosion optimization during the indirect-drive National Ignition Campaign  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Capsule performance optimization campaigns will be conducted at the National Ignition Facility [G. H. Miller, E. I. Moses, and C. R. Wuest, Nucl. Fusion 44, 228 (2004)] to substantially increase the probability of ignition. The campaigns will experimentally correct for residual uncertainties in the implosion and hohlraum physics used in our radiation-hydrodynamic computational models using a variety of ignition capsule surrogates before proceeding to cryogenic-layered implosions and ignition experiments. The quantitative goals and technique options and down selections for the tuning campaigns are first explained. The computationally derived sensitivities to key laser and target parameters are compared to simple analytic models to gain further insight into the physics of the tuning techniques. The results of the validation of the tuning techniques at the OMEGA facility [J. M. Soures et al., Phys. Plasmas 3, 2108 (1996)] under scaled hohlraum and capsule conditions relevant to the ignition design are shown to meet the required sensitivity and accuracy. A roll-up of all expected random and systematic uncertainties in setting the key ignition laser and target parameters due to residual measurement, calibration, cross-coupling, surrogacy, and scale-up errors has been derived that meets the required budget. Finally, we show how the tuning precision will be improved after a number of shots and iterations to meet an acceptable level of residual uncertainty.

Landen, O. L.; Edwards, J.; Haan, S. W.; Robey, H. F.; Milovich, J.; Spears, B. K.; Weber, S. V.; Clark, D. S.; Lindl, J. D.; MacGowan, B. J.; Moses, E. I.; Atherton, J.; Amendt, P. A.; Bradley, D. K.; Braun, D. G.; Callahan, D. A.; Celliers, P. M.; Collins, G. W.; Dewald, E. L.; Divol, L. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

311

Inertial fusion target development for ignition and energy  

SciTech Connect

The target needs of the next ICF experiments that will lead toward ignition and energy are different from those of today`s experiments. The future experiments on OMEGA Upgrade, GEKKO XII Upgrade, the National Ignition Facility and Megajoule will need large, precise, cryogenic targets. Development is needed on a number of aspects of these targets, including shell fabrication, characterization, cryogenic layering and target handling. However, coordinated R and D programs are in place and work is in process to carry out the needed development. It is vital to the success of inertial fusion that this work be sustained. Coordinated effort, like the National Cryogenic Target Program in the USA, will help make the development activities as efficient and effective as possible, and should be encouraged.

Schultz, K.R. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Norimatsu, T. [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Laser Engineering

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

The Ignition Physics Study Group  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the US magnetic fusion program there have been relatively few standing committees of experts, with the mandate to review a particular sub-area on a continuing basis. Generally, ad hoc committees of experts have been assembled to advise on a particular issue. There has been a lack of broad, systematic and continuing review and analysis, combining the wisdom of experts in the field, in support of decision making. The Ignition Physics Study Group (IPSG) provides one forum for the systematic discussion of fusion science, complementing the other exchanges of information, and providing a most important continuity in this critical area. In a similar manner to the European program, this continuity of discussion and the focus provided by a national effort, Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT), and international effort, Engineering Test Reactor (ETR), are helping to lower those barriers which previously were an impediment to rational debate.

Sheffield, J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

INTERPRTATION DES FAUTES D'EMPILEMENT DANS L'ANTIFERROMAGNTIQUE K2NiF4  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

859. INTERPR�TATION DES FAUTES D'EMPILEMENT DANS L'ANTIFERROMAGN�TIQUE K2NiF4 Par R. PLUMIER. 2014 Nous montrons qu'une légère déformation orthorhombique de la maille de K2NiF4 entraîne parNiF4 cell leads to a decrease of the free energy of the crystal through an exchange striction

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

314

Reaction-in-Flight Neutrons as a Signature for Shell Mixing in NIF capsules  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present analytic calculations and results from computational simulations showing that reaction-in-flight (RIF) neutrons act as a robust indicator for mixing of the ablator shell material into the fuel in DT capsules designed for the National Ignition Facility. The sensitivity of RIF neutrons to hydrodynamical mixing arises through the dependence of RIF production on charged-particle stopping lengths in the mixture of DT fuel and ablator material. Since the stopping power in the plasma is a sensitive function of the electron temperature and density, it is also sensitive to mix. RIF production scales approximately inversely with the degree of mixing taking place, and the ratio of RIF to downscattered neutrons provides a measure of the mix fraction and/or the mixing length. For sufficiently high-yield capsules, where spatially resolved RIF images may be possible, neutron imaging could be used to map RIF images into detailed mix images.

A. C. Hayes; P. A. Bradley; G. P. Grim; Gerard Jungman; J. B. Wilhelmy

2009-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

315

History and future of spark ignition engines  

SciTech Connect

A report on the history and future of spark ignition engines for automobile propulsion is presented, with particular emphasis on their environmental impact. Topics covered include: factors affecting early decisions in favor of spark ignition engines and influencing continued reliance on spark ignition engines; the early history of automobile engines, including propulsion by steam, electricity, spark ignition, and diesel power; and contemporary alternative power sources such as the stratified charge engine and the Wankel rotary combustion engine. There appear to be no equivalents in knowledge, experience, or data with alternative engine designs to allow for the prediction that a change from spark ignition propulsion to one of the possible alternatives would be beneficial either in terms of emission reduction or performance and fuel economy. The stratified charge engine, however, appears to offer great promise for adequate emission control with good fuel economy and performance characteristics; moreover, it has the significant advantage of being an incremental change from the current spark ignition engine.

1973-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Laser Spark Distribution and Ignition System  

Laser Spark Distribution and Ignition System Opportunity The Department of Energy’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners ...

317

Argonne TTRDC - Engines - Home - combustion, compression ignition,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

* Combustion Visualization * Combustion Visualization * Compression-Ignition * Emissions Control * Fuel Injection and Sprays * Idling * Multi-Dimensional Modeling * Particulate Matter * Spark Ignition Green Racing GREET Hybrid Electric Vehicles Hydrogen & Fuel Cells Materials Modeling, Simulation & Software Plug-In Hybrid Electric Vehicles PSAT Smart Grid Student Competitions Technology Analysis Transportation Research and Analysis Computing Center Working With Argonne Contact TTRDC Engines Omnivorous engine tested by Thomas Wallner Thomas Wallner tests the omnivorous engine, a type of spark-ignition engine. Argonne's engine research is contributing to advances in technology that will impact the use of conventional and alternative fuels and the design of advanced technology vehicles. Compression Ignition

318

Ignitability Measurements with the Cone Calorimeter*  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 22. WD Weatherford, Jr and DM Sheppard, Basic studies of the mechanism of ignition of cellulosic materials. Tenth Symp. (IntI) on Combustion, pp. ...

2008-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

319

Ignition and spread of electrical wire fires  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

pilot source, placed in the center of the wire sample to initiate ignition, which heats the wire through both convection (major) and radiation (

Huang, Xinyan

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Modelling piloted ignition of wood and plastics  

SciTech Connect

Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We model piloted ignition times of wood and plastics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The model is applied on a packed bed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer When the air flow is above a critical level, no ignition can take place. - Abstract: To gain insight in the startup of an incinerator, this article deals with piloted ignition. A newly developed model is described to predict the piloted ignition times of wood, PMMA and PVC. The model is based on the lower flammability limit and the adiabatic flame temperature at this limit. The incoming radiative heat flux, sample thickness and moisture content are some of the used variables. Not only the ignition time can be calculated with the model, but also the mass flux and surface temperature at ignition. The ignition times for softwoods and PMMA are mainly under-predicted. For hardwoods and PVC the predicted ignition times agree well with experimental results. Due to a significant scatter in the experimental data the mass flux and surface temperature calculated with the model are hard to validate. The model is applied on the startup of a municipal waste incineration plant. For this process a maximum allowable primary air flow is derived. When the primary air flow is above this maximum air flow, no ignition can be obtained.

Blijderveen, Maarten van [TNO, Schoemakerstraat 97, 2628 VK Delft (Netherlands); University of Twente, Department of Thermal Engineering, Drienerlolaan 5, 7522 NB Enschede (Netherlands); Bramer, Eddy A. [University of Twente, Department of Thermal Engineering, Drienerlolaan 5, 7522 NB Enschede (Netherlands); Brem, Gerrit, E-mail: g.brem@utwente.nl [University of Twente, Department of Thermal Engineering, Drienerlolaan 5, 7522 NB Enschede (Netherlands)

2012-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ignition facility nif" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Study on Adaptive Ignition Energy System of Two-Stroke Spark Ignition Engine  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Kerosene is characteristic of higher flash point, poorer evaporation, higher energy density, higher use safety, higher ignition temperature, and slower combustion velocity than that of gasoline. Therefore, kerosene is widely used in the field of navigation. ... Keywords: CDI, Adaptive Ignition Energy, Spark Ignition Engine, Microcontroller Unit

Binglin Li; Minxiang Wei

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

An experimental investigation of the ignition properties of hydrogen and carbon monoxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for syngas turbine applications S.M. Walton *, X. He, B.T. Zigler, M.S. Wooldridge Department of Mechanical of simulated syngas mixtures of hydrogen (H2), carbon monoxide (CO), oxygen (O2), nitrogen (N2), and carbon. Keywords: Carbon monoxide; Hydrogen; Syngas; Ignition; Rapid compression facility 1. Introduction Syngas

Wooldridge, Margaret S.

323

Tank farm deflagration rates due to various ignition sources  

SciTech Connect

This supporting document evaluates potential ignition sources, documents calculated deflagration rates in flammable gas tanks from these ignition sources, and assesses the efficacy of controls to mitigate or prevent ignition.

Powers, T.B., Westinghouse Hanford

1996-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

324

Weapons Activities/ Inertial Confinement Fusion Ignition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2012 Congressional Budget Campaign and a major goal for National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). The ICF Campaign supports the NNSA's Stockpile Stewardship Program. The NIF provides NNSA extraordinary opportunities for scientific progress and discovery in the areas

325

The Defect Induced Mix Experiment (DIME) for NIF  

SciTech Connect

LANL will perform two Defect Induced Mix Experiment (DIME) implosion campaigns on NIF in July and September, 2012. This presentation describes the goals for these shots and the experimental configuration and diagnostic set up to collect the appropriate data. The first two-shot campaign will focus on executing polar direct drive (PDD) implosions of plastic CH capsules filled with deuterium gas. Gas filling will be performed through a fill tube at target chamber center. A vanadium backligher foil will provide x-rays to radiograph the last half of the implosion to compare the implosion trajectory with modeling predictions. An equatorial groove in one of the capsules will be present to determine its effect on implosion dynamics. The second DIME campaign will commission and use a spectral imager (MMI) to examine the evolution of thin capsule layers doped with either Ge or Ga at 1.85%. Spectral line emission from these layers will quantify the mix width at the inner shell radius and near an equatorial groove feature.

Schmitt, Mark J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bradley, Paul A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Cobble, James A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hakel, Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hsu, Scott C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Krasheninnikova, Natalia S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kyrala, George A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Murphy, Thomas J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Obrey, Kimberly A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shah, Rahul C [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Tregillis, Ian L [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

326

Advanced ignition and propulsion technology program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Reliable engine re-ignition plays a crucial role in enabling commercial and military aircraft to fly safely at high altitudes. This project addressed research elements critical to the optimization of laser-based igniter. The effort initially involved a collaborative research and development agreement with B.F. Goodrich Aerospace and Laser Fare, Inc. The work involved integrated experiments with theoretical modeling to provide a basic understanding of the chemistry and physics controlling the laser-induced ignition of fuel aerosols produced by turbojet engine injectors. In addition, the authors defined advanced laser igniter configurations that minimize laser packaging size, weight, complexity and power consumption. These innovative ignition concepts were shown to reliably ignite jet fuel aerosols over a broad range of fuel/air mixture and a t fuel temperatures as low as -40 deg F. The demonstrated fuel ignition performance was highly superior to that obtained by the state-of-the-art, laser-spark ignition method utilizing comparable laser energy. The authors also developed a laser-based method that effectively removes optically opaque deposits of fuel hydrocarbon combustion residues from laser window surfaces. Seven patents have been either issued or are pending that resulted from the technology developments within this project.

Oldenborg, R.; Early, J.; Lester, C.

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Managing transient behaviors of a dual mode spark ignition-- controlled auto ignition engine with a variable valve timing system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gasoline Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) engine has the potential of providing better fuel economy and emissions characteristics than current spark ignition engines. One implementation of this technology ...

Santoso, Halim G. (Halim Gustiono), 1975-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

HIGH-SPEED IMAGER FOR FAST, TRANSIENT EVENTS AT NIF  

Facility. HIGH-SPEED IMAGER . FOR FAST, TRANSIENT ... GATOR can convert x rays and other types of radiation to coherent optical radiation, which can be transported and

329

Fuzzy Expert System to Estimate Ignition Timing for Hydrogen Car  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents the application of fuzzy expert system technique as a basis to estimate ignition timing for subsequent tuning of a Toyota Corolla 4 cylinder, 1.8l hydrogen powered car. Ignition timing prediction is a typical problem to which decision ... Keywords: Fuzzy expert system, Hydrogen engine tuning, Hydrogen powered car, Ignition advance, Ignition timing

Tien Ho; Vishy Karri

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

JIFT Workshop `Advanced Simulation Methods in Plasma Physics'at NIFS, Dec.14-16 Particle Simulation AnalysisParticle Simulation Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

JIFT Workshop `Advanced Simulation Methods in Plasma Physics'at NIFS, Dec.14-16 Particle Simulation)Hiroaki Ohtani 1,2), Nobuaki Ohno 3), Ritoku Horiuchi 1,2) 1National Institute for Fusion Science (NIFS'at NIFS, Dec.14-16 ContentsContents · Introduction ­ Virtual Realityy · Application to Magnetic

Ito, Atsushi

331

Laser Shocking of Materials: Toward the National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Producing Metal Parts with Selective Laser Sintering/Hot Isostatic Pressing .... ?, based on experimental measurements of dislocation cell sizes: ? ? P1/2.

332

Director of the National Ignition Facility, Lawrence Livermore...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

after working on a number of laser research projects at Hughes Aircraft and LLNL. He led the development of the Peregine radiation therapy planning tool for the treatment of...

333

NERSC/DOE FES Requirements Workshop Worksheet - Frank Tsung  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

due to wave particle effects even in the absence of plasma wave self-focusing. With NIF (National Ignition Facility) coming online, this is the perfect time to apply both the...

334

Microsoft Word - LL_Report_9-13-13rev.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

T he W all S treet J ournal. Akima employee Beth Palma is a National Ignition Facility (NIF) diagnostic engineerdeputy systems section manager. Lawrence L ivermore N ational L...

335

Chemical kinetic modelling of hydrocarbon ignition  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Chemical kinetic modeling of hydrocarbon ignition is discussed with reference to a range of experimental configurations, including shock tubes, detonations, pulse combustors, static reactors, stirred reactors and internal combustion engines. Important conditions of temperature, pressure or other factors are examined to determine the main chemical reaction sequences responsible for chain branching and ignition, and kinetic factors which can alter the rate of ignition are identified. Hydrocarbon ignition usually involves complex interactions between physical and chemical factors, and it therefore is a suitable and often productive subject for computer simulations. In most of the studies to be discussed below, the focus of the attention is placed on the chemical features of the system. The other physical parts of each application are generally included in the form of initial or boundary conditions to the chemical kinetic parts of the problem, as appropriate for each type of application being addressed.

Westbrook, C.K.; Pitz, W.J.; Curran, H.J.; Gaffuri, P.; Marinov, N.M.

1995-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

336

Laser Spark Distribution and Ignition System  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spark Distribution and Ignition System Spark Distribution and Ignition System Opportunity The Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) is seeking licensing partners interested in implement- ing United States Patent Number 7,421,166 entitled "Laser Spark Distribution and Ignition System." Disclosed in this patent is NETL's laser spark distribution and ignition system, which reduces the high-power optical requirements normally needed for such a system by using optical fibers to deliver low-peak-energy pumping pulses to a laser amplifier or laser oscillator. Laser spark generators then produce a high-peak-power laser spark from a single low power pulse. The system has ap- plications in natural gas fueled reciprocating engines, turbine combustors, explosives, and laser induced breakdown spectroscopy diagnostic sensors.

337

Ignition methods and apparatus using microwave energy  

SciTech Connect

An ignition apparatus for a combustor includes a microwave energy source that emits microwave energy into the combustor at a frequency within a resonant response of the combustor, the combustor functioning as a resonant cavity for the microwave energy so that a plasma is produced that ignites a combustible mixture therein. The plasma preferably is a non-contact plasma produced in free space within the resonant cavity spaced away from with the cavity wall structure and spaced from the microwave emitter.

DeFreitas, Dennis Michael (Oxford, NY); Migliori, Albert (Santa Fe, NM)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Infrared Thermographic Study of Laser Ignition  

SciTech Connect

Pyrotechnic ignition has been studied in the past by making a limited number of discrete temperature-time observations during ignition. Present-day infrared scanning techniques make it possible to record thermal profiles, during ignition, with high spacial and temporal resolution. Data thus obtained can be used with existing theory to characterize pyrotechnic materials and to develop more precise kinetic models of the ignition process. Ignition has been studied theoretically and experimentally using various thermal methods. It has been shown that the whole process can, ideally, be divided into two stages. In the first stage, the sample pellet behaves like an inert body heated by an external heat source. The second stage is governed by the chemical reaction in the heated volume produced during the first stage. High speed thermographic recording of the temperature distribution in the test sample during laser ignition makes it possible to calculate the heat content at any instant. Thus, one can actually observe laser heating and the onset of self-sustained combustion in the pellet. The experimental apparatus used to make these observations is described. The temperature distributions recorded are shown to be in good agreement with those predicted by heat transfer theory. Heat content values calculated from the observed temperature distributions are used to calculate thermal and kinetic parameters for several samples. These values are found to be in reasonable agreement with theory.

Mohler, Jonathan H.; Chow, Charles T. S.

1986-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Direct Injection Compressed Ignition Diesel Automotive Technology Education GATE Program  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The underlying goal of this project was to provide multi-disciplinary engineering training for graduate students in the area of internal combustion engines, specifically in direct injection compression ignition engines. The program was designed to educate highly qualified engineers and scientists that will seek to overcome technological barriers preventing the development and production of cost-effective high-efficiency vehicles for the US. market. Further, these highly qualified engineers and scientists will foster an educational process to train a future workforce of automotive engineering professionals who are knowledgeable about and have experience in developing and commercializing critical advanced automotive technologies. Eight objectives were defined to accomplish this goal: (1) Develop an interdisciplinary internal combustion engine curriculum emphasizing direct injected combustion ignited diesel engines. (2) Encourage and promote interdisciplinary interaction of the faculty. (3) Offer a Ph.D. degree in internal combustion engines based upon an interdisciplinary curriculum. (4) Promote strong interaction with industry, develop a sense of responsibility with industry and pursue a self sustaining program. (5) Establish collaborative arrangements and network universities active in internal combustion engine study. (6) Further Enhance a First Class educational facility. (7) Establish ''off-campus'' M.S. and Ph.D. engine programs of study at various industrial sites. (8) Extend and Enhance the Graduate Experience.

Carl L. Anderson

2006-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

340

Deliberate ignition of hydrogen-air-steam mixtures under conditions of rapidly condensing steam  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of experiments was conducted to determine hydrogen combustion behavior under conditions of rapidly condensing steam caused by water sprays. Experiments were conducted in the Surtsey facility under conditions that were nearly prototypical of those that would be expected in a severe accident in the CE System 80+ containment. Mixtures were initially nonflammable owing to dilution by steam. The mixtures were ignited by thermal glow plugs when they became flammable after sufficient steam was removed by condensation caused by water sprays. No detonations or accelerated flame propagation was observed in the Surtsey facility. The combustion mode observed for prototypical mixtures was characterized by multiple deflagrations with relatively small pressure rises. The thermal glow plugs were effective in burning hydrogen safely by igniting the gases as the mixtures became marginally flammable.

Blanchat, T.; Stamps, D.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ignition facility nif" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

APPLICATION OF FAULT TREE ANALYSIS TO IGNITION OF FIRE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ignition, but which, due to human error causing a sufficientfuel is primarily due to human error. For example, a cooke.g. planned ignition f human error comes in e.g. failure of

Teresa Ling, W.C.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Fuel effects in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Homogenous-charge, compression-ignition (HCCI) combustion is a new method of burning fuel in internal combustion (IC) engines. In an HCCI engine, the fuel and air are premixed prior to combustion, like in a spark-ignition ...

Angelos, John P. (John Phillip)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

On the ignition of fuel beds by firebrands  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... The firebrand ignition apparatus consists of four butane burners and a firebrand mounting probe. The butane flowrate is ...

2006-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

344

The NIF DISCO Framework: Facilitating Automated Integration of Neuroscience Content on the Web  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract This paper describes the capabilities of DISCO, an extensible approach that supports integrative Web-based information dissemination. DISCO is a component of the Neuroscience Information Framework (NIF), an NIH Neuroscience Blueprint initiative that facilitates integrated access to diverse neuroscience resources via the Internet. DISCO facilitates the automated maintenance of several distinct capabilities using a collection of files 1) that are maintained locally by the developers of participating neuroscience resources and 2) that are “harvested ” on a regular basis by a central DISCO server. This approach allows central NIF capabilities to be updated as each resource’s content changes over time. DISCO currently supports the following capabilities: 1) resource descriptions, 2) “LinkOut ” to a resource’s data items from NCBI Entrez resources such as PubMed, 3) Web-based interoperation with a resource, 4) sharing a resource’s lexicon and

Luis Marenco; Rixin Wang; Gordon M. Shepherd; Perry L. Miller; L. Marenco; L. Marenco; R. Wang; P. L. Miller; G. M. Shepherd; P. L. Miller

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Nitrogen fixation and nitrogenase (nifH) expression in tropical waters of the eastern north atlantic.  

SciTech Connect

Expression of nifH in 28 surface water samples collected during fall 2007 from six stations in the vicinity of the Cape Verde Islands (north-east Atlantic) was examined using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR)-based clone libraries and quantitative RT-PCR (RT-qPCR) analysis of seven diazotrophic phylotypes. Biological nitrogen fixation (BNF) rates and nutrient concentrations were determined for these stations, which were selected based on a range in surface chlorophyll concentrations to target a gradient of primary productivity. BNF rates greater than 6 nmolN I{sup -1} h{sup -1} were measured at two of the near-shore stations where high concentrations of Fe and PO{sub 4}{sup 3-} were also measured. Six hundred and five nifH transcripts were amplified by RT-PCR, of which 76% are described by six operational taxonomic units, including Trichodesmium and the uncultivated UCYN-A, and four non-cyanobacterial diazotrophs that clustered with uncultivated Proteobacteria. Although all five cyanobacterial phylotypes quantified in RT-qPCR assays were detected at different stations in this study, UCYN-A contributed most significantly to the pool of nifH transcripts in both coastal and oligotrophic waters. A comparison of results from RT-PCR clone libraries and RT-qPCR indicated that a {gamma}-proteobacterial phylotype was preferentially amplified in clone libraries, which underscores the need to use caution interpreting clone-library-based nifH studies, especially when considering the importance of uncultivated proteobacterial diazotrophs.

Turk, K. A.; Rees, A. P.; Zehr, J. P.; Pereira, N.; Swift, P.; Shelley, R.; Lohan, M.; Woodward, E. M. S.; Gilbert, J. (CLS-CI); (Department of Ocean Sciences, University of California Santa Cruz); (Plymouth Marine Laboratory, Prospect Place); (NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology); (University of Plymouth, Drake Circus); (Department of Ecology and Evolution, University of Chicago)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Premature ignition of a rocket motor.  

SciTech Connect

During preparation for a rocket sled track (RST) event, there was an unexpected ignition of the zuni rocket motor (10/9/08). Three Sandia staff and a contractor were involved in the accident; the contractor was seriously injured and made full recovery. The data recorder battery energized the low energy initiator in the rocket.

Moore, Darlene Ruth

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Laser Spark Distribution and Ignition System  

Disclosed in this patent is NETL’s laser spark distribution and ignition system, which reduces the high-power optical requirements normally needed for such a system by using optical fibers to deliver low-peak-energy pumping pulses to a laser amplifier ...

348

Advanced aircraft ignition CRADA final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Conventional commercial and military turbo-jet aircraft engines use capacitive discharge ignition systems to initiate fuel combustion. The fuel-rich conditions required to ensure engine re-ignition during flight yield less than optimal engine performance, which in turn reduces fuel economy and generates considerable pollution in the exhaust. Los Alamos investigated two approaches to advanced ignition: laser based and microwave based. The laser based approach is fuel ignition via laser-spark breakdown and via photo-dissociation of fuel hydrocarbons and oxygen. The microwave approach involves modeling, and if necessary redesigning, a combustor shape to form a low-Q microwave cavity, which will ensure microwave breakdown of the air/fuel mixture just ahead of the nozzle with or without a catalyst coating. This approach will also conduct radio-frequency (RF) heating of ceramic elements that have large loss tangents. Replacing conventional systems with either of these two new systems should yield combustion in leaner jet fuel/air mixtures. As a result, the aircraft would operate with (1) considerable less exhaust pollution, (2) lower engine maintenance, and (3) significantly higher fuel economy.

Early, J.W.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Fundamental Studies of Ignition Process in Large Natural Gas Engines Using Laser Spark Ignition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Past research has shown that laser ignition provides a potential means to reduce emissions and improve engine efficiency of gas-fired engines to meet longer-term DOE ARES (Advanced Reciprocating Engine Systems) targets. Despite the potential advantages of laser ignition, the technology is not seeing practical or commercial use. A major impediment in this regard has been the 'open-path' beam delivery used in much of the past research. This mode of delivery is not considered industrially practical owing to safety factors, as well as susceptibility to vibrations, thermal effects etc. The overall goal of our project has been to develop technologies and approaches for practical laser ignition systems. To this end, we are pursuing fiber optically coupled laser ignition system and multiplexing methods for multiple cylinder engine operation. This report summarizes our progress in this regard. A partial summary of our progress includes: development of a figure of merit to guide fiber selection, identification of hollow-core fibers as a potential means of fiber delivery, demonstration of bench-top sparking through hollow-core fibers, single-cylinder engine operation with fiber delivered laser ignition, demonstration of bench-top multiplexing, dual-cylinder engine operation via multiplexed fiber delivered laser ignition, and sparking with fiber lasers. To the best of our knowledge, each of these accomplishments was a first.

Azer Yalin; Bryan Willson

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

350

Mechanical Engineering Safety Note: Analysis and Control of Hazards Associated with NIF Capacitor Module Events  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The NIF capacitor module was reviewed with respect to pressure venting and shrapnel containment during failures. A modified module concept was proposed that would adequately vent the pressure, yet be effective at containing shrapnel. Two large vents are provided on each side of the module. These have fixed vent areas, and are immediately accessible for pressure venting at the beginning of a pressure transient. A shrapnel shield is located on the outside of each vent opening forming a chute. The chute contains a collimator. This increases the number of bounces that shrapnel must take on the way out, and directs the shrapnel to the trap beneath. The trap contains a depth of clear pine, sufficient to completely absorb the energy of even the most energetic fragment considered. Based on a review of the evidence from past capacitor failures at the FANTM facility at Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, and additional theoretical estimates, the peak pressure generated in the module during explosive events was estimated to be less than 40 psig. This internal pressure in the FANTM module appears to be tolerable, as only minor damage to the module and to internal components was observed after events. The new module concept proposed here provides increased venting area, fully available at the initiation of an event. It is expected that even less damage would be observed if an event occurred in a module with this design. The module joints and connections were formally reviewed with respect to their tolerance to a brief internal pressure as high as 40 psig. With minor modifications that have been incorporated into the design, the module was shown to maintain its integrity during such events. Some of the calculations performed estimated the quantity of dielectric oil that could be involved in a capacitor failure. It was determined that a very small amount of the available oil would contribute to the explosive event, on the order of 500 g or less. This is a small fraction of the total free oil available in a capacitor (approximately 10,900 g), on the order of 5% or less. The estimates of module pressure were used to estimate the potential overpressure in the capacitor bays after an event. It was shown that the expected capacitor bay overpressure would be less than the structural tolerance of the walls. Thus, it does not appear necessary to provide any pressure relief for the capacitor bays. The ray tracing analysis showed the new module concept to be 100% effective at containing fragments generated during the events. The analysis demonstrated that all fragments would impact an energy absorbing surface on the way out of the module. Thus, there is high confidence that energetic fragments will not escape the module. However, since the module was not tested, it was recommended that a form of secondary containment on the walls of the capacitor bays (e.g., 1.0 inch of fire-retardant plywood) be provided. Any doors to the exterior of the capacitor bays should be of equivalent thickness of steel or suitably armed with a thickness of plywood. Penetrations in the ceiling of the interior bays (leading to the mechanical equipment room) do not require additional protection to form a secondary barrier. The mezzanine and the air handling units (penetrations lead directly to the air handling units) provide a sufficient second layer of protection.

Brereton, S

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Investigation of spark discharge processes and ignition systems for spark-ignited internal combustion engines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spark ignition of the air-fuel mixture at the appropriate time is important for successful flame initiation and complete combustion thereafter without unnecessary emissions. The physical and chemical reactions taking place between the spark plug electrodes during spark delivery determine the intensity of the spark and subsequent flame initiation. The energy of spark and the duration of its delivery are dependent on the ignition system design. The characteristics of the spark plug determine the interaction of the spark with the air-fuel mixture. The compression pressure, combustion chamber temperature and mixture motion at the time of spark generation play a significant role in the flame initiation process. All of these parameters are responsible for the resulting spark discharge and flame initiation process. The objectives of this research include investigation of the different phases of spark discharge and development of a thermodynamic analysis to determine the rate of change of the spark kernel temperature with time during the initial phases of the spark discharge. The effect of spark energy delivery rate, heat transfer losses and mass entrainment on the spark kernel temperature was determined through the thermodynamic analysis. This research also includes an evaluation of the various types of conventional as well as high-energy ignition systems for lean burn engines. An experimental ignition system was constructed to determine the effect of ignition energy, spark plug electrode geometry and gas pressure on the characteristics of the spark discharge. Images of spark discharge were captured through photography using three different types of electrode geometries and also by varying the pressure and by changing the ignition energy using different condensers in the ignition system. Finally, the results of the thermodynamic analysis were compared with the results from the experiment.

Khare, Yogesh Jayant

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Nuclear Facilities Production Facilities  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Sand 2011-4582P. ENERGY U.S. DEPARTMENT OF Gamma Irradiation Facility (GIF) The GIF provides test cells for...

353

Test report for core drilling ignitability testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Testing was carried out with the cooperation of Westinghouse Hanford Company and the United States Bureau of Mines at the Pittsburgh Research Center in Pennsylvania under the Memorandum of Agreement 14- 09-0050-3666. Several core drilling equipment items, specifically those which can come in contact with flammable gasses while drilling into some waste tanks, were tested under conditions similar to actual field sampling conditions. Rotary drilling against steel and rock as well as drop testing of several different pieces of equipment in a flammable gas environment were the specific items addressed. The test items completed either caused no ignition of the gas mixture, or, after having hardware changes or drilling parameters modified, produced no ignition in repeat testing.

Witwer, K.S.

1996-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

354

Laser-plasma interactions for fast ignition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the electron-driven fast-ignition approach to inertial confinement fusion, petawatt laser pulses are required to generate MeV electrons that deposit several tens of kilojoules in the compressed core of an imploded DT shell. We review recent progress in the understanding of intense laser plasma interactions (LPI) relevant to fast ignition. Increases in computational and modeling capabilities, as well as algorithmic developments have led to enhancement in our ability to perform multi-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations of LPI at relevant scales. We discuss the physics of the interaction in terms of laser absorption fraction, the laser-generated electron spectra, divergence, and their temporal evolution. Scaling with irradiation conditions such as laser intensity are considered, as well as the dependence on plasma parameters. Different numerical modeling approaches and configurations are addressed, providing an overview of the modeling capabilities and limitations. In addition, we discuss the compa...

Kemp, A J; Debayle, A; Johzaki, T; Mori, W B; Patel, P K; Sentoku, Y; Silva, L O

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Rapid ignition of fluidized bed boiler  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fluidized bed boiler is started up by directing into the static bed of inert and carbonaceous granules a downwardly angled burner so that the hot gases cause spouting. Air is introduced into the bed at a rate insufficient to fluidize the entire bed. Three regions are now formed in the bed, a region of lowest gas resistance, a fluidized region and a static region with a mobile region at the interface of the fluidized and static regions. Particles are transferred by the spouting action to form a conical heap with the carbonaceous granules concentrated at the top. The hot burner gases ignite the carbonaceous matter on the top of the bed which becomes distributed in the bed by the spouting action and bed movement. Thereafter the rate of air introduction is increased to fluidize the entire bed, the spouter/burner is shut off, and the entire fluidized bed is ignited.

Osborn, Liman D. (Alexandria, VA)

1976-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

356

Direct-Drive Inertial Fusion Research at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics: A Review  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews the status of direct-drive inertial confinement fusion (ICF) research at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). LLE's goal is to demonstrate direct-drive ignition on the National Ignition Facility (NIF) by 2014. Baseline "all-DT" NIF direct-drive ignition target designs have been developed that have a predicted gain of 45 (1-D) at a NIF drive energy of ~1.6 MJ. Significantly higher gains are calculated for targets that include a DT-wicked foam ablator. This paper also reviews the results of both warm fuel and initial cryogenic-fuel spherical target implosion experiments carried out on the OMEGA UV laser. The results of these experiments and design calculations increase confidence that the NIF direct-drive ICF ignition goal will be achieved.

McCrory, R.L.; Meyerhofer, D.D.; Loucks, S.J.; Skupsky, S.; Bahr, R.E.; Betti, R.; Boehly, T.R.; Craxton, R.S.; Collins, T.J.B.; Delettrez, J.A.; Donaldson, W.R.; Epstein, R.; Fletcher, K.A.; Freeman, C.; Frenje, J.A.; Glebov, V.Yu.; Goncharov, V.N.; Harding, D.R.; Jaanimagi, P.A.; Keck, R.L.; Kelly, J.H.; Kessler, T.J.; Kilkenny, J.D.; Knauer, J.P.; Li, C.K.; Lund, L.D.; Marozas, J.A.; McKenty, P.W.; Marshall, F.J.; Morse, S.F.B.; Padalino, S.; Petrasso, R.D.; Radha, P.B.; Regan, S.P.; Roberts, S.; Sangster, T.C.; Seguin, F.H.; Seka, W.; Smalyuk, V.A.; Soures, J.M.; Stoeckl, C.; Thorp, K.A.; Yaakobi, B.; Zuegel, J.D.

2010-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

357

Multiple laser pulse ignition method and apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Two or more laser light pulses with certain differing temporal lengths and peak pulse powers can be employed sequentially to regulate the rate and duration of laser energy delivery to fuel mixtures, thereby improving fuel ignition performance over a wide range of fuel parameters such as fuel/oxidizer ratios, fuel droplet size, number density and velocity within a fuel aerosol, and initial fuel temperatures. 18 figs.

Early, J.W.

1998-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

358

Multiple laser pulse ignition method and apparatus  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Two or more laser light pulses with certain differing temporal lengths and peak pulse powers can be employed sequentially to regulate the rate and duration of laser energy delivery to fuel mixtures, thereby improving fuel ignition performance over a wide range of fuel parameters such as fuel/oxidizer ratios, fuel droplet size, number density and velocity within a fuel aerosol, and initial fuel temperatures.

Early, James W. (Los Alamos, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Modeling the Number of Ignitions Following an Earthquake: Developing...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ignitions Following an Earthquake: Developing Prediction Limits for Overdispersed Count Data Authors: Elizabeth J. Kelly and Raymond N. Tell Intended Use: Deliverable to SB-TS:...

360

Edward Moses to lead Fusion Ignition Science and Applications...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

1 For immediate release: 10012013 | NR-13-10-01 Edward Moses to lead Fusion Ignition Science and Applications research effort -- Jeff Wisoff appointed acting principal associate...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ignition facility nif" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Argonne TTRDC - Engines - Compression-Ignition - diesel, fuel...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compression Ignition Engines Clean Diesel Technologies for Greener Performance Mechanical engineer Alan Kastengren examines a diesel injection nozzle used in Argonne's X-ray spray...

362

Ignition of an overheated, underdense, fusioning tokamak plasma  

SciTech Connect

Methods of igniting an overheated but underdense D-T plasma core with a cold plasma blanket are investigated using a simple two-zone model with a variety of transport scaling laws, and also using a one-dimensional transport code. The power consumption of neutral-beam injectors required to produce ignition can be reduced significantly if the underdense core plasma is heated to temperatures much higher than the final equilibrium ignition values, followed by fueling from a cold plasma blanket. It is also found that the allowed impurity concentration in the initial hot core can be greater than normally permitted for ignition provided that the blanket is free from impurities.

Singer, C.E.; Jassby, D.L.; Hovey, J.

1979-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Project: Reduced Ignition and Flame Spread with Nano ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... to ignition, time to extinction, and time to smoke ... of innovative technologies to develop cost-effective fire ... [6] Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET ...

2013-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

364

PF Coil System Comparisons for a Compact Ignition Device  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Compact Ignition Tokamak Program / Proceedings of the Seveth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (Reno, Nevada, June 15–19, 1986)

R.D. Pillsbury; Jr.; J.H. Schultz; R.J. Thome

365

Predicting Ignition Delay for Gas Turbine Fuel Flexibility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Predicting Ignition Delay for Gas Turbine Fuel Flexibility 15 m * Low emission combustion systems have been carefully optimized for natural gas * Future fuel diversity (including...

366

On the Piloted Ignition of Solid Fuels in Spacecraft Environments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

importance of the heat transfer processes in the ignition ofa measure of the heat transfer processes involved. Aninsight on the heat and mass transfer processes involved in

Fereres-Rapoport, Sonya M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Modeling the Fuel Spray and Combustion Process of the Ignition Quality Tester with KIVA-3V  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Discusses the use of KIVA-3V to develop a model that reproduces ignition behavior inside the Ignition Quality Tester, which measures the ignition delay of low-volatility fuels.

Bogin, G. E. Jr.; DeFilippo, A.; Chen, J. Y.; Chin, G.; Luecke, J.; Ratcliff, M. A.; Zigler, B. T.; Dean, A. M.

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Ignition of hydrogen/air mixing layer in turbulent flows  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Autoignition of a scalar hydrogen/air mixing layer in homogeneous turbulence is studied using direct numerical simulation. An initial counterflow of unmixed nitrogen-diluted hydrogen and heated air is perturbed by two-dimensional homogeneous turbulence. The temperature of the heated air stream is chosen to be 1,100 K which is substantially higher than the crossover temperature at which the rates of the chain branching and termination reactions become equal. Three different turbulence intensities are tested in order to assess the effect of the characteristic flow time on the ignition delay. For each condition, a simulation without heat release is also performed. The ignition delay determined with and without heat release is shown to be almost identical up to the point of ignition for all of the turbulence intensities tested, and the predicted ignition delays agree well within a consistent error band. It is also observed that the ignition kernel always occurs where hydrogen is focused, and the peak concentration of HO{sub 2} is aligned well with the scalar dissipation rate. The dependence of the ignition delay on turbulence intensity is found to be nonmonotonic. For weak to moderate turbulence the ignition is facilitated by turbulence via enhanced mixing, while for stronger turbulence, whose timescale is substantially smaller than the ignition delay, the ignition is retarded due to excessive scalar dissipation, and hence diffusive loss, at the ignition location. However, for the wide range of initial turbulence fields studied, the variation in ignition delay due to the corresponding variation in turbulence intensity appears to be quite small.

Im, H.G.; Chen, J.H. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility; Law, C.K. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Low emissions compression ignited engine technology  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method and apparatus for operating a compression ignition engine having a cylinder wall, a piston, and a head defining a combustion chamber. The method and apparatus includes delivering fuel substantially uniformly into the combustion chamber, the fuel being dispersed throughout the combustion chamber and spaced from the cylinder wall, delivering an oxidant into the combustion chamber sufficient to support combustion at a first predetermined combustion duration, and delivering a diluent into the combustion chamber sufficient to change the first predetermined combustion duration to a second predetermined combustion duration different from the first predetermined combustion duration.

Coleman, Gerald N. (Dunlap, IL); Kilkenny, Jonathan P. (Peoria, IL); Fluga, Eric C. (Dunlap, IL); Duffy, Kevin P. (East Peoria, IL)

2007-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

370

Research Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FLEX lab image, windows testing lab, scientist inside a lab, Research Facilities EETD maintains advanced research and test facilities for buildings, energy technologies, air...

371

Ignition Analysis of a Porous Energetic Material - II. Ignition at a Closed Heated End  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A continuation of an ignition analysis for porous energetic materials subjected to a constant energy flux is presented. In the first part (I), the analysis was developed for the case of an open-end, semi-infinite material such that gas flow, generated by thermal expansion, flowed out of the porous solid, thereby removing energy from the system. In the present study, the case of a closed end is considered, and thus the thermally-induced gas flow is now directed into the solid. In these studies, an asymptotic perturbation analysis, based on the smallness of the gas-to-solid density ratio and the largeness of the activation energy, is utilized to describe the inert and transition stages leading to thermal runaway. In both cases it is found that the effects of porosity provide a leading-order reduction in the time to ignition relative to that for the nonporous problem, arising from the reduced amount of solid material that must be heated and the difference in thermal conductivities of the solid and gaseous phases. A correction to the leading-order ignition-delay time, however, is provided by the convective flow of gas through the solid, and the sign of this correction is shown to depend on the direction of the gas flow. Thus, gas flowing out of an open-end solid was previously shown to give a positive correction to the leading-order time to ignition. Here, however, it is demonstrated that when the flow of gas is directed into the porous solid, the relative transport effects associated with the gas flow serve to preheat the material, resulting in a negative correction and hence a decrease in the ignition-delay time.

S. B. Margolis; A. M. Telengator; F. A. Williams

1999-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

372

Ignition analysis of a porous energetic material. 2. Ignition at a closed heated end  

SciTech Connect

A continuation of an ignition analysis for porous energetic materials subjected to a constant energy flux is presented. In the first part, the analysis was developed for the case of an open-end, semi-infinite material such that gas flow, generated by thermal expansion, flowed out of the porous solid, thereby removing energy from the system. In the present study, the case of a closed end is considered, and thus the thermally-induced gas flow is now directed into the solid. In these studies, an asymptotic perturbation analysis, based on the smallness of the gas-to-solid density ratio and the largeness of the activation energy, is utilized to describe the inert and transition stages leading to thermal runaway. In both cases it is found that the effects of porosity provide a leading-order reduction in the time to ignition relative to that for the nonporous problem, arising from the reduced amount of solid material that must be heated and the difference in thermal conductivities of the solid and gaseous phases. A correction to the leading-order ignition-delay time, however, is provided by the convective flow of gas through the solid, and the sign of this correction is shown to depend on the direction of the gas flow. Thus, gas flowing out of an open-end solid was previously shown to give a positive correction to the leading-order time to ignition. Here, however, it is demonstrated that when the flow of gas is directed into the porous solid, the relative transport effects associated with the gas flow serve to preheat the material, resulting in a negative correction and hence a decrease in the ignition-delay time.

Alexander M. Telegentor; Stephen B. Margolis; Forman A. Williams

1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

10-kJ Status and 100-kJ Future for NIF PetaWatt Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We discuss the status of the NIF ARC, an 8-beam 10-kJ class high-energy petawatt laser, and the future upgrade path of this and similar systems to 100-kJ-class with coherent phasing of multiple apertures.

Siders, C W; Crane, J K; Rushford, M C; Haefner, L C; Hernandez, J E; Dawson, J W; Beach, R J; Clark, W J; Trummer, D J; Tietbohl, G L; Barty, C J

2007-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

374

PBXN-9 Ignition Kinetics and Deflagration Rates  

SciTech Connect

The ignition kinetics and deflagration rates of PBXN-9 were measured using specially designed instruments at LLNL and compared with previous work on similar HMX based materials. Ignition kinetics were measured based on the One Dimensional Time-to-Explosion combined with ALE3D modeling. Results of these experiments indicate that PBXN-9 behaves much like other HMX based materials (i.e. LX-04, LX-07, LX-10 and PBX-9501) and the dominant factor in these experiments is the type of explosive, not the type of binder/plasticizer. In contrast, the deflagration behavior of PBXN-9 is quite different from similar high weight percent HMX based materials (i.e LX-10, LX-07 and PBX-9501). PBXN-9 burns in a laminar manner over the full pressure range studied (0-310 MPa) unlike LX-10, LX-07, and PBX-9501. The difference in deflagration behavior is attributed to the nature of the binder/plasticizer alone or in conjunction with the volume of binder present in PBXN-9.

Glascoe, E; Maienschein, J; Burnham, A; Koerner, J; Hsu, P; Wemhoff, A

2008-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

375

Facility Microgrids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microgrids are receiving a considerable interest from the power industry, partly because their business and technical structure shows promise as a means of taking full advantage of distributed generation. This report investigates three issues associated with facility microgrids: (1) Multiple-distributed generation facility microgrids' unintentional islanding protection, (2) Facility microgrids' response to bulk grid disturbances, and (3) Facility microgrids' intentional islanding.

Ye, Z.; Walling, R.; Miller, N.; Du, P.; Nelson, K.

2005-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Response Time Measurements of the NIF DANTE XRD-31 X-Ray Diodes (Pre-print)  

SciTech Connect

The XRD-31 is a fast, windowless X-ray vacuum photodiode developed by EG&G. It is currently the primary fast X-ray detector used to diagnose the X-rays on NIF and OMEGA on the multichannel DANTE spectrometer. The XRD-31 has a dynamic range of less than 1e-12 amps to more than 10 amps. A technique is described to measure the impulse response of the diodes to a 150 fs pulse of 200 nm laser light and a method to calculate the “risetime” for a square pulse and compare it with the computed electron transit time from the photocathode to the anode. Measured response time for 5 XRD-31s assembled in early 2004 was 149.7 ps +-2.75 ps.

Don Pellinen and Michael Griffin

2009-01-23T23:59:59.000Z

377

Catalytic igniters and their use to ignite lean hydrogen-air mixtures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This disclosure describes a catalytic igniter which can ignite a hydrogen-air mixture as lean as 5.5% hydrogen with induction times ranging from 20 s to 400 s, under conditions which may be present during a loss-of-liquid-coolant accident at a light water nuclear reactor. It is comprised of (1) a perforate catalytically active substrate, such as a platinum coated ceramic honeycomb or wire mesh screen, through which heated gases produced by oxidation of the mixture can freely flow and (2) a plurality of thin platinum wires mounted in a thermally conductive manner on the substrate and positioned thereon so as to be able to receive heat from the substrate and the heated gases while also in contact with unoxidized gases.

McLean, W.J.; Thorne, L.R.; Volponi, J.V.

1986-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

378

Laser-induced spark ignition fundamental and applications  

SciTech Connect

Laser ignition has become an active research topic in recent years because it has the potential to replace the conventional electric spark plugs in engines that are required to operate under much higher compression ratios, faster compression rates, and much leaner fuel-to-air ratios than gas engines today. It is anticipated that the igniter in these engines will face with pressures as high as 50MPa and temperatures as high as 4000 K. Using the conventional ignition system, the required voltage and energy must be greatly increased (voltages in excess of 40 kV) to reliably ignite the air and fuel mixture under these conditions. Increasing the voltage and energy does not always improve ignitability but it does create greater reliability problem. The objective of this paper is to review past work to identify some fundamental issues underlying the physics of the laser spark ignition process and research needs in order to bring the laser ignition concept into the realm of reality.

Tran, P.X.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

A comparison between direct spark ignition and prechamber ignition in an internal combustion engine  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We simulated the flow field and flame propagation near top dead center in a generic large-bore internal combustion engine using the COYOTE computer program, which is based on the full Navier-Stokes equations for a fluid mixture. The combustion chamber is a right circular cylinder, and the main charge is uniformly premixed. The calculations are axisymmetric. The results illustrate the differences in flow patterns, flame propagation, and thermal NO production between ignition with a spark plug and with a small prechamber. In the spark-ignited case, the flame propagates away from the spark plug approximately as a segment of a spherical surface, just as expected. With the prechamber, a high speed jet of hot combustion products shoots into the main chamber, quickly producing a large flame sheet that spreads along the piston face. The prechamber run consumes all of the fuel in half the time required by the spark-ignited case. The two cases produce comparable amounts of thermal NO at the end of fuel combustion.

Cloutman, L.D.

1993-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

380

Fast Camera Imaging of Hall Thruster Ignition  

SciTech Connect

Hall thrusters provide efficient space propulsion by electrostatic acceleration of ions. Rotating electron clouds in the thruster overcome the space charge limitations of other methods. Images of the thruster startup, taken with a fast camera, reveal a bright ionization period which settles into steady state operation over 50 ?s. The cathode introduces azimuthal asymmetry, which persists for about 30 ?s into the ignition. Plasma thrusters are used on satellites for repositioning, orbit correction and drag compensation. The advantage of plasma thrusters over conventional chemical thrusters is that the exhaust energies are not limited by chemical energy to about an electron volt. For xenon Hall thrusters, the ion exhaust velocity can be 15-20 km/s, compared to 5 km/s for a typical chemical thruster

C.L. Ellison, Y. Raitses and N.J. Fisch

2011-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ignition facility nif" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

J. M. Soures for R. L. McCrory University of Rochester  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

optics and other technologies National Ignition Campaign (NIC) Support of NIC ignition NIF ignition PDD higher gains than the baseline NIF indirect-drive design · LLE will make major contributions to IFE. Betti talk #12;LLE's IFE research program will focus on advanced ignition concepts after NIF ignition I

382

Hydrogen-assisted catalytic ignition characteristics of different fuels  

SciTech Connect

Hydrogen-assisted catalytic ignition characteristics of methane (CH{sub 4}), n-butane (n-C{sub 4}H{sub 10}) and dimethyl ether (DME) were studied experimentally in a Pt-coated monolith catalytic reactor. It is concluded that DME has the lowest catalytic ignition temperature and the least required H{sub 2} flow, while CH{sub 4} has the highest catalytic ignition temperature and the highest required H{sub 2} flow among the three fuels. (author)

Zhong, Bei-Jing; Yang, Fan [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Yang, Qing-Tao [Key Laboratory for Thermal Science and Power Engineering of Ministry of Education, Department of Engineering Mechanics, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); China Aerodynamics Research and Development Center, Mianyang 621000 (China)

2010-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

383

Application: Facilities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Option.. Papavergos, PG; 1991. Halon 1301 Use in Oil and Gas Production Facilities: Alaska's North Slope.. Ulmer, PE; 1991. ...

2011-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

384

Relativistic electron beam transport for fast ignition relevant scenarios  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A crucial issue surrounding the feasibility of fast ignition, an alternative inertial confinement fusion scheme, is the ability to efficiently couple energy from an incident short-pulse laser to a high-density, pre-compressed ...

Cottrill, Larissa A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

NETL: NETL - Media Backgrounder: Laser spark ignition for lean...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ratios and three timing conditions were compared. The NETL research provides the first lean-burn natural gas engine data using a laser-spark ignition source and the first...

386

Frictionally induced ignition processes in drop and skid tests  

SciTech Connect

The standard LANL/Pantex drop and skid tests rely on subjective assessment of reaction violence to quantify the response of the charge, and completely miss nonpropagating hot-spot ignition sites. Additionally, large variations in test results have been observed, which we propose is due to a misunderstanding of the basic physical processes that lead to threshold ignition in these tests. The tests have been redesigned to provide control of these mechanisms and to permit direct observation of hot spots at the impact site, allowing us to follow the progression of the outcome as the drop height and ignition source density are varied. The results confirm that frictional interactions between high-melting-point solids are the dominant ignition mechanism, not just at the threshold, but in fact at all realistic drop heights.

Dickson, Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Parker, Gary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Novak, Alan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Ignition technique for an in situ oil shale retort  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A generally flat combustion zone is formed across the entire horizontal cross-section of a fragmented permeable mass of formation particles formed in an in situ oil shale retort. The flat combustion zone is formed by either sequentially igniting regions of the surface of the fragmented permeable mass at successively lower elevations or by igniting the entire surface of the fragmented permeable mass and controlling the rate of advance of various portions of the combustion zone.

Cha, Chang Y. (Golden, CO)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Predicting Ignition Delay for Gas Turbine Fuel Flexibility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ignition Delay for Ignition Delay for Gas Turbine Fuel Flexibility 15 μm * Low emission combustion systems have been carefully optimized for natural gas * Future fuel diversity (including H2 containing fuels) may generate auto-ignition damage * Existing theories vary in predicting propensity for auto-ignition damage * Theory A vs Theory B shows factor of 100 difference-which is right? * UC Irvine improved and validated design tools for ignition delay allow designers to evaluate the risk for auto-ignition in advanced combustion systems with future fuels * Models are available to engine OEM's to shorten design cycle time and save $$ UC Irvine Scott Samuelsen / Vince McDonell #112 1000/T (1/K) 0.4 0.6 0.8 1.0 1.2 1.4 1.6 1.8 τ [O 2 ] 0.5 [F] 0.25 (sec(mol/cm 3 ) 0.75 ) 10 -10 10 -9 10 -8 10 -7 10 -6 10 -5

389

JOURNAL OF MATERIALS SCIENCE LETTERS 15 (1996) 1294-1296 New ternary fluoride with K2NiF4-type structure in CsF-CaF2 system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

JOURNAL OF MATERIALS SCIENCE LETTERS 15 (1996) 1294-1296 New ternary fluoride with K2NiF4-type size and the strucmral relationship between perovskite ABF3 and A2BF4 with K2NiF4-type structure, it might be possible to predict the appearance of the above phases in the AF-BF2 system. The compound K2NiF

Jo, Moon-Ho

390

The Role of The fedeRal PRojecT diRecToR  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Role of The fedeRal PRojecT diRecToR: Role of The fedeRal PRojecT diRecToR: lessons fRom The naTional igniTion faciliTy The national ignition facility (nif) is home of the world's largest laser. With 192 laser beams that can deliver more than 60 times the energy of any previous laser system, NIF represents a significant step in enabling the study of high-energy density science, and should demonstrate fusion ignition and burn in the laboratory for the first time. The design and construction of this unique, highly complex facility posed management challenges that the project team overseeing its development could not foresee. The national ignition facility's final optics assemblies, shown here mounted on the lower hemisphere of the target chamber, contain

391

JOURNAL DE PHYSIQUE ColloqueC5, supplmentau no 11-12, Tome 34, Novembre-Dcembre 1973,page C5-11 SIMULATION PAR BOMBARDEMENT D'IONS Nif  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-11 SIMULATION PAR BOMBARDEMENT D'IONS Nif DE MOYENNE Ã?NERGIE DES EFFETS D'IRRADIATION EN BILE DANS LE NICKEL ET

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

392

User Facilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory's National User Facilities are available for cooperative research with institutions and the private sector worldwide. The Environmental...

393

Analysis of Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI) Engines for Cogeneration Applications  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents an evaluation of the applicability of Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition Engines (HCCI) for small-scale cogeneration (less than 1 MWe) in comparison to five previously analyzed prime movers. The five comparator prime movers include stoichiometric spark-ignited (SI) engines, lean burn SI engines, diesel engines, microturbines and fuel cells. The investigated option, HCCI engines, is a relatively new type of engine that has some fundamental differences with respect to other prime movers. Here, the prime movers are compared by calculating electric and heating efficiency, fuel consumption, nitrogen oxide (NOx) emissions and capital and fuel cost. Two cases are analyzed. In Case 1, the cogeneration facility requires combined power and heating. In Case 2, the requirement is for power and chilling. The results show that the HCCI engines closely approach the very high fuel utilization efficiency of diesel engines without the high emissions of NOx and the expensive diesel fuel. HCCI engines offer a new alternative for cogeneration that provides a unique combination of low cost, high efficiency, low emissions and flexibility in operating temperatures that can be optimally tuned for cogeneration systems. HCCI engines are the most efficient technology that meets the oncoming 2007 CARB NOx standards for cogeneration engines. The HCCI engine appears to be a good option for cogeneration systems and merits more detailed analysis and experimental demonstration.

Aceves, S; Martinez-Frias, J; Reistad, G

2004-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

394

Spark Ignited Turbulent Flame Kernel Growth  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An experimental study of the effects of spark power and of incomplete fuel-air mixing on spark-ignited flame kernel growth was conducted in turbulent propane-air mixtures at 1 atm, 300K conditions. The results showed that increased spark power resulted in an increased growth rate, where the effect of short duration breakdown sparks was found to persist for times of the order of milliseconds. The effectiveness of increased spark power was found to be less at high turbulence and high dilution conditions. Increased spark power had a greater effect on the 0-5 mm burn time than on the 5-13 mm burn time, in part because of the effect of breakdown energy on the initial size of the flame kernel. And finally, when spark power was increased by shortening the spark duration while keeping the effective energy the same there was a significant increase in the misfire rate, however when the spark power was further increased by increasing the breakdown energy the misfire rate dropped to zero. The results also showed that fluctuations in local mixture strength due to incomplete fuel-air mixing cause the flame kernel surface to become wrinkled and distorted; and that the amount of wrinkling increases as the degree of incomplete fuel-air mixing increases. Incomplete fuel-air mixing was also found to result in a significant increase in cyclic variations in the flame kernel growth. The average flame kernel growth rates for the premixed and the incompletely mixed cases were found to be within the experimental uncertainty except for the 33%-RMS-fluctuation case where the growth rate was significantly lower. The premixed and 6%-RMS-fluctuation cases had a 0% misfire rate. The misfire rates were 1% and 2% for the 13%-RMS-fluctuation and 24%-RMS-fluctuation cases, respectively; however, it drastically increased to 23% in the 33%-RMS-fluctuation case.

Santavicca, D.A.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Mobile Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Facility Facility AMF Information Science Architecture Baseline Instruments AMF1 AMF2 AMF3 Data Operations AMF Fact Sheet Images Contacts AMF Deployments Hyytiälä, Finland, 2014 Manacapuru, Brazil, 2014 Oliktok Point, Alaska, 2013 Los Angeles, California, to Honolulu, Hawaii, 2012 Cape Cod, Massachusetts, 2012 Gan Island, Maldives, 2011 Ganges Valley, India, 2011 Steamboat Springs, Colorado, 2010 Graciosa Island, Azores, 2009-2010 Shouxian, China, 2008 Black Forest, Germany, 2007 Niamey, Niger, 2006 Point Reyes, California, 2005 Mobile Facilities Pictured here in Gan, the second mobile facility is configured in a standard layout. Pictured here in Gan, the second mobile facility is configured in a standard layout. To explore science questions beyond those addressed by ARM's fixed sites at

396

Methane ignition catalyzed by in situ generated palladium nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect

Catalytic ignition of methane over the surfaces of freely-suspended and in situ generated palladium nanoparticles was investigated experimentally and numerically. The experiments were conducted in a laminar flow reactor. The palladium precursor was a compound (Pd(THD){sub 2}, THD: 2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedione) dissolved in toluene and injected into the flow reactor as a fine aerosol, along with a methane-oxygen-nitrogen mixture. For experimental conditions chosen in this study, non-catalytic, homogeneous ignition was observed at a furnace temperature of {proportional_to}1123 K, whereas ignition of the same mixture with the precursor was found to be {proportional_to}973 K. In situ production of Pd/PdO nanoparticles was confirmed by scanning mobility, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses of particles collected at the reactor exit. The catalyst particle size distribution was log-normal. Depending on the precursor loading, the median diameter ranged from 10 to 30 nm. The mechanism behind catalytic ignition was examined using a combined gas-phase and gas-surface reaction model. Simulation results match the experiments closely and suggest that palladium nanocatalyst significantly shortens the ignition delay times of methane-air mixtures over a wide range of conditions. (author)

Shimizu, T.; Abid, A.D.; Poskrebyshev, G.; Wang, H. [Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089 (United States); Nabity, J.; Engel, J.; Yu, J. [TDA Research, Inc., 12345 W. 52nd Ave, Wheat Ridge, CO 80033 (United States); Wickham, D. [Reaction Systems, LLC, 19039 E. Plaza Drive, Suite 290, Parker, CO 80134 (United States); Van Devener, B.; Anderson, S.L. [Department of Chemistry, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT 84112 (United States); Williams, S. [Air Force Research Laboratory, Mail Stop RZA, 1950 Fifth Street, WPAFB, OH 45433 (United States)

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

397

Evaluating the ignition sensitivity of thermal battery heat pellets  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal batteries are activated by the ignition of heat pellets. If the heat pellets are not sensitive enough to the ignition stimulus, the thermal battery will not activate, resulting in a dud. Thus, to assure reliable thermal batteries, it is important to demonstrate that the pellets have satisfactory ignition sensitivity by testing a number of specimens. There are a number of statistical methods for evaluating the sensitivity of a device to some stimulus. Generally, these methods are applicable to the situation in which a single test is destructive to the specimen being tested, independent of the outcome of the test. In the case of thermal battery heat pellets, however, tests that result in a nonresponse do not totally degrade the specimen. This peculiarity provides opportunities to efficiently evaluate the ignition sensitivity of heat pellets. In this paper, a simple strategy for evaluating heat pellet ignition sensitivity (including experimental design and data analysis) is described. The relatively good asymptotic and small-sample efficiencies of this strategy are demonstrated.

Thomas, E.V.

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

THE AUTOIGNITION OF CYCLOPENTANE IN AN IGNITION QUALITY TESTER  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cyclopentane, a flammable hydrocarbon, is being considered as a working fluid for waste heat recovery applications using Organic Rankine Cycles with Direct Evaporators. A postulated failure mode consisting of a pinhole leak in a heat exchanger tube raises safety concerns due to autoignition of the working fluid. The ignition delay time (IDT) of cyclopentane was measured using an Ignition Quality Test™ (IQT™) device. Hot, vitiated air was used to simulate turbine exhaust gas (TEG). Experiments were conducted in accordance with ASTM D6890 (with exception to charge pressure and temperature) to determine ignition delay of the fuel at atmospheric pressure for vitiated air (13.3% oxygen). The test matrixencompassed equivalence ratios from 0.5 to 5.0 and chamber temperatures ranging from 673 to 823 K to establish a set of ignition delay curves. IDT was observed to decrease with increasing temperature and equivalence ratio. For the cases tested, no ignition was observed at temperatures at or below 723 K or at an equivalence ratio of 0.5.

Donna Post Guillen

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Data Analysis, Pre-Ignition Assessment, and Post-Ignition Modeling of the Large-Scale Annular Cookoff Tests  

SciTech Connect

In order to understand the implications that cookoff of plastic-bonded explosive-9501 could have on safety assessments, we analyzed the available data from the large-scale annular cookoff (LSAC) assembly series of experiments. In addition, we examined recent data regarding hypotheses about pre-ignition that may be relevant to post-ignition behavior. Based on the post-ignition data from Shot 6, which had the most complete set of data, we developed an approximate equation of state (EOS) for the gaseous products of deflagration. Implementation of this EOS into the multimaterial hydrodynamics computer program PAGOSA yielded good agreement with the inner-liner collapse sequence for Shot 6 and with other data, such as velocity interferometer system for any reflector and resistance wires. A metric to establish the degree of symmetry based on the concept of time of arrival to pin locations was used to compare numerical simulations with experimental data. Several simulations were performed to elucidate the mode of ignition in the LSAC and to determine the possible compression levels that the metal assembly could have been subjected to during post-ignition.

G. Terrones; F.J. Souto; R.F. Shea; M.W.Burkett; E.S. Idar

2005-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

400

Engines - Spark Ignition Engines - Direct Injection - Omnivorous Engine  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Direct Injection, Spark-Ignited Engines Direct Injection, Spark-Ignited Engines Omnivorous Engine Omnivorous Engine Setup Omnivorous Engine Setup New engine technology has made possible engines that will operate on a wide variety of fuel inputs, from gasoline to naptha to ethanol to methanol, without driver intervention. Although flexible fuel vehicles have been produced in the millions, their engines have always been optimized for gasoline operation while accepting significant performance and efficiency degradations when using the alternative fuel. This project seeks to combine in-cylinder measurement technology, and advanced controls to optimize spark timing, the quantity and timing of injected fuel, to produce an "omnivorous engine"--one that will be able to run on any liquid spark ignition fuel with optimal efficiency and low

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401

WILDFIRE IGNITION RESISTANCE ESTIMATOR WIZARD SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT REPORT  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the development of a software tool, entitled “WildFire Ignition Resistance Estimator Wizard” (WildFIRE Wizard, Version 2.10). This software was developed within the Wildfire Ignition Resistant Home Design (WIRHD) program, sponsored by the U. S. Department of Homeland Security, Science and Technology Directorate, Infrastructure Protection & Disaster Management Division. WildFIRE Wizard is a tool that enables homeowners to take preventive actions that will reduce their home’s vulnerability to wildfire ignition sources (i.e., embers, radiant heat, and direct flame impingement) well in advance of a wildfire event. This report describes the development of the software, its operation, its technical basis and calculations, and steps taken to verify its performance.

Phillips, M.; Robinson, C.; Gupta, N.; Werth, D.

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

402

Flash Ignition and Initiation of Explosives-Nanotubes Mixture  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The recent astounding discoveries of ignition in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) after exposure to an ordinary photographic flash, (1) other formulations of carbons containing noble metals, (2) and polyaniline nanofibers (3) prompted us to explore a possible further instigation of explosive materials. Here, we report that an ignition and initiation process, further leading to actual detonation, does occur for explosives in lax contact with carbon nanotubes that are prone to opto-thermal activity via a conventional flashbulb. Optical ignition and initiation of explosives could thus far only be accomplished through lasers, (4) with specific characteristic of high power, pulse length, wavelength, and a small target area that greatly inhibit their applications. Our results have the implication that explosives with opto-thermally active SWNTs formulations are new ideal candidates for remote optical triggering of safety apparatus such as the firing of bolts on space shuttles rockets and aircraft exit doors, and for controlled burning of explosives as actuators.

Manaa, M R; Mitchell, A R; Garza, R G; Pagoria, P F; Watkins, B E

2005-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

403

Closed-loop, variable-valve-timing control of a controlled-auto-ignition engine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The objective of this study was to develop a closed-loop controller for use on a Controlled-Auto- Ignition (CAI) / Spark-Ignition (SI) mixed mode engine equipped with a variable-valve-timing (VVT) mechanism. The controller ...

Matthews, Jeffrey A., 1970-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Mapping of the molecular gas inflow towards the Seyfert nucleus of NGC4051 using Gemini NIFS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present two-dimensional (2D) stellar and gaseous kinematics of the inner ~130x180 pc^2 of the Narrow Line Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC4051 at a sampling of 4.5 pc, from near-infrared K-band spectroscopic observations obtained with the Gemini's Near-infrared Integral Field Spectrograph (NIFS). The turnover of the stellar rotation curve at only ~55 pc from the nucleus, revealing a highly concentrated gravitational potential. The stellar velocity dispersion of the bulge is ~60 km/s -- implying on a nuclear black hole mass of ~10^6 M_sun -- within which patches of lower velocity dispersion suggest the presence of regions of more recent star formation. The Brgamma emission-line shows no rotation as well as no blueshifts or redshifts in excess of 30 km/s, and is thus not restricted to the galaxy plane. The [CaVIII] coronal region is compact but resolved, extending over the inner 75 pc. It shows the highest blueshifts -- of up to -250 km/s, and the highest velocity dispersions, interpreted as due to outflows from the active nucleus, supporting an origin close to the nucleus. Subtraction of the stellar velocity field from the gaseous velocity field has allowed us to isolate non-circular motions observed in the H_2 emitting gas. The most conspicuous kinematic structures are two nuclear spiral arms. We interpret these structures as inflows towards the nucleus, a result similar to those of previous studies in which we have found streaming motions along nuclear spirals in ionized gas using optical IFU observations. We have calculated the mass inflow rate along the nuclear spiral arms, obtaining $\\dot{M}_{H_2} ~ 4x10^{-5} M_Sun/yr, value ~100 times smaller than the accretion rate necessary to power the active nucleus.

Rogemar A. Riffel; Thaisa Storchi-Bergmann; Claudia Winge; Peter J. McGregor; Tracy Beck; Henrique Schmitt

2008-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

405

Reactive burn models and ignition & growth concept  

SciTech Connect

Plastic-bonded explosives are heterogeneous materials. Experimentally, shock initiation is sensitive to small amounts of porosity, due to the formation of hot spots (small localized regions of high temperature). This leads to the Ignition and Growth concept, introduced by Lee and Tarver in 1980, as the basis for reactive burn models. A homogeneized burn rate needs to account for three mesoscale physical effects (i) the density of burnt hot spots, which depends on the lead shock strength; (ii) the growth of the burn fronts triggered by hot spots, which depends on the local deflagration speed; (iii) a geometric factor that accounts for the overlap of deflagration wavelets from adjacent hot spots. These effects can be combined and the burn model defined by specifying the reaction progress variable {lambda}(t) as a function of a dimensionless reaction length {tau}{sub hs}(t)/{ell}{sub hs}, rather than by xpecifying an explicit burn rate. The length scale {ell}{sub hs} is the average distance between hot spots, which is proportional to [N{sub hs}(P{sub s})]{sup -1/3}, where N{sub hs} is the number density of hot spots activated by the lead shock. The reaction length {tau}{sub hs}(t) = {line_integral}{sub 0}{sup t} D(P(t'))dt' is the distance the burn front propagates from a single hot spot, where D is the deflagration speed and t is the time since the shock arrival. A key implementation issue is how to determine the lead shock strength in conjunction with a shock capturing scheme. They have developed a robust algorithm for this purpose based on the Hugoniot jump condition for the energy. The algorithm utilizes the time dependence of density, pressure and energy within each cell. The method is independent of the numerical dissipation used for shock capturing. It is local and can be used in one or more space dimensions. The burn model has a small number of parameters which can be calibrated to fit velocity gauge data from shock initiation experiments.

Menikoff, Ralph S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Shaw, Milton S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Ignition feedback regenerative free electron laser (FEL) amplifier  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An ignition feedback regenerative amplifier consists of an injector, a linear accelerator with energy recovery, and a high-gain free electron laser amplifier. A fraction of the free electron laser output is coupled to the input to operate the free electron laser in the regenerative mode. A mode filter in this loop prevents run away instability. Another fraction of the output, after suitable frequency up conversion, is used to drive the photocathode. An external laser is provided to start up both the amplifier and the injector, thus igniting the system.

Kim, Kwang-Je (Burr Ridge, IL); Zholents, Alexander (Walnut Creek, CA); Zolotorev, Max (Oakland, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Exhaust gas recirculation in a homogeneous charge compression ignition engine  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A homogeneous charge compression ignition engine operates by injecting liquid fuel directly in a combustion chamber, and mixing the fuel with recirculated exhaust and fresh air through an auto ignition condition of the fuel. The engine includes at least one turbocharger for extracting energy from the engine exhaust and using that energy to boost intake pressure of recirculated exhaust gas and fresh air. Elevated proportions of exhaust gas recirculated to the engine are attained by throttling the fresh air inlet supply. These elevated exhaust gas recirculation rates allow the HCCI engine to be operated at higher speeds and loads rendering the HCCI engine a more viable alternative to a conventional diesel engine.

Duffy, Kevin P. (Metamora, IL); Kieser, Andrew J. (Morton, IL); Rodman, Anthony (Chillicothe, IL); Liechty, Michael P. (Chillicothe, IL); Hergart, Carl-Anders (Peoria, IL); Hardy, William L. (Peoria, IL)

2008-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

408

Carbon dioxide emission during forest fires ignited by lightning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we developed the model for the carbon dioxide emission from forest fire. The master equation for the spreading of the carbon dioxide to atmosphere is the hyperbolic diffusion equation. In the paper we study forest fire ignited by lightning. In that case the fores fire has the well defined front which propagates with finite velocity.

Magdalena Pelc; Radoslaw Osuch

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

409

On Operational Power Reactor Regime and Ignited Spherical Tokamaks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 2003 version of the "cold" magnetic "Fusion without ignition" in the next 35 years, the talk.-Pitersburg, St.-Pitersburg, RF % Insutute of Nuclear Fusion, RRC "Kurchatov Ins.", Moscow, RF & Vyoptics, Inc for magnetic fusion, OPRR requires a low recycling and wall-stabilized high- plasma. Because of the small

Zakharov, Leonid E.

410

Optimization of the process of plasma ignition of coal  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are given of experimental and theoretical investigations of plasma ignition of coal as a result of its thermochemical preparation in application to the processes of firing up a boiler and stabilizing the flame combustion. The experimental test bed with a commercial-scale burner is used for determining the conditions of plasma ignition of low-reactivity high-ash anthracite depending on the concentration of coal in the air mixture and velocity of the latter. The calculations produce an equation (important from the standpoint of practical applications) for determining the energy expenditure for plasma ignition of coal depending on the basic process parameters. The tests reveal the difficulties arising in firing up a boiler with direct delivery of pulverized coal from the mill to furnace. A scheme is suggested, which enables one to reduce the energy expenditure for ignition of coal and improve the reliability of the process of firing up such a boiler. Results are given of calculation of plasma thermochemical preparation of coal under conditions of lower concentration of oxygen in the air mixture.

Peregudov, V.S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

411

CO/sub 2/-laser ignition of DAPP targets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A pulse derived by shuttering a CO/sub 2/ laser operating in the cw mode has been used to ignite a diallyl phthalate pyrotechnic (DAPP) material. Data from this work along with some data taken earlier, while operating the laser in the pulse mode, are presented. When operating in the cw mode, a pulse is mechanically chopped out of the beam and focussed onto the DAPP material. It was found that the shuttered cw mode of operation gives a more reproducible pulse and a more accurate determination of the incident energy than the pulse mode does. The pulse widths for threshold ignition (50% ignitions) at different power levels have been determined for 254 and 127 mm-focal-length lenses which were used to focus the beam on the target. It was also found that targets could be penetrated without ignition of the DAPP material. A 2.54 mm-thick DAPP target is penetrated by the laser beam if the energy per unit area exceeds 29 +1 J/mm/sup 2/. Based on this study, recommendations are given for improving the present test procedures used for DAPP material.

Brannon, P.J.

1981-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Relativistic Laser Plasma Research for Fast Ignition Laser Fusion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reviewed are the present status and future prospects of the laser fusion research at the ILE (Institute of Laser Engineering) Osaka. The Gekko XII and Peta Watt laser system have been operated for investigating the fast ignition, the relativistic laser plasma interactions and so on. In particular, the fast ignition experiments with cone shell target have been in progress as the UK and US-Japan collaboration programs. In the experiments, the imploded high density plasmas are heated by irradiating 500 J level peta watt laser pulse. The thermal neutron yield is found to increase by three orders of magnitude by injecting the peta watt laser into the cone shell target. Transport of relativistic high density electron is the critical issue as the basic physics for understanding the dense plasma heating process. By the theory, simulation and experiment, the collective phenomena in the interactions of intense relativistic electron current with dense plasmas has been investigated to find the formation of self organized flow as the result of filamentation (Weibel) instability. Through the present understanding, the new project, FIREX-I has started recently to prove the principle of the fast ignition scheme. Keywords: fast ignition, peta watt laser, relativistic electron, weibel instability

Mima Kunioki; Tanaka Kazuo. A; Kodama Ryosuke; Johzaki Tomohiro; Nagatomo Hideo; Shiraga Hiroyuki; Miyanaga Noriaki; Azechi Hiroshi; Nakai Mitsuo; Norimatsu Takayoshi; Nagai Keiji; Sunahara Atsushi; Nishihara Katsunobu; Taguchi Toshihiro; Sakagami Hitoshi; Sentoku Yasuhiko; Ruhl Hartmut

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Railplug Ignition System for Enhanced Engine Performance and Reduced Maintenance  

SciTech Connect

This Final Technical Report discusses the progress that was made on the experimental and numerical tasks over the duration of this project. The primary objectives of the project were to (1) develop an improved understanding of the spark ignition process, and (2) develop the railplug as an improved ignitor for large bore stationary natural gas engines. We performed fundamental experiments on the physical processes occurring during spark ignition and used the results from these experiments to aid our development of the most complete model of the spark ignition process ever devised. The elements in this model include (1) the dynamic response of the ignition circuit, (2) a chemical kinetics mechanism that is suitable for the reactions that occur in the plasma, (3) conventional flame propagation kinetics, and (4) a multi-dimensional formulation so that bulk flow through the spark gap can be incorporated. This model (i.e., a Fortran code that can be used as a subroutine within an engine modeling code such as KIVA) can be obtained from Prof. Ron Matthews at rdmatt{at}mail.utexas.edu or Prof. DK Ezekoye at dezekoye{at}mail.utexas.edu. Fundamental experiments, engine experiments, and modeling tasks were used to help develop the railplug as a new ignitor for large bore natural gas engines. As the result of these studies, we developed a railplug that could extend the Lean Stability Limit (LSL) of an engine operating at full load on natural gas from {phi} = 0.59 for operation on spark plugs down to {phi} = 0.53 using railplugs with the same delivered energy (0.7 J). However, this delivered energy would rapidly wear out the spark plug. For a conventional delivered energy (<0.05 J), the LSL is {phi} = 0.63 for a spark plug. Further, using a permanent magnet to aid the plasma movement, the LSL was extended to {phi} = 0.54 for a railplug with a delivered energy of only 0.15 J/shot, a typical discharge energy for commercial capacitive discharge ignition systems. Here, it should be noted that railplugs and the associated ignition circuit should not cost much more than a conventional spark ignition system. Additionally, it is believed that the railplug performance can be further improved via continued research and development.

DK Ezekoye; Matt Hall; Ron Matthews

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Feeding versus Feedback in NGC 4151 probed with Gemini NIFS. I. Excitation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have used the Gemini Near-infrared Integral Field Spectrograph (NIFS) to map the emission-line intensity distributions and ratios in the Narrow-Line Region (NLR) of the Seyfert galaxy NGC 4151 in the Z, J, H and K bands at a resolving power ~ 5000, covering the inner 200 pc x 300 pc of the galaxy at a spatial resolution of 8 pc. We present intensity distributions I(r) in 14 emission lines. (1) For the ionized gas, I(r) is extended to ~ 100 pc from the nucleus along pos. angle PA=60/240 deg-- NE--SW), consistent with an origin in the known biconical outflow; while for the recombination lines I(r) ~ r^-1, for the forbidden lines I(r) is flat (r^0). (2) The H_2 emission lines intensity distributions avoid the region of the bicone, extending to r ~ 60 pc, perpendicular to the bicone axis, supporting an origin for the H_2-emitting gas in the galaxy plane. (3) The coronal lines show a steep intensity profile, described by r^-2. Using the line-ratio maps [Fe II]1.644/1.257 and Pa_b/Br_g we obtain a reddening of E(B-V)~0.5 along the NLR and E(B-V)>1 at the nucleus. Our line-ratio map [Fe II] 1.257/[P II] 1.189 is the first such map of an extragalactic source. Together with the [Fe II]/Pa_b map, these line ratios correlate with the radio intensity distribution, mapping the effects of shocks produced by the radio jet, which probably release the Fe locked in grains and produce the enhancement of the [Fe II] emission observed at ~ 1 arcsec from the nucleus. At these regions, we obtain densities N_e ~4000 cm^-3 and temperatures T_e ~ 15000K for the [Fe II]-emitting gas. For the H_2-emitting gas we obtain T ~ 2100K. The distinct intensity distributions, physical properties and locations of the ionized and molecular gas suggest that the H_2-emitting gas traces the AGN feeding, while the ionized gas traces its feedback.

T. Storchi-Bergmann; P. J. McGregor; Rogemar A. Riffel; R. Simoes-Lopes; T. Beck; M. Dopita

2008-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

415

Simulation of hydrogen and hydrogen-assisted propane ignition in Pt catalyzed microchannel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper deals with self-ignition of catalytic microburners from ambient cold-start conditions. First, reaction kinetics for hydrogen combustion is validated with experimental results from the literature, followed by validation of a simplified pseudo-2D microburner model. The model is then used to study the self-ignition behavior of lean hydrogen/air mixtures in a Platinum-catalyzed microburner. Hydrogen combustion on Pt is a very fast reaction. During cold start ignition, hydrogen conversion reaches 100% within the first few seconds and the reactor dynamics are governed by the ''thermal inertia'' of the microburner wall structure. The self-ignition property of hydrogen can be used to provide the energy required for propane ignition. Two different modes of hydrogen-assisted propane ignition are considered: co-feed mode, where the microburner inlet consists of premixed hydrogen/propane/air mixtures; and sequential feed mode, where the inlet feed is switched from hydrogen/air to propane/air mixtures after the microburner reaches propane ignition temperature. We show that hydrogen-assisted ignition is equivalent to selectively preheating the inlet section of the microburner. The time to reach steady state is lower at higher equivalence ratio, lower wall thermal conductivity, and higher inlet velocity for both the ignition modes. The ignition times and propane emissions are compared. Although the sequential feed mode requires slightly higher amount of hydrogen, the propane emissions are at least an order of magnitude lower than the other ignition modes. (author)

Seshadri, Vikram; Kaisare, Niket S. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology - Madras, Chennai 600 036 (India)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

416

Direct drive heavy-ion-beam inertial fusion at high coupling efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

M J of fusion yield. This NIF capsule design ab- sorbs 200capsules the size of the NIF capsule with heavy-ion beams (designs emerge, and, if the NIF's ignition campaign is also

Logan, B.G.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Direct Drive Heavy-Ion-Beam Inertial Fusion at High Coupling Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of fusion yield [16]. This NIF capsule design absorbs 200 kJcapsules the size of the NIF capsule with heavy ion beams (designs emerge, and, i f the NIF's ignition campaign is also

Logan, B. Grant

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Energy Blog | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Energy.gov » Energy Blog Energy.gov » Energy Blog Energy Blog RSS December 27, 2013 Both! The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a large research device located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The NIF uses powerful lasers to heat and compress hydrogen fuel to the point where nuclear fusion reactions take place. It is currently the largest and most energetic inertial confinement fusion device in the world. Researchers use the NIF to ensure the safety of nuclear weapons, explore the potential of fusion as a safe energy source, and understand how the universe was created. In this photo, NIF Team members Bruno Van Wonterghem (left), Jim Nally (pointing) and Rod Saunders watch through a newly installed viewing window, which allows the NIF team and visitors to see inside the chamber while it is vacuum-sealed for experiments.

419

Photo of the Week: Real-Life Laser Device or Star Trek Set? | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Real-Life Laser Device or Star Trek Set? Real-Life Laser Device or Star Trek Set? Photo of the Week: Real-Life Laser Device or Star Trek Set? December 27, 2013 - 2:45pm Addthis Both! The National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a large research device located at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The NIF uses powerful lasers to heat and compress hydrogen fuel to the point where nuclear fusion reactions take place. It is currently the largest and most energetic inertial confinement fusion device in the world. Researchers use the NIF to ensure the safety of nuclear weapons, explore the potential of fusion as a safe energy source, and understand how the universe was created. In this photo, NIF Team members Bruno Van Wonterghem (left), Jim Nally (pointing) and Rod Saunders watch through a newly installed viewing window, which allows the NIF team and visitors to see inside the chamber while it is vacuum-sealed for experiments.

420

Compact proton spectrometers for measurements of shock  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The compact Wedge Range Filter (WRF) proton spectrometer was developed for OMEGA and transferred to the National Ignition Facility (NIF) as a National Ignition Campaign (NIC) diagnostic. The WRF measures the spectrum of protons from D-{sup 3}He reactions in tuning-campaign implosions containing D and {sup 3}He gas; in this work we report on the first proton spectroscopy measurement on the NIF using WRFs. The energy downshift of the 14.7-MeV proton is directly related to the total {rho}R through the plasma stopping power. Additionally, the shock proton yield is measured, which is a metric of the final merged shock strength.

Mackinnon, A; Zylstra, A; Frenje, J A; Seguin, F H; Rosenberg, M J; Rinderknecht, H G; Johnson, M G; Casey, D T; Sinenian, N; Manuel, M; Waugh, C J; Sio, H W; Li, C K; Petrasso, R D; Friedrich, S; Knittel, K; Bionta, R; McKernan, M; Callahan, D; Collins, G; Dewald, E; Doeppner, T; Edwards, M J; Glenzer, S H; Hicks, D; Landen, O L; London, R; Meezan, N B

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ignition facility nif" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

DOE/EIS-0236-S1F; National Ignition Facility Final Supplemental...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

required, which could lead to certain measures being imposed, such as prohibition of blasting during the nesting season or within a certain distance from the nest. Response 1-30...

422

Developing Depleted Uranium and Gold Hohlraums for the National Ignition Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bull. Am. Phys. Soc. 51, 339 (2006)48th American Physical Society Annual Meeting of Division of Plasma Physics Philadelphia Pennsylvania, US, 2006999613300

Wilkens, H.L.

2008-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

423

Post-Shot Radiation Environment Following Low-Yield Shots Inside the National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Safety & Environment / Proceedings of the Nineteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE) (Part 2)

S. Sitaraman et al.

424

So Far Unfruitful, Fusion Project Faces a Frugal Congress National Ignition Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

's architects and supporters at the Livermore lab defended the device as working beautifully and pointed

425

Performance of the beamlet laser, a testbed for the National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present initial performance studies for Beamlet, a single-beam prototype for megajoule-class neodymium-glass laser fusion drivers using a multipass main amplifier, adaptive optics, and efficient, high-fluence conversion to the third harmonic. The Beamlet final amplifier uses Brewsters-angle glass slabs with a square 39 {times} 39 cm{sup 2} aperture and a full-aperture plasma-electrode Pockels cell switch. The laser has been tested at the fundamental wavelength over a range of pulselengths from 1-10 ns up to energies of 5.8 kJ at 10 ns and 17.3 kJ at 10 ns at a beam area of 35 {times} 35 cm{sup 2}. A 39-actuator deformable mirror system corrects the beam to a Strehl ratio of 0.4.

van Wonterghem, B.M.; Caird, J.A.; Barker, C.E.; Campbell, J.H.; Murray, J.R.; Speck, D.R.

1995-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

426

The National Ignition Facility and the Promise of Inertial Fusion Energy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Plenary / Proceedings of the Nineteenth Topical Meeting on the Technology of Fusion Energy (TOFE) (Part 1)

E. I. Moses

427

Production Manufacturing of Gold-Depleted Uranium Layered Hohlraums for the National Ignition Facility  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Technical Paper / Selected papers from 20th Target Fabrication Meeting, May 20-24, 2012, Santa Fe, NM, Guest Editor: Robert C. Cook

N. A. Hein; H. L. Wilkens; A. Nikroo; H.-C. B. Chen; H. H. Streckert; K. Quan; J. R. Wall; T. A. Fuller; M. R. Jackson; E. M. Giraldez; S. J. Price; R. J. Sohn; M. Stadermann

428

DOE/EIS-0236-S1F; National Ignition Facility Final Supplemental...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4-30 Responses to Issues Identified in Document 16 (Letter from Cathie Brown, Mayor, City of Livermore, December 6, 1999) ......

429

Measurement of electron temperature of imploded capsules at the National Ignition Facility  

SciTech Connect

The electron and ion temperatures of the imploded core plasma are two of the most important metrics of inertial confinement fusion experiments. We have developed a technique for inferring electron temperatures from the contrast of x-ray images observed through a group of x-ray filters. Generally, the plasma electron temperature exhibits spatial and temporal variations, so time-averaged and time-resolved measurements are expected to yield somewhat different results. By analyzing the intensity of images observed with both a time-integrated detector (imaging plates) and a time-resolved detector (gated micro-channel plate), we found the electron temperature observed from x-ray images to be systematically higher than the ion temperature inferred from fusion neutron spectroscopy.

Izumi, N.; Ma, T.; Barrios, M.; Benedetti, L. R.; Callahan, D.; Cerjan, C.; Edwards, J.; Glenn, S.; Glenzer, S.; Landen, O. L.; Springer, P.; Suter, L.; Tommasini, R.; Town, R.; Mackinnon, A. J.; Bell, P.; Bradley, D. K. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550 (United States); Kilkenny, J. [General Atomics, San Diego, California 92121 (United States); Kline, J.; Kyrala, G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); and others

2012-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

430

BASIC RESEARCH DIRECTIONS for User Science at the National Ignition Facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(K.O.H.). XAS data were measured at the Stanford Synchro- tron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL), which is supported by the Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences. The SSRL Structural Molecular

Stewart, Sarah T.

431

Partial fuel stratification to control HCCI heat release rates : fuel composition and other factors affecting pre-ignition reactions of two-stage ignition fuels.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) combustion with fully premixed charge is severely limited at high-load operation due to the rapid pressure-rise rates (PRR) which can lead to engine knock and potential engine damage. Recent studies have shown that two-stage ignition fuels possess a significant potential to reduce the combustion heat release rate, thus enabling higher load without knock.

Dec, John E.; Sjoberg, Carl-Magnus G.; Cannella, William (Chevron USA Inc.); Yang, Yi; Dronniou, Nicolas

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Inertial confinement fusion (ICF) review  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During its 1996 winter study JASON reviewed the DOE Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) program. This included the National Ignition Facility (NIF) and proposed studies. The result of the review was to comment on the role of the ICF program in support of the DOE Science Based Stockpile Stewardship program.

Hammer, D.; Dyson, F.; Fortson, N.; Novick, B.; Panofsky, W.; Rosenbluth, M.; Treiman, S.; York, H.

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

433

Shot in the dark [nuclear weapon testing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the future of the National Ignition Facility (NIF) located in Livermore, CA, amid criticisms about whether it can achieve its stated scientific goals and whether such a money-draining project was really necessary in the first place. ...

E. Svoboda

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Modeling of high energy laser ignition of energetic materials  

SciTech Connect

We present a model for simulating high energy laser heating and ignition of confined energetic materials. The model considers the effect of irradiating a steel plate with long laser pulses and continuous lasers of several kilowatts and the thermal response of well-characterized high explosives for ignition. Since there is enough time for the thermal wave to propagate into the target and to create a region of hot spot in the high explosives, electron thermal diffusion of ultrashort (femto- and picosecond) lasing is ignored; instead, heat diffusion of absorbed laser energy in the solid target is modeled with thermal decomposition kinetic models of high explosives. Numerically simulated pulsed-laser heating of solid target and thermal explosion of cyclotrimethylenetrinitramine, triaminotrinitrobenzene, and octahydrotetranitrotetrazine are compared to experimental results. The experimental and numerical results are in good agreement.

Lee, Kyung-cheol; Kim, Ki-hong; Yoh, Jack J. [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul, 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

435

RAILPLUG IGNITION SYSTEM FOR ENHANCED ENGINE PERFORMANCE AND REDUCED MAINTENANCE  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the first year of this project, three experimental subtasks and four modeling subtasks were scheduled to begin. Five of these 7 subtasks were scheduled for completion by the end of the first year. Both experimental tasks were completed on schedule. No experimental data were scheduled for the first year. The four modeling tasks are progressing well. However, two of the numerical tasks have been delayed somewhat. A simplified plasma kinetics mechanism was developed and tested against a detailed model. The agreement was quite good. A simplified kinetics mechanism for flame propagation was also developed and validated via comparisons against an elementary kinetics mechanism. Again, the agreement was quite good. The 2D spark ignition process model was exercised to ensure stability but the 3D version was not completed. Excellent progress was made on the ignition circuit model, but it is not yet finished. The delays in these two subtasks are not expected to impact the schedule for the overall project.

Ron Matthews

2003-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

436

Analysis of ignition of a porous energetic material  

SciTech Connect

A theory of ignition is presented to analyze the effect of porosity on the time to ignition of a semi-infinite porous energetic solid subjected to a constant energy flux. An asymptotic perturbation analysis, based on the smallness of the gas-to-solid density ratio and the largeness of the activation energy, is utilized to describe the inert and transition stages leading to thermal runaway. As in the classical study of a nonporous solid, the transition stage consists of three spatial regions in the limit of large activation energy: a thin reactive-diffusive layer adjacent to the exposed surface of the material where chemical effects are first felt, a somewhat thicker transient-diffusive zone, and finally an inert region where the temperature field is still governed solely by conductive heat transfer. Solutions in each region are constructed at each order with respect to the density-ratio parameter and matched to one another using asymptotic matching principles. It is found that the effects of porosity provide a leading-order reduction in the time to ignition relative to that for the nonporous problem, arising from the reduced amount of solid material that must be heated and the difference in thermal conductivities of the solid and gaseous phases. A positive correction to the leading-order ignition-delay time, however, is provided by the convective flow of gas out of the solid, which stems from the effects of thermal expansion and removes energy from the system. The latter phenomenon is absent from the corresponding calculation for the nonporous problem and produces a number of modifications at the next order in the analysis arising from the relative transport effects associated with the gas flow.

Telengator, A.M.; Williams, F.A. [Univ. of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States). Dept. of Applied Mechanics and Engineering Sciences; Margolis, S.B. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States). Combustion Research Facility

1998-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

Modeling of homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) of methane  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The operation of piston engines on a compression ignition cycle using a lean, homogeneous charge has many potential attractive features. These include the potential for extremely low NO{sub x} and particulate emissions while maintaining high thermal efficiency and not requiring the expensive high pressure injection system of the typical modem diesel engine. Using the HCT chemical kinetics code to simulate autoignition of methane-air mixtures, we have explored the ignition timing, burn duration, NO{sub x} production, indicated efficiency and power output of an engine with a compression ratio of 15:1 at 1200 and 2400 rpm. HCT was modified to include the effects of heat transfer. This study used a single control volume reaction zone that varies as a function of crank angle. The ignition process is controlled by varying the intake equivalence ratio and varying the residual gas trapping (RGT). RGT is internal exhaust gas recirculation which recycles both heat and combustion product species. It is accomplished by varying the timing of the exhaust valve closure. Inlet manifold temperature was held constant at 330 Kelvins. Results show that there is a narrow range of operational conditions that show promise of achieving the control necessary to vary power output while keeping indicated efficiency above 50% and NO{sub x} levels below 100 ppm.

Smith, J.R.; Aceves, S.M.; Westbrook, C.; Pitz, W.

1997-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

SGP Central Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central Facility Central Facility SGP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts SGP Central Facility The ARM Climate Research Facility deploys specialized remote sensing instruments in a fixed location at the site to gather atmospheric data of unprecedented quality, consistency, and completeness. More than 30 instrument clusters have been placed around the site; the central facility; and the boundary, intermediate, and extended facilities. The locations for the instruments were chosen so that the measurements reflect conditions

439

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

31, 2004 Facility News ARM Climate Research Facility Achieves User Milestone Three Months Ahead of Schedule Bookmark and Share Summary of the ARM Climate Research Facility User...

440

ARM - Facility News Article  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

January 15, 2008 Facility News Future of User Facility Discussed at Fall Workshop As a national user facility, ARM is accessible to scientists around the globe for...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ignition facility nif" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

ARM - SGP Central Facility  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Central Facility Central Facility SGP Related Links Facilities and Instruments Central Facility Boundary Facility Extended Facility Intermediate Facility Radiometric Calibration Facility Geographic Information ES&H Guidance Statement Operations Science Field Campaigns Visiting the Site Fact Sheet Images Information for Guest Scientists Contacts SGP Central Facility The ARM Climate Research Facility deploys specialized remote sensing instruments in a fixed location at the site to gather atmospheric data of unprecedented quality, consistency, and completeness. More than 30 instrument clusters have been placed around the site; the central facility; and the boundary, intermediate, and extended facilities. The locations for the instruments were chosen so that the measurements reflect conditions

442

Parametric combustion modeling for ethanol-gasoline fuelled spark ignition engines.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Ethanol-gasoline fuel blends are increasingly being used in spark ignition (SI) engines due to continued growth in renewable fuels as part of a growing… (more)

Yeliana

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Influence of the molecular structure of biofuels on combustion in a compression ignition engine.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis presents an experimental study on the influence of the molecular structure of potential biofuels on combustion in a compression ignition engine. The molecular… (more)

Schönborn, A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Plasma ignition schemes for the SNS radio-frequency driven H- source  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Project,” EPAC ‘98,ignition schemes for the SNS radio-frequency driven H -the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a cesiated, radio-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Control strategy for hydrocarbon emissions in turbocharged direct injection spark ignition engines during cold-start  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Gasoline consumption and pollutant emissions from transportation are costly and have serious, demonstrated environmental and health impacts. Downsized, turbocharged direct-injectio