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  1. International Energy Agency (IEA) | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    International Energy Agency (IEA) International Energy Agency (IEA) History The International Energy Agency is an international energy forum comprised of 29 industrialized countries under the Organization for Economic Development and Cooperation (OECD). The IEA was established in 1974, in the wake of the 1973/74 oil crisis, to help its members respond to major oil supply disruptions, a role it continues to fulfill today. IEA's mandate has expanded over time to include tracking and analyzing

  2. International Energy Agency (IEA) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Database IEA RECaBS Interactive REcalculator IEA Technology Roadmaps IEA World Energy Outlook IEA-Risk Quantification and Risk Management in Renewable Energy Projects...

  3. Sandia Energy - IEA PVPS Task 13 Activities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IEA PVPS Task 13 Activities Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Photovoltaics PV Modeling & Analysis IEA PVPS Task 13 Activities IEA PVPS Task 13...

  4. Thailand-IEA Activities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Activities IEA-MoEN oil & gas emergency preparedness IEA-MoEN Biofuels Workshop (2009) Emergency Response Review (ERR) to be held in 2010 References "IEA Bilateral...

  5. IEA/RFP Workshop 2011

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    International Energy Agency (IEA) | UW Madison Plasma Physics RFP Workshop Madison, WI - 2011 Home Presentations Contact Admin ETN_Logo_Colour_WEB uwlogo_web_sm_ctr The 15th International RFP Workshop was held at the University of Wisconsin-Madison October 10-12, 2011. IEA-RFP attendees This workshop series was organized through the framework of the International Energy Agency (IEA) Implementing Agreement on the Research and Development of Reversed Field Pinches (RFP). The last workshop was held

  6. Indonesia-IEA Activities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Indonesia-IEA Activities Jump to: navigation, search Name Indonesia-IEA Activities AgencyCompany Organization International Energy Agency Sector Energy Focus Area Conventional...

  7. IEA Organizational Chart | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    IEA Organizational Chart IEA Organizational Chart More Documents & Publications Organizational Chart Office of International Affairs Org Chart Independent Oversight Review, Idaho Cleanup Project - August 201

  8. IEA Wind Energy Annual Report 2000

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2001-05-01

    The twenty-third IEA Wind Energy Annual Report reviews the progress during 2000 of the activities in the Implementing Agreement for Co-operation in the Research and Development on Wind Turbine Systems under the auspices of the International Energy Agency (IEA). The agreement and its program, which is known as IEA R&D Wind, is a collaborative venture among 19 contracting parties from 17 IEA member countries and the European Commission.

  9. International Energy Agency (IEA) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovak Republic, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom, United States.2 Headlines IEA Deputy Executive Director explores...

  10. IEA Technology Roadmaps | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Plug-in Hybrid Vehicles Energy Efficient Buildings: heating & cooling systems Geothermal Nuclear Power Smart Grids Solar Photovoltaic Wind Energy" References "IEA Technology...

  11. International Energy Agency (IEA) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of Expertise in Energy Technology Case Studies in Sustainable Development in the Coal Industry China-2050 Wind Technology Roadmap China-IEA Network of Expertise in Energy...

  12. IEA Energy Statistics | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Statistics Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: IEA Energy Statistics AgencyCompany Organization: International Energy Agency Sector: Energy Topics: GHG...

  13. South Africa-IEA Network of Expertise in Energy Technology |...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    IEA Network of Expertise in Energy Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name South Africa-IEA Cooperation AgencyCompany Organization International Energy Agency Sector Energy...

  14. IEA-Risk Quantification and Risk Management in Renewable Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Topics: Finance, Implementation, Market analysis Resource Type: Presentation, Lessons learnedbest practices Website: www.iea-retd.orgfilesRISK%20IEA-RETD%20(2011-6)....

  15. IEA-Electricity Access Database | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    - Energy Access Resource Type: Dataset Website: www.iea.orgweoelectricity.asp Language: English IEA-Electricity Access Database Screenshot References: Electricity Access...

  16. IEA-Technology Roadmap: Smart Grids | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Guidemanual Website: www.iea.orgpapers2011smartgridsroadmap.pdf Cost: Free IEA-Technology Roadmap: Smart Grids Screenshot References: Technology Roadmap: Smart...

  17. Asia Pacific Energy Research Centre-IEA Cooperation | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Research Centre-IEA Cooperation AgencyCompany Organization Asia Pacific Energy Research Centre, International Energy Agency Sector Energy Focus Area Conventional Energy,...

  18. IEA Clean Energy Progress Report | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Progress Report Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: IEA Clean Energy Progress Report AgencyCompany Organization: International Energy Agency Sector: Energy...

  19. IEA-Technology Roadmap: Concentrating Solar Power | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Power Screenshot References: IEA-CSP Roadmap1 "This roadmap identifies technology, economy and policy goals and milestones needed to support the development and deployment of...

  20. IEA Renewable Energy Technology Deployment | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Renewable Energy Technology Deployment Jump to: navigation, search Name IEA Renewable Energy Technology Deployment AgencyCompany Organization International Energy Agency -...

  1. Brazil-IEA Network of Expertise in Energy Technology | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    IEA Network of Expertise in Energy Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name Brazil-IEA Cooperation AgencyCompany Organization International Energy Agency Sector Energy Focus...

  2. IEA Energy Efficiency Policy Recommendations to the 2007 G8 Summit...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    IEA Energy Efficiency Policy Recommendations to the 2007 G8 Summit Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: IEA Energy Efficiency Policy Recommendations to the...

  3. Mexico-IEA Network of Expertise in Energy Technology | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    IEA Network of Expertise in Energy Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name Mexico-IEA Cooperation AgencyCompany Organization International Energy Agency Sector Energy Focus...

  4. India-IEA Network of Expertise in Energy Technology | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    IEA Network of Expertise in Energy Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name India-IEA Cooperation AgencyCompany Organization International Energy Agency Sector Energy Focus...

  5. China-IEA Network of Expertise in Energy Technology | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    IEA Network of Expertise in Energy Technology Jump to: navigation, search Name China-IEA Cooperation AgencyCompany Organization International Energy Agency Sector Energy Focus...

  6. International Collaboration on Offshore Wind Energy Under IEA Annex XXIII

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Musial, W.; Butterfield, S.; Lemming, J.

    2005-11-01

    This paper defines the purpose of IEA Annex XXIII, the International Collaboration on Offshore Wind Energy. This international collaboration through the International Energy Agency (IEA) is an efficient forum from which to advance the technical and environmental experiences collected from existing offshore wind energy projects, as well as the research necessary to advance future technology for deep-water wind energy technology.

  7. Fuel Cell Technologies Program Overview: 2012 IEA HIA Hydrogen Safety Stakeholder Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation by Sunita Satyapal at the IEA HIA Hydrogen Safety Stakeholder Workshop on October 2, 2012.

  8. IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies 2012 | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies 2012 IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies 2012 PDF icon IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies 2012.pdf More Documents & Publications 2011 IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies Before the Senate Energy and Natural Resources Committee EIS-0238: Withdrawal of Notice of Intent to Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement

  9. IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    requires IEA member countries to hold oil stocks equivalent to at least 90 days of net oil imports and - in the event of a major oil supply disruption - to release stocks,...

  10. IEA-GIA ExCo - National Geothermal Data System and Online Tools...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    IEA-GIA ExCo - National Geothermal Data System and Online Tools IEA-GIA ExCo - National Geothermal Data System and Online Tools National Geothermal Data System presentation by Jay...

  11. 2011 IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies 2011 IEA Response System for Oil Supply Emergencies Emergency response to oil supply disruptions has remained a core mission of the International Energy Agency since its founding in 1974. This information pamphlet explains the decisionmaking process leading to an IEA collective action, the measures available - focusing on stockdraw - and finally, the historical background of major oil supply disruptions and the IEA response to them. It also

  12. IEA-GIA ExCo - National Geothermal Data System and Online Tools |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy IEA-GIA ExCo - National Geothermal Data System and Online Tools IEA-GIA ExCo - National Geothermal Data System and Online Tools National Geothermal Data System presentation by Jay Nathwani at the September 30, 2011 IEA-GIA ExCo conference in London. PDF icon gtp_iea-gia_presentation_nathwani_9-30-11.pdf More Documents & Publications International Partnership for Geothermal Technology - 2012 Peer Review Presentation Innovative Exploration Technologies Subprogram

  13. CRAD, Preliminary Documented Safety Analysis- July 25, 2014 (IEA CRAD 31-2, REV. 0)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This Criteria Review and Approach Document (IEA CRAD 31-2, REV. 0) provides objectives, criteria, and approaches for reviewing Nuclear Facility Preliminary Documented Safety Analysis.

  14. CRAD, Hazard Analysis- July 25, 2014 (IEA CRAD 31-1, REV. 0)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Criteria Review and Approach Document (IEA CRAD 31-1, REV. 0) provides objectives, criteria, and approaches for reviewing Nuclear Facility Hazard Analysis.

  15. IEA Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Meredydd; Meier, Alan; Runci, Paul J.

    2008-08-05

    This guide presents insights and guidance from DOEs gathered through longstanding and extensive participation in IEA implementing agreements (IAs) and annexes. Even though DOE has been a key participant in international research activities through the IEA since the 1970s, the experience, knowledge, and institutional memory associated with these activities can be lost or forgotten easily as key DOE managers retire or leave the department. The guide seeks to assemble in a single reference some of the learning that has occurred through participation in IEA IAs as a guide for BTP managers currently responsible for IAs and for those who might consider entering into new IEA activities in the future.

  16. Funding Formulas and Arrangements under IEA Implementing Agreements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delgado, Alison; Evans, Meredydd

    2008-12-30

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory has researched how participating countries divide funding obligations under International Energy Agency (IEA) Implementing Agreements (IAs). This is part of a broader assessment evaluating the buildings-area IAs. This particular part of the analysis looked at 12 IAs funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. By selecting a range of agreements, we hoped to understand the types of arrangements and the range of funding formulas. PNNL asked the U.S. Executive Committee (ExCo) members how the total contribution for their IA and its Annexes were determined, and how the total was then divided between participating countries.

  17. Secretary Chu to Lead Delegation to IEA Ministerial in Paris | Department

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Energy to Lead Delegation to IEA Ministerial in Paris Secretary Chu to Lead Delegation to IEA Ministerial in Paris October 17, 2011 - 9:40am Addthis Washington D.C. - U.S. Energy Secretary Steven Chu will lead the delegation to the International Energy Agency (IEA) Ministerial Meeting in Paris, France, on Tuesday, October 18. This year's ministerial theme is "Our Energy Future: Secure, Sustainable, and Together." Secretary Chu will frame the discussion by speaking on energy

  18. IEA Annex 26: Advanced Supermarket Refrigeration/Heat Recovery Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, VAN

    2003-05-19

    With increased concern about the impact of refrigerant leakage on global warming, a number of new supermarket refrigeration system configurations requiring significantly less refrigerant charge are being considered. In order to help promote the development of advanced systems and expand the knowledge base for energy-efficient supermarket technology, the International Energy Agency (IEA) established IEA Annex 26 (Advanced Supermarket Refrigeration/Heat Recovery Systems) under the ''IEA Implementing Agreement on Heat Pumping Technologies''. Annex 26 focuses on demonstrating and documenting the energy saving and environmental benefits of advanced systems design for food refrigeration and space heating and cooling for supermarkets. Advanced in this context means systems that use less energy, require less refrigerant and produce lower refrigerant emissions. Stated another way, the goal is to identify supermarket refrigeration and HVAC technology options that reduce the total equivalent warming impact (TEWI) of supermarkets by reducing both system energy use (increasing efficiency) and reducing total refrigerant charge. The Annex has five participating countries: Canada, Denmark, Sweden, the United Kingdom, and the United States. The working program of the Annex has involved analytical and experimental investigation of several candidate system design approaches to determine their potential to reduce refrigerant usage and energy consumption. Advanced refrigeration system types investigated include the following: distributed compressor systems--small parallel compressor racks are located in close proximity to the food display cases they serve thus significantly shortening the connecting refrigerant line lengths; secondary loop systems--one or more central chillers are used to refrigerate a secondary coolant (e.g. brine, ice slurry, or CO2) that is pumped to the food display cases on the sales floor; self-contained display cases--each food display case has its own refrigeration unit; low-charge direct expansion--similar to conventional multiplex refrigeration systems but with improved controls to limit charge. Means to integrate store HVAC systems for space heating/cooling with the refrigeration system have been investigated as well. One approach is to use heat pumps to recover refrigeration waste heat and raise it to a sufficient level to provide for store heating needs. Another involves use of combined heating and power (CHP) or combined cooling, heating, and power (CCHP) systems to integrate the refrigeration, HVAC, and power services in stores. Other methods including direct recovery of refrigeration reject heat for space and water heating have also been examined.

  19. IEA Wind Task 26 - Multi-national Case Study of the Financial...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Wind Task 26 - Multi-national Case Study of the Financial Cost of Wind Energy, Work Package 1, Final Report Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: IEA Wind Task...

  20. IEA-GIA ExCo - National Geothermal Data System and Online Tools...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Geothermal Data System and Online Tools National Geothermal Data System presentation by Jay Nathwani at the September 30, 2011 IEA-GIA ExCo conference in London. PDF icon...

  1. Renewable Energy to be Half of Global Generation Increase to 2035: IEA |

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Department of Energy Renewable energy sources could account for nearly half of the increase in global power generation through 2035, according to the International Energy Agency's (IEA) 2013 edition of the World Energy Outlook. Wind energy and solar energy could make up 45% of that expansion in renewables. The report, released on November 12, also found that a renewed global focus on energy efficiency is taking hold and is set to deliver multiple benefits. The IEA report noted that China is

  2. IEA Agreement on the production and utilization of hydrogen: 1996 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elam, Carolyn C. )

    1997-01-31

    The annual report includes an overview of the IEA Hydrogen Agreement, including a brief summary of hydrogen in general. The Chairman's report provides highlights for the year. Sections are included on hydrogen energy activities in the IEA Hydrogen Agreement member countries, including Canada, European Commission, Germany, Japan, Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the US. Lastly, Annex reports are given for the following tasks: Task 10, Photoproduction of Hydrogen, Task 11, Integrated Systems, and Task 12, Metal Hydrides and Carbon for Hydrogen Storage.

  3. IEA Wind Task 24 Integration of Wind and Hydropower Systems; Volume 2: Participant Case Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acker, T.

    2011-12-01

    This report describes the background, concepts, issues and conclusions related to the feasibility of integrating wind and hydropower, as investigated by the members of IEA Wind Task 24. It is the result of a four-year effort involving seven IEA member countries and thirteen participating organizations. The companion report, Volume 2, describes in detail the study methodologies and participant case studies, and exists as a reference for this report.

  4. Technology status of hydrogen road vehicles. IEA technical report from the IEA Agreement of the production and utilization of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Doyle, T.A.

    1998-01-31

    The report was commissioned under the Hydrogen Implementing Agreement of the International Energy Agency (IEA) and examines the state of the art in the evolving field of hydrogen-fueled vehicles for road transport. The first phase surveys and analyzes developments since 1989, when a comprehensive review was last published. The report emphasizes the following: problems, especially backfiring, with internal combustion engines (ICEs); operational safety; hydrogen handling and on-board storage; and ongoing demonstration projects. Hydrogen vehicles are receiving much attention, especially at the research and development level. However, there has been a steady move during the past 5 years toward integral demonstrations of operable vehicles intended for public roads. Because they emit few, or no greenhouse gases, hydrogen vehicles are beginning to be taken seriously as a promising solution to the problems of urban air quality. Since the time the first draft of the report was prepared (mid-19 96), the 11th World Hydrogen Energy Conference took place in Stuttgart, Germany. This biennial conference can be regarded as a valid updating of the state of the art; therefore, the 1996 results are included in the current version. Sections of the report include: hydrogen production and distribution to urban users; on-board storage and refilling; vehicle power units and drives, and four appendices titled: 'Safety questions of hydrogen storage and use in vehicles', 'Performance of hydrogen fuel in internal production engines for road vehicles, 'Fuel cells for hydrogen vehicles', and 'Summaries of papers on hydrogen vehicles'. (refs., tabs.)

  5. Secretary Moniz's Remarks at the Bipartisan Policy Center on the IEA

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    In-Depth Review of U.S. Energy Policy -- As Delivered | Department of Energy Bipartisan Policy Center on the IEA In-Depth Review of U.S. Energy Policy -- As Delivered Secretary Moniz's Remarks at the Bipartisan Policy Center on the IEA In-Depth Review of U.S. Energy Policy -- As Delivered December 18, 2014 - 5:27pm Addthis Dr. Ernest Moniz Dr. Ernest Moniz Secretary of Energy Well thanks, Jason, and thanks to the BPC for hosting this event. It's a great organization and one that is always a

  6. IEA Unveils Clean Energy Progress Report in London | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    IEA Unveils Clean Energy Progress Report in London IEA Unveils Clean Energy Progress Report in London April 26, 2012 - 12:20pm Addthis Prime Minister David Cameron, Secretary of State Edward Davey, Energy Department Secretary Steven Chu and Minister of State Greg Barker at the third Clean Energy Ministerial event in London on 26 April 2012. | Photo courtesy of the <a href="http://www.decc.gov.uk/">Department of Energy and Climate Change</a>. Prime Minister David Cameron,

  7. IEA-GIA ExCo - National Geothermal Data System and Online Tools

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    IEA-GIA ExCo National Geothermal Data System & Online Tools Jay Nathwani Enel Salt Wells - Courtesy of Enel Green Power - North America September 30, 2011 Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy eere.energy.gov Discussed Rather than a full country report, the following selected topics will be discussed briefly. 2 New Program Manager US Installed Capacity National Geothermal Data System DOE Projects Database Demo 2011 R&D Funding Opportunity Awards Existing International Collaborations

  8. Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration (OC3) for IEA Wind Task 23 Offshore Wind Technology and Deployment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonkman, J.; Musial, W.

    2010-12-01

    This final report for IEA Wind Task 23, Offshore Wind Energy Technology and Deployment, is made up of two separate reports, Subtask 1: Experience with Critical Deployment Issues and Subtask 2: Offshore Code Comparison Collaborative (OC3). Subtask 1 discusses ecological issues and regulation, electrical system integration, external conditions, and key conclusions for Subtask 1. Subtask 2 included here, is the larger of the two volumes and contains five chapters that cover background information and objectives of Subtask 2 and results from each of the four phases of the project.

  9. IEA Agreement on the production and utilization of hydrogen: 1999 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elam, Carolyn C. )

    2000-01-31

    The annual report begins with an overview of the IEA Hydrogen Agreement, including guiding principles and their strategic plan followed by the Chairman's report providing the year's highlights. Annex reports included are: the final report for Task 11, Integrated Systems; task updates for Task 12, Metal Hydrides and Carbon for Hydrogen Storage, Task 13, Design and Optimization of Integrated Systems, Task 14, Photoelectrolytic Production of Hydrogen, and Task 15, Photobiological Production of Hydrogen; and a feature article by Karsten Wurr titled 'Large-Scale Industrial Uses of Hydrogen: Final Development Report'.

  10. Twenty Years On!: Updating the IEA BESTEST Building Thermal Fabric Test Cases for ASHRAE Standard 140

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judkoff, R.; Neymark, J.

    2013-07-01

    ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 140, Standard Method of Test for the Evaluation of Building Energy Analysis Computer Programs applies the IEA BESTEST building thermal fabric test cases and example simulation results originally published in 1995. These software accuracy test cases and their example simulation results, which comprise the first test suite adapted for the initial 2001 version of Standard 140, are approaching their 20th anniversary. In response to the evolution of the state of the art in building thermal fabric modeling since the test cases and example simulation results were developed, work is commencing to update the normative test specification and the informative example results.

  11. IEA agreement on the production and utilization of hydrogen: 2000 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elam, Carolyn C.

    2001-12-01

    The 2000 annual report of the IEA Hydrogen Agreement contains an overview of the agreement, including its guiding principles, latest strategic plan, and a report from the Chairman, Mr. Neil P. Rossmeissl, U.S. Department of Energy. Overviews of the National Hydrogen Programs of nine member countries are given: Canada, Japan, Lithuania, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United States. Task updates are provided on the following annexes: Annex 12 - Metal Hydrides and Carbon for Hydrogen Storage, Annex 13 - Design and Optimization of Integrated Systems, Annex 14 - Photoelectrolytic Production of Hydrogen, and, Annex 15 - Photobiological Production of Hydrogen.

  12. IEA Agreement on the Production and utilization of hydrogen: 1998 annual report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elam, Carolyn C. )

    1999-01-31

    The annual report includes an overview of the IEA Hydrogen Agreement, including its guiding principles. The Chairman's report section includes highlights of the agreement for 1998. Annex reports are given on various tasks: Task 10, Photoproduction of Hydrogen, Task 11, Integrated Systems, and Task 12, Metal Hydrides and Carbon for Hydrogen Storage. Lastly, a feature article by Karsten Wurr, E3M Material Consulting, GmbH, Hamburg Germany, is included titled 'Hydrogen in Material Science and Technology: State of the Art and New Tendencies'.

  13. IEA Wind Task 24 Integration of Wind and Hydropower Systems; Volume 1: Issues, Impacts, and Economics of Wind and Hydropower Integration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Acker, T.

    2011-12-01

    This report describes the background, concepts, issues and conclusions related to the feasibility of integrating wind and hydropower, as investigated by the members of IEA Wind Task 24. It is the result of a four-year effort involving seven IEA member countries and thirteen participating organizations. The companion report, Volume 2, describes in detail the study methodologies and participant case studies, and exists as a reference for this report.

  14. Impacts of Large Amounts of Wind Power on Design and Operation of Power Systems; Results of IEA Collaboration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parsons, B. and Ela, E.; Holttinen, H.; Meibom, P.; Orths, A.; O'Malley, M.; Ummels, B.C.; Tande, J.

    2008-06-01

    There are a multitude of studies completed and ongoing related to the cost of wind integration. However, the results are not easy to compare. An international forum for exchange of knowledge of power system impacts of wind power has been formed under the IEA Implementing Agreement on Wind Energy. IEA WIND R&D Task 25 on Design and Operation of Power Systems with Large Amounts of Wind Power produced a state-of-the-art report in October 2007, where the most relevant wind-power grid integration studies were analyzed, especially regarding methodologies and input data. This paper summarizes the results from 18 case studies, with discussion on differences in methodology as well as issues that have been identified to impact the cost of wind integration.

  15. Process analysis and economics of biophotolysis of water. IEA technical report from the IEA Agreement on the Production and Utilization of Hydrogen

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benemann, J.R.

    1998-03-31

    This report is a preliminary cost analysis of the biophotolysis of water and was prepared as part of the work of Annex 10 of the IEA Hydrogen agreement. Biophotolysis is the conversion of water and solar energy to hydrogen and oxygen using microalgae. In laboratory experiments at low light intensities, algal photosynthesis and some biophotolysis reactions exhibit highlight conversion efficiencies that could be extrapolated to about 10% solar efficiencies if photosynthesis were to saturate at full sunlight intensities. The most promising approach to achieving the critical goal of high conversion efficiencies at full sunlight intensities, one that appears within the capabilities of modern biotechnology, is to genetically control the pigment content of algal cells such that the photosynthetic apparatus does not capture more photons than it can utilize. A two-stage indirect biophotolysis system was conceptualized and general design parameters extrapolated. The process comprises open ponds for the CO{sub 2}fixation stage, an algal concentration step, a dark adaptation and fermentation stage, and a closed tubular photobioreactor in which hydrogen production would take place. A preliminary cost analysis for a 200 hectare (ha) system, including 140 ha of open algal ponds and 14 ha of photobioreactors was carried out. The cost analysis was based on prior studies for algal mass cultures for fuels production and a conceptual analysis of a hypothetical photochemical processes, as well as the assumption that the photobioreactors would cost about $100/m(sup 2). Assuming a very favorable location, with 21 megajoules (MJ)/m{sup 2} total insolation, and a solar conversion efficiency of 10% based on CO{sub 2} fixation in the large algal ponds, an overall cost of $10/gigajoule (GJ) is projected. Of this, almost half is due to the photobioreactors, one fourth to the open pond system, and the remainder to the H{sub 2} handling and general support systems. It must be cautioned that these are highly preliminary, incomplete, and optimistic estimates. Biophotolysis processes, indirect or direct, clearly require considerable basic and applied R and D before a more detailed evaluation of their potential and plausible economics can be carried out. For example, it is not yet clear which type of algae, green algae, or cyanobacteria, would be preferred in biophotolysis. If lower-cost photobioreactors can be developed, then small-scale (<1 ha) single-stage biophotolysis processes may become economically feasible. A major basic and applied R and D effort will be required to develop such biophotolysis processes.

  16. Twenty Years On!: Updating the IEA BESTEST Building Thermal Fabric Test Cases for ASHRAE Standard 140: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judkoff, R.; Neymark, J.

    2013-07-01

    ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 140, Standard Method of Test for the Evaluation of Building Energy Analysis Computer Programs applies the IEA BESTEST building thermal fabric test cases and example simulation results originally published in 1995. These software accuracy test cases and their example simulation results, which comprise the first test suite adapted for the initial 2001 version of Standard 140, are approaching their 20th anniversary. In response to the evolution of the state of the art in building thermal fabric modeling since the test cases and example simulation results were developed, work is commencing to update the normative test specification and the informative example results.

  17. IEA Wind Task 26. Wind Technology, Cost, and Performance Trends in Denmark, Germany, Ireland, Norway, the European Union, and the United States: 2007–2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitina, Aisma; Lüers, Silke; Wallasch, Anna-Kathrin; Berkhout, Volker; Duffy, Aidan; Cleary, Brendan; Husabø, Lief I.; Weir, David E.; Lacal-Arántegui, Roberto; Hand, Maureen; Lantz, Eric; Belyeu, Kathy; Wiser, Ryan H; Bolinger, Mark; Hoen, Ben

    2015-06-01

    The International Energy Agency Implementing Agreement for cooperation in Research, Development, and Deployment of Wind Energy Systems (IEA Wind) Task 26—The Cost of Wind Energy represents an international collaboration dedicated to exploring past, present and future cost of wind energy. This report provides an overview of recent trends in wind plant technology, cost, and performance in those countries that are currently represented by participating organizations in IEA Wind Task 26: Denmark, Germany, Ireland, Norway, and the United States as well as the European Union.

  18. International Energy Agency Building Energy Simulation Test and Diagnostic Method (IEA BESTEST): In-Depth Diagnostic Cases for Ground Coupled Heat Transfer Related to Slab-on-Grade Construction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neymark, J.; Judkoff, R.; Beausoleil-Morrison, I.; Ben-Nakhi, A.; Crowley, M.; Deru, M.; Henninger, R.; Ribberink, H.; Thornton, J.; Wijsman, A.; Witte, M.

    2008-09-01

    This report documents a set of idealized in-depth diagnostic test cases for use in validating ground-coupled floor slab heat transfer models. These test cases represent an extension to IEA BESTEST.

  19. Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, Continuation within IEA Wind Task 30: Phase II Results Regarding a Floating Semisubmersible Wind System: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.; Vorpahl, F.; Popko, W.; Qvist, J.; Froyd, L.; Chen, X.; Azcona, J.; Uzungoglu, E.; Guedes Soares, C.; Luan, C.; Yutong, H.; Pengcheng, F.; Yde, A.; Larsen, T.; Nichols, J.; Buils, R.; Lei, L.; Anders Nygard, T.; et al.

    2014-03-01

    Offshore wind turbines are designed and analyzed using comprehensive simulation tools (or codes) that account for the coupled dynamics of the wind inflow, aerodynamics, elasticity, and controls of the turbine, along with the incident waves, sea current, hydrodynamics, and foundation dynamics of the support structure. This paper describes the latest findings of the code-to-code verification activities of the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, Continuation (OC4) project, which operates under the International Energy Agency (IEA) Wind Task 30. In the latest phase of the project, participants used an assortment of simulation codes to model the coupled dynamic response of a 5-MW wind turbine installed on a floating semisubmersible in 200 m of water. Code predictions were compared from load-case simulations selected to test different model features. The comparisons have resulted in a greater understanding of offshore floating wind turbine dynamics and modeling techniques, and better knowledge of the validity of various approximations. The lessons learned from this exercise have improved the participants? codes, thus improving the standard of offshore wind turbine modeling.

  20. IEA Wind Task 26. Wind Technology, Cost and Performance Trends in Denmark, Germany, Ireland, Norway, the European Union, and the United States. 2007 - 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vitina, Aisma; Luers, Silke; Wallasch, Anna-Kathrin; Berkhout, Volker; Duffy, Aidan; Cleary, Brendan; Husabo, Leif I.; Weir, David E.; Lacal-Arantegui, Roberto; Hand, M. Maureen; Lantz, Eric; Belyeu, Kathy; Wiser, Ryan; Bolinger, Mark; Hoen, Ben

    2015-06-12

    This report builds from a similar previous analysis (Schwabe et al., 2011) exploring the differences in cost of wind energy in 2008 among countries participating in IEA Wind Task 26 at that time. The levelized cost of energy (LCOE) is a widely recognized metric for understanding how technology, capital investment, operations, and financing impact the life-cycle cost of building and operating a wind plant. Schwabe et al. (2011) apply a spreadsheet-based cash flow model developed by the Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN) to estimate LCOE. This model is a detailed, discounted cash flow model used to represent the various cost structures in each of the participating countries from the perspective of a financial investor in a domestic wind energy project. This model is used for the present analysis as well, and comparisons are made for those countries who contributed to both reports, Denmark, Germany, and the United States.

  1. IEA Wind Task 26 - Multi-national Case Study of the Financial Cost of Wind Energy; Work Package 1 Final Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwabe, P.; Lensink, S.; Hand, M.

    2011-03-01

    The lifetime cost of wind energy is comprised of a number of components including the investment cost, operation and maintenance costs, financing costs, and annual energy production. Accurate representation of these cost streams is critical in estimating a wind plant's cost of energy. Some of these cost streams will vary over the life of a given project. From the outset of project development, investors in wind energy have relatively certain knowledge of the plant's lifetime cost of wind energy. This is because a wind energy project's installed costs and mean wind speed are known early on, and wind generation generally has low variable operation and maintenance costs, zero fuel cost, and no carbon emissions cost. Despite these inherent characteristics, there are wide variations in the cost of wind energy internationally, which is the focus of this report. Using a multinational case-study approach, this work seeks to understand the sources of wind energy cost differences among seven countries under International Energy Agency (IEA) Wind Task 26 - Cost of Wind Energy. The participating countries in this study include Denmark, Germany, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United States. Due to data availability, onshore wind energy is the primary focus of this study, though a small sample of reported offshore cost data is also included.

  2. A guidebook for insulated low-slope roof systems. IEA Annex 19, Low-slope roof systems: International Energy Agency Energy Conservation in Buildings and Community Systems Programme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    Low-slope roof systems are common on commercial and industrial buildings and, to a lesser extent, on residential buildings. Although insulating materials have nearly always been a component of low-slope roofs, the amount of insulation used has increased in the past two decades because of escalation of heating and cooling costs and increased awareness of the need for energy conservation. As the amount of insulation has increased, the demand has intensified for design, installation, and maintenance information specifically for well-insulated roofs. Existing practices for design, installation, and maintenance of insulated roofs have evolved from experience. Typically, these practices feature compromises due to the different properties of materials making up a given roof system. Therefore, they should be examined from time to time to ensure that they are appropriate as new materials continue to enter the market and as the data base on existing systems expands. A primary purpose of this International Energy Agency (IEA) study is to assess current roofing insulation practices in the context of an accumulating data base on performance.

  3. Second generation sodium heat pipe receiver for a USAB V-160 Stirling engine: Evaluation of on-sun test results using the proposed IEA guidelines and analysis of heat pipe damage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Laing, D.; Traebing, C.

    1997-11-01

    Dish/Stirling technology has demonstrated the highest conversion efficiencies of all solar thermal conversion systems. At the DLR a second generation sodium heat pipe receiver for the Schlaich Bergermann und Partner (SBP) 9-kW{sub e} dish/Stirling system has been developed and constructed. Long-term operation occurred from Oct. 1992 until Aug. 1993 at the Plataforma Solar de Almeria (PSA) in Spain, accumulating 950 operating hours. The performance of the SBP 9-kW{sub e} system with a sodium heat pipe receiver is evaluated according to the guidelines for dish/Stirling performance evaluation by Stine and Powel, as proposed to the International Energy Agency (IEA). Tests were stopped due to a leak in the receiver absorber surface. The analysis of this damage is reported.

  4. Fossil and synthetic fuels: miscellaneous. Part 1. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Fossil and Synthetic Fuels of the Committee on Energy and Commerce, House of Representatives, Ninety-Seventh Congress, First Session on Extension of IEA antitrust defense authorities, February 26, 1981, H. R. 2166, Department of Transportation authorization request, April 8, 1981, Gasohol usage in federal vehicles, July 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01

    Part I of the hearing record covers testimony relating to the extension of antitrust defense availability to the International Energy Agency (IEA); an authorization request by the Department of Transportation (DOT) to comply with pipeline safety regulations; and the administration's reluctance to promote gasohol use in federal vehicles. The first day's hearing included discussion of H.R. 2166, which extended the IEA authority by amending the Energy Policy and Conservation Act, and the testimony of four witnesses representing federal agencies involved in international affairs. On the second day, three DOT witnesses described pipeline-safety programs, enforcement, and procedures, with emphasis on the transport of liquefied natural gas. On the third day, nine witnesses representing gasohol-producing states, the US Army Equipment Research and Development Command, federal fleet services, and DOE examined the appropriateness and compliance record of Executive Order 12261 mandating gasohol for federally owned or leased vehicles. At issue was the need to convert Midwest grains to fuel at a time when oil is plentiful, the performance of alcohol fuels, and the administration's preference for working through the marketplace. Additional material submitted for the record follows each day's testimony. (DCK)

  5. Heat pump concepts for nZEB Technology developments, design tools and testing of heat pump systems for nZEB in the USA: Country report IEA HPT Annex 40 Task 2, Task 3 and Task 4 of the USA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, Van D.; Payne, W. Vance; Ling, Jiazhen; Radermacher, Reinhard

    2015-12-01

    The IEA HPT Annex 40 "Heat pump concepts for Nearly Zero Energy Buildings" deals with the application of heat pumps as a core component of the HVAC system for Nearly or Net Zero energy buildings (nZEB). This report covers Task 2 on the system comparison and optimisation and Task 3 dedicated to the development of adapted technologies for nZEB and field monitoring results of heat pump systems in nZEB. In the US team three institutions are involved and have worked on the following projects: The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) will summarize development activities through the field demonstration stage for several integrated heat pump (IHP) systems electric ground-source (GS-IHP) and air-source (AS-IHP) versions and an engine driven AS-IHP version. The first commercial GS-IHP product was just introduced to the market in December 2012. This work is a contribution to Task 3 of the Annex. The University of Maryland will contribute a software development project to Task 2 of the Annex. The software ThermCom evaluates occupied space thermal comfort conditions accounting for all radiative and convective heat transfer effects as well as local air properties. The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) is working on a field study effort on the NIST Net Zero Energy Residential Test Facility (NZERTF). This residential building was constructed on the NIST campus and officially opened in summer 2013. During the first year, between July 2013 and June 2014, baseline performance of the NZERTF was monitored under a simulated occupancy protocol. The house was equipped with an air-to-air heat pump which included a dedicated dehumidification operating mode. Outdoor conditions, internal loads and modes of heat pump operation were monitored. Field study results with respect to heat pump operation will be reported and recommendations on heat pump optimization for a net zero energy building will be provided. This work is a contribution to Task 3 of the Annex.

  6. ASEAN-IEA Activities | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Policiesdeployment programs, Technology characterizations Resource Type Workshop, Training materials Country Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand, Philippines, Vietnam,...

  7. IEA World Energy Outlook | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Agency's flagship publication and leading source of analysis of global energy trends - presents updated projections of energy demand, production, trade and...

  8. The IEA's role in advanced geothermal drilling.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hoover, Eddie Ross; Jelacic, Allan; Finger, John Travis; Tyner, Craig E.

    2004-06-01

    This paper describes an 'Annex', or task, that is part of the International Energy Agency's Geothermal Implementing Agreement. Annex 7 is aimed at improving the state of the art in geothermal drilling, and has three subtasks: an international database on drilling cost and performance, a 'best practices' drilling handbook, and collaborative testing among participating countries. Drilling is an essential and expensive part of geothermal exploration, production, and maintenance. High temperature, corrosive fluids, and hard, fractured formations increase the cost of drilling, logging, and completing geothermal wells, compared to oil and gas. Cost reductions are critical because drilling and completing the production and injection well field can account for approximately half the capital cost for a geothermal power project. Geothermal drilling cost reduction can take many forms, e.g., faster drilling rates, increased bit or tool life, less trouble (twist-offs, stuck pipe, etc.), higher per-well production through multilaterals, and others. Annex 7 addresses all aspects of geothermal well construction, including developing a detailed understanding of worldwide geothermal drilling costs, understanding geothermal drilling practices and how they vary across the globe, and development of improved drilling technology. Objectives for Annex 7 include: (1) Quantitatively understand geothermal drilling costs and performance from around the world and identify ways to improve costs, performance, and productivity. (2) Identify and develop new and improved technologies for significantly reducing the cost of geothermal well construction. (3) Inform the international geothermal community about these drilling technologies. (4) Provide a vehicle for international cooperation, collaborative field tests, and data sharing toward the development and demonstration of improved geothermal drilling technology.

  9. IEA Implementing Agreements | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    this property., "Western & Eastern Europe" is not in the list of possible values (Eastern Africa, Middle Africa, Northern Africa, Southern Africa, Western Africa, Caribbean,...

  10. IEA Ministerial Press Briefing | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Addthis Related Articles The American Chamber of Commerce of Trinidad & Tobago Energy Secretary Bodman Leads US Delegation to International Energy Agency Ministerial Financial ...

  11. World Energy Outlook 2008

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    OECD/IEA - 2008 © OECD/IEA - 2008 © OECD/IEA - 2008 To Cover... To Cover To Cover ... ... Transport Energy and CO 2 Where are we going? What are the dangers? How do we change direction? Primarily reporting on: IEA WEO 2008 IEA ETP 2008 On-going work with IEA's Mobility Model One or two detours to talk about modelling © OECD/IEA - 2008 0 2 000 4 000 6 000 8 000 10 000 12 000 14 000 16 000 18 000 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 2030 Mtoe Other renewables Hydro Nuclear

  12. IEA: Tracking Clean Energy Progress: Energy Technology Perspectives 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This report, released by International Energy Agency at the third Clean Energy Ministerial in London, measures progress in the global development and deployment of energy-efficient and clean energy...

  13. IEA Renewables in Southeast Asian Countries: Trends and Potentials...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    policy recommendations to encourage effective and efficient exploitation of renewable energy in Southeast Asia. As production is growing rapidly in the region, biofuels and...

  14. IEA RECaBS Interactive REcalculator | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    include the economic values of various externalities - air emissions, system integration, security of supply, employment - in your calculations. It provides the basis for...

  15. IEA Energy Technology Data Exchange | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    member countries with access to the widest range of information on energy research, science and technology and to increase dissemination of this information to developing...

  16. The Iea'S Role In Advanced Geothermal Drilling | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    increase the cost of drilling, logging, and completing geothermal wells, compared to oil and gas. Cost reductions are critical because drilling and completing the production...

  17. IEA Policies and Measures Database | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy, Energy Efficiency, Climate Change Topics: Policiesdeployment programs, Background analysis Resource Type: Dataset...

  18. Annex 7 - The Iea'S Role In Advanced Geothermal Drilling | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Drilling Abstract No abstract prepared. Authors John Travis Finger and Eddie Ross Hoover Published Publisher Not Provided, Date Not Provided DOI Not Provided Check for...

  19. 2015 Project Peer Review International SustainabilityandIEA Bioenergy...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... own organizational and management structure, usually very ... IPCC from the starting organization proposed by the ... 12008 Report Structure CLA & LA Mtg S. Jose Campos, Brazil ...

  20. Paris, France: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energy Agency (IEA) Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD) Renewable Energy Policy Network for the 21st Century (REN21) Registered Energy...

  1. International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sustainable Development (WPISD). Partners include the OECD International Energy Agency (IEA), UN Department of Economic and Social Affairs (DESA), Eurostat, and the European...

  2. Microsoft Word - 20140617 Water Energy Nexus 1030pm FINAL.docx

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    pressurized 2 Organization of Economically Developed Countries. 2005. "Water Consumption" http:www.oecd.orgpublicationsfactbook34416097.pdf 3 IEA (International Energy...

  3. Slide 1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    © OECD/IEA, 2008 OECD/IEA, 2008 30 30 th th Anniversary of the EIA Anniversary of the EIA Washington, 7 Washington, 7 - - 8 April 2008 8 April 2008 Energy Statistics at the IEA: Energy Statistics at the IEA: From Supply to Energy Efficiency From Supply to Energy Efficiency Will the G8 Hokkaido Summit constitute a milestone on Will the G8 Hokkaido Summit constitute a milestone on the road to a global database on efficiency? the road to a global database on efficiency? Karen Tréanton Energy

  4. O

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    O ECD/IEA 2 013 © O ECD/IEA 2 013 Interna'onal E nergy S ta's'cs and t he C hanging O il M ap E IA E nergy C onference Washington, D C, J une 1 8, 2 013 © O ECD/IEA 2 013 New map, new challenges © O ECD/IEA 2 013 Statistics versus the market  OECD d ata a re i ncreasingly l ess r epresenta've  OECD c ountries < 5 0% o f g lobal d emand  Ascent o f n on---OECD m eans l ess v isibility  Great s trides i n J ODI d ata, b ut s 'll r oom f or i mprovement  OECD c ountries h ave

  5. Final draft: IEA Task 1. Report on Subtask D, optimization of solar heating and cooling systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freeman, T.L.

    1981-03-01

    A review of general techniques and specific methods useful in the optimization of solar heating and cooling systems is undertaken. A discussion of the state-of-the-art and the principal problems in both the simplified thermal performance analysis and economic analysis portions of the optimization problem are presented. Sample economic analyses are performed using several widely used economic criteria. The predicted thermal results of one typical, widely used simplified method is compared to detailed simulation results. A methodology for and the results of a sensitivity study of key economic parameters in the life cycle cost method are presented. Finally, a simple graphical optimization technique based on the life cycle cost method is proposed.

  6. IEA: Renewable Energy to Grow During the Next 5 Years | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    capacity expected, China accounts for almost 40%, with the United States, India, Germany, and Brazil also contributing to the growth. The report presents detailed forecasts...

  7. National Geothermal Data System & Online Tools Presentation (IEA-GIA event)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jay Nathwani

    2011-09-30

    Geothermal Technologies Program presentation by Jay Nathwani on the National Geothermal Data System, 9-30-2011.

  8. IEA Wind Task 26: The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy, Work Package 2

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lantz, E.; Wiser, R.; Hand, M.

    2012-05-01

    Over the past 30 years, wind power has become a mainstream source of electricity generation around the world. However, the future of wind power will depend a great deal on the ability of the industry to continue to achieve cost of energy reductions. In this summary report, developed as part of the International Energy Agency Wind Implementing Agreement Task 26, titled 'The Cost of Wind Energy,' we provide a review of historical costs, evaluate near-term market trends, review the methods used to estimate long-term cost trajectories, and summarize the range of costs projected for onshore wind energy across an array of forward-looking studies and scenarios. We also highlight the influence of high-level market variables on both past and future wind energy costs.

  9. Russia-IEA Network of Expertise in Energy Technology | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Russia-IEANetworkofExpertiseinEnergyTechnology&oldid329172" Feedback Contact needs updating Image needs updating Reference needed Missing content Broken link Other...

  10. IEA Wind Task 26: The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy, Work...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    energy across an array of forward-looking studies and scenarios. It also highlights high-level market variables that have influenced wind energy costs in the past and are expected...

  11. IEA Wind Task 34 (WREN) Quarterly Webinar #3: Understanding Avian Collision Rate Modeling

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Wind farms can impact birds through collisions. Collision rate models have been developed to estimate the perceived risk to birds and the potential number of collisions within proposed wind farms....

  12. Summary Article: IEA HPP Annex 36: Quality Installation / Quality Maintenance Sensitivity Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hourahan, Mr. Glenn; Domanski, Dr. Piotr; Baxter, Van D

    2015-01-01

    The outcome from this Annex activity clearly identifies that poorly designed, installed, and/or maintained heat pumps operate inefficiently and waste considerable energy compared to their as-designed potential. Additionally, it is clear that small faults for a given field-observed practice are significant, that some attribute deviations (in various equipment applications and geographical locations) have a larger impact than others, and that multiple faults or deviations have a cumulative impact on heat pump performance.

  13. International Energy Agency (IEA) Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Weyburn-Midale CO₂ Monitoring and Storage Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sacuta, Norm; Young, Aleana; Worth, Kyle

    2015-12-22

    The IEAGHG Weyburn-Midale CO₂ Monitoring and Storage Project (WMP) began in 2000 with the first four years of research that confirmed the suitability of the containment complex of the Weyburn oil field in southeastern Saskatchewan as a storage location for CO₂ injected as part of enhanced oil recovery (EOR) operations. The first half of this report covers research conducted from 2010 to 2012, under the funding of the United States Department of Energy (contract DEFE0002697), the Government of Canada, and various other governmental and industry sponsors. The work includes more in-depth analysis of various components of a measurement, monitoring and verification (MMV) program through investigation of data on site characterization and geological integrity, wellbore integrity, storage monitoring (geophysical and geochemical), and performance/risk assessment. These results then led to the development of a Best Practices Manual (BPM) providing oilfield and project operators with guidance on CO₂ storage and CO₂-EOR. In 2013, the USDOE and Government of Saskatchewan exercised an optional phase of the same project to further develop and deploy applied research tools, technologies, and methodologies to the data and research at Weyburn with the aim of assisting regulators and operators in transitioning CO₂-EOR operations into permanent storage. This work, detailed in the second half of this report, involves seven targeted research projects – evaluating the minimum dataset for confirming secure storage; additional overburden monitoring; passive seismic monitoring; history-matched modelling; developing proper wellbore design; casing corrosion evaluation; and assessment of post CO₂-injected core samples. The results from the final and optional phases of the Weyburn-Midale Project confirm the suitability of CO₂-EOR fields for the injection of CO₂, and further, highlight the necessary MMV and follow-up monitoring required for these operations to be considered permanent storage.

  14. OECD | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    energy becomes more competitive with fossil fuels in OECD countries, reports of this nature can go a long way to supporting more and more development. The four new reports in...

  15. Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OECD-Private Sector Engagement in Adaptation to Climate Change Visualization of World Energy Supply Add Tool OECD Programs Ethiopia-National Greenhouse Gas Emissions...

  16. IEA BESTEST In-Depth Diagnostic Cases for Ground Coupled Heat Transfer Related to Slab-on-Grade Construction: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neymark, J.; Judkoff, R.; Beausoleil-Morrison, I.; Ben-Nakhi, A.; Crowley, M.; Deru, M.; Henninger, R.; Ribberink, H.; Thornton, J.; Wijsman, A.; Witte, M.

    2009-06-01

    A set of validation test cases is presented to compare the results of midlevel detailed ground-coupled heat transfer models typically used with whole-building energy simulation software.

  17. Markets to Facilitate Wind and Solar Energy Integration in the Bulk Power Supply: An IEA Task 25 Collaboration; Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Milligan, M.; Holttinen, H.; Soder, L.; Clark, C.; Pineda, I.

    2012-09-01

    Wind and solar power will give rise to challenges in electricity markets regarding flexibility, capacity adequacy, and the participation of wind and solar generators to markets. Large amounts of wind power will have impacts on bulk power system markets and electricity prices. If the markets respond to increased wind power by increasing investments in low-capital, high-cost or marginal-cost power, the average price may remain in the same range. However, experiences so far from Denmark, Germany, Spain, and Ireland are such that the average market prices have decreased because of wind power. This reduction may result in additional revenue insufficiency, which may be corrected with a capacity market, yet capacity markets are difficult to design. However, the flexibility attributes of the capacity also need to be considered. Markets facilitating wind and solar integration will include possibilities for trading close to delivery (either by shorter gate closure times or intraday markets). Time steps chosen for markets can enable more flexibility to be assessed. Experience from 5- and 10-minute markets has been encouraging.

  18. A comparative study of the SSC resistance of a novel welding process IEA with SAW and MIG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Natividad, C. . E-mail: consnatividad@yahoo.com.mx; Salazar, M. . E-mail: salazarm@imp.mx; Espinosa-Medina, M.A.; Perez, R.

    2007-08-15

    The Stress Sulphide Cracking resistance of X65 weldments produced by Indirect Electric Arc, Submerged Arc Welding (SAW) and Metal Inert Gas (MIG) processes were evaluated in a NACE solution saturated with H{sub 2}S at 25 deg. C, 37 deg. C and 50 deg. C using Slow Strain Rate Tests (SSRT) and electrochemical measurements. Weldments produced by the Indirect Electric Arc presented the best Stress Sulphide Cracking resistance at 25 deg. C. This behavior is attributed to the microstructural modification of the weld bead from ferrite in a needlelike form to a fine grain microstructure, which was not observed at 37 deg. C and 50 deg. C. In addition, the hydrogen permeation flux increased with the temperature, this result is associated with the ferrite phase. The electrochemical results show a decrease of the trapping sites for the atomic hydrogen on this weldment. This behavior has not been observed for the other welding processes due to their microstructure (a typical columnar growth of coarse grain)

  19. IEA Wind Task 34 (WREN) Quarterly Webinar #2: Marine Mammal and Avian Behavior at Offshore Wind Farms

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Please join us for the second in our quarterly webinar series to be held on Tuesday, December 9 from 4 to 5:30 pm UTC (8:00 am PT/11:00 am ET) developed as part of International Energy Agency’s...

  20. Impacts of Large Amounts of Wind Power on Design and Operation of Power Systems; Results of IEA Collaboration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ela, E.; Parsons, B.; Holttinen, H.; Meibom, P.; Orths, A.; O'Malley, M.; Ummels, B. C.; Tande, J. O.; Estanqueiro, A.; Gomez, E.; Smith, J. C.

    2008-06-01

    This paper summarizes the results from 18 case studies, with discussion on differences in methodology as well as issues that have been identified to impact the cost of wind integration.

  1. Air Source Heat Pumps for Cold Climate Applications: Recent U. S. R&D Results from IEA HPP Annex 41

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baxter, Van D; Groll, Dr. Eckhard A.; Shen, Bo

    2014-01-01

    Air source heat pumps are easily applied to buildings almost anywhere. They are widespread in milder climate regions but their use in cold regions is hampered due to low efficiency and heating capacity at cold outdoor temperatures. This article describes selected R&D activities aimed at improving their cold weather performance.

  2. Vehicle Technologies Office Merit Review 2014: International Energy Agency (IEA IA-AMT) International Characterization Methods (Agreement ID:26462)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Presentation given by Oak Ridge National Laboratory at 2014 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and Vehicle Technologies Office Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting about International...

  3. IEA Bioenergy Task 40Sustainable International Bioenergy Trade:Securing Supply and Demand Country Report 2014—United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hess, J. Richard; Lamers, Patrick; Roni, Mohammad S.; Jacobson, Jacob J.; Heath, Brendi

    2015-01-01

    Logistical barrier are tied to feedstock harvesting, collection, storage and distribution. Current crop harvesting machinery is unable to selectively harvest preferred components of cellulosic biomass while maintaining acceptable levels of soil carbon and minimizing erosion. Actively managing biomass variability imposes additional functional requirements on biomass harvesting equipment. A physiological variation in biomass arises from differences in genetics, degree of crop maturity, geographical location, climatic events, and harvest methods. This variability presents significant cost and performance risks for bioenergy systems. Currently, processing standards and specifications for cellulosic feedstocks are not as well-developed as for mature commodities. Biomass that is stored with high moisture content or exposed to moisture during storage is susceptible to spoilage, rotting, spontaneous combustion, and odor problems. Appropriate storage methods and strategies are needed to better define storage requirements to preserve the volume and quality of harvested biomass over time and maintain its conversion yield. Raw herbaceous biomass is costly to collect, handle, and transport because of its low density and fibrous nature. Existing conventional, bale-based handling equipment and facilities cannot cost-effectively deliver and store high volumes of biomass, even with improved handling techniques. Current handling and transportation systems designed for moving woodchips can be inefficient for bioenergy processes due to the costs and challenges of transporting, storing, and drying high-moisture biomass. The infrastructure for feedstock logistics has not been defined for the potential variety of locations, climates, feedstocks, storage methods, processing alternatives, etc., which will occur at a national scale. When setting up biomass fuel supply chains, for large-scale biomass systems, logistics are a pivotal part in the system. Various studies have shown that long-distance international transport by ship is feasible in terms of energy use and transportation costs, but availability of suitable vessels and meteorological conditions (e.g., winter time in Scandinavia and Russia) need to be considered. However, local transportation by truck (both in biomass exporting and importing countries) may be a high-cost factor, which can influence the overall energy balance and total biomass costs.

  4. PowerPoint Presentation

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    20 W 118 th St, New York, NY 10027 | http://energypolicy.columbia.edu | @ColumbiaUEnergy Pacific Rim Impacts of US Shale Boom Jason Bordoff 2013 EIA Energy Conference June 17, 2013 1 420 W 118 th St, New York, NY 10027 | http://energypolicy.columbia.edu | @ColumbiaUEnergy Global Gas Demand Forecast Bcf/d Source: IEA WEO2012 0 100 200 300 400 500 600 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 2035 Non-OECD Asia OECD Asia Africa Middle East Non-OECD Europe/Eurasia Europe Non-OECD Americas OECD Americas 2 420 W 118

  5. Loads Providing Ancillary Services: Review of International Experience

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... Dispatcher, v. 1 6. Newsletter of the IEA DSM Task XIII Project, IEA DSM Programme. IEEEPES 2005. Transmission and Distribution Conference & Exhibition: Asia and Pacific. ...

  6. Technology Roadmap: Biofuels for Transport | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    TOOL Name: Technology Roadmap: Biofuels for Transport AgencyCompany Organization: IEA ComplexityEase of Use: Not Available Website: www.iea.orgpublications...

  7. Property:UNRegion | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Solid Waste Management Guidelines for Conversion of Diesel Buses to Compressed Natural Gas H How Communities Manage Forests I IEA Energy Statistics IEA Implementing Agreements...

  8. Energy Security and Sustainable Development in Asia and the Pacific...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Statistics Division, UNDP, APERC, BP and IEA. For demand forecasts, it uses IEA methodology, albeit modified for Asia-Pacific conditions. The study uses the international...

  9. Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Turkey, United Kingdom and United States Mission OECD brings together the governments of...

  10. OECD-Fostering Innovation for Green Growth | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fostering Innovation for Green Growth Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: OECD-Fostering Innovation for Green Growth AgencyCompany Organization:...

  11. OECD-Private Sector Engagement in Adaptation to Climate Change...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Private Sector Engagement in Adaptation to Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: OECD-Private Sector Engagement in Adaptation to Climate Change...

  12. What Did They Do in IEA 34/43? Or How to Diagnose and Repair Bugs in 500,000 Lines of Code: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Judkoff, R.; Neymark, J.

    2009-06-01

    This paper presents an overview of the International Energy Agency Solar Heating and Cooling Task 34 and Energy Conservation in Buildings and Community Systems Annex 43.

  13. International Energy Agency (IEA) Task 40 — Sustainable International Energy Trade: Securing Supply and Demand -- Country Report 2009 for the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Richard Hess; Jacob J. Jacobson; Richard Nelson; Carl Wolf

    2009-06-01

    This report outlines the status of U.S. biomass resources currently and future potentials for domestic and export markets of residues, energy crops, and woody resources. Includes energy and fuel production and consumption statistics, driving policies, targets, and government investment in bioenergy industry development.

  14. International Energy Agency Building Energy Simulation Test and Diagnostic Method (IEA BESTEST) Multi-Zone Non-Airflow In-Depth Diagnostic Cases: MZ320 -- MZ360

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neymark, J.; Judkoff, R.; Alexander, D.; Felsmann, C.; Strachan, P.; Wijsman, A.

    2008-09-01

    This report documents a set of diagnostic test cases for multi-zone heat transfer models. The methodology combines empirical validation, analytical verification, and comparative analysis techniques.

  15. Renewable Electricity Grid Integration Roadmap for Mexico. Supplement to the IEA Expert Group Report on Recommended Practices for Wind Integration Studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parsons, Brian; Cochran, Jaquelin; Watson, Andrea; Katz, Jessica; Bracho, Ricardo

    2015-08-19

    As a recognized leader in efforts to mitigate global climate change, the Government of Mexico (GOM) works proactively to reduce emissions, demonstrating strong political will and capacity to comprehensively address climate change. Since 2010, the U.S. government (USG) has supported these efforts by partnering with Mexico under the Enhancing Capacity for Low Emission Development Strategies (EC-LEDS) program. Through the program, the USG has partnered with Mexico’s Ministry of Energy (SENER), as well as other government agencies, to support GOM in reaching its clean energy and climate change goals. Specifically, the EC-LEDS program is supporting GOM’s clean energy goal of generating 35% of its electricity from renewable energy (RE) by 2024. EC-LEDS, through the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) and the U.S Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), has been collaborating with SENER and GOM interagency working group—the Consejo Consultivo para las Energías Renovables (Consultative Council on Renewable Energy)—to create a grid integration roadmap for variable RE. 1 A key objective in creating a grid integration roadmap is assessing likely impacts of wind and solar energy on the power system and modifying planning and operations accordingly. This paper applies best practices in conducting a grid integration study to the Mexican context.

  16. International Energy Agency (IEA) Task 40 — Sustainable International Energy Trade: Securing Supply and Demand -- Country Report 2010 for the United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Richard Hess; Jacob J. Jacobson; Richard Nelson; Carl Wolf

    2011-12-01

    This report updates the status of U.S. biomass resources currently and future potentials for domestic and export markets of residues, energy crops, and woody resources. Includes energy and fuel production and consumption statistics, driving policies, targets, and government investment in bioenergy industry development.

  17. Forecasting Crude Oil Spot Price Using OECD Petroleum Inventory Levels

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a short-term monthly forecasting model of West Texas Intermediate crude oil spot price using Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) petroleum inventory levels.

  18. Energy Use and Carbon Emissions: Non-OECD Countries

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    1994-01-01

    Presents world energy use and carbon emissions patterns, with particular emphasis on the non-OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development) countries (including the current and former centrally planned economies).

  19. Bahattin Buyuksahin

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    0 Investor Flows and the 2008 Boom/Bust in Oil Prices Discussion by Bahattin Buyuksahin © OECD/IEA 2010 Quick Overview of Oil Market:  Rising uncertainty about the strength of global economy going forward has major impact on the oil market outlook  Emerging markets, hitherto the cornerstone of demand growth could see the greatest impact from economic slow-down  Until the recent concerns on sovereign debt (OECD) and inflation (non- OECD) intensified, higher crude prices had derived from

  20. OECD-A Green Growth Strategy for Food and Agriculture | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OECD-A Green Growth Strategy for Food and Agriculture Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: OECD-A Green Growth Strategy for Food and Agriculture Agency...

  1. Changing Global Petroleum Product Trade Flows

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 © OECD/IEA 2014 Antoine Halff 2014 EIA Energy Conference Changing Global Petroleum Product Trade Flows Washington, DC July 14, 2014 © OECD/IEA 2014 Crude trade shifts further east  Asia imports increase by 2.6 mb/d to 22.1 mb, or 65% of the international crude market Crude Exports in 2019 and Growth in 2013-19 for Key Trade Routes 1 (million barrels per day) 0.2 0.3 (0) 2.0 (0.2) (-0.6) 4.1 (-0.6) 0.1 (-0.7) 3.1 1.2 (0.3) 1.0 (+0.1) -0.6 2.2 1.8 (+0.8) (-0.6) 1.1 (+0.3) Red number in

  2. CRAD, Preliminary Documented Safety Analysis - July 25, 2014...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    4 Preliminary Documented Safety Analysis (IEA CRAD 31-2, REV. 0) This Criteria Review and Approach Document (IEA CRAD 31-2, REV. 0) provides objectives, criteria, and approaches...

  3. NREL: Wind Research - News Release Archives

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    09 September 14, 2009 IEA Wind Energy 2008 Annual Report Now Available for Free Download The IEA Annual Report for 2008 provides the latest information on wind industries in 20 ...

  4. From Roadmaps to Implementation Workshop | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Implementation, Market analysis, Technology characterizations Resource Type: Workshop, Lessons learnedbest practices Website: www.iea.orgworkworkshopdetail.asp?WSID433...

  5. Energy Technology Roadmaps: A Guide to Development and Implementation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Topics: Low emission development planning, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Guidemanual, Lessons learnedbest practices Website: www.iea.orgpapersroadmapsguide.pdf Energy...

  6. Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration Continuation (OC4), Phase I - Results of Coupled Simulations of an Offshore Wind Turbine with Jacket Support Structure: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Popko, W.; Vorpahl, F.; Zuga, A.; Kohlmeier, M.; Jonkman, J.; Robertson, A.; Larsen, T. J.; Yde, A.; Saetertro, K.; Okstad, K. M.; Nichols, J.; Nygaard, T. A.; Gao, Z.; Manolas, D.; Kim, K.; Yu, Q.; Shi, W.; Park, H.; Vasquez-Rojas, A.

    2012-03-01

    This paper presents the results of the IEA Wind Task 30, Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration Continuation Project - Phase 1.

  7. Standardization of Transport Properties Measurements: Internal Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Agency (IEA-AMT) Annex on Thermoelectric | Department of Energy Standardization of Transport Properties Measurements: Internal Energy Agency (IEA-AMT) Annex on Thermoelectric Standardization of Transport Properties Measurements: Internal Energy Agency (IEA-AMT) Annex on Thermoelectric Thermoelectric materials transport properties measurements improvement and standardization is undertaken by new IEA annex under the Advanced Materials for Transportation implementing agreement PDF icon wang.pdf

  8. OECD-A Green Growth Strategy for Energy | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    A Green Growth Strategy for Energy Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: OECD-A Green Growth Strategy for Energy AgencyCompany Organization: Organisation for...

  9. Microsoft PowerPoint - GuyCaruso oilmarketmar2010.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Despite Excess Spare Capacity, Reduced Demand and Increased OPEC Production volumes, High , g Prices Persist.... 8 160 mmb/d US$/barrel 5 6 7 8 100 120 140 160 2 3 4 5 40 60 80 100 0 1 2 0 20 40 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 www.csis.org | 1 Source: IEA OMR September 2009, EIA Prices Surplus Capacity If the Fundamentals are so Bad, What's Driving Oil Prices to Increase? * Questionable Data ? What is really happening in non- OECD/China? Stocks and Line Fill? Cold Weather? *

  10. OECD MCCI project final report, February 28, 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S.

    2011-05-23

    Although extensive research has been conducted over the last several years in the areas of Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) and debris coolability, two important issues warrant further investigation. The first issue concerns the effectiveness of water in terminating a CCI by flooding the interacting masses from above, thereby quenching the molten core debris and rendering it permanently coolable. This safety issue was investigated in the Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program. The approach was to conduct large scale, integral-type reactor materials experiments with core melt masses ranging up to two metric tons. These experiments provided unique, and for the most part repeatable, indications of heat transfer mechanism(s) that could provide long term debris cooling. However, the results did not demonstrate definitively that a melt would always be completely quenched. This was due to the fact that the crust anchored to the test section sidewalls in every test, which led to melt/crust separation, even at the largest test section lateral span of 1.20 m. This decoupling is not expected for a typical reactor cavity, which has a span of 5-6 m. Even though the crust may mechanically bond to the reactor cavity walls, the weight of the coolant and the crust itself is expected to periodically fracture the crust and restore contact with the melt. The fractured crust will provide a pathway for water to recontact the underlying melt, thereby allowing other debris cooling mechanisms to proceed and contribute to terminating the core-concrete interaction. Thus, one of the key aims of the current program was to measure crust strength to check the hypothesis that a corium crust would not be strong enough to sustain melt/crust separation in a plant accident. The second important issue concerns long-term, two-dimensional concrete ablation by a prototypic core oxide melt. As discussed by Foit, the existing reactor material database for dry cavity conditions is solely one-dimensional. Although the MACE Scoping Test was carried out with a two-dimensional concrete cavity, the interaction was flooded soon after ablation was initiated to investigate debris coolability. Moreover, due to the scoping nature of this test, the apparatus was minimally instrumented and therefore the results are of limited value from the code validation viewpoint. Aside from the MACE program, the COTELS test series also investigated 2-D CCI under flooded cavity conditions. However, the input power density for these tests was quite high relative to the prototypic case. Finally, the BETA test series provided valuable data on 2-D core concrete interaction under dry cavity conditions, but these tests focused on investigating the interaction of the metallic (steel) phase with concrete. Due to these limitations, there is significant uncertainty in the partitioning of energy dissipated for the ablation of concrete in the lateral and axial directions under dry cavity conditions for the case of a core oxide melt. Accurate knowledge of this 'power split' is important in the evaluation of the consequences of an ex-vessel severe accident; e.g., lateral erosion can undermine containment structures, while axial erosion can penetrate the basemat, leading to ground contamination and/or possible containment bypass. As a result of this uncertainty, there are still substantial differences among computer codes in the prediction of 2-D cavity erosion behavior under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Thus, a second key aim of the current program was to provide the necessary data to help resolve these modeling differences. In light of the above issues, the OECD-sponsored Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program was initiated at Argonne National Laboratory. The project conducted reactor materials experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following technical objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focused on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in previous

  11. Slide 1

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Active Labor Unions Interfacing with DOE June 2014 Information Book 1 Introduction Overview: On February 12, 2014 the Secretary of Energy announced the formation of a new Office of Independent Enterprise Assessments (IEA). IEA reports directly to the Office of the Secretary and provides independent advice to the Secretary and Deputy Secretary. IEA is responsible for meeting Federal regulations and directives in the areas of independent oversight, safety and security enforcement and is headed by

  12. Oak Ridge National Laboratory's philosophy and approach to NEPA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Hook, R.I.; Braunstein, H.M.; Sigal, L.L.; Trettin, C.C.

    1991-01-01

    At Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), the overall responsibility for compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) resides with Environmental Review and Documentations Section that is within the Office of Environmental Compliance and Documentation (OECD). Organizationally, OECD is a line-management division reporting to the Director for Environmental, Safety and Health Compliance. The cornerstone for NEPA compliance at ORNL is the Internal Environmental Assessment (IEA), which is designed to provide a basis for NEPA review and documentation. The Standard Operating Procedures provide for evaluation and documentation records management and training, and auditing. The IEA provides a project description and a review of environmental, health and safety issues. The completed IEA is used to make recommendations to DOE regarding the appropriate level of NEPA documentation required for the action. NEPA documents which may be prepared include the Categorical Exclusion, Abbreviated Environmental Assessment, and Environmental Assessment; actions requiring Environmental Impact Statements are prepared by US Department of Energy (US DOE). The relatively recent DOE initiative for agency-wide compliance with NEPA has created areas in which ORNL has found itself lacking adequate resources and expertise. These are discussed in this paper. Throughout ORNL, there is strong management support for compliance with NEPA which has resulted in enhanced awareness and implementation of the NEPA requirements. Guidance is being provided and Laboratory divisions are factoring early integration of NEPA into their project planning with the goal of ensuring that their activities are carried out in full compliance with the letter and the spirit of NEPA and the other environmental statutes and regulations.

  13. OECD/NEA study on the economics of the long-term operation of nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lokhov, A.; Cameron, R.

    2012-07-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) established the Ad hoc expert group on the Economics of Long-term Operation (LTO) of Nuclear Power Plants. The primary aim of this group is to collect and analyse technical and economic data on the upgrade and lifetime extension experience in OECD countries, and to assess the likely applications for future extensions. This paper describes the key elements of the methodology of economic assessment of LTO and initial findings for selected NEA member countries. (authors)

  14. Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    This activity consisted of IEA staff conducting an informational visit to WTP to review the Bechtel National, Incorporated response to Quality Assurance Program Effectiveness ...

  15. Department of Energy Quadrennial Technology Review Clean Electricity...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Slide 1 Quadrennial Technology Review's Alternative Generation Workshop Slides IEA-GIA ExCo - National Geothermal Data System and Online Tools...

  16. Netherlands: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Wind Energy Resource Atlas for Netherlands. 3 Programs IEA Renewable Energy Technology Deployment ECN-NREL Collaboration Action Plan for Forest Law Enforcement Governance...

  17. Energa hidroelctrica | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Energa hidroelctrica Jump to: navigation, search Potencia generada con hidroelctrica en sur Amrica fuente IEA Potencia generada con energa hidroelctrica en centro...

  18. Organizational Chart | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Chart Office presentation icon Organizational Chart More Documents & Publications IEA Organizational Chart Office of International Affairs Org Chart Chart of breakout of...

  19. Renewables in Global Energy Supply | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass, Geothermal, Solar, Wind, Hydrogen Website: www.iea.orgpapers2006renewablefactsheet.pdf Renewables in Global Energy Supply Screenshot...

  20. LBNL China Energy Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    organizations, as well as with multilateral organizations working in China such as the IEA, World Bank, UN Development Program."1 "LBNL's China Energy Group can contribute to...

  1. China-2050 Wind Technology Roadmap | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pathways analysis, Technology characterizations Country China Eastern Asia References IEA Energy Technology Roadmaps1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding...

  2. Netherlands Antilles: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    country in North America. External Links Netherlands Antilles Renewable Energy Data from IEA Netherlands Antilles Contacts from Climate-Eval LowCarbonWorld Profile for Netherlands...

  3. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    For example, the posted price for West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil that the International Energy Agency (IEA) used in its calculations to show that the record...

  4. Energy Development Index (EDI) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Index (EDI) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Energy Development Index (EDI) AgencyCompany Organization: International Energy Agency (IEA) Sector:...

  5. Standardization of Transport Properties Measurements: Internal...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Standardization of Transport Properties Measurements: Internal Energy Agency (IEA-AMT) Annex on Thermoelectric Standardization of Transport Properties Measurements: Internal Energy...

  6. International Low-Carbon Energy Technology Platform | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Topics: Low emission development planning, Policiesdeployment programs Resource Type: Lessons learnedbest practices Website: www.iea.orgplatform.asp International Low-Carbon...

  7. 2010 Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Global Commercialization & Development...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications Fuel Cell Technologies Program Overview: 2012 DOE Polymer and Composite Materials Meetings Fuel Cell Technologies Program Overview: 2012 IEA HIA ...

  8. Democratic Republic of Congo: Energy Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    D Reegle Clean Energy Datasets The Democratic Republic of the Congo is a country in Africa. External Links Democratic Republic of Congo Renewable Energy Data from IEA...

  9. Burkina Faso: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    World Factbook, Appendix D Reegle Clean Energy Datasets Burkina Faso is a country in Africa. External Links Burkina Faso Renewable Energy Data from IEA Burkina Faso Contacts...

  10. International Energy Agency Bioenergy Conference 2015

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The 2015 International Energy Agency (IEA) Bioenergy Conference will be hosted in Berlin, Germany, from October 27 to 29, 2015. The conference will highlight recent research and market developments in bioenergy, such as challenges across bioenergy value chains, as well as crosscutting topics such as environmental sustainability, socioeconomic issues, and trade. The U.S. Department of Energy Bioenergy Technologies Office Demonstration and Market Transformation Program Manager Jim Spaeth will be moderating a panel on multidisciplinary projects within IEA Bioenergy. He will also be attending the IEA Executive Committee meeting on October 26, during which plans and commitments will be made for the IEA Bioenergy projects for the next triennium.

  11. This Week In Petroleum Printer-Friendly Version

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Energy Agency (IEA) released its latest monthly Oil Market Report (OMR). The big news was that inventory levels for the Organization for Economic Cooperation and...

  12. "Title","Creator/Author","Publication Date","OSTI Identifier...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report",,,,"United States Carbon Sequestration Council (United States)","IEA Clean Coal Centre, London (United Kingdom)","20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; COAL GASIFICATION;...

  13. Biomasa | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Biomasa Jump to: navigation, search Mapa Interactivo de Biocombustibles Potencia generada con Biomasa en sur America fuente IEA Potencia generada con Biomasa en centro America...

  14. Wind Vision: A New Era for Wind Power in the United States

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... HVAC high-voltage alternating current IEA International Energy Agency IEC International Electrotechnical Commission IEEE Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers IGCC ...

  15. Developing the Next Generation of Gridded TMYs (Presentation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    o Outreach * Standards, expert committees, and collaborations o ASTM G03-radiometry o IEA Task 46 Solar Resource Assessment and Forecasting o Subcontracts and cooperative...

  16. Bibliography, Bioenergy Technologies Office Multi-Year Program...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    M. (2013). "Status of Advanced Biofuels Demonstration Facilities in 2012: A Report to IEA Bioenergy Task 39," http:demoplants.bioenergy2020.eufilesDemoplantsReportFinal.pd...

  17. Hydrogen Safety Panel

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    or otherwise restricted information. Project ID: scs07weiner PNNL-SA-65397 2 IEA HIA Task 19 Working Group Hydrogen Safety Training Props Hydrogen Safety Panel Incident...

  18. Renewable Electricity Grid Integration Roadmap for Mexico: Supplement...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    FOR LOW EMISSION DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIES Renewable Electricity Grid Integration Roadmap for Mexico: Supplement to the IEA Expert Group Report on Recommended Practices for...

  19. Category:CLEAN Partner | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) International Energy Agency (IEA) International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD) International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) J Joint...

  20. Key World Energy Statistics-2010 | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    World Energy Statistics-2010 AgencyCompany Organization: International Energy Agency Sector: Energy Topics: Market analysis Resource Type: Dataset, Maps Website: www.iea.org...

  1. Microsoft PowerPoint - RFA_EIA_conference_2009.ppt

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    production yields between 30 and 59% reduction in GHG emissions compared to gasoline (Journal of Industrial Ecology, Liska et all., 2009 and IEA Bioenergy Task 39) * Future GHG ...

  2. Gateway:Coordinated Low Emissions Assistance Network (CLEAN)...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Center ClimateTechWiki ESMAP Low Carbon Development Knowledge Products and E-Learning IEA Policies and Measures Database GEF-Knowledge Management Initiative REN21...

  3. Bioenergy Sustainability: How to Define & Measure It

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Organization), IEA (International Energy Agency) Universities: Univ. Tennessee, NC State Univ., Texas A&M, Great ... indicators focus on management practices but knowledge ...

  4. ESPA Authoring Template

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018 2019 2020 ... The IEA also reports that the most used coal-based ... "hybrid" plant, which partially gasifies refinery residues. ...

  5. Integrated MARKAL-EFOM System (TIMES) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Program ComplexityEase of Use: Advanced Website: iea-etsap.orgwebTimes.asp Cost: Free Related Tools TEEMP Intertemporal Computable Equilibrium System (ICES) MCA4Climate -...

  6. Energy Technology Perspectives, 2010: Scenarios & Strategies...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Carbon Capture and Storage Topics: Environmental Website: www.iea.orgTextbasenppdffree2010etp2010part1.pdf Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.orgcontent...

  7. INL Results for Phases I and III of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 Benchmark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerhard Strydom; Javier Ortensi; Sonat Sen; Hans Hammer

    2013-09-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Technology Development Office (TDO) Methods Core Simulation group led the construction of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Modular High Temperature Reactor (MHTGR) 350 MW benchmark for comparing and evaluating prismatic VHTR analysis codes. The benchmark is sponsored by the OECD's Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), and the project will yield a set of reference steady-state, transient, and lattice depletion problems that can be used by the Department of Energy (DOE), the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), and vendors to assess their code suits. The Methods group is responsible for defining the benchmark specifications, leading the data collection and comparison activities, and chairing the annual technical workshops. This report summarizes the latest INL results for Phase I (steady state) and Phase III (lattice depletion) of the benchmark. The INSTANT, Pronghorn and RattleSnake codes were used for the standalone core neutronics modeling of Exercise 1, and the results obtained from these codes are compared in Section 4. Exercise 2 of Phase I requires the standalone steady-state thermal fluids modeling of the MHTGR-350 design, and the results for the systems code RELAP5-3D are discussed in Section 5. The coupled neutronics and thermal fluids steady-state solution for Exercise 3 are reported in Section 6, utilizing the newly developed Parallel and Highly Innovative Simulation for INL Code System (PHISICS)/RELAP5-3D code suit. Finally, the lattice depletion models and results obtained for Phase III are compared in Section 7. The MHTGR-350 benchmark proved to be a challenging simulation set of problems to model accurately, and even with the simplifications introduced in the benchmark specification this activity is an important step in the code-to-code verification of modern prismatic VHTR codes. A final OECD/NEA comparison report will compare the Phase I and III results of all other international participants in 2014, while the remaining Phase II transient case results will be reported in 2015.

  8. Results from the OECD report on international projections of electricity generating costs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paffenbarger, J.A.; Bertel, E.

    1998-07-01

    The International Energy Agency and Nuclear Energy Agency of the OECD have periodically undertaken a joint study on electricity generating costs in OECD Member countries and selected non-Member countries. This paper presents key results from the 1998 update of this study. Experts from 19 countries drawn from electric utility companies and government provided data on capital costs, operating and maintenance costs, and fuel costs from which levelized electricity generating costs (US cents/kWh) for baseload power plants were estimated in each country using a common set of economic assumptions. Light water nuclear power plants, pulverized coal plants, and natural gas-fired combined cycle gas turbines were the principal options evaluated. five and 10% discount rates, 40-year operating lifetime, and 75% annual load factor were the base assumptions, with sensitivity analyses on operating lifetime and load factor. Fuel costs and fuel escalation were provided individually by country, with a sensitivity case to evaluate costs assuming no real fuel price escalation over plant lifetimes. Of the three principal fuel/technology options, none is predominantly the cheapest option for all economic assumptions. However, fossil-fueled options are generally estimated to be the least expensive option. The study confirms that gas-fired combined cycles have improved their economic performance in most countries in recent years and are strong competitors to nuclear and coal-fired plants. Eleven out of the 18 countries with two or more options show gas-fired plants to be the cheapest option at 10% discount rate. Coal remains a strong competitor to gas when lower discount rates are used. Nuclear is the least expensive at both 5 and 10% discount rate in only two countries. Generally, with gas prices above 5 US$/GJ, nuclear plants constructed at overnight capital costs below 1 650 $/kWe have the potential to be competitive only at lower discount rates.

  9. The OECD/NEA/NSC PBMR coupled neutronics/thermal hydraulics transient benchmark: The PBMR-400 core design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reitsma, F.; Ivanov, K.; Downar, T.; De Haas, H.; Gougar, H. D.

    2006-07-01

    The Pebble Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) is a High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) concept to be built in South Africa. As part of the verification and validation program the definition and execution of code-to-code benchmark exercises are important. The Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) has accepted, through the Nuclear Science Committee (NSC), the inclusion of the Pebble-Bed Modular Reactor (PBMR) coupled neutronics/thermal hydraulics transient benchmark problem in its program. The OECD benchmark defines steady-state and transients cases, including reactivity insertion transients. It makes use of a common set of cross sections (to eliminate uncertainties between different codes) and includes specific simplifications to the design to limit the need for participants to introduce approximations in their models. In this paper the detailed specification is explained, including the test cases to be calculated and the results required from participants. (authors)

  10. OECD/NEA Ongoing activities related to the nuclear fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cornet, S.M.; McCarthy, K.; Chauvin, N.

    2013-07-01

    As part of its role in encouraging international collaboration, the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency is coordinating a series of projects related to the Nuclear Fuel Cycle. The Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) Working Party on Scientific Issues of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (WPFC) comprises five different expert groups covering all aspects of the fuel cycle from front to back-end. Activities related to fuels, materials, physics, separation chemistry, and fuel cycles scenarios are being undertaken. By publishing state-of-the-art reports and organizing workshops, the groups are able to disseminate recent research advancements to the international community. Current activities mainly focus on advanced nuclear systems, and experts are working on analyzing results and establishing challenges associated to the adoption of new materials and fuels. By comparing different codes, the Expert Group on Advanced Fuel Cycle Scenarios is aiming at gaining further understanding of the scientific issues and specific national needs associated with the implementation of advanced fuel cycles. At the back end of the fuel cycle, separation technologies (aqueous and pyrochemical processing) are being assessed. Current and future activities comprise studies on minor actinides separation and post Fukushima studies. Regular workshops are also organized to discuss recent developments on Partitioning and Transmutation. In addition, the Nuclear Development Committee (NDC) focuses on the analysis of the economics of nuclear power across the fuel cycle in the context of changes of electricity markets, social acceptance and technological advances and assesses the availability of the nuclear fuel and infrastructure required for the deployment of existing and future nuclear power. The Expert Group on the Economics of the Back End of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle (EBENFC), in particular, is looking at assessing economic and financial issues related to the long term management of spent nuclear fuel. (authors)

  11. Federal Trade Commission tenth report to the Congress and the President

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-04-01

    This Tenth Report on the Voluntary Agreement has reviewed the major activities of the oil industry groups participating in IEA activities during the reporting period. The Report concludes that the safeguards built into the conduct of AST-3 minimized competitive risks. However, the report recommends that the extent of ISAG's planning role be clarified for future tests or during an emergency. In December 1980, the IEA adopted an inventory balancing plan to forstall price increases that could result from the oil supply disruption caused by the Iran/Iraq war. Oil companies were given clearance to provide the IEA with supply data and to engage in bilateral consultation with the Secretariat to assist the IEA to determine whether to activate its oil sharing system. However, Section 252 required that no antitrust immunity be given for any supply actions taken at the request of the IEA or the US Government to carry out the balancing plan. Although the companies submitted supply data, no bilateral consultation were conducted. In the past, industry consultation on the need to activate the sharing system has included the receipt and discussion of Secretariat forecasts based upon company-submitted supply data. The report notes the traditional antitrust concern regarding the dissemination and discussion of short term industry forecasts. In addition, the report reviews the results of our staff's inquiry into company use of IEA-forecast data. The inquiry found that while the forecasts had not been used for operational purposes, some companies circulated the forecasts widely and did not limit the use of the data to IEA- related purposes. The report recommends that access to forecast data be restricted to company personnel who need the information in connection with IEA activities and that the use of the data for non-IEA purposes be prohibited. The report also suggests that industry discussions of short-term market conditions be restricted.

  12. Case studies on recent fossil-fired plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henderson, C.

    2007-12-31

    The article summarises the findings of case studies on fossil-fired power plants carried out by the IEA Clean Coal Centre for the IEA at the request of world leaders at the Gleneagles G8 Summit in July 2005. The studies compared the cost, efficiency and emissions of eight recently constructed coal-fired plants using pulverized coal combustion with subcritical, supercritical or ultra-supercritical steam turbine cycles. Also included was a review of IGCC developments. A case study of a natural gas combined-cycle plant was included for comparison. The full report has been published by the IEA. 1 tab.

  13. OECD/MCCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : final report February 28, 2006.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

    2011-05-23

    Although extensive research has been conducted over the last several years in the areas of Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) and debris coolability, two important issues warrant further investigation. The first issue concerns the effectiveness of water in terminating a CCI by flooding the interacting masses from above, thereby quenching the molten core debris and rendering it permanently coolable. This safety issue was investigated in the EPRI-sponsored Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program. The approach was to conduct large scale, integral-type reactor materials experiments with core melt masses ranging up to two metric tons. These experiments provided unique, and for the most part repeatable, indications of heat transfer mechanism(s) that could provide long term debris cooling. However, the results did not demonstrate definitively that a melt would always be completely quenched. This was due to the fact that the crust anchored to the test section sidewalls in every test, which led to melt/crust separation, even at the largest test section lateral span of 1.20 m. This decoupling is not expected for a typical reactor cavity, which has a span of 5-6 m. Even though the crust may mechanically bond to the reactor cavity walls, the weight of the coolant and the crust itself is expected to periodically fracture the crust and restore contact with the melt. Although crust fracturing does not ensure that coolability will be achieved, it nonetheless provides a pathway for water to recontact the underlying melt, thereby allowing other debris cooling mechanisms to proceed. A related task of the current program, which is not addressed in this particular report, is to measure crust strength to check the hypothesis that a corium crust would not be strong enough to sustain melt/crust separation in a plant accident. The second important issue concerns long-term, two-dimensional concrete ablation by a prototypic core oxide melt. As discussed by Foit the existing reactor material database for dry cavity conditions is solely one-dimensional. Although the MACE Scoping Test was carried out with a two-dimensional concrete cavity, the interaction was flooded soon after ablation was initiated to investigate debris coolability. Moreover, due to the scoping nature of this test, the apparatus was minimally instrumented and therefore the results are of limited value from the code validation viewpoint. Aside from the MACE program, the COTELS test series also investigated 2-D CCI under flooded cavity conditions. However, the input power density for these tests was quite high relative to the prototypic case. Finally, the BETA test series provided valuable data on 2-D core concrete interaction under dry cavity conditions, but these tests focused on investigating the interaction of the metallic (steel) phase with concrete. Due to these limitations, there is significant uncertainty in the partition of energy dissipated for the ablation of concrete in the lateral and axial directions under dry cavity conditions for the case of a core oxide melt. Accurate knowledge of this 'power split' is important in the evaluation of the consequences of an ex-vessel severe accident; e.g., lateral erosion can undermine containment structures, while axial erosion can penetrate the basemat, leading to ground contamination and/or possible containment bypass. As a result of this uncertainty, there are still substantial differences among computer codes in the prediction of 2-D cavity erosion behavior under both wet and dry cavity conditions. In light of the above issues, the OECD-sponsored Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction (MCCI) program was initiated at Argonne National Laboratory. The project conducted reactor materials experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following technical objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focused on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties relat

  14. Analysis of the OECD/NRC BWR Turbine Trip Benchmark by the Coupled-Code System ATHLET-QUABOX/CUBBOX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Langenbuch, S.; Schmidt, K.-D.; Velkov, K.

    2004-10-15

    The OECD/NRC boiling water reactor (BWR) turbine trip benchmark has been calculated by the coupled thermal-hydraulic neutronics system code ATHLET-QUABOX/CUBBOX developed by Gesellschaft fuer Anlagen- und Reaktorsicherheit. The results obtained for all three exercises and for the additional four hypothetical cases are presented. The physical phenomena determining the BWR pressure transient are studied and explained. The sensitivity of results to variations of the initial steady-state conditions and of parameters of the two-phase flow model is discussed. A comparison is also performed for exercise 2 between the reactor core model with 33 thermal-hydraulic channels (THCs) as specified and a reactor core model with 764 THCs using a 1:1 mapping scheme.

  15. Wind Technology, Cost, and Performance Trends in Denmark, Germany, Ireland, Norway, the European Union, and the United States: 2007 - 2012; NREL (National Renewable Energy Laboratory)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hand, Maureen

    2015-06-15

    This presentation provides a summary of IEA Wind Task 26 report on Wind Technology, Cost, and Performance Trends in Denmark, Germany, Ireland, Norway, the European Union, and the United States: 2007-2012

  16. MARKet ALlocation (MARKAL) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Interface: Desktop Application ComplexityEase of Use: Moderate Website: iea-etsap.orgwebMarkal.asp Cost: Paid OpenEI Keyword(s): EERE tool References: MARKAL website1...

  17. High-Efficiency Rooftop Air Conditioners: Innovative Procurement...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE Contract Number: AC05-76RL01830 Resource Type: Journal Article Resource Relation: Journal Name: IEA Heat Pump Centre Newsletter; Journal Volume: 21; Journal Issue: 2 Research ...

  18. International Round-Robin on Transport Properties of Bismuth...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    IEA-AMT round-robin testing of n- and p-type bismuth telluride transport properties showed ... of measurements of thermoelectric material properties PDF icon wang.pdf More ...

  19. Aruba: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Aruba is a country in the Caribbean. External Links Aruba Renewable Energy Data from IEA Aruba Contacts from Climate-Eval LowCarbonWorld Profile for Aruba Retrieved from...

  20. Monaco: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Datasets Monaco is a country in Europe. External Links Monaco Renewable Energy Data from IEA Monaco Contacts from Climate-Eval LowCarbonWorld Profile for Monaco Retrieved from...

  1. Worldwide Trends in Energy Use and Efficiency: Key Insights from...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Trends in Energy Use and Efficiency: Key Insights from International Energy Agency (IEA) Indicator Analysis in Support of the Group of Eight (G8) Plan of Action Jump to:...

  2. Mali: Energy Resources | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    CIA World Factbook, Appendix D Reegle Clean Energy Datasets Mali is a country in Africa. External Links Mali Renewable Energy Data from IEA Mali Contacts from Climate-Eval...

  3. Office of Heath, Safety and Security Now Two New Offices

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    To serve you better, DOE has structured the former HSS into to new organizations: the Office Independent Enterprise Assessment (IEA); and Office of Environment, Health, Safety and Security (EHSS).

  4. 032202ASA.doc

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... to the IEA, spend a month there, go back to China, mainly on definitional and methodology. ... We are fortunate enough to have this relationship with the China Energy Research Institute ...

  5. Annex IV Environmental Webinar: Effects of Energy Removal on Physical Systems

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Please mark your calendars for the next Annex IV Environmental webinar titled: Effects of Energy Removal on Physical Systems. Held under the auspices of the Annex IV initiative to the IEA Ocean...

  6. Hydrogen Safety Knowledge Tools

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Data Partners Best Practices - LANL, SNL, NREL, NASA, Hydrogen Safety Panel, and IEA HIA Tasks 19 and 22 Incident Reporting - NASA and Hydrogen Safety Panel 3 Objectives H2...

  7. Microsoft PowerPoint - C-Mod_BPM_2010_21.ppt [Compatibility Mode...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    di Torino U. Tokyo U T U. Texas IFS U. Toronto Coordination: FFCC, USBPO, TTF, ITPA, IEA C-Mod International Collaborations* Selected Highlights (FY0910) and Plans (FY10-12) *...

  8. Organizational Chart | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Chart Organizational Chart Office presentation icon Organizational Chart More Documents & Publications IEA Organizational Chart Office of International Affairs Org Chart Chart of breakout of funds by major FSC

  9. International HVAC&R R&D Collaboration | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    International HVAC&R R&D Collaboration International HVAC&R R&D Collaboration Tony Bouza, chair of the International Organizing Committee for the 11th IEA Heat Pump Conference, delivers the welcoming address in Montreal. (2014) Tony Bouza, chair of the International Organizing Committee for the 11th IEA Heat Pump Conference, delivers the welcoming address in Montreal. (2014) Lead Performer: Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Oak Ridge, TN Partners: -- International Energy Agency -

  10. Energy Secretary Bodman Leads US Delegation to International Energy Agency

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Ministerial | Department of Energy Leads US Delegation to International Energy Agency Ministerial Energy Secretary Bodman Leads US Delegation to International Energy Agency Ministerial May 2, 2005 - 12:41pm Addthis PARIS, FRANCE -- Secretary of Energy Samuel W. Bodman this week is leading the U.S. Delegation to the Ministerial Meeting of the International Energy Agency (IEA), being held in Paris. Secretary Bodman will emphasize three principles at the IEA Ministerial -- that energy security

  11. International markets for CCTs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferriter, J.P.

    1997-12-31

    The paper begins by describing the role of the International Energy Agency, the importance of coal, what the IEA is doing in the area of clean coal technology, and the role of the IEA Coal Industry Advisory Board. The paper then discusses which coal technologies will be chosen, what the problem areas are, and what can be done to accelerate the take-up of clean coal technologies.

  12. International Energy Agency Bioenergy Webinar: Mobilizing Sustainable Bioenergy Supply Chains

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    International Energy Agency (IEA) Bioenergy program will be hosting a webinar on Feb. 25, 2016 to present the findings of their “Mobilize Sustainable Bioenergy Supply Chains” project. Over the last three years, researchers have collaborated to examine the prospects for large-scale mobilization of bioenergy resources across the globe. Members of Bioenergy Technologies Office staff support the research and activities and IEA Bioenergy. Email to register to attend the webinar.

  13. Training | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Training Training The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Independent Assessments (IEA) provides expert evaluations of management performance in safety, security and other areas by seasoned experts who are independent of line management and will ensure that training reflects the most current Departmental policy on safety and security issues. IEA incorporates the lessons learned from inspections, reviews and assessments into safety and security training courses through its management of

  14. RELAP5-3D Results for Phase I (Exercise 2) of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW Benchmark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerhard Strydom

    2012-06-01

    The coupling of the PHISICS code suite to the thermal hydraulics system code RELAP5-3D has recently been initiated at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to provide a fully coupled prismatic Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) system modeling capability as part of the NGNP methods development program. The PHISICS code consists of three modules: INSTANT (performing 3D nodal transport core calculations), MRTAU (depletion and decay heat generation) and a perturbation/mixer module. As part of the verification and validation activities, steady state results have been obtained for Exercise 2 of Phase I of the newly-defined OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW Benchmark. This exercise requires participants to calculate a steady-state solution for an End of Equilibrium Cycle 350 MW Modular High Temperature Reactor (MHTGR), using the provided geometry, material, and coolant bypass flow description. The paper provides an overview of the MHTGR Benchmark and presents typical steady state results (e.g. solid and gas temperatures, thermal conductivities) for Phase I Exercise 2. Preliminary results are also provided for the early test phase of Exercise 3 using a two-group cross-section library and the Relap5-3D model developed for Exercise 2.

  15. Sixteen Years of International Co-operation. The OECD/NEA Co-operative Programme on Decommissioning

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menon, S.; Valencia, L.

    2002-02-25

    The Co-operative Programme on Decommissioning under the administration of the Radioactive Waste Management Committee of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) has recently completed sixteen years of operation. The Programme, which is essentially an information exchange programme between decommissioning projects, came into being in 1985. It has grown from an initial 10 decommissioning projects from 7 countries to 39 projects from 14 countries today. From purely information exchange to start with, the Programme has, in later years, been functioning as a voice for the collective expression of views of the implementers of nuclear decommissioning. During the first sixteen years of the operation of the Co-operative Programme, nuclear decommissioning has grown from local specialist activities within projects to a competitive commercial industry. By the dismantling and release from regulatory control of over a dozen diverse nuclear facilities, the Programme has been able to demonstrate in practice, that nuclear decommissioning can be performed safely both for the workers and the public, and that this can be done at reasonable costs in an environmentally friendly fashion. During the recent years, discussions and work within the Co-operative Programme, specially within some of the Task Groups, have had/are having effects and repercussions not just in the field of nuclear decommissioning, but can possibly affect activities and regulations in other industries. This paper describes how the Programme and its activities and procedures have evolved over the years and indicate the directions of developments in the organization and execution of decommissioning projects. Finally, it gives a brief overview of the achievements of the Cooperative Programme and visualizes future developments in the field of nuclear decommissioning.

  16. Summary of comparison and analysis of results from exercises 1 and 2 of the OECD PBMR coupled neutronics/thermal hydraulics transient benchmark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mkhabela, P.; Han, J.; Tyobeka, B.; Ivanov, K.; Reitsma, F.; Sartori, E.

    2006-07-01

    The Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) has accepted, through the Nuclear Science Committee (NSC), the inclusion of the Pebble-Bed Modular Reactor 400 MW design (PBMR-400) coupled neutronics/thermal hydraulics transient benchmark problem as part of their official activities. The scope of the benchmark is to establish a well-defined problem, based on a common given library of cross sections, to compare methods and tools in core simulation and thermal hydraulics analysis with a specific focus on transient events through a set of multi-dimensional computational test problems. The benchmark includes three steady state exercises and six transient exercises. This paper describes the first two steady state exercises, their objectives and the international participation in terms of organization, country and computer code utilized. This description is followed by a comparison and analysis of the participants' results submitted for these two exercises. The comparison of results from different codes allows for an assessment of the sensitivity of a result to the method employed and can thus help to focus the development efforts on the most critical areas. The two first exercises also allow for removing of user-related modeling errors and prepare core neutronics and thermal-hydraulics models of the different codes for the rest of the exercises in the benchmark. (authors)

  17. Independent Oversight Activity Report, Nevada National Security Site -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    May 5-7, 2014 | Department of Energy May 5-7, 2014 Independent Oversight Activity Report, Nevada National Security Site - May 5-7, 2014 May 5-7, 2014 Operational Awareness Oversight Visit of the Nevada National Security Site [IAR-NNSS-2014-05-05] This Independent Activity Report documents an oversight activity conducted by the Office of Independent Enterprise Assessments (IEA), Office of Nuclear Safety and Environmental Assessments, from May 5-7, 2014. The activity consisted of IEA staff

  18. ITP Distributed Energy: The International CHP/DHC Collaborative - Advancing Near-Term Low Carbon Technologies

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    50 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 IEA_USA_16pp_A4:IEA_USA_16pp_A4 21/7/08 16:16 Page 1 1 CHP/DHC Country Scorecard: United States The United States has a long history of using Combined Heat and Power (CHP), and 8% of US electricity generation is provided by 85 gigawatts (GWe) of installed CHP capacity at over 3 300 facilities. The large-scale district energy systems are located in many major cities, and 330 university campuses use district energy systems as a low-carbon,

  19. Chinese Oil Demand: Steep Incline Ahead

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Chinese Oil Demand: Steep Incline Ahead Malcolm Shealy Alacritas, Inc. April 7, 2008 Oil Demand: China, India, Japan, South Korea 0 2 4 6 8 1995 2000 2005 2010 Million Barrels/Day China South Korea Japan India IEA China Oil Forecast 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 Million Barrels/Day WEO 2007 16.3 mbd 12.7 mbd IEA China Oil Forecasts 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 2000 2005 2010 2015 2020 2025 2030 Million Barrels/Day WEO 2007 WEO 2006 WEO 2004 WEO 2002 Vehicle Sales in

  20. How To Setup EA Landing Page As Default Home Page For Google Chrome |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Google Chrome How To Setup EA Landing Page As Default Home Page For Google Chrome STEP 1: In Chrome enter the URL http://energy.gov/iea. Once the EA site loads, go to the Customize and Control Google Chrome button in the far right of the top menu (the icon looks like a page with multiple horizontal lines on it). STEP 1: In Chrome enter the URL http://energy.gov/iea. Once the EA site loads, go to the Customize and Control Google Chrome button in the far right of the top

  1. How To Setup EA Landing Page As Default Home Page For Internet Explorer |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Internet Explorer How To Setup EA Landing Page As Default Home Page For Internet Explorer STEP 1: In Internet Explorer enter the URL http://energy.gov/iea/. Once the EA site loads, click on the Home (Alt + M) drop-down list (highlighted with the red arrow and box). STEP 1: In Internet Explorer enter the URL http://energy.gov/iea/. Once the EA site loads, click on the Home (Alt + M) drop-down list (highlighted with the red arrow and box). STEP 2: Choose “Add or

  2. Comparison of the PHISICS/RELAP5-3D Ring and Block Model Results for Phase I of the OECD MHTGR-350 Benchmark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerhard Strydom

    2014-04-01

    The INL PHISICS code system consists of three modules providing improved core simulation capability: INSTANT (performing 3D nodal transport core calculations), MRTAU (depletion and decay heat generation) and a perturbation/mixer module. Coupling of the PHISICS code suite to the thermal hydraulics system code RELAP5-3D has recently been finalized, and as part of the code verification and validation program the exercises defined for Phase I of the OECD/NEA MHTGR 350 MW Benchmark were completed. This paper provides an overview of the MHTGR Benchmark, and presents selected results of the three steady state exercises 1-3 defined for Phase I. For Exercise 1, a stand-alone steady-state neutronics solution for an End of Equilibrium Cycle Modular High Temperature Reactor (MHTGR) was calculated with INSTANT, using the provided geometry, material descriptions, and detailed cross-section libraries. Exercise 2 required the modeling of a stand-alone thermal fluids solution. The RELAP5-3D results of four sub-cases are discussed, consisting of various combinations of coolant bypass flows and material thermophysical properties. Exercise 3 combined the first two exercises in a coupled neutronics and thermal fluids solution, and the coupled code suite PHISICS/RELAP5-3D was used to calculate the results of two sub-cases. The main focus of the paper is a comparison of the traditional RELAP5-3D ring model approach vs. a much more detailed model that include kinetics feedback on individual block level and thermal feedbacks on a triangular sub-mesh. The higher fidelity of the block model is illustrated with comparison results on the temperature, power density and flux distributions, and the typical under-predictions produced by the ring model approach are highlighted.

  3. Definition of the Floating System for Phase IV of OC3

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jonkman, J.

    2010-05-01

    Phase IV of the IEA Annex XXIII Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration (OC3) involves the modeling of an offshore floating wind turbine. This report documents the specifications of the floating system, which are needed by the OC3 participants for building aero-hydro-servo-elastic models.

  4. International Energy Agency | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Agency International Energy Agency The International Energy Agency (IEA) provides a mechanism for member countries to task- and cost-share research activities through two agreements-one supporting hydrogen activities and another supporting fuel cell activities. The Hydrogen Implementing Agreement (HIA) focuses on facilitating, coordinating, and maintaining innovative research, development, and demonstration activities through international cooperation and information exchange. There are

  5. Hydrogen from Biomass - State of the Art and Research Challenges

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    IEA/H2/TR-02/001 Hydrogen from Biomass State of the Art and Research Challenges Thomas A. Milne, Carolyn C. Elam and Robert J. Evans National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, CO USA A Report for the International Energy Agency Agreement on the Production and Utilization of Hydrogen Task 16, Hydrogen from Carbon-Containing Materials Table of Contents Preface.......................................................................................................... i Executive

  6. Test Procedures for Building Energy Simulation Tools | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Test Procedures for Building Energy Simulation Tools Test Procedures for Building Energy Simulation Tools Lead Performer: -- National Renewable Energy Laboratory - Golden, CO -- J. Neymark & Associates - Golden, CO -- Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) - Berkeley, CA Partners: -- ASHRAE Standing Special Projects Committee 140 -- Residential Energy Services Network (RESNET) -- International Energy Agency (IEA) - Paris, France -- Trane Inc. - Piscataway, NJ -- Carrier Corp. -

  7. Int'l Smart Grid Action Network | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Int'l Smart Grid Action Network Int'l Smart Grid Action Network International PDF icon Int'l Smart Grid Action Network More Documents & Publications Clean Energy Ministerial Press Fact Sheet IEA: Tracking Clean Energy Progress: Energy Technology Perspectives 2012 Joint Statement by Energy Ministers of G8, The People's Republic of China, India and The Republic of Korea (June 2008)

  8. Multinational Partnerships and Projects | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Multinational Partnerships and Projects Multinational Partnerships and Projects The Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) plays a key role in a number of multinational energy relationships. Click on the links below to jump to the respective section. Clean Energy Ministerial International Partnership for Energy Efficiency Cooperation (IPEEC) International Renewable Energy Agency (IRENA) International Energy Agency (IEA) Working Groups and Implementing Agreements International

  9. New Multi-group Transport Neutronics (PHISICS) Capabilities for RELAP5-3D and its Application to Phase I of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW Benchmark

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerhard Strydom; Cristian Rabiti; Andrea Alfonsi

    2012-10-01

    PHISICS is a neutronics code system currently under development at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). Its goal is to provide state of the art simulation capability to reactor designers. The different modules for PHISICS currently under development are a nodal and semi-structured transport core solver (INSTANT), a depletion module (MRTAU) and a cross section interpolation (MIXER) module. The INSTANT module is the most developed of the mentioned above. Basic functionalities are ready to use, but the code is still in continuous development to extend its capabilities. This paper reports on the effort of coupling the nodal kinetics code package PHISICS (INSTANT/MRTAU/MIXER) to the thermal hydraulics system code RELAP5-3D, to enable full core and system modeling. This will enable the possibility to model coupled (thermal-hydraulics and neutronics) problems with more options for 3D neutron kinetics, compared to the existing diffusion theory neutron kinetics module in RELAP5-3D (NESTLE). In the second part of the paper, an overview of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 MW benchmark is given. This benchmark has been approved by the OECD, and is based on the General Atomics 350 MW Modular High Temperature Gas Reactor (MHTGR) design. The benchmark includes coupled neutronics thermal hydraulics exercises that require more capabilities than RELAP5-3D with NESTLE offers. Therefore, the MHTGR benchmark makes extensive use of the new PHISICS/RELAP5-3D coupling capabilities. The paper presents the preliminary results of the three steady state exercises specified in Phase I of the benchmark using PHISICS/RELAP5-3D.

  10. Empirical Validation Workshop: Need and Theory

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    gov Empirical Validation Workshop: Need and Theory, Jan 28-29, 2015 Model vs Measured Pre-normative work by Labs, IEA, ASHRAE etc. becomes... Normative ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 140 Software Testing & Diagnostic Method: Finding needles in haystacks (BESTEST) 2 IRS & RESNET Qualified Software BESTESTed with Standard 140 EnerSim 179D Commercial Building Tax Credits (13 Simulation Tools) Hourly Analysis Program (HAP) RESNET (HERS, IECC, Tax Credits)(6 Tools) EnergyInsights(tm) TRANE/TRACE

  11. International Energy Agency

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE's market transformation efforts have reached to European and other countries who are part of the international distributed and decentralized energy community. Through its partnership with DOE, the combined heat and power (CHP) program of the International Energy Agency (IEA) conducts research and analysis of CHP markets and deployment efforts around the world and has used lessons learned from U.S. research, development, and deployment efforts to recommend market transformation activities and policies that will lead to new CHP installations worldwide.

  12. Performance and risks of advanced pulverized-coal plants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nalbandian, H.

    2009-07-01

    This article is based on an in-depth report of the same title published by the IEA Clean Coal Centre, CCC/135 (see Coal Abstracts entry Sep 2008 00535). It discusses the commercial, developmental and future status of pulverized fuel power plants including subcritical supercritical and ultra supercritical systems of pulverized coal combustion, the most widely used technology in coal-fired power generation. 1 fig., 1 tab.

  13. Slide 1

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Session on International Energy Statistics EIA Conference 2013 Washington, DC June 17-18, 2013 Oslo Group on Energy Statistics 1 2 What is the Oslo Group (OG)?  A committee of international experts on energy statistics  Established by the United Nations Statistical Commission (UNSC) * First meeting took place in 2006  Membership: * 30+ countries * 5 international organizations (UNSD, IEA, Eurostat, IAEA, IMF) 3 What is the Mandate of the OG?  To promote and support the development,

  14. 2011 SPR Report to Congress | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    SPR Report to Congress 2011 SPR Report to Congress Highlights from the report include: Drawdown 2011 - Libya Collective Action On June 23, 2011, President Obama authorized the sale and drawdown of 30 million barrels of crude oil from the Strategic Petroleum Reserve as the United States' share of a coordinated 60 million barrel release of oil from member countries of the IEA that had been announced the same day. The Strategic Petroleum Reserve conducted an online competitive sale that resulted in

  15. 70 MPa Fast-Fill Modeling and Validation Experiments | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    70 MPa Fast-Fill Modeling and Validation Experiments 70 MPa Fast-Fill Modeling and Validation Experiments These slides were presented at the Onboard Storage Tank Workshop on April 29, 2010. PDF icon mpafastfill_modelingexperiments_ostw.pdf More Documents & Publications Fuel Cell Technologies Program Overview: 2012 IEA HIA Hydrogen Safety Stakeholder Workshop Bonfire Tests of High Pressure Hydrogen Storage Tanks International Hydrogen Fuel and Pressure Vessel Forum 2010 Proceedings

  16. Secretary Comments on the Selection of the Next Executive Director of the

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    International Energy Agency | Department of Energy Comments on the Selection of the Next Executive Director of the International Energy Agency Secretary Comments on the Selection of the Next Executive Director of the International Energy Agency March 11, 2011 - 12:00am Addthis Washington, D.C. - The Governing Board of the International Energy Agency (IEA) today announced that their 28 members have selected Maria Van der Hoeven of the Netherlands, the former Dutch Minister of the Economy, to

  17. Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment and

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Immobilization Plant - April 2-10, 2014 | Department of Energy April 2-10, 2014 Independent Oversight Activity Report, Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant - April 2-10, 2014 April 2-10, 2014 Informational Visit to the Hanford Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant [IAR-ORP-2014-04-02] This Independent Oversight Activity Report documents an oversight activity conducted by the Office of Independent Enterprise Assessments' (IEA) Office of Nuclear Safety and Environmental

  18. International Energy Agency 2011 Wind Energy Annual Report Available for

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Download | Department of Energy International Energy Agency 2011 Wind Energy Annual Report Available for Download International Energy Agency 2011 Wind Energy Annual Report Available for Download October 1, 2012 - 12:04pm Addthis This is an excerpt from the Third Quarter 2012 edition of the Wind Program R&D Newsletter. The IEA Wind Energy 2011 Annual Report is available for download on the Wind Program website. The report contains information on generation capacity, progress toward

  19. International Partnership for Geothermal Technology - 2012 Peer Review

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Presentation | Department of Energy International Partnership for Geothermal Technology - 2012 Peer Review Presentation International Partnership for Geothermal Technology - 2012 Peer Review Presentation International Partnership for Geothermal Technology presentation by Jay Nathwani at the May 7, 2012 Peer Review Meeting PDF icon gtp_2012peerreview_ipgt_iea-gia_nathwani.pdf More Documents & Publications Development and Validation of an Advanced Stimulation Prediction Model for Enhanced

  20. International Round-Robin on Transport Properties of Bismuth Telluride |

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Department of Energy Round-Robin on Transport Properties of Bismuth Telluride International Round-Robin on Transport Properties of Bismuth Telluride IEA-AMT round-robin testing of n- and p-type bismuth telluride transport properties showed significant measurement issues and highlighted need for standardization of measurements of thermoelectric material properties PDF icon wang.pdf More Documents & Publications Reliability of Transport Properties for Bulk Thermoelectrics Thermoelectric

  1. Noncompliance Tracking System Registration and Reporting | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Noncompliance Tracking System Registration and Reporting Noncompliance Tracking System Registration and Reporting NTS Reporting NTS Registration (For new registration) REGISTRATION INFORMATION Once NTS account access has been granted, registrants for the Noncompliance Tracking System (NTS) with an ACTIVE ACCOUNT for the IEA Reporting Systems: Occurrence Reports & Processing System (ORPS), Computerized Accident/Incident Reporting System (CAIRS), Suspect Counterfeit Items (SCI), or

  2. U.S. Leads International Collaborative to Address Wind Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Development/Wildlife Challenges | Department of Energy Leads International Collaborative to Address Wind Energy Development/Wildlife Challenges U.S. Leads International Collaborative to Address Wind Energy Development/Wildlife Challenges May 18, 2015 - 5:46pm Addthis The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is leading a new International Energy Agency (IEA) Wind Task to address concerns about the environmental effects of wind energy technology. Task 34, also known as WREN (Working together to

  3. Global Databases, Office of Scientific and Technical Information, USDOE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Global Databases OSTI ensures global access to DOE research. OSTI brings the world's research to DOE. Multilingual WorldWideScience.org The Global Science Gateway This gateway gives citizens, researchers, and anyone interested in science the capability to search national science portals from participating nations. Patrons will get the most current information from around the world in fields such as energy, medicine, agriculture, environment, and basic sciences. IEA Energy Technology Data

  4. Safety, Codes, and Standards | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Safety, Codes, and Standards Safety, Codes, and Standards 2009 DOE Hydrogen Program and Vehicle Technologies Program Annual Merit Review and Peer Evaluation Meeting, May 18-22, 2009 -- Washington D.C. PDF icon scs_0_ruiz.pdf More Documents & Publications US DRIVE Hydrogen Codes and Standards Technical Team Roadmap Hydrogen Codes and Standards and Permitting Fuel Cell Technologies Program Overview: 2012 IEA HIA Hydrogen Safety Stakeholder Workshop

  5. The Methane to Markets Coal Mine Methane Subcommittee meeting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2008-07-01

    The presentations (overheads/viewgraphs) include: a report from the Administrative Support Group; strategy updates from Australia, India, Italy, Mexico, Nigeria, Poland and the USA; coal mine methane update and IEA's strategy and activities; the power of VAM - technology application update; the emissions trading market; the voluntary emissions reduction market - creating profitable CMM projects in the USA; an Italian perspective towards a zero emission strategies; and the wrap-up and summary.

  6. DOE Science Showcase - Wind Power | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Scientific and Technical Information Science Showcase - Wind Power Wind Powering America is a nationwide initiative of the U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Program designed to educate, engage, and enable critical stakeholders to make informed decisions about how wind energy contributes to the U.S. electricity supply. Wind Power Research Results in DOE Databases IEA Wind Task 26: The Past and Future Cost of Wind Energy, Work Package 2, Energy Citations Database NREL Triples Previous Estimates

  7. Fuel Cell Technologies Program Overview

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    IEA HIA Hydrogen Safety Stakeholder Workshop Bethesda, Maryland Fuel Cell Technologies Program Overview Dr. Sunita Satyapal U.S. Department of Energy Fuel Cell Technologies Program Program Manager 10/2/2012 2 | Fuel Cell Technologies Program eere.energy.gov Overview Fuel Cells - An Emerging Global Industry Clean Energy Patent Growth Index [1] shows that fuel cell patents lead in the clean energy field with over 950 fuel cell patents issued in 2011. * Nearly double the second place holder, solar,

  8. DOE Releases Updated Induced Seismicity Protocol | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Releases Updated Induced Seismicity Protocol DOE Releases Updated Induced Seismicity Protocol January 30, 2012 - 3:45pm Addthis At the 37th Stanford Geothermal Workshop in Stanford, California, the Geothermal Technologies Program at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) released an updated Induced Seismicity Protocol. This document supplements the existing International Energy Agency (IEA) protocol of 2009, and is intended to be a living document kept up-to-date with state-of-the-art knowledge and

  9. Demonstration and Deployment Workshop - Day 2

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    © 2014 LanzaTech Inc. All rights reserved. US Department of Energy, Bioenergy Technologies Office Demonstration and Deployment Strategy Workshop Argonne National Laboratory March 13, 2014 Jennifer Holmgren CEO Going Commercial: The Road to Awesome Energy Demand Rising IEA World Energy Outlook 2012 Population growth and climate change put pressure on land, food, water, and ecosystems... Share of Global Energy Demand 1975 2010 2035 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% 6 030 Mtoe 12 380 Mtoe 16 730 Mtoe Rest of

  10. Microsoft Word - Highlights.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    July 2011 1 Independent Statistics & Analysis U.S. Energy Information Administration July 2011 Short-Term Energy Outlook July 12, 2011 Release Highlights  World crude oil prices initially fell following the June 23 announcement by the International Energy Agency (IEA) that its member countries would release up to 60 million barrels from strategic reserves but then rose above the pre- announcement levels in late June and early July. Attributing observed price changes since June 23 to the

  11. BESTEST: Test Procedures Building Energy SimulationŽ Tools

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ron.Judkoff@nrel.gov BESTEST: Test Procedures "Building Energy Simulation" Tools 2014 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Pre-normative work by Labs, IEA, ASHRAE etc. becomes... Normative ANSI/ASHRAE Standard 140 Software Testing & Diagnostic Method: Finding needles in haystacks 2 Project Summary Timeline: Start date: Oct 2013* Planned end date: Mar 2017* Key Milestones FY14 1. Draft final report for Airside HVAC Tests 2. Draft updated BESTEST Thermal Fabric Tests 3. Addition

  12. Technology Validation Fact Sheet | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Technology Validation Fact Sheet Technology Validation Fact Sheet Fact sheet produced by the Fuel Cell Technologies Office describing hydrogen and fuel cell technology validation efforts (September 2013). PDF icon Technology Validation More Documents & Publications Tri-Generation Success Story: World's First Tri-Gen Energy Station-Fountain Valley Fuel Cell Technologies Program Overview: 2012 DOE Polymer and Composite Materials Meetings Fuel Cell Technologies Program Overview: 2012 IEA HIA

  13. The International CHP/DHC Collaborative - Advancing Near-Term Low Carbon

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Technologies, July 2008 | Department of Energy The International CHP/DHC Collaborative - Advancing Near-Term Low Carbon Technologies, July 2008 The International CHP/DHC Collaborative - Advancing Near-Term Low Carbon Technologies, July 2008 The International Energy Agency (IEA) has developed a scorecard of national Combined Heat and Power (CHP)/District Heat and Cooling (DHC) policy efforts that takes into account three criteria: the effectiveness of past policies in developing the CHP/DHC

  14. The International CHP/DHC Collaborative - Advancing Near-Term Low Carbon

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Technologies, July 2008 | Department of Energy The International CHP/DHC Collaborative - Advancing Near-Term Low Carbon Technologies, July 2008 The International CHP/DHC Collaborative - Advancing Near-Term Low Carbon Technologies, July 2008 The International Energy Agency (IEA) has developed a scorecard of national Combined Heat and Power (CHP)/District Heat and Cooling (DHC) policy efforts that takes into account three criteria: the effectiveness of past policies in developing the CHP/DHC

  15. Antonio Bouza | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Antonio Bouza About Us Antonio Bouza - HVAC, Water Heating, and Appliances Technology Manager, Building Technologies Office Antonio Bouza Antonio M. Bouza is a Technology Manager with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Building Technologies Office (BTO). He is the emerging technology lead on Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning (HVAC), Water Heating and Appliances research. He is the U.S. National Executive Committee (ExCo) delegate to the IEA's Heat Pump Program. Previously at DOE, he

  16. International Effort Advances Offshore Wind Turbine Design Codes |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy International Effort Advances Offshore Wind Turbine Design Codes International Effort Advances Offshore Wind Turbine Design Codes September 12, 2014 - 12:16pm Addthis For the past several years, the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory has teamed with the Fraunhofer Institute for Wind Energy and Energy System Technology (IWES) in Germany to lead an international effort under the International Energy Agency's (IEA) Task 30 to improve the tools

  17. Independent Oversight Review, Idaho Cleanup Project - August 2014 |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Cleanup Project - August 2014 Independent Oversight Review, Idaho Cleanup Project - August 2014 August 2014 The U.S. Department of Energy?s (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety and Health Assessments, within the DOE Office of Independent Enterprise Assessments (IEA) (formerly the Office of Health, Safety and Security), conducted an independent oversight review of the Integrated Waste Treatment facility contractor readiness assessment (C-RA) at the Idaho Site from January

  18. Emerging Technologies Team | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Emerging Technologies » Emerging Technologies Team Emerging Technologies Team Antonio Bouza HVAC, Water Heating, and Appliances Technology Manager, Building Technologies Office Antonio M. Bouza is a Technology Manager with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Building Technologies Office (BTO). He is the emerging technology lead on Heating, Ventilating, and Air Conditioning (HVAC), Water Heating and Appliances research. He is the U.S. National Executive Committee (ExCo) delegate to the IEA's

  19. Role of Smart Grids in Integrating Renewable Energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Speer, B.; Miller, M.; Schaffer, W.; Gueran, L.; Reuter, A.; Jang, B.; Widegren, K.

    2015-05-27

    This report was prepared for the International Smart Grid Action Network (ISGAN), which periodically publishes briefs and discussion papers on key topics of smart grid development globally. The topic of this report was selected by a multilateral group of national experts participating in ISGAN Annex 4, a working group that aims to produce synthesis insights for decision makers. This report is an update of a 2012 ISGAN Annex 4 report entitled “Smart Grid Contributions to Variable Renewable Resource Integration.” That report and other past publications of ISGAN Annexes can be found at www.iea-isgan.org and at www.cleanenergysolutions.org.

  20. Strategic Planning 2004 - 2008

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Global Demand Growth 2006/2007/2008 thousand barrels per day North America Latin America 188 251 203 Europe 37 124 -319 FSU 173 141 -178 Middle East Asia Africa Global Demand Growth (mb/d) 2006 1.02 1.2% 2007 0.92 1.1% 2008 1.72 2.0% -11 127 110 467 497 836 Source: IEA (3/11/2008) 35 1 303 405 -189 238 -95 2 Petroleum Demand Drivers ©Economic Growth s Social Trends - Population (growing but shifting) - Environmental consciousness - Globalization s World Financial Direction - Central banks

  1. Human Behavior, Standards and Tools to Improve Design & Operation

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Human Behavior, Standards and Tools to Improve Design & Operation 2014 Building Technologies Office Peer Review Tianzhen Hong, thong@lbl.gov Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Project Summary Timeline: Start date: 10/1/2012 planned, 1/1/2013 actual Planned end date: 9/30/2015 Key Milestones 1. Behavior data mining and models; 6/28/2013 2. Behavior framework; 12/20/2013 3. IEA EBC Annex 66 launched; 11/14/2013 Budget: Total DOE $ to date: $380K (FY13 + FY14) Total future DOE $: $220K, FY15

  2. Notices

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    297 Federal Register / Vol. 80, No. 31 / Tuesday, February 17, 2015 / Notices The agenda of the joint meeting of the SEQ and the SOM on February 24 is under the control of the SEQ and the SOM. It is expected that the SEQ and the SOM will adopt the following agenda: 1. Adoption of the Agenda 2. Approval of the Summary Record of the October 21, 2014 Joint Session 3. Reports on Recent Oil Market and Policy Developments in IEA Countries 4. Update on Offshore Installation Manager Projects and

  3. Department of Energy Update on Strategic Petroleum Reserve Sale |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Update on Strategic Petroleum Reserve Sale Department of Energy Update on Strategic Petroleum Reserve Sale June 30, 2011 - 1:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - On June 23, 2011, the International Energy Agency (IEA) announced that its 28 member countries would release 60 million barrels of crude oil and refined products into the global market. As part of that action, the President directed the Department of Energy to auction 30.237 million barrels of light, sweet crude oil

  4. OECD-International Platform on Policy Coherence for Development...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Area: Economic Development Topics: Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Guidemanual, Lessons learnedbest practices, Technical report User Interface: Website Website:...

  5. OECD Input-Output Tables | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    714271111,00.html Country: Sweden, Finland, Japan, South Korea, Argentina, Australia, China, Israel, United Kingdom, Portugal, Romania, Greece, Poland, Slovakia, Chile, India,...

  6. International Round-Robin Study on Thermoelectric Transport Properties of n-type Half-Heusler from 300 K to 773 K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Hsin; Bai, Shengqiang; Chen, Lidong; Cuenat, Alexander; Joshi, Giri; Kleinke, Holger; Konig, Jan; Lee, Hee Woong; Martin, Joshua; Oh, Min-Wook; Porter, Wallace D.; Ren, Zhifeng; Salvador, James R.; Sharp, Jeff W.; Taylor, Patrick; Thompson, Alan J.; Tseng, Yu -Chih

    2015-09-03

    International transport property measurement round-robins have been conducted by the Thermoelectric Annex under the International Energy Agency (IEA) Implementing Agreement on Advanced Materials for Transportation (AMT). The previous round-robins used commercially available bismuth telluride as the testing material, with the goals of understanding measurement issues and developing standard testing procedures. The current round-robin extended the measurement temperature range to 773 K. It was designed to meet the increasing demands for reliable transport data of thermoelectric materials for power generation applications. Eleven laboratories from six IEA-AMT member countries participated in this study. Half-Heusler (n-type) material prepared by GMZ Energy was selected for the round-robin. The measured transport properties showed narrower distribution on uncertainties compared to previous round-robin efforts. The study intentionally included multiple testing methods and instrument types. Over the full temperature range, the measurement discrepancies on the figure of merit, ZT, in this round-robin were ±1.5 to ±16.4% from the averages.

  7. International energy program and United States antitrust law

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carr, R.G.

    1983-01-01

    Congress granted participating US oil companies a limited antitrust defense, through Section 252 of the Energy Policy and Conservation Act of 1975, for certain actions taken in carrying out the International Energy Agency's (IEA) emergency oil allocation and information systems. These limits (1) apply only to actions taken in accordance with approved voluntary plans, (2) are not applicable if the purpose is to injure competition, and (3) apply only to voluntary plans or agreements concerning allocation and information provisions of the International Energy Program. These limitations are augmented by other antitrust safeguards incorporated in the Voluntary Agreement. Actions by oil companies outside antitrust defense do not necessarily violate the antitrust laws. A May 1981 revised draft of Plan of Action was issued by DOE. Comments raised are concerns for independent transactions and whether the limited antitrust defense should be extended to some reallocation activities independent of IEA requests. Risks (such as collusion) arising from participation in meetings with government and joint action by competitors are outlined. 15 references.

  8. Workshop Proceedings on Financing the Development and Deployment of Renewable Energy Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-05-16

    The Working Party on Renewable Energy (REWP) of the International Energy Agency (IEA) organized a two-day seminar on the role of financing organizations in the development and deployment of renewable energy (RE). The World Bank (WB) and the US Department of Energy (USDOE) hosted the workshop. Delegates were mainly senior government representatives from the 23 IEA member countries, whose responsibilities are related to all or most of the renewable sources of energy. In addition, representatives of the European Union, United Nations, trade organizations, utilities and industries and the WB attended the meeting. The workshop was recognized as an important first step in a dialog required between the parties involved in the development of RE technology, project preparation and the financing of RE. It was also recognized that much more is required--particularly in terms of increased collaboration and coordination, and innovative financing--for RE to enter the market at an accelerated pace, and that other parties (for example from the private sector and recipient countries) need to have increased involvement in future initiatives.

  9. International Round-Robin Study on Thermoelectric Transport Properties of n-type Half-Heusler from 300 K to 773 K

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wang, Hsin; Bai, Shengqiang; Chen, Lidong; Cuenat, Alexander; Joshi, Giri; Kleinke, Holger; Konig, Jan; Lee, Hee Woong; Martin, Joshua; Oh, Min-Wook; et al

    2015-09-03

    International transport property measurement round-robins have been conducted by the Thermoelectric Annex under the International Energy Agency (IEA) Implementing Agreement on Advanced Materials for Transportation (AMT). The previous round-robins used commercially available bismuth telluride as the testing material, with the goals of understanding measurement issues and developing standard testing procedures. The current round-robin extended the measurement temperature range to 773 K. It was designed to meet the increasing demands for reliable transport data of thermoelectric materials for power generation applications. Eleven laboratories from six IEA-AMT member countries participated in this study. Half-Heusler (n-type) material prepared by GMZ Energy was selectedmore » for the round-robin. The measured transport properties showed narrower distribution on uncertainties compared to previous round-robin efforts. The study intentionally included multiple testing methods and instrument types. Over the full temperature range, the measurement discrepancies on the figure of merit, ZT, in this round-robin were ±1.5 to ±16.4% from the averages.« less

  10. Wellbore Integrity Network

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carey, James W.; Bachu, Stefan

    2012-06-21

    In this presentation, we review the current state of knowledge on wellbore integrity as developed in the IEA Greenhouse Gas Programme's Wellbore Integrity Network. Wells are one of the primary risks to the successful implementation of CO{sub 2} storage programs. Experimental studies show that wellbore materials react with CO{sub 2} (carbonation of cement and corrosion of steel) but the impact on zonal isolation is unclear. Field studies of wells in CO{sub 2}-bearing fields show that CO{sub 2} does migrate external to casing. However, rates and amounts of CO{sub 2} have not been quantified. At the decade time scale, wellbore integrity is driven by construction quality and geomechanical processes. Over longer time-scales (> 100 years), chemical processes (cement degradation and corrosion) become more important, but competing geomechanical processes may preserve wellbore integrity.

  11. Investigation of saliva of patients with periodontal disease using NAA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zamboni, C. B.; Metairon, S.; Medeiros, I. M. M. A.

    2013-05-06

    In this study the non-stimulated whole saliva of 26 healthy subjects (mean age 33.9 {+-} 11.0 years, range: 26 to 49 years) and 11 patients with periodontal disease (mean age 41.7 {+-} 11.5 years; range 29 to 55 years) was investigated using Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) technique. The samples were obtained from donors at Sao Paulo city (Brazil). The analyses were performed in the nuclear reactor IEA-R1 (3.5-4.5MW, pool type) at IPEN/CNEN-SP (Brazil). Considerable changes in Ca and S saliva's level were identified in patients with periodontal disease suggesting they can be used as monitors of periodontal diseases.

  12. Modelling Residential-Scale Combustion-Based Cogeneration in Building Simulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ferguson, A.; Kelly, N.; Weber, A.; Griffith, B.

    2009-03-01

    This article describes the development, calibration and validation of a combustion-cogeneration model for whole-building simulation. As part of IEA Annex 42, we proposed a parametric model for studying residentialscale cogeneration systems based on both Stirling and internal combustion engines. The model can predict the fuel use, thermal output and electrical generation of a cogeneration device in response to changing loads, coolant temperatures and flow rates, and control strategies. The model is now implemented in the publicly-available EnergyPlus, ESP-r and TRNSYS building simulation programs. We vetted all three implementations using a comprehensive comparative testing suite, and validated the model's theoretical basis through comparison to measured data. The results demonstrate acceptable-to-excellent agreement, and suggest the model can be used with confidence when studying the energy performance of cogeneration equipment in non-condensing operation.

  13. Assessment of the Technical Potential for Micro-Cogeneration in Small Commerical Buildings across the United States: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Griffith, B.

    2008-05-01

    This paper presents an assessment of the technical potential for micro-cogeneration in small commercial buildings throughout the United States. The cogeneration devices are simulated with the computer program EnergyPlus using models developed by Annex 42, a working group of the International Energy Agency's Energy Efficiency in Buildings and Community Systems (IEA/ECBCS). Although the Annex 42 models were developed for residential applications, this study applies them to small commercial buildings, assumed to have a total floor area of 500 m2 or less. The potential for micro-cogeneration is examined for the entire existing stock of small U.S. commercial buildings using a bottom-up method based on 1,236 EnergyPlus models.

  14. OC5 Project Phase I: Validation of Hydrodynamic Loading on a Fixed Cylinder: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, A. N.; Wendt, F. F.; Jonkman, J. M.; Popko, W.; Vorpahl, F.; Stansberg, C. T.; Bachynski, E. E.; Bayati, I.; Beyer, F.; de Vaal, J. B.; Harries, R.; Yamaguchi, A.; Shin, H.; Kim, B.; van der Zee, T.; Bozonnet, P.; Aguilo, B.; Bergua, R.; Qvist, J.; Qijun, W.; Chen, X.; Guerinel, M.; Tu, Y.; Yutong, H.; Li, R.; Bouy, L.

    2015-04-23

    This paper describes work performed during the first half of Phase I of the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration Continuation, with Correlation project (OC5). OC5 is a project run under the IEA Wind Research Task 30, and is focused on validating the tools used for modeling offshore wind systems. In this first phase, simulated responses from a variety of offshore wind modeling tools were modeling tools were validated against tank test data of a fixed, suspended cylinder (without a wind turbine) that was tested under regular and irregular wave conditions at MARINTEK. The results from this phase include an examination of different approaches one can use for defining and calibrating hydrodynamic coefficients for a model, and the importance of higher-order wave models in accurately modeling the hydrodynamic loads on offshore substructures.

  15. Technical Potential of Solar Energy to Address Energy Poverty and Avoid GHG Emissions in Africa (Poster)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cowlin, S.; Heimiller, D.; Bilello, D.; Renne, D.

    2008-10-01

    Approximately 1.6 billion people worldwide do not have access to electricity, and roughly 2.4 billion people rely on traditional biomass fuels to meet their heating and cooking needs. Lack of access to and use of energy - or energy poverty - has been recognized as a barrier to reaching the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and other targeted efforts to improve health and quality of life. Reducing reliance on traditional biomass can substantially reduce indoor air pollution-related morbidity and mortality; increasing access to lighting and refrigeration can improve educational and economic opportunities. Though targeted electrification efforts have had success within Latin America and East Asia (reaching electrification rates above 85%), sub-Saharan Africa has maintained electrification rates below 25% (IEA 2004).

  16. International Energy Agency Implementing Agreements and Annexes: A Guide for Building Technologies Program Managers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, Meredydd; Runci, Paul; Meier, Alan

    2008-08-01

    This report presents results from a program evaluation of the U.S. Department of Energy?s Buildings Technologies Program (BTP) participation in collaborative international technology implementing agreements. The evaluation was conducted by researchers from the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in the fall of 2007 and winter 2008 and was carried out via interviews with stakeholders in four implementing agreements in which BTP participates, reviews of relevant program reports, websites and other published materials. In addition to these findings, the report includes a variety of supporting materials such that aim to assist BTP managers who currently participate in IEA implementing agreements or who may be considering participation.

  17. Impact of Installation Faults on Heat Pump Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hourahan, Mr. Glenn; Baxter, Van D

    2015-01-01

    Numerous studies and surveys indicate that typically-installed HVAC equipment operate inefficiently and waste considerable energy due to varied installation errors (faults) such as improper refrigerant charge, incorrect airflow, oversized equipment, and leaky ducts. This article summarizes the results of a large United States (U.S.) experimental/analytical study (U.S. contribution to IEA HPP Annex 36) of the impact that different faults have on the performance of an air-source heat pump (ASHP) in a typical U.S. single-family house. It combines building effects, equipment effects, and climate effects in an evaluation of the faults impact on seasonal energy consumption through simulations of the house/ASHP pump system.

  18. 2007 Estimated International Energy Flows

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, C A; Belles, R D; Simon, A J

    2011-03-10

    An energy flow chart or 'atlas' for 136 countries has been constructed from data maintained by the International Energy Agency (IEA) and estimates of energy use patterns for the year 2007. Approximately 490 exajoules (460 quadrillion BTU) of primary energy are used in aggregate by these countries each year. While the basic structure of the energy system is consistent from country to country, patterns of resource use and consumption vary. Energy can be visualized as it flows from resources (i.e. coal, petroleum, natural gas) through transformations such as electricity generation to end uses (i.e. residential, commercial, industrial, transportation). These flow patterns are visualized in this atlas of 136 country-level energy flow charts.

  19. Biomass Direct Liquefaction Options. TechnoEconomic and Life Cycle Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tews, Iva J.; Zhu, Yunhua; Drennan, Corinne; Elliott, Douglas C.; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Onarheim, Kristin; Solantausta, Yrjo; Beckman, David

    2014-07-31

    The purpose of this work was to assess the competitiveness of two biomass to transportation fuel processing routes, which were under development in Finland, the U.S. and elsewhere. Concepts included fast pyrolysis (FP), and hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL), both followed by hydrodeoxygenation, and final product refining. This work was carried out as a collaboration between VTT (Finland), and PNNL (USA). The public funding agents for the work were Tekes in Finland and the Bioenergy Technologies Office of the U.S. Department of Energy. The effort was proposed as an update of the earlier comparative technoeconomic assessment performed by the IEA Bioenergy Direct Biomass Liquefaction Task in the 1980s. New developments in HTL and the upgrading of the HTL biocrude product triggered the interest in reinvestigating this comparison of these biomass liquefaction processes. In addition, developments in FP bio-oil upgrading had provided additional definition of this process option, which could provide an interesting comparison.

  20. TR1P~TTOUPQIH?RurJn#ll

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

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  1. Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, Continuation: Phase II Results of a Floating Semisubmersible Wind System: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, A.; Jonkman, J.; Musial, W.; Vorpahl, F.; Popko, W.

    2013-11-01

    Offshore wind turbines are designed and analyzed using comprehensive simulation tools that account for the coupled dynamics of the wind inflow, aerodynamics, elasticity, and controls of the turbine, along with the incident waves, sea current, hydrodynamics, and foundation dynamics of the support structure. The Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration (OC3), which operated under the International Energy Agency (IEA) Wind Task 23, was established to verify the accuracy of these simulation tools [1]. This work was then extended under the Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration, Continuation (OC4) project under IEA Wind Task 30 [2]. Both of these projects sought to verify the accuracy of offshore wind turbine dynamics simulation tools (or codes) through code-to-code comparison of simulated responses of various offshore structures. This paper describes the latest findings from Phase II of the OC4 project, which involved the analysis of a 5-MW turbine supported by a floating semisubmersible. Twenty-two different organizations from 11 different countries submitted results using 24 different simulation tools. The variety of organizations contributing to the project brought together expertise from both the offshore structure and wind energy communities. Twenty-one different load cases were examined, encompassing varying levels of model complexity and a variety of metocean conditions. Differences in the results demonstrate the importance and accuracy of the various modeling approaches used. Significant findings include the importance of mooring dynamics to the mooring loads, the role nonlinear hydrodynamic terms play in calculating drift forces for the platform motions, and the difference between global (at the platform level) and local (at the member level) modeling of viscous drag. The results from this project will help guide development and improvement efforts for these tools to ensure that they are providing the accurate information needed to support the design and analysis needs of the offshore wind community.

  2. Verification of the New FAST v8 Capabilities for the Modeling of Fixed-Bottom Offshore Wind Turbines: Preprint

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barahona, B.; Jonkman, J.; Damiani, R.; Robertson, A.; Hayman, G.

    2014-12-01

    Coupled dynamic analysis has an important role in the design of offshore wind turbines because the systems are subject to complex operating conditions from the combined action of waves and wind. The aero-hydro-servo-elastic tool FAST v8 is framed in a novel modularization scheme that facilitates such analysis. Here, we present the verification of new capabilities of FAST v8 to model fixed-bottom offshore wind turbines. We analyze a series of load cases with both wind and wave loads and compare the results against those from the previous international code comparison projects-the International Energy Agency (IEA) Wind Task 23 Subtask 2 Offshore Code Comparison Collaboration (OC3) and the IEA Wind Task 30 OC3 Continued (OC4) projects. The verification is performed using the NREL 5-MW reference turbine supported by monopile, tripod, and jacket substructures. The substructure structural-dynamics models are built within the new SubDyn module of FAST v8, which uses a linear finite-element beam model with Craig-Bampton dynamic system reduction. This allows the modal properties of the substructure to be synthesized and coupled to hydrodynamic loads and tower dynamics. The hydrodynamic loads are calculated using a new strip theory approach for multimember substructures in the updated HydroDyn module of FAST v8. These modules are linked to the rest of FAST through the new coupling scheme involving mapping between module-independent spatial discretizations and a numerically rigorous implicit solver. The results show that the new structural dynamics, hydrodynamics, and coupled solutions compare well to the results from the previous code comparison projects.

  3. Assessment of Historic Trend in Mobility and Energy Use in India Transportation Sector Using Bottom-up Approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Nan; McNeil, Michael A.

    2009-05-01

    Transportation mobility in India has increased significantly in the past decades. From 1970 to 2000, motorized mobility (passenger-km) has risen by 888%, compared with an 88% population growth (Singh,2006). This contributed to many energy and environmental issues, and an energy strategy incorporates efficiency improvement and other measures needs to be designed. Unfortunately, existing energy data do not provide information on driving forces behind energy use and sometime show large inconsistencies. Many previous studies address only a single transportation mode such as passenger road travel; did not include comprehensive data collection or analysis has yet been done, or lack detail on energy demand by each mode and fuel mix. The current study will fill a considerable gap in current efforts, develop a data base on all transport modes including passenger air and water, and freight in order to facilitate the development of energy scenarios and assess significance of technology potential in a global climate change model. An extensive literature review and data collection has been done to establish the database with breakdown of mobility, intensity, distance, and fuel mix of all transportation modes. Energy consumption was estimated and compared with aggregated transport consumption reported in IEA India transportation energy data. Different scenarios were estimated based on different assumptions on freight road mobility. Based on the bottom-up analysis, we estimated that the energy consumption from 1990 to 2000 increased at an annual growth rate of 7% for the mid-range road freight growth case and 12% for the high road freight growth case corresponding to the scenarios in mobility, while the IEA data only shows a 1.7% growth rate in those years.

  4. Proceedings of the OECD/CSNI workshop on transient thermal-hydraulic and neutronic codes requirements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebert, D.

    1997-07-01

    This is a report on the CSNI Workshop on Transient Thermal-Hydraulic and Neutronic Codes Requirements held at Annapolis, Maryland, USA November 5-8, 1996. This experts` meeting consisted of 140 participants from 21 countries; 65 invited papers were presented. The meeting was divided into five areas: (1) current and prospective plans of thermal hydraulic codes development; (2) current and anticipated uses of thermal-hydraulic codes; (3) advances in modeling of thermal-hydraulic phenomena and associated additional experimental needs; (4) numerical methods in multi-phase flows; and (5) programming language, code architectures and user interfaces. The workshop consensus identified the following important action items to be addressed by the international community in order to maintain and improve the calculational capability: (a) preserve current code expertise and institutional memory, (b) preserve the ability to use the existing investment in plant transient analysis codes, (c) maintain essential experimental capabilities, (d) develop advanced measurement capabilities to support future code validation work, (e) integrate existing analytical capabilities so as to improve performance and reduce operating costs, (f) exploit the proven advances in code architecture, numerics, graphical user interfaces, and modularization in order to improve code performance and scrutibility, and (g) more effectively utilize user experience in modifying and improving the codes.

  5. OECD NEA Benchmark Database of Spent Nuclear Fuel Isotopic Compositions for World Reactor Designs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauld, Ian C; Sly, Nicholas C; Michel-Sendis, Franco

    2014-01-01

    Experimental data on the isotopic concentrations in irradiated nuclear fuel represent one of the primary methods for validating computational methods and nuclear data used for reactor and spent fuel depletion simulations that support nuclear fuel cycle safety and safeguards programs. Measurement data have previously not been available to users in a centralized or searchable format, and the majority of accessible information has been, for the most part, limited to light-water-reactor designs. This paper describes a recent initiative to compile spent fuel benchmark data for additional reactor designs used throughout the world that can be used to validate computer model simulations that support nuclear energy and nuclear safeguards missions. Experimental benchmark data have been expanded to include VVER-440, VVER-1000, RBMK, graphite moderated MAGNOX, gas cooled AGR, and several heavy-water moderated CANDU reactor designs. Additional experimental data for pressurized light water and boiling water reactor fuels has also been compiled for modern assembly designs and more extensive isotopic measurements. These data are being compiled and uploaded to a recently revised structured and searchable database, SFCOMPO, to provide the nuclear analysis community with a centrally-accessible resource of spent fuel compositions that can be used to benchmark computer codes, models, and nuclear data. The current version of SFCOMPO contains data for eight reactor designs, 20 fuel assembly designs, more than 550 spent fuel samples, and measured isotopic data for about 80 nuclides.

  6. OECD MCCI project long-term 2-D molten core concrete interaction test design report, Rev. 0. September 30, 2002.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M. T.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschliman, R. W.; Basu, S. (Nuclear Engineering Division); (NRC)

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program at Argonne National Laboratory addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following two technical objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of the first program objective, the Small-Scale Water Ingression and Crust Strength (SSWICS) test series has been initiated to provide fundamental information on the ability of water to ingress into cracks and fissures that form in the debris during quench, thereby augmenting the otherwise conduction-limited heat transfer process. A test plan for Melt Eruption Separate Effects Tests (MESET) has also been developed to provide information on the extent of crust growth and melt eruptions as a function of gas sparging rate under well-controlled experiment conditions. In terms of the second program objective, the project Management Board (MB) has approved startup activities required to carry out experiments to address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interaction. In particular, for both wet and dry cavity conditions, there is uncertainty insofar as evaluating the lateral vs. axial power split during a core-concrete interaction due to a lack of experiment data. As a result, there are differences in the 2-D cavity erosion predicted by codes such as MELCOR, WECHSL, and COSACO. The first step towards generating this data is to produce a test plan for review by the Project Review Group (PRG). The purpose of this document is to provide this plan.

  7. Half-life determination for {sup 108}Ag and {sup 110}Ag

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zahn, Guilherme S.; Genezini, Frederico A.

    2014-11-11

    In this work, the half-life of the short-lived silver radionuclides {sup 108}Ag and {sup 110}Ag were measured by following the activity of samples after they were irradiated in the IEA-R1 reactor. The results were then fitted using a non-paralizable dead time correction to the regular exponential decay and the individual half-life values obtained were then analyzed using both the Normalized Residuals and the Rajeval techniques, in order to reach the most exact and precise final values. To check the validity of dead-time correction, a second correction method was also employed by means of counting a long-lived {sup 60}Co radioactive source together with the samples as a livetime chronometer. The final half-live values obtained using both dead-time correction methods were in good agreement, showing that the correction was properly assessed. The results obtained are partially compatible with the literature values, but with a lower uncertainty, and allow a discussion on the last ENSDF compilations' values.

  8. Design of the Grimethorpe Experimental Facility as of March 1981: a technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1984-06-01

    The Experimental Pressurized Fluidized Bed Combustor, which has been built as an extension to the National Coal Board Power Station, which is adjacent to Grimethorpe Colliery, Yorkshire, England, is described in this report. The Governments of the United Kingdom, the United States of America and the Federal Republic of Germany, under the auspices of the International Energy Agency, have agreed to share equally between them the costs of building and operating the plant. Control of the project was vested in an Executive Committee consisting of one representative of each Government with all decisions requiring unanimity. The actual operation of the project was vested in an Operating Agent, NCB (IEA Services) Ltd., a wholly owned subsidiary of the National Coal Board. The Implementing Agreement envisages a seven year project to be executed in four stages: (1) Procurement of Design Study with accompanying tender documents. (2) Tendering for construction of the Plant; study of appraisal of tenders. (3) Construction and acceptance of the Plant. (4) Operation of the Plant. The project is now towards the end of Stage 3. Construction has been completed and commissioning is in progress to prepare the plant for the start of the operational phase in Autumn 1981. Because of the confidentiality of much of the design information, for the purposes of this report technical descriptions have been confined to that of a general appraisal.

  9. Minimising greenhouse gas emissions from fossil fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Freund, P.

    1997-07-01

    Combustion of fossil fuels is the main anthropogenic source of carbon dioxide, the principal greenhouse gas. Generation of electricity is the single largest user of fossil fuels, world-wide. If there is international agreement about the need to make substantial reductions in greenhouse gas emissions, then having access to suitable, effective technology would be important. This would help avoid the need for precipitate action, such as radical changes in the energy supply systems. Capture and disposal of greenhouse gases from flue gases can achieve substantial reductions in greenhouse gas emissions. This can be realized with known technology. In this paper, the range of options will be summarized and steps needed to achieve further progress will be identified. Emissions of other gases, such as methane, are also expected to influence the climate. Methane is emitted from many anthropogenic sources; the IEA Greenhouse Gas programme is investigating ways of reducing these emissions. Opportunities for abatement of methane emissions associated with coal mining will be described. Reduction in emissions from drainage gas is relatively straightforward and can, in appropriate circumstances, generate useful income for the none operator. More substantial amounts of methane are discharged in mine ventilation air but these are more difficult to deal with. In this paper, a summary will be given of recent progress in reducing methane emissions. Opportunities will be examined for further research to progress these technologies.

  10. Superconducting magnet development in Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yasukochi, K.

    1983-05-01

    The present state of R and D works on the superconducting magnet and its applications in Japan are presented. On electrical rotating machines, 30 MVA superconducting synchronous rotary condenser (Mitsubishi and Fuji) and 50 MVA generator are under construction. Two ways of ship propulsion by superconducting magnets are developing. A superconducting magnetically levitated and linear motor propelled train ''MAGLEV'' was developed by the Japan National Railways (JNR). The superconducting magnet development for fusion is the most active field in Japan. The Cluster Test program has been demonstrated on a 10 T Nb/sub 3/Sn coil and the first coil of Large Coil Task in IEA collaboration has been constructed and the domestic test was completed in JAERI. These works are for the development of toroidal coils of the next generation tokamak machine. R and D works on superconducting ohmic heating coil are in progress in JAERI and ETL. The latter group has constructed 3.8 MJ pulsed coil. A high ramp rate of changing field in pulsed magnet, 200 T/s, has been tested successfully. High Energy Physics Laboratory (KEK) are conducting active works. The superconducting ..mu.. meson channel and ..pi.. meson channel have been constructed and are operating successfully. KEK has also a project of big accelerator named ''TRISTAN'', which is similar to ISABELLE project of BNL. Superconducting synchrotron magnets are developed for this project. The development of superconducting three thin wall solenoid has been started. One of them, CDF, is progressing under USA-Japan collaboration.

  11. India Energy Outlook: End Use Demand in India to 2020

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    de la Rue du Can, Stephane; McNeil, Michael; Sathaye, Jayant

    2009-03-30

    Integrated economic models have been used to project both baseline and mitigation greenhouse gas emissions scenarios at the country and the global level. Results of these scenarios are typically presented at the sectoral level such as industry, transport, and buildings without further disaggregation. Recently, a keen interest has emerged on constructing bottom up scenarios where technical energy saving potentials can be displayed in detail (IEA, 2006b; IPCC, 2007; McKinsey, 2007). Analysts interested in particular technologies and policies, require detailed information to understand specific mitigation options in relation to business-as-usual trends. However, the limit of information available for developing countries often poses a problem. In this report, we have focus on analyzing energy use in India in greater detail. Results shown for the residential and transport sectors are taken from a previous report (de la Rue du Can, 2008). A complete picture of energy use with disaggregated levels is drawn to understand how energy is used in India and to offer the possibility to put in perspective the different sources of end use energy consumption. For each sector, drivers of energy and technology are indentified. Trends are then analyzed and used to project future growth. Results of this report provide valuable inputs to the elaboration of realistic energy efficiency scenarios.

  12. Lessons Learned from Safety Events

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weiner, Steven C.; Fassbender, Linda L.

    2012-11-01

    The Hydrogen Incident Reporting and Lessons Learned website (www.h2incidents.org) was launched in 2006 as a database-driven resource for sharing lessons learned from hydrogen-related safety events to raise safety awareness and encourage knowledge-sharing. The development of this database, its first uses and subsequent enhancements have been described at the Second and Third International Conferences on Hydrogen Safety. [1,2] Since 2009, continuing work has not only highlighted the value of safety lessons learned, but enhanced how the database provides access to another safety knowledge tool, Hydrogen Safety Best Practices (http://h2bestpractices.org). Collaborations with the International Energy Agency (IEA) Hydrogen Implementing Agreement (HIA) Task 19 Hydrogen Safety and others have enabled the database to capture safety event learnings from around the world. This paper updates recent progress, highlights the new Lessons Learned Corner as one means for knowledge-sharing and examines the broader potential for collecting, analyzing and using safety event information.

  13. International Round-Robin Testing of Bulk Thermoelectrics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Hsin; Porter, Wallace D; Bottner, Harold; Konig, Jan; Chen, Lidong; Bai, Shengqiang; Tritt, Terry M.; Mayolett, Alex; Smith, Charlene; Harris, Fred; Sharp, Jeff; Lo, Jason; Keinke, Holger; Kiss, Laszlo I.

    2011-11-01

    Two international round-robin studies were conducted on transport properties measurements of bulk thermoelectric materials. The study discovered current measurement problems. In order to get ZT of a material four separate transport measurements must be taken. The round-robin study showed that among the four properties Seebeck coefficient is the one can be measured consistently. Electrical resistivity has +4-9% scatter. Thermal diffusivity has similar +5-10% scatter. The reliability of the above three properties can be improved by standardizing test procedures and enforcing system calibrations. The worst problem was found in specific heat measurements using DSC. The probability of making measurement error is great due to the fact three separate runs must be taken to determine Cp and the baseline shift is always an issue for commercial DSC. It is suggest the Dulong Petit limit be always used as a guide line for Cp. Procedures have been developed to eliminate operator and system errors. The IEA-AMT annex is developing standard procedures for transport properties testing.

  14. International petroleum statistics report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-03-01

    This report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1994; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1994; and OECD trade from 1984 through 1994.

  15. Comparative Analysis of Modeling Studies on China's Future Energy and Emissions Outlook

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zheng, Nina; Zhou, Nan; Fridley, David

    2010-09-01

    The past decade has seen the development of various scenarios describing long-term patterns of future Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions, with each new approach adding insights to our understanding of the changing dynamics of energy consumption and aggregate future energy trends. With the recent growing focus on China's energy use and emission mitigation potential, a range of Chinese outlook models have been developed across different institutions including in China's Energy Research Institute's 2050 China Energy and CO2 Emissions Report, McKinsey & Co's China's Green Revolution report, the UK Sussex Energy Group and Tyndall Centre's China's Energy Transition report, and the China-specific section of the IEA World Energy Outlook 2009. At the same time, the China Energy Group at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has developed a bottom-up, end-use energy model for China with scenario analysis of energy and emission pathways out to 2050. A robust and credible energy and emission model will play a key role in informing policymakers by assessing efficiency policy impacts and understanding the dynamics of future energy consumption and energy saving and emission reduction potential. This is especially true for developing countries such as China, where uncertainties are greater while the economy continues to undergo rapid growth and industrialization. A slightly different assumption or storyline could result in significant discrepancies among different model results. Therefore, it is necessary to understand the key models in terms of their scope, methodologies, key driver assumptions and the associated findings. A comparative analysis of LBNL's energy end-use model scenarios with the five above studies was thus conducted to examine similarities and divergences in methodologies, scenario storylines, macroeconomic drivers and assumptions as well as aggregate energy and emission scenario results. Besides directly tracing different energy and CO{sub 2} savings potential back to the underlying strategies and combination of efficiency and abatement policy instruments represented by each scenario, this analysis also had other important but often overlooked findings.

  16. Experimentally validated long-term energy production prediction model for solar dish/Stirling electric generating systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stine, W.B.

    1995-12-31

    Dish/Stirling solar electric systems are currently being tested for performance and longevity in order to bring them to the electric power generation market. Studies both in Germany and the United States indicate that a significant market exists for these systems if they perform in actual installations according to tested conditions, and if, when produced in large numbers their cost will drop to goals currently being projected. In the 1980`s, considerable experience was gained operating eight dish/Stirling systems of three different designs. One of these recorded the world`s record for converting solar energy into electricity of 29.4%. The approach to system performance prediction taken in this presentation results from lessons learned in testing these early systems, and those currently being tested. Recently the IEA through the SolarPACES working group, has embarked on a program to develop uniform guidelines for measuring and presenting performance data. These guidelines are to help potential buyers who want to evaluate a specific system relative to other dish/Stirling systems, or relative to other technologies such as photovoltaic, parabolic trough or central receiver systems. In this paper, a procedure is described that permits modeling of long-term energy production using only a few experimentally determined parameters. The benefit of using this technique is that relatively simple tests performed over a period of a few months can provide performance parameters that can be used in a computer model requiring only the input of insolation and ambient temperature data to determine long-term energy production information. A portion of this analytical procedure has been tested on the three 9-kW(e) systems in operation in Almeria, Spain. Further evaluation of these concepts is planned on a 7.5-kW(e) system currently undergoing testing at Cal Poly University in Pomona, California and later on the 25 kW(e) USJVP systems currently under development.

  17. Strategic planning -- task 7.1. Topical report, February 1994--June 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Daly, D.J.

    1996-01-01

    The nations of East Central Europe regained their political and economic freedom in 1989, ending nearly a half century of centrally planned economies under the hegemony of the former Soviet Union (FSU). These nations are now emerging from economic conditions marked by price distortions and a focus on heavy industry, isolation from world markets, and a lack of occupational health and environmental safeguards. Economic recovery, environmental restoration, and political stability, as well as eventual entrance into the European Community (EC), require a reordering of policies and priorities, including those bearing on energy and the environment. This report, prepared as a background document for the Second International Conference on Energy and Environment to be held in Prague in November 1994, is composed of a summary table and supporting text and is intended to provide a concise review of issues related to energy and the environment for the Czech and Slovak Republics, Hungary, Poland, and Bulgaria. Organized by subject and country, Table 1 contains country profiles (Row A), information on the economy (Row B), primary energy consumption, environmental priorities, energy resources, production, and utilization (Rows C, D, F, G, H, and 1), electrical generation and transmission (Rows J and K), district heating (Row L), briquettes (Row M), and environmental regulations (Row N). Pertinent policy goals, issues, and trends are noted. The reports is based largely on a review of documents published by the International Energy Agency (IEA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), as well as selected sources obtained from the countries of the region. Reference citations are keyed to information presented in Table 1.

  18. [Energy and environmental research emphasizing low-rank coal]: Task 7.1, Strategic planning. Topical report, February 1, 1994--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-01-01

    The nations of East Central Europe regained their political and economic freedom in 1989, ending nearly a half century of centrally planned economies under the hegemony of the former Soviet Union (FSU). These nations are now emerging from economic conditions marked by price distortions and a focus on heavy industry, isolation from world markets, and a lack of occupational health and environmental safeguards. Economic recovery, environmental restoration, and political stability, as well as eventual entrance into the European Community (EC), require a reordering of policies and priorities, including those bearing on energy and the environment. This report, prepared as a background document for the Second International Conference on Energy and Environment to be held in Prague in November 1994, is composed of a summary table (Table 1) and supporting text and is intended to provide a concise review of issues related to energy and the environment for the Czech and Slovak Republics, Hungary, Poland, and Bulgaria. Organized by subject and country, Table 1 contains country profiles (Row A), information on the economy (Row B), primary energy consumption, environmental priorities, energy resources, production, and utilization (Rows C, D, F, G, H, and I), electrical generation and transmission (Rows J and K), district heating (Row L), briquettes (Row M), and environmental regulations (Row N). Pertinent policy goals, issues, and trends are noted. The reports is based largely on a review of documents published by the International Energy Agency (IEA) and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), as well as selected sources obtained from the countries of the region. Reference citations are keyed to information presented in Table 1.

  19. Glazing materials for solar and architectural applications. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lampert, C.M. [ed.

    1994-09-01

    This report summarizes five collaborative research projects on glazings performed by participants in Subtask C of IEA Solar Heating and Cooling Programme (SHC) Task 10, Materials Research and Testing. The projects include materials characterization, optical and thermal measurements, and durability testing of several types of new glazings Three studies were completed on electrochromic and dispersed liquid crystals for smart windows, and two were completed for low-E coatings and transparent insulation materials for more conventional window and wall applications. In the area of optical switching materials for smart windows, the group developed more uniform characterization parameters that are useful to determine lifetime and performance of electrochromics. The detailed optical properties of an Asahi (Japan) prototype electrochromic window were measured in several laboratories. A one square meter array of prototype devices was tested outdoors and demonstrated significant cooling savings compared to tinted static glazing. Three dispersed liquid crystal window devices from Taliq (USA) were evaluated. In the off state, these liquid crystal windows scatter light greatly. When a voltage of about 100 V ac is applied, these windows become transparent. Undyed devices reduce total visible light transmittance by only .25 when switched, but this can be increased to .50 with the use of dyed liquid crystals. A wide range of solar-optical and emittance measurements were made on low-E coated glass and plastic. Samples of pyrolytic tin oxide from Ford glass (USA) and multilayer metal-dielectric coatings from Interpane (Germany) and Southwall (USA) were evaluated. In addition to optical characterization, the samples were exposure-tested in Switzerland. The thermal and optimal properties of two different types of transparent insulation materials were measured.

  20. Trends in emissions of acidifying species in Asia, 1985-1997.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Streets, D. G.; Tsai, N. Y.; Akimoto, H.; Oka, K.

    2000-05-31

    Acid deposition is a serious problem throughout much of Asia. Emissions of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x}) have been increasing steadily, as nations strive to increase their levels of economic development. Coal and fuel oil have been the main choices for powering industrial development; and, until recently, only a few countries (notably Japan and Taiwan) had taken significant steps to avert the atmospheric emissions that accompany fuel combustion. This paper discusses trends in emissions of SO{sub 2} and NO{sub x} that have occurred in Asian countries in the period 1985--1997, using results from the RAINS-ASIA computer model and energy-use trends from the IEA Energy Statistics and Balances database. Emissions of SO{sub 2} in Asia grew from 26.6 Tg in 1985 to 33.7 Tg in 1990 and to 39.2 Tg in 1997. Though SO{sub 2} emissions used to grow as fast as fossil-fuel use, recent limitations on the sulfur content of coal and oil have slowed the growth. The annual-average emissions growth between 1990 and 1997 was only 1.1%, considerably less than the economic growth rate. Emissions of NO{sub x}, on the other hand, continue to grow rapidly, from 14.1 Tg in 1985 to 18.7 Tg in 1990 and 28.5 Tg in 1997, with no signs of abating. Thus, though SO{sub 2} remains the major contributor to acidifying emissions in Asia, the role of NO{sub x}, will become more and more important in the future.

  1. Conjunction of Multizone Infiltration Specialists (COMIS) fundamentals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Feustel, H.E.; Rayner-Hooson, A.

    1990-05-01

    The COMIS workshop (Conjunction of Multizone Infiltration Specialists) was a joint research effort to develop a multizone infiltration mode. This workshop (October 1988--September 1989) was hosted by the Energy Performance of Buildings Group at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory's Applied Science Division. The task of the workshop was to develop a detailed multizone infiltration program taking crack flow, HVAC-systems, single-sided ventilation and transport mechanism through large openings into account. This work was accomplished not by investigating into numerical description of physical phenomena but by reviewing the literature for the best suitable algorithm. The numerical description of physical phenomena is clearly a task of IEA-Annex XX Air Flow Patterns in Buildings,'' which will be finished in September 1991. Multigas tracer measurements and wind tunnel data will be used to check the model. The agenda integrated all participants' contributions into a single model containing a large library of modules. The user-friendly program is aimed at researchers and building professionals. From its announcement in December 1986, COMIS was well received by the research community. Due to the internationality of the group, several national and international research programmes were co-ordinated with the COMIS workshop. Colleagues for France, Italy, Japan, The Netherlands, People's Republic of China, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United States of America were working together on the development of the model. Even though this kind of co-operation is well known in other fields of research, e.g., high energy physics; for the field of building physics it is a new approach. This document contains an overview about infiltration modelling as well as the physics and the mathematics behind the COMIS model. 91 refs., 38 figs., 9 tabs.

  2. Newberry Volcano EGS Demonstration - Phase I Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    William L. Osborn, Susan Petty, Trenton T. Cladouhos, Joe Iovenitti, Laura Nofziger, Owen Callahan, Douglas S. Perry and Paul L. Stern

    2011-10-23

    Phase I of the Newberry Volcano Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) Demonstration included permitting, community outreach, seismic hazards analysis, initial microseismic array deployment and calibration, final MSA design, site characterization, and stimulation planning. The multi-disciplinary Phase I site characterization supports stimulation planning and regulatory permitting, as well as addressing public concerns including water usage and induced seismicity. A review of the project'????s water usage plan by an independent hydrology consultant found no expected impacts to local stakeholders, and recommended additional monitoring procedures. The IEA Protocol for Induced Seismicity Associated with Enhanced Geothermal Systems was applied to assess site conditions, properly inform stakeholders, and develop a comprehensive mitigation plan. Analysis of precision LiDAR elevation maps has concluded that there is no evidence of recent faulting near the target well. A borehole televiewer image log of the well bore revealed over three hundred fractures and predicted stress orientations. No natural, background seismicity has been identified in a review of historic data, or in more than seven months of seismic data recorded on an array of seven seismometers operating around the target well. A seismic hazards and induced seismicity risk assessment by an independent consultant concluded that the Demonstration would contribute no additional risk to residents of the nearest town of La Pine, Oregon. In Phase II of the demonstration, an existing deep hot well, NWG 55-29, will be stimulated using hydroshearing techniques to create an EGS reservoir. The Newberry Volcano EGS Demonstration is allowing geothermal industry and academic experts to develop, validate and enhance geoscience and engineering techniques, and other procedures essential to the expansion of EGS throughout the country. Successful development will demonstrate to the American public that EGS can play a significant role in reducing foreign energy dependence, and provide clean, renewable, baseload geothermal power generation in the State of Oregon.

  3. Tethys and Annex IV Progress Report for FY 2012

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hanna, Luke A.; Butner, R. Scott; Whiting, Jonathan M.; Copping, Andrea E.

    2013-09-01

    The marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) environmental Impacts Knowledge Management System, dubbed “Tethys” after the mythical Greek titaness of the seas, is being developed by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to support the U.S. Department of Energy’s Wind and Water Power Program (WWPP). Functioning as a smart database, Tethys enables its users to identify key words or terms to help gather, organize and make available information and data pertaining to the environmental effects of MHK and offshore wind (OSW) energy development. By providing and categorizing relevant publications within a simple and searchable database, Tethys acts as a dissemination channel for information and data which can be utilized by regulators, project developers and researchers to minimize the environmental risks associated with offshore renewable energy developments and attempt to streamline the permitting process. Tethys also houses a separate content-related Annex IV data base with identical functionality to the Tethys knowledge base. Annex IV is a collaborative project among member nations of the International Energy Agency (IEA) Ocean Energy Systems – Implementing Agreement (OES-IA) that examines the environmental effects of ocean energy devices and projects. The U.S. Department of Energy leads the Annex IV working with federal partners such as the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM), and the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA). While the Annex IV database contains technical reports and journal articles, it is primarily focused on the collection of project site and research study metadata forms (completed by MHK researchers and developers around the world, and collected by PNNL) which provide information on environmental studies and the current progress of the various international MHK developments in the Annex IV member nations. The purpose of this report is to provide a summary of the content, accessibility and functionality enhancements made to the Annex IV and Tethys knowledge bases in FY12.

  4. ENV-Linkages General Equilibrium Model | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Topics: Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Softwaremodeling tools Website: www.oecd.orgofficialdocumentsdisplaydocumentpdf?coteECOWKP(2008)6 References: OECD1...

  5. Energy & Financial Markets - U.S. Energy Information Administration...

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    OECD The Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) consists of the United States, much of Europe, and other advanced countries. At 53 percent of world oil ...

  6. Analysis of the OECD/NRC BWR Turbine Trip Transient Benchmark with the Coupled Thermal-Hydraulics and Neutronics Code TRAC-M/PARCS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Deokjung; Downar, Thomas J.; Ulses, Anthony; Akdeniz, Bedirhan; Ivanov, Kostadin N.

    2004-10-15

    An analysis of the Peach Bottom Unit 2 Turbine Trip 2 (TT2) experiment has been performed using the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission coupled thermal-hydraulics and neutronics code TRAC-M/PARCS. The objective of the analysis was to assess the performance of TRAC-M/PARCS on a BWR transient with significance in two-phase flow and spatial variations of the neutron flux. TRAC-M/PARCS results are found to be in good agreement with measured plant data for both steady-state and transient phases of the benchmark. Additional analyses of four fictitious extreme scenarios are performed to provide a basis for code-to-code comparisons and comprehensive testing of the thermal-hydraulics/neutronics coupling. The obtained results of sensitivity studies on the effect of direct moderator heating on transient simulation indicate the importance of this modeling aspect.

  7. Using the OECD/NRC Pressurized Water Reactor Main Steam Line Break Benchmark to Study Current Numerical and Computational Issues of Coupled Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivanov, Kostadin N.; Todorova, Nadejda K.; Sartori, Enrico

    2003-05-15

    Incorporating full three-dimensional (3-D) models of the reactor core into system transient codes allows for a 'best-estimate' calculation of interactions between the core behavior and plant dynamics. Recent progress in computer technology has made the development of coupled thermal-hydraulic (T-H) and neutron kinetics code systems feasible. Considerable efforts have been made in various countries and organizations in this direction. Appropriate benchmarks need to be developed that will permit testing of two particular aspects. One is to verify the capability of the coupled codes to analyze complex transients with coupled core-plant interactions. The second is to test fully the neutronics/T-H coupling. One such benchmark is the Pressurized Water Reactor Main Steam Line Break (MSLB) Benchmark problem. It was sponsored by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, and The Pennsylvania State University. The benchmark problem uses a 3-D neutronics core model that is based on real plant design and operational data for the Three Mile Island Unit 1 nuclear power plant. The purpose of this benchmark is threefold: to verify the capability of system codes for analyzing complex transients with coupled core-plant interactions; to test fully the 3-D neutronics/T-H coupling; and to evaluate discrepancies among the predictions of coupled codes in best-estimate transient simulations. The purposes of the benchmark are met through the application of three exercises: a point kinetics plant simulation (exercise 1), a coupled 3-D neutronics/core T-H evaluation of core response (exercise 2), and a best-estimate coupled core-plant transient model (exercise 3).In this paper we present the three exercises of the MSLB benchmark, and we summarize the findings of the participants with regard to the current numerical and computational issues of coupled calculations. In addition, this paper reviews in some detail the sensitivity studies on exercises 2 and 3 performed by the benchmark team using the coupled code TRAC-PF1/NEM. The purpose of these supporting studies was to aid participants in developing their models.

  8. OECD MMCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCCI-1 test data report-thermalhydraulic results. Rev 0 January 31, 2004.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S.

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten coreconcrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of two long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiments designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-1 experiment, which was conducted on December 19, 2003. Test specifications for CCI-1 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 400 kg PWR core melt, initially containing 8 wt % calcined siliceous concrete, with a specially designed two-dimensional siliceous concrete test section with an initial cross-sectional area of 50 cm x 50 cm. The report begins by providing a summary description of the CCI-1 test apparatus and operating procedures, followed by presentation of the thermal-hydraulic results. The posttest debris examination results will be provided in a subsequent publication. Observations drawn within this report regarding the overall cavity erosion behavior may be subject to revision once the posttest examinations are completed, since these examinations will fully reveal the final cavity shape.

  9. OECD MCCI 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCI-2 test data report-thermalhydraulic results, Rev. 0 October 15, 2004.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S.

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of two long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiments designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-2 experiment, which was conducted on August 24, 2004. Test specifications for CCI-2 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 400 kg PWR core melt, initially containing 8 wt % Limestone/Common Sand (LCS) concrete, with a specially designed two-dimensional LCS concrete test section with an initial cross-sectional area of 50 cm x 50 cm. The report begins by providing a summary description of the CCI-2 test apparatus and operating procedures, followed by presentation of the thermal-hydraulic results. Detailed posttest debris examination results will be provided in a subsequent publication. Observations drawn within this report regarding the overall cavity erosion behavior may be subject to revision once the posttest examinations are completed, since these examinations will fully reveal the final cavity shape.

  10. OECD MCCI project 2-D Core Concrete Interaction (CCI) tests : CCI-3 test data report-thermalhydraulic results. Rev. 0 October 15, 2005.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farmer, M. T.; Lomperski, S.; Kilsdonk, D. J.; Aeschlimann, R. W.; Basu, S.

    2011-05-23

    The Melt Attack and Coolability Experiments (MACE) program addressed the issue of the ability of water to cool and thermally stabilize a molten core-concrete interaction when the reactants are flooded from above. These tests provided data regarding the nature of corium interactions with concrete, the heat transfer rates from the melt to the overlying water pool, and the role of noncondensable gases in the mixing processes that contribute to melt quenching. As a follow-on program to MACE, The Melt Coolability and Concrete Interaction Experiments (MCCI) project is conducting reactor material experiments and associated analysis to achieve the following objectives: (1) resolve the ex-vessel debris coolability issue through a program that focuses on providing both confirmatory evidence and test data for the coolability mechanisms identified in MACE integral effects tests, and (2) address remaining uncertainties related to long-term two-dimensional molten core-concrete interactions under both wet and dry cavity conditions. Achievement of these two program objectives will demonstrate the efficacy of severe accident management guidelines for existing plants, and provide the technical basis for better containment designs for future plants. In terms of satisfying these objectives, the Management Board (MB) approved the conduct of a third long-term 2-D Core-Concrete Interaction (CCI) experiment designed to provide information in several areas, including: (i) lateral vs. axial power split during dry core-concrete interaction, (ii) integral debris coolability data following late phase flooding, and (iii) data regarding the nature and extent of the cooling transient following breach of the crust formed at the melt-water interface. This data report provides thermal hydraulic test results from the CCI-3 experiment, which was conducted on September 22, 2005. Test specifications for CCI-3 are provided in Table 1-1. This experiment investigated the interaction of a fully oxidized 375 kg PWR core melt, initially containing 15 wt% siliceous concrete, with a specially designed two-dimensional siliceous concrete test section with an initial cross-sectional area of 50 cm x 50 cm. The sand and aggregate constituents for this particular siliceous concrete were provided by CEA as an in-kind contribution to the program. The report begins by providing a summary description of the CCI-3 test apparatus and operating procedures, followed by presentation of the thermal-hydraulic results. Detailed posttest debris examination results will be provided in a subsequent publication. Observations drawn within this report regarding the overall cavity erosion behavior may be subject to revision once the posttest examinations are completed, since these examinations will fully reveal the final cavity shape.

  11. Evaluation of select heat and pressure measurement gauges for potential use in the NRC/OECD High Energy Arc Fault (HEAF) test program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lopez, Carlos; Wente, William Baker; Figueroa, Victor G.

    2014-01-01

    In an effort to improve the current state of the art in fire probabilistic risk assessment methodology, the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Office of Regulatory Research, contracted Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to conduct a series of scoping tests to identify thermal and mechanical probes that could be used to characterize the zone of influence (ZOI) during high energy arc fault (HEAF) testing. For the thermal evaluation, passive and active probes were exposed to HEAF-like heat fluxes for a period of 2 seconds at the SNLs National Solar Thermal Test Facility to determine their ability to survive and measure such an extreme environment. Thermal probes tested included temperature lacquers (passive), NANMAC thermocouples, directional flame thermometers, modified plate thermometers, infrared temperature sensors, and a Gardon heat flux gauge. Similarly, passive and active pressure probes were evaluated by exposing them to pressures resulting from various high-explosive detonations at the Sandia Terminal Ballistic Facility. Pressure probes included bikini pressure gauges (passive) and pressure transducers. Results from these tests provided good insight to determine which probes should be considered for use during future HEAF testing.

  12. Microsoft PowerPoint - 04-10 DC_Ruhl.ppt [Compatibility Mode...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Non-OECD Non-OECD 2.80 2.90 150 200 World World 2.60 2.70 50 100 OECD OECD BP 2010 1970 1976 1982 1988 1994 2000 2006 1970 1976 1982 1988 1994 2000 2006 2. Energy Security 3 ...

  13. Advancement of DOE's EnergyPlus Building Energy Simulation Payment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lixing Gu; Don Shirey; Richard Raustad; Bereket Nigusse; Chandan Sharma; Linda Lawrie; Rich Strand; Curt Pedersen; Dan Fisher; Edwin Lee; Mike Witte; Jason Glazer; Chip Barnaby

    2011-03-31

    EnergyPlus{sup TM} is a new generation computer software analysis tool that has been developed, tested, and commercialized to support DOE??s Building Technologies (BT) Program in terms of whole-building, component, and systems R&D (http://www.energyplus.gov). It is also being used to support evaluation and decision making of zero energy building (ZEB) energy efficiency and supply technologies during new building design and existing building retrofits. The 5-year project was managed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory and was divided into 5 budget period between 2006 and 2011. During the project period, 11 versions of EnergyPlus were released. This report summarizes work performed by an EnergyPlus development team led by the University of Central Florida??s Florida Solar Energy Center (UCF/FSEC). The team members consist of DHL Consulting, C. O. Pedersen Associates, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Oklahoma State University, GARD Analytics, Inc., and WrightSoft Corporation. The project tasks involved new feature development, testing and validation, user support and training, and general EnergyPlus support. The team developed 146 new features during the 5-year period to advance the EnergyPlus capabilities. Annual contributions of new features are 7 in budget period 1, 19 in period 2, 36 in period 3, 41 in period 4, and 43 in period 5, respectively. The testing and validation task focused on running test suite and publishing report, developing new IEA test suite cases, testing and validating new source code, addressing change requests, and creating and testing installation package. The user support and training task provided support for users and interface developers, and organized and taught workshops. The general support task involved upgrading StarTeam (team sharing) software and updating existing utility software. The project met the DOE objectives and completed all tasks successfully. Although the EnergyPlus software was enhanced significantly under this project, more enhancements are needed for further improvement to ensure that EnergyPlus is able to simulate the latest technologies and perform desired HAVC system operations for the development of next generation HVAC systems. Additional development will be performed under a new 5-year project managed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.

  14. Subtask 2.17 - CO{sub 2} Storage Efficiency in Deep Saline Formations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorecki, Charles; Liu, Guoxiang; Braunberger, Jason; Klenner, Robert; Ayash, Scott; Dotzenrod, Neil; Steadman, Edward; Harju, John

    2014-02-01

    As the field of carbon capture and storage (CCS) continues to advance, and large-scale implementation of geologic carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) storage progresses, it will be important to understand the potential of geologic formations to store meaningful amounts of CO{sub 2}. Geologic CO{sub 2} storage in deep saline formations (DSFs) has been suggested as one of the best potential methods for reducing anthropogenic CO{sub 2} emission to the atmosphere, and as such, updated storage resource estimation methods will continue to be an important component for the widespread deployment of CCS around the world. While there have been several methodologies suggested in the literature, most of these methods are based on a volumetric calculation of the pore volume of the DSF multiplied by a storage efficiency term and do not consider the effect of site-specific dynamic factors such as injection rate, injection pattern, timing of injection, pressure interference between injection locations, and overall formation pressure buildup. These volumetric methods may be excellent for comparing the potential between particular formations or basins, but they have not been validated through real-world experience or full-formation injection simulations. Several studies have also suggested that the dynamic components of geologic storage may play the most important role in storing CO{sub 2} in DSFs but until now have not directly compared CO{sub 2} storage resource estimates made with volumetric methodologies to estimates made using dynamic CO{sub 2} storage methodologies. In this study, two DSFs, in geographically separate areas with geologically diverse properties, were evaluated with both volumetric and dynamic CO{sub 2} storage resource estimation methodologies to compare the results and determine the applicability of both approaches. In the end, it was determined that the dynamic CO{sub 2} storage resource potential is timedependent and it asymptotically approaches the volumetric CO{sub 2} storage resource potential over very long periods of time in the two systems that were evaluated. These results indicate that the volumetric assessments can be used as long as the appropriate storage efficiency terms are used and it is understood that it will take many wells over very long periods of time to fully realize the storage potential of a target formation. This subtask was funded through the Energy & Environmental Research Center (EERC) U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Joint Program on Research and Development for Fossil Energy-Related Resources Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-08NT43291. Nonfederal funding was provided by the IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme.

  15. Daylighting simulation: methods, algorithms, and resources

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carroll, William L.

    1999-12-01

    This document presents work conducted as part of Subtask C, ''Daylighting Design Tools'', Subgroup C2, ''New Daylight Algorithms'', of the IEA SHC Task 21 and the ECBCS Program Annex 29 ''Daylight in Buildings''. The search for and collection of daylighting analysis methods and algorithms led to two important observations. First, there is a wide range of needs for different types of methods to produce a complete analysis tool. These include: Geometry; Light modeling; Characterization of the natural illumination resource; Materials and components properties, representations; and Usability issues (interfaces, interoperability, representation of analysis results, etc). Second, very advantageously, there have been rapid advances in many basic methods in these areas, due to other forces. They are in part driven by: The commercial computer graphics community (commerce, entertainment); The lighting industry; Architectural rendering and visualization for projects; and Academia: Course materials, research. This has led to a very rich set of information resources that have direct applicability to the small daylighting analysis community. Furthermore, much of this information is in fact available online. Because much of the information about methods and algorithms is now online, an innovative reporting strategy was used: the core formats are electronic, and used to produce a printed form only secondarily. The electronic forms include both online WWW pages and a downloadable .PDF file with the same appearance and content. Both electronic forms include live primary and indirect links to actual information sources on the WWW. In most cases, little additional commentary is provided regarding the information links or citations that are provided. This in turn allows the report to be very concise. The links are expected speak for themselves. The report consists of only about 10+ pages, with about 100+ primary links, but with potentially thousands of indirect links. For purposes of the printed version, a list of the links is explicitly provided. This document exists in HTML form at the URL address: http://eande.lbl.gov/Task21/dlalgorithms.html. An equivalent downloadable PDF version, also with live links, at the URL address: http://eande.lbl.gov/Task21/dlalgorithms.pdf. A printed report can be derived directly from either of the electronic versions by simply printing either of them. In addition to the live links in the electronic forms, all report forms, electronic and paper, also have explicitly listed link addresses so that they can be followed up or referenced manually.

  16. Oil and gas outlook

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 non-OECD consumption growth non-OECD GDP growth* Prices and economic growth are important, but policy, preferences, and technology may have a bigger...

  17. Certifying Industrial Energy Efficiency Performance: AligningManagement, Measurement, and Practice to Create Market Value

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKane, Aimee; Scheihing, Paul; Williams, Robert

    2007-07-01

    More than fifteen years after the launch of programs in theU.K. and U.S., industry still offers one of the largest opportunities forenergy savings worldwide. The International Energy Agency (IEA) estimatesthe savings potential from cost-optimization of industrial motor-drivensystems alone at 7 percent of global electricity use. The U.S. Departmentof Energy (USDOE) Industrial Technologies Program estimates 7 percentsavings potential in total US industrial energy use through theapplication of proven best practice. Simple paybacks for these types ofprojects are frequently two years or less. The technology required toachieve these savings is widely available; the technical skills requiredto identify energy saving opportunities are known and transferable.Although programs like USDOE's Best Practices have been highlysuccessful, most plants, as supported by 2002 MECS data, remain eitherunaware or unmotivated to improve their energy efficiency--as evidencedby the 98 percent of US industrial facilities reporting to MECS say thatthey lack a full-time energy manager. With the renewed interest in energyefficiency worldwide and the emergence of carbon trading and newfinancial instruments such as white certificates1, there is a need tointroduce greater transparency into the way that industrial facilitiesidentify, develop, and document energy efficiency projects. Historically,industrial energy efficiency projects have been developed by plantengineers, frequently with assistance from consultants and/or supplierswith highly specialized technical skills. Under this scenario,implementation of energy efficiency improvements is dependent onindividuals. These individuals typically include "champions" within anindustrial facility or corporation, working in cooperation withconsultants or suppliers who have substantial knowledge based on years ofexperience. This approach is not easily understood by others without thisspecialized technical knowledge, penetrates the market fairly slowly, andhas no assurance of persistence, since champions may leave the company orbe reassigned after project completion.This paper presents an alternatescenario that builds on the body of expert knowledge concerning energymanagement best practices and the experience of industrial champions toengage industry in continuous energy efficiency improvement at thefacility rather than the individual level. Under this scenario,standardized methodologies for applying and validating energy managementbest practices in industrial facilities will be developed through aconsensus process involving both plant personnel and specializedconsultants and suppliers. The resulting protocols will describe aprocess or framework for conducting an energy savings assessment andverifying the results that will be transparent to policymakers, managers,and the financial community, and validated by a third-party organization.Additionally, a global dialogue is being initiated by the United NationsIndustrial Development Organization (UNIDO) concerning the development ofan international industrial energy management standard that would be ISOcompatible. The proposed scenario will combine the resulting standardwith the best practice protocols for specific energy systems (i.e.,steam, process heating, compressed air, pumping systems, etc.) to formthe foundation of a third party, performance-based certification programfor the overall industrial facility that is compatible with existingmanagement systems, including ISO 9001:2000, 14001:2004 and 6 Sigma. Thelong term goal of this voluntary, industry designed certification programis to develop a transparent, globally accepted system for validatingenergy efficiency projects and management practices. This system wouldcreate a verified record of energy savings with potential market valuethat could be recognized among sectors and countries.

  18. SUBTASK 2.19 – OPERATIONAL FLEXIBILITY OF CO2 TRANSPORT AND STORAGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jensen, Melanie; Schlasner, Steven; Sorensen, James; Hamling, John

    2014-12-31

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is produced in large quantities during electricity generation and by industrial processes. These CO2 streams vary in terms of both composition and mass flow rate, sometimes substantially. The impact of a varying CO2 stream on pipeline and storage operation is not fully understood in terms of either operability or infrastructure robustness. This study was performed to summarize basic background from the literature on the topic of operational flexibility of CO2 transport and storage, but the primary focus was on compiling real-world lessons learned about flexible operation of CO2 pipelines and storage from both large-scale field demonstrations and commercial operating experience. Modeling and pilot-scale results of research in this area were included to illustrate some of the questions that exist relative to operation of carbon capture and storage (CCS) projects with variable CO2 streams. It is hoped that this report’s real-world findings provide readers with useful information on the topic of transport and storage of variable CO2 streams. The real-world results were obtained from two sources. The first source consisted of five full-scale, commercial transport–storage projects: Sleipner, Snøhvit, In Salah, Weyburn, and Illinois Basin–Decatur. These scenarios were reviewed to determine the information that is available about CO2 stream variability/intermittency on these demonstration-scale projects. The five projects all experienced mass flow variability or an interruption in flow. In each case, pipeline and/or injection engineers were able to accommodate any issues that arose. Significant variability in composition has not been an issue at these five sites. The second source of real- world results was telephone interviews conducted with experts in CO2 pipeline transport, injection, and storage during which commercial anecdotal information was acquired to augment that found during the literature search of the five full-scale projects. The experts represented a range of disciplines and hailed from North America and Europe. Major findings of the study are that compression and transport of CO2 for enhanced oil recovery (EOR) purposes in the United States has shown that impurities are not likely to cause transport problems if CO2 stream composition standards are maintained and pressures are kept at 10.3 MPa or higher. Cyclic, or otherwise intermittent, CO2 supplies historically have not impacted in-field distribution pipeline networks, wellbore integrity, or reservoir conditions. The U.S. EOR industry has demonstrated that it is possible to adapt to variability and intermittency in CO2 supply through flexible operation of the pipeline and geologic storage facility. This CO2 transport and injection experience represents knowledge that can be applied in future CCS projects. A number of gaps in knowledge were identified that may benefit from future research and development, further enhancing the possibility for widespread application of CCS. This project was funded through the Energy & Environmental Research Center–U.S. Department of Energy Joint Program on Research and Development for Fossil Energy-Related Resources Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC26-08NT43291. Nonfederal funding was provided by the IEA Greenhouse Gas R&D Programme.

  19. OES-IA Annex IV: Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Devices - Report from the Experts Workshop September 27th 28th 2010 Clontarf Castle, Dublin Ireland

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copping, Andrea E.; O'Toole, Michael J.

    2010-12-02

    An experts' workshop was convened in Dublin Ireland September 27th 28th 2010 in support of IEA Ocean Energy Systems Implementing Agreement Annex IV. PNNL was responsible for organizing the content of the workshop, overseeing the contractors (Irish Marine Institute) hosting the event, presenting material on Annex IV and materials applicable to the workshop intent. PNNL is also overseeing a contractor (Wave Energy Center/University of Plymouth WEC/UP) in the collection and analysis of the Annex IV data. Fifty-eight experts from 8 countries attended the workshop by invitation, spending two days discussing the needs of Annex IV. Presentations by DOE (background on Annex IV), PNNL (process for developing Annex IV; presentation of the draft database for PNNL project, plans for incorporating Annex IV data), WEC/UP on the environmental effect matrix, and four MHK developers (two from the UK, one from Ireland and one from Sweden; each discussing their own projects and lessons learned for measuring and mitigating environmental effects, as well as interactions with consenting [permitting] processes) helped provide background. The workshop participants worked part of the time in the large group and most of the time in four smaller breakout groups. Participants engaged in the process and provided a wealth of examples of MHK environmental work, particularly in the European nations. They provided practical and actionable advice on the following: Developing the Annex IV database, with specific uses and audiences Strong consensus that we should collect detailed metadata on available data sets, rather than attempting to draw in copious datasets. The participants felt there would then be an opportunity to then ask for specific set of data as needed, with specific uses and ownership of the data specified. This is particularly important as many data collected, particularly in Europe but also in Canada, are proprietary; developers were not comfortable with the idea of handing over all their environmental effects data, but all said they would entertain the request if they specifics were clear. The recommendation was to collect metadata via an online interactive form, taking no more than one hour to complete. Although the idea of cases representing the best practices was recognized as useful, the participants pointed out that there are currently so few MHK projects in the water, that any and all projects were appropriate to highlight as cases. There was also discomfort at the implication that best practices implied lesser practices; this being unhelpful to a new and emerging industry. Workshop participants were asked if they were willing to continue to engage in the Annex IV process; all expressed willingness. The workshop was successful in adequately addressing its objectives and through participation and interaction in the breakout sessions around the various topics. As a result of the workshop, many delegates are now better informed and have a greater understanding of the potential environmental effects of MHK devices on the marine environment. There is now a greater sense of understanding of the issues involved and consensus by those regulators, developers and scientists who attended the workshop. A strong network has also been built over the two days between European and US/Canadian technical experts in wave and tidal energy.

  20. International petroleum statistics report, November 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-11-26

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1992; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1992: and OECD trade from 1982 through 1992.

  1. International petroleum statistics report, October 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-10-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1996; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1996; and OECD trade from 1986 through 1996. 4 figs., 48 tabs.

  2. International petroleum statistics report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-06-01

    This report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the OECD. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world, presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production, oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries.

  3. International petroleum statistics report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-05-01

    This monthly publication provides current international oil data. The Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the OECD. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries.

  4. International petroleum statistics report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1995-01-01

    This monthly publication provides current data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the OECD. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries.

  5. International petroleum statistics report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-08-01

    This report provides information on current international petroleum production, demand, imports, and stocks. World oil demand and OECD demand data are presented for the years 1970 thru 1995.

  6. Widget:Motion Chart Visualizations | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    References usenergyconsumption: SED data usconsumption2010: SED data worldenergysupply: OECD data Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleWidget:MotionChartVisuali...

  7. International Transport Forum | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ernationaltransportforum.orgaboutstaff.html "The International Transport Forum at the OECD is an intergovernmental organisation with 52 member countries. It acts as a strategic...

  8. Empowering Variable Renewables: Options for Flexible Electricity...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    additional fast response power plants, interconnection or storage. Much of existing transmission hardware in OECD countries was built in the middle of the last century, and a new...

  9. Word Pro - S11

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    1 Table 11.3 Petroleum Stocks in OECD Countries (Million Barrels) France Germany a Italy United Kingdom OECD Europe b Canada Japan South Korea United States Other OECD c OECD d 1973 Year ......................... 201 181 152 156 1,070 140 303 NA 1,008 67 2,588 1975 Year ......................... 225 187 143 165 1,154 174 375 NA 1,133 67 2,903 1980 Year ......................... 243 319 170 168 1,464 164 495 NA 1,392 72 3,587 1985 Year ......................... 139 277 156 131 1,154 112 500 13

  10. Monitoring and Tracking Long-Term Finance to Support Climate...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sector: Energy, Climate Topics: Finance, GHG inventory Resource Type: Publications, Lessons learnedbest practices Website: www.oecd.orgdataoecd575748073739.pdf Cost:...

  11. Low Emission Development Strategies (LEDS): Technical, Institutional...

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    Energy, Land Topics: Low emission development planning Resource Type: Publications, Lessons learnedbest practices Website: www.oecd.orgdataoecd325846553489.pdf Low...

  12. United Nations Economic Commission for Africa | Open Energy Informatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Ministerial Consultation known as "The Big Table" . Started in 2000, a small group of African Ministers of Finance gather with...

  13. Visualization of World Energy Supply | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    isualizationofWorldEnergySupply Cost: Free OpenEI Keyword(s): Community Generated Language: English References: OECD1 Motion chart visualization of the world energy supply...

  14. Financial News for Major Energy Companies

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), and higher foreign refinery throughput. ... to this report and to other Energy Finance products, click here, then click on the ...

  15. Slide 1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    - case study Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Knowledge Preservation for Nuclear Weapons - case study NEA-OECD Sponsored Records, Knowledge and Memory (RK&M) Project ...

  16. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2. World gross domestic product by OECD and non-OECD in three oil price cases, 1990-2040 billion 2005 dollars purchashing power parity History Projections Reference case 1990 2009 2010 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 Average annual percent change 2010-40 OECD 25,529 35,551 36,609 45,711 50,965 56,358 62,143 68,357 2.1 Non-OECD 14,416 31,640 33,889 56,432 72,255 90,672 111,157 132,123 4.6 World 37,945 67,192 70,498 102,142 123,220 142,030 173,300 200,479 3.5 High Oil Price case OECD 23,529 35,551 36,609

  17. Word Pro - S11

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    2 Petroleum Consumption in OECD Countries (Million Barrels per Day) Overview, 1973-2014 OECD Total, October By Selected OECD Country 168 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review February 2016 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 20 40 60 80 100 46.336 46.369 45.882 2013 2014 2015 0 20 40 60 World OECD United States OECD Europe Japan 1.620 2.437 1.317 1.528 2.373 3.917 2.431 19.350 1.724 2.506 1.268 1.519 2.426 3.984 2.247 19.691 France Germany Italy United Kingdom

  18. Word Pro - S11

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    Petroleum Stocks in OECD Countries (Billion Barrels) Overview, End of Year, 1973-2014 OECD Stocks, End of Month, October By Selected OECD Country, End of Month 170 U.S. Energy Information Administration / Monthly Energy Review February 2016 OECD Europe 1975 1980 1985 1990 1995 2000 2005 2010 0 1 2 3 4 5 4.241 4.287 4.546 2013 2014 2015 0 1 2 3 4 5 OECD United States Japan 0.165 0.282 0.118 0.080 0.183 0.588 0.223 2.009 0.169 0.280 0.117 0.072 0.185 0.609 0.196 1.834 France Germany Italy United

  19. International petroleum statistics report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-10-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report is a monthly publication that provides current international oil data. This report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world, in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries.

  20. International petroleum statistics report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-01-01

    This monthly publication provides international oil data for January 1998. The report presents data on oil production, demand, imports, and stocks in four sections. Section 1 containes time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. Section 4 containes annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries.

  1. International petroleum statistics report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-12-01

    This document is a monthly publication that provides current international oil data. The Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the OECD. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand and trade in OECD countries.

  2. International Petroleum Statistics Report, January 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-01-31

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade for the years 1970 through 1992; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1992; and OECD trade from 1982 through 1992.

  3. International petroleum statistics report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-12-01

    This report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1995; stocks from 1973 through 1995, and trade from 1985 through 1995.

  4. Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development Feed ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    according to a new OECD report. Thu, 24 Sep 2015 17:36:00 GMT CLIMATE CHANGE: Support to fossil fuels remains high Government support to fossil fuel consumption and production in...

  5. SEDS | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    8 August, 2012 - 12:37 New Gapminder Visualizations Added EIA Energy data Gapminder OECD OpenEI SEDS Visualization Graph OpenEI now features some cool new Gapminder...

  6. Gapminder | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    8 August, 2012 - 12:37 New Gapminder Visualizations Added EIA Energy data Gapminder OECD OpenEI SEDS Visualization Graph OpenEI now features some cool new Gapminder...

  7. Visualization Graph | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    8 August, 2012 - 12:37 New Gapminder Visualizations Added EIA Energy data Gapminder OECD OpenEI SEDS Visualization Graph OpenEI now features some cool new Gapminder...

  8. Word Pro - S11

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    9 Table 11.2 Petroleum Consumption in OECD Countries (Thousand Barrels per Day) France Germany a Italy United Kingdom OECD Europe b Canada Japan South Korea United States Other OECD c OECD d World 1973 Average .................... 2,601 3,324 2,068 2,341 15,879 1,729 4,949 281 17,308 1,768 41,913 57,237 1975 Average .................... 2,252 2,957 1,855 1,911 14,314 1,779 4,621 311 16,322 1,885 39,232 56,198 1980 Average .................... 2,256 3,082 1,934 1,725 14,995 1,873 4,960 537 17,056

  9. fossil fuels | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    energy becomes more competitive with fossil fuels in OECD countries, reports of this nature can go a long way to supporting more and more development. The four new reports in...

  10. policy | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    energy becomes more competitive with fossil fuels in OECD countries, reports of this nature can go a long way to supporting more and more development. The four new reports in...

  11. energy scenarios | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    energy becomes more competitive with fossil fuels in OECD countries, reports of this nature can go a long way to supporting more and more development. The four new reports in...

  12. Four new publications help advance renewable energy development...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    energy becomes more competitive with fossil fuels in OECD countries, reports of this nature can go a long way to supporting more and more development. The four new reports in...

  13. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Recent OECD inventory data show signs of building, and U.S. inventories built ... looseness that developed after the financial crisis in first-quarter 2009. Figure 13. Crude ...

  14. Microsoft PowerPoint - BP 2030 Outlook (EIA conference Apr 2011...

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ... Billion toe Mtoe -4.4% -7% -38% +6% +31% +6% +10% Energy Outlook 2030 14 BP 2011 OECD Europe Mtoe US China Implications for energy security 0 250 500 750 1000 1250 1500 1990 ...

  15. Initial Modeling of a Pressurized Water Reactor Completed Using RELAP-7 |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy Initial Modeling of a Pressurized Water Reactor Completed Using RELAP-7 Initial Modeling of a Pressurized Water Reactor Completed Using RELAP-7 January 29, 2013 - 12:06pm Addthis Schematic of the OECD PWR benchmark used in the initial RELAP-7 demonstration Schematic of the OECD PWR benchmark used in the initial RELAP-7 demonstration RELAP-7 is a nuclear reactor system safety analysis code. Development started in October 2011, and during the past quarter the initial

  16. International petroleum statistics report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-11-01

    This document is a monthly publication which provides current data on international oil production,demand,imports and stocks. This report has four sections which contain time series data on world oil production and oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). Also included is oil supply/demand balance information for the world, and data on oil imports and trade by OECD countries.

  17. Microsoft PowerPoint - 2013_summer_fuels.pptx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    S F l O tl k 2013 Summer Fuels Outlook April 9, 2013 www.eia.gov U.S. Energy Information Administration Independent Statistics & Analysis Key factors driving the short-term outlook * World liquid fuels consumption growth driven by emerging economies, with continuing consumption declines in OECD economies, with continuing consumption declines in OECD countries. * Non-OPEC supply growth, particularly in North America, pp y g , p y , expected to keep pace with world liquid fuels consumption

  18. International petroleum statistics report, April 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-04-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on International oil production, demand, imports and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1997; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1997; and OECD trade from 1986 through 1996. 4 figs., 46 tabs.

  19. International petroleum statistics report, May 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-05-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics report is a monthly publication that provides current international oil data. It presents data on international production, demand, imports and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two year. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1997; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1997, and OECD trade from 1987 through 1997. 4 fig., 48 tabs.

  20. International petroleum statistics report, January 1992. [Contains Glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1992-01-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, consumption, imports, exports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil consumption and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1980, and monthly data for the most two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/consumption balance for the market economies (i.e., non-communist countries). This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, consumption, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD consumption data are for the years 1970 through 1990; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1990; and OECD trade from 1982 through 1990.

  1. International petroleum statistics report, August 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-08-26

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1993; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1993; and OECD trade from 1983 through 1993.

  2. International petroleum statistics report, May 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-05-30

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1994; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1994; and OECD trade from 1983 through 1993.

  3. International petroleum statistics report, March 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-03-30

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data for March 1995 on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1993; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1993; and OECD trade from 1983 through 1993.

  4. International petroleum statistics report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-07-27

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and exports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1994; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1994; and OECD trade from 1984 through 1994.

  5. International petroleum statistics report, December 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-12-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1992; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1992; and OECD trade from 1982 through 1992. 41 tabs.

  6. International petroleum statistics report, April 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1993; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1993; and OECD trade from 1982 through 1992. 41 tables.

  7. International petroleum statistics report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-11-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1994; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1994; and OECD trade from 1984 through 1994.

  8. International petroleum statistics report, February 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-28

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1992; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1992; and OECD trade from 1982 through 1992.

  9. International petroleum statistics report, November 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-11-25

    Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. The International production, and on oil and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1993; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1993; and OECD trade from 1983 through 1993.

  10. International petroleum statistics report, June 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-27

    The report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1994; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1994; and OECD trade from 1984 through 1994. 4 figs., 45 tabs.

  11. International petroleum statistics report, April 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-05-04

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance fore the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1997; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1997; and OECD trade from 1987 through 1997. 4 figs., 48 tabs.

  12. International petroleum statistics report, August 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-08-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1997; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1997; and OECD trade from 1987 through 1997. 4 figs., 48 tabs.

  13. International petroleum statistics report, February 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-02-28

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1994; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1994; and OECD trade from 1984 through 1994.

  14. International petroleum statistics report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-10-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. Word oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1995; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1995; and OECD trade from 1985 through 1995.

  15. International petroleum statistics report, July 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-07-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1997; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1997; and OECD trade from 1987 through 1997. 4 figs., 46 tabs.

  16. International petroleum statistics report, December 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-12-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1997; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1997; and OECD trade from 1987 through 1997. 4 figs., 46 tabs.

  17. International petroleum statistics report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-05-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1995; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1995; and OECD trade from 1084 through 1994.

  18. International petroleum statistics report, May 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-05-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1990, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1998; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1998; and OECD trade from 1988 through 1998. 4 figs., 48 tabs.

  19. International petroleum statistics report, October 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-10-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1997; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1997; and OECD trade from 1987 through 1997. 4 figs., 46 tabs.

  20. International petroleum statistics report, December 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-12-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. The balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1996; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1996; and OECD trade from 1986 through 1996. 4 figs., 46 tabs.

  1. International petroleum statistics report, September 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-09-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1997; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1997; and OECD trade from 1987 through 1997. 4 figs., 46 tabs.

  2. International petroleum statistics report, June 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-06-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1997; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1997; and OECD trade from 1987 through 1997. 4 figs., 48 tabs.

  3. International petroleum statistics report, April 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-04-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1995; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1995; and OECD trade from 1985 through 1995. 4 figs., 47 tabs.

  4. International petroleum statistics report, June 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-06-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1996; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1996; and OECD trade from 1986 through 1996. 46 tabs.

  5. International petroleum statistics report, March 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-03-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1990, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years and annually for the three years prior to that. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarter data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1997; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1997; and OECD trade from 1987 through 1997. 4 figs., 48 tabs.

  6. International petroleum statistics report, September 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-09-27

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1995; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1995; and OECD trade from 1985 through 1995.

  7. International petroleum statistics report, February 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-02-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1996; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1996; and OECD trade from 1986 through 1996. 4 figs., 48 tabs.

  8. International petroleum statistics report, June 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-06-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1990, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years and annually for the three years prior to that. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1998; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1998; and OECD trade from 1988 through 1998. 4 figs., 46 tabs.

  9. International petroleum statistics report, February 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-02-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1995; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1995; and OECD trade from 1985 through 1995. 4 figs., 47 tabs.

  10. International petroleum statistics report, March 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-03-28

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1992; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1992; and OECD trade from 1982 through 1992.

  11. International petroleum statistics report, January 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-01-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1997; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1997; and OECD trade from 1987 through 1997. 4 figs., 46 tabs.

  12. International petroleum statistics report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-07-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report is a monthly publication that provides current international data. The report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent 12 months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1996; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1996; and OECD trade from 1986 through 1996.

  13. International petroleum statistics report, November 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-11-01

    This report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1995; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1995; and OECD trade from 1985 through 1995. 4 figs., 45 tabs.

  14. International petroleum statistics report, February 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-02-01

    The International petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970--1997; OECD stocks from 1973--1997; and OECD trade from 1987--1997.

  15. International petroleum statistics report, March 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-03-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report is a monthly publication that provides current international oil data. This report is published for the use of Members of Congress, Federal agencies, State agencies, industry, and the general public. The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1996; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1996; and OECD trade from 1986 through 1996.

  16. International petroleum statistics report, November 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1998-11-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1997; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1997; and OECD trade from 1987 through 1997. 4 figs., 46 tabs.

  17. International petroleum statistics report, July 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1999-07-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report is a monthly publication that provides current international oil data. This report is published for the use of Members of Congress, Federal agencies, State agencies, industry, and the general public. The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1990, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years and annually for the three years prior to that. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1998; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1998; and OECD trade from 1988 through 1998. 4 figs., 44 tabs.

  18. International petroleum statistics report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1997-05-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report is a monthly publication that provides current international oil data. This report is published for the use of Members of Congress, Federal agencies, State agencies, industry, and the general public. Publication of this report is in keeping with responsibilities given the Energy Information Administration in Public Law 95-91. The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1995; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1995; and OECD trade from 1985 through 1995.

  19. International petroleum statistics report, September 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1994; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1994; and OECD trade from 1984 through 1994. 4 figs., 45 tabs.

  20. International petroleum statistics report, October 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1993-10-27

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1980, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1992; OECD stocks from 1982 through 1992.

  1. International petroleum statistics report, September 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-09-01

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (ECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1993; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1993; and OECD trade from 1983 through 1993.

  2. A comparative analysis of accident risks in fossil, hydro, and nuclear energy chains

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burgherr, P.; Hirschberg, S.

    2008-07-01

    This study presents a comparative assessment of severe accident risks in the energy sector, based on the historical experience of fossil (coal, oil, natural gas, and LPG (Liquefied Petroleum Gas)) and hydro chains contained in the comprehensive Energy-related Severe Accident Database (ENSAD), as well as Probabilistic Safety Assessment (PSA) for the nuclear chain. Full energy chains were considered because accidents can take place at every stage of the chain. Comparative analyses for the years 1969-2000 included a total of 1870 severe ({>=} 5 fatalities) accidents, amounting to 81,258 fatalities. Although 79.1% of all accidents and 88.9% of associated fatalities occurred in less developed, non-OECD countries, industrialized OECD countries dominated insured losses (78.0%), reflecting their substantially higher insurance density and stricter safety regulations. Aggregated indicators and frequency-consequence (F-N) curves showed that energy-related accident risks in non-OECD countries are distinctly higher than in OECD countries. Hydropower in non-OECD countries and upstream stages within fossil energy chains are most accident-prone. Expected fatality rates are lowest for Western hydropower and nuclear power plants; however, the maximum credible consequences can be very large. Total economic damages due to severe accidents are substantial, but small when compared with natural disasters. Similarly, external costs associated with severe accidents are generally much smaller than monetized damages caused by air pollution.

  3. World nuclear outlook 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-12-01

    As part of the EIA program to provide energy information, this analysis report presents the current status and projections through 2010 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the uranium market. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for three different scenarios through 2040 are developed for the Department of Energy`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). In turn, the OCRWM provides partial funding for preparation of this report. The projections of uranium requirements are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) for preparation of the Nuclear Energy Agency/OECD report, Summary of Nuclear Power and Fuel Cycle Data in OECD Member Countries.

  4. Appendix A. Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2014 38 Appendix B Table B2. World liquids consumption by region, High Oil Price case, 2009-40 (million barrels per day) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-40 2009 2010 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 23.1 23.5 23.4 22.9 22.3 22.0 22.0 -0.2 United States a 18.6 18.9 18.6 18.0 17.4 17.2 17.2 -0.3 Canada 2.2 2.2 2.2 2.1 2.0 2.0 1.9 -0.5 Mexico/Chile 2.4 2.4 2.6 2.7 2.8 2.8 2.9 0.6 OECD

  5. Appendix A. Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2014 50 Appendix C Table C2. World liquids consumption by region, Low Oil Price case, 2009-40 (million barrels per day) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-40 2009 2010 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 23.1 23.5 24.8 24.8 24.7 24.9 25.5 0.3 United States a 18.6 18.9 19.6 19.5 19.4 19.4 19.8 0.1 Canada 2.2 2.2 2.4 2.4 2.4 2.5 2.6 0.5 Mexico/Chile 2.4 2.4 2.8 2.9 3.0 3.0 3.2 1.0 OECD Europe

  6. World nuclear outlook 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-09-29

    As part of the EIA program to provide energy information, this analysis report presents the current status and projections through 2015 of nuclear capacity, generation, and fuel cycle requirements for all countries in the world using nuclear power to generate electricity for commercial use. It also contains information and forecasts of developments in the uranium market. Long-term projections of US nuclear capacity, generation, and spent fuel discharges for two different scenarios through 2040 are developed for the Department of Energy`s Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM). In turn, the OCRWM provides partial funding for preparation of this report. The projections of uranium requirements are provided to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) for preparation of the Nuclear Energy Agency/OECD report, Summary of Nuclear Power and Fuel Cycle Data in OECD Member Countries.

  7. Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.4 Environmental Data

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    6 World Carbon Dioxide Emissions Nation/Region 1990 2000 2010 1990-2000 2000-2010 China 2270 2850 8262 26% 2.3% 11.2% United States 5041 5862 5644 18% 1.5% -0.4% OECD Europe 4128 4191 4094 13% 0.2% -0.2% Other Non-OECD Asia 827 1339 1872 6% 4.9% 3.4% Russia (1) 3821 1556 1632 5% -8.6% 0.5% Middle East 730 1094 1692 5% 4.1% 4.5% India 579 1003 1602 5% 5.7% 4.8% Central & S. America 716 992 1150 4% 3.3% 1.5% Japan 1047 1201 1090 3% 1.4% -1.0% Africa 726 887 1107 4% 2.0% 2.2% Oth. Non-OECD

  8. International Petroleum Statistics Report, July 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-26

    The International Petroleum Statistics Report presents data on international oil production, demand, imports, exports, and stocks. The report has four sections. Section 1 contains time series data on world oil production, and on oil demand and stocks in the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). This section contains annual data beginning in 1985, and monthly data for the most recent two years. Section 2 presents an oil supply/demand balance for the world. This balance is presented in quarterly intervals for the most recent two years. Section 3 presents data on oil imports by OECD countries. This section contains annual data for the most recent year, quarterly data for the most recent two quarters, and monthly data for the most recent twelve months. Section 4 presents annual time series data on world oil production and oil stocks, demand, and trade in OECD countries. World oil production and OECD demand data are for the years 1970 through 1993; OECD stocks from 1973 through 1993; and OECD trade from 1983 through 1993. Data for the United States are developed by the Energy Information Administration`s (EIA) Office of Oil and Gas. Data for other countries are derived largely from published sources, including International Energy Agency publications, the EIA International Energy Annual, and the trade press. (See sources after each section.) All data are reviewed by the International Statistics Branch of EIA. All data have been converted to units of measurement familiar to the American public. Definitions of oil production and consumption are consistent with other EIA publications.

  9. Monthly energy review, February 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-24

    The Monthly Energy Review gives information on production, distribution, consumption, prices, imports, and exports for the following US energy sources: petroleum; petroleum products; natural gas; coal; electricity; and nuclear energy. The section on international energy contains data for world crude oil production and consumption, petroleum stocks in OECD countries, and nuclear electricity gross generation.

  10. Monthly energy review, March 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-03-29

    The Monthly Energy Review provides information on production, distribution, consumption, prices, imports, and exports for the following US energy sources: petroleum; petroleum products; natural gas; coal; electricity; and nuclear energy. The section on international energy contains data for world crude oil production and consumption, petroleum stocks in OECD countries, and nuclear electricity gross generation.

  11. IAEA National Statement

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The United States thanks the Government of Russia and Rosatom Director General Sergei Kiriyenko, our hosts, and the IAEA, led by Yukia Amano, in cooperation with the Nuclear Energy Agency of the OECD, for convening this important conference in the beautiful city of St. Petersburg.

  12. "U.S. Energy Information Administration"

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ...8.225,7.8841,7.4662,-0.6115705203 " South Korea" " Residential",0.1295,,0.1322,0.127,0.125...9.3983,89.2622,-0.1236504239 "Non-OECD" " Russia" " Residential",0.3215,,0.3276,0.2954,0.2...

  13. Appendix A. Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    26 Appendix A Table A2. World liquids consumption by region, Reference case, 2009-40 (million barrels per day) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-40 2009 2010 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD OECD Americas 23.1 23.5 24.3 24.0 23.6 23.4 23.5 0.0 United States a 18.6 18.9 19.2 19.0 18.6 18.5 18.4 -0.1 Canada 2.2 2.2 2.3 2.2 2.2 2.2 2.1 -0.1 Mexico/Chile 2.4 2.4 2.7 2.8 2.8 2.8 2.9 0.7 OECD Europe 15.0 14.8 14.1 14.1 14.0 13.9 14.0 -0.2 OECD Asia 7.7 7.7 8.0 7.9 7.7 7.4 7.2

  14. IAEA CRP on HTGR Uncertainty Analysis: Benchmark Definition and Test Cases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerhard Strydom; Frederik Reitsma; Hans Gougar; Bismark Tyobeka; Kostadin Ivanov

    2012-11-01

    Uncertainty and sensitivity studies are essential elements of the reactor simulation code verification and validation process. Although several international uncertainty quantification activities have been launched in recent years in the LWR, BWR and VVER domains (e.g. the OECD/NEA BEMUSE program [1], from which the current OECD/NEA LWR Uncertainty Analysis in Modelling (UAM) benchmark [2] effort was derived), the systematic propagation of uncertainties in cross-section, manufacturing and model parameters for High Temperature Reactor (HTGR) designs has not been attempted yet. This paper summarises the scope, objectives and exercise definitions of the IAEA Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on HTGR UAM [3]. Note that no results will be included here, as the HTGR UAM benchmark was only launched formally in April 2012, and the specification is currently still under development.

  15. The distribution of the major economies effort in the Durban platform scenarios

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tavoni, Massimo; Kriegler, Elmar; Aboumahboub, Tino; Calvin, Katherine V.; DeMaere, Gauthier; Wise, Marshall A.; Klein, David; Jewell, Jessica; Kober, Tom; Lucas, Paul; Luderer, Gunnar; McCollum, David; Marangoni, Giacomo; Riahi, Keywan; Van Vuuren, Detlef

    2013-11-01

    The feasibility of achieving climate stabilization consistent with the objective of 2C is heavily influenced by how the effort in terms of mitigation and economic resources will be distributed among the major economies. This paper provides a multi-model quantifications of the mitigation commitment in ten major regions of the world for a diversity of allocation schemes. Our results indicate that a stylized policy with uniform carbon pricing and no transfer payments would yield an uneven distribution of policy costs, which would be lower, higher and significantly higher than the average for the OECD, developing economies and energy exporters respectively. We show that resource sharing burden sharing schemes would not resolve the issue of cost distribution. An effort sharing scheme which equalizes policy costs would yield an allocation of allowances in line with the aspirational targets of the OECD countries, and which would peak before 2030 for China. In all cases, a large international carbon market would emerge.

  16. An analysis of markets for small-scale, advanced coal-combustion technology in Spain, Italy, and Turkey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-09-01

    This report describes the results of an in-depth analysis of markets for US-developed, advanced coal-combustion technology (ACT) in the residential, commercial, and industrial sectors of three countries -- Spain, Italy, and Turkey. These countries were chosen in a previous study, in which member countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) were rated on eight factors influencing their propensity to use small-scale, US-developed ACT. 76 refs., 16 figs., 14 tabs.

  17. Short Term Energy Outlook ,October 2002

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    October 2002 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook October 2002 Overview World Oil Markets: Continued high oil prices are the result of declining OECD commercial oil inventories, worries over a potential clash with Iraq, and OPEC's decision to leave production quotas unchanged at its September meeting. Solid growth in world oil demand this winter (and for 2003 as a whole) is likely to tighten world oil markets and reduce commercial oil inventories. The West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil spot price

  18. Short-Term Energy Outlook

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (STEO) Highlights  January was the seventh consecutive month in which monthly average North Sea Brent crude oil prices decreased, reaching $48/barrel (bbl), the lowest since March 2009. The price decline reflects continued growth in U.S. tight oil production and strong global supply, amid weaker global oil demand growth, which contributed to rising global oil inventories. In January, estimated Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) total commercial oil inventories

  19. RELAP-7 Development | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    RELAP-7 Development RELAP-7 Development January 29, 2013 - 12:03pm Addthis During the second quarter, the Reactor team drafted software development guidance documents and a software quality assurance plan and developed component models for pipe flows, pipe junctions, and basic reactor core channels using the Moose code development framework. These components are now being tested for inclusion in a simplified reactor model. Addthis Related Articles Schematic of the OECD PWR benchmark used in the

  20. Coalescence and Chemical Equilibrium in Multifragmentation at Intermediate Energies, T

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 - March 31, 2008 Introductory Remarks at the Long Range Plan Working Group Meeting, R.E. Tribble, Galveston, Texas (April, 2007). Tokyo Meeting Report: New Initiatives, R.E. Tribble, Invited Talk, OECD Meeting, Tokyo, Japan (May, 2007). Report to IUPAP WG9: NSAC Long Range Plan and the RIB Task Force, R.E. Tribble, Invited Talk, IUPAP Meeting, Tokyo, Japan (May, 2007). Radioactive Beams for Nuclear Spectroscopy and Nuclear Astrophysics, R.E. Tribble, Invited Talk, Direct Reaction with Exotic

  1. Presentation title: This can be up to 2 lines

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    8, 2014 2014 Summer Fuels Outlook Key factors driving the short-term outlook * World liquid fuels consumption growth driven by emerging economies, with continuing consumption declines in OECD countries. * Non-OPEC supply growth, particularly in North America, expected to keep pace with world liquid fuels consumption growth and contribute to modest declines in world crude oil prices. * Brent crude oil prices fall gradually over the forecast, averaging, from $109 per barrel in 2013 to $105 per

  2. International Transportation Energy Demand Determinants (ITEDD): Prototype Results for China

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Jim Turnure, Director Office of Energy Consumption & Efficiency Analysis, EIA EIA Conference: Asian Energy Demand July 14, 2014 | Washington, DC International Transportation Energy Demand Determinants (ITEDD): Prototype Results for China Dawn of new global oil market paradigm? 2 Jim Turnure, EIA Conference July 14, 2014 * Conventional wisdom has centered around $100-120/barrel oil and 110-115 million b/d global liquid fuel demand in the long term (2030-2040) * Demand in non-OECD may push

  3. Short-Term Energy Outlook - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    a : International Petroleum and Other Liquids Production, Consumption, and Inventories (Million Barrels per Day, Except OECD Commercial Stocks) Either scripts and active content are not permitted to run or Adobe Flash Player version ${version_major}.${version_minor}.${version_revision} or greater is not installed. Get Adobe Flash Player a Supply includes production of crude oil (including lease condensates), natural gas plant liquids, biofuels, other liquids, and refinery processing gains. b

  4. Energy & Financial Markets - U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) -

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Balance Inventories act as the balancing point between supply and demand. During periods when production exceeds consumption, crude oil and petroleum products can be stored for expected future use. In the economic downturn of late 2008 and early 2009, for example, the unexpected drop in world demand led to record crude oil inventories in the United States and other OECD countries. In contrast, when consumption outstrips current production,

  5. Microsoft Word - Highlights.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7 1 November 2007 Short-Term Energy Outlook November 6, 2007 Release Highlights Global oil markets will likely remain stretched, as world oil demand has continued to grow much faster than oil supply outside of the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), putting pressure on OPEC and inventories to bridge the gap. Additional fundamental factors contributing to price volatility include ongoing geopolitical risks, OECD inventory tightness, and worldwide refining bottlenecks. As a

  6. Regional trends in the take-up of clean coal technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wootten, J.M.

    1997-12-31

    Using surveys of the electricity industry taken in major OECD coal producing/coal consuming regions of North America, Europe, Southern Africa, and Asia/Pacific, this paper reports on the attitudes of power plant operators and developers toward clean coal technologies, the barriers to their use and the policies and measures that might be implemented, if a country or region desired to encourage greater use of clean coal technologies.

  7. International environmental justice: Geo-political implications of the Basel agreement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Padgett, D.

    1995-12-01

    The 1994 Basel Convention concluded with a historical agreement to immediately ban the export of hazardous wastes for disposal from member countries of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) to non-OECD nations. The OECD nations account for approximately 98 percent of the world`s toxic waste generation. As of December 31, 1997, exports of wastes for recycling will be illegal. For many years, industrialized nations have shipped hazardous wastes to developing nations under the guise of recycling. The ban will make 90 percent of current shipments unlawful. The United States was among the industrialized OCED nations declining to partake in the agreement. In March 1994, the Waste Export and Import Control Act was introduced to Congress by a concerned coalition of Representatives. The bill would ban all exports of toxic wastes except to those nations. Critics have argued that the nature of the Agreement makes it unenforceable under certain conditions. Applied geographical techniques are employed to reveal regions where the effectiveness of the waste ban may be challenged. Formulas are developed to determine the cost-benefit ratio for non-OECD nations involved in significant levels of toxic waste trade. Political and historical analyses are applied in order to clarify the U.S. opposition to the ban. A list of predictions is offered with the future of hazardous waste transhipments within the context of the world`s ever-changing geo-political sphere. Suggestions for improving the effectiveness and enforceability of the Basel Agreement are offered for discussion.

  8. REGULATIONS ON PHOTOVOLTAIC MODULE DISPOSAL AND RECYCLING.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    FTHENAKIS,V.

    2001-01-29

    Environmental regulations can have a significant impact on product use, disposal, and recycling. This report summarizes the basic aspects of current federal, state and international regulations which apply to end-of-life photovoltaic (PV) modules and PV manufacturing scrap destined for disposal or recycling. It also discusses proposed regulations for electronics that may set the ground of what is to be expected in this area in the near future. In the US, several states have started programs to support the recycling of electronic equipment, and materials destined for recycling often are excepted from solid waste regulations during the collection, transfer, storage and processing stages. California regulations are described separately because they are different from those of most other states. International agreements on the movement of waste between different countries may pose barriers to cross-border shipments. Currently waste moves freely among country members of the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), and between the US and the four countries with which the US has bilateral agreements. However, it is expected, that the US will adopt the rules of the Basel Convention (an agreement which currently applies to 128 countries but not the US) and that the Convection's waste classification system will influence the current OECD waste-handling system. Some countries adopting the Basel Convention consider end-of-life electronics to be hazardous waste, whereas the OECD countries consider them to be non-hazardous. Also, waste management regulations potentially affecting electronics in Germany and Japan are mentioned in this report.

  9. International energy outlook 1995, May 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1995-06-01

    The International Energy Outlook 1995 (IEO95) presents an assessment by the Energy Information Administration (EIA) of the international energy market outlook through 2010. The report is an extension of the EIA`s Annual Energy Outlook 1995 (AEO95), which was prepared using the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS). US projections appearing in the IEO95 are consistent with those published in the AEO95. IEO95 is provided as a statistical service to energy managers and analysts, both in government and in the private sector. The projects are used by international agencies, Federal and State governments, trade associations, and other planners and decisionmakers. They are published pursuant to the Department of energy Organization Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-91), Section 295(c). The IEO95 projections are based on US and foreign government policies in effect on October 1, 1994. IEO95 displays projections according to six basic country groupings. The regionalization has changed since last year`s report. Mexico has been added to the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD), and a more detailed regionalization has been incorporated for the remainder of the world, including the following subgroups: non-OECD Asia, Africa, Middle East, and Central and South America. China is included in non-OECD Asia. Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union are combined in the EE/FSU subgroup.

  10. 239Pu Resonance Evaluation for Thermal Benchmark System Calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leal, Luiz C; Noguere, G; De Saint Jean, C; Kahler, A.

    2013-01-01

    Analyses of thermal plutonium solution critical benchmark systems have indicated a deciency in the 239Pu resonance evaluation. To investigate possible solutions to this issue, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Working Party for Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC) established Subgroup 34 to focus on the reevaluation of the 239Pu resolved resonance parameters. In addition, the impacts of the prompt neutron multiplication (nubar) and the prompt neutron ssion spectrum (PFNS) have been investigated. The objective of this paper is to present the results of the 239Pu resolved resonance evaluation eort.

  11. Highlights.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    July 2003 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook July 2003 Overview World Oil Markets. The average West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil price for June was up by about $2.50 per barrel from the May average, in part because OECD oil inventories remain low by historical standards. Oil prices are not likely to fall significantly until commercial inventories rise to levels observed in recent years. EIA's Outlook is for prices to remain firm throughout the rest of 2003 (in the $29- $30 per barrel range for

  12. Rare events: a state of the art

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Uppuluri, V.R.R.

    1980-12-01

    The study of rare events has become increasingly important in the context of nuclear safety. Some philosophical considerations, such as the framework for the definition of a rare event, rare events and science, rare events and trans-science, and rare events and public perception, are discussed. The technical work of the Task Force on problems of Rare Events in the Reliability Analysis of Nuclear Plants (1976-1978), sponsored by OECD, is reviewed. Some recent technical considerations are discussed, and conclusions are drawn. The appendix contains an essay written by Anne E. Beachey, under the title: A Study of Rare Events - Problems and Promises.

  13. Non-OPEC oil supply continues to grow

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knapp, D.H.

    1995-12-25

    Global reserves of crude oil remain at 1 trillion bbl, according to OGJ`s annual survey of producing countries. Significant gains are in Brazil, Colombia, Congo, Egypt, Libya, Nigeria, Oman, and Papua New Guinea. Decreases were reported by Indonesia, Norway, the U.K., Iran, Canada, Mexico, and the US. Natural gas reserves slipped to 4.9 quadrillion cu ft. The major production trend is a lasting surge from outside of OPEC. This year`s Worldwide Production report begins with a detailed analysis of this crucial development by an international authority. This article discusses the OECD outlook by region and the turnaround in production in the former Soviet Union.

  14. Proceedings of the CSNI specialists meeting on fuel-coolant interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1994-03-01

    A specialists meeting on fuel-coolant interactions was held in Santa Barbara, CA from January 5-7, 1993. The meeting was sponsored by the United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission in collaboration with the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installation (CSNI) of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) and the University of California at Santa Barbara. The objectives of the meeting are to cross-fertilize on-going work, provide opportunities for mutual check points, seek to focus the technical issues on matters of practical significance and re-evaluate both the objectives as well as path of future research. Individual papers have been cataloged separately.

  15. Microsoft Word - Highlights.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook August 2003 Overview World Oil Markets. Average crude oil prices for July were little changed from June. The West Texas Intermediate (WTI) spot average for July was $30.75 per barrel compared to $30.66 in June. EIA's Outlook is for prices to remain firm through the rest of 2003, or at least until autumn, when OECD oil inventories may rebuild above observed 5-year lows. Once inventories have been rebuilt, WTI oil prices may slide gradually to $26 per barrel during

  16. Microsoft Word - Highlights.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3 1 Short-Term Energy Outlook September 2003 Overview World Oil Markets. The August average West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude oil price of $31.57 per barrel was almost $1 per barrel higher than it was in July (Figure 1). Crude oil prices declined slightly in early September as pressure to buy oil dropped at the end of the summer driving season. Still, OECD oil inventories remain low, leaving the market susceptible to price uncertainty. We do not see market fundamentals as favoring sustained

  17. Microsoft Word - Price Uncertainty Supplement.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    April 2010 Short-Term Energy Outlook Energy Price Volatility and Forecast Uncertainty 1 April 6, 2010 Release Crude Oil Prices. WTI crude oil spot prices averaged $81 per barrel in March 2010, almost $5 per barrel above the prior month's average and $3 per barrel higher than forecast in last month's Outlook. Oil prices rose from a low this year of $71.15 per barrel on February 5 to $80 per barrel by the end of February, generally on news of robust economic and energy demand growth in non-OECD

  18. Microsoft PowerPoint - Sweetnam NG Disc Slides - April 7 2010 final.ppt [Compatibility Mode]

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Gas: U.S. Markets in a Global Context 2010 Energy Conference U.S. Energy Information Administration Johns Hopkins University - SAIS p y April 7, 2010 - Washington, DC Natural Gas: U.S. Markets is a Global Context, April 7, 2010 Richard Newell, March 2, 2010 1 Richard Newell, SAIS, December 14, 2009 1 April 7, 2010 Washington, DC Discussion Outline * Setting the context * Demand/supply outlook for 3 regions - United States United States - OECD Europe - China * Evolution of the global gas market -

  19. Appendix A. Reference case projections

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    15.0 14.8 14.1 14.1 14.0 13.9 14.0 -0.2 OECD Asia 7.7 7.7 8.0 7.9 7.7 7.4 7.2 -0.2 Japan 4.4 4.4 4.3 4.2 4.0 3.9 3.6 -0.6 South Korea 2.2 2.3 2.6 2.6 2.5 2.5 2.4 0.2...

  20. Appendix A. Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    15.0 14.8 13.7 13.7 13.6 13.5 13.4 -0.3 OECD Asia 7.7 7.7 7.6 7.5 7.2 6.9 6.7 -0.5 Japan 4.4 4.4 4.0 4.0 3.8 3.6 3.3 -0.9 South Korea 2.2 2.3 2.4 2.4 2.4 2.3 2.2 0.0...

  1. Appendix A. Reference case projections

    Annual Energy Outlook [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    Europe 15.0 14.8 14.7 15.0 15.2 15.4 15.9 0.2 OECD Asia 7.7 7.7 8.4 8.4 8.3 8.2 8.1 0.2 Japan 4.4 4.4 4.5 4.5 4.4 4.2 4.0 -0.3 South Korea 2.2 2.3 2.7 2.8 2.8 2.8 2.8 0.7...

  2. An analysis of markets for small-scale, advanced coal-combustion technology in Spain, Italy, and Turkey

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Placet, M.; Gerry, P.A.; Kenski, D.M.; Kern, D.M.; Nehring, J.L.; Szpunar, C.B.

    1989-09-01

    This report discusses the examination of potential overseas markets for using small-scale, US-developed, advanced coal-combustion technologies (ACTs). In previous work, member countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) were rated on their potential for using ACTs through a comprehensive screening methodology. The three most promising OECD markets were found to be Spain, Italy, and Turkey. This report provides in-depth analyses of these three selected countries. First, it addresses changes in the European Community with particular reference to the 1992 restructuring and its potential effect on the energy situation in Europe, specifically in the three subject countries. It presents individual country studies that examine demographics, economics, building infrastructures, and energy-related factors. Potential niches for ACTs are explored for each country through regional analyses. Marketing channels, strategies, and the trading environments in each country are also discussed. The information gathered indicates that Turkey is a most promising market, Spain is a fairly promising market, and Italy appears to be a somewhat limited market for US ACTs. 76 refs., 16 figs., 14 tabs.

  3. Technological options of Taiwan to mitigate global warming: Perspectives of a newly industrialized economy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Young, R.T.; Fang, L.J.

    1996-12-31

    While there is no shortage of studies on whether and how OECD countries can stabilize their CO{sub 2} emissions, the situation in developing countries has been subjected to much less scrutiny. Although current emission levels in developing countries are low, they can vastly increase in the future due to higher economic growth rates. Of particular interest are newly industrializing economies; they are positioned to be the first group of countries to catch up with OECD emission levels. In this paper, the authors examine the CO{sub 2} emission scenarios in Taiwan, whose economy is still growing at more than 6% after years of impressive performance. A dynamic, multi-period optimization model was constructed to evaluate various energy system development paths. Both currently utilized technologies and advanced technologies that may become available are considered. The model meets externally specified final energy sectoral demands while keeping the objective function minimal. For devising a practical program to control greenhouse gases emissions, relative advantages of the conventional regulation approach with incentive-based approaches are compared. The comparison is made by running the model using different objective functions.

  4. U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    3. World petroleum and other liquid fuels consumption by region, Reference case, 1980-2040 million barrels per day Average annual percent change Region 1980 1990 2000 2010 2020 20305 2040 1980-2010 2010-2040 OECD 41.6 41.6 48.3 46.0 46.4 45.3 44.7 0.3 -0.1 Americas 20.3 20.4 24.0 23.5 24.3 23.6 23.5 0.5 0.0 Europe 15.2 13.9 15.6 14.8 14.1 14.0 14.0 -0.1 -0.2 Asia 6.2 7.2 8.7 7.7 8.0 7.7 7.2 0.7 -0.2 Non-OECD 21.5 24.9 28.5 40.7 51.2 62.1 74.7 2.2 2.0 Europe/Eurasia 10.1 9.3 4.3 4.8 5.5 5.6 5.6

  5. Buildings Energy Data Book: 1.1 Buildings Sector Energy Consumption

    Buildings Energy Data Book [EERE]

    3 World Primary Energy Consumption and Population, by Country/Region 1990-2000 2000-2010 Region/Country 1990 2000 2010 1990 2000 2010 Energy Pop. Energy Pop. United States 85.0 99.8 97.8 18.7% 250 282 311 4.6% 1.6% 1.2% -0.2% 1.0% China 27.0 36.4 104.6 20.0% 1,148 1,264 1,343 20.0% 3.0% 1.0% 11.1% 0.6% OECD Europe 69.9 76.8 79.6 15.2% 402 522 550 8.2% 0.9% 2.6% 0.4% 0.5% Other Non-OECD Asia 12.5 20.6 31.3 6.0% 781 1,014 1,086 16.2% 5.1% 2.6% 4.2% 0.7% Russia (1) 61.0 27.2 29.9 5.7% 288 147 140

  6. Verification of the coupled 3-D neutronics and thermal-hydraulic code SKETCH-INS/TRAC-P

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakajima, T.; Takeuchi, A.

    2006-07-01

    In order to analyze the complex transients with coupled interactions between core behavior and plant dynamics, the three-dimensional neutronics code SKETCH-INS was coupled with the thermal-hydraulic code TRAC-P. The capability SKETCH-INS code was verified against the 3-D transient benchmark problem. The capability of the coupled code SKETCH-INS/TRAC-P was verified against the NEACRP 3-D LWR core transient benchmark and OECD MSLB benchmark problems. The results of analyses were in reasonable agreement with the reference and different codes results of benchmarks. This paper provides the outline of the coupled code SKETCH-INS/TRAC-P and the results of benchmarks. (authors)

  7. International nuclear fuel cycle fact book

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh, I.W.

    1988-01-01

    As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need has developed for a ready source or information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book was compiled to meet that need. The information contained has been obtained from nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECD/NEA activities reports; proceedings of conferences and workshops; and so forth. Sources do not agree completely with each other, and the data listed herein does not reflect any one single source but frequently is consolidation/combination of information. Lack of space as well as the intent and purpose of the Fact Book limit the given information to that pertaining to the Nuclear Fuel Cycle and to data considered of primary interest or most helpful to the majority of users.

  8. An Overview of the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Briggs, J. Blair; Gulliford, Jim

    2014-10-09

    Interest in high-quality integral benchmark data is increasing as efforts to quantify and reduce calculational uncertainties associated with advanced modeling and simulation accelerate to meet the demands of next generation reactor and advanced fuel cycle concepts. Two Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) activities, the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP), initiated in 1992, and the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP), initiated in 2003, have been identifying existing integral experiment data, evaluating those data, and providing integral benchmark specifications for methods and data validation for nearly two decades. Data provided by those two projects will be of use to the international reactor physics, criticality safety, and nuclear data communities for future decades. An overview of the IRPhEP and a brief update of the ICSBEP are provided in this paper.

  9. Current Reactor Physics Benchmark Activities at the Idaho National Laboratory

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    John D. Bess; Margaret A. Marshall; Mackenzie L. Gorham; Joseph Christensen; James C. Turnbull; Kim Clark

    2011-11-01

    The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) [1] and the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) [2] were established to preserve integral reactor physics and criticality experiment data for present and future research. These valuable assets provide the basis for recording, developing, and validating our integral nuclear data, and experimental and computational methods. These projects are managed through the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD-NEA). Staff and students at the Department of Energy - Idaho (DOE-ID) and INL are engaged in the development of benchmarks to support ongoing research activities. These benchmarks include reactors or assemblies that support Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) research, space nuclear Fission Surface Power System (FSPS) design validation, and currently operational facilities in Southeastern Idaho.

  10. International nuclear fuel cycle fact book. [Contains glossary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh, I.W.; Lakey, L.T.; Schneider, K.J.; Silviera, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need has developed for a ready source of information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book was compiled to meet that need. The information contained has been obtained from nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECD/NEA activities reports; proceedings of conferences and workshops; and so forth. Sources do not agree completely with each other, and the data listed herein does not reflect any one single source but frequently is a consolidation/combination of information. Lack of space as well as the intent and purpose of the Fact Book limit the given information to that pertaining to the Nuclear Fuel Cycle and to data considered of primary interest or most helpful to the majority of users.

  11. Greenhouse gas emissions from forest, land use and biomass burning in Tanzania

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matitu, M.R.

    1994-12-31

    Carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and methane (CH{sub 4}) gases are the main contributors to the greenhouse effect that consequently results in global warming. This paper examines the sources and sinks of these gases from/to forest, land use and biomass burning and their likely contribution to climate change using IPCC/OECD methodology. Emissions have been calculated in mass units of carbon and nitrogen Emissions and uptake have been summed for each gas and the emissions converted to full molecular weights. Mismanagement of forests and land misuse have contributed much to greenhouse gas emissions in Tanzania. For example, cultivation methods, forest clearing, burning of savannah grass and indiscriminate logging (non-sustainable logging) have contributed significantly to greenhouse gas emissions. These categories contribute more than 90% of total CO{sub 2} emissions. However, the study shows that shifting cultivation, savannah burning and forest clearing for conversion to permanent crop land and pasture are the main contributors.

  12. Making the market right for environmentally sound energy-efficient technologies: US buildings sector successes that might work in developing countries and Eastern Europe

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gadgil, A.; Rosenfeld, A.H.; Price, L.

    1991-12-01

    Between 1973 and 1985, when energy prices were high, all Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) countries improved their E/GNP by about 2.5% annually. Increased energy efficiency accounted for 2/3rds of this improvement; the remaining portion was due to structural changes in the economy. In the US, analytic and policy tools that have successfully promoted energy efficiency include integrated resource planning, energy use labels, energy use standards, ``Golden Carrot`` incentive programs, and revenue-neutral ``feebates.`` In addition, a number of low cost, environmentally sound, energy-efficient technologies, such as electronic ballasts, compact fluorescent lamps, and low-emissivity windows, have recently been developed. We discuss how many of these policies and technologies are probably exportable to developing countries and Eastern Europe, giving examples of successful starts in India, the ASEAN countries, and Brazil.

  13. 3atab.xlsx

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    (a) OECD ................................................. 26.64 26.43 26.80 26.97 26.59 26.41 25.90 25.91 25.98 25.97 25.85 25.89 26.71 26.20 25.92 U.S. (50 States) ............................... 14.81 15.10 15.13 15.11 14.77 14.69 14.29 14.28 14.20 14.34 14.28 14.50 15.04 14.51 14.33 Canada ............................................ 4.69 4.16 4.55 4.54 4.57 4.60 4.66 4.72 4.77 4.77 4.83 4.82 4.48 4.64 4.80 Mexico ............................................. 2.68 2.58 2.62 2.62 2.60 2.59

  14. Appendix A. Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2014 High Oil Price case projections Table B3. World petroleum and other liquids consumption by region and end-use sector, High Oil Price case, 2010-40 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-40 2010 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD United States Residential 1.1 0.9 0.8 0.7 0.7 0.6 -1.9 Commercial 0.7 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 0.6 -0.3 Industrial 8.1 9.4 9.9 9.9 10.0 10.0 0.7 Transportation 26.9

  15. International Legal Framework for Denuclearization and Nuclear Disarmament Present Situation and Prospects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gastelum, Zoe N.

    2012-12-16

    This thesis is the culminating project for my participation in the OECD NEA International School of Nuclear Law. This paper will begin by providing a historical background to current disarmament and denuclearization treaties. This paper will discuss the current legal framework based on current and historical activities related to denuclearization and nuclear disarmament. Then, it will propose paths forward for the future efforts, and describe the necessary legal considerations. Each treaty or agreement will be examined in respect to its requirements for: 1) limitations and implementation; 2) and verification and monitoring. Then, lessons learned in each of the two areas (limitations and verification) will be used to construct a proposed path forward at the end of this paper.

  16. International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh, I.W.

    1992-05-01

    As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need exists costs for a ready source of information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book has been compiled to meet that need. The information contained in the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book has been obtained from many unclassified sources: nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECD/NMEA activities reports; and proceedings of conferences and workshops. The data listed typically do not reflect any single source but frequently represent a consolidation/combination of information.

  17. International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book. Revision 12

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh, I.W.

    1992-05-01

    As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need exists costs for a ready source of information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book has been compiled to meet that need. The information contained in the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book has been obtained from many unclassified sources: nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECD/NMEA activities reports; and proceedings of conferences and workshops. The data listed typically do not reflect any single source but frequently represent a consolidation/combination of information.

  18. Nuclear Science User Facilities (NSUF) Monthly Report March 2015

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soelberg, Renae

    2015-03-01

    Nuclear Science User Facilities (NSUF) Formerly: Advanced Test Reactor National Scientific User Facility (ATR NSUF) Monthly Report February 2015 Highlights; Jim Cole attended the OECD NEA Expert Group on Innovative Structural Materials meeting in Paris, France; Jim Lane and Doug Copsey of Writers Ink visited PNNL to prepare an article for the NSUF annual report; Brenden Heidrich briefed the Nuclear Energy Advisory Committee-Facilities Subcommittee on the Nuclear Energy Infrastructure Database project and provided them with custom reports for their upcoming visits to Argonne National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; and University of California-Berkeley Principal Investigator Mehdi Balooch visited PNNL to observe measurements and help finalize plans for completing the desired suite of analyses. His visit was coordinated to coincide with the visit of Jim Lane and Doug Copsey.

  19. 1993 International conference on nuclear waste management and environmental remediation, Prague, Czech Republic, September 5--11, 1993. Combined foreign trip report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Slate, S.C.; Allen, R.E.

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of the trip was to attend the 1993 International Conference on Nuclear Waste Management and Environmental Remediation. The principal objective of this conference was to facilitate a truly international exchange of information on the management of nuclear wastes as well as contaminated facilities and sites emanating from nuclear operations. The conference was sponsored by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the Czech and Slovak Mechanical Engineering Societies, and the Czech and Slovak Nuclear Societies in cooperation with the Commission of the European Communities, the International Atomic Energy Agency, and the OECD Nuclear Agency. The conference was cosponsored by the American Nuclear Society, the Atomic Energy Society of Japan, the Canadian Nuclear Society, the (former USSR) Nuclear Society, and the Japan Society of Mechanical Engineers. This was the fourth in a series of biennial conferences, which started in Hong Kong, in 1987. This report summarizes shared aspects of the trip; however, each traveler`s observations and recommendations are reported separately.

  20. International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Leigh, I W; Mitchell, S J

    1990-01-01

    As the US Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractors have become increasingly involved with other nations in nuclear fuel cycle and waste management cooperative activities, a need has developed for a ready source of information concerning foreign fuel cycle programs, facilities, and personnel. This Fact Book was compiled to meet that need. The information contained in the International Nuclear Fuel Cycle Fact Book has been obtained from many unclassified sources: nuclear trade journals and newsletters; reports of foreign visits and visitors; CEC, IAEA, and OECD/NEA activities reports; proceedings of conferences and workshops, etc. The data listed do not reflect any one single source but frequently represent a consolidation/combination of information.

  1. Appendix A. Reference case projections

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    U.S. Energy Information Administration | International Energy Outlook 2014 Reference case projections Table A3. World petroleum and other liquids consumption by region and end-use sector, Reference case, 2010-40 (quadrillion Btu) Region History Projections Average annual percent change, 2010-40 2010 2020 2025 2030 2035 2040 OECD United States Residential 1.1 0.9 0.8 0.8 0.7 0.7 -1.8 Commercial 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.7 0.1 Industrial 8.1 9.6 9.9 10.1 10.1 10.1 0.7 Transportation 26.9 25.6 24.7

  2. Using Economic Input/Output Tables to Predict a Countrys Nuclear Status

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Weimar, Mark R.; Daly, Don S.; Wood, Thomas W.

    2010-07-15

    Both nuclear power and nuclear weapons programs should have (related) economic signatures which are detectible at some scale. We evaluated this premise in a series of studies using national economic input/output (IO) data. Statistical discrimination models using economic IO tables predict with a high probability whether a country with an unknown predilection for nuclear weapons proliferation is in fact engaged in nuclear power development or nuclear weapons proliferation. We analyzed 93 IO tables, spanning the years 1993 to 2005 for 37 countries that are either members or associates of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD). The 2009 OECD input/output tables featured 48 industrial sectors based on International Standard Industrial Classification (ISIC) Revision 3, and described the respective economies in current country-of-origin valued currency. We converted and transformed these reported values to US 2005 dollars using appropriate exchange rates and implicit price deflators, and addressed discrepancies in reported industrial sectors across tables. We then classified countries with Random Forest using either the adjusted or industry-normalized values. Random Forest, a classification tree technique, separates and categorizes countries using a very small, select subset of the 2304 individual cells in the IO table. A nations efforts in nuclear power, be it for electricity or nuclear weapons, are an enterprise with a large economic footprint -- an effort so large that it should discernibly perturb coarse country-level economics data such as that found in yearly input-output economic tables. The neoclassical economic input-output model describes a countrys or regions economy in terms of the requirements of industries to produce the current level of economic output. An IO table row shows the distribution of an industrys output to the industrial sectors while a table column shows the input required of each industrial sector by a given industry.

  3. GROWTH OF THE INTERNATIONAL CRITICALITY SAFETY AND REACTOR PHYSICS EXPERIMENT EVALUATION PROJECTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Blair Briggs; John D. Bess; Jim Gulliford

    2011-09-01

    Since the International Conference on Nuclear Criticality Safety (ICNC) 2007, the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) and the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) have continued to expand their efforts and broaden their scope. Eighteen countries participated on the ICSBEP in 2007. Now, there are 20, with recent contributions from Sweden and Argentina. The IRPhEP has also expanded from eight contributing countries in 2007 to 16 in 2011. Since ICNC 2007, the contents of the 'International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments1' have increased from 442 evaluations (38000 pages), containing benchmark specifications for 3955 critical or subcritical configurations to 516 evaluations (nearly 55000 pages), containing benchmark specifications for 4405 critical or subcritical configurations in the 2010 Edition of the ICSBEP Handbook. The contents of the Handbook have also increased from 21 to 24 criticality-alarm-placement/shielding configurations with multiple dose points for each, and from 20 to 200 configurations categorized as fundamental physics measurements relevant to criticality safety applications. Approximately 25 new evaluations and 150 additional configurations are expected to be added to the 2011 edition of the Handbook. Since ICNC 2007, the contents of the 'International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments2' have increased from 16 different experimental series that were performed at 12 different reactor facilities to 53 experimental series that were performed at 30 different reactor facilities in the 2011 edition of the Handbook. Considerable effort has also been made to improve the functionality of the searchable database, DICE (Database for the International Criticality Benchmark Evaluation Project) and verify the accuracy of the data contained therein. DICE will be discussed in separate papers at ICNC 2011. The status of the ICSBEP and the IRPhEP will be discussed in the full paper, selected benchmarks that have been added to the ICSBEP Handbook will be highlighted, and a preview of the new benchmarks that will appear in the September 2011 edition of the Handbook will be provided. Accomplishments of the IRPhEP will also be highlighted and the future of both projects will be discussed. REFERENCES (1) International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments, NEA/NSC/DOC(95)03/I-IX, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development-Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD-NEA), September 2010 Edition, ISBN 978-92-64-99140-8. (2) International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments, NEA/NSC/DOC(2006)1, Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development-Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD-NEA), March 2011 Edition, ISBN 978-92-64-99141-5.

  4. Commercial viability of hybrid vehicles : best household use and cross national considerations.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Santini, D. J.; Vyas, A. D.

    1999-07-16

    Japanese automakers have introduced hybrid passenger cars in Japan and will soon do so in the US. In this paper, we report how we used early computer simulation model results to compare the commercial viability of a hypothetical near-term (next decade) hybrid mid-size passenger car configuration under varying fuel price and driving patterns. The fuel prices and driving patterns evaluated are designed to span likely values for major OECD nations. Two types of models are used. One allows the ''design'' of a hybrid to a specified set of performance requirements and the prediction of fuel economy under a number of possible driving patterns (called driving cycles). Another provides an estimate of the incremental cost of the hybrid in comparison to a comparably performing conventional vehicle. In this paper, the models are applied to predict the NPV cost of conventional gasoline-fueled vehicles vs. parallel hybrid vehicles. The parallel hybrids are assumed to (1) be produced at high volume, (2) use nickel metal hydride battery packs, and (3) have high-strength steel bodies. The conventional vehicle also is assumed to have a high-strength steel body. The simulated vehicles are held constant in many respects, including 0-60 time, engine type, aerodynamic drag coefficient, tire rolling resistance, and frontal area. The hybrids analyzed use the minimum size battery pack and motor to meet specified 0-60 times. A key characteristic affecting commercial viability is noted and quantified: that hybrids achieve the most pronounced fuel economy increase (best use) in slow, average-speed, stop-and-go driving, but when households consistently drive these vehicles under these conditions, they tend to travel fewer miles than average vehicles. We find that hours driven is a more valuable measure than miles. Estimates are developed concerning hours of use of household vehicles versus driving cycle, and the pattern of minimum NPV incremental cost (or benefit) of selecting the hybrid over the conventional vehicle at various fuel prices is illustrated. These results are based on data from various OECD motions on fuel price, annual miles of travel per vehicle, and driving cycles assumed to be applicable in those nations. Scatter in results plotted as a function of average speed, related to details of driving cycles and the vehicles selected for analysis, is discussed.

  5. PRISMATIC CORE COUPLED TRANSIENT BENCHMARK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Ortensi; M.A. Pope; G. Strydom; R.S. Sen; M.D. DeHart; H.D. Gougar; C. Ellis; A. Baxter; V. Seker; T.J. Downar; K. Vierow; K. Ivanov

    2011-06-01

    The Prismatic Modular Reactor (PMR) is one of the High Temperature Reactor (HTR) design concepts that have existed for some time. Several prismatic units have operated in the world (DRAGON, Fort St. Vrain, Peach Bottom) and one unit is still in operation (HTTR). The deterministic neutronics and thermal-fluids transient analysis tools and methods currently available for the design and analysis of PMRs have lagged behind the state of the art compared to LWR reactor technologies. This has motivated the development of more accurate and efficient tools for the design and safety evaluations of the PMR. In addition to the work invested in new methods, it is essential to develop appropriate benchmarks to verify and validate the new methods in computer codes. The purpose of this benchmark is to establish a well-defined problem, based on a common given set of data, to compare methods and tools in core simulation and thermal hydraulics analysis with a specific focus on transient events. The benchmark-working group is currently seeking OECD/NEA sponsorship. This benchmark is being pursued and is heavily based on the success of the PBMR-400 exercise.

  6. Global Energy Futures Model

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2004-01-01

    The Global Energy Futures Model (GEFM) is a demand-based, gross domestic product (GDP)-driven, dynamic simulation tool that provides an integrated framework to model key aspects of energy, nuclear-materials storage and disposition, environmental effluents from fossil and non fossil energy and global nuclear-materials management. Based entirely on public source data, it links oil, natural gas, coal, nuclear and renewable energy dynamically to greenhouse-gas emissions and 13 other measures of environmental impact. It includes historical data frommore » 1990 to 2000, is benchmarked to the DOE/EIA/IEO 2002 [5] Reference Case for 2000 to 2020, and extrapolates energy demand through the year 2050. The GEFM is globally integrated, and breaks out five regions of the world: United States of America (USA), the Peoples Republic of China (China), the former Soviet Union (FSU), the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) nations excluding the USA (other industrialized countries), and the rest of the world (ROW) (essentially the developing world). The GEFM allows the user to examine a very wide range of what ir scenarios through 2050 and to view the potential effects across widely dispersed, but interrelated areas. The authors believe that this high-level learning tool will help to stimulate public policy debate on energy, environment, economic and national security issues.« less

  7. Steady-state Analysis Model for Advanced Fuelcycle Schemes

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2006-05-12

    The model was developed as a part of the study, "Advanced Fuel Cycles and Waste Management", which was performed during 2003—2005 by an ad-hoc expert group under the Nuclear Development Committee in the OECD/NEA. The model was designed for an efficient conduct of nuclear fuel cycle scheme cost analyses. It is simple, transparent and offers users the capability to track down the cost analysis results. All the fuel cycle schemes considered in the model aremore » represented in a graphic format and all values related to a fuel cycle step are shown in the graphic interface, i.e., there are no hidden values embedded in the calculations. All data on the fuel cycle schemes considered in the study including mass flows, waste generation, cost data, and other data such as activities, decay heat and neutron sources of spent fuel and high—level waste along time are included in the model and can be displayed. The user can modify easily the values of mass flows and/or cost parameters and see the corresponding changes in the results. The model calculates: front—end fuel cycle mass flows such as requirements of enrichment and conversion services and natural uranium; mass of waste based on the waste generation parameters and the mass flow; and all costs. It performs Monte Carlo simulations with changing the values of all unit costs within their respective ranges (from lower to upper bounds).« less

  8. Progress of the work of the Megascience Forum as of 15 May 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oborne, M.W.

    1993-05-01

    This report gives an account of the activities of the OECD Megascience Forum following its creation in June 1992, in particular the reviews of two areas of megascience: Astronomy and deep drilling (both deep sea and continental). It presents the main policy conclusions reached by the Megascience Forum on these areas. It also give an indication of ongoing and future work. With regard to ongoing and future work, the Forum will review at its next meeting, in July 1993, the area of global change research, and for this purpose an expert meeting was held in late March 1993 in Cambridge, Mass. (USA). Areas to be reviewed later in 1993 include oceanography, and neutron sources and synchrotron radiation sources as multipurpose facilities for the study of condensed matter, as well as for other applications such as element transmutation. The Megascience Forum will also undertake to discuss generic science and technology policy issues related to the development and management of megascience, starting with a discussion, at its next meeting, of national decision-making structure and processes.

  9. Progress of the work of the Megascience Forum as of 15 May 1993. Progress report, June 15, 1992--June 14, 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oborne, M.W.

    1993-05-01

    This report gives an account of the activities of the OECD Megascience Forum following its creation in June 1992, in particular the reviews of two areas of megascience: Astronomy and deep drilling (both deep sea and continental). It presents the main policy conclusions reached by the Megascience Forum on these areas. It also give an indication of ongoing and future work. With regard to ongoing and future work, the Forum will review at its next meeting, in July 1993, the area of global change research, and for this purpose an expert meeting was held in late March 1993 in Cambridge, Mass. (USA). Areas to be reviewed later in 1993 include oceanography, and neutron sources and synchrotron radiation sources as multipurpose facilities for the study of condensed matter, as well as for other applications such as element transmutation. The Megascience Forum will also undertake to discuss generic science and technology policy issues related to the development and management of megascience, starting with a discussion, at its next meeting, of national decision-making structure and processes.

  10. Implementation and validation of the variational nodal expansion method core simulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mullet, S.; Tsuiki, M.; Beere, W.; Sandberg, U.; Nylen, H.

    2012-07-01

    The variational nodal expansion method (VNEM) has been developed by the OECD Halden Reactor Project for the purpose of implementation into a full-core simulator. This version of the VNEM does not make use of the diffusion approximation, but instead provides a fast converged solution to the even-parity neutron transport equation in several minutes using nodal methods and variational techniques. This 'method to simulator' implementation has been completed and the VNEM-simulator is currently undergoing continued validation efforts to ensure that it can track more nuclear reactor cycles effectively. This paper presents the results of the most recent development on the 3D VNEM core simulator implementation and validation efforts. The method is briefly described and data is presented and discussed for three cases for the initial criticality tests at the beginning of life, hot stand-by state for the Ringhals-3 PWR. Also presented here are the results for one year of operation of the maiden cycle of this unit. The effective neutron multiplication factor, k{sub eff}, and relative neutron detector readings are compared showing excellent agreement. (authors)

  11. Review and Assessment of Neutron Cross Section and Nubar Covariances for Advanced Reactor Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maslov,V.M.; Oblozinsky, P.; Herman, M.

    2008-12-01

    In January 2007, the National Nuclear Data Center (NNDC) produced a set of preliminary neutron covariance data for the international project 'Nuclear Data Needs for Advanced Reactor Systems'. The project was sponsored by the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA), Paris, under the Subgroup 26 of the International Working Party on Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC). These preliminary covariances are described in two recent BNL reports. The NNDC used a simplified version of the method developed by BNL and LANL that combines the recent Atlas of Neutron Resonances, the nuclear reaction model code EMPIRE and the Bayesian code KALMAN with the experimental data used as guidance. There are numerous issues involved in these estimates of covariances and it was decided to perform an independent review and assessment of these results so that better covariances can be produced for the revised version in future. Reviewed and assessed are uncertainties for fission, capture, elastic scattering, inelastic scattering and (n,2n) cross sections as well as prompt nubars for 15 minor actinides ({sup 233,234,236}U, {sup 237}Np, {sup 238,240,241,242}Pu, {sup 241,242m,243}Am and {sup 242,243,244,245}Cm) and 4 major actinides ({sup 232}Th, {sup 235,238}U and {sup 239}Pu). We examined available evaluations, performed comparison with experimental data, taken into account uncertainties in model parameterization and made use state-of-the-art nuclear reaction theory to produce the uncertainty assessment.

  12. Comparative Evaluation of Cutting Methods of Activated Concrete from Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning - 13548

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, HakSoo; Chung, SungHwan; Maeng, SungJun

    2013-07-01

    The amount of radioactive wastes from decommissioning of a nuclear power plant varies greatly depending on factors such as type and size of the plant, operation history, decommissioning options, and waste treatment and volume reduction methods. There are many methods to decrease the amount of decommissioning radioactive wastes including minimization of waste generation, waste reclassification through decontamination and cutting methods to remove the contaminated areas. According to OECD/NEA, it is known that the radioactive waste treatment and disposal cost accounts for about 40 percentage of the total decommissioning cost. In Korea, it is needed to reduce amount of decommissioning radioactive waste due to high disposal cost, about $7,000 (as of 2010) per a 200 liter drum for the low- and intermediate-level radioactive waste (LILW). In this paper, cutting methods to minimize the radioactive waste of activated concrete were investigated and associated decommissioning cost impact was assessed. The cutting methods considered are cylindrical and volume reductive cuttings. The study showed that the volume reductive cutting is more cost-effective than the cylindrical cutting. Therefore, the volume reductive cutting method can be effectively applied to the activated bio-shield concrete. (authors)

  13. Advanced fuel assembly characterization capabilities based on gamma tomography at the Halden boiling water reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holcombe, S.; Eitrheim, K.; Svaerd, S. J.; Hallstadius, L.; Willman, C.

    2012-07-01

    Characterization of individual fuel rods using gamma spectroscopy is a standard part of the Post Irradiation Examinations performed on experimental fuel at the Halden Boiling Water Reactor. However, due to handling and radiological safety concerns, these measurements are presently carried out only at the end of life of the fuel, and not earlier than several days or weeks after its removal from the reactor core. In order to enhance the fuel characterization capabilities at the Halden facilities, a gamma tomography measurement system is now being constructed, capable of characterizing fuel assemblies on a rod-by-rod basis in a more timely and efficient manner. Gamma tomography for measuring nuclear fuel is based on gamma spectroscopy measurements and tomographic reconstruction techniques. The technique, previously demonstrated on irradiated commercial fuel assemblies, is capable of determining rod-by-rod information without the need to dismantle the fuel. The new gamma tomography system will be stationed close to the Halden reactor in order to limit the need for fuel transport, and it will significantly reduce the time required to perform fuel characterization measurements. Furthermore, it will allow rod-by-rod fuel characterization to occur between irradiation cycles, thus allowing for measurement of experimental fuel repeatedly during its irradiation lifetime. The development of the gamma tomography measurement system is a joint project between the Inst. for Energy Technology - OECD Halden Reactor Project, Westinghouse (Sweden), and Uppsala Univ.. (authors)

  14. Return to 1990: The cost of mitigating United States carbon emissions in the post-2000 period

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Edmonds, J.A.; Kim, S.H.; MacCracken, C.N.; Sands, R.D.; Wise, M.A.

    1997-10-01

    The Second Generation Model (SGM) is employed to examine four hypothetical agreements to reduce emissions in Annex 1 nations (OECD nations plus most of the nations of Eastern Europe and the former Soviet Union) to levels in the neighborhood of those which existed in 1990, with obligations taking effect in the year 2010. The authors estimate the cost to the US of complying with such agreements under three distinct conditions: no trading of emissions rights, trading of emissions rights only among Annex 1 nations, and a fully global trading regime. The authors find that the marginal cost of returning to 1990 emissions levels in the US in the absence of trading opportunities is approximately $108 per metric ton carbon in 2010. The total cost in that year is approximately 0.2% of GDP. International trade in emissions permits lowers the cost of achieving any mitigation objective by equalizing the marginal cost of carbon mitigation among countries. For the four mitigation scenarios in this study, economic costs to the US remain below 1% of GDP through at least the year 2020.

  15. Analysis of international efforts in energy research and development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rezaiyan, A.J.; Gill, R.T.

    1995-09-01

    Research and experimental development comprise innovative and creative work undertaken systematically to increase the stock of knowledge of science, engineering, and society. This knowledge reserve is used to improve living conditions and standards, including economic growth. Research and development (R&D) expenditures are useful measures of the scale and direction of technological innovation within a country, industry, or scientific field. Administrators concerned with economic growth and performance rely on R&D statistics as one possible type of indicator of technological change. R&D statistics are an essential tool in many government programs and evaluations (OECD 1993). The objective of the analysis was to identify and evaluate R&D funding sources, levels, and trends in the energy sectors of selected industrialized countries (Australia, Belgium, Canada, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, Netherlands, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom, United States) and the European Union (EU). Fossil fuel technologies, particularly fuel cells and advanced gas turbines, were the focus of the analysis, whose results are presented in this report.

  16. CO{sub 2} emissions from developing countries: Better understanding the role of Energy in the long term. Volume 2, Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, and Venezuela

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ketoff, A.; Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N.

    1991-07-01

    Recent years have witnessed a growing recognition of the link between emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and changes in the global climate. Of all anthropogenic activities, energy production and use generate the single largest portion of these greenhouse gases. Although developing countries currently account for a small share of global carbon emissions, their contribution is increasing rapidly. Due to the rapid expansion of energy demand in these nations, the developing world`s share in global modern energy use rose from 16 to 27 percent between 1970 and 1990. If the growth rates observed over the past 20 years persist energy demand in developing will surpass that in the countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) early in the 21st century. The study seeks to examine the forces that galvanize the growth of energy use and carbon emissions, to assess the likely future levels of energy and CO{sub 2} in selected developing nations and to identify opportunities for restraining this growth. The purpose of this report is to provide the quantitative information needed to develop effective policy options, not to identify the options themselves. These individual studies were conducted fro Argentina, Brazil, Mexico and Venezuela in Latin America.

  17. CO sub 2 emissions from developing countries: Better understanding the role of Energy in the long term

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ketoff, A.; Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N.

    1991-07-01

    Recent years have witnessed a growing recognition of the link between emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and changes in the global climate. Of all anthropogenic activities, energy production and use generate the single largest portion of these greenhouse gases. Although developing countries currently account for a small share of global carbon emissions, their contribution is increasing rapidly. Due to the rapid expansion of energy demand in these nations, the developing world's share in global modern energy use rose from 16 to 27 percent between 1970 and 1990. If the growth rates observed over the past 20 years persist energy demand in developing will surpass that in the countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) early in the 21st century. The study seeks to examine the forces that galvanize the growth of energy use and carbon emissions, to assess the likely future levels of energy and CO{sub 2} in selected developing nations and to identify opportunities for restraining this growth. The purpose of this report is to provide the quantitative information needed to develop effective policy options, not to identify the options themselves. These individual studies were conducted fro Argentina, Brazil, Mexico and Venezuela in Latin America.

  18. CO sub 2 emissions from developing countries: Better understanding the role of energy in the long term

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N.

    1991-07-01

    Recent years have witnessed a growing recognition of the link between emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and changes in the global climate. of all anthropogenic activities, energy production and use generate the single largest portion of these greenhouse gases. Although developing countries currently account for a small share of global carbon emissions, their contribution is increasing rapidly. Due to the rapid expansion of energy demand in these nations, the developing world's share in global modern energy use rose from 16 to 27 percent between 1970 and 1990. If the growth rates observed over the past 20 years persist, energy demand in developing nations will surpass that in the countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) early in the 21st century. The study seeks to examine the forces that galvanize the growth of energy use and carbon emissions, to assess the likely future levels of energy and CO{sub 2} in selected developing nations and to identify opportunities for restraining this growth. The purpose of this report is to provide the quantitative information needed to develop effective policy options, not to identify the options themselves. A combined study was carried out for the countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council (Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates).

  19. CO{sub 2} emissions from developing countries: Better understanding the role of energy in the long term. Volume 4, Ghana, Sierra Leone, Nigeria and the Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathaye, J.; Goldman, N.

    1991-07-01

    Recent years have witnessed a growing recognition of the link between emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and changes in the global climate. of all anthropogenic activities, energy production and use generate the single largest portion of these greenhouse gases. Although developing countries currently account for a small share of global carbon emissions, their contribution is increasing rapidly. Due to the rapid expansion of energy demand in these nations, the developing world`s share in global modern energy use rose from 16 to 27 percent between 1970 and 1990. If the growth rates observed over the past 20 years persist, energy demand in developing nations will surpass that in the countries of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) early in the 21st century. The study seeks to examine the forces that galvanize the growth of energy use and carbon emissions, to assess the likely future levels of energy and CO{sub 2} in selected developing nations and to identify opportunities for restraining this growth. The purpose of this report is to provide the quantitative information needed to develop effective policy options, not to identify the options themselves. A combined study was carried out for the countries of the Gulf Cooperation Council (Bahrain, Kuwait, Oman, Qatar, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates).

  20. Considerations Related To Human Intrusion In The Context Of Disposal Of Radioactive Waste-The IAEA HIDRA Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seitz, Roger; Kumano, Yumiko; Bailey, Lucy; Markley, Chris; Andersson, Eva; Beuth, Thomas

    2014-01-09

    The principal approaches for management of radioactive waste are commonly termed delay and decay, concentrate and contain and dilute and disperse. Containing the waste and isolating it from the human environment, by burying it, is considered to increase safety and is generally accepted as the preferred approach for managing radioactive waste. However, this approach results in concentrated sources of radioactive waste contained in one location, which can pose hazards should the facility be disrupted by human action in the future. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP), International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA) agree that some form of inadvertent human intrusion (HI) needs to be considered to address the potential consequences in the case of loss of institutional control and loss of memory of the disposal facility. Requirements are reflected in national regulations governing radioactive waste disposal. However, in practice, these requirements are often different from country to country, which is then reflected in the actual implementation of HI as part of a safety case. The IAEA project on HI in the context of Disposal of RadioActive waste (HIDRA) has been started to identify potential areas for improved consistency in consideration of HI. The expected outcome is to provide recommendations on how to address human actions in the safety case in the future, and how the safety case may be used to demonstrate robustness and optimize siting, design and waste acceptance criteria within the context of a safety case.

  1. MCNP6 Results for the Phase III Sensitivity Benchmark of the OCED/NEA Expert Group on Uncertainty Analysis for Criticality Safety Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiedrowski, Brian C.

    2012-06-19

    Within the last decade, there has been increasing interest in the calculation of cross section sensitivity coefficients of k{sub eff} for integral experiment design and uncertainty analysis. The OECD/NEA has an Expert Group devoted to Sensitivity and Uncertainty Analysis within the Working Party for Nuclear Criticality Safety. This expert group has developed benchmarks to assess code capabilities and performance for doing sensitivity and uncertainty analysis. Phase III of a set of sensitivity benchmarks evaluates capabilities for computing sensitivity coefficients. MCNP6 has the capability to compute cross section sensitivities for k{sub eff} using continuous-energy physics. To help verify this capability, results for the Phase III benchmark cases are generated and submitted to the Expert Group for comparison. The Phase III benchmark has three cases: III.1, an array of MOX fuel pins, III.2, a series of infinite lattices of MOX fuel pins with varying pitches, and III.3 two spheres with homogeneous mixtures of UF{sub 4} and polyethylene with different enrichments.

  2. RELAP-7 and PRONGHORN Initial Integration Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Ortensi; D. Andrs; A.A. Bingham; R.C. Martineau; J.W. Peterson

    2012-05-01

    Modern nuclear reactor safety codes require the ability to solve detailed coupled neutronicthermal fluids problems. For larger cores, this implies fully coupled 3-D spatial dynamics with appropriate feedback models that can provide enough resolution to accurately compute core heat generation and removal during steady and unsteady conditions. The reactor analyis code PRONGHORN is being coupled to RELAP-7 as a first step to extend RELAP's current capabilities. This report details the mathematical models, the type of coupling, and the testing that will be used to produce an integrated system. RELAP-7 is a MOOSE-based application that solves the continuity, momentum, and energy equations in 1-D for a compressible fluid. The pipe and joint capabilities enable it to model parts of the PCU system. The PRONGHORN application, also developed on the MOOSE infrastructure, solves the coupled equations that define the neutron diffusion, fluid flow, and heat transfer in a 3-D core model. Initially, the two systems will be loosely coupled to simplify the transition towards a more complex infrastructure. The integration will be tested with the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 Coupled Neutronics-Thermal Fluids benchmark model.

  3. Initial Coupling of the RELAP-7 and PRONGHORN Applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Ortensi; D. Andrs; A.A. Bingham; R.C. Martineau; J.W. Peterson

    2012-10-01

    Modern nuclear reactor safety codes require the ability to solve detailed coupled neutronic- thermal fluids problems. For larger cores, this implies fully coupled higher dimensionality spatial dynamics with appropriate feedback models that can provide enough resolution to accurately compute core heat generation and removal during steady and unsteady conditions. The reactor analysis code PRONGHORN is being coupled to RELAP-7 as a first step to extend RELAPs current capabilities. This report details the mathematical models, the type of coupling, and the testing results from the integrated system. RELAP-7 is a MOOSE-based application that solves the continuity, momentum, and energy equations in 1-D for a compressible fluid. The pipe and joint capabilities enable it to model parts of the power conversion unit. The PRONGHORN application, also developed on the MOOSE infrastructure, solves the coupled equations that define the neutron diffusion, fluid flow, and heat transfer in a full core model. The two systems are loosely coupled to simplify the transition towards a more complex infrastructure. The integration is tested on a simplified version of the OECD/NEA MHTGR-350 Coupled Neutronics-Thermal Fluids benchmark model.

  4. Critical Experiments that Simulated Damp MOX Powders - Do They Meet the Need?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Blair Briggs; Dr. Ali Nouri; Dr. Claes Nordborg

    2005-09-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Working Party on Nuclear Criticality Safety (WPNCS) identified the MOX fuel manufacturing process as an area in which there is a need for additional integral benchmark data. The specific need focused on damp MOX powders. The WPNCS was ultimately asked by the NEA Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) to provide the framework for the selection and performance of new experiments that fill the identified need. A set of criteria was established to enable uniform comparison of experimental proposals with generic MOX application data. Criteria were established for five general characteristics: (1) neutronic parameters, (2) type of experiments, (3) financial aspects, (4) schedule, and (5) other considerations. Proposals were judged most importantly on their ability to match the neutronic parameters of predetermined MOX applications. The neutronic parameters that formed the basis for comparison included core average values (not local values) for flux, fission and capture rate; detailed balance data (fission and capture) for the main isotopes (Actinides, H and O); sensitivity coefficients to important nuclear reactions (fission, capture, elastic and inelastic scatter, nu-bar, mu-bar) for all uranium and plutonium isotopes, hydrogen, and oxygen; sensitivity profiles to the main nuclear reactions for uranium and plutonium isotopes; energy of average lethargy causing fission; and the average fission group energy. The focus of this paper is on the definition of the need; the neutronics criteria established to assess which, if any, of three proposed MOX experimental programs best meet the need; and the actual assessment of the proposed experimental programs.

  5. BFS, a Legacy to the International Reactor Physics, Criticality Safety, and Nuclear Data Communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Blair Briggs; Anatoly Tsibulya; Yevgeniy Rozhikhin

    2012-03-01

    Interest in high-quality integral benchmark data is increasing as efforts to quantify and reduce calculational uncertainties accelerate to meet the demands of next generation reactor and advanced fuel cycle concepts. Two Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) activities, the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP), initiated in 1992, and the International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP), initiated in 2003, have been identifying existing integral experiment data, evaluating those data, and providing integral benchmark specifications for methods and data validation for nearly two decades. Thus far, 14 countries have contributed to the IRPhEP, and 20 have contributed to the ICSBEP. Data provided by these two projects will be of use to the international reactor physics, criticality safety, and nuclear data communities for future decades The Russian Federation has been a major contributor to both projects with the Institute of Physics and Power Engineering (IPPE) as the major contributor from the Russian Federation. Included in the benchmark specifications from the BFS facilities are 34 critical configurations from BFS-49, 61, 62, 73, 79, 81, 97, 99, and 101; spectral characteristics measurements from BFS-31, 42, 57, 59, 61, 62, 73, 97, 99, and 101; reactivity effects measurements from BFS-62-3A; reactivity coefficients and kinetics measurements from BFS-73; and reaction rate measurements from BFS-42, 61, 62, 73, 97, 99, and 101.

  6. Oil supply increase due in 1996`s second half

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck, R.J.

    1996-07-29

    The crucial oil-market issue for this year`s second half is new supply. Production will increase again outside the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries. And Iraq has general approval to resume exports under limits set by the United Nations, although start of the exports has been delayed by at least 60 days. The big question is the market`s ability to absorb the supply gains. As usual, the market`s need for oil in the second half will depend on economies. So far in 1996, economic growth has pushed consumption to levels unexpected a year ago. Demand the rest of the year depends heavily on economic performances of the industrialized nations that make up the organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) and the rapidly growing nations of the Asia-Pacific region. Growth in countries elsewhere in the developing world, especially Latin America, remains a wild card. The paper discusses the worldwide outlook, crude oil prices, US product prices, natural gas prices, US economy, US energy demand, natural gas in the US, US oil demand, gasoline prices, distillate gains, resid slumps, LPG, ethane, US supply, production patterns, rise in refinery capacity, imports, stocks, and stock coverage.

  7. Energy Efficiency Indicators Methodology Booklet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sathaye, Jayant; Price, Lynn; McNeil, Michael; de la rue du Can, Stephane

    2010-05-01

    This Methodology Booklet provides a comprehensive review and methodology guiding principles for constructing energy efficiency indicators, with illustrative examples of application to individual countries. It reviews work done by international agencies and national government in constructing meaningful energy efficiency indicators that help policy makers to assess changes in energy efficiency over time. Building on past OECD experience and best practices, and the knowledge of these countries' institutions, relevant sources of information to construct an energy indicator database are identified. A framework based on levels of hierarchy of indicators -- spanning from aggregate, macro level to disaggregated end-use level metrics -- is presented to help shape the understanding of assessing energy efficiency. In each sector of activity: industry, commercial, residential, agriculture and transport, indicators are presented and recommendations to distinguish the different factors affecting energy use are highlighted. The methodology booklet addresses specifically issues that are relevant to developing indicators where activity is a major factor driving energy demand. A companion spreadsheet tool is available upon request.

  8. Analysis of fission gas release in LWR fuel using the BISON code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    G. Pastore; J.D. Hales; S.R. Novascone; D.M. Perez; B.W. Spencer; R.L. Williamson

    2013-09-01

    Recent advances in the development of the finite-element based, multidimensional fuel performance code BISON of Idaho National Laboratory are presented. Specifically, the development, implementation and testing of a new model for the analysis of fission gas behavior in LWR-UO2 fuel during irradiation are summarized. While retaining a physics-based description of the relevant mechanisms, the model is characterized by a level of complexity suitable for application to engineering-scale nuclear fuel analysis and consistent with the uncertainties pertaining to some parameters. The treatment includes the fundamental features of fission gas behavior, among which are gas diffusion and precipitation in fuel grains, growth and coalescence of gas bubbles at grain faces, grain growth and grain boundary sweeping effects, thermal, athermal, and transient gas release. The BISON code incorporating the new model is applied to the simulation of irradiation experiments from the OECD/NEA International Fuel Performance Experiments database, also included in the IAEA coordinated research projects FUMEX-II and FUMEX-III. The comparison of the results with the available experimental data at moderate burn-up is presented, pointing out an encouraging predictive accuracy, without any fitting applied to the model parameters.

  9. A Two-Step Approach to Uncertainty Quantification of Core Simulators

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yankov, Artem; Collins, Benjamin; Klein, Markus; Jessee, Matthew A.; Zwermann, Winfried; Velkov, Kiril; Pautz, Andreas; Downar, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    For the multiple sources of error introduced into the standard computational regime for simulating reactor cores, rigorous uncertainty analysis methods are available primarily to quantify the effects of cross section uncertainties. Two methods for propagating cross section uncertainties through core simulators are the XSUSA statistical approach and the “two-step” method. The XSUSA approach, which is based on the SUSA code package, is fundamentally a stochastic sampling method. Alternatively, the two-step method utilizes generalized perturbation theory in the first step and stochastic sampling in the second step. The consistency of these two methods in quantifying uncertainties in the multiplication factor andmore » in the core power distribution was examined in the framework of phase I-3 of the OECD Uncertainty Analysis in Modeling benchmark. With the Three Mile Island Unit 1 core as a base model for analysis, the XSUSA and two-step methods were applied with certain limitations, and the results were compared to those produced by other stochastic sampling-based codes. Based on the uncertainty analysis results, conclusions were drawn as to the method that is currently more viable for computing uncertainties in burnup and transient calculations.« less

  10. Development of a Preliminary Decommissioning Plan Following the International Structure for Decommissioning Costing (ISDC) of Nuclear Installations - 13361

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moshonas Cole, Katherine; Dinner, Julia; Grey, Mike; Daniska, Vladimir

    2013-07-01

    The International Structure for Decommissioning Costing (ISDC) of Nuclear Installations, published by OECD/NEA, IAEA and EC is intended to provide a uniform list of cost items for decommissioning projects and provides a standard format that permits international cost estimates to be compared. Candesco and DECOM have used the ISDC format along with two costing codes, OMEGA and ISDCEX, developed from the ISDC by DECOM, in three projects: the development of a preliminary decommissioning plan for a multi-unit CANDU nuclear power station, updating the preliminary decommissioning cost estimates for a prototype CANDU nuclear power station and benchmarking the cost estimates for CANDU against the cost estimates for other reactor types. It was found that the ISDC format provides a well defined and transparent basis for decommissioning planning and cost estimating that assists in identifying gaps and weaknesses and facilitates the benchmarking against international experience. The use of the ISDC can also help build stakeholder confidence in the reliability of the plans and estimates and the adequacy of decommissioning funding. (authors)

  11. World Oil Prices and Production Trends in AEO2008 (released in AEO2008)

    Reports and Publications (EIA)

    2008-01-01

    Annual Energy Outlook 2008 (AEO) defines the world oil price as the price of light, low-sulfur crude oil delivered in Cushing, Oklahoma. Since 2003, both "above ground" and "below ground" factors have contributed to a sustained rise in nominal world oil prices, from $31 per barrel in 2003 to $69 per barrel in 2007. The AEO2008 reference case outlook for world oil prices is higher than in the AEO2007 reference case. The main reasons for the adoption of a higher reference case price outlook include continued significant expansion of world demand for liquids, particularly in non-OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development) countries, which include China and India; the rising costs of conventional non-OPEC (Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries) supply and unconventional liquids production; limited growth in non-OPEC supplies despite higher oil prices; and the inability or unwillingness of OPEC member countries to increase conventional crude oil production to levels that would be required for maintaining price stability. The Energy Information Administration will continue to monitor world oil price trends and may need to make further adjustments in future AEOs.

  12. Comparison of MACCS users calculations for the international comparison exercise on probabilistic accident consequence assessment code, October 1989--June 1993

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Neymotin, L.

    1994-04-01

    Over the past several years, the OECD/NEA and CEC sponsored an international program intercomparing a group of six probabilistic consequence assessment (PCA) codes designed to simulate health and economic consequences of radioactive releases into atmosphere of radioactive materials following severe accidents at nuclear power plants (NPPs): ARANO (Finland), CONDOR (UK), COSYMA (CEC), LENA (Sweden), MACCS (USA), and OSCAAR (Japan). In parallel with this effort, two separate groups performed similar calculations using the MACCS and COSYMA codes. Results produced in the MACCS Users Group (Greece, Italy, Spain, and USA) calculations and their comparison are contained in the present report. Version 1.5.11.1 of the MACCS code was used for the calculations. Good agreement between the results produced in the four participating calculations has been reached, with the exception of the results related to the ingestion pathway dose predictions. The main reason for the scatter in those particular results is attributed to the lack of a straightforward implementation of the specifications for agricultural production and counter-measures criteria provided for the exercise. A significantly smaller scatter in predictions of other consequences was successfully explained by differences in meteorological files and weather sampling, grids, rain distance intervals, dispersion model options, and population distributions.

  13. The IAEA Coordinated Research Program on HTGR Uncertainty Analysis: Phase I Status and Initial Results

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strydom, Gerhard; Bostelmann, Friederike; Ivanov, Kostadin

    2014-10-01

    The continued development of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTGRs) requires verification of HTGR design and safety features with reliable high fidelity physics models and robust, efficient, and accurate codes. One way to address the uncertainties in the HTGR analysis tools is to assess the sensitivity of critical parameters (such as the calculated maximum fuel temperature during loss of coolant accidents) to a few important input uncertainties. The input parameters were identified by engineering judgement in the past but are today typically based on a Phenomena Identification Ranking Table (PIRT) process. The input parameters can also be derived from sensitivity studies and are then varied in the analysis to find a spread in the parameter of importance. However, there is often no easy way to compensate for these uncertainties. In engineering system design, a common approach for addressing performance uncertainties is to add compensating margins to the system, but with passive properties credited it is not so clear how to apply it in the case of modular HTGR heat removal path. Other more sophisticated uncertainty modelling approaches, including Monte Carlo analysis, have also been proposed and applied. Ideally one wishes to apply a more fundamental approach to determine the predictive capability and accuracies of coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics and depletion simulations used for reactor design and safety assessment. Today there is a broader acceptance of the use of uncertainty analysis even in safety studies, and it has been accepted by regulators in some cases to replace the traditional conservative analysis. Therefore some safety analysis calculations may use a mixture of these approaches for different parameters depending upon the particular requirements of the analysis problem involved. Sensitivity analysis can for example be used to provide information as part of an uncertainty analysis to determine best estimate plus uncertainty results to the required confidence level. In order to address uncertainty propagation in analysis and methods in the HTGR community the IAEA initiated a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the HTGR Uncertainty Analysis in Modelling (UAM) that officially started in 2013. Although this project focuses specifically on the peculiarities of HTGR designs and its simulation requirements, many lessons can be learned from the LWR community and the significant progress already made towards a consistent methodology uncertainty analysis. In the case of LWRs the NRC has already in 1988 amended 10 CFR 50.46 to allow best-estimate (plus uncertainties) calculations of emergency core cooling system performance. The Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) of the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) also established an Expert Group on "Uncertainty Analysis in Modelling" which finally led to the definition of the "Benchmark for Uncertainty Analysis in Modelling (UAM) for Design, Operation and Safety Analysis of LWRs". The CRP on HTGR UAM will follow as far as possible the on-going OECD Light Water Reactor UAM benchmark activity.

  14. Growth and Expansion of the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project and the Newly Organized International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Blair Briggs; Lori Scott; Yolanda Rugama; Enrico Satori

    2007-05-01

    Since ICNC 2003, the International Criticality Safety Benchmark Evaluation Project (ICSBEP) has continued to expand its efforts and broaden its scope. Criticality-alarm / shielding type benchmarks and fundamental physics measurements that are relevant to criticality safety applications are not only included in the scope of the project, but benchmark data are also included in the latest version of the handbook. A considerable number of improvements have been made to the searchable database, DICE and the criticality-alarm / shielding benchmarks and fundamental physics measurements have been included in the database. There were 12 countries participating on the ICSBEP in 2003. That number has increased to 18 with recent contributions of data and/or resources from Brazil, Czech Republic, Poland, India, Canada, and China. South Africa, Germany, Argentina, and Australia have been invited to participate. Since ICNC 2003, the contents of the International Handbook of Evaluated Criticality Safety Benchmark Experiments have increased from 350 evaluations (28,000 pages) containing benchmark specifications for 3070 critical or subcritical configurations to 442 evaluations (over 38,000 pages) containing benchmark specifications for 3957 critical or subcritical configurations, 23 criticality-alarm-placement / shielding configurations with multiple dose points for each, and 20 configurations that have been categorized as fundamental physics measurements that are relevant to criticality safety applications in the 2006 Edition of the ICSBEP Handbook. Approximately 30 new evaluations and 250 additional configurations are expected to be added to the 2007 Edition of the Handbook. Since ICNC 2003, a reactor physics counterpart to the ICSBEP, The International Reactor Physics Experiment Evaluation Project (IRPhEP) was initiated. Beginning in 1999, the IRPhEP was conducted as a pilot activity by the by the Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Nuclear Science Committee (NSC). The project was endorsed as an official activity of the NSC in June of 2003. The IRPhEP is patterned after its predecessor, the ICSBEP, but focuses on other integral measurements such as buckling, spectral characteristics, reactivity effects, reactivity coefficients, kinetics measurements, reaction-rate and power distributions, nuclide compositions and other miscellaneous types of measurements in addition to the critical configuration. The two projects are closely coordinated to avoid duplication of effort and to leverage limited resources to achieve a common goal. The purpose of the IRPhEP is to provide an extensively peer reviewed set of reactor physics related integral benchmark data that can be used by reactor designers and safety analysts to validate the analytical tools used to design next generation reactors and establish the safety basis for operation of these reactors. While coordination and administration of the IRPhEP takes place at an international level, each participating country is responsible for the administration, technical direction, and priorities of the project within their respective countries. The work of the IRPhEP is documented in an OECD NEA Handbook entitled, International Handbook of Evaluated Reactor Physics Benchmark Experiments. The first edition of this Handbook, the 2006 Edition spans over 2000 pages and contains data from 16 different experimental series that were

  15. The IAEA Coordinated Research Program on HTGR Reactor Physics, Thermal-hydraulics and Depletion Uncertainty Analysis: Description of the Benchmark Test Cases and Phases

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frederik Reitsma; Gerhard Strydom; Bismark Tyobeka; Kostadin Ivanov

    2012-10-01

    The continued development of High Temperature Gas Cooled Reactors (HTGRs) requires verification of design and safety features with reliable high fidelity physics models and robust, efficient, and accurate codes. The uncertainties in the HTR analysis tools are today typically assessed with sensitivity analysis and then a few important input uncertainties (typically based on a PIRT process) are varied in the analysis to find a spread in the parameter of importance. However, one wish to apply a more fundamental approach to determine the predictive capability and accuracies of coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulics and depletion simulations used for reactor design and safety assessment. Today there is a broader acceptance of the use of uncertainty analysis even in safety studies and it has been accepted by regulators in some cases to replace the traditional conservative analysis. Finally, there is also a renewed focus in supplying reliable covariance data (nuclear data uncertainties) that can then be used in uncertainty methods. Uncertainty and sensitivity studies are therefore becoming an essential component of any significant effort in data and simulation improvement. In order to address uncertainty in analysis and methods in the HTGR community the IAEA launched a Coordinated Research Project (CRP) on the HTGR Uncertainty Analysis in Modelling early in 2012. The project is built on the experience of the OECD/NEA Light Water Reactor (LWR) Uncertainty Analysis in Best-Estimate Modelling (UAM) benchmark activity, but focuses specifically on the peculiarities of HTGR designs and its simulation requirements. Two benchmark problems were defined with the prismatic type design represented by the MHTGR-350 design from General Atomics (GA) while a 250 MW modular pebble bed design, similar to the INET (China) and indirect-cycle PBMR (South Africa) designs are also included. In the paper more detail on the benchmark cases, the different specific phases and tasks and the latest status and plans are presented.

  16. Energy use in Denmark: An international perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schipper, L.; Howarth, R.; Andersson, B.; Price, L.

    1992-08-01

    This report analyzes the evolution use in Denmark since the early 1970s in order to shed light on the future path of energy use in Denmark, with particular emphasis on the role of energy efficiency. The authors found that improvements in end-use energy efficiency reduced primary energy requirements in Denmark by 22% between 1972 and 1988. Focusing on developments in six individual sectors of the Danish economy (residential, manufacturing, other industry, service, travel, and freight), they found that the residential, manufacturing, and service sectors have led the improvements in efficiency. Travel showed few significant improvements and the efficiency of freight transportation worsened. The international comparisons showed that the structure of energy use in Denmark is less energy-intensive than that of most high-income OECD countries, with the exception of Japan. Overall, they concluded that most of the energy savings achieved in Denmark were brought about through improvements in technology. They also found that an important stimulus for improved efficiency was higher energy prices, led in no small part by significant taxes imposed on small consumers of heating oil, electricity, and motor fuels. Energy-efficiency programs accelerated energy savings in homes and commercial buildings. The rate of improvement of energy efficiency in Denmark has slowed down significantly since 1984, consistent with trends observed in other major countries. While many of the energy-efficiency goals stated or implied in Denmark`s Energi 2000 are achievable over a very long period, present trends do not point towards achievement of these goals by 2010 or even 2020. Strong measures will have to be developed by both public and private authorities if energy efficiency is to make a key contributions to reducing environmental problems associated with energy use in Denmark.

  17. Trends in transportation energy use, 1970--1988: An international perspective

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schipper, L.; Steiner, R.; Meyers, S.

    1992-05-01

    Personal mobility and timely movement of goods have become increasingly important around the world, and energy use for transportation has grown rapidly as a consequence. Energy is used in transportation for two rather different activities: moving people, which we refer to as passenger travel, and moving freight. While freight transport is closely connected to economic activity, much of travel is conducted for personal reasons. In the OECD countries, travel accounts for around 70% of total transportation energy use. In contrast, freight transport accounts for the larger share in the Former East Bloc and the developing countries (LDCs). In our analysis, we focus on three elements that shape transportation energy use: activity, which we measure in passenger-km (p-km) or tonne-km (t-km), modal structure (the share of total activity accounted for by various modes), and modal energy intensities (energy use per p-km or t-km). The modal structure of travel and freight transport is important because there are often considerable differences in energy intensity among modes. The average 1988 average energy use per p-km of different travel modes in the United States (US), West Germany, and Japan are illustrated. With the exception of rail in the US, bus and rail travel had much lower intensity than automobile and air travel. What is perhaps surprising is that the intensity of air travel is only slightly higher than that of automobile travel. This reflects the much higher utilization of vehicle capacity in air travel and the large share of automobile travel that takes place in urban traffic (automobile energy intensity in long-distance driving is much lower than the average over types of driving).

  18. Finite element analyses for seismic shear wall international standard problem

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Y.J.; Hofmayer, C.H.

    1998-04-01

    Two identical reinforced concrete (RC) shear walls, which consist of web, flanges and massive top and bottom slabs, were tested up to ultimate failure under earthquake motions at the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation`s (NUPEC) Tadotsu Engineering Laboratory, Japan. NUPEC provided the dynamic test results to the OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development), Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) for use as an International Standard Problem (ISP). The shear walls were intended to be part of a typical reactor building. One of the major objectives of the Seismic Shear Wall ISP (SSWISP) was to evaluate various seismic analysis methods for concrete structures used for design and seismic margin assessment. It also offered a unique opportunity to assess the state-of-the-art in nonlinear dynamic analysis of reinforced concrete shear wall structures under severe earthquake loadings. As a participant of the SSWISP workshops, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) performed finite element analyses under the sponsorship of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (USNRC). Three types of analysis were performed, i.e., monotonic static (push-over), cyclic static and dynamic analyses. Additional monotonic static analyses were performed by two consultants, F. Vecchio of the University of Toronto (UT) and F. Filippou of the University of California at Berkeley (UCB). The analysis results by BNL and the consultants were presented during the second workshop in Yokohama, Japan in 1996. A total of 55 analyses were presented during the workshop by 30 participants from 11 different countries. The major findings on the presented analysis methods, as well as engineering insights regarding the applicability and reliability of the FEM codes are described in detail in this report. 16 refs., 60 figs., 16 tabs.

  19. China power - thermal coal and clean coal technology export. Topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Binsheng Li

    1996-12-31

    China is the world`s fourth largest electric power producer, and is expected to surpass Japan within the next two years to become the third largest power producer. During the past 15 years, China`s total electricity generation more than tripled, increasing from about 300 TWh to about 1,000 TWh. Total installed generating capacity grew at an average of 8.2 percent per year, increasing from 66 to 214 GW. The share of China`s installed capacity in Asia increased from 21 to 31 percent. The Chinese government plans to continue China`s rapid growth rate in the power sector. Total installed capacity is planned to reach 300 GW by 2000, which will generate 1,400 TWh of electricity per year. China`s long-term power sector development is subject to great uncertainty. Under the middle scenario, total capacity is expected to reach 700 GW by 2015, with annual generation of 3,330 TWh. Under the low and high scenarios, total capacity will reach 527-1,005 GW by 2015. The high scenario representing possible demand. To achieve this ambitious scenario, dramatic policy changes in favor of power development are required; however, there is no evidence that such policy changes will occur at this stage. Even under the high scenario, China`s per capita annual electricity consumption would be only 3,000 kWh by 2015, less than half of the present per capita consumption for OECD countries. Under the low scenario, electricity shortages will seriously curb economic growth.

  20. Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dupont, E.; Chadwick, M.B.; Danon, Y.; De Saint Jean, C.; Dunn, M.; Fischer, U.; Forrest, R.A.; Fukahori, T.; Ge, Z.; Harada, H.; Herman, M.; Igashira, M.; Ignatyuk, A.; Ishikawa, M.; Iwamoto, O.; Jacqmin, R.; Kahler, A.C.; Kawano, T.; Koning, A.J.; Leal, L.; and others

    2014-06-15

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) organizes cooperation between the major nuclear data evaluation projects in the world. The NEA Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC) was established to promote the exchange of information on nuclear data evaluation, measurement, nuclear model calculation, validation, and related topics, and to provide a framework for cooperative activities between the participating projects. The working party assesses nuclear data improvement needs and addresses these needs by initiating joint activities in the framework of dedicated WPEC subgroups. Studies recently completed comprise a number of works related to nuclear data covariance and associated processing issues, as well as more specific studies related to the resonance parameter representation in the unresolved resonance region, the gamma production from fission product capture reactions, the {sup 235}U capture cross section, the EXFOR database, and the improvement of nuclear data for advanced reactor systems. Ongoing activities focus on the evaluation of {sup 239}Pu in the resonance region, scattering angular distribution in the fast energy range, and reporting/usage of experimental data for evaluation in the resolved resonance region. New activities include two subgroups on improved fission product yield evaluation methodologies and on modern nuclear database structures. Future activities under discussion include a pilot project for a Collaborative International Evaluated Library Organization (CIELO) and methods to provide feedback from nuclear and covariance data adjustment for improvement of nuclear data. In addition to the above mentioned short-term task-oriented subgroups, WPEC also hosts a longer-term subgroup charged with reviewing and compiling the most important nuclear data requirements in a high priority request list (HPRL)

  1. International Workshop on Characterization and PIE Needs for Fundamental Understanding of Fuels Performance and Safety

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Listed

    2011-12-01

    The International Workshop on Characterization and PIE Needs to Support Science-Based Development of Innovative Fuels was held June 16-17, 2011, in Paris, France. The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) Working Party on the Fuel Cycle (WPFC) sponsored the workshop to identify gaps in global capabilities that need to be filled to meet projected needs in the 21st century. First and foremost, the workshop brought nine countries and associated international organizations, together in support of common needs for nuclear fuels and materials testing, characterization, PIE, and modeling capabilities. Finland, France, Germany, Republic of Korea, Russian Federation, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom, United States of America, IAEA, and ITU (on behalf of European Union Joint Research Centers) discussed issues and opportunities for future technical advancements and collaborations. Second, the presentations provided a base level of understanding of current international capabilities. Three main categories were covered: (1) status of facilities and near term plans, (2) PIE needs from fuels engineering and material science perspectives, and (3) novel PIE techniques being developed to meet the needs. The International presentations provided valuable data consistent with the outcome of the National Workshop held in March 2011. Finally, the panel discussion on 21st century PIE capabilities, created a unified approach for future collaborations. In conclusion, (1) existing capabilities are not sufficient to meet the needs of a science-based approach, (2) safety issues and fuels behavior during abnormal conditions will receive more focus post-Fukushima; therefore we need to adopt our techniques to those issues, and (3) International collaboration is needed in the areas of codes and standards development for the new techniques.

  2. Bioenergy in Energy Transformation and Climate Management

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rose, Steven K.; Kriegler, Elmar; Bibas, Ruben; Calvin, Katherine V.; Popp, Alexander; van Vuuren, Detlef; Weyant, John

    2014-04-01

    Unlike fossil fuels, biomass is a renewable resource that can sequester carbon during growth, be converted to energy, and then re-grown. Biomass is also a flexible fuel that can service many end-uses. This paper explores the importance of bioenergy to potential future energy transformation and climate change management. Using a model comparison of fifteen models, we characterize and analyze future dependence on, and the value of, bioenergy in achieving potential long-run climate objectivesreducing radiative forcing to 3.7 and 2.8 W/m2 in 2100 (approximately 550 and 450 ppm carbon dioxide equivalent atmospheric concentrations). Model scenarios project, by 2050, bioenergy growth of 2 to 10% per annum reaching 5 to 35 percent of global primary energy, and by 2100, bioenergy becoming 15 to 50 percent of global primary energy. Non-OECD regions are projected to be the dominant suppliers of biomass, as well as consumers, with up to 35 percent of regional electricity from biopower by 2050, and up to 70 percent of regional liquid fuels from biofuels by 2050. Bioenergy is found to be valuable to many models with significant implications for mitigation costs and world consumption. The availability of bioenergy, in particular biomass with carbon dioxide capture and storage (BECCS), notably affects the cost-effective global emissions trajectory for climate management by accommodating prolonged near-term use of fossil fuels. We also find that models cost-effectively trade-off land carbon and nitrous oxide emissions for the long-run climate change management benefits of bioenergy. Overall, further evaluation of the viability of global large-scale bioenergy is merited.

  3. Subacute effects of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) on hepatic gene expression profiles in rats

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canton, Rocio F. [Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80.177, NL-3508 TD, Utrecht (Netherlands)], E-mail: rfcanton@gmail.com; Peijnenburg, Ad A.C.M.; Hoogenboom, Ron L.A.P. [RIKILT Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen University and Research Center, P.O. Box 230, 6700 AE Wageningen (Netherlands); Piersma, Aldert H.; Ven, Leo T.M. van der [National Institute of Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Laboratory for Heath Protection Research, P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands); Berg, Martin van den [Institute for Risk Assessment Sciences (IRAS), Utrecht University, P.O. Box 80.177, NL-3508 TD, Utrecht (Netherlands); Heneweer, Marjoke [RIKILT Institute of Food Safety, Wageningen University and Research Center, P.O. Box 230, 6700 AE Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2008-09-01

    Hexabromoyclododecane (HBCD), used as flame retardant (FR) mainly in textile industry and in polystyrene foam manufacture, has been identified as a contaminant at levels comparable to other brominated FRs (BFRs). HBCD levels in biota are increasing slowly and seem to reflect the local market demand. The toxicological database of HBCD is too limited to perform at present a solid risk assessment, combining data from exposure and effect studies. In order to fill in some gaps, a 28-day HBCD repeated dose study (OECD407) was done in Wistar rats. In the present work liver tissues from these animals were used for gene expression profile analysis. Results show clear gender specificity with females having a higher number of regulated genes and therefore being more sensitive to HBCD than males. Several specific pathways were found to be affected by HBCD exposure, like PPAR-mediated regulation of lipid metabolism, triacylglycerol metabolism, cholesterol biosynthesis, and phase I and II pathways. These results were corroborated with quantitative RT-PCR analysis. Cholesterol biosynthesis and lipid metabolism were especially down-regulated in females. Genes involved in phase I and II metabolism were up-regulated predominantly in males, which could explain the observed lower HBCD hepatic disposition in male rats in this 28-day study. These sex-specific differences in gene expression profiles could also underlie sex-specific differences in toxicity (e.g. decreased thyroid hormone or increased serum cholesterol levels). To our knowledge, this is the fist study that describes the changes in rat hepatic gene profiles caused by this commonly used flame retardant.

  4. Assessment of fission product yields data needs in nuclear reactor applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kern, K.; Becker, M.; Broeders, C.

    2012-07-01

    Studies on the build-up of fission products in fast reactors have been performed, with particular emphasis on the effects related to the physics of the nuclear fission process. Fission product yields, which are required for burn-up calculations, depend on the proton and neutron number of the target nucleus as well as on the incident neutron energy. Evaluated nuclear data on fission product yields are available for all relevant target nuclides in reactor applications. However, the description of their energy dependence in evaluated data is still rather rudimentary, which is due to the lack of experimental fast fission data and reliable physical models. Additionally, physics studies of evaluated JEFF-3.1.1 fission yields data have shown potential improvements, especially for various fast fission data sets of this evaluation. In recent years, important progress in the understanding of the fission process has been made, and advanced model codes are currently being developed. This paper deals with the semi-empirical approach to the description of the fission process, which is used in the GEF code being developed by K.-H. Schmidt and B. Jurado on behalf of the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency, and with results from the corresponding author's diploma thesis. An extended version of the GEF code, supporting the calculation of spectrum weighted fission product yields, has been developed. It has been applied to the calculation of fission product yields in the fission rate spectra of a MOX fuelled sodium-cooled fast reactor. Important results are compared to JEFF-3.1.1 data and discussed in this paper. (authors)

  5. Advanced power assessment for Czech lignite task 3.6. Topical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sondreal, E.A.; Mann, M.D.; Weber, G.W.; Young, B.C.

    1995-12-01

    Major reforms in the Czech energy sector have been initiated to reverse 40 years of central planning, subsidized energy pricing, unchecked pollution from coal-fired plants, concerns over nuclear safety and fuel cycle management, and dependence on the former U.S.S.R. for oil, gas, and nuclear fuel processing. Prices for electricity, heat, and natural gas paid by industry are close to western levels, but subsidized prices for households are as much as 40% lower and below economic cost. State control of major energy enterprises is being reduced by moving toward government-regulated, investor-owned companies to raise needed capital, but with a strategic stake retained by the state. Foreign firms will participate in privatization, but they are not expected to acquire a controlling interest in Czech energy companies. Economic conditions in the Czech Republic are now improving after the disruptions caused by restructuring since 1989 and separation of the former Czech and Slovak Federal Republics in January 1993. The downturn in the economy after 1989 was concentrated in energy-intensive heavy industry, and recovery is paced by consumer trade, services, light industry and construction. Energy use in relation to gross domestic product (GDP) has declined, but it is still significantly higher than in OECD (Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development) countries. The GDP increased by 2% in 1994 after dropping 22% between 1989 and 1993. A positive balance of payments has been achieved, with foreign investment offsetting a small trade deficit. The government`s external debt is only 4% of GDP. This report studies the application of lignite resources within the newly formulated energy policies of the republic, in light of a move toward privatization and stronger air pollution regulations. Lignite has represented the major energy source for the country.

  6. Photosynthetic pigment concentrations, gas exchange and vegetative growth for selected monocots and dicots treated with two contrasting coal fly ashes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yunusa, I.A.M.; Burchett, M.D.; Manoharan, V.; DeSilva, D.L.; Eamus, D.; Skilbeck, C.G.

    2009-07-15

    There is uncertainty as to the rates of coal fly ash needed for optimum physiological processes and growth. In the current study we tested the hyothesis that photosynthetic pigments concentrations and CO{sub 2} assimilation (A) are more sensitive than dry weights in plants grown on media amended with coal fly ash. We applied the Terrestrial Plant Growth Test (Guideline 208) protocols of the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) to monocots (barley (Hordeum vulgare) and ryegrass (Secale cereale)) and dicots (canola (Brasica napus), radish (Raphanus sativus), field peas (Pisum sativum), and lucerne (Medicago sativa)) on media amended with fly ashes derived from semi-bituminous (gray ash) or lignite (red ash) coals at rates of 0, 2.5, 5.0, 10, or 20 Mg ha(-1). The red ash had higher elemental concentrations and salinity than the gray ash. Fly ash addition had no significant effect on germination by any of the six species. At moderate rates ({<=}10 Mg ha{sup -1}) both ashes increased (P < 0.05) growth rates and concentrations of chlorophylls a and b, but reduced carotenoid concentrations. Addition of either ash increased A in radish and transpiration in barley. Growth rates and final dry weights were reduced for all of the six test species when addition rates exceeded 10 Mg ha{sup -1} for gray ash and 5 Mg ha{sup -1} for red ash. We concluded that plant dry weights, rather than pigment concentrations and/or instantaneous rates of photosynthesis, are more consistent for assessing subsequent growth in plants supplied with fly ash.

  7. Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Giuseppe Palmiotti

    2014-06-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) is organizing the cooperation between the major nuclear data evaluation projects in the world. The NEA Working Party on International Nuclear Data Evaluation Cooperation (WPEC) was established to promote the exchange of information on nuclear data evaluation, measurement, nuclear model calculation, validation, and related topics, and to provide a framework for cooperative activities between the participating projects. The working party assesses nuclear data improvement needs and addresses these needs by initiating joint activities in the framework of dedicated WPEC subgroups. Studies recently completed comprise a number of works related to nuclear data covariance and associated processing issues, as well as more specific studies related to the resonance parameter representation in the unresolved resonance region, the gamma production from fission-product capture reactions, the U-235 capture cross-section, the EXFOR database, and the improvement of nuclear data for advanced reactor systems. Ongoing activities focus on the evaluation of Pu-239 in the resonance region, scattering angular distribution in the fast energy range, and reporting/usage of experimental data for evaluation in the resolved resonance region. New activities include two new subgroups on improved fission product yield evaluation methodologies and on modern nuclear database structures. Future activities under discussion include a pilot project of a Collaborative International Evaluated Library (CIELO) and methods to provide feedback from nuclear and covariance data adjustment for improvement of nuclear data. In addition to the above mentioned short-term, task-oriented subgroups, the WPEC also hosts a longer-term subgroup charged with reviewing and compiling the most important nuclear data requirements in a high priority request list (HPRL).

  8. MOX Cross-Section Libraries for ORIGEN-ARP

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gauld, I.C.

    2003-07-01

    The use of mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel in commercial nuclear power reactors operated in Europe has expanded rapidly over the past decade. The predicted characteristics of MOX fuel such as the nuclide inventories, thermal power from decay heat, and radiation sources are required for design and safety evaluations, and can provide valuable information for non-destructive safeguards verification activities. This report describes the development of computational methods and cross-section libraries suitable for the analysis of irradiated MOX fuel with the widely-used and recognized ORIGEN-ARP isotope generation and depletion code of the SCALE (Standardized Computer Analyses for Licensing Evaluation) code system. The MOX libraries are designed to be used with the Automatic Rapid Processing (ARP) module of SCALE that interpolates appropriate values of the cross sections from a database of parameterized cross-section libraries to create a problem-dependent library for the burnup analysis. The methods in ORIGEN-ARP, originally designed for uranium-based fuels only, have been significantly upgraded to handle the larger number of interpolation parameters associated with MOX fuels. The new methods have been incorporated in a new version of the ARP code that can generate libraries for low-enriched uranium (LEU) and MOX fuel types. The MOX data libraries and interpolation algorithms in ORIGEN-ARP have been verified using a database of declared isotopic concentrations for 1042 European MOX fuel assemblies. The methods and data are validated using a numerical MOX fuel benchmark established by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) Working Group on burnup credit and nuclide assay measurements for irradiated MOX fuel performed as part of the Belgonucleaire ARIANE International Program.

  9. Investigation of the effects of soluble boron tracking on coupled CTF / NEM, LWR simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biery, M.; Avramova, M.; Ivanov, K.

    2013-07-01

    The primary objective of this study is to evaluate the effects of introducing a boron tracking capability to the COBRA-TF / NEM code coupling. The Pennsylvania State University (PSU) versions of COBRA-TF - CTF, and Nodal Expansion Method (NEM) codes are utilized. Previous implementations of the CTF / NEM coupled code had no capability to model soluble boron feedback effects due to boron transport. This study builds upon the validation and qualification efforts of the boron tracking model implementation in CTF by modeling the boron feedback calculated by the CTF boron tracking model in NEM. The core model chosen for this study is the Purdue MOX/UO{sub 2} core model used in the 2007 OECD/NRC code benchmark study. Following the implementation of an explicit online coupling scheme and accompanying k-search routine, the newly coupled CTF / NEM code version with boron tracking is compared to prior results of the non-boron tracking CTF / NEM code version at steady-state hot full power and hot zero power conditions. It was found that the boron tracking model exhibited little influence on the hot zero power result as expected due to a smaller heat flux, which does not significantly change the moderator density and boron concentration as the moderator travels up the axial core length. Meanwhile the boron tracking model had a much greater impact on the hot full power results, predicting the critical inlet boron concentration to be 9.9 ppm below the non-boron tracking result due to greater and more rapid changes in boron concentration corresponding to the reduction in moderator density from being more rapidly heated. (authors)

  10. Reactive Transport and Coupled THM Processes in Engineering Barrier Systems (EBS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steefel, Carl; Rutqvist, Jonny; Tsang, Chin-Fu; Liu, Hui-Hai; Sonnenthal, Eric; Houseworth, Jim; Birkholzer, Jens

    2010-08-31

    Geological repositories for disposal of high-level nuclear wastes generally rely on a multi-barrier system to isolate radioactive wastes from the biosphere. The multi-barrier system typically consists of a natural barrier system, including repository host rock and its surrounding subsurface environment, and an engineering barrier system (EBS). EBS represents the man-made, engineered materials placed within a repository, including the waste form, waste canisters, buffer materials, backfill and seals (OECD, 2003). EBS plays a significant role in the containment and long-term retardation of radionuclide release. EBS is involved in complex thermal, hydrogeological, mechanical, chemical and biological processes, such as heat release due to radionuclide decay, multiphase flow (including gas release due to canister corrosion), swelling of buffer materials, radionuclide diffusive transport, waste dissolution and chemical reactions. All these processes are related to each other. An in-depth understanding of these coupled processes is critical for the performance assessment (PA) for EBS and the entire repository. Within the EBS group of Used Fuel Disposition (UFD) Campaign, LBNL is currently focused on (1) thermal-hydraulic-mechanical-chemical (THMC) processes in buffer materials (bentonite) and (2) diffusive transport in EBS associated with clay host rock, with a long-term goal to develop a full understanding of (and needed modeling capabilities to simulate) impacts of coupled processes on radionuclide transport in different components of EBS, as well as the interaction between near-field host rock (e.g., clay) and EBS and how they effect radionuclide release. This final report documents the progress that LBNL has made in its focus areas. Specifically, Section 2 summarizes progress on literature review for THMC processes and reactive-diffusive radionuclide transport in bentonite. The literature review provides a picture of the state-of-the-art of the relevant research areas addressed by LBNL. Section 3 documents the current modeling tools, available at LBNL, for the EBS study. This may be important for identifying future modeling activities within the EBS group with these current capabilities and needs for future EBS modeling development. Section 4 presents the results of geomechanical modeling using the Barcelona Basic Model (BBM) constitutive relationship for thermo-elasto-plastic media such as bentonite and an update on reactive-diffusive transport modeling approaches through bentonite in the EBS. Section 5 discusses identified knowledge gaps and technical issues as well as short- and long-term R&D plans.

  11. Bridging the gap: adapting advanced display technologies for use in hybrid control rooms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jokstad, Hkon; Boring, Ronald

    2015-02-01

    The Institute for Energy Technology (IFE), runs the OECD Halden Reactor Project (HRP), featuring a state-of-the-art research simulator facility in Halden, Norway, called HAMMLAB. HAMMLAB serves two main purposes: the study of human behaviour in interaction with complex process systems; and the development, test and evaluation of prototype control centres and their individual systems. By studying operator performance in HAMMLAB and integrating the knowledge gained into new designs, the HRP contributes to improving operational safety, reliability, efficiency and productivity. The U.S. Department of Energys (DOE) Light Water Reactor Sustainability (LWRS) Program has contracted IFE to assist DOE national laboratory staff at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) in adapting HAMMLAB design concepts for the purpose of control room modernization at nuclear power plants in the U.S. In support of this effort, the DOE has built a simulator research facility at INL called the Human Systems Simulation Laboratory (HSSL). The HSSL is centered on control room modernization, in which industry provided plant instrumentation and controls are modified for upgrade opportunities. The HSSL houses the LWRS simulator, which is a reconfigurable full-scale and full-scope control room simulator. Consisting of 45 large touchscreens on 15 panels, the LWRS simulator is currently using this glass top technology to digitally represent and replicate the functionality of the analog I&C systems in existing control rooms. The LWRS simulator is reconfigurable in that different plant training simulator models obtained from the utilities can be run on the panels, and the panels can be physically moved and arranged to mimic the layout of those control rooms. The glass top technology and reconfigurability capabilities allow the LWRS simulator to be the research platform that is necessary to design, prototype, and validate human-system interface (HSI) technologies that can replace existing analog I&C. IFE has recently assisted INL in establishing the technical infrastructure for implementation of HSI prototypes from HAMMLAB into the HSSL to demonstrate relevant control room replacement systems in support of the LWRS program. In March, 2014, IFE delivered the first HSI prototype utilizing this infrastructure a large screen overview display for INL's simulator. The co-operation now continues by developing Procedure Support Displays targeted for operators in hybrid control room settings. These prototypes are being validated with U.S. reactor operators in the HSSL and optimized to enhance their performance. This research serves as a crucial stepping stone toward incorporation of advanced display technologies into conventional main control rooms.

  12. I-NERI 2004 Annual Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2004-01-01

    The International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (I-NERI) supports the National Energy Policy by conducting research to advance the state of nuclear science and technology in the United States (U.S.). I-NERI sponsors innovative scientific and engineering research and development (R&D) in cooperation with participating countries. The R&D research performed under the I-NERI umbrella addresses the key issues affecting the future of nuclear energy and its global deployment. I-NERI research is directed towards improving cost performance, increasing proliferation resistance, enhancing safety, and improving the waste management of future nuclear energy systems. This I-NERI 2004 Annual Report serves to inform interested parties on the program's organization, progress of the collaborative research projects, and future planning for the program. The report covers the four years of I-NERI activity since the program's inception in fiscal year (FY) 2001. The motivation and series of events that led to the creation of the I-NERI program are discussed in Section 2. The participating countries in current I-NERI collaborative agreements are also presented. Section 3 presents an overview of the I-NERI goals and objectives, a work scope summary for the collaborative projects, and a summary of research project awards through the end of FY 2004. It also includes FY 2005 accomplishments and planned FY 2005 activities. A summary of programmatic accomplishments is presented in Section 4. Also included is a summary of new and existing projects, an overview of the I-NERI program funding, and the new collaborations anticipated in FY 2005. The R&D work scope for current I-NERI collaborative projects with Canada, France, Japan, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA), and the Republic of Korea are presented in Sections 5 through 9, respectively. For each participating country, an index of projects and a summary of FY 2004 technical accomplishments are presented in Appendices A through E.

  13. Cynod: A Neutronics Code for Pebble Bed Modular Reactor Coupled Transient Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hikaru Hiruta; Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Hans D. Gougar; Javier Ortensi

    2008-09-01

    The Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) is one of the two concepts currently considered for development into the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP). This interest is due, in particular, to the concepts inherent safety characteristics. In order to verify and confirm the design safety characteristics of the PBR computational tools must be developed that treat the range of phenomena that are expected to be important for this type of reactors. This paper presents a recently developed 2D R-Z cylindrical nodal kinetics code and shows some of its capabilities by applying it to a set of known and relevant benchmarks. The new code has been coupled to the thermal hydraulics code THERMIX/KONVEK[1] for application to the simulation of very fast transients in PBRs. The new code, CYNOD, has been written starting with a fixed source solver extracted from the nodal cylindrical geometry solver contained within the PEBBED code. The fixed source solver was then incorporated into a kinetic solver.. The new code inherits the spatial solver characteristics of the nodal solver within PEBBED. Thus, the time-dependent neutron diffusion equation expressed analytically in each node of the R-Z cylindrical geometry sub-domain (or node) is transformed into one-dimensional equations by means of the usual transverse integration procedure. The one-dimensional diffusion equations in each of the directions are then solved using the analytic Greens function method. The resulting equations for the entire domain are then re-cast in the form of the Direct Coarse Mesh Finite Difference (D-CMFD) for convenience of solution. The implicit Euler method is used for the time variable discretization. In order to correctly treat the cusping effect for nodes that contain a partially inserted control rod a method is used that takes advantage of the Greens function solution available in the intrinsic method. In this corrected treatment, the nodes are re-homogenized using axial flux shapes reconstructed based on the Greens function method. The performance of the new code is demonstrated by applying it to a delayed supercritical problem and a to the OECD PBMR400 rod ejection benchmark problem. The latter makes use of the coupled CYNOD-THERMIX/KONVEK codes. A final improvement to the code is the subject of a companion paper: a heterogeneous TRISO fuel particle model was devised and incorporated into the code and used to provide an enhanced Doppler treatment. The new code is currently being coupled to the RELAP5-3D code for thermal-hydraulics. The full length paper will include extensive summaries of the equations and algorithm, descriptions of the sample and benchmark problems and details of the results. It is shown, in inter-code comparisons, that the new code correctly predicts the transient behaviors of the test problems.

  14. A Hydro-Economic Approach to Representing Water Resources Impacts in Integrated Assessment Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kirshen, Paul H.; Strzepek, Kenneth, M.

    2004-01-14

    Grant Number DE-FG02-98ER62665 Office of Energy Research of the U.S. Department of Energy Abstract Many Integrated Assessment Models (IAM) divide the world into a small number of highly aggregated regions. Non-OECD countries are aggregated geographically into continental and multiple-continental regions or economically by development level. Current research suggests that these large scale aggregations cannot accurately represent potential water resources-related climate change impacts. In addition, IAMs do not explicitly model the flow regulation impacts of reservoir and ground water systems, the economics of water supply, or the demand for water in economic activities. Using the International Model for Policy Analysis of Agricultural Commodities and Trade (IMPACT) model of the International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) as a case study, this research implemented a set of methodologies to provide accurate representation of water resource climate change impacts in Integrated Assessment Models. There were also detailed examinations of key issues related to aggregated modeling including: modeling water consumption versus water withdrawals; ground and surface water interactions; development of reservoir cost curves; modeling of surface areas of aggregated reservoirs for estimating evaporation losses; and evaluating the importance of spatial scale in river basin modeling. The major findings include: - Continental or national or even large scale river basin aggregation of water supplies and demands do not accurately capture the impacts of climate change in the water and agricultural sector in IAMs. - Fortunately, there now exist gridden approaches (0.5 X 0.5 degrees) to model streamflows in a global analysis. The gridded approach to hydrologic modeling allows flexibility in aligning basin boundaries with national boundaries. This combined with GIS tools, high speed computers, and the growing availability of socio-economic gridded data bases allows assignment of demands to river basins to create hydro-economic zones that respect as much as possible both political and hydrologic integrity in different models. - To minimize pre-processing of data and add increased flexibility to modeling water resources and uses, it is recommended that water withdrawal demands be modeled, not consumptive requirements even though this makes the IAM more complex. - IAMs must consider changes in water availability for irrigation under climate change; ignoring them is more inaccurate than ignoring yield changes in crops under climate change. - Determining water availability and cost in river basins must include modeling streamflows, reservoirs and their operations, and ground water and its interaction with surface water. - Scale issues are important. The results from condensing demands and supplies in a large complex river basin to one node can be misleading for all uses under low flow conditions and instream flow uses under all conditions. Monthly is generally the most accurate scale for modeling river flows and demands. Challenges remain in integrating hydrologic units with political boundaries but the gridded approach to hydrologic modeling allows flexibility in aligning basin boundaries with political boundaries. - Using minimal reservoir cost data, it is possible to use basin topography to estimate reservoir storage costs. - Reservoir evaporation must be considered when assessing the usable water in a watershed. Several methods are available to estimate the relationship between aggregated storage surface area and storage volume. - For existing or future IAMs that can not use the appropriate aggregation for water, a water preprocessor may be required due the finer scale of hydrologic impacts.

  15. ACHILLES: Heat Transfer in PWR Core During LOCA Reflood Phase

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2013-11-01

    1. NAME AND TITLE OF DATA LIBRARY ACHILLES -Heat Transfer in PWR Core During LOCA Reflood Phase. 2. NAME AND TITLE OF DATA RETRIEVAL PROGRAMS N/A 3. CONTRIBUTOR AEA Technology, Winfrith Technology Centre, Dorchester DT2 8DH United Kingdom through the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency Data Bank, Issy-les-Moulineaux, France. 4. DESCRIPTION OF TEST FACILITY The most important features of the Achilles rig were the shroud vessel, which contained the test section, and the downcomer. These maymore » be thought of as representing the core barrel and the annular downcomer in the reactor pressure vessel. The test section comprises a cluster of 69 rods in a square array within a circular shroud vessel. The rod diameter and pitch (9.5 mm and 12.6 mm) were typical of PWR dimensions. The internal diameter of the shroud vessel was 128 mm. Each rod was electrically heated over a length of 3.66 m, which is typical of the nuclear heated length in a PWR fuel rod, and each contained 6 internal thermocouples. These were arranged in one of 8 groupings which concentrated the thermocouples in different axial zones. The spacer grids were at prototypic PWR locations. Each grid had two thermocouples attached to its trailing edge at radial locations. The axial power profile along the rods was an 11 step approximation to a "chopped cosine". The shroud vessel had 5 heating zones whose power could be independently controlled. 5. DESCRIPTION OF TESTS The Achilles experiments investigated the heat transfer in the core of a Pressurized Water Reactor during the re-flood phase of a postulated large break loss of coolant accident. The results provided data to validate codes and to improve modeling. Different types of experiments were carried out which included single phase cooling, re-flood under low flow conditions, level swell and re-flood under high flow conditions. Three series of experiments were performed. The first and the third used the same test section but the second used another test section, similar in all respects except that it contained a partial blockage formed by attaching sleeves (or "balloons") to some of the rods. 6. SOURCE AND SCOPE OF DATA Phenomena Tested - Heat transfer in the core of a PWR during a re-flood phase of postulated large break LOCA. Test Designation - Achilles Rig. The programme includes the following types of experiments: - on an unballooned cluster: -- single phase air flow -- low pressure level swell -- low flooding rate re-flood -- high flooding rate re-flood - on a ballooned cluster containing 80% blockage formed by 16 balloon sleeves -- single phase air flow -- low flooding rate re-flood 7. DISCUSSION OF THE DATA RETRIEVAL PROGRAM N/A 8. DATA FORMAT AND COMPUTER Many Computers (M00019MNYCP00). 9. TYPICAL RUNNING TIME N/A 11. CONTENTS OF LIBRARY The ACHILLES package contains test data and associated data processing software as well as the documentation listed above. 12. DATE OF ABSTRACT November 2013. KEYWORDS: DATABASES, BENCHMARKS, HEAT TRANSFER, LOSS-OF-COLLANT ACCIDENT, PWR REACTORS, REFLOODING« less

  16. ACHILLES: Heat Transfer in PWR Core During LOCA Reflood Phase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    2013-11-01

    1. NAME AND TITLE OF DATA LIBRARY ACHILLES -Heat Transfer in PWR Core During LOCA Reflood Phase. 2. NAME AND TITLE OF DATA RETRIEVAL PROGRAMS N/A 3. CONTRIBUTOR AEA Technology, Winfrith Technology Centre, Dorchester DT2 8DH United Kingdom through the OECD Nuclear Energy Agency Data Bank, Issy-les-Moulineaux, France. 4. DESCRIPTION OF TEST FACILITY The most important features of the Achilles rig were the shroud vessel, which contained the test section, and the downcomer. These may be thought of as representing the core barrel and the annular downcomer in the reactor pressure vessel. The test section comprises a cluster of 69 rods in a square array within a circular shroud vessel. The rod diameter and pitch (9.5 mm and 12.6 mm) were typical of PWR dimensions. The internal diameter of the shroud vessel was 128 mm. Each rod was electrically heated over a length of 3.66 m, which is typical of the nuclear heated length in a PWR fuel rod, and each contained 6 internal thermocouples. These were arranged in one of 8 groupings which concentrated the thermocouples in different axial zones. The spacer grids were at prototypic PWR locations. Each grid had two thermocouples attached to its trailing edge at radial locations. The axial power profile along the rods was an 11 step approximation to a "chopped cosine". The shroud vessel had 5 heating zones whose power could be independently controlled. 5. DESCRIPTION OF TESTS The Achilles experiments investigated the heat transfer in the core of a Pressurized Water Reactor during the re-flood phase of a postulated large break loss of coolant accident. The results provided data to validate codes and to improve modeling. Different types of experiments were carried out which included single phase cooling, re-flood under low flow conditions, level swell and re-flood under high flow conditions. Three series of experiments were performed. The first and the third used the same test section but the second used another test section, similar in all respects except that it contained a partial blockage formed by attaching sleeves (or "balloons") to some of the rods. 6. SOURCE AND SCOPE OF DATA Phenomena Tested - Heat transfer in the core of a PWR during a re-flood phase of postulated large break LOCA. Test Designation - Achilles Rig. The programme includes the following types of experiments: - on an unballooned cluster: -- single phase air flow -- low pressure level swell -- low flooding rate re-flood -- high flooding rate re-flood - on a ballooned cluster containing 80% blockage formed by 16 balloon sleeves -- single phase air flow -- low flooding rate re-flood 7. DISCUSSION OF THE DATA RETRIEVAL PROGRAM N/A 8. DATA FORMAT AND COMPUTER Many Computers (M00019MNYCP00). 9. TYPICAL RUNNING TIME N/A 11. CONTENTS OF LIBRARY The ACHILLES package contains test data and associated data processing software as well as the documentation listed above. 12. DATE OF ABSTRACT November 2013. KEYWORDS: DATABASES, BENCHMARKS, HEAT TRANSFER, LOSS-OF-COLLANT ACCIDENT, PWR REACTORS, REFLOODING

  17. Sectoral trends in global energy use and greenhouse gasemissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Sinton, Jonathan; Worrell, Ernst; Zhou, Nan; Sathaye, Jayant; Levine, Mark

    2006-07-24

    In 2000, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) published a new set of baseline greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions scenarios in the Special Report on Emissions Scenarios (SRES) (Nakicenovic et al., 2000). The SRES team defined four narrative storylines (A1, A2, B1 and B2) describing the relationships between the forces driving GHG and aerosol emissions and their evolution during the 21st century. The SRES reports emissions for each of these storylines by type of GHG and by fuel type to 2100 globally and for four world regions (OECD countries as of 1990, countries undergoing economic reform, developing countries in Asia, rest of world). Specific assumptions about the quantification of scenario drivers, such as population and economic growth, technological change, resource availability, land-use changes, and local and regional environmental policies, are also provided. End-use sector-level results for buildings, industry, or transportation or information regarding adoption of particular technologies and policies are not provided in the SRES. The goal of this report is to provide more detailed information on the SRES scenarios at the end use level including historical time series data and a decomposition of energy consumption to understand the forecast implications in terms of end use efficiency to 2030. This report focuses on the A1 (A1B) and B2 marker scenarios since they represent distinctly contrasting futures. The A1 storyline describes a future of very rapid economic growth, low population growth, and the rapid introduction of new and more efficient technologies. Major underlying themes are convergence among regions, capacity building, and increased cultural and social interactions, with a substantial reduction in regional differences in per capita income. The B2 storyline describes a world with an emphasis on economic, social, and environmental sustainability, especially at the local and regional levels. It is a world with moderate population growth, intermediate levels of economic development, and less rapid and more diverse technological change (Nakicenovic et al., 2000). Data were obtained from the SRES modeling teams that provide more detail than that reported in the SRES. For the A1 marker scenario, the modeling team provided final energy demand and carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions by fuel for industry, buildings, and transportation for nine world regions. Final energy use and CO{sub 2} emissions for three sectors (industry, transport, buildings) for the four SRES world regions were provided for the B2 marker scenario. This report describes the results of a disaggregation of the SRES projected energy use and energy-related CO{sub 2} emissions for the industrial, transport, and buildings sectors for 10 world regions (see Appendix 1) to 2030. An example of further disaggregation of the two SRES scenarios for the residential buildings sector in China is provided, illustrating how such aggregate scenarios can be interpreted at the end use level.

  18. Nuclear Hybrid Energy Systems: Imperatives, Prospects, and Challenges

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steven E. Aumeier

    2010-10-01

    As global population reaches an expected 8 billion people by 2030, primary energy consumption is expected to increase by almost 40% from approximately 520 exajoules consumed today to almost 740 exajoules. Much of this increase is expected to come from non-Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) nations, and Asia specifically. In these economies, energy used for transportation is expected to grow substantially, as is industrial, commercial and to a lesser degree residential energy use, creating considerable pressure on global and local energy markets. The magnitude and timing of growth in energy consumption likely will create a global imperative to deploy energy production technologies that balance the three pillars of energy security: economic stability related to the affordability of energy products, stability and predictability in their price, and the efficient and effective deployment of global capital resources in their development; environmental sustainability related to minimizing the negative impacts of energy production to air, land, and water systems and advancing the long-term viability of using a particular resource in a way that does not limit future generations ability to prosper; resource security related to the ability to access energy resources and products where and when necessary, in an affordable and predictable manner. One approach to meeting these objectives is hybrid energy systems (HES). Broadly described, HES are energy product production plants that take two or more energy resource inputs (typically includes both carbon and non-carbon based sources) and produce two or more energy products (e.g. electricity, liquid transportation fuels, industrial chemicals) in an integrated plant. Nuclear energy integration into HES offers intriguing potential, particularly if smaller (<300 MWe) reactors are available. Although the concept of using nuclear energy in a variety of non-electrical process applications is certainly not new, renewed interest in more tightly coupled energy product plants (such as HES) that meet the objectives outline above have gained additional interest recently, an interest likely sparked by sharpening energy security concerns. Studies have shown that non-nuclear integrated (hybrid) energy systems can have appealing attributes in terms of overall process efficiency, enhanced electric grid stability, renewable energy integration, and economic performance, and lifecycle greenhouse gas emissions. These attributes seem to be sufficiently compelling that several significant commercial investments in fossil-renewable HES are being made in the United States while the U.S. Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) has openly solicited information regarding nuclear energy integration schemes. The challenges of nuclear energy integration include myriad issues associated with the following RD&D areas, or platforms: feedstock processing (e.g. bio-feedstock integration with coal, carbon feedstock extraction using nuclear energy); heat / energy management (e.g. advanced heat exchangers, process design); energy storage (e.g. H2 production, liquid fuels synthesis); byproduct management (e.g. CO2 recycle approaches); systems dynamics, integration and control (e.g. process dynamics analyses and optimization, advanced prognostics, diagnostics, variable time scale control and flow sheet optimization).

  19. Plutonium chemistry under conditions relevant for WIPP performance assessment. Review of experimental results and recommendations for future work

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oversby, Virginia M.

    2000-09-30

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), located at a depth of 650 m in bedded salt at a site approximately 40 km east of Carlsbad, New Mexico, was constructed by the US Department of Energy for the disposal of transuranic wastes arising from defense-related activities. The disposal site is regulated by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). During the process leading to certification of the site for initial emplacement of waste, EEG and their contractors reviewed the DOE Compliance Certification Application (CCA) and raised a number of issues. This report reviews the issues related to the chemistry of plutonium as it will affect the potential for release of radioactivity under WIPP conditions. Emphasis is placed on conditions appropriate for the Human Intrusion scenario(s), since human intrusion has the largest potential for releasing radioactivity to the environment under WIPP conditions. The most significant issues that need to be addressed in relation to plutonium chemistry under WIPP conditions are (1) the effects of heterogeneity in the repository on Pu concentrations in brines introduced under the human intrusion scenario, (2) the redox state of Pu in solution and potential for plutonium in solid phases to have a different redox state from that in the solution phase, (3) the effect of organic ligands on the solubility of Pu in WIPP-relevant brines, and (4) the effects of TRU waste characteristics in determining the solubility of Pu. These issues are reviewed with respect to the treatment they received in the DOE CCA, DOEs response to EEGs comments on the CCA, and EPAs response to those comments as reflected in the final EPA rule that led to the opening of the WIPP. Experimental results obtained in DOEs Actinide Source-Term Test Program (STTP) during the last two years are reviewed and interpreted in the light of other developments in the field of Pu solution chemistry. This analysis is used as the basis for a conceptual model for Pu behavior under WIPP conditions. This report identifies three issues that can be addressed as part of the five-year re-certification cycles mandated by the WIPP Land Withdrawal Act (U.S. Congress, 1996, *8.(f)(1)) and implemented in the EPA Final Rule (U.S. EPA, 1998a). First, the impact of organic ligands on the complexation of a system with multiple cations could be delineated by some simple experiments with Th (IV), citrate,EDTA, Ca2+ and one or more transition metals. An experiment with Pu (IV) could be designed to determine the lability of Pu oxidation states in the presence of organic ligands. Second, the issue of using analogs for Pu could be addressed with appropriate experiments using U and Pu at redox conditions in the range anticipated at the WIPP. Attention to the published experimental results of U and Pu could make a considerable contribution to this effort. Third, the issue of uncertainty in calculated actinide solubility can be resolved with experimental data for Pu (IV) compounds of appropriate compositions. The report also recommends starting by constructing a data base for U and Pu using the published, peer-reviewed OECD/NEA U and Pu data bases.

  20. Used fuel disposition campaign international activities implementation plan.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nutt, W. M. (Nuclear Engineering Division)

    2011-06-29

    The management of used nuclear fuel and nuclear waste is required for any country using nuclear energy. This includes the storage, transportation, and disposal of low and intermediate level waste (LILW), used nuclear fuel (UNF), and high level waste (HLW). The Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC), within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Energy (NE), Office of Fuel Cycle Technology (FCT), is responsible for conducting research and development pertaining to the management of these materials in the U.S. Cooperation and collaboration with other countries would be beneficial to both the U.S. and other countries through information exchange and a broader participation of experts in the field. U.S. participation in international UNF and HLW exchanges leads to safe management of nuclear materials, increased security through global oversight, and protection of the environment worldwide. Such interactions offer the opportunity to develop consensus on policy, scientific, and technical approaches. Dialogue to address common technical issues helps develop an internationally recognized foundation of sound science, benefiting the U.S. and participating countries. The UNF and HLW management programs in nuclear countries are at different levels of maturity. All countries utilizing nuclear power must store UNF, mostly in wet storage, and HLW for those countries that reprocess UNF. Several countries either utilize or plan to utilize dry storage systems for UNF, perhaps for long periods of time (several decades). Geologic disposal programs are at various different states, ranging from essentially 'no progress' to selected sites and pending license applications to regulators. The table below summarizes the status of UNF and HLW management programs in several countriesa. Thus, the opportunity exists to collaborate at different levels ranging from providing expertise to those countries 'behind' the U.S. to obtaining access to information and expertise from those countries with more mature programs. The U.S. fuel cycle is a once through fuel cycle involving the direct disposal of UNF, as spent nuclear fuel, in a geologic repository (previously identified at Yucca Mountain, Nevada), following at most a few decades of storage (wet and dry). The geology at Yucca Mountain, unsaturated tuff, is unique among all countries investigating the disposal of UNF and HLW. The decision by the U.S. Department of Energy to no longer pursue the disposal of UNF at Yucca Mountain and possibly utilize very long term storage (approaching 100 years or more) while evaluating future fuel cycle alternatives for managing UNF, presents a different UNF and HLW management R&D portfolio that has been pursued in the U.S. In addition, the research and development activities managed by OCRWM have been transferred to DOE-NE. This requires a reconsideration of how the UFDC will engage in cooperative and collaborative activities with other countries. This report presents the UFDC implementation plan for international activities. The DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM) has cooperated and collaborated with other countries in many different 'arenas' including the Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) within the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), and through bilateral agreements with other countries. These international activities benefited OCRWM through the acquisition and exchange of information, database development, and peer reviews by experts from other countries. DOE-NE cooperates and collaborates with other countries in similar 'arenas' with similar objectives and realizing similar benefits. However the DOE-NE focus has not typically been in the area of UNF and HLW management. This report will first summarize these recent cooperative and collaborative activities. The manner that the UFDC will cooperate and collaborate in the future is expected to change as R&D is conducted regarding long-term storage and the potential disposal of UNF and HLW in different geolo