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1

GHG REDUCTION POTENTIAL OF BIOGAS RESOURCE UTILZATION IN HOLBÆK’S HEATING AND ELECTRICITY SECTOR.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This project is set out to identify the GHG reduction potentials of the 3 identified biogas plants in the Holbæk municipality. The GHG reduction of… (more)

DAO, THI THU HUONG DIU

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

2

Estimate Greenhouse Gas Reduction Potential and Cost-Effectiveness of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Greenhouse Gas Reduction Potential and Cost-Effectiveness Greenhouse Gas Reduction Potential and Cost-Effectiveness of Strategies for Vehicles and Mobile Equipment Estimate Greenhouse Gas Reduction Potential and Cost-Effectiveness of Strategies for Vehicles and Mobile Equipment October 7, 2013 - 11:58am Addthis YOU ARE HERE: Step 3 After identifying petroleum reduction strategies, a Federal agency should estimate the greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction potential and cost effectiveness of these strategies for vehicles and mobile equipment. The table below provides steps for identifying optimal vehicle acquisition strategies. Table 1. Framework for Identifying Optimal Vehicle Acquisition Strategies Step Summary Purpose PLAN and COLLECT 1 Determine vehicle acquisition requirements Establish a structured Vehicle Allocation Matrix (VAM) to determine the numbers and types of vehicles required to accomplish your fleet's mission

3

Identify Petroleum Reduction Strategies for Vehicles and Mobile Equipment |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Petroleum Reduction Strategies for Vehicles and Mobile Petroleum Reduction Strategies for Vehicles and Mobile Equipment Identify Petroleum Reduction Strategies for Vehicles and Mobile Equipment October 7, 2013 - 11:50am Addthis YOU ARE HERE: Step 3 As defined by the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction strategies for Federal vehicles and equipment are based on the three driving principles of petroleum reduction: Reduce vehicle miles traveled Improve fuel efficiency Use alternative fuels. These strategies provide a framework for an agency to use when developing a strategic plan that can be specifically tailored to match the agency's fleet profile and meet its mission. Agency fleet managers should evaluate petroleum reduction strategies and tactics for each fleet location, based on an evaluation of site-specific

4

Energy Cost Reduction Measures Identified for Texas State Agencies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

According t o energy auditors, state-owned facilities in Texas on the average consume over twice the energy of comparable facilities in the private sector. In 1984 and 1986 as part of the Texas Energy Cost Containment Program, two extensive energy audit programs examined a total of 35.3 million square feet of state-owned space. Energy cost reduction measures with paybacks of four years or less were identified. The purpose of this paper is to present the projects identified in 1986. Most relate to lighting, HVAC, and energy management systems. The type of facilities audited include colleges and universities, health science centers, state schools and centers, hospitals, and office buildings. The relation between the facility type and the energy cost reduction measures identified is discussed. In addition, the energy and dollar savings derived from the identified measures at the different facilities are presented. The total savings of the projects identified in both energy audit programs amount to $23.7 million annually.

Grigg, T. J.; Verdict, M. E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Mexico - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Buildings Jump to: navigation, search Name Mexico - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials...

6

Analysis of Potential Energy Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Potential Energy Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction of Home Appliances and Commercial Equipments in China Title Analysis of Potential Energy Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction of...

7

Carbon Efficiency, Carbon Reduction Potential, and Economic Developmen...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbon Reduction Potential, and Economic Development in the People's Republic of China Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Carbon Efficiency, Carbon Reduction...

8

Identifying Project Potential and Options Webinar | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Identifying Project Potential and Options Webinar Identifying Project Potential and Options Webinar Identifying Project Potential and Options Webinar April 30, 2014 11:00AM MDT Attendees will understand the components of identifying energy project potential and options. Presenters will discuss market considerations, initial site considerations, project savings or rate-of-return estimates, production potential, final site selection, tribal options, finance, partnerships, and participation processes. Attendees will also become familiar with data gathering and analysis procedures such as tribal facility electric cost data, regulations, and interconnection requirements; paths to market for project power; and renewable sales, risks; and utility rules. By following the steps outlined in the webinar, Tribes can determine

9

Analysis of Potential Energy Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Analysis of Potential Energy Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction of Home Appliances and Commercial Equipments in China Title Analysis of Potential Energy Saving and CO2 Emission...

10

Mexico - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials from  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Buildings Jump to: navigation, search Name Mexico - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Buildings Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme Sector Energy Focus Area Buildings Topics Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Pathways analysis, Background analysis Resource Type Publications Website http://www.unep.org/sbci/pdfs/ Country Mexico Central America References Greenhouse Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials for Buildings[1] Mexico - Greenhouse Gas Emissions Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Buildings Screenshot "This report represents the first comprehensive description of the factors that determine the present and future impacts of residential and commercial

11

ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

e.g. , reductions in landfill gas flaring),  or changes to landfills is +/?30%, the range for methane emissions from  natural gas 

Masanet, Eric

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

Property:IdentifiedHydrothermalPotential | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IdentifiedHydrothermalPotential IdentifiedHydrothermalPotential Jump to: navigation, search Property Name IdentifiedHydrothermalPotential Property Type Quantity Description Conventional hydrothermal electricity generation potential from identified hydrothermal sites, as determined by the USGS 2008 Geothermal Resource Assessment (Williams et al, 2008). Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS

13

ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy,  Industrial Technologies Program, Washington, D.C.    GlossaryEnergy Efficient Technology Potentials. 31 Conclusions and Recommendations 42 References. 45 Glossary .

Masanet, Eric

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

which will help California energy and policy analysts and KEMA (2008).  California Energy Efficiency Potential Final Report.  California Energy Commission, Sacramento, 

Masanet, Eric

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

South Africa - Greenhouse Gas Emission Baselines and Reduction Potentials  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Africa - Greenhouse Gas Emission Baselines and Reduction Potentials Africa - Greenhouse Gas Emission Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Buildings Jump to: navigation, search Name South Africa - Greenhouse Gas Emission Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Buildings Agency/Company /Organization United Nations Environment Programme Sector Energy Focus Area Buildings Topics Baseline projection, GHG inventory, Pathways analysis, Background analysis Resource Type Publications Website http://www.unep.org/sbci/pdfs/ Country South Africa UN Region Southern Africa References South Africa - Greenhouse Gas Emission Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Buildings[1] South Africa - Greenhouse Gas Emission Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Buildings Screenshot "This report aims to provide: a summary quantification of the influence of buildings on climate

16

ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS  

SciTech Connect

The term ?household carbon footprint? refers to the total annual carbon emissions associated with household consumption of energy, goods, and services. In this project, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory developed a carbon footprint modeling framework that characterizes the key underlying technologies and processes that contribute to household carbon footprints in California and the United States. The approach breaks down the carbon footprint by 35 different household fuel end uses and 32 different supply chain fuel end uses. This level of end use detail allows energy and policy analysts to better understand the underlying technologies and processes contributing to the carbon footprint of California households. The modeling framework was applied to estimate the annual home energy and supply chain carbon footprints of a prototypical California household. A preliminary assessment of parameter uncertainty associated with key model input data was also conducted. To illustrate the policy-relevance of this modeling framework, a case study was conducted that analyzed the achievable carbon footprint reductions associated with the adoption of energy efficient household and supply chain technologies.

Kramer, Klaas Jan; Homan, Greg; Brown, Rich; Worrell, Ernst; Masanet, Eric

2009-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

17

Two hundred Energy Savings Assessments identified potential annual energy savings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center (IAC) teams. The Industrial Technologies Program completed 200 SENAs at U.S. industrial plants3/20/09 Two hundred Energy Savings Assessments identified potential annual energy savings of $485 million Industrial Energy Efficiency The ORNL Industrial Energy Efficiency Team supports DOE's Best

18

Assessment of Tire Technologies and Practices for Potential Waste and Energy Use Reductions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Practices for Potential Waste and Energy Use ReductionsPractices for Potential Waste and Energy Use Reductions Maythe study involving research on waste and energy saving tire

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Regnier, Justin; Burke, Andy; Melaina, Marc W; Bremson, Joel; Keteltas, Michael

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Analysis of Energy, Environmental and Life Cycle Cost Reduction Potential  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Environmental and Life Cycle Cost Reduction Potential Environmental and Life Cycle Cost Reduction Potential of Ground Source Heat Pump (GSHP) in Hot and Humid Climate Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Analysis of Energy, Environmental and Life Cycle Cost Reduction Potential of Ground Source Heat Pump (GSHP) in Hot and Humid Climate Project Type / Topic 1 Recovery Act - Geothermal Technologies Program: Ground Source Heat Pumps Project Type / Topic 2 Topic Area 2: Data Gathering and Analysis Project Description It has been widely recognized that the energy saving benefits of GSHP systems are best realized in the northern and central regions where heating needs are dominant or both heating and cooling loads are comparable. For hot and humid climate such as in the states of FL, LA, TX, southern AL, MS, GA, NC and SC, buildings have much larger cooling needs than heating needs. The Hybrid GSHP (HGSHP) systems therefore have been developed and installed in some locations of those states, which use additional heat sinks (such as cooling tower, domestic water heating systems) to reject excess heat. Despite the development of HGSHP the comprehensive analysis of their benefits and barriers for wide application has been limited and often yields non-conclusive results. In general, GSHP/HGSHP systems often have higher first costs than conventional systems making short-term economics unattractive. Addressing these technical and financial barriers call for additional evaluation of innovative utility programs, incentives and delivery approaches.

20

Carbon Efficiency, Carbon Reduction Potential, and Economic Development in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Carbon Efficiency, Carbon Reduction Potential, and Economic Development in Carbon Efficiency, Carbon Reduction Potential, and Economic Development in the People's Republic of China Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Carbon Efficiency, Carbon Reduction Potential, and Economic Development in the People's Republic of China Agency/Company /Organization: Asian Development Bank Sector: Energy Focus Area: Energy Efficiency, Industry Topics: Low emission development planning, Policies/deployment programs, Background analysis Resource Type: Publications, Case studies/examples Website: www.adb.org/documents/studies/carbon-efficiency-prc/carbon-efficiency- Country: China UN Region: Eastern Asia Coordinates: 35.86166°, 104.195397° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":35.86166,"lon":104.195397,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identifying reduction potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Identifying Options for Deep Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from California Transportation: Meeting an 80% Reduction Goal in 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sets minimum targets for the use of bioenergy and biofuels,biofuels with low GHG intensity to meet the emission reductions target.biofuels future, is unable to meet the 80% emission reductions target

Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Potential Peak Load Reductions From Residential Energy Efficient Upgrades  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The demand for electricity is continuing to grow at a substantial rate. Utilities are interested in managing this growth's peak demand for a number of reasons including: costly construction of new generation capacity can be deferred; the reliability of the distribution network can be improved; and added environmental pollution can be minimized. Energy efficiency improvements, especially through residential programs, are increasingly being used to mitigate this rise in peak demand. This paper examines the potential peak load reductions from residential energy efficiency upgrades in hot and humid climates. First, a baseline scenario is established. Then, the demand and consumption impacts of individual upgrade measures are assessed. Several of these upgrades are then combined into a package to assess the synergistic demand and energy impacts. A sensitivity analysis is then performed to assess the impacts of housing characteristics on estimated demand and energy savings. Finally, the demand, energy, and environmental impacts are estimated at the community level.

Meisegeier, D.; Howes, M.; King, D.; Hall, J.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Identifying Options for Deep Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from California Transportation: Meeting an 80% Reduction Goal in 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of total potential U.S. biofuel production under optimisticare developed for biofuel production. Reference travelof total potential U.S. biofuel production under optimistic

Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Identifying Options for Deep Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from California Transportation: Meeting an 80% Reduction Goal in 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that organizes future transportation scenarios (includingclimate change. In this future, transportation activity andhow potential transportation futures in California could

Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Carbon Emissions Reduction Potential in the U.S. Chemicals and...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reduction Potential in the U.S. Chemicals and Pulp and Paper Industries by Applying CHP Technologies Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login...

26

An Examination of Greenhouse Gas Reduction Potential at the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

amount reduction from present emissions depends on the energy use trends of the nation in question and create an informed project timeline that takes into account the institution's trends in energy use Hall, came with a large initial price tag but will end up saving energy and money in the future

Peterson, Blake R.

27

Potential of solar cooling systems for peak demand reduction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We investigated the technical feasibility of solar cooling for peak demand reduction using a building energy simulation program (DOE2.1D). The system studied was an absorption cooling system with a thermal coefficient of performance of 0.8 driven by a solar collector system with an efficiency of 50% with no thermal storage. The analysis for three different climates showed that, on the day with peak cooling load, about 17% of the peak load could be met satisfactorily with the solar-assisted cooling system without any thermal storage. A performance availability analysis indicated that the solar cooling system should be designed for lower amounts of available solar resources that coincide with the hours during which peak demand reduction is required. The analysis indicated that in dry climates, direct-normal concentrating collectors work well for solar cooling; however, in humid climates, collectors that absorb diffuse radiation work better.

Pesaran, A.A. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Neymark, J. [Neymark (Joel), Golden, CO (United States)

1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Study to Identify Potential Improvements of Operation Tools and Support Systems - Non-Proprietary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project analyzed safety significant events (SSEs) in several nuclear power plants to identify where improvements in instrumentation and control (IC) and information technology (IT) could prevent or mitigate some of these events. This report identifies potential improvement paths that could enhance reliability and availability for implementation consideration by utilities where appropriate at their own plants.

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

29

U-117: Potential security vulnerability has been identified with certain HP  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7: Potential security vulnerability has been identified with 7: Potential security vulnerability has been identified with certain HP printers and HP digital senders U-117: Potential security vulnerability has been identified with certain HP printers and HP digital senders March 5, 2012 - 7:00am Addthis PROBLEM: The vulnerability could be exploited remotely to install unauthorized printer firmware. PLATFORM: Select HP printers and Digital Senders ABSTRACT: Remote attackers could execute arbitrary code by using a session on TCP port 9100 to upload a crafted firmware update. reference LINKS: Vendor Advisory CVE-2011-4161 Previous JC3 Advisory Bulletin IMPACT ASSESSMENT: High Discussion: The default configuration of the HP CM8060 Color MFP with Edgeline; Color LaserJet 3xxx, 4xxx, 5550, 9500, CMxxxx, CPxxxx, and Enterprise CPxxxx;

30

HDR reservoir flow impedance and potentials for impedance reduction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The data from flow tests which employed two different production zones in a well at Fenton Hill indicates the flow impedance of a wellbore zone damaged by rapid depressurization was altered, possibly by pressure spallation, which appears to have mechanically propped the joint apertures of outlet flow paths intersecting the altered wellbore. The rapid depressurization and subsequent flow test data derived from the damaged well has led to the hypothesis that pressure spallation and the resultant mechanical propping of outlet flow paths reduced the outlet flow impedance of the damaged wellbore. Furthermore, transient pressure data shows the largest pressure drop between the injection and production wellheads occurs near the production wellbore, so lowering the outlet impedance by increasing the apertures of outlet flow paths will have the greatest effect on reducing the overall reservoir impedance. Fenton Hill data also reveals that increasing the overall reservoir pressure dilates the apertures of flow paths, which likewise serves to reduce the reservoir impedance. Data suggests that either pressure dilating the wellbore connected joints with high production wellhead pressure, or mechanically propping open the outlet flow paths will increase the near-wellbore permeability. Finally, a new method for calculating and comparing near-wellbore outlet impedances has been developed. Further modeling, experimentation, and engineered reservoir modifications, such as pressure dilation and mechanical propping, hold considerable potential for significantly improving the productivity of HDR reservoirs.

DuTeau, R.; Brown, D.

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

HDR reservoir flow impedance and potentials for impedance reduction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The data from flow tests which employed two different production zones in a well at Fenton Hill indicates the flow impedance of a wellbore zone damaged by rapid depressurization was altered, possibly by pressure spallation, which appears to have mechanically propped the joint apertures of outlet flow paths intersecting the altered wellbore. The rapid depressurization and subsequent flow test data derived from the damaged well has led to the hypothesis that pressure spallation and the resultant mechanical propping of outlet flow paths reduced the outlet flow impedance of the damaged wellbore. Furthermore, transient pressure data shows the largest pressure drop between the injection and production wellheads occurs near the production wellbore, so lowering the outlet impedance by increasing the apertures of outlet flow paths will have the greatest effect on reducing the overall reservoir impedance. Fenton Hill data also reveals that increasing the overall reservoir pressure dilates the apertures of flow paths, which likewise serves to reduce the reservoir impedance. Data suggests that either pressure dilating the wellbore connected joints with high production wellhead pressure, or mechanically propping open the outlet flow paths will increase the near-wellbore permeability. Finally, a new method for calculating and comparing near-wellbore outlet impedances has been developed. Further modeling, experimentation, and engineered reservoir modifications, such as pressure dilation and mechanical propping, hold considerable potential for significantly improving the productivity of HDR reservoirs.

DuTeau, R.; Brown, D.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry Title Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2012 Authors Ke, Jing, Nina Zheng, David Fridley, Lynn K. Price, and Nan Zhou Date Published 06/2012 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Keywords cement industry, china energy, china energy group, emission reduction, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, energy efficiency, industrial energy efficiency, Low Emission & Efficient Industry, policy studies Abstract This study analyzes current energy and carbon dioxide (CO2) emission trends in China's cement industryas the basis for modeling different levels of cement production and rates of efficiency improvement andcarbon reduction in 2011-2030. Three cement output projections are developed based on analyses ofhistorical production and physical and macroeconomic drivers. For each of these three productionprojections, energy savings and CO2 emission reduction potentials are estimated in a best practicescenario and two continuous improvement scenarios relative to a frozen scenario. The results reveal thepotential for cumulative final energy savings of 27.1 to 37.5 exajoules and energy-related directemission reductions of 3.2 to 4.4 gigatonnes in 2011-2030 under the best practice scenarios. Thecontinuous improvement scenarios produce cumulative final energy savings of 6.0 to 18.9 exajoules andreduce CO2 emissions by 1.0 to 2.4 gigatonnes. This analysis highlights that increasing energy efficiencyis the most important policy measure for reducing the cement industry's energy and emissions intensity,given the current state of the industry and the unlikelihood of significant carbon capture and storagebefore 2030. In addition, policies to reduce total cement production offer the most direct way ofreducing total energy consumption and CO2 emissions.

33

Using Helicopter Electromagnetic Surveys to Identify Potential Hazards at Mine Waste Impoundments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In July 2003, helicopter electromagnetic surveys were conducted at 14 coal waste impoundments in southern West Virginia. The purpose of the surveys was to detect conditions that could lead to impoundment failure either by structural failure of the embankment or by the flooding of adjacent or underlying mine works. Specifically, the surveys attempted to: 1) identify saturated zones within the mine waste, 2) delineate filtrate flow paths through the embankment or into adjacent strata and receiving streams, and 3) identify flooded mine workings underlying or adjacent to the waste impoundment. Data from the helicopter surveys were processed to generate conductivity/depth images. Conductivity/depth images were then spatially linked to georeferenced air photos or topographic maps for interpretation. Conductivity/depth images were found to provide a snapshot of the hydrologic conditions that exist within the impoundment. This information can be used to predict potential areas of failure within the embankment because of its ability to image the phreatic zone. Also, the electromagnetic survey can identify areas of unconsolidated slurry in the decant basin and beneath the embankment. Although shallow, flooded mineworks beneath the impoundment were identified by this survey, it cannot be assumed that electromagnetic surveys can detect all underlying mines. A preliminary evaluation of the data implies that helicopter electromagnetic surveys can provide a better understanding of the phreatic zone than the piezometer arrays that are typically used.

Hammack, R.W.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Reductions in Northeast Refining Activity: Potential Implications for Petroleum Product Markets  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Reductions in Northeast Reductions in Northeast Refining Activity: Potential Implications for Petroleum Product Markets December 2011 Independent Statistics & Analysis www.eia.gov U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 U.S. Energy Information Administration | Reductions in Northeast Refining Activity: Potential Implications for Petroleum Product Markets i This report was prepared by the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA), the statistical and analytical agency within the U.S. Department of Energy. By law, EIA's data, analyses, and forecasts are independent of approval by any other officer or employee of the United States Government. The views in this report therefore should not be construed as representing those of the U.S. Department of Energy

35

Assessment of NOx Reduction Potential from Combustion Modifications at Illinois Power -- Baldwin Unit 1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cyclone boilers have recently become regulated with respect to NOx emissions due to the adoption of Title IV -- Group 2 NOx emission limits for cyclones of 0.86 lb/MBtu. This project explored the NOx reduction potential of cyclone biasing on a bituminous coal-fired cyclone boiler.

1998-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

36

Identifying Potential Areas for Siting Interim Nuclear Waste Facilities Using Map Algebra and Optimization Approaches  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The renewed interest in siting new nuclear power plants in the United States has brought to the center stage, the need to site interim facilities for long-term management of spent nuclear fuel (SNF). In this paper, a two-stage approach for identifying potential areas for siting interim SNF facilities is presented. In the first stage, the land area is discretized into grids of uniform size (e.g., 100m x 100m grids). For the continental United States, this process resulted in a data matrix of about 700 million cells. Each cell of the matrix is then characterized as a binary decision variable to indicate whether an exclusion criterion is satisfied or not. A binary data matrix is created for each of the 25 siting criteria considered in this study. Using map algebra approach, cells that satisfy all criteria are clustered and regarded as potential siting areas. In the second stage, an optimization problem is formulated as a p-median problem on a rail network such that the sum of the shortest distance between nuclear power plants with SNF and the potential storage sites from the first stage is minimized. The implications of obtained results for energy policies are presented and discussed.

Omitaomu, Olufemi A [ORNL; Liu, Cheng [ORNL; Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit [ORNL; Belles, Randy [ORNL; Mays, Gary T [ORNL; Tuttle, Mark A [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Omen: identifying potential spear-phishing targets before the email is sent.  

SciTech Connect

We present the results of a two year project focused on a common social engineering attack method called %22spear phishing%22. In a spear phishing attack, the user receives an email with information specifically focused on the user. This email contains either a malware-laced attachment or a link to download the malware that has been disguised as a useful program. Spear phishing attacks have been one of the most effective avenues for attackers to gain initial entry into a target network. This project focused on a proactive approach to spear phishing. To create an effective, user-specific spear phishing email, the attacker must research the intended recipient. We believe that much of the information used by the attacker is provided by the target organization's own external website. Thus when researching potential targets, the attacker leaves signs of his research in the webserver's logs. We created tools and visualizations to improve cybersecurity analysts' abilities to quickly understand a visitor's visit patterns and interests. Given these suspicious visitors and log-parsing tools, analysts can more quickly identify truly suspicious visitors, search for potential spear-phishing targeted users, and improve security around those users before the spear phishing email is sent.

Wendt, Jeremy Daniel

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Rationally Tuning the Reduction Potential of a Single Cupredoxin Beyond the Natural Range  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Redox processes are at the heart of numerous functions in chemistry and biology, from long-range electron transfer in photosynthesis and respiration to catalysis in industrial and fuel cell research. These functions are accomplished in nature by only a limited number of redox-active agents. A long-standing issue in these fields is how redox potentials are fine-tuned over a broad range with little change to the redox-active site or electron-transfer properties. Resolving this issue will not only advance our fundamental understanding of the roles of long-range, non-covalent interactions in redox processes, but also allow for design of redox-active proteins having tailor-made redox potentials for applications such as artificial photosynthetic centres or fuel cell catalysts for energy conversion. Here we show that two important secondary coordination sphere interactions, hydrophobicity and hydrogen-bonding, are capable of tuning the reduction potential of the cupredoxin azurin over a 700 mV range, surpassing the highest and lowest reduction potentials reported for any mononuclear cupredoxin, without perturbing the metal binding site beyond what is typical for the cupredoxin family of proteins. We also demonstrate that the effects of individual structural features are additive and that redox potential tuning of azurin is now predictable across the full range of cupredoxin potentials.

Marshall, N.; Garner, D; Wilson, T; Gao, Y; Robinson, H; Nilges, M; Lu, Y

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Standard test method for measurement of oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) of soil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1.1 This test method covers a procedure and related test equipment for measuring oxidation-reduction potential (ORP) of soil samples removed from the ground. 1.2 The procedure in Section 9 is appropriate for field and laboratory measurements. 1.3 Accurate measurement of oxidation-reduction potential aids in the analysis of soil corrosivity and its impact on buried metallic structure corrosion rates. 1.4 The values stated in inch-pound units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to SI units that are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 1.5 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

FGDExpert Demonstration at NIPSCO Schahfer Unit 17: Oxidation Reduction Potential Effects on Scrubber Chemistry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Flue gas desulfurization (FGD) systems have been shown to remove soluble oxidized mercury (Hg), as well as selenium (Se), from flue gas. However, one phenomenon that has been observed, but not well characterized, is the re-emission of oxidized Hg captured in the FGD scrubber as elemental Hg. Several studies have shown that oxidation reduction potential (ORP) influences the re-emission of Hg from FGD scrubbers. Other studies have demonstrated that ORP influences the speciation of Se in the scrubber ...

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identifying reduction potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Electrical Energy Conservation and Peak Demand Reduction Potential for Buildings in Texas: Preliminary Results  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper presents preliminary results of a study of electrical energy conservation and peak demand reduction potential for the building sector in Texas. Starting from 1980 building stocks and energy use characteristics, technical conservation potentials were calculated relative to frozen energy efficiency stock growth over the 1980-2000 period. The application of conservation supply methodology to Texas utilities is outlined, and then the energy use and peak demand savings, and their associated costs, are calculated using a prototypical building technique. Representative results are presented, for residential and commercial building types, as conservation supply curves for several end use categories; complete results of the study are presented in Ref. 1.

Hunn, B. D.; Baughman, M. L.; Silver, S. C.; Rosenfeld, A. H.; Akbari, H.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

GREENHOUSE GAS REDUCTION POTENTIAL WITH COMBINED HEAT AND POWER WITH DISTRIBUTED GENERATION PRIME MOVERS - ASME 2012  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Pending or recently enacted greenhouse gas regulations and mandates are leading to the need for current and feasible GHG reduction solutions including combined heat and power (CHP). Distributed generation using advanced reciprocating engines, gas turbines, microturbines and fuel cells has been shown to reduce greenhouse gases (GHG) compared to the U.S. electrical generation mix due to the use of natural gas and high electrical generation efficiencies of these prime movers. Many of these prime movers are also well suited for use in CHP systems which recover heat generated during combustion or energy conversion. CHP increases the total efficiency of the prime mover by recovering waste heat for generating electricity, replacing process steam, hot water for buildings or even cooling via absorption chilling. The increased efficiency of CHP systems further reduces GHG emissions compared to systems which do not recover waste thermal energy. Current GHG mandates within the U.S Federal sector and looming GHG legislation for states puts an emphasis on understanding the GHG reduction potential of such systems. This study compares the GHG savings from various state-of-the- art prime movers. GHG reductions from commercially available prime movers in the 1-5 MW class including, various industrial fuel cells, large and small gas turbines, micro turbines and reciprocating gas engines with and without CHP are compared to centralized electricity generation including the U.S. mix and the best available technology with natural gas combined cycle power plants. The findings show significant GHG saving potential with the use of CHP. Also provided is an exploration of the accounting methodology for GHG reductions with CHP and the sensitivity of such analyses to electrical generation efficiency, emissions factors and most importantly recoverable heat and thermal recovery efficiency from the CHP system.

Curran, Scott [ORNL; Theiss, Timothy J [ORNL; Bunce, Michael [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

POTENTIAL HEALTH RISK REDUCTION ARISING FROM REDUCED MERCURY EMISSIONS FROM COAL FIRED POWER PLANTS.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has announced plans to regulate mercury (Hg) emissions from coal-fired power plants. EPA has not prepared a quantitative assessment of the reduction in risk that could be achieved through reduction in coal plant emissions of Hg. To address this issue, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) with support from the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Fossil Energy (DOE FE) prepared a quantitative assessment of the reduction in human health risk that could be achieved through reduction in coal plant emissions of Hg. The primary pathway for Hg exposure is through consumption of fish. The most susceptible population to Hg exposure is the fetus. Therefore the risk assessment focused on consumption of fish by women of child-bearing age. Dose response factors were generated from studies on loss of cognitive abilities (language skills, motor skills, etc.) by young children whose mothers consumed large amounts of fish with high Hg levels. Population risks were estimated for the general population in three regions of the country, (the Midwest, Northeast, and Southeast) that were identified by EPA as being heavily impacted by coal emissions. Three scenarios for reducing Hg emissions from coal plants were considered: (1) A base case using current conditions; (2) A 50% reduction; and, (3) A 90% reduction. These reductions in emissions were assumed to translate linearly into a reduction in fish Hg levels of 8.6% and 15.5%, respectively. Population risk estimates were also calculated for two subsistence fisher populations. These groups of people consume substantially more fish than the general public and, depending on location, the fish may contain higher Hg levels than average. Risk estimates for these groups were calculated for the three Hg levels used for the general population analyses. Analysis shows that the general population risks for exposure of the fetus to Hg are small. Estimated risks under current conditions (i.e., no specific Hg controls) ranged from 5.7 x 10{sup -6} in the Midwest to 2 x 10{sup -5} in the Southeast. Reducing emissions from coal plants by 90% reduced the estimated range in risk to 5 x 10{sup -6} in the Midwest and 1.5 x 10{sup -5} in Southeast, respectively. The population risk for the subsistence fisher using the Southeast regional fish Hg levels was 3.8 x 10{sup -3}, a factor of 200 greater than the general population risk. For the subsistence fishers and the Savannah River Hg levels, the population risk was 4.3 x 10{sup -5}, a factor of 2 greater than for the general population. The estimated risk reductions from a 90% reduction in coal plant Hg emissions ranged from 25%-68%, which is greater than the assumed reduction in Hg levels in fish, (15.5%). To place this risk in perspective, there are approximately 4 x 10{sup 6} births/year in the U.S (National Vital Statistics Report, 2000). Assuming that the Southeast risk level (the highest of the regions) is appropriate for the entire U.S., an estimate of 80 newborn children per year have a 5% chance of realizing any of the 16 adverse effects used to generate the DRF. If Hg emissions from power plants are reduced 90%, the number of children at risk is reduced to 60.

SULLIVAN,T.M.LIPFERT,F.W.MORRIS,S.C.MOSKOWITZ,P.D.

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Materials Reliability Program: Preliminary Basis for Potential Reductions in Pipe Fitting Stress Indices (MRP-261)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes the results of Task 1 of a multi-task EPRI program to improve the accuracy and lower the conservatism in the stress indices in NB-3680 of Section III of the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code. The principal results of Task 1 include a compilation of references relevant to providing a preliminary basis for potential reductions in pipe fitting stress indices. The report also provides a list of future recommendations regarding how fitting characteristics and dimensions can be better ...

2009-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

45

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Ernest Orlando Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) is working with the California Energy Commission (CEC) to determine the potential role of commercial sector distributed generation (DG) with combined heat and power (CHP) capability deployment in greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) reductions. CHP applications at large industrial sites are well known, and a large share of their potential has already been harvested. In contrast, relatively little attention has been paid to the potential of medium-sized commercial buildings, i.e., ones with peak electric loads ranging from 100 kW to 5 MW. We examine how this sector might implement DG with CHP in cost minimizing microgrids that are able to adopt and operate various energy technologies, such as solar photovoltaics (PV), on-site thermal generation, heat exchangers, solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and storage systems. We apply a mixed-integer linear program (MILP) that minimizes a site's annual energy costs as its objective. Using 138 representative mid-sized commercial sites in California (CA), existing tariffs of three major electricity distribution ultilities plus a natural gas company, and performance data of available technology in 2020, we find the GHG reduction potential for this CA commercial sector segment, which represents about 35percent of total statewide commercial sector sales. Under the assumptions made, in a reference case, this segment is estimated to be capable of economically installing 1.4 GW of CHP, 35percent of the California Air Resources Board (CARB) statewide 4 GW goal for total incremental CHP deployment by 2020. However, because CARB's assumed utilization is far higherthan is found by the MILP, the adopted CHP only contributes 19percent of the CO2 target. Several sensitivity runs were completed. One applies a simple feed-in tariff similar to net metering, and another includes a generous self-generation incentive program (SGIP) subsidy for fuel cells. The feed-in tariff proves ineffective at stimulating CHP deployment, while the SGIP buy down is more powerful. The attractiveness of CHP varies widely by climate zone and service territory, but in general, hotter inland areas and San Diego are the more attractive regions because high cooling loads achieve higher equipment utilization. Additionally, large office buildings are surprisingly good hosts for CHP, so large office buildings in San Diego and hotter urban centers emerge as promising target hosts. Overall the effect on CO2 emissions is limited, never exceeding 27percent of the CARB target. Nonetheless, results suggest that the CO2 emissions abatement potential of CHP in mid-sized CA buildings is significant, and much more promising than is typically assumed.

Stadler, Michael; Marnay, Chris; Cardoso, Goncalo; Lipman, Tim; Megel, Olivier; Ganguly, Srirupa; Siddiqui, Afzal; Lai, Judy

2009-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

46

Identifying potential repositories for radioactive waste: multiple criteria decision analysis and critical infrastructure systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An approach for the analysis and management of multiple criteria critical infrastructure problems is put forth. Nuclear waste management involves complex tradeoffs under uncertainty. Among all waste either generated by nature or human activities, radioactive nuclear waste is the most toxic to human health and difficult to manage: it is known that some nuclear waste material will be radioactive and potentially dangerous for hundreds of thousands of years. This paper discusses the use of multiple criteria decision analysis techniques such as the analytic hierarchy process for recommending sites to be considered as potential repositories for nuclear waste.

Kouichi Taji; Jason K. Levy; Jens Hartmann; Michelle L. Bell; Richard M. Anderson; Benjamin F. Hobbs; Tom Feglar

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

DEMONSTRATION OF POTENTIAL FOR SELECTIVE CATALYTIC REDUCTION AND DIESEL PARTICULATE FILTERS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project addresses the potential for Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) devices (using urea as reductant) together with Diesel Particulate Filters (DPF) and low-pressure loop exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) to achieve future stringent emissions standards for heavy-duty engines powering Class 8 vehicles. Two emission control systems consisting of the three technologies (EGR, SCR, and DPF) were calibrated on a Caterpillar C-12 heavy-duty diesel engine. Results of these calibrations showed good promise in meeting the 2010 heavy-duty emission standards as set forth by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). These two emission control systems were developed to evaluate a series of fuels that have similar formulations except for their sulfur content. Additionally, one fuel, code-named BP15, was also evaluated. This fuel was prepared by processing straight-run distillate stocks through a commercial, single stage hydrotreater employing high activity catalyst at maximum severity. An additional goal of this program is to provide data for an on-going EPA technology review that evaluates progress toward meeting 2007/2010 emission standards. These emissions levels were to be achieved not only on the transient test cycles but in other modes of operation such as the steady-state Euro-III style emission test known as the OICA (Organisation Internationale des Compagnies d'Automobiles) or the ESC (European Stationary Cycle). Additionally, hydrocarbon and carbon monoxide emissions standards are to be met.

McGILL,R; KHAIR, M; SHARP, C

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

48

A Study of Achievable Potential for Transmission and Disitribution Loss Reduction and End-Use Energy Efficiency for Eskom  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the results of a study undertaken to assess the "end-to-end" achievable efficiency potential for Eskom’s electrical system. The assessment includes potential energy and demand savings estimates due to transmission and distribution loss reduction measures and implementation of end-use energy-efficiency measures over the period of 20122030.

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

49

Renewable energy and its potential for carbon emissions reductions in developing countries: Methodology for technology evaluation. Case study application to Mexico  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many projects have been proposed to promote and demonstrate renewable energy technologies (RETs) in developing countries on the basis of their potential to reduce carbon emissions. However, no uniform methodology has been developed for evaluating RETs in terms of their future carbon emissions reduction potential. This study outlines a methodology for identifying RETs that have the potential for achieving large carbon emissions reductions in the future, while also meeting key criteria for commercialization and acceptability in developing countries. In addition, this study evaluates the connection between technology identification and the selection of projects that are designed to demonstrate technologies with a propensity for carbon emission reductions (e.g., Global Environmental Facility projects). Although this report applies the methodology to Mexico in a case study format, the methodology is broad based and could be applied to any developing country, as well as to other technologies. The methodology used in this report is composed of four steps: technology screening, technology identification, technology deployment scenarios, and estimates of carbon emissions reductions. The four technologies with the highest ranking in the technology identification process for the on-grid category were geothermal, biomass cogeneration, wind, and micro-/mini-hydro. Compressed natural gas (CNG) was the alternative that received the highest ranking for the transportation category.

Corbus, D.; Martinez, M.; Rodriguez, L.; Mark, J.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Quantifying the fuel use and greenhouse gas reduction potential of electric and hybrid vehicles.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Since 1989, the Northeast Sustainable Energy Association (NESEA) has organized the American Tour de Sol in which a wide variety of participants operate electric vehicles (EVs) and hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs) for several hundred miles under various roadway conditions (e.g., city center and highway). The event offers a unique opportunity to collect on-the-road energy efficiency data for these EVs and HEVs as well as comparable gasoline-fueled conventional vehicles (CVs) that are driven under the same conditions. NESEA and Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) collaborated on collecting and analyzing vehicle efficiency data during the 1998 and 1999 NESEA American Tour de Sols. Using a transportation fuel-cycle model developed at ANL with data collected on vehicle fuel economy from the two events as well as electric generation mix data from the utilities that provided the electricity to charge the EVs on the two Tours, we estimated full fuel-cycle energy use and GHG emissions of EVs and CVs. This paper presents the data, methodology, and results of this study, including the full fuel-cycle energy use and GHG emission reduction potential of the EVs operating on the Tour.

Singh, M.; Wang, M.; Hazard, N.; Lewis, G.; Energy Systems; Northeast Sustainable Energy Association; Univ. of Michigan

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Energy Savings and NOx Emissions Reduction Potential from the 2012 Federal Legislation to Phase Out Incandescent Lamps in Texas  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report provides detailed information about the potential savings from the 2012 Federal Legislation to phase out incandescent lamps and the NOx emissions reduction from the replacement of incandescent bulbs with Compact Fluorescent Lamps (CFL). In Texas, this analysis includes the savings estimates from both the annual and Ozone Season Day (OSD) NOx reductions. The NOx emissions reduction in this analysis are calculated using estimated emissions factors for 2007 from the US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) eGRID database, which had been specially prepared for this purpose.

Liu, Zi; Baltazar, Juan Carlos; Haberl, Jeff; Soman, Rohit

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Sustainable Campus Project: Potential for Energy Conservation and Carbon Reduction Education in Taiwan  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The reality of global warming, climate change and energy shortages has put all circles to the task of actively promoting education in energy conservation and carbon reduction. From 2004, the Ministry of Education has been promoting the Sustainable Campus ... Keywords: Carbon Reduction, Education, Energy Conservation, Facility, Sustainable Campus Project

Shun-Mei Wang; Chien-Kuo Ku; Chun-Yu Chu

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy demand and emissions in 2030 in China: scenarios andand carbon reduction in 2011-2030. Three cement output3.2 to 4.4 gigatonnes in 2011-2030 under the best practice

Ke, Jing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Potential energy savings based on reduction of pressure in Central Heating System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Methodology and practical recommendations on retrofitting existing Central Heating Systems to deliver steam at lower pressure are presented. The retrofitting, is examined in terms of engineering approaches and economic effectiveness. In addition to investigating the savings obtainable through reduction of thermal and leakage losses, other energy conservation opportunities related to reduction of steam pressure are considered. The latter includes less boiler blowdown, less energy used pumping feedwater, less steam vented from the deaerator, reduced boiler maintenance and repair requirements, and cogeneration of electricity by steam or gas turbines. Energy savings are estimated as up to 10%, and payback period as in the range of two to four years.

Minkov, V.; Hirsch, P.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Compressed Air Energy Storage: Proven US CAES Plant Cost Achievements and Potential Engineering, Design & Project Management Based C ost Reductions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) is a market ready technology that can play a valuable role in enhancing grid flexibility for variable generation integration. Relative to combustion turbines, CAES provides additional benefits and value streams, such as potential classification as a transmission asset, lower emissions, superior regulation service, reduction of wind spillage and in other ways improving wind plant economics. Although high cost estimates for CAES circulate in the industry, the first ...

2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

56

Assessing the potential visibility benefits of Clean Air Act Title IV emission reductions  

SciTech Connect

Assessments are made of the benefits of the 1990 Clean Air Act Title IV (COVE), Phase 2, SO2 and NOX reduction provisions, to the visibility in typical eastern and western Class 1 areas. Probable bands of visibility impairment distribution curves are developed for Shenandoah National Park, Smoky Mountain National Park and the Grand Canyon National Park, based on the existing emissions, ``Base Case``, and for the COVE emission reductions, ``CAAA Case``. Emission projections for 2010 are developed with improved versions of the National Acid Precipitation Assessment Program emission projection models. Source-receptor transfer matrices created with the Advanced Statistical Trajectory Regional Air Pollution (ASTRAP) model are used with existing emission inventories and with the emission projections to calculate atmospheric concentrations of sulfate and nitrate at the receptors of interest for existing and projected emission scenarios. The Visibility Assessment Scoping Model (VASM) is then used to develop distributions of visibility impairment. VASM combines statistics of observed concentrations of particulate species and relative humidity with ASTRAP calculations of the relative changes in atmospheric sulfate and nitrate particulate concentrations in a Monte Carlo approach to produce expected distributions of hourly particulate concentrations and RH. Light extinction relationships developed in theoretical and field studies are then used to calculate the resulting distribution of visibility impairment. Successive Monte Carlo studies are carried out to develop sets of visibility impairment distributions with and without the COVE emission reductions to gain insight into the detectability of expected visibility improvements.

Trexler, E.C. Jr. [USDOE, Washington, DC (United States); Shannon, J.D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

pH-Dependent Reduction Potentials and Proton-Coupled Electron Transfer Mechanisms in Hydrogen-Producing Nickel Molecular Electrocatalysts  

SciTech Connect

The nickel-based Ph Bz 2 2 P N electrocatalysts, which are comprised of a nickel atom and two 1,5-dibenzyl-3,7-diphenyl-1,5-diaza-3,7-diphosphacyclooctane ligands, have been shown to effectively catalyze H2 production in acetonitrile. Recent electrochemical experiments revealed a linear dependence of the NiII/I reduction potential on pH, suggesting a proton-coupled electron transfer (PCET) reaction. In the proposed mechanism, the catalytic cycle begins with a PCET process involving electrochemical electron transfer to the nickel center and intermolecular proton transfer from an acid to the pendant amine ligand. This paper presents quantum mechanical calculations of this PCET process to examine the thermodynamics of the sequential mechanisms, in which either the electron or the proton transfers first (ET–PT and PT–ET, respectively), and the concerted mechanism (EPT). The favored mechanism depends on a balance among many factors, including the acid strength, association free energy for the acid–catalyst complex, PT free energy barrier, and ET reduction potential. The ET reduction potential is less negative after PT, favoring the PT–ET mechanism, and the association free energy is less positive after reduction, favoring the ET–PT mechanism. The calculations, along with analysis of the experimental data, indicate that the sequential ET–PT mechanism is favored for weak acids because of the substantial decrease in the association free energy after reduction. For strong acids, however, the PT–ET mechanism may be favored because the association free energy is somewhat smaller and PT is more thermodynamically favorable. The concerted mechanism could also occur, particularly for intermediate acid strengths. In the context of the entire catalytic cycle for H2 production, the initial PCET process involving intermolecular PT has a more negative reduction potential than the subsequent PCET process involving intramolecular PT. As a result, the second PCET should occur spontaneously, which is consistent with cyclic voltammogram experiments. This research was supported as part of the Center for Molecular Electrocatalysis, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U. S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences.

Horvath, Samantha; Fernandez, Laura; Appel, Aaron M.; Hammes-Schiffer, Sharon

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Some potential material supply constraints in the deployment of photovoltaic solar electric systems. (A preliminary screening to identify critical materials)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this study are to: (1) identify potential material supply constraints which could seriously impede the large scale installation of photovoltaic (PV) systems; (2) provide a functional description of materials used in the construction of selected photovoltaic systems in computerized format suitable for interactive updating in workshops or for future reviews; (3) provide a data base of statistics and production processes in machine accessible format for making this assessment and supporting future PV assessments; and (4) show the sensitivity of potential shortages to the size of the PV implementation scenario. The scope of the study includes the screening of 13 photovoltaic cells in a total of 15 system designs. Some cells are also included in concentrating systems at 500 suns and 30 suns. The systems all are based on the substitutions of various cells and concentrator devices into designs based on the Meade, Nebraska 25 kW installation. The system designs all include energy storage but the effect of deleting energy storage is also examined. The study methodology, results, and recommendations are presented in detail. (WHK)

Watts, R.L.; Gurwell, W.E.; Bloomster, C.H.; Smith, S.A.; Nelson, T.A.; Pawlewicz, W.W.

1978-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Evaluation of severe accident risks and the potential for risk reduction: Surry Power Station, Unit 1: Draft report for comment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Severe Accident Risk Reduction Program (SARRP) has completed a rebaselining of the risks to the public from a particular pressurized water reactor with a subatmospheric containment (Surry, Unit 1). Emphasis was placed on determining the magnitude and character of the uncertainties, rather than focusing on a point estimate. The risk-reduction potential of a set of proposed safety option backfits was also studied, and their costs and benefits were also evaluated. It was found that the risks from internal events are generally lower than previously evaluated in the Reactor Safety Study (RSS). However, certain unresolved issues (such as direct containment heating) caused the top of the uncertainty band to appear at a level that is comparable with the RSS point estimate. None of the postulated safety options appears to be cost effective for the Surry power plant. This work supports the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's assessment of severe accidents in NUREG-1150.

Benjamin, A.S.; Boyd, G.J.; Kunsman, D.M.; Murfin, W.B.; Williams, D.C.

1987-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Analysis of Potential Energy Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction of Home Appliances and Commercial Equipments in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

China has implemented a series of minimum energy performance standards (MEPS) for over 30 appliances, voluntary energy efficiency label for 40 products and a mandatory energy information label that covers 19 products to date. However, the impact of these programs and their savings potential has not been evaluated on a consistent basis. This paper uses modeling to estimate the energy saving and CO{sub 2} emission reduction potential of the appliances standard and labeling program for products for which standards are currently in place, under development or those proposed for development in 2010 under three scenarios that differ in the pace and stringency of MEPS development. In addition to a baseline 'Frozen Efficiency' scenario at 2009 MEPS level, the 'Continued Improvement Scenario' (CIS) reflects the likely pace of post-2009 MEPS revisions, and the likely improvement at each revision step. The 'Best Practice Scenario' (BPS) examined the potential of an achievement of international best practice efficiency in broad commercial use today in 2014. This paper concludes that under 'CIS', cumulative electricity consumption could be reduced by 9503 TWh, and annual CO{sub 2} emissions of energy used for all 37 products would be 16% lower than in the frozen efficiency scenario. Under a 'BPS' scenario for a subset of products, cumulative electricity savings would be 5450 TWh and annual CO{sub 2} emissions reduction of energy used for 11 appliances would be 35% lower.

Zhou, Nan; Fridley, David; McNeil, Michael; Zheng, Nina; Letschert, Virginie; Ke, Jing

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identifying reduction potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Analysis of Potential Energy Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction of Home Appliances and Commercial Equipments in China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

China is now the world's largest producer and consumer of household appliances and commercial equipment. To address the growth of electricity use of the appliances, China has implemented a series of minimum energy performance standards (MEPS) for 30 appliances, and voluntary energy efficiency label for 40 products. Further, in 2005, China started a mandatory energy information label that covers 19 products to date. However, the impact of these standard and labeling programs and their savings potential has not been evaluated on a consistent basis. This research involved modeling to estimate the energy saving and CO{sub 2} emission reduction potential of the appliances standard and labeling program for products for which standards are currently in place, or under development and those proposed for development in 2010. Two scenarios that have been developed differ primarily in the pace and stringency of MEPS development. The 'Continued Improvement Scenario' (CIS) reflects the likely pace of post-2009 MEPS revisions, and the likely improvement at each revision step considering the technical limitation of the technology. The 'Best Practice Scenario' (BPS) examined the potential of an achievement of international best practice MEPS in 2014. This paper concludes that under the 'CIS' of regularly scheduled MEPS revisions to 2030, cumulative electricity consumption could be reduced by 9503 TWh, and annual CO{sub 2} emissions would be 16% lower than in the frozen efficiency scenario. Under a 'BPS' scenario for a subset of products, cumulative electricity savings would be 5450 TWh and annual CO{sub 2} emissions reduction would be 35% lower than in the frozen scenario.

Zhou, Nan; Fridley, David; McNeill, Michael; Zheng, Nina; Letschert, Virginie; Ke, Jing; Saheb, Yamina

2010-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

62

A Potential Reduction Algorithm With User-Specified Phase I - Phase II Balance, for Solving a Linear Program from an Infeasible Warm Start  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper develops a potential reduction algorithm for solving a linear-programming problem directly from a "warm start" initial point that is neither feasible nor optimal. The algorithm is of an "interior point" variety ...

Freund, Robert M.

63

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Iron and Steel Industry in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

industry, encouraging widespread energy saving, emission reduction, increased steel scrap recycling rate,

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Potential of solar domestic hot water systems in rural areas for greenhouse gas emission reduction in Poland  

SciTech Connect

Application of solar energy for preparing domestic hot water is one of the easiest methods of utilization of this energy. At least part of the needs for warm tap water could be covered by solar systems. At present, mainly coal is used for water heating at dwellings in rural areas in Poland. Warm tap water consumption will increase significantly in the future as standards of living are improved. This can result in the growth of electricity use and an increase in primary fuel consumption. Present and future methods of warm sanitary water generation in rural areas in Poland is discussed, and associated greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are estimated. It is predicted that the emission of CO{sub 2} and NOx will increase. The emission of CO and CH{sub 4} will decrease because of changes in the structure of the final energy carriers used. The economic and market potentials of solar energy for preparing warm water in rural areas are discussed. It is estimated that solar systems can meet 30%-45% of the energy demand for warm water generation in rural areas at a reasonable cost, with a corresponding CO{sub 2} emission reduction. The rate of realization of the economic potential of solar water heaters depends on subsidies for the installation of equipment. 13 refs., 9 tabs.

Skowronski, P. [Polish Foundation for Energy Efficiency, Warsaw (Poland); Wisniewski, G. [Institute for Building, Mechanization and Electrification of Agriculture, Warsaw (Poland)

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Using PharmGKB to train text mining approaches for identifying potential gene targets for pharmacogenomic studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main objective of this study was to investigate the feasibility of using PharmGKB, a pharmacogenomic database, as a source of training data in combination with text of MEDLINE abstracts for a text mining approach to identification of potential gene ... Keywords: Gene-drug associations, Pathway-driven analysis, PharmGKB, Pharmacogenomics, Support vector machine, Text mining

S. Pakhomov; B. T. Mcinnes; J. Lamba; Y. Liu; G. B. Melton; Y. Ghodke; N. Bhise; V. Lamba; A. K. Birnbaum

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

ISD97, a computer program to analyze data from a series of in situ measurements on a grid and identify potential localized areas of elevated activity  

SciTech Connect

A computer program, ISD97, was developed to analyze data from a series of in situ measurements on a grid and identify potential localized areas of elevated activity. The ISD97 code operates using a two-step process. A deconvolution of the data is carried out using the maximum entropy method, and a map of activity on the ground that fits the data within experimental error is generated. This maximum entropy map is then analyzed to determine the locations and magnitudes of potential areas of elevated activity that are consistent with the data. New deconvolutions are then carried out for each potential area of elevated activity identified by the code. Properties of the algorithm are demonstrated using data from actual field measurements.

Reginatto, M.; Shebell, P.; Miller, K.M.

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Iron and Steel Industry in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emissions Reductionconsumption and related carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions.during Cumulative Carbon Dioxide Emission Reduction (MtCO

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Analysis of Potential Energy Saving and CO2 Emission Reduction of Home Appliances and Commercial Equipments in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficiency in Domestic Appliances and Lighting (EEDAL), 1:Reduction of Home Appliances and Commercial Equipments inSaheb Collaborative Labeling and Appliance Standards Program

Zhou, Nan

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Investigation of the Potential for Biofuel Blends in Residual Oil-Fired Power Generation Units as an Emissions Reduction Strategy for New York State  

SciTech Connect

There is a significant amount of oil, about 12.6 million barrels per year, used for power generation in New York State. The majority of it is residual oil. The primary reason for using residual oil probably is economic, as these fuels are cheaper than distillates. However, the stack emissions from the use of such fuels, especially in densely populated urban areas, can be a cause for concern. The emissions of concern include sulfur and nitrogen oxides and particulates, particularly PM 2.5. Blending with distillate (ASTM No.2) fuels may not reduce some or all of these emissions. Hence, a case can be made for blending with biofuels, such as biodiesel, as they tend to have very little fuel bound sulfur and nitrogen and have been shown in prior work at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to reduce NOx emissions as well in small boilers. Some of the research carried out at CANMET in Canada has shown potential reductions in PM with blending of biodiesel in distillate oil. There is also the benefit obtaining from the renewable nature of biofuels in reducing the net carbon dioxide emitted thus contributing to the reduction of green house gases that would otherwise be emitted to the atmosphere. The present project was conceived to examine the potential for such benefits of blending biofuels with residual oil. A collaboration was developed with personnel at the New York City Poletti Power Plant of the New York Power Authority. Their interest arose from an 800 MW power plant that was using residual oil and which was mandated to be shut down in 2010 because of environmental concerns. A blend of 20% biodiesel in residual oil had also been tested for a short period of about two days in that boiler a couple of years back. In this project, emission measurements including particulate measurements of PM2.5 were made in the commercial boiler test facility at BNL described below. Baseline tests were done using biodiesel as the blending biofuel. Biodiesel is currently and probably in the foreseeable future more expensive than residual fuel. So, another task was to explore potential alternative biofuels that might confer emission benefits similar to those of biodiesel, while being potentially significantly cheaper. Of course, for power plant use, availability in the required quantities is also a significant criterion. A subsidiary study to determine the effect of the temperature of the filter used to collect and measure the PM 2.5 emissions was conducted. This was done for reasons of accuracy in a residential boiler using distillate fuel blends. The present report details the results obtained in these tests with the baseline ASTM No. 6 fuel and blends of biodiesel with it as well as the results of the filter temperature study. The search for the alternative 'cheaper' biofuel identified a potential candidate, but difficulties encountered with the equipment during the testing prevented testing of the alternative biofuel.

Krishna, C.R.; McDonald, R.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Investigation of the Potential for Biofuel Blends in Residual Oil-Fired Power Generation Units as an Emissions Reduction Strategy for New York State  

SciTech Connect

There is a significant amount of oil, about 12.6 million barrels per year, used for power generation in New York State. The majority of it is residual oil. The primary reason for using residual oil probably is economic, as these fuels are cheaper than distillates. However, the stack emissions from the use of such fuels, especially in densely populated urban areas, can be a cause for concern. The emissions of concern include sulfur and nitrogen oxides and particulates, particularly PM 2.5. Blending with distillate (ASTM No.2) fuels may not reduce some or all of these emissions. Hence, a case can be made for blending with biofuels, such as biodiesel, as they tend to have very little fuel bound sulfur and nitrogen and have been shown in prior work at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to reduce NOx emissions as well in small boilers. Some of the research carried out at CANMET in Canada has shown potential reductions in PM with blending of biodiesel in distillate oil. There is also the benefit obtaining from the renewable nature of biofuels in reducing the net carbon dioxide emitted thus contributing to the reduction of green house gases that would otherwise be emitted to the atmosphere. The present project was conceived to examine the potential for such benefits of blending biofuels with residual oil. A collaboration was developed with personnel at the New York City Poletti Power Plant of the New York Power Authority. Their interest arose from an 800 MW power plant that was using residual oil and which was mandated to be shut down in 2010 because of environmental concerns. A blend of 20% biodiesel in residual oil had also been tested for a short period of about two days in that boiler a couple of years back. In this project, emission measurements including particulate measurements of PM2.5 were made in the commercial boiler test facility at BNL described below. Baseline tests were done using biodiesel as the blending biofuel. Biodiesel is currently and probably in the foreseeable future more expensive than residual fuel. So, another task was to explore potential alternative biofuels that might confer emission benefits similar to those of biodiesel, while being potentially significantly cheaper. Of course, for power plant use, availability in the required quantities is also a significant criterion. A subsidiary study to determine the effect of the temperature of the filter used to collect and measure the PM 2.5 emissions was conducted. This was done for reasons of accuracy in a residential boiler using distillate fuel blends. The present report details the results obtained in these tests with the baseline ASTM No. 6 fuel and blends of biodiesel with it as well as the results of the filter temperature study. The search for the alternative 'cheaper' biofuel identified a potential candidate, but difficulties encountered with the equipment during the testing prevented testing of the alternative biofuel.

Krishna, C.R.; McDonald, R.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Potential for Induced Seismicity Related to the Northern California CO2 Reduction Project Pilot Test, Solano County, California  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The objective of this technical report is to analyze the potential for induced seismicity due to a proposed small-scale CO{sub 2} injection project in the Montezuma Hills. We reviewed currently available public information, including 32 years of recorded seismic events, locations of mapped faults, and estimates of the stress state of the region. We also reviewed proprietary geological information acquired by Shell, including seismic reflection imaging in the area, and found that the data and interpretations used by Shell are appropriate and satisfactory for the purpose of this report. The closest known fault to the proposed injection site is the Kirby Hills Fault. It appears to be active, and microearthquakes as large as magnitude 3.7 have been associated with the fault near the site over the past 32 years. Most of these small events occurred 9-17 miles (15-28 km) below the surface, which is deep for this part of California. However, the geographic locations of the many events in the standard seismicity catalog for the area are subject to considerable uncertainty because of the lack of nearby seismic stations; so attributing the recorded earthquakes to motion along any specific fault is also uncertain. Nonetheless, the Kirby Hills Fault is the closest to the proposed injection site and is therefore our primary consideration for evaluating the potential seismic impacts, if any, from injection. Our planned installation of seismic monitoring stations near the site will greatly improve earthquake location accuracy. Shell seismic data also indicate two unnamed faults more than 3 miles east of the project site. These faults do not reach the surface as they are truncated by an unconformity at a depth of about 2,000 feet (610 m). The unconformity is identified as occurring during the Oligocene Epoch, 33.9-23.03 million years ago, which indicates that these faults are not currently active. Farther east are the Rio Vista Fault and Midland Fault at distances of about 6 miles (10 km) and 10 miles (16 km), respectively. These faults have been identified as active during the Quaternary (last 1.6 million years), but without evidence of displacement during the Holocene (the last 11,700 years). The stress state (both magnitude and direction) in the region is an important parameter in assessing earthquake potential. Although the available information regarding the stress state is limited in the area surrounding the injection well, the azimuth of the mean maximum horizontal stress is estimated at 41{sup o} and it is consistent with strike-slip faulting on the Kirby Hills Fault, unnamed fault segments to the south, and the Rio Vista Fault. However, there are large variations (uncertainty) in stress estimates, leading to low confidence in these conclusions regarding which fault segments are optimally oriented for potential slip induced by pressure changes. Uncertainty in the stress state can be substantially reduced by measurements planned when wells are drilled at the site. Injection of CO{sub 2} at about two miles depth will result in a reservoir fluid pressure increase, which is greatest at the well and decreases with distance from the well. After the injection stops, reservoir fluid pressures will decrease rapidly. Pressure changes have been predicted quantitatively by numerical simulation models of the injection. Based on these models, the pressure increase on the Kirby Hills Fault at its closest approach to the well due to the injection of 6,000 metric tons of CO{sub 2} would be a few pounds per square inch (psi), which is a tiny fraction of the natural pressure of approximately 5,000 psi at that depth. The likelihood of such a small pressure increase triggering a slip event is very small. It is even more unlikely that events would be induced at the significantly greater depths where most of the recorded earthquakes are concentrated, because it is unlikely that such a small pressure pulse would propagate downwards any appreciable distance. Therefore, in response to the specific question of the likelihood of the CO{sub 2} injection caus

Myer, L.; Chiaramonte, L.; Daley, T.M.; Wilson, D.; Foxall, W.; Beyer, J.H.

2010-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

72

A Big Response to a “Small” Problem: Identifying the Oxidative Potential of Nanomaterials and the Physicochemical Characteristics That Play a Role  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nanotechnology as a science is emerging rapidly. As materials are synthesized and utilized at the nanometer size scale, concerns of potential health and safety effects are arising. In an effort to elucidate the physicochemical characteristics of nanoparticles influential in toxicological studies, surface properties of metal oxide and carbonaceous nanoparticles were measured. These properties include zeta potential, dissolution and surface-bound chemical components. Subsequently, the role of these properties in oxidative stress was examined in vitro. This work identifies the influence that pH has on the zeta potential of nanoparticles. The zeta potential has the ability to alter colloidal stability, as the largest nanoparticle agglomerate is seen at or near the isoelectric point for each of the particles tested. Furthermore, it was observed that metal oxide nanoparticles which exhibit a charged surface at physiological pH, lead to decreased in vitro cellular viability as compared to those that were neutral. Thus, nanoparticle zeta potential may be an important factor to consider when attempting to predict nanoparticle toxicity. Real world exposure to nanoparticles is a mixture of various particulates and organics. Therefore, to simulate this particle mixture, iron oxide (Fe2O3) and engineered carbon black (ECB) were utilized in combination to identify potential synergistic reactions. Following in vitro exposure, both nanoparticle types are internalized into endosomes, where liberated Fe3+ reacts with hydroquinone moieties on the ECB surface yielding Fe2+. This bioavailable iron may then generate oxidative stress through intracellular pathways including the Fenton reaction. As oxidative stress is common in particulate toxicology, a comparison between the antioxidant defenses of epithelial (A549) and mesothelial (MeT-5A) cell lines was made. The A549 cell line exhibits alterations in the NRF2-KEAP1 transcription factor system and therefore retains high basal levels of phase II antioxidants. Both cell types were exposed to 33 nm silica where intracellular oxidant generation coupled with markers of oxidative stress were observed. While the MeT-5A cells exhibited a decrease in cell viability, the A549 cell line did not. Therefore, proper characterization of both material and biological systems prior to toxicity testing will help to further define the risks associated with the use of nanotechnology.

Berg, James Michael

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Iron and Steel Industry in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

potential and costs of energy- efficiency improvements bypotentials and the cost of energy-efficiency measures andand Cost Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Conceptual study: potential energy savings based on reduction of pressure in the ANL-east central heating system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Retrofitting existing Central Heating Systems to deliver steam at lower pressure and where necessary retrofitting end users to perform satisfactorily at the lower pressure, is examined in terms of engineering approaches and economic effectiveness. In addition to investigating the savings obtainable through reduction of thermal and leakage losses, other energy conservation opportunities related to reduction of steam pressure are considered. The latter includes less boiler blowdown, less energy used pumping feedwater, less steam vented from the deaerator, reduced boiler maintenance and repair requirements, and cogeneration of electricity by steam or gas turbines. Methodology and practical recommendations are presented that, although related directly to Argonne, are applicable to other facilities. Energy savings are estimated as up to 10%, and payback period as in the range of two to four years.

Minkov, V.; Hirsch, P.

1982-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

China's Pathways to Achieving 40% ~ 45% Reduction in CO{sub 2} Emissions per Unit of GDP in 2020: Sectoral Outlook and Assessment of Savings Potential  

SciTech Connect

Achieving China’s goal of reducing its carbon intensity (CO{sub 2} per unit of GDP) by 40% to 45% percent below 2005 levels by 2020 will require the strengthening and expansion of energy efficiency policies across the buildings, industries and transport sectors. This study uses a bottom-up, end-use model and two scenarios -- an enhanced energy efficiency (E3) scenario and an alternative maximum technically feasible energy efficiency improvement (Max Tech) scenario – to evaluate what policies and technical improvements are needed to achieve the 2020 carbon intensity reduction target. The findings from this study show that a determined approach by China can lead to the achievement of its 2020 goal. In particular, with full success in deepening its energy efficiency policies and programs but following the same general approach used during the 11th Five Year Plan, it is possible to achieve 49% reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions per unit of GDP (CO{sub 2} emissions intensity) in 2020 from 2005 levels (E3 case). Under the more optimistic but feasible assumptions of development and penetration of advanced energy efficiency technology (Max Tech case), China could achieve a 56% reduction in CO{sub 2} emissions intensity in 2020 relative to 2005 with cumulative reduction of energy use by 2700 Mtce and of CO{sub 2} emissions of 8107 Mt CO{sub 2} between 2010 and 2020. Energy savings and CO{sub 2} mitigation potential varies by sector but most of the energy savings potential is found in energy-intensive industry. At the same time, electricity savings and the associated emissions reduction are magnified by increasing renewable generation and improving coal generation efficiency, underscoring the dual importance of end-use efficiency improvements and power sector decarbonization.

Zheng, Nina; Fridley, David; Zhou, Nan; Levine, Mark; Price, Lynn; Ke, Jing

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

76

Assessment of Energy Efficiency Improvement and CO2 Emission Reduction Potentials in the Iron and Steel Industry in China  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potentials in the Iron and steel Industry in China. Reportfor the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry. An ENERGY STAR Guidein the U.S. Iron and Steel Industry. Report LBNL-41724.

Hasanbeigi, Ali

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Some potential material supply constraints in solar systems for heating and cooling of buildings and process heat. (A preliminary screening to identify critical materials)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nine Solar Heating and Cooling of Buildings (SHACOB) designs and three Agricultural and Industrial Process Heat (AIPH) designs have been studied to identify potential future material constraints to their large scale installation and use. The nine SHACOB and three AIPH systems were screened and found to be free of serious future material constraints. The screening was carried out for each individual system design assuming 500 million m/sup 2/ of collector area installed by the year 2000. Also, two mixed design scenarios, containing equal portions of each system design, were screened. To keep these scenarios in perspective, note that a billion m/sup 2/ containing a mixture of the nine SHACOB designs will yield an annual solar contribution of about 1.3 Quads or will displace about 4.2 Quads of fossil fuel used to generate electricity. For AIPH a billion square meters of the mixed designs will yield about 2.8 Quads/year. Three materials were identified that could possibly restrain the deployment of solar systems in the specific scenarios investigated. They are iron and steel, soda lime glass and polyvinyl fluoride. All three of these materials are bulk materials. No raw material supply constraints were found.

Watts, R.L.; Gurwell, W.E.; Nelson, T.A.; Smith, S.A.

1979-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Potential  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and and Frictional Drag on a Floating Sphere in a Flowing Plasma I. H. Hutchinson Plasma Science and Fusion Center Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA The interaction of an ion-collecting sphere at floating potential with a flowing colli- sionless plasma is investigated using the "Specialized Coordinate Electrostatic Particle and Thermals In Cell" particle-in-cell code SCEPTIC[1, 2]. Code calculations are given of potential and the total force exerted on the sphere by the flowing plasma. This force is of crucial importance to the problem of dusty plasmas, and the present results are the first for a collisionless plasma to take account of the full self-consistent potential. They reveal discrepancies amounting to as large as 20% with the standard analytic expressions, in parameter regimes where the analytic approximations might have been expected

79

The Use of Conditional Probability Functions and Potential Source Contribution Functions to Identify Source Regions and Advection Pathways of Hydrocarbon Emissions in Houston, Texas  

SciTech Connect

In this study, we demonstrate the utility of conditional probability functions (CPFs), potential source contribution functions (PSCFs), and hierarchical clustering analysis to identify the source region and transport pathways of hydrocarbons measured at five photochemical assessment monitoring stations (PAMS) near the Houston ship channel from June to October 2003. Over 50 volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations were measured on the hourly collected samples. Routine surface observations of wind directions measured at each of the receptor sites were used extensively. We show that VOCs with similar CPF patterns likely have common transport pathways. This was established with the multivariate technique, which uses the hierarchical clustering analysis to allow clusters of groups of VOCs to form with similar CPF patterns. This method revealed that alkenes, and in particular those with geometric isomers such as cis-/trans-2-butene and cis-/trans-2-pentene, have similar CPF patterns. The alkane isomers often show CPF patterns among themselves, and similarly, aromatic compounds often show similar patterns among themselves too. We also show how trajectory information can be used in conjunction with the PSCF analysis to produce a graphic analysis suggesting specific source areas for a given VOC. The use of these techniques in the chemically and meteorologically complex environment of Houston, Texas, suggests its further utility in other areas with relatively simpler conditions.

Xie, YuLong; Berkowitz, Carl M.

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

Greenhouse gas and air pollutant emission reduction potentials of renewable energy - case studies on photovoltaic and wind power introduction considering interactions among technologies in Taiwan  

SciTech Connect

To achieve higher energy security and lower emission of greenhouse gases (GHGs) and pollutants, the development of renewable energy has attracted much attention in Taiwan. In addition to its contribution to the enhancement of reliable indigenous resources, the introduction of renewable energy such as photovoltaic (PV) and wind power systems reduces the emission of GHGs and air pollutants by substituting a part of the carbon- and pollutant-intensive power with power generated by methods that are cleaner and less carbon-intensive. To evaluate the reduction potentials, consequential changes in the operation of different types of existing power plants have to be taken into account. In this study, a linear mathematical programming model is constructed to simulate a power mix for a given power demand in a power market sharing a cost-minimization objective. By applying the model, the emission reduction potentials of capacity extension case studies, including the enhancement of PV and wind power introduction at different scales, were assessed. In particular, the consequences of power mix changes in carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides, sulfur oxides, and particulates were discussed. Seasonally varying power demand levels, solar irradiation, and wind strength were taken into account. In this study, we have found that the synergetic reduction of carbon dioxide emission induced by PV and wind power introduction occurs under a certain level of additional installed capacity. Investigation of a greater variety of case studies on scenario development with emerging power sources becomes possible by applying the model developed in this study. 15 refs., 8 figs., 11 tabs.

Yu-Ming Kuo; Yasuhiro Fukushima [National Cheng Kung University, Tainan City (Taiwan). Department of Environmental Engineering

2009-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identifying reduction potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Energy transport corridors: the potential role of Federal lands in states identified by the Energy Policy Act of 2005, section 368(b).  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

On August 8, 2005, the President signed the Energy Policy Act of 2005 (EPAct) into law. In Subtitle F of EPAct, Congress set forth various provisions that would change the way certain federal agencies (Agencies) coordinate to authorize the use of land for a variety of energy-related purposes. As part of Subtitle F of EPAct, Section 368 addresses the issue of energy transportation corridors on federal land for oil, gas, and hydrogen pipelines, as well as electricity transmission and distribution facilities. Because of the critical importance of improving the nation's electrical transmission grid, Congress recognized that electricity transmission issues should receive added attention when the Agencies address corridor location and analysis issues. In Section 368, Congress specifically directed the Agencies to consider the need for upgraded and new facilities to deliver electricity: In carrying out [Section 368], the Secretaries shall take into account the need for upgraded and new electricity transmission and distribution facilities to (1) improve reliability; (2) relieve congestion; and (3) enhance capability of the national grid to deliver electricity. Section 368 does not require the Agencies to consider or approve specific projects, applications for rights-of-way (ROWs), or other permits within designated energy corridors. Importantly, Section 368 does not direct, license, or otherwise permit any on-the-ground activity of any sort. If an applicant is interested in obtaining an authorization to develop a project within any corridor designated under Section 368, the applicant would have to apply for a ROW authorization and applicable permits. The Agencies would consider each application by applying appropriate project-specific reviews under requirements of laws and related regulations, including, but not limited to, the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), the Clean Water Act, the Clean Air Act, Section 7 of the Endangered Species Act (ESA), and Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA). Under Section 368, Congress divided the United States into two groups of states: the 11 contiguous western states and the remaining states. Direction for energy transportation corridor analysis and selection in the 11 western states was addressed in Section 368(a) of EPAct, while direction for energy transportation corridor analysis and selection in all other states was addressed under Section 368(b) of EPAct. It was clearly the priority of Congress to conduct corridor location studies and designation first on federal lands in the western states. Under Section 368(a), the Agencies produced a programmatic environmental impact statement (EIS), Designation of Energy Corridors on Federal Land in the 11 Western States (DOE and DOI 2008), that was used in part as the basis for designating more than 6,000 mi (9,656 km) of energy transportation corridors on federal land in 11 western states. Under Section 368(a) of EPAct, Congress clearly stated the Agencies needed to (1) designate energy transportation corridors on federal land, (2) conduct the necessary environmental review of the designated corridors, and (3) incorporate the designated corridors into the appropriate land use plans. Congressional direction under Section 368(b) of EPAct differs from that provided under Section 368(a). Specifically, Section 368(b) requires the secretaries of the Agencies, in consultation with the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC), affected utility industries, and other interested persons, to jointly: (1) Identify corridors for oil, gas, and hydrogen pipelines and electricity transmission and distribution facilities on federal land in states other than the 11 western states identified under Section 368(a) of EPAct, and (2) Schedule prompt action to identify, designate, and incorporate the corridors into the applicable land use plans. While Section 368(a) clearly directs designation as a necessary first step for energy transportation corridors in the 11 western states, Section 368(b) directs the Agencies to first identify corridor

Krummel, J.; Hlohowskyj, I.; Kuiper, J.; Kolpa, R.; Moore, R.; May, J.; VanKuiken, J.C.; Kavicky, J.A.; McLamore, M.R.; Shamsuddin, S. (Decision and Information Sciences); ( EVS)

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

Analysis of Energy, Environmental and Life Cycle Cost Reduction Potential of Ground Source Heat Pump (GSHP) in Hot and Humid Climate  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

It has been widely recognized that the energy saving benefits of GSHP systems are best realized in the northern and central regions where heating needs are dominant or both heating and cooling loads are comparable. For hot and humid climate such as in the states of FL, LA, TX, southern AL, MS, GA, NC and SC, buildings have much larger cooling needs than heating needs. The Hybrid GSHP (HGSHP) systems therefore have been developed and installed in some locations of those states, which use additional heat sinks (such as cooling tower, domestic water heating systems) to reject excess heat. Despite the development of HGSHP the comprehensive analysis of their benefits and barriers for wide application has been limited and often yields non-conclusive results. In general, GSHP/HGSHP systems often have higher initial costs than conventional systems making short-term economics unattractive. Addressing these technical and financial barriers call for additional evaluation of innovative utility programs, incentives and delivery approaches. From scientific and technical point of view, the potential for wide applications of GSHP especially HGSHP in hot and humid climate is significant, especially towards building zero energy homes where the combined energy efficient GSHP and abundant solar energy production in hot climate can be an optimal solution. To address these challenges, this report presents gathering and analyzing data on the costs and benefits of GSHP/HGSHP systems utilized in southern states using a representative sample of building applications. The report outlines the detailed analysis to conclude that the application of GSHP in Florida (and hot and humid climate in general) shows a good potential.

Yong X. Tao; Yimin Zhu

2012-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

83

Allocation Reductions  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Allocation Allocation Reductions Quarterly Allocation Reductions MPP (or computational) repositories that haven't used significant amounts of time are adjusted at certain times by transferring a part of the unused balance to the corresponding DOE Office reserve. The following schedule will be used for allocation year 2014 (which runs 14 January 2014 through 132January 2015). On April 9: if usage is less than 10% remove 25% of the unused balance On July 9: if usage is less than 25% remove 25% of the unused balance if usage is less than 10% remove 50% of the unused balance On October 8: if usage is less than 50% remove 25% of the unused balance if usage is less than 25% remove 75% of the unused balance if usage is less than 10% remove 90% of the unused balance On November 5:

84

Identifying cost reduction and performance improvement opportunities through simulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During difficult economic times, companies have few positive cost reducing options that simultaneously improve operational performance. This paper addresses how Deloitte Consulting partnered with Simio LLC to model multiple process improvement opportunities ...

J. Ethan Brown; David Sturrock

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Study of Potential Cost Reductions Resulting from Super-Large-Scale Manufacturing of PV Modules: Final Subcontract Report, 7 August 2003--30 September 2004  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Hewlett Packard has created a design for a ''Solar City'' factory that will process 30 million sq. meters of glass panels per year and produce 2.1-3.6 GW of solar panels per year-100x the volume of a typical, thin-film, solar panel manufacturer in 2004. We have shown that with a reasonable selection of materials, and conservative assumptions, this ''Solar City'' can produce solar panels and hit the price target of $1.00 per peak watt (6.5x-8.5x lower than prices in 2004) as the total price for a complete and installed rooftop (or ground mounted) solar energy system. This breakthrough in the price of solar energy comes without the need for any significant new invention. It comes entirely from the manufacturing scale of a large plant and the cost savings inherent in operating at such a large manufacturing scale. We expect that further optimizations from these simple designs will lead to further improvements in cost. The manufacturing process and cost depend on the choice for the active layer that converts sunlight into electricity. The efficiency by which sunlight is converted into electricity can range from 7% to 15%. This parameter has a large effect on the overall price per watt. There are other impacts, as well, and we have attempted to capture them without creating undue distractions. Our primary purpose is to demonstrate the impact of large-scale manufacturing. This impact is largely independent of the choice of active layer. It is not our purpose to compare the pro's and con's for various types of active layers. Significant improvements in cost per watt can also come from scientific advances in active layers that lead to higher efficiency. But, again, our focus is on manufacturing gains and not on the potential advances in the basic technology.

Keshner, M. S.; Arya, R.

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Investigating the potential for long-term permeable reactive barrier (PRB) monitoring from the electrical signatures associated with the reduction in reactive iron performance  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this work was to conduct laboratory and field experiments to determine the sensitivity of low frequency electrical measurements (resistivity and induced polarization) to the processes of corrosion and precipitation that are believed to limit permeable reactive barrier (PRB) performance. The research was divided into four sets of experiments that were each written up and submitted to a peer-reviewed journal: [1] A laboratory experiment to define the controls of aqueous chemistry (electrolyte activity; pH; valence) and total zero valent iron (Fe0) available surface area on the electrical properties of Fe0 columns. [2] A laboratory experiment to determine the impact of corrosion and precipitation on the electrical response of synthetic Fe0 columns as a result of geochemical reactions with NaSO4 and NaCO3 electrolytes. [3] Laboratory experiments on a sequence of cores retrieved from the Kansas City PRB to determine the magnitude of electrical and geochemical changes within a field active PRB after eight years of operation [4] Field-scale cross borehole resistivity and induced polarization monitoring of the Kansas City PRB to evaluate the potential of electrical imaging as a technology for non-invasive, long-term monitoring of indicators of reduced PRB performance This report first summarizes the findings of the four major experiments conducted under this research. The reader is referred to the four papers in Appendices 1-4 for a full description of each experiment, including motivation and significance, technical details, findings and implications. The deliverables of the project, including the publications, conference papers and new collaborative arrangements that have resulted are then described. Appendices 5-6 contain two technical reports written by co-PI Korte describing (1) supporting geochemical measurements, and (2) the coring procedure, conducted at the Kansas City PRB as part of this project.

Slater, Lee D.; Korte, N.; Baker, J.

2005-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

87

Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Reduction Strategies for Vehicles and Mobile  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Vehicles and Vehicles and Mobile Equipment Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Reduction Strategies for Vehicles and Mobile Equipment October 7, 2013 - 11:48am Addthis YOU ARE HERE: Step 3 Reducing petroleum consumption is the principal means to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from vehicles and mobile equipment. Each agency has the flexibility to evaluate a variety of options to ensure its strategy best fits the mission and makeup of its fleets. The purpose of this evaluation is to: Identify strategies that will best encourage the reduction of petroleum use in Federal vehicles Estimate the GHG reduction potential and cost effectiveness of these strategies. Next Step After evaluating GHG reduction strategies, the next step in the GHG mitigation planning for vehicles and mobile equipment is to estimate the

88

South Africa - Greenhouse Gas Emission Baselines and Reduction...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Africa - Greenhouse Gas Emission Baselines and Reduction Potentials from Buildings Jump to: navigation, search Name South Africa - Greenhouse Gas Emission Baselines and Reduction...

89

Magnesium Components Achieve Weight Reduction and Fuel Savings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cast mag- nesium can achieve consider- able weight reduction advantages over both steel and aluminum. Furthermore, this favorable weight reduction potential can enable...

90

ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

affordable, and reliable energy services and products to consumption of energy, goods, and services by  California consumption of energy, goods, and services by  California 

Masanet, Eric

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

help California energy and policy analysts better assess end use detail  allows energy and policy analysts to better which would allow energy and policy analysts to better 

Masanet, Eric

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Residential Appliance Saturation Survey  Database.  Residential Appliance Saturation  Survey (RASS) database (

Masanet, Eric

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heating Elec: Industrial refrigeration Petr: Agricultural estimates for industrial HVAC, refrigeration, and  lighting Commercial Refrigeration NG: Industrial process heating

Masanet, Eric

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Renewable Energy Technologies   Transportation   Assessment Department of Energy, Industrial Technologies Program, Department of Energy, Industrial Technologies Program, 

Masanet, Eric

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

7: Estimated annual supply chain natural gas related GHG7: Estimated annual supply chain natural gas related GHGTotal Indirect ? supply chain Direct ? natural gas Direct ?

Masanet, Eric

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heating Dryer Range/oven Pool heating Spa heating TotalWater heating Space heating Range/oven Dryer Pool/spa Water heating Outdoor lighting Microwave Range/oven Clothes 

Masanet, Eric

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A/C Clothes washer Dishwasher First refrigerator Freezerenabled ENERGY STAR dishwashers, fryers, hot food holding

Masanet, Eric

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Flour milling and malt  manufacturing   Fats and oils refining and  blending   Breakfast cereal  manufacturing   Sugar cane mills 

Masanet, Eric

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

ASSESSMENT OF HOUSEHOLD CARBON FOOTPRINT REDUCTION POTENTIALS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Use Facility HVAC CHP and/or Cogeneration Process FacilityBoiler Use CHP and/or Cogeneration Process Facility HVAC Endby process heating, cogeneration, and steam systems  in the 

Masanet, Eric

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Reduction potential of the sulfhydryl radical: Pulse radiolysis and laser flash photolysis studies of the formation and reactions of {sm_bullet}SH and HSSH{sm_bullet}{sup {minus}} in aqueous solutions  

SciTech Connect

H{sub 2}S, which is a very toxic gas, has a large number of natural and anthropogenic sources, and the safe removal of this substance has been a matter of ongoing industrial concern. Formation and reactions of the {sm_bullet}SH/{sm_bullet}S{sup {minus}} and HSSH{sm_bullet}{sup {minus}}/HSS{sm_bullet}{sup 2{minus}} radicals in aqueous solutions have been studied by excimer laser flash photolysis and by pulse radiolysis. Acidic H{sub 2}S solutions can be photolyzed with 193 nm laser pulses and produce a transient species with {lambda}{sub max} at 240 nm, ascribed to the {sm_bullet}SH/{sm_bullet}S{sup {minus}} radical. Solutions of SH{sup {minus}} can be photolyzed also with 248 nm laser pulses to produce the {sm_bullet}SH/{sm_bullet}S{sup {minus}} reacts with SH{sup {minus}} ({kappa}{sub f} = 4 {times} 10{sup 9} L/mol s, {kappa}{sub r} = 5 {times} 10{sup 5} s{sup {minus}1}) to form HSSH{sm_bullet}{sup {minus}}/HSS{sm_bullet}{sup 2{minus}}, with {lambda}{sub max} at 380 nm. Both {sm_bullet}SH/{sm_bullet}S{sup {minus}} and HSSH{sm_bullet}{sup {minus}}/HSS{sm_bullet}{sup 2{minus}} react rapidly with O{sub 2}; the former produces SO{sub 2}{sm_bullet}{sup {minus}} ({kappa} = 5 {times} 10{sup 9} L/mol s), and the latter produces O{sub 2}{sm_bullet} ({kappa} = 4 {times} 10{sup 8} L/mol s). Both radicals react with olefinic compounds. The monomeric radical oxidizes Fe(CN){sub 6}{sup 4{minus}}, SO{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}, ClO{sub 2}{sup {minus}}, and chlorpromazine. The dimeric radical is a weaker oxidant toward ferrocyanide but reduces N-methylpyridinium compounds. The reduction potential for the dimeric radical at pH 7 was determined from one-electron transfer equilibria with Mo(CN){sub 8}{sup 3{minus}} and with the 4-methoxyaniline radical cation and found to be 0.69 V vs NHE. From the equilibrium constant K = [HSS{sm_bullet}{sup 2{minus}}]/[SH{sup {minus}}][{sm_bullet}S{sup {minus}}] = 8 {times} 10{sup 3} L/mol, the reduction potential for ({sm_bullet}S{sup {minus}},H{sup +}/SH{sup {minus}}) is calculated to be 0.92 V.

Das, T.N.; Huie, R.E.; Neta, P.; Padmaja, S. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States). Physical and Chemical Properties Div.

1999-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identifying reduction potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Reduction Strategies for Employee Commuting |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Employee Commuting Employee Commuting Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Reduction Strategies for Employee Commuting October 7, 2013 - 2:25pm Addthis YOU ARE HERE Step 3 This section will help agencies to determine the most visible alternatives to single occupancy vehicle (SOV) commuting at the agencies major worksites establish the number of employees that may reasonably switch to non-SOV methods and estimate the resulting impact greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions at their worksites. Learn how to: Identify relevant alternatives and supporting strategies Evaluate potential adoption of alternatives Estimate the GHG emission impact Identify Employee Commuting Alternatives Alternative employee commuting approaches for Federal agency consideration include both alternative travel methods and alternative work arrangements.

102

Thermochemical nitrate reduction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A series of preliminary experiments was conducted directed at thermochemically converting nitrate to nitrogen and water. Nitrates are a major constituent of the waste stored in the underground tanks on the Hanford Site, and the characteristics and effects of nitrate compounds on stabilization techniques must be considered before permanent disposal operations begin. For the thermochemical reduction experiments, six reducing agents (ammonia, formate, urea, glucose, methane, and hydrogen) were mixed separately with {approximately}3 wt% NO{sub 3}{sup {minus}} solutions in a buffered aqueous solution at high pH (13); ammonia and formate were also mixed at low pH (4). Reactions were conducted in an aqueous solution in a batch reactor at temperatures of 200{degrees}C to 350{degrees}C and pressures of 600 to 2800 psig. Both gas and liquid samples were analyzed. The specific components analyzed were nitrate, nitrite, nitrous oxide, nitrogen, and ammonia. Results of experimental runs showed the following order of nitrate reduction of the six reducing agents in basic solution: formate > glucose > urea > hydrogen > ammonia {approx} methane. Airnmonia was more effective under acidic conditions than basic conditions. Formate was also effective under acidic conditions. A more thorough, fundamental study appears warranted to provide additional data on the mechanism of nitrate reduction. Furthermore, an expanded data base and engineering feasibility study could be used to evaluate conversion conditions for promising reducing agents in more detail and identify new reducing agents with improved performance characteristics.

Cox, J.L.; Lilga, M.A.; Hallen, R.T.

1992-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: DOD-DOE Aircraft Petroleum Use Reduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOD-DOE Aircraft Petroleum Use Reduction Workshop DOD-DOE Aircraft Petroleum Use Reduction Workshop The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Fuel Cell Technologies Office and the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) held a workshop on September 30, 2010, in Washington, DC, to discuss the potential for fuel cells to reduce aircraft petroleum use. Workshop objectives were to discuss collaboration across DOD and DOE in keeping with the DOD-DOE Memorandum of Understanding (MOU), to motivate RD&D for auxiliary power unit (APU) applications and identify R&D challenges, and to identify next steps and potential collaboration opportunities. Workshop Agenda Aircraft Petroleum Use Reduction Workshop Agenda Workshop Proceedings Report of the DOD-DOE Workshop on Fuel Cells in Aviation: Workshop Summary and Action Plan

104

SF6 Emission Reduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SF 6 Emission Reduction Steve Lowder Bonneville Power Administration 2010.09 slide 1 Emission Reduction Emission Reduction is the reason for why we do all of this - because:...

105

Gas pressure reduction circuits  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This note describes passive pressure reduction devices for use with sensitive instruments. Two gas circuits are developed which not only provide a pressure reduction under flow demand

D. W. Guillaume; D. DeVries

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Roasting, Reduction and Smelting  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mar 6, 2013 ... Researches on Reduction Roasting of Low-grade Manganese Oxide Ores Using Biomass Charcoal as Reductant: Yuanbo Zhang1; Daoxian ...

107

Metal alloy identifier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

To identify the composition of a metal alloy, sparks generated from the alloy are optically observed and spectrographically analyzed. The spectrographic data, in the form of a full-spectrum plot of intensity versus wavelength, provide the "signature" of the metal alloy. This signature can be compared with similar plots for alloys of known composition to establish the unknown composition by a positive match with a known alloy. An alternative method is to form intensity ratios for pairs of predetermined wavelengths within the observed spectrum and to then compare the values of such ratios with similar values for known alloy compositions, thereby to positively identify the unknown alloy composition.

Riley, William D. (Avondale, MD); Brown, Jr., Robert D. (Avondale, MD)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Identifying heavy Higgs bosons  

SciTech Connect

Two techniques for identifying heavy Higgs bosons produced at SSC energies are discussed. In the first, the Higgs boson decays into ZZ, with one Z decaying into an e-pair or ..mu..-pair and the other into a neutrino pair. In the second, the production of the Higgs boson by WW fusion is tagged by detecting the quarks that produced the bremsstrahlung virtual W's. The associated Higgs decay is identified by one leptonic and one hadronic decay. Both methods appear capable of finding a heavy Higgs boson provided the SSC design parameters are achieved. 16 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Cahn, R.N.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Most Commonly Identified Recommendations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Most Commonly Identified Recommendations Most Commonly Identified Recommendations DOE ITP In Depth ITP Energy Assessment Webcast Presented by: Dr. Bin Wu, Director, Professor of Industrial Engineering Dr. Sanjeev Khanna, Assistant Director, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering With Contribution From MO IAC Student Engineers: Chatchai Pinthuprapa Jason Fox Yunpeng Ren College of Engineering, University of Missouri. April 16, 2009 Missouri Industrial Assessment Center Missouri IAC is one of the 26 centers founded by the U.S. DOE in the nation. Since its establishment in 2005, we have been working closely with the MoDNR, the MU University Extension, utility providers in the state, etc, to provide education, development and services in industrial energy efficiency. Our services (audits, workshops, etc), have already covered many locations across the state of Missouri.

110

Aluminum Reduction Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increasing the Power Modulation Window of Aluminium Smelter Pots with Shell Heat Exchanger Technology · Initiatives To Reduction Of Aluminum Potline ...

111

Aluminum Reduction Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 31, 2011 ... GHG Measurement and Inventory for Aluminum Production · HEX Retrofit Enables Smelter Capacity Expansion · HF Emission Reduction from ...

112

Cobalt Reduction Sourcebook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many nuclear utilities have a cobalt reduction plan in place for each plant. However, establishing a cobalt reduction plan is a challenging and often plant-specific task. This document seeks to provide a general approach to not only minimizing elemental cobalt transport to Boiling Water Reactors (BWR) and Pressurized Water Reactors (PWR) reactors, but also to help prioritize cobalt reduction actions for optimum dose rate reduction.

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

113

MCNP variance reduction overview  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The MCNP code is rich in variance reduction features. Standard variance reduction methods found in most Monte Carlo codes are available as well as a number of methods unique to MCNP. We discuss the variance reduction features presently in MCNP as well as new ones under study for possible inclusion in future versions of the code.

Hendricks, J.S.; Booth, T.E.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Two hundred Energy Savings Assessments identified potential annual  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Program. For the DOE programs and other customers, the team supports energy management decisions efficiency opportunities · Development and maintenance of tools for making energy efficiency decisions testing to support deployment · Development and management of program performance metrics to measure

115

Recycling, Source Reduction,  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Type:" ,"Emission Reductions by Gas in U.S. Units:" ,"Year","Carbon Dioxide (CO2)",,"Methane (CH4)",,"Perfluoromethane (CF4)",,"Perfluoroethane (C2F6)" ,,"short...

116

Aluminum Reduction Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Increased Energy Efficiency and Reduced HF Emissions with New Heat Exchanger · Industrial Test of Low-voltage Energy-saving Aluminum Reduction ...

117

Lattice Reduction - CECM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lattice reduction`);" }} {PARA 0 "> " 0 "" {MPLTEXT 1 0 6 " fi;" }}{PARA 0 "> " 0 "" { MPLTEXT 1 0 13 " if dd then" }}{PARA 0 "> " 0 "" {MPLTEXT 1 0 27 " \\+ uu ...

118

PAPERWORK REDUCTION ACT SUBMISSION  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

19. Certification for Paperwork Reduction Act Submissions On behalf of this Federal agency, I certify that the collection of information encompassed ...

119

DOD-DOE Aircraft Petroleum Use Reduction Workshop Agenda  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

DOD-DOE Workshop DOD-DOE Workshop Aircraft Petroleum Use Reduction: Can Fuel Cells be a Game Changer? U.S. Department of Energy, Washington, DC 4 th Floor Conference Room (4A-104) September 30, 2010 8:30 am to 5 pm Agenda 8:30 am Welcome, introductions and mtg logistics: Pete Devlin (DOE EERE FCTP) Overall Purpose * To begin discussing collaboration across DOD and DOE in keeping with the MOU * To motivate RD&D for APU applications and identify R&D challenges * To identify the next steps and potential collaboration Background Materials Provided * DOD-DOE MOU * NASA/UTC SOFC APU Feasibility Study for Long Range Commercial Aircraft 9:00 am DOE Perspective - Henry Kelly (US DOE Dep. Principal Asst. Sect. of Energy) 9:15 am MOU Overview - Richard Kidd (DOE EERE FEMP)

120

Novel reactions of a neutral organic reductant : reductive coupling and nanoparticle synthesis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A recently developed bis-pyridinylidene neutral organic electron donor captured our interest as a potential source of new chemistries for reductive coupling and the synthesis of group IV nanoparticles. This super electron ...

Mork, Anna Jolene

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identifying reduction potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Particle Data Group - PDG Identifiers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PDG Identifiers PDG Identifiers PDG Identifiers are references to items of PDG data such as particles, particle properties, decay modes and review articles. Once defined, a PDG Identifier is guaranteed to not change and can thus be used in other systems as a permanent reference to PDG data. Note that although the meaning of a given PDG Identifier will not change, there is no guarantee that the corresponding data will be included into future editions of the Review of Particle Physics. Each PDG Identifier consists of a single string without embedded spaces. PDG Identifiers are not case-sensitive. More details on PDG Identifiers can be found in this proposal. Future versions of pdgLive will directly support PDG Identifiers both for viewing and for downloading the data associated with a given PDG Identifier.

122

Operator strength reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Operator strength reduction is a technique that improves compiler-generated code by reformulating certain costly computations in terms of less expensive ones. A common case arises in array addressing expressions used in loops. The compiler can replace ... Keywords: loops, static single assignment form, strength reduction

Keith D. Cooper; L. Taylor Simpson; Christopher A. Vick

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Transparent partial order reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Partial Order Reduction (POR) techniques improve the basic model checking algorithm by reducing the numbers of states and transitions explored in verifying a property of the model. In the "ample set" POR framework for the verification of an LTL¿X ... Keywords: Invisibility, Model checking, Partial order reduction, Transparent, Verification

Stephen F. Siegel

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

The reduction of packaging waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Nationwide, packaging waste comprises approximately one-third of the waste disposed in sanitary landfills. the US Department of Energy (DOE) generated close to 90,000 metric tons of sanitary waste. With roughly one-third of that being packaging waste, approximately 30,000 metric tons are generated per year. The purpose of the Reduction of Packaging Waste project was to investigate opportunities to reduce this packaging waste through source reduction and recycling. The project was divided into three areas: procurement, onsite packaging and distribution, and recycling. Waste minimization opportunities were identified and investigated within each area, several of which were chosen for further study and small-scale testing at the Hanford Site. Test results, were compiled into five ``how-to`` recipes for implementation at other sites. The subject of the recipes are as follows: (1) Vendor Participation Program; (2) Reusable Containers System; (3) Shrink-wrap System -- Plastic and Corrugated Cardboard Waste Reduction; (4) Cardboard Recycling ; and (5) Wood Recycling.

Raney, E.A.; Hogan, J.J.; McCollom, M.L.; Meyer, R.J.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Aluminum Reduction Technology  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 15, 2013... and academia from all over the world meet each other and share information. ... Trend and market demand, Energy saving initiatives in Reduction Process, ... An improved finite element model for thermal balance analysis of ...

126

Reduction-in-Force  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Reduction in force (RIF) is a set of regulations and procedures that are used to determine whether an employee keeps his or her present position, or whether the employee has a right to another...

127

Human Error Reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reducing human error is recognized in the power-generation industry as a key factor in reducing safety-related events as well as improving asset availability. Achieving a sustainable culture change that leads to human error reduction in plant operations and maintenance remains a significant challenge to the industry. This report presents a behavior-based approach to human performance improvement and error reduction. The report explains fundamental elements of culture change and describes proven practices...

2010-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

128

Identification of Process Energy and Pollution Reduction Opportunities at DoD Industrial Facilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Industrial facilities operated by the Department of Defense consume large amounts of energy and emit significant quantities of air pollutants. Recent Executive Orders issued by the President set goals for increased energy efficiency and reduced emissions which must be met by these industrial facilities. These new energy and environmental directives in most instances exceed the performance capabilities of DoD's installed industrial technologies. Cost-effective compliance with these directives in the existing DoD industrial base will require a thorough evaluation of DoD industrial activities and their potential for improvements. Understanding the energy-use patterns and options in DoD production sites could be invaluable in identifying energy and emission reduction opportunities. Under the sponsorship of the Federal Energy Management program, the U.S. Army Construction Engineering Research Laboratories (US ACERL) initiated a project to identify energy and pollution reduction opportunities in processes at DoD industrial facilities in which reduced energy consumption can, via energy efficiency and operational improvements, simultaneously bring about significant reduction of pollutant emissions. In this project, major DoD industrial energy-consuming activities were screened and qualitatively evaluated with respect to their potential to emit pollutants. Site visits were made to representative bases, one for each of the three services, to (1) collect and evaluate available energy consumption/emissions data, (2) directly observe various types of process activities and operations, (3) examine facility conditions, and (4) recommend energy conservation opportunities to reduce energy use and pollution. Based on the opportunities identified, as well as data from other studies and a review of other installations, estimates of generalized DoD-wide process energy savings were developed. A significant amount of potential energy savings were identified. It is recommended that additional work would be beneficial to develop a process database with equipment inventory as well as energy consumption information at DoD industrial facilities, which could then be used to identify and evaluate specific opportunities.

Lin, M. C.; Northrup, J. I.; Smith, E. D.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Discovery of New NOx Reduction Catalysts for CIDI Engines Using Combinatorial Techniques  

SciTech Connect

This project for the discovery of new lean reduction NOx catalysts was initiated on August 16th, 2002 and is now into its fourth year. Several materials have already been identified as NOx reduction catalysts for possible future application. NOx reduction catalysts are a critical need in the North American vehicle market since these catalysts are needed to enable both diesels and lean gasoline engines to meet the 2007-2010 emission standards. Hydrocarbon selective catalytic reduction (SCR) is a preferred technology since it requires no infrastructure changes (as may be expected for urea SCR) and most likely has the simplest engine control strategy of the three proposed NOx reduction approaches. The use of fast throughput techniques and informatics greatly enhances the possibility of discovering new NOx reduction catalysts. Using fast throughput techniques this project has already screened over 3000 new materials and evaluates hundreds of new materials a month. Evaluating such a high number of new materials puts this approach into a very different paradigm than previous discovery approaches for new NOx reduction catalysts. With so much data on materials it is necessary to use statistical techniques to identify the potential catalysts and these statistical techniques are needed to optimize compositions of the multi-component materials that are identified under the program as possible new lean NOx catalysts. Several new materials have conversions in excess of 80% at temperatures above 300 C. That is more than twice the activity of previous HC SCR materials. These materials are candidates for emission control on heavy-duty systems (i.e.; over 8500 pounds gross weight). Tests of one of the downselected materials on an engine dynamometer show NOx reductions greater than 80% under some conditions even though the net NOx reductions on the HWFET and the US06 cycles were relatively low. The program is scheduled to continue until the end of the 2006 calendar year. Work in the final year will focus on continued discovery and identity of candidate materials, and also on refining the engine operating strategies to increase NOx reduction over a full engine cycle.

Blint, Richard J

2005-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

130

Power Tower Technology Roadmap and cost reduction plan.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Concentrating solar power (CSP) technologies continue to mature and are being deployed worldwide. Power towers will likely play an essential role in the future development of CSP due to their potential to provide dispatchable solar electricity at a low cost. This Power Tower Technology Roadmap has been developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to describe the current technology, the improvement opportunities that exist for the technology, and the specific activities needed to reach the DOE programmatic target of providing competitively-priced electricity in the intermediate and baseload power markets by 2020. As a first step in developing this roadmap, a Power Tower Roadmap Workshop that included the tower industry, national laboratories, and DOE was held in March 2010. A number of technology improvement opportunities (TIOs) were identified at this workshop and separated into four categories associated with power tower subsystems: solar collector field, solar receiver, thermal energy storage, and power block/balance of plant. In this roadmap, the TIOs associated with power tower technologies are identified along with their respective impacts on the cost of delivered electricity. In addition, development timelines and estimated budgets to achieve cost reduction goals are presented. The roadmap does not present a single path for achieving these goals, but rather provides a process for evaluating a set of options from which DOE and industry can select to accelerate power tower R&D, cost reductions, and commercial deployment.

Mancini, Thomas R.; Gary, Jesse A. (U.S. Department of Energy); Kolb, Gregory J.; Ho, Clifford Kuofei

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION (PCOR) PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect

During the period of October 1, 2003, through September 30, 2005, the Plains CO2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership, identified geologic and terrestrial candidates for near-term practical and environmentally sound carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration demonstrations in the heartland of North America. The PCOR Partnership region covered nine states and three Canadian provinces. The validation test candidates were further vetted to ensure that they represented projects with (1) commercial potential and (2) a mix that would support future projects both dependent and independent of CO2 monetization. This report uses the findings contained in the PCOR Partnership's two dozen topical reports and half-dozen fact sheets as well as the capabilities of its geographic information system-based Decision Support System to provide a concise picture of the sequestration potential for both terrestrial and geologic sequestration in the PCOR Partnership region based on assessments of sources, sinks, regulations, deployment issues, transportation, and capture and separation. The report also includes concise action plans for deployment and public education and outreach as well as a brief overview of the structure, development, and capabilities of the PCOR Partnership. The PCOR Partnership is one of seven regional partnerships under Phase I of the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership program. The PCOR Partnership, comprising 49 public and private sector members, is led by the Energy & Environmental Research Center at the University of North Dakota. The international PCOR Partnership region includes the Canadian provinces of Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba and the states of Montana (part), Wyoming (part), North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Missouri, Iowa, Minnesota, and Wisconsin.

Edward N. Steadman; Daniel J. Daly; Lynette L. de Silva; John A. Harju; Melanie D. Jensen; Erin M. O'Leary; Wesley D. Peck; Steven A. Smith; James A. Sorensen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION (PCOR) PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect

During the period of October 1, 2003, through September 30, 2005, the Plains CO2 Reduction (PCOR) Partnership, identified geologic and terrestrial candidates for near-term practical and environmentally sound carbon dioxide (CO2) sequestration demonstrations in the heartland of North America. The PCOR Partnership region covered nine states and three Canadian provinces. The validation test candidates were further vetted to ensure that they represented projects with (1) commercial potential and (2) a mix that would support future projects both dependent and independent of CO2 monetization. This report uses the findings contained in the PCOR Partnership's two dozen topical reports and half-dozen fact sheets as well as the capabilities of its geographic information system-based Decision Support System to provide a concise picture of the sequestration potential for both terrestrial and geologic sequestration in the PCOR Partnership region based on assessments of sources, sinks, regulations, deployment issues, transportation, and capture and separation. The report also includes concise action plans for deployment and public education and outreach as well as a brief overview of the structure, development, and capabilities of the PCOR Partnership. The PCOR Partnership is one of seven regional partnerships under Phase I of the U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory's Regional Carbon Sequestration Partnership program. The PCOR Partnership, comprising 49 public and private sector members, is led by the Energy & Environmental Research Center at the University of North Dakota. The international PCOR Partnership region includes the Canadian provinces of Alberta, Saskatchewan, and Manitoba and the states of Montana (part), Wyoming (part), North Dakota, South Dakota, Nebraska, Missouri, Iowa, Minnesota, and Wisconsin.

Edward N. Steadman; Daniel J. Daly; Lynette L. de Silva; John A. Harju; Melanie D. Jensen; Erin M. O' Leary; Wesley D. Peck; Steven A. Smith; James A. Sorensen

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Identifying Options for Deep Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from California Transportation: Meeting an 80% Reduction Goal in 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

energy conversion efficiency enabled by combined cycle systemsThese systems can improve primary energy conversion by 25%energy conversion efficiency. Advanced propulsion systems

Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Identifying Options for Deep Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from California Transportation: Meeting an 80% Reduction Goal in 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fleet). Regenerative braking can improve energy efficiencyregenerative braking. Application of these technologies and strategies has the effect of lowering the energy

Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Identifying Options for Deep Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from California Transportation: Meeting an 80% Reduction Goal in 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrolysis/fermentation, gasification, catalytic synthesis)biomass-to-liquids (BTL) gasification of cellulosic biomass20% from biomass gasification, and 40% from natural gas

Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Identifying Options for Deep Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from California Transportation: Meeting an 80% Reduction Goal in 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

remain dominant but unconventional oil sources are utilizedremain dominant, and unconventional oil sources are utilizedTransport - Overall Unconventional oil resources (coal, NG,

Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Identifying Options for Deep Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from California Transportation: Meeting an 80% Reduction Goal in 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

algae, agricultural and forest residues, and so on) and production processes (fermentation, trans-esterification, cellulosic hydrolysis/fermentation, gasification,

Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Identifying Options for Deep Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from California Transportation: Meeting an 80% Reduction Goal in 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

cellulosic hydrolysis/fermentation, gasification, catalytic synthesis) can be used to make biofuels. Depending on the feedstock

Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Identifying Options for Deep Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from California Transportation: Meeting an 80% Reduction Goal in 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

but unconventional oil sources are utilized to a greaterand unconventional oil sources are utilized more) 5 . FigureConventional Crude Oil Unconventional Sources 90 to 90 to 92

Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Identifying Options for Deep Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from California Transportation: Meeting an 80% Reduction Goal in 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

coal-to-liquids, and oil shale. This shift could potentiallyresources (coal, NG, oil shale, tar sands) used in producing

Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identifying reduction potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Identifying Options for Deep Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from California Transportation: Meeting an 80% Reduction Goal in 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity (Natural Gas Combined Cycle) Electricity (Coal,efficiency enabled by combined cycle systems at stationarybut also using combined cycle and fuel cell-based power

Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

Identifying Options for Deep Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from California Transportation: Meeting an 80% Reduction Goal in 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of U.S. Croplands for Biofuels Increases Greenhouse GasesGHG Emissions from Biofuels . in STEPS Research Symposium .NRDC, Growing Energy: How Biofuels Can Help End America's

Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Identifying Options for Deep Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from California Transportation: Meeting an 80% Reduction Goal in 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

petroleum gases, and compressed natural gas, but their totalNatural Gas (LNG) Compressed Natural Gas (CNG) Liquefied

Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Identifying Options for Deep Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from California Transportation: Meeting an 80% Reduction Goal in 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GHG emissions for both corn ethanol and cellulosic ethanole/MJ, respectively, a 93% (corn ethanol) and 50% (cellulosicSugar Cane) Ethanol (Corn) Ethanol (Cellulosic biomass) 25

Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Identifying Options for Deep Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from California Transportation: Meeting an 80% Reduction Goal in 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and A. Schafer, Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions from U.S.Marintek, Study of Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Ships .Biofuels Increases Greenhouse Gases Through Emissions from

Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Identifying Options for Deep Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from California Transportation: Meeting an 80% Reduction Goal in 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to biomass production, severely impacting food prices, and/price of these commodities. Several studies [35-37] have estimated the total amount of biomass and

Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Identifying Options for Deep Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from California Transportation: Meeting an 80% Reduction Goal in 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

exceed the waste biomass resource supply of the state, anduse of biofuels is the supply of biomass resources. Biomassto exceed feasible supply from waste biomass resources. This

Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Identifying Options for Deep Reductions in Greenhouse Gas Emissions from California Transportation: Meeting an 80% Reduction Goal in 2050  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electricity -intensive SB Biofuel- intensive SB EfficientPMT SB LDVs Gasoline ICEs Biofuel ICEs Diesel ICEs GasolineHeavy Trucks Diesel Diesel HEV Biofuel HEVs H2FCVs miles/gge

Yang, Christopher; McCollum, David L; McCarthy, Ryan; Leighty, Wayne

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Global Threat Reduction Initiative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

comprehensive comprehensive strategy to prevent nuclear terrorism; and  The key organization responsible for implementing the U.S. HEU minimization policy. GTRI MISSION Reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear and radiological material located at civilian sites worldwide. DOE STRATEGIC GOAL 2.2 Prevent the acquisition of nuclear and radiological materials for use in weapons of mass destruction and other acts of terrorism Protect high priority nuclear and radiological materials from theft and sabotage These efforts result in threat reduction by improving security on the bomb material remaining at civilian sites - each vulnerable building that is protected reduces the risk until a permanent threat reduction solution can be implemented.

150

REDUCTIONS WITHOUT REGRET: SUMMARY  

SciTech Connect

This paper briefly summarizes the series in which we consider the possibilities for losing, or compromising, key capabilities of the U.S. nuclear force in the face of modernization and reductions. The first of the three papers takes an historical perspective, considering capabilities that were eliminated in past force reductions. The second paper is our attempt to define the needed capabilities looking forward in the context of the current framework for force modernization and the current picture of the evolving challenges of deterrence and assurance. The third paper then provides an example for each of our undesirable outcomes: the creation of roach motels, box canyons, and wrong turns.

Swegle, J.; Tincher, D.

2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

151

Cost Reduction Strategies for Mixed Waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential for generating mixed waste is a reality at all nuclear power plants. The report provides utilities with a means for developing cost reduction strategies to minimize the volume of waste generated, optimize treatment and disposal options, and maximize overall cost savings.

1998-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

152

Connecticut Yankee risk reduction initiative  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A Risk Reduction Task Force, comprised of an interdisciplinary team of Connecticut Yankee (CY) and Northeast Utilities (NU) personnel, was formed to identify means of reducing the core-melt frequency (CMF) and the overall risk at CY. Currently, Connecticut Yankee is the only NU nuclear power plant with a CMF significantly above the corporate nuclear safety goal of < 10{sup {minus}4}/yr. It was the purpose of this task force to brainstorm ideas for design and/or procedural changes that would improve safety while allowing for operational flexibility, and also give consideration to licensing issues and design basis/deterministic concerns. The final recommendations by the task force include the installation of a tornado-protected, air-cooled diesel generator; reconfiguration of the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) flow path; addition of a diverse AFW pump; additional modifications to address tornado concerns; and repowering of several motor-operated valves.

Oswald, E.A.; Dube, D.A.; Becker, W.H.; Flannery, G.A.; Weyland, S.J. (Northeast Utilities Service Co., Hartford, CT (United States))

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Assessment of foreign decommissioning technology with potential application to US decommissioning needs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study was conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) for the US Department of Energy (DOE) to identify and technically assess foreign decommissioning technology developments that may represent significant improvements over decommissioning technology currently available or under development in the United States. Technology need areas for nuclear power reactor decommissioning operations were identified and prioritized using the results of past light water reactor (LWR) decommissioning studies to quantitatively evaluate the potential for reducing cost and decommissioning worker radiation dose for each major decommissioning activity. Based on these identified needs, current foreign decommissioning technologies of potential interest to the US were identified through personal contacts and the collection and review of an extensive body of decommissioning literature. These technologies were then assessed qualitatively to evaluate their uniqueness, potential for a significant reduction in decommissioning costs and/or worker radiation dose, development status, and other factors affecting their value and applicability to US needs.

Allen, R.P.; Konzek, G.J.; Schneider, K.J.; Smith, R.I.

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

On A^1-fundamental groups of isotropic reductive groups.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We discuss A^1-fundamental groups of isotropic reductive groups. Using homotopy invariance of group homology in one variable, we identify the sections of A^1-fundamental group sheaves of an isotropic reductive group G over an infinite field k with the second homology group of the group G(k). This provides explicit loops representing elements in the A^1-fundamental groups.

Konrad Voelkel; Matthias Wendt

155

Aluminum reduction cell electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is directed to cathode modules comprised of refractory hard metal materials, such as TiB[sub 2], for an electrolytic cell for the reduction of alumina wherein the modules may be installed and replaced during operation of the cell and wherein the structure of the cathode modules is such that the refractory hard metal materials are not subjected to externally applied forces or rigid constraints. 9 figs.

Goodnow, W.H.; Payne, J.R.

1982-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

156

Establish Internal Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets | Department  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Establish Internal Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets Establish Internal Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets Establish Internal Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets October 7, 2013 - 10:24am Addthis Question to Answer What are appropriate GHG emission reduction targets for specific agency programs and sites? Not all administrative units within the agency have the same potential to contribute to agency-level targets. This step aims to help agencies establish what each major administrative unit (e.g. program site) should contribute to the agency goal based on its planned growth trajectory and estimates of its cost and potential to reduce GHG emissions. As illustrated in the figure below, two sites may have equal potential to reduce GHG emissions. But a site expecting significant mission-related growth prior to the 2020 target year may have a lower reduction target

157

Potential Impacts of Reductions in Refinery Activity on Northeast ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)

receipt of crude oil at idled refineries require considerable modification before they can be used to receive products. Moreover, ...

158

Residential duct system leakage; Magnitude, impacts, and potential for reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the issues associated with leakage in residential air distribution systems, touching on the prevalence of duct leakage, the impacts of duct leakage, and on the techniques available for sealing duct systems. The issues examined in detail are: present techniques for measuring the leakage area of ducts existing data bases of duct leakage area measurements, the impacts of duct leakage on space-conditioning energy consumption and peak demand, and the ventilation impacts of duct leakage. The paper also includes a brief discussion of techniques for sealing duct systems in the field. The results derived from duct leakage are and driving pressure measurements indicate that in regions in which distribution systems pass through unconditioned spaces, air infiltration rates will typically double when the distribution fan is turned on, and that the average annual air infiltration rate is increased by 30% to 70% due to the existence of the distribution system. Estimates based upon a simplified analysis of leakage-induced energy losses also indicate the peak electricity demands due to duct leakage can be as high as 4 kW in Sacramento, California, and West Palm Beach, Florida, and that peak loads on the order of 1 to 2 kW are highly likely in these locations. Both peak loads and annual energy impacts are found to be strongly dependent on the location of the return duct, and attic return costing approximately 1500 kWh more energy than a crawlspace return in the two climates examined.

Modera, M.P. (Lawrence Berkeley Lab., Berkeley, CA (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Economic Potential of Greenhouse Gas Emission Reductions: Comparative...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bruce A. McCarl (mccarl@tamu.edu, 979-845-1706) Department of Agricultural Economics Texas A&M University College Station, TX, 77845-2124 Uwe Schneider (uwe@iastate.edu,...

160

Energy reduction analysis report for Tropicana solar process steam system  

SciTech Connect

Economic assessment data pertinent to the current Tropican solar system configuration is presented and the potential for energy reduction through the use of additional and/or larger systems is projected. The economic model, Tropicana plant and citrus juice industry energy savings potential, and industrial low-pressure steam energy savings potential are discussed. (MHR)

1978-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identifying reduction potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Potential Water and Energy Savings from Showerheads  

SciTech Connect

This paper estimates the benefits and costs of six water reduction scenarios. Benefits and costs of showerhead scenarios are ranked in this paper by an estimated water reduction percentage. To prioritize potential water and energy saving scenarios regarding showerheads, six scenarios were analyzed for their potential water and energy savings and the associated dollar savings to the consumer.

Biermayer, Peter J.

2005-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

162

Radar-cross-section reduction of wind turbines. part 1.  

SciTech Connect

In recent years, increasing deployment of large wind-turbine farms has become an issue of growing concern for the radar community. The large radar cross section (RCS) presented by wind turbines interferes with radar operation, and the Doppler shift caused by blade rotation causes problems identifying and tracking moving targets. Each new wind-turbine farm installation must be carefully evaluated for potential disruption of radar operation for air defense, air traffic control, weather sensing, and other applications. Several approaches currently exist to minimize conflict between wind-turbine farms and radar installations, including procedural adjustments, radar upgrades, and proper choice of low-impact wind-farm sites, but each has problems with limited effectiveness or prohibitive cost. An alternative approach, heretofore not technically feasible, is to reduce the RCS of wind turbines to the extent that they can be installed near existing radar installations. This report summarizes efforts to reduce wind-turbine RCS, with a particular emphasis on the blades. The report begins with a survey of the wind-turbine RCS-reduction literature to establish a baseline for comparison. The following topics are then addressed: electromagnetic model development and validation, novel material development, integration into wind-turbine fabrication processes, integrated-absorber design, and wind-turbine RCS modeling. Related topics of interest, including alternative mitigation techniques (procedural, at-the-radar, etc.), an introduction to RCS and electromagnetic scattering, and RCS-reduction modeling techniques, can be found in a previous report.

Brock, Billy C.; Loui, Hung; McDonald, Jacob J.; Paquette, Joshua A.; Calkins, David A.; Miller, William K.; Allen, Steven E.; Clem, Paul Gilbert; Patitz, Ward E.

2012-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

163

Milestone Project Demonstrates Innovative Mercury Emissions Reduction  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Milestone Project Demonstrates Innovative Mercury Emissions Milestone Project Demonstrates Innovative Mercury Emissions Reduction Technology Milestone Project Demonstrates Innovative Mercury Emissions Reduction Technology January 12, 2010 - 12:00pm Addthis Washington, DC - An innovative technology that could potentially help some coal-based power generation facilities comply with anticipated new mercury emissions standards was successfully demonstrated in a recently concluded milestone project at a Michigan power plant. Under a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), WE Energies demonstrated the TOXECON(TM) process in a $52.9million project at the Presque Isle Power Plant in Marquette, Mich. TOXECON is a relatively cost-effective option for achieving significant reductions in mercury emissions and increasing the

164

Fuel savings and emissions reductions from light duty fuel cell vehicles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) operate efficiently, emit few pollutants, and run on nonpetroleum fuels. Because of these characteristics, the large-scale deployment of FCVs has the potential to lessen US dependence on foreign oil and improve air quality. This study characterizes the benefits of large-scale FCV deployment in the light duty vehicle market. Specifically, the study assesses the potential fuel savings and emissions reductions resulting from large-scale use of these FCVs and identifies the key parameters that affect the scope of the benefits from FCV use. The analysis scenario assumes that FCVs will compete with gasoline-powered light trucks and cars in the new vehicle market for replacement of retired vehicles and will compete for growth in the total market. Analysts concluded that the potential benefits from FCVs, measured in terms of consumer outlays for motor fuel and the value of reduced air emissions, are substantial.

Mark, J.; Ohi, J.M.; Hudson, D.V. Jr.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

On the longest perpetual reductions in orthogonal expression reduction systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study perpetual reductions in orthogonal (or conflict-free) fully extended expression reduction systems (OERS). ERS is a formalism for rewriting that subsumes term rewriting systems (TRSs) and the &lgr;-calculus. We design a strategy ... Keywords: &lgr;-calculus, perpetual reductions, rewrite systems, strong normalization

Zurab Khasidashvili

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

(Bioprocessing of lignite coals using reductive microorganisms)  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of this report are to: (1) characterize selected aerobic bacterial strains for their abilities to depolymerize lignite coal polymers, and isolate and identify the extracellular enzymes responsible for depolymerization of the coal; (2) characterize selected strictly anaerobic bacteria, that were previously shown to reductively transform coal substructure model compounds, for the ability to similarly transform polymeric coal; and (3) isolate more strains of anaerobic bacteria by enrichment using additional coal substructure model compounds and coal as substrates.

Crawford, D.L.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

EPRI Integrated Dose Reduction Program Pilot Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Integrated Dose Reduction (IDR) project is an integral part of EPRI's support to nuclear plant radiation protection programs. The broad objective of the IDR program is to review existing and recent industry developments and provide utilities with an integrated plan for EPRI's assistance based on a plant's specific needs. This document describes a pilot test of this product at a host site, and identifies areas where EPRI's RP assessments and technical assistance can support key plant programs.

2003-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

168

September 2008 UCD-ITS-RR-08-23 Identifying Options for Deep Reductions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

oil shale - Fischer-Tropsch synthetic fuels from biomass, coal, natural gas More significant changes

California at Davis, University of

169

NETL: Turbine Projects - Emissions Reduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Emissions Reduction Turbine Projects Emissions Reduction Pre-Mixer Design for High Hydrogen Fuels DataFact Sheets Low-NOX Emissions in a Fuel Flexible Gas Turbine Combustor Design...

170

facial reduction and extended duals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Facial reduction and extended duals Here we study two fundamental approaches ...... denberghe, and Henry Wolkowicz, editors, Handbook of semidefinite ...

171

ALUMINIUM REDUCTION TECHNOLOGY: V: Fundamentals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ALUMINIUM REDUCTION TECHNOLOGY: Session V: Fundamentals. Sponsored by: LMD Aluminum Committee Program Organizer: Harald A. Øye, Institute of ...

172

Database - Selective Catalytic Reduction Catalyst Deactivation Rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Selective catalytic reduction (SCR) catalyst deactivation is a critical parameter controlling to a large extent achievable catalyst life, as well as overall SCR system performance. Accurate assessment and prediction of catalyst deactivation is required to adequately manage reactor potential. EPRI has on-going efforts underway aimed at better understanding the factors that affect catalyst deactivation, especially as a function of fuel, boiler design, and boiler operating conditions, in hopes of ...

2013-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

173

Global Threat Reduction Initiative  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nonproliferation Nonproliferation U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 1 The Current Status of Gap and U.S.-Origin Nuclear Fuel Removals 2011 Jeff Galan, Deputy Project Manager U.S.-Origin Nuclear Remove Program National Nuclear Security Administration Global Threat Reduction Initiative Defense Nuclear Nonproliferation U.S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY 2 GTRI Mission and Goals GTRI is: A part of President Obama's comprehensive strategy to prevent nuclear terrorism; and The key organization responsible for implementing the U.S. HEU minimization policy. GTRI MISSION Reduce and protect vulnerable nuclear and radiological material located at civilian sites worldwide. DOE STRATEGIC GOAL 2.2 Prevent the acquisition of nuclear and radiological materials for use in weapons of mass destruction and other

174

Aluminum reduction cell electrode  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is directed to an anode-cathode structure for an electrolytic cell for the reduction of alumina wherein the structure is comprised of a carbon anode assembly which straddles a wedge-shaped refractory hard metal cathode assembly having steeply sloped cathodic surfaces, each cathodic surface being paired in essentially parallel planar relationship with an anode surface. The anode-cathode structure not only takes into account the structural weakness of refractory hard metal materials but also permits the changing of the RHM assembly during operation of the cell. Further, the anode-cathode structure enhances the removal of anode gas from the interpolar gap between the anode and cathode surfaces. 10 figs.

Payne, J.R.

1983-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

175

Site Energy Reduction Program  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DuPont’s Sabine River Works site is the largest energy consuming location within DuPont. In the year 2000, each production area was encouraged to reduce energy costs. By 2003 site energy consumption was down 16% on an absolute basis and 12% on a BTU/LB basis. By 2004, overall progress had slowed, energy consumption increased slightly, and area results were mixed. It was time to shake things up with a new perspective. A coordinated site energy program was launched. In 2005, the first full year of the unified program, the site saved $6.9 MM from energy reduction projects. The rate of improvement is accelerating in 2006 with $3.6 MM in energy projects being implemented in the first four months.

Jagen, P. R.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Dose Reduction Techniques  

SciTech Connect

As radiation safety specialists, one of the things we are required to do is evaluate tools, equipment, materials and work practices and decide whether the use of these products or work practices will reduce radiation dose or risk to the environment. There is a tendency for many workers that work with radioactive material to accomplish radiological work the same way they have always done it rather than look for new technology or change their work practices. New technology is being developed all the time that can make radiological work easier and result in less radiation dose to the worker or reduce the possibility that contamination will be spread to the environment. As we discuss the various tools and techniques that reduce radiation dose, keep in mind that the radiological controls should be reasonable. We can not always get the dose to zero, so we must try to accomplish the work efficiently and cost-effectively. There are times we may have to accept there is only so much you can do. The goal is to do the smart things that protect the worker but do not hinder him while the task is being accomplished. In addition, we should not demand that large amounts of money be spent for equipment that has marginal value in order to save a few millirem. We have broken the handout into sections that should simplify the presentation. Time, distance, shielding, and source reduction are methods used to reduce dose and are covered in Part I on work execution. We then look at operational considerations, radiological design parameters, and discuss the characteristics of personnel who deal with ALARA. This handout should give you an overview of what it takes to have an effective dose reduction program.

WAGGONER, L.O.

2000-05-16T23:59:59.000Z

177

COE Reductions through Active Aerodynamic Control of Rotor Aerodynamics and Geometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates potential cost of energy reductions that might be achieved by designing active systems to mitigate loads throughout the wind turbine system.

Griffin, D. A.; McCoy, T. J.

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Waste reduction through consumer education. Final report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Waste Reduction through Consumer Education research project was conducted to determine how environmental educational strategies influence purchasing behavior in the supermarket. The objectives were to develop, demonstrate, and evaluate consumer education strategies for waste reduction. The amount of waste generated by packaging size and form, with an adjustment for local recyclability of waste, was determined for 14 product categories identified as having more waste generating and less waste generating product choices (a total of 484 products). Using supermarket scan data and shopper identification numbers, the research tracked the purchases of shoppers in groups receiving different education treatments for 9 months. Statistical tests applied to the purchase data assessed patterns of change between the groups by treatment period. Analysis of the data revealed few meaningful statistical differences between study groups or changes in behavior over time. Findings suggest that broad brush consumer education about waste reduction is not effective in changing purchasing behaviors in the short term. However, it may help create a general awareness of the issues surrounding excess packaging and consumer responsibility. The study concludes that the answer to waste reduction in the future may be a combination of voluntary initiatives by manufacturers and retailers, governmental intervention, and better-informed consumers.

Harrison, E.Z.

1996-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Energy Reduction at HQ | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy Reduction at HQ Energy Reduction at HQ Aviation Management Executive Secretariat Energy Reduction at HQ Electric Metering Facilities Initiatives Recycling Programs Services...

180

Vehicle Technologies Office: Parasitic Loss Reduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Parasitic Loss Reduction Parasitic Loss Reduction Heavy vehicles lose a tremendous amount of energy to wind resistance and drag, braking, and rolling resistance. Such non-engine losses can account for an approximate 45% decrease in efficiency. Other sources of energy loss include: friction and wear in the power train, thermal (heat) loads, operation of auxiliary loads (air conditioning, heaters, refrigeration, etc.), and engine idling. The parasitic loss activity identifies methodologies that may reduce energy losses, and tests those in the laboratory. Promising technologies are then prototyped and tested onboard heavy vehicles. Once validated, technologies must be tested on-road to obtain durability, reliability, and life-cycle cost data for the developmental component and/or design strategy.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identifying reduction potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

The role of Life Cycle Assessment in identifying and reducing environmental impacts of CCS  

SciTech Connect

Life Cycle Assessment (LCA) should be used to assist carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) planners to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and avoid unintended environmental trade-offs. LCA is an analytical framework for determining environmental impacts resulting from processes, products, and services. All life cycle stages are evaluated including raw material sourcing, processing, operation, maintenance, and component end-of-life, as well as intermediate stages such as transportation. In recent years a growing number of LCA studies have analyzed CCS systems. We reviewed 50+ LCA studies, and selected 11 studies that compared the environmental performance of 23 electric power plants with and without CCS. Here we summarize and interpret the findings of these studies. Regarding overall climatemitigation effectiveness of CCS, we distinguish between the capture percentage of carbon in the fuels, the net carbon dioxide (CO2) emission reduction, and the net GHG emission reduction. We also identify trade-offs between the climate benefits and the potential increased non-climate impacts of CCS. Emissions of non-CO2 flue gases such as NOx may increase due to the greater throughput of fuel, and toxicity issues may arise due to the use of monoethanolamine (MEA) capture solvent, resulting in ecological and human health impacts. We discuss areas where improvements in LCA data or methods are needed. The decision to implement CCS should be based on knowledge of the overall environmental impacts of the technologies, not just their carbon capture effectiveness. LCA will be an important tool in providing that knowledge.

Sathre, Roger; Masanet, Eric; Cain, Jennifer; Chester, Mikhail

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

182

Report: Technical Uncertainty and Risk Reduction  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

TECHNICAL UNCERTAINTY AND RISK REDUCTION TECHNICAL UNCERTAINTY AND RISK REDUCTION Background In FY 2007 EMAB was tasked to assess EM's ability to reduce risk and technical uncertainty. Board members explored this topic throughout the year as a component of their focus on the previously discussed topic of Discretionary Budgeting. Discussion Understanding the risks and variability associated with EM's projects is a challenging task that has the potential to significantly impact the program's established baselines. According to budget personnel, EM has established a database of baseline variables and possibilities; however, this tool is project-specific and does not apply to the greater complex. The Board believes that EM could benefit from incorporating an additional and more comprehensive data point into the baseline development process that budgets

183

Components of Congestion: Delay from Incidents, Special Events, Lane Closures, Weather, Potential Ramp Metering Gain, and Excess Demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

potential reduction due to metering needs to be interpretedCollisions, Potential Ramp Metering Gain, and Excess Demand.Weather, Potential Ramp Metering Gain, and Excess Demand

Kwon, Jaimyoung; Mauch, Michael; Varaiya, Pravin

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

184

Yale's Greenhouse Gas Reduction Strategy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Yale's Greenhouse Gas Reduction Strategy ...creating a sustainable future August 2007 #12;Yale is a greenhouse gas re- duction goal. This goal has guided the development of an aggressive and in- formed to similar commitments to greenhouse gas reductions by other institutions of higher learning nationally

Haller, Gary L.

185

Waste reduction options for manufacturers of copper indium diselenide photovoltaic cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper identifies general waste reduction concepts and specific waste reduction options to be used in the production of copper indium diselenide (CIS) photovoltaic cells. A general discussion of manufacturing processes used for the production of photovoltaic cells is followed by a description of the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) guidelines for waste reduction (i.e., waste minimization through pollution prevention). A more specific discussion of manufacturing CIS cells is accompanied by detailed suggestions regarding waste minimization options for both inputs and outputs for ten stages of this process. Waste reduction from inputs focuses on source reduction and process changes, and reduction from outputs focuses on material reuse and recycling.

DePhillips, M.P.; Fthenakis, V.M.; Moskowitz, P.D.

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Energy Efficiency Interest Rate Reduction Program | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Interest Rate Reduction Program Energy Efficiency Interest Rate Reduction Program Eligibility Residential Savings For Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial...

187

National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program Staff ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program Staff. National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (731.05). Dr. John (Jack) R. Hayes, Jr. ...

2013-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

188

Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Reduction Strategies Using Renewable Energy in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Reduction Strategies Using Renewable Energy Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Reduction Strategies Using Renewable Energy in Buildings Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Reduction Strategies Using Renewable Energy in Buildings October 7, 2013 - 11:23am Addthis Once Federal sites have been screened for viability of different renewable energy resources to evaluate emissions profile, the next step is to establish what renewable energy resources developed at which particular sites would have the greatest impact on the agency's overall greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions goals. It is important to consider that some types of renewable energy generation could impact not only Scope 1 and 2 GHG goals, but also Scope 3 goals through avoided transmission and distribution losses. Estimate Greenhouse Gas Reduction Potential It is important to note that solar systems can have the greatest reduction

189

Potential benefits of solar reflective car shells: Cooler cabins...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of solar reflective car shells: Cooler cabins, fuel savings and emission reductions Title Potential benefits of solar reflective car shells: Cooler cabins, fuel savings and...

190

DRAG REDUCTION WITH SUPERHYDROPHOBIC RIBLETS  

SciTech Connect

Samples combining riblets and superhydrophobic surfaces are fabricated at University of Pittsburgh and their drag reduction properties are studied at the Center for Nanophase Materials Sciences (CNMS) in Oak Ridge National Laboratory with a commercial cone-and-plate rheometer. In parallel to the experiments, numerical simulations are performed in order to estimate the slip length at high rotational speed. For each sample, a drag reduction of at least 5% is observed in both laminar and turbulent regime. At low rotational speed, drag reduction up to 30% is observed with a 1 mm deep grooved sample. As the rotational speed increases, a secondary flow develops causing a slight decrease in drag reductions. However, drag reduction above 15% is still observed for the large grooved samples. In the turbulent regime, the 100 microns grooved sample becomes more efficient than the other samples in drag reduction and manages to sustain a drag reduction above 15%. Using the simulations, the slip length of the 100 micron grooved sample is estimated to be slightly above 100 micron in the turbulent regime.

Barbier, Charlotte N [ORNL; D'Urso, Brian R [ORNL; Jenner, Elliot [University of Pittsburgh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Identified Patent Waivers | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Identified Identified Patent Waivers Identified Patent Waivers June 18, 2013 Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2012-012 This is a request by DR. F. JEFFREY MARTIN for a DOE Identified patent waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-AC52-06NA25396. March 1, 2013 Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2012-005 This is a request by UCHICAGO ARGONNE, LLC for a DOE Identified patent waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-AC02-06CH11357. March 1, 2013 Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2012-004 This is a request by UCHICAGO ARGONNE, LLC for a DOE Identified patent waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-AC02-06CH11357. March 1, 2013 Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2012-003 This is a request by UCHICAGO ARGONNE, LLC for a DOE Identified patent

192

Study of integration issues to realize the market potential of OTEC energy in the aluminum industry. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The various integration issues are studied which must be considered to realize the market potential for the use of OTEC by the aluminum industry. The chloride reduction process has been identified as an attractive candidate for use with OTEC systems, and drained-cathode Hall cells and two alternative chloride reduction processes are considered. OTEC power system and plantships for the different processes are described. Aluminum industry characteristics important for OTEC considerations are given, including economic models and case history analyses. Appended are supporting cost estimates and energy bridge concepts for getting OTEC energy to shore. (LEW)

Jones, M.S. Jr.; Thiagarajan, V.; Sathyanarayana, K.; Markel, A.L.; Snyder, J.E. III; Sprouse, A.M.; Leshaw, D.

1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

PAPERWORK REDUCTION ACT OF 1995  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PAPERWORK REDUCTION ACT PAPERWORK REDUCTION ACT OF 1995 U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY INFORMATION COLLECTION MANAGEMENT PROGRAM Chris Rouleau, PRA Officer Records Management Division Office of the Associate Chief Information Officer for IT Planning, Architecture and E-Government Office of the Chief Information Officer Office of the Chief Information Officer 2/16/2010 2 TOPICS  Paperwork Reduction Act (PRA) of 1995 - Law  Paperwork Reduction Act - Overview  Information Collection Requests (ICRs)  Information Collection Request Associated with A Notice of Proposed Rule Making  Program Points of Contacts  Information Collection Clearance Managers  Information Collection Requests Checklist  Drivers  Annual Information Collection Budget  Summary of What To Do  Summary of What NOT

194

Carbothermic Reduction of Niobium Concentrate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Ferro Niobium is produced by aluminothermic reduction of the ... However, the niobium concentrate has impurities, such as phosphorus, lead and tin, ... Phase Transformation of Andalusite-Mullite and Its Fiber Reinforcement to ...

195

Metal reduction kinetics in Shewanella  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Motivation: Metal reduction kinetics have been studied in cultures of dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria which include the Shewanella oneidensis strain MR-1. Estimation of system parameters from time-series data faces obstructions in ...

Raman Lall; Julie Mitchell

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

ALUMINIUM REDUCTION TECHNOLOGY: VII: Modelling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Previous models of the behaviour of interfacial waves in aluminium reduction cells ... Attia A. Arif, Omar M. Dahab, Power and Energy Dept., Minya University, Egypt ... of Technology, Liancheng Aluminum Plant, Lanzhou, Gansu 730335, China.

197

Piecewise polynomial nonlinear model reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a novel, general approach towards model-order reduction (MOR) of nonlinear systems that combines good global and local approximation properties. The nonlinear system is first approximated as piecewise polynomials over a number of regions, ...

Ning Dong; Jaijeet Roychowdhury

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Economics of Steam Pressure Reduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Economics of Steam Pressure Reduction is a technical paper that addresses the operating and economic advantages associated with the program to lower the steam operating pressure. Evaluation of a testing program will be discussed. The paper will address the following. 1. Factors that determine the feasibility of reducing the plant steam operating pressure. 2. The operating advantages and disadvantages associated with the decreased steam pressure. 3. The economics of steam pressure reduction. Appropriate visual aids will be utilized as part of the discussion.

Sylva, D. M.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Steam Pressure Reduction, Opportunities, and Issues  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Steam pressure reduction has the potential to reduce fuel consumption for a minimum capital investment. When the pressure at the boiler is reduced, fuel and steam are saved as a result of changes in the high-pressure side of the steam system from the boiler through the condensate return system. In the boiler plant, losses from combustion, boiler blowdown, radiation, and steam venting from condensate receivers would be reduced by reducing steam pressure. Similarly, in the steam distribution system, losses from radiation, flash steam vented from condensate receivers, and component and steam trap leakage would also be reduced. There are potential problems associated with steam pressure reduction, however. These may include increased boiler carryover, boiler water circulation problems in watertube boilers, increased steam velocity in piping, loss of power in steam turbines, and issues with pressure reducing valves. This paper is based a Steam Technical Brief sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy and Enbridge Gas Distribution, Inc. (5). An example illustrates the use of DOE BestPractices Steam System Assessment Tool to model changes in steam, fuel, electricity generation, and makeup water and to estimate resulting economic benefits.

Berry, Jan [ORNL; Griffin, Mr. Bob [Enbridge Gas Distribution, Inc.; Wright, Anthony L [ORNL

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emissions Reduction Emissions Reduction Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Emissions Reduction Requirements Recognizing the impact of carbon-emitting fuels on climate change and to

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identifying reduction potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum Reduction Requirements  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Petroleum Reduction Petroleum Reduction Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum Reduction Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum Reduction Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum Reduction Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum Reduction Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum Reduction Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum Reduction Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Petroleum Reduction Requirements The Wisconsin Department of Administration's fleet management policy

202

An optimization approach to kinetic model reduction for combustion chemistry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Model reduction methods are relevant when the computation time of a full convection-diffusion-reaction simulation based on detailed chemical reaction mechanisms is too large. In this article, we review a model reduction approach based on optimization of trajectories and show its applicability to realistic combustion models. As most model reduction methods, it identifies points on a slow invariant manifold based on time scale separation in the dynamics of the reaction system. The numerical approximation of points on the manifold is achieved by solving a semi-infinite optimization problem, where the dynamics enter the problem as constraints. The proof of existence of a solution for an arbitrarily chosen dimension of the reduced model (slow manifold) is extended to the case of realistic combustion models including thermochemistry by considering the properties of proper maps. The model reduction approach is finally applied to three models based on realistic reaction mechanisms: 1. ozone decomposition as a small t...

Lebiedz, Dirk

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

INEEL Radioactive Liquid Waste Reduction Program  

SciTech Connect

Reduction of radioactive liquid waste, much of which is Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) listed, is a high priority at the Idaho National Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). Major strides in the past five years have lead to significant decreases in generation and subsequent reduction in the overall cost of treatment of these wastes. In 1992, the INTEC, which is part of the Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory (INEEL), began a program to reduce the generation of radioactive liquid waste (both hazardous and non-hazardous). As part of this program, a Waste Minimization Plan was developed that detailed the various contributing waste streams, and identified methods to eliminate or reduce these waste streams. Reduction goals, which will reduce expected waste generation by 43%, were set for five years as part of this plan. The approval of the plan led to a Waste Minimization Incentive being put in place between the Department of Energy–Idaho Office (DOE-ID) and the INEEL operating contractor, Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMITCO). This incentive is worth $5 million dollars from FY-98 through FY-02 if the waste reduction goals are met. In addition, a second plan was prepared to show a path forward to either totally eliminate all radioactive liquid waste generation at INTEC by 2005 or find alternative waste treatment paths. Historically, this waste has been sent to an evaporator system with the bottoms sent to the INTEC Tank Farm. However, this Tank Farm is not RCRA permitted for mixed wastes and a Notice of Non-compliance Consent Order gives dates of 2003 and 2012 for removal of this waste from these tanks. Therefore, alternative treatments are needed for the waste streams. This plan investigated waste elimination opportunities as well as treatment alternatives. The alternatives, and the criteria for ranking these alternatives, were identified through Value Engineering meetings with all of the waste generators. The most promising alternatives were compared by applying weighting factors to each based on how well the alternative met the established criteria. From this information, an overall ranking of the various alternatives was obtained and a path forward recommended.

Tripp, Julia Lynn; Archibald, Kip Ernest; Argyle, Mark Don; Demmer, Ricky Lynn; Miller, Rose Anna; Lauerhass, Lance

1999-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

INEEL Radioactive Liquid Waste Reduction Program  

SciTech Connect

Reduction of radioactive liquid waste, much of which is Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) listed, is a high priority at the Idaho National Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC). Major strides in the past five years have lead to significant decreases in generation and subsequent reduction in the overall cost of treatment of these wastes. In 1992, the INTEC, which is part of the Idaho National Environmental and Engineering Laboratory (INEEL), began a program to reduce the generation of radioactive liquid waste (both hazardous and non-hazardous). As part of this program, a Waste Minimization Plan was developed that detailed the various contributing waste streams, and identified methods to eliminate or reduce these waste streams. Reduction goals, which will reduce expected waste generation by 43%, were set for five years as part of this plan. The approval of the plan led to a Waste Minimization Incentive being put in place between the Department of Energy ? Idaho Office (DOE-ID) and the INEEL operating contractor, Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Company (LMITCO). This incentive is worth $5 million dollars from FY-98 through FY-02 if the waste reduction goals are met. In addition, a second plan was prepared to show a path forward to either totally eliminate all radioactive liquid waste generation at INTEC by 2005 or find alternative waste treatment paths. Historically, this waste has been sent to an evaporator system with the bottoms sent to the INTEC Tank Farm. However, this Tank Farm is not RCRA permitted for mixed wastes and a Notice of Non-compliance Consent Order gives dates of 2003 and 2012 for removal of this waste from these tanks. Therefore, alternative treatments are needed for the waste streams. This plan investigated waste elimination opportunities as well as treatment alternatives. The alternatives, and the criteria for ranking these alternatives, were identified through Value Engineering meetings with all of the waste generators. The most promising alternatives were compared by applying weighting factors to each based on how well the alternative met the established criteria. From this information, an overall ranking of the various alternatives was obtained and a path forward recommended.

C. B. Millet; J. L. Tripp; K. E. Archibald; L. Lauerhauss; M. D. Argyle; R. L. Demmer

1999-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Identify Vehicle Usage Mission Constraints for Reducing Greenhouse Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Identify Vehicle Usage Mission Constraints for Reducing Greenhouse Identify Vehicle Usage Mission Constraints for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions Identify Vehicle Usage Mission Constraints for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions October 7, 2013 - 11:46am Addthis YOU ARE HERE: Step 2 As Federal agencies work to identify opportunities for right-sizing the fleet and replacing inefficient vehicles with new, efficient, and/or alternatively fueled models to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, they should flag potential mission constraints associated with vehicle usage. This may involve further data collection to understand the mission considerations associated with individual vehicles. For instance, in Figure 1, Vehicle 004 appears to be underutilized, having both a low user-to-vehicle ratio and a relatively low time in use per day. However,

206

Method of identifying plant pathogen tolerance  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for identifying a plant having disease tolerance comprising administering to a plant an inhibitory amount of ethylene and screening for ethylene insensitivity, thereby identifying a disease tolerant plant, is described. Plants identified by the foregoing process are also described.

Ecker, Joseph R. (Erial, NJ); Staskawicz, Brian J. (Castro Valley, CA); Bent, Andrew F. (Piedmont, CA); Innes, Roger W. (Bloomington, IN)

1997-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

207

Method of identifying plant pathogen tolerance  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for identifying a plant having disease tolerance comprising administering to a plant an inhibitory amount of ethylene and screening for ethylene insensitivity, thereby identifying a disease tolerant plant, is described. Plants identified by the foregoing process are also described. 7 figs.

Ecker, J.R.; Staskawicz, B.J.; Bent, A.F.; Innes, R.W.

1997-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

208

Microbial reduction of iron ore  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry.

Hoffmann, Michael R. (Pasadena, CA); Arnold, Robert G. (Pasadena, CA); Stephanopoulos, Gregory (Pasadena, CA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Microbial reduction of iron ore  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is provided for reducing iron ore by treatment with microorganisms which comprises forming an aqueous mixture of iron ore, microorganisms operable for reducing the ferric iron of the iron ore to ferrous iron, and a substrate operable as an energy source for the microbial reduction; and maintaining the aqueous mixture for a period of time and under conditions operable to effect the reduction of the ore. Preferably the microorganism is Pseudomonas sp. 200 and the reduction conducted anaerobically with a domestic wastewater as the substrate. An aqueous solution containing soluble ferrous iron can be separated from the reacted mixture, treated with a base to precipitate ferrous hydroxide which can then be recovered as a concentrated slurry. 11 figs.

Hoffmann, M.R.; Arnold, R.G.; Stephanopoulos, G.

1989-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

210

NETL: Turbine Projects - Cost Reduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost Reduction Cost Reduction Turbine Projects Cost Reduction Single Crystal Turbine Blades Enhancing Gas Turbine Efficiency Data/Fact Sheets Enabling and Information Technologies to Increase RAM of Advanced Powerplants Data/Fact Sheets Development of NDE Technology for Environmental Barrier Coating and Residual Life Estimation Data/Fact Sheets Welding and Weld Repair of Single Crystal Gas Turbine Alloy Data/Fact Sheets Combustion Turbine Hot Section Coating Life Management Data/Fact Sheets On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating Monitor for Real-Time Failure Protection and Life Maximization Data/Fact Sheets On-Line Thermal Barrier Coating [PDF] Advanced Monitoring to Improve Combustion Turbine/Combined Cycle RAM Data/Fact Sheets Advanced Monitoring to Improve Combustion Turbine [PDF]

211

Transportation Energy Futures Series: Effects of Travel Reduction and Efficient Driving on Transportation: Energy Use and Greenhouse Gas Emissions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Since the 1970s, numerous transportation strategies have been formulated to change the behavior of drivers or travelers by reducing trips, shifting travel to more efficient modes, or improving the efficiency of existing modes. This report summarizes findings documented in existing literature to identify strategies with the greatest potential impact. The estimated effects of implementing the most significant and aggressive individual driver behavior modification strategies range from less than 1% to a few percent reduction in transportation energy use and GHG emissions. Combined strategies result in reductions of 7% to 15% by 2030. Pricing, ridesharing, eco-driving, and speed limit reduction/enforcement strategies are widely judged to have the greatest estimated potential effect, but lack the widespread public acceptance needed to accomplish maximum results. This is one of a series of reports produced as a result of the Transportation Energy Futures (TEF) project, a Department of Energy-sponsored multi-agency project initiated to pinpoint underexplored strategies for abating GHGs and reducing petroleum dependence related to transportation.

Porter, C. D.; Brown, A.; DeFlorio, J.; McKenzie, E.; Tao, W.; Vimmerstedt, L.

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

2008 world direct reduction statistics  

SciTech Connect

This supplement discusses total direct reduced iron (DRI) production for 2007 and 2008 by process. Total 2008 production by MIDREX(reg sign) direct reduction process plants was over 39.8 million tons. The total of all coal-based processes was 17.6 million tons. Statistics for world DRI production are also given by region for 2007 and 2008 and by year (1970-2009). Capacity utilization for 2008 by process is given. World DRI production by region and by process is given for 1998-2008 and world DRI shipments are given from the 1970s to 2008. A list of world direct reduction plants is included.

NONE

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Reduction of carbon dioxide emissions by mineral carbonation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The study investigates the technologies that have the potential to provide feasible reduction of carbon dioxide (CO2) from a reference power plant. Particular focus has been given to mineral carbonation (at 1 bar) in which magnesium (Mg) and/or ... Keywords: carbon dioxide, emissions, mineral carbonation

C. J. Sturgeon; M. G. Rasul; Ashfaque Ahmed Chowdhury

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Diesel Idling Reduction | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Page Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon Diesel Idling Reduction Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Diesel Idling Reduction AgencyCompany...

215

Dry Barrier Mix in Reduction Cell Cathodes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Dry Barrier Mix in Reduction Cell Cathodes ... successfully tested as a replacement for barrier bricks in several reduction cell technology types ...

216

Black carbon snow albedo reduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Black carbon snow albedo reduction Black carbon snow albedo reduction Title Black carbon snow albedo reduction Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Hadley, Odelle L., and Thomas W. Kirchstetter Journal Nature Climate Change Volume 2 Pagination 437-440 Abstract Climate models indicate that the reduction of surface albedo caused by black-carbon contamination of snow contributes to global warming and near-worldwide melting of ice1, 2. In this study, we generated and characterized pure and black-carbon-laden snow in the laboratory and verified that black-carbon contamination appreciably reduces snow albedo at levels that have been found in natural settings1, 3, 4. Increasing the size of snow grains in our experiments decreased snow albedo and amplified the radiative perturbation of black carbon, which justifies the aging-related positive feedbacks that are included in climate models. Moreover, our data provide an extensive verification of the Snow, Ice and Aerosol Radiation model1, which will be included in the next assessment of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change5.

217

Poverty Reduction Strategies in Indonesia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Poverty Reduction Strategies in Indonesia A Public Lecture presented by Aris Mundayat, University in fifteen districts/cities in nine provinces in Indonesia, as measured by the newly launched People in Indonesia. Thursday 29th March 2012 10:00 am Murdoch University Senate Room All Welcome Aris Mundayat

218

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emissions Reduction Emissions Reduction Credits to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reduction Credits on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Emissions Reduction Credits Any state mobile emissions reduction credits program must allow credits for emissions reductions achieved by converting a vehicle to operate on an

219

Depleted uranium plasma reduction system study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A system life-cycle cost study was conducted of a preliminary design concept for a plasma reduction process for converting depleted uranium to uranium metal and anhydrous HF. The plasma-based process is expected to offer significant economic and environmental advantages over present technology. Depleted Uranium is currently stored in the form of solid UF{sub 6}, of which approximately 575,000 metric tons is stored at three locations in the U.S. The proposed system is preconceptual in nature, but includes all necessary processing equipment and facilities to perform the process. The study has identified total processing cost of approximately $3.00/kg of UF{sub 6} processed. Based on the results of this study, the development of a laboratory-scale system (1 kg/h throughput of UF6) is warranted. Further scaling of the process to pilot scale will be determined after laboratory testing is complete.

Rekemeyer, P.; Feizollahi, F.; Quapp, W.J.; Brown, B.W.

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Dynamic reduction, Version 1. 0  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the theoretical background of the EPRI Dynamic Reduction DYNRED V 1.0. EPRI initiated research under project RP763 to develop the original reduction program DYNEQU. This program was the first to be based on the concept of aggregating of coherent groups of synchronous generators into a single equivalent generator model. While technically advanced, DYNEQU proved difficult to use. Since then, the stability problems encountered in power system planning and operations have changed. The emphasis on first swing transient stability has been replaced by emphasis on inter-area oscillations and voltage stability. The method of identification of coherent generators used in DYNEQU is based on the comparison of rotor angle swings, in a linearized system model, following a fault. It has been shown that this method of coherency identification is good for first swing stability. For inter-area oscillation studies, this method of generator aggregation is less accurate. Far better, are identification methods based on the structure of the power system. Because of these changes in the requirements for reduced order power system models, a new dynamic reduction program (DYNRED) has been developed under EPRI project RP2447-1. It is coherency based, as is DYNEQU, but it has structurally based coherency identification methods in addition to the method used in DYNEQU. This report describes the techniques used in DYNRED, that is: Coherency Identification; Network Reduction; Method of Aggregation, Generator Aggregation, Excitation Aggregation, Primemover/Governor Aggregation. An example of the application of DYNRED to the reduction of a large interconnected power system model is also presented. DYNRED uses the special modeling and network solution techniques developed to enable systems having up to 12,000 bus to be studied. Dynamic data is completely compatible between MASS, PEALS, and the EPRI Extended Transient Midterm Stability Program (ETMSP).

Rogers, G.J.; Wong, D.Y.; Ottevangers, J.; Wang, L. (Ontario Hydro, Toronto, ON (Canada))

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identifying reduction potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Hydrogen Reduction of Ferric Ions for Use in Copper Electrowinning  

SciTech Connect

The conventional copper electrowinning process uses the water hydrolysis reaction as the anodic source of electrons. However this reaction generates acid mist and requires large quantities of energy. In order to improve energy efficiency and avoid acid mist, an alternative anodic reaction of ferrous ion oxidation has been proposed. This reaction does not involve evolution of acid mist and can be carried out at a lower cell voltage than the conventional process. However, because ferrous ions are converted to ferric ions at the anode in this process, there is a need for reduction of ferric ions to ferrous ions to continue this process. The most promising method for this reduction is the use of hydrogen gas since the resulting byproduct acid can be used elsewhere in the process and, unlike other reductants, hydrogen does not introduce other species that need subsequent removal. Because the hydrogen reduction technology has undergone only preliminary lab scale testing, additional research is needed to evaluate its commercial potential. Two issues for this research are the potentially low mass transfer rate of hydrogen into the electrolyte stream because of its low solubility in water, and whether other gaseous reductants less expensive than hydrogen, such as natural gas or syngas, might work. In this study various reductants were investigated to carry out the reduction of ferric ions to ferrous ions using a simulated electrolyte solution recycled through a trickle bed reactor packed with catalyst. The gases tested as reductants were hydrogen, methane, carbon monoxide, and a 50/50 mixture of H2 and CO. Nitrogen was also tested as an inert control. These gases were tested because they are constituents in either natural gas or syngas. The catalysts tested were palladium and platinum. Two gas flow rates and five electrolyte flow rates were tested. Pure hydrogen was an effective reductant of ferric ion. The rates were similar with both palladium and platinum. The ferric iron reduction increased with both the flow rate of gas as well as the liquid flow rate (up to ~0.1 g/L/min). Pure carbon monoxide also reduced the ferric ion, but at a rate about one tenth that of pure hydrogen at similar conditions. The syngas mixture of equimolar hydrogen and carbon monoxide reacted at a rate intermediate between each gas as a pure stream (up to ~ 0.06 g/L/min). This gas mixture shows that some form of unpurified reformer gas could be used to reduce the ferric ion in the electrolyte solution. Nitrogen was inert causing very little to no reduction of ferric ion.

Karl S. Noah; Debby F. Bruhn; John E. Wey; Robert S. Cherry

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Green roofs: potential at LANL  

SciTech Connect

Green roofs, roof systems that support vegetation, are rapidly becoming one of the most popular sustainable methods to combat urban environmental problems in North America. An extensive list of literature has been published in the past three decades recording the ecological benefits of green roofs; and now those benefits have been measured in enumerated data as a means to analyze the costs and returns of green roof technology. Most recently several studies have made substantial progress quantifying the monetary savings associated with storm water mitigation, the lessoning of the Urban Heat Island, and reduction of building cooling demands due to the implementation of green roof systems. Like any natural vegetation, a green roof is capable of absorbing the precipitation that falls on it. This capability has shown to significantly decrease the amount of storm water runoff produced by buildings as well as slow the rate at which runoff is dispensed. As a result of this reduction in volume and velocity, storm drains and sewage systems are relieved of any excess stress they might experience in a storm. For many municipalities and private building owners, any increase in storm water mitigation can result in major tax incentives and revenue that does not have to be spent on extra water treatments. Along with absorption of water, vegetation on green roofs is also capable of transpiration, the process by which moisture is evaporated into the air to cool ambient temperatures. This natural process aims to minimize the Urban Heat Island Effect, a phenomenon brought on by the dark and paved surfaces that increases air temperatures in urban cores. As the sun distributes solar radiation over a city's area, dark surfaces such as bitumen rooftops absorb solar rays and their heat. That heat is later released during the evening hours and the ambient temperatures do not cool as they normally would, creating an island of constant heat. Such excessively high temperatures induce heat strokes, heat exhaustion, and pollution that can agitate the respiratory system. The most significant savings associated with green roofs is in the reduction of cooling demands due to the green roof's thermal mass and their insulating properties. Unlike a conventional roof system, a green roof does not absorb solar radiation and transfer that heat into the interior of a building. Instead the vegetation acts as a shade barrier and stabilizes the roof temperature so that interior temperatures remain comfortable for the occupants. Consequently there is less of a demand for air conditioning, and thus less money spent on energy. At LANL the potential of green roof systems has already been realized with the construction of the accessible green roof on the Otowi building. To further explore the possibilities and prospective benefits of green roofs though, the initial capital costs must be invested. Three buildings, TA-03-1698, TA-03-0502, and TA-53-0031 have all been identified as sound candidates for a green roof retrofit project. It is recommended that LANL proceed with further analysis of these projects and implementation of the green roofs. Furthermore, it is recommended that an urban forestry program be initiated to provide supplemental support to the environmental goals of green roofs. The obstacles barring green roof construction are most often budgetary and structural concerns. Given proper resources, however, the engineers and design professionals at LANL would surely succeed in the proper implementation of green roof systems so as to optimize their ecological and monetary benefits for the entire organization.

Pacheco, Elena M [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

NREL: Vehicle Ancillary Loads Reduction - Air Conditioner Reduction Project  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conditioner Reduction Project to Reduce Vehicle Fuel Use by 30% Conditioner Reduction Project to Reduce Vehicle Fuel Use by 30% United States map depicting number of millions of gallons of cooling and dehumidification by state: Alabama 167, Alaska 1, Arizona 43, Arkansas 86, California 730, Colorado 76, Connecticut 61, Delaware 19, Florida 753, Georgia 251, Hawaii 68, Idaho 26, Illinois 242, Indiana 142, Iowa 68, Kansas 75, Kentucky 95, Louisiana 176, Maine 21, Maryland 118, Massachusetts 86, Michigan 186, Minnesota 86, Mississippi 85, Missouri 144, Montana 12, Nebraska 40, Nevada 61, New Hampshire 90, New Jersey 167, New Mexico 52, New York 273, North Carolina 187, North Dakota 12, Ohio 229, Oklahoma 109, Oregon 66, Pennsylvania 238, Rhode Island 15, South Carolina 127, South Dakota 17, Tennessee 179, Texas 735, Utah 43, Vermont 9, Virginia 187, Washington 64, West Virginia 37, Wisconsin 167, and Wyoming 7

224

Solid tags for identifying failed reactor components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid tag material which generates stable detectable, identifiable, and measurable isotopic gases on exposure to a neutron flux to be placed in a nuclear reactor component, particularly a fuel element, in order to identify the reactor component in event of its failure. Several tag materials consisting of salts which generate a multiplicity of gaseous isotopes in predetermined ratios are used to identify different reactor components.

Bunch, Wilbur L. (Richland, WA); Schenter, Robert E. (Richland, WA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Nanomechanical Sensor Detects and Identifies Chemical Analytes  

ORNL 2010-G00612/jcn UT-B ID 200802066 Nanomechanical Sensor Detects and Identifies Chemical Analytes Technology Summary ORNL researchers developed a ...

226

Identify energy-saving actions | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Identify energy-saving actions Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction...

227

Stability of alert survivable forces during reductions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The stability of current and projected strategic forces are discussed within a framework that contains elements of current US and Russian analyses. For current force levels and high alert, stability levels are high, as are the levels of potential strikes, due to the large forces deployed. As force levels drop towards those of current value target sets, the analysis becomes linear, concern shifts from stability to reconstitution, and survivable forces drop out. Adverse marginal costs generally provide disincentives for the reduction of vulnerable weapons, but the exchange of vulnerable for survivable weapons could reduce cost while increasing stability even for aggressive participants. Exchanges between effective vulnerable and survivable missile forces are studied with an aggregated, probabilistic model, which optimizes each sides` first and determines each sides` second strikes and costs by minimizing first strike costs.

Canavan, G.H.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Reduct based Q-learning: an introduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper introduces an approach to Reinforcement Learning Algorithm by introducing reduct concept of rough set methodology using a variation of Q-Learning algorithm. Unlike the conventional Q-Learning, the proposed algorithm calculates the reduct from ... Keywords: Q-learning method, reduct and reduct based Q-learning, reinforcement learning, rough set

Punit Pandey; Deepshikha Pandey

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

NEHRP - National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Failures I by John Egan National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program. A research and implementation partnership. ...

2013-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

230

Flexible reference trace reduction for VM simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The unmanageably large size of reference traces has spurred the development of sophisticated trace reduction techniques. In this article we present two new algorithms for trace reduction: Safely Allowed Drop (SAD) and Optimal LRU Reduction ... Keywords: cache hierarchies, locality, reference traces, trace compression, trace reduction

Scott F. Kaplan; Yannis Smaragdakis; Paul R. Wilson

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction to Idle Reduction to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction on AddThis.com... More in this section... Idle Reduction Benefits & Considerations Heavy-Duty Vehicles Medium-Duty Vehicles Light-Duty Vehicles School Buses Laws & Incentives Research & Development Related Links Parts & Equipment Maintenance Driving Behavior Fleet Rightsizing System Efficiency Idle Reduction Photo of fleet trucks

232

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Incentives  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Incentives to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Incentives on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Incentives on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Incentives on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Incentives on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Incentives on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Incentives on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Incentives Cascade Sierra Solutions (CSS) provides comprehensive idle reduction solutions for commercial trucks and trailers. Financing, loans, and grant

233

Reductive Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Reductive Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide Reductive Sequestration of Carbon Dioxide T. Mill (ted.mill@sri.com; 650-859-3605) SRI, PS273 333 Ravenswood Menlo Park, CA 94025 D. Ross (dsross3@yahoo.com; 650-327-3842) U.S. Geological Survey, Bldg 15 MS 999 345 Middlefield Rd. Menlo Park, CA 94025 Introduction The United States currently meets 80% of its energy needs by burning fossil fuels to form CO 2 . The combustion-based production of CO 2 has evolved into a major environmental challenge that extends beyond national borders and the issue has become as politically charged as it is technologically demanding. Whereas CO 2 levels in the atmosphere had remained stable over the 10,000 years preceeding the industrial revolution, that event initiated rapid growth in CO 2 levels over the past 150 years (Stevens, 2000). The resulting accelerating accumulation of

234

Wind load reduction for heliostats  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of wind-tunnel tests supported through the Solar Energy Research Institute (SERI) by the Office of Solar Thermal Technology of the US Department of Energy as part of the SERI research effort on innovative concentrators. As gravity loads on drive mechanisms are reduced through stretched-membrane technology, the wind-load contribution of the required drive capacity increases in percentage. Reduction of wind loads can provide economy in support structure and heliostat drive. Wind-tunnel tests have been directed at finding methods to reduce wind loads on heliostats. The tests investigated primarily the mean forces, moments, and the possibility of measuring fluctuating forces in anticipation of reducing those forces. A significant increase in ability to predict heliostat wind loads and their reduction within a heliostat field was achieved.

Peterka, J.A.; Hosoya, N.; Bienkiewicz, B.; Cermak, J.E.

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Biological Sludge Reduction and Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document describes research sponsored by EPRI and Advanced Biological Services (ABS). A series of experiments focused on the reduction and analysis of biological sludge in pulp mill wastewater. The first experiment involved optimization of the milling process through the alteration of the grinding gap and the number of times sludge was passed through the colloid mill in order to affect fractionation, dispersion, and lysis. For the second experiment, tests were conducted to evaluate the effect of ble...

2001-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

236

Reductive Dissolution of Goethite and Hematite by Reduced Flavins  

SciTech Connect

The abiotic reductive dissolution of goethite and hematite by the reduced forms of flavin mononucleotide (FMNH2) and riboflavin (RBFH2), electron transfer mediators (ETM) secreted by the dissimilatory iron-reducing bacterium Shewanella, was investigated under stringent anaerobic conditions. In contrast to the rapid redox reaction rate observed for ferrihydrite and lepidocrocite (Shi et al., 2012), the reductive dissolution of crystalline goethite and hematite was slower, with the extent of reaction limited by the thermodynamic driving force at circumneutral pH. Both the initial reaction rate and reaction extent increased with decreasing pH. On a unit surface area basis, goethite was less reactive than hematite between pH 4.0 and 7.0. AH2DS, the reduced form of the well-studied synthetic ETM anthraquinone-2,6-disulfonate (AQDS), yielded higher rates than FMNH2 under most reaction conditions, despite the fact that FMNH2 was a more effective reductant than AH2DS for ferryhydrite and lepidocrocite. Two additional model compounds, methyl viologen and benzyl viologen, were investigated under similar reaction conditions to explore the relationship between reaction rate and thermodynamic properties. Relevant kinetic data from the literature were also included in the analysis to span a broad range of half-cell potentials. Other conditions being equal, the surface area normalized initial reaction rate (ra) increased as the redox potential of the reductant became more negative. A non-linear, parabolic relationship was observed between log ra and the redox potential for eight reducants at pH 7.0, as predicted by Marcus theory for electron transfer. When pH and reductant concentration were fixed, log ra was positively correlated to the redox potential of four Fe(III) oxides over a wide pH range, following a non-linear parabolic relationship as well.

Shi, Zhi; Zachara, John M.; Wang, Zheming; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.

2013-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

237

Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Reduction Strategies | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reduction Strategies Reduction Strategies Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Reduction Strategies October 7, 2013 - 10:16am Addthis For each major emission source identified in the previous step to evaluate greenhouse gas (GHG) emission profile, Federal agencies should review possible strategies for reducing GHG emissions and determine what assets may benefit from each strategy. This guidance describes technologies, policies, practices, and other strategies for reducing GHG emissions from each major emission source: Buildings Vehicles and mobile equipment Business travel Employee commuting. It also helps users determine what strategies are applicable to their facilities, employees, or other assets, and estimate the GHG emissions that may be avoided if they are adopted. For example, a facility manager may

238

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Reduction Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement A commercial vehicle or gasoline powered vehicle may not idle for more than five minutes during any 60-minute period. Exemptions are allowed for the

239

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Emissions Reductions Emissions Reductions Grants to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Emissions Reductions Grants on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Emissions Reductions Grants The Carl Moyer Memorial Air Quality Standards Attainment Program (Program) provides incentives to cover the incremental cost of purchasing engines and

240

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement A gasoline-fueled motor vehicle is not allowed to operate for more than three consecutive minutes when the vehicle is not in motion, with the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identifying reduction potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement A vehicle may not idle at a loading zone, parking or service area, route terminal, or other off-street areas, except for the following situations:

242

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement A motor vehicle engine may not operate for more than five consecutive minutes when the vehicle is not in motion, with the following exceptions:

243

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirements  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirements to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirements on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirements on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirements on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirements on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirements on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirements on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirements Effective May 1, 2014, a driver may not idle his or her motor vehicle for more than five minutes in a 60-minute period. This limit does not apply if

244

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement Diesel vehicles with a gross vehicle weight rating over 10,000 pounds may not idle for more than five minutes in any continuous 60 minute period.

245

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Reduction Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement The owner or operator of a diesel powered vehicle must limit the length of time their vehicle remains idle. The limit is based on the outside

246

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement Motor vehicles may not idle unnecessarily for longer than five consecutive minutes during any 60-minute period. This includes heavy-duty diesel

247

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement Diesel truck or bus engines may not idle for more than 15 consecutive minutes. Exemptions apply to diesel trucks or buses for which the Nevada

248

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement A person that operates a diesel powered motor vehicle in certain counties and townships may not cause or allow the motor vehicle, when it is not in

249

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement A diesel- or gasoline-powered motor vehicle may not idle for more than three consecutive minutes, except under the following conditions: 1) to

250

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement Motor vehicles licensed for commercial or public service may not idle for more than three minutes in commercial or residential urban areas, unless

251

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement Idling of any unattended vehicle is prohibited in Utah. Violators are subject to a penalty of up to $750 and/or up to 90 days imprisonment.

252

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Reduction Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement On-road heavy-duty motor vehicles with a gross vehicle weight rating of 8,500 pounds or greater may not idle for more than three consecutive

253

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Loans  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Loans Idle Reduction Loans to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Loans on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Loans on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Loans on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Loans on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Loans on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Loans on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Loans The Small Business Pollution Prevention Assistance Account Loan Program provides low interest rate loans to small businesses undertaking projects in Pennsylvania that reduce waste, pollution, or energy use, including the

254

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum Reduction Initiative  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Petroleum Reduction Petroleum Reduction Initiative to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum Reduction Initiative on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum Reduction Initiative on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum Reduction Initiative on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum Reduction Initiative on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum Reduction Initiative on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Petroleum Reduction Initiative on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Petroleum Reduction Initiative The Petroleum Savings and Independence Advisory Commission (Commission) was established to provide recommendations and monitor programs designed to

255

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement A motor vehicle may not idle for more than five consecutive minutes. This regulation does not apply to: 1) vehicles being serviced, provided that

256

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Reduction Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement Vehicle operators may not idle any commercial diesel vehicle with a gross vehicle weight rating of more than 10,000 pounds for more than 10 minutes

257

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement School bus operators may not idle a school bus engine for more than three consecutive minutes except under the following conditions: uncontrollable

258

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Reduction Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement A commercial motor vehicle with a gross vehicle weight rating of 10,000 pounds or more may not idle for more than 15 minutes in any 60-minute

259

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement A vehicle may not idle for more than five minutes from April through October in cities and counties where the local government has signed a

260

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Requirement A driver may not idle a vehicle on a roadway outside a business or residential district when it is practical to stop and park the vehicle. A

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identifying reduction potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Laser Weather Identifier: Present and Future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prototype Laser Weather Identifier (LWI) systems designed to detect fog, rain and snow were tested for several months at Stapleton International Airport in Denver, and at the AFGL Weather Test Facility at Otis Air Force Base, Massachusetts. We ...

Ting-I. Wang; R. Lataitis; R. S. Lawrence; G. R. Ochs

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Identify Institutional Change Roles for Sustainability | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Roles for Sustainability Roles for Sustainability Identify Institutional Change Roles for Sustainability October 8, 2013 - 11:47am Addthis Example of How Roles Affect Sustainability Goals The following scenario is an example of how roles can affect the implementation of a sustainability goal despite best intentions. Policymakers mandate waste reduction. A waste manager determines that a solution is to recycle more. No one notices that the staff responsible for implementing the solution forgets to order enough recycling bins for a building. Office workers continue to put recyclable material in the trash instead of a recycling bin. Janitorial staff members don't have the time to sort the recyclable material from the trash. Municipal waste personnel dump recyclable material in a landfill. Lesson: It is important that action plans

263

Minimal nuclear deterrence : a nuclear arsenal reduction plan for the United States  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The global political climate has called for reductions to nuclear arsenals around the world. This thesis researches how potential deep cuts to the United States' large strategic nuclear arsenal would affect its current ...

Laderman, Sarah (Sarah Jane)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Solar cost reduction through technical improvements: the concepts of learning and experience  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The concepts of learning and experience are reviewed and their usefulness for predicting the future costs of solar technologies are evaluated. The literature review indicated that the cost estimates for solar energy technologies are typically made assuming a fixed production process, characterized by standard capacity factors, overhead, and labor costs. The learning curve is suggested as a generalization of the costs of potential solar energy systems. The concept of experience is too ambiguous to be useful for cost estimation. There is no logical reason to believe that costs will decline purely as a function of cumulative production, and experience curves do not allow the analyst to identify logical sources of cost reduction directly. The procedures for using learning and aggregated cost curves to estimate the costs of solar technologies are outlined. It is recommended that production histories of analogous products and processes are analyzed and the learning and cost curves for these surrogates are estimated. These curves, if judged applicable, can be used to predict the cost reductions in manufacturing solar energy technologies.

Krawiec, F.; Flaim, T.

1979-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Reduction Pilot Plant - WV 01  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

Reduction Pilot Plant - WV 01 Reduction Pilot Plant - WV 01 FUSRAP Considered Sites Site: REDUCTION PILOT PLANT (WV.01 ) Eliminated from further consideration under FUSRAP Designated Name: Not Designated Alternate Name: International Nickel Company WV.01-1 Location: Cole Street at Alterizer Ave. , Huntington , West Virginia WV.01-2 Evaluation Year: 1987 WV.01-1 Site Operations: Manufactured powdered Nickel for use at Paducah and Portsmouth gaseous diffusion plants and Nickel plated a small quantity of Uranium slugs. WV.01-2 WV.01-1 Site Disposition: Eliminated - Limited quantities of radioactive material used on the site. Potential for residual radioactive material from AEC operations conducted at the site considered remote - confirmed by radiological survey. WV.01-1 WV.01-3

266

Lean Gasoline Engine Reductant Chemistry During Lean NOx Trap Regeneration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lean NOx Trap (LNT) catalysts can effectively reduce NOx from lean engine exhaust. Significant research for LNTs in diesel engine applications has been performed and has led to commercialization of the technology. For lean gasoline engine applications, advanced direct injection engines have led to a renewed interest in the potential for lean gasoline vehicles and, thereby, a renewed demand for lean NOx control. To understand the gasoline-based reductant chemistry during regeneration, a BMW lean gasoline vehicle has been studied on a chassis dynamometer. Exhaust samples were collected and analyzed for key reductant species such as H2, CO, NH3, and hydrocarbons during transient drive cycles. The relation of the reductant species to LNT performance will be discussed. Furthermore, the challenges of NOx storage in the lean gasoline application are reviewed.

Choi, Jae-Soon [ORNL; Prikhodko, Vitaly Y [ORNL; Partridge Jr, William P [ORNL; Parks, II, James E [ORNL; Norman, Kevin M [ORNL; Huff, Shean P [ORNL; Chambon, Paul H [ORNL; Thomas, John F [ORNL

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Identifying Efficiency Degrading Faults in Split Air Conditioning Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Studies estimate that as much as 50% of packaged air conditioning systems operate in faulty conditions that degrade system efficiency. Common faults include: under- and over-charged systems (too much or too little refrigerant), faulty expansions valves (stuck valves, valve hunting, poorly tuned valve controllers), and fouled evaporators and condensers. Furthermore, air conditioning systems can often be adjusted to improve efficiency while continuing to meet cooling loads (adjusting system pressures, decreasing superheat setpoints). This study presents the design of a low cost device that can non-invasively measure system operating conditions, diagnose faults, estimate potential energy savings, and provide recommendations on how the system should be adjusted or repaired. Using eight external temperature measurements, the device potentially can detect and diagnose up to ten faults commonly found in HVAC systems. Steady state temperatures are compared to threshold values obtained from literature and HVAC manufacturers to detect and determine the severity of faults and subsequent reductions in coefficient of performance. Preliminary tests reveal the potential for the device to detect and diagnose common efficiency-degrading faults in HVAC systems.

Terrill, T. J.; Brown, M. L.; Cheyne, R. W. Jr.; Cousins, A. J.; Daniels, B. P.; Erb, K. L.; Garcia, P. A.; Leutermann, M. J.; Nel, A. J.; Robert, C. L.; Widger, S. B.; Williams, A. G.; Rasmussen, B. P.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Global Threat Reduction Initiative | National Nuclear Security  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Threat Reduction Initiative | National Nuclear Security Threat Reduction Initiative | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Global Threat Reduction Initiative Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Global Threat Reduction Initiative Global Threat Reduction Initiative The mission of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) is to reduce

269

Global Threat Reduction Initiative | National Nuclear Security  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Threat Reduction Initiative | National Nuclear Security Threat Reduction Initiative | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Global Threat Reduction Initiative Home > About Us > Our Programs > Nonproliferation > Global Threat Reduction Initiative Global Threat Reduction Initiative The mission of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI) is to reduce

270

NOx Reduction through Efficiency Gain  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Benz Air Engineering and the CompuNOx system focus on a controls approach to minimize emissions without exposing steam generation plants to an unbearable financial burden. With minimal system changes we use thorough system analysis in conjunction with a novel control design to deliver a comprehensive boiler controls retrofit that provides reductions in emissions as well as substantial cost savings. Combining mechanical engineering expertise with substantial experience in control engineering in over 200 retrofits this system achieves astonishing results with short payback time, making CompuNOx a feasible solution for emission mandates and cost savings.

Benz, R.; Thompson, R.; Staedter, M.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

On the design of potential collaboration spaces  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we introduce the concepts of Potential and Actual Collaboration Spaces. The former applies to the initial space where opportunities for collaboration are identified and an initial interaction is established, while the latter relates to ... Keywords: Doc2U, casual and informal interactions, potential collaboration awareness, potential collaboration spaces

Alberto L. Moran; Jesus Favela; Ana M. Martinez Enriquez; Dominique Decouchant

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Identifying at-risk employees: A behavioral model for predicting potential insider threats  

SciTech Connect

A psychosocial model was developed to assess an employee’s behavior associated with an increased risk of insider abuse. The model is based on case studies and research literature on factors/correlates associated with precursor behavioral manifestations of individuals committing insider crimes. In many of these crimes, managers and other coworkers observed that the offenders had exhibited signs of stress, disgruntlement, or other issues, but no alarms were raised. Barriers to using such psychosocial indicators include the inability to recognize the signs and the failure to record the behaviors so that they could be assessed by a person experienced in psychosocial evaluations. We have developed a model using a Bayesian belief network with the help of human resources staff, experienced in evaluating behaviors in staff. We conducted an experiment to assess its agreement with human resources and management professionals, with positive results. If implemented in an operational setting, the model would be part of a set of management tools for employee assessment that can raise an alarm about employees who pose higher insider threat risks. In separate work, we combine this psychosocial model’s assessment with computer workstation behavior to raise the efficacy of recognizing an insider crime in the making.

Greitzer, Frank L.; Kangas, Lars J.; Noonan, Christine F.; Dalton, Angela C.

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

The Potential for Self-Organizing Maps to Identify Model Error Structures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An important aspect of numerical weather model improvement is the identification of deficient areas of the model, particularly deficiencies that are flow-dependent or otherwise vary in time or space. Here the authors introduce the use of self-...

Walter C. Kolczynski; Jr.; Joshua P. Hacker

274

Marine Megafauna Surveys in Timor Leste: Identifying Opportunities for Potential Ecotourism Final Report  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

) monthly aerial surveys (ii) field ground-truthing using boats and (iii) training of TL government staff in aerial survey techniques (manual prepared) and GIS analysis of data. A light plane was used for aerial of the coast. Main findings of aerial and boat surveys Dolphins and small whales were sighted throughout all

275

Guide for Identifying and Converting High-Potential Petroleum Brownfield Sites to Alternative Fuel Stations  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Former gasoline stations that are now classified as brownfields can be good sites to sell alternative fuels because they are in locations that are convenient to vehicles and they may be seeking a new source of income. However, their success as alternative fueling stations is highly dependent on location-specific criteria. First, this report outlines what these criteria are, how to prioritize them, and then applies that assessment framework to five of the most popular alternative fuels--electricity, natural gas, hydrogen, ethanol, and biodiesel. The second part of this report delves into the criteria and tools used to assess an alternative fuel retail site at the local level. It does this through two case studies of converting former gasoline stations in the Seattle-Eugene area into electric charge stations. The third part of this report addresses steps to be taken after the specific site has been selected. This includes choosing and installing the recharging equipment, which includes steps to take in the permitting process and key players to include.

Johnson, C.; Hettinger, D.; Mosey, G.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Reduction of Metal Oxide to Metal using Ionic Liquids  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A novel pathway for the high efficiency production of metal from metal oxide means of electrolysis in ionic liquids at low temperature was investigated. The main emphasis was to eliminate the use of carbon and high temperature application in the reduction of metal oxides to metals. The emphasis of this research was to produce metals such as Zn, and Pb that are normally produced by the application of very high temperatures. The reduction of zinc oxide to zinc and lead oxide to lead were investigated. This study involved three steps in accomplishing the final goal of reduction of metal oxide to metal using ionic liquids: 1) Dissolution of metal oxide in an ionic liquid, 2) Determination of reduction potential using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and 3) Reduction of the dissolved metal oxide. Ionic liquids provide additional advantage by offering a wide potential range for the deposition. In each and every step of the process, more than one process variable has been examined. Experimental results for electrochemical extraction of Zn from ZnO and Pb from PbO using eutectic mixtures of Urea ((NH2)2CO) and Choline chloride (HOC2H4N(CH3)3+Cl-) or (ChCl) in a molar ratio 2:1, varying voltage and temperatures were carried out. Fourier Transform Infra-Red (FTIR) spectroscopy studies of ionic liquids with and without metal oxide additions were conducted. FTIR and induction coupled plasma spectroscopy (ICPS) was used in the characterization of the metal oxide dissolved ionic liquid. Electrochemical experiments were conducted using EG&G potentiostat/galvanostat with three electrode cell systems. Cyclic voltammetry was used in the determination of reduction potentials for the deposition of metals. Chronoamperometric experiments were carried out in the potential range of -0.6V to -1.9V for lead and -1.4V to -1.9V for zinc. The deposits were characterized using XRD and SEM-EDS for phase, morphological and elemental analysis. The results showed that pure metal was deposited on the cathode. Successful extraction of metal from metal oxide dissolved in Urea/ChCl (2:1) was accomplished. The current efficiencies were relatively high in both the metal deposition processes with current efficiency greater than 86% for lead and 95% for zinc. This technology will advance the metal oxide reduction process by increasing the process efficiency and also eliminate the production of CO2 which makes this an environmentally benign technology for metal extraction.

Dr. Ramana Reddy

2012-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

277

POTENTIAL THERMOELECTRIC APPLICATIONS IN DIESEL VEHICLES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Novel thermodynamic cycles developed by BSST provide improvements by factors of approximately 2 in cooling, heating and power generation efficiency of solid-state thermoelectric systems. The currently available BSST technology is being evaluated in automotive development programs for important new applications. Thermoelectric materials are likely to become available that further increase performance by a comparable factor. These major advancements should allow the use of thermoelectric systems in new applications that have the prospect of contributing to emissions reduction, fuel economy, and improved user comfort. Potential applications of thermoelectrics in diesel vehicles are identified and discussed. As a case in point, the history and status of the Climate Controlled Seat (CCS) system from Amerigon, the parent of BSST, is presented. CCS is the most successful and highest production volume thermoelectric system in vehicles today. As a second example, the results of recent analyses on electric power generation from vehicle waste heat are discussed. Conclusions are drawn as to the practicality of waste power generation systems that incorporate BSST's thermodynamic cycle and advanced thermoelectric materials.

Crane, D

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

278

Selective Catalytic Reduction Catalyst Recycle and Re-Use Options  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Given the widespread implementation of selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology, there is a great deal of interest in finding viable recycle/re-use routes for spent catalyst as an alternative to landfilling. The current effort has focused on detailed evaluation of several recycle/re-use processes that were identified in previous EPRI studies. These recycle/re-use technologies include mineral filler applications, incorporation into wet-bottom boiler slag, cement kiln co-processing, and use in iron/s...

2010-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

279

Quantum noise and stochastic reduction  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In standard nonrelativistic quantum mechanics the expectation of the energy is a conserved quantity. It is possible to extend the dynamical law associated with the evolution of a quantum state consistently to include a nonlinear stochastic component, while respecting the conservation law. According to the dynamics thus obtained, referred to as the energy-based stochastic Schrodinger equation, an arbitrary initial state collapses spontaneously to one of the energy eigenstates, thus describing the phenomenon of quantum state reduction. In this article, two such models are investigated: one that achieves state reduction in infinite time, and the other in finite time. The properties of the associated energy expectation process and the energy variance process are worked out in detail. By use of a novel application of a nonlinear filtering method, closed-form solutions--algebraic in character and involving no integration--are obtained for both these models. In each case, the solution is expressed in terms of a random variable representing the terminal energy of the system, and an independent noise process. With these solutions at hand it is possible to simulate explicitly the dynamics of the quantum states of complicated physical systems.

Dorje C. Brody; Lane P. Hughston

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

280

Intramolecular Reduction of Oxyferryl Myoglobin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

of Intramolecular Reduction of Oxyferryl Iron in Horse Heart Myoglobin of Intramolecular Reduction of Oxyferryl Iron in Horse Heart Myoglobin Craig Fenwick, Stephen Marmor, K. Govindaraju, Ann M. English, James F. Wishart and Ji Sun J. Am. Chem. Soc. 116, 3169-3170 (1994) Abstract: The observed rate constant (kobs), as determined by pulse radiolysis, for intramolecular electron transfer (ET) from a5RuII bound at His48 to the ferric heme of horse heart myoglobin was 0.059 ± 0.003 s-1 at 25 °C, pH 7.0. This value is essentially identical to that previously reported in the literature for sperm whale myoglobin. Following oxidation by H2O2 of the ferric heme to oxyferryl heme (FeIV=O), kobs for intramolecular ET from a5RuII(His48) to heme increased to 0.19 ± 0.02 s-1 at a driving force of 0.96 eV. However, at the same driving force, a rate

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identifying reduction potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Experimental research on comprehensive emission reduction of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Comprehensively considering the factors of the reduction effect, the influence on ... Effects of reducer and slag concentrations in the iron-carbon nuggets coalescence in ... Simulation Calculation on Calciothermic Reduction of Titanium Dioxide.

282

MOLECULAR MECHANISM OF MICROBIAL TECHNETIUM REDUCTION FINAL REPORT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microbial Tc(VII) reduction is an attractive alternative strategy for bioremediation of technetium-contaminated subsurface environments. Traditional ex situ remediation processes (e.g., adsorption or ion exchange) are often limited by poor extraction efficiency, inhibition by competing ions and production of large volumes of produced waste. Microbial Tc(VII) reduction provides an attractive alternative in situ remediation strategy since the reduced end-product Tc(IV) precipitates as TcO2, a highly insoluble hydrous oxide. Despite its potential benefits, the molecular mechanism of microbial Tc(VII) reduction remains poorly understood. The main goal of the proposed DOENABIR research project is to determine the molecular mechanism of microbial Tc(VII) reduction. Random mutagenesis studies in our lab have resulted in generation of a set of six Tc(VII) reduction-deficient mutants of Shewanella oneidensis. The anaerobic respiratory deficiencies of each Tc(VII) reduction-deficient mutant was determined by anaerobic growth on various combinations of three electron donors and 14 terminal electron acceptors. Results indicated that the electron transport pathways to Tc(VII), NO3 -, Mn(III) and U(VI) share common structural or regulatory components. In addition, we have recently found that wild-type Shewanella are also able to reduce Tc(IV) as electron acceptor, producing Tc(III) as an end-product. The recent genome sequencing of a variety of technetium-reducing bacteria and the anticipated release of several additional genome sequences in the coming year, provides us with an unprecedented opportunity to determine the mechanism of microbial technetium reduction across species and genus lines.

DiChristina, Thomas J. [Georgia Tech

2013-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

283

A Review of Street Lighting Evaluations: Crime Reduction Effects  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Consideration of the literature concerning street lighting effects on crime yields the following conclusions: (1) Precisely targeted increases in street lighting generally have crime reduction effects. (2) More general increases in street lighting seem to have crime prevention effects, but this outcome is not universal Older and U.S. research yield fewer positive results than more recent U.K. research. (3) Even untargeted increases in crime prevention generally make residents less fearful of crime or more confident of their own safety at night. (4) In the most recent and sophisticated studies, street lighting improvements are associated with crime reductions in the daytime as well as during the hours of darkness. (5) The debate about lighting effects has served to preclude a more refined analysis of the means by and circumstances in which lighting might reduce crime. Our aim should now be to use context-appropriate lighting schemes as part of a full repertoire of crime reduction tactics. Recommendations based upon a strategic view of current crime reduction policy are made about how lighting effects could be clarified and elaborated. The provisions of the British Crime and Disorder Act 1998 constitute a potential vehicle for lighting programmes operating within crime reduction schemes generally.

Ken Pease

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

An Approach for Measuring Reductions in Construction ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. An Approach for Measuring Reductions in Construction Worker Illnesses and Injuries: Baseline Measures of Construction Industry ...

2001-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

285

Molecular Mechanisms of Uranium Reduction by Clostridia  

SciTech Connect

The objective of this research is to elucidate systematically the molecular mechanisms involved in the reduction of uranium by Clostridia.

Francis, A.J.; Matin, A.C.; Gao, W.; Chidambaram, D.; Barak, Y.; Dodge, C.J.

2006-04-05T23:59:59.000Z

286

Earthquake Hazards Reduction Information at NIST  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 2013). Earthquakes (08/15/2011). Fifteen Named to Earthquake Hazards Reduction Advisory Committee (10/05/2010). Final ...

2010-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

287

Disposal Cost Savings Considerations in Curie Reduction Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 1996, the Low Level Radioactive Waste (LLW) Disposal Facility in Barnwell, South Carolina, announced a new fee structure for the disposal of radioactive wastes based on waste density, dose rate, and activity (curies). This report provides a detailed discussion of the current Barnwell Disposal Fee Structure along with its cost impact on various types of wastes generated. The report also evaluates various curie reduction options, their practical application, and their cost savings potential to help LLW ...

1998-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

288

Project Title: VIscosity Reduction Date:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4t 3 4t 3 l I Project lnfonnatlon Project Title: VIscosity Reduction Date: 11-22-2010 DOE Code: 673()-()20-51141 Contractor Code: 8067-778 Project Lead: Frank Ingham Project Overview 1. The purpose of the project is to test a tool that temporarily reduces the viscosity of oil which allows it to be 1. Brief project description ~nclude pumped through pipelines easier. The test will require about 4 miles of line to pump the oil through after anything that could impact the treatment (hence the need to connect the 31oops together), a holding volume for recovery, then repeat. environmenJ] There will be tanks to hold the original volume, tanks to receive the volume after treatment and pumping 2. Legal location through the line, possible transfer between tanks, transport (trucking) of the oil to the site (by the COC) and

289

PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Plains CO{sub 2} Reduction (PCOR) Partnership continues to make great progress. Task 2 (Technology Deployment) focused on developing information regarding deployment issues to support Task 5 (Modeling and Phase II Action Plans) by providing information to be used to assess CO{sub 2} sequestration opportunities in the PCOR Partnership region. Task 3 (Public Outreach) focused on developing an informational video about CO{sub 2} sequestration. Progress in Task 4 (Sources, Sinks, and Infrastructure) included the continued collection of data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, treatment, and compression for pipeline transportation. Task 5 focused on screening and qualitatively assessing sequestration options. Task 5 activities also continue to be useful in structuring data collection and other activities in Tasks 2, 3, and 5.

Edward N. Steadman; John A. Harju; Erin M. O'Leary; James A. Sorensen; Daniel J. Daly; Melanie D. Jensen; Thea E. Reikoff

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect

The Plains Co{sub 2} Reduction (PCOR) Partnership continues to make great progress. Task 2 (Technology Deployment) activities have focused on developing information on deployment issues to support Task 5 activities by providing information to be used to assess CO{sub 2} sequestration opportunities in the PCOR Partnership region. Task 3 (Public Outreach) activities have focused on developing an informational video about CO{sub 2} sequestration. Progress in Task 4 (Sources, Sinks, and Infrastructure) has included the continued collection of data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, treatment, and compression for pipeline transportation. Task 5 (Modeling and Phase II Action Plans) activities have focused on screening and qualitatively assessing sequestration options. Task 5 activities also continue to be useful in structuring data collection and other activities in Tasks 2, 3, and 5.

Edward N. Steadman

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Electrolyte treatment for aluminum reduction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of treating an electrolyte for use in the electrolytic reduction of alumina to aluminum employing an anode and a cathode, the alumina dissolved in the electrolyte, the treating improving wetting of the cathode with molten aluminum during electrolysis. The method comprises the steps of providing a molten electrolyte comprised of ALF.sub.3 and at least one salt selected from the group consisting of NaF, KF and LiF, and treating the electrolyte by providing therein 0.004 to 0.2 wt. % of a transition metal or transition metal compound for improved wettability of the cathode with molten aluminum during subsequent electrolysis to reduce alumina to aluminum.

Brown, Craig W. (Seattle, WA); Brooks, Richard J. (Seattle, WA); Frizzle, Patrick B. (Seattle, WA); Juric, Drago D. (Bulleen, AU)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect

The Plains CO{sub 2} Reduction (PCOR) Partnership continues to make great progress. Task 2 (Technology Deployment) focused on developing information regarding deployment issues to support Task 5 (Modeling and Phase II Action Plans) by providing information to be used to assess CO{sub 2} sequestration opportunities in the PCOR Partnership region. Task 3 (Public Outreach) focused on developing an informational video about CO{sub 2} sequestration. Progress in Task 4 (Sources, Sinks, and Infrastructure) included the continued collection of data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, treatment, and compression for pipeline transportation. Task 5 focused on screening and qualitatively assessing sequestration options. Task 5 activities also continue to be useful in structuring data collection and other activities in Tasks 2, 3, and 5.

Edward N. Steadman; John A. Harju; Erin M. O' Leary; James A. Sorensen; Daniel J. Daly; Melanie D. Jensen; Thea E. Reikoff

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

A method for identifying market power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An ability to exercise market power by suppliers may significantly reduce market efficiency in restructured electricity markets. Many studies have been performed to develop an effective tool to identify market power based on indices. Most often it is ... Keywords: Dispatch sensitivity matrix, HHI, KKT, LI, LMP, MC, Market power, Null space, PTDF, Power transfer distribution factor (PTDF) matrix

Hyungseon Oh; Robert J. Thomas

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Diffraction gratings used as identifying markers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A finely detailed defraction grating is applied to an object as an identifier or tag which is unambiguous, difficult to duplicate, or remove and transfer to another item, and can be read and compared with prior readings with relative ease. The exact pattern of the defraction grating is mapped by diffraction moire techniques and recorded for comparison with future readings of the same grating.

Deason, Vance A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ward, Michael B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Embedded sensor having an identifiable orientation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method is described wherein a sensor, such as a mechanical strain sensor, embedded in a fiber core, is "flagged" to identify a preferred orientation of the sensor. The identifying "flag" is a composite material, comprising a plurality of non-woven filaments distributed in a resin matrix, forming a small planar tab. The fiber is first subjected to a stimulus to identify the orientation providing the desired signal response, and then sandwiched between first and second layers of the composite material. The fiber, and therefore, the sensor orientation is thereby captured and fixed in place. The process for achieving the oriented fiber includes, after identifying the fiber orientation, carefully laying the oriented fiber onto the first layer of composite, moderately heating the assembled layer for a short period in order to bring the composite resin to a "tacky" state, heating the second composite layer as the first, and assembling the two layers together such that they merge to form a single consolidated block. The consolidated block achieving a roughly uniform distribution of composite filaments near the embedded fiber such that excess resin is prevented from "pooling" around the periphery of the fiber.

Bennett, Thomas E. (31 Portola Ct., Danville, CA 94506); Nelson, Drew V. (840 Cabot Ct., San Carlos, CA 94070)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Identify the Problem: Reduce Waste By  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Identify the Problem: Reduce Waste By Banning Plastic Bag Use Define Goal: Is the ban the most The 2008 EPA report asserts that while paper waste has remained relatively constant at approximately 31%, plastic waste has been rising from 0.4% in 1960 to the present value at 12%a. San Francisco sets the goal

Iglesia, Enrique

297

Identifying important concepts from medical documents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Automated medical concept recognition is important for medical informatics such as medical document retrieval and text mining research. In this paper, we present a software tool called keyphrase identification program (KIP) for identifying topical concepts ... Keywords: Document keyphrase, Keyphrase extraction, Medical concepts, Medical documents, Noun phrase extraction, Text mining

Quanzhi Li; Yi-Fang Brook Wu

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Technological cost-reduction pathways for attenuator wave energy converters in the marine hydrokinetic environment.  

SciTech Connect

This report considers and prioritizes the primary potential technical costreduction pathways for offshore wave activated body attenuators designed for ocean resources. This report focuses on technical research and development costreduction pathways related to the device technology rather than environmental monitoring or permitting opportunities. Three sources of information were used to understand current cost drivers and develop a prioritized list of potential costreduction pathways: a literature review of technical work related to attenuators, a reference device compiled from literature sources, and a webinar with each of three industry device developers. Data from these information sources were aggregated and prioritized with respect to the potential impact on the lifetime levelized cost of energy, the potential for progress, the potential for success, and the confidence in success. Results indicate the five most promising costreduction pathways include advanced controls, an optimized structural design, improved power conversion, planned maintenance scheduling, and an optimized device profile.

Bull, Diana L; Ochs, Margaret Ellen

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Use of bromodeoxyuridine immunocapture to identify psychrotolerant phenanthrene-degrading bacteria in phenanthrene-enriched polluted Baltic Sea sediments  

SciTech Connect

The aim of this study was to enrich and identify psychrotolerant phenanthrenedegrading bacteria from polluted Baltic Sea sediments. Polyaromatic hydrocarbon (PAH)-contaminated sediments were spiked with phenanthrene and incubated for 2 months in the presence of bromodeoxyuridine that is incorporated into the DNA of replicating cells. The bromodeoxyuridine-incorporated DNA was extracted by immunocapture and analyzed by terminal-restriction fragment length polymorphism and 16S rRNA gene cloning and sequencing to identify bacterial populations that were growing. In addition, degradation genes were quantified in the bromodeoxyuridine-incorporated DNA by real-time PCR. Phenanthrene concentrations decreased after 2 months of incubation in the phenanthrene-enriched sediments and this reduction correlated to increases in copy numbers of xylE and phnAc dioxygenase genes. Representatives of Exiguobacterium, Schewanella,Methylomonas, Pseudomonas, Bacteroides and an uncultured Deltaproteobacterium and a Gammaproteobacterium dominated the growing community in the phenanthrene spiked sediments. Isolates that were closely related to three of these bacteria (two pseudomonads and an Exiguobacterium sp.) could reduce phenanthrene concentrations in pure cultures and they all harbored phnAc dioxygenase genes. These results confirm that this combination of culture-based and molecular approaches was useful for identification of actively growing bacterial species with a high potential for phenanthrene degradation.

Edlund, A.; Jansson, J.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Pollution Prevention - Environmental Impact Reduction Checklists for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pollution Prevention - Environmental Impact Reduction Checklists Pollution Prevention - Environmental Impact Reduction Checklists for NEPA/309 Reviewers Pollution Prevention - Environmental Impact Reduction Checklists for NEPA/309 Reviewers The environmental review process under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) provides a valuable opportunity for Federal agency NEPA/309 reviewers to incorporate pollution prevention and environmental impact reduction into actions (or projects). This Environmental Protection Agency guidance was prepared to assist NEPA/309 reviewers in incorporating pollution prevention into each step of the environmental review process, including scoping, mitigation, monitoring, and enforcement. POLLUTION PREVENTION - ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REDUCTION CHECKLISTS FOR NEPA/309 REVIEWERS JANUARY 1995

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identifying reduction potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Pollution Prevention - Environmental Impact Reduction Checklists for  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Pollution Prevention - Environmental Impact Reduction Checklists Pollution Prevention - Environmental Impact Reduction Checklists for NEPA/309 Reviewers Pollution Prevention - Environmental Impact Reduction Checklists for NEPA/309 Reviewers The environmental review process under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) provides a valuable opportunity for Federal agency NEPA/309 reviewers to incorporate pollution prevention and environmental impact reduction into actions (or projects). This Environmental Protection Agency guidance was prepared to assist NEPA/309 reviewers in incorporating pollution prevention into each step of the environmental review process, including scoping, mitigation, monitoring, and enforcement. POLLUTION PREVENTION - ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REDUCTION CHECKLISTS FOR NEPA/309 REVIEWERS JANUARY 1995

302

Equivalence of Local Potential Approximations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In recent papers it has been noted that the local potential approximation of the Legendre and Wilson-Polchinski flow equations give, within numerical error, identical results for a range of exponents and Wilson-Fisher fixed points in three dimensions, providing a certain ``optimised'' cutoff is used for the Legendre flow equation. Here we point out that this is a consequence of an exact map between the two equations, which is nothing other than the exact reduction of the functional map that exists between the two exact renormalization groups. We note also that the optimised cutoff does not allow a derivative expansion beyond second order.

Tim R. Morris

2005-03-21T23:59:59.000Z

303

List of Publications from the Energy for Development and Poverty Reduction  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

List of Publications from the Energy for Development and Poverty Reduction List of Publications from the Energy for Development and Poverty Reduction Website Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: List of Publications from the Energy for Development and Poverty Reduction Website Agency/Company /Organization: Energy for Development and Poverty Reduction Sector: Energy Focus Area: Renewable Energy Phase: Create a Vision Topics: - Energy Access, Finance Resource Type: Publications User Interface: Website Website: www.energyfordevelopment.com/p/publications.html Language: English List of publications from the Energy for Development and Poverty Reduction website. Publications mainly focus on rural electrification and cooking stoves and its potential environmental, social and health benefits. List of publications from the Energy for Development and Poverty Reduction

304

Pacific Northwest Regional Assessment of the Potential  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, demand response and energy efficiency demand-side reductions. The fact that natural gas is the regionPacific Northwest Regional Assessment of the Potential Benefits of the Direct Use of Natural Gas) .........................42 Figure 1 Service Area Map of PNW Participating Natural Gas Utilities

305

Personally Identifiable Information | Scientific and Technical Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Personally Identifiable Information Personally Identifiable Information Print page Print page Email page Email page PII is any information about an individual which can be used to distinguish or trace an individual's identity. PII is categorized as either Public PII or Protected PII. Public PII is available in public sources such as telephone books, public websites, business cards, university listings, etc. Public PII does not require redaction prior to document submission to OSTI. Some common examples of Public PII include: · First and last name · Address · Work telephone number · E-mail address · Home telephone number · General educational credentials (e.g., those credentials typically found in resumes) Protected PII is defined as an individual's first name or first initial

306

Ion Technique for Identifying Gamma Detector Candidates  

SciTech Connect

Recent demands for radiation detector materials with better energy resolution at room temperature have prompted research efforts on both accelerated material discovery and efficient analysis techniques. Ions can easily deposit their energy in thin films or small crystals and the radiation response can be used to identify material properties relevant to detector performance. In an effort to identify gamma detector candidates using small crystals or film samples, an ion technique is developed to measure relative light yield and energy resolution of candidate materials and to evaluate radiation detection performance. Employing a unique time-of-flight (TOF) telescope, light yield and energy resolution resulting from ion excitation are investigated over a continuous energy region. The efficiency of this ion technique is demonstrated using both organic (plastic scintillator) and inorganic (CaF2:Eu, YAP:Ce, CsI:Tl and BGO) scintillators.

Zhang, Yanwen; Xiang, Xia; Rausch, Julie L.; Zu, Xiaotao T.; Weber, William J.

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

307

Guidelines for identifying suspect/counterfeit material  

SciTech Connect

These guidelines are intended to assist users of products in identifying: substandard, misrepresented, or fraudulently marked items. The guidelines provide information about such topics as: precautions, inspection and testing, dispositioning identified items, installed inspection and reporting suspect/counterfeit materials. These guidelines apply to users who are developing procurement documents, product acceptance/verification methods, company procedures, work instructions, etc. The intent of these SM guidelines in relation to the Quality Assurance Program Description (QAPD) and implementing company Management Control Procedures is not to substitute or replace existing requirements, as defined in either the QAPD or company implementing instructions (Management Control Procedures). Instead, the guidelines are intended to provide a consolidated source of information addressing the issue of Suspect/Counterfeit materials. These guidelines provide an extensive suspect component listing and suspect indications listing. Users can quickly check their suspect items against the list of manufacturers products (i.e., type, LD. number, and nameplate information) by consulting either of these listings.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Identifying Opportunities for Industrial Energy Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Energy Productivity Center of the Mellon Institute is engaged in a 2-year study to identify opportunities for improved U.S. industrial energy productivity. A distinguishing feature is the focus on energy services provided when fuels are consumed. The paper describes the Center's Least-Cost Energy Strategy, the Industrial Energy Productivity Project, and presents least-cost results for 1978 and for energy markets over the next two decades.

Hoffman, A. R.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Diffraction gratings used as identifying markers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A finely detailed defraction grating is applied to an object as an identifier or tag which is unambiguous, difficult to duplicate, or remove and transfer to another item, and can be read and compared with prior readings with relative ease. The exact pattern of the defraction grating is mapped by diffraction moire techniques and recorded for comparison with future readings of the same grating. 7 figs.

Deason, V.A.; Ward, M.B.

1989-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

310

Diffraction gratings used as identifying markers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A finely detailed diffraction grating is applied to an object as an identifier or tag which is unambiguous, difficult to duplicate, or remove and transfer to another item, and can be read and compared with prior readings with relative ease. The exact pattern of the diffraction grating is mapped by diffraction moire techniques and recorded for comparison with future readings of the same grating. 7 figures.

Deason, V.A.; Ward, M.B.

1991-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

311

Interrogator system for identifying electrical circuits  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for interrogating electrical leads to correctly ascertain the identity of equipment attached to remote ends of the leads. The system includes a source of a carrier signal generated in a controller/receiver to be sent over the leads and an identifier unit at the equipment. The identifier is activated by command of the carrier and uses a portion of the carrier to produce a supply voltage. Each identifier is uniquely programmed for a specific piece of equipment, and causes the impedance of the circuit to be modified whereby the carrier signal is modulated according to that program. The modulation can be amplitude, frequency or phase modulation. A demodulator in the controller/receiver analyzes the modulated carrier signal, and if a verified signal is recognized displays and/or records the information. This information can be utilized in a computer system to prepare a wiring diagram of the electrical equipment attached to specific leads. Specific circuit values are given for amplitude modulation, and the system is particularly described for use with thermocouples.

Jatko, William B. (10601 Rivermist La., Knoxville, TN 37922); McNeilly, David R. (Rte. 12, Box 538, Maryville, TN 37801)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Interrogator system for identifying electrical circuits  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for interrogating electrical leads to correctly ascertain the identity of equipment attached to remote ends of the leads is disclosed. The system includes a source of a carrier signal generated in a controller/receiver to be sent over the leads and an identifier unit at the equipment. The identifier is activated by command of the carrier and uses a portion of the carrier to produce a supply voltage. Each identifier is uniquely programmed for a specific piece of equipment, and causes the impedance of the circuit to be modified whereby the carrier signal is modulated according to that program. The modulation can be amplitude, frequency or phase modulation. A demodulator in the controller/receiver analyzes the modulated carrier signal, and if a verified signal is recognized displays and/or records the information. This information can be utilized in a computer system to prepare a wiring diagram of the electrical equipment attached to specific leads. Specific circuit values are given for amplitude modulation, and the system is particularly described for use with thermocouples. 6 figs.

Jatko, W.B.; McNeilly, D.R.

1988-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

313

Mitigation potential and cost in tropical forestry - relative role for agroforestry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Potential for Carbon Sequestration and Emission ReductionForestry Options on Carbon Sequestration in India'. WorkingGas Emissions and Carbon Sequestration in the Forest Sector

Makundi, Willy R.; Sathaye, Jayant A.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect

The Plains CO{sub 2} Reduction (PCOR) Partnership continues to make great progress. Task 2 (Technology Deployment) focused on developing information regarding deployment issues to support Task 5 (Modeling and Phase II Action Plans) and provided information to be used to assess CO{sub 2} sequestration opportunities in the PCOR Partnership region. Task 2 efforts also included preparation of a draft topical report entitled ''Deployment Issues Related to Geologic CO{sub 2} Sequestration in the PCOR Partnership Region'', which is nearing completion. Task 3 (Public Outreach) focused on developing an informational video about CO{sub 2} sequestration. The video will be completed and aired on Prairie Public Television in the next quarter. Progress in Task 4 (Sources, Sinks, and Infrastructure) included the continued collection of data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, treatment, and compression for pipeline transportation. The addition of the Canadian province of Alberta to the PCOR Partnership region expanded the decision support system (DSS) geographic information system database. Task 5 screened and qualitatively assessed sequestration options. Task 5 activities also continue to be useful in structuring data collection and other activities in Tasks 2, 3, and 5.

Edward N. Steadman; John A. Harju; Erin M. O'Leary; James A. Sorensen; Daniel J. Daly; Melanie D. Jensen; Thea E. Reikoff

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

PLAINS CO2 REDUCTION PARTNERSHIP  

SciTech Connect

The Plains CO{sub 2} Reduction (PCOR) Partnership characterization work is nearing completion, and most remaining efforts are related to finalizing work products. Task 2 (Technology Deployment) has developed a Topical Report entitled ''Deployment Issues Related to Geologic CO{sub 2} Sequestration in the PCOR Partnership Region''. Task 3 (Public Outreach) has developed an informational Public Television program entitled ''Nature in the Balance'', about CO{sub 2} sequestration. The program was completed and aired on Prairie Public Television in this quarter. Task 4 (Sources, Sinks, and Infrastructure) efforts are nearing completion, and data regarding CO{sub 2} sources and sinks and data on the performance and costs for CO{sub 2} separation, capture, treatment, and compression for pipeline transportation are being incorporated into a series of topical reports. The expansion of the Decision Support System Geographic Information System database has continued with the development of a ''save bookmark'' feature that allows users to save a map from the system easily. A feature that allows users to develop a report that summarizes CO{sub 2} sequestration parameters was also developed. Task 5 (Modeling and Phase II Action Plans) focused on screening and qualitatively assessing sequestration options and developing economic estimates for important regional CO{sub 2} sequestration strategies.

Edward N. Steadman; John A. Harju; Erin M. O'Leary; James A. Sorensen; Daniel J. Daly; Melanie D. Jensen; Lisa S. Botnen

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Fuel Cells: Identifying Promising Development Opportunities  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Low temperature PEM (proton exchange membrane) fuel cells are in the initial stage of commercialization, while high temperature SOFC (solid oxide fuel cells) are under development because they hold promise of higher efficiency and lower costs. To assess their future market potential, this study analyzed several innovative market applications and technical improvements: PEM fuel cells for peak shaving, PEM fuel cells for uninterruptible power supply (UPS), tubular and planar SOFC units for residential use...

2000-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

317

Identifying Needed Capabilities in Multifamily Models  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Identifying Needed Capabilities in Multifamily Models Building America Technical Update Meeting Eric Wilson April 30, 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Definitions Current definitions for HSP/BEopt: Single Family Attached = Townhouses, row houses, duplexes Multifamily Buildings = 5+ units; shared floors/ceilings 2 Single Family Attached - Rowhouses 3 Multifamily - Stacked Units * Enable Superinsulated Slab and Roof options in Option Manager 4 Multifamily Modeling Needs * Adiabatic shared walls, floors, and ceilings * Unit multipliers  Whole-Building Model * Corridors * Common Areas * Operating Conditions (Benchmark)

318

Reduction of Lie-Jordan algebras: Classical  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we present a unified algebraic framework to discuss the reduction of classical and quantum systems. The underlying algebraic structure is a Lie-Jordan algebra supplemented, in the quantum case, with a Banach structure. We discuss the reduction by symmetries, by constraints as well as the possible, non trivial, combinations of both. We finally introduce a new, general framework to perform the reduction of physical systems in an algebraic setup.

F. Falceto; L. Ferro; A. Ibort; G. Marmo

2013-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

319

Boiling water reactor uranium utilization improvement potential  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the results of design and operational simulation studies to assess the potential for reduction of BWR uranium requirements. The impact of the improvements on separative work requirements and other fuel cycle requirements also were evaluated. The emphasis was on analysis of the improvement potential for once-through cycles, although plutonium recycle also was evaluated. The improvement potential was analyzed for several design alternatives including axial and radial natural uranium blankets, low-leakage refueling patterns, initial core enrichment distribution optimization, reinsert of initial core discharge fuel, preplanned end-of-cycle power coastdown and feedwater temperature reduction, increased discharge burnup, high enrichment discharge fuel rod reassembly and reinsert, lattice and fuel bundle design optimization, coolant density spectral shift with flow control, reduced burnable absorber residual, boric acid for cold shutdown, six-month subcycle refueling, and applications of a once-through thorium cycle design and plutonium recycle.

Wei, P.; Crowther, R.L.; Fennern, L.E.; Savoia, P.J.; Specker, S.R.; Tilley, R.M.; Townsend, D.B.; Wolters, R.A.

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

NREL: Vehicle Ancillary Loads Reduction - Laboratory Capabilities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

VALR Lab. NREL's Vehicle Ancillary Loads Reduction Laboratory houses ADAM, our advanced thermal manikin, as well as a passenger compartment climate simulator, testing equipment...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identifying reduction potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Harm Reduction Journal BioMed Central  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bundling occupational safety with harm reduction information as a feasible method for improving police receptiveness to syringe access programs: evidence from three U.S. cities

Corey S Davis; Leo Beletsky; Open Access

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Optimizing Anode Performance in DUBAL Reduction Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Reduction in Gross Carbon consumption by 5% over the past 4 years was achieved through optimization of anode quality, modification of anode design and ...

323

Idle Reduction Technology Demonstrations: Status Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

DOE's Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity is sponsoring 3 idle reduction demonstration projects for heavy-duty trucks. This report provides the status of the projects.

Proc, K.

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Electrocatalyst for Oxygen Reduction with Reduced Platinum ...  

Platinum is the most efficient electrocatalyst for accelerating the oxygen reduction reaction in fuel cells. Under operating conditions, though, platinum catalysts ...

325

Petroleum Reduction Planning Tool | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Petroleum Reduction Planning Tool Petroleum Reduction Planning Tool Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Petroleum Reduction Planning Tool Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, United States Department of Energy Sector: Energy Focus Area: Biomass, Energy Efficiency, Fuels & Efficiency, Hydrogen, Transportation Phase: Prepare a Plan Topics: Analysis Tools, Pathways analysis Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Website Complexity/Ease of Use: Not Available Website: www.afdc.energy.gov/afdc/prep/index.php OpenEI Keyword(s): Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Tools Equivalent URI: cleanenergysolutions.org/content/petroleum-reduction-planning-tool Language: English Policies: Deployment Programs DeploymentPrograms: Demonstration & Implementation

326

PPPL Celebrates Earth Day with Reduction in Greenhouse Gas Emissions |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PPPL Celebrates Earth Day with Reduction in Greenhouse Gas Emissions PPPL Celebrates Earth Day with Reduction in Greenhouse Gas Emissions By Patti Wieser April 25, 2011 Tweet Widget Facebook Like Google Plus One PPPL's Tim Stevenson takes inventory of the SF6 levels at a power supply tank for NSTX. (Photo by Elle Starkman, PPPL Office of Communications) PPPL's Tim Stevenson takes inventory of the SF6 levels at a power supply tank for NSTX. In an effort to respond to President Obama's call to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 28 percent by the year 2020, researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) have identified ways to cut emissions that will allow the facility to exceed that goal - a decade early. Staff members at the laboratory, where scientists are finding ways to produce fusion energy, have trimmed the facility's greenhouse gas emissions

327

Petroleum Reduction Strategies to Reduce Vehicle Miles Traveled |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reduce Vehicle Miles Traveled Reduce Vehicle Miles Traveled Petroleum Reduction Strategies to Reduce Vehicle Miles Traveled October 7, 2013 - 11:52am Addthis YOU ARE HERE: Step 3 For reducing greenhouse gas emissions, the table below describes petroleum reduction strategies to reduce vehicle miles traveled, as well as guidance and best practices for each strategy. Table 1. Determining When and How to Promote the Use of Strategies to Reduce Vehicle Miles Traveled Strategy When Applicable Best Practices Consolidate trips Applicable to all vehicles, regardless of ownership or vehicle and fuel type Target vehicle operators who take longer trips Seek vehicle operator input and collaboration to identify regular or occasional trips that involve similar routes. Determine whether trips on multiple days or times can be consolidated into a single trip.

328

Max Tech Appliance Design: Potential for Maximizing U.S. Energy Savings through Standards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study surveyed the technical potential for efficiency improvements in 150 categories of appliances and equipment representing 33 quads of primary energy use across the US economy in 2010 and (1) documented efficient product designs, (2) identified the most promising cross-cutting strategies, and (3) ranked national energy savings potential by end use. Savings were estimated using a method modeled after US Department of Energy priority-setting reports - simplified versions of the full technical and economic analyses performed for rulemakings. This study demonstrates that large savings are possible by replacing products at the end-of-life with ultra-efficient models that use existing technology. Replacing the 50 top energy-saving end-uses (constituting 30 quads of primary energy consumption in 2010) with today's best-on-market equivalents would save {approx}200 quads of US primary energy over 30 years (25% of consumption anticipated there from). For the 29 products for maximum feasible savings potential could be estimated, the savings were twice as high. These results demonstrate that pushing ultra-efficient products to market could significantly escalate carbon emission reductions and is a viable strategy for sustaining large emissions reductions through standards. The results of this analysis were used by DOE for new coverage prioritization, to identify key opportunities for product prototyping and market development, and will leverage future standards rulemakings by identifying the full scope of maximum feasible technology options. High leverage products include advances lighting systems, HVAC, and televisions. High leverage technologies include electronic lighting, heat pumps, variable speed motors, and a host of controls-related technologies.

Garbesi, Karina; Desroches, Louis-Benoit; Bolduc, Christopher; Burch, Gabriel; Hosseinzadeh, Griffin; Saltiel, Seth

2011-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

329

Identifying failure in a tree network of a parallel computer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods, parallel computers, and products are provided for identifying failure in a tree network of a parallel computer. The parallel computer includes one or more processing sets including an I/O node and a plurality of compute nodes. For each processing set embodiments include selecting a set of test compute nodes, the test compute nodes being a subset of the compute nodes of the processing set; measuring the performance of the I/O node of the processing set; measuring the performance of the selected set of test compute nodes; calculating a current test value in dependence upon the measured performance of the I/O node of the processing set, the measured performance of the set of test compute nodes, and a predetermined value for I/O node performance; and comparing the current test value with a predetermined tree performance threshold. If the current test value is below the predetermined tree performance threshold, embodiments include selecting another set of test compute nodes. If the current test value is not below the predetermined tree performance threshold, embodiments include selecting from the test compute nodes one or more potential problem nodes and testing individually potential problem nodes and links to potential problem nodes.

Archer, Charles J. (Rochester, MN); Pinnow, Kurt W. (Rochester, MN); Wallenfelt, Brian P. (Eden Prairie, MN)

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

330

REDUCTIONS WITHOUT REGRET: HISTORICAL PERSPECTIVES  

SciTech Connect

This is the first of three papers (in addition to an introductory summary) aimed at providing a framework for evaluating future reductions or modifications of the U.S. nuclear force, first by considering previous instances in which nuclear-force capabilities were eliminated; second by looking forward into at least the foreseeable future at the features of global and regional deterrence (recognizing that new weapon systems currently projected will have expected lifetimes stretching beyond our ability to predict the future); and third by providing examples of past or possible undesirable outcomes in the shaping of the future nuclear force, as well as some closing thoughts for the future. This paper examines the circumstances and consequences of the elimination of ? The INF-range Pershing II ballistic missile and Gryphon Ground-Launched Cruise Missile (GLCM), deployed by NATO under a dual-track strategy to counter Soviet intermediate-range missiles while pursuing negotiations to limit or eliminate all of these missiles. ? The Short-Range Attack Missile (SRAM), which was actually a family of missiles including SRAM A, SRAM B (never deployed), and SRAM II and SRAM T, these last two cancelled during an over-budget/behind-schedule development phase as part of the Presidential Nuclear Initiatives of 1991 and 1992. ? The nuclear-armed version of the Tomahawk Land-Attack Cruise Missile (TLAM/N), first limited to shore-based storage by the PNIs, and finally eliminated in deliberations surrounding the 2010 Nuclear Posture Review Report. ? The Missile-X (MX), or Peacekeeper, a heavy MIRVed ICBM, deployed in fixed silos, rather than in an originally proposed mobile mode. Peacekeeper was likely intended as a bargaining chip to facilitate elimination of Russian heavy missiles. The plan failed when START II did not enter into force, and the missiles were eliminated at the end of their intended service life. ? The Small ICBM (SICBM), or Midgetman, a road-mobile, single-warhead missile for which per-unit costs were climbing when it was eliminated under the PNIs. Although there were liabilities associated with each of these systems, there were also unique capabilities; this paper lays out the pros and cons for each. Further, we articulate the capabilities that were eliminated with these systems.

Swegle, J.; Tincher, D.

2013-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

331

Los Alamos identifies internal material control issue  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Internal material control issue Internal material control issue Los Alamos identifies internal material control issue The error relates to internal inventory and accounting that documents movement of sensitive materials within a small portion of Technical Area 55. February 26, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

332

Identifying AFDC Regions: A Cluster Analysis Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this report identifies six distinct Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) regions. Among the more striking results is the emergence of two regions---Central Cities and Hispanic Rural---with unique patterns of welfare usage and demographic characteristics. Also, rural Minnesota is divided into four separate regions with unique characteristics. This information is intended to help policymakers and others interested in the welfare system to better understand the geographic pattern of AFDC recipiency. This report is the first in a series of working papers regarding welfare and welfare reform. This report was prepared by DON HIRASUNA, Legislative Analyst in the House Research Department. Questions may be addressed to DON at 651-296-8038. JULIE FRANTUM

Don Hirasuna; Series One

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Method of identifying features in indexed data  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a method of identifying features in indexed data, especially useful for distinguishing signal from noise in data provided as a plurality of ordered pairs. Each of the plurality of ordered pairs has an index and a response. The method has the steps of: (a) providing an index window having a first window end located on a first index and extending across a plurality of indices to a second window end; (b) selecting responses corresponding to the plurality of indices within the index window and computing a measure of dispersion of the responses; and (c) comparing the measure of dispersion to a dispersion critical value. Advantages of the present invention include minimizing signal to noise ratio, signal drift, varying baseline signal and combinations thereof.

Jarman, Kristin H. (Richland, WA); Daly, Don Simone (Richland, WA); Anderson, Kevin K. (Richland, WA); Wahl, Karen L. (Richland, WA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

URANIUM ALLOY POWDERS BY DIRECT REDUCTION OF OXIDES  

SciTech Connect

A process is outlined for the production of uranium alloy powders by co- reduction of mintures of uranium oxide and alloy element oxides. The reduction of mechanical mintures of the oxides of uranium and alloy element with calcium in a sealed reaction vessel is shown to produce powder wtth a variation in particle composition, although of consistert composition over various size fractions. The particular alloy systems which are considered are uranium--nickel, uranium-- chromium, uranium --molybdenum, and uranium--niobium. The uranium-molybdenum and uranium--niobium powders are single phase (metastable gamma), which is of consequence in the production of dimensionaHy stable nuclear fuels. Potential applications of some of these alloys are discussed. (auth)

Myers, R.H.; Robins, R.G.

1959-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

335

Energy Reductions Using Next-Generation Remanufacturing Techniques  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goal of this project was to develop a radically new surface coating approach that greatly enhances the performance of thermal spray coatings. Rather than relying on a roughened grit blasted substrate surface for developing a mechanical bond between the coating and substrate, which is the normal practice with conventional thermal spraying, a hybrid approach of combining a focused laser beam to thermally treat the substrate surface in the vicinity of the rapidly approaching thermally-sprayed powder particles was developed. This new surface coating process is targeted primarily at enabling remanufacturing of components used in engines, drive trains and undercarriage systems; thereby providing a substantial global opportunity for increasing the magnitude and breadth of parts that are remanufactured through their life cycle, as opposed to simply being replaced by new components. The projected benefits of a new remanufacturing process that increases the quantity of components that are salvaged and reused compared to being fabricated from raw materials will clearly vary based on the specific industry and range of candidate components that are considered. At the outset of this project two different metal processing routes were considered, castings and forgings, and the prototypical components for each process were liners and crankshafts, respectively. The quantities of parts used in the analysis are based on our internal production of approximately 158,000 diesel engines in 2007. This leads to roughly 1,000,000 liners (assuming a mixture of 6- and 8-cylinder engines) and 158,000 crankshafts. Using energy intensity factors for casting and forgings, respectively, of 4450 and 5970 Btu-hr/lb along with the energy-induced CO2 generation factor of 0.00038 lbs CO2/Btu, energy savings of over 17 trillion BTUs and CO2 reductions of over 6.5 million lbs could potentially be realized by remanufacturing the above mentioned quantities of crankshafts and liners. This project supported the Industrial Technologies Program's initiative titled 'Industrial Energy Efficiency Grand Challenge.' To contribute to this Grand Challenge, we. pursued an innovative processing approach for the next generation of thermal spray coatings to capture substantial energy savings and green house gas emission reductions through the remanufacturing of steel and aluminum-based components. The primary goal was to develop a new thermal spray coating process that yields significantly enhanced bond strength. To reach the goal of higher coating bond strength, a laser was coupled with a traditional twin-wire arc (TWA) spray gun to treat the component surface (i.e., heat or partially melt) during deposition. Both ferrous and aluminum-based substrates and coating alloys were examined to determine what materials are more suitable for the laser-assisted twin-wire arc coating technique. Coating adhesion was measured by static tensile and dynamic fatigue techniques, and the results helped to guide the identification of appropriate remanufacturing opportunities that will now be viable due to the increased bond strength of the laser-assisted twin-wire arc coatings. The feasibility of the laser-assisted TWA (LATWA) process was successfully demonstrated in this current effort. Critical processing parameters were identified, and when these were properly controlled, a strong, diffusion bond was developed between the substrate and the deposited coating. Consequently, bond strengths were nearly doubled over those typically obtained using conventional grit-blast TWA coatings. Note, however, that successful LATWA processing was limited to ferrous substrates coated with steel coatings (e.g., 1020 and 1080 steel). With Al-based substrates, it was not possible to avoid melting a thin layer of the substrate during spraying, and this layer re-solidified to form a band of intermetallic phases at the substrate/coating interface, which significantly diminished the coating adhesion. The capability to significantly increase the bond strength with ferrous substrates and coatings may open new reman

Sordelet, Daniel; Racek, Ondrej

2012-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

336

Planning for future uncertainties in electric power generation : an analysis of transitional strategies for reduction of carbon and sulfur emissions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The object of this paper is to identify strategies for the U.S. electric utility industry for reduction of both acid rain producing and global warming gases. The research used the EPRI Electric Generation Expansion Analysis ...

Tabors, Richard D.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Iodine retention during evaporative volume reduction  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved method for retaining radioactive iodine in aqueous waste solutions during volume reduction is disclosed. The method applies to evaporative volume reduction processes whereby the decontaminated (evaporated) water can be returned safely to the environment. The method generally comprises isotopically diluting the waste solution with a nonradioactive iodide and maintaining the solution at a high pH during evaporation.

Godbee, H.W.; Cathers, G.I.; Blanco, R.E.

1975-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

338

Energy Use Reduction Pilot College of Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Engineering leadership are presented with the expectation of a realization in a reduction of energy usage equipment that consumes three to four times as much energy as a typical house. Observe behavior patterns to a reduction in energy usage. Building occupants include students, faculty and staff who spend a reasonable

Chinnam, Ratna Babu

339

On-The-Fly Path Reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Path reduction is a well-known technique to alleviate the state-explosion problem incurred by explicit-state model checking, its key idea being to store states only at predetermined breaking points. This paper presents an adaptation of this technique ... Keywords: model checking, path reduction, state explosion, verification

Sebastian Biallas; Jörg Brauer; Dominique Gückel; Stefan Kowalewski

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

Domain reduction method for atomistic simulations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, a quasi-static formulation of the method of multi-scale boundary conditions (MSBCs) is derived and applied to atomistic simulations of carbon nano-structures, namely single graphene sheets and multi-layered graphite. This domain reduction ... Keywords: atomistic simulation, carbon nano-structures, deformable boundary, domain reduction, graphite, multi-scale modeling, nano-indentation

Sergey N. Medyanik; Eduard G. Karpov; Wing Kam Liu

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identifying reduction potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Danish Greenhouse Gas Reduction Scenarios for 2020  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Danish Greenhouse Gas Reduction Scenarios for 2020 and 2050 February 2008 Prepared by Ea Energy 54 2.9 ENERGY RESOURCES 55 3 DANISH GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSION 58 3.1 GREENHOUSE GAS SOURCES 58 4 of 2007, Ea Energy Analyses and Risø DTU developed a number of greenhouse gas emissions reduction

342

The octaheme SirA catalyses dissimilatory sulfite reduction in Shewanella oneidensis MR-1  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 is a metal reducer that uses a large number of electron acceptors that include thiosulfate, polysulfide, and sulfite. The enzyme required for thiosulfate and polysulfide respiration has been recently identified, but the mechanisms of sulfite reduction remained unexplored. Analysis of MR-1 cultures grown anaerobically with sulfite suggested that the dissimilatory sulfite reductase catalyzes six-electron reduction of sulfite to sulfide. Reduction of sulfite required menaquinones and c cytochromes but appeared to be independent of the intermediate electron carrier CymA. Furthermore, the terminal sulfite reductase, SirA, was identified as an octaheme c cytochrome with an atypical heme binding site that represents a new class of sulfite reductases. The sirA locus was identified in the genomes of several sequenced Shewanella genomes, and its presence appears to be linked to the ability of these organisms to reduce sulfite under anaerobic conditions.

Shirodkar, Sheetal; Reed, Samantha B.; Romine, Margaret F.; Saffarini, Daad

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

MS/MS Libraries of Identified Peptides and Recurring Spectra ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Three Classes of Libraries. I. Conventional Target Identification. Peptides (Proteins). II. Identifiable. By unconventional searching. III. Not Identifiable. ...

2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

344

RANGELAND SEQUESTRATION POTENTIAL ASSESSMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Rangelands occupy approximately half of the world's land area and store greater than 10% of the terrestrial biomass carbon and up to 30% of the global soil organic carbon. Although soil carbon sequestration rates are generally low on rangelands in comparison to croplands, increases in terrestrial carbon in rangelands resulting from management can account for significant carbon sequestration given the magnitude of this land resource. Despite the significance rangelands can play in carbon sequestration, our understanding remains limited. Researchers conducted a literature review to identify sustainably management practices that conserve existing rangeland carbon pools, as well as increase or restore carbon sequestration potentials for this type of ecosystem. The research team also reviewed the impact of grazing management on rangeland carbon dynamics, which are not well understood due to heterogeneity in grassland types. The literature review on the impact of grazing showed a wide variation of results, ranging from positive to negative to no response. On further review, the intensity of grazing appears to be a major factor in controlling rangeland soil organic carbon dynamics. In 2003, researchers conducted field sampling to assess the effect of several drought years during the period 1993-2002. Results suggested that drought can significantly impact rangeland soil organic carbon (SOC) levels, and therefore, carbon sequestration. Resampling was conducted in 2006; results again suggested that climatic conditions may have overridden management effects on SOC due to the ecological lag of the severe drought of 2002. Analysis of grazing practices during this research effort suggested that there are beneficial effects of light grazing compared to heavy grazing and non-grazing with respect to increased SOC and nitrogen contents. In general, carbon storage in rangelands also increases with increased precipitation, although researchers identified threshold levels of precipitation where sequestration begins to decrease.

Lee Spangler; George F. Vance; Gerald E. Schuman; Justin D. Derner

2012-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

345

Complexity Reduction of H.264 using Lagrange Optimization Methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A complexity reduction algorithm for an H.264 encoder is proposed. Computational savings are achieved by identifying, prior to motion estimation, macroblocks that are likely to be skipped and hence saving further computational processing of these macroblocks. This early prediction is made by estimating a Lagrangian rate-distortion cost function which incorporates an adaptive model for the Lagrange multiplier parameter based on local sequence statistics. Simulation results demonstrate that the algorithm can achieve computational savings of 19-65 % (depending on the source sequence) with no significant loss of rate-distortion performance. 1

C. S. Kannangara; I. E. G. Richardson; M. Bystrom; J. Solera; Y. Zhao; A. Maclennan

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Toxics Use Reduction Act (Massachusetts) | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Toxics Use Reduction Act (Massachusetts) Toxics Use Reduction Act (Massachusetts) Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fuel Distributor Industrial Institutional...

347

State Buildings Energy Reduction Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

State Buildings Energy Reduction Plan State Buildings Energy Reduction Plan Eligibility Institutional State Government Savings For Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization...

348

Biomass fuel systems: directory of sources and potential users  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Sources and potential users of technical information on biomass fuel systems are identified. Organizations and individual contacts are listed in various production and conversion categories.

Henry, J.F.; Salo, D.J.; Schauffler, M.S.; Smith, B.T.

1978-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Turbulence Patch Identification in Potential Density or Temperature Profiles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Thorpe analysis is a recognized method used to identify and characterize turbulent regions within stably stratified fluids. By comparing an observed profile of potential temperature or potential density to a reference profile obtained by ...

Richard Wilson; Hubert Luce; Francis Dalaudier; Jacques Lefrère

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Identifying Wind and Solar Ramping Events: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind and solar power are playing an increasing role in the electrical grid, but their inherent power variability can augment uncertainties in power system operations. One solution to help mitigate the impacts and provide more flexibility is enhanced wind and solar power forecasting; however, its relative utility is also uncertain. Within the variability of solar and wind power, repercussions from large ramping events are of primary concern. At the same time, there is no clear definition of what constitutes a ramping event, with various criteria used in different operational areas. Here the Swinging Door Algorithm, originally used for data compression in trend logging, is applied to identify variable generation ramping events from historic operational data. The identification of ramps in a simple and automated fashion is a critical task that feeds into a larger work of 1) defining novel metrics for wind and solar power forecasting that attempt to capture the true impact of forecast errors on system operations and economics, and 2) informing various power system models in a data-driven manner for superior exploratory simulation research. Both allow inference on sensitivities and meaningful correlations, as well as the ability to quantify the value of probabilistic approaches for future use in practice.

Florita, A.; Hodge, B. M.; Orwig, K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Mercury Oxidation Behavior of a New Advanced Selective Catalytic Reduction Catalyst Formulation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Industry data have indicated that along with NOx reduction, selective catalytic reduction (SCR) technology has the potential for oxidizing mercury, providing enhanced removal in downstream systems. In recent years there has been an incentive to develop SCR catalyst formulations that maximize mercury oxidation while retaining their deNOx and SO2 conversion properties. The subject test program sought to evaluate the mercury oxidation performance of Hitachis new Triple Action Catalyst (TRAC) as a function o...

2011-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

352

Identify Strategies to Reduce Business Travel for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Strategies to Reduce Business Travel for Greenhouse Gas Strategies to Reduce Business Travel for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Identify Strategies to Reduce Business Travel for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation October 7, 2013 - 1:34pm Addthis YOU ARE HERE The tables below illustrate some of the more common strategies that can enable employees to travel less and travel more efficiently for business. The "Purpose of Travel" analysis in the previous step can be used with the guidance below to help determine what type of trips may be most appropriately substituted with each business travel alternative. Table 1. Strategies that Enable Employees to Travel Less Business Travel Strategy Best Potential Application Best Practices Web meetings/webinars, including option for video Purpose of travel: training, conferences.

353

Identifying Event Impacts by Monitoring the News Media  

SciTech Connect

Assessing the potential property and social impacts of an event, such as tornado or wildfire, continues to be a challenging research area. From financial markets to disaster management to epidemiology, the importance of understanding the impacts that events create cannot be understated. Our work describes an approach to fuse information from multiple sources, then to analyze the information cycles to identify prior temporal patterns related to the impact of an event. This approach is then applied to the analysis of news reports from multiple news sources pertaining to several different natural disasters. Results show that our approach can project the severity of the impacts of certain natural disasters, such as heat waves on droughts and wild fires. In addition, results show that specific types of disaster consistently produce similar impacts when each time they occur.

Patton, Robert M [ORNL; Potok, Thomas E [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Identifying video spammers in online social networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In many video social networks, including YouTube, users are permitted to post video responses to other users ’ videos. Such a response can be legitimate or can be a video response spam, which is a video response whose content is not related to the topic being discussed. Malicious users may post video response spam for several reasons, including increase the popularity of a video, marketing advertisements, distribute pornography, or simply pollute the system. In this paper we consider the problem of detecting video spammers. We first construct a large test collection of YouTube users, and manually classify them as either legitimate users or spammers. We then devise a number of attributes of video users and their social behavior which could potentially be used to detect spammers. Employing these attributes, we apply machine learning to provide a heuristic for classifying an arbitrary video as either legitimate or spam. The machine learning algorithm is trained with our test collection. We then show that our approach succeeds at detecting much of the spam while only falsely classifying a small percentage of the legitimate videos as spam. Our results highlight the most important attributes for video response spam detection.

Fabricio Benevenuto; Tiago Rodrigues; Virgilio Almeida; Jussara Almeida; Chao Zhang; Keith Ross

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Use of hazard assessments to achieve risk reduction in the USDOE Stockpile Stewardship (SS-21) Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper summarizes the nuclear explosive hazard assessment activities performed to support US Department of Energy (DOE) Stockpile Stewardship Demonstration Project SS-21, better known as the ``Seamless Safety`` program. Past practice within the DOE Complex has dictated the use of a significant number of post-design/fabrication safety reviews to analyze the safety associated with operations on nuclear explosives and to answer safety questions. These practices have focused on reviewing-in or auditing-in safety vs incorporating safety in the design process. SS-21 was proposed by the DOE as an avenue to develop a program to ``integrate established, recognized, verifiable safety criteria into the process at the design stage rather than continuing the reliance on reviews, evaluations and audits.`` The entire Seamless Safety design and development process is verified by a concurrent hazard assessment (HA). The primary purpose of the SS-21 Demonstration Project HA was to demonstrate the feasibility of performing concurrent HAs as part of an engineering design and development effort and then to evaluate the use of the HA to provide an indication in the risk reduction or gain in safety achieved. To accomplish this objective, HAs were performed on both baseline (i.e., old) and new (i.e. SS-21) B61-0 Center Case Section disassembly processes. These HAs were used to support the identification and documentation of weapon- and process-specific hazards and safety-critical operating steps. Both HAs focused on identifying accidents that had the potential for worker injury, public health effects, facility damage, toxic gas release, and dispersal of radioactive materials. A comparison of the baseline and SS-21 process risks provided a semi-quantitative estimate of the risk reduction gained via the Seamless Safety process.

Fischer, S.R.; Konkel, H.; Bott, T.; Eisenhawer, S.W. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); DeYoung, L.; Hockert, J. [Odgen Environmental and Energy Services, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Reduction Strategies for Buildings | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Buildings Buildings Evaluate Greenhouse Gas Reduction Strategies for Buildings October 7, 2013 - 11:00am Addthis YOU ARE HERE: Step 3 Once key building types and priority sites have been identified, a Federal agency can identify appropriate energy management measures and estimate their impact on each program's building greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. To support this evaluation, energy managers can use the Buildings GHG Mitigation Worksheet Estimator in tandem with this guidance to estimate of GHG savings and cost. Figure 1 - An image of an organizational-type flowchart. A rectangle labeled 'Program' has a line pointing to a rectangle labeled 'Building Type.' 'Building Type' has a lines pointing to rectangles labeled 'Site Ranked Overall #1,' 'Site Ranked Overall #2,' and 'Site Ranked Overall #3.'

357

Max Tech Appliance Design: Potential for Maximizing U.S. Energy Savings  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Appliance Design: Potential for Maximizing U.S. Energy Savings Appliance Design: Potential for Maximizing U.S. Energy Savings through Standards Title Max Tech Appliance Design: Potential for Maximizing U.S. Energy Savings through Standards Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-4608E Year of Publication 2011 Authors Garbesi, Karina, Louis-Benoit Desroches, Christopher A. Bolduc, Gabriel Burch, Griffin Hosseinzadeh, and Seth Saltiel Document Number LBNL-4608E Pagination 13 Date Published July 11 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract This study surveyed the technical potential for efficiency improvements in 150 categories of appliances and equipment representing 33 quads of primary energy use across the US economy in 2010 and (1) documented efficient product designs, (2) identified the most promising cross-cutting strategies, and (3) ranked national energy savings potential by end use. Savings were estimated using a method modeled after US Department of Energy priority-setting reports-simplified versions of the full technical and economic analyses performed for rulemakings. This study demonstrates that large savings are possible by replacing products at the end-of-life with ultra-efficient models that use existing technology. Replacing the 50 top energy-saving end-uses (constituting 30 quads of primary energy consumption in 2010) with today's best-on-market equivalents would save ~200 quads of US primary energy over 30 years (25% of consumption anticipated there from). For the 29 products for maximum feasible savings potential could be estimated, the savings were twice as high. These results demonstrate that pushing ultra-efficient products to market could significantly escalate carbon emission reductions and is a viable strategy for sustaining large emissions reductions through standards. The results of this analysis were used by DOE for new coverage prioritization, to identify key opportunities for product prototyping and market development, and will leverage future standards rulemakings by identifying the full scope of maximum feasible technology options. High leverage products include advances lighting systems, HVAC, and televisions. High leverage technologies include electronic lighting, heat pumps, variable speed motors, and a host of controls-related technologies.

358

A comparison of ground source heat pumps and micro-combined heat and power as residential greenhouse gas reduction strategies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Both ground source heat pumps operating on electricity and micro-combined heat and power systems operating on fossil fuels offer potential for the reduction of green house gas emissions in comparison to the conventional ...

Guyer, Brittany (Brittany Leigh)

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Improved Initial Performance of Si Nanoparticles by Surface Oxide Reduction  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Improved Initial Performance of Si Nanoparticles by Surface Oxide Reduction Improved Initial Performance of Si Nanoparticles by Surface Oxide Reduction for Lithium-Ion Battery Application Title Improved Initial Performance of Si Nanoparticles by Surface Oxide Reduction for Lithium-Ion Battery Application Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2011 Authors Xun, Shidi, Xiangyun Song, Michael E. Grass, Daniel K. Roseguo, Z. Liu, Vincent S. Battaglia, and Gao Li Journal Electrochemical Solid-State Letters Volume 14 Start Page A61 Issue 5 Pagination A61-A63 Date Published 02/2001 Keywords Electrochemistry, elemental semiconductors, etching, lithium, nanoparticles, secondary cells, silicon, thermal analysis, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectra Abstract This study characterizes the native oxide layer of Si nanoparticles and evaluates its effect on their performance for Li-ion batteries. x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy were applied to identify the chemical state and morphology of the native oxide layer. Elemental and thermogravimetric analysis were used to estimate the oxide content for the Si samples. Hydrofluoric acid was used to reduce the oxide layer. A correlation between etching time and oxide content was established. The initial electrochemical performances indicate that the reversible capacity of etched Si nanoparticles was enhanced significantly compared with that of the as-received Si sample.

360

Energy Reduction Goals | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Reduction Goals Reduction Goals Energy Reduction Goals < Back Eligibility Investor-Owned Utility Municipal Utility Rural Electric Cooperative Savings Category Other Program Info State Vermont Program Type Energy Efficiency Resource Standard Provider Vermont Energy Investment Corporation In June 1999, Vermont enacted legislation authorizing the Vermont Public Service Board (PSB) to establish a volumetric charge on all electric customers' bills to support energy efficiency programs and goals.* The subsequent year the PSB established Efficiency Vermont, a statewide "energy efficiency utility," and a funding mechanism to support it. Efficiency Vermont is currently administered by Vermont Energy Investment Corporation (VEIC), an independent, non-profit corporation. Efficiency Vermont periodically establishes certain goals that constitute

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identifying reduction potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Municipal Energy Reduction Fund | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Municipal Energy Reduction Fund Municipal Energy Reduction Fund Municipal Energy Reduction Fund < Back Eligibility Local Government Savings Category Heating & Cooling Commercial Heating & Cooling Heating Home Weatherization Commercial Weatherization Sealing Your Home Cooling Construction Design & Remodeling Manufacturing Other Windows, Doors, & Skylights Ventilation Heat Pumps Appliances & Electronics Commercial Lighting Lighting Insulation Buying & Making Electricity Energy Sources Maximum Rebate $400,000 Program Info Start Date 3/17/2010 State New Hampshire Program Type State Loan Program Rebate Amount $5,000 to $400,000 Provider New Hampshire Community Development Finance Authority In March 2010, the New Hampshire Community Development Finance Authority (CDFA) launched a revolving loan program to encourage the state's

362

Manager, International Chemical Threat Reduction Department, Sandia  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

International Chemical Threat Reduction Department, Sandia International Chemical Threat Reduction Department, Sandia National Laboratories | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Who We Are > In The Spotlight > Nancy Jackson Manager, International Chemical Threat Reduction Department, Sandia National Laboratories

363

Manager, International Chemical Threat Reduction Department, Sandia  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

International Chemical Threat Reduction Department, Sandia International Chemical Threat Reduction Department, Sandia National Laboratories | National Nuclear Security Administration Our Mission Managing the Stockpile Preventing Proliferation Powering the Nuclear Navy Emergency Response Recapitalizing Our Infrastructure Continuing Management Reform Countering Nuclear Terrorism About Us Our Programs Our History Who We Are Our Leadership Our Locations Budget Our Operations Media Room Congressional Testimony Fact Sheets Newsletters Press Releases Speeches Events Social Media Video Gallery Photo Gallery NNSA Archive Federal Employment Apply for Our Jobs Our Jobs Working at NNSA Blog Home > About Us > Who We Are > In The Spotlight > Nancy Jackson Manager, International Chemical Threat Reduction Department, Sandia National Laboratories

364

Fundamental limits on NOx reduction by plasma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the gas-phase reaction mechanisms for removal of NO{sub x} in a plasma. The effect of oxygen content on the competition between the reduction and oxidation processes is discussed. The effect of the electron kinetic energy distribution on the radical production and subsequent chemistry is then discussed in order to predict the best performance that can be achieved for NO{sub x} reduction using the plasma alone. The fundamental limit on the minimum electrical energy consumption that will be required to implement NO{sub x} reduction in any type of plasma reactor is established.

Penetrante, B. M., LLNL

1997-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

365

Nox reduction system utilizing pulsed hydrocarbon injection  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hydrocarbon co-reductants, such as diesel fuel, are added by pulsed injection to internal combustion engine exhaust to reduce exhaust NO.sub.x to N.sub.2 in the presence of a catalyst. Exhaust NO.sub.x reduction of at least 50% in the emissions is achieved with the addition of less than 5% fuel as a source of the hydrocarbon co-reductants. By means of pulsing the hydrocarbon flow, the amount of pulsed hydrocarbon vapor (itself a pollutant) can be minimized relative to the amount of NO.sub.x species removed.

Brusasco, Raymond M. (Livermore, CA); Penetrante, Bernardino M. (San Ramon, CA); Vogtlin, George E. (Fremont, CA); Merritt, Bernard T. (Livermore, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Suspension Hydrogen Reduction of Iron Oxide Concentrates  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of the project is to develop a new ironmaking technology based on hydrogen and fine iron oxide concentrates in a suspension reduction process. The ultimate objective of the new technology is to replace the blast furnace and to drastically reduce CO2 emissions in the steel industry. The goals of this phase of development are; the performance of detailed material and energy balances, thermochemical and equilibrium calculations for sulfur and phosphorus impurities, the determination of the complete kinetics of hydrogen reduction and bench-scale testing of the suspension reduction process using a large laboratory flash reactor.

H.Y. Sohn

2008-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

367

CHP Emissions Reduction Estimator | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

CHP Emissions Reduction Estimator CHP Emissions Reduction Estimator Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: CHP Emissions Reduction Estimator Agency/Company /Organization: United States Environmental Protection Agency Sector: Energy Focus Area: Buildings, Transportation, Industry Topics: GHG inventory, Co-benefits assessment Resource Type: Software/modeling tools User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.epa.gov/chp/basic/calculator.html Country: United States UN Region: Northern America CHP Emissions Reduction Estimator Screenshot References: http://www.epa.gov/chp/basic/calculator.html "This Emissions Estimator provides the amount of reduced emissions in terms of pounds of CO2, SO2, and NOX based on input from the User regarding the CHP technology being used. In turn the User will be provided with

368

Intramolecular Oxyferryl Heme Reduction in Myoglobin  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ACS Publications Abstract: The kinetics of oxyferryl (FeIVO) heme reduction in horse heart myoglobin (Mb) by a4LRuII (a NH3; L NH3, pyridine, isonicotinamide) bound at the...

369

National Idling Reduction Network News - December 2009  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the Credit for New Qualified Hybrid Motor Vehicles, and for Other Purposes"), includes a tax credit of up to 3,500 for idle reduction technology, including the installation of...

370

Multiresolution histogram analysis for color reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new technique for color reduction is presented, based on the analysis of the histograms of an image at different resolutions. Given an input image, lower resolution images are generated by using a scaling down interpolation method. Then, peaks and ...

Giuliana Ramella; Gabriella Sanniti Di Baja

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Lattice Reduction: a Toolbox for the Cryptanalyst  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

], circulated around 1979) and the lattice reduc­ tion algorithm reached a final form in the paper [LLL82 reduction techniques, almost by inspection. This fact, which may be due to the apparent technicality

Stern, Jacques

372

Sharing the Burden of GHG Reductions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The G8 countries propose a goal of a 50% reduction in global emissions by 2050, in an effort that needs to take account of other agreements specifying that developing countries are to be provided with incentives to action ...

Jacoby, Henry D.

373

Maximizing Wastewater Reduction for the Process Industries  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study provides an overview of water and wastewater management practices in the U.S. process industries. The focus is on the chemical and petroleum industries and their methods for maximizing wastewater reduction and zero discharge. However, it also covers end-of-pipe treatment, since water reduction and zero discharge practices have evolved from end-of-pipe treatment practices. The resulting report is a comprehensive reference developed to help utilities and energy service providers understand and f...

1999-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

374

Reduction of metal oxides through mechanochemical processing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The low temperature reduction of a metal oxide using mechanochemical processing techniques. The reduction reactions are induced mechanically by milling the reactants. In one embodiment of the invention, titanium oxide TiO.sub.2 is milled with CaH.sub.2 to produce TiH.sub.2. Low temperature heat treating, in the range of 400.degree. C. to 700.degree. C., can be used to remove the hydrogen in the titanium hydride.

Froes, Francis H. (Moscow, ID); Eranezhuth, Baburaj G. (Moscow, ID); Senkov, Oleg N. (Moscow, ID)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

D-Area Sulfate Reduction Studty Comprehensive Final Report  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An acidic/metals/sulfate, groundwater contaminant plume emanates from the D-Area Coal Pile Runoff Basin (DCPRB) at the Savannah River Site (SRS), due to the contaminated runoff the basin receives from the D-Area coal pile. A Treatability Study Work Plan (TSWP) (WSRC 2001) was implemented to evaluate the potential for the sulfate reduction remediation of the DCPRB acidic/metals/sulfate, groundwater contaminant plume. The following studies, implemented as part of the TSWP, are documented herein: Bacteria Population and Organic Selection Laboratory Testing; DTT-1 Trench Evaluation; DIW-1 Organic Application Field Study-Part 1; and DIW-1 Organic Application Field Study-Part 2. Evaluation of sulfate reduction applicability actually began with a literature search and feasibility report in mid 2001, which fed into the TSWP. Physical completion of TSWP work occurred in late 2004 with the completion of the DIW-1 Organic Application Field Study-Part 2. The following are the primary conclusions drawn based upon this 3-year effort: (1) Pure soybean oil provides a long-term, indirect, SRB carbon source that floats on top of the water table (by indirect it means that the soybean oil must be degraded by other microbes prior to utilization by SRB) for the promotion of sulfate reduction remediation. Soybean oil produces no known SRB inhibitory response and therefore large quantities can be injected. (2) Sodium lactate provides a short-term, immediately available, direct, SRB carbon source that is miscible with the groundwater and therefore flows with the groundwater until it has been completely utilized for the promotion of sulfate reduction remediation. Lactate at elevated concentrations (greater than 6 g/L) does produce a SRB inhibitory response and therefore small quantities must be injected frequently. (3) The use of limestone to buffer the contaminated groundwater facilitates sulfate reduction remediation through the injection of organic substrate. Additionally conclusions and recommendations are made in Sections 8 and 9 regarding continuation of this study, the potential for an interim action, and the final remediation once discharge to the DCPRB has been discontinued.

Phifer, M

2005-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

376

Evaluation of Efficiency Activities in the Industrial Sector Undertaken in Response to Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Targets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 2006 California Global Warming Solutions Act calls for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions to 1990 levels by 2020. Meeting this target will require action from all sectors of the California economy, including industry. The industrial sector consumes 25% of the energy used and emits 28% of the carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) produced in the state. Many countries around the world have national-level GHG reduction or energy-efficiency targets, and comprehensive programs focused on implementation of energy efficiency and GHG emissions mitigation measures in the industrial sector are essential for achieving their goals. A combination of targets and industry-focused supporting programs has led to significant investments in energy efficiency as well as reductions in GHG emissions within the industrial sectors in these countries. This project has identified program and policies that have effectively targeted the industrial sector in other countries to achieve real energy and CO{sub 2} savings. Programs in Ireland, France, The Netherlands, Denmark, and the UK were chosen for detailed review. Based on the international experience documented in this report, it is recommended that companies in California's industrial sector be engaged in a program to provide them with support to meet the requirements of AB32, The Global Warming Solution Act. As shown in this review, structured programs that engage industry, require members to evaluate their potential efficiency measures, plan how to meet efficiency or emissions reduction goals, and provide support in achieving the goals, can be quite effective at assisting companies to achieve energy efficiency levels beyond those that can be expected to be achieved autonomously.

Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Lu, Hongyou; Horvath, Arpad

2010-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

377

Development and testing of a photometric method to identify non-operating solar hot water systems in field settings.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the results of experimental tests of a concept for using infrared (IR) photos to identify non-operational systems based on their glazing temperatures; operating systems have lower glazing temperatures than those in stagnation. In recent years thousands of new solar hot water (SHW) systems have been installed in some utility districts. As these numbers increase, concern is growing about the systems dependability because installation rebates are often based on the assumption that all of the SHW systems will perform flawlessly for a 20-year period. If SHW systems routinely fail prematurely, then the utilities will have overpaid for grid-energy reduction performance that is unrealized. Moreover, utilities are responsible for replacing energy for loads that failed SHW system were supplying. Thus, utilities are seeking data to quantify the reliability of SHW systems. The work described herein is intended to help meet this need. The details of the experiment are presented, including a description of the SHW collectors that were examined, the testbed that was used to control the system and record data, the IR camera that was employed, and the conditions in which testing was completed. The details of the associated analysis are presented, including direct examination of the video records of operational and stagnant collectors, as well as the development of a model to predict glazing temperatures and an analysis of temporal intermittency of the images, both of which are critical to properly adjusting the IR camera for optimal performance. Many IR images and a video are presented to show the contrast between operating and stagnant collectors. The major conclusion is that the technique has potential to be applied by using an aircraft fitted with an IR camera that can fly over an area with installed SHW systems, thus recording the images. Subsequent analysis of the images can determine the operational condition of the fielded collectors. Specific recommendations are presented relative to the application of the technique, including ways to mitigate and manage potential sources of error.

He, Hongbo (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Vorobieff, Peter V. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Menicucci, David (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Mammoli, Andrea A. (University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM); Carlson, Jeffrey J.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Carbon mitigation potential and costs of forestry options in Brazil, China, India, Indonesia, Mexico, the Phillippines and Tanzania  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

potential for carbon sequestration and emission reductionForestry Options on Carbon Sequestration in India, Workinggas emissions and carbon sequestration in the forest sector

Sathaye, J.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Inert Anode Life in Low Temperature Reduction Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The production of aluminum metal by low temperature electrolysis utilizing metal non-consumable anodes and ceramic cathodes was extensively investigated. Tests were performed with traditional sodium fluoride--aluminum fluoride composition electrolytes, potassium fluoride-- aluminum fluoride electrolytes, and potassium fluoride--sodium fluoride--aluminum fluoride electrolytes. All of the Essential First-Tier Requirements of the joint DOE-Aluminum Industry Inert Anode Road Map were achieved and those items yet to be resolved for commercialization of this technology were identified. Methods for the fabrication and welding of metal alloy anodes were developed and tested. The potential savings of energy and energy costs were determined and potential environmental benefits verified.

Bradford, Donald R.

2005-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

380

Identifying Cost-Effective Residential Energy Efficiency Opportunities...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Identifying Cost-Effective Residential Energy Efficiency Opportunities for the Kauai Island Utility Cooperative Identifying Cost-Effective Residential Energy Efficiency...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identifying reduction potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Identify and Protect Your Vital Records | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Your Vital Records IDENTIFY AND PROTECT YOUR VITAL RECORDS (2).pdf More Documents & Publications IDENTIFY AND PROTECT YOUR VITAL RECORDS Untitled (2).PDF Audit Report: DOEIG-0838...

382

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Benefits and Considerations  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Benefits and Considerations to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Benefits and Considerations on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Benefits and Considerations on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Benefits and Considerations on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Benefits and Considerations on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Benefits and Considerations on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Benefits and Considerations on AddThis.com... More in this section... Idle Reduction Benefits & Considerations Heavy-Duty Vehicles Medium-Duty Vehicles Light-Duty Vehicles

383

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Technology Weight Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Idle Reduction Technology Weight Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Technology Weight Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Technology Weight Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Technology Weight Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Technology Weight Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Technology Weight Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Technology Weight Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Technology Weight Exemption

384

Comments on MHK Cost Reduction Pathway White Papers | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Comments on MHK Cost Reduction Pathway White Papers Comments on MHK Cost Reduction Pathway White Papers Home > Groups > Water Power Forum Feedback Welcome: The Water Power Program welcomes comments on MHK Cost Reduction Pathway white paper products from the MHK community. Comments will be used for the Program's internal purposes and DOE is not obligated to provide a response to comments. Please provide your feedback regarding the content of the white papers via this Forum. Cost Reduction Pathways White Papers: The U.S. Department of Energy's Water Power Program is seeking to demonstrate the technical and economic opportunity of marine and hydrokinetic (MHK) technologies. As part of this process, Sandia National Laboratories, in partnership with the Water Power Program, developed four white papers to identify and address critical cost drivers, and

385

State of the art review of radioactive waste volume reduction techniques for commercial nuclear power plants  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A review is made of the state of the art of volume reduction techniques for low level liquid and solid radioactive wastes produced as a result of: (1) operation of commercial nuclear power plants, (2) storage of spent fuel in away-from-reactor facilities, and (3) decontamination/decommissioning of commercial nuclear power plants. The types of wastes and their chemical, physical, and radiological characteristics are identified. Methods used by industry for processing radioactive wastes are reviewed and compared to the new techniques for processing and reducing the volume of radioactive wastes. A detailed system description and report on operating experiences follow for each of the new volume reduction techniques. In addition, descriptions of volume reduction methods presently under development are provided. The Appendix records data collected during site surveys of vendor facilities and operating power plants. A Bibliography is provided for each of the various volume reduction techniques discussed in the report.

Not Available

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Piecewise Potential Vorticity Inversion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The treatment of the potential vorticity (PV) distribution as a composite of individual perturbations is central to the diagnostic and conceptual utility of PV. Nonlinearity in the inversion operator for Ertel's potential vorticity renders ...

Christopher A. Davis

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

387

Multi-Site Energy Reduction Through Teamwork  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Teams have been established at seven BASF locations to facilitate implementation of the findings from the 2003 and 2004 Energy Audits conducted at these Sites. These Teams were charged with implementation, progress tracking, and management reporting. The Teams are comprised of engineers, technicians, and operators with various backgrounds and responsibilities. The diversity of the Teams was a factor in their success through the willingness to challenge various conditions. The Teams addressed hundreds of Energy Conservation Opportunities (ECOs) to set priorities and create implementation schedules. Many of the ECOs were implemented with little or no cost to BASF. The final Energy Audit of 2004 was conducted in July and the Energy Team for that Site was still able to implement a 7% energy reduction as compared to 2003. The combined results from these seven Energy Teams represent a 5.8% reduction in energy consumption, for these facilities, within BASF in 2004, as compared to 2003, a total savings of slightly more than $4,900k. The “top ten” items implemented were: 1. Cogeneration load following 2. Creation of a 60 psig steam header between blocks to utilize waste steam 3. Elimination of WWTP steam 4. Incinerator process control 5. Flare switched to stand-by 6. Acid water specification 7. Nitrogen consumption reduction 8. Compressed air optimization 9. Boiler minimum fire set-point reduction 10. Leak reduction

Theising, T

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar heat; • refrigeration loads that can be met either by standard equipment or absorption equivalents; • hot-water and space-heating

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was originally published in “Energy Policy” (Volume 45, Junewas originally published in “Energy Policy” (Volume 45, Junewas originally published in “Energy Policy” (Volume 45, June

Ke, Jing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Assessment of the Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Potential of Ultra-Clean Hybrid-Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ENERGY USAGE, AND GREENHOUSE EMISSIONS GAS 4. ASSESSMENT ANDgas consumption (miles per gallon or Wh mile) of a vehicle, calculation of the fuel usageGas from Biomass from Solar Carbon Dioxide Table 2: [gin ~mlsslons~-~iJf°r Usage

Burke, A.F.; Miller, M.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is coal-fired power generation. power generation. China Cement (10), 18-heat recovery (WHR) power generation technologies have been

Ke, Jing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of CHP varies widely by climate zone and service territory,sites 2 in different climate zones were picked. These samplevaries considerably by climate zone, and in general, the

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Storage and Reliability on Microgrid Viability: A Study of1947-4326 Introduction A microgrid is defined as a clusterfor short periods (see Microgrid Symposiums 2005-2009, and

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Assessment of the Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Potential of Ultra-Clean Hybrid-Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RFG Running Hot Soak Diurnal CNG :Diesel Fuels Emissions RFGwith compressednatural gas (CNG),the hydrocarbontaitpipemethanol, natural gas (CNG),and hydrogen. As noted above,

Burke, A.F.; Miller, M.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Assessment of the Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Potential of Ultra-Clean Hybrid-Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and to recover energy during regenerative braking. Theunituse of regenerative braking. 4.3 Pulse Power Energy Storage

Burke, A.F.; Miller, M.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

mid-sized commercial sites in California (CA), existing tariffs of three major electricity distribution utilities plus a natural gas company, and performance data of...

397

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

utilities, the electricity tariff has a fairly small fixed4 detailed electricity and natural gas tariffs, and DGexisting tariffs of three major electricity distribution

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Commercial-Building Microgrids,” IEEE Transactions on2009, Special Issue on Microgrids and Energy Management, (CHP in cost minimizing microgrids that are able to adopt and

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

://eetd.lbl.gov/EA/EMP/emp-pubs.html The work described in this report was funded by the California Energy Commission, Public Interest Energy owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by its trade name examine how this sector might implement DG with CHP in cost minimizing microgrids that are able to adopt

400

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

J.L. Edwards, (2003), “Distributed Energy Resources CustomerGas-Fired Distributed Energy Resource Characterizations,”on the economics of distributed energy resources (DER) in

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identifying reduction potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solar thermal collectors, absorption chillers, and storageCHP, often with absorption chillers that use waste heat forand • heat-driven absorption chillers. Figure 1 shows a

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

402

Assessment of the Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Potential of Ultra-Clean Hybrid-Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

results for mid-size hybrid cars (5-passengers) using portthe Federal Highway cycle, the hybrid car has only about 10%for compact (4-passenger) hybrid cars using port injected

Burke, A.F.; Miller, M.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Assessment of the Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Potential of Ultra-Clean Hybrid-Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

fuel distribution, powerplantand refinery emissions -- areemissions fromoil refineries and electrical powerplants. Inproduction of the fuel at the refinery, the distribution of

Burke, A.F.; Miller, M.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Assessment of Tire Technologies and Practices for Potential Waste and Energy Use Reductions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Presentation to the NRC Tire Committee in Davis, California.Rubber Reviews 75(3). NRC, 2006. Tires and Passenger Vehicle14 FIGURE 6. Tire Data on RRC and Tread Wear (NRC,

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Regnier, Justin; Burke, Andy; Melaina, Marc W; Bremson, Joel; Keteltas, Michael

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in tariff similar to net metering, and another includes athe purchase price (pure net-metering) and without the Selfin tariff similar to net metering, and another includes a

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Assessment of the Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Potential of Ultra-Clean Hybrid-Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2 gm/mifor the mid-size electric car. All the emissions areemissions for the mid-size electric cars vary from about Isize. In the case of electric cars, the efficiency standard

Burke, A.F.; Miller, M.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Assessment of Tire Technologies and Practices for Potential Waste and Energy Use Reductions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

14 FIGURE 6. Tire Data on RRC and Tread Wear (NRC,resistance coefficient (RRC) were found to be uncertain in6. FIGURE 6. Tire Data on RRC and Tread Wear (NRC, 2006)

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Regnier, Justin; Burke, Andy; Melaina, Marc W; Bremson, Joel; Keteltas, Michael

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Assessment of the Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Potential of Ultra-Clean Hybrid-Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF TECHNOLOGIES FOR HYBRID-ELECTRIC VEHICLES 4.1EnginesG.H. , SIMPLEV: Simple Electric Vehicle Simulation Program-G.H, SIMPLEV: Simple Electric Vehicle Simulation Program-

Burke, A.F.; Miller, M.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2009, 2010). Electricity transmission and distribution (T&D)f Electricity transmission and distribution losses are2010). Electricity transmission and distribution losses are

Ke, Jing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of three major electricity distribution ultilities plus aof three major electricity distribution ultilities plus a

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

incentive than the current California SGIP support levels for stationary fuel cells of $2500/kW for natural gas

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

35% of CA commercial electricity demand. Simulating thesereflect the benefit of electricity demand displacement byApr. ) Electricity electricity demand electricity demand

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

413

Assessment of the Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Potential of Ultra-Clean Hybrid-Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Table ES-3: Summaryof Hybrid Vehicle Fuel Economy Results onmal ICE and Series Hybrid Vehicles (t) Vehicle Test Weight (I) Conventional and Series Hybrid Vehicles had same weight,

Burke, A.F.; Miller, M.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Assessment of the Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Potential of Ultra-Clean Hybrid-Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

vehicles using the Stirling engine are very. low (less thanexcept possibly with the Stirling engine. Theprospects ofHybrid Vehicles using Stirling Engines with DifferentAll-

Burke, A.F.; Miller, M.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Specific cement energy consumption: conversion of power into2006. Cement industry energy consumption status and energyZhou, H. , 2007a. Energy consumption and environment

Ke, Jing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in CO 2 emissions from fossil fuel consumption and cement2010a). Coal is the main fossil fuel used in China’s cementdioxide (CO2) emissions from fossil fuel combustion, as well

Ke, Jing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Potential Energy Savings and CO2 Emissions Reduction of China's Cement Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2030. Three cement output projections are developed based onthese three production projections, energy savings and CO2have been a number of projections of China’s future cement

Ke, Jing

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Assessment of the Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Potential of Ultra-Clean Hybrid-Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydrogenfrom natural gas and the distribution and storage ofProduction and Storage Fuel Cycle" Natural gas/CompressedHz

Burke, A.F.; Miller, M.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Firestone 2004, EPRI-DOE Handbook 2003, Mechanical Cost Datahttp://der.lbl.gov). EPRI-DOE Handbook of Energy Storage for

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Assessment of the Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Potential of Ultra-Clean Hybrid-Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hybrid vehicle technologyunless there are special incentives through newemissionsor fuel economy regulations or tax

Burke, A.F.; Miller, M.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identifying reduction potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Assessment of the Greenhouse Gas Emission Reduction Potential of Ultra-Clean Hybrid-Electric Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

OF TECHNOLOGIES FOR HYBRID-ELECTRIC VEHICLES 4.1Engines13. Burke, A.F. , Hybrid/Electric Vehicle Design Options andOperation for Hybrid/Electric Vehicles, SAE Paper 930042,

Burke, A.F.; Miller, M.

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

by heat activated absorption cooling, direct-fired naturalwith absorption chillers that use waste heat for cooling (

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

The CO2 Reduction Potential of Combined Heat and Power in California's Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

also consider solar thermal and PV, but they are mostlywas performed in which solar thermal and PV are included. Inthis competition between FCs and PV/solar thermal change if

Stadler, Michael

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Energy savings potential from simple standby reduction devices in the Netherlands.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??In the last decades new lifestyle trends led to a high proliferation rate of domestic appliances that raises overall standby energy consumption. This study investigates… (more)

Tselekis, K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Assessment of Tire Technologies and Practices for Potential Waste and Energy Use Reductions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

modifications in tire maintenance and management Analyze theinvestigates tire maintenance management practices and tire-purchasing, maintenance, management, and disposal) than to

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Regnier, Justin; Burke, Andy; Melaina, Marc W; Bremson, Joel; Keteltas, Michael

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Model Studies of DNA Photorepair: Reduction Potentials of Thymine and Cytosine Cyclobutane Dimers Measured by  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, J.; Vigny, P. In Bioorganic Photochemistry; Morrison, H., Ed.; Wiley: New York, 1990; pp 1-272. (5) Smith, K. C. In The Science of Photobiology, 2nd ed.; Smith, K. C., Ed.; Plenum Press: New York, 1989,3-dimethylthymine, DMT, 1,3-bis(N4,N4-dimethylcytosin-1- yl)propane, DMC) and their corresponding cis

Yeh, Syun-Ru

427

Enhanced electrocatalysis of the oxygen reduction reaction based on patterning of platinum surfaces with cyanide  

SciTech Connect

The slow rate of the oxygen reduction reaction in the phosphoric acid fuel cell is the main factor limiting its wide application. Here, we present an approach that can be used for the rational design of cathode catalysts with potential use in phosphoric acid fuel cells, or in any environments containing strongly adsorbing tetrahedral anions. This approach is based on molecular patterning of platinum surfaces with cyanide adsorbates that can efficiently block the sites for adsorption of spectator anions while the oxygen reduction reaction proceeds unhindered. We also demonstrate that, depending on the supporting electrolyte anions and cations, on the same CN-covered Pt(111) surface, the oxygen reduction reaction activities can range from a 25-fold increase to a 50-fold decrease. This behaviour is discussed in the light of the role of covalent and non-covalent interactions in controlling the ensemble of platinum active sites required for high turn over rates of the oxygen reduction reaction.

Strmcnik, D.; Escudero, M.; Kodama, K.; Stamenkovic, V. R.; Cuesta, A.; Markovic, N. M. (Materials Science Division); (Inst. de Quimica Fisica); (Toyota Central R& D Labs.)

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Enhanced electrocatalysis of the oxygen reduction reaction based on pattering of platinum surfaces with cyanide.  

SciTech Connect

The slow rate of the oxygen reduction reaction in the phosphoric acid fuel cell is the main factor limiting its wide application. Here, we present an approach that can be used for the rational design of cathode catalysts with potential use in phosphoric acid fuel cells, or in any environments containing strongly adsorbing tetrahedral anions. This approach is based on molecular patterning of platinum surfaces with cyanide adsorbates that can efficiently block the sites for adsorption of spectator anions while the oxygen reduction reaction proceeds unhindered. We also demonstrate that, depending on the supporting electrolyte anions and cations, on the same CN-covered Pt(111) surface, the oxygen reduction reaction activities can range from a 25-fold increase to a 50-fold decrease. This behaviour is discussed in the light of the role of covalent and non-covalent interactions in controlling the ensemble of platinum active sites required for high turn over rates of the oxygen reduction reaction.

Strmcnik, D.; Escudero-Escribano, M.; Kodama, K.; Stamenkovic, V. R.; Cuesta, A.; Markovic, N. M.; Materials Science Division; Inst. de Quimica Fisica; Toyota Central R& D Labs., Inc.

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

429

Oxidation and Reduction of Copper in Steam Generator Deposits: Under Shutdown, Layup, and Startup Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project was initiated to address recent experience suggesting that the oxidation of secondary-side tube scale during shutdown, layup, and startup (SLS) is a major factor in the corrosion degradation of pressurized water reactor (PWR) steam generators (SGs). The objective of this project was to evaluate the potential for oxidation and reduction of SG deposits under prototypical SLS conditions. Steam generator deposits contain a variety of compounds or metals that could potentially be oxidized or redu...

2001-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

430

Lithiation of Silica through Partial Reduction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We demonstrate the reversible lithiation of SiO{sub 2} up to 2/3 Li per Si, and propose a mechanism for it based on molecular dynamics and density functional theory simulations. Our calculations show that neither interstitial Li (no reduction), nor the formation of Li{sub 2}O clusters and Si-Si bonds (full reduction) are energetically favorable. Rather, two Li effectively break a Si-O bond and become stabilized by oxygen, thus partially reducing the SiO{sub 2} anode: this leads to increased anode capacity when the reduction occurs at the Si/SiO{sub 2} interface. The resulting Li{sub x}SiO{sub 2} (x < 2/3) compounds have band-gaps in the range of 2.0-3.4 eV.

Ban, C.; Kappes, B. B.; Xu, Q.; Engtrakul, C.; Ciobanu, C. V.; Dillon, A. C.; Zhao, Y.

2012-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

431

Cleanup of plutonium oxide reduction black salts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work describes pyrochemical processes employed to convert direc oxide reduction (DOR) black salts into discardable white salt and plutonium metal. The DOR process utilizes calcium metal as the reductant in a molten calcium chloride solvent salt to convert plutonium oxide to plutonium metal. An insoluble plutonium-rich dispersion called black salt sometimes forms between the metal phase and the salt phase. Black salts accumulated for processing were treated by one of two methods. One method utilized a scrub alloy of 70 wt % magnesium/30 wt % zinc. The other method utilized a pool of plutonium metal to agglomerate the metal phase. The two processes were similar in that calcium metal reductant and calcium chloride solvent salt were used in both cases. Four runs were performed by each method, and each method produced greater than 93% conversion of the black salt.

Giebel, R.E.; Wing, R.O.

1986-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

432

Data Reduction and Analysis Graphical Organizer  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Spectroscopic surveys are undergoing a rapid expansion in their data collecting capabilities, reaching the level of hundreds of spectra per pointing. An efficient use of such huge amounts of information requires a high degree of interconnection between the various tools involved in preparing the observations, reducing the data, and carrying out the data analysis. DRAGO (Data Reduction and Analysis Graphical Organizer) attempts to easy the process, by integrating in a global framework the main data handling components: from reduction pipelines, to data organization, plotting, and browsing tools, to storing the data reduction results in a database for further analysis. DRAGO allows the use of the astronomer own's preferred tools, by "plugging them in" in an environment which handles transparently the communications between them. See http://cosmos.mi.iasf.cnr.it/pandora .

L. Paioro; B. M. Garilli; M. Scodeggio; P. Franzetti

2004-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

433

Hydropower potential in Turkey  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Turkey has a total hydropower potential of 433 GW that is equal to 1.2% of the total hydropower potential of the world and to 14% of European hydropower potential. Only 125 GW of the total hydroelectric potential of Turkey can be economically used. By the commissioning of new hydropower plants, which are under construction, 34% of the economically usable potential of the country would be tapped. At the present, hydropower energy is an important energy source for Turkey due to its useful characteristics such as being renewable, clean, and less of an impact on the environment, and a cheap and domestic energy source.

Kaygusuz, K. [Karadeniz Technical Univ., Trabzon (Turkey). Dept. of Chemistry

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 3: Identify and Engage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3: 3: Identify and Engage Financial Partners to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 3: Identify and Engage Financial Partners on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 3: Identify and Engage Financial Partners on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 3: Identify and Engage Financial Partners on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 3: Identify and Engage Financial Partners on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 3: Identify and Engage Financial Partners on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 3: Identify and Engage Financial Partners on AddThis.com... Getting Started Driving Demand Financing Assess the Market

435

Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Rules,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Identify Identify Institutional Change Rules, Roles, and Tools Constituting Context for Sustainability to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Rules, Roles, and Tools Constituting Context for Sustainability on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Rules, Roles, and Tools Constituting Context for Sustainability on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Rules, Roles, and Tools Constituting Context for Sustainability on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Rules, Roles, and Tools Constituting Context for Sustainability on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional

436

Energy dependence of nucleus-nucleus potential close to the Coulomb barrier  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The nucleus-nucleus interaction potentials in heavy-ion fusion reactions are extracted from the microscopic time-dependent Hartree-Fock theory for mass symmetric reactions $^{16}$O${}+^{16}$O, $^{40}$Ca${}+^{40}$Ca, $^{48}$Ca${}+^{48}$Ca and mass asymmetric reactions $^{16}$O$ +^{40,48}$Ca, $^{40}$Ca${}+^{48}$Ca, $^{16}$O+$^{208}$Pb, $^{40}$Ca+$^{90}$Zr. When the center-of-mass energy is much higher than the Coulomb barrier energy, potentials deduced with the microscopic theory identify with the frozen density approximation. As the center-of-mass energy decreases and approaches the Coulomb barrier, potentials become energy dependent. This dependence signs dynamical reorganization of internal degrees of freedom and leads to a reduction of the "apparent" barrier felt by the two nuclei during fusion of the order of $2-3 %$ compared to the frozen density case. Several examples illustrate that the potential landscape changes rapidly when the center-of-mass energy is in the vicinity of the Coulomb barrier energy. The energy dependence is expected to have a significant role on fusion around the Coulomb barrier.

Kouhei Washiyama; Denis Lacroix

2008-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

437

Earthquake risk reduction in the United States: An assessment of selected user needs and recommendations for the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This Assessment was conducted to improve the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) by providing NEHRP agencies with information that supports their user-oriented setting of crosscutting priorities in the NEHRP strategic planning process. The primary objective of this Assessment was to take a ``snapshot`` evaluation of the needs of selected users throughout the major program elements of NEHRP. Secondary objectives were to conduct an assessment of the knowledge that exists (or is being developed by NEHRP) to support earthquake risk reduction, and to begin a process of evaluating how NEHRP is meeting user needs. An identification of NEHRP`s strengths also resulted from the effort, since those strengths demonstrate successful methods that may be useful to NEHRP in the future. These strengths are identified in the text, and many of them represent important achievements since the Earthquake Hazards Reduction Act was passed in 1977.

NONE

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

438

Potential automotive uses of wrought magnesium alloys  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Vehicle weight reduction is one of the major means available to improve automotive fuel efficiency. High-strength steels, aluminum (Al), and polymers are already being used to reduce weight significantly, but substantial additional reductions could be achieved by greater use of low-density magnesium (Mg) and its alloys. Mg alloys are currently used in relatively small quantities for auto parts, generally limited to die castings (e.g., housings). Argonne National Laboratory`s Center for Transportation Research has performed a study for the Lightweight Materials Program within DOE`s Office of Transportation Materials to evaluate the suitability of wrought Mg and its alloys to replace steel/aluminum for automotive structural and sheet applications. Mg sheet could be used in body nonstructural and semi-structural applications, while extrusions could be used in such structural applications as spaceframes. This study identifies high cost as the major barrier to greatly increased Mg use in autos. Two technical R and D areas, novel reduction technology and better hot-forming technology, could enable major cost reductions.

Gaines, L.; Cuenca, R.; Wu, S. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Stodolsky, F. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)]|[Argonne National Lab., Washington, DC (United States)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Identifying and Remediating High Water Production Problems in Basin-Centered Formations  

SciTech Connect

Through geochemical analyses of produced waters, petrophysics, and reservoir simulation we developed concepts and approaches for mitigating unwanted water production in tight gas reservoirs and for increasing recovery of gas resources presently considered noncommercial. Only new completion research (outside the scope of this study) will validate our hypothesis. The first task was assembling and interpreting a robust regional database of historical produced-water analyses to address the production of excessive water in basin-centered tight gas fields in the Greater Green (GGRB ) and Wind River basins (WRB), Wyoming. The database is supplemented with a sampling program in currently active areas. Interpretation of the regional water chemistry data indicates most produced waters reflect their original depositional environments and helps identify local anomalies related to basement faulting. After the assembly and evaluation phases of this project, we generated a working model of tight formation reservoir development, based on the regional nature and occurrence of the formation waters. Through an integrative approach to numerous existing reservoir concepts, we synthesized a generalized development scheme organized around reservoir confining stress cycles. This single overarching scheme accommodates a spectrum of outcomes from the GGRB and Wind River basins. Burial and tectonic processes destroy much of the depositional intergranular fabric of the reservoir, generate gas, and create a rock volume marked by extremely low permeabilities to gas and fluids. Stress release associated with uplift regenerates reservoir permeability through the development of a penetrative grain bounding natural fracture fabric. Reservoir mineral composition, magnitude of the stress cycle and local tectonics govern the degree, scale and exact mechanism of permeability development. We applied the reservoir working model to an area of perceived anomalous water production. Detailed water analyses, seismic mapping, petrophysics, and reservoir simulation indicate a lithologic and structural component to excessive in situ water permeability. Higher formation water salinity was found to be a good pay indicator. Thus spontaneous potential (SP) and resistivity ratio approaches combined with accurate formation water resistivity (Rw) information may be underutilized tools. Reservoir simulation indicates significant infill potential in the demonstration area. Macro natural fracture permeability was determined to be a key element affecting both gas and water production. Using the reservoir characterization results, we generated strategies for avoidance and mitigation of unwanted water production in the field. These strategies include (1) more selective perforation by improved pay determination, (2) using seismic attributes to avoid small-scale fault zones, and (3) utilizing detailed subsurface information to deliberately target optimally located small scale fault zones high in the reservoir gas column. Tapping into the existing natural fracture network represents opportunity for generating dynamic value. Recognizing the crucial role of stress release in the natural generation of permeability within tight reservoirs raises the possibility of manmade generation of permeability through local confining stress release. To the extent that relative permeabilities prevent gas and water movement in the deep subsurface a reduction in stress around a wellbore has the potential to increase the relative permeability conditions, allowing gas to flow. For this reason, future research into cavitation completion methods for deep geopressured reservoirs is recommended.

R.L. Billingsley

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

RMOTC to Test Oil Viscosity Reduction Technology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to Test Oil Viscosity Reduction Technology to Test Oil Viscosity Reduction Technology The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) announces that the "Teapot Dome" oil field in Wyoming is hosting a series of tests funded by STWA, Inc. ("STWA") to determine the performance of its Applied Oil Technology (AOT(tm)) in reducing crude oil's viscosity to lower transportation costs for pipeline operators. The testing is managed by RMOTC, and conducted at Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3, also known as the Teapot Dome oil field. RMOTC is providing the infrastructure and technical expertise to support companies such as STWA in their efforts to validate new technologies and bring those products and

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identifying reduction potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Synthesis of DiamidoPyrrolyl Molybdenum Complexes Relevant to Reduction of Dinitrogen to Ammonia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A potentially useful trianionic ligand for the reduction of dinitrogen catalytically by molybdenum complexes is one in which one of the arms in a [(RNCH2CH2)3N]3? ligand is replaced by a 2-mesitylpyrrolyl-?-methyl arm, ...

Chin, J. M.

442

Information Collection Requests/Paper Reduction Act | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Information Collection RequestsPaper Reduction Act Information Collection RequestsPaper Reduction Act Training Presentation on the on Information Collection and the Paper...

443

Stripping Ethanol from Ethanol-Blended Diesel Fuels for Reductant ...  

Stripping Ethanol from Ethanol-Blended Diesel Fuels for Reductant Use in N0x Catalytic Reduction Note: The technology described above is an early stage opportunity.

444

DOE Retrospective Review Plan and Burden Reduction Report - December...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and Burden Reduction Report - December 18, 2012 DOE Retrospective Review Plan and Burden Reduction Report - December 18, 2012 DOE EO 13563 December 2012 Update Report and Burden...

445

IEP - Advanced NOx Emissions Control: NOx Reduction Technologies  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

NOx Reduction Technologies NOx reduction technologies can be grouped into two broad categories: combustion modifications and post-combustion processes. Some of the more important...

446

Greenhouse Gas Reductions: SF6 | Argonne National Laboratory  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Greenhouse Gas Reductions: SF6 Share Description Argonne National Laboratory is leading the way in greenhouse gas reductions, particularly with the recapture and recycling of...

447

Emerging Energy-efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emissions-reduction...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy-efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emissions-reduction Technologies for the Iron and Steel Industry Title Emerging Energy-efficiency and Carbon Dioxide Emissions-reduction...

448

Nevada State Energy Reduction Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Nevada State Energy Reduction Plan Nevada State Energy Reduction Plan Eligibility State Government Savings For Heating & Cooling Home Weatherization Construction Commercial...

449

Alternative Fuels Data Center: School District Emissions Reduction Policies  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

School District School District Emissions Reduction Policies to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School District Emissions Reduction Policies on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: School District Emissions Reduction Policies on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School District Emissions Reduction Policies on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: School District Emissions Reduction Policies on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: School District Emissions Reduction Policies on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: School District Emissions Reduction Policies on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type School District Emissions Reduction Policies

450

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Commercial Vehicle Idle Reduction  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Commercial Vehicle Commercial Vehicle Idle Reduction Requirement to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Commercial Vehicle Idle Reduction Requirement on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Commercial Vehicle Idle Reduction Requirement on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Commercial Vehicle Idle Reduction Requirement on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Commercial Vehicle Idle Reduction Requirement on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Commercial Vehicle Idle Reduction Requirement on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Commercial Vehicle Idle Reduction Requirement on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Commercial Vehicle Idle Reduction Requirement

451

Dynamic Reduction of a CH4/Air Chemical Mechanism Appropriate...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dynamic Reduction of a CH4Air Chemical Mechanism Appropriate for Investigating Vortex Flame Interactions Title Dynamic Reduction of a CH4Air Chemical Mechanism Appropriate for...

452

Performance Analysis: Work Control Events Identified January - August 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This performance analysis evaluated 24 events that occurred at LLNL from January through August 2010. The analysis identified areas of potential work control process and/or implementation weaknesses and several common underlying causes. Human performance improvement and safety culture factors were part of the causal analysis of each event and were analyzed. The collective significance of all events in 2010, as measured by the occurrence reporting significance category and by the proportion of events that have been reported to the DOE ORPS under the ''management concerns'' reporting criteria, does not appear to have increased in 2010. The frequency of reporting in each of the significance categories has not changed in 2010 compared to the previous four years. There is no change indicating a trend in the significance category and there has been no increase in the proportion of occurrences reported in the higher significance category. Also, the frequency of events, 42 events reported through August 2010, is not greater than in previous years and is below the average of 63 occurrences per year at LLNL since 2006. Over the previous four years, an average of 43% of the LLNL's reported occurrences have been reported as either ''management concerns'' or ''near misses.'' In 2010, 29% of the occurrences have been reported as ''management concerns'' or ''near misses.'' This rate indicates that LLNL is now reporting fewer ''management concern'' and ''near miss'' occurrences compared to the previous four years. From 2008 to the present, LLNL senior management has undertaken a series of initiatives to strengthen the work planning and control system with the primary objective to improve worker safety. In 2008, the LLNL Deputy Director established the Work Control Integrated Project Team to develop the core requirements and graded elements of an institutional work planning and control system. By the end of that year this system was documented and implementation had begun. In 2009, training of the workforce began and as of the time of this report more than 50% of authorized Integration Work Sheets (IWS) use the activity-based planning process. In 2010, LSO independently reviewed the work planning and control process and confirmed to the Laboratory that the Integrated Safety Management (ISM) System was implemented. LLNL conducted a cross-directorate management self-assessment of work planning and control and is developing actions to respond to the issues identified. Ongoing efforts to strengthen the work planning and control process and to improve the quality of LLNL work packages are in progress: completion of remaining actions in response to the 2009 DOE Office of Health, Safety, and Security (HSS) evaluation of LLNL's ISM System; scheduling more than 14 work planning and control self-assessments in FY11; continuing to align subcontractor work control with the Institutional work planning and control system; and continuing to maintain the electronic IWS application. The 24 events included in this analysis were caused by errors in the first four of the five ISMS functions. The most frequent cause was errors in analyzing the hazards (Function 2). The second most frequent cause was errors occurring when defining the work (Function 1), followed by errors during the performance of work (Function 4). Interestingly, very few errors in developing controls (Function 3) resulted in events. This leads one to conclude that if improvements are made to defining the scope of work and analyzing the potential hazards, LLNL may reduce the frequency or severity of events. Analysis of the 24 events resulted in the identification of ten common causes. Some events had multiple causes, resulting in the mention of 39 causes being identified for the 24 events. The most frequent cause was workers, supervisors, or experts believing they understood the work and the hazards but their understanding was incomplete. The second most frequent cause was unclear, incomplete or confusing documents directing the work. Together, these two causes were mentioned 17 times and co

De Grange, C E; Freeman, J W; Kerr, C E; Holman, G; Marsh, K; Beach, R

2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

453

Potential impact of R and D on hydrothermal energy cost  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The potentital impact of the DOE/Geothermal Technology Development programs on the cost of geothermal power has been estimated using the computer program IMGEO.300. Results indicate a potential 30 to 40% cost reduction for hydrothermal systems with a 40 to 50% cost reduction potential for binary systems. The purpose of this document is to demonstrate the use of IMGEO. The initial results are tentative because the R and D goals have not been finalized and the code has not been completely validated.

Traeger, R.K.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Thermal management in heavy vehicles : a review identifying issues and research requirements.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Thermal management in heavy vehicles is cross-cutting because it directly or indirectly affects engine performance, fuel economy, safety and reliability, engine/component life, driver comfort, materials selection, emissions, maintenance, and aerodynamics. It follows that thermal management is critical to the design of large (class 6-8) trucks, especially in optimizing for energy efficiency and emissions reduction. Heat rejection requirements are expected to increase, and it is industry's goal to develop new, innovative, high-performance cooling systems that occupy less space and are lightweight and cost-competitive. The state of the art in heavy vehicle thermal management is reviewed, and issues and research areas are identified.

Wambsganss, M. W.

1999-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

455

User-assisted ink-bleed reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a novel user-assisted approach to reduce Ink-bleed interference found in old manuscripts. The problem is addressed by first having the user provide simple examples of foreground ink, ink-bleed, and the manuscript's background. From ... Keywords: document imaging processing, dual-layer Markov random field (MRF), ink-bleed reduction

Yi Huang; Michael S. Brown; Dong Xu

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Annual Operation of Selective Catalytic Reduction Systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In 2009, many coal-fired generating units equipped with selective catalytic reduction (SCR) systems for nitrogen oxide (NOX) control will convert from seasonal to annual SCR operation. This report provides guidelines on how to prepare for annual operation. It focuses on existing experience with annual operation, catalyst management strategy, equipment reliability, cold weather issues, low load and cycling operation, and risk assessment.

2007-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

457

Classification with dynamic reducts and belief functions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we propose two approaches of classification namely, Dynamic Belief Rough Set Classifier (D-BRSC) and Dynamic Belief Rough Set Classifier based on Generalization Distribution Table (D-BRSC-GDT). Both the classifiers are induced from uncertain ... Keywords: belief function theory, classification, dynamic reduct, generalization distribution table, rough sets, uncertainty

Salsabil Trabelsi; Zied Elouedi; Pawan Lingras

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

UREA INFRASTRUCTURE FOR UREA SCR NOX REDUCTION  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Urea SCR is currently the only proven NOX aftertreatment for diesel engines - high NOX reduction possible - some SCR catalyst systems are robust against fuel sulfur - durability has been demonstrated - many systems in the field - long history in other markets - Major limitations to acceptance - distribution of urea solution to end user - ensuring that urea solution is added to vehicle.

Bunting, Bruce G.

2000-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

459

Energy Reduction in California Pipeline Operations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Energy Reduction in California Pipeline Operations Industrial/Agriculture/Water End-Use PIER The Issue Fluid pipelines operating in California transport gasoline, fuel oil, jet fuel, crude, other hydrocarbons, and water, all vital to the wellbeing of Californias economy. These pipelines are also

460

2001 Workshop on Selective Catalytic Reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Approximately 100,000 megawatts of coal-fired capacity in the United States will employ selective catalytic reduction (SCR) for the control of nitrogen oxides (NOx) emissions by 2004. The 2001 Workshop on SCR, held in Baltimore, Maryland, provided a forum for discussion of current SCR issues.

2002-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identifying reduction potential" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Power reduction techniques for microprocessor systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Power consumption is a major factor that limits the performance of computers. We survey the “state of the art” in techniques that reduce the total power consumed by a microprocessor system over time. These techniques are applied at various ... Keywords: Energy dissipation, power reduction

Vasanth Venkatachalam; Michael Franz

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Waste Reduction and Recycling Rina Parikh  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Waste Reduction and Recycling Rina Parikh Jimmy Zimmerman Brooke Evans Lacey Johnston #12;The with ideas to reduce waste. Many students have researched possibilities in exploring other aspects of waste that is accumulating in areas of food service and increasing the number of people who recycle. We

Peterson, Blake R.

463

Weighted locally linear embedding for dimension reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The low-dimensional representation of high-dimensional data and the concise description of its intrinsic structures are central problems in data analysis. In this paper, an unsupervised learning algorithm called weighted locally linear embedding (WLLE) ... Keywords: Feature extraction, Locally linear embedding, Manifold learning, Nonlinear dimensionality reduction

Yaozhang Pan; Shuzhi Sam Ge; Abdullah Al Mamun

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Potential Release Sites  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PRS PRS Potential Release Sites Legacy sites where hazardous materials are found to be above acceptable levels are collectively called potential release sites. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Less than 10 percent of the total number of potential release sites need to go through the full corrective action process. What are potential release sites? Potential release sites are areas around the Laboratory and the town of Los Alamos at which hazardous materials from past activities have been found. Some examples of potential release sites include septic tanks and associated drain lines chemical storage areas wastewater outfalls material disposal areas incinerators sumps firing ranges

465

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Weight Exemption  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Idle Reduction Weight Idle Reduction Weight Exemption to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Weight Exemption on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Weight Exemption on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Weight Exemption on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Weight Exemption on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Weight Exemption on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Idle Reduction Weight Exemption on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Idle Reduction Weight Exemption A motor vehicle equipped with idle reduction or emissions reduction technology may exceed the maximum gross vehicle weight and axle weight

466

RECOVERY AND BEYOND: ENHANCING COMPETITIVENESS TO REALISE INDONESIA'S TRADE POTENTIAL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Document complet disponible sur OLIS dans son format d'origine Complete document available on OLIS in its original formatTAD/TC/WP(2008)14/FINAL As Indonesia recovered from the 1997-98 Asian Financial Crisis, the economy underwent significant political and structural changes, and the role of trade policy evolved. It is clear that there is much scope for trade to enhance economic growth. However, there remain significant challenges in realising this potential, including the need to improve external competitiveness. This paper analyses Indonesian trade policy following the crisis, and identifies some key reforms that may help to increase competitiveness. In view of the evolving domestic and global environment, a comprehensive policy approach will be required involving trade policy reform moving in tandem with reforms in other policy areas. Suggested reforms include, among others, complementing applied tariff cuts with reductions in non-tariff barriers and bound tariffs, reducing trade costs by easing behind-the-border regulations, and further improving the investment climate.

Organisation Coopération; Margit Molnar; Molly Lesher; English Or. English; Michael Olsson; Sjamsu Rahardja; Peter Rosner

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Rules for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rules for Sustainability to someone by E-mail Rules for Sustainability to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Rules for Sustainability on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Rules for Sustainability on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Rules for Sustainability on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Rules for Sustainability on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Rules for Sustainability on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Rules for Sustainability on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance

468

Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Roles for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Roles for Sustainability to someone by E-mail Roles for Sustainability to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Roles for Sustainability on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Roles for Sustainability on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Roles for Sustainability on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Roles for Sustainability on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Roles for Sustainability on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Roles for Sustainability on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance

469

Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Tools for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tools for Sustainability to someone by E-mail Tools for Sustainability to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Tools for Sustainability on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Tools for Sustainability on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Tools for Sustainability on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Tools for Sustainability on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Tools for Sustainability on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Tools for Sustainability on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance

470

Load Reduction, Demand Response and Energy Efficient Technologies and Strategies  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) was tasked by the DOE Office of Electricity (OE) to recommend load reduction and grid integration strategies, and identify additional demand response (energy efficiency/conservation opportunities) and strategies at the Forest City Housing (FCH) redevelopment at Pearl Harbor and the Marine Corps Base Hawaii (MCBH) at Kaneohe Bay. The goal was to provide FCH staff a path forward to manage their electricity load and thus reduce costs at these FCH family housing developments. The initial focus of the work was at the MCBH given the MCBH has a demand-ratchet tariff, relatively high demand (~18 MW) and a commensurate high blended electricity rate (26 cents/kWh). The peak demand for MCBH occurs in July-August. And, on average, family housing at MCBH contributes ~36% to the MCBH total energy consumption. Thus, a significant load reduction in family housing can have a considerable impact on the overall site load. Based on a site visit to the MCBH and meetings with MCBH installation, FCH, and Hawaiian Electric Company (HECO) staff, recommended actions (including a "smart grid" recommendation) that can be undertaken by FCH to manage and reduce peak-demand in family housing are made. Recommendations are also made to reduce overall energy consumption, and thus reduce demand in FCH family housing.

Boyd, Paul A.; Parker, Graham B.; Hatley, Darrel D.

2008-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

471

Energy Conservation and Waste Reduction in the Metal Fabrication Industry  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Reductions of energy use and waste generation can help manufacturers to be more profitable and more environmentally acceptable. Industrial Assessment Centers located at universities throughout the United States, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, are conducting combined energy and waste assessments for small and medium-size manufacturers. The Industrial Technology and Energy Management (ITEM) division of University City Science Center is field manager for the western region of the Industrial Assessment Center program. These case studies present results from three assessments of manufacturing plants in the metal fabrication industry. Primary processing operations include machining, painting, plating, and assembly. Energy conservation opportunities chiefly involved motor systems, compressed air systems, and heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning systems. Typically, pollution prevention opportunities involved the painting lines. For each of the three plants studied, processes are described; the specific energy conserving and waste-reducing measures are identified; the energy savings and waste reductions are quantified; and financial analyses are presented, including cost savings and paybacks. In addition, actual implementation results reported by the manufacturers are provided.

Kirk, M. C. Jr.; Looby, G. P.

1996-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

472

Realizing load reduction functions by aperiodic switching of load groups  

SciTech Connect

This paper investigates the problem of scheduling ON/OFF switching of residential appliances under the control of a Load Management System (LMS). The scheduling process is intended to reduce the controlled appliances` power demand in accordance with a predefined load reduction profile. To solve this problem, a solution approach, based on the methodology of Pulse Width Modulation (PWM), is introduced. This approach provides a flexible mathematical basis for studying different aspects of the scheduling problem. The conventional practices in this area are shown to be special cases of the PWM technique. By applying the PWM-based technique to the scheduling problem, important classes of scheduling errors are identified and analytical expressions describing them are derived. These expressions are shown to provide sufficient information to compensate for the errors. Detailed simulations of load