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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Microfluidic in vivo screen identifies compounds enhancing neuronal  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Compound screening is a powerful tool to identify new therapeutic targets, drug leads, and elucidate the fundamental mechanisms of biological processes. We report here the results of the first in vivo small-molecule screens ...

Haggarty, Stephen

2

Identifying Sources of Volatile Organic Compounds and Aldehydes in a High  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Identifying Sources of Volatile Organic Compounds and Aldehydes in a High Identifying Sources of Volatile Organic Compounds and Aldehydes in a High Performance Building Title Identifying Sources of Volatile Organic Compounds and Aldehydes in a High Performance Building Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-3979e Year of Publication 2010 Authors Ortiz, Anna C., Marion L. Russell, Wen-Yee Lee, Michael G. Apte, and Randy L. Maddalena Pagination 29 Date Published 09/2010 Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Abstract The developers of the Paharpur Business Center (PBC) and Software Technology Incubator Park in New Delhi, India offer an environmentally sustainable building with a strong emphasis on energy conservation, waste minimization and superior indoor air quality (IAQ). To achieve the IAQ goal, the building utilizes a series of air cleaning technologies for treating the air entering the building. These technologies include an initial water wash followed by ultraviolet light treatment and biolfiltration using a greenhouse located on the roof and numerous plants distributed throughout the building. Even with the extensive treatment of makeup air and room air in the PBC, a recent study found that the concentrations of common volatile organic compounds and aldehydes appear to rise incrementally as the air passes through the building from the supply to the exhaust. This finding highlights the need to consider the minimization of chemical sources in buildings in combination with the use of advanced air cleaning technologies when seeking to achieve superior IAQ. The goal of this project was to identify potential source materials for indoor chemicals in the PBC. Samples of building materials, including wood paneling (polished and unpolished), drywall, and plastic from a hydroponic drum that was part of the air cleaning system, were collected from the building for testing. All materials were collected from the PBC building and shipped to the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for testing. The materials were pre-conditioned for two different time periods before measuring material and chemical specific emission factors for a range of VOCs and Aldehydes. Of the six materials tested, we found that the highest emitter of formaldehyde was new plywood paneling. Although polish and paint contribute to some VOC emissions, the main influence of the polish was in altering the capacity of the surface to accumulate formaldehyde. Neither the new nor aged polish contributed significantly to formaldehyde emissions. The VOC emission stream (excluding formaldehyde) was composed of up to 18 different chemicals and the total VOC emissions ranged in magnitude from 7 μg/m2/h (old wood with old polish) to >500 μg/m2/h (painted drywall). The formaldehyde emissions from drywall and old wood with either new or old polish were ~ 15 μg/m2/h while the new wood material emitted > 100 μg/m2/h. However, when the projected surface area of each material in the building was considered, the new wood, old wood and painted drywall material all contributed substantially to the indoor formaldehyde loading while the coatings contributed primarily to the VOCs

3

Identifying Sources of Volatile Organic Compounds and Aldehydes in a High Performance Building  

SciTech Connect

The developers of the Paharpur Business Center (PBC) and Software Technology Incubator Park in New Delhi, India offer an environmentally sustainable building with a strong emphasis on energy conservation, waste minimization and superior indoor air quality (IAQ). To achieve the IAQ goal, the building utilizes a series of air cleaning technologies for treating the air entering the building. These technologies include an initial water wash followed by ultraviolet light treatment and biolfiltration using a greenhouse located on the roof and numerous plants distributed throughout the building. Even with the extensive treatment of makeup air and room air in the PBC, a recent study found that the concentrations of common volatile organic compounds and aldehydes appear to rise incrementally as the air passes through the building from the supply to the exhaust. This finding highlights the need to consider the minimization of chemical sources in buildings in combination with the use of advanced air cleaning technologies when seeking to achieve superior IAQ. The goal of this project was to identify potential source materials for indoor chemicals in the PBC. Samples of building materials, including wood paneling (polished and unpolished), drywall, and plastic from a hydroponic drum that was part of the air cleaning system, were collected from the building for testing. All materials were collected from the PBC building and shipped to the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) for testing. The materials were pre-conditioned for two different time periods before measuring material and chemical specific emission factors for a range of VOCs and Aldehydes. Of the six materials tested, we found that the highest emitter of formaldehyde was new plywood paneling. Although polish and paint contribute to some VOC emissions, the main influence of the polish was in altering the capacity of the surface to accumulate formaldehyde. Neither the new nor aged polish contributed significantly to formaldehyde emissions. The VOC emission stream (excluding formaldehyde) was composed of up to 18 different chemicals and the total VOC emissions ranged in magnitude from 7 mu g/m2/h (old wood with old polish) to>500 mu g/m2/h (painted drywall). The formaldehyde emissions from drywall and old wood with either new or old polish were ~;;15 mu g/m2/h while the new wood material emitted>100 mu g/m2/h. However, when the projected surface area of each material in the building was considered, the new wood, old wood and painted drywall material all contributed substantially to the indoor formaldehyde loading while the coatings contributed primarily to the VOCs.

Ortiz, Anna C.; Russell, Marion; Lee, Wen-Yee; Apte, Michael; Maddalena, Randy

2010-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

4

Exposure Levels for Chemical Threat Compounds; Information to Facilitate Chemical Incident Response  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Exposure Standards, Limits and Guidelines for Chemical Threat Compunds ABSTRACT Exposure criteria for chemical warfare (CW) agents and certain toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) used as CW agents (such as chlorine fill in an improvised explosive device) have been developed for protection of the civilian general public, civilian employees in chemical agent processing facilities and deployed military populations. In addition, compound-specific concentrations have been developed to serve as how clean is clean enough clearance criteria guiding facility recovery following chemical terrorist or other hazardous release events. Such criteria are also useful to verify compound absence, identify containment boundaries and expedite facility recovery following chemical threat release. There is no single right value or concentration appropriate for all chemical hazard control applications. It is acknowledged that locating and comparing the many sources of CW agent and TIC exposure criteria has not been previously well-defined. This paper summarizes many of these estimates and assembles critical documentation regarding their derivation and use.

Hauschild, Veronique [U.S. Army Public Health Command] [U.S. Army Public Health Command; Watson, Annetta Paule [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Aqueous Corrosion Study of Melt-Spun NdFeB Ribbons with TiC ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results showed that TiC additions improve corrosion resistance as indicated by lower corrosion rates (icorr) and more noble corrosion potentials. Results also...

6

NELCO METALS. INC. CANAAN. CONNBC.TIC"T  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

NELCO METALS. INC. NELCO METALS. INC. CANAAN. CONNBC.TIC"T -1 . 3. .' " : .: ~ .r 3. ,i . . . .:, , I November 11, 1963 i I I i] U. S. Atomic Energy CornmiSSiOn Feed Materials DiLision Oak Ridge, Tennessee Attention: Mr. W. J. Moore Administrative Officer Gentlemen: It has been requested that we make an estimate of whet: would be re- quired to recover the magnesium and uranium from prill. We muat base all our figures on the premise that all the prill to be handled will be similar in characteristics to the samples Sent to us for our trial work. It will be necessary to make a capital outlay of something under - $5,000 for hoods, fans, drying pans, ingot and sludge molds. We would not anticipate .hiring additional men at this time to do the job if it is possible to allow us to work on the prill piecemeal.

7

TiC x N 1-x Eutectic Composite Prepared by  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Presentation Title, Microstructure and Mechanical Property of TiB2-TiCxN1-x ... TiB2, TiC and TiN powders in N2 atmosphere at 60 ...

8

Polybenzimidazole compounds  

SciTech Connect

A PBI compound that includes imidazole nitrogens, at least a portion of which are substituted with an organic-inorganic hybrid moiety. At least 85% of the imidazole nitrogens may be substituted. The organic-inorganic hybrid moiety may be an organosilane moiety, for example, (R)Me.sub.2SiCH.sub.2--, where R is selected from among methyl, phenyl, vinyl, and allyl. The PBI compound may exhibit similar thermal properties in comparison to the unsubstituted PBI. The PBI compound may exhibit a solubility in an organic solvent greater than the solubility of the unsubstituted PBI. The PBI compound may be included in separatory media. A substituted PBI synthesis method may include providing a parent PBI in a less than 5 wt % solvent solution. Substituting may occur at about room temperature and/or at about atmospheric pressure. Substituting may use at least five equivalents in relation to the imidazole nitrogens to be substituted or, preferably, about fifteen equivalents.

Klaehn, John R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Peterson, Eric S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wertsching, Alan K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Orme, Christopher J. (Shelley, ID); Luther, Thomas A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Jones, Michael G. (Pocatello, ID)

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

9

Polybenzimidazole compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A PBI compound includes imidazole nitrogens at least a portion of which are substituted with a moiety containing a carbonyl group, the substituted imidazole nitrogens being bonded to carbon of the carbonyl group. At least 85% of the nitrogens may be substituted. The carbonyl-containing moiety may include RCO--, where R is alkoxy or haloalkyl. The PBI compound may exhibit a first temperature marking an onset of weight loss corresponding to reversion of the substituted PBI that is less than a second temperature marking an onset of decomposition of an otherwise identical PBI compound without the substituted moiety. The PBI compound may be included in separatory media. A substituted PBI synthesis method may include providing a parent PBI in a less than 5 wt % solvent solution. Substituting may use more than 5 equivalents in relation to the imidazole nitrogens to be substituted.

Klaehn, John R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Peterson, Eric S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Orme, Christopher J. (Shelley, ID); Jones, Michael G. (Chubbuck, ID); Wertsching, Alan K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Luther, Thomas A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Trowbridge, Tammy L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

10

Bismaleimide compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Bismaleimides of the formula ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 each independently is H, C.sub.1-4 -alkyl, C.sub.1-4 -alkoxy, C1 or Br, or R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 together form a fused 6-membered hydrocarbon aromatic ring, with the proviso that R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 are not t-butyl or t-butoxy; X is O, S or Se; n is 1-3; and the alkylene bridging group, optionally, is substituted by 1-3 methyl groups or by fluorine, form polybismaleimide resins which have valuable physical properties. Uniquely, these compounds permit extended cure times, i.e., they remain fluid for a time sufficient to permit the formation of a homogeneous melt prior to curing.

Adams, Johnnie E. (Grandview, MO); Jamieson, Donald R. (Merriam, KS)

1986-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

11

Pyrolitic Uranium Compound (PYRUC)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pyrolitic Uranium Compound Pyrolitic Uranium Compound (PYRUC) PYRolitic Uranium Compound (PYRUC) is a shielding material consisting of depleted uranium UO2 or UC in either pellet...

12

Uranium and Its Compounds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

and Its Compounds Uranium and Its Compounds line line What is Uranium? Chemical Forms of Uranium Properties of Uranium Compounds Radioactivity and Radiation Uranium Health Effects...

13

Reactivity of Transition Metals (Pd, Pt, Cu, Ag, Au) toward Molecular Hydrogen Dissociation: Extended Surfaces versus Particles Supported on TiC(001) or Small Is Not Always Better and Large Is Not Always Bad  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The reactivity of Pd{sub 4}, Pt{sub 4}, Cu{sub 4}, Ag{sub 4}, and Au{sub 4} clusters supported on TiC(001) toward molecular hydrogen dissociation has been studied by means of density functional based theory and periodic models and compared to that of the (111) and (001) surfaces. Pd{sub 4} and Pt{sub 4} interact rather strongly with the TiC(001) substrate, but the interaction of molecular hydrogen with the Pd{sub 4}/TiC and Pt{sub 4}/TiC systems is also very strong. As a consequence of the substantial admetal {leftrightarrow} carbide interactions, the adsorbed H{sub 2} molecule becomes more difficult to dissociate than on the corresponding extended (111) and (001) surfaces. Here, having a small supported particle does not lead to an enhanced chemical activity. On the contrary, for the Cu{sub 4}/TiC, Ag{sub 4}/TiC, and Au{sub 4}/TiC systems the combination of the small size of the particle and the polarization induced by the underlying carbide facilitates the dissociation of the hydrogen molecule with respect to the case of the extended surfaces. Here, the reduced size effectively enhances the activity of the supported particle. Thus, our results for the M(111), M(100), and M{sub 4}/TiC(001) systems show the complex interplay that can take place among the nature of the admetal, particle size effects, and support interactions.

Rodriguez, J.A.; Gomez, T.; Florez, E.; Illas, F.

2011-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

14

Reactivity of Transition Metals (Pd Pt Cu Ag Au) toward Molecular Hydrogen Dissociation: Extended Surfaces versus Particles Supported on TiC(001) or Small Is Not Always Better and Large Is Not Always Bad  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The reactivity of Pd{sub 4}, Pt{sub 4}, Cu{sub 4}, Ag{sub 4}, and Au{sub 4} clusters supported on TiC(001) toward molecular hydrogen dissociation has been studied by means of density functional based theory and periodic models and compared to that of the (111) and (001) surfaces. Pd{sub 4} and Pt{sub 4} interact rather strongly with the TiC(001) substrate, but the interaction of molecular hydrogen with the Pd{sub 4}/TiC and Pt{sub 4}/TiC systems is also very strong. As a consequence of the substantial admetal {leftrightarrow} carbide interactions, the adsorbed H{sub 2} molecule becomes more difficult to dissociate than on the corresponding extended (111) and (001) surfaces. Here, having a small supported particle does not lead to an enhanced chemical activity. On the contrary, for the Cu{sub 4}/TiC, Ag{sub 4}/TiC, and Au{sub 4}/TiC systems the combination of the small size of the particle and the polarization induced by the underlying carbide facilitates the dissociation of the hydrogen molecule with respect to the case of the extended surfaces. Here, the reduced size effectively enhances the activity of the supported particle. Thus, our results for the M(111), M(100), and M{sub 4}/TiC(001) systems show the complex interplay that can take place among the nature of the admetal, particle size effects, and support interactions.

Rodriguez J. A.; Gomez T.; Florez E.; Illas F.

2011-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

15

Identifying heavy Higgs bosons  

SciTech Connect

Two techniques for identifying heavy Higgs bosons produced at SSC energies are discussed. In the first, the Higgs boson decays into ZZ, with one Z decaying into an e-pair or ..mu..-pair and the other into a neutrino pair. In the second, the production of the Higgs boson by WW fusion is tagged by detecting the quarks that produced the bremsstrahlung virtual W's. The associated Higgs decay is identified by one leptonic and one hadronic decay. Both methods appear capable of finding a heavy Higgs boson provided the SSC design parameters are achieved. 16 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

Cahn, R.N.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Metal alloy identifier  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

To identify the composition of a metal alloy, sparks generated from the alloy are optically observed and spectrographically analyzed. The spectrographic data, in the form of a full-spectrum plot of intensity versus wavelength, provide the "signature" of the metal alloy. This signature can be compared with similar plots for alloys of known composition to establish the unknown composition by a positive match with a known alloy. An alternative method is to form intensity ratios for pairs of predetermined wavelengths within the observed spectrum and to then compare the values of such ratios with similar values for known alloy compositions, thereby to positively identify the unknown alloy composition.

Riley, William D. (Avondale, MD); Brown, Jr., Robert D. (Avondale, MD)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Most Commonly Identified Recommendations  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Most Commonly Identified Recommendations Most Commonly Identified Recommendations DOE ITP In Depth ITP Energy Assessment Webcast Presented by: Dr. Bin Wu, Director, Professor of Industrial Engineering Dr. Sanjeev Khanna, Assistant Director, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering With Contribution From MO IAC Student Engineers: Chatchai Pinthuprapa Jason Fox Yunpeng Ren College of Engineering, University of Missouri. April 16, 2009 Missouri Industrial Assessment Center Missouri IAC is one of the 26 centers founded by the U.S. DOE in the nation. Since its establishment in 2005, we have been working closely with the MoDNR, the MU University Extension, utility providers in the state, etc, to provide education, development and services in industrial energy efficiency. Our services (audits, workshops, etc), have already covered many locations across the state of Missouri.

18

Studies of Hadronization Mechanisms using Pion Electroproduction in Deep Inelas tic Scattering from Nuclei  

SciTech Connect

Atomic nuclei can be used as spatial analyzers of the hadronization process in semi-inclusive deep inelastic scattering. The study of this process using fully-identified final state hadrons began with the HERMES program in the late 1990s, and is now continuing at Jefferson Lab. In the measurement described here, electrons and positive pions were measured from a 5 GeV electron beam incident on targets of liquid deuterium, C, Fe, and Pb using CLAS in Hall B. The broadening of the transverse momentum of positive pions has been studied in detail as a function of multiple kinematic variables, and interpreted in terms of the transport of the struck quark through the nuclear systems. New insights are being obtained into the hadronization process from these studies; and experiments of this type can be relevant for the interpretation of jet quenching and proton-nucleus collisions at RHIC and LHC. These measurements will be extended in the next few years with the approved Jlab experiment E12-06-117, and later at a future Electron-Ion Collider.

Will Brooks, Hayk Hakobyan, Cristian Pea, Miguel Arratia, Constanza Valds

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

XAFS Model Compound Library  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

The XAFS Model Compound Library contains XAFS data on model compounds. The term "model" compounds refers to compounds of homogeneous and well-known crystallographic or molecular structure. Each data file in this library has an associated atoms.inp file that can be converted to a feff.inp file using the program ATOMS. (See the related Searchable Atoms.inp Archive at http://cars9.uchicago.edu/~newville/adb/) This Library exists because XAFS data on model compounds is useful for several reasons, including comparing to unknown data for "fingerprinting" and testing calculations and analysis methods. The collection here is currently limited, but is growing. The focus to date has been on inorganic compounds and minerals of interest to the geochemical community. [Copied, with editing, from http://cars9.uchicago.edu/~newville/ModelLib/

Newville, Matthew

20

Preparation of uranium compounds  

SciTech Connect

UI.sub.3(1,4-dioxane).sub.1.5 and UI.sub.4(1,4-dioxane).sub.2, were synthesized in high yield by reacting turnings of elemental uranium with iodine dissolved in 1,4-dioxane under mild conditions. These molecular compounds of uranium are thermally stable and excellent precursor materials for synthesizing other molecular compounds of uranium including alkoxide, amide, organometallic, and halide compounds.

Kiplinger, Jaqueline L; Montreal, Marisa J; Thomson, Robert K; Cantat, Thibault; Travia, Nicholas E

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identified compound tic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Partially fluorinated ionic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Partially fluorinated ionic compounds are prepared. They are useful in the preparation of partially fluorinated dienes, in which the repeat units are cycloaliphatic.

Han, legal representative, Amy Qi (Hockessin, DE); Yang, Zhen-Yu (Hockessin, DE)

2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

22

Heart testing compound  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The compound 15-(p-(/sup 125/I)-iodophenyl)-6-tellurapentadecanoic acid is disclosed as a myocardial imaging agent having rapid and pronounced uptake, prolonged myocardial retention, and low in vivo deiodination.

Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Goodman, M.M.

1983-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

23

Heart testing compound  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The compound 15-(p-[.sup.125 I]-iodophenyl)-6-tellurapentadecanoic acid is disclosed as a myocardial imaging agent having rapid and pronounced uptake, prolonged myocardial retention, and low in vivo deiodination.

Knapp, Jr., Furn F. (Oak Ridge, TN); Goodman, Mark M. (Knoxville, TN)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Particle Data Group - PDG Identifiers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

PDG Identifiers PDG Identifiers PDG Identifiers are references to items of PDG data such as particles, particle properties, decay modes and review articles. Once defined, a PDG Identifier is guaranteed to not change and can thus be used in other systems as a permanent reference to PDG data. Note that although the meaning of a given PDG Identifier will not change, there is no guarantee that the corresponding data will be included into future editions of the Review of Particle Physics. Each PDG Identifier consists of a single string without embedded spaces. PDG Identifiers are not case-sensitive. More details on PDG Identifiers can be found in this proposal. Future versions of pdgLive will directly support PDG Identifiers both for viewing and for downloading the data associated with a given PDG Identifier.

25

Separation of polar shale oil compounds using high-speed liquid chromatography. [Compounds known to exist in shale oil  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Methods for separation of potentially toxic compounds from shale oil and its waste products by high-speed liquid chromatography (HSLC) are discussed. The following classes of compounds were selected for study: aromatic and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, thiophenes, and indoles. No attempt was made to identify or quantitate compounds in shale oil, but it was demonstrated that HSLC can be a rapid and sensitive method for the separation of polar compounds from classes recognized to be present in shale oil and its waste products. Specific compounds studied were: phenanthrene, naphthalene, anthracene, pyrene, triphenylene, chrysene, benzo(a)pyrene, 1,2,3,4-dibenzanthracene, and 1,2,5,6-dibenzanthracene. (JGB)

Riley, R.G.

1976-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Charge Density Wave Compounds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fisher Research Group Fisher Research Group Layered Chalcogenides 29 February 2008 Controlling the Wave by Brad Plummer, SLAC Communications Stanford University researchers working in part at SSRL have discovered a novel set of properties pertaining to a compound of materials called tritellurides. These compounds, composed of three atoms of tellurium and a single atom of one of the rare earth elements, demonstrate unique electronic properties that can be controlled by altering the temperature of the material. The tritellurides display phenomena known as charge density waves (CDW). In a normal conductive metal, electrons persist in a "sea" wherein they are evenly distributed and equally available, or conductive. A CDW occurs under certain circumstances and causes the electrons to clump together, lowering their availability, and thereby lowering the compound's conductivity. Tellurium, when crystallized into quasi-two-dimensional planes and combined with rare earth elements, produces a material with CDWs that can be manipulated and controlled.

27

8-fluoropurine compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An efficient, regiocontrolled approach to the synthesis of 8-fluoropurines by direct fluorination of purines with dilute elemental fluorine, or acetyl hypofluorite, is provided. In a preferred embodiment, a purine compound is dissolved in a polar solvent and reacted with a dilute mixture of F.sub.2 in He or other inert gas.

Barrio, Jorge R. (Agoura Hills, CA); Satyamurthy, Nagichettiar (Los Angeles, CA); Namavari, Mohammad (Los Angeles, CA); Phelps, Michael E. (Encino, CA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Compound semiconductor MOSFETs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Enhancement mode, high electron mobility MOSFET devices have been fabricated using an oxide high-@k gate dielectric stack developed using molecular beam epitaxy. A template layer of Ga"2O"3, initially deposited on the surface of the III-V device unpins ... Keywords: Compound semiconductors, GaAs gate dielectric, III-V MOSFETs

R. Droopad; K. Rajagopalan; J. Abrokwah; P. Zurcher; M. Passlack

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

A compound parabolic concentrator  

SciTech Connect

A compound parabolic concentrator (CPC) for solar energy applications is presented in this work. A prototype was built and its thermal performance was determined. Operating temperatures of the order of 150 /sup 0/C with a reasonable efficiency can be attained by means of a fixed CPC.

Manrique, J.A.

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Hydrogen in compound semiconductors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Progress in the understanding of hydrogen and its interactions in III/V and II/VI compound semiconductors is reviewed. Donor, acceptor and deep level passivation is well established in III/V compounds based on electrical measurements and on spectroscopic studies. The hydrogen donor levels in GaAs and GaP are estimated to lie near E{sub v}+0.5 eV and E{sub v}+0.3 eV, respectively. Arsenic acceptors have been passivated by hydrogen in CdTe and the very first nitrogen-hydrogen local vibrational model spectra in ZnSe have been reported. This long awaited result may lead to an explanation for the poor activation of nitrogen acceptors in ZnSe grown by techniques which involve high concentrations of hydrogen.

Haller, E.E.

1993-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Injection Molding Compounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 5   Common thermoplastic and thermoset molding compounds...(r) (s) (t) Phenolic Distributor caps, plastic ash trays (a) (b) (g) (h) (i) (j) (k) (l) (m) (n) (o) (q) (r) (s) (t) Urethane Automotive body panels, bumpers (a) (d) (e) (g) (i) (l) (m) (o) (q) (r) (t) Vinyl ester Composite car/truck springs, wheels (b) (d) (e) (g) (i) (j) (k) (l) (m) (n) (o) (p)...

32

Identifying Sources of Volatile Organic Compounds and Aldehydes in a High Performance Building  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of formaldehyde was new plywood paneling. Although polishand aged (~20 year old) plywood wall paneling was present inboard Description New plywood paneling with new polish 1 New

Ortiz, Anna C.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Sandia National Labs: PCNSC: Research: Compound Semiconductor...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compound Semiconductor Science and Technology Thrust The Physical, Chemical, and Nano Sciences Center's vision for Compound Semiconductors is to develop the science of compound...

34

High-Value Fluorine Compounds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Compounds Baseline plans call for production of anhydrous or aqueous Hydrogen Fluoride (HF) from the DU hexafluoride conversion plant and subsequent recycle of these...

35

METHOD OF REDUCING PLUTONIUM COMPOUNDS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for reducing plutonium compounds in aqueous solution from a higher to a lower valence state. This reduction of valence is achieved by treating the aqueous solution of higher valence plutonium compounds with hydrogen in contact with an activated platinum catalyst.

Johns, I.B.

1958-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Devices for collecting chemical compounds  

SciTech Connect

A device for sampling chemical compounds from fixed surfaces and related methods are disclosed. The device may include a vacuum source, a chamber and a sorbent material. The device may utilize vacuum extraction to volatilize the chemical compounds from a fixed surface so that they may be sorbed by the sorbent material. The sorbent material may then be analyzed using conventional thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS) instrumentation to determine presence of the chemical compounds. The methods may include detecting release and presence of one or more chemical compounds and determining the efficacy of decontamination. The device may be useful in collection and analysis of a variety of chemical compounds, such as residual chemical warfare agents, chemical attribution signatures and toxic industrial chemicals.

Scott, Jill R; Groenewold, Gary S

2013-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

37

Polishing compound for plastic surfaces  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A polishing compound for plastic surfaces. The compound contains by weight approximately 4 to 17 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 6 parts mineral spirits, 2.5 to 15 parts abrasive particles, and 2.5 to 10 parts water. The abrasive is tripoli or a similar material that contains fine particles silica. Preferably, most of the abrasive particles are less than approximately 10 microns, more preferably less than approximately 5 microns in size. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS.TM., LEXAN.TM., LUCITE.TM., polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired.

Stowell, Michael S. (New Ellenton, SC)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Polishing compound for plastic surfaces  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A polishing compound for plastic surfaces is disclosed. The compound contains by weight approximately 4 to 17 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 6 parts mineral spirits, 2.5 to 15 parts abrasive particles, and 2.5 to 10 parts water. The abrasive is tripoli or a similar material that contains colloidal silica. Preferably, most of the abrasive particles are less than approximately 10 microns, more preferably less than approximately 5 microns in size. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS{sup TM}, LEXAN{sup TM}, LUCITE{sup TM}, polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired.

Stowell, M.S.

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Polishing compound for plastic surfaces  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention is comprised of a polishing compound for plastic materials. The compound includes approximately by approximately by weight 25 to 80 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, 1 to 12 parts mineral spirits, 50 to 155 parts abrasive paste, and 15 to 60 parts water. Preferably, the compound includes approximately 37 to 42 parts at least one petroleum distillate lubricant, up to 8 parts mineral spirits, 95 to 110 parts abrasive paste, and 50 to 55 parts water. The proportions of the ingredients are varied in accordance with the particular application. The compound is used on PLEXIGLAS{trademark}, LEXAN{trademark}, LUCITE{trademark}, polyvinyl chloride (PVC), and similar plastic materials whenever a smooth, clear polished surface is desired.

Stowell, M.S.

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

COMBUSTION SOURCES OF NITROGEN COMPOUNDS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Rasmussen, R.A. (1976). Combustion as a source of nitrousx control for stationary combustion sources. Prog. Energy,CA, March 3-4, 1977 COMBUSTION SOURCES OF NITROGEN COMPOUNDS

Brown, Nancy J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identified compound tic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Detection of chlorinated aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for making a composition for measuring the concentration of chlorinated aromatic compounds in aqueous fluids, and an optical probe for use with the method are disclosed. The composition comprises a hydrophobic polymer matrix, preferably polyamide, with a fluorescent indicator uniformly dispersed therein. The indicator fluoresces in the presence of the chlorinated aromatic compounds with an intensity dependent on the concentration of these compounds in the fluid of interest, such as 8-amino-2-naphthalene sulfonate. The probe includes a hollow cylindrical housing that contains the composition in its distal end. The probe admits an aqueous fluid to the probe interior for exposure to the composition. An optical fiber transmits excitation light from a remote source to the composition while the indicator reacts with chlorinated aromatic compounds present in the fluid. The resulting fluorescence light signal is reflected to a second optical fiber that transmits the light to a spectrophotometer for analysis. 5 figs.

Ekechukwu, A.A.

1996-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

42

Detection of chlorinated aromatic compounds  

SciTech Connect

A method for making a composition for measuring the concentration of chloated aromatic compounds in aqueous fluids, and an optical probe for use with the method. The composition comprises a hydrophobic polymer matrix, preferably polyamide, with a fluorescent indicator uniformly dispersed therein. The indicator fluoresces in the presence of the chlorinated aromatic compounds with an intensity dependent on the concentration of these compounds in the fluid of interest, such as 8-amino-2-naphthalene sulfonate. The probe includes a hollow cylindrical housing that contains the composition in its distal end. The probe admits an aqueous fluid to the probe interior for exposure to the composition. An optical fiber transmits excitation light from a remote source to the composition while the indicator reacts with chlorinated aromatic compounds present in the fluid. The resulting fluorescence light signal is reflected to a second optical fiber that transmits the light to a spectrophotometer for analysis.

Ekechukwu, Amy A. (Augusta, GA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Aza compounds as anion receptors  

SciTech Connect

A family of aza-ether based compounds including linear, multi-branched and aza-crown ethers is provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the family of aza-ether based compounds acts as neutral receptors to complex the anion moiety of the electrolyte salt thereby increasing the conductivity and the transference number of Li.sup.+ ion in alkali metal batteries.

Lee, Hung Sui (East Setauket, NY); Yang, Xiao-Qing (Port Jefferson Station, NY); McBreen, James (Bellport, NY)

1998-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

44

Method for purifying bidentate organophosphorus compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Bidentate organophosphorus compounds useful for extracting actinide elements from acidic nuclear waste solutions are purified of undesirable acidic impurities by contacting the compounds with ethylene glycol which preferentially extracts the impurities found in technical grade bidentate compounds.

Schulz, Wallace W. (Richland, WA)

1977-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Identified Patent Waivers | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Identified Identified Patent Waivers Identified Patent Waivers June 18, 2013 Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2012-012 This is a request by DR. F. JEFFREY MARTIN for a DOE Identified patent waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-AC52-06NA25396. March 1, 2013 Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2012-005 This is a request by UCHICAGO ARGONNE, LLC for a DOE Identified patent waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-AC02-06CH11357. March 1, 2013 Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2012-004 This is a request by UCHICAGO ARGONNE, LLC for a DOE Identified patent waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-AC02-06CH11357. March 1, 2013 Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2012-003 This is a request by UCHICAGO ARGONNE, LLC for a DOE Identified patent

46

Uranium Compounds and Other Natural Radioactivities  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X-ray Science Division XSD Groups Industry Argonne Home Advanced Photon Source Uranium Compounds and Other Natural Radioactivities Uranium containing compounds and other...

47

compound queries | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

- 15:22 Multicolor Maps from Compound Queries ask queries compound queries developer Google maps maps multicolor result formats results Semantic Mediawiki Hi all, Recently, a...

48

Possible explosive compounds in the Savannah River Site waste tank farm facilities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Based on a comparison of the known constituents in high-level nuclear waste stored at the Savannah River Site (SRS) and explosive compounds reported in the literature, only two classes of explosive compounds (metal NO{sub x} compounds and organic compounds) were identified as requiring further work to determine if they exist in the waste, and if so, in what quantities. Of the fourteen classes of explosive compounds identified as conceivably being present in tank farm operations, nine classes (metal fulminates, metal azides, halogen compounds, metal-amine complexes, nitrate/oxalate mixtures, metal oxalates, metal oxohalogenates, metal cyanides/cyanates, and peroxides) are not a hazard because these classes of compounds cannot be formed or accumulated in sufficient quantity, or they are not reactive at the conditions which exist in the tank farm facilities. Three of the classes (flammable gases, metal nitrides, and ammonia compounds and derivatives) are known to have the potential to build up to concentrations at which an observable reaction might occur. Controls have been in place for some time to limit the formation or control the concentration of these classes of compounds. A comprehensive list of conceivable explosive compounds is provided in Appendix 3.

Hobbs, D.T.

1992-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

49

Method of identifying plant pathogen tolerance  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for identifying a plant having disease tolerance comprising administering to a plant an inhibitory amount of ethylene and screening for ethylene insensitivity, thereby identifying a disease tolerant plant, is described. Plants identified by the foregoing process are also described. 7 figs.

Ecker, J.R.; Staskawicz, B.J.; Bent, A.F.; Innes, R.W.

1997-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

50

Method of identifying plant pathogen tolerance  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for identifying a plant having disease tolerance comprising administering to a plant an inhibitory amount of ethylene and screening for ethylene insensitivity, thereby identifying a disease tolerant plant, is described. Plants identified by the foregoing process are also described.

Ecker, Joseph R. (Erial, NJ); Staskawicz, Brian J. (Castro Valley, CA); Bent, Andrew F. (Piedmont, CA); Innes, Roger W. (Bloomington, IN)

1997-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

51

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a molecular sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene to about the mid point of the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 figures.

Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

1993-09-07T23:59:59.000Z

52

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a molecular sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 fig.

Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

1994-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

53

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C[sub 2] to C[sub 10] olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80 C to 500 C, using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms. 1 fig.

Smith, L.A. Jr.

1989-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

54

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene to about the mid point of the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); Arganbright, Robert P. (Seabrook, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); Arganbright, Robert P. (Seabrook, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a catalytic distillation, wherein the catalyst structure also serves as a distillation component by contacting the aromatic compound with a C.sub.2 to C.sub.10 olefin in the catalyst bed under 0.25 to 50 atmospheres of pressure and at temperatures in the range of 80.degree. C. to 500.degree. C., using as the catalyst a mole sieve characterized as acidic or an acidic cation exchange resin. For example, ethyl benzene is produced by feeding ethylene below the catalyst bed while benzene is conveniently added through the reflux in molar excess to that required to react with ethylene, thereby reacting substantially all of the ethylene and recovering benzene as the principal overhead and ethyl benzene in the bottoms.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Houston, TX)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Solid tags for identifying failed reactor components  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A solid tag material which generates stable detectable, identifiable, and measurable isotopic gases on exposure to a neutron flux to be placed in a nuclear reactor component, particularly a fuel element, in order to identify the reactor component in event of its failure. Several tag materials consisting of salts which generate a multiplicity of gaseous isotopes in predetermined ratios are used to identify different reactor components.

Bunch, Wilbur L. (Richland, WA); Schenter, Robert E. (Richland, WA)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Nanomechanical Sensor Detects and Identifies Chemical Analytes  

ORNL 2010-G00612/jcn UT-B ID 200802066 Nanomechanical Sensor Detects and Identifies Chemical Analytes Technology Summary ORNL researchers developed a ...

59

Identify energy-saving actions | ENERGY STAR  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Identify energy-saving actions Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction...

60

Feedback Capacity of the Compound Channel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, we find the capacity of a compound finite-state channel (FSC) with time-invariant deterministic feedback. We consider the use of fixed length block codes over the compound channel. Our achievability result ...

Shrader, Brooke E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identified compound tic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Superconducting phases of f-electron compounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Superconductivity was discovered almost a century ago. Yet, unexpected and fascinating new variants of this same old theme are being found at an increasing pace. This is due to great technical advances in materials preparation and an increasingly more systematic screening of new compounds. Prior to the late 1970s all known superconductors could be accounted for in terms of a condensate of Cooper pairs, where the Cooper pairs form due to electron-phonon interactions. With the discovery of the superfluid phases of 3He this understanding began to change in two ways (Osheroff et al., 1972; Vollhardt and Wlfle, 1990). First, 3He provided an example of non-electron-phonon mediated pairing. Second, it provided an example of a superfluid condensate that breaks additional symmetries. The discovery of heavy-fermion superconductivity as a prime candidate for complex order parameter symmetries and non-electron-phonon mediated pairing in f-electron compounds nearly three decades ago was long recognized as an important turning point in the history of superconductivity. However, progress in heavy fermion superconductivity until not long ago seemed to have been slow. In recent years especially the superconductivity in the cuprates, ruthenates, cobaltates, pyrochlores and ironpnictides received great attention. However, a spectacular series of discoveries and developments in f-electron superconductors took place at the same time. While in the first twelve years following the discovery of heavyfermion superconductivity in CeCu2Si2 only five more heavy fermion superconductors could be identified, over twenty five additional systems have been found in the past fifteen years (see Fig. 1). By now over thirty systems are known, about half of which were discovered in the past five years alone. This illustrates the speed of development the field of f-electron superconductivity has picked up despite its long tradition. As a result there is growing appreciation that superconducting phases of f-electron compounds frequently exist at the border of competing and coexisting forms of electronic order. For the majority of systems, including the original heavy-fermion superconductors, an inarXiv:0905.2625v1

Christian Pfleiderer

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Thin films of mixed metal compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compositionally uniform thin film of a mixed metal compound is formed by simultaneously evaporating a first metal compound and a second metal compound from independent sources. The mean free path between the vapor particles is reduced by a gas and the mixed vapors are deposited uniformly. The invention finds particular utility in forming thin film heterojunction solar cells.

Mickelsen, Reid A. (Bellevue, WA); Chen, Wen S. (Seattle, WA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

The Compound Capacity of Polar Codes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the compound capacity of polar codes under successive cancellation decoding for a collection of binary-input memoryless output-symmetric channels. By deriving a sequence of upper and lower bounds, we show that in general the compound capacity under successive decoding is strictly smaller than the unrestricted compound capacity.

Hassani, S Hamed; Urbanke, Ruediger

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

INSENSITIVE HIGH-NITROGEN COMPOUNDS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The conventional approach to developing energetic molecules is to chemically place one or more nitro groups onto a carbon skeleton, which is why the term ''nitration'' is synonymous to explosives preparation. The nitro group carries the oxygen that reacts with the skeletal carbon and hydrogen fuels, which in turn produces the heat and gaseous reaction products necessary for driving an explosive shock. These nitro-containing energetic molecules typically have heats of formation near zero and therefore most of the released energy is derived from the combustion process. Our investigation of the tetrazine, furazan and tetrazole ring systems has offered a different approach to explosives development, where a significant amount of the chemical potential energy is derived from their large positive heats of formation. Because these compounds often contain a large percentage of nitrogen atoms, they are usually regarded as high-nitrogen fuels or explosives. A general artifact of these high-nitrogen compounds is that they are less sensitive to initiation (e.g. by impact) when compared to traditional nitro-containing explosives of similar performances. Using the precursor, 3,6-bis-(3,5-dimethylpyrazol-1-yl)-s-tetrazine, several useful energetic compounds based on the s-tetrazine system have been synthesized and studied. Some of the first compounds are 3,6-diamino-s-tetrazine-1,4-dioxide (LAX-112) and 3,6-dihydrazino-s-tetrazine (DHT). LAX-112 was once extensively studied as an insensitive explosive by Los Alamos; DHT is an example of a high-nitrogen explosive that relies entirely on its heat of formation for sustaining a detonation. Recent synthesis efforts have yielded an azo-s-tetrazine, 3,3'-azobis(6-amino-s-tetrazine) or DAAT, which has a very high positive heat of formation. The compounds, 4,4'-diamino-3,3'-azoxyfurazan (DAAF) and 4,4'-diamino-3,3'-azofurazan (DAAzF), may have important future roles in insensitive explosive applications. Neither DAAF nor DAAzF can be initiated by laboratory impact drop tests, yet both have in some aspects better explosive performances than 1,3,5-triamino-2,4,6-trinitrobenzene TATB--the standard of insensitive high explosives. The thermal stability of DAAzF is equal to that of hexanitrostilbene (HNS), yet it too is a better explosive performer. The recently discovered tetrazol derivative, 3,6-bis-(1H-1,2,3,4-tetrazol-5-ylamino)-s-tetrazine (BTATz) was measured to have exceptional positive heats of formation and to be insensitive to explosive initiation. Because of its high burn rate with low sensitivity to pressure, this material is of great interest to the propellant community.

D. CHAVEZ; ET AL

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Thin films of mixed metal compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a thin film heterojunction solar cell, said heterojunction comprising a p-type I-III-IV[sub 2] chalcopyrite substrate and an overlying layer of an n-type ternary mixed metal compound wherein said ternary mixed metal compound is applied to said substrate by introducing the vapor of a first metal compound to a vessel containing said substrate from a first vapor source while simultaneously introducing a vapor of a second metal compound from a second vapor source of said vessel, said first and second metals comprising the metal components of said mixed metal compound; independently controlling the vaporization rate of said first and second vapor sources; reducing the mean free path between vapor particles in said vessel, said gas being present in an amount sufficient to induce homogeneity of said vapor mixture; and depositing said mixed metal compound on said substrate in the form of a uniform composition polycrystalline mixed metal compound. 5 figs.

Mickelsen, R.A.; Chen, W.S.

1985-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

66

An automatic analysis of Norwegian compounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Introduction The University of Oslo is currently developing an automatic morphosyntactic tagger for Norwegian. 2 A very important module is one which can analyse compounds. Compounding is extremely productive in Norwegian, and it is futile to ever hope for a lexicon (dictionary) that will contain all or even most of the compounds that occr in actual texts. Since the tagger we are developing is based on the possibility of recognising words by the help of a lexicon, it is of great importance to have a module that recognises new compounds. According to Munthe (1972), 10.4 per cent of all words in running text are compounds. Any text sample will contain a greatnumber of compounds. This statistics is true even for small samples. I took an arbitrary 440-word article from the newspaper Aftenposten from September this year, Full penhet om passunion (Full openness on passport union), and I quickly counted 47 compounds. Many of them a

Janne Bondi Johannessen; Helge Hauglin

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Laser Weather Identifier: Present and Future  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Prototype Laser Weather Identifier (LWI) systems designed to detect fog, rain and snow were tested for several months at Stapleton International Airport in Denver, and at the AFGL Weather Test Facility at Otis Air Force Base, Massachusetts. We ...

Ting-I. Wang; R. Lataitis; R. S. Lawrence; G. R. Ochs

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Volatile organic compound sensing devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs.

Lancaster, Gregory D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Moore, Glenn A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Stone, Mark L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Reagen, William K. (Stillwater, MN)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Volatile organic compound sensing devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs. 15 figs.

Lancaster, G.D.; Moore, G.A.; Stone, M.L.; Reagen, W.K.

1995-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

70

METHOD OF RECOVERING URANIUM COMPOUNDS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

S>The recovery of uranium compounds which have been adsorbed on anion exchange resins is discussed. The uranium and thorium-containing residues from monazite processed by alkali hydroxide are separated from solution, and leached with an alkali metal carbonate solution, whereby the uranium and thorium hydrorides are dissolved. The carbonate solution is then passed over an anion exchange resin causing the uranium to be adsorbed while the thorium remains in solution. The uranium may be recovered by contacting the uranium-holding resin with an aqueous ammonium carbonate solution whereby the uranium values are eluted from the resin and then heating the eluate whereby carbon dioxide and ammonia are given off, the pH value of the solution is lowered, and the uranium is precipitated.

Poirier, R.H.

1957-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

71

Volatile organic compound sensing devices  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Apparatus employing vapochromic materials in the form of inorganic double complex salts which change color reversibly when exposed to volatile organic compound (VOC) vapors is adapted for VOC vapor detection, VOC aqueous matrix detection, and selective VOC vapor detection. The basic VOC vapochromic sensor is incorporated in various devices such as a ground probe sensor, a wristband sensor, a periodic sampling monitor, a soil/water penetrometer, an evaporative purge sensor, and various vacuum-based sensors which are particularly adapted for reversible/reusable detection, remote detection, continuous monitoring, or rapid screening of environmental remediation and waste management sites. The vapochromic sensor is used in combination with various fiber optic arrangements to provide a calibrated qualitative and/or quantitative indication of the presence of VOCs.

Lancaster, G.D.; Moore, G.A.; Stone, M.L.; Regen, W.K.

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

72

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a combination reactor/distillation column comprising a vessel suitable for operating between 70 C and 500 C and from 0.5 to 20 atmospheres pressure; an inert distillation packing in the lower one-third of said vessel; solid acidic catalytic material such as zeolites or an acidic cation exchange resin supported in the middle one-third of said vessel; and inert distillation packing in the upper one-third of said vessel. A benzene inlet is located near the upper end of the vessel; an olefin inlet is juxtaposed with said solid acidic catalytic material; a bottoms outlet is positioned near the bottom of said vessel for removing said cumene and ethyl benzene; and an overhead outlet is placed at the top of said vessel for removing any unreacted benzene and olefin.

Smith, L.A. Jr.; Arganbright, R.P.; Hearn, D.

1993-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

73

Alkylation of organic aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Aromatic compounds are alkylated in a combination reactor/distillation column comprising a vessel suitable for operating between 70.degree. C. and 500.degree. C. and from 0.5 to 20 atmospheres pressure; an inert distillation packing in the lower one-third of said vessel; solid acidic catalytic material such as zeolites or an acidic cation exchange resin supported in the middle one-third of said vessel; and inert distillation packing in the upper one-third of said vessel. A benzene inlet is located near the upper end of the vessel; an olefin inlet is juxtaposed with said solid acidic catalytic material; a bottoms outlet is positioned near the bottom of said vessel for removing said cumene and ethyl benzene; and an overhead outlet is placed at the top of said vessel for removing any unreacted benzene and olefin.

Smith, Jr., Lawrence A. (Bellaire, TX); Arganbright, Robert P. (Seabrook, TX); Hearn, Dennis (Houston, TX)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Effect of Outside Air Ventilation Rate on Volatile Organic Compound  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Outside Air Ventilation Rate on Volatile Organic Compound Outside Air Ventilation Rate on Volatile Organic Compound Concentrations in a Call Center Title Effect of Outside Air Ventilation Rate on Volatile Organic Compound Concentrations in a Call Center Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2003 Authors Hodgson, Alfred T., David Faulkner, Douglas P. Sullivan, Dennis L. DiBartolomeo, Marion L. Russell, and William J. Fisk Journal Atmospheric Environment Volume 37 Start Page Chapter Pagination 5517-5528 Abstract A study of the relationship between outside air ventilation rate and concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) generated indoors was conducted in a call center office building. The building, with two floors and a floor area of 4,600 m2, was located in the San Francisco Bay Area, CA. Ventilation rates were manipulated with the building's four air handling units (AHUs). VOC concentrations in the AHU returns were measured on seven days during a 13-week period. VOC emission factors were determined for individual zones on days when they were operating at near steady-state conditions. The emission factor data were subjected to principal component (PC) analysis to identify groups of co-varying compounds. Potential sources of the PC vectors were ascribed based on information from the literature supporting the associations. Two vectors with high loadings of compounds including formaldehyde, 2,2,4-trimethyl-1,3- pentanediol monoisobutyrate, decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (d5 siloxane), and isoprene likely identified occupant-related sources. One vector likely represented emissions from building materials. Another vector represented emissions of solvents from cleaning products. The relationships between indoor minus outdoor VOC concentrations and ventilation rate were qualitatively examined for eight VOCs. Of these, acetaldehyde and hexanal, which were likely associated with material sources, and d5 siloxane exhibited general trends of higher concentrations at lower ventilation rates. For other compounds, the operation of the building and variations in pollutant generation and removal rates apparently combined to obscure the inverse relationship between VOC concentrations and ventilation. This result emphasizes the importance of utilizing source control measures, in addition to adequate ventilation, to limit concentrations of VOCs of concern in office buildings

75

Reactivity of target compounds for chemical coal desulfurization. Technical report, March 1, 1994--May 31, 1994  

SciTech Connect

This project seeks to identify representative organosulfur compounds which are removed by known coal desulfurization reactions. Demineralized coals are solvent extracted and the extracts fractionated to concentrate organosulfur compounds for analysis by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectroscopy. After sulfur compounds are characterized, the parent extracts are subjected to reactions previously shown to reduce the organic sulfur content of Illinois coals, fractionated and again analyzed for organosulfur content to determine if the identified compounds reacted during the chemical treatment. The original coal also will be subjected to chemical desulfurization, extraction, fractionation and analysis in order to correlate changes in organic sulfur content of the coal with reactions of specific sulfur compounds. These compounds can thus be reliably considered as target molecules for the next generation of desulfurization processes. Work during this quarter has shown that fractionation and chromatography of pyridine extracts to isolate suitable samples for GC/MS analysis, although time-consuming, appears to be better than direct toluene extraction in terms of providing a representative set of compounds for analysis. The toluene soluble fractions prepared by this route contain aromatic sulfur compounds and O, N, S-containing hetrocycles. A set of these compounds has been identified and their fate following desulfurization of the parent coal extracts is under investigation. Previously studied desulfurization reactions using the single electron transfer reagent, K/THF/naphthalene, and the reactive nickel boride reagent have been repeated and analyzed by GC/MS. SET and nickel boride reactions of the THF soluble portions of pyridine coal are currently in progress.

Buchanan, D.H.; Amin, M.; Cunningham, R.; Galyen, J.; Ho, K.K.

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Comparison of predicted and derived measures of volatile organic compounds inside four relocatable classrooms due to identified interior finish sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

carpet bonded to the plywood subfloor with a solvent-freebond properly to the plywood, and the carpet was installedlikely derived from the plywood used as the substrate for

Hodgson, Alfred T.; Shendell, Derek G.; Fisk, William J.; Apte, Michael G.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Compound cryopump for fusion reactors  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We reconsider an old idea: a three-stage compound cryopump for use in fusion reactors such as DEMO. The helium "ash" is adsorbed on a 4.5 K charcoal-coated surface, while deuterium and tritium are adsorbed at 15-22 K on a second charcoal-coated surface. The helium is released by raising the first surface to ~30 K. In a separate regeneration step, deuterium and tritium are released at ~110 K. In this way, the helium can be pre-separated from other species. In the simplest design, all three stages are in the same vessel, with a single valve to close the pump off from the tokamak during regeneration. In an alternative design, the three stages are in separate vessels, connected by valves, allowing the stages to regenerate without interfering with each other. The inclusion of the intermediate stage would not affect the overall pumping speed significantly. The downstream exhaust processing system could be scaled down, as much of the deuterium and tritium could be returned directly to the reactor. This could reduce ...

Kovari, M; Shephard, T

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Reading Comprehension - Dissecting and Compound Microscopes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dissecting and Compound Microscopes Two types of microscopes. _________ Dissecting and Compound Microscopes Two types of microscopes. _________ Dissecting Microscope Compound Microscope _________ eyepiece focus knob light light switch objective stage _________ eyepiece focus knob light light switch objective stage _________ eyepiece focus knob light light switch objective stage _________ eyepiece focus knob light light switch objective stage _________ eyepiece focus knob light light switch objective stage _________ eyepiece focus knob light light switch objective stage _________ Dissecting Microscope Compound Microscope _________ eyepieces focus knob light light switch objective stage _________ eyepieces focus knob light light switch objective stage _________ eyepieces focus knob light light switch objective stage _________ eyepieces focus knob light

79

Why Sequence Bacteria That Reduce Sulfur Compounds?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Bacteria That Reduce Sulfur Compounds? Combustion of sulfur-containing fuels, such as coal, oil, and natural gas, contributes significantly to global environmental problems, such...

80

Modern Records of Radiatively Important Halogenated Compounds...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

at CDIAC sites: Methane, Nonmethane Hydrocarbons, Alkyl Nitrates, and Chlorinated Carbon Compounds including three Chlorofluorocarbons (CFC-11, CFC-12, and CFC-113) in...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identified compound tic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Volatile organic compound emissions from composting.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This paper is a review of the aerobic composting process and the emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from this process. To understand why and (more)

Harris, Stephanie Rose Rene

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

PLUTONIUM COMPOUNDS AND PROCESS FOR THEIR PREPARATION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to certain new compounds of plutonium, and to the utilization of these compounds to effect purification or separation of the plutonium. The compounds are organic chelate compounds consisting of tetravalent plutonium together with a di(salicylal) alkylenediimine. These chelates are soluble in various organic solvents, but not in water. Use is made of this property in extracting the plutonium by contacting an aqueous solution thereof with an organic solution of the diimine. The plutonium is chelated, extracted and effectively separated from any impurities accompaying it in the aqueous phase.

Wolter, F.J.; Diehl, H.C. Jr.

1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Process for synthesizing compounds from elemental powders  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for synthesizing intermetallic compounds from elemental powders. The elemental powders are initially combined in ratio a which approximates the stoichiometric composition of the intermetallic compound. The mixed powders are then formed into a compact which is heat treated at a controlled rate of heating such that an exothermic reaction between the elements is initiated. The heat treatment may be performed under controlled conditions ranging from a vacuum (pressureless sintering) to compression (hot pressing) to produce a desired densification of the intermetallic compound. In a preferred form of the invention, elemental powders of Fe and Al are combined to form aluminide compounds of Fe{sub 3}Al and FeAl.

Rabin, B.H.; Wright, R.N.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Hydrodesulfurization catalysis by Chevrel phase compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for the hydrodesulfurization of sulfur-containing hydrocarbon fuel with reduced ternary molybdenum sulfides, known as Chevrel phase compounds. Chevrel phase compounds of the general composition M.sub.x Mo.sub.6 S.sub.8, with M being Ho, Pb, Sn, Ag, In, Cu, Fe, Ni, or Co, were found to have hydrodesulfurization activities comparable to model unpromoted and cobalt-promoted MoS.sub.2 catalysts. The most active catalysts were the "large" cation compounds (Ho, Pb, Sn), and the least active catalysts were the "small" cation compounds (Cu, Fe, Ni, Co.).

McCarty, Kevin F. (Livermore, CA); Schrader, Glenn L. (Ames, IA)

1985-12-24T23:59:59.000Z

85

A method for identifying market power  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An ability to exercise market power by suppliers may significantly reduce market efficiency in restructured electricity markets. Many studies have been performed to develop an effective tool to identify market power based on indices. Most often it is ... Keywords: Dispatch sensitivity matrix, HHI, KKT, LI, LMP, MC, Market power, Null space, PTDF, Power transfer distribution factor (PTDF) matrix

Hyungseon Oh; Robert J. Thomas

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Embedded sensor having an identifiable orientation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus and method is described wherein a sensor, such as a mechanical strain sensor, embedded in a fiber core, is "flagged" to identify a preferred orientation of the sensor. The identifying "flag" is a composite material, comprising a plurality of non-woven filaments distributed in a resin matrix, forming a small planar tab. The fiber is first subjected to a stimulus to identify the orientation providing the desired signal response, and then sandwiched between first and second layers of the composite material. The fiber, and therefore, the sensor orientation is thereby captured and fixed in place. The process for achieving the oriented fiber includes, after identifying the fiber orientation, carefully laying the oriented fiber onto the first layer of composite, moderately heating the assembled layer for a short period in order to bring the composite resin to a "tacky" state, heating the second composite layer as the first, and assembling the two layers together such that they merge to form a single consolidated block. The consolidated block achieving a roughly uniform distribution of composite filaments near the embedded fiber such that excess resin is prevented from "pooling" around the periphery of the fiber.

Bennett, Thomas E. (31 Portola Ct., Danville, CA 94506); Nelson, Drew V. (840 Cabot Ct., San Carlos, CA 94070)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Identify the Problem: Reduce Waste By  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Identify the Problem: Reduce Waste By Banning Plastic Bag Use Define Goal: Is the ban the most The 2008 EPA report asserts that while paper waste has remained relatively constant at approximately 31%, plastic waste has been rising from 0.4% in 1960 to the present value at 12%a. San Francisco sets the goal

Iglesia, Enrique

88

Diffraction gratings used as identifying markers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A finely detailed defraction grating is applied to an object as an identifier or tag which is unambiguous, difficult to duplicate, or remove and transfer to another item, and can be read and compared with prior readings with relative ease. The exact pattern of the defraction grating is mapped by diffraction moire techniques and recorded for comparison with future readings of the same grating.

Deason, Vance A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ward, Michael B. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Identifying important concepts from medical documents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Automated medical concept recognition is important for medical informatics such as medical document retrieval and text mining research. In this paper, we present a software tool called keyphrase identification program (KIP) for identifying topical concepts ... Keywords: Document keyphrase, Keyphrase extraction, Medical concepts, Medical documents, Noun phrase extraction, Text mining

Quanzhi Li; Yi-Fang Brook Wu

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Alloys and Compounds for Thermoelectric and Solar Cell Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alloys and Compounds for Thermoelectric and Solar Cell Applications II: Alloys and Compounds for Thermoelectric and Solar Cell Applications: Thermoelectric...

91

Personally Identifiable Information | Scientific and Technical Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Personally Identifiable Information Personally Identifiable Information Print page Print page Email page Email page PII is any information about an individual which can be used to distinguish or trace an individual's identity. PII is categorized as either Public PII or Protected PII. Public PII is available in public sources such as telephone books, public websites, business cards, university listings, etc. Public PII does not require redaction prior to document submission to OSTI. Some common examples of Public PII include: · First and last name · Address · Work telephone number · E-mail address · Home telephone number · General educational credentials (e.g., those credentials typically found in resumes) Protected PII is defined as an individual's first name or first initial

92

Guidelines for identifying suspect/counterfeit material  

SciTech Connect

These guidelines are intended to assist users of products in identifying: substandard, misrepresented, or fraudulently marked items. The guidelines provide information about such topics as: precautions, inspection and testing, dispositioning identified items, installed inspection and reporting suspect/counterfeit materials. These guidelines apply to users who are developing procurement documents, product acceptance/verification methods, company procedures, work instructions, etc. The intent of these SM guidelines in relation to the Quality Assurance Program Description (QAPD) and implementing company Management Control Procedures is not to substitute or replace existing requirements, as defined in either the QAPD or company implementing instructions (Management Control Procedures). Instead, the guidelines are intended to provide a consolidated source of information addressing the issue of Suspect/Counterfeit materials. These guidelines provide an extensive suspect component listing and suspect indications listing. Users can quickly check their suspect items against the list of manufacturers products (i.e., type, LD. number, and nameplate information) by consulting either of these listings.

NONE

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Ion Technique for Identifying Gamma Detector Candidates  

SciTech Connect

Recent demands for radiation detector materials with better energy resolution at room temperature have prompted research efforts on both accelerated material discovery and efficient analysis techniques. Ions can easily deposit their energy in thin films or small crystals and the radiation response can be used to identify material properties relevant to detector performance. In an effort to identify gamma detector candidates using small crystals or film samples, an ion technique is developed to measure relative light yield and energy resolution of candidate materials and to evaluate radiation detection performance. Employing a unique time-of-flight (TOF) telescope, light yield and energy resolution resulting from ion excitation are investigated over a continuous energy region. The efficiency of this ion technique is demonstrated using both organic (plastic scintillator) and inorganic (CaF2:Eu, YAP:Ce, CsI:Tl and BGO) scintillators.

Zhang, Yanwen; Xiang, Xia; Rausch, Julie L.; Zu, Xiaotao T.; Weber, William J.

2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

94

Possible explosive compounds in the Savannah River Site Tank Farm facilities. Revision 1  

SciTech Connect

Since 1970, many studies have been conducted concerning the potential for explosive compounds in tank farm operations including ammonium nitrate, metal oxalates, and silver and mercury compounds. The study currently in progress is the most comprehensive to date, encompassing all previous studies and extending the scope to include all compounds that could be formed from the known species in SRS wastes. In addition to waste storage, the study also considers waste removal and waste processing operations. The total number of possible explosive compounds is so large that it would not be useful to list them all here. Instead, only those compounds are listed that are known to be present or could conceivably be formed from material that is known to be present in the waste. The general approach to the problem is: identify all of the constituents that are known to be present in the waste together with those that might be present from possible chemical and radiolytic reactions, determine the compounds that could be formed from these constituents, compare these compounds with those listed in the literature, and assess the formation and stability of these compounds against the conditions existing in the tank farm facilities.

Hobbs, D.T.

1995-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

95

Diffraction gratings used as identifying markers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A finely detailed defraction grating is applied to an object as an identifier or tag which is unambiguous, difficult to duplicate, or remove and transfer to another item, and can be read and compared with prior readings with relative ease. The exact pattern of the defraction grating is mapped by diffraction moire techniques and recorded for comparison with future readings of the same grating. 7 figs.

Deason, V.A.; Ward, M.B.

1989-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

96

Diffraction gratings used as identifying markers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A finely detailed diffraction grating is applied to an object as an identifier or tag which is unambiguous, difficult to duplicate, or remove and transfer to another item, and can be read and compared with prior readings with relative ease. The exact pattern of the diffraction grating is mapped by diffraction moire techniques and recorded for comparison with future readings of the same grating. 7 figures.

Deason, V.A.; Ward, M.B.

1991-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

97

Identifying Opportunities for Industrial Energy Conservation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Energy Productivity Center of the Mellon Institute is engaged in a 2-year study to identify opportunities for improved U.S. industrial energy productivity. A distinguishing feature is the focus on energy services provided when fuels are consumed. The paper describes the Center's Least-Cost Energy Strategy, the Industrial Energy Productivity Project, and presents least-cost results for 1978 and for energy markets over the next two decades.

Hoffman, A. R.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Interrogator system for identifying electrical circuits  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for interrogating electrical leads to correctly ascertain the identity of equipment attached to remote ends of the leads. The system includes a source of a carrier signal generated in a controller/receiver to be sent over the leads and an identifier unit at the equipment. The identifier is activated by command of the carrier and uses a portion of the carrier to produce a supply voltage. Each identifier is uniquely programmed for a specific piece of equipment, and causes the impedance of the circuit to be modified whereby the carrier signal is modulated according to that program. The modulation can be amplitude, frequency or phase modulation. A demodulator in the controller/receiver analyzes the modulated carrier signal, and if a verified signal is recognized displays and/or records the information. This information can be utilized in a computer system to prepare a wiring diagram of the electrical equipment attached to specific leads. Specific circuit values are given for amplitude modulation, and the system is particularly described for use with thermocouples.

Jatko, William B. (10601 Rivermist La., Knoxville, TN 37922); McNeilly, David R. (Rte. 12, Box 538, Maryville, TN 37801)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Interrogator system for identifying electrical circuits  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A system for interrogating electrical leads to correctly ascertain the identity of equipment attached to remote ends of the leads is disclosed. The system includes a source of a carrier signal generated in a controller/receiver to be sent over the leads and an identifier unit at the equipment. The identifier is activated by command of the carrier and uses a portion of the carrier to produce a supply voltage. Each identifier is uniquely programmed for a specific piece of equipment, and causes the impedance of the circuit to be modified whereby the carrier signal is modulated according to that program. The modulation can be amplitude, frequency or phase modulation. A demodulator in the controller/receiver analyzes the modulated carrier signal, and if a verified signal is recognized displays and/or records the information. This information can be utilized in a computer system to prepare a wiring diagram of the electrical equipment attached to specific leads. Specific circuit values are given for amplitude modulation, and the system is particularly described for use with thermocouples. 6 figs.

Jatko, W.B.; McNeilly, D.R.

1988-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

100

On Quantum Capacity of Compound Channels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we address the issue of universal or robust communication over quantum channels. Specifically, we consider memoryless communication scenario with channel uncertainty which is an analog of compound channel in classical information theory. We determine the quantum capacity of finite compound channels and arbitrary compound channels with informed decoder. Our approach in the finite case is based on the observation that perfect channel knowledge at the decoder does not increase the capacity of finite quantum compound channels. As a consequence we obtain coding theorem for finite quantum averaged channels, the simplest class of channels with long-term memory. The extension of these results to quantum compound channels with uninformed encoder and decoder, and infinitely many constituents remains an open problem.

I. Bjelakovic; H. Boche; J. Noetzel

2008-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identified compound tic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Identifying Needed Capabilities in Multifamily Models  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Identifying Needed Capabilities in Multifamily Models Building America Technical Update Meeting Eric Wilson April 30, 2013 NREL is a national laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, operated by the Alliance for Sustainable Energy, LLC. Definitions Current definitions for HSP/BEopt: Single Family Attached = Townhouses, row houses, duplexes Multifamily Buildings = 5+ units; shared floors/ceilings 2 Single Family Attached - Rowhouses 3 Multifamily - Stacked Units * Enable Superinsulated Slab and Roof options in Option Manager 4 Multifamily Modeling Needs * Adiabatic shared walls, floors, and ceilings * Unit multipliers  Whole-Building Model * Corridors * Common Areas * Operating Conditions (Benchmark)

102

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print For decades, intermetallic compounds of rare-earth metals have been favorite systems of the research community studying strong electron correlations in solids. Nowadays rare-earth intermetallics are often treated as model systems for studies of zero-temperature quantum critical phase transitions, since heavy-fermion rare-earth compounds (in which the electron effective mass is orders of magnitude larger than the bare electron mass) have provided the clearest evidence for these continuous phase transitions, which are controlled by such parameters as chemical composition, magnetic field, and pressure, rather than temperature. A new study of a europium-based compound by an international team led by researchers from the Technische Universität Dresden in Germany hints that this compound could join well-known compounds of cerium, ytterbium, and uranium as a new material suitable for research on quantum critical transitions. This finding is exciting, since physicists hope that the use of a new material will give an additional degree of freedom for researching quantum critical behavior.

103

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print For decades, intermetallic compounds of rare-earth metals have been favorite systems of the research community studying strong electron correlations in solids. Nowadays rare-earth intermetallics are often treated as model systems for studies of zero-temperature quantum critical phase transitions, since heavy-fermion rare-earth compounds (in which the electron effective mass is orders of magnitude larger than the bare electron mass) have provided the clearest evidence for these continuous phase transitions, which are controlled by such parameters as chemical composition, magnetic field, and pressure, rather than temperature. A new study of a europium-based compound by an international team led by researchers from the Technische Universität Dresden in Germany hints that this compound could join well-known compounds of cerium, ytterbium, and uranium as a new material suitable for research on quantum critical transitions. This finding is exciting, since physicists hope that the use of a new material will give an additional degree of freedom for researching quantum critical behavior.

104

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print For decades, intermetallic compounds of rare-earth metals have been favorite systems of the research community studying strong electron correlations in solids. Nowadays rare-earth intermetallics are often treated as model systems for studies of zero-temperature quantum critical phase transitions, since heavy-fermion rare-earth compounds (in which the electron effective mass is orders of magnitude larger than the bare electron mass) have provided the clearest evidence for these continuous phase transitions, which are controlled by such parameters as chemical composition, magnetic field, and pressure, rather than temperature. A new study of a europium-based compound by an international team led by researchers from the Technische Universität Dresden in Germany hints that this compound could join well-known compounds of cerium, ytterbium, and uranium as a new material suitable for research on quantum critical transitions. This finding is exciting, since physicists hope that the use of a new material will give an additional degree of freedom for researching quantum critical behavior.

105

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print For decades, intermetallic compounds of rare-earth metals have been favorite systems of the research community studying strong electron correlations in solids. Nowadays rare-earth intermetallics are often treated as model systems for studies of zero-temperature quantum critical phase transitions, since heavy-fermion rare-earth compounds (in which the electron effective mass is orders of magnitude larger than the bare electron mass) have provided the clearest evidence for these continuous phase transitions, which are controlled by such parameters as chemical composition, magnetic field, and pressure, rather than temperature. A new study of a europium-based compound by an international team led by researchers from the Technische Universität Dresden in Germany hints that this compound could join well-known compounds of cerium, ytterbium, and uranium as a new material suitable for research on quantum critical transitions. This finding is exciting, since physicists hope that the use of a new material will give an additional degree of freedom for researching quantum critical behavior.

106

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print For decades, intermetallic compounds of rare-earth metals have been favorite systems of the research community studying strong electron correlations in solids. Nowadays rare-earth intermetallics are often treated as model systems for studies of zero-temperature quantum critical phase transitions, since heavy-fermion rare-earth compounds (in which the electron effective mass is orders of magnitude larger than the bare electron mass) have provided the clearest evidence for these continuous phase transitions, which are controlled by such parameters as chemical composition, magnetic field, and pressure, rather than temperature. A new study of a europium-based compound by an international team led by researchers from the Technische Universität Dresden in Germany hints that this compound could join well-known compounds of cerium, ytterbium, and uranium as a new material suitable for research on quantum critical transitions. This finding is exciting, since physicists hope that the use of a new material will give an additional degree of freedom for researching quantum critical behavior.

107

Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Towards Heavy Fermions in Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Towards Heavy Fermions in Europium Intermetallic Compounds Print Wednesday, 29 July 2009 00:00 For decades, intermetallic compounds of rare-earth metals have been favorite systems of the research community studying strong electron correlations in solids. Nowadays rare-earth intermetallics are often treated as model systems for studies of zero-temperature quantum critical phase transitions, since heavy-fermion rare-earth compounds (in which the electron effective mass is orders of magnitude larger than the bare electron mass) have provided the clearest evidence for these continuous phase transitions, which are controlled by such parameters as chemical composition, magnetic field, and pressure, rather than temperature. A new study of a europium-based compound by an international team led by researchers from the Technische Universität Dresden in Germany hints that this compound could join well-known compounds of cerium, ytterbium, and uranium as a new material suitable for research on quantum critical transitions. This finding is exciting, since physicists hope that the use of a new material will give an additional degree of freedom for researching quantum critical behavior.

108

Los Alamos identifies internal material control issue  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Internal material control issue Internal material control issue Los Alamos identifies internal material control issue The error relates to internal inventory and accounting that documents movement of sensitive materials within a small portion of Technical Area 55. February 26, 2009 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials.

109

Identifying AFDC Regions: A Cluster Analysis Approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

this report identifies six distinct Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC) regions. Among the more striking results is the emergence of two regions---Central Cities and Hispanic Rural---with unique patterns of welfare usage and demographic characteristics. Also, rural Minnesota is divided into four separate regions with unique characteristics. This information is intended to help policymakers and others interested in the welfare system to better understand the geographic pattern of AFDC recipiency. This report is the first in a series of working papers regarding welfare and welfare reform. This report was prepared by DON HIRASUNA, Legislative Analyst in the House Research Department. Questions may be addressed to DON at 651-296-8038. JULIE FRANTUM

Don Hirasuna; Series One

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Method of identifying features in indexed data  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a method of identifying features in indexed data, especially useful for distinguishing signal from noise in data provided as a plurality of ordered pairs. Each of the plurality of ordered pairs has an index and a response. The method has the steps of: (a) providing an index window having a first window end located on a first index and extending across a plurality of indices to a second window end; (b) selecting responses corresponding to the plurality of indices within the index window and computing a measure of dispersion of the responses; and (c) comparing the measure of dispersion to a dispersion critical value. Advantages of the present invention include minimizing signal to noise ratio, signal drift, varying baseline signal and combinations thereof.

Jarman, Kristin H. (Richland, WA); Daly, Don Simone (Richland, WA); Anderson, Kevin K. (Richland, WA); Wahl, Karen L. (Richland, WA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Compound and Elemental Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis Compound and Elemental Analysis Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Technique: Compound and Elemental Analysis Details Activities (104) Areas (69) Regions (6) NEPA(0) Exploration Technique Information Exploration Group: Lab Analysis Techniques Exploration Sub Group: Fluid Lab Analysis Parent Exploration Technique: Fluid Lab Analysis Information Provided by Technique Lithology: Stratigraphic/Structural: Hydrological: Results can aid in the determination of fluid source regions and circulation pathways. Thermal: Certain elements exhibit high spatial correlation with high-temperature geothermal systems. Cost Information Low-End Estimate (USD): 15.001,500 centUSD 0.015 kUSD 1.5e-5 MUSD 1.5e-8 TUSD / compound Median Estimate (USD): 30.003,000 centUSD

112

Fission Barriers of Compound Superheavy Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dependence of fission barriers on the excitation energy of the compound nucleus impacts the survival probability of superheavy nuclei synthesized in heavy-ion fusion reactions. In this work, we investigate the isentropic ...

Sheikh, J. A.

113

Production method for making rare earth compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of making a rare earth compound, such as a earth-transition metal permanent magnet compound, without the need for producing rare earth metal as a process step, comprises carbothermically reacting a rare earth oxide to form a rare earth carbide and heating the rare earth carbide, a compound-forming reactant (e.g. a transition metal and optional boron), and a carbide-forming element (e.g. a refractory metal) that forms a carbide that is more thermodynamically favorable than the rare earth carbide whereby the rare earth compound (e.g. Nd.sub.2 Fe.sub.14 B or LaNi.sub.5) and a carbide of the carbide-forming element are formed.

McCallum, R. William (Ames, IA); Ellis, Timothy W. (Ames, IA); Dennis, Kevin W. (Ames, IA); Hofer, Robert J. (Ames, IA); Branagan, Daniel J. (Ames, IA)

1997-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

114

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Geysers Area (Lambert & Epstein, 1992) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Geysers Area Compound and Elemental Analysis At Geysers Area (Lambert & Epstein, 1992) Exploration Activity Details Location Geysers Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Rocks and minerals were visually identified in cuttings, and identifications were confirmed through examination of thin sections. X-ray powder diffraction was used to test the purity of some mineral separates. The chemical compositions of some metamorphic minerals were determined by electron microprobe. References Steven J. Lambert, Samuel Epstein (1992) Stable-Isotope Studies Of Rocks And Secondary Minerals In A Vapor-Dominated Hydrothermal System At The Geysers, Sonoma County, California Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Compound_and_Elemental_Analysis_At_Geysers_Area_(Lambert_%26_Epstein,_1992)&oldid=510406"

115

Aza crown ether compounds as anion receptors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A family of aza-ether based compounds including linear, multi-branched and aza-crown ethers is provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the new family of aza-ether based compounds acts as neutral receptors to complex the anion moiety of the electrolyte salt thereby increasing the conductivity and the transference number of LI{sup +} ion in alkali metal batteries. 3 figs.

Lee, H.S.; Yang, X.O.; McBreen, J.

1998-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

116

Aza crown ether compounds as anion receptors  

SciTech Connect

A family of aza-ether based compounds including linear, multi-branched and aza-crown ethers is provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the new family of aza-ether based compounds acts as neutral receptors to complex the anion moiety of the electrolyte salt thereby increasing the conductivity and the transference number of LI.sup.+ ion in alkali metal batteries.

Lee, Hung Sui (East Setauket, NY); Yang, Xiao-Oing (Port Jefferson Station, NY); McBreen, James (Bellport, NY)

1998-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

117

MS/MS Libraries of Identified Peptides and Recurring Spectra ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Three Classes of Libraries. I. Conventional Target Identification. Peptides (Proteins). II. Identifiable. By unconventional searching. III. Not Identifiable. ...

2009-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

118

Identifying Wind and Solar Ramping Events: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Wind and solar power are playing an increasing role in the electrical grid, but their inherent power variability can augment uncertainties in power system operations. One solution to help mitigate the impacts and provide more flexibility is enhanced wind and solar power forecasting; however, its relative utility is also uncertain. Within the variability of solar and wind power, repercussions from large ramping events are of primary concern. At the same time, there is no clear definition of what constitutes a ramping event, with various criteria used in different operational areas. Here the Swinging Door Algorithm, originally used for data compression in trend logging, is applied to identify variable generation ramping events from historic operational data. The identification of ramps in a simple and automated fashion is a critical task that feeds into a larger work of 1) defining novel metrics for wind and solar power forecasting that attempt to capture the true impact of forecast errors on system operations and economics, and 2) informing various power system models in a data-driven manner for superior exploratory simulation research. Both allow inference on sensitivities and meaningful correlations, as well as the ability to quantify the value of probabilistic approaches for future use in practice.

Florita, A.; Hodge, B. M.; Orwig, K.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Polymers containing borane or carborane cage compounds and related applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Polymers comprising residues of cage compound monomers having at least one polyalkoxy silyl substituent are provided. The cage compound monomers are selected from borane cage compound monomers comprising at least 7 cage atoms and/or carborane cage compound monomers comprising 7 to 11 cage compound monomers. Such polymers can further comprise one or more reactive matrices and/or co-monomers covalently bound with the cage compound monomer residues. Articles of manufacture comprising such polymers are also disclosed.

Bowen, III, Daniel E; Eastwood, Eric A

2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

120

Breeding for Bioactive Compounds in Vigna Unguiculata L. (WALP.)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of the many ways to address health, obesity and hunger issues is genetic bio-fortification, a strategy of breeding or transforming staple crops with micronutrients and vitamins. This dissertation details efforts to bio-fortify bioactive compounds (phenols, antioxidants, condensed tannins, flavonoids and anthocyanins) in Vigna unguiculata, a staple legume grain crop. Approaches included screening of genetic variation in polyphenolic compositions to identify potential varieties and phenotypes, evaluating the impact of environment (drought stress) on these compositions and elucidating the underlying genetics of their inheritance. Our screening showed significant diversity among genotypes for phenols (2.05 15.48 mg GAE/g), condensed tannin (0.05 -15.29 mg CE/g) and antioxidant activity (4.0 -201.8 M TE/g). The highest levels of phenols and antioxidant activity were observed in genotypes with light brown, black and red seed coat color, and those with smooth texture and medium maturity (70-90 days). Red and black phenotypes showed the highest content of flavan-3-ols, flavonols and phenolic acids among all color groups, with values of 169 g CE/g, 26.17 g QHE/g, 27.14 g GAE/g for red and 281 g CE/g, 23 g QHE/g and 25 GAE/g for black phenotypes. When studying the impact of drought stress, genotypeXtreatment and treatmentXyear interactions for bioactive compounds were significant when tested under irrigated and drought stress conditions. Anthocyanins showed a 14 % decrease under drought stress. The genotypes that were stable to drought stress are favorable for breeding programs in preparation towards climate change. An FTNIR method was established for high-throughput, non-destructive quantification of bioactive compounds. This was used in inheritance studies of bioactive compounds. Phenols, condensed tannins and flavonoids showed heterosis in F1 and exhibit transgressive segregation in F2 populations. The information presented in this manuscript will be useful for nutritional improvement of cowpeas, where potential genotypes and phenotypes with health benefits offered by enhanced contents of bioactive compounds can be improved further upon.

Gawde, Archana Jairam

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identified compound tic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Salt Wells Area (Shevenell...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Salt Wells Area (Shevenell & Garside, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and...

122

Alloys and Compounds for Thermoelectric and Solar Cell Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alloys and Compounds for Thermoelectric and Solar Cell Applications II: Alloys and Compounds for Thermoelectric and Solar Cell Applications: Thermoelectric I

123

Energy-efficient indoor volatile organic compound air cleaning...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Energy-efficient indoor volatile organic compound air cleaning using activated carbon fiber media with nightly regeneration Title Energy-efficient indoor volatile organic compound...

124

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Black Warrior Area (DOE GTP...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Black Warrior Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Black Warrior Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis...

125

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Wister Area (DOE GTP) | Open...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Wister Area (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At...

126

SEPARATION PROCESS FOR ZIRCONIUM AND COMPOUNDS THEREOF  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The separation of zirconium from columbium, rare earths, yttrium and the alkaline earth metals, such mixtures of elements occurring in zirconium ores or neutron irradiated uranium is described. According to the invention a suitable separation of zirconium from a one normal acidic aqueous solution containing salts, nitrates for example, of tetravalent zirconium, pentavalent columbium, yttrium, rare earths in the trivalent state and alkaline earths can be obtained by contacting the aqueous solution with a fluorinated beta diketonc alone or in an organic solvent solution, such as benzene, to form a zirconium chelate compound. When the organic solvent is present the zirconium chelate compound is directly extracted; otherwise it is separated by filtration. The zirconium may be recovered from contacting the organic solvent solution containing the chelated compound by back extraction with either an aqueous hydrofluoric acid or an oxalic acid solution.

Crandall, H.W.; Thomas, J.R.

1959-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

127

Process for producing phenolic compounds from lignins  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for the production of low molecular weight phenolic compounds from lignins through the pyrolysis of the lignins in the presence of a strong base. In a preferred embodiment, potassium hydroxide is present in an amount of from about 0.1% to about 5% by weight, the pyrolysis temperature is from about 400 C to about 600 C at atmospheric pressure, and the time period for substantial completion of the reaction is from about 1--3 minutes. Examples of low molecular weight phenolic compounds produced include methoxyphenols, non-methoxylated phenols, and mixtures thereof. 16 figs.

Agblevor, F.A.

1998-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

128

Inelastic neutron scattering in valence fluctuation compounds  

SciTech Connect

The valence fluctuation compounds are rare earth intermetallics where hybridization of the nearly-localized 4f electrons with the conduction electrons leads to incorporation of the 4f's into the itinerant states. This hybridization slows down the conduction electrons and hence gives them a heavy effective mass, justifying application of the term 'heavy Fermion' (HF) to these materials. During the project period, we grew large single crystals of several such compounds and measured their properties using both standard thermodynamic probes and state-of-the-art inelastic neutron scattering. We obtained three main results. For the intermediate valence compounds CePd{sub 3} and YbAl{sub 3}, we showed that the scattering of neutrons by the fluctuations of the 4f magnetic moment does not have the momentum dependence expected for the itinerant heavy mass state; rather, the scattering is more typical of a localized spin fluctuation. We believe that incoherent scattering localizes the excitation. For the heavy Fermion compound Ce(Ni{sub 0.935}Pd{sub 0.065}){sub 2}Ge{sub 2}, which sits at a T = 0 critical point for transformation into an antiferromagnetic (AF) phase, we showed that the scattering from the AF fluctuations does not exhibit any of the divergences that are expected at a phase transition. We speculate that alloy disorder profoundly suppresses the growth of the fluctuating AF regions, leading to short range clusters rather than regions of infinite size. Finally, we explored the applicability of key concepts used to describe the behavior of rare earth heavy Fermions to uranium based HF compounds where the 5f electrons are itinerant as opposed to localized. We found that scaling laws relating the spin fluctuation energy measured in neutron scattering to the low temperature specific heat and susceptibility are valid for the uranium compounds, once corrections are made for AF fluctuations; however, the degeneracy of the high temperature moment is smaller than expected for rare-earth-like Hund's rule behavior, essentially because the orbital moment is suppressed for itinerant 5f electrons. We also found that the standard local-moment-based theory of the temperature dependence of the specific heat, susceptibility and neutron scattering fails badly for URu{sub 2}Zn{sub 20} and UCo{sub 2}Zn{sub 20}, even though the theory is phenomenally successful for the closely related rare earth compound YbFe{sub 2}Zn{sub 20}. Both these results highlight the distinction between the itineracy of the 5f's and the localization of the 4f's. It is our hope that these results are sufficiently significant as to stimulate deeper investigation of these compounds.

Jon M Lawrence

2011-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

129

Process for producing phenolic compounds from lignins  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for the production of low molecular weight phenolic compounds from lignins through the pyrolysis of the lignins in the presence of a strong base. In a preferred embodiment, potassium hydroxide is present in an amount of from about 0.1% to about 5% by weight, the pyrolysis temperature is from about 400.degree. C. to about 600.degree. C. at atmospheric pressure, and the time period for substantial completion of the reaction is from about 1-3 minutes. Examples of low molecular weight phenolic compounds produced include methoxyphenols, non-methoxylated phenols, and mixtures thereof.

Agblevor, Foster A. (Lakewood, CO)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Organic photosensitive devices using subphthalocyanine compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An organic photosensitive optoelectronic device, having a donor-acceptor heterojunction of a donor-like material and an acceptor-like material and methods of making such devices is provided. At least one of the donor-like material and the acceptor-like material includes a subphthalocyanine, a subporphyrin, and/or a subporphyrazine compound; and/or the device optionally has at least one of a blocking layer or a charge transport layer, where the blocking layer and/or the charge transport layer includes a subphthalocyanine, a subporphyrin, and/or a subporphyrazine compound.

Rand, Barry (Princeton, NJ); Forrest, Stephen R. (Ann Arbor, MI); Mutolo, Kristin L. (Hollywood, CA); Mayo, Elizabeth (Alhambra, CA); Thompson, Mark E. (Anaheim Hills, CA)

2011-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

131

Identify and Protect Your Vital Records | Department of Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Your Vital Records IDENTIFY AND PROTECT YOUR VITAL RECORDS (2).pdf More Documents & Publications IDENTIFY AND PROTECT YOUR VITAL RECORDS Untitled (2).PDF Audit Report: DOEIG-0838...

132

Identifying Cost-Effective Residential Energy Efficiency Opportunities...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Identifying Cost-Effective Residential Energy Efficiency Opportunities for the Kauai Island Utility Cooperative Identifying Cost-Effective Residential Energy Efficiency...

133

Pyrolysis mechanisms of lignin model compounds  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The flash vacuum pyrolysis of lignin model compounds was studied under conditions optimized for the production of liquid products to provide mechanistic insight into the reaction pathways that lead to product formation. The major reaction products can be explained by cleavage of the C-O either linkage by a free radial or concerted 1,2-elimination.

Britt, P.F.; Buchanan, A.C. III; Cooney, M.J.

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Fluorescent compounds for plastic scintillation applications  

SciTech Connect

Several 2-(2{prime}-hydroxyphenyl)benzothiazole, -benzoxazole, and -benzimidazole derivatives have been prepared. Transmittance, fluorescence, light yield, and decay time characteristics of these compounds have been studied in a polystyrene matrix and evaluated for use in plastic scintillation detectors. Radiation damage studies utilizing a {sup 60}C source have also been performed.

Pla-Dalmau, A.; Bross, A.D.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Stable surface passivation process for compound semiconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A passivation process for a previously sulfided, selenided or tellurated III-V compound semiconductor surface. The concentration of undesired mid-gap surface states on a compound semiconductor surface is reduced by the formation of a near-monolayer of metal-(sulfur and/or selenium and/or tellurium)-semiconductor that is effective for long term passivation of the underlying semiconductor surface. Starting with the III-V compound semiconductor surface, any oxidation present thereon is substantially removed and the surface is then treated with sulfur, selenium or tellurium to form a near-monolayer of chalcogen-semiconductor of the surface in an oxygen-free atmosphere. This chalcogenated surface is then contacted with a solution of a metal that will form a low solubility chalcogenide to form a near-monolayer of metal-chalcogen-semiconductor. The resulting passivating layer provides long term protection for the underlying surface at or above the level achieved by a freshly chalcogenated compound semiconductor surface in an oxygen free atmosphere.

Ashby, Carol I. H. (Edgewood, NM)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Compound nucleus studies withy reverse kinematics  

SciTech Connect

Reverse kinematics reactions are used to demonstrate the compound nucleus origin of intermediate mass particles at low energies and the extension of the same mechanism at higher energies. No evidence has appeared in our energy range for liquid-vapor equilibrium or cold fragmentation mechanisms. 11 refs., 12 figs.

Moretto, L.G.

1985-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

PRODUCTION OF URANIUM AND THORIUM COMPOUNDS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Compounds of Th and U are extracted with an organic solvent in the presence of an adsorbent substance which has greater retentivity for impurities present than for the uranium and/or thorium. The preferred adsorbent material is noted as being cellulose. The uranium and thoriumcontaining substances treated are preferably in the form of dissolved nitrates, and the preferred organic solvent is diethyl ether.

Arden, T.V.; Burstall, F.H.; Linstead, R.P.; Wells, R.A.

1955-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

138

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fenton Hill Hdr Fenton Hill Hdr Area (Laughlin, Et Al., 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Thin sections were prepared of the different lithologies from each core. Standard petrographic techniques were used to identify constituent minerals and to obtain modal analyses. The number of points counted varied from about 500 to several thousand, depending upon the grain size of the rock. Whole-rock chemical analysis was performed by John Husler, University of New Mexico, using a variety of techniques (Laughlin and Eddy, 1977). The precision for SiO2 is + 1% relative; for the other oxides it is + 2% relative. Accuracy was monitored by using USGS standard rock samples. Where

139

Tritium labeling of organic compounds deposited on porous structures  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An improved process for labeling organic compounds with tritium is carried out by depositing the selected compound on the extensive surface of a porous structure such as a membrane filter and exposing the membrane containing the compound to tritium gas activated by the microwave discharge technique. The labeled compound is then recovered from the porous structure.

Ehrenkaufer, Richard L. E. (Speonk, NY); Wolf, Alfred P. (Setauket, NY); Hembree, Wylie C. (Woodcliff Lake, NJ)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Compositions containing borane or carborane cage compounds and related applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Compositions comprising a polymer-containing matrix and a filler comprising a cage compound selected from borane cage compounds, carborane cage compounds, metal complexes thereof, residues thereof, mixtures thereof, and/or agglomerations thereof, where the cage compound is not covalently bound to the matrix polymer. Methods of making and applications for using such compositions are also disclosed.

Bowen, III, Daniel E; Eastwood, Eric A

2013-05-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identified compound tic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 3: Identify and Engage  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3: 3: Identify and Engage Financial Partners to someone by E-mail Share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 3: Identify and Engage Financial Partners on Facebook Tweet about Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 3: Identify and Engage Financial Partners on Twitter Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 3: Identify and Engage Financial Partners on Google Bookmark Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 3: Identify and Engage Financial Partners on Delicious Rank Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 3: Identify and Engage Financial Partners on Digg Find More places to share Better Buildings Neighborhood Program: Step 3: Identify and Engage Financial Partners on AddThis.com... Getting Started Driving Demand Financing Assess the Market

142

Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Rules,  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Identify Identify Institutional Change Rules, Roles, and Tools Constituting Context for Sustainability to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Rules, Roles, and Tools Constituting Context for Sustainability on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Rules, Roles, and Tools Constituting Context for Sustainability on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Rules, Roles, and Tools Constituting Context for Sustainability on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Rules, Roles, and Tools Constituting Context for Sustainability on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional

143

Hydromechanical transmission with compound planetary assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A power transmission having three distinct ranges: (1) hydrostatic, (2) simple power-split hydromechanical, and (3) compound power-split hydromechanical. A single compound planetary assembly has two sun gears, two ring gears, and a single carrier with two sets of elongated planet gears. The two sun gears may be identical in size, and the two ring gears may be identical in size. A speed-varying module in driving relationship to the first sun gear is clutchable, in turn, to (1) the input shaft and (2) the second sun gear. The speed-varying means may comprise a pair of hydraulic units hydraulically interconnected so that one serves as a pump while the other serves as a motor and vice versa, one of the units having a variable stroke and being the one clutchable to either the input shaft or to the second sun gear. The other unit, which may have a fixed stroke, is connected in driving relation to the first sun gear. A brake grounds the carrier in the first range and in reverse and causes drive to be delivered to the output shaft through the first ring gear in a hydrostatic mode, the first ring gear being rigidly connected to the output shaft. The input shaft is also clutchable to the second ring gear of the compound planetary assembly.

Orshansky, Jr., deceased, Elias (late of San Francisco, CA); Weseloh, William E. (San Diego, CA)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Rules for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Rules for Sustainability to someone by E-mail Rules for Sustainability to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Rules for Sustainability on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Rules for Sustainability on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Rules for Sustainability on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Rules for Sustainability on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Rules for Sustainability on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Rules for Sustainability on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance

145

Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Roles for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Roles for Sustainability to someone by E-mail Roles for Sustainability to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Roles for Sustainability on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Roles for Sustainability on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Roles for Sustainability on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Roles for Sustainability on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Roles for Sustainability on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Roles for Sustainability on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance

146

Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Tools for  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tools for Sustainability to someone by E-mail Tools for Sustainability to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Tools for Sustainability on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Tools for Sustainability on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Tools for Sustainability on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Tools for Sustainability on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Tools for Sustainability on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: Identify Institutional Change Tools for Sustainability on AddThis.com... Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Operations & Maintenance

147

Potential Signatures of Semi-volatile Compounds Associated With Nuclear Processing  

SciTech Connect

Semi-volatile chemicals associated with nuclear processes (e.g., the reprocessing of uranium to produce plutonium for nuclear weapons, or the separation of actinides from processing waste streams), can provide sticky residues or signatures that will attach to piping, ducting, soil, water, or other surface media. Volatile compounds, that are more suitable for electro-optical sensing, have been well studied. However, the semi-volatile compounds have not been well documented or studied. A majority of these semi-volatile chemicals are more robust than typical gaseous or liquid chemicals and can have lifetimes of several weeks, months, or years in the environment. However, large data gaps exist concerning these potential signature compounds and more research is needed to fill these data gaps so that important signature information is not overlooked or discarded. This report investigates key semi-volatile compounds associated with nuclear separations, identifies available chemical and physical properties, and discusses the degradation products that would result from hydrolysis, radiolysis and oxidation reactions on these compounds.

Probasco, Kathleen M.; Birnbaum, Jerome C.; Maughan, A. D.

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Identifying Infill Locations and Underperformer Wells in Mature Fields using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Identifying Infill Locations and Underperformer Wells in Mature Fields using Monthly Production wells rather than the entire field. #12;Introduction Objective Methodology Results Conclusion Objective field. Identify opportunities in mature fields: Sweet spots for infill drilling. Underperformer wells

Mohaghegh, Shahab

149

Workshop to Identify Strategies to Get to Net Zero Energy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... 1 A Residential Energy Efficiency Meeting sponsored by DOE's Building America Building Technologies Program in July 2010 identified the ...

2013-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

150

New Report Identifies Strategies to Achieve Net-Zero Energy ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

New Report Identifies Strategies to Achieve Net-Zero Energy Homes. From NIST Tech Beat: May 14, 2013. ...

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

151

Palladium catalyzed hydrogenation of bio-oils and organic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides palladium-catalyzed hydrogenations of bio-oils and certain organic compounds. Experimental results have shown unexpected and superior results for palladium-catalyzed hydrogenations of organic compounds typically found in bio-oils.

Elliott, Douglas C [Kennewick, WA; Hu, Jianli [Richland, WA; Hart,; Todd, R [Kennewick, WA; Neuenschwander, Gary G [Burbank, WA

2011-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

152

Palladium catalyzed hydrogenation of bio-oils and organic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides palladium-catalyzed hydrogenations of bio-oils and certain organic compounds. Experimental results have shown unexpected and superior results for palladium-catalyzed hydrogenations of organic compounds typically found in bio-oils.

Elliott, Douglas C. (Richland, WA); Hu, Jianli (Kennewick, WA); Hart, Todd R. (Kennewick, WA); Neuenschwander, Gary G. (Burbank, WA)

2008-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

153

Hydroxyalkyl phosphine compounds for use as diagnostic and therapeutic pharmaceuticals  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This research discloses a compound and method of making a compound for use as a diagnostic or therapeutic pharmaceutical comprises a functionalized hydroxyalkyl phosphine ligand and a metal combined with the ligand. 16 figs.

Katti, K.V.; Singh, P.R.; Reddy, V.S.; Katti, K.K.; Volkert, W.A.; Ketring, A.R.

1999-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

154

Surface passivation process of compound semiconductor material using UV photosulfidation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for passivating compound semiconductor surfaces by photolytically disrupting molecular sulfur vapor with ultraviolet radiation to form reactive sulfur which then reacts with and passivates the surface of compound semiconductors.

Ashby, Carol I. H. (Edgewood, NM)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Ternary compound electrode for lithium cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and of light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and normally is operated in the temperature range of about 350 to 500/sup 0/C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell in which lithium is the electroactive species. The cell has a positive electrode which includes a ternary compound generally represented as Li-M-O, wherein M is a transition metal. Corrosion of the inventive cell is considerably reduced.

Raistrick, I.D.; Godshall, N.A.; Huggins, R.A.

1980-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

156

Ternary compound electrode for lithium cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Lithium-based cells are promising for applications such as electric vehicles and load-leveling for power plants since lithium is very electropositive and of light weight. One type of lithium-based cell utilizes a molten salt electrolyte and normally is operated in the temperature range of about 350.degree.-500.degree. C. Such high temperature operation accelerates corrosion problems. The present invention provides an electrochemical cell in which lithium is the electroactive species. The cell has a positive electrode which includes a ternary compound generally represented as Li-M-O, wherein M is a transition metal. Corrosion of the inventive cell is considerably reduced.

Raistrick, Ian D. (Menlo Park, CA); Godshall, Ned A. (Stanford, CA); Huggins, Robert A. (Stanford, CA)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Alloys and Compounds for Thermoelectric and Solar Cell ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

About this Symposium. Meeting, 2014 TMS Annual Meeting & Exhibition. Symposium, Alloys and Compounds for Thermoelectric and Solar Cell Applications II.

158

Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Indonesia (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area...

159

Catalytic Esterification of Model Compounds of Biomass Pyrolysis Oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Biomass pyrolysis oil is a complex mixture containing a wide variety of oxygenated compounds, which results in difficulties in bio-oil upgrading. To gain a clearer understanding of the reaction pathways, seven compounds were chosen to represent biomass ... Keywords: pyrolysis oil, model compounds, catalytic esterification

Zuo-gang Guo; Shu-rong Wang; Ying-ying Zhu

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

160

Novel amine-based presursor compounds and composite membranes thereof  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Novel amine-based precursor compounds comprising the condensation products of dialkylenetriamine and alpha, beta-unsaturated acid halides are disclosed, as well as composite membranes containing such compounds, the membranes being useful in RO-type processes for desalination and the removal of low molecular weight organic compounds such as phenols and carboxylic acids.

Lee, Eric K. L. (Wilmington, DE); Tuttle, Mark E. (Bend, OR)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identified compound tic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Method for conversion of .beta.-hydroxy carbonyl compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is disclosed for conversion of salts of .beta.-hydroxy carbonyl compounds forming useful conversion products including, e.g., .alpha.,.beta.-unsaturated carbonyl compounds and/or salts of .alpha.,.beta.-unsaturated carbonyl compounds. Conversion products find use, e.g., as feedstock and/or end-use chemicals.

Lilga, Michael A. (Richland, WA); White, James F. (Richland, WA); Holladay, Johnathan E. (Kennewick, WA); Zacher, Alan H. (Kennewick, WA); Muzatko, Danielle S. (Kennewick, WA); Orth, Rick J. (Kennewick, WA)

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

162

Boron containing amino acid compounds and methods for their use  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides new boron containing amino acid compounds and methods for making these compounds by contacting melphalan or another nitrogen mustard derivative and sodium borocaptate. The present invention also provides a method of treating a mammal having a tumor by administering to the mammal a therapeutically effective amount of the new boron containing amino acid compounds.

Glass, John D. (Shoreham, NY); Coderre, Jeffrey A. (Wading River, NY)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Compound parabolic concentrators for narrowband wireless infrared receivers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Compound parabolic concentrators for narrowband wireless infrared receivers Keang-Po Ho Joseph M and hollow compound parabolic concentrators (CPCs), for use in free-space infrared communication receivers terms: compound parabolic concentrators (CPCs); optical bandpass fil- ters; Monte Carlo ray tracing

Kahn, Joseph M.

164

Compound Refractive Lenses for Thermal Neutron Applications  

SciTech Connect

This project designed and built compound refractive lenses (CRLs) that are able to focus, collimate and image using thermal neutrons. Neutrons are difficult to manipulate compared to visible light or even x rays; however, CRLs can provide a powerful tool for focusing, collimating and imaging neutrons. Previous neutron CRLs were limited to long focal lengths, small fields of view and poor resolution due to the materials available and manufacturing techniques. By demonstrating a fabrication method that can produce accurate, small features, we have already dramatically improved the focal length of thermal neutron CRLs, and the manufacture of Fresnel lens CRLs that greatly increases the collection area, and thus efficiency, of neutron CRLs. Unlike a single lens, a compound lens is a row of N lenslets that combine to produce an N-fold increase in the refraction of neutrons. While CRLs can be made from a variety of materials, we have chosen to mold Teflon lenses. Teflon has excellent neutron refraction, yet can be molded into nearly arbitrary shapes. We designed, fabricated and tested Teflon CRLs for neutrons. We demonstrated imaging at wavelengths as short as 1.26 ? with large fields of view and achieved resolution finer than 250 ?m which is better than has been previously shown. We have also determined designs for Fresnel CRLs that will greatly improve performance.

Gary, Charles K.

2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

165

Identify Institutional Change Rules, Roles, and Tools Constituting Context  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Identify Institutional Change Rules, Roles, and Tools Constituting Identify Institutional Change Rules, Roles, and Tools Constituting Context for Sustainability Identify Institutional Change Rules, Roles, and Tools Constituting Context for Sustainability October 8, 2013 - 11:43am Addthis Graphic showing 5 gears. They progress from Determine Goal to Identify Context-Rules, Roles and Tools to Develop Action Plan to Implement Plan to Measure and Evaluate. Institutional Change Continuous Improvement Cycle After determining your agency's institutional change sustainability goals, the next step is to analyze the context within which these goals are to be achieved. Start by identifying the organizational rules, roles, and tools that shape the current context and may influence success in achieving these goals. Identifying the linkages among rules, roles, and tools and how they

166

Identifying Project Potential and Options Webinar | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Identifying Project Potential and Options Webinar Identifying Project Potential and Options Webinar Identifying Project Potential and Options Webinar April 30, 2014 11:00AM MDT Attendees will understand the components of identifying energy project potential and options. Presenters will discuss market considerations, initial site considerations, project savings or rate-of-return estimates, production potential, final site selection, tribal options, finance, partnerships, and participation processes. Attendees will also become familiar with data gathering and analysis procedures such as tribal facility electric cost data, regulations, and interconnection requirements; paths to market for project power; and renewable sales, risks; and utility rules. By following the steps outlined in the webinar, Tribes can determine

167

Step 3. Identify the Appropriate Adoption Process and Framework...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3. Identify the Appropriate Adoption Process and Framework Description Once the code support infrastructure has established clear, measurable goals for a new energy code or update,...

168

Report Identifies Three Key R&D Priorities for Future ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... Networking and Information Technology Research and Development Program. For more details, see Report Identifies Three Key R&D Priorities for ...

2011-07-18T23:59:59.000Z

169

Non-Transgenic Cell Lines for Identifying Target Premalignant ...  

Biofuels; Biotechnology & Medicine. ... Non-Transgenic Cell Lines for Identifying Target Premalignant Genes IB-2023 : Berkeley Lab's S3 cell lines display partial

170

MATTERS IDENTIFIED AT THE OAK RIDGE OPERATIONS OFFICE DURING...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Marketing Administration Other Agencies You are here Home MATTERS IDENTIFIED AT THE OAK RIDGE OPERATIONS OFFICE DURING THE AUDIT OF THE DEPARTMENT'S CONSOLIDATEDFISCAL YEAR...

171

Microsoft Word - IDENTIFY AND PROTECT YOUR VITAL RECORDS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

and priorities for the allocation of all energy resource requirements * Identify energy facilities essential to the mobilization, deployment and sustainment of resources to...

172

Step 2. Identify a Code Support Infrastructure | Building Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2. Identify a Code Support Infrastructure Utilities can play several roles in support of building energy codes. Examples include partnering with states and localities during code...

173

Managing Your Energy: An ENERGY STAR Guide for Identifying Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

LBNL-3714E ERNEST ORLANDO LAWRENCE BERKELEY NATIONAL LABORATORY Managing Your Energy An ENERGY STAR Guide for Identifying Energy Savings in Manufacturing Plants Ernst Worrell...

174

DOE O 475.2A, Identifying Classified Information  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The Order establishes the program to identify information classified under the Atomic Energy Act [Restricted Data (RD), Formerly Restricted Data (FRD), and ...

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Systematic evaluation of satellite remote sensing for identifying uranium mines and mills.  

SciTech Connect

In this report, we systematically evaluate the ability of current-generation, satellite-based spectroscopic sensors to distinguish uranium mines and mills from other mineral mining and milling operations. We perform this systematic evaluation by (1) outlining the remote, spectroscopic signal generation process, (2) documenting the capabilities of current commercial satellite systems, (3) systematically comparing the uranium mining and milling process to other mineral mining and milling operations, and (4) identifying the most promising observables associated with uranium mining and milling that can be identified using satellite remote sensing. The Ranger uranium mine and mill in Australia serves as a case study where we apply and test the techniques developed in this systematic analysis. Based on literature research of mineral mining and milling practices, we develop a decision tree which utilizes the information contained in one or more observables to determine whether uranium is possibly being mined and/or milled at a given site. Promising observables associated with uranium mining and milling at the Ranger site included in the decision tree are uranium ore, sulfur, the uranium pregnant leach liquor, ammonia, and uranyl compounds and sulfate ion disposed of in the tailings pond. Based on the size, concentration, and spectral characteristics of these promising observables, we then determine whether these observables can be identified using current commercial satellite systems, namely Hyperion, ASTER, and Quickbird. We conclude that the only promising observables at Ranger that can be uniquely identified using a current commercial satellite system (notably Hyperion) are magnesium chlorite in the open pit mine and the sulfur stockpile. Based on the identified magnesium chlorite and sulfur observables, the decision tree narrows the possible mineral candidates at Ranger to uranium, copper, zinc, manganese, vanadium, the rare earths, and phosphorus, all of which are milled using sulfuric acid leaching.

Blair, Dianna Sue; Stork, Christopher Lyle; Smartt, Heidi Anne; Smith, Jody Lynn

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

Radiological Control Programs for Special Tritium Compounds  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

84-2004 84-2004 SEPTEMBER 2004 CHANGE NOTICE NO. 1 Date June 2006 DOE HANDBOOK RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL PROGRAMS FOR SPECIAL TRITIUM COMPOUNDS U.S. Department of Energy AREA OCSH Washington, D.C. 20585 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. NOT MEASUREMENT SENSITIVE ii Table of Changes Page Change 67 (near bottom) In row 1, column 2 of the table titled "dosimetric properties" 6 mrem was changed to 6 x 10 -2 mrem Available on the Department of Energy Technical Standards Program Web site at http://tis.eh.doe.gov/techstds/ DOE-HDBK-1184-2004 iii Foreword The Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessor agencies have undertaken a wide variety

177

Radiological Control Programs for Special Tritium Compounds  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

F 1325.8 F 1325.8 (08-93) United States Government Department of Energy memorandum DATE: May 11, 2006 REPLY TO EH-52:JRabovsky:3-2 135 ATTN OF: APPROVAL OF CHANGE NOTICE 1 TO DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (DOE) SUBJECT. HANDBOOK 1184-2004, RADIOLOGICAL CONTROL PROGRAMS FOR SPECIAL TRITIUM COMPOUNDS TO: Dennis Kubicki, EH-24 Technical Standards Manager This memorandum forwards the subject Change Notice 1 to DOE Handbook, DOE- HDBK- 1184-2004, which has approved for publication and distribution. The change to this handbook consists of a correction to the rule of thumb, listed in Appendix A, for converting the uptake of tritium oxide into radiation dose. A factor of 1/100 was inadvertently omitted from this rule of thumb when this DOE Handbook was originally published. This change does not affect the references, is not of a technical nature, and

178

IRRADIATION METHOD OF CONVERTING ORGANIC COMPOUNDS  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is given for changing the distribution of organic compounds from that produced by the irradiation of bulk alkane hydrocarbons. This method consists of depositing an alkane hydrocarbon on the surface of a substrate material and irradiating with gamma radiation at a dose rate of more than 100,000 rads. The substrate material may be a metal, metal salts, metal oxides, or carbons having a surface area in excess of 1 m/sup 2//g. The hydrocarbons are deposited in layers of from 0.1 to 10 monolayers on the surfaces of these substrates and irradiated. The product yields are found to vary from those which result from the irradiation of bulk hydrocarbons in that there is an increase in the quantity of branched hydrocarbons.

Allen, A.O.; Caffrey, J.M. Jr.

1960-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

179

Clathrate compounds and method of manufacturing  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention comprises new materials, material structures, and processes of fabrication of such that may be used in technologies involving the conversion of light to electricity and/or heat to electricity, and in optoelectronics technologies. The present invention provide for the fabrication of a clathrate compound comprising a type II clathrate lattice with atoms of silicon and germanium as a main framework forming lattice spacings within the framework, wherein the clathrate lattice follows the general formula Si.sub.136-yGe.sub.y, where y indicates the number of Ge atoms present in the main framework and 136-y indicates the number of Si atoms present in the main framework, and wherein y>0.

Nolas, George S. (Tampa, FL); Witanachchi, Sarath (Tampa, FL); Mukherjee, Pritish (Tampa, FL)

2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

180

Fission Barriers of Compound Superheavy Nuclei  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dependence of fission barriers on the excitation energy of the compound nucleus impacts the survival probability of superheavy nuclei synthesized in heavy-ion fusion reactions. In this work, we investigate the isentropic fission barriers by means of the self-consistent nuclear density functional theory. The relationship between isothermal and isentropic descriptions is demonstrated. Calculations have been carried out for $^{264}$Fm, $^{272}$Ds, $^{278}$112, $^{292}$114, and $^{312}$124. For nuclei around $^{278}$112 produced in "cold fusion" reactions, we predict a more rapid decrease of fission barriers with excitation energy as compared to the nuclei around $^{292}$114 synthesized in "hot fusion" experiments. This is explained in terms of the difference between the ground-state and saddle-point temperatures. The effect of the particle gas is found to be negligible in the range of temperatures studied.

J. C. Pei; W. Nazarewicz; J. A. Sheikh; A. K. Kerman

2009-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identified compound tic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Syntheses and studies of organosilicon compounds  

SciTech Connect

The syntheses of polycarbosilanes and polysilanes as silicon carbide ceramic precursors have been active research areas in the Barton Research Group. In this thesis, the work is focused on the preparation of polycarbosilanes and polysilanes as stoichiometric silicon carbide precursor polymers. The syntheses of the precursor polymers are discussed and the conversions of these precursors to silicon carbide via pyrolysis are reported. The XRD pattern and elemental analyses of the resulting silicon carbide ceramics are presented. Silicon monoxide is an important intermediate in the production of silicon metal. The existence of silicon monoxide in gap phase has been widely accepted. In the second part of this thesis, the generation of gaseous silicon monoxide in four different reactors and the reactions of gaseous silicon monoxide towards organic compounds are discussed.

Xie, R.

1999-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

182

Steam generation in compound parabolic concentrator collectors  

SciTech Connect

This report describes the advantages of generating steam directly in a nonimaging compound parabolic concentrator (CPC) collector rather than using a heat-transfer fluid and a secondary heat exchanger. The predicted performance advantages from generating steam directly in CPC collectors are significant, and that performance has ben verified using a collector built and tested at Argonne National Laboratory. The collector and the method used to test its operation in a steam-generating mode are described. Test results are included for a 6.4-m/sup 2/ array of evacuated tube collectors with an advanced absorber coating, silver reflectors, and tubes oriented in a north-south configuration. Also described are the test methods and results for indoor testing for heat loss by the collectors and outdoor testing of their instantaneous optical efficiency.

Allen, J.W.; Schertz, W.W.; Wantroba, A.S.

1985-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

Predicting flammability of gas mixtures containing volatile organic compounds  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

One requirement regarding the transportation of transuranic (TRU) radioactive waste containers currently limits the total concentration of potentially flammable volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and flammable gases in the headspace of the waste container. Typical VOCs observed in the drums include aromatic hydrocarbons, ketones, alcohols, cyclohexane, as well as chlorinated hydrocarbons (alkanes and alkenes). Flammable gases, such as hydrogen and methane, may be generated in the containers by radiation-induced decomposition (radiolysis) of water and hydrocarbon waste forms. An experimental program was initiated to identify an accurate means for predicting flammability for gas mixtures containing one or more of the following species: hydrogen, carbon tetrachloride, 1,2-dichloroethane, toluene, or 2-butanone. The lower flammability limits (LFL) of gas mixtures containing equimolar quantity for each species were determined in a 19-liter laboratory flammability chamber using a strong spark ignition source. The group factor contribution method was determined to be more accurate than the LeChatelier method for estimating the LFL for these gas mixtures.

Liekhus, K. [Lockheed Martin Idaho Technologies Co., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Lab.; Zlochower, I. [National Inst. for Occupational Safety and Health, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Pittsburgh Research Lab.; Djordjevic, S.; Loehr, C. [Benchmark Environmental, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

184

Enhanced Elemental Mercury Removal from Coal-fired Flue Gas by Sulfur-chlorine Compounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

efficiency by sulfur and/or chlorine containing compounds atfired Flue Gas by Sulfur-chlorine Compounds Nai-Qiang Yanremoval. Two sulfur-chlorine compounds, sulfur dichloride (

Miller, Nai-Qiang Yan-Zan Qu Yao Chi Shao-Hua Qiao Ray Dod Shih-Ger Chang Charles

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

IDENTIFYING FRACTURES AND FLUID TYPES USING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IDENTIFYING FRACTURES AND FLUID TYPES USING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY IDENTIFYING FRACTURES AND FLUID TYPES USING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Conference Proceedings: IDENTIFYING FRACTURES AND FLUID TYPES USING FLUID INCLUSION STRATIGRAPHY Details Activities (1) Areas (1) Regions (0) Abstract: Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy (FIS) is a method currently being developed for use in geothermal systems to identify fractures and fluid types. This paper is the third in a series of papers on the development of FIS. Fluid inclusion gas chemistry is analyzed and plotted on well log diagrams. The working hypothesis is that select gaseous species and species ratios indicate areas of groundwater and reservoir fluid flow and reservoir seals. Previously we showed that FIS analyses identify fluid types and

186

Reactive codoping of GaAlInP compound semiconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A GaAlInP compound semiconductor and a method of producing a GaAlInP compound semiconductor are provided. The apparatus and method comprises a GaAs crystal substrate in a metal organic vapor deposition reactor. Al, Ga, In vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing organometallic compounds. P vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing phospine gas, group II vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing an organometallic group IIA or IIB compound. Group VIB vapors are prepared by thermally decomposing a gaseous compound of group VIB. The Al, Ga, In, P, group II, and group VIB vapors grow a GaAlInP crystal doped with group IIA or IIB and group VIB elements on the substrate wherein the group IIA or IIB and a group VIB vapors produced a codoped GaAlInP compound semiconductor with a group IIA or IIB element serving as a p-type dopant having low group II atomic diffusion.

Hanna, Mark Cooper (Boulder, CO); Reedy, Robert (Golden, CO)

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

187

Complex Hydride Compounds with Enhanced Hydrogen Storage Capacity  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The United Technologies Research Center (UTRC), in collaboration with major partners Albemarle Corporation (Albemarle) and the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), conducted research to discover new hydride materials for the storage of hydrogen having on-board reversibility and a target gravimetric capacity of ? 7.5 weight percent (wt %). When integrated into a system with a reasonable efficiency of 60% (mass of hydride / total mass), this target material would produce a system gravimetric capacity of ? 4.5 wt %, consistent with the DOE 2007 target. The approach established for the project combined first principles modeling (FPM - UTRC) with multiple synthesis methods: Solid State Processing (SSP - UTRC), Solution Based Processing (SBP - Albemarle) and Molten State Processing (MSP - SRNL). In the search for novel compounds, each of these methods has advantages and disadvantages; by combining them, the potential for success was increased. During the project, UTRC refined its FPM framework which includes ground state (0 Kelvin) structural determinations, elevated temperature thermodynamic predictions and thermodynamic / phase diagram calculations. This modeling was used both to precede synthesis in a virtual search for new compounds and after initial synthesis to examine reaction details and options for modifications including co-reactant additions. The SSP synthesis method involved high energy ball milling which was simple, efficient for small batches and has proven effective for other storage material compositions. The SBP method produced very homogeneous chemical reactions, some of which cannot be performed via solid state routes, and would be the preferred approach for large scale production. The MSP technique is similar to the SSP method, but involves higher temperature and hydrogen pressure conditions to achieve greater species mobility. During the initial phases of the project, the focus was on higher order alanate complexes in the phase space between alkaline metal hydrides (AmH), Alkaline earth metal hydrides (AeH2), alane (AlH3), transition metal (Tm) hydrides (TmHz, where z=1-3) and molecular hydrogen (H2). The effort started first with variations of known alanates and subsequently extended the search to unknown compounds. In this stage, the FPM techniques were developed and validated on known alanate materials such as NaAlH4 and Na2LiAlH6. The coupled predictive methodologies were used to survey over 200 proposed phases in six quaternary spaces, formed from various combinations of Na, Li Mg and/or Ti with Al and H. A wide range of alanate compounds was examined using SSP having additions of Ti, Cr, Co, Ni and Fe. A number of compositions and reaction paths were identified having H weight fractions up to 5.6 wt %, but none meeting the 7.5 wt%H reversible goal. Similarly, MSP of alanates produced a number of interesting compounds and general conclusions regarding reaction behavior of mixtures during processing, but no alanate based candidates meeting the 7.5 wt% goal. A novel alanate, LiMg(AlH4)3, was synthesized using SBP that demonstrated a 7.0 wt% capacity with a desorption temperature of 150C. The deuteride form was synthesized and characterized by the Institute for Energy (IFE) in Norway to determine its crystalline structure for related FPM studies. However, the reaction exhibited exothermicity and therefore was not reversible under acceptable hydrogen gas pressures for on-board recharging. After the extensive studies of alanates, the material class of emphasis was shifted to borohydrides. Through SBP, several ligand-stabilized Mg(BH4)2 complexes were synthesized. The Mg(BH4)2*2NH3 complex was found to change behavior with slightly different synthesis conditions and/or aging. One of the two mechanisms was an amine-borane (NH3BH3) like dissociation reaction which released up to 16 wt %H and more conservatively 9 wt%H when not including H2 released from the NH3. From FPM, the stability of the Mg(BH4)2*2NH3 compound was found to increase with the inclusion of NH3 groups in the inner-Mg coordination

Mosher, Daniel A.; Opalka, Susanne M.; Tang, Xia; Laube, Bruce L.; Brown, Ronald J.; Vanderspurt, Thomas H.; Arsenault, Sarah; Wu, Robert; Strickler, Jamie; Anton, Donald L.; Zidan, Ragaiy; Berseth, Polly

2008-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

188

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Warpinski,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Warpinski, Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lake City Hot Springs Area (Warpinski, Et Al., 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Lake City Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The Lake City site, which is located in far northeastern California, consists of a previously identified geothermal site that has been explored with both geophysics and drilling (Hedel, 1981), but has not been characterized adequately to allow accurate siting or drilling of production wells. Some deep wells, several seismic lines, limited gravity surveys, and geochemical and geological studies have suggested that the geothermal

189

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Kodosky & Keith, 1993) Kodosky & Keith, 1993) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area (Kodosky & Keith, 1993) Exploration Activity Details Location Valley Of Ten Thousand Smokes Region Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes The purpose of this paper is to examine whether statistical analysis of encrustation chemistries, when supplemented with petrologic data, can identify the individual processes that generate and degrade fumarolic encrustations. Knowledge of these specific processes broadens the applications of fumarolic alteration studies. Geochemical data for a 47-element suite were obtained for an air-dried subset of the collected

190

Structure determination of an amorphous compound AlB4H11.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The structure of the amorphous aluminoborane compound AlB4H11 was identified through a collaborative study closely coupling a first-principles density functional based approach with experimental measurements using IR, NMR, and neutron vibrational spectroscopy (NVS). The AlB4H11 structure was found to contain distinct [BH4] and [B3H7] units without any [AlH4] units. It forms a [B3H7] Al(BH4) polymer chain with the [BH4] units twisted relative to each other perpendicular to the chain direction and bonded to Al, and a chain backbone consists of [B3H7] and Al where the [B3H7] unit exhibits a triangular boron configuration. The computed lowest energy structure shows good agreement with results of IR, NVS and NMR spectra; this agreement demonstrates the extended applicability of the structure prediction approach to the prediction of even amorphous compounds.

Chen, Xuenian [Ohio State University; Zhang, Yongsheng [Northwestern University, Evanston; Wang, Yongli [Northwestern University, Evanston; Zhou, Wei [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Knight, Douglas A [ORNL; Yisgedu, Teshome [Ohio State University; Huang, Zhenguo [Ohio State University; Lingam, Hima [Ohio State University; Billet, Beau [Ohio State University; Udovic, Terrence J [ORNL; Brown, Gilbert M [ORNL; Shore, Sheldon [Ohio State University; Wolverton, Christopher [Northwestern University, Evanston; Zhao, J.-C. [Ohio State University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Chemical and Radiological Toxicity of Uranium and Its Compounds  

SciTech Connect

The concentration of uranyl nitrate required to deliver the radiation dose limit for soluble uranium compounds is larger than the toxicity-based concentration limits. Therefore, for soluble uranium compounds, health consequences of exposure are primarily due to their chemical toxicity. For insoluble compounds of uranium, health consequences (e.g., fibrosis and/or carcinogenesis of the lung) are primarily due to irradiation of pulmonary tissues from inhaled respirable particles.

Tansky, R.R.

2001-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

192

Boron compounds as anion binding agents for nonaqueous battery electrolytes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Novel fluorinated boron-based compounds which act as anion receptors in non-aqueous battery electrolytes are provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the fluorinated boron-based compounds of the invention enhance ionic conductivity and cation transference number of non-aqueous electrolytes. The fluorinated boron-based anion receptors include borane and borate compounds bearing different fluorinated alkyl and aryl groups.

Lee, Hung Sui (East Setauket, NY); Yang, Xia-Oing (Port Jefferson Station, NY); McBreen, James (Bellport, NY); Xiang, Caili (Upton, NY)

2000-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

193

THE PREPARATION OF RHENIUM FROM IODO COMPOUNDS  

SciTech Connect

Potassium hexaiodorhenate (IV) decomposes in vacuo at 500 maiinly to potassium iodide, rhenium and iodine. At 700 potassium iodide sublimes off to leave an iodinefree product, but analyses showed retention of potassium. This cannot be ascribed to the retention of alkali as in the hydrogen reduction of potassium perrhenate, and it indicates that an unsolvated potassium rhenide is stable at high temperatures. Ammonium hexaiodorhenate (IV) prepared quaatitatively from rhenium heptoxide decomposes quantitatively to rhenium at 700 in vacuo. A compound approximating to rhenium tri-iodide was prepared by evaporating the eluate, obtained by passing potassium hexachlororhenate in hydrochloric acid through a cation exchange column, to dryness with hydriodic acid. This iodide also decomposed to rhenium in vacuo. We have confirmed and extended the observations thai rhenium iodides cannot be prepared by direct combination alone or in complexing and non-complexing solvents for iodine. The hexaiodorhenates can be prepared quantitatively from the corresponding chlorides. It has been shown that the series K/sub 2/ReCl/sub 6/, K/sub 2/ReBrI/sub 6/ can be interconvented in either direction with the appropriate halogen acids but with greater difficulty to the left. The hexachloro salt is converted to potassium perrhenate and bifiuoride with hydrofluoric acid and not to the hexafluoro salt. The last resembles the hexaffluoro iridate and not osmate or platinate. (auth)

Woolf, A.A.

1958-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Flash vacuum pyrolysis of lignin model compounds  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Despite the extensive research into the pyrolysis of lignin, the underlying chemical reactions that lead to product formation are poorly understood. Detailed mechanistic studies on the pyrolysis of biomass and lignin under conditions relevant to current process conditions could provide insight into utilizing this renewable resource for the production of chemicals and fuel. Currently, flash or fast pyrolysis is the most promising process to maximize the yields of liquid products (up to 80 wt %) from biomass by rapidly heating the substrate to moderate temperatures, typically 500{degrees}C, for short residence times, typically less than two seconds. To provide mechanistic insight into the primary reaction pathways under process relevant conditions, we are investigating the flash vacuum pyrolysis (FVP) of lignin model compounds that contain a {beta}-ether. linkage and {alpha}- or {gamma}-alcohol, which are key structural elements in lignin. The dominant products from the FVP of PhCH{sub 2}CH{sub 2}OPh (PPE), PhC(OH)HCH{sub 2}OPh, and PhCH{sub 2}CH(CH{sub 2}OH)OPh at 500{degrees}C can be attributed to homolysis of the weakest bond in the molecule (C-O bond) or 1,2-elimination. Surprisingly, the hydroxy-substituent dramatically increases the decomposition of PPE. It is proposed that internal hydrogen bonding is accelerating the reaction.

Cooney, M.J.; Britt, P.F.; Buchanan, A.C. III

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Volatile organic compound remedial action project  

SciTech Connect

This Environmental Assessment (EA) reviews a proposed project that is planned to reduce the levels of volatile organic compound (VOC) contaminants present in the Mound domestic water supply. The potable and industrial process water supply for Mound is presently obtained from a shallow aquifer via on-site production wells. The present levels of VOCs in the water supply drawn from the on-site wells are below the maximum contaminant levels (MCLs) permissible for drinking water under Safe Drinking Water Act (SDWA; 40 CFR 141); however, Mound has determined that remedial measures should be taken to further reduce the VOC levels. The proposed project action is the reduction of the VOC levels in the water supply using packed tower aeration (PTA). This document is intended to satisfy the requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969 and associated Council on Environmental Quality regulations (40 CFR parts 1500 through 1508) as implemented through U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5440.1D and supporting DOE NEPA Guidelines (52 FR 47662), as amended (54 FR 12474; 55 FR 37174), and as modified by the Secretary of Energy Notice (SEN) 15-90 and associated guidance. As required, this EA provides sufficient information on the probable environmental impacts of the proposed action and alternatives to support a DOE decision either to prepare an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) or issue a Finding of No Significant Impact (FONSI).

NONE

1991-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

196

Alloys and Compounds for Thermoelectric and Solar Cell Applications  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Jul 31, 2012 ... TMS: Energy Conversion and Storage Committee ... of the alloys and compounds used in the thermoelectric and solar cell devices. Materials of...

197

Testing of Selected Self-Leveling Compounds for Floors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... was not attempted, because the rank would depend on the tight given to each ... The mixes were neat self-leveling compounds without added sand. ...

1997-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

198

Method for conversion of .beta.-hydroxy carbonyl compounds ...  

A process is disclosed for conversion of salts of .beta.-hydroxy carbonyl compounds forming useful conversion products including, e.g., .alpha.,.beta.-unsaturated ...

199

Process for preparing a chemical compound enriched in isotope content  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process to prepare a chemical enriched in isotope content which includes: (a) A chemical exchange reaction between a first and second compound which yields an isotopically enriched first compound and an isotopically depleted second compound; (b) the removal of a portion of the first compound as product and the removal of a portion of the second compound as spent material; (c) the conversion of the remainder of the first compound to the second compound for reflux at the product end of the chemical exchange reaction region; (d) the conversion of the remainder of the second compound to the first compound for reflux at the spent material end of the chemical exchange region; and the cycling of the additional chemicals produced by one conversion reaction to the other conversion reaction, for consumption therein. One of the conversion reactions is an oxidation reaction, and the energy that it yields is used to drive the other conversion reaction, a reduction. The reduction reaction is carried out in a solid polymer electrolyte electrolytic reactor. The overall process is energy efficient and yields no waste by-products.

Michaels, Edward D. (Spring Valley, OH)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Fish...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identified compound tic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fish Lake Valley Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Fish Lake Valley Area...

202

Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H.sub.2 O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H.sub.2 O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); George, William A. (Rockport, MA)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H[sub 2]O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H[sub 2]O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds. 3 figs.

Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.

1989-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

204

Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H.sub.2 O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H.sub.2 O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); George, William A. (Rockport, MA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg.sub.2 Cl.sub.2 employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H.sub.2 O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H.sub.2 O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds.

Grossman, Mark W. (Belmont, MA); George, William A. (Rockport, MA)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Recovery of mercury from mercury compounds via electrolytic methods  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for electrolytically recovering mercury from mercury compounds is provided. In one embodiment, Hg is recovered from Hg[sub 2]Cl[sub 2] employing as the electrolyte solution a mixture of HCl and H[sub 2]O. In another embodiment, Hg is electrolytically recovered from HgO wherein the electrolyte solution is comprised of glacial acetic acid and H[sub 2]O. Also provided is an apparatus for producing isotopically enriched mercury compounds in a reactor and then transporting the dissolved compounds into an electrolytic cell where mercury ions are electrolytically reduced and elemental mercury recovered from the mercury compounds. 3 figures.

Grossman, M.W.; George, W.A.

1991-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

207

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Flint Geothermal Area (DOE...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Geothermal Area (DOE GTP) Exploration Activity Details Location Flint Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated...

208

Supercritical Water Gasification of Biomass & Biomass Model Compounds.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Supercritical water gasification (SCWG) is an innovative, modern, and effective destruction process for the treatment of organic compounds. Hydrogen production using SCWG of biomass or (more)

Youssef, Emhemmed A.E.A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Little Valley Area (Wood,...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Area (Wood, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Little Valley Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration...

210

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Salt Wells Area (Coolbaugh...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date 2005 - 2005 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Geochemical water sampling, mineral distribution...

211

Technologies for Extracting Valuable Metals and Compounds from...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Technologies for Extracting Valuable Metals and Compounds from Geothermal Fluids Project...

212

Process for synthesizing compounds from elemental powders and product  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for synthesizing intermetallic compounds from elemental powders. The elemental powders are initially combined in a ratio which approximates the stoichiometric composition of the intermetallic compound. The mixed powders are then formed into a compact which is heat treated at a controlled rate of heating such that an exothermic reaction between the elements is initiated. The heat treatment may be performed under controlled conditions ranging from a vacuum (pressureless sintering) to compression (hot pressing) to produce a desired densification of the intermetallic compound. In a preferred form of the invention, elemental powders of Fe and Al are combined to form aluminide compounds of Fe.sub.3 Al and FeAl.

Rabin, Barry H. (Idaho Falls, ID); Wright, Richard N. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico (Norman & Moore, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area...

214

Cold cases heat up through Lawrence Livermore approach to identifying  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

10-03 10-03 For immediate release: 10/10/2012 | NR-12-10-03 Cold cases heat up through Lawrence Livermore approach to identifying remains Anne M Stark, LLNL, (925) 422-9799, stark8@llnl.gov Printer-friendly Bruce Buchholz loads a sample in the accelerator. High Resolution Image LIVERMORE, Calif. -- In an effort to identify the thousands of John/Jane Doe cold cases in the United States, a Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory researcher and a team of international collaborators have found a multidisciplinary approach to identifying the remains of missing persons. Using "bomb pulse" radiocarbon analysis developed at Lawrence Livermore, combined with recently developed anthropological analysis and forensic DNA techniques, the researchers were able to identify the remains of a missing

215

Photo of the Week: Identifying and Protecting Alaskan Fishery Habitats |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Identifying and Protecting Alaskan Fishery Identifying and Protecting Alaskan Fishery Habitats Photo of the Week: Identifying and Protecting Alaskan Fishery Habitats September 27, 2013 - 3:08pm Addthis This aerial photo shows open water and floating ice on ponds, lakes and river channels in the Sagavanirktok River Delta in Alaska’s North Slope. PNNL scientists employed satellite technology to understand the impacts of oil development activities on the environment. Using satellite radar to “see” through the ice, scientists detected critical fish overwintering habitats by identifying where ice was grounded and where it was floating. Utilizing this information on critical habitats, fishery managers can suggest locations for energy development activities that increase the sustainability of fishery resources and minimize environmental impacts. Research was funded by the U.S. Department of the Interior. | Photo courtesy of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory.

216

Identify Employee Commuting Clusters for Greenhouse Gas Profile |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Identify Employee Commuting Clusters for Greenhouse Gas Profile Identify Employee Commuting Clusters for Greenhouse Gas Profile Identify Employee Commuting Clusters for Greenhouse Gas Profile October 7, 2013 - 1:53pm Addthis YOU ARE HERE: Step 2 For evaluating a greenhouse gas profile for employee commuting, use survey data on employee home location and arrival/departure times to identify geographic areas to target for vanpool and carpool ride-matching efforts. Those who live in close proximity or en route to the workplace and with similar hours may be clustered to determine which locations might represent the best candidates for ride-share matching. As illustrated in Figure 1, areas with higher concentrations of employees that live farther from the worksite might be good candidate locations for targeted carpool and vanpool

217

Property:IdentifiedHydrothermalPotential | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

IdentifiedHydrothermalPotential IdentifiedHydrothermalPotential Jump to: navigation, search Property Name IdentifiedHydrothermalPotential Property Type Quantity Description Conventional hydrothermal electricity generation potential from identified hydrothermal sites, as determined by the USGS 2008 Geothermal Resource Assessment (Williams et al, 2008). Use this property to express potential electric energy generation, such as Nameplate Capacity. The default unit is megawatts (MW). For spatial capacity, use property Volume. Acceptable units (and their conversions) are: 1 MW,MWe,megawatt,Megawatt,MegaWatt,MEGAWATT,megawatts,Megawatt,MegaWatts,MEGAWATT,MEGAWATTS 1000 kW,kWe,KW,kilowatt,KiloWatt,KILOWATT,kilowatts,KiloWatts,KILOWATT,KILOWATTS 1000000 W,We,watt,watts,Watt,Watts,WATT,WATTS

218

Identifying best practices for supporting broadband growth: Methodology and analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents a methodology for identifying best practices followed by various countries worldwide for supporting broadband growth. It also investigates and analyzes these practices using data concerning broadband penetration, access technologies, ... Keywords: Best practices, Broadband, Telecommunications policies

C. Bouras; E. Giannaka; Thrasyvoulos Tsiatsos

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Production and Flow of Identified Hadrons at RHIC  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We review the production and flow of identified hadrons at RHIC with a main emphasis on the intermediate transverse momentum region ($2production and resolve the anomalously large baryon yields and elliptic flow observed in the experiments.

Julia Velkovska

2004-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

220

Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2012-002  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This is a request by BATTELLE MEMORIAL INSTITUTE for a DOE Identified patent waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-AC07-05ID14517.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identified compound tic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Report on Matters Identified at Strategic Petroleum Reserve During...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Strategic Petroleum Reserve During Audit of Statement of Financial Position, CR-FS-96-03 Report on Matters Identified at Strategic Petroleum Reserve During Audit of Statement of...

222

Report on Matters Identified at the Richland Operations Office...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

WR-FS-97-04 More Documents & Publications Report on Matters Identified at the Rocky Flats Field Office During the Audit of the Department's Consolidated Fiscal Year 1996...

223

Report on Matters Identified at the Rocky Flats Field Office...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rocky Flats Field Office During the Audit of the Department's Consolidated Fiscal Year 1996 Financial Statements, WR-FS-97-03 Report on Matters Identified at the Rocky Flats Field...

224

Report on Matters Identified at the Richland Operations Office...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Position (as of September 30, 1995), IG-FS-96-01 Report on Matters Identified at the Rocky Flats Field Office During the Audit of the Department's Consolidated Fiscal Year 1996...

225

IdentifyingWeather Systems from NumericalWeather Prediction Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Weather systems such as tropical cyclones, fronts, troughs and ridges affect our daily lives. Yet, they are often manually located and drawn on weather charts based on forecasters' experience. To identify them, multiple atmospheric elements need to be ...

WONG Ka Yan; YIP Chi Lap; LI Ping Wah

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

AUDIT REPORT REPORT ON MATTERS IDENTIFIED AT THE IDAHO OPERATIONS...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

REPORT ON MATTERS IDENTIFIED AT THE IDAHO OPERATIONS OFFICE DURING THE AUDIT OF THE DEPARTMENT'S CONSOLIDATED FISCAL YEAR 1998 FINANCIAL STATEMENTS, WR-FS-99-01 AUDIT REPORT REPORT...

227

Zebrafish promoter microarrays identify actively transcribed embryonic genes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have designed a zebrafish genomic microarray to identify DNA-protein interactions in the proximal promoter regions of over 11,000 zebrafish genes. Using these microarrays, together with chromatin immunoprecipitation ...

Wardle, Fiona C

228

Atmospheric Issues Identified in State Water Resource Planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Illinois is completing a comprehensive statewide water plan. The plan selects three atmospheric issues, among the 11 identified as key issues facing the state's water resources. The issues selected include climate change and prediction, ...

Stanley A. Changnon Jr.; Richard G. Semonin

1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2012-009  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This is a request by UNITED TECHNOLOGIES RESEARCH for a DOE Identified patent waiver of domestic and foreign patent rights under agreement DE-AC02-05CH11231.

230

Efficiently identifying significant associations in genome-wide association studies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over the past several years, genome wide association studies (GWAS) have implicated hundreds of genes in common disease. More recently, the GWAS approach has been utilized to identify regions of the genome which harbor variation affecting gene expression ...

Emrah Kostem; Eleazar Eskin

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Simulations Identify Requirements for LANL's High Intensity Laser...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Identify Requirements for LANL's High Intensity Laser Lab cielo equip Fig. 1. Cielo is a 1.37 petaflops capability-class supercomputer installed at LANL, funded by the US DOE NNSA...

232

Identifying Necessary Reactions in Metabolic Pathways by Minimal Model Generation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In systems biology, identifying vital functions like glycolysis from a given metabolic pathway is important to understand living organisms. In this paper, we focus on the problem of finding minimal sub-pathways producing target metabolites from source ...

Takehide Soh; Katsumi Inoue

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Identifying Non-Federal Cooperating Agencies in Implementing the Procedural  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Identifying Non-Federal Cooperating Agencies in Implementing the Identifying Non-Federal Cooperating Agencies in Implementing the Procedural Requirements of NEPA Identifying Non-Federal Cooperating Agencies in Implementing the Procedural Requirements of NEPA The purpose of this Council on Environmental Quality Memorandum is to ensure that all federal and non-federal cooperating agencies are identified on the cover sheet of each Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) prepared by your agency. G-CEQ-IdentnonfedCooperatingAgencies.pdf More Documents & Publications Designation of Non-Federal Agencies as Cooperating Agencies Cooperating Agencies in Implementing the Procedural Requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act Reporting Cooperating Agencies in Implementing the Procedural Requirements of the National Environmental Policy Act

234

Identify Vehicle Usage Mission Constraints for Reducing Greenhouse Gas  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Identify Vehicle Usage Mission Constraints for Reducing Greenhouse Identify Vehicle Usage Mission Constraints for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions Identify Vehicle Usage Mission Constraints for Reducing Greenhouse Gas Emissions October 7, 2013 - 11:46am Addthis YOU ARE HERE: Step 2 As Federal agencies work to identify opportunities for right-sizing the fleet and replacing inefficient vehicles with new, efficient, and/or alternatively fueled models to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, they should flag potential mission constraints associated with vehicle usage. This may involve further data collection to understand the mission considerations associated with individual vehicles. For instance, in Figure 1, Vehicle 004 appears to be underutilized, having both a low user-to-vehicle ratio and a relatively low time in use per day. However,

235

Potential influence of organic compounds on the transport of radionuclides from a geologic repository. Assessment of effectiveness of geologic isolation systems  

SciTech Connect

This study identifies organic compounds that may be present in a repository and outlines plausible interactions and mechanisms that may influence the forms and chemical behavior of these compounds. A review of the literature indicates that large quantities of organic radioactive wastes are generated by the nuclear industry and if placed in a repository could increase or decrease the leach rate and sorption characteristics of waste radionuclides. The association of radionuclides with organic matter can render the nuclides soluble or insoluble depending on the particular nuclide and such parameters as the pH, Eh, and temperature of the hydrogeologic system as well as the properties of the organic compounds themselves. 44 references.

Silviera, D.J.

1981-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Energy Cost Reduction Measures Identified for Texas State Agencies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

According t o energy auditors, state-owned facilities in Texas on the average consume over twice the energy of comparable facilities in the private sector. In 1984 and 1986 as part of the Texas Energy Cost Containment Program, two extensive energy audit programs examined a total of 35.3 million square feet of state-owned space. Energy cost reduction measures with paybacks of four years or less were identified. The purpose of this paper is to present the projects identified in 1986. Most relate to lighting, HVAC, and energy management systems. The type of facilities audited include colleges and universities, health science centers, state schools and centers, hospitals, and office buildings. The relation between the facility type and the energy cost reduction measures identified is discussed. In addition, the energy and dollar savings derived from the identified measures at the different facilities are presented. The total savings of the projects identified in both energy audit programs amount to $23.7 million annually.

Grigg, T. J.; Verdict, M. E.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Semantic interpretation of noun compounds using verbal and other paraphrases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the problem of semantic interpretation of noun compounds such as bee honey, malaria mosquito, apple cake, and stem cell. In particular, we explore the potential of using predicates that make explicit the hidden relation ... Keywords: Lexical semantics, Web as a corpus, machine translation, multiword expressions, noun compounds, paraphrases

Preslav I. Nakov; Marti A. Hearst

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Method for converting asbestos to non-carcinogenic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Hazardous and carcinogenic asbestos waste characterized by a crystalline fibrous structure is transformed into non-carcinogenic, relatively nonhazardous, and non-crystalline solid compounds and gaseous compounds which have commercial utilization. The asbestos waste is so transformed by the complete fluorination of the crystalline fibrous silicate mineral defining the asbestos. 7 figs.

Selby, T.W.

1996-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

239

Polymers containing borane or carborane cage compounds and related applications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Polymers comprising residues of borane and/or carborane cage compound monomers having at least one polyalkoxy silyl substituent. Such polymers can further comprise one or more reactive matrices and/or co-monomers covalently bound with the cage compound monomer residues. Methods of making and applications for using such polymers are also disclosed.

Bowen, III, Daniel E. (Olathe, KS); Eastwood, Eric A. (Raymore, MO)

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

240

Redox chromophore compounds and electrodes of metal containing substituted bipyridines  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Chromophoric compounds, each having a wide range of distinct color changes in response to changes in the oxidation states thereof, are provided in the form of polymerizable monomers, and polymers thereof, of certain metal containing, and electron group substituted, 2,2'-bipyridine compounds.

Elliott, Cecil M. (Fort Collins, CO); Redepenning, Jody G. (Fort Collins, CO)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identified compound tic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Process for reducing aromatic compounds in ethylenediamine with calcium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Olefins are produced by containing an organic compound having at least one benzene ring with ethylenediamine and calcium metal, the calcium metal being used in large excess or alternatively in conjunction with an inert abrasive particulate substance. Substantially all of the organic compounds are converted to corresponding cyclic olefins, largely mono-olefins.

Benkeser, R.A.; Laugal, J.A.; Rappa, A.

1985-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

242

Process for reducing aromatic compounds in ethylenediamine with calcium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Olefins are produced by containing an organic compound having at least one benzene ring with ethylenediamine and calcium metal, the calcium metal being used in large excess or alternatively in conjunction with an inert abrasive particulate substance. Substantially all of the organic compounds are converted to corresponding cyclic olefins, largely mono-olefins.

Benkeser, Robert A. (West Lafayette, IN); Laugal, James A. (Lostant, IL); Rappa, Angela (Baltimore, MD)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Brookins & Laughlin, 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Brookins & Laughlin, 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Fenton Hill HDR Site References D. G. Brookins, A. W. Laughlin (1983) Rb-Sr Geochronologic Investigation Of Precambrian Samples From Deep Geothermal Drill Holes, Fenton Hill, New Mexico Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Compound_and_Elemental_Analysis_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Brookins_%26_Laughlin,_1983)&oldid=511281"

244

Definition: Compound and Elemental Analysis | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Compound and Elemental Analysis Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Compound and Elemental Analysis Compound and elemental analysis is a process where a sample of some material (e.g., soil, waste or drinking water, bodily fluids, minerals, chemical compounds) is analyzed for its elements and compounds and sometimes its isotopic composition. Elemental analysis can be qualitative (determining what elements are present), and it can also be quantitative (determining how much of each type are present).[1] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition References ↑ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elemental_analysis Ret Like Like You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. rieved from

245

Multicolor Maps from Compound Queries | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Multicolor Maps from Compound Queries Multicolor Maps from Compound Queries Home > Groups > OpenEI Community Central Jweers's picture Submitted by Jweers(83) Contributor 16 May, 2013 - 14:22 ask queries compound queries developer Google maps maps multicolor result formats results Semantic Mediawiki Hi all, Recently, a couple of people on OpenEI have asked me how to do compound (or multicolor) maps like this one: Thanks to the new Google Maps v3 API, this is really easy. I put together a quick sample of how this is done, complete with code snippits, here: http://en.openei.org/wiki/User:Jweers/Test5. First, create a compound query, then atttribute a custom marker icon to each query using the ;param=value syntax. The new OpenEI maps extension will take care of the rest. Here is an example of it in use on OpenEI by NREL's Geothermal team:

246

Device for collecting chemical compounds and related methods  

SciTech Connect

A device for sampling chemical compounds from fixed surfaces and related methods are disclosed. The device may include a vacuum source, a chamber and a sorbent material. The device may utilize vacuum extraction to volatilize the chemical compounds from the fixed surfaces so that they may be sorbed by the sorbent material. The sorbent material may then be analyzed using conventional thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (TD/GC/MS) instrumentation to determine presence of the chemical compounds. The methods may include detecting release and presence of one or more chemical compounds and determining the efficacy of decontamination. The device may be useful in collection and analysis of a variety of chemical compounds, such as residual chemical warfare agents, chemical attribution signatures and toxic industrial chemicals.

Scott, Jill R.; Groenewold, Gary S.; Rae, Catherine

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Corona method and apparatus for altering carbon containing compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a method and apparatus for altering a carbon containing compound in an aqueous mixture. According to a first aspect of the present invention, it has been discovered that for an aqueous mixture having a carbon containing compound with an ozone reaction rate less than the ozone reaction rate of pentachlorophenol, use of corona discharge in a low or non-oxidizing atmosphere increases the rate of destruction of the carbon containing compound compared to corona discharge an oxidizing atmosphere. For an aqueous mixture containing pentachlorphenol, there was essentially no difference in destruction between atmospheres. According to a second aspect of the present invention, it has been further discovered that an aqueous mixture having a carbon containing compound in the presence of a catalyst and oxygen resulted in an increased destruction rate of the carbon containing compound compared to no catalyst.

Sharma, Amit K. (Richland, WA); Camaioni, Donald M. (Richland, WA); Josephson, Gary B. (Richland, WA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Corona Method And Apparatus For Altering Carbon Containing Compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a method and apparatus for altering a carbon-containing compound in an aqueous mixture. According to a first aspect of the present invention, it has been discovered that for an aqueous mixture having a carbon containing compound with an ozone reaction rate less than the ozone reaction rate of pentachlorophenol, use of corona discharge in a low or non-oxidizing atmosphere increases the rate of destruction of the carbon containing compound compared to corona discharge an oxidizing atmosphere. For an aqueous mixture containing pentachlorphenol, there was essentially no difference in destruction between atmospheres. According to a second aspect of the present invention, it has been further discovered that an aqueous mixture having a carbon-containing compound in the presence of a catalyst and oxygen resulted in an increased destruction rate of the carbon containing compound compared to no catalyst.

Sharma, Amit K. (Plainsboro, NJ); Camaioni, Donald M. (Richland, WA); Josephson; Gary B. (Richland, WA)

2004-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

249

Digital Object Identifiers (DOI) | Scientific and Technical Information  

Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

Digital Object Identifiers (DOI) Digital Object Identifiers (DOI) Print page Print page Email page Email page A Digital Object Identifier (DOI) is a permanent, unique name used in the web-based global naming and resolution system that provides for the identification, retrieval, exchange and maintenance of intellectual property. DOIs assist the publishing community with electronic commerce and copyright management of digital objects published on the Internet. Development of the DOI System was initiated in 1997 by the Association of American Publishers, and is now managed by the International DOI Foundation. The DOI System was initially developed by the publishing community but is now a non-profit collaboration to develop infrastructure for persistent identification and management of content. Approximately 2000

250

Sharing De-identified Data | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Information Center » Worker » Former Worker Program » Program Information Center » Worker » Former Worker Program » Program Implementation » Sharing De-identified Data Sharing De-identified Data Sharing De-identified Data: Use the collected information to implement new strategies for worker safety and health at DOE sites and to inform industry-specific researchers while still protecting sensitive participant information and confidentiality. The confidentiality and privacy rights of former workers are not only a legal requirement, they are crucial to establishing and maintaining credibility with the former worker community. All medical information that is collected as part of this program is treated as confidential and is used only as allowed by the Privacy Act of 1974. All FWP activities are conducted with the approval of the Institutional Review Boards, or Human

251

Protecting FWP Participant Personally Identifiable Information/Protected  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Protecting FWP Participant Personally Identifiable Protecting FWP Participant Personally Identifiable Information/Protected Health Information Protecting FWP Participant Personally Identifiable Information/Protected Health Information The confidentiality and privacy rights of former workers are not only a legal requirement, they are crucial to establishing and maintaining credibility with the former worker community. All medical information that is collected as part of this program is treated as confidential and is used only as allowed by the Privacy Act of 1974. All FWP activities are conducted with the approval of the Institutional Review Boards, or Human Subjects Committees, of DOE and involved universities. All individuals sign an informed consent and Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act

252

Identify Institutional Change Rules for Sustainability | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Rules for Sustainability Rules for Sustainability Identify Institutional Change Rules for Sustainability October 8, 2013 - 11:45am Addthis It is important to analyze formal and informal workplace rules governing the behavior of individuals and organizations to meet a Federal agency's institutional change goals for sustainability. It is also important to determine how these rules actually affect people filling different roles in the organization, and how they mesh with the technologies, systems, and processes that constitute tools. Identify Formal and Informal Rules First, identify the formal and informal rules that shape current or desired behaviors. This includes checking the extent to which they align with one another in support of your agency's sustainability objectives. You may want

253

Waveform correlation methods for identifying populations of calibration events  

SciTech Connect

An approach for systematically screening large volumes of continuous data for repetitive events identified as mining explosions on basis of temporal and amplitude population characteristics. The method extends event clustering through waveform correlation with a new source-region-specific detector. The new signal subspace detector generalizes the matched filter and can be used to increase the number of events associated with a given cluster, thereby increasing the reliability of diagnostic cluster population characteristics. The method can be applied to obtain bootstrap ground truth explosion waveforms for testing discriminants, where actual ground truth is absent. The same events, if associated with to a particular mine, may help calibrate velocity models. The method may also assist earthquake hazard risk assessment by providing what amounts to blasting logs for identified mines. The cluster event lists can be reconciled against earthquake catalogs to screen explosions, otherwise hard to identify from the catalogs.

Harris, D.B.

1997-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

A Study of Scientometric Methods to Identify Emerging Technologies  

SciTech Connect

This work examines a scientometric model that tracks the emergence of an identified technology from initial discovery (via original scientific and conference literature), through critical discoveries (via original scientific, conference literature and patents), transitioning through Technology Readiness Levels (TRLs) and ultimately on to commercial application. During the period of innovation and technology transfer, the impact of scholarly works, patents and on-line web news sources are identified. As trends develop, currency of citations, collaboration indicators, and on-line news patterns are identified. The combinations of four distinct and separate searchable on-line networked sources (i.e., scholarly publications and citation, worldwide patents, news archives, and on-line mapping networks) are assembled to become one collective network (a dataset for analysis of relations). This established network becomes the basis from which to quickly analyze the temporal flow of activity (searchable events) for the example subject domain we investigated.

Abercrombie, Robert K [ORNL; Udoeyop, Akaninyene W [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Identify energy-saving actions | ENERGY STAR Buildings & Plants  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Identify energy-saving actions Identify energy-saving actions Secondary menu About us Press room Contact Us Portfolio Manager Login Facility owners and managers Existing buildings Commercial new construction Industrial energy management Small business Service providers Service and product providers Verify applications for ENERGY STAR certification Design commercial buildings Energy efficiency program administrators Commercial and industrial program sponsors Associations State and local governments Federal agencies Tools and resources Training In this section Learn the benefits Get started Use Portfolio Manager Save energy Stamp out energy waste Find cost-effective investments Engage occupants Provide a seat at the table Share energy goals and progress Identify energy-saving actions Spread the word about how to help

256

Identify Institutional Change Tools for Sustainability | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Tools for Sustainability Tools for Sustainability Identify Institutional Change Tools for Sustainability October 8, 2013 - 11:49am Addthis After identifying institutional change rules and roles, a Federal agency should identify the tools that create the infrastructural context within which it can achieve its sustainability goals. A tool is defined simply as a technology, system, or process used to meet a need. An example would be a time card, which is a system for tracking and verifying work hours. An organization's tools support its standard operations and ensure consistency over the long term; tools both allow and constrain behavior practices. Changes to institutional behavior must be supported by modified operational standards and tools. When an organization's tools are in opposition to

257

A Radically Configurable Six-State Compound  

SciTech Connect

Most organic radicals possess short lifetimes and quickly undergo dimerization or oxidation. Here, we report on the synthesis by radical templation of a class of air- and water-stable organic radicals, trapped within a homo[2]catenane composed of two rigid and fixed cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) rings. The highly energetic octacationic homo[2]catenane, which is capable of accepting up to eight electrons, can be configured reversibly, both chemically and electrochemically, between each one of six experimentally accessible redox states (0, 2+, 4+, 6+, 7+, and 8+) from within the total of nine states evaluated by quantum mechanical methods. All six of the observable redox states have been identified by electrochemical techniques, three (4+, 6+, and 7+) have been characterized by x-ray crystallography, four (4+, 6+, 7+, and 8+) by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy, one (7+) by superconducting quantum interference device magnetometry, and one (8+) by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

Barnes, J.C.; Fahrenbach, Albert C.; Cao, Dennis; Dyar, Scott M.; Frasconi, M.; Giesener, M. A.; Bentez, D.; Tkatchouk, E.; Li, H.; Stern, Charlotte L.; Sarjeant, Amy A.; Hartlieb, K.J.; Liu, Z.; Carmieli, Raanan; Botros, Y.Y.; Wasielewski, M. R.; Goddard III, W.A.; Stoddart, J. Fraser

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Identifying and Indoctrinating Qualifying Officials - Nevada Site Office  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

IDENTIFYING AND INDOCTRINATING QUALIFYING OFFICIALS (QO) QOs verify and certify Technical Qualification Program (TQP) participant qualifications. QOs are identified and indoctrinated as follows: QO IDENTIFICATION AND INDOCTRINATION PROCESS STEPS Process Steps/Work Instructions Step Who Does It What Happens 1 Designating Supervisor/Federal Technical Capability (FTC) Agent/TQP Manager NOMINATE an individual to serve as a QO. CONSIDER the nominee's technical and personal skills, knowledge, experience, and past performance, and ability to evaluate a TQP participant's attainment or equivalency of assigned competencies. 2 QO Nominee COMPLETE assigned QO orientation training and the expectations briefing with the FTC Agent. NOTE: The QO orientation training is provided by the

259

Draft Proposal for PDG Identifiers Purpose and Use Cases  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Proposal for PDG Identifiers Proposal for PDG Identifiers Purpose and Use Cases PDG Identif iers are strings that can be used to ref erence items in PDG such as rev iew articles, particles, datablocks or decay modes. Currently env isaged use cases include: External ref erences to items in the PDG database. For example, giv en a PDG Identif ier one can directly go to a specif ic page in pdgLiv e. Tags that can be included into the meta data of publication databases (in particular INSPIRE).

260

Using Financial Ratios to Identify Romanian Distressed Companies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the context of the current financial crisis, when more companies are facing bankruptcy or insolvency, the paper aims to find methods to identify distressed firms by using financial ratios. The study will focus on identifying a group of Romanian listed companies, for which financial data for the year 2008 were available. For each company a set of 14 financial indicators was calculated and then used in a principal component analysis, followed by a cluster analysis, a logit model, and a CHAID classification tree.

Andreica, Madalina Ecaterina; Andreica, Marin

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identified compound tic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Compound cast product and method for producing a compound cast product  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compound cast product is formed in a casting mold (14) having a mold cavity (16) sized and shaped to form the cast product. A plurality of injectors (24) is supported from a bottom side (26) of the casting mold (14). The injectors (24) are in fluid communication with the mold cavity (16) through the bottom side (26) of the casting mold (14). A molten material holder furnace (12) is located beneath the casting mold (14). The holder furnace (12) defines molten material receiving chambers (36) configured to separately contain supplies of two different molten materials (37, 38). The holder furnace (12) is positioned such that the injectors (24) extend downward into the receiving chamber (36). The receiving chamber (36) is separated into at least two different flow circuits (51, 52). A first molten material (37) is received in a first flow circuit (51), and a second molten material (38) is received into a second flow circuit (52). The first and second molten materials (37, 38) are injected into the mold cavity (16) by the injectors (24) acting against the force of gravity. The injectors (24) are positioned such that the first and second molten materials (37, 38) are injected into different areas of the mold cavity (16). The molten materials (37, 38) are allowed to solidify and the resulting compound cast product is removed from the mold cavity (16).

Meyer, Thomas N. (3987 Murray Highlands Cir., Murrysville, PA 15668-1747); Viswanathan, Srinath (1104 Albermarle La., Knoxville, TN 37923)

2002-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

262

Identifying Transformer Incipient Events for Maintaining Distribution System Reliability  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Identifying Transformer Incipient Events for Maintaining Distribution System Reliability Karen L events in single-phase distribution transformers. This analysis will aid in the development of an automatic detection method for internal incipient faults in the transformers. The detection method can

263

Two hundred Energy Savings Assessments identified potential annual energy savings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Center (IAC) teams. The Industrial Technologies Program completed 200 SENAs at U.S. industrial plants3/20/09 Two hundred Energy Savings Assessments identified potential annual energy savings of $485 million Industrial Energy Efficiency The ORNL Industrial Energy Efficiency Team supports DOE's Best

264

Identifying spam link generators for monitoring emerging web spam  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we address the question of how we can identify hosts that will generate links to web spam. Detecting such spam link generators is important because almost all new spam links are created by them. By monitoring spam link generators, we can ... Keywords: information retrieval, link analysis, web spam

Young-joo Chung; Masashi Toyoda; Masaru Kitsuregawa

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Identifying Differences in Cultural Behavior in Online Groups  

SciTech Connect

We have developed methods to identify online communities, or groups, using a combination of structural information variables and content information variables from weblog posts and their comments to build a characteristic footprint for groups. We have worked with both explicitly connected groups and 'abstract' groups, in which the connection between individuals is in interest (as determined by content based features) and behavior (metadata based features) as opposed to explicit links. We find that these variables do a good job at identifying groups, placing members within a group, and helping determine the appropriate granularity for group boundaries. The group footprint can then be used to identify differences between the online groups. In the work described here we are interested in determining how an individual's online behavior is influenced by their membership in more than one group. For example, individuals belong to a certain culture; they may belong as well to a demographic group, and other 'chosen' groups such as churches or clubs. There is a plethora of evidence surrounding the culturally sensitive adoption, use, and behavior on the Internet. In this work we begin to investigate how culturally defined internet behaviors may influence behaviors of subgroups. We do this through a series of experiments in which we analyze the interaction between culturally defined behaviors and the behaviors of the subgroups. Our goal is to (a) identify if our features can capture cultural distinctions in internet use, and (b) determine what kinds of interaction there are between levels and types of groups.

Gregory, Michelle L.; Engel, David W.; Bell, Eric B.; Mcgrath, Liam R.

2012-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

266

Using Frontogenesis to Identify Sting Jets in Extratropical Cyclones  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sting jets, or surface wind maxima at the end of bent-back fronts in ShapiroKeyser cyclones, are one cause of strong winds in extratropical cyclones. Although previous studies identified the release of conditional symmetric instability as a cause ...

David M. Schultz; Joseph M. Sienkiewicz

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Identifying human miRNA targets with a genetic algorithm  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in eukaryotic gene regulation. Although thousands of miRNAs have been identified in laboratories around the world, most of their targets still remain unknown. Different computational techniques exist to predict ... Keywords: genetic algorithms, miRNA targets, microRNAs

Kalle Karhu; Sami Khuri; Juho Mkinen; Jorma Tarhio

2010-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

An integrated framework for de-identifying unstructured medical data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

While there is an increasing need to share medical information for public health research, such data sharing must preserve patient privacy without disclosing any information that can be used to identify a patient. A considerable amount of research in ... Keywords: Anonymization, Conditional random fields, Cost-proportionate sampling, Data linkage, Medical text, Named entity recognition

James Gardner; Li Xiong

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

IDENTIFYING COMMUNITIES ASSOCIATED WITH THE FISHING INDUSTRY IN LOUISIANA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-10). The Louisiana Offshore Oil Port, 18 miles from Lafourche, has been economically important to the parish sinceVolume II IDENTIFYING COMMUNITIES ASSOCIATED WITH THE FISHING INDUSTRY IN LOUISIANA - FINAL REPORT in the northern reaches of the parish, and saltwater wetlands predominate in the south. Lafourche Parish

270

IDENTIFYING COMMUNITIES ASSOCIATED WITH THE FISHING INDUSTRY IN LOUISIANA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

.......................................................11 2.3 A Brief Cultural Geography of Coastal Louisiana of the offshore oil and gas industry to Louisiana, and the now lengthy history of economic and social interactionVolume I IDENTIFYING COMMUNITIES ASSOCIATED WITH THE FISHING INDUSTRY IN LOUISIANA - FINAL REPORT

271

Molecular and morphological methods for identifying plankton: what makes a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

HORIZONS Molecular and morphological methods for identifying plankton: what makes a successful of planktologists in monographs or at the bench. Despite recent rapid growth of molecular methods, taxonomists have been slow to incorporate molecular information in a formal way into species descriptions. Likewise

Katz, Laura

272

Online idea contests: identifying factors for user retention  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current literature about idea contests has emphasized individuals' motives for joining volunteer idea contests. However, explanation of why people stay or leave in the long run is rare. We identify factors that motivate users to participate repeatedly ... Keywords: motivation, multiple idea contests, open innovation, user retention

Stefan Richter, Stefan Perkmann Berger, Giordano Koch, Johann Fller

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

A taxonomy for identifying requirement interactions in software systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an interaction taxonomy for classifying and identifying requirement interactions in software systems. The proposed taxonomy is in the form of a four-layered pyramid that defines 6 Main Interaction Categories in the first layer, 17 ... Keywords: Interaction scenarios, Requirement engineering, Requirement interaction taxonomy

Mohamed Shehata; Armin Eberlein; Abraham O. Fapojuwo

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Sulfur Compound Emissions  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Sulfur Compound Emissions Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Sulfur Compound Emissions (Connecticut) Abatement of Air Pollution: Control of Sulfur Compound Emissions (Connecticut) < Back Eligibility Agricultural Commercial Construction Fed. Government Fuel Distributor General Public/Consumer Industrial Installer/Contractor Institutional Investor-Owned Utility Local Government Low-Income Residential Multi-Family Residential Municipal/Public Utility Nonprofit Residential Retail Supplier Rural Electric Cooperative Schools State/Provincial Govt Systems Integrator Transportation Tribal Government Utility Program Info State Connecticut Program Type Environmental Regulations Provider Department of Energy and Environmental Protection These regulations set limits on the sulfur content of allowable fuels (1.0%

275

Process and apparatus for formation of photovoltaic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention relates to a process and apparatus for formation and deposition of thin films on a substrate, in a vacuum, by evaporation of the elements to form a Zn.sub.x Cd.sub.1-x S compound having a preselected fixed ratio of cadmium to zinc, characterized by the evaporation of cadmium and zinc at a rate the ratio of which is proportional to the stoichiometric ratio of those elements in the intended compound and evaporation of sulfur at a rate at least twice the combined rates of cadmium and zinc, and at least twice that required by the stoichiometry of the intended compound.

Hall, Robert B. (Newark, DE); Rocheleau, Richard E. (Wilmington, DE)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Dosimeter for monitoring vapors and aerosols of organic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A dosimeter is provided for collecting and detecting vapors and aerosols of organic compounds. The dosimeter comprises a lightweight, passive device that can be conveniently worn by a person as a badge or placed at a stationary location. The dosimeter includes a sample collector comprising a porous web treated with a chemical for inducing molecular displacement and enhancing phosphorescence. Compounds are collected onto the web by molecular diffusion. The web also serves as the sample medium for detecting the compounds by a room temperature phosphorescence technique.

Vo-Dinh, Tuan (625 Gulfwood Rd., Knoxville, TN 37923)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Dosimeter for monitoring vapors and aerosols of organic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A dosimeter is provided for collecting and detecting vapors and aerosols of organic compounds. The dosimeter comprises a lightweight, passive device that can be conveniently worn by a person as a badge or placed at a stationary location. The dosimeter includes a sample collector comprising a porous web treated with a chemical for inducing molecular displacement and enhancing phosphorescence. Compounds are collected onto the web by molecular diffusion. The web also serves as the sample medium for detecting the compounds by a room temperature phosphorescence technique. 7 figs.

Vo-Dinh, T.

1987-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

278

Characterization of nitrogen compound types in hydrotreated Paraho shale oil  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results from the separation and characterization of nitrogen compound types in hydrotreated Paraho shale oil samples were obtained. Two samples of Paraho shale oil were hydrotreated by Chevron Research Company such that one sample contained about 0.05 wt. percent nitrogen and the other sample contained about 0.10 wt. percent nitrogen. A separation method concentrate specific nitrogen compound types was developed. Characterization of the nitrogen types was accomplished by infrared spectroscopy, mass spectrometry, potentiometric titration, and elemental analysis. The distribution of nitrogen compound types in both samples and in the Paraho crude shale oil is compared.

Holmes, S.A.; Latham, D.R.

1980-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Mechanistic Study of Oxygen Atom Transfer Catalyzed by Rhenium Compounds  

SciTech Connect

Two ionic and one neutral methyl(oxo)rhenium(V) compounds were synthesized and structurally characterized. They were compared in reactivity towards the ligands triphenylphosphane, pyridines, pyridine N-oxides. Assistance from Broensted bases was found on ligand displacement of ionic rhenium compounds as well as nucleophile assistance on oxidation of all compounds. From the kinetic data, crystal structures, and an analysis of the intermediates, a structural formula of PicH{sup +}3{sup -} and mechanisms of ligand displacement and oxidation were proposed.

Xiaopeng Shan

2003-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

280

Identifying Opportunities for Low-Carbon Supply Chains  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Identifying Opportunities for Low-Carbon Supply Chains Identifying Opportunities for Low-Carbon Supply Chains Speaker(s): Eric Masanet Date: April 11, 2011 - 1:30pm Location: 90-3075 Seminar Host/Point of Contact: Barbara Adams There is growing interest in the development of tools and methods for calculating the supply chain energy and carbon "footprints" associated with products and services. Much of the activity has been in response to "low carbon" product reporting mandates by large global retailers, such as Wal-Mart and Tesco. However, relatively little attention has been paid to the development of models that allow decision makers to assess realistic opportunities for reducing such footprints once they've been established. This presentation will provide an overview of a new supply chain energy use

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identified compound tic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

CEQ Memorandum - Identifying Cooperating Agencies - 09/25/2000  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5, 2000 5, 2000 MEMORANDUM FOR DEPUTY/ASSISTANT HEADS OF FEDERAL AGENCIES FROM: HORST G. GRECZMIEL Associate Director for NEPA Oversight SUBJECT: IDENTIFYING NON-FEDERAL COOPERATING AGENCIES IN IMPLEMENTING THE PROCEDURAL REQUIREMENTS OF THE NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT The purpose of this Memorandum is to ensure that all federal and non- federal cooperating agencies are identified on the cover sheet of each Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) prepared by your agency. In his Memorandum of July 28, 1999 (attached below), George T. Frampton, Jr., the CEQ Chair, urged all agencies to more actively solicit the participation of state, tribal and local governments as cooperating agencies in implementing the environmental impact statement process under the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA). Agencies are

282

Short period eclipsing binary candidates identified using SuperWASP  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present light curves and periods of 53 candidates for short period eclipsing binary stars identified by SuperWASP. These include 48 newly identified objects with periods <2x10^4 seconds (~0.23d), as well as the shortest period binary known with main sequence components (GSC2314-0530 = 1SWASP J022050.85+332047.6) and four other previously known W UMa stars (although the previously reported periods for two of these four are shown to be incorrect). The period distribution of main sequence contact binaries shows a sharp cut-off at a lower limit of around 0.22d, but until now, very few systems were known close to this limit. These new candidates will therefore be important for understanding the evolution of low mass stars and to allow investigation of the cause of the period cut-off.

Norton, A J; Evans, T; West, R G; Wheatley, P J; Anderson, D R; Barros, S C C; Butters, O W; Cameron, A Collier; Christian, D J; Enoch, B; Faedi, F; Haswell, C A; Hellier, C; Holmes, S; Horne, K D; Lister, T A; Maxted, P F L; Parley, N; Pollacco, D; Simpson, E K; Skillen, I; Smalley, B; Southworth, J; Street, R A

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Evaluation of Methods to Identify Boiler Air Inleakage Sources  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The information contained in this technical update report represents a first-of-a-kind study to evaluate different methods used to identify boiler air inleakage. The study begins to outline the cost and benefits of using those different methods in addition to describing their application. The collection and assemblage of this information will provide a reference for plant engineering and management personnel as their units experience the problems associated with boiler air inleakage. Through the use of t...

2011-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

284

Methods for characterizing, classifying, and identifying unknowns in samples  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a method for taking the data generated from an array of responses from a multichannel instrument, and determining the characteristics of a chemical in the sample without the necessity of calibrating or training the instrument with known samples containing the same chemical. The characteristics determined by the method are then used to classify and identify the chemical in the sample. The method can also be used to quantify the concentration of the chemical in the sample.

Grate, Jay W [West Richland, WA; Wise, Barry M [Manson, WA

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Removal of basic nitrogen compounds from hydrocarbon liquids  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is provided for reducing the concentration of basic nitrogen compounds in hydrocarbonaceous feedstock fluids used in the refining industry by providing a solid particulate carbonaceous adsorbent/fuel material such as coal having active basic nitrogen complexing sites on the surface thereof and the coal with a hydrocarbonaceous feedstock containing basic nitrogen compounds to facilitate attraction of the basic nitrogen compounds to the complexing sites and the formation of complexes thereof on the surface of the coal. The adsorbent coal material and the complexes formed thereon are from the feedstock fluid to provide a hydrocarbonaceous fluid of reduced basic nitrogen compound concentration. The coal can then be used as fuel for boilers and the like.

Givens, Edwin N. (Bethlehem, PA); Hoover, David S. (New Tripoli, PA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Electrochemically driven phase transformation in energy storage compounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nanoscale lithium transition metal phosphate olivines have become commercially important as positive electrode materials in a new generation of lithium-ion batteries. Not surprisingly, many energy storage compounds undergo ...

Gao, Yuhua

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Cocoa Butter and Related CompoundsChapter 3 Cocoa Polyphenols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cocoa Butter and Related Compounds Chapter 3 Cocoa Polyphenols Food Science Health Nutrition eChapters Food Science & Technology Health - Nutrition - Biochemistry 58E85136211F4F2A1FF657252FD1866B AOCS Press Downloadab

288

EVect of aromatic compounds on the production of laccase and ...  

J Ind Microbiol Biotechnol (2010) 37:10911096 DOI 10.1007/s10295-010-0757-y 123 ORIGINAL PAPER EVect of aromatic compounds on the production of ...

289

Lattice mismatched compound semiconductors and devices on silicon  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

III-V compound semiconductors, due to their superior electron mobility, are promising candidates for n-type metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs). However, the limited size of III-V substrates and ...

Yang, Li, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Compound Solar Technology CompSolar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Solar Technology CompSolar Jump to: navigation, search Name Compound Solar Technology (CompSolar) Place Jhunan, Taiwan Zip 350 Sector Solar Product Producer of glass-based...

291

Metastable, Single Crystalline Nanopillar Growth of III-V Compounds...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Metastable, Single Crystalline Nanopillar Growth of III-V Compounds on Lattice-Mismatched Substrates Speaker(s): Connie Chang-Hasnain Date: February 28, 2012 - 12:00pm Location:...

292

Low-Cost Phosphate Compounds Enhance Lithium Battery Performance  

Argonne National Laboratory has developed a series of inexpensive, electrochemically active phosphate compounds that are highly functional when used in high-power and high-energy lithium batteries.

293

Process for synthesizing compounds from elemental powders and product  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for synthesizing intermetallic compounds from elemental powders is described. The elemental powders are initially combined in a ratio which approximates the stoichiometric composition of the intermetallic compound. The mixed powders are then formed into a compact which is heat treated at a controlled rate of heating such that an exothermic reaction between the elements is initiated. The heat treatment may be performed under controlled conditions ranging from a vacuum (pressureless sintering) to compression (hot pressing) to produce a desired densification of the intermetallic compound. In a preferred form of the invention, elemental powders of Fe and Al are combined to form aluminide compounds of Fe[sub 3] Al and FeAl. 25 figures.

Rabin, B.H.; Wright, R.N.

1993-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

294

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Hurwitz, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Hurwitz, Et Al., Compound and Elemental Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Hurwitz, Et Al., 2007) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Yellowstone Region (Hurwitz, Et Al., 2007) Exploration Activity Details Location Yellowstone Caldera Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes In this paper, we present and evaluate a chemical dataset that includes the concentrations and fluxes of HCO3_, SO42_, Cl_, and F_ in rivers draining YNP for the 2002-2004 water years (1 October 2001 - 30 September 2004). These solutes were chosen because they are likely derived in part, from the magmatic volatiles CO2, SO2, H2S, HCl, HF (Symonds et al., 2001). Weekly to

295

Device for aqueous detection of nitro-aromatic compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a compact and portable detection apparatus for nitro-aromatic based chemical compounds, such as nitrotoluenes, dinitrotoluenes, and trinitrotoluene (TNT). The apparatus is based upon the use of fiber optics using filtered light. The preferred process of the invention relies upon a reflective chemical sensor and optical and electronic components to monitor a decrease in fluorescence when the nitro-aromatic molecules in aqueous solution combine and react with a fluorescent polycyclic aromatic compound. 4 figures.

Reagen, W.K.; Schulz, A.L.; Ingram, J.C.; Lancaster, G.D.; Grey, A.E.

1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

296

Anion receptor compounds for non-aqueous electrolytes  

SciTech Connect

A new family of aza-ether based compounds including linear, multi-branched and aza-crown ethers is provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the new family of aza-ether based compounds acts as neutral receptors to complex the anion moiety of the electrolyte salt thereby increasing the conductivity and the transference number of LI.sup.+ ion in alkali metal batteries.

Lee, Hung Sui (East Setauket, NY); Yang, Xiao-Oing (Port Jefferson Station, NY); McBreen, James (Bellport, NY)

2000-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

297

Chromium (V) compounds as cathode material in electrochemical power sources  

SciTech Connect

A cathode for use in a thermal battery, comprising a chromium (V) compound. The preferred materials for this use are Ca.sub.5 (CrO.sub.4).sub.3 Cl, Ca.sub.5 (CrO.sub.4).sub.3 OH, and Cr.sub.2 O.sub.5. The chromium (V) compound can be employed as a cathode material in ambient temperature batteries when blended with a suitably conductive filler, preferably carbon black.

Delnick, Frank M. (Albuquerque, NM); Guidotti, Ronald A. (Albuquerque, NM); McCarthy, David K. (Albuquerque, NM)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

298

Process for reducing organic compounds with calcium, amine, and alcohol  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Olefins are produced by contacting an organic compound having at least one benzene ring with calcium metal, ethylenediamine, a low molecular weight aliphatic alcohol, and optionally a low molecular weight aliphatic primary amine, and/or an inert, abrasive particulate substance. The reduction is conducted at temperatures ranging from about -10.degree. C. to about 30.degree. C. or somewhat higher. Substantially all of the organic compounds are converted to corresponding cyclic olefins, primarily diolefins.

Benkeser, Robert A. (West Lafayette, IN); Laugal, James A. (Lostant, IL); Rappa, Angela (Baltimore, MD)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Process for reducing organic compounds with calcium, amine, and alcohol  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Olefins are produced by contacting an organic compound having at least one benzene ring with calcium metal, ethylenediamine, a low molecular weight aliphatic alcohol, and optionally a low molecular weight aliphatic primary amine, and/or an inert, abrasive particulate substance. The reduction is conducted at temperatures ranging from about [minus]10 C to about 30 C or somewhat higher. Substantially all of the organic compounds are converted to corresponding cyclic olefins, primarily diolefins.

Benkeser, R.A.; Laugal, J.A.; Rappa, A.

1985-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

300

Identifying Fracture Types and Relative Ages Using Fluid Inclusion Stratigraphy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) are designed to recover heat from the subsurface by mechanically creating fractures in subsurface rocks. Understanding the life cycle of a fracture in a geothermal system is fundamental to the development of techniques for creating fractures. Recognizing the stage of a fracture, whether it is currently open and transmitting fluids; if it recently has closed; or if it is an ancient fracture would assist in targeting areas for further fracture stimulation. Identifying dense fracture areas as well as large open fractures from small fracture systems will also assist in fracture stimulation selection. Geothermal systems are constantly generating fractures, and fluids and gases passing through rocks in these systems leave small fluid and gas samples trapped in healed microfractures. Fluid inclusions trapped in minerals as the fractures heal are characteristic of the fluids that formed them, and this signature can be seen in fluid inclusion gas analysis. Our hypothesis is that fractures over their life cycle have different chemical signatures that we can see in fluid inclusion gas analysis and by using the new method of fluid inclusion stratigraphy (FIS) the different stages of fractures, along with an estimate of fracture size can be identified during the well drilling process. We have shown with this study that it is possible to identify fracture locations using FIS and that different fractures have different chemical signatures however that signature is somewhat dependent upon rock type. Open, active fractures correlate with increase concentrations of CO2, N2, Ar, and to a lesser extent H2O. These fractures would be targets for further enhancement. The usefulness of this method is that it is low cost alternative to current well logging techniques and can be done as a well is being drilled.

Dilley, Lorie M.; Norman, David; Owens, Lara

2008-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identified compound tic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Portable data collection device with self identifying probe  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention provides a portable data collection device that has a variety of sensors that are interchangeable with a variety of input ports in the device. The various sensors include a data identification feature that provides information to the device regarding the type of physical data produced by each sensor and therefore the type of sensor itself. The data identification feature enables the device to locate the input port where the sensor is connected and self adjust when a sensor is removed or replaced. The device is able to collect physical data, whether or not a function of time. The sensor may also store a unique sensor identifier.

French, Patrick D. (Aurora, CO)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Identifying Critical Pathways to High-Performance PV: Preprint  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This conference paper describes the High-Performance Photovoltaic (HiPerf PV)Project was initiated by the U.S. Department of Energy to substantially increase the viability of photovoltaics (PV) for cost-competitive applications so that PV can contribute significantly to our energy supply and our environment in the 21st century. To accomplish this, the NCPV directs in-house and subcontracted research in high-performance polycrystalline thin-film and multijunction concentrator devices. Details of the subcontractor and in-house progress will be described toward identifying critical pathways of 25% polycrystalline thin-film tandem cells and developing multijunction concentrator modules to 33%.

Symko-Davies, M.; Noufi, R.; Kurtz, S.

2002-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Identifying Reference Objects by Hierarchical Clustering in Java Environment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently Java programming environment has become so popular. Java programming language is a language that is designed to be portable enough to be executed in wide range of computers ranging from cell phones to supercomputers. Computer programs written in Java are compiled into Java Byte code instructions that are suitable for execution by a Java Virtual Machine implementation. Java virtual Machine is commonly implemented in software by means of an interpreter for the Java Virtual Machine instruction set. As an object oriented language, Java utilizes the concept of objects. Our idea is to identify the candidate objects' references in a Java environment through hierarchical cluster analysis using reference stack and execution stack.

Saha, Rahul

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

A Methodology for Identifying Retrofit Energy Savings in Commercial Buildings  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Measured energy savings resulting from energy conservation retrofits in commercial buildings can be used to verify the success of the retrofits, determine the payment schedule for the retrofits, and guide the selection of future retrofits. This paper presents a structured methodology, developed for buildings in the Texas LoanSTAR program, for measuring retrofit savings in commercial buildings. This methodology identifies the pre-retrofit construction and post-retrofit periods, normalizes energy consumption data, and quantifies the uncertainty associated with the measured savings. A case study from the Texas LoanSTAR program is presented as an example.

Kissock, K.; Reddy, A.; Claridge, D.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Apparatus for controlling system state based on unique identifiers  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus allows workers to assert and release control over the energization of a system. The apparatus does not require the workers to carry any additional paraphernalia, and is not be easily defeated by other workers. Users asserting and releasing control present tokens uniquely identifying each user to a reader, and the apparatus prevents transition of the system to an undesired state until an appropriate number of users are currently asserting control. For example, a dangerous manufacturing robot can be prevented from energizing until all the users that have asserted control when entering the robot's controlled space have subsequently released control when leaving the robot's controlled space.

Drotning, William D. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Identifying the unknown circuit breaker statuses in power networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes an approach by which the circuit breaker status errors can be detected and identified in the presence of analog measurement errors. This is accomplished by using the least absolute value (LAV) state estimation method and applying the previously suggested two stage estimation approach. The ability of the LAV estimators to reject inconsistent measurements, is exploited in order to differentiate between circuit breaker status and analog measurement errors. The first stage of estimation uses a bus level network model as in conventional LAV estimators. Results of Stage 1 are used to draw a set of suspect buses whose substation configurations may be erroneous. In the second stage, the identified buses are modeled in detail using the bus sections and the circuit breaker models while keeping the bus level network models for the rest of the system. The LAV estimation is repeated for the expanded system model and any remaining significant normalized residuals are flagged as bad analog measurements, while the correct topology is determined based on the estimated flows through the modeled circuit breakers in the substations. The proposed approach is implemented and tested. Simulation results for cases involving circuit breaker status and/or analog measurement errors are provided.

Abur, A.; Kim, H. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Celik, M.K. [Celik (Mehmet K.), San Francisco, CA (United States)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Exome sequencing identifies recurrent somatic RAC1 mutations in melanoma  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We characterized the mutational landscape of melanoma, the form of skin cancer with the highest mortality rate, by sequencing the exomes of 147 melanomas. Sun-exposed melanomas had markedly more ultraviolet (UV)-like C>T somatic mutations compared to sun-shielded acral, mucosal and uveal melanomas. Among the newly identified cancer genes was PPP6C, encoding a serine/threonine phosphatase, which harbored mutations that clustered in the active site in 12% of sun-exposed melanomas, exclusively in tumors with mutations in BRAF or NRAS. Notably, we identified a recurrent UV-signature, an activating mutation in RAC1 in 9.2% of sun-exposed melanomas. This activating mutation, the third most frequent in our cohort of sun-exposed melanoma after those of BRAF and NRAS, changes Pro29 to serine (RAC1{sup P29S}) in the highly conserved switch I domain. Crystal structures, and biochemical and functional studies of RAC1{sup P29S} showed that the alteration releases the conformational restraint conferred by the conserved proline, causes an increased binding of the protein to downstream effectors, and promotes melanocyte proliferation and migration. These findings raise the possibility that pharmacological inhibition of downstream effectors of RAC1 signaling could be of therapeutic benefit.

Krauthammer, Michael; Kong, Yong; Ha, Byung Hak; Evans, Perry; Bacchiocchi, Antonella; McCusker, James P.; Cheng, Elaine; Davis, Matthew J.; Goh, Gerald; Choi, Murim; Ariyan, Stephan; Narayan, Deepak; Dutton-Regester, Ken; Capatana, Ana; Holman, Edna C.; Bosenberg, Marcus; Sznol, Mario; Kluger, Harriet M.; Brash, Douglas E.; Stern, David F.; Materin, Miguel A.; Lo, Roger S.; Mane, Shrikant; Ma, Shuangge; Kidd, Kenneth K.; Hayward, Nicholas K.; Lifton, Richard P.; Schlessinger, Joseph; Boggon, Titus J.; Halaban, Ruth (Yale-MED); (UCLA); (Queens)

2012-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

308

X-rays structural analysis and thermal stability studies of the ternary compound {alpha}-AlFeSi  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From literature data presently available, the decomposition temperature and the nature of the decomposition reaction of the ternary compound {alpha}-AlFeSi (also designated as {alpha}{sub H} or {tau}{sub 5}) are not clearly identified. Moreover, some uncertainties remain concerning its crystal structure. The crystallographic structure and thermochemical behaviour of the ternary compound {alpha}-AlFeSi were meticulously studied. The crystal structure of {alpha}-AlFeSi was examined at room temperature from X-ray single crystal intensity data. It presents hexagonal symmetry, space group P6{sub 3}/mmc with unit cell parameters (293 K) a=12.345(2) A and c=26.210(3) A (V=3459 A{sup 3}). The average chemical formula obtained from refinement is Al{sub 7.1}Fe{sub 2}Si. From isothermal reaction-diffusion experiments and Differential Thermal Analysis, the title compound decomposes peritectically upon heating into {theta}-Fe{sub 4}Al{sub 13}(Si), {gamma}-Al{sub 3}FeSi and a ternary Al-rich liquid. Under atmospheric pressure, the temperature of this reversible transformation has been determined to be 772{+-}12 {sup o}C. -- Graphical abstract: Partial representation of the crystal structure of the {alpha}-Al{sub 7.1}Fe{sub 2}Si compound. Display Omitted Highlights: The main findings of our work are: {yields} a detailed X-rays crystal structure determination of the ternary compound {alpha}-AlFeSi. {yields} The precision of the silicon atoms positions in the crystal structure. {yields} A precised determination of the decomposition temperature of this compound.

Roger, J., E-mail: jerome.roger@univ-lyon1.f [Laboratoire des Multimateriaux et Interfaces, UMR CNRS no. 5615, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Bosselet, F.; Viala, J.C. [Laboratoire des Multimateriaux et Interfaces, UMR CNRS no. 5615, Universite Claude Bernard Lyon 1, F-69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

309

Total phenolic compounds and free phenol in softwood structural plywood  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Construction-grade plywood panels manufactured at five plywood mills were analyzed for total phenolic compounds and free phenol detection. Small samples of plywood were ground plywood samples were also analyzed for total phenolic compounds by a distillation-colorimetric method. The range of total phenolic compounds was 6.8 to 25.3 mg/kg and the range of free phenol was 0.090 to 0.73 mg/kg. The sources of phenolic compounds in plywood are wood components, the phenol-formaldehyde resin adhesive, and the ligno-cellulosic adhesive fillers. The source of free phenol in structural plywood is presumably the phenol-formaldehyde resin adhesive. The extraction procedures used in this study were extreme and are not typical for plywood in service. Yet the levels of phenolic compounds and free phenol detected were so low that they most often were beyond the quantitative accuracy of the test methods and instruments, requiring extrapolative techniques. The low levels are supportive of the fact that structural wood composites bonded with phenol-formaldehyde resins have been found to be very safe environmentally for multiple uses.

Tiedeman, G.T.; Isaacson, R.L. (Weyerhaeuser Co., Tacoma, WA (United States)); Sellers, T. Jr. (Mississippi Forest Products Lab., Mississippi State, MS (United States))

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Identify Strategies to Reduce Business Travel for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Strategies to Reduce Business Travel for Greenhouse Gas Strategies to Reduce Business Travel for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Identify Strategies to Reduce Business Travel for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation October 7, 2013 - 1:34pm Addthis YOU ARE HERE The tables below illustrate some of the more common strategies that can enable employees to travel less and travel more efficiently for business. The "Purpose of Travel" analysis in the previous step can be used with the guidance below to help determine what type of trips may be most appropriately substituted with each business travel alternative. Table 1. Strategies that Enable Employees to Travel Less Business Travel Strategy Best Potential Application Best Practices Web meetings/webinars, including option for video Purpose of travel: training, conferences.

311

Identify types of development and climate impacts that are country  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

source source History View New Pages Recent Changes All Special Pages Semantic Search/Querying Get Involved Help Apps Datasets Community Login | Sign Up Search Page Edit History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Identify types of development and climate impacts that are country priorities Jump to: navigation, search Stage 3 LEDS Home Introduction to Framework Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities Develop_BAU Stage 4: Prioritizing and Planning for Actions Begin execution of implementation plans 1.0. Organizing the LEDS Process 1.1. Institutional Structure for LEDS 1.2. Workplan to Develop the LEDS 1.3. Roles and responsibilities to develop LEDS 2.1. Assess current country plans, policies, practices, and capacities 2.2. Compile lessons learned and good practices from ongoing and

312

Identify Petroleum Reduction Strategies for Vehicles and Mobile Equipment |  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Petroleum Reduction Strategies for Vehicles and Mobile Petroleum Reduction Strategies for Vehicles and Mobile Equipment Identify Petroleum Reduction Strategies for Vehicles and Mobile Equipment October 7, 2013 - 11:50am Addthis YOU ARE HERE: Step 3 As defined by the Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP), greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction strategies for Federal vehicles and equipment are based on the three driving principles of petroleum reduction: Reduce vehicle miles traveled Improve fuel efficiency Use alternative fuels. These strategies provide a framework for an agency to use when developing a strategic plan that can be specifically tailored to match the agency's fleet profile and meet its mission. Agency fleet managers should evaluate petroleum reduction strategies and tactics for each fleet location, based on an evaluation of site-specific

313

Microsoft Word - IDENTIFY AND PROTECT YOUR VITAL RECORDS  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

I I I D D E E N N T T I I F F Y Y A A N N D D P P R R O O T T E E C C T T Y Y O O U U R R V V I I T T A A L L R R E E C C O O R R D D S S July 2010 Records Management Division Office of IT Planning, Architecture, and E-Government Office of the Chief Information Officer 2 INTRODUCTION Each Federal agency is responsible for establishing a Vital Records Program for the identification and protection of those records needed for continuity of operations before, during, and after emergencies; and those records needed to protect the legal and financial rights of the Government and persons affected by Government activities. This means identifying, safeguarding, and having readily available documents, databases, and information systems that support an organization's performance of its essential functions

314

GAMQUEST, a Computer Program to Identify Gamma Rays  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GAMQUEST GAMQUEST A Computer Program to Identify Gamma Rays Edgardo Browne, Nuclear Science Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 EBROWNE@LBL.Gov Table of Contents Introduction. Program Access and Output Files. How to Run GAMQUEST. From Individual Accounts. From Guest Account. Gamma-Ray Data. GAMQUEST, a Tool for Applied Research. Searching Strategies. Examples. Neutron Activation Analysis. Gamma-Ray Spectrum Between 100 and 800 keV. Gamma-Ray Spectrum Between 800 and 1600 keV. A List of X Rays and Gamma Rays from the Decay of 192Ir (74 hr). Run GAMQUEST from Guest Account Acknowledgments. References. 1. Introduction. The characteristic energies and intensities of gamma rays emitted by radioactive isotopes are commonly used as fingerprints for isotope

315

Identifying Event Impacts by Monitoring the News Media  

SciTech Connect

Assessing the potential property and social impacts of an event, such as tornado or wildfire, continues to be a challenging research area. From financial markets to disaster management to epidemiology, the importance of understanding the impacts that events create cannot be understated. Our work describes an approach to fuse information from multiple sources, then to analyze the information cycles to identify prior temporal patterns related to the impact of an event. This approach is then applied to the analysis of news reports from multiple news sources pertaining to several different natural disasters. Results show that our approach can project the severity of the impacts of certain natural disasters, such as heat waves on droughts and wild fires. In addition, results show that specific types of disaster consistently produce similar impacts when each time they occur.

Patton, Robert M [ORNL; Potok, Thomas E [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Identify Institutional Change Roles for Sustainability | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Roles for Sustainability Roles for Sustainability Identify Institutional Change Roles for Sustainability October 8, 2013 - 11:47am Addthis Example of How Roles Affect Sustainability Goals The following scenario is an example of how roles can affect the implementation of a sustainability goal despite best intentions. Policymakers mandate waste reduction. A waste manager determines that a solution is to recycle more. No one notices that the staff responsible for implementing the solution forgets to order enough recycling bins for a building. Office workers continue to put recyclable material in the trash instead of a recycling bin. Janitorial staff members don't have the time to sort the recyclable material from the trash. Municipal waste personnel dump recyclable material in a landfill. Lesson: It is important that action plans

317

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Central Nevada Compound and Elemental Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being conducted using the new geochemical data. Objectives changed slightly in

318

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Chipera,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Et Al., 2008) Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Redondo Area (Chipera, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Redondo Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes X-Ray Diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy, and Electron Microprobe. References Steve J. Chipera, Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Goff, Melissa Fittipaldo (2008) Zeolitization Of Intracaldera Sediments And Rhyolitic Rocks In The 1.25 Ma Lake Of Valles Caldera, New Mexico, Usa Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Compound_and_Elemental_Analysis_At_Valles_Caldera_-_Redondo_Area_(Chipera,_Et_Al.,_2008)&oldid=510462

319

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Area Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells. References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long Valley And Other Geothermal Systems Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Compound_and_Elemental_Analysis_At_Valles_Caldera_-_Sulphur_Springs_Area_(Goff_%26_Janik,_2002)&oldid=510466

320

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area (Grigsby, Et Al., 1983) Exploration Activity Details Location Fenton Hill Hdr Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References C. O. Grigsby, J. W. Tester, P. E. Trujillo, D. A. Counce, J. Abbott, C. E. Holley, L. A. Blatz (1983) Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Compound_and_Elemental_Analysis_At_Fenton_Hill_Hdr_Geothermal_Area_(Grigsby,_Et_Al.,_1983)&oldid=511285

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identified compound tic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

LANL researchers improve path to producing uranium compounds, candidates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Researchers improve path to producing uranium compounds Researchers improve path to producing uranium compounds LANL researchers improve path to producing uranium compounds, candidates for advanced nuclear fuels Enhance the ability to develop advanced nuclear fuels in a safer, simpler manner. April 7, 2011 This illustration shows the structures of UI4(1,4-dioxane)2 (left) and the UI3(1,4-dioxane)1.5 complexes. This illustration shows the structures of UI4(1,4-dioxane)2 (left) and the UI3(1,4-dioxane)1.5 complexes. Contact Kevin Roark Communicatons Office (505) 665-9202 Email LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, April 7, 2010- Advances made by researchers at Los Alamos National Laboratory could enhance the ability of scientists to develop advanced nuclear fuels in a safer, simpler manner. Uranium chemistry research relies heavily on a variety of uranium "starting

322

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Dixie Valley Compound and Elemental Analysis At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley and Beowawe fields in Nevada; 5) Palinpiiion, the Philippines; 6) the Salton Sea and Heber geothermal fields of southern California; and 7) the

323

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Et Al., 2008) Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (Chipera, Et Al., 2008) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes X-Ray Diffraction, Scanning Electron Microscopy, and Electron Microprobe. References Steve J. Chipera, Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Goff, Melissa Fittipaldo (2008) Zeolitization Of Intracaldera Sediments And Rhyolitic Rocks In The 1.25 Ma Lake Of Valles Caldera, New Mexico, Usa Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Compound_and_Elemental_Analysis_At_Valles_Caldera_-_Sulphur_Springs_Area_(Chipera,_Et_Al.,_2008)&oldid=51046

324

SOME AB$sub 3$ COMPOUNDS OF THE TRANSITION METALS  

SciTech Connect

Crystal structure data for fifteen AB/sub 3/ compounds of the transition metals were studied. The alloys were made by arc melting 3 to 5 of the elements in a water-cooled copper crucible. AB/sub 3/ compounds with the Cu/sub 3/Au- structure, Ll/sub 2/, space group Pm/sub 3/m included: ScRh/sub 3/, ScPd/sub 3/, ScPt/sub 3/, YPd/sub 3/, YPt/sub 3/, LaPd/sub 3/, HoPd/sub 3/, HoPt/sub 3/, ThRh/ sub 3/, URh/sub 3/, and Ulr/sub 3/. AB /sub 3/ compounds with close-packed ordered structures included ThPd/sub 3/, VPd/sub 3/, VPt/sub 3/, and HfAl/sub 3/. (M.C.G.)

Dwight, A.E.; Downey, J.W.; Conner, R.A. Jr.

1961-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

325

Low work function, stable compound clusters and generation process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Low work function, stable compound clusters are generated by co-evaporation of a solid semiconductor (i.e., Si) and alkali metal (i.e., Cs) elements in an oxygen environment. The compound clusters are easily patterned during deposition on substrate surfaces using a conventional photo-resist technique. The cluster size distribution is narrow, with a peak range of angstroms to nanometers depending on the oxygen pressure and the Si source temperature. Tests have shown that compound clusters when deposited on a carbon substrate contain the desired low work function property and are stable up to 600.degree. C. Using the patterned cluster containing plate as a cathode baseplate and a faceplate covered with phosphor as an anode, one can apply a positive bias to the faceplate to easily extract electrons and obtain illumination.

Dinh, Long N. (Concord, CA); Balooch, Mehdi (Berkeley, CA); Schildbach, Marcus A. (Livermore, CA); Hamza, Alex V. (Livermore, CA); McLean, II, William (Oakland, CA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Aromatic nitrogen compounds in fossil fuels: a potential hazard  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

To achieve energy independence in the United States, converting coal to oil or extracting oil from shale will be required. Before commercial scale fossil fuel conversion facilities become a reality, chemical and biological studies of currently available synfuel samples derived from coal or shale are urgently needed in order to determine what the potential health problems, such as from occupational exposure, might be. Aromatic nitrogen compounds such as basic aza-arenes, neutral aza-arenes, and aromatic amines are considered environmentally important and several members of these classes of compounds possess biological activity. For example, dibenz(a,h)acridine, 7 H-dibenzo(c,g)carbazole, and 2-naphthylamine, are well known as carcinogens. The methods used to isolate the basic aromatic nitrogen compounds and neutral aza-arenes from one shale oil and one coal-derived oil are discussed. The mutagenic activities of these fractions, based on the Ames Salmonella typhimurium test, are compared.

Ho, C H; Clark, B R; Guerin, M R; Ma, C Y; Rao, T K

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Performance Analysis: Work Control Events Identified January - August 2010  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This performance analysis evaluated 24 events that occurred at LLNL from January through August 2010. The analysis identified areas of potential work control process and/or implementation weaknesses and several common underlying causes. Human performance improvement and safety culture factors were part of the causal analysis of each event and were analyzed. The collective significance of all events in 2010, as measured by the occurrence reporting significance category and by the proportion of events that have been reported to the DOE ORPS under the ''management concerns'' reporting criteria, does not appear to have increased in 2010. The frequency of reporting in each of the significance categories has not changed in 2010 compared to the previous four years. There is no change indicating a trend in the significance category and there has been no increase in the proportion of occurrences reported in the higher significance category. Also, the frequency of events, 42 events reported through August 2010, is not greater than in previous years and is below the average of 63 occurrences per year at LLNL since 2006. Over the previous four years, an average of 43% of the LLNL's reported occurrences have been reported as either ''management concerns'' or ''near misses.'' In 2010, 29% of the occurrences have been reported as ''management concerns'' or ''near misses.'' This rate indicates that LLNL is now reporting fewer ''management concern'' and ''near miss'' occurrences compared to the previous four years. From 2008 to the present, LLNL senior management has undertaken a series of initiatives to strengthen the work planning and control system with the primary objective to improve worker safety. In 2008, the LLNL Deputy Director established the Work Control Integrated Project Team to develop the core requirements and graded elements of an institutional work planning and control system. By the end of that year this system was documented and implementation had begun. In 2009, training of the workforce began and as of the time of this report more than 50% of authorized Integration Work Sheets (IWS) use the activity-based planning process. In 2010, LSO independently reviewed the work planning and control process and confirmed to the Laboratory that the Integrated Safety Management (ISM) System was implemented. LLNL conducted a cross-directorate management self-assessment of work planning and control and is developing actions to respond to the issues identified. Ongoing efforts to strengthen the work planning and control process and to improve the quality of LLNL work packages are in progress: completion of remaining actions in response to the 2009 DOE Office of Health, Safety, and Security (HSS) evaluation of LLNL's ISM System; scheduling more than 14 work planning and control self-assessments in FY11; continuing to align subcontractor work control with the Institutional work planning and control system; and continuing to maintain the electronic IWS application. The 24 events included in this analysis were caused by errors in the first four of the five ISMS functions. The most frequent cause was errors in analyzing the hazards (Function 2). The second most frequent cause was errors occurring when defining the work (Function 1), followed by errors during the performance of work (Function 4). Interestingly, very few errors in developing controls (Function 3) resulted in events. This leads one to conclude that if improvements are made to defining the scope of work and analyzing the potential hazards, LLNL may reduce the frequency or severity of events. Analysis of the 24 events resulted in the identification of ten common causes. Some events had multiple causes, resulting in the mention of 39 causes being identified for the 24 events. The most frequent cause was workers, supervisors, or experts believing they understood the work and the hazards but their understanding was incomplete. The second most frequent cause was unclear, incomplete or confusing documents directing the work. Together, these two causes were mentioned 17 times and co

De Grange, C E; Freeman, J W; Kerr, C E; Holman, G; Marsh, K; Beach, R

2011-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

328

Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area, Indonesia  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Indonesia Indonesia (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area Indonesia (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area Indonesia Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Improving Exploration Models of Andesite-Hosted Geothermal Systems, Allis, Browne, Bruton, Christensen, Hulen, Lutz, Mindenhall, Nemcok, Norman, Powell and Stimac. The approach we are using is to characterize the petrology, geochemistry and fractures in core and cuttings samples and then integrate these data with measured downhole temperatures and pressures and with the compositions of the reservoir fluids. Our investigations represent

329

Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area, Mexico  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mexico Mexico (Norman & Moore, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area Mexico (Norman & Moore, 2004) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area Mexico Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes Our examination of Cerro Prieto gas analyses indicates that the geothermal system structure is changing with time. Gas data routinely measured in most geothermal fields; hence fluid-flow plots as presented here can be accomplished with little cost. Gas analytical data, therefore, are useful in developing management procedures for geothermal fields characterized by

330

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Northern Basin & Range Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

(Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Northern Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Northern Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "This second paper provides more detailed documentation on water and rock geochemistries and describes diagnostic major and trace element ratios and concentrations that can be used to distinguish tufa columns formed from thermal waters from those that formed from non-thermal waters." "In addition to providing a potentially diagnostic lithogeochemical tool for

331

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1992) 1992) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area (White, Et Al., 1992) Exploration Activity Details Location Valles Caldera - Sulphur Springs Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Used various geochemical techniques to obtain data from which information regarding mass transfer rates. This then led to conclucions of the history/evolution of the geothermal system. Unclear whether useful for exploration purposes. References Art F. White, Nancy J. Chuma, Fraser Goff (1992) Mass Transfer Constraints On The Chemical Evolution Of An Active Hydrothermal System, Valles Caldera, New Mexico

332

On superconductivity of high-spin transition metal compounds  

SciTech Connect

The possibility of Cooper instability in transition metal compounds is established based of the concept of the strong interaction in the same unit cell. The multicomponent scattering amplitude of excitations is calculated. The superconductivity equations are derived for compounds of 3d transition metals. It is shown that in the pole approximation, the superconductivity equations can be reduced to the multicomponent superconductivity equations with preset BCS constants. A method is developed for calculating one-orbital constants and constants with different orbitals as functions of the total spin. The concentration ranges of superconducting ordering are obtained for one-orbital equations.

Zaitsev, R. O., E-mail: Zaitsev_rogdai@mail.ru [Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University) (Russian Federation)

2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

333

Finding New Thermoelectric Compounds Using Crystallographic Data: Atomic Displacement Parameters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new structure-property relationship is discussed which links atomic displacement parameters (ADPs) and the lattice thermal conductivity of clathrate-like compounds. For many clathrate-like compounds, in which one of the atom types is weakly bound and ''rattles'' within its atomic cage, room temperature ADP information can be used to estimate the room temperature lattice thermal conductivity, the vibration frequency of the ''rattler'', and the temperature dependence of the heat capacity. Neutron data and X-ray crystallography data, reported in the literature, are used to apply this analysis to several promising classes of thermoelectric materials.

Chakoumakos, B.C.; Mandrus, D.G.; Sales, B.C.; Sharp, J.W.

1999-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

334

Natural convective studies within a compound parabolic concentrator enclosure  

SciTech Connect

The contribution due to natural convection within a compound parabolic concentrator enclosure has been experimentally determined. These studies have been conducted within a truncated compound parabolic concentrator having a concentration ratio of 4, a receiver width of 3.175 cm, and a length of 244.0 cm. The receiver was heated electrically while the aperture was provided with a duct that was cooled by water. The limbs of the collector were fabricated from aluminum. Temperatures were directly obtained with copper constantan thermocouples located throughout the entire enclosure and provided the basis needed to calculate the different modes of heat transfer. The constant heat flux

Tatara, R.A.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Identifying failure in a tree network of a parallel computer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods, parallel computers, and products are provided for identifying failure in a tree network of a parallel computer. The parallel computer includes one or more processing sets including an I/O node and a plurality of compute nodes. For each processing set embodiments include selecting a set of test compute nodes, the test compute nodes being a subset of the compute nodes of the processing set; measuring the performance of the I/O node of the processing set; measuring the performance of the selected set of test compute nodes; calculating a current test value in dependence upon the measured performance of the I/O node of the processing set, the measured performance of the set of test compute nodes, and a predetermined value for I/O node performance; and comparing the current test value with a predetermined tree performance threshold. If the current test value is below the predetermined tree performance threshold, embodiments include selecting another set of test compute nodes. If the current test value is not below the predetermined tree performance threshold, embodiments include selecting from the test compute nodes one or more potential problem nodes and testing individually potential problem nodes and links to potential problem nodes.

Archer, Charles J. (Rochester, MN); Pinnow, Kurt W. (Rochester, MN); Wallenfelt, Brian P. (Eden Prairie, MN)

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

336

Identified By: NRC Item Type: NCV NonCited Violation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Inadequate measures to assure that accurate and conservative values were used to establish second level undervoltage relay setpoint. The measures established by the licensee for the translation of design requirements were not adequate to assure that the values used to establish the second level undervoltage relay setpoint were accurate and conservative with respect to the technical specifications. In addition, the measures for promptly identifying and correcting the adverse condition were not adequate as demonstrated by the length of time this condition has existed (since 1987). The failure to accurately translate design requirements was a violation of Criterion III of Appendix B to 10 CFR Part 50, and the untimely corrective actions was a violation of Criterion XVI of Appendix B to 10 CFR Part 50. This violation is noncited in accordance with Section VI.A of NRC's Enforcement Policy, and is in the licensee's corrective action program (Notification 10092429). (Section 1R21.5.b.1.) The finding was of very low safety significance because, although the calculated values were not conservative and were not consistent with the technical specification values, there were administrative procedures in place to prevent exceeding the correct analytical limit. Additionally, there was no actual loss of safety function.

unknown authors

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Multistate Outbreak of Fungal Infection Associated with Injection of Methylprednisolone Acetate Solution from a Single Compounding Pharmacy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

was alerted by a clinician regarding a patient with cultureconfirmed Aspergillus fumigatus meningitis diagnosed 46 days after epidural steroid injection at a Tennessee ambulatory surgical center. By September 27, the initial investigation, carried out by the Tennessee Department of Health in collaboration with CDC and the North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, had identified an additional eight patients with clinically diagnosed, culture-negative meningitis: seven in Tennessee and one in North Carolina. All nine patients had received epidural steroid injection with preservative-free methylprednisolone acetate solution (MPA), compounded at New England Compounding Center (NECC) in Framingham, Massachusetts. All nine patients had received one or more injections from three lots of MPA (lot numbers 05212012@68;

unknown authors

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Identifying Energy-Efficient Concurrency Levels using Machine Learning  

SciTech Connect

Multicore microprocessors have been largely motivated by the diminishing returns in performance and the increased power consumption of single-threaded ILP microprocessors. With the industry already shifting from multicore to many-core microprocessors, software developers must extract more thread-level parallelism from applications. Unfortunately, low power-efficiency and diminishing returns in performance remain major obstacles with many cores. Poor interaction between software and hardware, and bottlenecks in shared hardware structures often prevent scaling to many cores, even in applications where a high degree of parallelism is potentially available. In some cases, throwing additional cores at a problem may actually harm performance and increase power consumption. Better use of otherwise limitedly beneficial cores by software components such as hypervisors and operating systems can improve system-wide performance and reliability, even in cases where power consumption is not a main concern. In response to these observations, we evaluate an approach to throttle concurrency in parallel programs dynamically. We throttle concurrency to levels with higher predicted efficiency from both performance and energy standpoints, and we do so via machine learning, specifically artificial neural networks (ANNs). One advantage of using ANNs over similar techniques previously explored is that the training phase is greatly simplified, thereby reducing the burden on the end user. Using machine learning in the context of concurrency throttling is novel. We show that ANNs are effective for identifying energy-efficient concurrency levels in multithreaded scientific applications, and we do so using physical experimentation on a state-of-the-art quad-core Xeon platform.

Curtis-Maury, M; Singh, K; Blagojevic, F; Nikolopoulos, D S; de Supinski, B R; Schulz, M; McKee, S A

2007-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

339

X-ray diffraction data for plutonium compounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work is a compilation of x-ray diffraction information relating to powder photographs of plutonium compounds. The information is presented in a format and style substantially as recommended by the International Centre for Diffraction Data. The Los Alamos National Laboratory has been very much involved in the study of the properties of plutonium and its compounds. During the past 45 years the Powder Diffraction File of the Laboratory has grown to more than 20,000 films. F.H. Ellinger and his coworkers have used this data to establish a large number of plutonium binary phase diagrams. A phase diagram, however, should never be regarded as really complete as new techniques of alloy preparation or x-ray and optical metallography continually discover new phases that must be incorporated in the diagram. In addition to the phase diagrams, the crystal structure of a number of plutonium intermetallic compounds have been determined at Los Alamos. Due to the importance of plutonium as a representative of the actinide series of elements, it is deemed advisable to have available information on the x-ray diffraction of plutonium and its compounds for the purpose of identification of these materials. It is hoped that the information presented here will be of value in this regard.

Roof, R.B.

1989-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

RADIOLYSIS OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS IN THE ADSORBED STATE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

>A method of forming branch chained hydrocarbons by means of energetic penetrating radiation is described. A solid zeolite substrate is admixed with a cobalt ion and is irradiated with a hydrocarbon adsorbed therein. Upon irradiation with gamma rays, there is an increased yield of branched and lower molecular straight chain compounds. (AEC)

Sutherland, J.W.; Allen, A.O.

1961-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identified compound tic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Polymerizable 2(2-hydroxynaphthyl)2H-benzotriazole compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Benzotriazole compounds having the formula: ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1 is H, Cl, or OCH.sub.3 ; R.sub.2 is a hydroxynaphthyl group; and R.sub.3 is a vinyl unsaturated polymerizable group. Homopolymers or copolymers thereof are effective as UV light stabilizers and absorbers.

Gomez, P.M.; Neidlinger, H.H.

1991-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

342

Prerequisites for a comprehensive dictionary of serbian compounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper describes the steps that were undertaken in order to start the production of a comprehensive morphological dictionary of compounds for Serbian. First, the classes of multi-word expressions were determined that were to be covered by the dictionaries. ...

Cvetana Krstev; Duko Vitas; Agata Savary

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

An algebra for specifying valid compound terms in faceted taxonomies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A faceted taxonomy is a set of taxonomies, each describing a given knowledge domain from a different aspect. The indexing of the domain objects is done using compound terms, i.e. conjunctive combinations of terms from the taxonomies. A faceted taxonomy ... Keywords: Conceptual modelling, Faceted taxonomies, Information services on the Web, Semantics

Yannis Tzitzikas; Anastasia Analyti; Nicolas Spyratos; Panos Constantopoulos

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Emission of complex fragments in compound nucleus decay  

SciTech Connect

The compound nucleus mechanism for complex fragment emission is discussed theoretically and demonstrated experimentally. The role of the potential energy as a function of mass asymmetry is shown in experimental charge distributions. This process is followed from near the threshold up to bombarding energies of several tens of MeV A. 12 refs., 12 figs.

Moretto, L.G.

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Thermoelectric materials: ternary penta telluride and selenide compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ternary tellurium compounds and ternary selenium compounds may be used in fabricating thermoelectric devices with a thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT) of 1.5 or greater. Examples of such compounds include Tl.sub.2 SnTe.sub.5, Tl.sub.2 GeTe.sub.5, K.sub.2 SnTe.sub.5 and Rb.sub.2 SnTe.sub.5. These compounds have similar types of crystal lattice structures which include a first substructure with a (Sn, Ge) Te.sub.5 composition and a second substructure with chains of selected cation atoms. The second substructure includes selected cation atoms which interact with selected anion atoms to maintain a desired separation between the chains of the first substructure. The cation atoms which maintain the desired separation between the chains occupy relatively large electropositive sites in the resulting crystal lattice structure which results in a relatively low value for the lattice component of thermal conductivity (.kappa..sub.g). The first substructure of anion chains indicates significant anisotropy in the thermoelectric characteristics of the resulting semiconductor materials.

Sharp, Jeffrey W. (Richardson, TX)

2002-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

346

Thermoelectric materials ternary penta telluride and selenide compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ternary tellurium compounds and ternary selenium compounds may be used in fabricating thermoelectric devices with a thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT) of 1.5 or greater. Examples of such compounds include Tl.sub.2 SnTe.sub.5, Tl.sub.2 GeTe.sub.5, K.sub.2 SnTe.sub.5 and Rb.sub.2 SnTe.sub.5. These compounds have similar types of crystal lattice structures which include a first substructure with a (Sn, Ge) Te.sub.5 composition and a second substructure with chains of selected cation atoms. The second substructure includes selected cation atoms which interact with selected anion atoms to maintain a desired separation between the chains of the first substructure. The cation atoms which maintain the desired separation between the chains occupy relatively large electropositive sites in the resulting crystal lattice structure which results in a relatively low value for the lattice component of thermal conductivity (.kappa..sub.g). The first substructure of anion chains indicates significant anisotropy in the thermoelectric characteristics of the resulting semiconductor materials.

Sharp, Jeffrey W. (Richardson, TX)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Relaxed: on the way towards true validation of compound documents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To maintain interoperability in the Web environment it is necessary to comply with Web standards. Current specifications of HTML and XHTML languages define conformance conditions both in specification prose and in a formalized way utilizing DTD. Unfortunately ... Keywords: RELAX NG, Schematron, XHTML, XML, compound documents, validation

Jirka Kosek; Petr Nlevka

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nw Basin & Range Nw Basin & Range Region (Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Northwest Basin and Range Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being conducted using the new geochemical data. Objectives changed slightly in 2004. Samples are now being collected at sites identified by other

349

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Walker-Lane Transitional Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Laney, 2005) Laney, 2005) Exploration Activity Details Location Walker-Lane Transition Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geochemical Sampling of Thermal and Non-thermal Waters in Nevada, Shevenell and Garside. The objective of this project is to obtain geochemical data from springs (and some wells) for which data are not publicly available, or for which the analyses are incomplete, poor, or nonexistent. With these data, geothermometers are being calculated and a preliminary assessment of the geothermal potential and ranking of the sampled areas is being conducted using the new geochemical data. Objectives changed slightly in 2004. Samples are now being collected at sites identified by other

350

High Density Hydrogen Storage System Demonstration Using NaAlH4 Based Complex Compound Hydrides  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This final report describes the motivations, activities and results of the hydrogen storage independent project "High Density Hydrogen Storage System Demonstration Using NaAlH4 Based Complex Compound Hydrides" performed by the United Technologies Research Center under the Department of Energy Hydrogen Program, contract # DE-FC36-02AL67610. The objectives of the project were to identify and address the key systems technologies associated with applying complex hydride materials, particularly ones which differ from those for conventional metal hydride based storage. This involved the design, fabrication and testing of two prototype systems based on the hydrogen storage material NaAlH4. Safety testing, catalysis studies, heat exchanger optimization, reaction kinetics modeling, thermochemical finite element analysis, powder densification development and material neutralization were elements included in the effort.

Daniel A. Mosher; Xia Tang; Ronald J. Brown; Sarah Arsenault; Salvatore Saitta; Bruce L. Laube; Robert H. Dold; Donald L. Anton

2007-07-27T23:59:59.000Z

351

Biodegradation and Biotransformation of Mixed Wastes Containing Metals and Chlorinated Xenobiotic Compounds By Microbial  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

OAK 270 - Biodegradation and biotransformation of mixed Wastes Containing metals and chlorinated Xenobiotic compounds by microbial.

Crqwford, D. L.; Kamashwaran, S. R.

2001-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Quantitative method of determining beryllium or a compound thereof in a sample  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of determining beryllium or a beryllium compound thereof in a sample, includes providing a sample suspected of comprising beryllium or a compound thereof, extracting beryllium or a compound thereof from the sample by dissolving in a solution, adding a fluorescent indicator to the solution to thereby bind any beryllium or a compound thereof to the fluorescent indicator, and determining the presence or amount of any beryllium or a compound thereof in the sample by measuring fluorescence.

McCleskey, T. Mark (Los Alamos, NM); Ehler, Deborah S. (Los Alamos, NM); John, Kevin D. (Santa Fe, NM); Burrell, Anthony K. (Los Alamos, NM); Collis, Gavin E. (Los Alamos, NM); Minogue, Edel M. (Los Alamos, NM); Warner, Benjamin P. (Los Alamos, NM)

2010-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

353

Enhanced Elemental Mercury Removal from Coal-fired Flue Gas by Sulfur-chlorine Compounds  

SciTech Connect

Oxidation of Hg0 with any oxidant or converting it to a particle-bound form can facilitate its removal. Two sulfur-chlorine compounds, sulfur dichloride (SCl2) and sulfur monochloride (S2Cl2), were investigated as oxidants for Hg0 by gas phase reaction and by surface-involved reactions in the presence of flyash or activated carbon. The gas phase reaction rate constants between Hg0 and the sulfur/chlorine compounds were determined, and the effects of temperature and the main components in flue gases were studied. The gas phase reaction between Hg0 and SCl2 is shown to be more rapid than the gas phase reaction with chlorine, and the second order rate constant was 9.1(+-0.5) x 10-18 mL-molecules-1cdots-1 at 373oK. Nitric oxide (NO) inhibited the gas phase reaction of Hg0 with sulfur-chlorine compounds. The presence of flyash or powdered activated carbon in flue gas can substantially accelerate the reaction. The predicted Hg0 removal is about 90percent with 5 ppm SCl2 or S2Cl2 and 40 g/m3 of flyash in flue gas. The combination of activated carbon and sulfur-chlorine compounds is an effective alternative. We estimate that co-injection of 3-5 ppm of SCl2 (or S2Cl2) with 2-3 Lb/MMacf of untreated Darco-KB is comparable in efficiency to the injection of 2-3 Lb/MMacf Darco-Hg-LH. Extrapolation of kinetic results also indicates that 90percent of Hg0 can be removed if 3 Lb/MMacf of Darco-KB pretreated with 3percent of SCl2 or S2Cl2 is used. Unlike gas phase reactions, NO exhibited little effect on Hg0 reactions with SCl2 or S2Cl2 on flyash or activated carbon. Mercuric sulfide was identified as one of the principal products of the Hg0/SCl2 or Hg0/S2Cl2 reactions. Additionally, about 8percent of SCl2 or S2Cl2 in aqueous solutions is converted to sulfide ions, which would precipitate mercuric ion from FGD solution.

Chang, Shih-Ger; Yan, Nai-Qiang; Qu, Zan; Chi, Yao; Qiao, Shao-Hua; Dod, Ray; Chang, Shih-Ger; Miller, Charles

2008-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

354

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Lassen Volcanic National Park Area (Janik & Mclaren, 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Lassen Volcanic National Park Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Analyses of eight well samples taken consecutively during the flow test showed an inverse correlation between NH3 and Cl_ concentrations. The last sample taken had a pH of 8.35 and contained 2100 ppm Cl_ and 0.55 ppm NH3. Ratios of Na+/K+ and Na+/Cl_ remained nearly constant throughout the flow test. Cation geothermometers (with inherent uncertainties of at least

355

Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Philippines (Wood, 2002) Philippines (Wood, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area Philippines (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area Philippines Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley

356

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Breitenbush Hot Springs Area (Wood,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Breitenbush Hot Springs Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Breitenbush Hot Springs Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley and Beowawe fields in Nevada; 5) Palinpiiion, the Philippines; 6) the

357

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1991) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

1) 1) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (1991) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date 1991 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Exploration Basis Determine the fluid origin by looking at variations in dissolved gas compositions of reservoir fluids Notes Gas concentrations and ratios in 110 analyses of geothermal fluids from 47 wells in the Coso geothermal system illustrate the complexity of this two-phase reservoir in its natural state. Two geographically distinct regions of single-phase (liquid) reservoir are present and possess distinctive gas and liquid compositions. Steam sampled from wells in the

358

Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area, New  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New New Zealand (Wood, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At International Geothermal Area New Zealand (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location International Geothermal Area New Zealand Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley

359

Method of plasma etching GA-based compound semiconductors  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of plasma etching Ga-based compound semiconductors includes providing a process chamber and a source electrode adjacent thereto. The chamber contains a Ga-based compound semiconductor sample in contact with a platen which is electrically connected to a first power supply, and the source electrode is electrically connected to a second power supply. SiCl.sub.4 and Ar gases are flowed into the chamber. RF power is supplied to the platen at a first power level, and RF power is supplied to the source electrode. A plasma is generated. Then, RF power is supplied to the platen at a second power level lower than the first power level and no greater than about 30 W. Regions of a surface of the sample adjacent to one or more masked portions of the surface are etched at a rate of no more than about 25 nm/min to create a substantially smooth etched surface.

Qiu, Weibin; Goddard, Lynford L.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Method of plasma etching Ga-based compound semiconductors  

SciTech Connect

A method of plasma etching Ga-based compound semiconductors includes providing a process chamber and a source electrode adjacent to the process chamber. The process chamber contains a sample comprising a Ga-based compound semiconductor. The sample is in contact with a platen which is electrically connected to a first power supply, and the source electrode is electrically connected to a second power supply. The method includes flowing SiCl.sub.4 gas into the chamber, flowing Ar gas into the chamber, and flowing H.sub.2 gas into the chamber. RF power is supplied independently to the source electrode and the platen. A plasma is generated based on the gases in the process chamber, and regions of a surface of the sample adjacent to one or more masked portions of the surface are etched to create a substantially smooth etched surface including features having substantially vertical walls beneath the masked portions.

Qiu, Weibin; Goddard, Lynford L.

2012-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identified compound tic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Development of New Cryocooler Regenerator Materials-Ductile Intermetallic Compounds  

SciTech Connect

The volumetric heat capacities of a number of binary and ternary Er- and Tm-based intermetallic compounds, which exhibited substantial ductilities, were measured from {approx}3 to {approx}350 K. They have the RM stoichiometry (where R = Er or Tm, and M is a main group or transition metal) and crystallize in the CsCl-type structure. The heat capacities of the Tm-based compounds are in general larger than the corresponding Er-based materials. Many of them have heat capacities which are significantly larger than those of the low temperature (<15 K) prototype cryocooler regenerator materials HoCu{sub 2}, Er{sub 3}Ni and ErNi. Utilization of the new materials as regenerators in the various cryocoolers should improve the performance of these refrigeration units for cooling below 15 K.

K.A. Gschneidner; A.O. Pecharsky; V.K. Pecharsky

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

362

Method for production of an isotopically enriched compound  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A method is presented for producing and isolating an isotopically enriched compound of a desired isotope from a parent radionuclide. The method includes forming, or placing, a precipitate containing a parent radionuclide of the desired daughter isotope in a first reaction zone and allowing sufficient time for the parent to decay into the desired gaseous daughter radioisotope. The method further contemplates collecting the desired daughter isotope as a solid in a second reaction zone through the application of temperatures below the freezing point of the desired isotope to a second reaction zone that is connected to the first reaction zone. Specifically, a method is presented for producing isotopically enriched compounds of xenon, including the radioactive isotope Xe-131m and the stable isotope Xe-131.

Watrous, Matthew G.

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

363

Method of recovering adsorbed liquid compounds from molecular sieve columns  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Molecularly adsorbed volatile liquid compounds are recovered from molecular sieve adsorbent columns by directionally applying microwave energy to the bed of the adsorbent to produce a mixed liquid-gas effluent. The gas portion of the effluent generates pressure within the bed to promote the discharge of the effluent from the column bottoms. Preferably the discharged liquid-gas effluent is collected in two to three separate fractions, the second or intermediate fraction having a substantially higher concentration of the desorbed compound than the first or third fractions. The desorption does not need to be assisted by passing a carrier gas through the bed or by applying reduced pressure to the outlet from the bed.

Burkholder, Harvey R. (Ames, IA); Fanslow, Glenn E. (Ames, IA)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Process for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is provided for removing heavy metal compounds from heavy crude oil by mixing the heavy crude oil with tar sand; preheating the mixture to a temperature of about 650.degree. F.; heating said mixture to up to 800.degree. F.; and separating tar sand from the light oils formed during said heating. The heavy metals removed from the heavy oils can be recovered from the spent sand for other uses.

Cha, Chang Y. (Golden, CO); Boysen, John E. (Laramie, WY); Branthaver, Jan F. (Laramie, WY)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Process for production of an aluminum hydride compound  

SciTech Connect

A compound of formula M(AlH.sub.3OR.sup.1).sub.y, wherein R.sup.1 is phenyl substituted by at least one of: (i) an alkoxy group having from one to six carbon atoms; and (ii) an alkyl group having from three to twelve carbon atoms; wherein M is an alkali metal, Be or Mg; and y is one or two.

Allen, Nathan Tait; Butterick, III, Robert; Chin, Arthur Achhing; Miller, Dean Michael; Molzahn, David Craig

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

366

Conversion of radioactive ferrocyanide compounds to immobile glasses  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Complex radioactive ferrocyanide compounds result from the scavenging of cesium from waste products produced in the chemical reprocessing of nuclear fuel. These ferrocyanides, in accordance with this process, are converted to an immobile glass, resistant to leaching by water, by fusion together with sodium carbonate and a mixture of (a) basalt and boron trioxide (B.sub.2 O.sub.3) or (b) silica (SiO.sub.2) and lime (CaO).

Schulz, Wallace W. (Richland, WA); Dressen, A. Louise (Richland, WA)

1977-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

367

DOE O 471.3 Admin Chg 1, Identifying and Protecting Official Use Only Information  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The order establishes a program within DOE and NNSA to identify certain unclassified controlled information as Official Use Only (OUO) and to identify, mark, ...

2003-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

368

X-ray diffraction data for plutonium compounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work is a compilation of x-ray diffraction information relating to powder photographs of plutonium compounds. The information is presented in a format and style substantially as recommended by the International Center for Diffraction Data. Los Alamos National Laboratory has been involved in the study of the properties of plutonium and its compounds. During the past 45 years, the Powder Diffraction File of the Laboratory has grown to more than 20,000 films. F.H. Ellinger and his coworkers have used this data to establish a large number of plutonium binary phase diagrams. These phase diagrams have been published in a special report of the Laboratory, LA-3870, Constitution of Plutonium Alloys,'' authored by F.H. Ellinger, W.N. Miner, D.R. O'Boyle, and F.W. Schonfeld. A phase diagram, however, should never be regarded as really complete as new techniques of alloy preparation or x-ray and optical metallography continually discover new phases that must be incorporated in the diagram. In addition to the phase diagrams, the crystal structures of a number of plutonium intermetallic compounds have been determined at Los Alamos and published in the general literature by D.T. Cromer, A.C. Larson, and R.B. Roof over the last 35 years.

Roof, R.B.

1991-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Chemicals from coal. Utilization of coal-derived phenolic compounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article provides an overview for possible utilization of coal-derived phenolic compounds. Phenolic compounds are abundant in coal-derived liquids. Coal-derived phenolic compounds include phenol, cresol, catechol, methylcatechol, naphthol, and their derivatives. Liquids from coal liquefaction, pyrolysis, gasification, and carbonization are potential sources of phenolic chemicals, although certain processing and separation are needed. There are opportunities for coal-based phenolic chemicals, because there are existing industrial applications and potential new applications. Currently the petrochemical industry produces phenol in multi-step processes, and new research and development has resulted in a one-step process. Selective methylation of phenol can produce a precursor for aromatic engineering plastics. Catalytic oxidation of phenol has been commercialized recently for catechol production. There are potential new uses of phenol that could replace large-volume multi-step chemical processes that are based on benzene as the starting material. New chemical research on coal and coal-derived liquids can pave the way for their non-fuel uses for making chemicals and materials.

Song, C.; Schobert, H.H.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

Measurement of Passive Uptake Rates for Volatile Organic Compounds on  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Measurement of Passive Uptake Rates for Volatile Organic Compounds on Measurement of Passive Uptake Rates for Volatile Organic Compounds on Commercial Thermal Desorption Tubes and the Effect of Ozone on Sampling Title Measurement of Passive Uptake Rates for Volatile Organic Compounds on Commercial Thermal Desorption Tubes and the Effect of Ozone on Sampling Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-6257E Year of Publication 2013 Authors Maddalena, Randy L., Amanda Parra, Marion L. Russell, and Wen-Yee Lee Publisher Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory City Berkeley Keywords indoor air quality, Passive Sampling, Uptake Rates, vocs Abstract Diffusive or passive sampling methods using commercially filled axial-sampling thermal desorption tubes are widely used for measuring volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in air. The passive sampling method provides a robust, cost effective way to measure air quality with time-averaged concentrations spanning up to a week or more. Sampling rates for VOCs can be calculated using tube geometry and Fick's Law for ideal diffusion behavior or measured experimentally. There is evidence that uptake rates deviate from ideal and may not be constant over time. Therefore, experimentally measured sampling rates are preferred. In this project, a calibration chamber with a continuous stirred tank reactor design and constant VOC source was combined with active sampling to generate a controlled dynamic calibration environment for passive samplers. The chamber air was augmented with a continuous source of 45 VOCs ranging from pentane to diethyl phthalate representing a variety of chemical classes and physiochemical properties. Both passive and active samples were collected on commercially filled Tenax TA thermal desorption tubes over an 11-day period and used to calculate passive sampling rates. A second experiment was designed to determine the impact of ozone on passive sampling by using the calibration chamber to passively load five terpenes on a set of Tenax tubes and then exposing the tubes to different ozone environments with and without ozone scrubbers attached to the tube inlet. During the sampling rate experiment, the measured diffusive uptake was constant for up to seven days for most of the VOCs tested but deviated from linearity for some of the more volatile compounds between seven and eleven days. In the ozone experiment, both exposed and unexposed tubes showed a similar decline in terpene mass over time indicating back diffusion when uncapped tubes were transferred to a clean environment but there was no indication of significant loss by ozone reaction.

371

Synthesis, structure and magnetic properties of lanthanide cluster compounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This dissertation focuses on the exploratory synthesis of compounds that contain R6ZI12 (R= Ce, Gd, Er; Z=Mn, Fe, Co, C2) clusters with the goal of finding magnetically interesting compounds. Several new compounds were made via high temperature, solid state methods and structurally characterized using x-ray diffraction. Compounds that contain isolated clusters were studied in order to understand the magnetic coupling between lanthanide atoms. The exploration of transition metal centered clusters resulted in the discovery of two new structure types, CsR(R6CoI12)2 (R=Gd and Er) and (CeI)0.26(Ce6MnI9)2. The xray crystal structure of CsEr(Er6CoI12)2 was solved in the Pa3 space group with the cell length 18.063(2) at 250K (Z = 4, R1 [I>2?(I)] = 0.0459). (CeI)0.26(Ce6MnI9)2 was made by combining KI, CeI3, MnI2 and Ce metal and heating to 850C for 500 hrs. The single crystal x-ray structure for (CeI)0.26(Ce6MnI9)2 was solved in the trigonal, P3 space group with lattice parameters of a = 11.695(1) c = 10.8591(2) (Z = 2, R1 [I>2?(I)] = 0.0895). The magnetic susceptibilities of hexanuclear gadolinium clusters in the compounds Gd(Gd6ZI12) (Z = Co, Fe or Mn), CaxGd1-x(Gd6MnI12) and CsGd(Gd6CoI12)2 are reported. The single-crystal structure of Gd(Gd6CoI12) and CaxGd1-x(Gd6MnI12) are reported here as well. The compound with a closed shell of cluster bonding electrons, Gd(Gd6CoI12), exhibits the effects of antiferromagnetic coupling over the entire range of temperatures measured (4 - 300 K). Clusters with unpaired, delocalized cluster bonding electrons (CBEs) exhibit enhanced susceptibilities consistent with strong ferromagnetic coupling, except at lower temperatures (less than 30 K) where intercluster antiferromagnetic coupling suppresses the susceptibilities. Four new compounds containing Gd6C2 clusters have been found: Gd6C2I11, Gd(Gd6C2I12), CsGd(Gd6C2I12)2 and Cs(Gd6C2I12). Gd6C2I11 and Cs(Gd6C2I12) crystallized in the P?1 space group while Gd(Gd6C2I12) and CsGd(Gd6C2I12)2 crystallized in the R?3 and Pa?3 space groups respectively. The magnetic susceptibility data for Cs(Gd6C2I12) indicate strong intracluster ferromagnetic coupling, but antiferromagnetic coupling suppresses the susceptibility below 150 K. DFT calculations on CsGd6C2I12 and molecular models indicate that the magnetic coupling between the basal Gd atoms is stronger than the magnetic coupling involving the axial Gd atoms in the distorted clusters.

Sweet, Lucas Edward

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

OBSERVATION Microbial Electrosynthesis: Feeding Microbes Electricity To Convert Carbon Dioxide and Water to Multicarbon Extracellular Organic Compounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT The possibility of providing the acetogenic microorganism Sporomusa ovata with electrons delivered directly to the cells with a graphite electrode for the reduction of carbon dioxide to organic compounds was investigated. Biofilms of S. ovata growing on graphite cathode surfaces consumed electrons with the reduction of carbon dioxide to acetate and small amounts of 2-oxobutyrate. Electrons appearing in these products accounted for over 85 % of the electrons consumed. These results demonstrate that microbial production of multicarbon organic compounds from carbon dioxide and water with electricity as the energy source is feasible. IMPORTANCE Reducing carbon dioxide to multicarbon organic chemicals and fuels with electricity has been identified as an attractive strategy to convert solar energy that is harvested intermittently with photovoltaic technology and store it as covalent chemical bonds. The organic compounds produced can then be distributed via existing infrastructure. Nonbiological electrochemical reduction of carbon dioxide has proven problematic. The results presented here suggest that microbiological catalysts may be a robust alternative, and when coupled with photovoltaics, current-driven microbial carbon dioxide reduction represents a new form of photosynthesis that might convert solar energy to organic products more effectively than traditional biomass-based strategies.

Kelly P. Nevin; Trevor L. Woodard; Ashley E. Franks; Zarath M. Summers; Derek R. Lovley

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

RECEIVED BY TIC FEB 2 7 18m  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

methods Drilling methods . Completion and pipelining Advanced recovery methods Oil shale and tar sands Liquified natural gas Oil storage methods Refining. M i d d l e A f r...

374

Microstructure and Corrosion Behaviour of TiC Reinforced Duplex ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... coating that prevented chromium from forming continuous passive oxide layers . ... Influence Of Cooling Rates On Nitrogen Precipitation Behaviors And The...

375

SPECIATION OF TRACE ORGANIC LIGANDS AND INORGANIC AND ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN OIL SHALE PROCESS WATERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Presented at the 13th Oil Shale Symposium, Golden, CO, April~1ETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN OIL SHALE PROCESS WATERS Richard H.compounds in the seven oil shale process waters. These

Fish, Richard H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

SPECIATION OF TRACE ORGANIC LIGANDS AND INORGANIC AND ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN OIL SHALE PROCESS WATERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

organoarsenic compounds in oi.l shale process waters using aPresented at the 13th Oil Shale Symposium, Golden, CO, April~1ETALLIC COMPOUNDS IN OIL SHALE PROCESS WATERS Richard H.

Fish, Richard H.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Comparative Carcinogenicity of Nickel Compounds: A Review of Nickel Toxicity, Pharmacokinetics, and Mode of Action  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report describes a comprehensive integrated review of the current extensive toxicological and epidemiological literature on nickel compounds. Nickel compounds are present in relatively high quantities in oil fuels combusted to generate electricity.

1999-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

378

A study of the manufacturing and product possibilities of a cork/polylactic acid compound  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A study of the manufacturing and product capabilities of a cork/polylactic acid compound was conducted. Fine granulated cork, 1mm in diameter, was compounded with Natureworks' IngeoTM3051D PLA and extruded into pellets. ...

Reed, Sarah BR

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

SEARCH FOR NEW YTTERBIUM-BASED HEAVY FERMION COMPOUNDS D. Bollinger, E. Morosan1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SEARCH FOR NEW YTTERBIUM-BASED HEAVY FERMION COMPOUNDS D. Bollinger, E on synthesizing Ytterbium-based heavy fermions that we believe will display these transitions compounds containing Ce have been found to be heavy fermions, one

Mellor-Crummey, John

380

Tetratopic phenyl compounds, related metal-organic framework materials and post-assembly elaboration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are tetratopic carboxylic acid phenyl for use in metal-organic framework compounds. These compounds are useful in catalysis, gas storage, sensing, biological imaging, drug delivery and gas adsorption separation.

Farha, Omar K; Hupp, Joseph T

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identified compound tic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Tetratopic phenyl compounds, related metal-organic framework materials and post-assembly elaboration  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed are tetratopic carboxylic acid phenyl for use in metal-organic framework compounds. These compounds are useful in catalysis, gas storage, sensing, biological imaging, drug delivery and gas adsorption separation.

Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.

2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

382

Phenolic Compounds of Sorghum, their Chemopreventive Properties and Absorption  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sorghum contains many phenolic compounds which have potential antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and chemopreventive properties as well as natural colorants in foods. Phenolic compounds of stalks, sheaths, leaves, glumes and grains from tan (ARTx631/RTx436), red (Tx2911) and purple (Tx3362) sorghum plants were characterized by UPLC-MS/MS. Antiproliferative properties of selected sorghum extracts were evaluated using HT-29 colon cancer cells and absorption of their polyphenolics was determined by a Caco-2 in vitro model system. Phenolic acids, flavones, 3-deoxyanthocyanidins and chalcones were found in all plant components. Phenolic acids were predominant in the stalks, sheaths and grains of all sorghum types. Flavone glycosides were predominant in leaves, sheaths and stalks while flavone aglycones in glumes and grains. 3-Deoxyanthocyanidins and chalcones were mostly found in sheaths, leaves, glumes and grains of Tx2911 (red) and Tx3362 (purple) genotypes. Sorghum leaves showed high levels of flavone glycosides while glumes had high levels of flavones aglycones. Glume extract of ATx631/RTx436 (tan) and Tx2911 genotypes had the strongest antiproliferation activity (IC_(50) = 85-178 g/ml), these extracts had also the highest levels of flavone aglycones (19.6-49.8 mg/g). Absorption of flavones (30.4-42.3 %) was higher than 3-deoxyantocyanidins (1.4-11.3%), while absorption of methoxylated 3-deoxyanthocyanidins (11.3%) was higher than non-methoxylated 3-deoxyanthocyanidins (1.4 1.6 %). Flavones had high absorption compared to other sorghum phenolics suggesting that sorghum flavone aglycones are more bioavailable than other sorghum phenolic compounds. Consequently, sorghum glumes could be used as used as a source of phytochemicals to increase value of sorghum crop.

Taleon Alban, Victor Manuel

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Detecting compounded anomalous SNMP situations using cooperative unsupervised pattern recognition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This research employs unsupervised pattern recognition to approach the thorny issue of detecting anomalous network behavior. It applies a connectionist model to identify user behavior patterns and successfully demonstrates that such models respond well ...

Emilio Corchado; lvaro Herrero; Jos Manuel Siz

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Nevada Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location Central Nevada Seismic Zone Geothermal Region Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes "This second paper provides more detailed documentation on water and rock geochemistries and describes diagnostic major and trace element ratios and concentrations that can be used to distinguish tufa columns formed from thermal waters from those that formed from non-thermal waters." "In addition to providing a potentially diagnostic lithogeochemical tool for geothermal exploration, the analysis of lithium and other elements in tufa deposits could serve as exploration guides for hot spring lithium

385

Process for removing an organic compound from water  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing organic compounds from water is disclosed. The process involves gas stripping followed by membrane separation treatment of the stripping gas. The stripping step can be carried out using one or multiple gas strippers and using air or any other gas as stripping gas. The membrane separation step can be carried out using a single-stage membrane unit or a multistage unit. Apparatus for carrying out the process is also disclosed. The process is particularly suited for treatment of contaminated groundwater or industrial wastewater.

Baker, Richard W. (Palo Alto, CA); Kaschemekat, Jurgen (Palo Alto, CA); Wijmans, Johannes G. (Menlo Park, CA); Kamaruddin, Henky D. (San Francisco, CA)

1993-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

386

Non-linear hydrodynamics of incommensurate intergrowth compounds and quasicrystals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Hamiltonian structures for non-linear hydrodynamics of incommensurate intergrowth compounds (IIC) and quasicrystals (IQ) are constructed. We discuss also the way to account for internal friction of phason nature. We show that the existence of a self-force in IIC and IQ is not only matter of constitutive issues, rather it is related with questions of SO(3) invariance. The covariant mechanics of discontinuity surfaces in quasiperiodic structures is also analyzed. The attention is mainly focused on the interaction between `diffuse' grain boundaries and sharp discontinuity (moving possibly) surfaces.

Paolo Maria Mariano

2004-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

387

Electrolytic photodissociation of chemical compounds by iron oxide photochemical diodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Chemical compounds can be dissociated by contacting the same with a p/n type semi-conductor photochemical diode having visible light as its sole source of energy. The photochemical diode consists of low cost, readily available materials, specifically polycrystalline iron oxide doped with silicon in the case of the n-type semi-conductor electrode, and polycrystalline iron oxide doped with magnesium in the case of the p-type electrode. So long as the light source has an energy greater than 2.2 electron volts, no added energy source is needed to achieve dissociation.

Somorjai, Gabor A. (Berkeley, CA); Leygraf, Christofer H. (Berkeley, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Electrolytic photodissociation of chemical compounds by iron oxide electrodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Chemical compounds can be dissociated by contacting the same with a p/n type semi-conductor diode having visible light as its sole source of energy. The diode consists of low cost, readily available materials, specifically polycrystalline iron oxide doped with silicon in the case of the n-type semi-conductor electrode, and polycrystalline iron oxide doped with magnesium in the case of the p-type electrode. So long as the light source has an energy greater than 2.2 electron volts, no added energy source is needed to achieve dissociation.

Somorjai, Gabor A. (Berkeley, CA); Leygraf, Christofer H. (Berkeley, CA)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Analysis of Oxygenated Compounds in Hydrotreated Biomass Fast Pyrolysis Oil Distillate Fractions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Three hydrotreated bio-oils with different oxygen contents (8.2, 4.9, and 0.4 w/w) were distilled to produce Light, Naphtha, Jet, Diesel, and Gasoil boiling range fractions that were characterized for oxygen containing species by a variety of analytical methods. The bio-oils were originally generated from lignocellulosic biomass in an entrained-flow fast pyrolysis reactor. Analyses included elemental composition, carbon type distribution by {sup 13}C NMR, acid number, GC-MS, volatile organic acids by LC, and carbonyl compounds by DNPH derivatization and LC. Acid number titrations employed an improved titrant-electrode combination with faster response that allowed detection of multiple endpoints in many samples and for acid values attributable to carboxylic acids and to phenols to be distinguished. Results of these analyses showed that the highest oxygen content bio-oil fractions contained oxygen as carboxylic acids, carbonyls, aryl ethers, phenols, and alcohols. Carboxylic acids and carbonyl compounds detected in this sample were concentrated in the Light, Naphtha, and Jet fractions (oil or refinery intermediate streams may exist for the Diesel and Gasoil fractions. The 4.9 % oxygen sample contained almost exclusively phenolic compounds found to be present throughout the boiling range of this sample, but imparting measurable acidity primarily in the Light, Naphtha and Jet fractions. Additional study is required to understand what levels of the weakly acidic phenols could be tolerated in a refinery feedstock. The Diesel and Gasoil fractions from this upgraded oil had low acidity but still contained 3 to 4 wt% oxygen present as phenols that could not be specifically identified. These materials appear to have excellent potential as refinery feedstocks and some potential for blending into finished fuels. Fractions from the lowest oxygen content oil exhibited some phenolic acidity, but generally contained very low levels of oxygen functional groups. These materials would likely be suitable as refinery feedstocks and potentially as fuel blend components. PIONA analysis of the Light and Naphtha fractions shows benzene content of 0.5 and 0.4 vol%, and predicted (RON + MON)/2 of 63 and 70, respectively.

Christensen, Earl D.; Chupka, Gina; Luecke, Jon; Smurthwaite, Tricia D.; Alleman, Teresa L.; Iisa, Kristiina; Franz, James A.; Elliott, Douglas C.; McCormick, Robert L.

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

390

A COMPARISON OF THE PHARMACOLOGICAL EFFECTS OF SOME COMPOUNDS RELATED TO 2- AMINOETHYLISOTHIURONIUM BROMIDE HYDROBROMIDE (AET)  

SciTech Connect

The pharmacological properties of nine compounds formed by substitutions either in the AET or in the APT molecule were studied in cats. None of the compounds elicited the chemoreflex characteristic of the parent compounds. In general, substitutions in the APT and AET molecules attenuated gut responses, amplified ganglionic block, ing activity (particularly in AET analogs), and resulted in compounds with some degree of neuromuscular depressant activity. (auth)

DiStefano, V.; Korn, P.S.; Leary, D.E.

1963-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

Gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) system for quantitative analysis of reactive chemical compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Described is a new gas chromatograph-mass spectrometer (GC/MS) system and method for quantitative analysis of reactive chemical compounds. All components of such a GC/MS system external to the oven of the gas chromatograph are programmably temperature controlled to operate at a volatilization temperature specific to the compound(s) sought to be separated and measured.

Grindstaff, Quirinus G. (Oak Ridge, TN)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Electronic structure of uranyl compounds: an XPS study  

SciTech Connect

X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) measurements are reported for a series of uranyl compounds in which the primary uranium--oxygen (U--O/sub I/) separation varies substantially. Crystal field splittings of the U 6p$sub 3$/ $sub 2$ core electron energy levels were observed. These splittings are explained with the point charge crystal field model when both first and second near uranium neighbors are considered. The systematics of charge migration (observed by monitoring electron core level shifts) associated with bonding in the uranyl series were also investigated. Core level shifts for compounds with different U--O/sub I/ separations are large, but essentially no relative shifts of uranium and oxygen core levels were observed within the uranyl group. Thus charge appears to flow between the uranyl group (as a unit), and the secondary uranium ligands as U--O/sub I/ is varied. The U 5f electron participation in covalent bonding was also studied by systematically measuring XPS line intensities; U 5f electron occupation appears to be minimal. (auth)

Veal, B.W.; Lam, D.J.; Hoekstra, H.R.; Carnall, W.T.

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

A COMPOUND MODEL FOR THE ORIGIN OF EARTH'S WATER  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the most important subjects of debate in the formation of the solar system is the origin of Earth's water. Comets have long been considered as the most likely source of the delivery of water to Earth. However, elemental and isotopic arguments suggest a very small contribution from these objects. Other sources have also been proposed, among which local adsorption of water vapor onto dust grains in the primordial nebula and delivery through planetesimals and planetary embryos have become more prominent. However, no sole source of water provides a satisfactory explanation for Earth's water as a whole. In view of that, using numerical simulations, we have developed a compound model incorporating both the principal endogenous and exogenous theories, and investigating their implications for terrestrial planet formation and water delivery. Comets are also considered in the final analysis, as it is likely that at least some of Earth's water has cometary origin. We analyze our results comparing two different water distribution models, and complement our study using the D/H ratio, finding possible relative contributions from each source and focusing on planets formed in the habitable zone. We find that the compound model plays an important role by showing greater advantage in the amount and time of water delivery in Earth-like planets.

Izidoro, A.; Winter, O. C. [UNESP, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Grupo de Dinamica Orbital and Planetologia, Guaratingueta, CEP 12.516-410, Sao Paulo (Brazil)] [UNESP, Universidade Estadual Paulista, Grupo de Dinamica Orbital and Planetologia, Guaratingueta, CEP 12.516-410, Sao Paulo (Brazil); De Souza Torres, K. [UTFPR, Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (Brazil)] [UTFPR, Universidade Tecnologica Federal do Parana (Brazil); Haghighipour, N., E-mail: ocwinter@pq.cnpq.br [Institute for Astronomy and NASA Astrobiology Institute, University of Hawaii-Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

394

Process for removal of sulfur compounds from fuel gases  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Fuel gases such as those produced in the gasification of coal are stripped of sulfur compounds and particulate matter by contact with molten metal salt. The fuel gas and salt are intimately mixed by passage through a venturi or other constriction in which the fuel gas entrains the molten salt as dispersed droplets to a gas-liquid separator. The separated molten salt is divided into a major and a minor flow portion with the minor flow portion passing on to a regenerator in which it is contacted with steam and carbon dioxide as strip gas to remove sulfur compounds. The strip gas is further processed to recover sulfur. The depleted, minor flow portion of salt is passed again into contact with the fuel gas for further sulfur removal from the gas. The sulfur depleted, fuel gas then flows through a solid absorbent for removal of salt droplets. The minor flow portion of the molten salt is then recombined with the major flow portion for feed to the venturi.

Moore, Raymond H. (Richland, WA); Stegen, Gary E. (Richland, WA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Natural organic compounds as tracers for biomass combustion in aerosols  

SciTech Connect

Biomass combustion is an important primary source of carbonaceous particles in the global atmosphere. Although various molecular markers have already been proposed for this process, additional specific organic tracers need to be characterized. The injection of natural product organic tracers to smoke occurs primarily by direct volatilization/steam stripping and by thermal alteration based on combustion temperature. The degree of alteration increases as the burn temperature rises and the moisture content of the fuel decreases. Although the molecular composition of organic matter in smoke particles is highly variable, the molecular structures of the tracers are generally source specific. The homologous compound series and biomarkers present in smoke particles are derived directly from plant wax, gum and resin by volatilization and secondarily from pyrolysis of biopolymers, wax, gum and resin. The complexity of the organic components of smoke aerosol is illustrated with examples from controlled burns of temperate and tropical biomass fuels. Burning of biomass from temperate regions (i.e., conifers) yields characteristic tracers from diterpenoids as well as phenolics and other oxygenated species, which are recognizable in urban airsheds. The major organic components of smoke particles from tropical biomass are straight-chain, aliphatic and oxygenated compounds and triterpenoids. The precursor-to-product approach of organic geochemistry can be applied successfully to provide tracers for studying smoke plume chemistry and dispersion.

Simoneit, B.R.T. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States). Coll. of Oceanic and Atmospheric Sciences; Abas, M.R. bin [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[Univ. of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Cass, G.R. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States). Environmental Engineering Science Dept.; Rogge, W.F. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)]|[Florida International Univ., University Park, FL (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering; Mazurek, M.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Standley, L.J. [Academy of Natural Sciences, Avondale, PA (United States). Stroud Water Research Center; Hildemann, L.M. [Stanford Univ., CA (United States). Dept. of Civil Engineering

1995-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Optical analysis of semi and compound hyperbolic spiral solar concentrator  

SciTech Connect

In the last few years, considerable efforts have gone into the developments of non-imaging solar concentrators. They are characterized by their moderate concentration ratios (up to 10) and large angle of acceptance which allows the collection of more diffuse radiation as well as direct beam. They have the advantage of high temperature output of focusing concentrators but without diurnal tracking. The most successful one of such concentrator type is the compound parabolic (CPC) which has been extensively studied by numerous investigators. However, it is idealized for the use with flat absorber which suffers from parasitic rear loss and inefficient evacuation for the suppression of convective loss. It has also an over heating problem due to the concentration of solar radiation upon the surface of the absorber in the focal line. In the way of continuous development of the non-imaging concentrators, the authors present here the design and optical analysis of a compound hyperbolic spiral concentrator (CHSC). Its surface of reflection consists of two identical segments of a hyperbolic spiral curve, arranged symmetrical about an axis of symmetry as given. Its optical characterestics are studied and compared with those of the previously discussed HSC which will be designated as semi hyperbolic spiral concentrator (SHSC).

Rabie, L.H.

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

397

Reactivity studies of antitumor active dirhodium compounds with DNA oligonucleotides  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The study of the mechanism of action of an antitumor active drug is essential for improving the efficacy and reducing the side effects of the drug as well as for developing better alternatives. In this vein, reactions of dirhodium compounds with DNA oligonucleotides were investigated by the techniques of mass spectrometry, HPLC, and NMR spectroscopic analytical methods. The relative reactivities of three dirhodium compounds, namely Rh2(O2CCH3)4, Rh2(O2CCF3)4, and [Rh2(O2CCH3)2(CH3CN)6](BF4)2, with DNA oligonucleotides were studied and compared to the clinically used anticancer drugs cisplatin and carboplatin using both MALDI and ESI mass spectrometric methods. The compound Rh2(O2CCF3)4 exhibits the highest reactivity among the dirhodium compounds, which is comparable to cisplatin, followed by [Rh2(O2CCH3)2(CH3CN)6](BF4)2, and finally Rh2(O2CCH3)4 which is the least reactive. Various dirhodium-oligonucleotide adducts were detected with both MALDI and ESI methods, which involve substitution of different numbers of the original ligands of the given dirhodium compound. ESI MS was found to be a sufficiently soft ionization method for detecting intact metal adducts, and CID MS-MS was useful for detecting weakly bound species such as axial adducts [M+Rh2(O2CCH3)4] and for comparing the relative bond strength between ligands in the metal adduct. A combination of anion exchange HPLC purification and enzymatic digestion studies of the adducts of Rh2(O2CCH3)4 with the 5'-CCTTCAACTCTC oligonucleotide revealed that Rh2(O2CCH3)4 binds to the center or to the ends of the oligonucleotide sequence by displacement of one or two acetate groups. Kinetic products of the type [M+Rh2(O2CCH3)3] obtained from the reaction of Rh2(O2CCH3)4 with 5'-CTCTCAACTTCC were separated by employing both reverse phase and anion exchange HPLC methods. The adduct that involves binding of the dirhodium unit to the exocyclic N4 atom of C5 and the N7 of A6 was found to be most stable whereas other adducts involving binding of C3 or C12 residues are clearly less stable. Reaction of cis-[Rh2(DAP)(O2CCH3)3(CH3OH)](O2CCH3) (DAP = 1,12- diazaperylene) with 5'-CTCTCAACTTCC produced a major adduct in which DAP group intercalates between 6A and 7A in the double stranded adduct with the rhodium atom that is not coordinated to the DAP group forming a covalent bond to the N7 atom of 6A which lends stability to the adduct.

Kang, Mijeong

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

New Physics in Iridium Compounds | Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Self-Improvement of Lithium-Ion Batteries The Self-Improvement of Lithium-Ion Batteries Architecture and Viral Disease RNA Folding: A Little Cooperation Goes a Long Way A New Phase in Cellular Communication Engineering Thin-Film Oxide Interfaces Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed New Physics in Iridium Compounds DECEMBER 10, 2012 Bookmark and Share An unprecedented "magnon gap" of Sr3Ir2O7 was revealed using resonant inelastic x-ray scattering beamline at the XSD 9-ID beamline at the APS. This implies that dipolar interactions, analogous to classical bar magnets, are extremely strong in a composite spin-orbit coupled state and that these interactions control the behavior of magnetic moments at the quantum level.

399

Teasing Out the Nature of Structural Instabilities in Ceramic Compounds |  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Doubling Estimates of Light Elements in the Earth's Core Doubling Estimates of Light Elements in the Earth's Core A New Material for Warm-White LEDs Probing Ultrafast Solvation Dynamics with High Repetition-Rate Laser/X-ray Methodologies Ultrafast X-Ray Spectroscopy as a Probe of Nonequilibrium Dynamics in Ruthenium Complexes The Electronic Origin of Photoinduced Strain Science Highlights Archives: 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 2001 | 2000 | 1998 | Subscribe to APS Science Highlights rss feed Teasing Out the Nature of Structural Instabilities in Ceramic Compounds MARCH 12, 2013 Bookmark and Share The simple perovskite structure of EuTiO3 illustrated above shows the essential competing structural instabilities. At the center of the figure is the oxygen cage rotation, and to the right is the central titanium

400

Hydrogenated 5-carbon compound and method of making  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is based upon the surprising discovery that a 5-carbon compound selected from the group of 4-oxopentanoic acid, at least one lactone of 4-oxopentanoic acid, and combinations thereof, may be hydrogenated with a bimetallic catalyst of a noble metal in combination with a second metal and preserve the pendant methyl group. It was further unexpectedly discovered that the same conditions of bimetallic catalyst in the presence of hydrogen are useful for catalyzing the different intermediate reactions for example angelicalactone to gamma-valerolactone and gamma-valerolactone to 1,4-pentanediol. Finally, it was surprising that levulinic acid could be converted to 2-methyltetrahydrofuran with heating in the presence of the bimetallic catalyst and hydrogen in a single process vessel. The method of the present invention unexpectedly produced a fuel or fuel component having 2-methyltetrahydrofuran either in a yield greater than 4.5 mol % or in combination with alcohols.

Elliott, Douglas C. (Richland, WA); Frye, John G. (Richland, WA)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

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401

Detection of volatile organic compounds using surface enhanced Raman scattering  

SciTech Connect

The authors present the detection of volatile organic compounds directly in their vapor phase by surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates based on lithographically-defined two-dimensional rectangular array of nanopillars. The type of nanopillars is known as the tapered pillars. For the tapered pillars, SERS enhancement arises from the nanofocusing effect due to the sharp tip on top. SERS experiments were carried out on these substrates using various concentrations of toluene vapor. The results show that SERS signal from a toluene vapor concentration of ppm level can be achieved, and the toluene vapor can be detected within minutes of exposing the SERS substrate to the vapor. A simple adsorption model is developed which gives results matching the experimental data. The results also show promising potential for the use of these substrates in environmental monitoring of gases and vapors.

Chang, A S; Maiti, A; Ileri, N; Bora, M; Larson, C C; Britten, J A; Bond, T C

2012-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

402

Use of compound parabolic concentrator for solar energy collection  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The joint team of Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) and the University of Chicago is reporting their midyear results of a proof-of-concept investigation of the Compound Parabolic Concentrator (CPC) for solar-energy collection. The CPC is a non-imaging, optical-design concept for maximally concentrating radiant energy onto a receiver. This maximum concentration corresponds to a relative aperture (f/number) of 0.5, which is well beyond the limit for imaging collectors. We have constructed an X3 concentrating flat-plate collector 16 ft/sup 2/ in area. This collector has been tested in a trailer laboratory facility built at ANL. The optical and thermal performance of this collector was in good agreement with theory. We have constructed an X10 collector (8 ft/sup 2/) and started testing. A detailed theoretical study of the optical and thermal characteristics of the CPC design has been performed.

Rabi, A.; Sevcik, V.J.; Giugler, R.M.; Winston, R.

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Residential pollutants and ventilation strategies: Volatile organic compounds and radon  

SciTech Connect

This paper reviews literature that reports investigations of residential ventilation and indoor air quality. Two important residential pollutant classes, volatile organic compounds and radon, are examined. A companion paper examines moisture and combustion pollutants. Control strategies recommended from the review include appropriate building design to prevent or limit the sources of the pollutants within the space, proper operation and maintenance to prevent adverse conditions from developing during the building's life and appropriate use of ventilation. The characteristics of these pollutant sources suggest that ventilation systems in residences should have several properties. They should have the extra capacity available to reduce short bursts of pollution, be located close to the expected source of the contamination, and be inexpensive. Mitigation of radon is technically a major success using a form of task ventilation. Whole-house ventilation is, at best, a secondary form of control of excess radon in residences.

Grimsrud, D.T.; Hadlich, D.E.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Coso Geothermal Area (2004) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Coso Geothermal Coso Geothermal Area (2004) Exploration Activity Details Location Coso Geothermal Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date 2004 Usefulness useful DOE-funding Unknown Notes In order to test FIS for geothermal exploration, drill chips from Coso well 83-16 were analyzed, which were selected at 1000 ft intervals by Joseph Moore. Sequential crushes done by the CFS (crushfast-scan) method (Norman 1996) show that chips have a high density of homogeneous fluid inclusions. Analyses were averaged and plotted verses depth (Fig. 4), and interpreted. Fluid inclusion gas analyses done on vein minerals from drill hole 68-6 that were earlier analyzed (Adams 2000) were plotted for comparison in order to confirm that similar analyses are obtained from chips and vein

405

Thermal design of compound parabolic concentrating solar-energy collectors  

SciTech Connect

A theoretical analysis of the heat exchanges in a Compound Parabolic Concentrator solar energy collector is presented. The absorber configuration considered is that of a tube (with or without a spectrally-selective surface) either directly exposed or enclosed within one or two glass envelopes. The annular cavity formed between the tube and the surrounding envelope can be either air-filled or evacuated. The optimal annular gap, which leads to the best overall collector efficiency, has been predicted for the nonevacuated arrangement. It was found to be approximately 5 mm for the considered geometry. The evacuation of the annular cavity or the application of a selective surface, separately employed, are demonstrated to yield improvements of the same order.

Prapas, D.E.; Norton, B.; Probert, S.D.

1987-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance and magnetic resonance imaging to discriminate and identify materials  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ultra-low magnetic field NMR system can non-invasively examine containers. Database matching techniques can then identify hazardous materials within the containers. Ultra-low field NMR systems are ideal for this purpose because they do not require large powerful magnets and because they can examine materials enclosed in conductive shells such as lead shells. The NMR examination technique can be combined with ultra-low field NMR imaging, where an NMR image is obtained and analyzed to identify target volumes. Spatial sensitivity encoding can also be used to identify target volumes. After the target volumes are identified the NMR measurement technique can be used to identify their contents.

Kraus, Robert H. (Los Alamos, NM); Matlashov, Andrei N. (Los Alamos, NM); Espy, Michelle A. (Los Alamos, NM); Volegov, Petr L. (Los Alamos, NM)

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

407

Source profiles for nonmethane organic compounds in the atmosphere of Cairo, Egypt.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Profiles of the sources of nonmethane organic compounds (NMOCs) were developed for emissions from vehicles, petroleum fuels (gasoline, liquefied petroleum gas (LPG), and natural gas), a petroleum refinery, a smelter, and a cast iron factory in Cairo, Egypt. More than 100 hydrocarbons and oxygenated hydrocarbons were tentatively identified and quantified. Gasoline-vapor and whole-gasoline profiles could be distinguished from the other profiles by high concentrations of the C{sub 5} and C{sub 6} saturated hydrocarbons. The vehicle emission profile was similar to the whole-gasoline profile, with the exception of the unsaturated and aromatic hydrocarbons, which were present at higher concentrations in the vehicle emission profile. High levels of the C{sub 2}-C{sub 4} saturated hydrocarbons, particularly n-butane, were characteristic features of the petroleum refinery emissions. The smelter and cast iron factory emissions were similar to the refinery emissions; however, the levels of benzene and toluene were greater in the former two sources. The LPG and natural gas emissions contained high concentrations of n-butane and ethane, respectively. The NMOC source profiles for Cairo were distinctly different from profiles for U.S. sources, indicating that NMOC source profiles are sensitive to the particular composition of petroleum fuels that are used in a location.

Doskey, P. V.; Fukui, Y.; Sultan, M.; Maghraby, A. A.; Taher, A.; Environmental Research; Cairo Univ.

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

408

Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contacting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible compound, such as, water or a polyhydroxy compound, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of water or polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the water or polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds and the low polar or nonpolar solvent are separated by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered from recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced.

Googin, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Napier, John M. (Oak Ridge, TN); Travaglini, Michael A. (Oliver Springs, TN)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Process for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds from petroleum products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for removing halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, e.g., polychlorinated biphenyls, from petroleum products by solvent extraction. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from a petroleum product into a polar solvent by contacting the petroleum product with the polar solvent. The polar solvent is characterized by a high solubility for the extracted halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds, a low solubility for the petroleum product and considerable solvent power for polyhydroxy compound. The preferred polar solvent is dimethylformamide. A miscible compound, such as, water or a polyhydroxy compound, is added to the polar extraction solvent to increase the polarity of the polar extraction solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds are extracted from the highly-polarized mixture of water or polyhydroxy compound and polar extraction solvent into a low polar or nonpolar solvent by contacting the water or polyhydroxy compound-polar solvent mixture with the low polar or nonpolar solvent. The halogenated aliphatic and aromatic compounds and the low polar or nonpolar solvent are separated by physical means, e.g., vacuum evaporation. The polar and nonpolar solvents are recovered from recycling. The process can easily be designed for continuous operation. Advantages of the process include that the polar solvent and a major portion of the nonpolar solvent can be recycled, the petroleum products are reclaimable and the cost for disposing of waste containing polychlorinated biphenyls is significantly reduced. 1 fig.

Googin, J.M.; Napier, J.M.; Travaglini, M.A.

1983-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

410

Potential influence of iodine-containing compounds on the chemistry of the troposphere in the polar spring. I. Ozone depletion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Iodine in the atmosphere, identified largely by the presence of IO, is a ubiquitous component of the troposphere in coastal and oceanic areas. The role, if any, that iodine chemistry plays in the polar ozone depletion episodes is not known. These events are rationalized today largely in terms of Br2- and BrCl-initiated reactions. The potential for enhancement of ozone depletions through the presence of iodine-containing molecules (I{sub 2}, IBr, ICl, CH{sub 2}I{sub 2}, CH{sub 2}IBr, CH{sub 2}ICl, and CH{sub 3}I) is investigated in this study. Computer simulations of the homogeneous chemistry are made using a reasonably complete reaction mechanism for Br-, Cl- and I-containing species together with representative chemistry of trace gases in the clean troposphere. The extent of uncertain alternative pathways and efficiencies for OIO and I{sub 2}O{sub 2} photolyses are varied over a range of possible values to establish the sensitivity of the depletion events to these variables. The study shows that significant enhancements of the polar ozone depletion are expected when small amounts of iodine-containing compounds such as CH{sub 2}I{sub 2}, IBr, or ICl are present in a polar air mass containing representative Br{sub 2}-BrCl-trace gas mixtures. The synergistic effect of the iodine compounds results from additional halogen-atom formation from IO-IO, IO-BrO, and IO-ClO reactions. Measurements of IO and precursor iodine-containing compounds are encouraged for future polar spring studies, as well as currently acknowledged important trace species (O{sub 3}, CH{sub 2}O, BrO, Br{sub 2}, and BrCl).

Calvert, Jack G [ORNL; Lindberg, Steven Eric [ORNL

2004-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Methods and systems for chemoautotrophic production of organic compounds  

SciTech Connect

The present disclosure identifies pathways, mechanisms, systems and methods to confer chemoautotrophic production of carbon-based products of interest, such as sugars, alcohols, chemicals, amino acids, polymers, fatty acids and their derivatives, hydrocarbons, isoprenoids, and intermediates thereof, in organisms such that these organisms efficiently convert inorganic carbon to organic carbon-based products of interest using inorganic energy, such as formate, and in particular the use of organisms for the commercial production of various carbon-based products of interest.

Fischer, Curt R.; Che, Austin J.; Shetty, Reshma P.; Kelly, Jason R.

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

412

NREL-Using RETScreen To Identify the Most Promising Clean Energy Projects  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

NREL-Using RETScreen To Identify the Most Promising Clean Energy Projects NREL-Using RETScreen To Identify the Most Promising Clean Energy Projects Webinar Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: Using RETScreen To Identify the Most Promising Clean Energy Projects Agency/Company /Organization: National Renewable Energy Laboratory Partner: United States Department of Energy Sector: Energy Topics: Market analysis, Pathways analysis, Technology characterizations Resource Type: Training materials, Software/modeling tools, Webinar User Interface: Spreadsheet Website: www.nrel.gov/applying_technologies/state_local_activities/webinar_2010 Cost: Free Using RETScreen To Identify the Most Promising Clean Energy Projects Screenshot References: Using RETScreen To Identify the Most Promising Clean Energy Projects[1] Logo: Using RETScreen To Identify the Most Promising Clean Energy Projects

413

Cross-study and cross-omics comparisons of three nephrotoxic compounds reveal mechanistic insights and new candidate biomarkers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The European InnoMed-PredTox project was a collaborative effort between 15 pharmaceutical companies, 2 small and mid-sized enterprises, and 3 universities with the goal of delivering deeper insights into the molecular mechanisms of kidney and liver toxicity and to identify mechanism-linked diagnostic or prognostic safety biomarker candidates by combining conventional toxicological parameters with 'omics' data. Mechanistic toxicity studies with 16 different compounds, 2 dose levels, and 3 time points were performed in male Crl: WI(Han) rats. Three of the 16 investigated compounds, BI-3 (FP007SE), Gentamicin (FP009SF), and IMM125 (FP013NO), induced kidney proximal tubule damage (PTD). In addition to histopathology and clinical chemistry, transcriptomics microarray and proteomics 2D-DIGE analysis were performed. Data from the three PTD studies were combined for a cross-study and cross-omics meta-analysis of the target organ. The mechanistic interpretation of kidney PTD-associated deregulated transcripts revealed, in addition to previously described kidney damage transcript biomarkers such as KIM-1, CLU and TIMP-1, a number of additional deregulated pathways congruent with histopathology observations on a single animal basis, including a specific effect on the complement system. The identification of new, more specific biomarker candidates for PTD was most successful when transcriptomics data were used. Combining transcriptomics data with proteomics data added extra value.

Matheis, Katja A., E-mail: katja.matheis@boehringer-ingelheim.com [Boehringer Ingelheim Pharma GmbH and Co. KG, Biberach an der Riss (Germany); Com, Emmanuelle [Sanofi-Aventis, Paris (France); High-Throughput Proteomics Core Facility OUEST-genopole (registered) , Rennes (France); Gautier, Jean-Charles [Sanofi-Aventis, Paris (France); Guerreiro, Nelson [Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research (NIBR), Basel (Switzerland); Brandenburg, Arnd; Gmuender, Hans [GeneData AG, Basel (Switzerland); Sposny, Alexandra; Hewitt, Philip [Merck KGaA, Darmstadt (Germany); Amberg, Alexander [Sanofi-Aventis, Frankfurt (Germany); Boernsen, Olaf [Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research (NIBR), Basel (Switzerland); Riefke, Bjoern [Bayer Schering Pharma AG, Berlin (Germany); Hoffmann, Dana; Mally, Angela [Department of Toxicology, University of Wuerzburg, Wuerzburg (Germany); Kalkuhl, Arno [Boehringer Ingelheim Pharma GmbH and Co. KG, Biberach an der Riss (Germany); Suter, Laura [F. Hoffmann-La Roche, Ltd., Basel (Switzerland); Dieterle, Frank; Staedtler, Frank [Novartis Institutes for BioMedical Research (NIBR), Basel (Switzerland)

2011-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

414

Conversion of depleted uranium hexafluoride to a solid uranium compound  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for converting UF.sub.6 to a solid uranium compound such as UO.sub.2 and CaF. The UF.sub.6 vapor form is contacted with an aqueous solution of NH.sub.4 OH at a pH greater than 7 to precipitate at least some solid uranium values as a solid leaving an aqueous solution containing NH.sub.4 OH and NH.sub.4 F and remaining uranium values. The solid uranium values are separated from the aqueous solution of NH.sub.4 OH and NH.sub.4 F and remaining uranium values which is then diluted with additional water precipitating more uranium values as a solid leaving trace quantities of uranium in a dilute aqueous solution. The dilute aqueous solution is contacted with an ion-exchange resin to remove substantially all the uranium values from the dilute aqueous solution. The dilute solution being contacted with Ca(OH).sub.2 to precipitate CaF.sub.2 leaving dilute NH.sub.4 OH.

Rothman, Alan B. (Willowbrook, IL); Graczyk, Donald G. (Lemont, IL); Essling, Alice M. (Elmhurst, IL); Horwitz, E. Philip (Naperville, IL)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Advanced heat pump for the recovery of volatile organic compounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Emissions of Volatile Organic Compounds (VOC) from stationary industrial and commercial sources represent a substantial portion of the total US VOC emissions. The Toxic-Release Inventory'' of The US Environmental Protection Agency estimates this to be at about 3 billion pounds per year (1987 estimates). The majority of these VOC emissions are from coating processes, cleaning processes, polymer production, fuel production and distribution, foam blowing,refrigerant production, and wood products production. The US Department of Energy's (DOE) interest in the recovery of VOC stems from the energy embodied in the recovered solvents and the energy required to dispose of them in an environmentally acceptable manner. This Phase I report documents 3M's work in close working relationship with its subcontractor Nuclear Consulting Services (Nucon) for the preliminary conceptual design of an advanced Brayton cycle heat pump for the recovery of VOC. Nucon designed Brayton cycle heat pump for the recovery of methyl ethyl ketone and toluene from coating operations at 3M Weatherford, OK, was used as a base line for the work under cooperative agreement between 3M and ODE. See appendix A and reference (4) by Kovach of Nucon. This cooperative agreement report evaluates and compares an advanced Brayton cycle heat pump for solvent recovery with other competing technologies for solvent recovery and reuse. This advanced Brayton cycle heat pump is simple (very few components), highly reliable (off the shelf components), energy efficient and economically priced.

Not Available

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Renyi divergences and the classical capacity of finite compound channels  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show two-sided bounds between the conventional quantum R\\'enyi divergences and the new notion of R\\'enyi divergences introduced recently in M\\"uller-Lennert, Dupuis, Szehr, Fehr and Tomamichel, arXiv:1306.3142, and Wilde, Winter, Yang, arXiv:1306.1586. The bounds imply that the two versions can be used interchangeably near alpha=1, and hence one can benefit from the best properties of both when proving coding theorems in the case of asymptotically vanishing error. We illustrate this by giving a short and simple proof for the achievability of the capacity formula given by Datta and Dorlas for averaged channels with finitely many i.i.d. branches, which yields the same lower bound for the classical capacity of finite compound channels. The proof is based on very general arguments; the main ingredients are Hayashi and Nagaoka's single-shot random coding theorem, and a weak quasi-concavity property of the Renyi divergences that we also establish here. We also use our techniques to give a new proof for the direct rate of the hypothesis testing problem between a composite i.i.d. null hypothesis and a simple i.i.d. alternative hypothesis.

Milan Mosonyi

2013-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

417

Mechanistic Study of the Acid Degradation of Lignin Model Compounds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lignin is a major constituent of biomass, which remains underutilized in selective biomass conversion strategies to renewable fuels and chemicals. Here we are interested in understanding the mechanisms related to the acid deconstruction of lignin with a combined theoretical and experimental approach. Two model dimers with a b-O-4 aryl ether linkage (2-phenoxy-1-phenethanol and 2-phenoxy-1-phenyl-1,3 propanediol) and model dimmers with an a-O-4 aryl ether linkage were synthesized and deconstructed in H2SO4. The major products of the acidolysis of the b-O-4 compounds consisted of phenol and two aldehydes, phenylacetaldehyde and benzaldehyde. Quantum mechanical calculations were employed to elucidate possible deconstruction mechanisms with transition state theory. To confirm proposed mechanisms several possible intermediates were studied under similar acidolysis conditions. Although the resonance time for cleavage was on the order several hours, we have shown that the cleavage of the aryl ether linkage affords phenol and aldehydes. We would next like to utilize our mechanism of aryl ether cleavage in actual lignin.

Sturgeon, M.; Kim, S.; Chmely, S. C.; Foust, T. D.; Beckham, G. T.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Development effort of sheet molding compound (SMC) parabolic trough panels  

SciTech Connect

The objectives of the development effort are to: investigate the problems of molding parabolic trough solar reflector panels of sheet molding compound (SMC); develop molding techniques and processes by which silvered glass reflector sheets can be integrally molded into SMC trough panels; provide representative prototype panels for evaluation; and provide information regarding the technical feasibility of molding SMC panels in high volume production. The approach taken to meet the objectives was to design the parabolic panel, fabricate a prototype die, choose an SMC formulation and mold the glass and SMC together into a vertex to rim mirrored panel. The main thrust of the program was to successfully co-mold a mirrored glass sheet with the SMC. Results indicate that mirrored glass sheets, if properly strengthened to withstand the temperature and pressure of the molding process, can be successfully molded with SMC in a single press stroke using standard compression molding techniques. The finalized design of the trough panel is given. The SMC formulation chosen is a low shrink, low profile SMC using 40% by weight one inch chopped glass fibers in a uv stabilized polyester resin matrix. A program to test for the adhesion between mirrored glass sheets and the SMC is discussed briefly. (LEW)

Kirsch, P.A.; Champion, R.L.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

419

Experimental natural convective studies within a compound parabolic concentrator enclosure  

SciTech Connect

The contribution due to natural convection within a compound parabolic concentrator enclosure has been experimentally determined. These studies have been conducted within a 4X-CPC collector, having a receiver width of 3.175 cm (1.25 inches) and 2.44 m (96 inches) in length. The receiver was heated electrically while the aperture was provided with a duct that was cooled by water. The limbs of the collector were fabricated from aluminum. Temperatures were directly obtained with copper-constantan thermocouples located throughout the entire enclosure and provided the basis needed to calculate the different modes of heat transfer. The constant heat flux at the receiver translated to a nearly isothermal state. The rates of natural convection have been expressed in terms of a Nu-Ra correlation where 1.0x10/sup 7/ < Ra < 4.0x10/sup 7/. To suppress natural convection, a horizontal partition was introduced at different heights between the receiver and aperture. These results have been expressed as heat fluxes and temperature differences between the receiver and the aperture. This information made possible a comparison between the aperture-partition enclosure and a flat plate geometry.

Tatara, R.A.; Thodos, G.

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

420

Two dimensional compound parabolic concentrating collectors. Final report  

SciTech Connect

Seven different compound parabolic concentrating (CPC) collector designs were tested by the ray trace method. The comparison of the collector was performed by simulating sunlight striking the designs at various angles of the sun during the course of the day. All of the CPC solar collector designs used the same type of reflective material, Kinglux reflective aluminum, which is a highly reflective surface used in solar applications. The CPC solar collector designs were subjected to a light source consisting of one helium-neon laser. The laser, to represent the effect of sunlight on the stationary CPC solar collector, was slowly moved across the aperture opening. This is explained in detail. Mathematic equations were used to develop the different CPC solar collector designs. The different shapes for each collector design, were acquired by varying the size of the absorber tube, and also by varying the acceptance angle of the collector. The seven CPC solar collector designs were tested, and the optimal design was selected for experimental testing.

Henry, J.P.; Gamble, N.T.; Cassidy, S.A.

1983-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identified compound tic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

New Soil Volatile Organic Compound Samplers U S  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Soil Volatile Organic Soil Volatile Organic Compound Samplers U . S . D e p a r t m e n t o f E n e r g y * O f f i c e o f F o s s i l E n e r g y N a t i o n a l E n e r g y T e c h n o l o g y L a b o r a t o r y Successes AdvAnced ReseARch To support coal and power systems development, NETL's Advanced Research Program conducts a range of pre-competitive research focused on breakthroughs in materials and processes, coal utilization science, sensors and controls, computational energy science, and bioprocessing-opening new avenues to gains in power plant efficiency, reliability, and environmental quality. NETL also sponsors cooperative educational initiatives in University Coal Research, Historically Black Colleges and Universities, and Other Minority Institutions. Accomplishments P Process improvement P Cost reduction P Greater efficiency

422

Identifying and Resolving Issues in EnergyPlus and DOE-2 Window Heat Transfer Calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Issues in building energy software accuracy are often identified by comparative, analytical, and empirical testing as delineated in the BESTEST methodology. As described in this report, window-related discrepancies in heating energy predictions were identified through comparative testing of EnergyPlus and DOE-2. Multiple causes for discrepancies were identified, and software fixes are recommended to better align the models with the intended algorithms and underlying test data.

Booten, C.; Kruis, N.; Christensen, C.

2012-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Precipitate hydrolysis process for the removal of organic compounds from nuclear waste slurries  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for removing organic compounds from a nuclear waste slurry comprising reacting a mixture of radioactive waste precipitate slurry and an acid in the presence of a catalytically effective amount of a copper(II) catalyst whereby the organic compounds in the precipitate slurry are hydrolyzed to form volatile organic compounds which are separated from the reacting mixture. The resulting waste slurry, containing less than 10 percent of the original organic compounds, is subsequently blended with high level radioactive sludge land transferred to a vitrification facility for processing into borosilicate glass for long-term storage. 2 figs., 3 tabs.

Doherty, J.P.; Marek, J.C.

1987-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

424

Nonstoichiometry in A BO3 compounds similar to PbTiO3  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A statistical thermodynamic model of the nonstoichiometry in A BO3 compounds possessing volatile AO species is applied to mass?loss Knudsen effusion experimental (p

James F. Shackelford; Robert L. Holman

1975-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Process for preparing a chemical compound enriched in isotope content. [nitrogen 15-enriched nitric acid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process to prepare a chemical enriched in isotope content includes: a chemical exchange reaction between a first and second compound which yields an isotopically enriched first compound and an isotopically depleted second compound; the removal of a portion of the first compound as product and the removal of a portion of the second compound as spent material; the conversion of the remainder of the first compound to the second compound for reflux at the product end of the chemical exchange reaction region; the conversion of the remainder of the second compound to the first compound for reflux at the spent material end of the chemical exchange region; and the cycling of the additional chemicals produced by one conversion reaction to the other conversion reaction, for consumption therein. One of the conversion reactions is an oxidation reaction, and the energy that it yields is used to drive the other conversion reaction, a reduction. The reduction reaction is carried out in a solid polymer electrolyte electrolytic reactor. The overall process is energy efficient and yields no waste by-products. A particular embodiment of the process in the production of nitrogen-15-enriched nitric acid.

Michaels, E.D.

1981-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

426

Development effort on sheet-molding compound (SMC) parabolic-trough panels  

SciTech Connect

The approach taken to develop integrally molded reflective glass with sheet molding compound into parabolic trough solar reflectors is described in detail. Results indicate that mirrored glass sheets, if properly strengthened to withstand the temperature and pressure of the molding process, can be successfully molded with sheet molding compound in a single press stroke using standard compression molding techniques. The silver reflective surface must be coated with an adhesive mixture that provides both protection of the silver and adhesion to the sheet molding compound. The sheet molding compound must provide the strength and stiffness required of a structure backing material. (LEW)

Kirsch, P.A.

1982-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Carbon sequestration with enhanced gas recovery: Identifying candidate sites for pilot study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Process modeling of carbon sequestration with enhanced gas2001. Reichle, D. et al.. Carbon sequestration research andCarbon Sequestration with Enhanced Gas Recovery: Identifying

Oldenburg, C.M.; Benson, S.M.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Asthma patients with specific genotypes identified for fish oil treatment trial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

genotypes identified for fish oil treatment trial Thecommon chronic disease. Fish oils containing omega-3 fattyinflammatory diseases. Fish oil inhibits the production of

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Scientists Identify New Quaternary Materials for Solar Cell Absorbers (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights, Science  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Research provides insight for exploring use of earth-abundant quaternary semiconductors for large-scale solar cell applications. For large-scale solar electricity generation, it is critical to find new material that is Earth abundant and easily manufactured. Previous experimental studies suggest that Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} could be a strong candidate absorber materials for large-scale thin-film solar cells due to its optimal bandgap, high adsorption coefficient, and ease of synthesis. However, due to the complicated nature of the quaternary compound, it is unclear whether other quaternary compounds have physical properties suitable for solar cell application. Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Fudan University, and University College London have performed systematic searches of quaternary semiconductors using a sequential cation mutation method in which the material properties of the quaternary compounds can be derived and understood through the evolution from the binary, to ternary, and to quaternary compounds. The searches revealed that in addition to Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4}, Cu{sub 2}ZnGeSe{sub 4} and Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} are also suitable quaternary materials for solar cell absorbers. Through the extensive study of defect and alloy properties of these materials, the researchers propose that to maximize solar cell performance, growth of Cu{sub 2}ZnSnS{sub 4} under Cu-poor/Zn-rich conditions will be optimal and the formation of Cu{sub 2}ZnSn(S,Se){sub 4} alloy will be beneficial in improving solar cell performance.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

The Use of Conditional Probability Functions and Potential Source Contribution Functions to Identify Source Regions and Advection Pathways of Hydrocarbon Emissions in Houston, Texas  

SciTech Connect

In this study, we demonstrate the utility of conditional probability functions (CPFs), potential source contribution functions (PSCFs), and hierarchical clustering analysis to identify the source region and transport pathways of hydrocarbons measured at five photochemical assessment monitoring stations (PAMS) near the Houston ship channel from June to October 2003. Over 50 volatile organic compound (VOC) concentrations were measured on the hourly collected samples. Routine surface observations of wind directions measured at each of the receptor sites were used extensively. We show that VOCs with similar CPF patterns likely have common transport pathways. This was established with the multivariate technique, which uses the hierarchical clustering analysis to allow clusters of groups of VOCs to form with similar CPF patterns. This method revealed that alkenes, and in particular those with geometric isomers such as cis-/trans-2-butene and cis-/trans-2-pentene, have similar CPF patterns. The alkane isomers often show CPF patterns among themselves, and similarly, aromatic compounds often show similar patterns among themselves too. We also show how trajectory information can be used in conjunction with the PSCF analysis to produce a graphic analysis suggesting specific source areas for a given VOC. The use of these techniques in the chemically and meteorologically complex environment of Houston, Texas, suggests its further utility in other areas with relatively simpler conditions.

Xie, YuLong; Berkowitz, Carl M.

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

An ant colony optimization based algorithm for identifying gene regulatory elements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is one of the most important tasks in bioinformatics to identify the regulatory elements in gene sequences. Most of the existing algorithms for identifying regulatory elements are inclined to converge into a local optimum, and have high time complexity. ... Keywords: Ant colony optimization, Gene regulatory elements, Motif identification

Wei Liu, Hanwu Chen, Ling Chen

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Study to Identify Potential Improvements of Operation Tools and Support Systems - Non-Proprietary  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This project analyzed safety significant events (SSEs) in several nuclear power plants to identify where improvements in instrumentation and control (IC) and information technology (IT) could prevent or mitigate some of these events. This report identifies potential improvement paths that could enhance reliability and availability for implementation consideration by utilities where appropriate at their own plants.

2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

433

DOE to Invest up to $2.3 Million to Identify Renewable Energy Zones In  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Invest up to $2.3 Million to Identify Renewable Energy Zones to Invest up to $2.3 Million to Identify Renewable Energy Zones In Western States, May 28, 2008 DOE to Invest up to $2.3 Million to Identify Renewable Energy Zones In Western States, May 28, 2008 DOE to Invest up to $2.3 Million to Identify Renewable Energy Zones In Western States. The Renewable Energy Zones Initiative will promote regional transmission planning and encourage the development of renewable sources of energy. DOE to Invest up to $2.3 Million to Identify Renewable Energy Zones In Western States, May 28, 2008 More Documents & Publications Senior DOE Official to Deliver Remarks at Western Governors' Association Renewable Energy Zones Initiative Launch Western Renewable Energy Zones-Phase 1 Report Statement of Patricia Hoffman Acting Assistant Secretary for Electricity

434

Opportunities for reducing volatile organic compound emissions in manufacturing office furniture partitions: a feasibility analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A feasibility analysis is reported of reduction opportunities for volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions in manufacturing office furniture partitions. The pollution prevention (P2) methodology as defined by the Ontario Ministry of the Environment ... Keywords: emissions, manufacturing, office furniture, pollution prevention, volatile organic compound

Frank S. Luisser; Marc A. Rosen

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Phenyl boron-based compounds as anion receptors for non-aqueous battery electrolytes  

SciTech Connect

Novel fluorinated boronate-based compounds which act as anion receptors in non-aqueous battery electrolytes are provided. When added to non-aqueous battery electrolytes, the fluorinated boronate-based compounds of the invention enhance ionic conductivity and cation transference number of non-aqueous electrolytes. The fluorinated boronate-based anion receptors include different fluorinated alkyl and aryl groups.

Lee, Hung Sui (East Setauket, NY); Yang, Xiao-Qing (Port Jefferson Station, NY); McBreen, James (Bellport, NY); Sun, Xuehui (Middle Island, NY)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Catalytic reforming and hydrocracking of organic compounds employing promoted zinc titanate as the catalytic agent  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The catalytic reforming of a feedstock which contains at least one reformable organic compound or the hydrocracking of a feedstock which contains at least one hydrocrackable organic compound is carried out in the presence of a catalyst composition comprising zinc, titanium and rhenium.

Drehman, L.E.; Farha, F.E.

1981-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

437

Catalytic reforming and hydrocracking of organic compounds employing zinc titanate as the catalytic agent  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The catalytic reforming of a feedstock which contains at least one reformable organic compound or the hydrocracking of a feedstock which contains at least one hydrocrackable organic compound is carried out in the presence of a catalyst composition comprising zinc and titanium.

Drehman, L.E.; Farha, F.E.; Walker, D.W.

1981-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

438

Hydroxymethyl phosphine compounds for use as diagnostic and therapeutic pharmaceuticals and method of making same  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A compound and method of making a compound for use as a diagnostic or therapeutic pharmaceutical comprises at least one functionalized hydroxyalkyl phosphine donor group and one or more sulfur or nitrogen donor and a metal combined with the ligand. 21 figs.

Katti, K.V.; Karra, S.R.; Berning, D.E.; Smith, C.J.; Volkert, W.A.; Ketring, A.R.

1999-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

439

Scientists Identify New Family of Iron-Based Absorber Materials for Solar Cells (Fact Sheet), NREL Highlights, Science  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Use of Earth-abundant materials in solar absorber films is critical for expanding the reach of photovoltaic (PV) technologies. The use of Earth-abundant and inexpensive Fe in PV was proposed more than 25 years ago in the form of FeS{sub 2} pyrite - fool's gold. Unfortunately, the material has been plagued by performance problems that to this day are both persistent and not well understood. Researchers from the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Oregon State University, working collaboratively in the Center for Inverse Design, an Energy Frontier Research Center, have uncovered several new insights into the problems of FeS{sub 2}. They have used these advances to propose and implement design rules that can be used to identify new Fe-containing materials that can circumvent the limitations of FeS{sub 2} pyrite. The team has identified that it is the unavoidable metallic secondary phases and surface defects coexisting near the FeS{sub 2} thin-film surfaces and grain boundaries that limit its open-circuit voltage, rather than the S vacancies in the bulk, which has long been commonly assumed. The materials Fe{sub 2}SiS{sub 4} and Fe{sub 2}GeS{sub 4} hold considerable promise as PV absorbers. The ternary Si compound is especially attractive, as it contains three of the more abundant low-cost elements available today. The band gap (E{sub g} = 1.5 eV) from both theory and experiment is higher than those of c-Si and FeS{sub 2}, offering better absorption of the solar spectrum and potentially higher solar cell efficiencies. More importantly, these materials do not have metallic secondary phase problems as seen in FeS{sub 2}. High calculated formation energies of donor-type defects are consistent with p-type carriers in thin films and are prospects for high open-circuit voltages in cells.

Not Available

2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Method of upgrading oils containing hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a multi-stepped method of converting an oil which is produced by various biomass and coal conversion processes and contains primarily single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline. The single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds in a raw oil material are first deoxygenated to produce a deoxygenated oil material containing single and multiple ring aromatic compounds. Then, water is removed from the deoxygenated oil material. The next step is distillation to remove the single ring aromatic compounds as gasoline. In the third step, the multiple ring aromatics remaining in the deoxygenated oil material are cracked in the presence of hydrogen to produce a cracked oil material containing single ring aromatic compounds. Finally, the cracked oil material is then distilled to remove the single ring aromatics as gasoline.

Baker, E.G.; Elliott, D.C.

1993-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identified compound tic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Step 2. Identify the Code and Compliance Path | Building Energy Codes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

2. Identify the Code and Compliance Path 2. Identify the Code and Compliance Path It is important to review the submitted documentation and identify which code was used for the building. Next, to determine whether the building complies with that code, the path used to demonstrate compliance must be identified. There are several compliance paths available in the 2009 and 2012 IECC and ASHRAE Standards 90.1-2007 and 90.1-2010. Each of these codes/standards contains a prescriptive path that clearly states specific requirements. Prescriptive paths limit design freedom. Each of these codes/standards also has a performance-based path that provides more design freedom and can lead to innovative design, but involves more complex energy simulations and tradeoffs between systems. Residential and smaller commercial buildings

442

DOE to Invest up to $2.3 Million to Identify Renewable Energy Zones in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

.3 Million to Identify Renewable Energy Zones .3 Million to Identify Renewable Energy Zones in Western States DOE to Invest up to $2.3 Million to Identify Renewable Energy Zones in Western States May 28, 2008 - 12:32pm Addthis The Renewable Energy Zones Initiative will promote regional transmission planning and encourage the development of renewable sources of energy WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Kevin Kolevar today announced the Department's plans to contribute up to $2.3 million over three years, subject to annual appropriations, to identify areas in the Western United States with vast renewable energy resources, and expedite the development and delivery of those resources to meet regional energy needs. The Western Renewable Energy Zones (WREZ) project, launched by the Western

443

DOE to Invest up to $2.3 Million to Identify Renewable Energy Zones in  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

to Invest up to $2.3 Million to Identify Renewable Energy Zones to Invest up to $2.3 Million to Identify Renewable Energy Zones in Western States DOE to Invest up to $2.3 Million to Identify Renewable Energy Zones in Western States May 28, 2008 - 1:58pm Addthis The Renewable Energy Zones Initiative will promote regional transmission planning and encourage the development of renewable sources of energy WASHINGTON, DC - U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Assistant Secretary for Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability Kevin Kolevar today announced the Department's plans to contribute up to $2.3 million over three years, subject to annual appropriations, to identify areas in the Western United States with vast renewable energy resources, and expedite the development and delivery of those resources to meet regional energy needs. The

444

Step 6. Identify and Overcome the Barriers of Adoption | Building Energy  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6. Identify and Overcome the Barriers of Adoption 6. Identify and Overcome the Barriers of Adoption Description It is important for a state or jurisdiction to identify and overcome a variety of political, economic, and technical challenges when adopting or updating an energy code. Confusion throughout the process and unclear adoption language are two of the most common barriers associated with code adoption. Other barriers identified by advocates and stakeholders include initial cost, limited outreach and education resources, cost and availability of code support information, and state and local confusion. These barriers are often resolved by amending the adoption process, providing code education, or selecting a model energy code for adoption. Adoption Process The adoption process itself can be a barrier to code adoption. States

445

Tracking Sooty Shearwaters to Identify Critical At-Sea Habitats in the California Current  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TRACKING SOOTY SHEARWATERS TO IDENTIFY CRITICAL AT-SEAfrom April to October. The tracking data were analyzed to:Grant project complements a tracking study begun in 2004 by

Harvey, James; Adams, Josh

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2012-003 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

3 Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2012-003 This document waives certain patent rights the Department of Energy (DOE) has to inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice...

447

Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2012-004 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2012-004 This document waives certain patent rights the Department of Energy (DOE) has to inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice...

448

Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2012-005 | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

5 Identified Patent Waiver W(I)2012-005 This document waives certain patent rights the Department of Energy (DOE) has to inventions conceived or first actually reduced to practice...

449

Web Science 2.0: Identifying Trends through Semantic Social Network Analysis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We introduce a novel set of social network analysis based algorithms for mining the Web, blogs, and online forums to identify trends and find the people launching these new trends. These algorithms have been implemented ...

Gloor, Peter A.

450

Automated MRI measures identify individuals with mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Mild cognitive impairment can represent a transitional state between normal ageing and Alzheimer's disease. Non-invasive diagnostic methods are needed to identify mild cognitive impairment individuals for early therapeutic ...

Desikan, Rahul S.

451

Identifying and Validating Irregular Mutual Exclusion Synchronization in Explicitly Parallel Programs (Research Note)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Existing work on mutual exclusion synchronization is based on a structural definition of mutex bodies. Although correct, this structural notion fails to identify many important locking patterns present in some programs. In this paper we present a novel ...

Diego Novillo; Ronald C. Unrau; Jonathan Schaeffer

2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Identifying Periodic Components in Atmospheric Data Using a Family of Minimum Variance Spectral Estimators  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work describes the application of a recently developed signal processing technique for identifying periodic components in the presence of unknown colored noise. Specifically, the application of this technique to the identification of ...

Christopher K. Wikle; Peter J. Sherman; Tsing-Chang Chen

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Characteristics of Radar-Identified Big Drop Zones in Swiss Hailstorms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The characteristics of the so-called radar-identified big drop zones (rBDZ) have been investigated. The study employs radar observations of several thunderstorms and simultaneous microphysical and vertical wind measurements with a penetrating T-...

Albert Waldvogel; Laszlo Klein; Dennis J. Musil; Paul L. Smith

1987-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Identifying Doppler Velocity Contamination Caused by Migrating Birds. Part II: Bayes Identification and Probability Tests  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the Bayesian statistical decision theory, a probabilistic quality control (QC) technique is developed to identify and flag migrating-bird-contaminated sweeps of level II velocity scans at the lowest elevation angle using the QC ...

Shun Liu; Qin Xu; Pengfei Zhang

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

A Method to Identify Convective Cells within Multicell Thunderstorms from Multiple Doppler Radar Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Convective cell identification methods, besides their operational utility, are useful to identify cells, to understand cell interactions within multicell thunderstorms, and to distinguish between convective and stratiform regions within mesoscale ...

James R. Stalker; Kevin R. Knupp

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

An Efficient, General-Purpose Technique for Identifying Storm Cells in Geospatial Images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Existing techniques for identifying, associating, and tracking storms rely on heuristics and are not transferrable between different types of geospatial images. Yet, with the multitude of remote sensing instruments and the number of channels and ...

Valliappa Lakshmanan; Kurt Hondl; Robert Rabin

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

The compact Selaginella genome identifies changes in gene content associated with the evolution of vascular plants  

SciTech Connect

We report the genome sequence of the nonseed vascular plant, Selaginella moellendorffii, and by comparative genomics identify genes that likely played important roles in the early evolution of vascular plants and their subsequent evolution

Grigoriev, Igor V.; Banks, Jo Ann; Nishiyama, Tomoaki; Hasebe, Mitsuyasu; Bowman, John L.; Gribskov, Michael; dePamphilis, Claude; Albert, Victor A.; Aono, Naoki; Aoyama, Tsuyoshi; Ambrose, Barbara A.; Ashton, Neil W.; Axtell, Michael J.; Barker, Elizabeth; Barker, Michael S.; Bennetzen, Jeffrey L.; Bonawitz, Nicholas D.; Chapple, Clint; Cheng, Chaoyang; Correa, Luiz Gustavo Guedes; Dacre, Michael; DeBarry, Jeremy; Dreyer, Ingo; Elias, Marek; Engstrom, Eric M.; Estelle, Mark; Feng, Liang; Finet, Cedric; Floyd, Sandra K.; Frommer, Wolf B.; Fujita, Tomomichi; Gramzow, Lydia; Gutensohn, Michael; Harholt, Jesper; Hattori, Mitsuru; Heyl, Alexander; Hirai, Tadayoshi; Hiwatashi, Yuji; Ishikawa, Masaki; Iwata, Mineko; Karol, Kenneth G.; Koehler, Barbara; Kolukisaoglu, Uener; Kubo, Minoru; Kurata, Tetsuya; Lalonde, Sylvie; Li, Kejie; Li, Ying; Litt, Amy; Lyons, Eric; Manning, Gerard; Maruyama, Takeshi; Michael, Todd P.; Mikami, Koji; Miyazaki, Saori; Morinaga, Shin-ichi; Murata, Takashi; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd; Nelson, David R.; Obara, Mari; Oguri, Yasuko; Olmstead, Richard G.; Onodera, Naoko; Petersen, Bent Larsen; Pils, Birgit; Prigge, Michael; Rensing, Stefan A.; Riano-Pachon, Diego Mauricio; Roberts, Alison W.; Sato, Yoshikatsu; Scheller, Henrik Vibe; Schulz, Burkhard; Schulz, Christian; Shakirov, Eugene V.; Shibagaki, Nakako; Shinohara, Naoki; Shippen, Dorothy E.; Sorensen, Iben; Sotooka, Ryo; Sugimoto, Nagisa; Sugita, Mamoru; Sumikawa, Naomi; Tanurdzic, Milos; Theilsen, Gunter; Ulvskov, Peter; Wakazuki, Sachiko; Weng, Jing-Ke; Willats, William W.G.T.; Wipf, Daniel; Wolf, Paul G.; Yang, Lixing; Zimmer, Andreas D.; Zhu, Qihui; Mitros, Therese; Hellsten, Uffe; Loque, Dominique; Otillar, Robert; Salamov, Asaf; Schmutz, Jeremy; Shapiro, Harris; Lindquist, Erika; Lucas, Susan; Rokhsar, Daniel

2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

458

Phylogenetic & Physiological Profiling of Microbial Communities of Contaminated Soils/Sediments: Identifying Microbial consortia...  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The goals of this study were: (1) survey the microbial community in soil samples from a site contaminated with heavy metals using new rapid molecular techniques that are culture-independent; (2) identify phylogenetic signatures of microbial populations that correlate with metal ion contamination; and (3) cultivate these diagnostic strains using traditional as well as novel cultivation techniques in order to identify organisms that may be of value in site evaluation/management or bioremediation.

Terence L. Marsh

2004-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

459

Identifying Inefficient Single-Family Homes With Utility Bill Analysis: Preprint  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Differentiating between energy-efficient and inefficient single-family homes on a community scale helps identify and prioritize candidates for energy-efficiency upgrades. Prescreening diagnostic procedures can further retrofit efforts by providing efficiency information before a site-visit is conducted. We applied the prescreening diagnostic to a simulated community of homes in Boulder, Colorado and analyzed energy consumption data to identify energy-inefficient homes.

Casey, S.; Krarti, M.; Bianchi, M.; Roberts, D.

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Sorption of organic compounds in the aqueous phase onto tire rubber  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Batch sorption tests were conducted to investigate the sorption capacity of organic compounds by ground tire and to assess the effects of the presence of other organic compounds, ionic strength, pH, ground tire particle size, and temperature on sorption. None of the factors were significant under the conditions tested, m-Xylene had the highest partition coefficient, followed by ethylbenzene, toluene, trichloroethylene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, chloroform, and methylene chloride (13 L/kg). The partition coefficients had a logarithmic linear relationship with the octanol-water partition coefficients. The diffusion coefficients of the compounds tested were in the range of 10{sup {minus}8} cm{sup 2}/s. The diffusion coefficients did not correlate well with the physical/chemical properties, such as molecular size, of the compounds tested. The heat of solutions of the compounds tested had relatively low values. Thus, the sorption may not be affected significantly by temperature change. Organic compounds sorbed onto tire rubber appear to be sorbed primarily onto tire rubber polymeric materials and partially carbon black in the tire rubber. Overall, ground tire shows significant capacity as a sorbent of organic compounds.

Kim, J.Y.; Park, J.K.; Edil, T.B. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States). Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering

1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

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461

Generation of shock/discontinuity compound structures through magnetic reconnection in the geomagnetic tail  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We use 1-D hybrid code to simulate the generation and evolution of MHD discontinuities associated with magnetic reconnection in a current sheet. It is found that the leakage of slow shock (SS) downstream particles to upstream region tends to increase the ion parallel temperature and temperature anisotropy with {beta}{sub i||}/{beta}{sub i Up-Tack } Much-Greater-Than 1, where {beta}{sub i||}({beta}{sub i Up-Tack }) is the ion parallel (perpendicular) beta. As a result, the propagation speed of rotational discontinuity (RD) is highly reduced and RD becomes attached to SS, leading to formation of various compound structures in the reconnection outflow region. Four types of compound structure are found in our simulations: (a) RD-SS compound structure: the RD is attached to the leading part of SS, (b) SS-RD (DD) compound structure: RD is attached to the rear part of SS, (c) SS-RD-SS compound structure: RD is trapped inside SS, and (d) switch-off slow shock (SSS) with a rotational wave train. The type of compound structure generated depends on initial ion beta {beta}{sub i0} and magnetic shear angle {phi}. RD tends to move in front of SS to form an RD-SS compound structure for cases with low {beta}{sub i0}. RD stays behind SS and form an SS-RD (DD) compound structure for large {beta}{sub i0}. The SS-RD-SS compound structure is formed for intermediate values of {beta}{sub i0}. When the shear angle is 180 Degree-Sign , SSS with a wave train is formed.

Weng, C. J. [Department of Physics, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan 701, Taiwan (China); Institute of Space Science, National Central University, Jungli 320, Taiwan (China); Lin, C. C. [Chemical Systems Research Division, Chung-Shan Institute of Science and Technology, Longtan 325, Taiwan (China); Lee, L. C. [Institute of Earth Science, Academia Sinica, Nankang 115, Taiwan (China); Institute of Space Science, National Central University, Jungli 320, Taiwan (China); Chao, J. K. [Institute of Space Science, National Central University, Jungli 320, Taiwan (China)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

462

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Kilauea Southwest Rift And South Flank  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Flank Flank Area (Coombs, Et Al., 2006) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Kilauea Southwest Rift And South Flank Area (Coombs, Et Al., 2006) Exploration Activity Details Location Kilauea Southwest Rift And South Flank Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown References Michelle L. Coombs, Thomas W. Sisson, Peter W. Lipman (2006) Growth History Of Kilauea Inferred From Volatile Concentrations In Submarine-Collected Basalts Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Compound_and_Elemental_Analysis_At_Kilauea_Southwest_Rift_And_South_Flank_Area_(Coombs,_Et_Al.,_2006)&oldid=510423"

463

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Jemez Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Janik, 2002) Janik, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Jemez Springs Area (Goff & Janik, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Jemez Springs Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness not indicated DOE-funding Unknown Notes Gas samples from fumaroles, springs, and/or wells. References Fraser Goff, Cathy J. Janik (2002) Gas Geochemistry Of The Valles Caldera Region, New Mexico And Comparisons With Gases At Yellowstone, Long Valley And Other Geothermal Systems Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Compound_and_Elemental_Analysis_At_Jemez_Springs_Area_(Goff_%26_Janik,_2002)&oldid=510418" Categories: Exploration Activities

464

Enhanced photo-activated luminescence for screening polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs) and other related chlorinated compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The presence of polychlorinated biphenyls and other chlorinated compounds in a sample is determined by treating the sample with a photo-activator and then exposing the treated sample to a UV light source. The UV light produces a photo-product complex, which is subsequently excited with UV light to cause luminescence of the complex. The luminescence is detected and characteristics of the luminescence spectra are used to determine the presence of chlorinated compounds and also the quantity of the chlorine in the compounds.

Vo-Dinh, Tuan (Knoxville, TN)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Enhanced photo-activated luminescence for screening polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs) and other related chlorinated compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The presence of polychlorinated biphenyls and other chlorinated compounds in a sample is determined by treating the sample with a photo-activator and then exposing the treated sample to a UV light source. The UV light produces a photo-product complex, which is subsequently excited with UV light to cause luminescence of the complex. The luminescence is detected and characteristics of the luminescence spectra are used to determine the presence of chlorinated compounds and also the quantity of the chlorine in the compounds

Vo-Dinh, Tuan (Knoxville, TN)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Clean process to destroy arsenic-containing organic compounds with recovery of arsenic  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reduction method is provided for the treatment of arsenic-containing organic compounds with simultaneous recovery of pure arsenic. Arsenic-containing organic compounds include pesticides, herbicides, and chemical warfare agents such as Lewisite. The arsenic-containing compound is decomposed using a reducing agent. Arsine gas may be formed directly by using a hydrogen-rich reducing agent, or a metal arsenide may be formed using a pure metal reducing agent. In the latter case, the arsenide is reacted with an acid to form arsine gas. In either case, the arsine gas is then reduced to elemental arsenic. 1 fig.

Upadhye, R.S.; Wang, F.T.

1996-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

467

Enhanced photo-activated luminescence for screening polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs) and other related chlorinated compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The presence of polychlorinated biphenyls and other chlorinated compounds in a sample is determined by treating the sample with a photo-activator and then exposing the treated sample to a UV light source. The UV light produces a photo-product complex, which is subsequently excited with UV light to cause luminescence of the complex. The luminescence is detected and characteristics of the luminescence spectra are used to determine the presence of chlorinated compounds and also the quantity of the chlorine in the compounds. 14 figures.

Tuan Vodinh.

1993-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

468

Enhanced photo-activated luminescence for screening polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs) and other related chlorinated compounds  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The presence of polychlorinated biphenyls and other chlorinated compounds in a sample is determined by treating the sample with a photo-activator and then exposing the treated sample to a UV light source. The UV light produces a photo-product complex, which is subsequently excited with UV light to cause luminescence of the complex. The luminescence is detected and characteristics of the luminescence spectra are used to determine the presence of chlorinated compounds and also the quantity of the chlorine in the compounds. 14 figs.

Vo-Dinh, T.

1994-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

469

Ethanol as Internal Standard for Quantitative Determination of Volatile Compounds in Spirit Drinks by Gas Chromatography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The new methodical approach of using ethanol as internal standard in gas chromatographic analysis of volatile compounds in spirit drinks in daily practice of testing laboratories is proposed. This method provides determination of volatile compounds concentrations in spirit drinks directly expressed in milligrams per liter (mg/L) of absolute alcohol according to official methods without measuring of alcohol strength of analyzed sample. The experimental demonstration of this method for determination of volatile compounds in spirit drinks by gas chromatography is described. Its validation was carried out by comparison with experimental results obtained by internal standard method and external standard method.

Charapitsa, Siarhei V; Kulevich, Nikita V; Makoed, Nicolai M; Mazanik, Arkadzi L; Sytova, Svetlana N

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

470

Sources of toxicity and exposure information for identifying chemicals of high concern to children  

SciTech Connect

Due to the large number of chemicals in commerce without adequate toxicity characterization data, coupled with an ineffective federal policy for chemical management in the United States, many states are grappling with the challenge to identify toxic chemicals that may pose a risk to human health and the environment. Specific populations (e.g., children, elderly) are particularly sensitive to these toxic chemicals. In 2008, the Children's Safe Product Act (CSPA) was passed in Washington State. The CSPA included specific requirements to identify High Priority Chemicals (HPCs) and Chemicals of High Concern to Children (CHCCs). To implement this legislation, a methodology was developed to identify HPCs from authoritative scientific and regulatory sources on the basis of toxicity criteria. Another set of chemicals of concern was then identified from authoritative sources, based on their potential exposure to children. Exposure potential was evaluated by identifying chemicals detected in biomonitoring studies (i.e., human tissues), as well as those present in residential exposure media (e.g., indoor air, house dust, drinking water, consumer products). Accordingly, CHCCs were defined as HPCs that also appear in biomonitoring studies or relevant exposure media. For chemicals with unique Chemical Abstracts Service (CAS) numbers, we identified 2044 HPCs and 2219 chemicals with potential exposure to children, resulting in 476 CHCCs. The process of chemical identification is dynamic, so that chemicals may be added or subtracted as new information becomes available. Although beyond the scope of this paper, the 476 CHCCs will be prioritized in a more detailed assessment, based on the strength and weight of evidence of toxicity and exposure data. Our approach was developed to be flexible which allows the addition or removal of specific sources of toxicity or exposure information, as well as transparent to allow clear identification of inputs. Although the methodology was constrained by specific requirements in the CSPA, the intent of this work was to identify HPCs and CHCCs that might guide future regulatory actions and inform chemical management policies, aimed at protecting children's health.

Stone, Alex, E-mail: alst461@ecy.wa.go [Washington State Department of Ecology, P.O. Box 47600, Olympia, WA 98504-7600 (United States); Delistraty, Damon, E-mail: ddel461@ecy.wa.go [Washington State Department of Ecology, Spokane, WA 99205-1295 (United States)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

471

Use of Proton-Transfer-Reaction Mass Spectrometry to Characterize Volatile Organic Compound Sources at the La Porte Super Site During the Texas Air Quality Study 2000  

SciTech Connect

Proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) was deployed for continuous real-time monitoring of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) at a site near the Houston Ship Channel during the Texas Air Quality Study 2000. Overall, 28 ions dominated the PTR-MS mass spectra and were assigned as anthropogenic aromatics (e.g., benzene, toluene, xylenes) and hydrocarbons (propene, isoprene), oxygenated compounds (e.g., formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, methanol, C7 carbonyls), and three nitrogencontaining compounds (e.g., HCN, acetonitrile and acrylonitrile). Biogenic VOCs were minor components at this site. Propene was the most abundant lightweight hydrocarbon detected by this technique with concentrations up to 100+ nmol mol-1, and was highly correlated with its oxidation products, formaldehyde (up to ~40 nmol mol-1) and acetaldehyde (up to ~80 nmol/mol), with typical ratios close to 1 in propene-dominated plumes. In the case of aromatic species the high time resolution of the obtained data set helped in identifying different anthropogenic sources (e.g., industrial from urban emissions) and testing current emission inventories. A comparison with results from complimentary techniques (gas chromatography, differential optical absorption spectroscopy) was used to assess the selectivity of this on-line technique in a complex urban and industrial VOC matrix and give an interpretation of mass scans obtained by soft chemical ionization using proton-transfer via H3O+. The method was especially valuable in monitoring rapidly changing VOC plumes which passed over the site, and when coupled with meteorological data it was possible to identify likely sources.

Karl, Thomas G.; Jobson, B Tom T.; Kuster, W. C.; Williams, Eric; Stutz, Jochen P.; Shetter, Rick; Hall, Samual R.; Goldan, P. D.; Fehsenfeld, Fred C.; Lindinger, Werner

2003-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

472

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Geysers Area (Kennedy & Truesdell, 1996)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Geysers Area (Kennedy & Truesdell, 1996) Compound and Elemental Analysis At Geysers Area (Kennedy & Truesdell, 1996) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Geysers Area (Kennedy & Truesdell, 1996) Exploration Activity Details Location Geysers Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes The evidence provided by the noble gases for a magmatic gas component in the Northwest Geysers adds new constraints to genetic models of the system and its evolution. The high proportion of magmatic gas and high total NCG in HTR steam are inconsistent with an origin of the vapor-dominated Northwest Geysers reservoir from deep boiling of a connate or metamorphic

473

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Heber Area (Wood, 2002) | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Compound and Elemental Analysis At Heber Area (Wood, 2002) Compound and Elemental Analysis At Heber Area (Wood, 2002) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Compound and Elemental Analysis At Heber Area (Wood, 2002) Exploration Activity Details Location Heber Area Exploration Technique Compound and Elemental Analysis Activity Date Usefulness could be useful with more improvements DOE-funding Unknown Notes Geothermal fluids from hot springs and wells have been sampled from a number of locations, including: 1) the North Island of New Zealand (three sets of samples from three different years) and the South Island of New Zealand (1 set of samples); 2) the Cascades of Oregon; 3) the Harney, Alvord Desert and Owyhee geothermal areas of Oregon; 4) the Dixie Valley and Beowawe fields in Nevada; 5) Palinpiiion, the Philippines; 6) the

474

Source Footprint Considerations in the Determination of Volatile Organic Compound Fluxes from Forest Canopies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Above-canopy sampling of trace gases to determine volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions should be interpreted in terms of footprint considerations. This can be accomplished by defining the upwind canopy areas effectively sampled under the ...

S. K. Kaharabata; P. H. Schuepp; J. D. Fuentes

1999-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Polybenzimidazole compounds, polymeric media, and methods of post-polymerization modifications  

SciTech Connect

A PBI compound includes imidazole nitrogens at least a portion of which are substituted with a moiety containing a carbonyl group, the substituted imidazole nitrogens being bonded to carbon of the carbonyl group. At least 85% of the nitrogens may be substituted. The carbonyl-containing moiety may include RCO--, where R is alkoxy or haloalkyl. The PBI compound may exhibit a first temperature marking an onset of weight loss corresponding to reversion of the substituted PBI that is less than a second temperature marking an onset of decomposition of an otherwise identical PBI compound without the substituted moiety. The PBI compound may be included in separatory media. A substituted PBI synthesis method may include providing a parent PBI in a less than 5 wt % solvent solution. Substituting may use more than 5 equivalents in relation to the imidazole nitrogens to be substituted.

Klaehn, John R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Peterson, Eric S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Orme, Christopher J. (Shelley, ID); Jones, Michael G. (Chubbuck, ID); Wertsching, Alan K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Luther, Thomas A. (Idaho Falls, ID); Trowbridge, Tammy L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

2007-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

476

The Periodic Table as a Part of the Periodic Table of Chemical Compounds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The numbers of natural chemical elements, minerals, inorganic and organic chemical compounds are determined by 1, 2, 3 and 4-combinations of a set 95 and are respectively equal to 95, 4,465, 138,415 and 3,183,545. To explain these relations it is suggested the concept of information coefficient of proportionality as mathematical generalization of the proportionality coefficient for any set of positive numbers. It is suggested a hypothesis that the unimodal distributions of the sets of information coefficients of proportionality for atomic weights of chemical elements of minerals and chemical compounds correspond to unimodal distributions of the above sets for combination of 2, 3 and 4 atomic weights of 95 natural chemical elements. The expected values of symmetrized distributions of information coefficients of proportionality sets for atomic weights of minerals and chemical compounds are proposed to be used to define chemical compounds, like atomic weights define chemical elements. Variational series of the e...

Labushev, Mikhail M

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

477

Method of upgrading oils containing hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is a multi-stepped method of converting an oil which is produced by various biomass and coal conversion processes and contains primarily single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds to highly aromatic gasoline. The single and multiple ring hydroxyaromatic hydrocarbon compounds in a raw oil material are first deoxygenated to produce a deoxygenated oil material containing single and multiple ring aromatic compounds. Then, water is removed from the deoxygenated oil material. The next step is distillation to remove the single ring aromatic compouns as gasoline. In the third step, the multiple ring aromatics remaining in the deoxygenated oil material a