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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identification number tin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Identification Numbers  

Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center (EERE)

Renewable Renewable Identification Numbers to someone by E-mail Share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Identification Numbers on Facebook Tweet about Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Identification Numbers on Twitter Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Identification Numbers on Google Bookmark Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Identification Numbers on Delicious Rank Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Identification Numbers on Digg Find More places to share Alternative Fuels Data Center: Renewable Identification Numbers on AddThis.com... More in this section... Federal State Advanced Search All Laws & Incentives Sorted by Type Renewable Identification Numbers RIN Format EPA uses the following format to determine RINs for each physical gallon of

2

OMB Number: 4040-0004 Expiration Date: 01/31/2009  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-Lincoln * b. Employer/Taxpayer Identification Number (EIN/TIN): 47-0049123 * c. Organizational DUNS: 555456995 * Street1: 312 N 14th Street Street2: Alexander West * City: Lincoln County: Lancaster * State: NE

Farritor, Shane

3

Sputtering of tin and gallium-tin clusters  

SciTech Connect

Tin and gallium-tin clusters have been produced by 4 keV Ar{sup +} ion bombardment of polycrystalline tin and the gallium-tin eutectic alloy and analyzed by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The sputtered neutral species were photoionized with 193 nm (6.4 eV) excimer laser light. Neutral tin clusters containing up to 10 atoms and mixed gallium-tin clusters Ga{sub (n-m)}Sn{sub m} with n {<=} 4 for the neutrals and N {<=} 3 for the sputtered ionic species have been detected. Laser power density dependent intensity measurements, relative yields, and kinetic energy distributions have been measured. The abundance distributions of the mixed clusters have been found to be nonstatistical due to significant differences in the ionization efficiencies for clusters with equal nuclearity but different number of tin atoms. The results indicate that Ga{sub 2}Sn and Ga{sub 3}Sn like the all-gallium clusters have ionization potentials below 6.4 eV. In the case of Sn{sub 5}, Sn{sub 6}, GaSn and Ga{sub (n-m)}Sn{sub m} clusters with n=2 to 4 and m>1, the authors detect species that have sufficient internal energy to be one photon ionized despite ionization potentials that are higher 6.4 eV. The tin atom signal that is detected can be attributed to photofragmentation of dimers for both sputtering from polycrystalline tin and from the gallium-tin eutectic alloy.

Lill, T.; Calaway, W.F.; Ma, Z.; Pellin, M.J.

1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

> REPLACE THIS LINE WITH YOUR PAPER IDENTIFICATION NUMBER (DOUBLE-CLICK HERE TO EDIT) < 1 A 13T CMOS Hardened Memory Cell for  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

> REPLACE THIS LINE WITH YOUR PAPER IDENTIFICATION NUMBER (DOUBLE-CLICK HERE TO EDIT) ray neutrons and -particles [1].These energy particles travel through the silicon bulk and create

Ayers, Joseph

5

> REPLACE THIS LINE WITH YOUR PAPER IDENTIFICATION NUMBER (DOUBLE-CLICK HERE TO EDIT) < 1 Abstract--The aggressive scaling of CMOS into the deep  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

> REPLACE THIS LINE WITH YOUR PAPER IDENTIFICATION NUMBER (DOUBLE-CLICK HERE TO EDIT) particles travelling through the silicon bulk can create minority carriers. These carriers may be collected

Ayers, Joseph

6

> REPLACE THIS LINE WITH YOUR PAPER IDENTIFICATION NUMBER (DOUBLE-CLICK HERE TO EDIT) < 1 Analysis and Design of Nanoscale CMOS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

> REPLACE THIS LINE WITH YOUR PAPER IDENTIFICATION NUMBER (DOUBLE-CLICK HERE TO EDIT) ray neutrons and -particles [1]. These energy particles travel through the silicon bulk and create

Ayers, Joseph

7

> REPLACE THIS LINE WITH YOUR PAPER IDENTIFICATION NUMBER (DOUBLE-CLICK HERE TO EDIT) < 1 Abstract--Magnetic sensors capable of detecting tiny ac  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

> REPLACE THIS LINE WITH YOUR PAPER IDENTIFICATION NUMBER (DOUBLE-CLICK HERE TO EDIT) , PA 16802 USA. temperature and ultra-sensitive magnetometers. Such bulk sensors constructed from ME

Yener, Aylin

8

> REPLACE THIS LINE WITH YOUR PAPER IDENTIFICATION NUMBER (DOUBLE-CLICK HERE TO EDIT) < 1 Abstract--The smart grid paradigm is set to revolutionize  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

> REPLACE THIS LINE WITH YOUR PAPER IDENTIFICATION NUMBER (DOUBLE-CLICK HERE TO EDIT) from tens of kilovolts to hundreds of kilovolts for transmission of bulk energy over long distances

Atkinson, Robert C

9

Implications of the toxicity of tetramethyltin, dimethyl tin dichloride, and tin tetrachloride in selecting a suitable tin precursor in the chemical vapor deposition of tin oxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Potential health hazards in the chemical vapor deposition of tin oxide films from tetramethylin dimethylin dichloride and tin tetrachloride have to be balanced against the benefits to solar cell fabrication. Concerns regarding the toxicity costs and physical properties of and the quality of the tin oxide films produced with these tin precursors are outlined. (AIP)

Roy G. Gordon; James W. Prescia

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Service Identification in TCP/IP: Well-Known versus Random Port Numbers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The sixteen-bit well-known port number is often overlooked as a network identifier in Internet communications. Its purpose at the most fundamental level is only to demultiplex flows of traffic. Several unintended uses of ...

Masiello, Elizabeth

2006-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

11

Number  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

' ' , /v-i 2 -i 3 -A, This dow'at consists ~f--~-_,_~~~p.~,::, Number -------of.-&--copies, 1 Series.,-a-,-. ! 1 THE UNIVERSITY OF ROCHESTER 1; r-.' L INTRAMURALCORRESPONDENCE i"ks' 3 2.. September 25, 1947 Memo.tor Dr. A. H, Dovdy . From: Dr. H. E, Stokinger Be: Trip Report - Mayvood Chemical Works A trip vas made Nednesday, August 24th vith Messrs. Robert W ilson and George Sprague to the Mayvood Chemical F!orks, Mayvood, New Jersey one of 2 plants in the U.S.A. engaged in the production of thorium compounds. The purpose of the trip vas to: l 1. Learn the type of chemical processes employed in the thorium industry (thorium nitrate). 2. Survey conditions of eeosure of personnel associated vith these chemical processes. 3. Obtain samples of atmospheric contaminants in the plant, as

12

Therapeutic tin-117m compositions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides a method for the palliation of bone pain due to cancer by the administration of a unique dosage of a tin-117m (Sn-117m) stannic chelate complex in a pharmaceutically acceptable composition. In addition, the invention provides a method for simultaneous palliation of bone pain and radiotherapy in cancer patients using compositions containing Sn-117m chelates. The invention also provides a method for palliating bone pain in cancer patients using Sn-117m-containing compositions and monitoring patient status by imaging the distribution of the Sn-117m in the patients. Also provided are pharmaceutically acceptable compositions containing Sn-117m chelate complexes for the palliation of bone pain in cancer patients.

Srivastava, Suresh C. (Setauket, NY); Meinken, George E. (Middle Island, NY); Mausner, Leonard F. (Stony Brook, NY); Atkins, Harold L. (Setauket, NY)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

Infrared Images of Shock-Heated Tin  

SciTech Connect

High-resolution, gated infrared images were taken of tin samples shock heated to just below the 505 K melting point. Sample surfaces were either polished or diamond-turned, with grain sizes ranging from about 0.05 to 10 mm. A high explosive in contact with a 2-mm-thick tin sample induced a peak sample stress of 18 GPa. Interferometer data from similarly-driven tin shots indicate that immediately after shock breakout the samples spall near the free (imaged) surface with a scab thickness of about 0.1 mm.

Craig W. McCluskey; Mark D. Wilke; William D. Turley; Gerald D. Stevens; Lynn R. Veeser; Michael Grover

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Advanced Load Identification and Management for Buildings: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number: CRD-11-422  

SciTech Connect

The goal of this CRADA work is to support Eaton Innovation Center (Eaton) efforts to develop advanced load identification, management technologies, and solutions to reduce building energy consumption by providing fine granular visibility of energy usage information and safety protection of miscellaneous electric loads (MELs) in commercial and residential buildings. MELs load identification and prediction technology will be employed in a novel 'Smart eOutlet*' to provide critical intelligence and information to improve the capability and functionality of building load analysis and design tools and building power management systems. The work scoped in this CRADA involves the following activities: development and validation of business value proposition for the proposed technologies through voice of customer investigation, market analysis, and third-party objective assessment; development and validation of energy saving impact as well as assessment of environmental and economic benefits; 'smart eOutlet' concept design, prototyping, and validation; field validation of the developed technologies in real building environments. (*Another name denoted as 'Smart Power Strip (SPS)' will be used as an alternative of the name 'Smart eOutlet' for a clearer definition of the product market position in future work.)

Gentile-Polese, L.

2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Design and fabrication of a tin-sulfide annealing furnace  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A furnace was designed and its heat transfer properties were analyzed for use in annealing thin-film tins-ulfide solar cells. Tin sulfide has been explored as an earth abundant solar cell material, and the furnace was ...

Lewis, Raymond (Raymond A.)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Growth behavior and properties of atomic layer deposited tin oxide on silicon from novel tin(II)acetylacetonate precursor and ozone  

SciTech Connect

In this work, a novel liquid tin(II) precursor, tin(II)acetylacetonate [Sn(acac){sub 2}], was used to deposit tin oxide films on Si(100) substrate, using a custom-built hot wall atomic layer deposition (ALD) reactor. Three different oxidizers, water, oxygen, and ozone, were tried. Resulting growth rates were studied as a function of precursor dosage, oxidizer dosage, reactor temperature, and number of ALD cycles. The film growth rate was found to be 0.1?±?0.01?nm/cycle within the wide ALD temperature window of 175–300?°C using ozone; no film growth was observed with water or oxygen. Characterization methods were used to study the composition, interface quality, crystallinity, microstructure, refractive index, surface morphology, and resistivity of the resulting films. X-ray photoelectron spectra showed the formation of a clean SnO{sub x}–Si interface. The resistivity of the SnO{sub x} films was calculated to be 0.3?? cm. Results of this work demonstrate the possibility of introducing Sn(acac){sub 2} as tin precursor to deposit conducting ALD SnO{sub x} thin films on a silicon surface, with clean interface and no formation of undesired SiO{sub 2} or other interfacial reaction products, for transparent conducting oxide applications.

Kannan Selvaraj, Sathees [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States); Feinerman, Alan [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States); Takoudis, Christos G., E-mail: takoudis@uic.edu [Departments of Bioengineering and Chemical Engineering, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60607 (United States)

2014-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

17

Proton elastic scattering from tin isotopes at 295 MeV and systematic change of neutron density distributions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cross sections and analyzing powers for proton elastic scattering from $^{116,118,120,122,124}$Sn at 295 MeV have been measured for a momentum transfer of up to about 3.5 fm$^{-1}$ to deduce systematic changes of the neutron density distribution. We tuned the relativistic Love-Franey interaction to explain the proton elastic scattering of a nucleus whose density distribution is well known. Then, we applied this interaction to deduce the neutron density distributions of tin isotopes. The result of our analysis shows the clear systematic behavior of a gradual increase in the neutron skin thickness of tin isotopes with mass number.

S. Terashima; H. Sakaguchi; H. Takeda; T. Ishikawa; M. Itoh; T. Kawabata; T. Murakami; M. Uchida; Y. Yasuda; M. Yosoi; J. Zenihiro; H. P. Yoshida; T. Noro; T. Ishida; S. Asaji; T. Yonemura

2008-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

18

Exhaust Gas Sensor Based On Tin Dioxide For Automotive Application  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Exhaust Gas Sensor Based On Tin Dioxide For Automotive Application Arthur VALLERON a,b , Christophe, Engineering Materials Department The aim of this paper is to investigate the potentialities of gas sensor based on semi-conductor for exhaust gas automotive application. The sensing element is a tin dioxide

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

19

Comparative and quantitative study of neutral debris emanated from tin plasmas produced by neodymium-doped yttrium-aluminum-garnet and carbon dioxide laser pulses  

SciTech Connect

Amount of neutral debris emanated from extreme ultraviolet light source must be minimized to maximize its lifetime. Emanation of neutral atomic debris was experimentally investigated using laser-induced-fluorescence technique for carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}, 10.6 {mu}m in wavelength) and Nd-doped yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Nd:YAG, 1.064 {mu}m) lasers irradiated tin foils. Total number of neutral atomic debris from CO{sub 2} laser-irradiated tin foils was 1/100 times smaller than that from Nd:YAG irradiated ones. Competitiveness of CO{sub 2} laser was revealed in terms of debris mitigation.

Matsuoka, Yuji; Nakai, Yuki; Fujioka, Shinsuke; Maeda, Shinsuke; Shimomura, Masashi; Nishimura, Hiroaki [Institute of Laser Engineering, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-Oka, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Shimada, Yoshinori; Sunahara, Atsushi [Institute for Laser Technology, Osaka University, 2-6 Yamada-Oka, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Yoshida, Minoru [Department of Electronics and Electronic Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1 Kowakae, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)

2010-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

20

The effect of regimes and methods of glass forming on the tin content in float glass  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The dependence of the tin content in glass is derived as a function of the iron oxidecontent in the glass composition, regimes and methods of forming, ... The ways of reducing the tin content in glass in the cour...

V. I. Kondrashov; V. S. Bezlyudnaya; Yu. V. Zverev

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identification number tin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Effect of TiN coatings on the rolling contact fatigue behavior of M50 bearing steel. Final report  

SciTech Connect

There is a continuing requirement for improved bearing performance for both commercial and military applications. Service temperatures are increasing steadily due to increased power requirements and corrosion of components remains a major concern as well, particularly for bearings in military systems. In our ongoing study, a number of different coatings were applied to VIM-VAR M50 bearing steel to improve both corrosion resistance and rolling contact fatigue behavior. This report deals specifically with coatings produced by the ion beam assisted deposition IBAD of TiN, details of the coating process, and test results obtained. The rolling contact fatigue performance of IBAD TiN coated M50 samples demonstrated increased lifetime performance and durability for a 1 micrometer thick coating. Preliminary data on corrosion properties is also presented.

Middleton, R.M.; Huang, P.J.; Wells, M.G.; Kant, R.A.

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Effect of Capping Agents in Tin Nanoparticles on Electrochemical Cycling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the particle surfaces. The cycling results using coin-type half cells confirmed that the hydrobenzamide, compared with the others. From Fourier transform magnitude FT of Sn LIII-edge energy dispersive X prepared by the decom- position of tin II amides, Sn NMe2 2 2, at 135°C in dry-anisole- produced particles

Cho, Jaephil

23

Head Knowledge: Summary (Segment from the Tin Shed essay)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, a world of objectivity, and his method of deductive logical reasoning, of John Locke (1632-1704) and his and objectification, material reductionism, quantification, gradation and secularization (Frey 1994: 95-104, 123 of reliability and validity (Frey 1994:95-104). While traveling outside the Tin Shed, systematic analysis

O'Laughlin, Jay

24

Combinatorial study of zinc tin oxide thin-film transistors  

SciTech Connect

Groups of thin-film transistors using a zinc tin oxide semiconductor layer have been fabricated via a combinatorial rf sputtering technique. The ZnO:SnO{sub 2} ratio of the film varies as a function of position on the sample, from pure ZnO to SnO{sub 2}, allowing for a study of zinc tin oxide transistor performance as a function of channel stoichiometry. The devices were found to have mobilities ranging from 2 to 12 cm{sup 2}/V s, with two peaks in mobility in devices at ZnO fractions of 0.80{+-}0.03 and 0.25{+-}0.05, and on/off ratios as high as 10{sup 7}. Transistors composed predominantly of SnO{sub 2} were found to exhibit light sensitivity which affected both the on/off ratios and threshold voltages of these devices.

McDowell, M. G.; Sanderson, R. J.; Hill, I. G. [Dalhousie University, Department of Physics, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3H 3J5 (Canada)

2008-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

25

Full-potential linear muffin-tin-orbital method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A new band-structure method which allows the self-consistent solution of the Schrödinger equation with a full (all-electron, non-muffin-tin) crystal potential has been developed. A basis set consisting of the 9 (16) s, p, and d (f) linear-muffin-tin orbitals per site is used. The wave functions as well as the electron density and the potential are split into a smooth ‘‘pseudo’’ part, which is expanded in plane waves, and local parts, which are expressed as spherical-harmonics one-center expansions. The total-energy functional of density-functional theory is evaluated without any shape approximation. The usefulness and accuracy of the method is demonstrated by applying it to a ‘‘frozen phonon’’ in silicon and comparing the results with experiment. The calculated phonon frequency and anharmonic term are in excellent agreement with the experimental data. The method is generally applicable to systems with delocalized as well as localized orbitals.

K. H. Weyrich

1988-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

26

Conductive Polymer Binder-Enabled Cycling of Pure Tin Nanoparticle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Conductive Polymer Binder-Enabled Cycling of Pure Tin Nanoparticle Conductive Polymer Binder-Enabled Cycling of Pure Tin Nanoparticle Composite Anode Electrodes for a Lithium-Ion Battery Title Conductive Polymer Binder-Enabled Cycling of Pure Tin Nanoparticle Composite Anode Electrodes for a Lithium-Ion Battery Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Xun, Shidi, Xiangyun Song, Vincent S. Battaglia, and Gao Liu Journal Journal of the Electrochemical Society Volume 160 Start Page A849 Issue 6 Pagination A849 - A855 Date Published 01/2013 ISSN 0013-4651 Abstract Pure tin (Sn) nanoparticles can be cycled in stable and high gravimetric capacity (>500 mAh/g) with a polyfluorene-type conductive polymer binder in composite electrodes. Crystalline Sn nanoparticles (<150 nanometers, nm) were used as anode materials in this study. The average diameter of Sn secondary particles is 270 nm, calculated based on BET surface area. The composite electrodes contain a conductive polymer binder that constitutes 2% to 10% of the material, without any conductive additives (e.g., acetylene black). The electrode containing the 5% conductive binder showed the best cycling performance, with a reversible capacity of 510 mAh/g. Crystallinity of Sn particles gradually degrades during cycling, and pulverization of particles was observed after long-term cycling, leading to the capacity fade. The conductive polymer binder shows advantages over other conventional binders, such as Poly(vinylidene difluoride) (PVDF) and carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) binders, because it can provide electrical conductivity and strong adhesion during Sn volume change.

27

High-frequency losses in tin Josephson tunnel junctions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The losses associated with the excitation of surface plasma oscillations in Fiske modes in tin Josephson junctions, at frequencies from 20 to 270 GHz, were measured by studying the currentvoltage characteristics as a function of magnetic field. Our results generally support Economou and Ngai's theory of surface-plasma oscillations and Miller's calculation of the conductivity of superconductors. At lower temperatures, discrepancies that include an anomalous peak in the frequency dependence of the loss may reflect a small disagreement with Miller's results.

T. C. Wang and R. I. Gayley

1978-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Liquid Tin Anode Direct Coal Fuel Cell - CellTech Power  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquid Tin Anode Direct Coal Liquid Tin Anode Direct Coal Fuel Cell-CellTech Power Background Direct carbon solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) offer a theoretical efficiency advantage over traditional SOFCs operating on gasified carbon (syngas). CellTech Power LLC (CellTech) has been developing a liquid tin anode (LTA) SOFC that can directly convert carbonaceous fuels including coal into electricity without gasification. One of the most significant impediments

29

One-pot synthesis of highly mesoporous antimony-doped tin oxide...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

One-pot synthesis of highly mesoporous antimony-doped tin oxide from interpenetrating inorganicorganic networks Authors: Volosin, A.M., Sharma, S., Traverse, C., Newman, N., and...

30

Differential Neutron Scattering Cross Sections and Average Neutron Parameters of Tin Isotopes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The differential cross sections of elastically scattered neutrons were measured for tin isotopes at the...o, s 1/2 1 , S 1/3 ...

V. G. Nikolenko; A. B. Popov; G. S. Samosvat

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Thin-film tin oxideâ??ethanol sensor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tin Oxide (SnO2) thin films grown on glass substrate at 648 K using direct evaporation method with two gold pads deposited on the top for electrical contacts were exposed to ethanol vapours (200-1000 ppm). The operating temperature of the sensor was optimised. The sensitivity variation of films having different thicknesses was studied. To improve the sensitivity and selectivity further, a thin layer of metal oxide was deposited on the sensor surface to work as a catalytic layer and its effect on the performance of the sensor was studied. The response and recovery times of the sensor were determined.

H.J. Pandya

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

P-7 / D. R. Cairns P-7: Wear Resistance of Indium Tin Oxide Coatings on Polyethylene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

P-7 / D. R. Cairns P-7: Wear Resistance of Indium Tin Oxide Coatings on Polyethylene Terephthalate The wear mechanisms of the Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) coated Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) topsheet). The bottom substrate is typically glass and the top sheet a polyester such as Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET

Cairns, Darran

33

The effect of different annealing temperatures on tin and cadmium telluride phases obtained by a modified chemical route  

SciTech Connect

Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ? Synthesis of cadmium and tin telluride. ? Chemical route to obtain pure crystalline cadmium and tin telluride. ? Effect of the annealing temperature on the crystalline phases. ? Removal of tin oxide as side product through thermal treatment. -- Abstract: In this work tin and cadmium telluride were prepared by a modification of a chemical route reported in the literature to obtain metallacycles formed by oxidative addition of tin-tellurium bonds to platinum (II). Through this procedure it was possible to obtain tin and cadmium telluride. X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to identify the crystalline phases obtained as well as the presence of side products. In the case of tin telluride it was identified potassium chloride, metallic tellurium and tin oxide as contaminants. The tin oxidation states were also monitored by {sup 119}Sn Mössbauer spectroscopy. The annealing in hydrogen atmosphere was chosen as a strategy to reduce the tin oxide and promote its reaction with the excess of tellurium present in the medium. The evolution of this tin oxide phase was studied through the annealing of the sample at different temperatures. Cadmium telluride was obtained with high degree of purity (98.5% relative weight fraction) according to the Rietveld refinement of X-ray diffraction data. The modified procedure showed to be very effective to obtain amorphous tin and cadmium telluride and the annealing at 450 °C has proven to be useful to reduce the amount of oxide produced as side product.

Mesquita, Anderson Fuzer [Departamento de Química, CCE, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Campus Goiabeiras, 29075-910 Vitória, Espírito Santo (Brazil)] [Departamento de Química, CCE, Universidade Federal do Espírito Santo, Campus Goiabeiras, 29075-910 Vitória, Espírito Santo (Brazil); Porto, Arilza de Oliveira, E-mail: arilzaporto@yahoo.com.br [Departamento de Química, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Magela de Lima, Geraldo [Departamento de Química, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)] [Departamento de Química, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Paniago, Roberto [Departamento de Física, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)] [Departamento de Física, ICEx, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Ardisson, José Domingos [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear, CDTN/CNEN, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)] [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear, CDTN/CNEN, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

34

Monopole-optimized effective interaction for tin isotopes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We present a systematic configuration-interaction shell-model calculation on the structure of light tin isotopes with a global optimized effective interaction. The starting point of the calculation is the realistic CD-Bonn nucleon-nucleon potential. The unknown single-particle energies of the 1d3/2, 2s1/2, and 0h11/2 orbitals and the T=1 monopole interactions are determined by fitting to the binding energies of 157 low-lying yrast states in 102?132Sn. We apply the Hamiltonian to analyze the origin of the spin inversion between 101Sn and 103Sn that was observed recently and to explore the possible contribution from interaction terms beyond the normal pairing.

Chong Qi and Z. X. Xu

2012-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

35

Enhanced superconducting pairing interaction in indium-doped tin telluride  

SciTech Connect

The ferroelectric degenerate semiconductor Sn{sub 1-{delta}}Te exhibits superconductivity with critical temperatures, T{sub c}, of up to 0.3 K for hole densities of order 10{sup 21} cm{sup -3}. When doped on the tin site with greater than x{sub c} = 1.7(3)% indium atoms, however, superconductivity is observed up to 2 K, though the carrier density does not change significantly. We present specific heat data showing that a stronger pairing interaction is present for x > x{sub c} than for x < x{sub c}. By examining the effect of In dopant atoms on both T{sub c} and the temperature of the ferroelectric structural phase transition, T{sub SPT}, we show that phonon modes related to this transition are not responsible for this T{sub c} enhancement, and discuss a plausible candidate based on the unique properties of the indium impurities.

Erickson, A.S.

2010-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

36

Enhanced superconducting pairing interaction in indium-doped tin telluride  

SciTech Connect

The ferroelectric degenerate semiconductor Sn{sub 1-{delta}}Te exhibits superconductivity with critical temperatures, T{sub c}, of up to 0.3 K for hole densities of order 10{sup 21} cm{sup -3}. When doped on the tin site with greater than x{sub c} = 1.7(3)% indium atoms, however, superconductivity is observed up to 2 K, though the carrier density does not change significantly. We present specific heat data showing that a stronger pairing interaction is present for x > x{sub c} than for x < x{sub c}. By examining the effect of In dopant atoms on both T{sub c} and the temperature of the ferroelectric structural phase transition, T{sub SPT}, we show that phonon modes related to this transition are not responsible for this T{sub c} enhancement, and discuss a plausible candidate based on the unique properties of the indium impurities.

Erickson, A.S.; Chu, J.-H.; /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.; Toney, M.F.; Geballe, T.H.; Fisher, I.R.; /SLAC, SSRL /Stanford U., Appl. Phys. Dept. /Stanford U., Geballe Lab.

2010-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

37

Calculation of tin atomic data and plasma properties.  

SciTech Connect

This report reviews the major methods and techniques we use in generating basic atomic and plasma properties relevant to extreme ultraviolet (EUV) lithography applications. The basis of the work is the calculation of the atomic energy levels, transitions probabilities, and other atomic data by various methods, which differ in accuracy, completeness, and complication. Later on, we calculate the populations of atomic levels and ion states in plasmas by means of the collision-radiation equilibrium (CRE) model. The results of the CRE model are used as input to the thermodynamic functions, such as pressure and temperature from the internal energy and density (equation of state), electric resistance, thermal conduction, and other plasma properties. In addition, optical coefficients, such as emission and absorption coefficients, are generated to resolve a radiation transport equation (RTE). The capabilities of our approach are demonstrated by generating the required atomic and plasma properties for tin ions and plasma within the EUV region near 13.5 nm.

Morozov, V.; Tolkach, V.; Hassanein, A.

2005-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

38

Photoconductivity of germanium tin alloys grown by molecular beam epitaxy  

SciTech Connect

Photocurrent spectroscopy was used to measure the infrared absorption of germanium-tin alloys grown by molecular beam epitaxy. To study dependence on Sn composition, the photocurrent was measured at 100 K on alloys of Ge{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x} with atomic percentages of Sn up to 9.8%. The optical absorption coefficient was calculated from the photocurrent, and it was found that the absorption edge and extracted bandgap energy decreased with increasing Sn content. For all Ge{sub 1-x}Sn{sub x} samples, a fundamental bandgap below that of bulk Ge was observed, and a bandgap energy as low as 0.624 eV was found for a Sn percentage of 9.8% at 100 K.

Coppinger, Matthew; Hart, John; Bhargava, Nupur; Kim, Sangcheol; Kolodzey, James [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States)

2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

39

Film Coating Process Research and Characterization of TiN Coated Racetrack-type Ceramic Pipe  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TiN film was coated on the internal face of racetrack-type ceramic pipe by three different methods: radio-frequency sputtering, DC sputtering and DC magnetron sputtering. The deposition rates of TiN film under different coating methods were compared. According to the AFM, SEM, XPS test results,these properties were analyzed, such as TiN film roughness and surface morphology. At the same time, the deposition rates were studied under two types' cathode, Ti wires and Ti plate. According to the SEM test results, Ti plate cathode can improve the TiN/Ti film deposition rate obviously.

Wang, Jie; Zhang, Bo; Wei, Wei; Fan, Le; Pei, Xiangtao; Hong, Yuanzhi; Wang, Yong

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Three-dimensional defect characterization : focused ion beam tomography applied to tin sulfide thin films  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Porosity is postulated to be one of the reasons for the low efficiency of tin sulfide-based devices. This work is a preliminary investigation of the effects of two film growth parameters deposition rate and substrate ...

Youssef, Amanda

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identification number tin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Transparent and Conductive Carbon Nanotube Multilayer Thin Films Suitable as an Indium Tin Oxide Replacement  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transparent electrodes made from metal oxides suffer from poor flexibility and durability. Highly transparent and electrically conductive thin films based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were assembled as a potential indium tin oxide (ITO) replacement...

Park, Yong Tae

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

42

Nanocrystalline tin compounds/graphene nanocomposite electrodes as anode for lithium-ion battery  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Nanocrystalline tin (Sn) compounds such as SnO2, SnS2, SnS, and graphene nanocomposites were prepared using hydrothermal method. The X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern of the prepared nanocomposite reveals the prese...

Marappan Sathish; Satoshi Mitani; Takaaki Tomai…

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

The tin impurity in Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3 alloys  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Extends work on tin to p-type thermoelectric alloys of formula Bi(2-x)Sb(x)Te(3) doped with Sn. Both single crystals and polycrystals prepared using powder metallurgical techniques are studied and properties reported.

44

Special government etalon of the brightness energy unit at the temperature of tin solidification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The special government etalon of the brightness energy unit at the tin solidification temperature, created in VNIIM, assures the reproduction of the unit and transmission of its dimension in conformity ... scheme...

V. V. Babushkin; I. V. Libova

1974-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Magnetoresistance and Microstructure of Magnetite Nanocrystals Dispersed in Indium?Tin Oxide Thin Films  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Indium?tin oxide (ITO) is the most widely used TCO in the semiconductor and electronic device industries. ... NCs of inverse-spinel-type Fe3O4 grew epitaxially on the YSZ substrate, as shown in Figure 4. ...

Koichi Okada; Shigemi Kohiki; Masanori Mitome; Hidekazu Tanaka; Masao Arai; Masaki Mito; Hiroyuki Deguchi

2009-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

46

Measurement of light capture in solar cells from silver- and tin-plated patterned bus bars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Bus bars on solar cells shade silicon from light. When the bus bars are patterned, they can reflect light back onto the silicon using total internal reflection. These patterned bus bars are tin plated and produce 1-2.5% ...

Winiarz, Christine Eve

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Tin oxide based gas sensor for in-door air quality monitoring  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Tin oxide nanograins doped with 0.1 at% of antimony have shown highly sensitivity towards tail gas, carbon monoxide and second-hand smoke. Such sensors are very useful for air quality...

Zhu, Lianfeng; Gai, Guosheng; Zhang, Changyue; Ji, Xuewen; Yao, Youwei

48

X-Ray Identification of Element 104  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The daughter x-ray identification technique has been applied to the identification of element 104. The characteristic K-series x rays from the ?-decay daughter isotope, nobelium (Z=102), have been observed in coincidence with ? particles from the decay of 4.5-sec 104257, thus providing an unequivocal determination of the parent atomic number, Z=104.

C. E. Bemis; Jr.; R. J. Silva; D. C. Hensley; O. L. Keller; Jr.; J. R. Tarrant; L. D. Hunt; P. F. Dittner; R. L. Hahn; C. D. Goodman

1973-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

49

Fabrication of heterojunction solar cells by improved tin oxide deposition on insulating layer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Highly efficient tin oxide-silicon heterojunction solar cells are prepared by heating a silicon substrate, having an insulating layer thereon, to provide a substrate temperature in the range of about 300.degree. C. to about 400.degree. C. and thereafter spraying the so-heated substrate with a solution of tin tetrachloride in a organic ester boiling below about 250.degree. C. Preferably the insulating layer is naturally grown silicon oxide layer.

Feng, Tom (Morris Plains, NJ); Ghosh, Amal K. (New Providence, NJ)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Preventive Action Number:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

8 Preventive Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 1 of 3 8 Preventive Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 1 of 3 EOTA - Business Form Document Title: Preventive Action Report Planning Worksheet Document Number: F-018 Rev 11_0414 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: P-008, Corrective/Preventive Action Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Document(s): N/A F-018 Preventive Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 2 of 3 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 08_0613 Initial Release 09_0924 Worksheet modified to reflect External Audit recommendation for identification of "Cause for Potential Nonconformance". Minor editing changes. 11_0414 Added Preventive Action Number block to match Q-Pulse

51

UNIT NUMBER:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

193 UNIT NUMBER: 197 UNIT NAME: CONCRETE RUBBLE PILE (30) REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Outside plant security fence, north of the plant on Big Bayou Creek on private property....

52

UNIT NUMBER  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 UNIT NUMBER UNIT NAME Rubble oile 41 REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Butler Lake Dam, West end of Butler Lake top 20 ft wide, 10 ft APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 200 ft long, base 30...

53

Tin City Long Range Radar Station Wind Farm | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Tin City Long Range Radar Station Wind Farm Tin City Long Range Radar Station Wind Farm Jump to: navigation, search Name Tin City Long Range Radar Station Wind Farm Facility Tin City Long Range Radar Station Sector Wind energy Facility Type Community Wind Facility Status In Service Owner Tin City Long Range Radar Station Developer Tanadgusix Corp. Energy Purchaser Tin City Long Range Radar Station Location Nome AK Coordinates 65.559372°, -167.949686° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":65.559372,"lon":-167.949686,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

54

SIGNUM: A Matlab, TIN-based landscape evolution model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Several numerical landscape evolution models (LEMs) have been developed to date, and many are available as open source codes. Most are written in efficient programming languages such as Fortran or C, but often require additional code efforts to plug in to more user-friendly data analysis and/or visualization tools to ease interpretation and scientific insight. In this paper, we present an effort to port a common core of accepted physical principles governing landscape evolution directly into a high-level language and data analysis environment such as Matlab. SIGNUM (acronym for Simple Integrated Geomorphological Numerical Model) is an independent and self-contained Matlab, TIN-based landscape evolution model, built to simulate topography development at various space and time scales. SIGNUM is presently capable of simulating hillslope processes such as linear and nonlinear diffusion, fluvial incision into bedrock, spatially varying surface uplift which can be used to simulate changes in base level, thrust and faulting, as well as effects of climate changes. Although based on accepted and well-known processes and algorithms in its present version, it is built with a modular structure, which allows to easily modify and upgrade the simulated physical processes to suite virtually any user needs. The code is conceived as an open-source project, and is thus an ideal tool for both research and didactic purposes, thanks to the high-level nature of the Matlab environment and its popularity among the scientific community. In this paper the simulation code is presented together with some simple examples of surface evolution, and guidelines for development of new modules and algorithms are proposed.

A. Refice; E. Giachetta; D. Capolongo

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

On-line coating of glass with tin oxide by atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition.  

SciTech Connect

Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) of tin oxide is a very important manufacturing technique used in the production of low-emissivity glass. It is also the primary method used to provide wear-resistant coatings on glass containers. The complexity of these systems, which involve chemical reactions in both the gas phase and on the deposition surface, as well as complex fluid dynamics, makes process optimization and design of new coating reactors a very difficult task. In 2001 the U.S. Dept. of Energy Industrial Technologies Program Glass Industry of the Future Team funded a project to address the need for more accurate data concerning the tin oxide APCVD process. This report presents a case study of on-line APCVD using organometallic precursors, which are the primary reactants used in industrial coating processes. Research staff at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, CA, and the PPG Industries Glass Technology Center in Pittsburgh, PA collaborated to produce this work. In this report, we describe a detailed investigation of the factors controlling the growth of tin oxide films. The report begins with a discussion of the basic elements of the deposition chemistry, including gas-phase thermochemistry of tin species and mechanisms of chemical reactions involved in the decomposition of tin precursors. These results provide the basis for experimental investigations in which tin oxide growth rates were measured as a function of all major process variables. The experiments focused on growth from monobutyltintrichloride (MBTC) since this is one of the two primary precursors used industrially. There are almost no reliable growth-rate data available for this precursor. Robust models describing the growth rate as a function of these variables are derived from modeling of these data. Finally, the results are used to conduct computational fluid dynamic simulations of both pilot- and full-scale coating reactors. As a result, general conclusions are reached concerning the factors affecting the growth rate in on-line APCVD reactors. In addition, a substantial body of data was generated that can be used to model many different industrial tin oxide coating processes. These data include the most extensive compilation of thermochemistry for gas-phase tin-containing species as well as kinetic expressions describing tin oxide growth rates over a wide range of temperatures, pressures, and reactant concentrations.

Allendorf, Mark D.; Sopko, J.F. (PPF Industries, Pittsburgh, PA); Houf, William G.; Chae, Yong Kee; McDaniel, Anthony H.; Li, M. (PPF Industries, Pittsburgh, PA); McCamy, J.W. (PPF Industries, Pittsburgh, PA)

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Release Path Temperatures of Shock-Compressed Tin from Dynamic Reflectance and Radiance Measurements  

SciTech Connect

Dynamic reflectance and radiance measurements were conducted for tin samples shock compressed to 35 GPa and released to 15 GPa using high explosives. We determined the reflectance of the tin samples glued to lithium fluoride windows using an integrating sphere with an internal xenon flashlamp as an illumination source. The dynamic reflectance (R) was determined at near normal incidence in four spectral bands with coverage in visible and near-infrared spectra. Uncertainties in R/R0 are < 2%, and uncertainties in absolute reflectance are < 5%. In complementary experiments, thermal radiance from the tin/glue/lithium fluoride interface was recorded with similar shock stress and spectral coverage as the reflectance measurements. The two sets of experiments were combined to obtain the temperature history of the tin surface with an uncertainty of < 2%. The stress at the interface was determined from photonic Doppler velocimetry and combined with the temperatures to obtain temperature-stress release paths for tin. We discuss the relationship between the experimental release paths and release isentropes that begin on the principal shock Hugoniot.

La Lone, B. M. [NSTec; Stevens, G. D. [NSTec; Turley, W. D. [NSTec; Holtkamp, D. B. [LANL; Iverson, A. J. [NSTec; Hixson, R. S. [NSTec; Veeser, L. R. [NSTec

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

State of the Art Power-in Tube Niobium-Tin Superconductors  

SciTech Connect

Powder-in-Tube (PIT) processed Niobium-Tin wires are commercially manufactured for nearly three decades and have demonstrated a combination of very high current density (presently up to 2500 A mm{sup -2} non-Cu at 12 T and 4.2 K) with fine (35 {micro}m), well separated filaments. We review the developments that have led to the present state of the art PIT Niobium-Tin wires, discuss the wire manufacturing and A15 formation processes, and describe typical superconducting performance in relation to magnetic field and strain. We further highlight successful applications of PIT wires and conclude with an outlook on possibilities for further improvements in the performance of PIT Niobium-Tin wires.

Godeke, A.; Ouden, A. Den; Nijhuis, A.; ten Kate, H.H.J.

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Case Number:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Name of Petitioner: Name of Petitioner: Date of Filing: Case Number: Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585 JUL 2 2 2009 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Appeal Dean P. Dennis March 2, 2009 TBA-0072 Dean D. Dennis filed a complaint of retaliation under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Mr. Dennis alleged that he engaged in protected activity and that his employer, National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec ), subsequently terminated him. An Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) Hearing Officer denied relief in Dean P. Dennis, Case No. TBH-0072, 1 and Mr. Dennis filed the instant appeal. As discussed below, the appeal is denied. I. Background The DOE established its Contractor Employee Protection Program to "safeguard public

59

JOB NUMBER  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

. . . . . . . . . .: LEAVE BLANK (NARA use only) JOB NUMBER N/-&*W- 9d - 3 DATE RECEIVED " -1s - 9 J - NOTIFICATION TOAGENCY , In accordance with the provisions of 44 U.S.C. 3303a the disposition request. including amendments, is ap roved except , . l for items that may be marke,, ,"dis osition not approved" or "withdrawn in c o i m n 10. 4. NAME OF PERSON WITH WHOM TO CONFER 5 TELEPHONE Jannie Kindred (202) 5&-333 5 - 2 -96 6 AGENCYCERTIFICATION -. ~ - I hereby certify that I am authorized to act for this agency in matters pertaining to the disposition of its records and that the records roposed for disposal are not now needed for the business of this agency or wiRnot be needed after t G t r & s s d ; and that written concurrence from

60

KPA Number  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Supports CMM-SW Level 3 Supports CMM-SW Level 3 Mapping of the DOE Information Systems Engineering Methodology to the Software Engineering Institute (SEI) Software Capability Maturity Model (CMM-SW) level 3. Date: September 2002 Page 1 KPA Number KPA Activity SEM Section SEM Work Product SQSE Web site http://cio.doe.gov/sqse ORGANIZATION PROCESS FOCUS OPF-1 The software process is assessed periodically, and action plans are developed to address the assessment findings. Chapter 1 * Organizational Process Management * Process Improvement Action Plan * Methodologies ! DOE Methodologies ! SEM OPF-2 The organization develops and maintains a plan for its software process development and improvement activities. Chapter 1 * Organizational Process Management * Process Improvement

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identification number tin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

COLLEGE OF CHARLESTON POLICY AND PROCEDURE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the taxpayer identification number (TIN) of a U. S. person/organization (including a resident alien. The Individual Taxpayer Identification Number (ITIN) issued by the IRS to resident aliens and nonresident aliens

Kasman, Alex

62

Ambient gas effects on the dynamics of laser-produced tin plume expansion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ambient gas effects on the dynamics of laser-produced tin plume expansion S. S. Harilal,a Beau O in the development of an extreme ultraviolet lithographic light source. An ambient gas that is transparent to 13.5 nm and deceleration of plume species, the addition of ambient gas leads to other events such as double peak formation

Tillack, Mark

63

Collapse of superconductivity in a hybrid tin-graphene Josephson junction array  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Collapse of superconductivity in a hybrid tin-graphene Josephson junction array Zheng Han1 of the Josephson junction array into a zero-temperature metallic state. The suppression of proximity, models involving specific types of Josephson junction arrays in which superconducting disks are coupled

Boyer, Edmond

64

Tin oxide-titanium oxide/graphene composited as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A tin oxide-titanium oxide/graphene (SnO2-TiO2.../G) ternary nanocomposite as high-performance anode for Li-ion batteries was prepared via a simple reflux method. ... The graphite oxide (GO) was reduced to graphene

Shan-Shan Chen; Xue Qin

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

A study of degradation of indium tin oxide thin films on glass for display applications  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Indium tin oxide (ITO) has been widely used in liquid crystal displays (LCD). Contamination and moisture have proved to have the adverse effect of causing ITO corrosion/degradation. The purpose of this paper is to determine if scratching the surface ... Keywords: Accelerated degradation test, ITO corrosion, ITO degradation, Scratching

W. S. Leung; Y. C. Chan; S. M. Lui

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

High Electric Resistance Polymer/Lipid Composite Films on Indium?Tin?Oxide Electrodes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

High Electric Resistance Polymer/Lipid Composite Films on Indium?Tin?Oxide Electrodes ... Impedance spectra were analyzed in terms of equivalent circuits with resistances, capacitances, and so-called “constant phase elements”. ... resists in directing the selective deposition of metal and ceramic thin films by MOCVD and sol-gel methods, resp. ...

Heiko Hillebrandt; Gerald Wiegand; Motomu Tanaka; Erich Sackmann

1999-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

67

Growth of single-crystalline rutile TiO2 nanorods on fluorine-doped tin oxide glass for organicinorganic  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, 15] and CdS [2] have been explored and studied to overcome this shortcome, and used in organicGrowth of single-crystalline rutile TiO2 nanorods on fluorine-doped tin oxide glass for organic

Cao, Guozhong

68

Growth of CrO[subscript 2] coated single crystalline (SnO[subscript 2]) tin oxide nanowires  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Single crystalline tin oxide (SnO[subscript 2]) nanowires have been synthesized by carbothermal reduction of SnO[subscript 2] nanopowder followed by thermal evaporation of the reduced precursor and growth via the ...

Miao, Guo-Xing

69

Multilayer films of indium tin oxide/TiO2 codoped with vanadium and nitrogen for efficient photocatalytic water splitting  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

TiO22 films codoped with V cations and N anions were synthesised by RF-magnetron sputtering. The incorporation of V and N in TiO2 lattice produces isolated energy levels near the conduction and valence bands, respectively, causing an effective narrowing of the band gap to 2.5 eV. Recombination of photo-charges was reduced by depositing multilayer films of indium tin oxide (ITO)/V-N-codoped TiO2 with different numbers of bilayers. In multilayer structure, the generated photoelectrons, travelling into TiO2 film of limited thickness, rapidly enter the space charge interface of the ITO/TiO2 films from where they are instantaneously injected into the ITO layer and then removed towards the cathode. The synergic effects created by band narrowing and enhanced charge separation by using codoping and multilayer structure strategy in TiO2 generate higher photocurrent for water splitting under visible light which definitely exceeds that obtained by doping TiO2 with a single, V or N, element.

Z. El Koura; N. Patel; R. Edla; A. Miotello

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Optical fuel pin scanner. [Patent application; for reading identifications  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This patent relates to an optical identification system developed for post-irradiation disassembly and analysis of fuel bundle assemblies. The apparatus is designed to be lowered onto a stationary fuel pin to read identification numbers or letters imprinted on the circumference of the top fuel pin and cap. (DLC)

Kirchner, T.L.; Powers, H.G.

1980-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

71

Crystalline to amorphous phase transition of tin oxide nanocrystals induced by SHI at low temperature  

SciTech Connect

Tin oxide (SnO{sub 2}) thin films were deposited using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique on Si substrates. The as-deposited films were irradiated using 100 MeV Ag ions at different fluences ranging from 3x10{sup 13} to 3x10{sup 14} ions/cm{sup 2} at an incidence angle of 75 deg. with respect to surface normal at liquid nitrogen (LN2) temperature. The as-deposited and irradiated films have been characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques to study the modifications in structural and surface morphological properties. Nanocrystalline film become completely amorphous and nanograins of tin oxide disappeared from the surface as indicated by XRD spectra and AFM micrographs respectively.

Kumar, Vijay; Pratap, Deepti; Jain, Anshul; Agarwal, D. C.; Sulania, I.; Tripathi, A.; Chaudhary, R. J.; Chauhan, R. S. [Department of Physics, R.B.S. College, Agra, U.P.,-282 002 (India); Inter-University Accelerator Centre, New Delhi, -110 067 (India); UGC-DAE CSR, Khandwa Road, Indore, M.P., -452 017 (India); Department of Physics, R.B.S. College, Agra, U.P., -282 002 (India)

2012-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

72

Hydrogen plasma treatment for improved conductivity in amorphous aluminum doped zinc tin oxide thin films  

SciTech Connect

Improving the conductivity of earth-abundant transparent conductive oxides (TCOs) remains an important challenge that will facilitate the replacement of indium-based TCOs. Here, we show that a hydrogen (H{sub 2})-plasma post-deposition treatment improves the conductivity of amorphous aluminum-doped zinc tin oxide while retaining its low optical absorption. We found that the H{sub 2}-plasma treatment performed at a substrate temperature of 50?°C reduces the resistivity of the films by 57% and increases the absorptance by only 2%. Additionally, the low substrate temperature delays the known formation of tin particles with the plasma and it allows the application of the process to temperature-sensitive substrates.

Morales-Masis, M., E-mail: monica.moralesmasis@epfl.ch; Ding, L.; Dauzou, F. [Photovoltaics and Thin-Film Electronics Laboratory (PVLab), Institute of Microengineering (IMT), Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne - EPFL, Rue de la Maladière 71b, CH-2002 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Jeangros, Q. [Interdisciplinary Centre for Electron Microscopy, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne (Switzerland); Hessler-Wyser, A. [Photovoltaics and Thin-Film Electronics Laboratory (PVLab), Institute of Microengineering (IMT), Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne - EPFL, Rue de la Maladière 71b, CH-2002 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Interdisciplinary Centre for Electron Microscopy, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL), Lausanne (Switzerland); Nicolay, S. [Centre Suisse d’Electronique et de Microtechnique (CSEM) SA, Rue Jaquet-Droz 1, CH-2002 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Ballif, C. [Photovoltaics and Thin-Film Electronics Laboratory (PVLab), Institute of Microengineering (IMT), Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne - EPFL, Rue de la Maladière 71b, CH-2002 Neuchatel (Switzerland); Centre Suisse d’Electronique et de Microtechnique (CSEM) SA, Rue Jaquet-Droz 1, CH-2002 Neuchatel (Switzerland)

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

An Original Route to Immobilize an Organic Biocide onto a Transparent Tin Dioxide Electrode  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

An Original Route to Immobilize an Organic Biocide onto a Transparent Tin Dioxide Electrode ... Chloramine is increasingly being considered as an alternative final disinfectant to chlorine in drinking water treatment even if it is generally not as potent as free chlorine against planktonic organisms. ... Moreover, the detection of chlorine by XPS (surface sensitive) and by EDX (bulk sensitive) indicates that the organic deposit is chlorinated throughout its thickness. ...

Catherine Debiemme-Chouvy; Sanae Haskouri; Guy Folcher; Hubert Cachet

2007-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

74

INTERIM RESULTS FROM A STUDY OF THE IMPACTS OF TIN(II) BASED MERCURY TREATMENT IN A SMALL STREAM ECOSYSTEM: TIMS BRANCH, SAVANNAH RIVER SITE  

SciTech Connect

Mercury (Hg) has been identified as a 'persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic' pollutant with widespread impacts throughout North America and the world (EPA. 1997a, 1997b, 1998a, 1998b, 2000). Although most of the mercury in the environment is inorganic Hg, a small proportion of total Hg is transformed through the actions of aquatic microbes into methylmercury (MeHg). In contrast to virtually all other metals, MeHg biomagnifies or becomes increasingly concentrated as it is transferred through aquatic food chains so that the consumption of mercury contaminated fish is the primary route of this toxin to humans. For this reason, the ambient water quality criterion (AWQC) for mercury is based on a fish tissue endpoint rather than an aqueous Hg concentration, as the tissue concentration (e.g., < 0.3 {mu}g/g fillet) is considered to be a more consistent indicator of exposure and risk (EPA, 2001). Effective mercury remediation at point-source contaminated sites requires an understanding of the nature and magnitude of mercury inputs, and also knowledge of how these inputs must be controlled in order to achieve the desired reduction of mercury contamination in biota necessary for compliance with AWQC targets. One of the challenges to remediation is that mercury body burdens in fish are more closely linked to aqueous MeHg than to inorganic Hg concentrations (Sveinsdottir and Mason 2005), but MeHg production is not easily predicted or controlled. At point-source contaminated sites, mercury methylation is not only affected by the absolute mercury load, but also by the form of mercury loaded. In addition, once MeHg is formed, the hydrology, trophic structure, and water chemistry of a given system affect how it is transformed and transferred through the food chain to fish. Decreasing inorganic Hg concentrations and loading may often therefore be a more achievable remediation goal, but has led to mixed results in terms of responses in fish bioaccumulation. A number of source control measures have resulted in rapid responses in lake or reservoir fisheries (Joslin 1994, Turner and Southworth 1999; Orihel et al., 2007), but examples of similar responses in Hg-contaminated stream ecosystems are less common. Recent work suggests that stream systems may actually be more susceptible to mercury bioaccumulation than lakes, highlighting the need to better understand the ecological drivers of mercury bioaccumulation in stream-dwelling fish (Chasar et al. 2009, Ward et al. 2010). In the present study we examine the response of fish to remedial actions in Tims Branch, a point-source contaminated stream on the Department of Energy's (DOE) Savannah River Site in Aiken, South Carolina. This second order stream received inorganic mercury inputs at its headwaters from the 1950s-2000s which contaminated the water, sediments, and biota downstream. In 2007, an innovative mercury removal system using tin (II) chloride (stannous chloride, SnCl{sub 2}) was implemented at a pre-existing air stripper. Tin(II) reduces dissolved Hg (II) to Hg (0), which is removed by the air stripper. During this process, tin(II) is oxidized to tin (IV) which is expected to precipitate as colloidal tin(IV) oxides and hydroxides, particulate materials with relatively low toxicity (Hallas and Cooney, 1981, EPA 2002, ATSDR, 2005). The objectives of the present research are to provide an initial assessment of the net impacts of the tin(II) based mercury treatment on key biota and to document the distribution and fate of inorganic tin in this small stream ecosystem after the first several years of operating a full scale system. To support these objectives, we collected fish, sediment, water, invertebrates, and biofilm samples from Tims Branch to quantify the general behavior and accumulation patterns for mercury and tin in the ecosystem and to determine if the treatment process has resulted in: (1) a measurable beneficial impact on (i.e., decrease of) mercury concentration in upper trophic level fish and other biota; this is a key environmental endpoint since reducing mercury concen

Looney, B.; Bryan, L.; Mathews, T.

2012-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

75

1. Identification Number: 2. Program/Project Title: 3. Recipient  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

period. O - Other; See instructions for further details. 5. Special Instructions: DOE F 4600.2 (03 with appropriate DOE F 241 forms available at https://www.osti.gov/elink/index.jsp ) Report/Product Form Final Scientific/Technical Report DOE F 241.3 Conference papers/proceedings DOE F 241.3 Software/Manual DOE F 241

76

Studies of positron identification with the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and PAMELA has been acquiring data for approximately four years. The detector was designed and optimised production in hadronic cascades within the context of positron identification. The number of 0 s produced Collaboration in 2009 were applied to simulations in the energy range 20 - 100 GeV. Results of this analysis

Haviland, David

77

Highly efficient inverted organic solar cells using amino acid modified indium tin oxide as cathode  

SciTech Connect

In this paper, we report that highly efficient inverted organic solar cells were achieved by modifying the surface of indium tin oxide (ITO) using an amino acid, Serine (Ser). With the modification of the ITO surface, device efficiency was significantly enhanced from 0.63% to 4.17%, accompanied with an open circuit voltage (Voc) that was enhanced from 0.30?V to 0.55?V. Ultraviolet and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies indicate that the work function reduction induced by the amino acid modification resulting in the decreased barrier height at the ITO/organic interface played a crucial role in the enhanced performances.

Li, Aiyuan; Nie, Riming; Deng, Xianyu, E-mail: xydeng@hitsz.edu.cn [Research Center for Advanced Functional Materials and Devices, Shenzhen Key Laboratory of Advanced Materials, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shenzhen Graduate School, Harbin Institute of Technology, Shenzhen 518055 (China); Wei, Huaixin; Li, Yanqing; Tang, Jianxin [Jiangsu Key Laboratory for Carbon-Based Functional Materials and Devices, Institute of Functional Nano and Soft Materials (FUNSOM), Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Zheng, Shizhao; Wong, King-Young [Department of Physics, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, New Territories, Hong Kong (China)

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

78

Liquid crystal terahertz phase shifters with functional indium-tin-oxide nanostructures for biasing and alignment  

SciTech Connect

Indium Tin Oxide (ITO) nanowhiskers (NWhs) obliquely evaporated by electron-beam glancing-angle deposition can serve simultaneously as transparent electrodes and alignment layer for liquid crystal (LC) devices in the terahertz (THz) frequency range. To demonstrate, we constructed a THz LC phase shifter with ITO NWhs. Phase shift exceeding ?/2 at 1.0 THz was achieved in a ?517??m-thick cell. The phase shifter exhibits high transmittance (?78%). The driving voltage required for quarter-wave operation is as low as 5.66?V (rms), compatible with complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) and thin-film transistor (TFT) technologies.

Yang, Chan-Shan [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Chemical Sciences Division, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States); Tang, Tsung-Ta [Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Pan, Ru-Pin [Department of Electrophysics, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30078, Taiwan (China); Yu, Peichen [Department of Photonics and Institute of Electro-Optical Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 30010, Taiwan (China); Pan, Ci-Ling, E-mail: clpan@phys.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China); Frontier Research Center on Fundamental and Applied Science of Matters, Hsinchu 30013, Taiwan (China)

2014-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

79

Indium tin oxide and indium phosphide heterojunction nanowire array solar cells  

SciTech Connect

Heterojunction solar cells were formed with a position-controlled InP nanowire array sputtered with indium tin oxide (ITO). The ITO not only acted as a transparent electrode but also as forming a photovoltaic junction. The devices exhibited an open-circuit voltage of 0.436?V, short-circuit current of 24.8?mA/cm{sup 2}, and fill factor of 0.682, giving a power conversion efficiency of 7.37% under AM1.5?G illumination. The internal quantum efficiency of the device was higher than that of the world-record InP cell in the short wavelength range.

Yoshimura, Masatoshi, E-mail: yoshimura@rciqe.hokudai.ac.jp; Nakai, Eiji; Fukui, Takashi [Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, and Research Center for Integrated Quantum Electronics (RCIQE), Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8, Sapporo 060–8628 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, and Research Center for Integrated Quantum Electronics (RCIQE), Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8, Sapporo 060–8628 (Japan); Tomioka, Katsuhiro [Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, and Research Center for Integrated Quantum Electronics (RCIQE), Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8, Sapporo 060–8628 (Japan) [Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, and Research Center for Integrated Quantum Electronics (RCIQE), Hokkaido University, Kita 13 Nishi 8, Sapporo 060–8628 (Japan); PRESTO, Japan Science and Technology Agency (JST), Honcho Kawaguchi, 332–0012 Saitama (Japan)

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

80

Investigation of hexadecanethiol self-assembled monolayers on cadmium tin oxide thin films  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This study reports the use of variable angle reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to investigate the formation of a 1-hexadecanethiol adlayer on cadmium tin oxide (CTO) thin film surfaces. These adlayers appear to be robust, ordered monolayers. The optical and electronic properties of CTO thin films chemically vapor deposited onto glass substrates were also investigated. The reflectance of the CTO films was dependent upon the incident angle of the impinging radiation and revealed a reflectance decrease indicative of a plasma frequency in the mid-IR using p-polarized radiation.

Crissy L. Rhodes; Scott H. Brewer; Jaap Folmer; Stefan Franzen

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identification number tin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Syntheses and structural characterization of zirconium-tin and zirconium-lead binary and ternary systems  

SciTech Connect

The binary zirconium-tin system was reinvestigated. The A15 phase appears to be a line phase with a Zr{sub 4}Sn composition. The Zr{sub 5}Sn{sub 3} (Mn{sub 5}Si{sub 3}-type) and Zr{sub 5}Sn{sub 4} (Ti{sub 5}Ga{sub 4}-type) compounds are line phases below 1000{degree}C, the latter being a self-interstitial phase of the former. ZrSn{sub 2} is the tin-richest phase. There is an one-phase region between these phases with partial self-interstitials at high temperatures. The zirconium-lead system behaves similarly: there are an A15 phase with a Zr{sub {approximately}5.8}Pb composition, Zr{sub 5}Pb{sub 3} (Mn{sub 5}Si{sub 3}-type) and Zr{sub 5}Pb{sub 4} (Ti{sub 5}Ga{sub 4-type}) compounds, and a high temperature solid solution between Zr{sub 5}Pb{sub >3.5} and Zr{sub 5}Pb{sub 4} from below 1000{degree}C; however, the ZrSn{sub 2} analogue is not formed. The Mn{sub 5}Si{sub 3}-type phases in these systems can accommodate third elements interstitially to form stoichiometric compounds Zr{sub 5}Sn{sub 3}Z (Z = B, C, N, O, Al, Si, P, S, Cu, Zn, Ga, Ge, and As and Se) and Zr{sub 5}Pb{sub 3}Z (Z = Al, Si, P, S, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Zn, Ga, Ge, As, Se, Ag, Cd, In, Sn, Sb and Te) as well as their self-interstitial derivatives. The systems Zr-Sn-T, T = Fe, Co and Ni, did not produce stoichiometric interstitial phases Zr{sub 5}Sn{sub 3}T. Instead, the interstitial phases for these elements are formed only with excess tin that partially occupies the interstitial site together with a T element. Reducing the amount of tin in these systems yields two new phases; Zr{sub 5}Sn{sub 2+x}Fe{sub 1-x} (0 {le} {times} {le} 0.28) (W{sub 5}Si{sub 3}-type) and Zr{sub 6}Sn{sub 2}Fe (Zr{sub 6}Al{sub 2}Co-type) as characterized by X-ray single crystal analyses. A cobalt analogue for the latter was also synthesized.

Kwon, Y.U.

1991-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

82

Methods of Improving Internal-TIN Nb{sub 3}Sn for Fusion Applications  

SciTech Connect

Development of a more reliable and economical high field material for ITER and TPX as well as LDK and KSTAR programs. The overall objective of this work is to provide the TPX/ITER programs and similar projects with an improved, reliable and economical high field Nb{sub 3}Sn multifilamentary conductor strand made by the internal-tin process. An effort will also be made to determine the reasons for the property changes taking place after various heat treatment cycles in an effort to develop optimized heat treatments for the various applications.

Pyon, T; Gregory, E.

2002-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

83

Indium (In)- and tin (Sn)-based metal induced crystallization (MIC) on amorphous germanium (?-Ge)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this paper, metal-induced crystallization (MIC) phenomenon on ?-Ge by indium (In) and tin (Sn) are thoroughly investigated. In- and Sn-MIC process respectively started at 250 °C and 400 °C. Compared to the previously reported MIC samples including In-MIC, Sn-MIC process presented higher sheet resistance (similar to that of SPC) and bigger crystal grains above 50 nm (slightly smaller than that of SPC). According to SIMS analysis, Sn atoms diffused more slowly into Ge than In at 400 °C, providing lower density of heterogeneous nuclei induced by metals and consequently larger crystal grains.

Dong-Ho Kang; Jin-Hong Park

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Chemical interactions at polymer interfaces: poly(p-xylylene-?-tetrahydrothiophene-bromide, chloride) on indium–tin-oxide  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Chemical interactions, at the interface between a precursor polymer for poly(p-phenylenevinylene), namely poly(p-xylylene-?-tetrahydrothiophene-chloride), and an indium–tin-oxide transparent electrode, are identified using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The \\{HCl\\} eliminated in the conversion process interacts with the surface of the indium–tin-oxide substrate leading to the formation of indium chloride which then diffuses into the polymer. It appears that indium–tin-oxide, or possibly the indium chloride generated at the interface, acts as a catalyst for the thermal elimination reaction. The results show unequivocally that interfacial interactions are of major importance in understanding, and ultimately improving, the performance of polymer-based electro-luminescent devices.

A Andersson; Th Kugler; M Lögdlund; A.B Holmes; X Li; W.R Salaneck

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Intrinsic anomalous surface roughening of TiN films deposited by reactive sputtering M. A. Auger,1,5 L. Vzquez,1,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Intrinsic anomalous surface roughening of TiN films deposited by reactive sputtering M. A. Auger,1 manuscript received 1 December 2005; published 31 January 2006 We study surface kinetic roughening of Ti. The TiN films exhibit intrinsic anomalous scaling and multiscaling. The film kinetic roughening

Cuerno, Rodolfo

86

Reduction And Stabilization (Immobilization) Of Pertechnetate To An Immobile Reduced Technetium Species Using Tin(II) Apatite  

SciTech Connect

Synthetic tin(II)apatite reduces pertechnetate from the mobile +7 to a non-mobile oxidation state and sequesters the technetium, preventing re-oxidization to mobile +7 state under acidic or oxygenated conditions. Previous work indicated technetium reacted Sn(II)apatite can achieve an ANSI leachability index of 12.8 in Cast Stone. An effect by pH is observed on the distribution coefficient, the highest distribution coefficient being l70,900 observed at pH levels of 2.5 to 10.2. The tin apatite was resistant to releasing technetium under test conditions.

Duncan, J. B.

2012-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

87

Neural Network Identification For a C5 Parallel Robot  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents the design and analysis of a neural network-based identification of the inverse dynamic model of a C5 parallel robot. The identification structure is designed using the black box form (the dynamic model is completely unknown). This identification uses real data acquired on the C5 parallel robot by applying a nominal control scheme (PD). The desired trajectories of this scheme are based on Fourier series and the coefficients are chosen in a heuristic way. We have used this type of desired trajectories to obtain exciting trajectories for identification procedure. Three identification schemes are tested and compared. The comparison is performed based on the number of parameters used in each architecture and the quality of the generalization error. The used neural network is of MLP type and composed of one hidden layer.

Daachi, M. E.; Chikouche, D. [Universite Ferhat Abbes, Setif (Algeria); Achili, B. [Laboratoire d'Informatique Avancees de Saint Denis (LIASD) 2, rue de la liberte 93526 Saint Denis Cedex (France); Daachi, B. [Laboratoire Images, Signaux et Systmes Intelligents (LISSI) 122, rue Paul Armangot 94400 Vitry/Seine (France)

2008-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

88

DOE/ID-Number  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Disposal Options for Research and Development for Spent Nuclear Fuel and High Basis for Identification of Disposal Options for Research and Development for Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Waste Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Rob P. Rechard Barry Goldstein Larry H. Brush Sandia National Laboratories James A. Blink Mark Sutton Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

89

The UniversiTy of Texas aT aUsTin Application for Tuition Rebate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The UniversiTy of Texas aT aUsTin Application for Tuition Rebate Name) _________ / _________ General Information An undergraduate may be eligible for a tuition rebate of up to $1,000 at graduation documentation, you may submit an application for a rebate. If you answered yes to question 3a., you

Lightsey, Glenn

90

Conductive indium-tin oxide nanowire and nanotube arrays made by electrochemically assisted deposition in template membranes: switching  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conductive indium-tin oxide nanowire and nanotube arrays made by electrochemically assisted-step electrochemically assisted deposition (EAD) process inside Au-plugged anodic aluminium oxide and polycarbonate electrodes in dye-sensi- tized2,6­11 and polymer12 solar cells, fillers in transparent and conductive polymer

91

Absolute orientation-dependent anisotropic TiN(111) island step energies and stiffnesses from shape fluctuation analyses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In situ high-temperature (1165–1248 K) scanning-tunneling microscopy was used to measure temporal fluctuations about the anisotropic equilibrium shape of two-dimensional TiN(111) adatom and vacancy islands on atomically smooth TiN(111) terraces. The equilibrium island shape was found to be a truncated hexagon bounded by alternating ?110? steps, which form [100] and [110] nanofacets with the terrace. Relative step energies ? as a function of step orientation ? were obtained from the inverse Legendre transformation of the equilibrium island shape to within an orientation-independent scale factor ?, the equilibrium chemical potential of the island per unit TiN area. We find that for alternating S1 and S2 ?110? steps, the ratio ?1/?2=0.72±0.02. The parameter ? and, hence, absolute orientation-dependent values of ?(?) and step stiffnesses ??(?) were extracted from quantitative shape fluctuation data using an exact theoretical approach valid for anisotropic islands. For the two ?110? steps, we obtain ?1=0.23±0.05 and ??1=1.9±1.1 eV/Å with ?2=0.33±0.07 and ??2=0.08±0.02 eV/Å over the observed temperature range. Due to the correspondingly high kink energies, TiN(111) step energies exhibit only a very weak temperature dependence between 0 K and the maximum measurement temperature 1248 K.

S. Kodambaka; S. V. Khare; V. Petrova; D. D. Johnson; I. Petrov; J. E. Greene

2003-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

92

Graphene oxide oxidizes stannous ions to synthesize tin sulfidegraphene nanocomposites with small crystal size for high performance lithium ion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Graphene oxide oxidizes stannous ions to synthesize tin sulfide­graphene nanocomposites with small September 2012 DOI: 10.1039/c2jm34864k This study reports a novel strategy of preparing graphene composites by employing graphene oxide as precursor and oxidizer. It is demonstrated that graphene oxide can oxidize

Cao, Guozhong

93

Efficient dehydration of carbohydrates to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural in ionic liquids catalyzed by tin(IV) phosphonate and zirconium phosphonate  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work, we synthesized tin(IV) phosphonate (SnBPMA) and zirconium phosphonate (ZrBPMA) by the reaction of SnCl4·5H2O or ZrOCl2·8H2O with N,N...-bis(phosphonomethyl)aminoacetic acid, which was synthesized fr...

Hui Ning; JinLiang Song; MinQiang Hou; DeZhong Yang; HongLei Fan…

2013-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Evaluation of four-center integrals with the linear muffin-tin orbital tight-binding method  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We derive formulas for the general four-center integral and its Bloch sum within the basis of optimally localized muffin-tin orbitals in the atomic spheres approximation. As an example of application the Hartree and exchange energies of silicon are calculated and the cohesive energy determined in the local-density and Hartree-Fock approximations.

A. Svane and O. K. Andersen

1986-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

95

The New Element Californium (Atomic Number 98)  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Definite identification has been made of an isotope of the element with atomic number 98 through the irradiation of Cm{sup 242} with about 35-Mev helium ions in the Berkeley Crocker Laboratory 60-inch cyclotron. The isotope which has been identified has an observed half-life of about 45 minutes and is thought to have the mass number 244. The observed mode of decay of 98{sup 244} is through the emission of alpha-particles, with energy of about 7.1 Mev, which agrees with predictions. Other considerations involving the systematics of radioactivity in this region indicate that it should also be unstable toward decay by electron capture. The chemical separation and identification of the new element was accomplished through the use of ion exchange adsorption methods employing the resin Dowex-50. The element 98 isotope appears in the eka-dysprosium position on elution curves containing berkelium and curium as reference points--that is, it precedes berkelium and curium off the column in like manner that dysprosium precedes terbium and gadolinium. The experiments so far have revealed only the tripositive oxidation state of eka-dysprosium character and suggest either that higher oxidation states are not stable in aqueous solutions or that the rates of oxidation are slow. The successful identification of so small an amount of an isotope of element 98 was possible only through having made accurate predictions of the chemical and radioactive properties.

Seaborg, G. T.; Thompson, S. G.; Street, K. Jr.; Ghiroso, A.

1950-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

96

Identification of Novel Virulence Genes of Salmonella enterica Using an Array Based Analysis of Cistrons Under Selection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the identification of genes required for Salmonella survival in many environments. Identification of Salmonella genes necessary for growth in different niches has made rapid progress in recent years, as the molecular biologic tools for their identification become... more sophisticated and are applied to study this organism in an increasing number of environments. In the following chapter I detail the identification of Salmonella genes required in niches that have been studied to date, and describe advances...

Reynolds, Mollie Megan

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

97

Enhancer Identification through Comparative Genomics  

SciTech Connect

With the availability of genomic sequence from numerousvertebrates, a paradigm shift has occurred in the identification ofdistant-acting gene regulatory elements. In contrast to traditionalgene-centric studies in which investigators randomly scanned genomicfragments that flank genes of interest in functional assays, the modernapproach begins electronically with publicly available comparativesequence datasets that provide investigators with prioritized lists ofputative functional sequences based on their evolutionary conservation.However, although a large number of tools and resources are nowavailable, application of comparative genomic approaches remains far fromtrivial. In particular, it requires users to dynamically consider thespecies and methods for comparison depending on the specific biologicalquestion under investigation. While there is currently no single generalrule to this end, it is clear that when applied appropriately,comparative genomic approaches exponentially increase our power ingenerating biological hypotheses for subsequent experimentaltesting.

Visel, Axel; Bristow, James; Pennacchio, Len A.

2006-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Method for palliation of pain in human bone cancer using therapeutic tin-117m compositions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides a method for the palliation of bone pain due to cancer by the administration of a unique dosage of a tin-117m (Sn-117m) stannic chelate complex in a pharmaceutically acceptable composition. In addition, the invention provides a method for simultaneous palliation of bone pain and radiotherapy in cancer patients using compositions containing Sn-117m chelates. The invention also provides a method for palliating bone pain in cancer patients using Sn-117m-containing compositions and monitoring patient status by imaging the distribution of the Sn-117m in the patients. Also provided are pharmaceutically acceptable compositions containing Sn-117m chelate complexes for the palliation of bone pain in cancer patients.

Srivastava, Suresh C. (Setauket, NY); Meinken, George E. (Middle Island, NY); Mausner, Leonard F. (Stony Brook, NY); Atkins, Harold L. (Setauket, NY)

1998-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

99

Method for palliation of pain in human bone cancer using therapeutic tin-117m compositions  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention provides a method for the palliation of bone pain due to cancer by the administration of a unique dosage of a tin-117m (Sn-117m) stannic chelate complex in a pharmaceutically acceptable composition. In addition, the invention provides a method for simultaneous palliation of bone pain and radiotherapy in cancer patients using compositions containing Sn-117m chelates. The invention also provides a method for palliating bone pain in cancer patients using Sn-117m-containing compositions and monitoring patient status by imaging the distribution of the Sn-117m in the patients. Also provided are pharmaceutically acceptable compositions containing Sn-117m chelate complexes for the palliation of bone pain in cancer patients. 5 figs.

Srivastava, S.C.; Meinken, G.E.; Mausner, L.F.; Atkins, H.L.

1998-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

100

Spray coated indium-tin-oxide-free organic photodiodes with PEDOT:PSS anodes  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we report on Indium Tin Oxide (ITO)-free spray coated organic photodiodes with an active layer consisting of a poly(3-hexylthiophen) (P3HT) and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) blend and patterned poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) electrodes. External quantum efficiency and current voltage characteristics under illuminated and dark conditions as well as cut-off frequencies for devices with varying active and hole conducting layer thicknesses were measured in order to characterize the fabricated devices. 60% quantum efficiency as well as nearly four orders of magnitude on-off ratios have been achieved. Those values are comparable with standard ITO devices.

Schmidt, Morten, E-mail: morten.schmidt@nano.ei.tum.de; Falco, Aniello; Loch, Marius; Lugli, Paolo; Scarpa, Giuseppe [Institute for Nanoelectronics, Technical University of Munich, Arcisstr. 21, 80333 Munich (Germany)

2014-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identification number tin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Inkjet printed ambipolar transistors and inverters based on carbon nanotube/zinc tin oxide heterostructures  

SciTech Connect

We report ambipolar field-effect transistors (FETs) consisting of inkjet printed semiconductor bilayer heterostructures utilizing semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and amorphous zinc tin oxide (ZTO). The bilayer structure allows for electron transport to occur principally in the amorphous oxide layer and hole transport to occur exclusively in the SWCNT layer. This results in balanced electron and hole mobilities exceeding 2 cm{sup 2} V{sup ?1} s{sup ?1} at low operating voltages (<5?V) in air. We further show that the SWCNT-ZTO hybrid ambipolar FETs can be integrated into functional inverter circuits that display high peak gain (>10). This work provides a pathway for realizing solution processable, inkjet printable, large area electronic devices, and systems based on SWCNT-amorphous oxide heterostructures.

Kim, Bongjun; Jang, Seonpil; Dodabalapur, Ananth, E-mail: ananth.dodabalapur@engr.utexas.edu [Microelectronics Research Center, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78758 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas 78712 (United States); Geier, Michael L.; Prabhumirashi, Pradyumna L. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Hersam, Mark C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States); Department of Medicine, Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois 60208 (United States)

2014-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

102

Two ways to perform spin-polarized relativistic linear muffin-tin-orbital calculations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Two spin-polarized relativistic versions of the linear muffin-tin-orbital method of band-structure calculations are presented. The first one is a pseudoperturbational method taking the effect of spin splitting only into account within the variational step. The second one treats spin polarization and spin-orbit coupling on the same level by making use of the proper solutions to the Dirac equation for a spin-dependent potential. Both approaches permit a detailed theoretical study of magnetocrystalline anisotropy effects. Results for the band structure, the spin and orbital magnetic moments and the conduction-band contribution to the hyperfine fields of Fe, Co, and Ni obtained by these methods are presented and compared to data obtained by an application of the spin-polarized version of the relativistic Korringa-Kohn-Rostoker method.

H. Ebert

1988-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

103

“One-Pot” Synthesis of 5-(Hydroxymethyl)furfural from Carbohydrates using Tin-Beta Zeolite  

SciTech Connect

Conversion of carbohydrates to 5-(hydroxymethyl)furfural (HMF) may provide a step forward toward achieving a renewable biomass-based chemicals and fuels platform. Recently, we reported that a tin-containing, high-silica molecular sieve with the zeolite beta topology (Sn-Beta) can efficiently catalyze the isomerization of glucose to fructose in aqueous media at low pH. Herein, we describe the combination of Sn-Beta with acid catalysts in a one vessel, biphasic reactor system to synthesize HMF from carbohydrates such as glucose, cellobiose, and starch with high efficiency. HMF selectivities over 70% were obtained using this “one-pot” biphasic water/tetrahydrofuran (THF) reactor system. The key to successfully achieving the conversions/selectivities reported is that Sn-Beta is able to convert glucose to fructose at pH near 1 and in saturated aqueous salt solutions.

Nikolla, E; Roman-Leshkov, Yuriy; Moliner, Manuel; Davis, Mark E.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

FEAST fundamental framework for electronic structure calculations: Reformulation and solution of the muffin-tin problem  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In a recent article Polizzi (2009) [15], the FEAST algorithm has been presented as a general purpose eigenvalue solver which is ideally suited for addressing the numerical challenges in electronic structure calculations. Here, FEAST is presented beyond the “black-box” solver as a fundamental modeling framework which can naturally address the original numerical complexity of the electronic structure problem as formulated by Slater in 1937 [3]. The non-linear eigenvalue problem arising from the muffin-tin decomposition of the real-space domain is first derived and then reformulated to be solved exactly within the FEAST framework. This new framework is presented as a fundamental and practical solution for performing both accurate and scalable electronic structure calculations, bypassing the various issues of using traditional approaches such as linearization and pseudopotential techniques. A finite element implementation of this FEAST framework along with simulation results for various molecular systems is also presented and discussed.

Alan R. Levin; Deyin Zhang; Eric Polizzi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Elements of number theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The dissertation argues for the necessity of a morphosemantic theory of number, that is, a theory of number serviceable both to semantics and morphology. The basis for this position, and the empirical core of the dissertation, ...

Harbour, Daniel, 1975-

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

An intelligent approach to handle False-Positive Radio Frequency Identification Anomalies  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Radio Frequency Identification RFID technology allows wireless interaction between tagged objects and readers to automatically identify large groups of items. This technology is widely accepted in a number of application domains, however, it suffers ... Keywords: Bayesian Network, False-Positive Anomaly, Neural Network, Non-Monotonic Reasoning, Radio Frequency Identification --Rfid

Peter Darcy; Bela Stantic; Abdul Sattar

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

In0,53Ga0.47Asp-i-n photodiodes with transparent cadmium tin oxide contacts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In0,53Ga0.47Asp-i-n photodiodes with transparent cadmium tin oxide contacts Paul R. Berger,a) Niloy for publication 28 July 1992) A new type of p-i-n In,,,,GaO,,,As photodiode having an optically transparent into the i-region is not relevant avoiding an increased dark current. The photodiodes exhibited leakage

108

Enhancing the Lithiation Rate of Silicon Nanowires by the Inclusion of Tin  

SciTech Connect

Silicon (Si) has a very high lithium storage capacity and is being explored as a negative electrode material in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). Si nanowires can exhibit relatively stable performance for many cycles of charging; however, conductive carbon must often be added to the electrode layer to improve the rate capability due to the relatively low electrical conductivity of Si. The added carbon lowers the capacity of the electrode. Here, we show that the rate capability of Si in LIBs can be substantially enhanced by incorporating tin (Sn) into Si nanowires. The solubility of Sn in Si is very low (0.015 at%); yet, Sn used as a seed for supercritical fluid–liquid–solid (SFLS) growth can be trapped in Si nanowires with relatively high concentration (10 at%). Such Sn-containing Si nanowires and no added conductive carbon in the electrode layer, could be cycled in LIBs with high capacity (*1000 mA h g*1 over 100 cycles) at a current density of 2.8 A g*1 (1 C). Capacities exceeding that of graphite could still be reached at cycle rates as high as 2 C. Real-time in situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that lithiation occurs five times faster in Si nanowires with significant amounts of Sn than in the Si nanowires without Sn, and twice as fast as in nanowires that were coated with carbon.

Bogart, Timothy D.; Lu, Xiaotang; Gu, Meng; Wang, Chong M.; Korgel, Brian A.

2014-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

109

The de Haas-van Alphen Effect in Enriched Tin Isotopes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The de Haas-van Alphen effect has been investigated in tin isotopes in the liquid helium temperature range, and no conclusive evidence has been found indicating a dependence of the effect upon atomic mass. However, some new features of the effect have been investigated which are interpreted as being caused by at least two independent groups of electrons. One group of electrons, having effective masses m3=1.1m0 (where m0 is the free electron mass) parallel to the tetragonal axis and m1=0.16m0 perpendicular to the tetragonal axis, and having a chemical potential of E0=0.25 electron volt, gives rise to short period oscillations in the magnetic susceptibility as the magnetic field is varied. A second group of electrons having a chemical potential E0=0.20 electron volts and for which the effective masses are not so clearly defined gives rise to longer period oscillations such that the observed de Haas-van Alphen oscillations exhibit beats between the long and short period terms.

Ted G. Berlincourt

1952-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

110

High-efficiency indium tin oxide/indium phosphide solar cells  

SciTech Connect

Improvements in the performance of indium tin oxide/indium phosphide (ITO/InP) solar cells have been achieved by using dc magnetron sputter deposited /ital n/-ITO onto an epitaxial /ital p///ital p//sup +/ structure grown on good quality commercial /ital p//sup +/ bulk substrates. The composition of the sputtering gas has been investigated and the highest efficiency cells resulted when the surface of the epilayer was exposed to an Ar/H/sub 2/ plasma before depositing the bulk of the ITO in a more typical Ar/O/sub 2/ plasma. With H/sub 2/ processing, record efficiencies of 18.9% global, 1000 W m/sup /minus/2/, 25 /degree/C (17.0% air mass zero) were achieved. Without H/sub 2/ processing, the devices exhibited lower efficiencies and were unstable. Type conversion of the InP was shown to occur and was established as being associated with the ITO (possibly due to Sn donors) rather than sputter damage. These improvements in performance have resulted from the optimization of the doping, thickness, transport, and surface properties of the /ital p/-type base, as well as from better control over the ITO deposition procedure.

Li, X.; Wanlass, M. W.; Gessert, T. A.; Emery, K. A.; Coutts, T. J.

1989-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

111

Tin clustering and precipitation in the oxide during autoclave corrosion of Zircaloy-2  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Atom probe tomography has been used to study the evolution of tin distribution during the corrosion process in Zircaloy-2. From being completely soluble in the Zr metal matrix, some clustering is evident already in the newly formed oxide close to the metal-oxide interface. Analysis of thicker oxides a few hundred nanometers away from the interface reveals fully developed precipitates of metallic Sn particles of up to 20 nm in size. Although the precipitates contain significant amounts of Zr, it is concluded that they are in the process of being depleted in Zr, which is limited only by the slow diffusion in the oxide scale. The findings are interpreted as being a result of the nobility of the Sn yielding a strong driving force to remain in a metallic state after incorporation in the barrier oxide layer. As Sn occupies substitutional sites in the ZrO2 lattice it is oxidized to a 4+ state when incorporated into the oxide, and in order to remain metallic it must nucleate into precipitates within the inner part of the oxide scale before being re-oxidized to 2+ and eventually to 4+ when the oxygen activity is sufficiently high in the outer parts of the oxide.

G. Sundell; M. Thuvander; H.-O. Andrén

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Unambiguous pure state identification without classical knowledge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study how to unambiguously identify a given quantum pure state with one of the two reference pure states when no classical knowledge on the reference states is given but a certain number of copies of each reference quantum state are presented. By the unambiguous identification, we mean that we are not allowed to make a mistake but our measurement can produce an inconclusive result. Assuming the two reference states are independently distributed over the whole pure state space in a unitary invariant way, we determine the optimal mean success probability for an arbitrary number of copies of the reference states and a general dimension of the state space. It is explicitly shown that the obtained optimal mean success probability asymptotically approaches that of the unambiguous discrimination as the number of the copies of the reference states increases.

A. Hayashi; M. Horibe; T. Hashimoto

2005-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

113

Heat Source Identification Based on L1 Constrained Minimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heat Source Identification Based on L1 Constrained Minimization Yingying Li Stanley Osher Richard to the heat equation is considered. The initial data is assumed to be a sum of an unknown but finite number of Dirac delta functions at unknown locations. Point-wise values of the heat solution at only a few

Soatto, Stefano

114

ORISE: Peer Review Expert Identification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Expert Identification Two peer review experts discussing the review topic Effective peer review management requires finding academic reviewers or other experts and recruiting them...

115

Number | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Number Number Jump to: navigation, search Properties of type "Number" Showing 200 properties using this type. (previous 200) (next 200) A Property:AvgAnnlGrossOpCpcty Property:AvgTempGeoFluidIntoPlant Property:AvgWellDepth B Property:Building/FloorAreaChurchesChapels Property:Building/FloorAreaGroceryShops Property:Building/FloorAreaHealthServices24hr Property:Building/FloorAreaHealthServicesDaytime Property:Building/FloorAreaHeatedGarages Property:Building/FloorAreaHotels Property:Building/FloorAreaMiscellaneous Property:Building/FloorAreaOffices Property:Building/FloorAreaOtherRetail Property:Building/FloorAreaResidential Property:Building/FloorAreaRestaurants Property:Building/FloorAreaSchoolsChildDayCare Property:Building/FloorAreaShops Property:Building/FloorAreaSportCenters

116

Tin-containing zeolites are highly active catalysts for the isomerization of glucose in water  

SciTech Connect

The isomerization of glucose into fructose is a large-scale reaction for the production of high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS; reaction performed by enzyme catalysts) and recently is being considered as an intermediate step in the possible route of biomass to fuels and chemicals. Here, it is shown that a large-pore zeolite that contains tin (Sn-Beta) is able to isomerize glucose to fructose in aqueous media with high activity and selectivity. Specifically, a 10% (wt/wt) glucose solution containing a catalytic amount of Sn-Beta (1?50 Sn:glucose molar ratio) gives product yields of approximately 46% (wt/wt) glucose, 31% (wt/wt) fructose, and 9% (wt/wt) mannose after 30 min and 12 min of reaction at 383 K and 413 K, respectively. This reactivity is achieved also when a 45 wt% glucose solution is used. The properties of the large-pore zeolite greatly influence the reaction behavior because the reaction does not proceed with a medium-pore zeolite, and the isomerization activity is considerably lower when the metal centers are incorporated in ordered mesoporous silica (MCM-41). The Sn-Beta catalyst can be used for multiple cycles, and the reaction stops when the solid is removed, clearly indicating that the catalysis is occurring heterogeneously. Most importantly, the Sn-Beta catalyst is able to perform the isomerization reaction in highly acidic, aqueous environments with equivalent activity and product distribution as in media without added acid. This enables Sn-Beta to couple isomerizations with other acid-catalyzed reactions, including hydrolysis/isomerization or isomerization/dehydration reaction sequences [starch to fructose and glucose to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) demonstrated here].

Moliner, Manuel; Roman-Leshkov, Yuriy; Davis, Mark E.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Characterization of Sodium Ion Electrochemical Reaction with Tin Anodes: Experiment and Theory  

SciTech Connect

Tin anodes show a rich structure and reaction chemistry which we have investigated in detail. Upon discharge five plateaus are observed corresponding to -Sn, an unidentified phase (Na/Sn = 0.6), an amorphous phase (Na/Sn = 1.2), a hexagonal R-3m Na5Sn2, and fully sodiated Na15Sn 4. With charging there are six plateaus, which are related to the formation of Na5Sn2 followed by the formation of amorphous phases and -Sn. Upon cycling the formation of metastable Na5Sn2 seems to be suppressed, leading to a single charge plateau at 0.2 V. Theoretical voltages calculated from existing crystal structures using DFT provide a good match with constant current measurements, however, the voltage is more negative compared to quasi-equilibrium measurements (GITT). Search for additional (meta)stable phases using cluster-expansion method predicts many phases lower in energy than the convex hull, including the R-3m Na5Sn2 phase characterized experimentally. The presence of multiple phases in varying lattices with very similar formation energy suggests why the reaction mechanism is non-reversible. Interpretation of M ssbauer spectroscopy data is not yet elucidated due to the very low recoil-free fraction of the materials. The electrode surface is terminated with a SEI layer rich in carbonates such as Na2CO3 and Na alkyl carbonates as evidenced by XPS. After a full charge at 2V, strong evidence for the formation of oxidized Sn4+ is obtained. Subjecting the electrode to a rest after a full charge at 2 V reveals that aging in the electrolyte reduces the oxidized Sn4+ into Sn2+ and Sn0, and concomitantly suppresses the electrolyte decomposition represented by an anomalous discharge plateau at 1.2 V. Thereby, the catalytic decomposition of the electrolyte during discharge is caused by nanosized Sn particles covered by oxidized Sn4+ and not by pure metallic Sn.

Baggetto, Loic [ORNL] [ORNL; Meisner, Roberta A [University of Tennessee (UTK) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL)] [University of Tennessee (UTK) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Ganesh, Panchapakesan [ORNL] [ORNL; Unocic, Raymond R [ORNL] [ORNL; Bridges, Craig A [ORNL] [ORNL; Jumas, Dr. Jean-Claude [Institut Charles Gerhardt, University of Montpellier II, FRANCE] [Institut Charles Gerhardt, University of Montpellier II, FRANCE; Veith, Gabriel M [ORNL] [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

LABORATORY REPORT ON THE REDUCTION AND STABILIZATION (IMMOBILIZATION) OF PERTECHNETATE TO TECHNETIUM DIOXIDE USING TIN(II)APATITE  

SciTech Connect

This effort is part of the technetium management initiative and provides data for the handling and disposition of technetium. To that end, the objective of this effort was to challenge tin(II)apatite (Sn(II)apatite) against double-shell tank 241-AN-105 simulant spiked with pertechnetate (TcO{sub 4}{sup -}). The Sn(II)apatite used in this effort was synthesized on site using a recipe developed at and provided by Sandia National Laboratories; the synthesis provides a high quality product while requiring minimal laboratory effort. The Sn(II)apatite reduces pertechnetate from the mobile +7 oxidation state to the non-mobile +4 oxidation state. It also sequesters the technetium and does not allow for re-oxidization to the mo bile +7 state under acidic or oxygenated conditions within the tested period oftime (6 weeks). Previous work (RPP-RPT-39195, Assessment of Technetium Leachability in Cement-Stabilized Basin 43 Groundwater Brine) indicated that the Sn(II)apatite can achieve an ANSI leachability index in Cast Stone of 12.8. The technetium distribution coefficient for Sn(II)apatite exhibits a direct correlation with the pH of the contaminated media. Table A shows Sn(II)apatite distribution coefficients as a function of pH. The asterisked numbers indicate that the lower detection limit of the analytical instrument was used to calculate the distribution coefficient as the concentration of technetium left in solution was less than the detection limit. The loaded sample (200 mg of Sn(II)apatite loaded with O.311 mg of Tc-99) was subjected to different molarities of nitric acid to determine if the Sn(II)apatite would release the sequestered technetium. The acid was allowed to contact for 1 minute with gentle shaking ('1st wash'); the aqueous solution was then filtered, and the filtrate was analyzed for Tc-99. Table B shows the results ofthe nitric acid exposure. Another portion of acid was added, shaken for a minute, and filtered ('2nd wash'). The technetium-loaded Sn(II)apatite was also subjected to water leach tests. The loaded sample (0.2 g of Sn(II)apatite was loaded with 0.342 mg of Tc-99) was placed in a 200-mL distilled water column and sparged with air. Samples were taken weekly over a 6-week period, and the dissolved oxygen ranged from 8.4 to 8.7 mg/L (average 8.5 mg/L); all samples recorded less than the detection limit of 0.01 mg/L Tc-99. The mechanism by which TcO{sub 2} is sequestered and hence protected from re-oxidation appears to be an exchange with phosphate in the apatite lattice, as the phosphorus that appeared in solution after reaction with technetium was essentially the same moles of technetium that were taken up by the Sn(II)apatite (Table 6). Overall, the reduction of the mobile pertechnetate (+7) to the less mobile technetium dioxide (+4) by Sn(II)apatite and subsequent sequestration of the technetium in the material indicates that Sn(II)apatite is an excellent candidate for long-term immobilization of technetium. The indications are that the Sn(II)apatite will lend itself to sequestering and inhibiting the reoxidation to the mobile pertechnetate species, thus keeping the radionuclide out of the environment.

DUNCAN JB; HAGERTY K; MOORE WP; RHODES RN; JOHNSON JM; MOORE RC

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

ALARA notes, Number 8  

SciTech Connect

This document contains information dealing with the lessons learned from the experience of nuclear plants. In this issue the authors tried to avoid the `tyranny` of numbers and concentrated on the main lessons learned. Topics include: filtration devices for air pollution abatement, crack repair and inspection, and remote handling equipment.

Khan, T.A.; Baum, J.W.; Beckman, M.C. [eds.] [eds.

1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

CHROMOSOME NUMBERS IN MAMMALS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...variables for which the double inte-gral does not exist: R. L. JEFFERY. On the number of elements in a group which have a power in...society will meet at Columbia University, MA ay 2, 1925. W. BENJAMIN FITE Acting Secretary 424 SCIENCE

Theophilus S. Painter

1925-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identification number tin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Baryon Number Violation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report, prepared for the Community Planning Study - Snowmass 2013 - summarizes the theoretical motivations and the experimental efforts to search for baryon number violation, focussing on nucleon decay and neutron-antineutron oscillations. Present and future nucleon decay search experiments using large underground detectors, as well as planned neutron-antineutron oscillation search experiments with free neutron beams are highlighted.

K. S. Babu; E. Kearns; U. Al-Binni; S. Banerjee; D. V. Baxter; Z. Berezhiani; M. Bergevin; S. Bhattacharya; S. Brice; R. Brock; T. W. Burgess; L. Castellanos; S. Chattopadhyay; M-C. Chen; E. Church; C. E. Coppola; D. F. Cowen; R. Cowsik; J. A. Crabtree; H. Davoudiasl; R. Dermisek; A. Dolgov; B. Dutta; G. Dvali; P. Ferguson; P. Fileviez Perez; T. Gabriel; A. Gal; F. Gallmeier; K. S. Ganezer; I. Gogoladze; E. S. Golubeva; V. B. Graves; G. Greene; T. Handler; B. Hartfiel; A. Hawari; L. Heilbronn; J. Hill; D. Jaffe; C. Johnson; C. K. Jung; Y. Kamyshkov; B. Kerbikov; B. Z. Kopeliovich; V. B. Kopeliovich; W. Korsch; T. Lachenmaier; P. Langacker; C-Y. Liu; W. J. Marciano; M. Mocko; R. N. Mohapatra; N. Mokhov; G. Muhrer; P. Mumm; P. Nath; Y. Obayashi; L. Okun; J. C. Pati; R. W. Pattie Jr.; D. G. Phillips II; C. Quigg; J. L. Raaf; S. Raby; E. Ramberg; A. Ray; A. Roy; A. Ruggles; U. Sarkar; A. Saunders; A. Serebrov; Q. Shafi; H. Shimizu; M. Shiozawa; R. Shrock; A. K. Sikdar; W. M. Snow; A. Soha; S. Spanier; G. C. Stavenga; S. Striganov; R. Svoboda; Z. Tang; Z. Tavartkiladze; L. Townsend; S. Tulin; A. Vainshtein; R. Van Kooten; C. E. M. Wagner; Z. Wang; B. Wehring; R. J. Wilson; M. Wise; M. Yokoyama; A. R. Young

2013-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

122

CHEMICAL SAFETY Emergency Numbers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- 1 - CHEMICAL SAFETY MANUAL 2010 #12;- 2 - Emergency Numbers UNBC Prince George Campus Security Prince George Campus Chemstores 6472 Chemical Safety 6472 Radiation Safety 5530 Biological Safety 5530 Risk and Safety Manager 5535 Security 7058 #12;- 3 - FOREWORD This reference manual outlines the safe

Bolch, Tobias

123

Development of CdS/CdTe Tin Film Devices for St. Gobain Coated Glass: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-08-317  

SciTech Connect

Research performed at NREL to produce CdS/CdTe devices on St. Gobain coated-glass material to establish a baseline CdS/CdTe device process and determine baseline device performance parameters on St. Gobain material. Performance of these baseline devices compared to similar devices produced by applying the established baseline CdS/CdTe process on alternative St. Gobain coated-glass materials.

Gessert, T.

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Linear muffin-tin-orbital and k?p calculations of effective masses and band structure of semiconducting diamond  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The electronic structure of semiconducting diamond is calculated by the scalar-relativistic linear muffin-tin-orbital method within the local-density approximation. Information about matrix elements, effective masses, and Luttinger parameters is extracted by comparison with k?p calculations. An extended 16×16 k?p calculation is performed using the parameters above as input so as to obtain the detailed band structure of the higher valence and lower conduction band states around the ? point in the (110) direction.

M. Willatzen; M. Cardona; N. E. Christensen

1994-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

A comparison of ZnO films deposited on indium tin oxide and soda lime glass under identical conditions  

SciTech Connect

ZnO films have been grown via a vapour phase transport (VPT) on soda lime glass (SLG) and indium-tin oxide (ITO) coated glass. ZnO film on ITO had traces of Zn and C which gives them a dark appearance while that appears yellowish-white on SLG. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies confirm the traces of C in the form of C-O. The photoluminescence studies reveal a prominent green luminescence band for ZnO film on ITO.

Deka, Angshuman; Nanda, Karuna Kar [Materials Research Centre, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore - 560012 (India)

2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

126

Evolution of optical properties of tin film from solid to liquid studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry and ab initio calculation  

SciTech Connect

The temperature dependent optical properties of tin film from solid to liquid were studied by spectroscopic ellipsometry and ab initio molecular dynamics simulations. The dielectric function of liquid Sn was different from solid, and an interband transition near 1.5?eV was easily observed in solid while it apparently disappeared upon melting. From the evolution of optical properties with temperature, an optical measurement to acquire the melting point by ellipsometry was presented. From first principles calculation, we show that the local structure difference in solid and liquid is responsible for this difference in the optical properties observed in experiment.

Zhang, D. X.; Shen, B.; Zheng, Y. X.; Wang, S. Y.; Zhang, J. B.; Yang, S. D.; Zhang, R. J.; Chen, L. Y.; Wang, C. Z.; Ho, K. M.

2014-03-24T23:59:59.000Z

127

ELECTRICAL DISTRICT NUMBER EIGHT  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ELECTRICAL DISTRICT NUMBER EIGHT ELECTRICAL DISTRICT NUMBER EIGHT Board of Directors Reply to: Ronald Rayner C. W. Adams James D. Downing, P.E. Chairman Billy Hickman 66768 Hwy 60 Brian Turner Marvin John P.O. Box 99 Vice-Chairman Jason Pierce Salome, AZ 85348 Denton Ross Jerry Rovey Secretary James N. Warkomski ED8@HARCUVARCO.COM John Utz Gary Wood PHONE:(928) 859-3647 Treasurer FAX: (928) 859-3145 Sent via e-mail Mr. Darrick Moe, Regional Manager Western Area Power Administration Desert Southwest Region P. O. Box 6457 Phoenix, AZ 85005-6457 moe@wapa.gov; dswpwrmrk@wapa.gov Re: ED5-Palo Verde Hub Project Dear Mr. Moe, In response to the request for comments issued at the October 6 Parker-Davis Project customer th meeting, and in conjunction with comments previously submitted by the Southwest Public Power

128

Preventive Action Number:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

7 Corrective Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 1 of 3 7 Corrective Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 1 of 3 EOTA - Business Form Document Title: Corrective Action Report Planning Worksheet Document Number: F-017 Rev 11_0414 Document Owner: Elizabeth Sousa Backup Owner: Melissa Otero Approver(s): Melissa Otero Parent Document: P-008, Corrective/Preventive Action Notify of Changes: EOTA Employees Referenced Document(s): N/A F-017 Corrective Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 2 of 3 Revision History: Rev. Description of Change 08_0613 Initial Release 11_0414 Added problem statement to first block. F-017 Corrective Action Report Planning Worksheet 11_0414 3 of 3 Corrective Action Report Planning Worksheet Corrective Action Number: Source: Details/Problem Statement: Raised By: Raised Date: Target Date:

129

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

130

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

131

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

132

NAME: STUDENT NUMBER (PID): CITY, STATE ZIP: DAYTIME PHONE NUMBER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

NAME: STUDENT NUMBER (PID): ADDRESS: CITY, STATE ZIP: DAYTIME PHONE NUMBER: CELL PHONE NUMBER of financial institution. 14 Cell Phone Expenses 15 Other ordinary and necessary living expenses. 16 TOTAL (add

133

Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6...

134

Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Commercial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

135

Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Connecticut Natural Gas Number of Industrial Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7...

136

First-principles real-space linear-muffin-tin-orbital calculations of 3d impurities in Cu  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We have recently developed a scheme, based on the linear-muffin-tin-orbital (LMTO) formalism in the atomic-sphere approximation (ASA) and the recursion method, which allows us to perform first-principles, spin-polarized, density-functional electronic-structure calculations in real space. Here we use the real-space linear-muffin-tin-orbital (RS-LMTO-ASA) approach to study the behavior of 3d impurities (V,Cr,Mn,Fe) in a Cu host. We obtain the local density of states, the charge transfers, and local magnetic moments of the impurity and four adjacent shells of Cu atoms. Even though the procedures are quite different, our results for 3d impurities in Cu agree very well with those obtained using the well-established ab initio Korringa-Kohn-Sham Green’s-function formalism. The RS-LMTO-ASA method does not require symmetry and can be used, with no extra effort, to study interstitial impurities and local disturbances in hosts with hcp or more complex structures. It can also be applied in the presence of lattice relaxation.

Sonia Frota-Pesso^a

1992-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Transverse stress effect on the critical current of internal tin and bronze process Nb{sub 3}Sn superconductors  

SciTech Connect

The effect of transverse stress on the critical current density, J{sub c}, has been shown to be significant in bronze process Nb{sub 3}Sn, with the onset of significant degradation at about 50 Mpa. In an applied field of 10 T, the magnitude of the effect is about seven times larger for transverse stress than for axial tensile stress. In a subsequent study, similar results were observed in another bronze process Nb{sub 3}Sn conductor made by a different manufacturer. The mechanism accounting for the transverse stress effect and its large magnitude compared with the axial tensile effect is still the subject of speculation. In an attempt to better understand the nature of the effect, The authors have undertaken a series of experiments to determine whether the transverse stress effect depends on the grain morphology of the Nb{sub 3}Sn reaction layer in the superconductor. To do this, the authors have measured the effect in an internal tin conductor with excess tin, which yields a more equiaxed Nb{sub 3}Sn grain morphology than for bronze process Nb{sub 3}Sn, where the grains are more columnar. The results for the effect of transverse compression on the J{sub c} of a round bronze process Nb{sub 3}Sn wire are given. The data are probably applicable to a wide variety of Nb{sub 3}Sn conductors for magnet engineering.

Ekin, J.W.; Bray, S.L. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Boulder, CO (United States); Danielson, P.; Smathers, D. [Teledyne Wah Chang, Albany, OR (United States); Sabatini, R.L.; Suenaga, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

1989-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

138

Iris Recognition for Human Identification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Iris recognition system is the biometric identification system. Iris has an intricate structure uniqueness stability and natural protection. Due to these features of the iris it can be used for biometric identification. This system gives better performance than other biometric identification systems. A novel eyelash removal method for preprocessing of human iris images in a human iris recognition system is presented.. Discrete cosine transform (DCT) method is used for feature extraction. For matching of two?iris code Hamming distance calculation is used. EER value must be less for the optimum performance of the system.

Lajari Alandkar; Sachin Gengaje

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Construction Project Number  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

North Execution - (2009 - 2011) North Execution - (2009 - 2011) Construction Project Number 2009 2010 2011 Project Description ANMLPL 0001C 76,675.32 - - Animas-Laplata circuit breaker and power rights CRGRFL 0001C - - 7,177.09 Craig Rifle Bay and transfer bay upgrade to 2000 amps; / Convert CRG RFL to 345 kV out of Bears Ear Sub FGE 0019C - - 39,207.86 Replace 69/25kV transformer KX2A at Flaming Gorge FGE 0020C - - 52,097.12 Flaming Gorge: Replace failed KW2A transformer HDN 0069C 16,638.52 208,893.46 3,704,578.33 Replace failed transformer with KZ1A 250 MVA 230/138kv

140

KPA Activity Number  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

supports CMM-SW Level 2 supports CMM-SW Level 2 Mapping of the DOE Systems Engineering Methodology to the Software Engineering Institute (SEI) Software Capability Maturity Model (CMM- SW) level 2. Date: September 2002 Page 1 KPA Activity Number KPA Activity SEM Section SME Work Product SQSE Web Site http://cio.doe.gov/sqse REQUIREMENTS MANAGEMENT RM-1 The software engineering group reviews the allocated requirements before they are incorporated in the software project. Chapter 3.0 * Develop High-Level Project Requirements Chapter 4.0 * Establish Functional Baseline * Project Plan * Requirements Specification Document * Requirements Management awareness * Defining Project Requirements RM-2 The software engineering group uses the allocated requirements as the basis for

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identification number tin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Surveillance Guides - Identification of Hazards  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Identification of Hazards Identification of Hazards 1.0 Objective The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's hazards identification programs. Surveillance activities encompass maintenance and implementation of safety basis documentation (SARs, ISBs, BIOs, JCOs, HASPs etc) as well as activity level hazards identification via JHAs, AJHAs, JSAs etc.) 2.0 References 2.1 DOE 4330.4B Maintenance Management Program 2.2 48 CFR 1970 Department of Energy Acquisition Regulations 2.3 DOE O 5480.21, Unreviewed Safety Questions 2.4 DOE O 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports 3.0 Requirements Implemented This surveillance verifies implementation of guiding principle #5 and core value #2 as specified in 48 CFR 1970.5204-2 (b) (5) and (c) (2) respectively. Additionally, it verifies implementation of

142

Color Tables for Mineral Identification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Fluorescent color can be a useful guide to mineral identification, and in some cases, it is the quickest and least expensive means. In the mines at Franklin and Ogdensburg, New Jersey, a portable battery opera...

Manuel Robbins

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Identification of telomerase in dog  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the telomeres from diminishing during replication and ensures immortality to the cancerous cell. As the result, telomerase can be used as an identification test for malignant tissues. In humans, even though important, there are may other ways to determine...

Lyuksyutova, Anna

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

144

Muon Identification at the Tevatron  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The muon detection and identification schemes for the CDF ... Fermilab Tevatron are described. Both experiments detect muons through the use of scintillation counters and ... surrounding a central tracker. Three ...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

3D nonparametric neural identification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the state identification study of 3D partial differential equations (PDEs) using the differential neural networks (DNNs) approximation. There are so many physical situations in applied mathematics and engineering that can be described ...

Rita Q. Fuentes; Isaac Chairez; Alexander Poznyak; Tatyana Poznyak

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Light output enhancement of InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes with contrasting indium tin-oxide nanopatterned structures  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Various nanopatterns on the transparent conducting indium tin oxide (ITO) layer are investigated to enhance the light extraction efficiency of the InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Triangular, square, and circular nanohole patterns with the square ...

Sang Hyun Jung; Keun Man Song; Young Su Choi; Hyeong-Ho Park; Hyun-Beom Shin; Ho Kwan Kang; Jaejin Lee

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Ab initio Molecular Dynamics and Elastic Properties of TiC and TiN Nanoparticles A. V. Postnikov and P. Entel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ab initio Molecular Dynamics and Elastic Properties of TiC and TiN Nanoparticles A. V. Postnikov composition and compared to frozen phonon and molecular dynamics calculations for crystalline TiC and Ti range of frequencies, including the phonon band gap of pure crystalline TiC (near 15 THz). Similar

Entel, P.

148

Improvement of corrosion and electrical conductivity of 316L stainless steel as bipolar plate by TiN nanoparticle implantation using plasma focus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The present work reports the results of TiN-ions implantation into the SS316L samples as bipolar plates by a 4 kJ Mather type Plasma Focus (PF) device operated with nitrogen gas for 10, 20, and 30 shots in order to improve the corrosion resistance and electrical conductivity of samples. The PF can generate short lived (10–100 ns) but high temperature (0.1–2.0 keV) and high density (1018–1020 cm?3) plasma, and the whole process of PF lasts just a few microseconds. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results reveal the formation of a nanocrystalline titanium nitride coating on the surface of substrate. The interfacial contact resistance (ICR) of samples is measured, and the results show that the conductivity of samples increase after coating because of high electrical conductivity of TiN coating. The electrochemical results show that the corrosion resistances are significantly improved when TiN films are deposited into SS316L substrate. The corrosion potential of the TiN coated samples increases compared with that of the bare SSI316L and corrosion currents decrease in TiN implanted samples. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) indicates changes in surface morphology before and after potentiostatic test. The thickness of coated layer which is obtained by cross sectional SEM is about 19 ?m.

Malihe Omrani; Morteza Habibi; Reza Amrollahi; Arash Khosravi

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

Characterization of TiN, TiC and TiCN coatings on Ti50.6 at.% Ni alloy deposited by PIII and deposition technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

high content of nickel [1]. In addition, its wear resistance is expected to be improved by transition-metal as nitride, carbide and carbonitride, respectively. Based on the electrochemical measurement and ion carbides and nitrides coatings at a rather broad composition range, such as TiN, TiC and TiC1-xNx (0bÃ?b1

Zheng, Yufeng

150

A pragmatic approach to temporary payment card numbers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

With the push towards electronic payments that use a smart card and authenticate the cardholder by his or her personal identification number, much fraud has switched to the residual payment methods that just rely on knowing the card number: card-not-present transactions. There are various countermeasures; notably some issuers allocate temporary card numbers (TCNs). The snag is that this is an online solution that requires the cardholder to be identified and authenticated over a separate and direct link between the cardholder and card issuer each time a number is allocated. Some off-line mechanisms have been proposed but those TCNs do not act as the cardholder's identifier. This paper examines a sample of online and off-line TCN mechanisms and then proposes an off-line mechanism that gives a comparable service to the online mechanisms. The cardholder's privacy is protected whilst still allowing proof of payment.

David J. Boyd

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

On neutron numbers and atomic masses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

On neutron numbers and atomic masses ... Assigning neutron numbers, correct neutron numbers, and atomic masses and nucleon numbers. ...

R. Heyrovská

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

The identification of mathematically gifted black students: an alternative approach  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1986 Major Subject: Curriculum and Instruction THE IDENTIFICATION OF MATHEMATICALLY GIFTED BLACK STUDENTS: AN ALTERNATIVE APPROACH A Thesis by MARGARET RUTH PETTEY HOBSON Approved as to style and content by: Clarenc J... CONCLUSIONS, LIMITATIONS, AND RECOMMENDATIONS Summary Results Limitations Implications and Recommendations. 38 38 43 44 REFERENCES. APPENDIX A. 47 51 APPENDIX B. VITA. 61 69 LIST OP TABLES TABLE 1 Number of Algebra and Geometry Courses Taken...

Hobson, Margaret Ruth Pettey

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Efficient Polymer Solar Cells Fabricated on Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):Poly(styrenesulfonate)-Etched Old Indium Tin Oxide Substrates  

SciTech Connect

In organic electronic devices, indium tin oxide (ITO) and poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) are the most common transparent electrode and anodic buffer layer materials, respectively. A widespread concern is that PEDOT:PSS is acidic and etches ITO. We show that this issue is not serious: only a few nanometers of ITO are etched in typical device processing conditions and storage thereafter; conductivity losses are affordable; and optical transmission gains further offset these losses. Organic photovoltaic (OPV) devices fabricated on old ITO (with PEDOT:PSS history) were similar or higher in efficiency than devices on fresh ITO. Poly[[4,8-bis[(2-ethylhexyl)oxy]benzo[1,2-b:4,5-b?]dithiophene-2,6-diyl][3-fluoro-2-[(2-ethylhexyl)carbonyl]thieno[3,4-b]thiophenediyl

Elshobaki, Moneim [Mansoura University; Anderegg, James [Ames Laboratory; Chaudhary, Sumit [Ames Laboratory

2014-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

154

Low-cost electrochemical treatment of indium tin oxide anodes for high-efficiency organic light-emitting diodes  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate a simple low-cost approach as an alternative to conventional O{sub 2} plasma treatment to modify the surface of indium tin oxide (ITO) anodes for use in organic light-emitting diodes. ITO is functionalized with F{sup ?} ions by electrochemical treatment in dilute hydrofluoric acid. An electrode with a work function of 5.2?eV is achieved following fluorination. Using this electrode, a maximum external quantum efficiency of 26.0% (91?cd/A, 102?lm/W) is obtained, which is 12% higher than that of a device using the O{sub 2} plasma-treated ITO. Fluorination also increases the transparency in the near-infrared region.

Hui Cheng, Chuan, E-mail: chengchuanhui@dlut.edu.cn; Shan Liang, Ze; Gang Wang, Li; Dong Gao, Guo; Zhou, Ting; Ming Bian, Ji; Min Luo, Ying [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Tong Du, Guo, E-mail: dugt@dlut.edu.cn [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); State Key Laboratory on Integrated Optoelectronics, College of Electronic Science and Engineering, Jilin University, Changchun 130012 (China)

2014-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

155

Alkaline earth lead and tin compounds Ae2Pb, Ae2Sn, Ae=Ca,Sr,Ba, as thermoelectric materials  

SciTech Connect

We present a detailed theoretical study of three alkaline earth compounds Ca2Pb, Sr2Pb and Ba2Pb, which have undergone little previous study, calculating electronic band structures and Boltzmann transport and bulk moduli using density functional theory. We also study the corresponding tin compounds Ca2 Sn, Sr2 Sn and Ba2 Sn. We find that these are all narrow band gap semiconductors with an electronic structure favorable for thermoelectric performance, with substantial thermopowers for the lead compounds at temperature ranges from 300 to 800 K. For the lead compounds, we further find very low calculated bulk moduli - roughly half of the values for the lead chalcogenides, suggestive of soft phonons and hence low lattice thermal conductivity. All these facts indicate that these materials merit experimental investigation as potential high performance thermoelectrics. We find good potential for thermoelectric performance in the environmentally friendly stannide materials, particularly at high temperature.

Parker, David S [ORNL; Singh, David J [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

High-performance tin oxide-nitrogen doped graphene aerogel hybrids as anode materials for lithium-ion batteries  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Tin dioxide nanoparticles on nitrogen doped graphene aerogel (SnO2-NGA) hybrid are synthesized by one-step hydrothermal method and successfully applied in lithium-ion batteries as a free-standing anode. The electrochemical performance of SnO2-NGA hybrid is investigated by galvanostatic charge–discharge cycling, rate capability test, cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. It is found that the SnO2-NGA hybrid with freestanding spongy-like structure exhibit remarkable lithium storage capacity (1100 mAh g?1 after 100 cycles), good cycling stability and high rate capability. The outstanding performance is attributed to the uniform SnO2 nanoparticles, unique spongy-like structure and N doping defect for Li+ diffusion.

Chunhui Tan; Jing Cao; Abdul Muqsit Khattak; Feipeng Cai; Bo Jiang; Gai Yang; Suqin Hu

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Physical properties of highly oriented spray-deposited fluorine-doped tin dioxide films as transparent conductor  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Heavily fluorine-doped tin dioxide films were deposited by spray pyrolysis using a high precursor concentration. The effect of film thickness was studied in the range 80–1230 nm. The films were polycrystalline and preferentially oriented along [2 0 0]. The grain size, carrier mobility ?, carrier concentration N and resistivity reached ?230 nm, 35 cm2/V s, 6×1020 cm?3 and 3×10?4 ? cm, respectively, for 1000 nm films. An unusual ‘direct and linear’ ?–N dependence revealed the importance of the structural properties. The 1000 nm thick films possessed an average visible transmittance ?81% and a reflectance ?66% at 2500 nm. The electro-optical properties revealed their excellent quality as a TCO material.

Chitra Agashe; J. Hüpkes; G. Schöpe; M. Berginski

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Investigation of charge compensation in indium-doped tin dioxide by hydrogen insertion via annealing under humid conditions  

SciTech Connect

The behavior of hydrogen (H) as an impurity in indium (In)-doped tin dioxide (SnO{sub 2}) was investigated by mass spectrometry analyses, with the aim of understanding the charge compensation mechanism in SnO{sub 2}. The H-concentration of the In-doped SnO{sub 2} films increased to (1–2)?×?10{sup 19}?cm{sup ?3} by annealing in a humid atmosphere (WET annealing). The electron concentration in the films also increased after WET annealing but was two orders of magnitude less than their H-concentrations. A self-compensation mechanism, based on the assumption that H sits at substitutional sites, is proposed to explain the mismatch between the electron- and H-concentrations.

Watanabe, Ken, E-mail: Watanabe.Ken@nims.go.jp [National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); International Center for Young Scientists (ICYS-MANA), NIMS, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Ohsawa, Takeo; Ross, Emily M., E-mail: emross@hmc.edu; Adachi, Yutaka; Haneda, Hajime [National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Sakaguchi, Isao; Takahashi, Ryosuke [National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Department of Applied Science for Electronics and Materials, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-kouen Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Bierwagen, Oliver, E-mail: bierwagen@pdi-berlin.de [Paul-Drude-Institute, Hausvogteiplatz 5-7, 10117 Berlin (Germany); Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); White, Mark E.; Tsai, Min-Ying; Speck, James S., E-mail: speck@ucsb.edu [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Ohashi, Naoki, E-mail: Ohashi.Naoki@nims.go.jp [National Institute for Materials Science (NIMS), 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Department of Applied Science for Electronics and Materials, Kyushu University, 6-1 Kasuga-kouen Kasuga, Fukuoka 816-8580 (Japan); Materials Research Center for Element Strategy (MCES), Mailbox S2-13, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-0026 (Japan)

2014-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

159

Concealed identification symbols and nondestructive determination of the identification symbols  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The concealing of one or more identification symbols into a target object and the subsequent determination or reading of such symbols through non-destructive testing is described. The symbols can be concealed in a manner so that they are not visible to the human eye and/or cannot be readily revealed to the human eye without damage or destruction of the target object. The identification symbols can be determined after concealment by e.g., the compilation of multiple X-ray images. As such, the present invention can also provide e.g., a deterrent to theft and the recovery of lost or stolen objects.

Nance, Thomas A.; Gibbs, Kenneth M.

2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

160

Transcendental L2 -Betti numbers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Transcendental L2 -Betti numbers Atiyah's question Thomas Schick G¨ottingen OA Chennai 2010 Thomas Schick (G¨ottingen) Transcendental L2 -Betti numbers Atiyah's question OA Chennai 2010 1 / 24 #12 = ~M/) with fundamental domain F. L2-Betti numbers:= normalized dimension( space of L2-harmonic forms

Sunder, V S

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identification number tin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Data Compression with Prime Numbers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A compression algorithm is presented that uses the set of prime numbers. Sequences of numbers are correlated with the prime numbers, and labeled with the integers. The algorithm can be iterated on data sets, generating factors of doubles on the compression.

Gordon Chalmers

2005-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

162

Aircraft System Identification Using Artificial Neural Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aircraft System Identification Using Artificial Neural Networks Kenton Kirkpatrick , Jim May Jr Artificial Neural Network System Identification, has the advantages of being straightforward with low for aircraft using an artificial neural network (ANN). Artificial neural networks are useful for creating

Valasek, John

163

Muon Identification in the ATLAS Calorimeters  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Muon Identification in the ATLAS Calorimeters #12;#12;Muon Identification in the ATLAS Calorimeters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 2.2.3 Muon spectrometer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 28 2.2.4 The forward . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 2.2.6 The trigger system . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 3 Muon

van Suijlekom, Walter

164

Parameters Identification for Motorcycle Simulator's Platform Characterization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Parameters Identification for Motorcycle Simulator's Platform Characterization L. Nehaoua H modeling and parameters identification of a motorcycle simulator's platform. This model begins with some (cars and motorcycles) is possible by taking in care some characteristics of land vehicles. Indeed

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

165

Conversion of the energy-subtracted CT number to electron density based on a single linear relationship: an experimental verification using a clinical dual-source CT scanner  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In radiotherapy treatment planning, the conversion of the computed tomography (CT) number to electron density is one of the main processes that determine the accuracy of patient dose calculations. However, in general, the CT number and electron density of tissues cannot be interrelated using a simple one-to-one correspondence. This study aims to experimentally verify the clinical feasibility of an existing novel conversion method proposed by the author of this note, which converts the energy-subtracted CT number (?HU) to the relative electron density (?e) via a single linear relationship by using a dual-energy CT (DECT). The ?HU–?e conversion was performed using a clinical second-generation dual-source CT scanner operated in the dual-energy mode with tube potentials of 80 kV and 140 kV with and without an additional tin filter. The ?HU–?e calibration line was obtained from the DECT image acquisition for tissue substitutes in an electron density phantom. In addition, the effect of object size on ?HU–?e conversion was also experimentally investigated. The plot of the measured ?HU versus nominal ?e values exhibited a single linear relationship over a wide ?e range from 0.00 (air) to 2.35 (aluminum). The ?HU–?e conversion performed with the tin filter yielded a lower dose and more reliable ?e values that were less affected by the object-size variation when compared to the corresponding values obtained for the case without the tin filter.

Masayoshi Tsukihara; Yoshiyuki Noto; Takahide Hayakawa; Masatoshi Saito

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Automated species identification: why not?  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...exhibiting basically the same body plan, a pro- portion of which may...to transform the images to a standard pose. In addition, many identifi...species identified database mining engines, etc. (a) (b...for pest identification: a review. In The identifi- cation and...

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Summary Protocol: Identification, Characterization, Designation, Remedial  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Summary Protocol: Identification, Characterization, Designation, Summary Protocol: Identification, Characterization, Designation, Remedial Action, Certification Summary Protocol: Identification, Characterization, Designation, Remedial Action, Certification Summary Protocol: Identification, Characterization, Designation, Remedial Action, Certification (January 1986) Summary Protocol: Identification, Characterization, Designation, Remedial Action, Certification (January 1986) More Documents & Publications Supplement No. 1 to the FUSRAP Summary Protocol - Designation/Elimination Protocol Pre-MARSSIM Surveys in a MARSSIM World: Demonstrating How Pre-MARSSIM Radiological Data Demonstrate Protectiveness at Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program Sites U.S. Department of Energy Guidelines for Residual Radioactive Material at

168

Number  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

NATIONAL ENERGY POLICY NATIONAL ENERGY POLICY STATUS REPORT on Implementation of NEP Recommendations January, 2005 1 NEP RECOMMENDATIONS: STATUS OF IMPLEMENTATION Chapter 1 1. That the President issue an Executive Order to direct all federal agencies to include in any regulatory action that could significantly and adversely affect energy supplies, distribution, or use, a detailed statement of energy effects and alternatives in submissions to the Office of Management and Budget of proposed regulations covered and all notices of proposed regulations published in the Federal Register. STATUS: IMPLEMENTED. In May 2001, President Bush issued Executive Order 13211 requiring federal agencies to include, in any regulatory action that could significantly and

169

NUMBER:  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SWMU 161 C-743 Trainina Trailer Comolex- Soil Backfill UNIT NAME: . REGULATORY STATUS: AOC LOCATION: Southwest of C-743 building APPROXIMATE DIMENSIONS: 200 feet wide by 200 feet...

170

Strong Sulfur Binding with Conducting Magneli-Phase TinO2n-1 Nanomaterials for Improving Lithium-Sulfur Batteries  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

will go through a series of soluble intermediate higher-order polysulfides (Li2S8, Li2S6, and Li2S4 of Li2S2, Li2S, and sulfur.6-8 In order to solve these challenges, there have been recent developmentsStrong Sulfur Binding with Conducting Magneli-Phase TinO2n-1 Nanomaterials for Improving Lithium-Sulfur

Cui, Yi

171

Combinatorial screening for the identification of Mg-based destabilized  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Combinatorial screening for the identification of Mg-based destabilized Combinatorial screening for the identification of Mg-based destabilized hydrogen storage materials Speaker(s): Robin Gremaud Date: October 16, 2006 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Limited energy resources and increasing pollution associated with the use of fossil resources have stimulated the search for cleaner, cheaper and more efficient energy technologies. One promising technology involves hydrogen that can be used in fuel cells and is stored in metal hydrides. However, for replacing existing technologies, still a large number of problems have to be solved, demanding for extensive fundamental research in the field of material science. Our experimental strategy, aimed at finding of novel (complex) hydrides is to carry out systematic experiments for various light-weight metal-hydrides. In the standard approach followed so

172

Compendium of Experimental Cetane Numbers  

SciTech Connect

This report is an updated version of the 2004 Compendium of Experimental Cetane Number Data and presents a compilation of measured cetane numbers for pure chemical compounds. It includes all available single compound cetane number data found in the scientific literature up until March 2014 as well as a number of unpublished values, most measured over the past decade at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. This Compendium contains cetane values for 389 pure compounds, including 189 hydrocarbons and 201 oxygenates. More than 250 individual measurements are new to this version of the Compendium. For many compounds, numerous measurements are included, often collected by different researchers using different methods. Cetane number is a relative ranking of a fuel's autoignition characteristics for use in compression ignition engines; it is based on the amount of time between fuel injection and ignition, also known as ignition delay. The cetane number is typically measured either in a single-cylinder engine or a constant volume combustion chamber. Values in the previous Compendium derived from octane numbers have been removed, and replaced with a brief analysis of the correlation between cetane numbers and octane numbers. The discussion on the accuracy and precision of the most commonly used methods for measuring cetane has been expanded and the data has been annotated extensively to provide additional information that will help the reader judge the relative reliability of individual results.

Yanowitz, J.; Ratcliff, M. A.; McCormick, R. L.; Taylor, J. D.; Murphy, M. J.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Deposition of TiN and HfO{sub 2} in a commercial 200 mm remote plasma atomic layer deposition reactor  

SciTech Connect

The authors describe a remote plasma atomic layer deposition reactor (Oxford Instruments FlexAL trade mark sign ) that includes an inductively coupled plasma source and a load lock capable of handling substrates up to 200 mm in diameter. The deposition of titanium nitride (TiN) and hafnium oxide (HfO{sub 2}) is described for the combination of the metal-halide precursor TiCl{sub 4} and H{sub 2}-N{sub 2} plasma and the combination of the metallorganic precursor Hf[N(CH{sub 3})(C{sub 2}H{sub 5})]{sub 4} and O{sub 2} plasma, respectively. The influence of the plasma exposure time and substrate temperature has been studied and compositional, structural, and electrical properties are reported. TiN films with a low Cl impurity content were obtained at 350 deg. C at a growth rate of 0.35 A /cycle with an electrical resistivity as low as 150 {mu}{omega} cm. Carbon-free (detection limit <2 at. %) HfO{sub 2} films were obtained at a growth rate of 1.0 A /cycle at 290 deg. C. The thickness and resisitivity nonuniformity was <5% for the TiN and the thickness uniformality was <2% for the HfO{sub 2} films as determined over 200 mm wafers.

Heil, S. B. S.; Hemmen, J. L. van; Hodson, C. J.; Singh, N.; Klootwijk, J. H.; Roozeboom, F.; Sanden, M. C. M. van de; Kessels, W. M. M. [Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands); Oxford Instruments Plasma Technology, North End, Yatton BS49 4AP (United Kingdom); Philips Research Laboratories, High Tech Campus 4, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); NXP Semiconductors Research, High Tech Campus 4, 5656 AE Eindhoven (Netherlands); Department of Applied Physics, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB Eindhoven (Netherlands)

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

174

Indium-tin-oxide-free tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) Al organic light-emitting diodes with 80% enhanced power efficiency  

SciTech Connect

Efficient indium tin oxide (ITO)-free small molecule organic light-emitting diodes (SMOLEDs) with multilayered highly conductive poly(3,4-ethylenedioxy thiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) as the anode are demonstrated. PEDOT:PSS/MoO{sub 3}/N,N'-diphenyl- N,N'-bis(1-naphthylphenyl)-1,1'-biphenyl-4,4'-diamine (NPD)/tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) Al (Alq{sub 3})/4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BPhen)/LiF/Al SMOLEDs exhibited a peak power efficiency of 3.82 lm/W, 81% higher than that of similar ITO-based SMOLEDs (2.11 lm/W). The improved performance is believed to be due to the higher work function, lower refractive index, and decreased surface roughness of PEDOT:PSS vs ITO, and to Ohmic hole injection from PEDOT:PSS to the NPD layer via the MoO{sub 3} interlayer. The results demonstrate that PEDOT:PSS can substitute ITO in SMOLEDs with strongly improved device performance.

Cai, Min; Xiao, Teng; Liu, Rui; Chen, Ying; Shinar, Ruth; Shinar, Joseph

2011-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

175

Lithium intercalation in sputter deposited antimony-doped tin oxide thin films: Evidence from electrochemical and optical measurements  

SciTech Connect

Transparent conducting oxides are used as transparent electrical contacts in a variety of applications, including in electrochromic smart windows. In the present work, we performed a study of transparent conducting antimony-doped tin oxide (ATO) thin films by chronopotentiometry in a Li{sup +}-containing electrolyte. The open circuit potential vs. Li was used to investigate ATO band lineups, such as those of the Fermi level and the ionization potential, as well as the dependence of these lineups on the preparation conditions for ATO. Evidence was found for Li{sup +} intercalation when a current pulse was set in a way so as to drive ions from the electrolyte into the ATO lattice. Galvanostatic intermittent titration was then applied to determine the lithium diffusion coefficient within the ATO lattice. The electrochemical density of states of the conducting oxide was studied by means of the transient voltage recorded during the chronopotentiometry experiments. These measurements were possible because, as Li{sup +} intercalation took place, charge compensating electrons filled the lowest part of the conduction band in ATO. Furthermore, the charge insertion modified the optical properties of ATO according to the Drude model.

Montero, J., E-mail: jose.montero@angstrom.uu.se; Granqvist, C. G.; Niklasson, G. A. [Department of Engineering Sciences, The A°ngström Laboratory, Uppsala University, P.O. Box 534, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden); Guillén, C.; Herrero, J. [Department of Energy, Ciemat, Avda. Complutense 40, Ed. 42, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

176

Thickness effect on laser-induced-damage threshold of indium-tin oxide films at 1064 nm  

SciTech Connect

Laser-induced-damage characteristics of commercial indium-tin oxide (ITO) films deposited by DC magnetron sputtering deposition on K9 glass substrates as a function of the film thickness have been studied at 1064 nm with a 10 ns laser pulse in the 1-on-1 mode, and the various mechanisms for thickness effect on laser-induced-damage threshold (LIDT) of the film have been discussed in detail. It is observed that laser-damage-resistance of ITO film shows dramatic thickness effect with the LIDT of the 50-nm ITO film 7.6 times as large as the value of 300 nm film, and the effect of depressed carrier density by decreasing the film thickness is demonstrated to be the primary reason. Our experiment findings indicate that searching transparent conductive oxide (TCO) film with low carrier density and high carrier mobility is an efficient technique to improve the laser-damage-resistance of TCO films based on maintaining their well electric conductivity.

Wang Haifeng; Huang Zhimeng; Zhang Dayong; Luo Fei; Huang Lixian; Li Yanglong; Luo Yongquan; Wang Weiping; Zhao Xiangjie [Institute of Fluid Physics, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621900 (China)

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Electric Resistance Change Mechanism of Indium-Tin Oxide Film During Deposition of Dielectric Oxide Films by RF Magnetron Sputtering  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Electric resistance change of indium-tin oxide (ITO) film was investigated when dielectric oxide films such as Sr(Zr0.2Ti0.8)O3 and Y2O3 for an electroluminescent device were deposited on the ITO by the rf magnetron sputtering method using oxide ceramic targets. In order to understand the mechanism of the resistance change, a dc voltage of -70~+70 V was biased to an ITO film during the sputtering of dielectric oxide films. The resistance of the ITO film became higher in the positive bias region. The cause of the increase in resistance of the ITO films was confirmed to be oxidation by the oxide targets and the sputtering gas. The amount of the resistance change could be qualitatively explained by the ratio of the oxygen introduced into the ITO film and the combined oxygen forming O2 gas at the ITO surface incident to the ITO film at the sputtering of the dielectric oxide films.

Tomizo Matsuoka; Jun Kuwata; Masahiro Nishikawa; Yosuke Fujita; Takao Tohda; Atsushi Abe

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

RNG: A Practitioner's Overview Random Number Generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RNG: A Practitioner's Overview Random Number Generation A Practitioner's Overview Prof. Michael and Monte Carlo Methods Pseudorandom number generation Types of pseudorandom numbers Properties of these pseudorandom numbers Parallelization of pseudorandom number generators New directions for SPRNG Quasirandom

Mascagni, Michael

179

Confidence Intervals Estimation in the Identification of Electromechanical Modes from Ambient Noise  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

from ambient data resulting from random load switching throughout the day in power systems effectiveness in reducing the number of trials, which would be beneficial for on-line power system monitoring-- Power system oscillations, modal analysis, power system monitoring, system identification, prediction

Cañizares, Claudio A.

180

Identification of advection-diffusion equation from a limited number of spatial  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heat conduction, state-of-health in advances batteries or population dynamics are phenomena described-uniform data distribution in space. Moreover, due to the sensor breakdown or data-storage errors, data can also

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identification number tin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Piecewise-constant and low-rank approximation for identification of recurrent copy number variations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......intensity ratios of the entire dataset can be approximated by a low-rank...Mathematically, we express each dataset by a matrix , where each row...Therefore, we replace the by the nuclear norm, which is defined as...be reduced to that becomes a nuclear-norm regularized least-squares......

Xiaowei Zhou; Jiming Liu; Xiang Wan; Weichuan Yu

2014-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

182

Identification and Characterization of Variable-Number Tandem Repeats in the Yersinia pestis Genome  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Democratic Republic of Congo A Pestoides F Former Soviet Union A Harbin 35 Manchuria M Kim 10 Variant Kurdistan M Nicholisk 41 Manchuria...Health, and the Cowden Endowment in Microbiology. We thank Christine Keys and an anonymous referee for reviewing the manuscript...

Alexandra M. Klevytska; Lance B. Price; James M. Schupp; Patricia L. Worsham; Jane Wong; Paul Keim

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

The Identification and Characterization of Copy Number Variants in the Bovine Genome  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Within and Flanking CNVs ............................................................. 114 5.4 Hierarchical Clustering of Cattle Using BovineHD SNP Genotypes ......... 116 5.5 Example of CNV that is Not Accurately Imputed by BovineHD SNP Array... .................................................................................................... 111 BovineHD BeadChip CNV Analysis ............................................................ 111 PLINK Analysis .......................................................................................... 112 CNV Imputation by SNPs...

Doan, Ryan

2013-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

184

Motion at low Reynolds number  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The work described in this thesis centers on inertialess motion at low Reynolds numbers at the crossroad between biofluids and microfluids. Here we address questions regarding locomotion of micro-swimmers, transport of ...

Tam, Daniel See Wai, 1980-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Departmental Business Instrument Numbering System  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

To prescribe procedures for assigning identifying numbers to all Department of Energy (DOE), including the National Nuclear Security Administration, business instruments. Cancels DOE 1331.2B. Canceled by DOE O 540.1A.

2000-12-05T23:59:59.000Z

186

Departmental Business Instrument Numbering System  

Directives, Delegations, and Requirements

The Order prescribes the procedures for assigning identifying numbers to all Department of Energy (DOE) and National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) business instruments. Cancels DOE O 540.1. Canceled by DOE O 540.1B.

2005-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

187

Potential of dual-energy subtraction for converting CT numbers to electron density based on a single linear relationship  

SciTech Connect

Purpose: The conversion of the computed tomography (CT) number to electron density is one of the main processes that determine the accuracy of patient dose calculations in radiotherapy treatment planning. However, the CT number and electron density of tissues cannot be generally interrelated via a simple one-to-one correspondence because the CT number depends on the effective atomic number as well as the electron density. The purpose of this study is to present a simple conversion from the energy-subtracted CT number ({Delta}HU) by means of dual-energy CT (DECT) to the relative electron density ({rho}{sub e}) via a single linear relationship. Methods: The {Delta}HU-{rho}{sub e} conversion method was demonstrated by performing analytical DECT image simulations that were intended to imitate a second-generation dual-source CT (DSCT) scanner with an additional tin filtration for the high-kV tube. The {Delta}HU-{rho}{sub e} calibration line was obtained from the image simulation with a 33 cm-diameter electron density calibration phantom equipped with 16 inserts including polytetrafluoroethylene, polyvinyl chloride, and aluminum; the elemental compositions of these three inserts were quite different to those of body tissues. The {Delta}HU-{rho}{sub e} conversion method was also applied to previously published experimental CT data, which were measured using two different CT scanners, to validate the clinical feasibility of the present approach. In addition, the effect of object size on {rho}{sub e}-calibrated images was investigated by image simulations using a 25 cm-diameter virtual phantom for two different filtrations: with and without the tin filter for the high-kV tube. Results: The simulated {Delta}HU-{rho}{sub e} plot exhibited a predictable linear relationship over a wide range of {rho}{sub e} from 0.00 (air) to 2.35 (aluminum). Resultant values of the coefficient of determination, slope, and intercept of the linear function fitted to the data were close to those of the ideal case. The maximum difference between the ideal and simulated {rho}{sub e} values was -0.7%. The satisfactory linearity of {Delta}HU-{rho}{sub e} was also confirmed from analyses of the experimental CT data. In the experimental cases, the maximum difference between the nominal and simulated {rho}{sub e} values was found to be 2.5% after two outliers were excluded. When compared with the case without the tin filter, the {Delta}HU-{rho}{sub e} conversion performed with the tin filter yielded a lower dose and more reliable {rho}{sub e} values that were less affected by the object-size variation. Conclusions: The {Delta}HU-{rho}{sub e} calibration line with a simple one-to-one correspondence would facilitate the construction of a well-calibrated {rho}{sub e} image from acquired dual-kV images, and currently, second generation DSCT may be a feasible modality for the clinical use of the {Delta}HU-{rho}{sub e} conversion method.

Saito, Masatoshi [Department of Radiological Technology, School of Health Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Niigata University, Niigata 951-8518 (Japan)

2012-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

188

California Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements)  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1980's 7,626 7,904,858 8,113,034 8,313,776 1990's 8,497,848 8,634,774 8,680,613 8,726,187 8,790,733 8,865,541 8,969,308 9,060,473 9,181,928 9,331,206 2000's 9,370,797 9,603,122 9,726,642 9,803,311 9,957,412 10,124,433 10,329,224 10,439,220 10,515,162 10,510,950 2010's 10,542,584 10,625,190 10,681,916 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 12/12/2013 Next Release Date: 1/7/2014 Referring Pages: Number of Natural Gas Residential

189

Muon Reconstruction and Identification in CMS  

SciTech Connect

We present the design strategies and status of the CMS muon reconstruction and identification identification software. Muon reconstruction and identification is accomplished through a variety of complementary algorithms. The CMS muon reconstruction software is based on a Kalman filter technique and reconstructs muons in the standalone muon system, using information from all three types of muon detectors, and links the resulting muon tracks with tracks reconstructed in the silicon tracker. In addition, a muon identification algorithm has been developed which tries to identify muons with high efficiency while maintaining a low probability of misidentification. The muon identification algorithm is complementary by design to the muon reconstruction algorithm that starts track reconstruction in the muon detectors. The identification algorithm accepts reconstructed tracks from the inner tracker and attempts to quantify the muon compatibility for each track using associated calorimeter and muon detector hit information. The performance status is based on detailed detector simulations as well as initial studies using cosmic muon data.

Everett, A. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, 47906 (United States)

2010-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

190

Identification of Hazards, 3/9/95  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's hazards identification programs.  Surveillance activities encompass maintenance and implementation of safety...

191

Muon Identification in the LHCb experiment  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A short summary of the LHCb muon identification procedure is given in this article. First, the muon system of LHCb is presented, together with some examples of physics measurements of the experiment where the muon identification is crucial. Then, the muon identification algorithm is introduced in three single steps. With this, the efficiency vs. misidentification rate is shown for MC simulated data. The way this method will be calibrated with real data is also seen. Finally, some preliminary muon identification results with proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s) = 900 GeV are presented.

X. Cid Vidal

2010-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

192

Document ID Number: RL-721  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Document ID Number: Document ID Number: RL-721 REV 4 NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM DOE/CX-00066 I. Project Title: Nesting Bird Deterrent Study at the 241-C Tank Farm CX B3.8, "Outdoor Terrestrial Ecological and Environmental Research" II. Project Description and Location (including Time Period over which proposed action will occur and Project Dimensions - e.g., acres displaced/disturbed, excavation length/depth, area/location/number of buildings, etc.): Washington River Protection Solutions LLC (WRPS) will perform an outdoor, terrestrial ecological research study to attempt to control and deter nesting birds at the 241-C Tank Farm. This will be a preventative study to test possible methods for controlling &/or minimizing the presence and impacts of nesting birds inside the tank farm. A nesting bird

193

On rings of structural numbers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

structural numbers over the set X, and let B(X) have the operations defined above with equality also as before. Theorem I. l. If X is any set, then B(X) is a commutative ring with identity. Proof. The structural number 0 is the additive identity element... with identity g. Definition I. 7. If A, B e S(X) then A'B = (P U q ( p e A, q e B, p Il q = &f and p U q can be formed in an odd number of ways). ~E1 t. 4. L t A = (( . b), (bj. 7 )) 4 B = ((b, c), (b), (a)) be in S(X) for some X. Then AD B = {{b, a), {a...

Powell, Wayne Bruce

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

194

Common Aquatic Plants -- Identification, Control.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of leaves: (1) floating and firm textured and (2) submersed, thin linear and membranous. Numerous pencil-like spikes are visible beneath the pond surface in early summer. Stems are jointed and have fibrous roots at the lower nodes. Identification within.... FLOATING PLANTS WATER STAR GRASS Heteranthera sp. (Mud plantain) Water star grass, a submersed or floating rooted plant, usually is found along muddy shores and in water up to 5 ft. deep. The leaves are approximately 2 inches long and 3/16 inch wide...

Klussmann, Wallace G. (Wallace Glenn); Lowman, Fred G.

1964-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Unspecified Journal Volume 00, Number 0, Pages 000000  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

0000 (copyright holder) 1 #12;2 W.S. CHEUNG, XUHUA LIU AND T.Y. TAM Theorem 1.1. ([9, p.50-51]) Let, BOUNDARY POINTS, AND JOINT NUMERICAL RANGES WAI-SHUN CHEUNG, XUHUA LIU AND TIN-YAU TAM Abstract

Tam, Tin-Yau

196

A Method to Increase Current Density in a Mono Element Internal Tin Processed Superconductor Utilizing Zr Oxide to Refine Grain Size  

SciTech Connect

The effect of Oxygen on (Nb1Zr)3Sn multifilament conductors manufactured by the Mono Element Internal Tin (MEIT) process was explored to improve the current density by refining the grain size. This followed work first done by General Electric on the Nb3Sn tape process. Techniques to fabricate the more difficult Nb1Zr composites are described and allowed fabrication of long lengths of .254 mm diameter wire from an 88.9 mm diameter billet. Oxygen was incorporated through the use of SnO2 mixed with tin powder and incorporated into the core. These were compared to samples with Ti+Sn and Cu+Sn cores. Heat treatments covered the range of 700 C to 1000 C. Current density vs. H, grain size, and reaction percentages are provided for the materials tested. The Oxygen gave superior results in the temperature range of 815-1000 C. It also stabilized the filament geometry of the array in comparison to the other additions at the higher temperatures. At 815 C a peak in layer Jc yielded values of 2537 A/mm2 at 12 T and 1353 A/mm2 at 15T, 8-22% and 30-73% greater respectively than 700 C values. Results with Oxygen at high temperature show the possibility of high speed continuous reaction of the composite versus the current batch or react in place methods. In general the Ti additions gave superior results at the lower reaction temperature. Future work is suggested to determine if the 815 C reaction temperature can lead to higher current density in high tin (Nb1Zr+Ox)3Sn conductors. A second technique incorporated oxygen directly into the Nb1Zr rods through heat treatment with Nb2O5 at 1100 C for 100 hours in vacuum prior to extrusion. The majority of the filaments reduced properly in the composite but some local variations in hardness led to breakage at smaller diameters.

Bruce A. Zeitlin, Eric Gregory

2008-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

197

Identification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

a a Bifunctional UDP-4-keto-pentose/UDP-xylose Synthase in the Plant Pathogenic Bacterium Ralstonia solanacearum Strain GMI1000, a Distinct Member of the 4,6-Dehydratase and Decarboxylase Family * □ S Received for publication, September 16, 2009, and in revised form, January 15, 2010 Published, JBC Papers in Press, January 29, 2010, DOI 10.1074/jbc.M109.066803 Xiaogang Gu ‡ , John Glushka ‡ , Yanbin Yin § , Ying Xu § , Timothy Denny ¶ , James Smith ‡ , Yingnan Jiang ‡ , and Maor Bar-Peled ‡ʈ1 From the ‡ Complex Carbohydrate Research Center, the § Computational System Biology Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, and the Institute of Bioinformatics, and the Departments of ¶ Plant Pathogen and ʈ Plant Biology, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602 The UDP-sugar interconverting enzymes involved in UDP- GlcA metabolism are well

198

Identification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Novel Novel Proteins Involved in Plant Cell-Wall Synthesis Based on Protein-Protein Interaction Data Chan Zhou, †,‡ Yanbin Yin, †,‡ Phuongan Dam, †,‡ and Ying Xu* ,†,‡,§ Computational Systems Biology Laboratory, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, and Institute of Bioinformatics, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia 30602, BioEnergy Science Center (http:// genomicsgtl.energy.gov/centers/), Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831, and College of Computer Science and Technology, Jilin University, Changchun, Jilin 130012, China Received April 4, 2010 The plant cell wall is mainly composed of polysaccharides, representing the richest source of biomass for future biofuel production. Currently, the majority of the cell-wall synthesis-related (CWSR) proteins are unknown even for model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. We report a computational framework

199

Khi i hc k thut thng tin (Undergraduateds School of IES) http://www.uec.ac.jp/ies/faculty/index.html (Jpns)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

lng Lng t hc Vt liu hc Cht bán dn - Siêu bán dn Thit b in t - Thit b quang in t - T - Vt liu quang Thông tin quang Vt lý rn Sinh hc - Thn kinh hc H thng sinh hc o lng sinh hc Tên thng qun lý doanh nghip... nh hng ngh nghip: K s h thng, K s qun lý sn xut - cht lng sn phm, Chuyên

Yanai, Keiji

200

Preparation, characterization and applications of novel carbon and nitrogen codoped TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles from annealing TiN under CO atmosphere  

SciTech Connect

Graphical abstract: Carbon and nitrogen codoped TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were firstly fabricated by calcining TiN powder under CO atmosphere at different temperatures between 400 and 600 °C, both the improved photocatalytic activity for degradation of methylene blue and enhanced photovoltaic performance for dye sensitized solar cells were demonstrated. - Highlights: • CN-codoped TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles were prepared by calcining TiN under CO atmosphere. • More visible light response was confirmed by UV–vis DRS and photocatalytic results. • Enhanced conversion efficiency was observed for the DSSCs from CN-TiO{sub 2} photoanode. • CN-codoping played an important role to improve the photocatalytic performance. - Abstract: Carbon and nitrogen codoped titania (CN-TiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles were fabricated by calcining titanium nitride (TiN) nanoparticles under carbon monoxide (CO) atmosphere at four different temperatures in a range of 400–600 °C. The as-prepared samples were characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Enhanced light absorption in both the UV and visible light region was observed for the resulted CN-TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles in ultraviolet-visible diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV–vis DRS). Improved photocatalytic activity toward the degradation of methylene blue by the CN-TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles was demonstrated under UV and visible light, respectively. The highest degradation rate was achieved for CN-TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles (13%) compared to N-TiO{sub 2} (10%) and the commercial P25 (5%) under visible light illumination for 40 min. Furthermore, the improved photocatalytic activity of CN-TiO{sub 2} was also confirmed by the degradation of colorless resorcinol under UV–vis light irradiation. Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) were fabricated using P25, N-TiO{sub 2} and CN-TiO{sub 2} photoanodes, respectively. The highest conversion efficiency of 3.31% was achieved by the DSSCs based on the CN-TiO{sub 2} photoanodes in comparison with the commercial P25 (1.61%) and N-TiO{sub 2} (2.44%) photoanodes. This work demonstrates that thermal treatment of TiN nanoparticles under CO atmosphere has shown to be a rapid, direct and clean approach to synthesize photocatalysts with enhanced photocatalytic and photovoltaic performance.

Sun, Mingxuan; Song, Peng; Li, Jing; Cui, Xiaoli, E-mail: xiaolicui@fudan.edu.cn

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identification number tin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Response: Issue Numbers and Librarianship  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...some time. Put back the issue number. ALISON BAKER Librawy Jackson Laboratot), Bar...passage in which he supposes some unusually wise ape-like animal to have first thought...the approving nods and kindly grunts ofmy wise and most respected chief. And now I feel...

DANIEL E. KOSHLAND; JR.

1986-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

202

INVESTIGATION Allele Identification for Transcriptome-Based  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INVESTIGATION Allele Identification for Transcriptome-Based Population Genomics in the Invasive, and AllelePipe for clustering of loci and allele identification in assembled datasets with or without are now making bulk sequencing of the genome practical for allele discovery in nonmodel and outbred study

Rieseberg, Loren

203

Vibration–based structural damage identification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...N. A. J. Lieven and D. J. Ewins Vibration-based structural damage identification...identification based upon changes in vibration characteristics is one of the few methods...last thirty years is first presented. Vibration-based damage detection is a primary...

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Stable Isotope, Site-Specific Mass Tagging For Protein Identification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stable Isotope, Site-Specific Mass Tagging For Protein Identification Stable Isotope, Site-Specific Mass Tagging For Protein Identification Proteolytic peptide mass mapping as...

205

Expert system for identification of simultaneous and sequential reactor fuel failures with gas tagging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Failure of a fuel element in a nuclear reactor core is determined by a gas tagging failure detection system and method. Failures are catalogued and characterized after the event so that samples of the reactor's cover gas are taken at regular intervals and analyzed by mass spectroscopy. Employing a first set of systematic heuristic rules which are applied in a transformed node space allows the number of node combinations which must be processed within a barycentric algorithm to be substantially reduced. A second set of heuristic rules treats the tag nodes of the most recent one or two leakers as "background" gases, further reducing the number of trial node combinations. Lastly, a "fuzzy" set theory formalism minimizes experimental uncertainties in the identification of the most likely volumes of tag gases. This approach allows for the identification of virtually any number of sequential leaks and up to five simultaneous gas leaks from fuel elements.

Gross, Kenny C. (Bolingbrook, IL)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Expert system for identification of simultaneous and sequential reactor fuel failures with gas tagging  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Failure of a fuel element in a nuclear reactor core is determined by a gas tagging failure detection system and method. Failures are catalogued and characterized after the event so that samples of the reactor's cover gas are taken at regular intervals and analyzed by mass spectroscopy. Employing a first set of systematic heuristic rules which are applied in a transformed node space allows the number of node combinations which must be processed within a barycentric algorithm to be substantially reduced. A second set of heuristic rules treats the tag nodes of the most recent one or two leakers as background'' gases, further reducing the number of trial node combinations. Lastly, a fuzzy'' set theory formalism minimizes experimental uncertainties in the identification of the most likely volumes of tag gases. This approach allows for the identification of virtually any number of sequential leaks and up to five simultaneous gas leaks from fuel elements. 14 figs.

Gross, K.C.

1994-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

207

Computing Betti Numbers via Combinatorial Laplacians  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computing Betti Numbers via Combinatorial Laplacians method to compute Betti numbers of sim- plicial complexes. This has a number of advantages over are the Betti numbers, the i-th Betti number, bi= bi(X), being the rank of Hi(X). The Betti numbers often have

Friedman, Joel

208

RIN Number 1904-AB68  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Federal Procurement of Energy Efficient Products Federal Procurement of Energy Efficient Products RIN NUMBER: 1904-AB68 CLOSING DATE: August 20, 2007 COMMENT NUMBER DATE RECEIVED/ DATE OF LETTER NAME & TITLE OF COMMENTATOR AFFILIATION & ADDRESS OF COMMENTATOR 1 ? 7/31/07 Edwin Pinero Federal Environmental Executive Office of the Federal Environmental Executive 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW Mail Code 1600J Washington, DC 20460 2 8/8/07 (e-mail) Bob Null President Arkansas Lamp Manufacturing bnull@arkansaslamp.com 3 8/10/07 (e-mail) Dawn Gunning Environmental Program Manager Department of Justice Dawn.M.Gunning@usdoj.gov 4 8/14/07 8/14/07 Kyle Pitsor Vice President, Government Relations National Electrical Manufacturers Association 1300 North 17th Street, Suite 1752 Rosslyn, VA 22209

209

RIN Number 1904-AB68  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

RULEMAKING TITLE: Federal Procurement of Energy Efficient Products RULEMAKING TITLE: Federal Procurement of Energy Efficient Products RIN NUMBER: 1904-AB68 CLOSING DATE: August 20, 2007 COMMENT NUMBER DATE RECEIVED/ DATE OF LETTER NAME & TITLE OF COMMENTATOR AFFILIATION & ADDRESS OF COMMENTATOR 1 ? 7/31/07 Edwin Pinero Federal Environmental Executive Office of the Federal Environmental Executive 1200 Pennsylvania Avenue, NW Mail Code 1600J Washington, DC 20460 2 8/8/07 (e-mail) Bob Null President Arkansas Lamp Manufacturing bnull@arkansaslamp.com 3 8/10/07 (e-mail) Dawn Gunning Environmental Program Manager Department of Justice Dawn.M.Gunning@usdoj.gov 4 8/14/07 8/14/07 Kyle Pitsor Vice President, Government Relations National Electrical Manufacturers Association 1300 North 17th Street, Suite 1752

210

RL·721 Document ID Number:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Document ID Number: Document ID Number: REV 3 NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM DOE/CX-00045 . J.proj(;l~t Titl~: - - - -- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -- --------- ------_. . _ - - - - - - - - - - - - - . - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - LIMITED FIREBREAK MAINTENANCE ON THE HANFORD SITE DURING CALENDAR YEAR 2012 II. Project Description and Location (including Time Period over which proposed action will occur and Project Dimensions· e.g., acres displaced/disturbed, excavation length/depth, etc.): The Department of Energy (DOE) proposes to perform firebreak maintenance in selected areas of the Hanford Site during calendar year 2012 with limited use of physical, chemical, and prescribed burning methods. Prescribed burning will be performed by the Hanford Fire Department under approved burn plans and permits; and only in previously disturbed

211

Effect of oxidizer on grain size and low temperature DC electrical conductivity of tin oxide nanomaterial synthesized by gel combustion method  

SciTech Connect

Nanocrystalline Tin oxide material with different grain size was synthesized using gel combustion method by varying the fuel (C{sub 6}H{sub 8}O{sub 7}) to oxidizer (HNO{sub 3}) molar ratio by keeping the amount of fuel as constant. The prepared samples were characterized by using X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Energy Dispersive Analysis X-ray Spectroscopy (EDAX). The effect of fuel to oxidizer molar ratio in the gel combustion method was investigated by inspecting the grain size of nano SnO{sub 2} powder. The grain size was found to be reduced with the amount of oxidizer increases from 0 to 6 moles in the step of 2. The X-ray diffraction patterns of the calcined product showed the formation of high purity tetragonal tin (IV) oxide with the grain size in the range of 12 to 31 nm which was calculated by Scherer's formula. Molar ratio and temperature dependence of DC electrical conductivity of SnO{sub 2} nanomaterial was studied using Keithley source meter. DC electrical conductivity of SnO{sub 2} nanomaterial increases with the temperature from 80K to 300K. From the study it was observed that the DC electrical conductivity of SnO{sub 2} nanomaterial decreases with the grain size at constant temperature.

Rajeeva, M. P., E-mail: jayanna60@gmail.com; Jayanna, H. S., E-mail: jayanna60@gmail.com; Ashok, R. L.; Naveen, C. S. [Department of P.G. Studies and Research in Physics, Kuvempu University, Jnanasahyadri, Shankarghatta, Shimoga- 577451, Karnataka (India); Bothla, V. Prasad [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore-560012 (India)

2014-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

212

Identification of process suitable diluent  

SciTech Connect

The Sigma Team for Minor Actinide Separation (STMAS) was formed within the USDOE Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program in order to develop more efficient methods for the separation of americium and other minor actinides (MA) from used nuclear fuel. The development of processes for MA separations is driven by the potential benefits; reduced long-term radiotoxicty of waste placed in a geologic repository, reduced timeframe of waste storage, reduced repository heat load, the possibility of increased repository capacity, and increased utilization of energy potential of used nuclear fuel. The research conducted within the STMAS framework is focused upon the realization of significant simplifications to aqueous recycle processes proposed for MA separations. This report describes the research efforts focused upon the identification of a process suitable diluent for a flowsheet concept for the separation of MA which is based upon the dithiophosphinic acid (DPAH) extractants previously developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL).

Dean R. Peterman

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Drilling Waste Management Technology Identification Module  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

you are in this section Technology Identification you are in this section Technology Identification Home » Technology Identification Drilling Waste Management Technology Identification Module The Technology Identification Module is an interactive tool for identifying appropriate drilling waste management strategies for a given well location and circumstances. The Technology Identification Module follows the philosophy of a waste management hierarchy. Waste management options with the lowest environmental impacts are encouraged ahead of those with more significant environmental impacts. The Technology Identification Module helps identify waste management options, but users should also consider their own site-specific costs and waste volumes. How it Works Users will be asked to answer a series of questions about the location of the well site, physical features of the site that may allow or inhibit the use of various options, whether the regulatory agency with jurisdiction allows or prohibits particular options, and whether cost or the user's company policy would preclude any options. Nearly all questions are set up for only "yes" or "no" responses. Depending on how the initial questions are answered, users will face from 15 to 35 total questions. Some of these can be answered immediately, while others may require some additional investigation of other portions of this web site or external information. Suitable options will be identified as users complete the questions, and users will be able to print out a summary of suitable options when the process is completed.

214

Computing Betti Numbers via Combinatorial Joel Friedman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computing Betti Numbers via Combinatorial Laplacians Joel Friedman Department of Mathematics 1984 Abstract We use the Laplacian and power method to compute Betti numbers of sim­ plicial complexes. This has are the Betti numbers, the i­th Betti number, b i = b i (X), being the rank of H i (X). The Betti numbers often

Friedman, Joel

215

Grantee Total Number of Homes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Grantee Grantee Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 [Recovery Act] Total Number of Homes Weatherized through November 2011 (Calendar Year 2009 - November 2011) [Recovery Act + Annual Program Funding] Alabama 6,704 7,867 1 Alaska 443 2,363 American Samoa 304 410 Arizona 6,354 7,518 Arkansas 5,231 6,949 California 41,649 50,002 Colorado 12,782 19,210 Connecticut 8,940 10,009 2 Delaware** 54 54 District of Columbia 962 1,399 Florida 18,953 20,075 Georgia 13,449 14,739 Guam 574 589 Hawaii 604 1,083 Idaho** 4,470 6,614 Illinois 35,530 44,493 Indiana** 18,768 21,689 Iowa 8,794 10,202 Kansas 6,339 7,638 Kentucky 7,639 10,902 Louisiana 4,698 6,946 Maine 5,130 6,664 Maryland 8,108 9,015 Massachusetts 17,687 21,645 Michigan 29,293 37,137 Minnesota 18,224 22,711 Mississippi 5,937 6,888 Missouri 17,334 20,319 Montana 3,310 6,860 Navajo Nation

216

Total Number of Operable Refineries  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Data Series: Total Number of Operable Refineries Number of Operating Refineries Number of Idle Refineries Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/CD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operable Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Operating Capacity (B/SD) Atmospheric Crude Oil Distillation Idle Capacity (B/SD) Vacuum Distillation Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Delayed Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD Thermal Cracking Fluid Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Visbreaking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/SD) Thermal Cracking Other/Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Cracking Recycle Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Low Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming High Pressure Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating/Desulfurization Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Naphtha/Reformer Feed Charge Cap (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Gasoline Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Heavy Gas Oil Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Kerosene/Jet Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Diesel Fuel Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Distillate Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual/Other Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Residual Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Hydrotreating Other Oils Charge Capacity (B/SD) Fuels Solvent Deasphalting Charge Capacity (B/SD) Catalytic Reforming Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Total Coking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Cracking Fresh Feed Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Catalytic Hydro-Cracking Downstream Charge Capacity (B/CD) Period:

217

Author Identification in Bengali Literary Works  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we study the problem of authorship identification in Bengali literary works. We considered three authors namely Rabindranath Tagore, Bankim Chandra Chattopadhyay and Sukanta Bhattacharyay. It was o...

Suprabhat Das; Pabitra Mitra

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Delaware Transportation Infrastructure Forum Problem Identification Statements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2013 Delaware Transportation Infrastructure Forum Problem Identification Statements Sponsored by The Delaware Center for Transportation and the Delaware Department of Transportation Delaware Center for Transportation Your main resource for transportation education and research Identifying Important Issues Related

Firestone, Jeremy

219

Morphometric identification of fossil spiders: Comment  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Kinchloe Roberts et al. (2008) proposed a technique, using outline-morphometric and linear analyses to permit identification of spider compression fossils to family level. This work focussed on fossil spiders ...

D. Penney; A. M. Langan

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

Identification and control of a flexible structure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis describes the identification and vibration ics. control of a cantilevered beam with piezoelectric material as actuators and sensors. The Euler-Bernoulli beam equation is used and gravity contribution to the stiffness matrix is included...

Huang, Haiming

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identification number tin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Ethnic identification among blacks and whites  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Two central questions drive this research: (1) Are there trends in ethnic identification among blacks and whites; and (2) Are there meaningful differences between groups that identify differently? I use descriptive and regression analysis...

Glass, Teresa Gail

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Feature identification framework and applications (FIFA)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

collections that provides a general framework for applications while allowing decisions about the details of document representation and features identification to be deferred to domain specific implementations of that framework. These deferred decisions...

Audenaert, Michael Neal

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

223

Identification of Information in Decision Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Extending unique identification to non-physical objects (data, information, decisions, knowledge) is a challenging problem in systems engineering. The tools and technologies available for naming physical objects may soon ...

Datta, Shoumen

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Radio Frequency Identification : regulating information privacy protection  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

As applications of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) become more profuse, the technology itself is stirring up some controversy. Due to its potential for amassing large amounts of information about both people and ...

Laufer, Deanna (Deanna Raquel)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Complex Technical System Operation Processes Identification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The methods of identification of the operation processes of complex technical systems are presented. These are methods and procedures ... for estimating the unknown basic parameters of the system operation proces...

Krzysztof Ko?owrocki; Joanna Soszy?ska-Budny

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Nonlinear system identification using the MRAS technique and hyperstability concepts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is presented. The algorithm is theoretically derived and proved hyperstable by extension of previous linear, hyperstabie response error MRAS identification techniques. Generalization and unification of pre- vious empirical nonlinear identification... Identification - Application of Hyperstability An important MRAS identification approach is known as "parallel MRAS" or response error (RE), Fig. 4. This method of identification was developed by Landau [17-18], Hang [15-16], and Johnson [19...

Schatte, Alvin Robert

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

RL-721 Document ID Number:  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4 4 NEPA REVIEW SCREENING FORM DOE/CX-00075 I. Project Title: Project 1-718, Electrical Utili ties Transformer Management Support Facility II. Project Description and Location (including Time Period over which proposed action will occur and Project Dimensions -e.g., acres displaced/disturbed, excavation length/depth, area/location/number of buildings, etc.): The proposed action includes design, procurement, and construction of a pre-engineered metal building for transformer management; including inspections, routine maintenance, testing, refurbishing, and disposition of excess transformers. The building will be constructed in the previously disturbed, gravel-covered electrical utilities lay-down yard west of the 2101-M Building in 200 East Area of the Hanford Site. The building footprint

228

Particle Number & Particulate Mass Emissions Measurements on...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Number & Particulate Mass Emissions Measurements on a 'Euro VI' Heavy-duty Engine using the PMP Methodologies Particle Number & Particulate Mass Emissions Measurements on a 'Euro...

229

Nanoscale Electrical Conductivity and Surface Spectroscopic Studies of Indium-Tin Oxide Yish-Hann Liau and Norbert F. Scherer*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

enabled the Electronic and optoelectronic devices impact many areas of society, from simple household and optoelectronic devices OCTOBER 2006 | VOLUME 9 | NUMBER 1018 #12;creation of a host of structures with modulated

Scherer, Norbert F.

230

Verification Challenges at Low Numbers  

SciTech Connect

Many papers have dealt with the political difficulties and ramifications of deep nuclear arms reductions, and the issues of “Going to Zero”. Political issues include extended deterrence, conventional weapons, ballistic missile defense, and regional and geo-political security issues. At each step on the road to low numbers, the verification required to ensure compliance of all parties will increase significantly. Looking post New START, the next step will likely include warhead limits in the neighborhood of 1000 . Further reductions will include stepping stones at1000 warheads, 100’s of warheads, and then 10’s of warheads before final elimination could be considered of the last few remaining warheads and weapons. This paper will focus on these three threshold reduction levels, 1000, 100’s, 10’s. For each, the issues and challenges will be discussed, potential solutions will be identified, and the verification technologies and chain of custody measures that address these solutions will be surveyed. It is important to note that many of the issues that need to be addressed have no current solution. In these cases, the paper will explore new or novel technologies that could be applied. These technologies will draw from the research and development that is ongoing throughout the national laboratory complex, and will look at technologies utilized in other areas of industry for their application to arms control verification.

Benz, Jacob M.; Booker, Paul M.; McDonald, Benjamin S.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Enhancement of hole injection and electroluminescence by ordered Ag nanodot array on indium tin oxide anode in organic light emitting diode  

SciTech Connect

We report the enhancement of hole injection and electroluminescence (EL) in an organic light emitting diode (OLED) with an ordered Ag nanodot array on indium-tin-oxide (ITO) anode. Until now, most researches have focused on the improved performance of OLEDs by plasmonic effects of metal nanoparticles due to the difficulty in fabricating metal nanodot arrays. A well-ordered Ag nanodot array is fabricated on the ITO anode of OLED using the nanoporous alumina as an evaporation mask. The OLED device with Ag nanodot arrays on the ITO anode shows higher current density and EL enhancement than the one without any nano-structure. These results suggest that the Ag nanodot array with the plasmonic effect has potential as one of attractive approaches to enhance the hole injection and EL in the application of the OLEDs.

Jung, Mi, E-mail: jmnano00@gmail.com, E-mail: Dockha@kist.re.kr [Sensor System Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); School of Mechanical Systems Engineering, Kookmin University, Seoul 136-702 (Korea, Republic of); Mo Yoon, Dang; Kim, Miyoung [Korea Printed Electronics Center, Korea Electronics Technology Institute, Jeollabuk-do, 561-844 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chulki; Lee, Taikjin; Hun Kim, Jae; Lee, Seok; Woo, Deokha, E-mail: jmnano00@gmail.com, E-mail: Dockha@kist.re.kr [Sensor System Research Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul 136-791 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Si-Hyung [School of Mechanical Systems Engineering, Kookmin University, Seoul 136-702 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

232

The relationship between structural evolution and electrical percolation of the initial stages of tungsten chemical vapor deposition on polycrystalline TiN  

SciTech Connect

This paper presents experimental results and a geometric model of the evolution of sheet resistance and surface morphology during the transition from nucleation to percolation of tungsten chemical vapor deposition over ultrathin polycrystalline titanium nitride (TiN). We observed two mechanisms of reduction in sheet resistance. At deposition temperatures higher than 310 deg. C, percolation effect is formed at {approx}35% of surface coverage, {theta}, and characterized with a sharp drop in resistance. At temperature below 310 deg. C, a reduction in resistance occurs in two steps. The first step occurs when {theta} = 35% and the second step at {theta} = 85%. We suggest a geometric model in which the electrical percolation pass is modulated by the thickness threshold of the islands at the instant of collision.

Rozenblat, A. [Micron Semiconductors Israel Ltd., Qiryat-Gat 82109 (Israel); Department of Physical Electronics, Electrical Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Haimson, S. [Material Science Program, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Shacham-Diamand, Y. [Department of Physical Electronics, Electrical Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Horvitz, D. [Micron Semiconductors Israel Ltd., Qiryat-Gat 82109 (Israel)

2012-01-16T23:59:59.000Z

233

Betti numbers, Morse theory, and homology Perturbations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Betti numbers, Morse theory, and homology Perturbations Cascades Multicomplexes Morse and Morse Hurtubise Morse and Morse-Bott Homology #12;Betti numbers, Morse theory, and homology Perturbations Cascades Multicomplexes Betti numbers, Morse theory, and homology Betti numbers Morse inequalities Transversality Morse

Hurtubise, David E.

234

h-analogue of Fibonacci Numbers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we introduce the h-analogue of Fibonacci numbers for non-commutative h-plane. For h h'= 1 and h = 0, these are just the usual Fibonacci numbers as it should be. We also derive a collection of identities for these numbers. Furthermore, h-Binet's formula for the h-Fibonacci numbers is found and the generating function that generates these numbers is obtained.

H. B. Benaoum

2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

235

Department for Analysis and Computational Number Theory Additive functions and number systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Department for Analysis and Computational Number Theory Additive functions and number systems systems April 7, 2010 1 / 35 #12;Department for Analysis and Computational Number Theory Outline Number #12;Department for Analysis and Computational Number Theory Examples for number systems b Z, b -2

236

Identification of lithofacies using Kohonen self-organizing maps  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lithofacies identification is a primary task in reservoir characterization. Traditional techniques of lithofacies identification from core data are costly, and it is difficult to extrapolate to non-cored wells. We present a low-cost automated technique using Kohonen self-organizing maps (SOMs) to identify systematically and objectively lithofacies from well log data. \\{SOMs\\} are unsupervised artificial neural networks that map the input space into clusters in a topological form whose organization is related to trends in the input data. A case study used five wells located in Appleton Field, Escambia County, Alabama (Smackover Formation, limestone and dolomite, Oxfordian, Jurassic). A five-input, one-dimensional output approach is employed, assuming the lithofacies are in ascending/descending order with respect to paleoenvironmental energy levels. To consider the possible appearance of new logfacies not seen in training mode, which may potentially appear in test wells, the maximum number of outputs is set to 20 instead of four, the designated number of lithofacies in the study area. This study found eleven major clusters. The clusters were compared to depositional lithofacies identified by manual core examination. The clusters were ordered by the SOM in a pattern consistent with environmental gradients inferred from core examination: bind/boundstone, grainstone, packstone, and wackestone. This new approach predicted lithofacies identity from well log data with 78.8% accuracy which is more accurate than using a backpropagation neural network (57.3%). The clusters produced by the SOM are ordered with respect to paleoenvironmental energy levels. This energy-related clustering provides geologists and petroleum engineers with valuable geologic information about the logfacies and their interrelationships. This advantage is not obtained in backpropagation neural networks and adaptive resonance theory neural networks.

Hsien-Cheng Chang; David C Kopaska-Merkel; Hui-Chuan Chen

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

High performance robust F-doped tin oxide based oxygen evolution electro-catalysts for PEM based water electrolysis  

SciTech Connect

Identification and development of non-noble metal based electro-catalysts or electro-catalysts comprising compositions with significantly reduced amounts of expensive noble metal contents (e.g. IrO{sub 2}, Pt) with comparable electrochemical performance to the standard noble metal/metal oxide for proton exchange membrane (PEM) based water electrolysis would signify a major breakthrough in hydrogen generation via water electrolysis. Development of such systems would lead to two primary outcomes: first, a reduction in the overall capital costs of PEM based water electrolyzers, and second, attainment of the targeted hydrogen production costs (<$3.00/gge delivered by 2015) comparable to conventional liquid fuels. In line with these goals, by exploiting a two-pronged theoretical first principles and experimental approach herein, we demonstrate for the very first time a solid solution of SnO{sub 2}:10 wt% F containing only 20 at.% IrO{sub 2} [e.g. (Sn{sub 0.80}Ir{sub 0.20})O{sub 2}:10F] displaying remarkably similar electrochemical activity and comparable or even much improved electrochemical durability compared to pure IrO{sub 2}, the accepted gold standard in oxygen evolution electro-catalysts for PEM based water electrolysis. We present the results of these studies.

Datta, Moni Kanchan; Kadakia, Karan; Velikokhatnyi, Oleg I.; Jampani, Prashanth H.; Chung, Sung Jae; Poston, James A.; Manivannan, Ayyakkannu; Kumta, Prashant N.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Prime number generation and factor elimination  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have presented a multivariate polynomial function termed as factor elimination function,by which, we can generate prime numbers. This function's mapping behavior can explain the irregularities in the occurrence of prime numbers on the number line. Generally the different categories of prime numbers found till date, satisfy the form of this function. We present some absolute and probabilistic conditions for the primality of the number generated by this method. This function is capable of leading to highly efficient algorithms for generating prime numbers.

Vineet Kumar

2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

239

,"New York Number of Natural Gas Consumers"  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

1: Residential" "Sourcekey","NA1501SNY8","NA1508SNY8","NA1509SNY8" "Date","New York Natural Gas Number of Residential Consumers (Count)","New York Natural Gas Number...

240

Electronic Vehicle Identification: Industry Standards, Performance, and Privacy Issues  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

0-5217-P2 Electronic Vehicle Identification: Industry Standards, Performance, and Privacy Issues of existing and potential legislation, and issues in electronic vehicle registration are introduced functions. Keywords: Tolling, electronic vehicle identification, DSRC, standards, performance, electronic

Texas at Austin, University of

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identification number tin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

The identification and function of English prosodic features  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis contains three sets of studies designed to explore the identification and function of prosodic features in English. The first set of studies explores the identification of prosodic features using prosodic ...

Breen, Mara E

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Sediment Toxicity Identification Evaluations San Francisco Bay Regional Monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sediment Toxicity Identification Evaluations San Francisco Bay Regional Monitoring Program chemicals of concern that may impact the estuary's ecosystem. Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE identified weak associations between mortality and bulk-phase chlordane and silver concentrations at Redwood

243

EXPERIMENTAL IDENTIFICATION OF COHESIVE ZONE MODELS FROM THERMOMECHANICAL IMAGING TECHNIQUES  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 EXPERIMENTAL IDENTIFICATION OF COHESIVE ZONE MODELS FROM THERMOMECHANICAL IMAGING TECHNIQUES S]. Although CZMs are becoming increasingly powerful, the identification of these models still remains of the ductile material into a purely elastoplastic behaviour related to the bulk response (hardening

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

244

Coordinated Searching and Target Identification Using Teams of Autonomous Agents  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coordinated Searching and Target Identification Using Teams of Autonomous Agents Christopher Lum;#12;University of Washington Abstract Coordinated Searching and Target Identification Using Teams of Autonomous & Astronautics Many modern autonomous systems actually require significant human involvement. Often, the amount

Washington at Seattle, University of

245

Oil-Spill Identification by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...May-June research-article Articles Oil-Spill Identification by Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry...the identification of a contaminant caused by the spilling of oil or oil products in water. A capillary gas chromatography (CGC......

A. Pavlova; D. Papazova

246

Comparative gene identification in mammalian, fly, and fungal genomes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An important step in genome interpretation is the accurate identification of protein-coding genes. One approach to gene identification is comparative analysis of the genomes of several related species, to find genes that ...

Lin, Michael F. (Michael Fong-Jay)

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Analysis of Random Number Generators Parijat Naik  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Analysis of Random Number Generators Parijat Naik Department of Computer Science Oregon State generation used in practice and a comparison of their efficiency. The paper focuses on the techniques used Random number generators are used for generating an array of numbers that have a random distribution

248

Growth of Betti Numbers Bryan Clair  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Growth of Betti Numbers Bryan Clair _____________________________________________________________________________ Introduction Let X = fX= be a finite simplicial complex. We study the growth rate of the Betti numbers of X. It is easy to see that the sequence of Betti numbers {bq(Xi)} can grow at most linearly

Clair, Bryan

249

Computing Betti Numbers via Combinatorial Joel Friedman  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Computing Betti Numbers via Combinatorial Laplacians Joel Friedman Department of Mathematics 1984 Abstract We use the Laplacian and power method to compute Betti numbers of sim- plicial complexes. This has, involving higher dimensional spaces (see [Cha95]). 1 #12;A part of the homology groups are the Betti numbers

Friedman, Joel

250

Betti Numbers of Graph Sean Jacques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ii Betti Numbers of Graph Ideals Sean Jacques Thesis submitted to the University of She but there are formulae for finding the Betti numbers (part of the information which comprises a minimal free resolution especially explicit or useful descriptions of the Betti numbers. However we restrict our attention to those

Katzman, Moty

251

The development of a speaker identification research facility  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

related research today is speaker identification Ll, 4]. Speaker identification is the process of identifying an individual by using only information derived from the person's voice. If speaker identification could be practically implemented, it would...THE DL'VELOPFU:NT Ol A SPEAKER IDENTIFICATION RESEARCH FACILITY A Thesis by DALE PETER RUSPINO Submitted to the Craduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August...

Ruspino, Dale Peter

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Biografo: An Integrated Tool for Forensic Writer Identification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Biografo: An Integrated Tool for Forensic Writer Identification Javier Galbally, Santiago Gonzalez of a practical integrated tool for writer identification in forensic scenarios is presented. The tool has been designed to help forensic examiners along the complete identification process: from the data acquisition

Autonoma de Madrid, Universidad

253

Regulation of chloroplast number and DNA synthesis in higher plants. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The long term objective of this research is to understand the process of chloroplast development and its coordination with leaf development in higher plants. This is important because the photosynthetic capacity of plants is directly related to leaf and chloroplast development. This research focuses on obtaining a detailing description of leaf development and the early steps in chloroplast development including activation of plastid DNA synthesis, changes in plastid DNA copy number, activation of chloroplast transcription and increases in plastid number per cell. The grant will also begin analysis of specific biochemical mechanisms by isolation of the plastid DNA polymerase, and identification of genetic mutants which are altered in their accumulation of plastid DNA and plastid number per cell.

Mullet, J.E.

1995-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

254

Regulation of chloroplast number and DNA synthesis in higher plants. Final report  

SciTech Connect

The long term objective of this research is to understand the process of chloroplast development and its coordination with leaf development in higher plants. This is important because the photosynthetic capacity of plants is directly related to leaf and chloroplast development. This research focuses on obtaining a detailed description of leaf development and the early steps in chloroplast development including activation of plastid DNA synthesis, changes in plastid DNA copy number, activation of chloroplast transcription and increases in plastid number per cell. The grant will also begin analysis of specific biochemical mechanisms by isolation of the plastid DNA polymerase, and identification of genetic mutants which are altered in their accumulation of plastid DNA and plastid number per cell.

Mullet, J.E.

1995-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

255

Author identification in bengali literary works  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, we study the problem of authorship identification in Bengali literary works. We considered three authors namely Rabindranath Tagore, Bankim Chandra Chattopadhyay and Sukanta Bhattacharyay. It was observed that simple unigram and bi-gram ... Keywords: authorship attribution, bengali literary works, bi-gram, stylometry, unigram

Suprabhat Das; Pabitra Mitra

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

Runtime Identification of Microprocessor Energy Saving Opportunities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Runtime Identification of Microprocessor Energy Saving Opportunities W. L. Bircher, M. Valluri, J power consumption and low energy efficiency have become significant impediments to future performance: linear regression models for power consumption and a detailed study of energy efficiency in a modern out

John, Lizy Kurian

257

Tier identification (TID) for tiered memory characteristics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A tier identification (TID) is to indicate a characteristic of a memory region associated with a virtual address in a tiered memory system. A thread may be serviced according to a first path based on the TID indicating a first characteristic. The thread may be serviced according to a second path based on the TID indicating a second characteristic.

Chang, Jichuan; Lim, Kevin T; Ranganathan, Parthasarathy

2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

258

Adjoint Lattice Boltzmann Equation for Parameter Identification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Adjoint Lattice Boltzmann Equation for Parameter Identification M.M. Tekitek a,b , M. Bouzidi c , F@asci.fr, francois.dubois@math.u-psud.fr, pierre.lal@free.fr 26 January 2005 Abstract. The Lattice Boltzmann to the Lattice Boltzmann Equation to get expressions for the derivatives of the cost function vs. parameters

Boyer, Edmond

259

Thrips on Onions: Identification and Management  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L-5397 7-01 Thrips on Onions Identification and Management A.N. Sparks, Jr. and T.-X. Liu Extension Entomologist and Research Entomologist The Texas A&M University System T hrips are the major arthropod pests of onions throughout Texas. They can...

Liu, Tong-Xian; Sparks Jr., Alton N.

2001-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

260

System Identification: Time Varying and Nonlinear Methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that the choice of the generalized time varying ARX model (GTV-ARX) can be set to realize a time varying dead beat observer. Methods to use the developed algorithm(s) in this research are then considered for application to the identification of system models...

Majji, Manoranjan

2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identification number tin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Identification in Posthumanist Rhetoric: Trauma and Empathy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of the rhetorical strategies used to build them have yet to be worked out. Identification, a key aim of rhetoric in the theory of Kenneth Burke and others, can persuade an audience to value others. However, it can also obscure the realities of who does and does...

Larsen, Amy Marie 1984-

2012-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

262

groundwater nitrogen source identification and remediation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

producer profits. This will, in turn, benefit water bodies in the area that receive stream baseflow fromgroundwater nitrogen source identification and remediation The Seymour Aquifer is a shallow aquifer water withdraws are used for irrigation while the cities of Vernon, Burk- burnett and Electra and many

263

Particle identification at an asymmetric B Factory  

SciTech Connect

Particle identification systems are an important component of any detector at a high-luminosity, asymmetric B Factory. In particular, excellent hadron identification is required to probe CP violation in B{sup 0} decays to CP eigenstates. The particle identification systems discussed below also provide help in separating leptons from hadrons at low momenta. We begin this chapter with a discussion of the physics motivation for providing particle identification, the inherent limitations due to interactions and decays in flight, and the requirements for hermiticity and angular coverage. A special feature of an asymmetric B Factory is the resulting asymmetry in the momentum distribution as a function of polar angle; this will also be quantified and discussed. In the next section the three primary candidates, time-of-flight (TOF), energy loss (dE/dx), and Cerenkov counters, both ring-imaging and threshold, will be briefly described and evaluated. Following this, one of the candidates, a long-drift Cerenkov ring-imaging device, is described in detail to provide a reference design. Design considerations for a fast RICH are then described. A detailed discussion of aerogel threshold counter designs and associated R D conclude the chapter. 56 refs., 64 figs., 13 tabs.

Coyle, P.; Eigen, G.; Hitlin, D.; Oddone, P.; Ratcliff, B.; Roe, N.; Va'vra, J.; Ypsilantis, T.

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Practical Attacks on Proximity Identification Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DEFCON ­ eavesdropped RFID at 20 m Confusion ?? RFID type Definition of distances Experimental setup skimming) Relay Attacks Practical Attacks on Proximity Identification Systems ­ p. #12;"Proximity from distance dE Further considerations dRT , Reader Token communication dTR, Token Reader

Hancke, Gerhard

265

Collaboration-Type Identification in Educational Datasets  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Collaboration-Type Identification in Educational Datasets ANDREW E. WATERS Department of Electrical Engineering Rice University richb@sparfa.com Identifying collaboration between learners in a course is an important challenge in education for two reasons: First, depending on the courses' rules, collaboration can

266

Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alabama Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

267

Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oregon Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

268

Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Montana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

269

Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arizona Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

270

Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Texas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

271

Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Wyoming Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

272

U.S. Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) U.S. Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

273

Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Utah Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

274

Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Alaska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

275

Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nevada Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

276

Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Indiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

277

Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Kansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

278

Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Ohio Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

279

* 1. NAME OF FEDERAL AGENCY: Npre-filled  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Nebraska-Lincoln b. Address: * Street1: 312 N 14th Street Street2: Alexander West * City: Lincoln County/Taxpayer Identification Number (EIN/TIN): 47-0049123 * f. Organizational DUNS: 555456995 * g. Congressional District-472-9323 * Street1: 312 N 14th Street, Alexander West Street2: * City: Lincoln County: * State: NE: Nebraska

Farritor, Shane

280

Louisiana State University Purchasing Office  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Louisiana State University Purchasing Office Vendor Enrollment Application Form Vendor Name changes to the LSU Purchasing Office. Taxpayer Identification Number (TIN) Certification [required] Check-To Address [required; used by LSU Purchasing to send solicitations, addenda, purchase orders, change orders

Harms, Kyle E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identification number tin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

10 CFR Part 1017 - Identification and Protection of Unclassified Controlled  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

0 CFR Part 1017 - Identification and Protection of Unclassified 0 CFR Part 1017 - Identification and Protection of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information 10 CFR Part 1017 - Identification and Protection of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information 10 CFR Part 1017, Identification and Protection of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information - Establishes the Government-wide policies and procedures for implementing the requirements of section 148 of the Atomic Energy Act of 1954 concerning identifying and protecting certain unclassified but sensitive Government information that concerns atomic energy defense programs. 10 CFR Part 1017, Identification and Protection of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information More Documents & Publications Summary, UCNI Document Markings - November 2011 Briefing, For Persons With Access to UCNI - April 2012

282

Augmenting real data with synthetic data: an application in assessing radio-isotope identification algorithms  

SciTech Connect

The performance of Radio-Isotope Identification (RIID) algorithms using gamma spectroscopy is increasingly important. For example, sensors at locations that screen for illicit nuclear material rely on isotope identification to resolve innocent nuisance alarms arising from naturally occurring radioactive material. Recent data collections for RIID testing consist of repeat measurements for each of several scenarios to test RIID algorithms. Efficient allocation of measurement resources requires an appropriate number of repeats for each scenario. To help allocate measurement resources in such data collections for RIID algorithm testing, we consider using only a few real repeats per scenario. In order to reduce uncertainty in the estimated RIID algorithm performance for each scenario, the potential merit of augmenting these real repeats with realistic synthetic repeats is also considered. Our results suggest that for the scenarios and algorithms considered, approximately 10 real repeats augmented with simulated repeats will result in an estimate having comparable uncertainty to the estimate based on using 60 real repeats.

Burr, Tom L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hamada, Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Graves, Todd [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Myers, Steve [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Computing the Betti Numbers of Arrangements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Computing the Betti Numbers of Arrangements Saugata Basu School of Mathematics & College complexity of a set S are the Betti numbers. i(S). · i(S) is the rank of the Hi (S) (the i-th co. · An important measure of the topological complexity of a set S are the Betti numbers. i(S). · i(S) is the rank

Basu, Saugata

284

BETTI NUMBERS OF HYPERSURFACE COMPLEMENTS LAURENTIU MAXIM  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

L2 ­BETTI NUMBERS OF HYPERSURFACE COMPLEMENTS LAURENTIU MAXIM Abstract. In [DJL07] it was shown that if A is an affine hyperplane arrange- ment in Cn, then at most one of the L2­Betti numbers b (2) i (Cn \\ A, id of [FLM09, LM06] about L2­Betti numbers of plane curve complements. 1. Introduction Let M be any

Maxim, Laurentiu-George

285

REFINED BOUNDS ON THE NUMBER OF CONNECTED ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Apr 6, 2011 ... Smith inequality (see Theorem 2.5) a bound on the number of semi- ... then using Smith inequality, have been used before in several different ...

2011-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

286

Battling bird flu by the numbers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

bird flu by the numbers Lab theorists have developed a mathematical tool that could help health experts and crisis managers determine in real time whether an emerging...

287

Nanocauliflower like structure of CdS thin film for solar cell photovoltaic applications: In situ tin doping by chemical bath deposition technique  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract We report on surface morphology changes of in situ tin (Sn) doped cadmium sulphide (CdS) thin film nanostructures prepared on a glass substrate using the chemical bath deposition (CBD) technique. Sn-doping in the presence of triethanolammine (TEOA) as complexing agent resulted in the formation of nanocauliflower like structure of CdS thin film. X-ray diffraction (XRD) results indicated that Sn-doped CdS thin films show a hexagonal structure with a preferential orientation growth along the c-axis (0 0 2). The Sn4+ doping markedly influenced on the evolution of the CdS nanostructures, resulting in the formation of nanocracks due to the substitution of Cd2+ ions by larger-than-host Sn4+ ions as well as a drastic increase in electrical conductivity. An improved optical transmittance property was also achieved by the Sn-doping with no considerable change in the energy band gap. Moreover, a large improvement in both electrical conductivity and photosensitivity observed in the Sn-doped CdS thin films suggests that Sn-doping is highly effective for applications as window/buffer layers in future solar cell applications. Structural evolution of cauliflower like nanostructures are also discussed in this paper.

K.C. Wilson; E. Manikandan; M. Basheer Ahamed; B.W. Mwakikunga

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Investigation of buried homojunctions in p -InP formed during sputter deposition of both indium tin oxide and indium oxide  

SciTech Connect

Although it is apparent that direct current (dc) magnetron sputter deposition of indium tin oxide (ITO) leads to the formation of a buried homojunction in single crystal {ital p}-type InP, the actual mechanism of type conversion of the InP surface is not clear, nor is it immediately obvious how further improvements may be achieved. Previously, we have suggested that type conversion is caused by indiffusion of Sn during the ITO deposition process and additionally demonstrated that this effect is strengthened by the presence of hydrogen in the sputtering gas. Recently, however, efficiencies of almost 17% (Global) have been achieved for cells fabricated by sputter depositing In{sub 2}O{sub 3}(IO) alone, strongly suggesting that the Sn may not be an essential part of type conversion. In this work, a variety of electrical and optical techniques has been used to assess the changes at the ITO/InP and IO/InP interfaces. From these, it is concluded that several mechanisms, including passivation of acceptors by hydrogen and sputter damage,'' occur simultaneously. This analysis suggests several directions for further improvement of these devices.

Gessert, T.A.; Li, X.; Wanlass, M.W.; Nelson, A.J.; Coutts, T.J. (Solar Energy Research Institute, Golden, CO (USA))

1990-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Enhancement of conduction noise absorption by hybrid absorbers composed of indium-tin-oxide thin film and magnetic composite sheet on a microstrip line  

SciTech Connect

In order to develop wide-band noise absorbers with a focused design for low frequency performance, this study investigates hybrid absorbers that are composed of conductive indium-tin-oxide (ITO) thin film and magnetic composite sheets. The ITO films prepared via reactive sputtering exhibit a typical value of electrical resistivity of ?10{sup ?4} ? m. Rubber composites with flaky Fe-Si-Al particles are used as the magnetic sheet with a high permeability and high permittivity. For the ITO film with a low surface resistance and covered by the magnetic sheet, approximately 90% power absorption can be obtained at 1?GHz, which is significantly higher than that of the original magnetic sheet or ITO film. The high power absorption of the hybrid absorber is attributed to the enhanced ohmic loss of the ITO film through increased electric field strength bounded by the upper magnetic composite sheet. However, for the reverse layering sequence of the ITO film, the electric field experienced by ITO film is very weak due to the electromagnetic shielding by the under layer of magnetic sheet, which does not result in enhanced power absorption.

Kim, Sun-Hong; Kim, Sung-Soo, E-mail: sskim@chungbuk.ac.kr [Department of Advanced Materials Engineering, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju 361-763 (Korea, Republic of)

2014-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

290

Pressure-induced phase transformations in alkali-metal hydrides calculated using an improved linear-muffin-tin-orbital–atomic-sphere-approximation energy scheme  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A scheme for the calculation of total energies from first principles is described which is intermediate between the popular linear muffin-tin-orbital method in the atomic-sphere approximation (LMTO-ASA) and an exact full-potential treatment. The local-density total energy is evaluated accurately for the output charge density from the ASA potential. This method is applied to the study of static structural properties and the pressure-induced phase transformation from B1 (NaCl-structure) to B2 (CsCl-structure) phases for the partially ionic alkaki-metal hydrides NaH and KH and the alkali halide NaCl. Good agreement with experimental transition pressures and volumes is obtained. The series NaH, KH, and NaCl shows the observed strong cation and weak anion dependence. Charge densities and band structures are given at zero and high pressure. Calculated energy-volume curves for LiH show no transition up to 1 Mbar, in agreement with experimental data.

C. O. Rodriguez and M. Methfessel

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Identification of Strategies to Leverage Public and Private Resources for National Security Workforce Development  

SciTech Connect

This report documents the identification of strategies to leverage public and private resources for the development of an adequate national security workforce as part of the National Security Preparedness Project (NSPP).There are numerous efforts across the United States to develop a properly skilled and trained national security workforce. Some of these efforts are the result of the leveraging of public and private dollars. As budget dollars decrease and the demand for a properly skilled and trained national security workforce increases, it will become even more important to leverage every education and training dollar. The leveraging of dollars serves many purposes. These include increasing the amount of training that can be delivered and therefore increasing the number of people reached, increasing the number and quality of public/private partnerships, and increasing the number of businesses that are involved in the training of their future workforce.

None

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

PINS Testing and Modification for Explosive Identification  

SciTech Connect

The INL's Portable Isotopic Neutron Spectroscopy System (PINS)1 non-intrusively identifies the chemical fill of munitions and sealed containers. PINS is used routinely by the U.S. Army, the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, and foreign military units to determine the contents of munitions and other containers suspected to contain explosives, smoke-generating chemicals, and chemical warfare agents such as mustard and nerve gas. The objects assayed with PINS range from softball-sized M139 chemical bomblets to 200 gallon DOT 500X ton containers. INL had previously examined2 the feasibility of using a similar system for the identification of explosives, and based on this proof-of-principle test, the development of a dedicated system for the identification of explosives in an improvised nuclear device appears entirely feasible. INL has been tasked by NNSA NA-42 Render Safe Research and Development with the development of such a system.

E.H. Seabury; A.J. Caffrey

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Company number 5857955 Wellcome Trust Finance plc  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Company number 5857955 Wellcome Trust Finance plc Annual Report and Financial Statements Year ended 30 September 2013 #12;Company number 5857955 Wellcome Trust Finance plc Contents Page Directors Trust Finance plc Directors' Report For the year ended 30 September 2013 Report of the Directors

Rambaut, Andrew

294

Company number 5857955 Wellcome Trust Finance plc  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Company number 5857955 Wellcome Trust Finance plc Annual Report and Financial Statements Year ended 30 September 2012 #12;Company number 5857955 Wellcome Trust Finance plc Contents Page Directors Trust Finance plc Directors' Report for the year ended 30 September 2012 Report of the Directors

Rambaut, Andrew

295

GENERAL CHEMISTRY TEXTBOOK LIST ISBN Number  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

FALL 2013 GENERAL CHEMISTRY TEXTBOOK LIST Course Number ISBN Number Title of Text and/or Material Edition Author Publishers 11100 978-1-2591-9687-4 Introduction to Chemistry, 3rd ed. (packaged w 978-1-2591-6192-6 Chemistry, The Molecular Nature of Matter and Change, 6e (packaged w

Jiang, Wen

296

High speed optical quantum random number generation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

High speed optical quantum random number generation Martin F¨urst1,2,, Henning Weier1,2, Sebastian, ready-for-use quantum random number generator (QRNG) whose stochastic model is based on the ran- domness directly delivered to a PC, generated at a rate of up to 50 Mbit/s, clearly pass all tests relevant

Weinfurter, Harald

297

Cascade Training Technique for Particle Identification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The cascade training technique which was developed during our work on the MiniBooNE particle identification has been found to be a very efficient way to improve the selection performance, especially when very low background contamination levels are desired. The detailed description of this technique is presented here based on the MiniBooNE detector Monte Carlo simulations, using both artifical neural networks and boosted decision trees as examples.

Yong Liu; Ion Stancu

2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

298

Compare Activities by Number of Computers  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Number of Computers Number of Computers Compare Activities by ... Number of Computers Office buildings contained the most computers per square foot, followed by education and outpatient health care buildings. Education buildings were the only type with more than one computer per employee. Religious worship and food sales buildings had the fewest computers per square foot. Percent of All Computers by Building Type Figure showing percent of all computers by building type. If you need assistance viewing this page, please call 202-586-8800. Computer Data by Building Type Number of Buildings (thousand) Total Floorspace (million square feet) Number of Employees (thousand) Total Computers (thousand) Computers per Million Square Feet Computers per Thousand Employees All Buildings 4,657

299

RCRA Permit for a Hazardous Waste Management Facility, Permit Number NEV HW0101, Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the EPA identification number of each generator from which the Permittee received a waste stream, a description and quantity of each waste stream in tons and cubic feet received at the facility, the method of treatment, storage, and/or disposal for each waste stream, a description of the waste minimization efforts undertaken, a description of the changes in volume and toxicity of waste actually received, any unusual occurrences, and the results of tank integrity assessments. This Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report is prepared in accordance with Section 2.13.3 of Permit Number NEV HW0101.

Arnold, Patrick [NSTec] [NSTec

2014-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

300

PERSONAL INFORMATION BANK (PIB) IDENTIFICATION FORM A personal information bank is a collection of personal information that is organized or retrievable by the name of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PERSONAL INFORMATION BANK (PIB) IDENTIFICATION FORM A personal information bank is a collection of personal information that is organized or retrievable by the name of an individual or by an identifying and Use of Information: Users of Information: Location of PIB Department: Room Number: Information

Seldin, Jonathan P.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identification number tin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

* Corresponding author. : Primary student contributor. Folding-aware and Structure-conscious 3D Substructures in Folding Data: Identification and Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

employed by biologists to study the protein folding problem. Such simulations have resulted in a large number of protein folding trajectories, each of which consists of a sequence of three, and cross-trajectory comparison. Key Words: protein folding trajectories, 3D substructure identification

Yang, Hui

302

Stockpile Stewardship Quarterly Volume 1, Number 4  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

1, Number 4 * February 2012 1, Number 4 * February 2012 Message from the Assistant Deputy Administrator for Stockpile Stewardship, Chris Deeney Defense Programs Stockpile Stewardship in Action Volume 1, Number 4 Inside this Issue 2 Applying Advanced Simulation Models to Neutron Tube Ion Extraction 3 Advanced Optical Cavities for Subcritical and Hydrodynamic Experiments 5 Progress Toward Ignition on the National Ignition Facility 7 Commissioning URSA Minor: The First LTD-Based Accelerator for Radiography 8 Publication Highlights 9 2011 NNSA Stewardship Science Graduate Fellowship Class S tockpile Stewardship Science is not for wimps, and

303

> REPLACE THIS LINE WITH YOUR PAPER IDENTIFICATION NUMBER (DOUBLE-CLICK HERE TO EDIT) vs. Sensory, Input-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Comparison of Local vs. Sensory, Input- Driven, Wide Area Reactive Power Control Jonathan W. Stahlhut, Member. J. W. Stahlhut is with the Electrical Engineering Department, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ, 85287 USA (e-mail: jonathan.stahlhut@asu.edu). G. T. Heydt is with the Electrical Engineering Department

304

> REPLACE THIS LINE WITH YOUR PAPER IDENTIFICATION NUMBER (DOUBLE-CLICK HERE TO EDIT) green-networking is raising  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- Research in the field of green-networking is raising more and more interest, in particular driven by energy or management strategies for greening the Internet relies on an initial study of the energy consumption consumption, Router, Wattmeter, energy saving, Internet greening, Green Internet management I. INTRODUCTION

Boyer, Edmond

305

> REPLACE THIS LINE WITH YOUR PAPER IDENTIFICATION NUMBER (DOUBLE-CLICK HERE TO EDIT) green-networking is raising  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- Research in the field of green-networking is raising more and more interest, in particular driven by energy saving purposes. Recent research dealt on one hand to design new mechanisms to reduce the energy consumed in a network device and a second to establish protocols which take into account the energy profile

Boyer, Edmond

306

> REPLACE THIS LINE WITH YOUR PAPER IDENTIFICATION NUMBER (DOUBLE-CLICK HERE TO EDIT) system operations is a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-- The maintenance of secure system operations is a highly challenging task that becomes even more complex system operations and the performance of the electricity markets. Such a characterization allows the development of an integrated analytic approach to quantify the economics of secure power system operations

Gross, George

307

Stable Isotope, Site-Specific Mass Tagging For Protein Identification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Stable Isotope, Site-Specific Mass Tagging For Protein Stable Isotope, Site-Specific Mass Tagging For Protein Identification Stable Isotope, Site-Specific Mass Tagging For Protein Identification Proteolytic peptide mass mapping as measured by mass spectrometry provides an important method for the identification of proteins, which are usually identified by matching the measured and calculated m/z values of the proteolytic peptides. Available for thumbnail of Feynman Center (505) 665-9090 Email Stable Isotope, Site-Specific Mass Tagging For Protein Identification Proteolytic peptide mass mapping as measured by mass spectrometry provides an important method for the identification of proteins, which are usually identified by matching the measured and calculated m/z values of the proteolytic peptides. A unique identification is, however, heavily

308

Notes 15. Identification of parameters in mechanical systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Notes 15. Identification of bearing force coefficients. ? Dr. Luis San Andr?s (2008) 1 Handout # 15 (MEEN 617) Application example Experimental identification of bearing force coefficients Consider a test bearing or seal element as a point mass... for your self-study and further learning. References Diaz, S., and L. San Andr?s, 1999, "A Method for Identification of Bearing Force Coefficients and its Application to a Squeeze Film Damper with a Bubbly Lubricant,? STLE Tribology Transactions...

San Andres, Luis

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Climate Zone Number 1 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Zone Number 1 Climate Zone Number 1 Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard. Climate Zone Number 1 is defined as Very Hot - Humid(1A) with IP Units 9000 < CDD50ºF and SI Units 5000 < CDD10ºC Dry(1B) with IP Units 9000 < CDD50ºF and SI Units 5000 < CDD10ºC . The following places are categorized as class 1 climate zones: Broward County, Florida Hawaii County, Hawaii Honolulu County, Hawaii Kalawao County, Hawaii Kauai County, Hawaii Maui County, Hawaii Miami-Dade County, Florida Monroe County, Florida Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Climate_Zone_Number_1&oldid=21604" Category: ASHRAE Climate Zones What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties

310

What's Behind the Numbers? | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

What's Behind the Numbers? What's Behind the Numbers? What's Behind the Numbers? June 24, 2011 - 3:39pm Addthis What's Behind the Numbers? Dr. Richard Newell Dr. Richard Newell What does this mean for me? New website shows data on the why's, when's and how's of crude oil prices. Among the most visible prices that consumers may see on a daily basis are the ones found on the large signs at the gasoline stations alongside our streets and highways. The biggest single factor affecting gasoline prices is the cost of crude oil, the main raw material for gasoline production, which accounts for well over half the price of gasoline at the pump. But what is behind the price of crude oil? This week the U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) launched a new web-based assessment highlighting key factors that can affect crude oil

311

REFINED BOUNDS ON THE NUMBER OF CONNECTED ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nov 6, 2011 ... closure imply using the well-known Smith inequality (see Theorem 2.4) a bound on the number of semi-algebraically connected components of ...

2011-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

312

Analytical number-projected BCS nuclear model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Transforming both the overlap energy kernel and overlap functionals into polynomial forms, the well-known integral of the number-projected BCS theory is performed analytically. We then obtain the projected ground state BCS energy in the closed form.

Mauro Kyotoku

1988-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Regulation of Numbers of Intracellular Algae  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Regulation of Numbers of Intracellular Algae L. Muscatine R. R. Pool Members of three classes of unicellular algae have exploited an intracellular habitat...is poorly understood. Steady-state algae:host cell ratios might be achieved by...

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Elastic tail propulsion at low Reynolds number  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A simple way to generate propulsion at low Reynolds number is to periodically oscillate a passive flexible filament. Here we present a macroscopic experimental investigation of such a propulsive mechanism. A robotic swimmer ...

Yu, Tony S. (Tony Sheung)

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Utility Priority Number Evaluation for FMEA  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Traditionally, decisions on how to improve an operation are based on risk priority number (RPN) in the failure mode and effects analysis (FMEA). Many scholars questioned the RPN method ... make a decision on impr...

Jih Kuang Chen

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Baryon number violation in particle decays  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

It has been argued in the past that in baryogenesis via out-of-equilibrium decays one must consider loop diagrams that contain more than one baryon number violating coupling. In this paper we argue that the requirement with regard to baryon number violating couplings in loop diagrams is that the interaction between the intermediate on-shell particles and the final particles should correspond to a net change in baryon number and that this can be satisfied even if the loop diagram contains only one baryon number violating coupling. Put simply, we show that to create a baryon asymmetry there should be net B violation to the right of the “cut” in the loop diagram. This is of relevance to some works involving the out-of-equilibrium decay scenario.

Rathin Adhikari and Raghavan Rangarajan

2002-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

317

Implementation of a Distributed Pseudorandom Number Generator  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In parallel Monte Carlo simulations, it is highly desirable to have a system of pseudo-random number generators that has good statistical properties and allows ... processes. In this work, we discuss a distributed

Jian Chen; Paula Whitlock

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Entropy of pseudo-random-number generators  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Since the work of Ferrenberg et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 69, 3382 (1992)] some pseudo-random-number generators are known to yield wrong results in cluster Monte Carlo simulations. In this contribution the fundamental mechanism behind this failure is discussed. Almost all random-number generators calculate a new pseudo-random-number xi from preceding values, xi=f(xi?1,xi?2,…,xi?q). Failure of these generators in cluster Monte Carlo simulations and related experiments can be attributed to the low entropy of the production rule f() conditioned on the statistics of the input values xi?1,…,xi?q. Being a measure only of the arithmetic operations in the generator rule, the conditional entropy is independent of the lag in the recurrence or the period of the sequence. In that sense it measures a more profound quality of a random-number generator than empirical tests with their limited horizon.

Stephan Mertens and Heiko Bauke

2004-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

319

Algorithms for Algebraic Number Theory II  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We now leave the realm of quadratic fields where the main computational tasks of algebraic number theory mentioned at the end of Chapter 4 were relatively simple (although as we have seen many conjectures rema...

Henri Cohen

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

Bridge Numbers of Torus Knots Jennifer Schultens  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

contained proof of the following result of H. Schubert: If K is a (p, q)-torus knot, then the bridge number below all maxima of h|K, then we say that K is in bridge position with respect to h. The bridge number of whether or not we require K to be in bridge position. Indeed, if h|K has n maxima, then the maxima of h

Schultens, Jennifer

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identification number tin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Parametrized linear muffin-tin orbitals atomic-sphere approximation tight-binding scheme: The electronic structure of MoRu alloys  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper we use the recursion method and a linear muffin-tin orbital atomic-sphere approximation (LMTO-ASA) tight-binding (TB) Hamiltonian taken to first order in E-E?, to obtain the electronic structure of Mo-Ru compounds and amorphous clusters of Mo1-xRux for several values of x. It is well known that the LMTO-ASA-TB formalism treats s, p, and d orbitals in an equivalent manner. Therefore it allows the inclusion of important effects, such as the splitting of the center of the bands due to local environment and s-p-d hybridization. These effects are often neglected in the usual parametrized tight-binding Hamiltonians. The LMTO-ASA-TB Hamiltonian used here is parametrized in the sense that potential parameters for the pure metals were used in the calculations and the relative position of the bands in the binaries was adjusted by imposing approximate charge neutrality. But the parametrization is based on a solid theoretical background and no fitting to more exact first-principles calculations is needed. In this paper we show that for the Mo-Ru compounds, a simple parametrized LMTO-ASA-TB Hamiltonian produces good results, when compared to independent first-principles, self-consistent augmented-spherical-wave k-space calculations. We also use the parametrized LMTO-ASA-TB Hamiltonian to obtain the electronic structure of amorphous Mo1-xRux alloys for several values of x. We show that, for these alloys, the density of states at the Fermi level, N(EF), tends to decrease as the Ru concentration increases. This is in agreement with observed experimental tendencies. We note that when the splitting of band centers and s-p-d hybridization are neglected in the calculations, the trends are reversed, with N(EF) increasing as the Ru concentration increases. This illustrates the importance of taking these effects into account.

Sandra Ferreira; Jaime Duarte; Jr.; Sonia Frota-Pessa

1990-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

322

Chemical kinetics of cetane number improving agents  

SciTech Connect

The increasing demand for diesel fuels has resulted in the use of greater percentage of cracked distillates having poor ignition properties. The ignition properties of diesel fuels can be rated in terms of their cetane number and diesel fuels having low cetane number may have poor ignition properties such as diesel knock, difficulties to start engines in the cold weather and so on. Such diesel fuels need cetane number improving agents. In the 1940s and 1950s alkyl nitrates, alkyl nitrites and organic peroxides were found to be effective cetane number improving additives. Our recent study suggests that free radicals produced from thermal decomposition just before ignition should have an important role to improve their ignition properties. However no studies on the reaction mechanism for improving effect of these additives have been attempted because of complex nature of spontaneous ignition reaction of hydrocarbons. In order to clarify the reaction mechanism for improving effects of cetane number improving agents. We here have attempted to simulate the spontaneous ignition of n-butane as a model compound in the presence of alkyl nitrites as cetane number improving agents.

Hashimoto, K.; Akutsu, Y.; Arai, M.; Tamura, M. [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

323

Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

- Resource Procurement and Identification - Resource Procurement and Identification Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home GEA Development Phase I: Resource Procurement and Identification GEA Development Phases The Geothermal Energy Association's (GEA) Geothermal Reporting Terms and Definitions are a guideline for geothermal developers to use when submitting geothermal resource development information to GEA for public dissemination in its annual US Geothermal Power Production and Development Update. GEA's Geothermal Reporting Terms and Definitions serve to increase the consistency, accuracy, and reliability of industry information presented in the development updates. Phase I - Resource Procurement and Identification Phase II - Resource Exploration and Confirmation Phase III - Permitting and Initial Development

324

Identification and Characterization of Near-Term Direct Hydrogen...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Characterization of Near-Term Direct Hydrogen Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Markets Identification and Characterization of Near-Term Direct Hydrogen Proton Exchange...

325

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternatives identification preconceptual...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

(FIRE) Collection: Plasma Physics and Fusion 51 A Framework for an HSI Downselection Tool Phillip M. Cunio Summary: Tool identification Tool scores Tool database Rating weights...

326

Introduction Compound-specific identification, or biomarker analysis,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

269 Introduction Compound-specific identification, or biomarker analysis, in organic geochemistry cases highlighting subtle yet important details not revealed by bulk analyses alone. For example

Long, Bernard

327

Modeling and online parameter identification methods for Electrohydraulic Valvetrain Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

bulk modulus which is dependent on pressure and temperature [29], which vary during operation we create an on-line parameter identification

Gray, James

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Chapter 31 Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste (Kentucky)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

This administrative regulation establishes the general provisions necessary for identification and listing of a hazardous waste. The regulation also establishes the criteria for identifying the...

329

Seismic damage identification for steel structures using distributed fiber optics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A distributed fiber optic monitoring methodology based on optic time domain reflectometry technology is developed for seismic damage identification of steel structures. Epoxy with a...

Hou, Shuang; Cai, C S; Ou, Jinping

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Identification of high angle structures controlling the geothermal...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

high angle structures controlling the geothermal system at Rye Patch, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Identification of...

331

New active set identification for general constrained optimization ...  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Wright [5] used a hybrid geometric-algebraic viewpoint and considered convex ... Oberlin and Wright [13] focused on identification schemes that do not require ...

2014-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

332

Identification of host response signatures of infection.  

SciTech Connect

Biological weapons of mass destruction and emerging infectious diseases represent a serious and growing threat to our national security. Effective response to a bioattack or disease outbreak critically depends upon efficient and reliable distinguishing between infected vs healthy individuals, to enable rational use of scarce, invasive, and/or costly countermeasures (diagnostics, therapies, quarantine). Screening based on direct detection of the causative pathogen can be problematic, because culture- and probe-based assays are confounded by unanticipated pathogens (e.g., deeply diverged, engineered), and readily-accessible specimens (e.g., blood) often contain little or no pathogen, particularly at pre-symptomatic stages of disease. Thus, in addition to the pathogen itself, one would like to detect infection-specific host response signatures in the specimen, preferably ones comprised of nucleic acids (NA), which can be recovered and amplified from tiny specimens (e.g., fingerstick draws). Proof-of-concept studies have not been definitive, however, largely due to use of sub-optimal sample preparation and detection technologies. For purposes of pathogen detection, Sandia has developed novel molecular biology methods that enable selective isolation of NA unique to, or shared between, complex samples, followed by identification and quantitation via Second Generation Sequencing (SGS). The central hypothesis of the current study is that variations on this approach will support efficient identification and verification of NA-based host response signatures of infectious disease. To test this hypothesis, we re-engineered Sandia's sophisticated sample preparation pipelines, and developed new SGS data analysis tools and strategies, in order to pioneer use of SGS for identification of host NA correlating with infection. Proof-of-concept studies were carried out using specimens drawn from pathogen-infected non-human primates (NHP). This work provides a strong foundation for large-scale, highly-efficient efforts to identify and verify infection-specific host NA signatures in human populations.

Branda, Steven S.; Sinha, Anupama; Bent, Zachary

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Obtaining material identification with cosmic ray radiography  

SciTech Connect

The passage of muons through matter is dominated by the Coulomb interaction with electrons and nuclei in the matter. The muon interaction with the electrons leads to continuous energy loss and stopping of the muons. The muon interaction with nuclei leads to angular diffusion. Using both stopped muons and angle diffusion interactions allows us to determine density and identify materials. Here we demonstrate material identification using data taken at Los Alamos with a particle tracker built from a set of sealed drift tubes with commercial electronics and software, the Mini Muon Tracker (MMT).

Morris, C. L.; Borozdin, Konstantin; Bacon, Jeffrey; Chen, Elliott; Lukic, Zarija; Milner, Edward; Miyadera, Haruo; Perry, John [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Schwellenbach, Dave; Aberle, Derek; Dreesen, Wendi; Green, J. Andrew; McDuff, George G. [National Security Technologies, Los Alamos, NM 87544 (United States); Nagamine, Kanetada [KEK, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-0801 (Japan); RIKEN, Wako, Saitama, 351-0198 (Japan) and UC-Riverside, CA 92521 (United States); Sossong, Michael [Decision Sciences, 12345 First American Way, Suite 130, Poway, CA 92064 (United States); Spore, Candace; Toleman, Nathan [Department of Chemical and Nuclear Engineering, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131-0001 (United States)

2012-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

334

Localization and identification of corona forms  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, the detection of a corona effect based on phase-resolved images is studied. An advanced method for localization and identification of defects occurring in high voltage (HV) overhead lines and substation power equipment is presented. Under the laboratory conditions phase-resolved images of discharges, generated at certain spots within the HV transmission line, were registered. Those spots represented defects existing in the real environment and they were sources of additional corona discharges. Results indicated that phase-resolved images of corona interference are well correlated to a special kind of defect occurring within the HV overhead lines, as well as within substation power equipment.

Barbara Florkowska; Pawel Zydron; Marek Florkowski

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Climate Zone Number 7 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Climate Zone Number 7 Climate Zone Number 7 Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard. Climate Zone Number 7 is defined as Very Cold with IP Units 9000 < HDD65ºF ≤ 12600 and SI Units 5000 < HDD18ºC ≤ 7000 . The following places are categorized as class 7 climate zones: Aitkin County, Minnesota Aleutians East Borough, Alaska Aleutians West Census Area, Alaska Anchorage Borough, Alaska Aroostook County, Maine Ashland County, Wisconsin Baraga County, Michigan Barnes County, North Dakota Bayfield County, Wisconsin Becker County, Minnesota Beltrami County, Minnesota Benson County, North Dakota Bottineau County, North Dakota Bristol Bay Borough, Alaska Burke County, North Dakota Burnett County, Wisconsin Carlton County, Minnesota Cass County, Minnesota

336

SPRNG Parallel Random Number Generators at NERSC  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SPRNG SPRNG SPRNG Description The SPRNG libraries of generators produce good quality random numbers, and are also fast. They have been subjected to some of the largest random number tests, with around 10^13 RNs per test. SPRNG provides both FORTRAN and C (also C++) interfaces for the use of the parallel random number generators. Access SPRNG v2.0 is available on Carver (gcc, intel and pgi) and Cray systems (pgi and cce). Use the module utility to load the software. module load sprng Using SPRNG On Cray systems: ftn sprng_test.F $SPRNG -lsprng On Carver: mpif90 sprng_test.F $SPRNG -lsprng Documentation On Carver there are various documents in $SPRNG/DOCS and various examples in $SPRNG/EXAMPLES. See the SPRNG web site at Florida State University for complete details. For help using SPRNG at NERSC contact the

337

Microsoft Word - Document Numbering Plan.doc  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

document Number Plan 11/3/2005 document Number Plan 11/3/2005 All documents numbers start with a 9 9 _ _ ___ | | | | | Document per chart | Generation (i.e. PSS has 1,2&3, FEEPS has 1&2) Use 0 when the document doesn't apply to any of these System 0- Non system Specific (group wide) 1- PSS 2- Reserved for PSS expansion 3- FEEPS 4- Reserved for FEEPS expansion 5- BLEPS 6- Reserved for BLEPS expansion 7- DIW 8- Reserved for future use 9- Reserved for future use 000-099 Requirements 000 - Statement of work For x.1.4.1.4 - Design Statement of Work For Beamlines - Installation Statement of Work 001-009 Reserved for Statement of Works for upgrade, revisions, add-ons, etc. 010 - Cost Estimate 011-019 Additional Cost Estimates

338

Notices OMB Control Number: 1850-0803.  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

870 Federal Register 870 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 140 / Monday, July 22, 2013 / Notices OMB Control Number: 1850-0803. Type of Review: Extension without change of an existing collection of information. Respondents/Affected Public: Individuals or households. Total Estimated Number of Annual Responses: 135,000. Total Estimated Number of Annual Burden Hours: 27,000. Abstract: This is a request for a 3-year renewal of the generic clearance to allow the National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) to continue to develop, test, and improve its survey and assessment instruments and methodologies. The procedures utilized to this effect include but are not limited to experiments with levels of incentives for various types of survey operations, focus groups, cognitive laboratory

339

Number Counts and Dynamical Vacuum Cosmologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study non-linear structure formation in an interacting model of the dark sector of the Universe in which the dark energy density decays linearly with the Hubble parameter, $\\rho_{\\Lambda} \\propto H$, leading to a constant-rate creation of cold dark matter. We derive all relevant expressions to calculate the mass function and the cluster number density using the Sheth-Torman formalism and show that the effect of the interaction process is to increase the number of bound structures of large masses ($M \\gtrsim 10^{14} M_{\\odot}h^{-1}$) when compared to the standard $\\Lambda$CDM model. Since these models are not reducible to each other, this number counts signature can in principle be tested in future surveys.

N. Chandrachani Devi; H. A. Borges; S. Carneiro; J. S. Alcaniz

2014-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

340

Number Counts and Dynamical Vacuum Cosmologies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study non-linear structure formation in an interacting model of the dark sector of the Universe in which the dark energy density decays linearly with the Hubble parameter, $\\rho_{\\Lambda} \\propto H$, leading to a constant-rate creation of cold dark matter. We derive all relevant expressions to calculate the mass function and the cluster number density using the Sheth-Torman formalism and show that the effect of the interaction process is to increase the number of bound structures of large masses ($M \\gtrsim 10^{14} M_{\\odot}h^{-1}$) when compared to the standard $\\Lambda$CDM model. Since these models are not reducible to each other, this number counts signature can in principle be tested in future surveys.

Devi, N Chandrachani; Carneiro, S; Alcaniz, J S

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identification number tin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Climate Zone Number 3 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Number 3 Number 3 Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard. Climate Zone Number 3 is defined as Warm - Humid(3A) with IP Units 4500 < CDD50ºF ≤ 6300 and SI Units 2500 < CDD10ºC < 3500 Dry(3B) with IP Units 4500 < CDD50ºF ≤ 6300 and SI Units 2500 < CDD10ºC < 3500 Warm - Marine(3C) with IP Units CDD50ºF ≤ 4500 AND HDD65ºF ≤ 3600 and SI Units CDD10ºC ≤ 2500 AND HDD18ºC ≤ 2000 . The following places are categorized as class 3 climate zones: Abbeville County, South Carolina Adair County, Oklahoma Adams County, Mississippi Aiken County, South Carolina Alameda County, California Alcorn County, Mississippi Alfalfa County, Oklahoma Allendale County, South Carolina Amite County, Mississippi Anderson County, South Carolina

342

WEATHER, p. 2 Volume 132, Number 18 Friday, April 13, 2012  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

°f | 45°f Partly cloudy SAT: 69°f | 53°f Partly cloudy SuN: 72°f | 57°f Chance of showers puTIN, ROuNd THREE How did Putin get elected a third time? opinion, p. 5 HOW dId THE COSmOS START? Impey's new guide

343

Probing lepton number violation on three frontiers  

SciTech Connect

Neutrinoless double beta decay constitutes the main probe for lepton number violation at low energies, motivated by the expected Majorana nature of the light but massive neutrinos. On the other hand, the theoretical interpretation of the (non-)observation of this process is not straightforward as the Majorana neutrinos can destructively interfere in their contribution and many other New Physics mechanisms can additionally mediate the process. We here highlight the potential of combining neutrinoless double beta decay with searches for Tritium decay, cosmological observations and LHC physics to improve the quantitative insight into the neutrino properties and to unravel potential sources of lepton number violation.

Deppisch, Frank F. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University College London (United Kingdom)

2013-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

344

NEW DIRECTIONS IN RADIOISOTOPE SPECTRUM IDENTIFICATION  

SciTech Connect

Recent studies have found the performance of commercial handheld detectors with automatic RIID software to be less than acceptable. Previously, we have explored approaches rooted in speech processing such as cepstral features and information-theoretic measures. Scientific advances are often made when researchers identify mathematical or physical commonalities between different fields and are able to apply mature techniques or algorithms developed in one field to another field which shares some of the same challenges. The authors of this paper have identified similarities between the unsolved problems faced in gamma-spectroscopy for automated radioisotope identification and the challenges of the much larger body of research in speech processing. Our research has led to a probabilistic framework for describing and solving radioisotope identification problems. Many heuristic approaches to classification in current use, including for radioisotope classification, make implicit probabilistic assumptions which are not clear to the users and, if stated explicitly, might not be considered desirable. Our framework leads to a classification approach with demonstrable improvements using standard feature sets on proof-of-concept simulated and field-collected data.

Salaymeh, S.; Jeffcoat, R.

2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

345

Comparison of four procedures for the identification of hybrid systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparison of four procedures for the identification of hybrid systems A.Lj. Juloski1 , W.niessen@nyquist.com Abstract. In this paper we compare four recently proposed procedures for the identification of PieceWise AutoRegressive eXogenous (PWARX) and switched ARX models. We consider the clustering-based procedure

346

Adaptive control based on neural network system identification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In adaptive control and system identification the self tuning regulator has wide range of applications. Neural network and artificial intelligence have big role in this area. This paper presents adaptive neural network control based on self tuning regulator ... Keywords: adaptive control, neural network, neuro control, self tuning regulator, system identification

Hassan E. A. Ibrahim

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

A METHODOLOGY FOR IDENTIFICATION OF NARMAX MODELS APPLIED TO DIESEL  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A METHODOLOGY FOR IDENTIFICATION OF NARMAX MODELS APPLIED TO DIESEL ENGINES 1 Gianluca Zito ,2 Ioan is illustrated by means of an automotive case study, namely a variable geometry turbocharged diesel engine identification procedure is illustrated. In section 3 a diesel engine system, used to test the procedure

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

348

Graphical language for identification of control strategies allowing Demand Response  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Graphical language for identification of control strategies allowing Demand Response David DA SILVA. This will allow the identification of the electric appliance availability for demand response control strategies to be implemented in terms of demand response for electrical appliances. Introduction An important part

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

349

Copyright 1997 Carnegie Mellon University Gas Identification System using  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Copyright © 1997 Carnegie Mellon University Gas Identification System using Graded Temperature are observed. Emphasis is on identification, since quantitation of identified mixtures is straightforward by the sensor bulk is decreased. Thus if an SnO2 sensor is ramped through an appropriate temperature range

Siegel, Mel

350

Horse Theft Awareness and Prevention - Identification of Horses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of advertising. Permanent Identif_ication of Horses L-5211 7-98 Pete Gibbs, Leman H. Wall and Doug Householder* *Professor and Extension Horse Specialist, Extension Assistant-Animal Science/4-H and Professor and Extension Horse Spe- cialist; The Texas A...

Gibbs, Pete G.; Wall, Leman H.; Householder, Doug

1998-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

351

Newborn Identification: Why and How? Prof. Dr. Daniel Weingaertner  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Universidade Federal do Paran´a - Brasil January, 23th 2009 D. Weingaertner (UFPR) Newborn Identification: Why and How? January, 23th 2009 1 / 29 #12;Brazil and Europe D. Weingaertner (UFPR) Newborn Identification: Why and How? January, 23th 2009 2 / 29 #12;Paran´a State in Brazil D. Weingaertner (UFPR) Newborn

352

Fast 3D Scanning for Biometric Identification and Verification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fast 3D Scanning for Biometric Identification and Verification June 2011 Authors Anselmo., & Chen, A. (2011). Fast 3D Scanning for Biometric Identification and Verification. (Prepared by RTI..................................................10 Summary and Findings for Integration of Imperceptible Structured Lighting and SIS's 3D Snapshot

McShea, Daniel W.

353

Weed Identification: Using Plant Structures as a Key  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Paul A. Baumann Professor and Extension W eed Specialist, The T exas A&M University System. B-6079 3-99 U si n g P lan t S t r u ct u r e s a s a Ke y W eed Identification: eed identification is necessary to the success of any...

Baumann, Paul A.

2002-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

354

Developing a SNP panel for forensic identification of individuals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Developing a SNP panel for forensic identification of individuals Kenneth K. Kidd a,*, Andrew J) are likely in the near future to have a fundamental role in forensics in both human identification www.elsevier.com/locate/forsciint Forensic Science International 164 (2006) 20­32 * Corresponding

Kidd, Kenneth

355

Forensic identification: the Island Problem and its generalisations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Forensic identification: the Island Problem and its generalisations Klaas Slooten and Ronald Meester April 26, 2010 Abstract In forensics it is a classical problem to determine, when a suspect by a likelihood ratio. Keywords: Island problem, Forensic identification, Weight of evidence, Posterior odds

Meester, Ronald

356

E-Print Network 3.0 - automatic identification system Sample...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Automatic2 Fingerprint Identification System (AFIS) in the 1960s. The use... -Finger Penetration Rate and ROC Variability for Automatic Fingerprint Identification Systems", in...

357

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessing radio-isotope identification...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

radio-isotope identification Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: assessing radio-isotope identification Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1...

358

Fault Identification in Doubly Fed Induction Generator Using FFT and Neural Networks  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents a fault identification system for doubly fed induction generator (DFIG). It considers cases of single phase ... with the PP to fault identification in the DFIG.

Marcelo Patrício de Santana…

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

359

Comparison of two audio fingerprinting algorithms for advertisement identification / van Nieuwenhuizen H.A.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Although the identification of humans by fingerprints is a well–known technique in practice, the identification of an audio sample by means of a technique called… (more)

Van Nieuwenhuizen, Heinrich Abrie

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Physical and Mathematical Description of Nuclear Weapons Identification System (NWIS) Signatures  

SciTech Connect

This report describes all time and frequency analysis parameters measured with the new Nuclear Weapons Identification System (NWIS) processor with three input channels: (1) the 252Cf source ionization chamber (2) a detection channel; and (3) a second detection channel for active measurements. An intuitive and physical description of the various functions is given as well as a brief mathematical description and a brief description of how the data are acquired. If the fill five channel capability is used, the number of functions increases in number but not in type. The parameters provided by this new NWIS processor can be divided into two general classes: time analysis signatures including multiplicities and frequency analysis signatures. Data from measurements with an 18.75 kg highly enriched uranium (93.2 wt 0/0, 235U) metai casting for storage are presented to illustrate the various time and frequency analysis parameters.

Mattingly, J.K.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Mullens, J.A.; Valentine, T.E.

1997-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identification number tin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Table B14. Number of Establishments in Building, Number of Buildings, 1999  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4. Number of Establishments in Building, Number of Buildings, 1999" 4. Number of Establishments in Building, Number of Buildings, 1999" ,"Number of Buildings (thousand)" ,"All Buildings","Number of Establishments in Building" ,,"One","Two to Five","Six to Ten","Eleven to Twenty","More than Twenty","Currently Unoccupied" "All Buildings ................",4657,3528,688,114,48,27,251 "Building Floorspace" "(Square Feet)" "1,001 to 5,000 ...............",2348,1897,272,"Q","Q","Q",164 "5,001 to 10,000 ..............",1110,802,222,17,"Q","Q","Q" "10,001 to 25,000 .............",708,506,121,51,12,"Q",17 "25,001 to 50,000 .............",257,184,33,15,15,"Q","Q"

362

Beamline Phone Numbers| Advanced Photon Source  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Interactive Map Interactive Map Beamlines Map Beamlines Directory Techniques Directory Sectors Directory Beamline Phone Numbers Status and Schedule Beamline Phone Numbers From on-site, dial 2, then a number listed below. From off-site, dial 630-252 and a number listed below. Sector 1 1-BM-A: 1701 1-BM-C: 5468 1-ID: 1801 Sector 2 2-BM: 1702 2-ID-B: 1628 2-ID-D: 1802 2-ID-E: 3711 Sector 3 3-ID: 1803 Sector 4 4-ID-C: 1704 4-ID-D: 1804 Sector 5 5-BM: 1705 5-ID: 1805 Sector 6 6-ID-B: 1806 6-ID-C: 1406 6-ID-D: 1606 Sector 7 7-ID-B: 1607 7-ID-C: 1707 7-ID-D: 1807 7-ID-E: 1207 Sector 8 8-ID-E: 1908 8-ID-I: 1808 Sector 9 9-BM-B: 1709 9-ID-B: 0349 9-ID-C: 1809 Column 95: 4705 Sector 10 10-BM-B: 6792 10-ID-B: 1710 Sector 11 11-BM-B: 5877 11-ID-B: 1711 11-ID-C: 1711 11-ID-D: 2162 Laser lab: 0379 Sector 12 12-BM-B: 0378 12-ID-B,C: 1712

363

March 2005 Number 238 CARBON CAPTURE AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

March 2005 Number 238 CARBON CAPTURE AND STORAGE (CCS) As part of the government's global strategy. This POSTnote discusses the potential of carbon capture and storage (CCS), a method of carbon sequestration2 stages: CO2 capture, transport and storage. CO2 capture Carbon capture is best applied to large

Mather, Tamsin A.

364

Colorado Number of Natural Gas Consumers  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

,606,602 1,622,434 1,634,587 1,645,716 1,659,808 1,672,312 1986-2013 Sales 1,634,582 1,645,711 1,659,803 1,672,307 1997-2013 Transported 5 5 5 5 1997-2013 Commercial Number of...

365

Report Number: _____________ UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Report Number: _____________ UNIVERSITY OF CONNECTICUT HEALTH CENTER EMPLOYEE SAFETY HAZARD REPORT health, life or property are to be reported by phone to "7777" on campus and "911" off campus. Employees are to use this form to report other hazards. The employee is then to distribute copies of this completed

Kim, Duck O.

366

Heat Transfer at Small Grashof Numbers  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...January 1957 research-article Heat Transfer at Small Grashof Numbers J. J...physical arguments suggest that the heat transfer from a body, immersed in a fluid...the problem is small. However, heat-transfer rates predicted in this fashion...

1957-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

Estimate octane numbers using an enhanced method  

SciTech Connect

An improved model, based on the Twu-Coon method, is not only internally consistent, but also retains the same level of accuracy as the previous model in predicting octanes of gasoline blends. The enhanced model applies the same binary interaction parameters to components in each gasoline cut and their blends. Thus, the enhanced model can blend gasoline cuts in any order, in any combination or from any splitting of gasoline cuts and still yield the identical value of octane number for blending the same number of gasoline cuts. Setting binary interaction parameters to zero for identical gasoline cuts during the blending process is not required. The new model changes the old model`s methodology so that the same binary interaction parameters can be applied between components inside a gasoline cut as are applied to the same components between gasoline cuts. The enhanced model is more consistent in methodology than the original model, but it has equal accuracy for predicting octane numbers of gasoline blends, and it has the same number of binary interaction parameters. The paper discusses background, enhancement of the Twu-Coon interaction model, and three examples: blend of 2 identical gasoline cuts, blend of 3 gasoline cuts, and blend of the same 3 gasoline cuts in a different order.

Twu, C.H.; Coon, J.E. [Simulation Sciences Inc., Brea, CA (United States)

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Student's Department: Course/Section Number  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Student's Department: Course/Section Number: Course Title: Instructor: Explanation of why coursework has not yet been completed: Description of coursework remaining to be completed: Graduate Student is Requested: Arts & Sciences Students: Shriver Hall 28 (Graduate Affairs and Admissions Office) Engineering

Weaver, Harold A. "Hal"

369

STUDENT HANDBOOK Table of Contents Page Number  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

STUDENT HANDBOOK Campus #12;Table of Contents Page Number Welcome 1 The School 1 Mission Statement Student Resources 8 Financial Aid and Funding Sources Writing Supports 9 Special Needs Computers Libraries RefWorks 10 Student Services 11 Administrative Information 14 Student ID, and Email Accounts U of R

Saskatchewan, University of

370

Connecticut Number of Natural Gas Consumers  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

487,320 489,349 490,185 494,970 504,138 513,492 1986-2013 Sales 489,380 494,065 503,241 512,110 1997-2013 Transported 805 905 897 1,382 1997-2013 Commercial Number of Consumers...

371

Volume 22, Number 2, 2014 ENGINEERING  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-users [2,3,4,5] reduce health risks [6,7,8], and mitigate the greenhouse gas impact of lighting techVolume 22, Number 2, 2014 LIGHT & ENGINEERING Znack Publishing House, Moscow ISSN 0236-2945 #12 Advisory Board: Lou Bedocs, Thorn Lighting Limited, United Kingdom Wout van Bommel, Philips Lighting

Jacobson, Arne

372

Idaho Number of Natural Gas Consumers  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

36,191 342,277 346,602 350,871 353,963 359,889 1987-2013 Sales 346,602 350,871 353,963 359,889 1997-2013 Commercial Number of Consumers 37,320 38,245 38,506 38,912 39,202 39,722...

373

Gorilla numbers doubled in the Congo  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... previously thought, according to a census of the northern regions of the Republic of the Congo. Led by the New-York-based Wildlife Conservation Society (WCS), the count found ... attributes the high numbers to successful management of protected areas in the Republic of the Congo, a food-rich habitat and the “remoteness and inaccessibility” of the region. The ...

2008-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

374

Paper Number (Assigned by IFPE Staff)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Paper Number (Assigned by IFPE Staff) Compressed Air Energy Storage for Offshore Wind Turbines pumped hydro, compressed air energy storage, a variety of battery chemistries, capacitors, flywheels of this paper, compressed air energy storage, is highly scalable, reasonably inexpensive, provides moderate ramp

Li, Perry Y.

375

The New Element Curium (Atomic Number 96)  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

Two isotopes of the element with atomic number 96 have been produced by the helium-ion bombardment of plutonium. The name curium, symbol Cm, is proposed for element 96. The chemical experiments indicate that the most stable oxidation state of curium is the III state.

Seaborg, G. T.; James, R. A.; Ghiorso, A.

1948-00-00T23:59:59.000Z

376

Quantum random-number generator based on a photon-number-resolving detector  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We demonstrated a high-efficiency quantum random number generator which takes inherent advantage of the photon number distribution randomness of a coherent light source. This scheme was realized by comparing the photon flux of consecutive pulses with a photon number resolving detector. The random bit generation rate could reach 2.4 MHz with a system clock of 6.0 MHz, corresponding to a random bit generation efficiency as high as 40%. The random number files passed all the stringent statistical tests.

Min Ren; E Wu; Yan Liang; Yi Jian; Guang Wu; Heping Zeng

2011-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

377

EMPLACEMENT GANTRY ITS STANDARDS IDENTIFICATION STUDY  

SciTech Connect

To date, the project has established ITS performance requirements for SSCs based on identification and categorization of event sequences that may result in a radiological release. These performance requirements are defined within the NSDB. Further, SSCs credited with performing safe functions are classified as ITS. In turn, perform confirmation for these SSCs is sought through the use of consensus code and standards. The purpose of this study is to identify applicable codes and standards for the WP Emplacement Gantry ITS SSCs. Further, this study will form the basis for selection and the extent of applicability of each code and standard. This study is based on the design development completed for LA only. Accordingly, identification of ITS SSCs beyond those defined within the NSDB are based on designs that may be subject to further development during detail design. Furthermore, several design alternatives may still be under consideration to satisfy certain safety functions, and that final selection will not be determined until further design development has occurred. Therefore, for completeness, throughout this study alternative designs currently under considered will be discussed. Further, the results of this study will be subject to evaluation as part of a follow-on GAP analysis study. Based on the results of this study the GAP analysis will evaluate each code and standard to ensure each ITS performance requirement is fully satisfied. When a performance requirement is not fully satisfied a ''gap'' is highlighted. Thereafter, the study will identify supplemental requirements to augment the code or standard to meet performance requirements. Further, the GAP analysis will identify non-standard areas of the design that will be subject to a Development Plan. Non-standard components and non-standard design configurations are defined as areas of the design that do not follow standard industry practices or codes and standards. Whereby, performance confirmation cannot be readily sought though use of consensus standards. The ITS codes and standards identified in this document were developed by the Yucca Mountain Project personnel from the Emplacement & Retrieval Project and are intended solely for the use of the Design and Engineering group in its work regarding the Emplacement and Retrieval system, specifically identification of Emplacement and Retrieval equipment codes and standards.

M. Voegele

2005-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

378

Betti Numbers, Spectral Sequences and Algorithms for computing them  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 Betti Numbers, Spectral Sequences and Algorithms for computing them Saugata Basu School on the number of connected components, Betti numbers etc. In terms of: #12;4 Complexity of Semi-algebraic Sets Uniform bounds on the number of connected components, Betti numbers etc. In terms of: The number

Basu, Saugata

379

Number Plastic Type Common Items Number of Items (tally) 1 polyethylene terephthalate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

End Time: Number Plastic Type Common Items Number of Items (tally) 1 polyethylene terephthalate and vegetable oil containers; ovenable food trays. 2 high density polyethylene Milk jugs, juice bottles; bleach, piping, candy wrappers 4 low density polyethylene Squeezable bottles; bread, frozen food, dry cleaning

Schladow, S. Geoffrey

380

Identification of Metal Reductases using Proteomic Analysis  

SciTech Connect

Central to the NABIR goal to develop the scientific basis for in situ remediation of radioactive contaminants is the fundamental understanding of microorganisms with dissimilatory metal reducing activity. In order to effectively exploit these bacteria, it is necessary to know which enzymes and pathways are involved. Additionally, it would be advantageous to understand the similarities and differences of these pathways across different bacteria for effective deployment in bioremediation, as well as to identify new microbes capable of such activities. Most approaches to identify these enzymes or enzyme complexes rely on biochemical purification to homogeneity with subsequent Nterminal sequencing of digested peptides. However, loss of activity before achieving purity often necessitates repetition of the entire process. Newly developed proteomics capabilities at PNNL allow for the identification of many proteins from a single sample through mass spectrometry analysis.

Lipton, Mary

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identification number tin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Aquifer Structure Identification Using Stochastic Inversion  

SciTech Connect

This study presents a stochastic inverse method for aquifer structure identification using sparse geophysical and hydraulic response data. The method is based on updating structure parameters from a transition probability model to iteratively modify the aquifer structure and parameter zonation. The method is extended to the adaptive parameterization of facies hydraulic parameters by including these parameters as optimization variables. The stochastic nature of the statistical structure parameters leads to nonconvex objective functions. A multi-method genetically adaptive evolutionary approach (AMALGAM-SO) was selected to perform the inversion given its search capabilities. Results are obtained as a probabilistic assessment of facies distribution based on indicator cokriging simulation of the optimized structural parameters. The method is illustrated by estimating the structure and facies hydraulic parameters of a synthetic example with a transient hydraulic response.

Harp, Dylan R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Dai, Zhenxue [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Wolfsberg, Andrew V [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vrugt, Jasper A [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Model Identification for Optimal Diesel Emissions Control  

SciTech Connect

In this paper we develop a model based con- troller for diesel emission reduction using system identification methods. Specifically, our method minimizes the downstream readings from a production NOx sensor while injecting a minimal amount of urea upstream. Based on the linear quadratic estimator we derive the closed form solution to a cost function that accounts for the case some of the system inputs are not controllable. Our cost function can also be tuned to trade-off between input usage and output optimization. Our approach performs better than a production controller in simulation. Our NOx conversion efficiency was 92.7% while the production controller achieved 92.4%. For NH3 conversion, our efficiency was 98.7% compared to 88.5% for the production controller.

Stevens, Andrew J.; Sun, Yannan; Song, Xiaobo; Parker, Gordon

2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

383

Photometric Identification of Cool White Dwarfs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the use of a narrow-band DDO51 filter for photometric identification of cool white dwarfs. We report photometric observations of 30 known cool white dwarfs with temperatures ranging from 10,000 K down to very cool temperatures (<3500 K). Follow-up spectroscopic observations of a sample of objects selected using this filter and our photometric observations show that DDO51 filter photometry can help select cool white dwarf candidates for follow-up multi--object spectroscopy by rejecting 65% of main sequence stars with the same broad--band colors as the cool white dwarfs. This technique is not selective enough to efficiently feed single--object spectrographs. We present the white dwarf cooling sequence using this filter. Our observations show that very cool white dwarfs form a sequence in the r-DDO vs. r-z color--color diagram and demonstrate that significant improvements are needed in white dwarf model atmospheres.

M. Kilic; D. E. Winget; Ted von Hippel; C. F. Claver

2004-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

384

Identification marking by means of laser peening  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The invention is a method and apparatus for marking components by inducing a shock wave on the surface that results in an indented (strained) layer and a residual compressive stress in the surface layer. One embodiment of the laser peenmarking system rapidly imprints, with single laser pulses, a complete identification code or three-dimensional pattern and leaves the surface in a state of deep residual compressive stress. A state of compressive stress in parts made of metal or other materials is highly desirable to make them resistant to fatigue failure and stress corrosion cracking. This process employs a laser peening system and beam spatial modulation hardware or imaging technology that can be setup to impress full three dimensional patterns into metal surfaces at the pulse rate of the laser, a rate that is at least an order of magnitude faster than competing marking technologies.

Hackel, Lloyd A. (Livermore, CA); Dane, C. Brent (Livermore, CA); Harris, Fritz (Rocklin, CA)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Muon Identification at ATLAS and CMS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Muonic final states will provide clean signatures formany physics processes at the LHC. The two LHC experiments ATLAS and CMS will be able to identify muons with a high reconstruction efficiency above 96% and a high transverse momentum resolution better than 2% for transverse momenta below 400 GeV/c and about 10% at 1 TeV/c. The two experiments follow complentary concepts of muon detection. ATLAS has an instrumented air-toroid mangetic system serving as a stand-alone muon spectrometer. CMS relies on high bending power and momentum resolution in the inner detector, and uses an iron yoke to increase its magnetic field. The iron yoke is instrumented with chambers used for muon identification. Therefore, muon momenta can only be reconstructed with high precision by combining inner-detector information with the data from the muon chambers.

Oliver Kortner

2007-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

386

Battling bird flu by the numbers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

May » May » Battling bird flu by the numbers Battling bird flu by the numbers Lab theorists have developed a mathematical tool that could help health experts and crisis managers determine in real time whether an emerging infectious disease such as avian influenza H5N1 is poised to spread globally. May 27, 2008 Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy sources, to plasma physics and new materials. Los Alamos National Laboratory sits on top of a once-remote mesa in northern New Mexico with the Jemez mountains as a backdrop to research and innovation covering multi-disciplines from bioscience, sustainable energy

387

Contractor: Contract Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Number: Number: Contract Type: Total Estimated Contract Cost: Performance Period Total Fee Earned FY2008 $2,550,203 FY2009 $39,646,446 FY2010 $64,874,187 FY2011 $66,253,207 FY2012 $41,492,503 FY2013 $0 FY2014 FY2015 FY2016 FY2017 FY2018 Cumulative Fee Earned $214,816,546 Fee Available $2,550,203 Minimum Fee $77,931,569 $69,660,249 Savannah River Nuclear Solutions LLC $458,687,779 $0 Maximum Fee Fee Information $88,851,963 EM Contractor Fee Site: Savannah River Site Office, Aiken, SC Contract Name: Management & Operating Contract September 2013 DE-AC09-08SR22470

388

Entanglement Distillation Protocols and Number Theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show that the analysis of entanglement distillation protocols for qudits of arbitrary dimension $D$ benefits from applying basic concepts from number theory, since the set $\\zdn$ associated to Bell diagonal states is a module rather than a vector space. We find that a partition of $\\zdn$ into divisor classes characterizes the invariant properties of mixed Bell diagonal states under local permutations. We construct a very general class of recursion protocols by means of unitary operations implementing these local permutations. We study these distillation protocols depending on whether we use twirling operations in the intermediate steps or not, and we study them both analitically and numerically with Monte Carlo methods. In the absence of twirling operations, we construct extensions of the quantum privacy algorithms valid for secure communications with qudits of any dimension $D$. When $D$ is a prime number, we show that distillation protocols are optimal both qualitatively and quantitatively.

H. Bombin; M. A. Martin-Delgado

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Entanglement distillation protocols and number theory  

SciTech Connect

We show that the analysis of entanglement distillation protocols for qudits of arbitrary dimension D benefits from applying basic concepts from number theory, since the set Z{sub D}{sup n} associated with Bell diagonal states is a module rather than a vector space. We find that a partition of Z{sub D}{sup n} into divisor classes characterizes the invariant properties of mixed Bell diagonal states under local permutations. We construct a very general class of recursion protocols by means of unitary operations implementing these local permutations. We study these distillation protocols depending on whether we use twirling operations in the intermediate steps or not, and we study them both analytically and numerically with Monte Carlo methods. In the absence of twirling operations, we construct extensions of the quantum privacy algorithms valid for secure communications with qudits of any dimension D. When D is a prime number, we show that distillation protocols are optimal both qualitatively and quantitatively.

Bombin, H.; Martin-Delgado, M.A. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica I, Universidad Complutense, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

2005-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

390

Case Numbers: TBH-0063, TBZ-0063  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

May 21, 2008 May 21, 2008 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Initial Agency Decision Motion To Dismiss Name of Case: Richard L. Urie Dates of Filing: May 15, 2007 July 19, 2007 Case Numbers: TBH-0063 TBZ-0063 This Decision concerns a Complaint filed by Richard L. Urie (hereinafter referred to as "Mr. Urie" or "the Complainant") against Los Alamos National Laboratory (hereinafter referred to as "LANL" or "the Respondent"), his former employer, under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor

391

On real number labelings and graph invertibility  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

For non-negative real x"0 and simple graph G, @l"x"""0","1(G) is the minimum span over all labelings that assign real numbers to the vertices of G such that adjacent vertices receive labels that differ by at least x"0 and vertices at distance two receive ... Keywords: ?-invertible, ?j,k-labeling, ?x,1-labeling, Distance-constrained labeling, Kneser graphs, Self-complementary graphs

Jeong-Ok Choi; John Georges; David Mauro; Yan Wang

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Laser interrogation of latent vehicle registration number  

SciTech Connect

A recent investigation involved automobile registration numbers as important evidentiary specimens. In California, as in most states, small, thin metallic decals are issued to owners of vehicles each year as the registration is renewed. The decals are applied directly to the license plate of the vehicle and typically on top of the previous year`s expired decal. To afford some degree of security, the individual registration decals have been designed to tear easily; they cannot be separated from each other, but can be carefully removed intact from the metal license plate by using a razor blade. In September 1993, the City of Livermore Police Department obtained a blue 1993 California decal that had been placed over an orange 1992 decal. The two decals were being investigated as possible evidence in a case involving vehicle registration fraud. To confirm the suspicion and implicate a suspect, the department needed to known the registration number on the bottom (completely covered) 1992 decal. The authors attempted to use intense and directed light to interrogate the colored stickers. Optical illumination using a filtered white-light source partially identified the latent number. However, the most successful technique used a tunable dye laser pumped by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser. By selectively tuning the wavelength and intensity of the dye laser, backlit illumination of the decals permitted visualization of the underlying registration number through the surface of the top sticker. With optimally-tuned wavelength and intensity, 100% accuracy was obtained in identifying the sequence of latent characters. The advantage of optical techniques is their completely nondestructive nature, thus preserving the evidence for further interrogation or courtroom presentation.

Russo, R.E. [Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States). Energy and Environment Div.]|[Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Forensic Science Center; Pelkey, G.E. [City of Livermore Police Dept., CA (United States); Grant, P.; Whipple, R.E.; Andresen, B.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States). Forensic Science Center

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Texas Rice, Volume VII, Number 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas A&M University System Agricultural Research and Extension Center Beaumont, Texas April 2007 Volume VII Number 2 Texas Rice Latest News on the Farm Bill continued on page 6 Agriculture Secretary, Mike Johanns, appears... News on the Farm Bill Welcome to the latest edition of Texas Rice. The 2007 crop season is starting off very slow. Unseasonably cool weather, combined with continuing damp conditions, has greatly delayed plantings. Many of the fields that were...

394

Winding number versus Chern--Pontryagin charge  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the usual d dimensional SO(d) gauged Higgs models with $d$-component Higgs fields, the 'energies' of the topologically stable solitons are bounded from below by the Chern-Pontryagin charges. A new class of Higgs models is proposed here, whose 'energies' are stabilised instead by the winding number of the Higgs field itself, with no reference to the gauge group. Consequently, such Higgs models can be gauged by SO(N), with 2 \\le N \\le d.

Tigran Tchrakian

2002-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

395

Electroweak strings, zero modes and baryon number  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The Dirac equations for leptons and quarks in the background of an electroweak Z—string have zero mode solutions. If two loops of electroweak string are linked, the zero modes on one of the loops interacts with the other loop via an Aharanov-Bohm interaction. The effects of this interaction are briefly discussed and it is shown that the fermions induce a baryon number on linked loops of Z—string.

Tanmay Vachaspati

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Property:PhoneNumber | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

PhoneNumber PhoneNumber Jump to: navigation, search This is a property of type String. Pages using the property "PhoneNumber" Showing 25 pages using this property. (previous 25) (next 25) 1 1st Light Energy, Inc. + 209-824-5500 + 2 21-Century Silicon, Inc. + 972-591-0713 + 3 3Degrees + 415.449.0500 + 3M + 1-888-364-3577 + 4 4C Offshore Limited + +44 (0)1502 509260 + 4th Day Energy + 877-484-3291 + @ @Ventures (California) + (650) 322-3246 + @Ventures (Massachusetts) + (978) 658-8980 + A A.J. Rose Manufacturing Company + 440-934-2859 + A.O. Smith + 414-359-4000 + A1 Sun, Inc. + (510) 526-5715 + A10 Power + 415-729-4A10 or 415-729-4210 + ABC Solar, Inc. + 1-866-40-SOLAR + ABS Alaskan Inc + (800) 235-0689 + ACME solar works + 877-226-3004 + ACORE + 202-393-0001 +

397

Tidal Love Numbers of Neutron Stars  

SciTech Connect

For a variety of fully relativistic polytropic neutron star models we calculate the star's tidal Love number k{sub 2}. Most realistic equations of state for neutron stars can be approximated as a polytrope with an effective index n {approx} 0.5-1.0. The equilibrium stellar model is obtained by numerical integration of the Tolman-Oppenheimer-Volkhov equations. We calculate the linear l = 2 static perturbations to the Schwarzschild spacetime following the method of Thorne and Campolattaro. Combining the perturbed Einstein equations into a single second-order differential equation for the perturbation to the metric coefficient g{sub tt} and matching the exterior solution to the asymptotic expansion of the metric in the star's local asymptotic rest frame gives the Love number. Our results agree well with the Newtonian results in the weak field limit. The fully relativistic values differ from the Newtonian values by up to {approx}24%. The Love number is potentially measurable in gravitational wave signals from inspiralling binary neutron stars.

Hinderer, Tanja [Center for Radiophysics and Space Research, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)], E-mail: tph25@cornell.edu

2008-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

398

The number counts, luminosity functions and evolution of microwave-selected (WMAP) blazars and radio galaxies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(Abridged) We carried out an extensive search to identify the counterparts of all the sources listed in the WMAP 3-yr catalogue using literature and archival data. Our work led to the identification of 309 WMAP sources, 98% of which are blazars, radio quasars or radio galaxies. At present, 15 objects still remain without identification due to the lack of optical spectroscopic data or a clear radio counterpart. Our results allow us to define a flux limited sample of 203 high Galactic latitude microwave sources ($f_{41GHz} \\ge 1$ Jy, $|b_{\\rm II}| > 15^\\circ$) which is virtually completely identified (99%). The microwave band is ideally suited for blazar statistical studies since this is the part of the em spectrum that is least affected by the superposition of spectral components of different origin. Using this data-set we derived number counts, luminosity functions and cosmological evolution of blazars and radio galaxies at microwave frequencies. Our results are in good agreement with those found at radio fre...

Giommi, P; Padovani, P; Gasparrini, D; Cavazzuti, E; Cutini, S

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Identification of Low Emissions Agricultural Pathways and Priorities for  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Identification of Low Emissions Agricultural Pathways and Priorities for Identification of Low Emissions Agricultural Pathways and Priorities for Mitigation in Agricultural Landscapes using Integrated Assessment Modeling and Scenarios Jump to: navigation, search Name Identification of Low Emissions Agricultural Pathways and Priorities for Mitigation in Agricultural Landscapes using Integrated Assessment Modeling and Scenarios Agency/Company /Organization CGIAR's Climate Change, Agriculture and Food Security (CCAFS), Canadian International Development Agency (CIDA), the Danish International Development Agency (DANIDA), the European Union, International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) Partner International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA) Sector Land Focus Area Agriculture Topics Background analysis, Baseline projection, Low emission development planning, -LEDS, Pathways analysis, Policies/deployment programs

400

CHAPTER XVIII - INDEX-NUMBERS OF PRICES PRICE INDEX-NUMBERS  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Publisher Summary This chapter provides an overview of index numbers. If a term is expressed in a statistical series comparing similar events at different times or in different places as a relative number to another term, called the base, of the same series one obtains an index number of the simplest form. If the terms of a series of prices of a given commodity are expressed as ratio to a fixed base and a number of such series are combined into a group, a frequency distribution is obtained. The first purpose of constructing price index numbers was the measurement of changes in the purchasing power of money considered as a reciprocal of the general price level. Another purpose of constructing price index numbers is the splitting of changes in aggregate values into their price and quantity components. While it is easy to split changes in aggregate values into price changes and quantity changes in the case of a single commodity, it is extremely difficult to do so in the case of a group of commodities. Theoretically, six fundamental types of price index numbers may be distinguished.

ISAAC PAENSON

1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identification number tin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Proteomic analysis of gliosomes from mouse brain: identification and investigation of glial membrane proteins  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Proteomic analysis of gliosomes from mouse brain: identification and investigation of glial membrane proteins ...

Karen E. Carney; Marco Milanese; Pim van Nierop; Ka Wan Li; Stéphane H.R. Oliet; August B. Smit; Giambattista Bonanno; Mark H.G. Verheijen

2014-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

402

Radio-frequency identification could help reduce the spread of plant pathogens  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

frequency identification could help reduce the spread ofeconomic losses. It also helps control the Plant Protection

Luvisi, Andrea; Panattoni, Alessandra; Triolo, Enrico

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Identification of threats using linguistics-based knowledge extraction.  

SciTech Connect

One of the challenges increasingly facing intelligence analysts, along with professionals in many other fields, is the vast amount of data which needs to be reviewed and converted into meaningful information, and ultimately into rational, wise decisions by policy makers. The advent of the world wide web (WWW) has magnified this challenge. A key hypothesis which has guided us is that threats come from ideas (or ideology), and ideas are almost always put into writing before the threats materialize. While in the past the 'writing' might have taken the form of pamphlets or books, today's medium of choice is the WWW, precisely because it is a decentralized, flexible, and low-cost method of reaching a wide audience. However, a factor which complicates matters for the analyst is that material published on the WWW may be in any of a large number of languages. In 'Identification of Threats Using Linguistics-Based Knowledge Extraction', we have sought to use Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA) and other similar text analysis techniques to map documents from the WWW, in whatever language they were originally written, to a common language-independent vector-based representation. This then opens up a number of possibilities. First, similar documents can be found across language boundaries. Secondly, a set of documents in multiple languages can be visualized in a graphical representation. These alone offer potentially useful tools and capabilities to the intelligence analyst whose knowledge of foreign languages may be limited. Finally, we can test the over-arching hypothesis--that ideology, and more specifically ideology which represents a threat, can be detected solely from the words which express the ideology--by using the vector-based representation of documents to predict additional features (such as the ideology) within a framework based on supervised learning. In this report, we present the results of a three-year project of the same name. We believe these results clearly demonstrate the general feasibility of an approach such as that outlined above. Nevertheless, there are obstacles which must still be overcome, relating primarily to how 'ideology' should be defined. We discuss these and point to possible solutions.

Chew, Peter A.

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

404

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

405

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

406

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

407

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Total................................................................... 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7,279 6,446 3,785 3,474 3,525 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 788 736 431

408

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 15,206 15,357 16,957 17,387 18,120 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 463,929 423,672 401,396 369,624 350,413 From Oil Wells.................................................. 63,222 57,773 54,736 50,403 47,784 Total................................................................... 527,151 481,445 456,132 420,027 398,197 Repressuring ...................................................... 896 818 775 714 677 Vented and Flared.............................................. 527 481 456 420 398 Wet After Lease Separation................................

409

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 9 8 7 9 6 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 368 305 300 443 331 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1 1 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 368 307 301 443 331 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 368 307 301 443 331 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

410

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 98 96 106 109 111 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 869 886 904 1,187 1,229 From Oil Wells.................................................. 349 322 288 279 269 Total................................................................... 1,218 1,208 1,193 1,466 1,499 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 5 12 23 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,218 1,208 1,188 1,454 1,476 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

411

Notices Total Estimated Number of Annual  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

72 Federal Register 72 Federal Register / Vol. 78, No. 181 / Wednesday, September 18, 2013 / Notices Total Estimated Number of Annual Burden Hours: 10,128. Abstract: Enrollment in the Federal Student Aid (FSA) Student Aid Internet Gateway (SAIG) allows eligible entities to securely exchange Title IV, Higher Education Act (HEA) assistance programs data electronically with the Department of Education processors. Organizations establish Destination Point Administrators (DPAs) to transmit, receive, view and update student financial aid records using telecommunication software. Eligible respondents include the following, but are not limited to, institutions of higher education that participate in Title IV, HEA assistance programs, third-party servicers of eligible institutions,

412

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4 4 4 4 4 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 7 7 6 6 5 Total................................................................... 7 7 6 6 5 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 7 7 6 6 5 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

413

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

414

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

415

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

416

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

417

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

418

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

419

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 380 350 400 430 280 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Total................................................................... 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,150 2,000 2,050 1,803 2,100 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

420

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identification number tin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 1,502 1,533 1,545 2,291 2,386 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 899 1,064 1,309 1,464 3,401 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed .....................

422

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

423

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

424

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

425

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 7 7 5 7 7 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 34 32 22 48 34 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 34 32 22 48 34 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 34 32 22 48 34 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

426

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

427

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ......................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells........................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Total......................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ............................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared .................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation...................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed............................ 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production

428

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

429

Stockpile Stewardship Quarterly, Volume 2, Number 1  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

1 * May 2012 1 * May 2012 Message from the Assistant Deputy Administrator for Stockpile Stewardship, Chris Deeney Defense Programs Stockpile Stewardship in Action Volume 2, Number 1 Inside this Issue 2 LANL and ANL Complete Groundbreaking Shock Experiments at the Advanced Photon Source 3 Characterization of Activity-Size-Distribution of Nuclear Fallout 5 Modeling Mix in High-Energy-Density Plasma 6 Quality Input for Microscopic Fission Theory 8 Fiber Reinforced Composites Under Pressure: A Case Study in Non-hydrostatic Behavior in the Diamond Anvil Cell 8 Emission of Shocked Inhomogeneous Materials 9 2012 NNSA Stewardship Science Academic

430

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

431

Number Suppletion in North American Indian Languages  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

been elimina ted from consideration. A total of 32 languages from 13 distinct genetic groupings were found to have suppletive verbs marking ergative plurality, i.e. the suppletive verb form cross-references the number of the subject of an intransitive... cry, die carry, put, stand throw sit go, run handle, put down lie, sit, fall, run stand lie, sit, float/glide carry, give, stand run/fly, put swim, turn, walk/go be locat- .arrive , be little die ed, lie, return sit,stand lie, sit falloff big, long...

Booker, Karen M.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Texas Rice, Volume VII, Number 7  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Texas A&M University System Agricultural Research and Extension Center Beaumont, Texas September 2007 Volume VII Number 7 Texas Rice Nobel Peace Prize Recipient Dr. Norman Borlaug continued on page 4 September of 2003 was a time etched... Tabien, and Dr. Lee Tarpley. Four years ago this month, the Texas A&M Research and Exten- sion Center at Beaumont was hon- ored to welcome one of the most influential people in agriculture. Nobel Peace Prize recipient, Dr. Norman Borlaug, has a long...

433

The New Element Berkelium (Atomic Number 97)  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

An isotope of the element with atomic number 97 has been discovered as a product of the helium-ion bombardment of americium. The name berkelium, symbol Bk, is proposed for element 97. The chemical separation of element 97 from the target material and other reaction products was made by combinations of precipitation and ion exchange adsorption methods making use of its anticipated (III) and (IV) oxidation states and its position as a member of the actinide transition series. The distinctive chemical properties made use of in its separation and the equally distinctive decay properties of the particular isotope constitute the principal evidence for the new element.

Seaborg, G. T.; Thompson, S. G.; Ghiorso, A.

1950-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

434

Probing Dark Energy with Neutrino Number  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), the effective number of neutrino is found to be close to the standard model value Neff = 3.046 for the \\LambdaCDM cosmology. One can obtain the same CMB angular power spectrum as that of \\LambdaCDM for the different value of Neff by using the different dark energy model (i.e. for the different value of w). This degeneracy between Neff and w in CMB can be broken from future galaxy survey using the matter power spectrum.

Seokcheon Lee

2014-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

435

Probing Dark Energy with Neutrino Number  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

From measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB), the effective number of neutrino is found to be close to the standard model value Neff = 3.046 for the \\LambdaCDM cosmology. One can obtain the same CMB angular power spectrum as that of \\LambdaCDM for the different value of Neff by using the different dark energy model (i.e. for the different value of w). This degeneracy between Neff and w in CMB can be broken from future galaxy survey using the matter power spectrum.

Lee, Seokcheon

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 17 20 18 15 15 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 1,412 1,112 837 731 467 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 198 3 0 0 0 Marketed Production

437

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 0 0 0 0 0 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 0 0 0 0 0 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed ..................... 0 0 0 0 0 Marketed Production ..........................................

438

Comparison of Pseudorandom Numbers Generators and Chaotic Numbers Generators used in Differential Evolution  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Differential evolution is one of the great family of evolutionary algorithms. As well as all evolutionary algorithms differential evolution uses pseudorandom numbers generators in many steps of algorithm. In this...

Lenka Skanderova; Adam ?eho?

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Duration of frication noise required for identification of English fricatives  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. These stimuli, and the entire syllables, were presented to 12 subjects for consonant identification. Results show that the listener does not require the entire fricative–vowel syllable in order to correctly perceive a fricative. The required frication duration...

Jongman, Allard

1989-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Role of shapes in the identification of superheavy nuclei  

SciTech Connect

The synthesis and identification of superheavy nuclei have taken a dramatic turn recently with the emergence of hot fusion reactions. Such new methods have enabled the synthesis and identification of superheavy elements with Z=114-116 and 118. The identification of such elements is mainly done by observing their {alpha}-decay chains terminating with spontaneous fission events. In such studies, the role played by the shapes of superheavy elements has assumed great significance. In this work, we use the Shanmugam-Kamalaharan model for {alpha} decay, which is versatile in accounting for the shapes and deformations of the parent and the daughter nuclei as well as the charge redistribution (also termed charge equilibration) process during the decay. Our calculations turn out to be very useful for the identification of superheavy elements.

Shanmugam, G.; Sudhakar, S.; Niranjani, S. [SK Institute of Higher Studies, S-2, Lotus Colony, Nandanam, Chennai - 600 035 (India)

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identification number tin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Identification and Characterization of Near-Term Direct Hydrogen...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

PEM Fuel Cell Markets Identification and Characterization of Near-Term Direct Hydrogen PEM Fuel Cell Markets July 9th presentation for the U.S. DOE HFCIT bi-montly informational...

442

INFRARED THERMAL IMAGING OF AUTOMOBILES: Identification of Cold Start Vehicles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

INFRARED THERMAL IMAGING OF AUTOMOBILES: Identification of Cold Start Vehicles Angela M. Monateri at the infrared image from an automobile. ·The camera was set up with a FEAT 3000 unit to compare emissions vs

Denver, University of

443

Identification of performance indicators for nuclear power plants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Performance indicators have been assuming an increasingly important role in the nuclear industry. An integrated methodology is proposed in this research for the identification and validation of performance indicators for ...

Sui, Yu, 1973-

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

A Binary Linear Programming Approach for LCA System Boundary Identification  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

One of the very first steps in conducting life cycle assessment (LCA) is system boundaries identification. A binary ... boundary between significant and insignificant processes in a LCA study. The proposed model ...

Feri Afrinaldi; Hong-Chao Zhang…

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

445

Multi-channel blind system identification for central hemodynamic monitoring  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Multi-channel Blind System Identification (MBSI) is a technique for estimating both an unknown input and unknown channel dynamics from simultaneous output measurements at different channels through which the input signal ...

Zhang, Yi, 1973-

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

System Identification and the Modeling of Sailing Yachts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This research represents an exploration of sailing yacht dynamics with full-scale sailing motion data, physics-based models, and system identification techniques. The goal is to provide a method of obtaining and validating ...

Legursky, Katrina

2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

447

Integrated circuit outlier identification by multiple parameter correlation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

(defective chips, or chips that lead to functional failure) from apparent outliers (seemingly defective, but fault-free chips). The outlier identification methods in this research primarily rely on wafer-level spatial correlation, but also use additional test...

Sabade, Sagar Suresh

2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

448

Interactive software for model predictive control with simultaneous identification  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis is a unified practical framework in the theory of Model Predictive Control with Simultaneous Identification. The ability to change and visualize parameters on-line makes this toolbox attractive for control engineers, and for anyone...

Echeverria Del Rio, Pablo

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

Star-ND (Multi-Dimensional Star-Identification)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In order to perform star-identification with lower processing requirements, multi-dimensional techniques are implemented in this research as a database search as well as to create star pattern parameters. New star pattern parameters are presented...

Spratling, Benjamin

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

450

Radio frequency identification enabled wireless sensing for intelligent food logistics  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Hoekstra, Bastien Chopard and Peter Coveney Radio frequency identification enabled wireless sensing for intelligent food logistics Zhuo Zou Qiang Chen Ismail Uysal Lirong Zheng Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A 372, 20130313 (13 June 2014; Published online...

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

451

Identification of MHF Fracture Planes and Flow Paths- a Correlation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Identification of MHF Fracture Planes and Flow Paths- a Correlation of Well Log Data with Patterns in Locations of Induced Seismicity Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

452

Identification of protein markers of neuroprotection from radiation  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Meeting-- Apr 12-16, 2008; San Diego, CA Identification of protein markers of neuroprotection from radiation Dinesh Kumar Thotala Sheerin Khatib-Shahidi Allie Fu Richard Caprioli Dennis Hallahan Eugenia Yazlovitskaya Vanderbilt University...

Dinesh Kumar Thotala; Sheerin Khatib-Shahidi; Allie Fu; Richard Caprioli; Dennis Hallahan; and Eugenia Yazlovitskaya

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Identification of Cardiac Infarctions from ECG-Measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Identification of Cardiac Infarctions from ECG-Measurements DIPLOMARBEIT vorgelegt von Melanie . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 2.2 The ECG . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 2 41 5.1 ECG-Measurements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 5

Münster, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität

454

Integrality of L2-Betti numbers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Atiyah conjecture predicts that the L2-Betti numbers of a finite CW-complex with torsion-free fundamental group are integers. We show that the Atiyah conjecture holds (with an additional technical condition) for direct and inverse limits of directed systems of groups for which it is true. As a corollary it holds for residually torsion-free solvable groups, e.g. for pure braid groups or for positive 1-relator groups with torsion free abelianization. Putting everything together we establish a new class of groups for which the Atiyah conjecture holds, which contains all free groups and in particular is closed under taking subgroups, direct sums, free products, extensions with elementary amenable quotient, and under direct and inverse limits of directed systems. This is a corrected version of an older paper with the same title. The proof of Proposition 2.1 of the earlier version contains a gap, as was pointed out to me by Pere Ara. This gap could not be fixed. Consequently, in this new version everything based on this result had to be removed. Please take the errata to "L2-determinant class and approximation of L2-Betti numbers" into account, which are added, rectifying some unproved statements about "amenable extension". As a consequence, throughout, amenable extensions should be extensions with normal subgroups.

Thomas Schick (Georg-August-Universität Göttingen).; Muenster; Preprint No. 73.; no. 4; 727--750. and Math. Ann. 322 (2002); no. 2; 421--422

455

Matter Waves and Orbital Quantum Numbers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The atom's orbital electron structure in terms of quantum numbers (principal, azimuthal, magnetic and spin) results in space for a maximum of: 2 electrons in the n=1 orbit, 8 electrons in the n=2 orbit, 18 electrons in the n=3 orbit, and so on. Those dispositions are correct, but that is not because of quantum numbers nor angular momentum nor a "Pauli exclusion principle". Matter waves were discovered in the early 20th century from their wavelength, which was predicted by DeBroglie to be, Planck's constant divided by the particle's momentum. But, the failure to obtain a reasonable theory for the matter wave frequency resulted in loss of interest. That problem is resolved in "A Reconsideration of Matter Waves" in which a reinterpretation of Einstein's derivation of relativistic kinetic energy [which produced his famous E = mc^2] leads to a valid matter wave frequency and a new understanding of particle kinetics and the atom's stable orbits. It is analytically shown that the orbital electron arrangement is enforced by the necessity of accommodating the space that each orbiting electron's matter wave occupies.

Roger Ellman

2005-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

456

U.S. Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Seismic Surveying (Number of  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) U.S. Maximum Number of Active Crews Engaged in Seismic Surveying (Number of Elements) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec 2000 0 0 62 63 59 63 58 61 59 63 62 65 2001 61 61 63 65 64 60 58 56 54 58 59 58 2002 54 57 54 50 51 50 52 50 56 57 50 43 2003 40 41 41 40 38 39 41 43 39 39 38 42 2004 43 45 45 45 44 49 48 49 48 48 49 50 2005 52 53 51 50 55 57 54 55 56 57 57 58 2006 55 57 59 58 58 57 66 62 63 64 65 64 2007 63 63 68 71 70 69 69 71 73 77 79 75 2008 76 77 75 72 73 73 72 72 NA 77 72 73 2009 75 76 72 70 65 60 61 60 60 63 62 63 2010 64 65 63 66 67 67 67 65 64 62 62 62

457

Identification of factors affecting the palatability of goat meat  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Copyright by MERRITT IVAN PIKE 1975 IDENTIFICATION OF FACTORS AFFECTING THE PALATABILITY OF GOAT MEAT A Thesis by MERRITT IVAN PIKE Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A8M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1974 Major Subject: Animal Science (Meat Science) IDENTIFICATION OF FACTORS AFFECTING THE PALATABILITY OF GOAT MEAT A Thesis by MERRITT IVAN PIKE Approved as to style and content by: Co- an of Committee Co...

Pike, Merritt Ivan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

458

Identification of toxic components in beechwood and petroleum creosotes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IDENTIFICATION OF TOXIC COMPONENTS IN BEECHWOOD AND PETROLEUM CREOSOTES A Thesis by MEHMET S. OKAYGUN Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... August 1989 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering IDENTIFICATION OF TOXIC COMPONENTS IN BEECHWOOD AND PETROLEUM CREOSOTES A Thesis by MEHMET S. OKAYGUN Approved as to style and content by: Ay(hn Akger (Co-Chairman of Committee) T. Rick Irvin (Co...

Okaygun, Mehmet S.

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

459

Rose germplasm identification and analysis with RAPD markers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, it is rapid, radioisotopes are not necessary, only a tiny amount of DNA is needed (nanograms per reaction), and reactions can be automated (Williams et al. , 1990). The applications of the RAPD technique includes variety identification and parentage...ROSE GERMPLASM IDENTIFICATION AND ANALYSIS WITH RAPD MARKERS A Thesis by CHIH-HUI JAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE...

Jan, Chih-Hui

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Rapid identification of bacteria using an umbelliferone fluorescent assay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

RAPID IDENTIFICATION OF BACTERIA USING AN UMBELLIFERONE FLUORESCENT ASSAY A Thesis by RICHARD THOMAS CHAMBLIN, JR, Submitted to the Graduate College of' Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE August 1983 Major Subject: Veterinary Microbiology RAPID IDENTIFICATION OF BACTERIA USING AN UMBELLIFERONE FLUORESCENT ASSAY A Thesis by RICHARD THOMAS CHAMBLIN, JR ~ Approved as to style and content by ( -Chairman of Committee) John M...

Chamblin, Richard Thomas

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identification number tin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Colorado Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

462

California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) California Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

463

Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Louisiana Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

464

Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Michigan Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

465

Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Oklahoma Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

466

Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Virginia Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

467

Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Tennessee Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

468

Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Pennsylvania Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

469

Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Arkansas Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

470

Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Maryland Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

471

Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Illinois Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

472

Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Missouri Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

473

Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells...  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Mississippi Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4...

474

Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells ...  

Annual Energy Outlook 2012 (EIA)

Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Nebraska Natural Gas Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells (Number of Elements) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5...

475

RCRA Permit for a Hazardous Waste Management Facility Permit Number NEV HW0101 Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report Calendar Year 2012, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) identification number of each generator from which the Permittee received a waste stream, a description and quantity of each waste stream in tons and cubic feet received at the facility, the method of treatment, storage, and/or disposal for each waste stream, a description of the waste minimization efforts undertaken, a description of the changes in volume and toxicity of waste actually received, any unusual occurrences, and the results of tank integrity assessments. This Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report is prepared in accordance with Section 2.13.3 of Permit Number NEV HW0101, issued 10/17/10.

,

2013-02-21T23:59:59.000Z

476

RCRA Permit for a Hazardous Waste Management Facility Permit Number NEV HW0101 Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report Calendar Year 2011  

SciTech Connect

This report summarizes the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) identification number of each generator from which the Permittee received a waste stream; a description and quantity of each waste stream in tons and cubic feet received at the facility; the method of treatment, storage, and/or disposal for each waste stream; a description of the waste minimization efforts undertaken; a description of the changes in volume and toxicity of waste actually received; any unusual occurrences; and the results of tank integrity assessments. This Annual Summary/Waste Minimization Report is prepared in accordance with Section 2.13.3 of Permit Number NEV HW0101.

NSTec Environmental Restoration

2012-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

477

Case Numbers: TBH-0098, TBZ-0098  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

November 9, 2010 November 9, 2010 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Motion to Dismiss Initial Agency Decision Names of Petitioners: Mark D. Siciliano Battelle Energy Alliance LLC Dates of Filings: March 15, 2010 August 16, 2010 Case Numbers: TBH-0098 TBZ-0098 This Decision will consider a Motion to Dismiss filed by Battelle Energy Alliance LLC (Battelle), the Management and Operating Contractor for the Department of Energy's (DOE) Idaho National Laboratory (INL), in connection with the pending Complaint of Retaliation filed by Mark Siciliano against Battelle under the DOE's Contractor Employee Protection Program and its governing regulations set forth at 10 C.F.R. Part 708. The Office of Hearings and Appeals

478

Case Numbers: TBH-0073, TBH-0075  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9, 2008 9, 2008 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARMENT OF ENERGY Initial Agency Decision Names of Petitioners: Jonathan K. Strausbaugh Richard L. Rieckenberg Date of Filing: February 1, 2008 Case Numbers: TBH-0073 TBH-0075 This Initial Agency Decision involves two whistleblower complaints, one filed by Jonathan K. Strausbaugh (Case No. TBH-0073) and the other filed by Richard L. Rieckenberg (Case No. TBH-0075) under the Department of Energy (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708. Both complainants were employees of KSL Services, Inc. ("KSL" or "the contractor"), a contractor providing technical services on the site of the DOE Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in Los Alamos, New Mexico, where they were employed until June 14, 2007. In their respective

479

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 21,507 32,672 33,279 34,334 35,612 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,473,792 1,466,833 1,476,204 1,487,451 1,604,709 From Oil Wells.................................................. 139,097 148,551 105,402 70,704 58,439 Total................................................................... 1,612,890 1,615,384 1,581,606 1,558,155 1,663,148 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................

480

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 94 95 100 117 117 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 13,527 13,846 15,130 14,524 15,565 From Oil Wells.................................................. 42,262 44,141 44,848 43,362 43,274 Total................................................................... 55,789 57,987 59,978 57,886 58,839 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 3,290 3,166 2,791 2,070 3,704 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 52,499 54,821 57,187 55,816 55,135

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "identification number tin" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Case Numbers: TBH-0080, TBZ-0080  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

7, 2009 7, 2009 DECISION AND ORDER OF THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Order to Show Cause Motion for Summary Judgment Initial Agency Decision Name of Cases: Billy Joe Baptist Dates of Filing: December 19, 2008 February 18, 2009 Case Numbers: TBH-0080 TBZ-0080 This decision will consider an Order to Show Cause that I issued on February 3, 2009, regarding a March 6, 2008, whistleblower complaint filed by Billy Joe Baptist (Baptist) under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708, against his employer, CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC (CWI). I will also consider in this decision as a Motion for Summary Judgment that CWI filed on February 18, 2009 regarding this complaint. Pursuant to Part 708, an OHA attorney conducted an investigation of Baptist's whistleblower

482

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 997 1,143 979 427 437 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 109,041 131,608 142,070 156,727 171,915 From Oil Wells.................................................. 5,339 5,132 5,344 4,950 4,414 Total................................................................... 114,380 136,740 147,415 161,676 176,329 Repressuring ...................................................... 6,353 6,194 5,975 6,082 8,069 Vented and Flared.............................................. 2,477 2,961 3,267 3,501 3,493 Wet After Lease Separation................................

483

Climate Zone Number 5 | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

5 5 Jump to: navigation, search A type of climate defined in the ASHRAE 169-2006 standard. Climate Zone Number 5 is defined as Cool- Humid(5A) with IP Units 5400 < HDD65ºF ≤ 7200 and SI Units 3000 < HDD18ºC ≤ 4000 Dry(5B) with IP Units 5400 < HDD65ºF ≤ 7200 and SI Units 3000 < HDD18ºC ≤ 4000 Marine(5C) with IP Units 5400 < HDD65ºF ≤ 7200 and SI Units 3000 < HDD18ºC ≤ 4000 . The following places are categorized as class 5 climate zones: Ada County, Idaho Adair County, Iowa Adair County, Missouri Adams County, Colorado Adams County, Illinois Adams County, Indiana Adams County, Iowa Adams County, Nebraska Adams County, Pennsylvania Adams County, Washington Albany County, New York Allegan County, Michigan Alleghany County, North Carolina

484

Case Numbers: TBD-0073, TBD-0075  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

16, 2008 16, 2008 DECISION AND ORDER OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Motion to Compel Discovery Case Names: Jonathan K. Strausbaugh Richard L. Rieckenberg Date of Filing: April 2, 2008 Case Numbers: TBD-0073 TBD-0075 Pending before me is a consolidated Motion to Compel Discovery filed with the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) on behalf of Jonathan K. Strausbaugh and Richard L. Rieckenberg (the complainants) by their attorney. This Motion relates to a hearing requested by the complainants under the Department of Energy's Contractor Employee Protection Program, 10 C.F.R. Part 708 (Part 708), in connection with the Part 708 complaints they filed against KSL Services, Inc. (KSL). The OHA has assigned Mr. Strausbaugh's and Mr. Rieckenberg's hearing

485

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 42,475 42,000 45,000 46,203 47,117 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 264,139 191,889 190,249 187,723 197,217 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 264,139 191,889 190,249 187,723 197,217 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 264,139 191,889 190,249 187,723 197,217 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

486

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 9,907 13,978 15,608 18,154 20,244 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,188,657 1,467,331 1,572,728 1,652,504 1,736,136 From Oil Wells.................................................. 137,385 167,656 174,748 183,612 192,904 Total................................................................... 1,326,042 1,634,987 1,747,476 1,836,115 1,929,040 Repressuring ...................................................... 50,216 114,407 129,598 131,125 164,164 Vented and Flared.............................................. 9,945 7,462 12,356 16,685 16,848

487

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 71 68 69 61 61 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 648 563 531 550 531 From Oil Wells.................................................. 10,032 10,751 9,894 11,055 11,238 Total................................................................... 10,680 11,313 10,424 11,605 11,768 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 1,806 2,043 1,880 2,100 2,135 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 8,875 9,271 8,545 9,504 9,633 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

488

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 60,577 63,704 65,779 68,572 72,237 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 5,859,358 4,897,366 4,828,188 4,947,589 5,074,067 From Oil Wells.................................................. 999,624 855,081 832,816 843,735 659,851 Total................................................................... 6,858,983 5,752,446 5,661,005 5,791,324 5,733,918 Repressuring ...................................................... 138,372 195,150 212,638 237,723 284,491 Vented and Flared.............................................. 32,010 26,823 27,379 23,781 26,947

489

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 15,700 16,350 17,100 16,939 20,734 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 4,260,529 1,398,981 1,282,137 1,283,513 1,293,204 From Oil Wells.................................................. 895,425 125,693 100,324 94,615 88,209 Total................................................................... 5,155,954 1,524,673 1,382,461 1,378,128 1,381,413 Repressuring ...................................................... 42,557 10,838 9,754 18,446 19,031 Vented and Flared.............................................. 20,266 11,750 10,957 9,283 5,015 Wet After Lease Separation................................

490

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 36,000 40,100 40,830 42,437 44,227 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 150,000 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 150,000 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. NA NA NA 0 NA Wet After Lease Separation................................ 150,000 130,853 157,800 159,827 197,217

491

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

3 3 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year.................................... 4,359 4,597 4,803 5,157 5,526 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells ................................................ 555,043 385,915 380,700 365,330 333,583 From Oil Wells .................................................. 6,501 6,066 5,802 5,580 5,153 Total................................................................... 561,544 391,981 386,502 370,910 338,735 Repressuring ...................................................... 13,988 12,758 10,050 4,062 1,307 Vented and Flared .............................................. 1,262 1,039 1,331 1,611 2,316 Wet After Lease Separation................................

492

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 3,321 4,331 4,544 4,539 4,971 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 61,974 71,985 76,053 78,175 87,292 From Oil Wells.................................................. 8,451 9,816 10,371 8,256 10,546 Total................................................................... 70,424 81,802 86,424 86,431 97,838 Repressuring ...................................................... 1 0 0 2 5 Vented and Flared.............................................. 488 404 349 403 1,071 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 69,936 81,397 86,075 86,027 96,762

493

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 3,051 3,521 3,429 3,506 3,870 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 71,545 71,543 76,915 R 143,644 152,495 From Oil Wells.................................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Total................................................................... 71,545 71,543 76,915 R 143,644 152,495 Repressuring ...................................................... NA NA NA 0 NA Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 71,545 71,543 76,915 R 143,644 152,495 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

494

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

5 5 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 33,948 35,217 35,873 37,100 38,574 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 1,484,269 1,484,856 1,432,966 1,391,916 1,397,934 From Oil Wells.................................................. 229,437 227,534 222,940 224,263 246,804 Total................................................................... 1,713,706 1,712,390 1,655,906 1,616,179 1,644,738 Repressuring ...................................................... 15,280 20,009 20,977 9,817 8,674 Vented and Flared.............................................. 3,130 3,256 2,849 2,347 3,525 Wet After Lease Separation................................

495

Title, Location, Document Number Estimated Cost Description  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Moody to Lev, SUBJECT: NEPA 2012 APS for DOE-SRS, Dated: JAN 25 2012 Moody to Lev, SUBJECT: NEPA 2012 APS for DOE-SRS, Dated: JAN 25 2012 Title, Location, Document Number Estimated Cost Description EA Determination Date: uncertain Transmittal to State: uncertain EA Approval: uncertain FONSI: uncertain EA Determination Date: uncertain Transmittal to State: uncertain EA Approval: uncertain FONSI: uncertain Total Estimated Cost $65,000 Annual NEPA Planning Summary NEPA Reviews of Proposals to Implement Enterprise SRS Initiatives unknown The Savannah River Site Strategic Plan for 2011 - 2015 describes 12 initiatives that Enterprise SRS will pursue by applying SRS's management core competencies in nuclear materials. Implementation of new missions resulting from this effort will likely require NEPA review. However, until firm proposals are developed

496

Case Numbers: TBH-0087, TBZ-0087  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

January 22, 2010 January 22, 2010 DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OFFICE OF HEARINGS AND APPEALS Initial Agency Decision Motion to Dismiss Name of Case: David P. Sanchez Dates of Filing: October 30, 2009 December 21, 2009 Case Numbers: TBH-0087 TBZ-0087 This Decision will consider a Motion to Dismiss filed by Los Alamos National Laboratory ("LANL" or "the Respondent"). LANL seeks dismissal of a pending complaint filed by David P. Sanchez ("Mr. Sanchez" or "the Complainant") against his employer, Los Alamos National Security, L. L. C. ("LANS"), 1 on October 30, 2009, under the Department of Energy's (DOE) Contractor Employee Protection Program, set for that 10 C.F.R. Part 708. OHA has assigned Mr. Sanchez' hearing request Case No. TBH-0087, and the present Motion to Dismiss Case No.

497

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

7 7 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 5,775 5,913 6,496 5,878 5,781 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 17,741 27,632 36,637 35,943 45,963 From Oil Wells.................................................. 16 155 179 194 87 Total................................................................... 17,757 27,787 36,816 36,137 46,050 Repressuring ...................................................... 0 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 0 0 0 0 0 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 17,757 27,787 36,816 36,137 46,050 Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed

498

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

9 9 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4,000 4,825 6,755 7,606 3,460 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 156,333 150,972 147,734 157,039 176,221 From Oil Wells.................................................. 15,524 16,263 14,388 12,915 11,088 Total................................................................... 171,857 167,235 162,122 169,953 187,310 Repressuring ...................................................... 8 0 0 0 0 Vented and Flared.............................................. 206 431 251 354 241 Wet After Lease Separation................................ 171,642 166,804

499

Mo Year Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER:  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Version No: 2013.01 Mo Year Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER: http://www.eia.gov/survey/form/eia_14/instructions.pdf Mailing Address: Secure File Transfer option available at: (e.g., PO Box, RR) https://signon.eia.doe.gov/upload/noticeoog.jsp Electronic Transmission: The PC Electronic Zip Code - Data Reporting Option (PEDRO) is available. If interested in software, call (202) 586-9659. Email form to: OOG.SURVEYS@eia.doe.gov - - - - Fax form to: (202) 586-9772 Mail form to: Oil & Gas Survey Email address: U.S. Department of Energy Ben Franklin Station PO Box 279 Washington, DC 20044-0279 Questions? Call toll free: 1-800-638-8812 PADD 4 Type of Report (Check One ): (Thousands of dollars) (Thousands of barrels) PADD 2 PADD 3 PAD DISTRICT (a) Revision to Report:

500

Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells  

Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

1 1 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 Number of Gas and Gas Condensate Wells Producing at End of Year ................................... 4,178 4,601 3,005 3,220 3,657 Production (million cubic feet) Gross Withdrawals From Gas Wells................................................ 244,826 264,809 260,554 254,488 259,432 From Oil Wells.................................................. 36,290 36,612 32,509 29,871 31,153 Total................................................................... 281,117 301,422 293,063 284,359 290,586 Repressuring ...................................................... 563 575 2,150 1,785 1,337 Vented and Flared.............................................. 1,941 1,847 955 705 688 Wet After Lease Separation................................