Sample records for identification activity population

  1. active microbial populations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of enzyme activity Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 2 MICROBIAL POPULATIONS FECAL PELLETS AND Geosciences Websites Summary: MICROBIAL POPULATIONS FECAL PELLETS AND AND...

  2. American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Active System Identification of a DC-DC Converter Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics 1 Active System Identification of a DC and Computer Engineering, UCB 425. #12;American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics 2 analysis10

  3. Identification of c-Type Heme-Containing Peptides Using Non-Activated...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Peptides Using Non-Activated Immobilized Metal Affinity Cchromatography Resin Enrichment and Higher-Energy Collisional Dissociation. Identification of c-Type Heme-Containing...

  4. PRE-MAIN-SEQUENCE STELLAR POPULATIONS ACROSS SHAPLEY CONSTELLATION III. I. PHOTOMETRIC ANALYSIS AND IDENTIFICATION ,

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gouliermis, Dimitrios A.; Gennaro, Mario; Henning, Thomas; Da Rio, Nicola; Brandner, Wolfgang [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Dolphin, Andrew E. [Raytheon Company, P.O. Box 11337, Tucson, AZ 85734 (United States); Robberto, Massimo; Panagia, Nino [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Dr., Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Gruendl, Robert A.; Chu, You-Hua [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois, 1002 West Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Rosa, Michael; Romaniello, Martino [ESO, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); De Marchi, Guido [ESA, Space Science Department, Keplerlaan 1, 2200 AG Noordwijk (Netherlands); Zinnecker, Hans [Institut fuer Raumfahrtsyteme, Universitaet Stuttgart, Pfaffenwaldring 31, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2011-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present our investigation of pre-main-sequence (PMS) stellar populations in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) from imaging with Hubble Space Telescope Wide-Field Planetary Camera 2. Our targets of interest are four star-forming regions located at the periphery of the super-giant shell LMC 4 (Shapley Constellation III). The PMS stellar content of the regions is revealed through the differential Hess diagrams and the observed color-magnitude diagrams (CMDs). Further statistical analysis of stellar distributions along cross sections of the faint part of the CMDs allowed the quantitative assessment of the PMS stars census, and the isolation of faint PMS stars as the true low-mass stellar members of the regions. These distributions are found to be well represented by a double-Gaussian function, the first component of which represents the main-sequence field stars and the second the native PMS stars of each region. Based on this result, a cluster membership probability was assigned to each PMS star according to its CMD position. The higher extinction in the region LH 88 did not allow the unambiguous identification of its native stellar population. The CMD distributions of the PMS stars with the highest membership probability in the regions LH 60, LH 63, and LH 72 exhibit an extraordinary similarity among the regions, suggesting that these stars share common characteristics, as well as common recent star formation history. Considering that the regions are located at different areas of the edge of LMC 4, this finding suggests that star formation along the super-giant shell may have occurred almost simultaneously.

  5. Microbe Identification Activity The purpose of this activity is to differentiate (tell the difference) between various bacterial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rose, Michael R.

    Microbe Identification Activity Purpose The purpose of this activity is to differentiate (tell between gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria - Tell the difference between catalase positive species Materials Microscope slide Crystal Violet Gram's Iodine Ethanol (de-stain) Safranin Malachite

  6. Damage Identification in Aging Aircraft Structures with Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    Damage Identification in Aging Aircraft Structures with Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors VICTOR of structural damage such as fatigue cracks and corrosion. Two main detection strategies are considered: (a) the wave propagation method for far-field damage detection; and (b) the electro-mechanical (E/M) impedance

  7. Damage Identification in Aging Aircraft Structures with Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giurgiutiu, Victor

    Damage Identification in Aging Aircraft Structures with Piezoelectric Wafer Active Sensors VICTOR the onset and progress of structural damage such as fatigue cracks and corrosion. Two main detection strategies are considered: (a) the wave propagation method for far-field damage detection; and (b

  8. Biomarker monitoring of a population residing near uranium mining activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Au, W.W.; Legator, M.S.; Whorton, E.B.; Wilkinson, G.S.; Gabehart, G.J.; Lane, R.G. [Univ. of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX (United States)

    1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigated whether residents residing near uranium mining operations (target population), who are potentially exposed to toxicants from mining waste, have increased genotoxic effects compared with people residing elsewhere (reference population). Population surveys were conducted, and 24 target and 24 reference residents were selected. The selected subjects and controls were matched on age and gender and they were nonsmokers. Blood samples were collected for laboratory studies. The standard cytogenetic assay was used to determine chromosome aberration frequencies, and the challenge assay was used to investigate DNA repair responses. We found that individuals who resided near uranium mining operations had a higher mean frequency of cells with chromosome aberrations and higher deletion frequency but lower dicentric frequency than the reference group, although the difference was not statistically significant. After cells were challenged by exposure to {gamma}-rays, the target population had a significantly higher frequency of cells with chromosome aberrations and deletion frequency than the reference group. The latter observation is indicative of abnormal DNA repair response in the target population. 22 refs., 3 tabs.

  9. Identification of four RXTE Slew Survey sources with nearby luminous active galactic nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Revnivtsev; S. Sazonov; E. Churazov; S. Trudolyubov

    2005-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Based on RXTE scans and observations with the SWIFT/XRT telescope and INTEGRAL observatory, we report the identification of four X-ray sources discovered during the RXTE Slew Survey of the |b|>10deg sky with nearby (z ~ 0.017-0.098) luminous (log L_2-10keV ~ 42.7-44 erg/s) active galactic nuclei. Two of the objects exhibit heavily intrinsically absorbed X-ray spectra (NHL~10^23 cm^-2).

  10. Topological Structure of Population Activity in Primary Visual Gurjeet Singh, Facundo Memoli, Tigran Ishkhanov,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    sensitive dyes (Grinvald and Hildesheim, 2004), appears to switch dynamically among states, some of them to study the topological structure of neural activity in cell populations of primary visual cortex

  11. Sociological adaptation among bacterial populations in an activated sludge ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forrest, Robert George

    1970-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Bacillus Corynebacterium, and Micrococcus being much less abundant. Unz and Dondero (70) isolated two-hundred and three strains from fifty-one trickling filters and activated sludge zoogloeas, with one-hundred and forty-seven of the strains forming... in the aeration basin or secondary sedimentation biomass; instead, members of the Flavobacterium C'~oh~as group, the genus Achromobacter, and a Pseudomonas-l&e group were most numerous. METHODS AND MATERIALS Batch fermentation s stem. The bench scale batch...

  12. THE SUB-mJy RADIO POPULATION OF THE E-CDFS: OPTICAL AND INFRARED COUNTERPART IDENTIFICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bonzini, M.; Mainieri, V.; Padovani, P.; Rosati, P. [ESO, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Kellermann, K. I. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903-2475 (United States); Miller, N. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States); Tozzi, P.; Balestra, I. [INAF Osservatorio Astronomico di Trieste, via G.B. Tiepolo 11, I-34131, Trieste (Italy); Vattakunnel, S. [Dipartimento di Fisica Universit di Trieste, piazzale Europa 1, I-34127 Trieste (Italy); Brandt, W. N.; Luo, B. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Xue, Y. Q., E-mail: mbonzini@eso.org [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Department of Astronomy, University of Science and Technology of China, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2012-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We study a sample of 883 sources detected in a deep Very Large Array survey at 1.4 GHz in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South. This paper focuses on the identification of their optical and infrared (IR) counterparts. We use a likelihood-ratio technique that is particularly useful when dealing with deep optical images to minimize the number of spurious associations. We find a reliable counterpart for 95% of our radio sources. Most of the counterparts (74%) are detected at optical wavelengths, but there is a significant fraction (21%) that are only detectable in the IR. Combining newly acquired optical spectra with data from the literature, we are able to assign a redshift to 81% of the identified radio sources (37% spectroscopic). We also investigate the X-ray properties of the radio sources using the Chandra 4 Ms and 250 ks observations. In particular, we use a stacking technique to derive the average properties of radio objects undetected in the Chandra images. The results of our analysis are collected in a new catalog containing the position of the optical/IR counterpart, the redshift information, and the X-ray fluxes. It is the deepest multi-wavelength catalog of radio sources, which will be used for future study of this galaxy population.

  13. Identification of environmentally derived cesium-137 burdens in a worker population

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacLellan, J.A.; Lynch, T.P.; Rieksts, G.A.; Brodzinski, R.L.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During 1990, whole body measurements of a number of workers with little probability of onsite occupational exposure showed positive evidence of [sup 137]Cs. Further investigation revealed that many of these workers supplemented their diet with a significant portion of wild game, mainly deer and elk. To validate the assumption of an environmental source, donated samples of venison and other game were analyzed by gamma spectroscopy. Results ranged from less than 0.1 to almost 100 Bq kg[sup [minus]l] (0.003 to 2.7 nCi kg[sup [minus]1]) and showed a correlation with the habitat from which the game was taken. Venison samples obtained from the two workers with the highest body burdens showed the highest activity. A questionnaire is now used to identify workers with an elevated potential for environmental-intakes.

  14. Identification of environmentally derived cesium-137 burdens in a worker population

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacLellan, J.A.; Lynch, T.P.; Rieksts, G.A.; Brodzinski, R.L.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During 1990, whole body measurements of a number of workers with little probability of onsite occupational exposure showed positive evidence of {sup 137}Cs. Further investigation revealed that many of these workers supplemented their diet with a significant portion of wild game, mainly deer and elk. To validate the assumption of an environmental source, donated samples of venison and other game were analyzed by gamma spectroscopy. Results ranged from less than 0.1 to almost 100 Bq kg{sup {minus}l} (0.003 to 2.7 nCi kg{sup {minus}1}) and showed a correlation with the habitat from which the game was taken. Venison samples obtained from the two workers with the highest body burdens showed the highest activity. A questionnaire is now used to identify workers with an elevated potential for environmental-intakes.

  15. The computerized identification of reactor-produced isotopes in an activation analysis environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlueter, Daniel John

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (ELG ('V rG:", ) I ~ 22F 06(3) 657 80(1000) 1 884 ~ 50( 539) 1 706 80( 162) 1 1384. 30( LO8) 1 686 F 80( 64)1 817, on( 61)1 556. CC( 34) 4 744. 20( 38) 1 937. 30( 243) I 677. 50( 107) 1 1505. ?0( 55)1 1475. 90( 16!1 763. 80( 446. 20( 620. 10( 1562... the rerluirement for U&c d gree of MASTI R OF SCIENC1. December 1971 Major Subject: Computing Science THE COMPUTERIZED IDENTIFICATION OF REACTOR-PRODUCED PSOTOPES IN AN ACTIVATION ANALYSIS ENVIRONMENT A Thesis by DANIEL ZOHN SCIILUETER Approved...

  16. Heavy-duty truck population, activity and usage patterns. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, M.

    1998-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of the study was to update the heavy-duty truck (HDT) population, activity (e.g., vehicle miles traveled (VMT), numbers of starts and trips, trip duration, etc.), and usage patterns type of service/business (e.g., delivery, construction, etc.), area of operation (i.e., local, short-haul, long-haul) for HDT`s registered and/or operated in California. The population and activity estimates were done on a weight-class-specific basis light-heavy-duty, medium-heavy-duty and heavy-heavy-duty. Population, activity and usage estimates were based primarily on Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) registration data and Truck Inventory and Usage Survey (TIUS) data. In addition to the analysis of existing data (i.e., DMV and TIUS), 42 HDTs were fitted with on-board data loggers that recorded numbers of trips and starts, daily VMT and travel by time-of-day.

  17. Structural damage identification in wind turbine blades using piezoelectric active sensing with ultrasonic validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Claytor, Thomas N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ammerman, Curtt N [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Park, Gyu Hae [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farinholt, Kevin M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Farrar, Charles R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Atterbury, Marie K [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper gives a brief overview of a new project at LANL in structural damage identification for wind turbines. This project makes use of modeling capabilities and sensing technology to understand realistic blade loading on large turbine blades, with the goal of developing the technology needed to automatically detect early damage. Several structural health monitoring (SHM) techniques using piezoelectric active materials are being investigated for the development of wireless, low power sensors that interrogate sections of the wind turbine blade using Lamb wave propagation data, frequency response functions (FRFs), and time-series analysis methods. The modeling and sensor research will be compared with extensive experimental testing, including wind tunnel experiments, load and fatigue tests, and ultrasonic scans - on small- to mid-scale turbine blades. Furthermore, this study will investigate the effect of local damage on the global response of the blade by monitoring low-frequency response changes.

  18. An Active Instance-based Machine Learning method for Stellar Population Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Solorio, T; Terlevich, R J; Terlevich, E; Solorio, Thamar; Fuentes, Olac; Terlevich, Roberto; Terlevich, Elena

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a method for fast and accurate stellar population parameters determination in order to apply it to high resolution galaxy spectra. The method is based on an optimization technique that combines active learning with an instance-based machine learning algorithm. We tested the method with the retrieval of the star-formation history and dust content in "synthetic" galaxies with a wide range of S/N ratios. The "synthetic" galaxies where constructed using two different grids of high resolution theoretical population synthesis models. The results of our controlled experiment shows that our method can estimate with good speed and accuracy the parameters of the stellar populations that make up the galaxy even for very low S/N input. For a spectrum with S/N=5 the typical average deviation between the input and fitted spectrum is less than 10**{-5}. Additional improvements are achieved using prior knowledge.

  19. An Active Instance-based Machine Learning method for Stellar Population Studies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thamar Solorio; Olac Fuentes; Roberto Terlevich; Elena Terlevich

    2005-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed a method for fast and accurate stellar population parameters determination in order to apply it to high resolution galaxy spectra. The method is based on an optimization technique that combines active learning with an instance-based machine learning algorithm. We tested the method with the retrieval of the star-formation history and dust content in "synthetic" galaxies with a wide range of S/N ratios. The "synthetic" galaxies where constructed using two different grids of high resolution theoretical population synthesis models. The results of our controlled experiment shows that our method can estimate with good speed and accuracy the parameters of the stellar populations that make up the galaxy even for very low S/N input. For a spectrum with S/N=5 the typical average deviation between the input and fitted spectrum is less than 10**{-5}. Additional improvements are achieved using prior knowledge.

  20. Travel determinants and multi-scale transferability of national activity patterns to local populations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henson, Kriste M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Gou; ias, Konstadinos G [UCSB

    2010-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to transfer national travel patterns to a local population is of interest when attempting to model megaregions or areas that exceed metropolitan planning organization (MPO) boundaries. At the core of this research are questions about the connection between travel behavior and land use, urban form, and accessibility. As a part of this process, a group of land use variables have been identified to define activity and travel patterns for individuals and households. The 2001 National Household Travel Survey (NHTS) participants are divided into categories comprised of a set of latent cluster models representing persons, travel, and land use. These are compared to two sets of cluster models constructed for two local travel surveys. Comparison of means statistical tests are used to assess differences among sociodemographic groups residing in localities with similar land uses. The results show that the NHTS and the local surveys share mean population activity and travel characteristics. However, these similarities mask behavioral heterogeneity that are shown when distributions of activity and travel behavior are examined. Therefore, data from a national household travel survey cannot be used to model local population travel characteristics if the goal to model the actual distributions and not mean travel behavior characteristics.

  1. Age determination of the nuclear stellar population of Active Galactic Nuclei using Locally Weighted Regression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trilce Estrada-Piedra; Juan Pablo Torres-Papaqui; Roberto Terlevich; Olac Fuentes; Elena Terlevich

    2003-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a new technique to segregate old and young stellar populations in galactic spectra using machine learning methods. We used an ensemble of classifiers, each classifier in the ensemble specializes in young or old populations and was trained with locally weighted regression and tested using ten-fold cross-validation. Since the relevant information concentrates in certain regions of the spectra we used the method of sequential floating backward selection offline for feature selection. The application to Seyfert galaxies proved that this technique is very insensitive to the dilution by the Active Galactic Nucleus (AGN) continuum. Comparing with exhaustive search we concluded that both methods are similar in terms of accuracy but the machine learning method is faster by about two orders of magnitude.

  2. Identification of opaque-2 genotypes in segregating populations of quality protein maize by analysis of restriction fragment length polymorphisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kata, Srinivas Reddy

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    has no effect on RFLP evaluations. RFLPs are powerful analytical tools and have many practical applications in plant breeding (for review, see Helentjaris er al. , 1985). They have been utilized in the transfer of desirable genes between varieties... AND METHODS Plant materials Two hard endosperm o2/o2 populations, POP20 and POP22 from Hans Gevers, University of Natal, South Africa and one CIMMYT QPM population, POB67, were used as opaque-2 source materiaL TX5855 was used as a recurnnt parent. Fl...

  3. A fluorescent assay for chloride transport; identification of a synthetic anionophore with improved activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Smith, Bradley D.

    A fluorescent assay for chloride transport; identification of a synthetic anionophore with improved on the chloride-sensitive probe, lucigenin, is developed for monitoring chloride transport into vesicles, and used to compare the effectiveness of three steroid- derived transporters. A topic of growing interest

  4. Effect of Crude Oil and Chemical Additives on Metabolic Activity of Mixed Microbial Populations in Fresh Marsh Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nyman, John

    Effect of Crude Oil and Chemical Additives on Metabolic Activity of Mixed Microbial Populations remineralization rates. Crude oil, which is known to contain toxins and reduce microbial diversity organic matter (Panicum hemitomon Shult. or Sagittaria lancifolia L. dominated marshes), crude oil

  5. Compost Science & Utilization, (2002), Vol.10,No. 2, 150-161 Microbial Population Dynamics and Enzyme Activities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tiquia-Arashiro, Sonia M.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Compost Science & Utilization, (2002), Vol.10,No. 2, 150-161 , . Microbial Population Dynamics and Enzyme Activities During Composting Sonia M. Tiquial, Judy H.C. Wan2and Nora F.Y.Tam3 1.Environmental litter and yard trimmings. Dur- ing composting, samples were taken at three different locations (top

  6. Identification of active agents for tetrachloroethylene degradation in Portland cement slurry containing ferrous iron

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ko, Sae Bom

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    -EDS) were used to identify minerals in chemical mixtures that have high activities. Results indicate that active agents for PCE degradation in Portland cement slurries and in cement extracts might be one of several AFm phases. However, systems without cement...

  7. Identification of Highly Active Fe Sites in (Ni,Fe)OOH for Electrocata...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    enhanced OER activity in Fe-doped -NiOOH, in which Fe sites have near-optimum binding energies for OER intermediates. The conversion of solar energy and water to hydrogen is a...

  8. Mitigating container security risk using real-time monitoring with active Radio Frequency Identification and sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schlesinger, Adam Ian

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The global village in which we live enables increased trade and commerce across regions but also brings a complicated new set of challenges such as terrorist activity, human and drug smuggling and theft in foreign or ...

  9. Shielding and activity estimator for template-based nuclide identification methods

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nelson, Karl Einar

    2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    According to one embodiment, a method for estimating an activity of one or more radio-nuclides includes receiving one or more templates, the one or more templates corresponding to one or more radio-nuclides which contribute to a probable solution, receiving one or more weighting factors, each weighting factor representing a contribution of one radio-nuclide to the probable solution, computing an effective areal density for each of the one more radio-nuclides, computing an effective atomic number (Z) for each of the one more radio-nuclides, computing an effective metric for each of the one or more radio-nuclides, and computing an estimated activity for each of the one or more radio-nuclides. In other embodiments, computer program products, systems, and other methods are presented for estimating an activity of one or more radio-nuclides.

  10. UHF Solar Powered Active Oscillator Antenna on Low Cost Flexible Substrate for Wireless Identification Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tentzeris, Manos

    UHF Solar Powered Active Oscillator Antenna on Low Cost Flexible Substrate for Wireless nature of the circuit and providing operational autonomy by harvesting solar power without affecting, solar power harvesting. I. INTRODUCTION The increasing use of RFIDs and wireless sensor networks

  11. Identification of items and activities important to waste form acceptance by Westinghouse GoCo sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Plodinec, M.J.; Marra, S.L. [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Dempster, J. [West Valley Demonstration Project, NY (United States); Randklev, E.H. [Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (United States)

    1993-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The Department of Energy has established specifications (Waste Acceptance Product Specifications for Vitrified High-Level Waste Forms, or WAPS) for canistered waste forms produced at Hanford, Savannah River, and West Valley. Compliance with these specifications requires that each waste form producer identify the items and activities which must be controlled to ensure compliance. As part of quality assurance oversight activities, reviewers have tried to compare the methodologies used by the waste form producers to identify items and activities important to waste form acceptance. Due to the lack of a documented comparison of the methods used by each producer, confusion has resulted over whether the methods being used are consistent. This confusion has been exacerbated by different systems of nomenclature used by each producer, and the different stages of development of each project. The waste form producers have met three times in the last two years, most recently on June 28, 1993, to exchange information on each producer`s program. These meetings have been sponsored by the Westinghouse GoCo HLW Vitrification Committee. This document is the result of this most recent exchange. It fills the need for a documented comparison of the methodologies used to identify items and activities important to waste form acceptance. In this document, the methodology being used by each waste form producer is summarized, and the degree of consistency among the waste form producers is determined.

  12. Identification of the amino acid residues at the active site of beef liver argininosuccinate synthetase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fulmer, Dorothy Ann

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of NMTS with 5, 5- dithiobis (2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTMB) was performed by adding 4, 62 mN DTNB to 20 mN MNTS in a 3-mL cuvette and monitoring the appearance of 2-nitro-5-mercaptobenzoic acid at 410 nm (Ae = 13, 600 M cm ). -1 -1 13 Inactivation b 5... binding. Results also show 5'fluorosulfonylbenzoyl adenosine to be a very effective affinity label for the enzyme. The pK values of the amino acid groups of argininosuccinate synthetase that are essential for catalytic activity and/or substrate...

  13. The cosmic growth of the active black hole population at 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schulze, A; Gavignaud, I; Schramm, M; Silverman, J; Merloni, A; Zamorani, G; Hirschmann, M; Mainieri, V; Wisotzki, L; Shankar, F; Fiore, F; Koekemoer, A M; Temporin, G

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a census of the active black hole population at 1active black hole mass function (BHMF) and the Eddington ratio distribution function (ERDF) allows to clearly disentangle the AGN downsizing phenomenon, present in the AGN luminosity function (AGN LF), into its physical processes of black hole mass downsizing and accretion rate evolution. We are utilizing type 1 AGN samples from 3 optical surveys (VVDS, zCOSMOS and SDSS), that cover a wide range of 3 dex in luminosity over our redshift interval of interest. We investigate the cosmic evolution of the AGN population as a function of AGN luminosity, black hole mass and accretion rate. Compared to z = 0 we find a distinct change in the shape of the BHMF and the ERDF, consistent with downsizing in black hole mass. The active fraction or duty cycle of type 1 AGN at z~1.5 is almost flat as...

  14. Synthesising evidence for equity impacts of population-based physical activity interventions: a pilot study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Humphreys, David K; Ogilvie, David

    2013-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    WC, Merlo A, Gewa C, Weber MD, et al. The Los Angeles Lift Off: a sociocultural environmental change intervention to integrate physical activity into the workplace. Preventive Medicine. 2004;38(6):848-56. P43. Coleman KJ, Gonzalez EC. Promoting Stair... activity patterns among adolescents: a pilot study of 'Slice of Life'. Health education research. 1987 June 1, 1987;2(2):93-103. P54. Robinson TN. Reducing children's television viewing to prevent obesity. JAMA: the journal of the American Medical...

  15. Identification of Loci Interacting with Melanocortin-1 Receptor to Modify Black Coat Color in an F2 Nellore-Angus Population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hulsman, Lauren L.

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    in melanin synthesis is tyrosinase (TYR). Tyrosinase activates melanin synthesis through the hydroxylation of tyrosine to dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA) and further oxidation of DOPA to DOPA quinone (Mason, 1948; reviewed by Prota, 1988; Seo et al., 2007...,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid (DHICA) and production of eumelanin (reviewed by Cone et al., 1996; Wolff, 2003). When MC1R is not activated, either through the absence of bound #1;-MSH or antagonism by ASIP, TYR, tyrosinase related protein-1 (TYRP1), and DCT...

  16. Dietary, Physical Activity, and Sedentary Behaviors and Their Relationship to Weight Gain in a College Age Population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Faegen Dillon

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    ix LIST OF FIGURES Page Figure 1 Weight vs days of 30+ minutes of physical activity ------------------------------ 49 Figure 2 BMI vs days of 30+ minutes of physical activity --------------------------------- 50 Figure 3 BMI difference vs days... --------------------------------------------- 45 Table 8 Physical activity and self-reported weight loss ----------------------------------- 47 Table 9 Days of 30+ minutes of physical activity and BMI ------------------------------ 48 Table 10 Days of 30+ minutes of physical activity...

  17. Diverse roles for the mitogen-activated protein kinase ERK2 revealed by high-throughput target identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carlson, Scott M. (Scott Moore)

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Many major human oncogenes contribute to cancer in large part by activating the mitogenactivated protein kinases (MAPK) ERK1 and ERK2 (ERK). These kinases are critical in normal physiological processes from development to ...

  18. Identification of Hazards, 3/9/95

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The objective of this surveillance is to evaluate the effectiveness of the contractor's hazards identification programs.  Surveillance activities encompass maintenance and implementation of safety...

  19. THE DEEP SWIRE FIELD. IV. FIRST PROPERTIES OF THE SUB-mJy GALAXY POPULATION: REDSHIFT DISTRIBUTION, AGN ACTIVITY, AND STAR FORMATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Strazzullo, Veronica; Pannella, Maurilio; Owen, Frazer N.; Wang, Wei-Hao [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 1003 Lopezville Rd., Socorro, NM 87801 (United States); Bender, Ralf [Universitaets-Sternwarte, Scheinerstrasse 1, Munich D-81679 (Germany); Morrison, Glenn E. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Shupe, David L., E-mail: vstrazzu@nrao.ed [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, California Institute of Technology, 100-22, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2010-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of a 20 cm selected sample in the Deep Spitzer Wide-area InfraRed Extragalactic Legacy Survey Very Large Array Field, reaching a 5{sigma} limiting flux density at the image center of S{sub 1.4{sub GHz}} {approx} 13.5 {mu}Jy. In a 0.6 x 0.6 deg{sup 2} field, we are able to assign an optical/IR counterpart to 97% of the radio sources. Up to 11 passbands from the NUV to 4.5 {mu}m are then used to sample the spectral energy distribution (SED) of these counterparts in order to investigate the nature of the host galaxies. By means of an SED template library and stellar population synthesis models, we estimate photometric redshifts, stellar masses, and stellar population properties, dividing the sample into three sub-classes of quiescent, intermediate, and star-forming galaxies. We focus on the radio sample in the redshift range 0.3 < z < 1.3 where we estimate to have a redshift completeness higher than 90% and study the properties and redshift evolution of these sub-populations. We find that, as expected, the relative contributions of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) and star-forming galaxies to the {mu}Jy population depend on the flux density limit of the sample. At all flux levels, a significant population of 'green-valley' galaxies is observed. While the actual nature of these sources is not definitely understood, the results of this work may suggest that a significant fraction of faint radio sources might be composite (and possibly transition) objects, thus a simple 'AGN versus star-forming' classification might not be appropriate to fully understand what faint radio populations really are.

  20. Populations Population Ecology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dever, Jennifer A.

    - species interactions Abiotic factors: l Climate l Temperature l Moisture l Wind l Soil l Fire Biotic- Ã? mortality increases as population size increases or birth rate decreases" l Negative feedback

  1. Laboratory and Field Testing of Commercially Available Detectors for the Identification of Chemicals of Interest in the Nuclear Fuel Cycle for the Detection of Undeclared Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carla Miller; Mary Adamic; Stacey Barker; Barry Siskind; Joe Brady; Warren Stern; Heidi Smartt; Mike McDaniel; Mike Stern; Rollin Lakis

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Traditionally, IAEA inspectors have focused on the detection of nuclear indicators as part of infield inspection activities. The ability to rapidly detect and identify chemical as well as nuclear signatures can increase the ability of IAEA inspectors to detect undeclared activities at a site. Identification of chemical indicators have been limited to use in the analysis of environmental samples. Although IAEA analytical laboratories are highly effective, environmental sample processing does not allow for immediate or real-time results to an IAEA inspector at a facility. During a complementary access inspection, under the Additional Protocol, the use of fieldable technologies that can quickly provide accurate information on chemicals that may be indicative of undeclared activities can increase the ability of IAEA to effectively and efficiently complete their mission. The Complementary Access Working Group (CAWG) is a multi-laboratory team with members from Brookhaven National Laboratory, Idaho National Laboratory, Los Alamos National Laboratory, and Sandia National Laboratory. The team identified chemicals at each stage of the nuclear fuel cycle that may provide IAEA inspectors with indications that proliferation activities may be occurring. The group eliminated all indicators related to equipment, technology and training, developing a list of by-products/effluents, non-nuclear materials, nuclear materials, and other observables. These proliferation indicators were prioritized based on detectability from a conduct of operations (CONOPS) perspective of a CA inspection (for example, whether an inspector actually can access the S&O or whether it is in process with no physical access), and the IAEA’s interest in the detection technology in conjunction with radiation detectors. The list was consolidated to general categories (nuclear materials from a chemical detection technique, inorganic chemicals, organic chemicals, halogens, and miscellaneous materials). The team then identified commercial off the shelf (COTS) chemical detectors that may detect the chemicals of interest. Three chemical detectors were selected and tested both in laboratory settings and in field operations settings at Idaho National Laboratory. The instruments selected are: Thermo Scientific TruDefender FT (FTIR), Thermo Scientific FirstDefender RM (Raman), and Bruker Tracer III SD (XRF). Functional specifications, operability, and chemical detectability, selectivity, and limits of detection were determined. Results from the laboratory and field tests will be presented. This work is supported by the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative, Office of Nonproliferation and International Security, National Nuclear Security Administration.

  2. Bayesian Analyses of Genetic Variation and Population Differentiation in Pacific Swordfish (Xiphias gladius L.) and the Development of High Resolution Melting Assays for Species Identification and Potential Sex-Linked Marker Survey in Istiophorid Billfish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Ching-Ping

    2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    ..................................................................... 7 CHAPTER II GENETIC IDENTIFICATION OF PACIFIC ISTIOPHORID BILLFISH BY HIGH-RESOLUTION MELTING ANALYSIS (HRMA) ..................... 10 Introduction... ............................................................................................................. 10 Materials and methods ............................................................................................ 13 Sampling and DNA isolation of Pacific billfish ........................................... 13 HRMA-genotyping assays design...

  3. DATA SHARING REPORT CHARACTERIZATION OF POPULATION 7: PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT, DRY ACTIVE WASTE, AND MISCELLANEOUS DEBRIS, SURVEILLANCE AND MAINTENANCE PROJECT OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY OAK RIDGE, TENNESSEE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harpenau, Evan M

    2013-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Office of Environmental Management (EM-OR) requested that Oak Ridge Associated Universities (ORAU), working under the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) contract, provide technical and independent waste management planning support under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). Specifically, DOE EM-OR requested that ORAU plan and implement a sampling and analysis campaign targeting certain URS|CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC (UCOR) surveillance and maintenance (S&M) process inventory waste. Eight populations of historical and reoccurring S&M waste at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) have been identified in the Waste Handling Plan for Surveillance and Maintenance Activities at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, DOE/OR/01-2565&D2 (WHP) (DOE 2012) for evaluation and processing to determine a final pathway for disposal. Population 7 (POP 7) consists of 56 containers of aged, low-level and potentially mixed S&M waste that has been staged in various locations around ORNL. Several of these POP 7 containers primarily contain personal protective equipment (PPE) and dry active waste (DAW), but may contain other miscellaneous debris. This data sharing report addresses the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 (CERCLA) specified waste in a 13-container subpopulation (including eight steel boxes, three 55-gal drums, one sealand, and one intermodal) that lacked sufficient characterization data for possible disposal at the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF) using the approved Waste Lot (WL) 108.1 profile.

  4. PINS Spectrum Identification Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.J. Caffrey

    2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Portable Isotopic Neutron Spectroscopy—PINS, for short—system identifies the chemicals inside munitions and containers without opening them, a decided safety advantage if the fill chemical is a hazardous substance like a chemical warfare agent or an explosive. The PINS Spectrum Identification Guide is intended as a reference for technical professionals responsible for the interpretation of PINS gamma-ray spectra. The guide is divided into two parts. The three chapters that constitute Part I cover the science and technology of PINS. Neutron activation analysis is the focus of Chapter 1. Chapter 2 explores PINS hardware, software, and related operational issues. Gamma-ray spectral analysis basics are introduced in Chapter 3. The six chapters of Part II cover the identification of PINS spectra in detail. Like the PINS decision tree logic, these chapters are organized by chemical element: phosphorus-based chemicals, chlorine-based chemicals, etc. These descriptions of hazardous, toxic, and/or explosive chemicals conclude with a chapter on the identification of the inert chemicals, e.g. sand, used to fill practice munitions.

  5. Earthquake Damage Identification using High-Resolution Satellite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shinozuka, Masanobu

    Earthquake Damage Identification using High-Resolution Satellite Images from the 2003 Northern & evaluation · High-resolution satellite imagery · Images from Boumerdes, Algeria · Semi-automated damage are most damaged? ­ Effects in less populated areas · Earthquake reconnaissance time wasted "looking

  6. ORIGINAL PAPER Selection, trans-species polymorphism, and locus identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zamudio, Kelly R.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Selection, trans-species polymorphism, and locus identification of major amphibian populations. Keywords Amphibia . Beta chain . Gene walking . Lithobates . Positive selection balancing selection Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00251

  7. Peptide identification

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jarman, Kristin H [Richland, WA; Cannon, William R [Richland, WA; Jarman, Kenneth D [Richland, WA; Heredia-Langner, Alejandro [Richland, WA

    2011-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Peptides are identified from a list of candidates using collision-induced dissociation tandem mass spectrometry data. A probabilistic model for the occurrence of spectral peaks corresponding to frequently observed partial peptide fragment ions is applied. As part of the identification procedure, a probability score is produced that indicates the likelihood of any given candidate being the correct match. The statistical significance of the score is known without necessarily having reference to the actual identity of the peptide. In one form of the invention, a genetic algorithm is applied to candidate peptides using an objective function that takes into account the number of shifted peaks appearing in the candidate spectrum relative to the test spectrum.

  8. The mitogen-activated protein kinome from Anopheles gambiae: identification, phylogeny and functional characterization of the ERK, JNK and p38 MAP kinases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    induced activation of TAK1 and ERK as well as the signalingamino acid sequences of ERK, JNK, p38 MAPK orthologs from18. 2. Roux PP, Blenis J: ERK and p38 MAPK-activated protein

  9. Photo Identification, Summer Activity Pattern, Estimated Field Metabolic Rate and Territory Quality of Adult Male Sea Otters (Enhydra lutris) in Simpson Bay, Prince William Sound, Alaska

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finerty, Shannon E.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    ) but are capable of traveling long distances across open water. Areas with canopy-forming kelp are often used by sea otters for resting and foraging, although it is not an essential habitat requirement, as several populations inhabit areas devoid of canopy...-forming kelp and rest in open water (Miller 1974, Riedman and Estes 1990). In their role as an upper trophic level predator, sea otters can have a strong top-down influence on populations of many species of benthic invertebrates. With a daily rate...

  10. Identification of repeat sequence heterogeneity at the polymorphic short tandem repeat locus HUMTH01[AATG][sub n] and reassignment of alleles in population analysis by using a locus-specific allelic ladder

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Puers, C. (Institute for Forensic Medicine, Muenster (Germany)); Schumm, J.W. (Promega Corp., Madison, WI (United States)); Hammond, H.A.; Caskey, C.T.; Jin, L.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An allelic ladder containing amplified sequences of seven alleles of the polymorphic human tyrosine hydroxylase locus, HUMTH01, was constructed and employed as a standard marker. Sequence analysis of each ladder component indicates that fragments differ by integral multiples of the AATG core repeat sequence characteristic of this locus. Individual alles are designated [open quotes]5[close quotes] through [open quotes]11,[close quotes] according to the number of complete reiterations of the core repeat contained within them. Comparison of the HUMTH01 allelic ladder with DNA samples amplified at this locus revealed core repeat length heterogeneity (i.e., deletions or insertions shorter than one core repeat) within the human population. In particular, a common allele was identified which migrates more quickly than allele 10, but more slowly than allele 9, on electrophoresis through a denaturing polyacrylamide gel. Sequence analysis of this allele, designated [open quotes]10-1,[close quotes] reveals lack of a single adenine normally present in the seventh copy of the AATG. The allelic ladder was used to reevaluate previously published population data. Results of testing for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and population substructure were not altered significantly by these modifications. 29 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  11. MICROBIAL POPULATIONS FECAL PELLETS AND

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luther, Douglas S.

    MICROBIAL POPULATIONS FECAL PELLETS AND AND BIOLU}IINESCENCEOF OCEANIC SEDII,IENTTRAP PARTICLES activities of microbial populations associated with fecal pellets col-Lecteo from oceanic zooplankton were (indicators of microbial growth and reproduction rates, respectively) were monitored in fecal pellets at time

  12. Estimated population near uranium tailings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bloomster, C.H.; Brown, D.R.; Bruno, G.A.; Craig, S.N.; Dirks, J.A.; Griffin, E.A.; Reis, J.W.; Young, J.K.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Population studies, which took place during the months of April, May, and June 1983, were performed for 27 active and 25 inactive mill sites. For each mill site, a table showing population by radius (1/2, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5 km) in 16 compass directions was generated. 22 references, 6 tables.

  13. Optical Identification of the ASCA Medium Sensitivity Survey in the Northern Sky: Nature of Hard X-ray-selected Luminous Active Galactic Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Masayuki Akiyama; Yoshihiro Ueda; Kouji Ohta; Tadayuki Takahashi; Toru Yamada

    2003-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of optical spectroscopic identifications of a bright subsample of 2-10keV hard X-ray selected sources from the ASCA Medium Sensitivity Survey in the northern sky. The flux limit of the subsample is 3*10^-13 erg s^-1 cm^-2 in the 2-10keV band. All but one of the 87 hard X-ray selected sources are optically identified, with AGNs, 7 clusters of galaxies, and 1 galactic star. It is the largest complete sample of hard X-ray selected AGNs at the bright flux limit. Amounts of absorption to their nuclei are estimated to be hydrogen column densities (N_H) of up to ~3*10^23 cm^-2 from their X-ray spectra. Optical properties of X-ray absorbed AGNs with N_H > 1*10^22 cm^-2 indicate the effects of dust absorption: at redshifts, z0.6, the X-ray absorbed AGNs have a large hard X-ray to optical flux ratio (log f2-10keV/fR > +1). However, three X-ray absorbed z>0.6 AGNs show strong broad lines. In combination with hard X-ray selected AGN samples from the ASCA Large Sky Survey, the ASCA Deep Survey in the Lockman Hole and Chandra Deep Field North, the luminosity distributions of absorbed and less-absorbed AGNs are compared.

  14. Identification of c-Type Heme-Containing Peptides Using Non-Activated Immobilized Metal Affinity Cchromatography Resin Enrichment and Higher-Energy Collisional Dissociation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Haizhen; Yang, Feng; Qian, Weijun; Brown, Roslyn N.; Wang, Yuexi; Merkley, Eric D.; Park, Jea H.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Moore, Ronald J.; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Smith, Richard D.; Lipton, Mary S.

    2011-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    c-type cytochromes play essential roles in many biological activities of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, including electron transfer, enzyme catalysis and induction of apoptosis. We report a novel enrichment strategy for identifying c-type heme-containing peptides that uses non-activated IMAC resin. The strategy demonstrated at least seven-fold enrichment for heme-containing peptides digested from a cytochrome c protein standard, and quantitative linear performance was also assessed for heme-containing peptide enrichment. Heme-containing peptides extracted from the periplasmic fraction of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 were further identified using higher-energy collisional dissociation tandem mass spectrometry. The results demonstrated the applicability of this enrichment strategy to identify c-type heme-containing peptides from a highly complex biological sample, and at the same time, confirmed the periplasmic localization of heme-containing proteins during suboxic respiration activities of S. oneidensis MR-1.

  15. Identification of 6-octadecynoic acid from a methanol extract of Marrubium vulgare L. as a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? agonist

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohtera, Anna; Miyamae, Yusaku; Nakai, Naomi [Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Kawachi, Atsushi; Kawada, Kiyokazu; Han, Junkyu; Isoda, Hiroko [Alliance for Research on North Africa (ARENA), University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8572 (Japan) [Alliance for Research on North Africa (ARENA), University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8572 (Japan); Faculty of Life and Environment, University of Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8572 (Japan); Neffati, Mohamed [Arid Zone Research Institute (IRA), Médenine 4119 (Tunisia)] [Arid Zone Research Institute (IRA), Médenine 4119 (Tunisia); Akita, Toru; Maejima, Kazuhiro [Nippon Shinyaku CO., LTD., Kyoto 601-8550 (Japan)] [Nippon Shinyaku CO., LTD., Kyoto 601-8550 (Japan); Masuda, Seiji; Kambe, Taiho [Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Mori, Naoki; Irie, Kazuhiro [Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Nagao, Masaya, E-mail: mnagao@kais.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)] [Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan)

    2013-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Highlights: •6-ODA, a rare fatty acid with a triple bond, was identified from Marrubium vulgare. •6-ODA was synthesized from petroselinic acid as a starting material. •6-ODA stimulated lipid accumulation in HSC-T6 and 3T3-L1 cells. •The first report of a fatty acid with a triple bond functioning as a PPAR? agonist. •This study sheds light on novel functions of a fatty acid with a triple bond. -- Abstract: 6-Octadecynoic acid (6-ODA), a fatty acid with a triple bond, was identified in the methanol extract of Marrubium vulgare L. as an agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ? (PPAR?). Fibrogenesis caused by hepatic stellate cells is inhibited by PPAR? whose ligands are clinically used for the treatment of diabetes. Plant extracts of Marrubium vulgare L., were screened for activity to inhibit fibrosis in the hepatic stellate cell line HSC-T6 using Oil Red-O staining, which detects lipids that typically accumulate in quiescent hepatic stellate cells. A methanol extract with activity to stimulate accumulation of lipids was obtained. This extract was found to have PPAR? agonist activity using a luciferase reporter assay. After purification using several chromatographic methods, 6-ODA, a fatty acid with a triple bond, was identified as a candidate of PPAR? agonist. Synthesized 6-ODA and its derivative 9-octadecynoic acid (9-ODA), which both have a triple bond but in different positions, activated PPAR? in a luciferase reporter assay and increased lipid accumulation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes in a PPAR?-dependent manner. There is little information about the biological activity of fatty acids with a triple bond, and to our knowledge, this is the first report that 6-ODA and 9-ODA function as PPAR? agonists.

  16. Occupational Populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    unknown authors

    ? The general population may be exposed to radon in indoor and outdoor air and drinking water. ? The primary source of indoor radon is from soil; radon in the soil can enter the home through cracks in the floors, walls, or foundations. The release of radon from water may also contribute to indoor levels. ? Exposures to radon gas are accompanied by exposure to radon progeny which are the decay products of radon-222 [e.g., bismuth-214 ( 214 Bi), lead-210 ( 210 Pb), 214 Pb, polonium-210 ( 210 Po), and 218 Po.

  17. Identification in Prediction Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bielefeld, University of

    Identification in Prediction Theory Lars B¨aumer Bielefeld 2000 #12;Acknowledgment I wish to thank remarks. 1 #12;Contents 1 Introduction 3 2 Finite-State Predictability 7 2.1 A Universal Predictor Predictability and Identifiability . . . . . . 30 3.3 Markov Machines for Identification

  18. Identifying Activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lewis, Adrian S

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Identification of active constraints in constrained optimization is of interest from both practical and theoretical viewpoints, as it holds the promise of reducing an inequality-constrained problem to an equality-constrained problem, in a neighborhood of a solution. We study this issue in the more general setting of composite nonsmooth minimization, in which the objective is a composition of a smooth vector function c with a lower semicontinuous function h, typically nonsmooth but structured. In this setting, the graph of the generalized gradient of h can often be decomposed into a union (nondisjoint) of simpler subsets. "Identification" amounts to deciding which subsets of the graph are "active" in the criticality conditions at a given solution. We give conditions under which any convergent sequence of approximate critical points finitely identifies the activity. Prominent among these properties is a condition akin to the Mangasarian-Fromovitz constraint qualification, which ensures boundedness of the set of...

  19. "Revealing a Population of Heavily Obscured Active Galactic Nuclei at z=0.5-1 in the Chandra Deep Field-South

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luo, B; Xue, Y Q; Alexander, D M; Brusa, M; Bauer, F E; Comastri, A; Fabian, A C; Gilli, R; Lehmer, B D; Rafferty, D A; Schneider, D P; Vignali, C

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    (abridged) We identify a numerically significant population of heavily obscured AGNs at z~0.5-1 in the Chandra Deep Field-South (CDF-S) and Extended Chandra Deep Field-South by selecting 242 X-ray undetected objects with infrared-based star formation rates (SFRs) substantially higher (a factor of 3.2 or more) than their SFRs determined from the UV after correcting for dust extinction. An X-ray stacking analysis of 23 candidates in the central CDF-S region using the 4 Ms Chandra data reveals a hard X-ray signal with an effective power-law photon index of Gamma=0.6_{-0.4}^{+0.3}, indicating a significant contribution from obscured AGNs. Based on Monte Carlo simulations, we conclude that 74+-25% of the selected galaxies host obscured AGNs, within which ~95% are heavily obscured and ~80% are Compton-thick (CT; NH>1.5x10^{24} cm^{-2}). The heavily obscured objects in our sample are of moderate intrinsic X-ray luminosity [ ~ (0.9-4)x10^{42} erg/s in the 2-10 keV band]. The space density of the CT AGNs is (1.6+-0.5)...

  20. Identification of a hypoxic population of bone marrow cells

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allalunis, M.J.; Chapman, J.D.; Turner, A.R.

    1983-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A technique using collagenase has been devised to release and separate, with reproducibility, hematopoietic cells (HC) from various microenvironments of mouse femurs. HC were assayed by an in vitro gel culture technique used traditionally to score granulocyte-macrophage precursor cells (CFU-C). CFU-C which resided in the medullary cavity and endosteal regions were sensitive to ionizing radiation and resistant to misonidazole (MISO) cytotoxicity. CFU-C which resided within the compact bone were resistant to ionizing radiation and sensitive to the cytotoxic action of MISO. These results suggest that HC which reside in the bone are hypoxic and retain clonogenic potential. When animals were exposed to various treatments with MISO followed by myelotoxic doses of cyclophosphamide (CTX) or total body irradiation (TBI), the LD/sub 50/ of both agents was significantly reduced. This result suggests that a hypoxic component of HC could be important in the regenerative process within the marrow after such myelotoxic trauma.

  1. ACTIVITY IDENTIFICATION AND LOCAL LINEAR CONVERGENCE ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    the l1-norm is soft thresholding. ... tor of the nuclear norm is just soft thresholding applied to the .... In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems. (NIPS) ...

  2. Population density of San Joaquin kit fox

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCue, P.; O'Farrell, T.P.; Kato, T.; Evans, B.G.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Populations of the endangered San Joaquin kit fox, vulpes macrotis mutica, are known to occur on the Elk Hills Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1. This study assess the impact of intensified petroleum exploration and production and associated human activities on kit fox population density. (ACR)

  3. Population Analysis, Fall 2005 1 Population Analyses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Clark, William R.

    Population Analysis, Fall 2005 1 Population Analyses EEOB/AEcl 611 Fall Semester 2005 Scheduled Phone: 294-5176 email: wrclark@iastate.edu AEcl 611 is evolving in response to very rapid changes. The emphasis in AEcl 611 is on understanding the statistical basis of various analytical techniques, applying

  4. Risk Identification and Assessment

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's PossibleRadiation Protection TechnicalResonantNovember 15 to March 15ARisk Identification and

  5. Review Article Seismic sequence near Zakynthos Island, Greece, April 2006: Identification of the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cerveny, Vlastislav

    Review Article Seismic sequence near Zakynthos Island, Greece, April 2006: Identification seismotectonic interpretation is that the whole sequence activated a single sub-horizontal fault zone at a depth is a high- seismicity area, the identification of the seismic fault is significant for the seismic hazard

  6. Estimating Traveler Populations at Airport and Cruise Terminals for Population Distribution and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jochem, Warren C [ORNL; Sims, Kelly M [ORNL; Bright, Eddie A [ORNL; Urban, Marie L [ORNL; Rose, Amy N [ORNL; Coleman, Phil R [ORNL; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, uses of high-resolution population distribution databases are increasing steadily for environmental, socioeconomic, public health, and disaster-related research and operations. With the development of daytime population distribution, temporal resolution of such databases has been improved. However, the lack of incorporation of transitional population, namely business and leisure travelers, leaves a significant population unaccounted for within the critical infrastructure networks, such as at transportation hubs. This paper presents two general methodologies for estimating passenger populations in airport and cruise port terminals at a high temporal resolution which can be incorporated into existing population distribution models. The methodologies are geographically scalable and are based on, and demonstrate how, two different transportation hubs with disparate temporal population dynamics can be modeled utilizing publicly available databases including novel data sources of flight activity from the Internet which are updated in near-real time. The airport population estimation model shows great potential for rapid implementation for a large collection of airports on a national scale, and the results suggest reasonable accuracy in the estimated passenger traffic. By incorporating population dynamics at high temporal resolutions into population distribution models, we hope to improve the estimates of populations exposed to or at risk to disasters, thereby improving emergency planning and response, and leading to more informed policy decisions.

  7. Surveillance Guides - Identification of Hazards

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Date: Facility Representative RL Facility Representative Program March 9, 1995 Surveillance Guide Revision 0 Identification of hazards Page 1 of 5...

  8. Identification of Metal Reductases using Proteomic Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lipton, Mary

    2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Central to the NABIR goal to develop the scientific basis for in situ remediation of radioactive contaminants is the fundamental understanding of microorganisms with dissimilatory metal reducing activity. In order to effectively exploit these bacteria, it is necessary to know which enzymes and pathways are involved. Additionally, it would be advantageous to understand the similarities and differences of these pathways across different bacteria for effective deployment in bioremediation, as well as to identify new microbes capable of such activities. Most approaches to identify these enzymes or enzyme complexes rely on biochemical purification to homogeneity with subsequent Nterminal sequencing of digested peptides. However, loss of activity before achieving purity often necessitates repetition of the entire process. Newly developed proteomics capabilities at PNNL allow for the identification of many proteins from a single sample through mass spectrometry analysis.

  9. Studies of positron identification with the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haviland, David

    Studies of positron identification with the PAMELA calorimeter LAURA ROSSETTO Licentiate Thesis Stockholm, Sweden 2010 #12;#12;Licentiate Thesis Studies of positron identification with the PAMELA

  10. The Use of Remote Cameras to Monitor Traffic Activity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padilla Paniagua, Manuel Antonio

    2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Remote Infrared-triggered cameras are commonly used in wildlife management research. Cameras are used for population estimates, identification, and behavioral observations. Road systems are an important factor in wildlife management research...

  11. Identification of host response signatures of infection.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Branda, Steven S.; Sinha, Anupama; Bent, Zachary

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Biological weapons of mass destruction and emerging infectious diseases represent a serious and growing threat to our national security. Effective response to a bioattack or disease outbreak critically depends upon efficient and reliable distinguishing between infected vs healthy individuals, to enable rational use of scarce, invasive, and/or costly countermeasures (diagnostics, therapies, quarantine). Screening based on direct detection of the causative pathogen can be problematic, because culture- and probe-based assays are confounded by unanticipated pathogens (e.g., deeply diverged, engineered), and readily-accessible specimens (e.g., blood) often contain little or no pathogen, particularly at pre-symptomatic stages of disease. Thus, in addition to the pathogen itself, one would like to detect infection-specific host response signatures in the specimen, preferably ones comprised of nucleic acids (NA), which can be recovered and amplified from tiny specimens (e.g., fingerstick draws). Proof-of-concept studies have not been definitive, however, largely due to use of sub-optimal sample preparation and detection technologies. For purposes of pathogen detection, Sandia has developed novel molecular biology methods that enable selective isolation of NA unique to, or shared between, complex samples, followed by identification and quantitation via Second Generation Sequencing (SGS). The central hypothesis of the current study is that variations on this approach will support efficient identification and verification of NA-based host response signatures of infectious disease. To test this hypothesis, we re-engineered Sandia's sophisticated sample preparation pipelines, and developed new SGS data analysis tools and strategies, in order to pioneer use of SGS for identification of host NA correlating with infection. Proof-of-concept studies were carried out using specimens drawn from pathogen-infected non-human primates (NHP). This work provides a strong foundation for large-scale, highly-efficient efforts to identify and verify infection-specific host NA signatures in human populations.

  12. Microbial studies of compost: bacterial identification, and their potential for turfgrass pathogen suppression

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boland, Greg J.

    Microbial studies of compost: bacterial identification, and their potential for turfgrass pathogen; accepted 17 April 2002 Keywords: Bacteria, compost, biocontrol disease suppression, grey snow mould Composting is the degradation of organic materials through the activities of diverse microorganisms

  13. PINS chemical identification software

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Caffrey, Augustine J.; Krebs, Kennth M.

    2004-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for identifying a chemical compound. A neutron source delivers neutrons into the chemical compound. The nuclei of chemical elements constituting the chemical compound emit gamma rays upon interaction with the neutrons. The gamma rays are characteristic of the chemical elements constituting the chemical compound. A spectrum of the gamma rays is generated having a detection count and an energy scale. The energy scale is calibrated by comparing peaks in the spectrum to energies of pre-selected chemical elements in the spectrum. A least-squares fit completes the calibration. The chemical elements constituting the chemical compound can be readily determined, which then allows for identification of the chemical compound.

  14. System and damage identification of civil structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moaveni, Babak

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    12 Damage Index Methods. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Model Updating for Damage Identification . . . . . . . .298 x Damage Factors and Residual

  15. Population segments with disabilities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stough, Laura

    with disabilities given the large prevalence of this population throughout the world, the intensity of their social vulnerabilities in disaster, and recent federal mandates that specify equal access for individuals with disabilities to emergency preparedness..., as “special needs” populations. More recently, the functional-needs approach to defining disability-related needs during disaster was adopted by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (2010) in its Comprehensive Preparedness Guide 101 and in the National...

  16. CONSULTANT REPORT IDENTIFICATION OF LOWIMPACT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    CONSULTANT REPORT IDENTIFICATION OF LOWIMPACT INTERCONNECTION SITES FOR WHOLESALE electric power sources strains existing processes to safely interconnect wholesale distributed resources for wholesale photovoltaic systems on the grid. The model, which integrates transmission and distribution

  17. Pileup Per Particle Identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniele Bertolini; Philip Harris; Matthew Low; Nhan Tran

    2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a new method for pileup mitigation by implementing "pileup per particle identification" (PUPPI). For each particle we first define a local shape $\\alpha$ which probes the collinear versus soft diffuse structure in the neighborhood of the particle. The former is indicative of particles originating from the hard scatter and the latter of particles originating from pileup interactions. The distribution of $\\alpha$ for charged pileup, assumed as a proxy for all pileup, is used on an event-by-event basis to calculate a weight for each particle. The weights describe the degree to which particles are pileup-like and are used to rescale their four-momenta, superseding the need for jet-based corrections. Furthermore, the algorithm flexibly allows combination with other, possibly experimental, probabilistic information associated with particles such as vertexing and timing performance. We demonstrate the algorithm improves over existing methods by looking at jet $p_T$ and jet mass. We also find an improvement on non-jet quantities like missing transverse energy.

  18. In Silico Identification Software (ISIS): A Machine Learning...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Silico Identification Software (ISIS): A Machine Learning Approach to Tandem Mass Spectral Identification of Lipids. In Silico Identification Software (ISIS): A Machine Learning...

  19. Concealed identification symbols and nondestructive determination of the identification symbols

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nance, Thomas A.; Gibbs, Kenneth M.

    2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The concealing of one or more identification symbols into a target object and the subsequent determination or reading of such symbols through non-destructive testing is described. The symbols can be concealed in a manner so that they are not visible to the human eye and/or cannot be readily revealed to the human eye without damage or destruction of the target object. The identification symbols can be determined after concealment by e.g., the compilation of multiple X-ray images. As such, the present invention can also provide e.g., a deterrent to theft and the recovery of lost or stolen objects.

  20. Population Ecology Philip M. Dixon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Population Ecology Philip M. Dixon Department of Statistics Iowa State University 20 December 2001 Population ecology is the discipline in ecology that deals with the structure and dynamics (e.g. growth interacting populations. Population ecology is closely related to other ecological disciplines, e

  1. COMPARATIVE STUDY OF POPULATIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    WOODS HOLE, MASS. SPECIAL SCIENTIFIC REPORT- FISHERIES No. 204 UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OF POPULATIONS OF THE STRIPED BASS By Robert Minturn Lewis Fishery Research Biologist Special Scientific Report by Merriman (1937 and 1941), Vladykov and Wal- lace (1952), Raney and de Sylva (1953), Raney, Woolcott

  2. 862 PHYTOPATHOLOGY Population Biology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDonald, Bruce

    de Agronomía, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Carrera 30 45-00 Bogotá, Colombia; second author potato in Colombia using 11 simple-sequence repeat (SSR) markers. In total, 288 different multilocus%. RST statistics indicated a very low level of population differentiation overall, consistent with high

  3. Visual Field Maps, Population Receptive Field Sizes, and Visual Field Coverage in the Human MT Complex

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dumoulin, Serge O.

    of processing in human motion-selective cortex. I N T R O D U C T I O N Neuroimaging experiments localize human by additional experiments. Defining human MT based on stimulus selectivity means that the identificationVisual Field Maps, Population Receptive Field Sizes, and Visual Field Coverage in the Human MT

  4. Identification and differentiation of individual beta emitters in waste mixtures by liquid scintillation spectrometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Siskel, Robin Lynn

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    carbon-14, tritium, and iodine-125 liquid scintillation wastes, provided that the activity and isotopes present can be documented. This legislation has generated a significant interest in developing a quick, cost efficient method of identificatior... to reference data was the most practical method of unknown identification, and fully complies with regulatory requirements for relatively unquenched sample mixtures of two isotopes. Accurate isotopic identification and differentiation was found...

  5. Protein Identification Using Top-Down. | EMSL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Identification Using Top-Down. Protein Identification Using Top-Down. Abstract: In the last two years, due to advances in protein separation and mass spectrometry, top-down mass...

  6. Aircraft System Identification Using Artificial Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valasek, John

    Aircraft System Identification Using Artificial Neural Networks Kenton Kirkpatrick Jim May Jr. John Meeting January 9, 2013 Compos Volatus #12;Overview Motivation System Identification Artificial Neural Networks 2 Artificial Neural Networks ANNSID Conclusions and Open Challenges #12;Motivation 3 #12

  7. Aircraft System Identification Using Artificial Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valasek, John

    Aircraft System Identification Using Artificial Neural Networks Kenton Kirkpatrick , Jim May Jr linear system identification for aircraft using artificial neural net- works. The output of a linear the correct model. In this paper, a new method of system identification is proposed that uses artificial

  8. Platform identification using Design Structure Matrices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Platform identification using Design Structure Matrices Konstantinos Kalligeros* , Olivier de Weck identification of platform components at multiple levels of system aggregation, among variants within a family variables of the variants. We then introduce a novel algorithm for the identification of platform variables

  9. Non-destructive Identification of Individual Leukemia Cells by Optical Trapping Raman Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, J W; Taylor, D S; Lane, S; Zwerdling, T; Tuscano, J; Huser, T

    2007-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Currently, a combination of technologies is typically required to assess the malignancy of cancer cells. These methods often lack the specificity and sensitivity necessary for early, accurate diagnosis. Here we demonstrate using clinical samples the application of laser trapping Raman spectroscopy as a novel approach that provides intrinsic biochemical markers for the noninvasive detection of individual cancer cells. The Raman spectra of live, hematopoietic cells provide reliable molecular fingerprints that reflect their biochemical composition and biology. Populations of normal T and B lymphocytes from four healthy individuals, and cells from three leukemia patients were analyzed, and multiple intrinsic Raman markers associated with DNA and protein vibrational modes have been identified that exhibit excellent discriminating power for cancer cell identification. A combination of two multivariate statistical methods, principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA), was used to confirm the significance of these markers for identifying cancer cells and classifying the data. The results indicate that, on average, 95% of the normal cells and 90% of the patient cells were accurately classified into their respective cell types. We also provide evidence that these markers are unique to cancer cells and not purely a function of differences in their cellular activation.

  10. SECURING RADIO FREQUENCY IDENTIFICATION (RFID)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    business process for an organization; as a result, the security risks for RFID systems and the controls for an organization; as a result, the security risks for RFID systems and the controls available to address themMay 2007 SECURING RADIO FREQUENCY IDENTIFICATION (RFID) SYSTEMS SECURING RADIO FREQUENCY

  11. Emergent vortices in populations of colloidal rollers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antoine Bricard; Jean-Baptiste-Caussin; Debasish Das; Charles Savoie; Vijayakumar Chikkadi; Kyohei Shitara; Oleksandr Chepizhko; Fernando Peruani; David Saintillan; Denis Bartolo

    2015-06-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Coherent vortical motion has been reported in a wide variety of populations including living organisms (bacteria, fishes, human crowds) and synthetic active matter (shaken grains, mixtures of biopolymers), yet a unified description of the formation and structure of this pattern remains lacking. Here we report the self-organization of motile colloids into a macroscopic steadily rotating vortex. Combining physical experiments and numerical simulations, we elucidate this collective behavior. We demonstrate that the emergent-vortex structure lives on the verge of a phase separation, and single out the very constituents responsible for this state of polar active matter. Building on this observation, we establish a continuum theory and lay out a strong foundation for the description of vortical collective motion in a broad class of motile populations constrained by geometrical boundaries.

  12. Population and Climate Change:Population and Climate Change: Coupling Population Models withCoupling Population Models with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalnay, Eugenia

    Coupling Population Models with Earth System ModelsEarth System Models Eugenia Kalnay, Safa Motesharrei, Jorge Rivas Change: Fully Coupling Population and Earth System Models" My research at the U. of Maryland #12

  13. Optimal control of population transfer in Markovian open quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wei Cui; Zairong Xi; Yu Pan

    2010-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    There has long been interest to control the transfer of population between specified quantum states. Recent work has optimized the control law for closed system population transfer by using a gradient ascent pulse engineer- ing algorithm [1]. Here, a spin-boson model consisting of two-level atoms which interact with the dissipative environment, is investigated. With opti- mal control, the quantum system can invert the populations of the quantum logic states. The temperature plays an important role in controlling popula- tion transfer. At low temperatures the control has active performance, while at high temperatures it has less erect. We also analyze the decoherence be- havior of open quantum systems with optimal population transfer control, and we find that these controls can prolong the coherence time. We hope that active optimal control can help quantum solid-state-based engineering.

  14. Muon Reconstruction and Identification in CMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Everett, A. [Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, 47906 (United States)

    2010-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the design strategies and status of the CMS muon reconstruction and identification identification software. Muon reconstruction and identification is accomplished through a variety of complementary algorithms. The CMS muon reconstruction software is based on a Kalman filter technique and reconstructs muons in the standalone muon system, using information from all three types of muon detectors, and links the resulting muon tracks with tracks reconstructed in the silicon tracker. In addition, a muon identification algorithm has been developed which tries to identify muons with high efficiency while maintaining a low probability of misidentification. The muon identification algorithm is complementary by design to the muon reconstruction algorithm that starts track reconstruction in the muon detectors. The identification algorithm accepts reconstructed tracks from the inner tracker and attempts to quantify the muon compatibility for each track using associated calorimeter and muon detector hit information. The performance status is based on detailed detector simulations as well as initial studies using cosmic muon data.

  15. Active Attacks Against Modulation-based Radiometric Identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bystroff, Chris

    ) may become compromised via physical attacks. In light of these difficulties, researchers have started Science Technical Report 09-02 Matthew Edman and B¨ulent Yener Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Department

  16. alters methyltransferase activity: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    D. Maynard-smith; Victoria L. Robinson; Petra C. F. Oyston; Rick W. Titball; Peter L. Roach 4 Identification of the Gene and Characterization of the Activity of the...

  17. Multi-wavelength identification of high-energy sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mignani, R P

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nature of most of the ~300 high-energy gamma-ray sources discovered by the EGRET instrument aboard the Gamma-ray Observatory (GRO) between 1991 and 1999 is one of the greatest enigmas in high-energy astrophysics. While about half of the extragalactic sources have been optically identified with Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN), only a meagre 10% of the galactic sources have a reliable identification. This low success rate has mainly to be ascribed to the local crowding of potential optical counterparts and to the large gamma-ray error boxes (of the order of one degree in radius) which prevented a straightforward optical identification. Indeed, a multi-wavelength identification strategy, based on a systematic coverage of the gamma-ray error boxes, has been the only do-able approach. The situation is now greatly improving thanks to the observations performed by the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope which, thanks to the LAT instrument, provides a factor of 50 improvement in sensitivity and a factor of 10 improvemen...

  18. Perturbation Theory for Population Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francisco M. Fernandez

    2007-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We prove that a recently proposed homotopy perturbation method for the treatment of population dynamics is just the Taylor expansion of the population variables about initial time. Our results show that this perturbation method fails to provide the global features of the ecosystem dynamics.

  19. aircraft system identification: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Aircraft System Identification Using Artificial Neural Networks Engineering Websites Summary: Aircraft System Identification Using...

  20. animal identification systems: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the performance of the new algorithm1 . I. Introduction Blind identification Reilly, James P. 178 Fuzzy membership function optimization for system identification using an...

  1. acoustic source identification: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the performance of the new algorithm1 . I. Introduction Blind identification Reilly, James P. 95 Mid-Infrared Identification of Faint Submillimeter Sources Astrophysics...

  2. aerosol source identification: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the performance of the new algorithm1 . I. Introduction Blind identification Reilly, James P. 60 Mid-Infrared Identification of Faint Submillimeter Sources Astrophysics...

  3. Method Development: Identification of the Soluble Organic Fraction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Method Development: Identification of the Soluble Organic Fraction of Particulate Matter on DPF Soot Method Development: Identification of the Soluble Organic Fraction of...

  4. On the Reliability of System Identification: Applications of Bootstrap Theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kareem, Ahsan

    1 On the Reliability of System Identification: Applications of Bootstrap Theory T. Kijewski & A of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN, USA Keywords: bootstrapping, system identification, Monte Carlo, damping

  5. Enrichment of Functional Redox Reactive Proteins and Identification...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Redox Reactive Proteins and Identification by Mass Spectrometry Results in Several Terminal Fe(III) Enrichment of Functional Redox Reactive Proteins and Identification by Mass...

  6. STEPS: A Grid Search Methodology for Optimized Peptide Identification...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Grid Search Methodology for Optimized Peptide Identification Filtering of MSMS Database Search Results. STEPS: A Grid Search Methodology for Optimized Peptide Identification...

  7. System identification for robust control design

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dohner, J.L.

    1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    System identification for the purpose of robust control design involves estimating a nominal model of a physical system and the uncertainty bounds of that nominal model via the use of experimentally measured input/output data. Although many algorithms have been developed to identify nominal models, little effort has been directed towards identifying uncertainty bounds. Therefore, in this document, a discussion of both nominal model identification and bounded output multiplicative uncertainty identification will be presented. This document is divided into several sections. Background information relevant to system identification and control design will be presented. A derivation of eigensystem realization type algorithms will be presented. An algorithm will be developed for calculating the maximum singular value of output multiplicative uncertainty from measured data. An application will be given involving the identification of a complex system with aliased dynamics, feedback control, and exogenous noise disturbances. And, finally, a short discussion of results will be presented.

  8. Nonlinear Identification Method Corresponding to Muscle Property Variation in FES -Experiments in Paraplegic Patients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    or unknown metabolic factor of human system. This identification method itself can be expected to be applied movement synthesis of spinal-cord-injured patients. The nonlinearity of the neuromuscular system can for general use in rehabilitation robotics. I. INTRODUCTION The electrical stimulation to activate paralyzed

  9. Risk assessment for osteoporotic fractures among men and women from a prospective population study: the EPIC-Norfolk study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moayyeri, Alireza

    2012-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

    ................................................................................................ 99  6.4.  Results ................................................................................................ 101  6.4.1.  Characteristics of the study population ....................................... 101  6.4.2.  Physical activity and heel...

  10. Identification of process suitable diluent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dean R. Peterman

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sigma Team for Minor Actinide Separation (STMAS) was formed within the USDOE Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) program in order to develop more efficient methods for the separation of americium and other minor actinides (MA) from used nuclear fuel. The development of processes for MA separations is driven by the potential benefits; reduced long-term radiotoxicty of waste placed in a geologic repository, reduced timeframe of waste storage, reduced repository heat load, the possibility of increased repository capacity, and increased utilization of energy potential of used nuclear fuel. The research conducted within the STMAS framework is focused upon the realization of significant simplifications to aqueous recycle processes proposed for MA separations. This report describes the research efforts focused upon the identification of a process suitable diluent for a flowsheet concept for the separation of MA which is based upon the dithiophosphinic acid (DPAH) extractants previously developed at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL).

  11. Energy Systems and Population Health

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ezzati, Majid; Bailis, Rob; Kammen, Daniel M.; Holloway, Tracey; Price, Lynn; Cifuentes, Luis A.; Barnes, Brendon; Chaurey, Akanksha; Dhanapala, Kiran N.

    2004-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    It is well-documented that energy and energy systems have a central role in social and economic development and human welfare at all scales, from household and community to regional and national (41). Among its various welfare effects, energy is closely linked with people s health. Some of the effects of energy on health and welfare are direct. With abundant energy, more food or more frequent meals can be prepared; food can be refrigerated, increasing the types of food items that are consumed and reducing food contamination; water pumps can provide more water and eliminate the need for water storage leading to contamination or increased exposure to disease vectors such as mosquitoes or snails; water can be disinfected by boiling or using other technologies such as radiation. Other effects of energy on public health are mediated through more proximal determinants of health and disease. Abundant energy can lead to increased irrigation, agricultural productivity, and access to food and nutrition; access to energy can also increase small-scale income generation such as processing of agricultural commodities (e.g., producing refined oil from oil seeds, roasting coffee, drying and preserving fruits and meats) and production of crafts; ability to control lighting and heating allows education or economic activities to be shielded from daily or seasonal environmental constraints such as light, temperature, rainfall, or wind; time and other economic resources spent on collecting and/or transporting fuels can be used for other household needs if access to energy is facilitated; energy availability for transportation increases access to health and education facilities and allow increased economic activity by facilitating the transportation of goods and services to and from markets; energy for telecommunication technology (radio, television, telephone, or internet) provides increased access to information useful for health, education, or economic purposes; provision of energy to rural and urban health facilities allows increased delivery and coverage of 3 various health services and interventions such as tests and treatments, better storage of medicine and vaccines, disinfection of medical equipment by boiling or radiation, and more frequent and efficient health system encounters through mobile clinics or longer working hours; and so on. In fact, while the dominant view of development-energy-health linkages has been that improvements in energy and health are outcomes of the socioeconomic development process (e.g., the ''energy ladder'' framework discussed below), it has even been argued that access to higher quality energy sources and technologies can initiate a chain of demographic, health, and development outcomes by changing the household structure and socioeconomic relationships. For example, in addition to increased opportunities for food and income production, reduced infant mortality as a result of transition to cleaner fuels or increased coverage of vaccination with availability of refrigerators in rural clinics may initiate a process of ''demographic transition'' to low-mortality and low-fertility populations (14). Such a transition has historically been followed with further improvements in maternal and child health and increased female participation in the labor markets and other economic activities.

  12. Inferring population history from genealogies 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lohse, Konrad R.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis investigates a range of genealogical approaches to making quantitative inferences about the spatial and demographic history of populations with application to two insect systems: A local radiation of high ...

  13. Population modeling using harpacticoid copepods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , communities and ecosystems. Environmental management decisions rely on ERAs, which and Amphiascus tenuiremis, and demographic equations were used to calculate population statistical power for reproductive endpoints, but at high labor and cost. Therefore

  14. Multi-level RF identification system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Steele, Kerry D.; Anderson, Gordon A.; Gilbert, Ronald W.

    2004-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A radio frequency identification system having a radio frequency transceiver for generating a continuous wave RF interrogation signal that impinges upon an RF identification tag. An oscillation circuit in the RF identification tag modulates the interrogation signal with a subcarrier of a predetermined frequency and modulates the frequency-modulated signal back to the transmitting interrogator. The interrogator recovers and analyzes the subcarrier signal and determines its frequency. The interrogator generates an output indicative of the frequency of the subcarrier frequency, thereby identifying the responding RFID tag as one of a "class" of RFID tags configured to respond with a subcarrier signal of a predetermined frequency.

  15. active populations based: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    behaviors, such as chemical diffusiondetection, motility, proliferation, adhesion and life cycle stages. In this paper we extend the model to simulate heterotypic cell sorting....

  16. INTERNATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY IDENTIFICATION, DEVELOPMENT, DEMONSTRATION, DEPLOYMENT AND EXCHANGE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roy C. Herndon

    2001-02-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Cooperative Agreement (DE-FC21-95EW55101) between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the Florida State University's Institute for International Cooperative Environmental Research (IICER) was designed to facilitate a number of joint programmatic goals of both the DOE and the IICER related to international technology identification, development, demonstration and deployment using a variety of mechanisms to accomplish these goals. These mechanisms included: laboratory and field research; technology demonstrations; international training and technical exchanges; data collection, synthesis and evaluation; the conduct of conferences, symposia and high-level meetings; and other appropriate and effective approaches. The DOE utilized the expertise and facilities of the IICER at Florida State University to accomplish its goals related to this cooperative agreement. The IICER has unique and demonstrated capabilities that have been utilized to conduct the tasks for this cooperative agreement. The IICER conducted activities related to technology identification, development, evaluation, demonstration and deployment through its joint centers which link the capabilities at Florida State University with collaborating academic and leading research institutions in the major countries of Central and Eastern Europe (e.g., Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland) and Russia. The activities and accomplishments for this five-year cooperative agreement are summarized in this Final Technical Report.

  17. The identification of blood group alleles using antisera produced in non-related populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fanguy, Roy Charles, 1929-

    1958-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of red blood cells of line 50 birds tested against selected refer? ence reagents. (F^ generation). . ............. 53 IIIo Iso-immunizations made within line 50 to obtain allele-specific A locus reagents iso-immunizations used to produce pure B locus reagents in line 50 b i r d...

  18. SOFA Component Revision Identification 1 Premysl Brada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SOFA Component Revision Identification 1 Premysl Brada Department of Computer Science versions, component revision numbers and change indications are derived as a well- founded version called "component revisions" and the basic fine-grained "type revisions", can subsequently be used

  19. Security approaches for Radio Frequency Identification systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foley, Joseph Timothy, 1976-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, I explore the challenges related to the security of the Electronic Product Code (EPC) class of Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tags and associated data. RFID systems can be used to improve supply chain ...

  20. Identification and control of a flexible structure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Haiming

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis describes the identification and vibration ics. control of a cantilevered beam with piezoelectric material as actuators and sensors. The Euler-Bernoulli beam equation is used and gravity contribution to the stiffness matrix is included...

  1. Delaware Transportation Infrastructure Forum Problem Identification Statements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Firestone, Jeremy

    2013 Delaware Transportation Infrastructure Forum Problem Identification Statements Sponsored by The Delaware Center for Transportation and the Delaware Department of Transportation Delaware Center for Transportation Your main resource for transportation education and research Identifying Important Issues Related

  2. Feature identification framework and applications (FIFA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Audenaert, Michael Neal

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    collections that provides a general framework for applications while allowing decisions about the details of document representation and features identification to be deferred to domain specific implementations of that framework. These deferred decisions...

  3. The Proteomics Identifications database: 2010 update

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vizcaino, Juan Antonio

    The Proteomics Identifications database (PRIDE, http://www.ebi.ac.uk/pride) at the European Bioinformatics Institute has become one of the main repositories of mass spectrometry-derived proteomics data. For the last 2 ...

  4. Online Identification and Stochastic Control for Autonomous

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papalambros, Panos

    Online Identification and Stochastic Control for Autonomous Internal Combustion Engines Andreas A Advanced internal combustion engine technologies have afforded an increase in the number of controllable economy, pollutant emissions, and engine acceleration. In engine use, table values are interpo- lated

  5. The Effect of Environmental Contaminants on Mating Dynamics and Population Viability in a Sex-Role-Reversed Pipefish

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Partridge, Charlyn G.

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding how anthropogenic activity impacts the health and viability of wildlife populations is one of the most important tasks of environmental biology. A key concern related to bi-products of human activity is the accumulation...

  6. Cardiovascular disease, diabetes and established risk factors among populations of sub-Saharan African descent in Europe: a literature review

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agyemang, Charles; Addo, Juliet; Bhopal, Raj; de-Graft Aikins, Ama; Stronks, Karien

    2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    . Dutch African-Suriname men and women are less physically active than the White-Dutch whereas British African women are more physically active than women in the general population. Literature on psychosocial stress shows inconsistent results. Conclusion...

  7. DNA barcodes and meiofaunal identification 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mann, Jenna D.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years there has been a desire to definitively catalogue the life on our planet. In light of the increasing extinction rates that are driven by human activities, it is unlikely that this will be achieved using ...

  8. Recovery Act: Advanced Load Identification and Management for Buildings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Yi; Casey, Patrick; Du, Liang; He, Dawei

    2014-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

    In response to the U.S. Department of Energy (DoE)’s goal of achieving market ready, net-zero energy residential and commercial buildings by 2020 and 2025, Eaton partnered with the Department of Energy’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and Georgia Institute of Technology to develop an intelligent load identification and management technology enabled by a novel “smart power strip” to provide critical intelligence and information to improve the capability and functionality of building load analysis and building power management systems. Buildings account for 41% of the energy consumption in the United States, significantly more than either transportation or industrial. Within the building sector, plug loads account for a significant portion of energy consumption. Plug load consumes 15-20% of building energy on average. As building managers implement aggressive energy conservation measures, the proportion of plug load energy can increase to as much as 50% of building energy leaving plug loads as the largest remaining single source of energy consumption. This project focused on addressing plug-in load control and management to further improve building energy efficiency accomplished through effective load identification. The execution of the project falls into the following three major aspects. 1) An intelligent load modeling, identification and prediction technology was developed to automatically determine the type, energy consumption, power quality, operation status and performance status of plug-in loads, using electric waveforms at a power outlet level. This project demonstrated the effectiveness of the developed technology through a large set of plug-in loads measurements and testing. 2) A novel “Smart Power Strip (SPS) / Receptacle” prototype was developed to act as a vehicle to demonstrate the feasibility of load identification technology as a low-cost, embedded solution. 3) Market environment for plug-in load control and management solutions, in particular, advanced power strips (APSs) was studied. The project evaluated the market potential for Smart Power Strips (SPSs) with load identification and the likely impact of a load identification feature on APS adoption and effectiveness. The project also identified other success factors required for widespread APS adoption and market acceptance. Even though the developed technology is applicable for both residential and commercial buildings, this project is focused on effective plug-in load control and management for commercial buildings, accomplished through effective load identification. The project has completed Smart Receptacle (SR) prototype development with integration of Load ID, Control/Management, WiFi communication, and Web Service. Twenty SR units were built, tested, and demonstrated in the Eaton lab; eight SR units were tested in the National Renewable Energy Lab (NREL) for one-month of field testing. Load ID algorithm testing for extended load sets was conducted within the Eaton facility and at local university campuses. This report is to summarize the major achievements, activities, and outcomes under the execution of the project.

  9. The indentification of genetic markers in the Roseate Spoonbill Ajaia ajaja and the family Bovidae and their application in captive population management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linn, Rebecca Annette

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    THE IDENTIFICATION OF GENETIC MARKERS IN THE ROSEATE SPOONBILL AJAIA AJAJA AND THE FAMILY BOVIDAE AND THEIR APPLICATION IN CAPTIVE POPULATION MANAGEMENT A Thesis by REBECCA ANNETIE LINN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A... in the Roseate Spoonbill Ajaia Ajaja and the Family Bovidae and Their Application in Captive Population Management. (December 1993) Rebecca Annette Linn, B. S. , Texas Christian University Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Scott K. Davis Various genetic...

  10. Radio-frequency identification could help reduce the spread of plant pathogens

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luvisi, Andrea; Panattoni, Alessandra; Triolo, Enrico

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ReVIEW Article Radio-frequency identification could helpcertified nursery stock. Radio- frequency identification (Panattoni and Enrico Triolo Radio-frequency identification (

  11. LAYNE, HOSPEDALES, GONG: PERSON RE-IDENTIFICATION BY ATTRIBUTES 1 Person Re-identification by Attributes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Shaogang

    LAYNE, HOSPEDALES, GONG: PERSON RE-IDENTIFICATION BY ATTRIBUTES 1 Person Re-identification by Attributes Ryan Layne rlayne@eecs.qmul.ac.uk Timothy Hospedales tmh@eecs.qmul.ac.uk Shaogang Gong sgg unchanged freely in print or electronic forms. #12;2 LAYNE, HOSPEDALES, GONG: PERSON RE

  12. Particle Identification The particle identification (PID) in BRAHMS is accomplished by a combination of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chapter 7 Particle Identification The particle identification (PID) in BRAHMS is accomplished detectors. This chapter first gives an overview of the PID scheme in the forward and mid­rapidity armsV/c in the angular range 2 ffi ! ` ! 18 ffi , and is the only PID for 18 ffi ! ` ! 35 ffi where the measurements

  13. Brain covariance selection: better individual functional connectivity models using population prior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Brain covariance selection: better individual functional connectivity models using population prior bertrand.thirion@inria.fr Abstract Spontaneous brain activity, as observed in functional neuroimaging, has been shown to display reproducible structure that expresses brain architecture and car- ries markers

  14. EO 12898: Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    EO 12898: Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations EO 12898: Environmental Justice in Minority Populations and Low-Income Populations To focus...

  15. A Population Model for the Academic Ecosystem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yan; Chiu, Dah Ming

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent times, the academic ecosystem has seen a tremendous growth in number of authors and publications. While most temporal studies in this area focus on evolution of co-author and citation network structure, this systemic inflation has received very little attention. In this paper, we address this issue by proposing a population model for academia, derived from publication records in the Computer Science domain. We use a generalized branching process as an overarching framework, which enables us to describe the evolution and composition of the research community in a systematic manner. Further, the observed patterns allow us to shed light on researchers' lifecycle encompassing arrival, academic life expectancy, activity, productivity and offspring distribution in the ecosystem. We believe such a study will help develop better bibliometric indices which account for the inflation, and also provide insights into sustainable and efficient resource management for academia.

  16. Population Ecology ISSN 1438-3896

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Aguiar, Marcus A. M.

    1 23 Population Ecology ISSN 1438-3896 Popul Ecol DOI 10.1007/s10144-012-0352-3 Impacts of enemy of Population Ecology and Springer Japan. This e-offprint is for personal use only and shall not be self of Population Ecology and Springer Japan 2012 Abstract In this study, we used data from both experi- ments

  17. Special population planner, version 4.0.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuiper, J.; Tanzman, E.; Metz, W.

    2007-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Emergencies happen every day. Many are caused by storms or auto accidents and can be planned for, if not predicted. Emergencies resulting from natural hazards often affect a large number of people, and planning for them can be difficult, since knowledge of the needs of the people involved is generally unavailable. Emergencies resulting from accidents at industrial and military facilities can also be large scale in nature if people must be evacuated or sheltered in place. Federal planning for large scale emergencies is the responsibility of the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), which provides assistance to various emergency management agencies at the national, state and local level. More information about FEMA is available at http://www.fema.gov/. The purpose of the Special Population Planner (SPP) is to help emergency planners address the needs of persons with special needs. The exact definition of 'special population' is a policy decision. Policymakers have included a variety of groups in this term, such as persons with disabilities, those who do not have vehicles with which to evacuate, children who are unattended at times (latchkey children), and many others. The SPP was developed initially for the Alabama Emergency Management Agency as part of its Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP), which aids emergency planning and preparedness in communities surrounding military installations across the United States where chemical weapons are stored pending their destruction under federal law. Like that specialized application, this open-source version contains a set of specialized Geographic Information System (GIS) tools to facilitate emergency planning on behalf of persons with special needs, regardless of how the term is defined. While the original SPP system was developed for emergency planning relating to chemical hazards, it can be applied to other threats as well. It is apparent from Hurricane Katrina and other natural and man-made disasters that many of the problems posed by emergency planning for a chemical weapons agent release are shared by other hazards as well. The notion that emergency planning shares common functions underlies the decision by FEMA to include the Chemical Stockpile Emergency Preparedness Program (CSEPP) in its 'all-hazards' planning approach. The CSEPP's official planning guidance operationalizes this approach by suggesting that state and local CSEPP emergency plans 'should be appended to the existing all-hazards emergency plan.' The SPP is programmed as a set of tools within an ESRI ArcMap 9.1 project. ArcMap is a component of both ESRI ArcGIS 9.1 and ESRI ArcView 9.1, and it provides a rich GIS user interface for viewing spatial and tabular data, analyzing it, and producing output reports and maps. This GIS interface has been augmented with the SPP tools for a user interface that provides custom functionality for emergency planning. The system as released also includes some hypothetical example records for special needs populations, facilities, resources, control points and sirens sufficient for showing how the system would work with real information. A GIS database is included with some publicly available example layers. The SPP is designed to support emergency planners as they address emergency management issues, and includes capabilities that support the collection and importing of data, the review of data in a spatial context, and GIS tools for emergency planning. The SPP system allows for the identification and categorization of response zones to allow for multiple levels of preparedness. An Immediate Response Zone (IRZ) might be designated as the area 0 to 10 miles from a facility where the response would be the most urgent. SPP can support more than one set of planning zones to accommodate different types of emergencies or the different jurisdictions of emergency response organizations. These areas can be delineated by any number of criteria that make sense for the area. An area like New Orleans might designate response zones based on the depth above/below s

  18. Population Displacements Associated with Environmentally

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Columbia University

    Socio economic Impacts Enviro Impacts Dam Climate Change Fresh H20 Salinization Drought Flood infrastructure Climate Impact(s) Infrastructure development objectives Socio economic Impacts Enviro Impacts ­ Environmental impacts of major infrastructure projects 2 P l i di l i d i h l i f2. Population displacements

  19. The stellar population of bulges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Jablonka

    2007-01-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This review summarizes the properties of the stellar population in bulges as observed in nearby or distant spiral galaxies. It gives a particular emphasis to the comparison with elliptical galaxies, when possible. The criteria of sample selection and choices in data analysis are addressed when they may be involved in discrepant results reached by different studies.

  20. The Evolution of Stellar Populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Angeles Diaz; Eduardo Hardy

    2001-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

    We summarize the discussion section on ``Evolution of Stellar Populations'' we led on May 27, 2000 in Granada, Spain, as part of the Euroconference on The Evolution of Galaxies. I- Observational Clues. We also provide a partial comparison between the present knowledge of these topics and that which existed at the time of the Crete Conference of 1995.

  1. Identification of process controls for nuclear explosive operations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, S.R.; Konkel, H.; Houghton, K.; Wilson, M.

    1998-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nuclear explosive assembly/disassembly operations that are carried out under United States Department of Energy (DOE) purview are characterized by activities that primarily involve manual tasks. These process activities are governed by procedural and administrative controls that traditionally have been developed without a formal link to process hazards. This work, which was based on hazard assessment (HA) activities conducted as part of the W69 Integrated Safety Process (ISP), specifies an approach to identifying formal safety controls for controlling (i.e., preventing or mitigating) hazards associated with nuclear explosive operations. Safety analysis methods are used to identify controls, which then are integrated into a safety management framework to provide assurance to the DOE that hazardous activities are managed properly. As a result of the work on the W69 ISP dismantlement effort, the authors have developed an approach to identify controls and safety measures to improve the safety of nuclear explosive operations. The methodology developed for the W69 dismantlement effort is being adapted to the W76 ISP effort. Considerable work is still ongoing to address issues such as the adequacy or effectiveness of controls. DOE nuclear explosive safety orders and some historical insights are discussed briefly in this paper. The safety measure identification methodology developed as part of the W69 ISP dismantlement process then is summarized.

  2. Ordered transport and identification of particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shera, E.B.

    1993-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are provided for application of electrical field gradients to induce particle velocities to enable particle sequence and identification information to be obtained. Particle sequence is maintained by providing electroosmotic flow for an electrolytic solution in a particle transport tube. The transport tube and electrolytic solution are selected to provide an electroosmotic radius of >100 so that a plug flow profile is obtained for the electrolytic solution in the transport tube. Thus, particles are maintained in the same order in which they are introduced in the transport tube. When the particles also have known electrophoretic velocities, the field gradients introduce an electrophoretic velocity component onto the electroosmotic velocity. The time that the particles pass selected locations along the transport tube may then be detected and the electrophoretic velocity component calculated for particle identification. One particular application is the ordered transport and identification of labeled nucleotides sequentially cleaved from a strand of DNA.

  3. Ordered transport and identification of particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shera, E. Brooks (Los Alamos, NM)

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method and apparatus are provided for application of electrical field gradients to induce particle velocities to enable particle sequence and identification information to be obtained. Particle sequence is maintained by providing electroosmotic flow for an electrolytic solution in a particle transport tube. The transport tube and electrolytic solution are selected to provide an electroosmotic radius of >100 so that a plug flow profile is obtained for the electrolytic solution in the transport tube. Thus, particles are maintained in the same order in which they are introduced in the transport tube. When the particles also have known electrophoretic velocities, the field gradients introduce an electrophoretic velocity component onto the electroosmotic velocity. The time that the particles pass selected locations along the transport tube may then be detected and the electrophoretic velocity component calculated for particle identification. One particular application is the ordered transport and identification of labeled nucleotides sequentially cleaved from a strand of DNA.

  4. A procedure for oscillatory parameter identification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trudnowski, D.J.; Donnelly, M.K. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Hauer, J.F. [Bonneville Power Administration, Portland, OR (United States)

    1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A procedure is proposed where a power system is excited with a low-level pseduo-random probing signal and the frequency, damping, magnitude, and shape of oscillatory modes are identified using spectral density estimation and frequency-domain transfer-function identification. Attention is focussed on identifying system modes in the presence of noise. Two examples cases are studied: identification of electromechanical oscillation modes in a 16-machine power system; and turbine-generator shaft modes of a 3-machine power plant feeding a series-compensated 500-kV network.

  5. Multichannel Blind Identification: From Subspace to Maximum Likelihood Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tong, Lang

    Multichannel Blind Identification: From Subspace to Maximum Likelihood Methods LANG TONG, MEMBER, IEEE, AND SYLVIE PERREAU Invited Paper A review of recent blind channel estimation algorithms is pre-- Blind equalization, parameter estimation, system identification. I. INTRODUCTION A. What Is Blind

  6. INSTANTANEOUS DAMAGE IDENTIFICATION AND LOCALIZATION THROUGH SPARSE LASER ULTRASONIC SCANNING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    INSTANTANEOUS DAMAGE IDENTIFICATION AND LOCALIZATION THROUGH SPARSE LASER ULTRASONIC SCANNING This study proposes an instantaneous damage identification and localization technique through sparse laser ultrasonic signals are obtained, a damage index (DI) representing the violation of the linear reciprocity

  7. Home and Farm Security Machinery and Equipment Identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Gary S.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    73 Fibme and Farm Security -m Machinery and Equipment identification Home and Farm Security chinery and Equipment Identification *Gary S. Nelson is no longer just an urban problem. d burglaries in rural communities have to an alarming...

  8. Identification and Evaluation of Fluvial-Dominated Deltaic Reservoirs.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baken, Mary K.; Andrews, Richard

    1997-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is provided as a Quarterly Technical Progress Report for the program entitled `Identification and Evaluation of Fluvial- Dominated Deltaic (Class I Oil) Reservoirs in Oklahoma`, covering the reporting period of July 1 - September 30, 1997. Work is progressing as expected for the project. The Tonkawa Play workshop was completed as scheduled on July 9, 1997 in Norman Oklahoma. It was attended by 101 people of whom about 55 were operators. The Bartlesville workshop is scheduled for October and November 1997, in three different sites including Tulsa, Bartlesville, and Norman, Oklahoma. The FDD computer facility is fully operational. During this quarter, there were 10 industry individuals who used the computer facility. This project is serving an extremely valuable role in the technology transfer activities for the Oklahoma petroleum industry, with very positive industry feedback.

  9. Atypical Behavior Identification in Large Scale Network Traffic

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Best, Daniel M.; Hafen, Ryan P.; Olsen, Bryan K.; Pike, William A.

    2011-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

    Cyber analysts are faced with the daunting challenge of identifying exploits and threats within potentially billions of daily records of network traffic. Enterprise-wide cyber traffic involves hundreds of millions of distinct IP addresses and results in data sets ranging from terabytes to petabytes of raw data. Creating behavioral models and identifying trends based on those models requires data intensive architectures and techniques that can scale as data volume increases. Analysts need scalable visualization methods that foster interactive exploration of data and enable identification of behavioral anomalies. Developers must carefully consider application design, storage, processing, and display to provide usability and interactivity with large-scale data. We present an application that highlights atypical behavior in enterprise network flow records. This is accomplished by utilizing data intensive architectures to store the data, aggregation techniques to optimize data access, statistical techniques to characterize behavior, and a visual analytic environment to render the behavioral trends, highlight atypical activity, and allow for exploration.

  10. Analysis of transcriptional responses in the mouse dorsal striatum following acute MDMA (Ecstasy): identification of ERK-controlled genes.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ): identification of ERK-controlled genes. J. Salzmann, C. Canestrelli, F. Noble*, and C. Marie-Claire. Université rewarding effects in mice were dependent upon ERK activation and that dorsal striatum was a critical region for mediating ERK-dependent Egr1 MDMA-induced transcription. Here, we extend these findings by showing that MDMA

  11. Notes 14. Experimental identification of bearing force coefficients

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    San Andres, Luis

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An example of system parameter identification (Hybrid Brush Seal) Luis San Andr?s (lecturer) Thanks to Adolfo Delgado, Jos? Baker (RAs) & support from Siemens Power Generation MEEN 617 - April 2008 Structural parameters K shaft = 243 lbf/in (42...Notes 14. IDENTIFICATION OF BEARING FORCE COEFFICIENTS. ? Dr. Luis San Andr?s (2009) 1 Handout # 14 (MEEN 626) Application example Experimental identification of bearing force coefficients Experimental identification of the dynamic force...

  12. Hazardous Material Code Identification NFPA 704, 1996 Edition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Slatton, Clint

    Hazardous Material Code Identification NFPA 704, 1996 Edition Identification of Health Hazard Color offer no hazard. 00 Materials that will not burn. 00 Materials that in themselves are normally stable DAMAGE TO LIVING TISSUE. MATERIALS POSSESSING RADIOACTIVITY HAZARDS. The identification systems

  13. University of Michigan and NBER "Identification of Discrete Choice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Presenter: Jeremy Fox University of Michigan and NBER "Identification of Discrete Choice Models;Identification of Discrete Choice Models for Bundles and Binary Games Jeremy T. Fox University of Michigan and NBER Natalia Lazzati University of Michigan March 2014 Abstract We study nonparametric identification

  14. Material identification employing a grating spectrometer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gornushkin, Ignor B.; Winefordner, James D.; Smith, Benjamin W.

    2007-01-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-ordered spectral data is obtained from various known substances and is stored in a spectral library. The identification of an unknown material is accomplished by correlating the sample's multi-ordered spectrum against all or a portion of the spectrum in the library, and finding the closest match.

  15. Autonomous Airborne Geomagnetic Surveying and Target Identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Positioning System (GPS) technology, and sensors (video and infrared cameras, magnetometers) coupled and identification of magnetic anomalies are evaluated. A combination of a particle filter and a neural network Airspeed w Weight on particle x State of agent with respect to target z Sensor measurement Subscript t Time

  16. Autonomous Airborne Geomagnetic Surveying and Target Identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lum, Christopher

    in miniaturized electronics, Global Positioning System (GPS) technology, and sensors (video and infrared cameras and identification of magnetic anomalies are evaluated. A combination of a particle filter and a neural network Airspeed w Weight on particle x State of agent with respect to target z Sensor measurement Subscript t Time

  17. Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) I. System Identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathis, Wayne N.

    Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) I. System Identification 1. IT System Name: NPM Current Public editing done at the time of entry. 2. Why the information is being collected. The NPM Education Department of the current permanent NPM Education Department staff only. The file resides on a server and access

  18. Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) I. System Identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mathis, Wayne N.

    Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) I. System Identification 1. IT System Name: NPM Public Program is being collected. The NPM Education Department manages numerous volunteers. A spreadsheet is required is shared with members of the current permanent NPM Education Department staff only. The file resides

  19. Tier identification (TID) for tiered memory characteristics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chang, Jichuan; Lim, Kevin T; Ranganathan, Parthasarathy

    2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A tier identification (TID) is to indicate a characteristic of a memory region associated with a virtual address in a tiered memory system. A thread may be serviced according to a first path based on the TID indicating a first characteristic. The thread may be serviced according to a second path based on the TID indicating a second characteristic.

  20. groundwater nitrogen source identification and remediation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    groundwater nitrogen source identification and remediation The Seymour Aquifer is a shallow aquifer, the Seymour Aquifer has the highest groundwater pollution potential of all the major aqui- fers in Texas drinking water standards. Potential sources of nitrate in groundwater include atmospheric deposi- tion

  1. Arthropod population and community dynamics in turfgrass

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yong

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Non-target arthropod and nematode populations in ographics. fungal and nematode treated bermudagrass were contrasted with populations in a chlorpyrifos and an untreated control treatment. Fifty-five arthropod families or suborder, herein referred...

  2. Advanced Techniques for Power System Identification from Measured Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierre, John W.; Wies, Richard; Trudnowski, Daniel

    2008-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Time-synchronized measurements provide rich information for estimating a power-system's electromechanical modal properties via advanced signal processing. This information is becoming critical for the improved operational reliability of interconnected grids. A given mode's properties are described by its frequency, damping, and shape. Modal frequencies and damping are useful indicators of power-system stress, usually declining with increased load or reduced grid capacity. Mode shape provides critical information for operational control actions. This project investigated many advanced techniques for power system identification from measured data focusing on mode frequency and damping ratio estimation. Investigators from the three universities coordinated their effort with Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). Significant progress was made on developing appropriate techniques for system identification with confidence intervals and testing those techniques on field measured data and through simulation. Experimental data from the western area power system was provided by PNNL and Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for both ambient conditions and for signal injection tests. Three large-scale tests were conducted for the western area in 2005 and 2006. Measured field PMU (Phasor Measurement Unit) data was provided to the three universities. A 19-machine simulation model was enhanced for testing the system identification algorithms. Extensive simulations were run with this model to test the performance of the algorithms. University of Wyoming researchers participated in four primary activities: (1) Block and adaptive processing techniques for mode estimation from ambient signals and probing signals, (2) confidence interval estimation, (3) probing signal design and injection method analysis, and (4) performance assessment and validation from simulated and field measured data. Subspace based methods have been use to improve previous results from block processing techniques. Bootstrap techniques have been developed to estimate confidence intervals for the electromechanical modes from field measured data. Results were obtained using injected signal data provided by BPA. A new probing signal was designed that puts more strength into the signal for a given maximum peak to peak swing. Further simulations were conducted on a model based on measured data and with the modifications of the 19-machine simulation model. Montana Tech researchers participated in two primary activities: (1) continued development of the 19-machine simulation test system to include a DC line; and (2) extensive simulation analysis of the various system identification algorithms and bootstrap techniques using the 19 machine model. Researchers at the University of Alaska-Fairbanks focused on the development and testing of adaptive filter algorithms for mode estimation using data generated from simulation models and on data provided in collaboration with BPA and PNNL. There efforts consist of pre-processing field data, testing and refining adaptive filter techniques (specifically the Least Mean Squares (LMS), the Adaptive Step-size LMS (ASLMS), and Error Tracking (ET) algorithms). They also improved convergence of the adaptive algorithms by using an initial estimate from block processing AR method to initialize the weight vector for LMS. Extensive testing was performed on simulated data from the 19 machine model. This project was also extensively involved in the WECC (Western Electricity Coordinating Council) system wide tests carried out in 2005 and 2006. These tests involved injecting known probing signals into the western power grid. One of the primary goals of these tests was the reliable estimation of electromechanical mode properties from measured PMU data. Applied to the system were three types of probing inputs: (1) activation of the Chief Joseph Dynamic Brake, (2) mid-level probing at the Pacific DC Intertie (PDCI), and (3) low-level probing on the PDCI. The Chief Joseph Dynamic Brake is a 1400 MW disturbance to the system and is injected for a ha

  3. Stellar populations of bulges at low redshift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez-Blazquez, Patricia

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter summarizes our current understanding of the stellar population properties of bulges and outlines important future research directions.

  4. Identification of Saprolegnia Spp. Pathogenic in Chinook Salmon : Final Report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whisler, Howard C.

    1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project has developed procedures to assess the role of the fungal parasite, Saprolegnia in the biology of salmon, particularly adult Chinook, in the Columbia River Basin. Both morphological and DNA ``fingerprinting`` surveys reveal that Saprolegnia parasitica (=S. diclina, Type I) is the most common pathogen of these fish. In the first phase of this study 92% of 620 isolates, from salmon lesions, conformed to this taxa of Saprolegnia. In the current phase, the authors have developed variants of DNA fingerprinting (RAPD and SWAPP analysis) that permit examination of the sub-structure of the parasite population. These results confirm the predominance of S. parasitica, and suggest that at least three different sub-groups of this fungus occur in the Pacific N.W., USA. The use of single and paired primers with PCR amplification permits identification of pathogenic types, and distinction from other species of the genus considered to be more saprophytic in character. A year`s survey of saprolegniaceous fungi from Lake Washington indicated that the fish-pathogen was not common in the water column. Where and how fish encounter this parasite can be approached with the molecular tags identified in this project.

  5. PINS Testing and Modification for Explosive Identification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    E.H. Seabury; A.J. Caffrey

    2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The INL's Portable Isotopic Neutron Spectroscopy System (PINS)1 non-intrusively identifies the chemical fill of munitions and sealed containers. PINS is used routinely by the U.S. Army, the Defense Threat Reduction Agency, and foreign military units to determine the contents of munitions and other containers suspected to contain explosives, smoke-generating chemicals, and chemical warfare agents such as mustard and nerve gas. The objects assayed with PINS range from softball-sized M139 chemical bomblets to 200 gallon DOT 500X ton containers. INL had previously examined2 the feasibility of using a similar system for the identification of explosives, and based on this proof-of-principle test, the development of a dedicated system for the identification of explosives in an improvised nuclear device appears entirely feasible. INL has been tasked by NNSA NA-42 Render Safe Research and Development with the development of such a system.

  6. Structural system identification: Structural dynamics model validation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Red-Horse, J.R.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Structural system identification is concerned with the development of systematic procedures and tools for developing predictive analytical models based on a physical structure`s dynamic response characteristics. It is a multidisciplinary process that involves the ability (1) to define high fidelity physics-based analysis models, (2) to acquire accurate test-derived information for physical specimens using diagnostic experiments, (3) to validate the numerical simulation model by reconciling differences that inevitably exist between the analysis model and the experimental data, and (4) to quantify uncertainties in the final system models and subsequent numerical simulations. The goal of this project was to develop structural system identification techniques and software suitable for both research and production applications in code and model validation.

  7. Protein Identification Using Top-Down

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Xiaowen; Sirotkin, Yakov; Shen, Yufeng; Anderson, Gordon A.; Tsai, Yi-Hsuan S.; Ting, Ying S.; Goodlett, David R.; Smith, Richard D.; Bafna, Vineet; Pevzner, Pavel A.

    2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the last two years, due to advances in protein separation and mass spectrometry, top-down mass spectrometry moved from analyzing single proteins to analyzing complex samples and identifying hundreds and even thousands of proteins. However, computational tools for database search of top-down spectra against protein databases are still in infancy. We describe MS-Align+, a fast algorithm for top-down protein identification based on spectral alignment that enables searches for unexpected post-translational modifications (PTMs). We also propose a method for evaluating statistical significance of top-down protein identifications and further benchmark MS-Align+ along with PIITA, ProSightPTM and SEQUEST, which were previously used for top-down MS/MS database searches. We demonstrate that MS-Align+ and PIITA significantly increase the number of identified proteins as compared to ProSightPTM and SEQUEST.

  8. A Very High Momentum Particle Identification Detector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    T. V. Acconcia; A. G. Agocs; F. Barile; G. G. Barnafoldi; R. Bellwied; G. Bencedi; G. Bencze; D. Berenyi; L. Boldizsar; S. Chattopadhyay; F. Cindolo; D. D. Chinellato; S. D'Ambrosio; D. Das; K. Das; L. Das-Bose; A. K. Dash; G. De Cataldo; S. De Pasquale; D. Di Bari; A. Di Mauro; E. Futo; E. Garcia; G. Hamar; A. Harton; G. Iannone; R. T. Jimenez; D. W. Kim; J. S. Kim; A. Knospe; L. Kovacs; P. Levai; E. Nappi; C. Markert; P. Martinengo; D. Mayani; L. Molnar; L. Olah; G. Paic; C. Pastore; G. Patimo; M. E. Patino; V. Peskov; L. Pinsky; F. Piuz; S. Pochybova; I. Sgura; T. Sinha; J. Song; J. Takahashi; A. Timmins; J. B. Van Beelen; D. Varga; G. Volpe; M. Weber; L. Xaplanteris; J. Yi; I. K. Yoo

    2013-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    The construction of a new detector is proposed to extend the capabilities of ALICE in the high transverse momentum (pT) region. This Very High Momentum Particle Identification Detector (VHMPID) performs charged hadron identification on a track-by-track basis in the 5 GeV/c < p < 25 GeV/c momentum range and provides ALICE with new opportunities to study parton-medium interactions at LHC energies. The VHMPID covers up to 30% of the ALICE central barrel and presents sufficient acceptance for triggered- and tagged-jet studies, allowing for the first time identified charged hadron measurements in jets. This Letter of Intent summarizes the physics motivations for such a detector as well as its layout and integration into ALICE.

  9. Estimating future global per capita water availability based on changes in climate and population

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Parish, Esther S [ORNL; Kodra, Evan [Northeastern University; Ganguly, Auroop R [Northeastern University; Steinhaeuser, Karsten [University of Minnesota

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Human populations are profoundly affected by water stress, or the lack of sufficient per capita available freshwater. Water stress can result from overuse of available freshwater resources or from a reduction in the amount of available water due to decreases in rainfall and stored water supplies. Analyzing the interrelationship between human populations and water availability is complicated by the uncertainties associated with climate change projections and population projections. We present a simple methodology developed to integrate disparate climate and population data sources and develop first-order per capita water availability projections at the global scale. Simulations from the coupled land-ocean-atmosphere Community Climate System Model version 3 (CCSM3) forced with a range of hypothetical greenhouse gas emissions scenarios are used to project grid-based changes in precipitation minus evapotranspiration as proxies for changes in runoff, or fresh water supply. Population growth changes according to several Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) storylines are used as proxies for changes in fresh water demand by 2025, 2050 and 2100. These freshwater supply and demand projections are then combined to yield estimates of per capita water availability aggregated by watershed and political unit. Results suggest that important insights might be extracted from the use of the process developed here, notably including the identification of the globe s most vulnerable regions in need of more detailed analysis and the relative importance of population growth versus climate change in in altering future freshwater supplies. However, these are only exemplary insights and, as such, could be considered hypotheses that should be rigorously tested with multiple climate models, multiple observational climate datasets, and more comprehensive population change storylines.

  10. Cascade Training Technique for Particle Identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yong Liu; Ion Stancu

    2006-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The cascade training technique which was developed during our work on the MiniBooNE particle identification has been found to be a very efficient way to improve the selection performance, especially when very low background contamination levels are desired. The detailed description of this technique is presented here based on the MiniBooNE detector Monte Carlo simulations, using both artifical neural networks and boosted decision trees as examples.

  11. Ligand identification using electron-density mapcorrelations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C.; Adams, Paul D.; Moriarty, Nigel W.; Cohn,Judith D.

    2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A procedure for the identification of ligands bound incrystal structuresof macromolecules is described. Two characteristics ofthe density corresponding to a ligand are used in the identificationprocedure. One is the correlation of the ligand density with each of aset of test ligands after optimization of the fit of that ligand to thedensity. The other is the correlation of a fingerprint of the densitywith the fingerprint of model density for each possible ligand. Thefingerprints consist of an ordered list of correlations of each the testligands with the density. The two characteristics are scored using aZ-score approach in which the correlations are normalized to the mean andstandard deviation of correlations found for a variety of mismatchedligand-density pairs, so that the Z scores are related to the probabilityof observing a particular value of the correlation by chance. Theprocedure was tested with a set of 200 of the most commonly found ligandsin the Protein Data Bank, collectively representing 57 percent of allligands in the Protein Data Bank. Using a combination of these twocharacteristics of ligand density, ranked lists of ligand identificationswere made for representative (F-o-F-c) exp(i phi(c)) difference densityfrom entries in the Protein Data Bank. In 48 percent of the 200 cases,the correct ligand was at the top of the ranked list of ligands. Thisapproach may be useful in identification of unknown ligands in newmacromolecular structures as well as in the identification of whichligands in a mixture have bound to a macromolecule.

  12. In Silico Identification Software (ISIS): A Machine Learning Approach to Tandem Mass Spectral Identification of Lipids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kangas, Lars J.; Metz, Thomas O.; Isaac, Georgis; Schrom, Brian T.; Ginovska-Pangovska, Bojana; Wang, Luning; Tan, Li; Lewis, Robert R.; Miller, John H.

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabolomics has gained importance in the life sciences, yet it is not supported by software tools for high throughput identification of metabolites based on their fragmentation spectra. An algorithm (ISIS: in silico identification software) and its implementation are presented and show great promise in generating in silico spectra of lipids for the purpose of structural identification. Instead of using chemical reaction rate equations or rules-based fragmentation libraries, the algorithm uses machine learning to find accurate bond cleavage rates in a mass spectrometer employing collision-induced dissocia-tion tandem mass spectrometry. A preliminary test of the algorithm with 45 lipids from a subset of lipid classes shows both high sensitivity and specificity.

  13. New southern galaxies with active nuclei

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maia, M.A.G.; Da costa, L.N.; Willmer, C.; Pellegrini, P.S.; Rite, C.

    1987-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A list of AGN candidates, identified from optical spectra taken as part of an ongoing redshift survey of southern galaxies, is presented. The identification, coordinates, morphological type, measured heliocentric radial velocity, and proposed emission type are given for the galaxies showing evidence of nonstellar nuclear activity. Using standard diagnostics, several new Seyferts and low-ionization nuclear-emission regions (LINERs) are identified among the emission-line galaxies observed. 14 references.

  14. Stellar populations in bulges of spiral galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Jablonka

    1997-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the integrated properties of the stellar population in bulges along the Hubble sequence and new HST data for individual stars in the bulge of M31.

  15. X-ray populations in galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Fabbiano

    2005-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Today's sensistive, high resolution Chandra X-ray observations allow the study of many populations of X-ray sources. The traditional astronomical tools of photometric diagrams and luminosity functions are now applied to these populations, and provide the means for classifying the X-ray sources and probing their evolution. While overall stellar mass drives the amount of X-ray binaries in old stellar population, the amount of sources in star-forming galaxies is related to the star formation rate. Shart-lived, luminous, high mass binaries (HNXBs) dominate these young populations.

  16. Empirical Prediction Intervals for County Population Forecasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rayer, Stefan; Smith, Stanley K.; Tayman, Jeff

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    in the determination and prediction of population forecastperformance of empirical prediction intervals? Table 5 shows26, 163–184. Empirical Prediction Intervals for County

  17. Supernova rates and stellar populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    F. Mannucci

    2007-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the results about the nature of type Ia Supernovae that can be derived by studying their rates in different stellar populations. While the evolution of SN photometry and spectra can constrain the explosion mechanism, the SN rate depends on the progenitor system. We review the current available data on rates as a function of parent galaxy color, morphology, star formation rate, radio luminosity and environment. By studying the variation of the rates with the color of the parent galaxy, a strong evidence was established that type Ia SNe come from both young and old stars. The dependence of the rates with the radio power of the parent galaxy is best reproduced by a bimodal distribution of delay time between the formation of the progenitor and its explosion as a SN. Cluster early-type galaxies show higher type Ia SN rate with respect to field galaxies, and this effect can be due either to traces of young stars or to differences in the delay time distribution.

  18. a431 cells identification: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    of the 911 emergency call services Chia, Liang-Tien 28 Application of Verified Optimization Techniques to Parameter Identification for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Computer...

  19. accurate protein identification: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and examines common identification errors. It also illustrates that data integration in PIR supports exploration of protein relationships and may reveal protein functional...

  20. Identification and Characterization of Near-Term Direct Hydrogen...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    & Publications Identification and Characterization of Near-Term Direct Hydrogen PEM Fuel Cell Markets 2008 Fuel Cell Technologies Market Report 2008 Fuel Cell Technologies...

  1. Identification and Characterization of Near-Term Direct Hydrogen...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for state and regional initiatives mahadevan.pdf More Documents & Publications Full Fuel-Cycle Comparison of Forklift Propulsion Systems Identification and Characterization of...

  2. Identification of a putative protein profile associating with...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a putative protein profile associating with tamoxifen therapy resistance in breast cancer. Identification of a putative protein profile associating with tamoxifen therapy...

  3. Chapter 31 Identification and Listing of Hazardous Waste (Kentucky)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This administrative regulation establishes the general provisions necessary for identification and listing of a hazardous waste. The regulation also establishes the criteria for identifying the...

  4. Econometrica Supplementary Material SUPPLEMENTAL TO "SHARP IDENTIFICATION REGIONS IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Molchanov, Ilya

    Econometrica Supplementary Material SUPPLEMENTAL TO "SHARP IDENTIFICATION REGIONS IN MODELS also that by the positive homogeneity of the support function, our moment inequalities can be written

  5. A multiplex PCR assay for the simultaneous identification of three

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A multiplex PCR assay for the simultaneous identification of three mealybug species (Hemiptera of three mealybug species (Hemiptera: Pseudococcidae) associated with grapevine in South Africa

  6. automatic identification system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Universidad 3 Automatic feature-queried bird identification system based on entropy and fuzzy similarity Computer Technologies and Information Sciences Websites Summary:...

  7. Identification of soybean proteins from a single cell type: The...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    soybean proteins from a single cell type: The root hair. Identification of soybean proteins from a single cell type: The root hair. Abstract: Root hairs are a terminally...

  8. Proteomic Identification and Quantification of S-glutathionylation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Quantification of S-glutathionylation in Mouse Macrophages Using Resin-Assisted Enrichment and Proteomic Identification and Quantification of S-glutathionylation in Mouse...

  9. Perspective: The Climate-Population-Infrastructure Modeling and Simulation Fertile Area for New Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, Melissa R [ORNL; Fernandez, Steven J [ORNL; Walker, Kimberly A [ORNL; Fu, Joshua S [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Managing the risks posed by climate change and extreme weather to energy production and delivery is a challenge to communities worldwide. As climate conditions change, populations will shift, and demand will re-locate; and networked infrastructures will evolve to accommodate new load centers, and, hopefully, minimize vulnerability to natural disaster. Climate effects such as sea level rise, increased frequency and intensity of natural disasters, force populations to move locations. Displaced population creates new demand for built infrastructure that in turn generates new economic activity that attracts new workers and associated households to the new locations. Infrastructures and their interdependencies will change in reaction to climate drivers as the networks expand into new population areas and as portions of the networks are abandoned as people leave. Thus, infrastructures will evolve to accommodate new load centers while some parts of the network are underused, and these changes will create emerging vulnerabilities. Forecasting the location of these vulnerabilities by combining climate predictions and agent based population movement models shows promise for defining these future population distributions and changes in coastal infrastructure configurations. By combining climate and weather data, engineering algorithms and social theory it has been only recently possible to examine electricity demand response to increased climactic temperatures, population relocation in response to extreme cyclonic events, consequent net population changes and new regional patterns in electricity demand. These emerging results suggest a research agenda of coupling these disparate modelling approaches to understand the implications of climate change for protecting the nation s critical infrastructure.

  10. Technical planning activity: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In April 1985, the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Fusion Energy commissioned the Technical Planning Activity (TPA). The purpose of this activity was to develop a technical planning methodology and prepare technical plans in support of the strategic and policy framework of the Magnetic Fusion Program Plan issued by DOE in February 1985. Although this report represents the views of only the US magnetic fusion community, it is international in scope in the sense that the technical plans contained herein describe the full scope of the tasks that are prerequisites for the commercialization of fusion energy. The TPA has developed a well-structured methodology that includes detailed definitions of technical issues, definitions of program areas and elements, statements of research and development objectives, identification of key decision points and milestones, and descriptions of facility requirements.

  11. Power system identification toolbox: Phase two progress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trudnowski, D.J.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes current progress on a project funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) to develop a set of state-of-the-art analysis software (termed the Power System Identification [PSI] Toolbox) for fitting dynamic models to measured data. The project is being conducted as a three-phase effort. The first phase, completed in late 1992, involved investigating the characteristics of the analysis techniques by evaluating existing software and developing guidelines for best use. Phase Two includes extending current software, developing new analysis algorithms and software, and demonstrating and developing applications. The final phase will focus on reorganizing the software into a modular collection of documented computer programs and developing user manuals with instruction and application guidelines. Phase Two is approximately 50% complete; progress to date and a vision for the final product of the PSI Toolbox are described. The needs of the power industry for specialized system identification methods are particularly acute. The industry is currently pushing to operate transmission systems much closer to theoretical limits by using real-time, large-scale control systems to dictate power flows and maintain dynamic stability. Reliably maintaining stability requires extensive system-dynamic modeling and analysis capability, including measurement-based methods. To serve this need, the BPA has developed specialized system-identification computer codes through in-house efforts and university contract research over the last several years. To make full integrated use of the codes, as well as other techniques, the BPA has commissioned Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to further develop the codes and techniques into the PSI Toolbox.

  12. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of the Arabian Horse Populations from Syria and other Countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Khanshour, Anas M

    2013-07-05T23:59:59.000Z

    different populations of Arabians representing Middle Eastern and Western populations. The main two aims of this study were to provide the genetic diversity description of Arabians from different origins and to examine the traditional classification system...

  13. Identification Strategies in Survey Response Using Vignettes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Corrado, Luisa; Weeks, Melvyn

    the price of various identification assumptions. 4A common distributional assumption used in these models is normality. For M > 1 this gives rise to the multivariate ordered probit model. 7 assuming scale homogeneity in the form of constant threshold... -reported life satisfaction in Table 4 we note that in Italy and the Czech Republic only 7% of the respondents are ”Very Satisfied” with their life while in Denmark this percentage is 41% and in Sweden is 31%. It is also interesting to note that in Italy...

  14. Sideband generation of transient lasing without population inversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luqi Yuan; Da-Wei Wang; Christopher O'Brien; Anatoly A. Svidzinsky; Marlan O. Scully

    2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

    We suggest a method to generate coherent short pulses by generating a frequency comb using lasing without inversion in the transient regime. We use a universal method to study the propagation of a pulse in various spectral regions through an active medium that is strongly driven on a low-frequency transition on a time scale shorter than the decoherence time. The results show gain on the sidebands at different modes can be produced even if there is no initial population inversion prepared. Besides the production of ultra-short pulse this frequency comb may have applications towards making short-wavelength or Tera-hertz lasers.

  15. Reversing Wolbachia-based population replacement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dobson, Stephen L.

    Wolbachia bacteria as a vehicle for population replace- ment. Also discussed are strategies strategies and provide mechan- isms for the autonomous spread of desired transgenes into the targeted relative to the natural population [15­17]. Primary candidates for gene-drive strategies are autonomous

  16. Cancer Epidemiology Population Health Sciences 750

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sheridan, Jennifer

    -01/5/11-1 Cancer Epidemiology Population Health Sciences 750 3 credits When: Spring 2011 (1 Audience: This course is intended for students in health-related disciplines interested in cancer etiology. the unequal burden of cancer among populations and variations across time and geography, 2. the distinctive

  17. Calculating Evolutionary Dynamics in Structured Populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Martin A.

    Calculating Evolutionary Dynamics in Structured Populations Charles G. Nathanson1. , Corina E. Here we provide a general formula for calculating evolutionary dynamics in a wide class of structured) Calculating Evolutionary Dynamics in Structured Populations. PLoS Comput Biol 5(12): e1000615. doi:10

  18. BLIND IDENTIFICATION OF UNDERDETERMINED MIXTURES BASED ON THE HEXACOVARIANCE AND HIGHER-ORDER CYCLOSTATIONARITY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    BLIND IDENTIFICATION OF UNDERDETERMINED MIXTURES BASED ON THE HEXACOVARIANCE AND HIGHER consider the problem of blind identification of un- derdetermined mixtures in a cyclostationary context hexacovariance. Two blind identification algorithms based on the proposed estima- tor are considered

  19. Planning, Execution, and Analysis of the Meridian UAS Flight Test Program Including System and Parameter Identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tom, Jonathan

    2010-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this Master Thesis is to present the flight test procedures, planning, and analysis including system identification, parameter identification, and drag calculations of the Meridian UAS. The system identification is performed using...

  20. Population genomics20-02-2009 Antnio Rodrigues; Bruno Santos / 59 Population Genomics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldschmidt, Christina

    Population genomics20-02-2009 António Rodrigues; Bruno Santos / 59 Population Genomics 1 António Rodrigues (PDBC 2008) Bruno Santos (PDBC 2008) #12;Population genomics20-02-2009 António Rodrigues; Bruno Santos / 59 Contents 2 2 1000 genome project 1 Motivation and Introduction New generation sequencing

  1. POPULATION ECOLOGY Population Dynamics of the Colorado Potato Beetle in an

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    POPULATION ECOLOGY Population Dynamics of the Colorado Potato Beetle in an Agroecosystem with Tomatoes and Potatoes with Management Implications to Processing Tomatoes CHRIS L. HARDING,1 S. J Environ. Entomol. 31(6): 1110Ð1118 (2002) ABSTRACT We evaluated the population dynamics of Colorado potato

  2. High-level waste storage tank farms/242-A evaporator standards/requirements identification document (S/RID), Vol. 7

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This Requirements Identification Document (RID) describes an Occupational Health and Safety Program as defined through the Relevant DOE Orders, regulations, industry codes/standards, industry guidance documents and, as appropriate, good industry practice. The definition of an Occupational Health and Safety Program as specified by this document is intended to address Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board Recommendations 90-2 and 91-1, which call for the strengthening of DOE complex activities through the identification and application of relevant standards which supplement or exceed requirements mandated by DOE Orders. This RID applies to the activities, personnel, structures, systems, components, and programs involved in maintaining the facility and executing the mission of the High-Level Waste Storage Tank Farms.

  3. NEW DIRECTIONS IN RADIOISOTOPE SPECTRUM IDENTIFICATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Salaymeh, S.; Jeffcoat, R.

    2010-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent studies have found the performance of commercial handheld detectors with automatic RIID software to be less than acceptable. Previously, we have explored approaches rooted in speech processing such as cepstral features and information-theoretic measures. Scientific advances are often made when researchers identify mathematical or physical commonalities between different fields and are able to apply mature techniques or algorithms developed in one field to another field which shares some of the same challenges. The authors of this paper have identified similarities between the unsolved problems faced in gamma-spectroscopy for automated radioisotope identification and the challenges of the much larger body of research in speech processing. Our research has led to a probabilistic framework for describing and solving radioisotope identification problems. Many heuristic approaches to classification in current use, including for radioisotope classification, make implicit probabilistic assumptions which are not clear to the users and, if stated explicitly, might not be considered desirable. Our framework leads to a classification approach with demonstrable improvements using standard feature sets on proof-of-concept simulated and field-collected data.

  4. Blind channel identification and extraction of more sources than sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Blind channel identification and extraction of more sources than sensors P. Comonba a I3S that a static system with more inputs (sources) than outputs (sensors, or channels) cannot be blindly identified blind identification problem. Here, in order to demonstrate its feasibility, the procedure is detailed

  5. Blind Channel Identification for the Emitter Location Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fowler, Mark

    a thesis entitled "Blind Channel Identification for the Emitter Location Problem: A Least Square ApproachBlind Channel Identification for the Emitter Location Problem: A Least Square Approach BY Cheung C. Chau B.S.E.E., Binghamton University, 2000 Thesis Submitted in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements

  6. Heat Source Identification Based on L1 Constrained Minimization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soatto, Stefano

    problem, which was shown to be very efficient for sparse recovery. For the heat source identificationHeat Source Identification Based on L1 Constrained Minimization Yingying Li Stanley Osher Richard to the heat equation is considered. The initial data is assumed to be a sum of an unknown but finite number

  7. Ris-R-1334(EN) Identification of Damage to Wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Risø-R-1334(EN) Identification of Damage to Wind Turbine Blades by Modal Parameter Estimation April 2002 #12;Risø-R-1334(EN) Identification of Damage to Wind Turbine Blades by Modal Parameter condition monitoring of wind turbine blades (Phase I)". The goal of Phase I is to make a pre

  8. Graphical language for identification of control strategies allowing Demand Response

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Graphical language for identification of control strategies allowing Demand Response David DA SILVA. This will allow the identification of the electric appliance availability for demand response control strategies to be implemented in terms of demand response for electrical appliances. Introduction An important part

  9. 3D Scanning for Biometric Identification and Verification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McShea, Daniel W.

    June 2010 3D Scanning for Biometric Identification and Verification Project Leads Anselmo Lastra example the subject's face could be rapidly scanned while his or her smart-card ID is being examined, and the system could then match the scan with data on the ID); (b) identification at a secure site or even

  10. GUIDELINES FOR THE IDENTIFICATION AND MANAGEMENT OF LEAD EXPOSURE IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    GUIDELINES FOR THE IDENTIFICATION AND MANAGEMENT OF LEAD EXPOSURE IN PREGNANT AND LACTATING WOMEN;GUIDELINES FOR THE IDENTIFICATION AND MANAGEMENT OF LEAD EXPOSURE IN PREGNANT AND LACTATING WOMEN and Disease Registry Christopher Portier, PhD Director Healthy Homes and Lead Poisoning

  11. A METHODOLOGY FOR IDENTIFICATION OF NARMAX MODELS APPLIED TO DIESEL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    A METHODOLOGY FOR IDENTIFICATION OF NARMAX MODELS APPLIED TO DIESEL ENGINES 1 Gianluca Zito ,2 Ioan is illustrated by means of an automotive case study, namely a variable geometry turbocharged diesel engine identification procedure is illustrated. In section 3 a diesel engine system, used to test the procedure

  12. Optical fuel pin scanner. [Patent application; for reading identifications

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kirchner, T.L.; Powers, H.G.

    1980-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

    This patent relates to an optical identification system developed for post-irradiation disassembly and analysis of fuel bundle assemblies. The apparatus is designed to be lowered onto a stationary fuel pin to read identification numbers or letters imprinted on the circumference of the top fuel pin and cap. (DLC)

  13. Identification and Control of the Jet in Crossflow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hendrickson, Cory Scott

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2 y i y q R p G lp (s) R p FRSP Identification I p G lp (s)during u 1 u 2 y i y q R p + FRSP Identification I p R p R gPiston actuator frsp at harmonic freq load(['C:\\Users\\EPRL

  14. System Identification and Modelling of a High Performance Hydraulic Actuator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hayward, Vincent

    System Identification and Modelling of a High Performance Hydraulic Actuator Benoit Boulet, Laeeque with the experimental identification and modelling of the nonlinear dynamics ofa high performance hydraulic actuator. The actuator properties and performance are also discussed. 1 Introduction Hydraulic actuation used to be

  15. A Quasilinearization Approach for Parameter Identification in a Nonlinear

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morin, Pedro

    (input), T = prescribed final time, 2, 4, 6, 1, are positive constants --depending on the material beingA Quasilinearization Approach for Parameter Identification in a Nonlinear Model of Shape Memory problem in an appropriate Hilbert Space. A quasilinearization-based algorithm for parameter identification

  16. Identification of Human Gene Core Promoters Michael Q. Zhang1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Identification of Human Gene Core Promoters in Silico Michael Q. Zhang1 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, Cold Spring Harbor, New York 11724 USA Identification of the 5 -end of human genes requires--CorePromoter. Our experiments indicate that when given a 1- to 2-kb extended promoter, CorePromoter will correctly

  17. A Reliable method for Blind Channel Identification using Burst Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raphaeli, Dan

    1 A Reliable method for Blind Channel Identification using Burst Data Dan Raphaeli, Senior Member Output (MISO) FIR channels with nonminimum phase. The approach is based on mini- mizing a cost function of identification success when consider- ing statistical channels, its ability to obtain reliable channel estimates

  18. Symbolic identification for fault detection in aircraft gas turbine engines

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Asok

    Symbolic identification for fault detection in aircraft gas turbine engines S Chakraborty, S Sarkar and computationally inexpensive technique of component-level fault detection in aircraft gas-turbine engines identification, gas turbine engines, language-theoretic analysis 1 INTRODUCTION The propulsion system of modern

  19. Identification with Stochastic Sampling Time Jitter Frida Eng 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gustafsson, Fredrik

    Identification with Stochastic Sampling Time Jitter Frida Eng 1 , Fredrik Gustafsson. Dept of EE sampling jitter noise affects the result of system identification, and proposes a modification of known approaches to mitigate the effects of sampling jitter, when the jitter is unknown and not measurable. By just

  20. On Identification Secret Sharing Schemes Departmant of Information Engineering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bielefeld, University of

    1 On Identification Secret Sharing Schemes Ning Cai Departmant of Information Engineering. #12; 2 Running head: Identification Secret Sharing Corresponding Author: Ning Cai Departmant be a set of participants sharing a secret from a set of secrets. A secret sharing scheme is a protocol

  1. Video Source Identification in Lossy Wireless Networks Shaxun Chen

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    Video Source Identification in Lossy Wireless Networks Shaxun Chen , Amit Pande , Kai Zeng@ucdavis.edu, kzeng@umich.edu, pmohapatra@ucdavis.edu Abstract-- Video source identification is very important in valida- ting video evidence, tracking down video piracy crimes and regu- lating individual video sources

  2. Advanced methods of flux identification for clarifierthickener simulation models q

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bürger, Raimund

    with mathematical models for the batch and continuous sedimentation of finely divided solid par- ticles dispersed: Solid­liquid separation Thickener simulation Batch sedimentation Flux identification Mathematical modelAdvanced methods of flux identification for clarifier­thickener simulation models q Fernando

  3. Wind turbine control systems: Dynamic model development using system identification and the fast structural dynamics code

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stuart, J.G.; Wright, A.D.; Butterfield, C.P.

    1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Mitigating the effects of damaging wind turbine loads and responses extends the lifetime of the turbine and, consequently, reduces the associated Cost of Energy (COE). Active control of aerodynamic devices is one option for achieving wind turbine load mitigation. Generally speaking, control system design and analysis requires a reasonable dynamic model of {open_quotes}plant,{close_quotes} (i.e., the system being controlled). This paper extends the wind turbine aileron control research, previously conducted at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC), by presenting a more detailed development of the wind turbine dynamic model. In prior research, active aileron control designs were implemented in an existing wind turbine structural dynamics code, FAST (Fatigue, Aerodynamics, Structures, and Turbulence). In this paper, the FAST code is used, in conjunction with system identification, to generate a wind turbine dynamic model for use in active aileron control system design. The FAST code is described and an overview of the system identification technique is presented. An aileron control case study is used to demonstrate this modeling technique. The results of the case study are then used to propose ideas for generalizing this technique for creating dynamic models for other wind turbine control applications.

  4. A comparison of networked approximators in parallel mode identification of a bioreactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Efe, Mehmet Önder

    A comparison of networked approximators in parallel mode identification of a bioreactor Mehmet 2010 Keywords: Bioreactor Identification Multilayer perceptron ANFIS Support vector machine Chemical

  5. Damage Identification of a Composite Beam Using Finite Element Model Updating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moaveni, Babak; He, Xianfei; Conte, Joel P; De Callafon, Raymond A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Shevitz, D. W. (1996), Damage identification in structuresreview of vibration-based damage identification methods, TheM. , & Samman, M. M. (1991), Damage detection from changes

  6. Process Guide for the Identification and Disposition of S/CI...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Process Guide for the Identification and Disposition of SCI or Defective Items at Department of Energy Facilities Process Guide for the Identification and Disposition of SCI or...

  7. Hanford Area 1990 population and 50-year projections. [Appendix contains computer programming for population projections and graphs showing them by grid areas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck, D.M.; Scott, M.J.; Shindle, S.F.; Napier, B.A.; Thurman, A.G.; Batishko, N.C. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Davis, M.D. (Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)); Pittenger, D.B. (Demographics Lab., Olympia, WA (United States))

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The complex and comprehensive safety analysis activities carried out at Hanford for nonreactor nuclear facilities require data from a number of scientific and engineering disciplines. The types of data that are required include data pertaining to current population and population projections. The types of data found in this document include 1990 census totals for residential population within a 50-mile radius of the 100-N, 200, 300, and 400 Area meteorological towers. This document also contains 50-year projections for residential populations within a 50-mile radius of these four meteorological towers. The analysis of population projections indicates that residential population within a 50-mile radius of the four meteorological towers in question will continue to grow through 2040, although at a slower rate each decade. In all cases, the highest growth is projected for the decade ending in the year 2000. The annual growth rate for this period is projected to be 0.646, 0.633, 0.543, and 0.570 in the 100-N, 200, 300, and 400 Areas, respectively. By 2040, these growth rates are projected to drop to 0.082, 0.068, 0.078, 0.078, respectively. 4 refs., 1 figs., 4 tabs.

  8. Population dynamics of the Concho water snake

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mueller, James Michael

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    on the Colorado River, Texas 24 14 Model A' estimates and standard errors for the 1987 age class of a Concho water snake population at the lower Elm Creek study site, near Ballinger, Texas. 25 15 Model A' estimates and standard errors for the 1988 age class... of a Concha water snake population at the lower Elm Creek study site, near Ballinger, Texas. 25 16 Jolly-Seber estimates and standard errors for the 1988 age class of a Concha water snake population at the upper Elm Creek study site, near Ballinger...

  9. Accounting for population variation in targeted proteomics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fujimoto, Grant M.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Rodriguez, Larissa M.; Wu, Chaochao; MacLean, Brendan; Smith, Richard D.; MacCoss, Michael; Payne, Samuel H.

    2014-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Individual proteomes typically differ from the reference human proteome at ~10,000 single amino acid variants. When viewed at the population scale, this individual variation results in a wide variety of protein sequences. In targeted proteomics experiments, such variability would confound accurate protein quantification. To facilitate researchers in identifying target peptides with high variability within the human population we have created the Population Variation plug-in for Skyline, which provides easy access to the polymorphisms stored in dbSNP. Given a set of peptides, the tool reports minor allele frequency for common polymorphisms. We highlight the importance of considering genetic variation by applying the tool to public datasets.

  10. Hanford Site Regional Population - 2010 Census

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton, Erin L.; Snyder, Sandra F.

    2011-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The U.S. Department of Energy conducts radiological operations in south-central Washington State. Population dose estimates must be performed to provide a measure of the impact from site radiological releases. Results of the U.S. 2010 Census were used to determine counts and distributions for the residential population located within 50-miles of several operating areas of the Hanford Site. Year 2010 was the first census year that a 50-mile population of a Hanford Site operational area exceeded the half-million mark.

  11. Stellar Populations in Circumnuclear Star Forming Regions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. I. Diaz; M. Alvarez-Alvarez; M. Castellanos

    2002-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a study of the stellar populations and gas physical conditions in Circumnuclear Star Forming Regions (CNSFR) based on broad and narrow band photometry and spectrophotometric data, which have been analyzed with the use of evolutionary population synthesis and photoionization models. It is found that most CNSFR show composite stellar populations of slightly different ages. They seem to have the highest abundances in HII region-like objects, showing also N/O overabundances and S/O underabundances by a factor of about three. Also, CNSFR as a class, segregate from the disk HII region family, clustering around smaller $\\eta$' values, and thereforefore higher ionizing temperatures.

  12. Population viability analysis of the Endangered shortnose sturgeon

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jager, Yetta [ORNL; Bevelhimer, Mark S [ORNL; Peterson, Douglas L. [University of Georgia, Athens, GA

    2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study used population viability analysis (PVA) to partition the influences of potential threats to the endangered shortnose sturgeon (Acipenser brevirostrum). A workshop brought together experts to help identify potential threats including groundwater withdrawal, poor water quality, saltwater intrusion, mercury effects, harvest as by-catch, and sedimentation of spawning habitat. During the course of the project, we eliminated some threats and added new ones. Groundwater withdrawal was dismissed after a study failed to identify connection with groundwater and the majority of pumping is from a confined aquifer. We also eliminated activities on Fort Stewart as influences on spawning habitat because any successful spawning must occur upstream of Fort Stewart. We added climate change to the list of threats based on our assessment of temperature effects and expectations of sea-level rise. Our study highlighted the role of populations in nearby rivers in providing metapopulation support, raising the concern that the population in the Ogeechee River acts as a demographic sink. As part of this study, we carried out a field sampling study to analyze effects of training activities on headwater streams. We developed a new methodology for sampling design as part of this effort and used a mixed-modeling approach to identify relationships between land cover-land use, including those associated with military training activity and water quality. We found that tank training was associated with higher suspended sediment and equipment training was associated with higher organic carbon) and water quality. We detected effects of training on suspended sediment and organic carbon. We also carried out a field sampling effort in the Canoochee and Ogeechee Rivers. In the Ogeechee River, we found that dissolved oxygen in 40% of measurements during summer were below 4 mg L-1. To evaluate mercury as a potential threat, we developed a mercury uptake model and analyzed mercury levels in amphipod prey and sturgeon eggs. These did not exceed EPA guidelines. Finally, we developed a PVA model that including linkages between shortnose sturgeon growth, reproduction, and survival and each remaining threat; All three had significant influences. Preliminary simulations suggest that elevated temperatures under future climate will extirpate this population and add support to the hypothesis that this species requires access to spawning habitat far upstream to persist.

  13. Conditions when hybridization might predispose populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    COMMENTARY Conditions when hybridization might predispose populations for adaptive radiation O (Sch- warzer et al., 2012), perhaps just as a consequence of many young species in geographical et al., 2011; Genner & Turner, 2012). Whether these species radiations happen despite hybridization

  14. Method for spatially distributing a population

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bright, Edward A [Knoxville, TN; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [Knoxville, TN; Coleman, Phillip R [Knoxville, TN; Dobson, Jerome E [Lawrence, KS

    2007-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A process for spatially distributing a population count within a geographically defined area can include the steps of logically correlating land usages apparent from a geographically defined area to geospatial features in the geographically defined area and allocating portions of the population count to regions of the geographically defined area having the land usages, according to the logical correlation. The process can also include weighing the logical correlation for determining the allocation of portions of the population count and storing the allocated portions within a searchable data store. The logically correlating step can include the step of logically correlating time-based land usages to geospatial features of the geographically defined area. The process can also include obtaining a population count for the geographically defined area, organizing the geographically defined area into a plurality of sectors, and verifying the allocated portions according to direct observation.

  15. Stellar Populations in Bulges of Spiral Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    P. Jablonka; J. Gorgas; P. Goudfrooij

    2002-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have conducted a spectroscopic analysis of the bulges of a sample of 31 spiral galaxies, spanning the Hubble sequence from S0 to Scd type, in order to study the radial distribution of their stellar population properties.

  16. Programmed population control by cellcell communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    You, Lingchong

    that autonomously regulates the density of an Escherichia coli population. The cell density is broadcasted from the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri13,14 synthesizes a small, diffusible acyl-homoserine lactone

  17. Population dynamic interference among childhood diseases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohani, Pejman

    is predicted and cannot be dismissed in the limited case-study data available for measles and whooping cough in England before the vaccination era. Keywords: measles; whooping cough; population dynamics; epidemiology

  18. System identification for passive linear quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Madalin Guta; Naoki Yamamoto

    2014-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

    System identification is a key enabling component for the implementation of quantum technologies, including quantum control. In this paper, we consider the class of passive linear input-output systems, and investigate several basic questions: (1) which parameters can be identified? (2) Given sufficient input-output data, how do we reconstruct system parameters? (3) How can we optimize the estimation precision by preparing appropriate input states and performing measurements on the output? We show that minimal systems can be identified up to a unitary transformation on the modes, and systems satisfying a Hamiltonian connectivity condition called "infecting" are completely identifiable. We propose a frequency domain design based on a Fisher information criterion, for optimizing the estimation precision for coherent input state. As a consequence of the unitarity of the transfer function, we show that the Heisenberg limit with respect to the input energy can be achieved using non-classical input states.

  19. Identification marking by means of laser peening

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hackel, Lloyd A. (Livermore, CA); Dane, C. Brent (Livermore, CA); Harris, Fritz (Rocklin, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is a method and apparatus for marking components by inducing a shock wave on the surface that results in an indented (strained) layer and a residual compressive stress in the surface layer. One embodiment of the laser peenmarking system rapidly imprints, with single laser pulses, a complete identification code or three-dimensional pattern and leaves the surface in a state of deep residual compressive stress. A state of compressive stress in parts made of metal or other materials is highly desirable to make them resistant to fatigue failure and stress corrosion cracking. This process employs a laser peening system and beam spatial modulation hardware or imaging technology that can be setup to impress full three dimensional patterns into metal surfaces at the pulse rate of the laser, a rate that is at least an order of magnitude faster than competing marking technologies.

  20. Output error identification of hydrogenerator conduit dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vogt, M.A.; Wozniak, L. (Illinois Univ., Urbana, IL (USA)); Whittemore, T.R. (Bureau of Reclamation, Denver, CO (USA))

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Two output error model reference adaptive identifiers are considered for estimating the parameters in a reduced order gate position to pressure model for the hydrogenerator. This information may later be useful in an adaptive controller. Gradient and sensitivity functions identifiers are discussed for the hydroelectric application and connections are made between their structural differences and relative performance. Simulations are presented to support the conclusion that the latter algorithm is more robust, having better disturbance rejection and less plant model mismatch sensitivity. For identification from recorded plant data from step gate inputs, the other algorithm even fails to converge. A method for checking the estimated parameters is developed by relating the coefficients in the reduced order model to head, an externally measurable parameter.

  1. Model Identification for Optimal Diesel Emissions Control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens, Andrew J.; Sun, Yannan; Song, Xiaobo; Parker, Gordon

    2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we develop a model based con- troller for diesel emission reduction using system identification methods. Specifically, our method minimizes the downstream readings from a production NOx sensor while injecting a minimal amount of urea upstream. Based on the linear quadratic estimator we derive the closed form solution to a cost function that accounts for the case some of the system inputs are not controllable. Our cost function can also be tuned to trade-off between input usage and output optimization. Our approach performs better than a production controller in simulation. Our NOx conversion efficiency was 92.7% while the production controller achieved 92.4%. For NH3 conversion, our efficiency was 98.7% compared to 88.5% for the production controller.

  2. Positive materials identification of existing equipment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wolf, H.A. [Exxon Research and Engineering Co., Florham Park, NJ (United States)

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Considerable engineering effort and expertise are expended for materials selection at refining and petrochemical facilities. However, the benefits of this effort are undermined if there is an inadvertent material substitution during construction. Although procedures have always been in place to reduce the chance of such substitutions, it is known that these errors have occurred. Accordingly, over the years the industry has periodically reviewed and improved quality control in this effort. However, many older facilities that did not benefit from today`s procedures are still in operation. As a consequence, some companies have conducted positive material identification (PMI) verification of existing equipment. This process is further complicated by the fact that the most susceptible components are typically insulated and must be located. Once located, accessibility and operating temperatures are complicating issues. This paper describes prioritization issues and hardware tradeoffs for conducting a PMI verification program.

  3. Dynamics of similar populations Geza Meszena1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meszéna, Géza

    Dynamics of similar populations G´eza Mesz´ena1 , Mats Gyllenberg2 , Frans J. Jacobs3 , Hans A. J. Metz3,4 1 E¨otv¨os Univerity, Budapest 2 University of Helsinki 3 Leiden University 4 Adaptive Dynamics by population dynamics: dni dt = ri (n1, n2, . . . , nL) ni i = 1, 2, . . . , L ni 0 for losers. Dynamics

  4. Voluntary Self-Identification of Veterans

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    requires Government contractors to take affirmative action to employ and advance in employment: (1) disabled veterans; (2) recently separated veterans; (3) active duty wartime or...

  5. A Multi-Resolution Large Population Game Framework for Smart Grid Demand Response Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    A Multi-Resolution Large Population Game Framework for Smart Grid Demand Response Management Quanyan Zhu and Tamer Bas¸ar Abstract--Dynamic demand response (DR) management is becoming an integral, active operation, and efficient demand response. A reliable and efficient communication and networking

  6. Brain covariance selection: better individual functional connectivity models using population prior

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brain covariance selection: better individual functional connectivity models using population prior.thirion@inria.fr Abstract Spontaneous brain activity, as observed in functional neuroimaging, has been shown to display reproducible structure that expresses brain architecture and car- ries markers of brain pathologies

  7. X-ray source populations in galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. Fabbiano

    2005-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Today's sensitive, high-resolution X-ray observations allow the study of populations of X-ray sources, in the luminosity range of Galactic X-ray binaries, in galaxies as distant as 20-30 Mpc. The traditional astronomical tools of photometric diagrams and luminosity functions are now applied to these populations, providing a direct probe of the evolved binary component of different stellar populations. The study of the X-ray populations of E and S0 galaxies has revamped the debate on the formation and evolution of low-mass X-ray binaries (LMXBs) and on the role of globular clusters in these processes. While overall stellar mass drives the amount of X-ray binaries in old stellar populations, the amount of sources in star forming galaxies is related to the star formation rate. Short-lived, luminous, high-mass binaries (HMXBs) dominate these young populations. The most luminous sources in these systems are the debated ULXs, which have been suggested to be ~100-1000 Msol black holes, but could alternatively include a number of binaries with stellar mass black holes. Very soft sources have also been discovered in many galaxies and their nature is currently being debated. Observations of the deep X-ray sky, and comparison with deep optical surveys, are providing the first evidence of the X-ray evolution of galaxies.

  8. Molecular analysis of the metabolic rates of discrete subsurface populations of sulfate reducers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miletto, M.; Williams, K.H.; N'Guessan, A.L.; Lovley, D.R.

    2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Elucidating the in situ metabolic activity of phylogenetically diverse populations of sulfate-reducing microorganisms that populate anoxic sedimentary environments is key to understanding subsurface ecology. Previous pure culture studies have demonstrated that transcript abundance of dissimilatory (bi)sulfite reductase genes is correlated with the sulfate reducing activity of individual cells. To evaluate whether expression of these genes was diagnostic for subsurface communities, dissimilatory (bi)sulfite reductase gene transcript abundance in phylogenetically distinct sulfate-reducing populations was quantified during a field experiment in which acetate was added to uranium-contaminated groundwater. Analysis of dsrAB sequences prior to the addition of acetate indicated that Desulfobacteraceae, Desulfobulbaceae, and Syntrophaceae-related sulfate reducers were the most abundant. Quantifying dsrB transcripts of the individual populations suggested that Desulfobacteraceae initially had higher dsrB transcripts per cell than Desulfobulbaceae or Syntrophaceae populations, and that the activity of Desulfobacteraceae increased further when the metabolism of dissimilatory metal reducers competing for the added acetate declined. In contrast, dsrB transcript abundance in Desulfobulbaceae and Syntrophaceae remained relatively constant, suggesting a lack of stimulation by added acetate. The indication of higher sulfate-reducing activity in the Desulfobacteraceae was consistent with the finding that Desulfobacteraceae became the predominant component of the sulfate-reducing community. Discontinuing acetate additions resulted in a decline in dsrB transcript abundance in the Desulfobacteraceae. These results suggest that monitoring transcripts of dissimilatory (bi)sulfite reductase genes in distinct populations of sulfate reducers can provide insight into the relative rates of metabolism of different components of the sulfate-reducing community and their ability to respond to environmental perturbations.

  9. acipenser transmontanus population: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Summary: stated that a high priority is the identification and clarification of site characteristics that are essential for golden paintbrush, both for management and...

  10. Algorithms for the Automatic Identification of MARFEs and UFOs in JET Database of Visible Camera Videos

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Algorithms for the Automatic Identification of MARFEs and UFOs in JET Database of Visible Camera Videos

  11. The Planetary Nebula population of the Sagittarius Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albert Zijlstra; K. Gesicki; J. R. Walsh; D. Pequignot; P. A. M. van Hoof; D. Minniti

    2006-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The identification of two new Planetary Nebulae in the Sagittarius Dwarf Spheroidal Galaxy (Sgr) is presented. This brings the total number to four. The first, StWr 2-21, belongs to the main body of Sgr. The second, the halo PN BoBn 1, has a location, distance and velocity in agreement with the leading tidal tail of Sgr. We estimate that 10 per cent of the Galactic halo consists of Sgr debris. The specific frequency of PNe indicates a total luminosity of Sgr, including its tidal tails, of M_V=-14.1. StWr 2-21 shows a high abundance of [O/H]=-0.23, which confirms the high-metallicity population in Sgr uncovered by Bonaficio et al. (2004). The steep metallicity--age gradient in Sgr is due to ISM removal during the Galactic plane passages, ISM reformation due to stellar mass loss, and possibly accretion of metal-enriched gas from our Galaxy. The ISM re-formation rate of Sgr, from stellar mass loss, is 5 X 10^-4 M_sun yr^-1, amounting to ~10^6 M_sun per orbital period. HST images reveal well-developed bipolar morphologies, and provide clear detections of the central stars. All three stars with deep spectra show WR-lines, suggesting that the progenitor mass and metallicity determines whether a PN central star develops a WR spectrum. One Sgr PN belongs to the class of IR-[WC] stars. Expansion velocities are determined for three nebulae. Comparison with hydrodynamical models indicates an initial density profile of rho ~ r^-3. This is evidence for increasing mass-loss rates on the AGB. Peak mass-loss rates are indicated of ~ 10^-4 M_sun yr^-1. The IR-[WC] PN, He 2-436, provides the sole direct detection of dust in a dwarf spheroidal galaxy, to date.

  12. Identification and modification of dynamical regions in proteins for alteration of enzyme catalytic effect

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Agarwal, Pratul K.

    2013-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for analysis, control, and manipulation for improvement of the chemical reaction rate of a protein-mediated reaction is provided. Enzymes, which typically comprise protein molecules, are very efficient catalysts that enhance chemical reaction rates by many orders of magnitude. Enzymes are widely used for a number of functions in chemical, biochemical, pharmaceutical, and other purposes. The method identifies key protein vibration modes that control the chemical reaction rate of the protein-mediated reaction, providing identification of the factors that enable the enzymes to achieve the high rate of reaction enhancement. By controlling these factors, the function of enzymes may be modulated, i.e., the activity can either be increased for faster enzyme reaction or it can be decreased when a slower enzyme is desired. This method provides an inexpensive and efficient solution by utilizing computer simulations, in combination with available experimental data, to build suitable models and investigate the enzyme activity.

  13. asian populations levels: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    asymptomatic condition, that is widespread in Southeast Asian populations of Malasia, Indonesia, Papua New Guinea (more) Ziervogel, Cheryl Anne 2008-01-01 2 Population Total...

  14. asian population predictors: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    asymptomatic condition, that is widespread in Southeast Asian populations of Malasia, Indonesia, Papua New Guinea (more) Ziervogel, Cheryl Anne 2008-01-01 2 Population Total...

  15. asian population modified: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    asymptomatic condition, that is widespread in Southeast Asian populations of Malasia, Indonesia, Papua New Guinea (more) Ziervogel, Cheryl Anne 2008-01-01 2 Population Total...

  16. asian population lessons: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    asymptomatic condition, that is widespread in Southeast Asian populations of Malasia, Indonesia, Papua New Guinea (more) Ziervogel, Cheryl Anne 2008-01-01 2 Population Total...

  17. asian populations identifies: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    asymptomatic condition, that is widespread in Southeast Asian populations of Malasia, Indonesia, Papua New Guinea (more) Ziervogel, Cheryl Anne 2008-01-01 2 Population Total...

  18. annual plant populations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DEMOGRAPHY IN PLANTAGO:VARIATION AMONG COHORTS IN A NATURAL PLANT POPULATION DEBORAH A Roach,. Deborah 67 PLANT-ANIMAL INTERACTIONS -ORIGINAL PAPER Population density of North...

  19. Will China's Vehicle Population Grow Even Faster than Forecasted?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Yunshi; Teter, Jacob; Sperling, Daniel

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2011. “China’s Soaring Vehicle Population: Even Greater Thanversion, “China’s Soaring Vehicle Population: Even Greater2012. “Modeling Future Vehicle Sales and Stock in China,”

  20. Block-oriented nonlinear system identification using semidenite programming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Han, Younghee

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    identification method for MISO Wiener-Hammerstein model.multi-input single-output (MISO) case. More recent work canmulti-input single-output (MISO) case. More recent work can

  1. Non-linear system identification in flow-induced vibration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Spanos, P.D.; Zeldin, B.A. [Rice Univ., Houston, TX (United States); Lu, R. [Hudson Engineering Corp., Houston, TX (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper introduces a method of identification of non-linear systems encountered in marine engineering applications. The non-linearity is accounted for by a combination of linear subsystems and known zero-memory non-linear transformations; an equivalent linear multi-input-single-output (MISO) system is developed for the identification problem. The unknown transfer functions of the MISO system are identified by assembling a system of linear equations in the frequency domain. This system is solved by performing the Cholesky decomposition of a related matrix. It is shown that the proposed identification method can be interpreted as a {open_quotes}Gram-Schmidt{close_quotes} type of orthogonal decomposition of the input-output quantities of the equivalent MISO system. A numerical example involving the identification of unknown parameters of flow (ocean wave) induced forces on offshore structures elucidates the applicability of the proposed method.

  2. System Identification and the Modeling of Sailing Yachts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Legursky, Katrina

    2013-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This research represents an exploration of sailing yacht dynamics with full-scale sailing motion data, physics-based models, and system identification techniques. The goal is to provide a method of obtaining and validating suitable physics...

  3. Seismic Facies Classification And Identification By Competitive Neural Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saggaf, Muhammad M.

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an approach based on competitive networks for the classification and identification of reservoir facies from seismic data. This approach can be adapted to perform either classification of the seismic facies based ...

  4. Radio frequency identification (RFID) applications in semiconductor manufacturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cassett, David Ian, 1971-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radio frequency identification (RFID) has an enormous potential impact within the semiconductor supply chain, especially within semiconductor manufacturing. The end benefit of RFID will be in the mass serialization, and ...

  5. Hazardous Material Identification With StreetLab Mobile | GE...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window) Hazardous Material Identification With StreetLab Mobile Vin Smentkowski 2011.01.10 One of our research teams at the India Technology Centre...

  6. Identification of performance indicators for nuclear power plants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sui, Yu, 1973-

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Performance indicators have been assuming an increasingly important role in the nuclear industry. An integrated methodology is proposed in this research for the identification and validation of performance indicators for ...

  7. Nonlinear stochastic system identification techniques for biological tissues/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Yi, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research develops a device capable of measuring the nonlinear dynamic mechanical properties of human tissue in vivo. The enabling technology is the use of nonlinear stochastic system identification techniques in ...

  8. Identification of geometrical and elastostatic parameters of heavy industrial robots

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Identification of geometrical and elastostatic parameters of heavy industrial robots A. Klimchik, Y modeling of heavy industrial robots with gravity compensators. The main attention is paid of huge aircraft compo- nents where industrial robots successfully replace conven- tional CNC

  9. Identification of simultaneous U(VI) sorption complexes and U...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    conditions under which U (VI)-CO3-Ca complexes inhibit U reduction. Citation: Singer DM, SME Chatman, ES Ilton, KM Rosso, JF Banfield, and G Waychunas.2012."Identification of...

  10. Frequency-based structural damage identification and dynamic system characterisation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mao, Lei

    2012-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis studies structural dynamic system identification in a frequency-based framework. The basic consideration stems from the fact that frequencies may generally be measured with higher accuracy than other pertinent ...

  11. Identification and Estimation of a Discrete Game of Complete Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bajari, Patrick

    We discuss the identification and estimation of discrete games of complete information. Following Bresnahan and Reiss (1990, 1991), a discrete game is a generalization of a standard discrete choice model where utility ...

  12. Insect Identification Service 1 Lyle J. Buss2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jawitz, James W.

    RFSR010 Insect Identification Service 1 Lyle J. Buss2 1. This document is RFSR010, one of a series. Visit the EDIS website at http://edis. ifas.ufl.edu. 2. Lyle J. Buss, Entomology and Nematology

  13. Web spam Identification Through Content and Hyperlinks Jacob Abernethy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abernethy, Jake

    Web spam Identification Through Content and Hyperlinks Jacob Abernethy Dept. of Computer Science or distributed for profit or commercial advantage and that copies bear this notice and the full citation

  14. Horse Theft Awareness and Prevention - Identification of Horses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibbs, Pete G.; Wall, Leman H.; Householder, Doug

    1998-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

    of proof always seems to lie with the victim. Therefore, permanent identif_ication can aid law enforce- ment agencies and livestock inves- tigators in theft cases. In September 1997, Texas leg- islation took ef_fect to help prevent and investigate horse..., illustrations and natural markings Owners should keep clear photographs of individual horses on file with other paperwork such as registration papers and health records. Precise photographs can help law enforcement authorities and brand inspectors identify sto...

  15. PROBABILISTIC SITE IDENTIFICATION ANALYSIS USING NUPEC RECORDED FREE FIELD MOTIONS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    XU,J.; COSTANTINO,C.; HOFMAYER,C.; MURPHY,A.; KITADA,Y.

    2002-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    THIS PAPER DESCRIBES A PROBABILISTIC SITE IDENTIFICATION ANALYSIS PERFORMED BY BNL, USING THE FREE FIELD EARTHQUAKE MOTIONS RECORDED AT THE NUPEC TEST SITE. THE BNL ANALYSIS WAS INTENDED TO PROVIDE ADEQUATE CHARACTERIZATION OF THE SOIL PROPERTIES FOR THE TEST SITE TO BE USED FOR SSI ANALYSES. THE FREE FIELD DATA WERE PROVIDED BY NUPEC. THE METHODOLOGY EMPLOYED IN THE BNL PROBABILISTIC ANALYSIS OF SITE IDENTIFICATION INCLUDES THE MONTE CARLO PR...

  16. Identification of airfoil characteristics for optimum wind turbine performance / b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Leonard Scott

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IDENTIFICATION OF AIRFOIL CHARACTERISTICS FOR OPTIMUM WIND TURBINE PERFORMANCE A Thesis by LEONARD SCOTT MILLER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER... OF SCIENCE December 1983 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering IDENTIFICATION OF AIRFOIL CHARACTERISTICS FOR OPTIMUM WIND TURBINE PERFORMANCE A Thesis by LEONARD SCOTT MILLER Approved as to Style and Content by: Dr. S. J. Miley (Chairm of Committee...

  17. Nonlinear system identification using the MRAS technique and hyperstability concepts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schatte, Alvin Robert

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Page 1. Example of Using a Taylor Series Expansion for the Function, f (x) '3 2. General MRAS Configuration 3. 8asic Hyperstability System 4. Parallel or Response Error MRAS Identification 5. Equation Error or Series Parallel MRAS Identification 6... Zl. Parametric Convergence for Model of (5. 2) 68 '69 71 72 75 77 Fig. 22. Nonlinear Power Series Model Results on Plant with Dead Zone 23. Parameter Convergence for Power Series Nodel of Dead Zone Nonlinear Plant 24. Zeroth Degree Taylor...

  18. Isolation and identification of a toxic metabolite of Phomopsis sp.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samples, Daniel Robert

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ISOLATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF A TOXIC MEl'ABOLITE OF PHOMOPSIS SP. A Thesis by DANIEL ROBERT SAMPLES Submitted to the Graduate College of' Texas A&B University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... MAY 1982 Major Subject~ Veterinary Toxicology ISOLATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF A TOXIC METABOLITE OF PHOMOPSIS SP. A Thesis by DANIEL ROBERT SAMPLES Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Membe (Mem ) (Head of Departme t...

  19. Isolation and identification of a toxic metabolite of Phomopsis sp. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samples, Daniel Robert

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ISOLATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF A TOXIC MEl'ABOLITE OF PHOMOPSIS SP. A Thesis by DANIEL ROBERT SAMPLES Submitted to the Graduate College of' Texas A&B University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE... MAY 1982 Major Subject~ Veterinary Toxicology ISOLATION AND IDENTIFICATION OF A TOXIC METABOLITE OF PHOMOPSIS SP. A Thesis by DANIEL ROBERT SAMPLES Approved as to style and content by: (Chairman of Committee) (Membe (Mem ) (Head of Departme t...

  20. Home and Farm Security Machinery and Equipment Identification.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, Gary S.

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    73 Fibme and Farm Security -m Machinery and Equipment identification Home and Farm Security chinery and Equipment Identification *Gary S. Nelson is no longer just an urban problem. d burglaries in rural communities have to an alarming... insurance y equipment replacement, lost work urs and so forth. mers can discourage and minimize y theft from their farms is by providing a law enforcement officers to easily identify Mark all machinery and tools with a tification number (ID). Use...

  1. Identification and enrichment of colony-forming cells from the adult murine pituitary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lepore, D.A. [Pituitary Research Unit, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Royal Children's Hospital, Parkville, Victoria 3052 (Australia); Roeszler, K. [Pituitary Research Unit, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Royal Children's Hospital, Parkville, Victoria 3052 (Australia); Wagner, J. [Pituitary Research Unit, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Royal Children's Hospital, Parkville, Victoria 3052 (Australia); Department of Paediatrics, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Ross, S.A. [Pituitary Research Unit, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Royal Children's Hospital, Parkville, Victoria 3052 (Australia); Bauer, K. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Experimentelle Endokrinologie, Hannover (Germany); Thomas, P.Q. [Pituitary Research Unit, Murdoch Childrens Research Institute, Royal Children's Hospital, Parkville, Victoria 3052 (Australia)], E-Mail: paul.thomas@mcri.edu.au

    2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Stem and progenitor cells have been identified in many adult tissues including bone marrow, the central nervous system, and skin. While there is direct evidence to indicate the activity of a progenitor cell population in the pituitary gland, this putative subpopulation has not yet been identified. Herein we describe the isolation and characterization of a novel clonogenic cell type in the adult murine pituitary, which we have termed Pituitary Colony-Forming Cells (PCFCs). PCFCs constitute 0.2% of pituitary cells, and generate heterogeneous colonies from single cells. PCFCs exhibit variable proliferative potential, and may exceed 11 population doublings in 14 days. Enrichment of PCFCs to 61.5-fold with 100% recovery can be obtained through the active uptake of the fluorescent dipeptide, {beta}-Ala-Lys-N{epsilon}-AMCA. PCFCs are mostly contained within the large, agranular subpopulation of AMCA{sup +} cells, and constitute 28% of this fraction, corresponding to 140.5-fold enrichment. Interestingly, the AMCA{sup +} population contains rare cells that are GH{sup +} or PRL{sup +}. GH{sup +} cells were also identified in PCFC single cell colonies, suggesting that PCFCs have the potential to differentiate into GH{sup +} cells. Together, these data show that the pituitary contains a rare clonogenic population which may correspond to the somatotrope/lactotrope progenitors suggested by previous experiments.

  2. Identification of a Novel Phytoestrogen: Trigonelline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yackley, Katarina M.

    2009-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    been found to increase formation of neurites in neuroblastoma cells. We were interested in determining whether trigonelline demonstrates estrogenic properties by activating the estrogen receptor. Estrogen dependent breast cancer (MCF-7) cells were...

  3. Activity report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, S W

    2008-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is aimed to show the author's activities to support the LDRD. The title is 'Investigation of the Double-C Behavior in the Pu-Ga Time-Temperature-Transformation Diagram' The sections are: (1) Sample Holder Test; (2) Calculation of x-ray diffraction patterns; (3) Literature search and preparing publications; (4) Tasks Required for APS Experiments; and (5) Communications.

  4. New possible resonance for population II Cepheids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cox, A.N.; Kidman, R.B.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Light and velocity curves of some radial mode variable stars seem to indicate a resonance where the second overtone has a period exactly half that of the fundamental mode. The two classes of stars that show this resonance by bumps in their light curves are the classical Cepheids and the population II BL Her variables. We here propose that there is another resonance for the population II W Vir variables where the ratio of the first overtone to the fundamental periods is 0.5.

  5. A Decade of Population Change in Texas.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skrabanek, R. L.

    1963-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of community facilities. The political representation of rural dwellers is also likely to be reduced. 3. In 1960, for the first time in history, Texas had more females than males. The projected sex ratio is 96.7 males per 100 females in 1970. At the same... of the Panhandle and extending southward beyond Abilene. This area sustained a decline of one-third in rural population during the decade. Only 2 of the 29 counties (Cottle and Donley) in area 6 had an increase in rural population. Another section, state...

  6. Probing Signal Design for Power System Identification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pierre, John W.; Zhou, Ning; Tuffner, Francis K.; Hauer, John F.; Trudnowski, Daniel J.; Mittelstadt, William

    2010-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper investigates the design of effective input signals for low-level probing of power systems. In 2005, 2006, and 2008 the Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) conducted four large-scale system wide tests of the western interconnected power system where probing signals were injected by modulating the control signal at the Celilo end of the Pacific DC intertie. A major objective of these tests is the accurate estimation of the inter-area electromechanical modes. A key aspect of any such test is the design of an effective probing signal that leads to measured outputs rich in information about the modes. This paper specifically studies low-level probing signal design for power-system identification. The paper describes the design methodology and the advantages of this new probing signal which was successfully applied during these tests. This probing input is a multi-sine signal with its frequency content focused in the range of the inter-area modes. The period of the signal is over two minutes providing high-frequency resolution. Up to 15 cycles of the signal are injected resulting in a processing gain of 15. The resulting system response is studied in the time and frequency domains. Because of the new probing signal characteristics, these results show significant improvement in the output SNR compared to previous tests.

  7. On the mechanism of populating 3p levels of neon under pumping by a hard ioniser

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Khasenov, M U [Fotonika LLC, ul. Utegen batyra 112, 050062 Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2011-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The effect of quenching additives on the luminescence properties of helium - neon mixtures under pumping by {alpha} particles emitted from {sup 210}Po atoms is considered. It is concluded that, under excitation by a heavy charged particle, the population of the 3p'[1/2]{sub 0} level of neon is not related to the dissociative recombination of molecular ions. It is suggested that the most likely channels for populating the 3p level are the excitation transfer from metastable helium atoms to neon atoms and direct excitation of neon by nuclear particles and secondary electrons. (lasers and active media)

  8. Radio faint AGN: a tale of two populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padovani, P; Kellermann, K I; Miller, N; Mainieri, V; Tozzi, P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (E-CDFS) Very Large Array sample, which reaches a flux density limit at 1.4 GHz of 32.5 microJy at the field centre and redshift ~ 4, and covers ~ 0.3 deg^2. Number counts are presented for the whole sample while the evolutionary properties and luminosity functions are derived for active galactic nuclei (AGN). The faint radio sky contains two totally distinct AGN populations, characterised by very different evolutions, luminosity functions, and Eddington ratios: radio-quiet (RQ)/radiative-mode, and radio-loud/jet-mode AGN. The radio power of RQ AGN evolves ~ (1+z)^2.5, similarly to star-forming galaxies, while the number density of radio-loud ones has a peak at ~ 0.5 and then declines at higher redshifts. The number density of radio-selected RQ AGN is consistent with that of X-ray selected AGN, which shows that we are sampling the same population. The unbiased fraction of radiative-mode RL AGN, derived from our own and previously published data, is a strong funct...

  9. MULTIWAVELENGTH CONSTRAINTS ON PULSAR POPULATIONS IN THE GALACTIC CENTER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wharton, R. S.; Chatterjee, S.; Cordes, J. M. [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Deneva, J. S. [Arecibo Observatory, HC3 Box 53995, Arecibo, PR 00612 (Puerto Rico); Lazio, T. J. W., E-mail: rwharton@astro.cornell.edu [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, M/S 138-308, 4800 Oak Grove Dr., Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)

    2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The detection of radio pulsars within the central few parsecs of the Galaxy would provide a unique probe of the gravitational and magneto-ionic environments in the Galactic center (GC) and, if close enough to Sgr A*, precise tests of general relativity in the strong-field regime. While it is difficult to find pulsars at radio wavelengths because of interstellar scattering, the payoff from detailed timing of pulsars in the GC warrants a concerted effort. To motivate pulsar surveys and help define search parameters for them, we constrain the pulsar number and spatial distribution using a wide range of multiwavelength measurements. These include the five known radio pulsars within 15' of Sgr A*, non-detections in high-frequency pulsar surveys of the central parsec, radio and gamma-ray measurements of diffuse emission, a catalog of radio point sources from an imaging survey, infrared observations of massive star populations in the central few parsecs, candidate pulsar wind nebulae in the inner 20 pc, and estimates of the core-collapse supernova rate based on X-ray measurements. We find that under current observational constraints, the inner parsec of the Galaxy could harbor as many as {approx}10{sup 3} active radio pulsars that are beamed toward Earth. Such a large population would distort the low-frequency measurements of both the intrinsic spectrum of Sgr A* and the free-free absorption along the line of sight of Sgr A*.

  10. population model Harald Rybka, Jason Wong, Jorge Rivas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yorke, James

    : food production = food consumption for a population of 8 billion consumption per capita is a constant

  11. Competitive niche: Way of population regulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meszéna, Géza

    1 / 27 Competitive niche: Way of population regulation G´eza Mesz´ena1, Andr´as Szil´agyi1, Kalle of coexistence Theory Regulating loop Results Examples Spatial segregation Functional & spatial segregation Regulating loop y Results Examples Conclusions 7 / 27 #12;Regulating loop Introduction Theory y Regulating

  12. The Population Status The American Alligator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Georgia, University of

    Carolina by Thomas M. Murphy A Publication of the Savannah River Plant National Environmental Research Park'S SAVANNAH RIVER PLANT NATIONAL ENVIRONMENT RESEARCH PARK Copies may be obtained from Savannah River Ecology Laboratory #12;- The Population Status of the American Alligator on the Savannah River Plant, South Carolina

  13. Neoclassical formulations of optimum population theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Glenn Anthony

    1971-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    discontinues [ 9, 221] . The modern theory of an optimum population has added three refinements to this notion: (1) there are several optima, and one of these optima is the "optimum-optimorum"; (2) the optima and the optimum-optimorum can be represented...

  14. Evolutionary Game Theory and Population Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miekisz, Jacek

    , Poland miekisz@mimuw.edu.pl 1 Short overview We begin these lecture notes by a crash course in game maximizing their individual payoffs and particles in lattice-gas models minimizing their interaction energy by the minimum of some global quantity, the total energy or free energy of the system. Population dynamics lacks

  15. Galaxy populations from Deep ISO Surveys

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seb Oliver

    2001-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    I discuss some of the main extra-galactic field surveys which have been undertaken by the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). I review the findings from the source counts analysies and then examine some of the more recent detailed investigations into the explicit nature of the populations that make up these source counts.

  16. Computational Identification of Operons in Microbial Genomes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    computational pipeline is proposed to find potential operons in microbial genomes. The algorithm relies activities and regulation, it is encouraged by selection. By group regu- lation of certain highly expressed expenditure. In most bacterial genomes, func- tionally coupled gene clusters are often regulated under

  17. Bacterial Population Genetics in a Forensic Context

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Velsko, S P

    2009-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This report addresses the recent Department of Homeland Security (DHS) call for a Phase I study to (1) assess gaps in the forensically relevant knowledge about the population genetics of eight bacterial agents of concern, (2) formulate a technical roadmap to address those gaps, and (3) identify new bioinformatics tools that would be necessary to analyze and interpret population genetic data in a forensic context. The eight organisms that were studied are B. anthracis, Y. pestis, F. tularensis, Brucella spp., E. coli O157/H7, Burkholderia mallei, Burkholderia pseudomallei, and C. botulinum. Our study focused on the use of bacterial population genetics by forensic investigators to test hypotheses about the possible provenance of an agent that was used in a crime or act of terrorism. Just as human population genetics underpins the calculations of match probabilities for human DNA evidence, bacterial population genetics determines the level of support that microbial DNA evidence provides for or against certain well-defined hypotheses about the origins of an infecting strain. Our key findings are: (1) Bacterial population genetics is critical for answering certain types of questions in a probabilistic manner, akin (but not identical) to 'match probabilities' in DNA forensics. (2) A basic theoretical framework for calculating likelihood ratios or posterior probabilities for forensic hypotheses based on microbial genetic comparisons has been formulated. This 'inference-on-networks' framework has deep but simple connections to the population genetics of mtDNA and Y-STRs in human DNA forensics. (3) The 'phylogeographic' approach to identifying microbial sources is not an adequate basis for understanding bacterial population genetics in a forensic context, and has limited utility, even for generating 'leads' with respect to strain origin. (4) A collection of genotyped isolates obtained opportunistically from international locations augmented by phylogenetic representations of relatedness will not and enzootic outbreaks noted through international outbreak surveillance systems, and 'representative' genetic sequences from each outbreak. (5) Interpretation of genetic comparisons between an attack strain and reference strains requires a model for the network structure of maintenance foci, enzootic outbreaks, and human outbreaks of that disease, coupled with estimates of mutational rate constants. Validation of the model requires a set of sequences from exemplary outbreaks and laboratory data on mutation rates during animal passage. The necessary number of isolates in each validation set is determined by disease transmission network theory, and is based on the 'network diameter' of the outbreak. (6) The 8 bacteria in this study can be classified into 4 categories based on the complexity of the transmission network structure of their natural maintenance foci and their outbreaks, both enzootic and zoonotic. (7) For B. anthracis, Y. pestis, E. coli O157, and Brucella melitensis, and their primary natural animal hosts, most of the fundamental parameters needed for modeling genetic change within natural host or human transmission networks have been determined or can be estimated from existing field and laboratory studies. (8) For Burkholderia mallei, plausible approaches to transmission network models exist, but much of the fundamental parameterization does not. In addition, a validated high-resolution typing system for characterizing genetic change within outbreaks or foci has not yet been demonstrated, although a candidate system exists. (9) For Francisella tularensis, the increased complexity of the transmission network and unresolved questions about maintenance and transmission suggest that it will be more complex and difficult to develop useful models based on currently available data. (10) For Burkholderia pseudomallei and Clostridium botulinum, the transmission and maintenance networks involve complex soil communities and metapopulations about which very little is known. It is not clear that these pathogens can be brought into the in

  18. The M31 population of supersoft sources

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peter Kahabka

    1999-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

    The 1991 ROSAT PSPC M31 X-ray point source catalog has been screened in order to set up a sample of candidate supersoft sources in this galaxy, additional to the 16 supersoft sources of Supper et al. (1997). 26 candidates have been found. Absorbing hydrogen column densities, effective temperatures and white dwarf masses (assuming the sources are on the stability line of surface nuclear burning) are derived. An observed white dwarf mass distribution is derived which indicates that the masses are constrained to values above 0.90 solar masses. The entire population of supersoft sources in M31 is estimated taking a theoretical white dwarf mass distribution into account, assuming that the observationally derived sample is restricted to white dwarf masses above 0.90 solar, and taking into account that the gas and the source population have a different scale height. A total number of at least 200-500 and at most 6,000-15,000 sources is deduced depending on the used galaxy N_H model, making use of the population synthesis calculation of Yungelson (1996). The spatial distribution favors a disk (or spiral-arm) dominated young stellar population with a ratio of 1/(4-7) of bulge/disk systems. Assuming that all supersoft sources with masses in excess of 0.5 solar masses are progenitors of supernovae of type Ia, a SN Ia rate of (0.8-7) 10^-3 yr^-1 is derived for M31 based on these progenitors. Supersoft sources might account for 20-100% of the total SN Ia rate in a galaxy like M31.

  19. Design exploration: engaging a larger user population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, John Michael

    2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

    an interface on a physical shared table space. Whereas PICTIVE requires physical co-location, TelePICTIVE [Miller et al. 1992] and PICTIOL [Farrell et al. 2006] moves the shared space to a collaborative computer application. While GUI developers are still... of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY August 2007 Major Subject: Computer Science DESIGN EXPLORATION: ENGAGING A LARGER USER POPULATION A Dissertation by JOHN MICHAEL MOORE Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University...

  20. WANDERING STARS: AN ORIGIN OF ESCAPED POPULATIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Teyssier, Maureen; Johnston, Kathryn V. [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, Pupin Physics Laboratory, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Shara, Michael M. [American Museum of Natural History, 79th Street and Central Park West, New York, NY 10024-5192 (United States)

    2009-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate that stars beyond the virial radii of galaxies may be generated by the gravitational impulse received by a satellite as it passes through the pericenter of its orbit around its parent. These stars may become energetically unbound (escaped stars), or may travel to further than a few virial radii for longer than a few Gyr, but still remain energetically bound to the system (wandering stars). Larger satellites (10%-100% the mass of the parent), and satellites on more radial orbits are responsible for the majority of this ejected population. Wandering stars could be observable on Mpc scales via classical novae, and on 100 Mpc scales via Type Ia supernova. The existence of such stars would imply a corresponding population of barely bound, old, high-velocity stars orbiting the Milky Way, generated by the same physical mechanism during the Galaxy's formation epoch. Sizes and properties of these combined populations should place some constraints on the orbits and masses of the progenitor objects from which they came, providing insight into the merging histories of galaxies in general and the Milky Way in particular.

  1. Molecular Imaging of the ATM Kinase Activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Terence M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Nyati, Shyam [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Center for Molecular Imaging, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Ross, Brian D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Rehemtulla, Alnawaz, E-mail: alnawaz@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Center for Molecular Imaging, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose: Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is a serine/threonine kinase critical to the cellular DNA-damage response, including from DNA double-strand breaks. ATM activation results in the initiation of a complex cascade of events including DNA damage repair, cell cycle checkpoint control, and survival. We sought to create a bioluminescent reporter that dynamically and noninvasively measures ATM kinase activity in living cells and subjects. Methods and Materials: Using the split luciferase technology, we constructed a hybrid cDNA, ATM-reporter (ATMR), coding for a protein that quantitatively reports on changes in ATM kinase activity through changes in bioluminescence. Results: Treatment of ATMR-expressing cells with ATM inhibitors resulted in a dose-dependent increase in bioluminescence activity. In contrast, induction of ATM kinase activity upon irradiation resulted in a decrease in reporter activity that correlated with ATM and Chk2 activation by immunoblotting in a time-dependent fashion. Nuclear targeting improved ATMR sensitivity to both ATM inhibitors and radiation, whereas a mutant ATMR (lacking the target phosphorylation site) displayed a muted response. Treatment with ATM inhibitors and small interfering (si)RNA-targeted knockdown of ATM confirm the specificity of the reporter. Using reporter expressing xenografted tumors demonstrated the ability of ATMR to report in ATM activity in mouse models that correlated in a time-dependent fashion with changes in Chk2 activity. Conclusions: We describe the development and validation of a novel, specific, noninvasive bioluminescent reporter that enables monitoring of ATM activity in real time, in vitro and in vivo. Potential applications of this reporter include the identification and development of novel ATM inhibitors or ATM-interacting partners through high-throughput screens and in vivo pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic studies of ATM inhibitors in preclinical models.

  2. Noninvasive identification of fluids by swept-frequency acoustic interferometry

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sinha, Dipen N. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for rapid, noninvasive identification and monitoring of chemicals in sealed containers or containers where direct access to the chemical is not possible is described. Multiple ultrasonic acoustic properties (up to four) of a fluid are simultaneously determined. The present invention can be used for chemical identification and for determining changes in known chemicals from a variety of sources. It is not possible to identify all known chemicals based on the measured parameters, but known classes of chemicals in suspected containers, such as in chemical munitions, can be characterized. In addition, a large number of industrial chemicals can be identified.

  3. A system identification approach to non-invasive central cardiovascular monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hahn, Jin-Oh, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents a new system identification approach to non-invasive central cardiovascular monitoring problem. For this objective, this thesis will develop and analyze blind system identification and input signal ...

  4. Geography Access Control / Identification Application Application Type: New Update/Addition Replacement Temporary

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Barbara, University of

    /Addition Replacement Temporary The following is to be completed by the employee (type or print legibly): Last name _____________________ $15 Access & Identification, $10 Identification Card only, $10 replacement fee for either Affiliation

  5. Next Generation Nuclear Plant Phenomena Identification and Ranking Tables (PIRTs) Volume 1: Main Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ball, Sydney J [ORNL

    2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A phenomena identification and ranking table (PIRT) process was conducted for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) design. This design (in the conceptual stage) is a modular high-temperature gas-cooled reactor (HTGR) that generates both electricity and process heat for hydrogen production. Expert panels identified safety-relevant phenomena, ranked their importance, and assessed the knowledge levels in the areas of accidents and thermal fluids, fission-product transport and dose, high-temperature materials, graphite, and process heat for hydrogen production. This main report summarizes and documents the process and scope of the reviews, noting the major activities and conclusions. The identified phenomena, analyses, rationales, and associated ratings of the phenomena, plus a summary of each panel's findings, are presented. Individual panel reports for these areas are provided as attached volumes to this main report and provide considerably more detail about each panel's deliberations as well as a more complete listing of the phenomena that were evaluated.

  6. Physical and Mathematical Description of Nuclear Weapons Identification System (NWIS) Signatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mattingly, J.K.; Mihalczo, J.T.; Mullens, J.A.; Valentine, T.E.

    1997-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes all time and frequency analysis parameters measured with the new Nuclear Weapons Identification System (NWIS) processor with three input channels: (1) the 252Cf source ionization chamber (2) a detection channel; and (3) a second detection channel for active measurements. An intuitive and physical description of the various functions is given as well as a brief mathematical description and a brief description of how the data are acquired. If the fill five channel capability is used, the number of functions increases in number but not in type. The parameters provided by this new NWIS processor can be divided into two general classes: time analysis signatures including multiplicities and frequency analysis signatures. Data from measurements with an 18.75 kg highly enriched uranium (93.2 wt 0/0, 235U) metai casting for storage are presented to illustrate the various time and frequency analysis parameters.

  7. Investigations into the Synthesis, Identification and Developability of Active Ionic Liquids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Elise

    2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    ; isothermal hold for 2 min.; modulate +/- 0.5°C every 60 sec; ramp 2°C /min to 100°C; mark end of cycle 1; ramp 5°C /min to -20°C; repeat isothermal hold and modulated ramp for two more cycles, with data sampling at 0.20 sec/point. Cycle 1 data was reported....0 g of sodium chloride and 16.8 mL of 1.0N HCl to a 1L bottle and diluting to 1.0 L with deionized water. Fasted State Simulated Intestinal Fluid (FaSSIF) was prepared by diluting 2.24 g of Phares Standard Intestinal Fluid (SIF) powder to 1.0 L...

  8. Identification of 2-Aminothiazole-4-Carboxylate Derivatives Active against Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    concern. M. tuberculosis, the causative organism, produces a chronic infection in the lungs that can

  9. Identification of active agents for tetrachloroethylene degradation in Portland cement slurry containing ferrous iron 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ko, Sae Bom

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Fe(II)-based degradative solidification/stabilization (Fe(II)-DS/S) technology is the modification of conventional solidification/stabilization (S/S). Inorganic pollutants are immobilized by Fe(II)-DS/S while organic pollutants are destroyed...

  10. Fossil identification activity Standard: Comparing fossils to each other or to living organisms reveals features of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Icaronycteris XI6a, aka" bat" 4. Boney Fish (Knightera) XI2c, (1 piece) 5. Megalodon tooth XIa 6. Dinosaur skin? (teeth? skin? bone? imprint?) 3. What kind of animal is it? (reptile? mammal? invertebrate? fish?) 4. Why

  11. Acoustics in the Klebanoff-Saric Wind Tunnel: Background Identification, Forcing, and Active Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kuester, Matthew

    2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    ......................................... 12 4 Layout of broadband acoustic panels on plenum floor, walls, and ceiling 16 5 Single direction sensing technique (frequency domain) ............................ 22 6 Single direction sensing technique (time domain... .............................................................................. 26 2 Comparison of microphone broadband noise in the 30 Hz ? 150 Hz band at 1000 RPM ............................................................................................... 28 3 Breakdown of baseline SPL by frequency range...

  12. Semi-supervised based Active Class Selection for Automatic Identification of Sub-Kilometer Craters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Wei

    characterized by heterogeneous surface morphology. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed about the past and present geological processes and provide the only tool to measuring relative ages of observed geologic formations. The size distribution of craters conforms to the power-law as large craters

  13. Identification of the amino acid residues at the active site of E. coli carbamyl phosphate synthetase

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Youn, Hejung

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    with water to block the carboxyl group in order to form an amide. This acceleration depends on the nucleophilic capacity of the reagent (Lacombe et al. , 19gl). Lusty (1983) has been reported 28 conserved glutamic acids and 15 conserved aspartic acids from...

  14. grams (see the first figure) can provide a direct identification of the highest activation barriers,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daniel, Rosenfeld

    )--which catalyze hydrogen evolution. The results indicate that the enzymes have hydro- gen adsorption nanostructured materials designed for optimal performance, be it in the production of hydrogen from bioresources (12), showing the edges where hydrogen can adsorb and H2 evolve. T he power of greenhouse

  15. Model Based Identification of Transcription Factor Regulatory Activity via Markov Chain Monte Carlo

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rogers, Simon

    ,Khanin,Girolami (Glasgow) MCMC for TFA MASAMB 2006 2 / 43 #12;Outline 1 Motivation Regulatory Networks Regulation 2 Model,Khanin,Girolami (Glasgow) MCMC for TFA MASAMB 2006 4 / 43 #12;Modeling Regulatory Networks Considerable effort has gone linear Rogers,Khanin,Girolami (Glasgow) MCMC for TFA MASAMB 2006 4 / 43 #12;Modeling Regulatory Networks

  16. Identification of Highly Active Fe Sites in (Ni,Fe)OOH for Electrocatalytic

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level: National5Sales for4,645 3,625 1,006 492 742EnergyOnItem NotEnergy,ARMFormsGasReleaseSpeechesHallNotSeventyTechnologiesfacility doe

  17. Questions For Identification, Evaluation, and Ranking of Proposed Infrastructure Protection Activities

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel), 2002; Level:Energy: Grid Integration Redefining What's Possible forPortsmouth/Paducah47,193.70COMMUNITY AEROSOL:QuantumAprilElasticQuestSAND2002-0877

  18. Linking Dynamical and Population Genetic Models of Persistent Viral Infection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kelly, John K.; Williamson, Scott; Orive, Maria E.; Smith, Marilyn S.; Holt, Robert D.

    2003-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This article develops a theoretical framework to link dynamical and population genetic models of persistent viral infection. This linkage is useful because, while the dynamical and population genetic theories have developed ...

  19. Diversity waves in collapse-driven population dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maslov, Sergei

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Populations of species in ecosystems are constrained by the availability of resources within their environment. In effect this means that a growth of one population, needs to be balanced by the reduction in size of others. In neutral models of biodiversity all populations are assumed to change incrementally due to stochastic births and deaths of individuals. Here we propose and model another redistribution mechanism driven by abrupt collapses of the entire population of a single species freeing up resources for the remaining ones. This mechanism may be relevant for communities of bacteria, with strain-specific collapses caused e.g. by invading bacteriophages, or for other ecosystems where infectious diseases play an important role. The emergent property of the population dynamics in our system are cyclic "diversity waves" triggered by collapses of globally dominating populations. The population diversity in the environment peaks at the beginning of each wave and exponentially decreases afterwards. Population ...

  20. autotrophic microbial populations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 MICROBIAL POPULATIONS FECAL PELLETS AND Geosciences Websites Summary: MICROBIAL POPULATIONS FECAL PELLETS AND AND...

  1. access microbial populations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 MICROBIAL POPULATIONS FECAL PELLETS AND Geosciences Websites Summary: MICROBIAL POPULATIONS FECAL PELLETS AND AND...

  2. Evolutionary dynamics in set structured populations Corina E. Tarnitaa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nowak, Martin A.

    Evolutionary dynamics in set structured populations Corina E. Tarnitaa , Tibor Antala , Hisashi a powerful method to study dynamical population structure: evolutionary set theory. The individuals of popu- lation structure on evolutionary and ecological dynamics. These approaches include spatial models

  3. Blind Identification of MIMO FIR Systems Driven by Quasi-Stationary Sources Using Second Order

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reilly, James P.

    1 Blind Identification of MIMO FIR Systems Driven by Quasi-Stationary Sources Using Second Order This paper discusses a frequency domain method for blind identification of MIMO convolutive channels driven are presented to demonstrate the performance of the new algorithm1 . I. Introduction Blind identification

  4. Speeding up Scoring Module of Mass Spectrometry Based Protein Identification by GPU

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chu, Xiaowen

    protein identification. It becomes very important to study how to speed up database search engines by GPUsSpeeding up Scoring Module of Mass Spectrometry Based Protein Identification by GPU You Li@comp.hkbu.edu.hk Abstract--Database searching is a main method for protein identification in shotgun proteomics, and many

  5. Modeling and identification of continuous-time system for RF amplifiers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Modeling and identification of continuous-time system for RF amplifiers Mourad Djamai 1 , Smail present a new identification proce- dure for radio frequency Power Amplifier (PA) in the presence signals in time domain. I. INTRODUCTION Numerous approaches in Power Amplifier identification area have

  6. Towards Robust Person Recognition On Handheld Devices Using Face and Speaker Identification Technologies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Towards Robust Person Recognition On Handheld Devices Using Face and Speaker Identification identification techniques to a person identification task on a handheld device. These techniques have proven and with the help of the inexpensive sound and image capture hardware present in mobile devices presents

  7. LandScan USA: A High Resolution Geospatial and Temporal Modeling Approach for Population Distribution and Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL; Bright, Eddie A [ORNL; Coleman, Phil R [ORNL; Urban, Marie L [ORNL

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    High resolution population distribution data are critical for successfully addressing important issues ranging from socio-environmental research to public health to homeland security, since scientific analyses, operational activities, and policy decisions are significantly influenced by the number of impacted people. Dasymetric modeling has been a well recognized approach for spatial decomposition of census data to increase the spatial resolution of population distribution. However, enhancing the temporal resolution of population distribution poses a greater challenge. In this paper, we discuss the development of LandScan USA, a multi-dimensional dasymetric modeling approach, which has allowed creation of very high resolution population distribution data both over space and time. At a spatial resolution of 3 arc seconds (~90m), the initial LandScan USA database contains both a nighttime residential as well as a baseline daytime population distribution that incorporates movement of workers and students. Challenging research issues of disparate and misaligned spatial data integration and modeling to develop a database at a national scale, as well as model verification and validation approaches are illustrated and discussed. Initial analyses indicate a high degree of accuracy for LandScan USA distribution model and data. High resolution population data such as LandScan USA, which describes both distribution and dynamics of human population, clearly has the potential to profoundly impact on multiple domain applications of national and global priority.

  8. assessing population genetic: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to random sampling effects Durrett, Richard 5 Population genetics Opinion piece Environmental Management and Restoration Websites Summary: ; optimization 1. INTRODUCTION...

  9. Emergence of Attention within a Neural Population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    We present a dynamic model of attention based on the Continuum Neural Field Theory that explains attention as being an emergent property of a neural population. This model is experimentally proved to be very robust and able to track one static or moving target in the presence of very strong noise or in the presence of a lot of distractors, even more salient than the target. This attentional property is not restricted to the visual case and can be considered as a generic attentional process of any spatio-temporal continuous input.

  10. INFRARED THERMAL IMAGING OF AUTOMOBILES: Identification of Cold Start Vehicles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Denver, University of

    INFRARED THERMAL IMAGING OF AUTOMOBILES: Identification of Cold Start Vehicles Angela M. Monateri emitters, even thought they have no repairable fault. This study investigates the use of thermal infrared be differentiated from hot vehicles by infrared imaging, which can distinguish between: ·Hot and cold exhaust system

  11. IDENTIFICATION AND SAMPLING OF STOCHASTIC OPERATORS Gtz Pfander1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheltov, Pavel

    IDENTIFICATION AND SAMPLING OF STOCHASTIC OPERATORS Götz Pfander1 , Pavel Zheltov1 1 School.zheltov}@jacobs-university.de ABSTRACT The classical Shannon-Nyquist theorem allows regular sam- pling of bandlimited signals. Recently one, resolving Bello's conjecture in positive. In this paper, it is shown that stochastic channels pos

  12. STATE-PARAMETER IDENTIFICATION PROBLEMS FOR ACCURATE BUILDING ENERGY AUDITS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    STATE-PARAMETER IDENTIFICATION PROBLEMS FOR ACCURATE BUILDING ENERGY AUDITS Jordan Brouns1 a fast method for computing model's sensitivities. INTRODUCTION Building energy performance simulation Universit´e de La Rochelle, LaSIE, FER 3474 CNRS, France ABSTRACT Building performance simulation often

  13. ON THE IDENTIFICATION AND HAPTIC DISPLAY OF FRICTION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    ON THE IDENTIFICATION AND HAPTIC DISPLAY OF FRICTION A DISSERTATION SUBMITTED TO THE DEPARTMENT by Christopher Richard All Rights Reserved #12;iv Abstract Although friction is an important phenomenon and greatly affects the way in which individ- uals interact with the world, friction is all but absent from

  14. BROADBAND IDENTIFICATION OF BATTERY ELECTRICAL IMPEDANCE FOR HEV

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    to perform impedance measurements on a battery cell. Moreover, spectral coherence is an advanced parameterBROADBAND IDENTIFICATION OF BATTERY ELECTRICAL IMPEDANCE FOR HEV R. Al-Nazer, V. Cattin, M. Montaru). In such applications, the most possible accurate estimation of the battery states is needed to optimize its operation

  15. Development/Plasticity/Repair Identification of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Recycling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alford, Simon

    Development/Plasticity/Repair Identification of Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor Recycling and Its, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109 In the CNS, receptor recycling is critical for synaptic plasticity; however, the recycling of receptors has never been observed at peripheral synapses. Using a novel

  16. 11. NUMERICAL TECHNIQUES 1 Numerical identification of effective multipole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    11. NUMERICAL TECHNIQUES 1 Numerical identification of effective multipole moments of polarizable of the induced multipole moments. A general multipole theory is available in the literature, however, only linear multipole model is usually exploited when determining numerically these effective moments. Since this axial

  17. Statement of James E. Hansen 1. Identification, Credentials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    Statement of James E. Hansen 1. Identification, Credentials I am a United States citizen, director Institute. I am a member of the United States National Academy of Sciences, have testified before our Senate and the deterministic response of the Earth to a large change in the planet's energy balance. Climate Forcings

  18. WAVELET TRANSFORMS FOR SYSTEM IDENTIFICATION AND ASSOCIATED PROCESSING CONCERNS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kareem, Ahsan

    WAVELET TRANSFORMS FOR SYSTEM IDENTIFICATION AND ASSOCIATED PROCESSING CONCERNS Tracy L. Kijewski1 , Student Member ASCE and Ahsan Kareem2 , Member ASCE ABSTRACT The time-frequency character of wavelet-domain transform, particularly for the popular Morlet wavelet. Unfortunately, in prior applications of wavelet

  19. Production Optimization; System Identification and Uncertainty Steinar M. Elgsaeter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Tor Arne

    Production Optimization; System Identification and Uncertainty Estimation Steinar M. Elgsaeter Olav Slupphaug Tor Arne Johansen 1 Abstract Real-time optimization of oil and gas production requires a production model, which must be fitted to data for accuracy. A certain amount of uncertainty must typically

  20. CONTINUOUS-TIME MODEL IDENTIFICATION OF ROBOT FLEXIBILITIES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    , instrumental variable, visual servoing, robot arm, H control, flexible manipulator. 1. INTRODUCTION This paper identification approach to identify a flexible robot arm for heart beating mouvement compensation. Generally, robotic arms are designed as rigid in order to be easily controllable. With the improve- ments in real

  1. Predictors of Threat and Error Management: Identification of Core

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Predictors of Threat and Error Management: Identification of Core Nontechnical Skills In normal flight operations, crews are faced with a variety of external threats and commit a range of errors of these threats and errors therefore forms an essential element of enhancing performance and minimizing risk

  2. FACTS about threat Possible INTERVENTIONS Strong domain identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chisholm, Rex L.

    FACTS about threat Possible INTERVENTIONS Strong domain identification heightens the effect are able to self affirm in difficult situations can lessen the effects of threat. Encourage students to use to students not under threat. Educate students on self talk! Teach them to pay close attention

  3. First Eye Movement Verification and Identification Competition at BTAS 2012

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oleg, Komogortsev - Department of Computer Science, Texas State University

    First Eye Movement Verification and Identification Competition at BTAS 2012 Pawel Kasprowski11,ak26}@txstate.edu Abstract--This paper presents the results of the first eye movement verification and methods used in the competition. The results highlight the importance of very careful eye positional data

  4. Identification of Severe Multiple Contingencies in Electric Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pinar, Ali

    1 Identification of Severe Multiple Contingencies in Electric Power Systems Vaibhav Donde, Member the effectiveness of the proposed approach. I. INTRODUCTION Robust operation of a power grid requires anticipation the integrity of the grid, and 2) calculate the maximum loss of load that would be required to survive

  5. A Comparison of Unsupervised Learning Techniques for Encrypted Traffic Identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zincir-Heywood, Nur

    the performance of five unsupervised clustering algorithms: Basic K-Means, Semi-supervised K-Means, DBSCAN, EM Algorithms, K-Means, DBSCAN, EM, Encrypted Traffic Identification. 1. Introduction An important part perspective we benchmark four unsupervised clustering techniques: basic K-Means, semi-supervised K- Means

  6. Genome-Wide In Silico Identification of Transcriptional Regulators Controlling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shamir, Ron

    Genome-Wide In Silico Identification of Transcriptional Regulators Controlling the Cell Cycle networks that control gene transcription is one of the greatest challenges of functional genomics. Using human genomic sequences, models for binding sites of known transcription factors, and gene expression

  7. Attack Detection and Identification in Cyber-Physical Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bullo, Francesco

    Attack Detection and Identification in Cyber-Physical Systems Fabio Pasqualetti, Florian D of unforeseen failures and external malicious attacks. In this paper (i) we propose a mathematical framework for cyber- physical systems, attacks, and monitors; (ii) we characterize fundamental monitoring limitations

  8. Non-Cryptographic Authentication and Identification in Wireless Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Davis, University of

    1 Non-Cryptographic Authentication and Identification in Wireless Networks Kai Zeng, Kannan considered as potential alternatives/complements to provide security services in wireless networks identi- fication in wireless networks using lower/physical layer properties or information. We discuss

  9. SYSTEM IDENTIFICATION OF UNDERWATER VEHICLES Javier Pereira and Alec Duncan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .duncan@cmst.curtin.edu.au Abstract - Unmanned underwater vehicles (UUV's) are used in a number of applications such as pipelineSYSTEM IDENTIFICATION OF UNDERWATER VEHICLES Javier Pereira and Alec Duncan Australian Maritime hydrodynamic derivative measurements from sea trials using an underwater vehicle which is a half-scale model

  10. IDENTIFICATION OF UNDERWATER VEHICLE HYDRODYNAMIC COEFFICIENTS USING FREE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansen, Tor Arne

    been an ever increasing num- ber of applications for unmanned underwater vehicles (UUV) in variousIDENTIFICATION OF UNDERWATER VEHICLE HYDRODYNAMIC COEFFICIENTS USING FREE DECAY TESTS Andrew Ross the potential accuracy of these new methods. Copyright c 2004 IFAC. Keywords: Low-speed underwater vehicles

  11. Identification and Protection of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information Manual

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2000-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This Manual provides detailed requirements to supplement DOE O 471.1A, Identification and Protection of Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information. Change 1, dated 10/23/01, was added to the Manual to clarify when and how encryption requirements for Unclassified Controlled Nuclear Information may be waived. Canceled by DOE O 471.1B.

  12. Ductile damage parameters identification for cold metal forming applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Ductile damage parameters identification for cold metal forming applications Pierre damage mechanics is essential to predict failure during cold metal forming applications. Several damage models can be found in the literature. These damage models are coupled with the mechanical behavior so

  13. IDENTIFICATION OF MOBILITIES FOR THE BUCKLEYLEVERETT EQUATION BY FRONT TRACKING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IDENTIFICATION OF MOBILITIES FOR THE BUCKLEY­LEVERETT EQUATION BY FRONT TRACKING VIDAR HAUGSE Multi--phase flow in porous media is modelled by Darcy's law. This empirical relation relates is also used to solve the saturation equation in a commercial reservoir simulator [1]. 2. Equations

  14. Fault Detection, Identification and Accommodation for an Electro-hydraulic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yao, Bin

    Fault Detection, Identification and Accommodation for an Electro-hydraulic System: An Adaptive in electro-hydraulic systems. It is well known fact that any realistic model of a hydraulic system suffers, such a scheme becomes a natural choice for designing robust fault detection algorithms for electro-hydraulic

  15. Advantages and Limitations of the RICH Technique for Particle Identification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ratcliff, Blair N.; /SLAC

    2011-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The ring imaging Cherenkov (RICH) technique for hadronic particle identification (PID) is described. The advantages and limitations of RICH PID counters are compared with those of other classic PID techniques, such as threshold Cherenkov counters, ionization loss (dE/dx) in tracking devices, and time of flight (TOF) detectors.

  16. ADALINE approach for induction motor mechanical parameters identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    training process. During the identification phase, the motor torque is controlled by the well-known field. They require only the stator current and mechanical speed measurements. Finally, the effectiveness of the two torque since the stator currents and the rotor flux are known [14]. In these conditions, many techniques

  17. Identification and Epidemiological Analysis of Ciguatera Cases in Puerto Rico

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Identification and Epidemiological Analysis of Ciguatera Cases in Puerto Rico G. ESCALONA de MOn hospitals in five areas of Puerto Rico from 1980 to 1982 disclosed 122 apparent ciguatera cases involving- tions of ciguatera cases in Puerto Rico. The results of this study complement available epidemiological

  18. Fingerprints for Machines Characterization and Optical Identification of Grinding Imprints

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fingerprints for Machines ­ Characterization and Optical Identification of Grinding Imprints Ralf. With this model we demonstrate that our characterization has a false positive rate of approximately 10-20 which of inherent material properties is used for fin- gerprinting in various fields, e.g. chemical fingerprints [10

  19. Critical fields in ferromagnetic thin films: Identification of four regimes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Otto, Felix

    Critical fields in ferromagnetic thin films: Identification of four regimes Rub´en Cantero­film elements is a paradigm for a multi­scale pattern­forming system. On one hand, there is a material length functional ceases to be positive definite. The degenerate subspace consists of the "unstable modes

  20. SHORT COMMUNICATION The identification of novel cyclic AMP-dependent

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wei

    SHORT COMMUNICATION The identification of novel cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase anchoring Avenue, Scranton PA 18510, USA, 2 Functional Nano & Soft Materials Laboratory (FUNSOM), Soochow isoform have been characterized with a position- specific scoring matrix (PSSM), as derived from an align

  1. Site locality identification study: Hanford Site. Volume II. Data cataloging

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Data compilation and cataloging for the candidate site locality identification study were conducted in order to provide a retrievable data cataloging system for the present siting study and future site evaluation and licensng processes. This task occurred concurrently with and also independently of other tasks of the candidate site locality identification study. Work in this task provided the data utilized primarily in the development and application of screening and ranking processes to identify candidate site localities on the Hanford Site. The overall approach included two steps: (1) data acquisition and screening; and (2) data compilation and cataloging. Data acquisition and screening formed the basis for preliminary review of data sources with respect to their probable utilization in the candidate site locality identification study and review with respect to the level of completeness and detail of the data. The important working assumption was that the data to be used in the study be based on existing and available published and unpublished literature. The data compilation and cataloging provided the basic product of the Task; a retrievable data cataloging system in the form of an annotated reference list and key word index and an index of compiled data. The annotated reference list and key word index are cross referenced and can be used to trace and retrieve the data sources utilized in the candidate site locality identification study.

  2. Identification of Nucleotides with Identical Fluorescent Labels Based on Fluorescence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Myrick, Michael Lenn

    Identification of Nucleotides with Identical Fluorescent Labels Based on Fluorescence Polarization for discriminating among the four DNA nucleotides la- beled identically with tetramethylrhodamine is described and demonstrated. Labeled nucleotides were dissolved in buffered surfactant solutions. In room temperature 4.5 m

  3. Physics 123 Identification Number _________________ Pressure in a Fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hart, Gus

    = ______________ = ______________ #12;#12;Physics 123 Identification Number _________________ Lab #2 Heat Capacity of a Solid will measure the density of an unknown liquid. You do this by forcing the liquid up a tube using a known amount of pressure (see figure). Pressurize the bottle of liquid by squeezing the hand pump repeatedly. The liquid

  4. Identification of a mesoscale model with multiscale experimental observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Identification of a mesoscale model with multiscale experimental observations M.T. Nguyen, C and at mesoscale within the framework of a heterogeneous microstruc- ture which is modeled by a random elastic measurements of the displacement fields at macroscale and at mesoscale performed with only a single specimen

  5. Vehicle Identification Using Infrared Vision and Applications to Cooperative Perception

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Vehicle Identification Using Infrared Vision and Applications to Cooperative Perception Axel von Arnim, Mathias Perrollaz, Arnaud Bertrand, Jacques Ehrlich Abstract-- Vehicles will be in the next on the road, or an emergency braking notification. Vehicles are also more and more equipped with perception

  6. Electronic Vehicle Identification: Industry Standards, Performance, and Privacy Issues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Texas at Austin, University of

    0-5217-P2 Electronic Vehicle Identification: Industry Standards, Performance, and Privacy Issues Authors: Dr. Khali Persad Dr. C. Michael Walton Shahriyar Hussain Project 0-5217: Vehicle/License Plate. Privacy concerns regarding collection and use of data on vehicle movements are examined in the context

  7. A HIERARCHICAL GENETIC SYSTEM FOR SYMBOLIC FUNCTION IDENTIFICATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wright, Alden H.

    as Ohm's law, Newton's law of universal gravitation, Kepler's law, and Snell's law of refraction from learning systems to find empirical laws (function models) from the observations, such as BACON (Langley concept learning tasks of function identification problems and "rediscover" such classical scientific laws

  8. CONVEXITY-PRESERVING FLUX IDENTIFICATION FOR SCALAR CONSERVATION LAWS MODELLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bürger, Raimund

    CONVEXITY-PRESERVING FLUX IDENTIFICATION FOR SCALAR CONSERVATION LAWS MODELLING SEDIMENTATION classification: 35L65, 35R30, 65M32 1. Introduction 1.1. Scope. The sedimentation of small particles dispersed length scales (diameter and depth) of the settling vessel. Moreover, sedimentation models

  9. CONVEXITY-PRESERVING FLUX IDENTIFICATION FOR SCALAR CONSERVATION LAWS MODELLING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bürger, Raimund

    CONVEXITY-PRESERVING FLUX IDENTIFICATION FOR SCALAR CONSERVATION LAWS MODELLING SEDIMENTATION RAIMUND B¨URGERA AND STEFAN DIEHLB, Abstract. Sedimentation of a suspension of small particles dispersed. Introduction 1.1. Scope. The sedimentation of small particles dispersed in a viscous fluid under the influence

  10. HumanMouse Gene Identification by Comparative Evidence Integration and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pavlovic, Vladimir

    The identification of genes in the human genome remains a challenge, as the actual predictions appear to disagree of genes in the human genome by using a reference, such as mouse genome. However, this comparative genome. In particular, it is not clear whether the mouse is at the correct evolutionary distance from

  11. Identification and Control Problems in Petroleum and Groundwater Modeling \\Lambda

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ewing, Richard E.

    Identification and Control Problems in Petroleum and Groundwater Modeling \\Lambda R.E. Ewing, y , M in groundwater remediation. 1 Introduction The outline of this survey talk is as follows: A general introduction differential equation models for multi­phase fluid flow through porous media, but the use of control

  12. Identification of Early Interstitial Lung Disease in Smokers from the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Identification of Early Interstitial Lung Disease in Smokers from the COPDGene Study George R interstitial lung disease (ILD) on chest computed tomographic (CT) scans. Materials and Methods: The CT scans: Early interstitial lung disease; CT scan; smoker. ªAUR, 2010 I diopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF

  13. TECHNICAL ADVANCE BAR expressolog identification: expression profile similarity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    TECHNICAL ADVANCE BAR expressolog identification: expression profile similarity ranking with the highest sequence similarity do not necessarily exhibit the highest expression pattern similarity. Other-annotation or more specific annotation. Ultimately, it is envisaged that this pipeline will aid in improvement

  14. 1. Identification Number: 2. Program/Project Title: 3. Recipient

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Personal Property Report Forms Family Other(see special instructions) Frequency Addressees1 1. Identification Number: 2. Program/Project Title: 3. Recipient: 4. Reporting Requirements: A. MANAGEMENT REPORTING Research Performance Progress Report (RPPR) (RD&D Projects) Progress Report (Non

  15. VOL I, ISSUE 1Quarterly Edition Population and Public Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saskatchewan, University of

    VOL I, ISSUE 1Quarterly Edition Population and Public Policy Migration to western Canada increases affect and are affected by public policy decisions. Even the sheer size of the population, the subject of this article, affects public policy because larger populations can usually support a wider range of public

  16. Proximate Population Factors and Deforestation in Tropical Agricultural Frontiers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez-Carr, David

    Proximate Population Factors and Deforestation in Tropical Agricultural Frontiers David L. Carr are significantly associated at the global and regional scales, evidence for population links to deforestation of thought on population­environment theories relevant to deforestation in tropical agricultural frontiers

  17. Hanford's Simulated Low Activity Waste Cast Stone Processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Young

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Cast Stone is undergoing evaluation as the supplemental treatment technology for Hanford’s (Washington) high activity waste (HAW) and low activity waste (LAW). This report will only cover the LAW Cast Stone. The programs used for this simulated Cast Stone were gradient density change, compressive strength, and salt waste form phase identification. Gradient density changes show a favorable outcome by showing uniformity even though it was hypothesized differently. Compressive strength exceeded the minimum strength required by Hanford and greater compressive strength increase seen between the uses of different salt solution The salt waste form phase is still an ongoing process as this time and could not be concluded.

  18. Applying optical imaging to study neurovascular coupling in cerebral cortex: from populational scale to single-cell single-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinfeld, David

    Applying optical imaging to study neurovascular coupling in cerebral cortex: from populational, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX Abstract: We use a suite of optical imaging technologies the hemodynamic response and the underlying brain neuronal activity. © 2006 Optical Society of America OCIS codes

  19. Ligand identification using electron-density map correlations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mailstop M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Adams, Paul D.; Moriarty, Nigel W. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, BLDG 64R0121, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Cohn, Judith D. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Mailstop M888, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An automated ligand-fitting procedure is applied to (F{sub o} ? F{sub c})exp(i?{sub c}) difference density for 200 commonly found ligands from macromolecular structures in the Protein Data Bank to identify ligands from density maps. A procedure for the identification of ligands bound in crystal structures of macromolecules is described. Two characteristics of the density corresponding to a ligand are used in the identification procedure. One is the correlation of the ligand density with each of a set of test ligands after optimization of the fit of that ligand to the density. The other is the correlation of a fingerprint of the density with the fingerprint of model density for each possible ligand. The fingerprints consist of an ordered list of correlations of each the test ligands with the density. The two characteristics are scored using a Z-score approach in which the correlations are normalized to the mean and standard deviation of correlations found for a variety of mismatched ligand-density pairs, so that the Z scores are related to the probability of observing a particular value of the correlation by chance. The procedure was tested with a set of 200 of the most commonly found ligands in the Protein Data Bank, collectively representing 57% of all ligands in the Protein Data Bank. Using a combination of these two characteristics of ligand density, ranked lists of ligand identifications were made for representative (F{sub o} ? F{sub c})exp(i?{sub c}) difference density from entries in the Protein Data Bank. In 48% of the 200 cases, the correct ligand was at the top of the ranked list of ligands. This approach may be useful in identification of unknown ligands in new macromolecular structures as well as in the identification of which ligands in a mixture have bound to a macromolecule.

  20. First Insights into the SWIRE Galaxy Populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carol Lonsdale; Maria Polletta; Jason Surace; David Shupe; Fan Fang; C. Kevin Xu; Harding E. Smith; Brian Siana; Michael Rowan-Robinson; Tom Babbedge; Seb Oliver; Francesca Pozzi; Payam Davoodi; Frazer Owen; Deborah Padgett; Dave Frayer; Tom Jarrett; Frank Masci; JoAnne O'Linger; Tim Conrow; Duncan Farrah; Glenn Morrison; Nick Gautier; Alberto Franceschini; Stefano Berta; Ismael Perez-Fournon; Herve Dole; Gordon Stacey; Steve Sergeant; Marguerite Pierre; Matt Griffin; Rick Puetter

    2004-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

    We characterize the SWIRE galaxy populations in the SWIRE validation field within the Lockman Hole, based on the 3.6-24$\\mu$ Spitzer data and deep U,g',r',r' optical imaging within an area ~1/3 sq. deg for ~16,000 Spitzer-SWIRE sources. The entire SWIRE survey will discover over 2.3 million galaxies at 3.6$\\mu$m and almost 350,000 at 24$\\mu$m; ~70,000 of these will be 5-band 3.6-24$\\mu$ detections. The colors cover a broad range, generally well represented by redshifted spectral energy distributions of known galaxy populations, however significant samples of unusually blue objects in the [3.6-4.5]$\\mu$m color are found, as well as many objects very red in the 3.6-24$\\mu$m mid-IR. Nine of these are investigated and are interpreted as star-forming systems, starbursts and AGN from z=0.37 to 2.8, with luminosities from L$_{IR}$=10$^{10.3}$ to 10$^{13.7}$ L$_{\\odot}$

  1. The Formation of Population III Binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kazuya Saigo; Tomoaki Matsumoto; Masayuki Umemura

    2004-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the possibility for the formation of Population III binaries. The collapse of a rotating cylinder is simulated with a three-dimensional, high-resolution nested grid, assuming the thermal history of primordial gas. The simulations are done with dimensionless units, and the results are applicable to low-mass as well as massive systems by scaling with the initial density. We find that if the initial angular momentum is as small as $\\beta \\approx 0.1$, where $\\beta$ is the ratio of centrifugal force to pressure force, then the runaway collapse of the cloud stops to form a rotationally-supported disk. After the accretion of the envelope, the disk undergoes a ring instability, eventually fragmenting into a binary. If the initial angular momentum is relatively large, a bar-type instability arises, resulting in the collapse into a single star through rapid angular momentum transfer. The present results show that a significant fraction of Pop III stars are expected to form in binary systems, even if they are quite massive or less massive. The cosmological implications of Population III binaries are briefly discussed.

  2. Collisional population transfer in yterbium ions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schauer, Martin Michael [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Torgerson, Justin R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Danielson, Jeremy R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhao, Xinxin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Nguyen, Ahn - Tuan [UNIV OF PITTSBURGH; Wang, Li - Bang [NATIONAL TSING HUA UNIV

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Long-lived metastable states of Yb+ ions are used for atomic frequency standards, precision measurements, and quantum information research. The effect of population trapping and transfer in these states must be well understood. We report here the transfer of Yb+ ions into the long-lived {sup 2}F{sub 7/2} state by means of collisions between He buffer gas and Yb+ ions held in a linear Paul trap. Transfer rates were measured as functions of buffer-gas pressure and repump-laser power, and the collisional population transfer rates were extracted. The measured transfer rate coefficients are 8.32(75)x10-11 and 8.65(33)x10-11 cm3/s for the collisional processes {sup 2}P{sub 1/2}{yields}{sup 2}D{sub 5/2} and {sup 2}D{sub 3/2}{yields}{sup 2}F{sub 7/2}, respectively.

  3. Guidelines for axion identification in astrophysical observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. Zioutas; Y. Semertzidis; Th. Papaevangelou

    2005-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The origin of various celestial phenomena have remained mysterious for conventional astrophysics. Therefore, alternative solutions should be considered, taking into account the involvement of unstable dark-matter particle candidates, such as the celebrated axions or other as yet unforeseen axion-like particles. Their spontaneous and induced decay by the ubiquitous solar magnetic fields can be at the origin of persisting enigmatic X-ray emission, giving rise to a steady and a transient/local solar activity, respectively. The (coherent) conversion of photons into axion(-like) particles in intrinsic magnetic fields may modify the solar axion spectrum. The reversed process can be behind transient (solar) luminosity deficits in the visible. Then, the Sun might be also a strong source of ~eV-axions. Thus, enigmatic observations might be the as yet missing direct signature for axion(-like) particles in earth-bound detectors.

  4. CANCELA, HOSPEDALES, GONG: OPEN-WORLD PERSON RE-IDENTIFICATION 1 Open-World Person Re-Identification by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Shaogang

    CANCELA, HOSPEDALES, GONG: OPEN-WORLD PERSON RE-IDENTIFICATION 1 Open-World Person Re@eecs.qmul.ac.uk Shaogang Gong2 sgg@eecs.qmul.ac.uk 1 VARPA Group, Universidade da Coruña, A Coruña, 15071, Spain 2 School. It may be distributed unchanged freely in print or electronic forms. #12;2 CANCELA, HOSPEDALES, GONG

  5. Journal of Theoretical Biology 227 (2004) 397401 Evolutionary stability for large populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gordon, Geoffrey J.

    population ESS, as distinct from Maynard Smith's infinite population ESS and Schaffer's finite population ESS. Building on Schaffer's finite population model, we define the large population ESS as a strategy which. The large population ESS is not equivalent to the infinite population ESS: we give examples of games

  6. Engineering the initial state in broadband population inversion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bo Y. Chang; Sheokmin Shin; Ignacio R. Sola

    2015-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Quantum systems with sublevel structures prevent full population inversion from one manifold of sublevels to the other using strong ultrafast resonant pulses. In this work we explain the mechanism by which this population transfer is blocked. We then develop a novel concept of geometric control, assuming full or partial coherent manipulation within the manifolds and show that by preparing specific coherent superpositions in the initial manifold, full population inversion or full population blockade, {\\it i.e} laser-induced transparency, can be achieved. In particular, by parallel population transfer we show how population inversion between the manifolds can be obtained with minimal pulse area. As the number of sublevels increases, population inversion can overcome the pulse area theorem at the expense of full control over the initial manifold of sublevels.

  7. Population and Climate Change:Population and Climate Change: Are they related?Are they related?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalnay, Eugenia

    depletion: water, oil, fisheries, topsoil, etc. · Resource wars and civil conflicts · Malnutrition and world! We are still missing the most important component of the Earth System: the Human System #12;Is, population would be much smaller! · Growth in grain production is now flattening out · Industrial farming

  8. The Birth of a Galaxy: Primoridal Metal Enrichment and Population II Stellar Populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wise, John H; Norman, Michael L; Abel, Tom

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Population III stars first form in dark matter halos with masses around 10^6 Msun. By definition, they are metal-free, and their protostellar collapse is driven by molecular hydrogen cooling in the gas-phase, leading to a massive characteristic mass ~100 Msun and suppressed fragmentation. Population II stars with lower characteristic masses form when the star-forming gas reaches a critical metallicity of 10^{-6} - 10^{-3.5} Zsun, depending on whether dust cooling is important. We present adaptive mesh refinement radiation hydrodynamics simulations that follows the transition from Population III to II star formation. We model stellar radiative feedback with adaptive ray tracing. A top-heavy initial mass function for the Population III stars is considered, resulting in a plausible distribution of pair-instability supernovae and associated metal enrichment. We find that the gas fraction recovers from 5 percent to nearly the cosmic fraction in halos with merger histories rich in halos above 10^7 Msun. A single pa...

  9. Identification of environmental RD D needs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Crocker, M.E.; Madden, M.P.; Porter, R.

    1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project was to identify needs for environmental research development and demonstration projects that have the potential to improve the performance of oil and gas exploration, drilling, and production technologies for maximum recovery of domestic petroleum resources under optimal environmental and economic conditions. To achieve this objective several areas of work were addressed. The first task was to compile as much related data as possible. This was achieved by literature searches of a number of petroleum-related data bases. After acquiring sufficient background on environmental and economical areas that should be expanded, experts who are knowledgeable in these areas were contacted to further define specific issues. More than 33 identified areas were submitted to an in-house panel at NIPER to assure that the final environmental research demonstration and development needs that were selected to be expanded were unbiased and worthy of additional work. Specific subjects that were expanded include: (1) the Mechanical Integrity Testing of Injection Wells by Oxygen-Activation Log, (2) A More Rapid or Alternative Bioassay Test, (3) An Environmentally Safe Drilling Fluid Additive, (4) Bioremediation of Waste Pits, (5) A More Efficient Technology Transfer, (6) A Comprehensive Work Management Protocol, and (7) A Pollution Potential Prioritization Protocol For Abandoned Wells. 6 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. A model for cerebral cortical neuron group electric activity and its implications for cerebral function

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karameh, Fadi Nabih

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The electroencephalogram, or EEG, is a recording of the field potential generated by the electric activity of neuronal populations of the brain. Its utility has long been recognized as a monitor which reflects the vigilance ...

  11. Old stellar populations in distant radio galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James Dunlop

    1998-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

    I describe the current status of our attempts to determine the age of the oldest known stellar populations at high redshift, in the red mJy radio galaxies 53W091 ($z = 1.55$) and 53W069 ($z = 1.43$). During the past year the original conclusion of Dunlop et al. (1996) - that 53W091 is $>3$ Gyr old - has been questioned from two, basically orthogonal directions. First, reports that the near-infrared light from 53W091 is highly polarized have cast some doubt on whether its red colour is genuinely due to an old population of stars. Second, assuming that all the light is indeed due to stars, it has been claimed that 53W091 is in fact only 1-2 Gyr old. Here I present a preliminary analysis of new infrared polarimetric observations of 53W091 which show that the first of these criticisms can be rejected with very high confidence. I then explore why different modellers have derived different ages for 53W091, and present new model fits to the spectrum of 53W069 which demonstrate that different spectral synthesis codes are certainly in good agreement that this galaxy is 3-4 Gyr old. Finally I present a preliminary analysis of the morphologies and scale-lengths of 53W091 and 53W069 as derived from new I-band WFPC2 HST images, and compare the results with those for 3CR galaxies at comparable redshifts. I conclude that the scalelengths and luminosities of radio galaxies at $z \\simeq 1.5$ appear to scale together as would be predicted from the Kormendy relation for low-redshift elliptical galaxies.

  12. B-Cell Activation and Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma Risk in an HIV Positive Population

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang, Po-Yin

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IL-27, IL-31, LIF), IP-10 and SDF-1? were measured using the8 (CXCL8) IP-10 (CXCL10) SDF-1? (CXCL12) Putative Functions10 IFN?-induced protein 10; SDF stromal cell-derived factor;

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - active elderly population--can Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biology and Medicine ; Computer Technologies and Information Sciences 3 Hospice Care: Caring for Elders with Termi nal Illnesses and Their Families Summary: Hospice Care:...

  14. Mortality benefits of population-wide adherence to national physical activity guidelines: a prospective cohort study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, Gráinne; Watkinson, Clare; Brage, Søren; Morris, Jerry; Tuxworth, Bill; Fentem, Peter; Griffin, Simon; Simmons, Rebecca; Wareham, Nicholas

    2014-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    , and Ursula Harries. With thanks to Stephen Sharp (MRC Epidemiology Unit) for statistical help. The Allied Dunbar National Fitness Survey was funded by the Department of Health, Health Education Authority, The Sports Council and Allied Dunbar Assurance plc...

  15. Wintering activity range and population ecology of Black-faced spoonbills (Platalea minor) in Taiwan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Liang-Li

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    research about habitat use by BFS on wintering sites. Lee et al. (1995) reported sites at Chi-Ku town were used by spoonbills for 50 years. They found spoonbills mainly used the tidal mudflat, shallow water, lagoons, and fish ponds. Wang and Chen...

  16. Identification of energy conservation research opportunities: a review and synthesis of the literature

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopp, W.J.; Hane, G.J.; Gurwell, W.E.; Hauser, S.G.; Williford, R.E.; Williams, T.A.; Ashton, W.B.

    1982-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Thirty-eight studies of energy conservation research opportunities are reviewed. The 38 studies chosen for review include many of the major efforts in the identification of energy conservation research and development (R and D) opportunities and provide a representative sample of the types of studies that have been performed. The sample includes studies that focus on specific energy use (e.g., auto transport), as well as studies that focus on specific types of research (e.g., materials science). The sample also includes studies that can be further contrasted in terms of long-term vs. short-term projects, evolutionary vs. revolutionary ideas, generic vs. process-specific activities, and technology base research vs. hardware development. Each of these perspectives contributes toward assuring coverage of the breadth of energy conservation R and D opportunities. In each review the technical or end-use focus is described, the research ideas identified in the study are listed, and a critical summary is given. The reviews also indicate whether the studies present end-use consumption data, estimate potential energy savings, estimate times to commercialization, summarize existing research programs, or describe the identification methodology. In Section 2.0 the various research studies are compared. In Section 3.0 the characteristics of an aggregate list of research ideas are discussed. The characteristics were collected from the research opportunities studies, which are included in Appendix A. Appendix A contains a compilation of energy conservation R and D opportunities arranged by energy end-use applications. Appendix B contains an outline of the format followed in writing the critical reviews of the studies, the individual study reviews, and the extended bibliography of 88 studies that describe energy conservation research opportunities.

  17. Identification of potential transuranic waste tanks at the Hanford Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colburn, R.P.

    1995-05-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this document is to identify potential transuranic (TRU) material among the Hanford Site tank wastes for possible disposal at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) as an alternative to disposal in the high-level waste (HLW) repository. Identification of such material is the initial task in a trade study suggested in WHC-EP-0786, Tank Waste Remediation System Decisions and Risk Assessment (Johnson 1994). The scope of this document is limited to the identification of those tanks that might be segregated from the HLW for disposal as TRU, and the bases for that selection. It is assumed that the tank waste will be washed to remove soluble inert material for disposal as low-level waste (LLW), and the washed residual solids will be vitrified for disposal. The actual recommendation of a disposal strategy for these materials will require a detailed cost/benefit analysis and is beyond the scope of this document.

  18. Rapid automatic NCS identification using heavy-atom substructures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Terwilliger, Thomas C., E-mail: terwilliger@lanl.gov [Mail Stop M888, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States)

    2002-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A rapid algorithm for identifying NCS in heavy-atom sites is described. An important component of a fully automated system for structure solution and phase improvement through density modification is a capability for identification of non-crystallographic symmetry as early in the process as possible. Algorithms exist for finding NCS in heavy-atom sites, but currently require of the order of N{sup 5} comparisons to be made, where N is the number of sites to be examined, including crystallographically related locations. A method described here based on considering only sets of sites that have common interatomic distances reduces the computational time by several orders of magnitude. Additionally, searches for proper symmetry allow the identification of NCS in cases where only one heavy atom is present per NCS copy.

  19. Stochastic Wireless Channel Modeling, Estimation and Identification from Measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Olama, Mohammed M [ORNL; Djouadi, Seddik M [ORNL; Li, Yanyan [ORNL

    2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is concerned with stochastic modeling of wireless fading channels, parameter estimation, and system identification from measurement data. Wireless channels are represented by stochastic state-space form, whose parameters and state variables are estimated using the expectation maximization algorithm and Kalman filtering, respectively. The latter are carried out solely from received signal measurements. These algorithms estimate the channel inphase and quadrature components and identify the channel parameters recursively. The proposed algorithm is tested using measurement data, and the results are presented.

  20. B plant standards/requirements identification document (S/RID)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maddox, B.S., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This Standards/Requirements Identification Document (S/RID) set forth the Environmental Safety and Health (ES{ampersand}H) standards/requirements for the B Plant. This S/RID is applicable to the appropriate life cycle phases of design, construction,operation, and preparation for decommissioning. These standards/requirements are adequate to ensure the protection of the health and safety of workers, the public, and the environment.

  1. Particle Identification in the NIMROD-ISiS Detector Array

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Wuenschel; K. Hagel; L. W. May; R. Wada; S. J. Yennello

    2009-03-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Interest in the influence of the neutron-to-proton (N/Z) ratio on multifragmenting nuclei has demanded an improvement in the capabilities of multi-detector arrays as well as the companion analysis methods. The particle identification method used in the NIMROD-ISiS 4 $\\pi$ array is described. Performance of the detectors and the analysis method are presented for the reaction of 86Kr+64Ni at 35MeV/u.

  2. Particle Identification in the NIMROD-ISiS Detector Array

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wuenschel, S.; Hagel, K.; May, L. W.; Wada, R.; Yennello, S. J. [Texas A and M University Cyclotron Institute College Station TX 77843 (United States)

    2009-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Interest in the influence of the neutron-to-proton (N/Z) ratio on multifragmenting nuclei has demanded an improvement in the capabilities of multi-detector arrays as well as the companion analysis methods. The particle identification method used in the NIMROD-ISiS 4{pi} array is described. Performance of the detectors and the analysis method are presented for the reaction of {sup 86}Kr+{sup 64}Ni at 35 MeV/u.

  3. A Spatiotemporal Graph Model for Rainfall Event Identification and Representation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Weibo

    2014-04-21T23:59:59.000Z

    of a storm ? The spread of a wildfire ? Other dynamic geographic phenomena from time series of snapshot datasets 3Research Objectives Identify the whole lifecycle of rainstorms from time series of snapshot datasets; Represent and analyze the rainstorms... based on a spatiotemporal graph model; Analyze the spatiotemporal characteristics of rainstorms. Data ? NEXRAD (Next generation Radar) ? Hourly precipitation estimate ? Cover more than 2/3 of the nation Rainstorms’ Lifecycle Identification Delineate...

  4. Secondary Energy Infobook Activities (19 Activities)'

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Infobook Activities (19 Activities) Grades: 9-12 Topics: Energy Basics Owner: NEED This educational material is brought to you by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy...

  5. Activated Boron Nitride Derived from Activated Carbon

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zettl, Alex

    combination of chemical, thermal, and electrical properties. The utility of activated carbon suggests is characterized by scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, and surface area analysis. The activated BN microstructure is similar

  6. The influence of coyotes on an urban Canada goose population in the Chicago metropolitan area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Justin L.; /Ohio State U.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Canada geese (Branta canadensis) have become common in many urban areas, often creating nuisance problems for human residents. The presence of urban geese has raised concerns about the spread of disease, increased erosion, excessive noise, eutrophication of waterways, and general nuisance problems. Goose populations have grown due to an increase in urbanization resulting in an abundance of high quality food (urban grass) and suitable nesting sites, as well as a decrease in some predators. I monitored nest predation in the Chicago suburbs during the 2004 and 2005 nesting seasons using 3 nest monitoring techniques to identify predators: video cameras, plasticine eggs, and sign from nest using a classification tree analysis. Of 58 nests monitored in 2004 and 286 in 2005, only raccoons (Procyon lotor) and coyotes (Canis latrans) were identified as nest predators. Raccoons were responsible for 22-25% of depredated nests, but were rarely capable of depredating nests that were actively defended by a goose. Coyotes were responsible for 75-78% of all Canada goose nest depredation and were documented killing one adult goose and feeding on several others. The coyote is a top-level predator that had increased in many metropolitan areas in recent years. To determine if coyotes were actively hunting geese or eggs during the nesting season, I analyzed coyote habitat selection between nesting and pre-nesting or post-nesting seasons. Coyote home ranges (95% Minimum Convex Polygon) were calculated for 19 coyotes to examine third order habitat selection related to goose nest abundance. A 100 m buffer (buffer habitat) was created and centered on each waterway edge and contained 90% of all nests. Coyotes showed selection for habitats during all seasons. Buffer habitat was the top ranked habitat in both pre-nesting and nesting seasons, but dropped to third ranked in post-nesting season. Habitat selection across seasons was compared using a repeated measures MANOVA. Habitat selection between pre-nesting and nesting seasons (P=0.72) were similar, while between post-nesting and nesting seasons there was a nearly significant difference (P=0.07). The insignificant change in habitat use across seasons suggests that coyotes did not switch habitat use to take advantage of goose nests. Alternatively, the change in ranking of buffer habitat across seasons suggests that coyotes may have switched habitat use to take advantage of goose nests. The results are not clear as large individual variation between coyotes due to differences in habitat availability, and social status interfere with the results of the analysis. Even though I failed to find strong support for coyotes actively hunting goose nests, they nevertheless were the primary nest predator in the area and may influence Canada goose populations. To determine the potential influence of coyotes on the Canada goose population, I created a Canada goose matrix population model that included variables such as coyote predation on adults and nests as well as coyote influence on nest desertion. Using the base population model I calculated the Canada goose population to be increasing with {lambda} = 1.055. The removal of all coyote influence on the goose population would allow {lambda} to increase to 1.214. Nest predation was the most important factor related to coyotes: the removal of coyote nest predation from the model resulted in a population growth rate {lambda} = 1.157. Modeling results suggest coyotes are serving as a limiting factor for the Canada goose population within the Chicago metropolitan area.

  7. An X-ray Imaging Study of the Stellar Population in RCW49

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Tsujimoto; E. D. Feigelson; L. K. Townsley; P. S. Broos; K. V. Getman; J. Wang; G. P. Garmire; D. Baba; T. Nagayama; M. Tamura; E. B. Churchwell

    2007-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the results of a high-resolution X-ray imaging study of the stellar population in the Galactic massive star-forming region RCW49 and its central OB association Westerlund 2. We obtained a 40 ks X-ray image of a 17'x17' field using the Chandra X-ray Observatory and deep NIR images using the Infrared Survey Facility in a concentric 8'3x8'3 region. We detected 468 X-ray sources and identified optical, NIR, and Spitzer Space Telescope MIR counterparts for 379 of them. The unprecedented spatial resolution and sensitivity of the X-ray image, enhanced by optical and infrared imaging data, yielded the following results: (1) The central OB association Westerlund 2 is resolved for the first time in the X-ray band. X-ray emission is detected from all spectroscopically-identified early-type stars in this region. (2) Most (86%) X-ray sources with optical or infrared identifications are cluster members in comparison with a control field in the Galactic Plane. (3) A loose constraint (2--5 kpc) for the distance to RCW49 is derived from the mean X-ray luminosity of T Tauri stars. (4) The cluster X-ray population consists of low-mass pre--main-sequence and early-type stars as obtained from X-ray and NIR photometry. About 30 new OB star candidates are identified. (5) We estimate a cluster radius of 6'--7' based on the X-ray surface number density profiles. (6) A large fraction (90%) of cluster members are identified individually using complimentary X-ray and MIR excess emission. (7) The brightest five X-ray sources, two Wolf-Rayet stars and three O stars, have hard thermal spectra.

  8. FINDING FOSSIL GROUPS: OPTICAL IDENTIFICATION AND X-RAY CONFIRMATION

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Eric D.

    We report the discovery of 12 new fossil groups (FGs) of galaxies, systems dominated by a single giant elliptical galaxy and cluster-scale gravitational potential, but lacking the population of bright galaxies typically ...

  9. adult swiss population: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Topic Index 1 Multifractal portrayal of the Swiss population CERN Preprints Summary: Fractal geometry is a fundamental approach for describing the complex irregularities of the...

  10. algorithm population sizing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CiteSeer Summary: Deciding the appropriate population size and number of islands for distributed island-model genetic algorithms is often critical to the algorithms success. This...

  11. arab general population: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    de Paris-Sud XI, Universit de 45 RESEARCH ARTICLE Contemporary epidemiology of gout in the UK general population CiteSeer Summary: Introduction: The objective of this...

  12. adult general population: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Texas (P. c. stanleyana Oli, Madan K. 30 RESEARCH ARTICLE Contemporary epidemiology of gout in the UK general population CiteSeer Summary: Introduction: The objective of this...

  13. apis mellifera populations: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The effect of Apis mellifera carnica Polm worker bee source for populating mating of Croatia (Received 9 December 1991; accepted 18 March 1992) Summary The influence of worker...

  14. Population estimates for Phase 1: Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beck, D.M.; Erickson, A.R.; Harkreader, S.A.

    1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes the population estimates of Phase I of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project. These estimates were used to develop preliminary dose estimates.

  15. admixed population lived: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    population in urban United Nations; Nations Unies 1999-01-01 67 Developing solutions for sustainable living-the Urban Living Laboratory: The world's largest 'living laboratory'...

  16. ORISE: Worker Health Studies - Testing Beryllium Vendor Populations

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education Beryllium Testing Vendor Populations When former employees at 25 closed U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) beryllium vendor companies needed...

  17. andalusian population sample: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sample allocation and effort in detecting population differentiation Dordrecht 2014 Abstract One of the most pressing issues in spatial genetics concerns sampling....

  18. aegypti population replacement: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Juliano, Steven A. 6 2132014 Household explosion replaces population explosion as world concern -UPI.com http:www.upiasia.comScience-Technology20140211...

  19. asthmatic population sample: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sample allocation and effort in detecting population differentiation Dordrecht 2014 Abstract One of the most pressing issues in spatial genetics concerns sampling....

  20. POPULATION ECOLOGY Phenology of Asian Citrus Psyllid (Hemiptera: Liviidae) and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hoddle, Mark S.

    POPULATION ECOLOGY Phenology of Asian Citrus Psyllid (Hemiptera: Liviidae) and Associated citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae), initiates economic losses in citrus due

  1. Population Games for Cognitive Radios: Evolution through Imitation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coupechoux, Marceau

    , Marceau Coupechoux1 1INFRES, Telecom ParisTech, 2LRI, Paris XI May 9th, 2011 SI, LC, MC () Population

  2. The Chemical Enrichment History of the Magellanic Clouds Field Populations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Carrera; C. Gallart; A. Aparicio; E. Costa; E. Hardy; R. A. Mendez; N. E. D. Noel; R. Zinn

    2008-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the results of our project devoted to study the chemical enrichment history of the field population in the Magellanic Clouds using Ca II triplet spectroscopy.

  3. The Formation of Population III Binaries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saigo, K; Umemura, M; Saigo, Kazuya; Matsumoto, Tomoaki; Umemura, Masayuki

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We explore the possibility for the formation of Population III binaries. The collapse of a rotating cylinder is simulated with a three-dimensional, high-resolution nested grid, assuming the thermal history of primordial gas. The simulations are done with dimensionless units, and the results are applicable to low-mass as well as massive systems by scaling with the initial density. We find that if the initial angular momentum is as small as $\\beta \\approx 0.1$, where $\\beta$ is the ratio of centrifugal force to pressure force, then the runaway collapse of the cloud stops to form a rotationally-supported disk. After the accretion of the envelope, the disk undergoes a ring instability, eventually fragmenting into a binary. If the initial angular momentum is relatively large, a bar-type instability arises, resulting in the collapse into a single star through rapid angular momentum transfer. The present results show that a significant fraction of Pop III stars are expected to form in binary systems, even if they ar...

  4. Carbon stars in populations of different metallicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. A. T. Groenewegen

    1998-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Our current knowledge of carbon stars in the Local Group and beyond, is discussed. Although many carbon stars and late M-stars have been identified in external galaxies a coherent understanding in terms of the chemical evolution- and star formation rate-history of a galaxy is still largely lacking. Issues that need to be addressed are: 1) for some of the larger galaxies only a small fraction in area has been surveyed so far, 2) surveys have been conducted using different techniques, and may be incomplete in bolometric magnitude, 3) only for some galaxies is there information about the late M-star population, 4) not all galaxies in the Local Group have been surveyed, 5) only for a sub-set of stars are bolometric magnitudes available. From the existing observations one can derive the following: the formation of carbon stars is both a function of metallicity and star-formation. In galaxies with a similar star-formation rate history, there will be relatively more carbon stars formed in the system with the lower metallicity. On the other hand, the scarcity of AGB type carbon stars in some systems with the lowest metallicity indicates that these galaxies have had a low, if any, star-formation rate history over the last few Gyrs.

  5. Magnetic Fields in Population III Star Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Turk, Matthew J.; Oishi, Jeffrey S.; Abel, Tom; Bryan, Greg

    2012-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the buildup of magnetic fields during the formation of Population III star-forming regions, by conducting cosmological simulations from realistic initial conditions and varying the Jeans resolution. To investigate this in detail, we start simulations from identical initial conditions, mandating 16, 32 and 64 zones per Jeans length, and studied the variation in their magnetic field amplification. We find that, while compression results in some amplification, turbulent velocity fluctuations driven by the collapse can further amplify an initially weak seed field via dynamo action, provided there is sufficient numerical resolution to capture vortical motions (we find this requirement to be 64 zones per Jeans length, slightly larger than, but consistent with previous work run with more idealized collapse scenarios). We explore saturation of amplification of the magnetic field, which could potentially become dynamically important in subsequent, fully-resolved calculations. We have also identified a relatively surprising phenomena that is purely hydrodynamic: the higher-resolved simulations possess substantially different characteristics, including higher infall-velocity, increased temperatures inside 1000 AU, and decreased molecular hydrogen content in the innermost region. Furthermore, we find that disk formation is suppressed in higher-resolution calculations, at least at the times that we can follow the calculation. We discuss the effect this may have on the buildup of disks over the accretion history of the first clump to form as well as the potential for gravitational instabilities to develop and induce fragmentation.

  6. Spectroscopy of the soliton lattice formation in quasi-one-dimensional fermionic superfluids with population imbalance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lutchyn, Roman M. [Joint Quantum Institute and Condensed Matter Theory Center, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742-4111 (United States); Microsoft Research, Station Q, Elings Hall, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Dzero, Maxim [Joint Quantum Institute and Condensed Matter Theory Center, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742-4111 (United States); Department of Physics, Kent State University, Kent, Ohio 44242 (United States); Yakovenko, Victor M. [Joint Quantum Institute and Condensed Matter Theory Center, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742-4111 (United States)

    2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Motivated by recent experiments in low-dimensional trapped fermionic superfluids, we study a quasi-one-dimensional (quasi-1D) superfluid with a population imbalance between two hyperfine states using an exact mean-field solution for the order parameter. When an effective 'magnetic field' exceeds a critical value, the superfluid order parameter develops spatial inhomogeneity in the form of a soliton lattice. The soliton lattice generates a band of quasiparticle states inside the energy gap, which originate from the Andreev bound states localized at the solitons. Emergence of the soliton lattice is accompanied by formation of a spin-density wave, with the majority fermions residing at the points in space where the Fulde-Ferrell-Larkin-Ovchinnikov (FFLO) order parameter vanishes. We discuss possibilities for experimental detection of the quasi-1D FFLO state using elastic and inelastic optical Bragg scattering and radiofrequency spectroscopy. We show that these measurements can provide necessary information for unambiguous identification of the spatially inhomogeneous quasi-1D FFLO state and the soliton lattice formation.

  7. Activity Based Costing

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1997-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Activity Based Costing (ABC) is method for developing cost estimates in which the project is subdivided into discrete, quantifiable activities or a work unit. This chapter outlines the Activity Based Costing method and discusses applicable uses of ABC.

  8. Proteomic Identification and Quantification of S-glutathionylation in Mouse Macrophages Using Resin-Assisted Enrichment and Isobaric Labeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Su, Dian; Gaffrey, Matthew J.; Guo, Jia; Hatchell, Kayla E.; Chu, Rosalie K.; Clauss, Therese RW; Aldrich, Joshua T.; Wu, Si; Purvine, Samuel O.; Camp, David G.; Smith, Richard D.; Thrall, Brian D.; Qian, Weijun

    2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Protein S-glutathionylation (SSG) is an important regulatory posttranslational modification of protein cysteine (Cys) thiol redox switches, yet the role of specific cysteine residues as targets of modification is poorly understood. We report a novel quantitative mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomic method for site-specific identification and quantification of S-glutathionylation across different conditions. Briefly, this approach consists of initial blocking of free thiols by alkylation, selective reduction of glutathionylated thiols and enrichment using thiol affinity resins, followed by on-resin tryptic digestion and isobaric labeling with iTRAQ (isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation) for MS-based identification and quantification. The overall approach was validated by application to RAW 264.7 mouse macrophages treated with different doses of diamide to induce glutathionylation. A total of 1071 Cys-sites from 690 proteins were identified in response to diamide treatment, with ~90% of the sites displaying >2-fold increases in SSG-modification compared to controls.. This approach was extended to identify potential SSG modified Cys-sites in response to H2O2, an endogenous oxidant produced by activated macrophages and many pathophysiological stimuli. The results revealed 364 Cys-sites from 265 proteins that were sensitive to S-glutathionylation in response to H2O2 treatment. These proteins covered a range of molecular types and molecular functions with free radical scavenging, and cell death and survival included as the most significantly enriched functional categories. Overall the results demonstrate that our approach is effective for site-specific identification and quantification of S-glutathionylated proteins. The analytical strategy also provides a unique approach to determining the major pathways and cell processes most susceptible to glutathionylation at a proteome-wide scale.

  9. LANL | Physics | Active Interrogation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physics Division activities in standoff active-interrogation for detecting terrorist nuclear devices, 2011 Detonation of a terrorist nuclear device in a major city would have...

  10. Active stewardship: sustainable future

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Active stewardship: sustainable future Active stewardship: sustainable future Energy sustainability is a daunting task: How do we develop top-notch innovations with some of the...

  11. Greater sage-grouse population response to energy development and habitat loss

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, B.L.; Naugle, D.E.; Doherty, K.E. [University of Montana, Missoula, MT (United States)

    2007-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Modification of landscapes due to energy development may alter both habitat use and vital rates of sensitive wildlife species. Greater sage-grouse (Centrocercus urophasianus) in the Powder River Basin (PRB) of Wyoming and Montana, USA, have experienced rapid, widespread changes to their habitat due to recent coal-bed natural gas (CBNG) development. We analyzed lek-count, habitat, and infrastructure data to assess how CBNG development and other landscape features influenced trends in the numbers of male sage-grouse observed and persistence of leks in the PRB. From 2001 to 2005, the number of males observed on leks in CBNG fields declined more rapidly than leks outside of CBNG. Of leks active in 1997 or later, only 38% of 26 leks in CBNG fields remained active by 2004-2005, compared to 84% of 250 leks outside CBNG fields. By 2005, leks in CBNG fields had 46% fewer males per active lek than leks outside of CBNG. Persistence of 110 leks was positively influenced by the proportion of sagebrush habitat within 6.4 km of the lek. After controlling for habitat, we found support for negative effects of CBNG development within 0.8 km and 3.2 km of the lek and for a time lag between CBNG development and lek disappearance. Current lease stipulations that prohibit development within 0.4 km of sage-grouse leks on federal lands are inadequate to ensure lek persistence and may result in impacts to breeding populations over larger areas. Seasonal restrictions on drilling and construction do not address impacts caused by loss of sagebrush and incursion of infrastructure that can affect populations over long periods of time. Regulatory agencies may need to increase spatial restrictions on development, industry may need to rapidly implement more effective mitigation measures, or both, to reduce impacts of CBNG development on sage-grouse populations in the PRB.

  12. Construction of a rice glycoside hydrolase phylogenomic database and identification of targets for biofuel research.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Rita; Cao, Peijian; Jung, Ki-Hong; Sharma, Manoj K; Ronald, Pamela C

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    fication of targets for biofuel research. Front. Plant Sci.identification of targets for biofuel research Rita Sharmawall modification. Keywords: biofuel, cell wall, database,

  13. assessing radio-isotope identification: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    will be provided by a combination of Cherenkov counters: a ring-imaging detector Physics Requirement 27 Collaboration Identification Physics Websites Summary: S , ,...

  14. The Continuous Risk Profile Approach for the Identification of High Collision Concentration Locations on Congested Highways

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chung, Koohong; Ragland, David R.; Madanat, Samer; Oh, Soon Mi

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Continuous Risk Profile Approach for the IdentificationTHE CONTINUOUS RISK PROFILE APPROACH FOR THE IDENTIFICATIONwords continuous risk profile, traffic collision, proactive

  15. Low dimensionality spectral sensing for low cost material discrimination and identification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bardagjy, Andrew Matthew

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectroscopy is a powerful tool in material identification, characterization and discrimination. Unfortunately industrial and laboratory spectrometers are typically very large, costly, and inconvenient. The aim of this ...

  16. Identification of Cross-Linked Peptides after Click-Based Enrichment...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Cross-Linked Peptides after Click-Based Enrichment Using Sequential Collision-Induced Dissociation and Identification of Cross-Linked Peptides after Click-Based Enrichment Using...

  17. The effect of European contact on the health of indigenous populations in Texas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miller, Elizabeth Ann

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ), and the prehistoric hunter/gatherer sites Blue Bayou (n-42) and Palm Harbor (n-7), were analyzed for medical disorders and dental attrition to determine the effect of European contact on indigenous populations in Texas. Mission San Juan Capistrano was active eight... PREHISTORIC SAMPLES 7 CARBOHYDRATE CONTENT. Page 63 67 . 83 84 85 86 92 LIST OF FIGURES FIGURE 1 TEXAS MAP SHOWING LOCATION OF SITES USED IN THIS ANALYSIS 2 THE HEALTH/DISEASE CONTINUUM 3 AN ECOLOGICAL APPROACH TO HEALTH AND DISEASE 4 TEXAS MAP...

  18. Fast population transfer engineering of three-level systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xi Chen; J. G. Muga

    2012-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We design, by invariant-based inverse engineering, resonant laser pulses to perform fast population transfers in three-level systems. The efficiency and laser intensities are examined for different protocols. The energy cost to improve the fidelity is quantified. The laser intensities can be reduced by populating the intermediate state and by multi-mode driving.

  19. September 15, 2000 Applications of Population Approaches in Toxicology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    or animal studied and extrapolating their results to larger and different populations requires careful in animal and human populations. It cannot be reduced and seems even desirable for the stability intra-individual variability, optimal design of experiments, and extension of toxicokinetic modelling

  20. Theoretical Population Biology 69 (2006) 231233 ESS theory now

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lessard, Sabin

    Theoretical Population Biology 69 (2006) 231­233 Editorial ESS theory now More than 30 years have passed since the concept of evolutionarily stable strategy (ESS) was introduced in the context of animal of the ESS concept. Even today the main idea, and the more general one, remains to look for a population

  1. Adaptation of two lucerne populations to different cutting regimes (*)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Adaptation of two lucerne populations to different cutting regimes (*) Fabio VERONESI, Anna MARIANI Piante foraggere del Consiglio nazionale delle Ricerche, Perugia, Italia SUMMARY Lucerne, Medicago sativa of proteic concentrates. For this purpose the behaviour of two lucerne populations was studied under

  2. Genetic adaptation of aspen (Populus tremuloides) populations to spring risk

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamann, Andreas

    in populations from the central boreal plains of Saskatchewan and Alberta, and populations from Minnesota exhibit therefore caution against long- distance seed transfer of Minnesota provenances to the boreal plains exigences e´leve´es en sommes de tempe´rature ont e´te´ note´es pour les popula- tions des plaines bore

  3. A Mesoscale Diffusion Model in Population Genetics with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    O'Leary, Michael

    ' & $ % A Mesoscale Diffusion Model in Population Genetics with Dynamic Fitness Mike O'Leary Towson University Judith R. Miller Georgetown University 1 #12;A mesoscale diffusion model in population genetics that dominance and epistasis are absent. April 28, 2005 Mike O'Leary and Judith Miller Slide 2 #12;A mesoscale

  4. Population Growth & Issues Can we feed the growing world

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Youqin

    Local and global weather change (global warming) Ozone depletion Can we feed world population? How population? Every six seconds a child dies because of hunger and related causes; 10.9 million children under five die in developing countries each year. Malnutrition and hunger-related diseases cause 60

  5. Sizing the illegally resident population in the UK

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jones, Peter JS

    Sizing the illegally resident population in the UK Home Office Online Report 58/04 MigrationLaughlan John Salt 2nd Edition #12;Sizing the illegally resident population in the UK Charles Pinkerton Gail Mc sources 3 Data sources ­ a typology 3 Methods of estimating the stock of illegal immigrants 4 Direct

  6. Colloid-based multiplexed method for screening plant biomass-degrading glycoside hydrolase activities in microbial communities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reindl, W.; Deng, K.; Gladden, J.M.; Cheng, G.; Wong, A.; Singer, S.W.; Singh, S.; Lee, J.-C.; Yao, J.-S.; Hazen, T.C.; Singh, A.K; Simmons, B.A.; Adams, P.D.; Northen, T.R.

    2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The enzymatic hydrolysis of long-chain polysaccharides is a crucial step in the conversion of biomass to lignocellulosic biofuels. The identification and characterization of optimal glycoside hydrolases is dependent on enzyme activity assays, however existing methods are limited in terms of compatibility with a broad range of reaction conditions, sample complexity, and especially multiplexity. The method we present is a multiplexed approach based on Nanostructure-Initiator Mass Spectrometry (NIMS) that allowed studying several glycolytic activities in parallel under diverse assay conditions. Although the substrate analogs carried a highly hydrophobic perfluorinated tag, assays could be performed in aqueous solutions due colloid formation of the substrate molecules. We first validated our method by analyzing known {beta}-glucosidase and {beta}-xylosidase activities in single and parallel assay setups, followed by the identification and characterization of yet unknown glycoside hydrolase activities in microbial communities.

  7. Advanced Load Identification and Management for Buildings: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number: CRD-11-422

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gentile-Polese, L.

    2014-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this CRADA work is to support Eaton Innovation Center (Eaton) efforts to develop advanced load identification, management technologies, and solutions to reduce building energy consumption by providing fine granular visibility of energy usage information and safety protection of miscellaneous electric loads (MELs) in commercial and residential buildings. MELs load identification and prediction technology will be employed in a novel 'Smart eOutlet*' to provide critical intelligence and information to improve the capability and functionality of building load analysis and design tools and building power management systems. The work scoped in this CRADA involves the following activities: development and validation of business value proposition for the proposed technologies through voice of customer investigation, market analysis, and third-party objective assessment; development and validation of energy saving impact as well as assessment of environmental and economic benefits; 'smart eOutlet' concept design, prototyping, and validation; field validation of the developed technologies in real building environments. (*Another name denoted as 'Smart Power Strip (SPS)' will be used as an alternative of the name 'Smart eOutlet' for a clearer definition of the product market position in future work.)

  8. Identification and evaluation of fluvial-dominated deltaic (Class I oil) reservoirs in Oklahoma. Final report, August 1998

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banken, M.K.

    1998-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Oklahoma Geological Survey (OGS), the Geo Information Systems department, and the School of Petroleum and Geological Engineering at the University of Oklahoma have engaged in a five-year program to identify and address Oklahoma`s oil recovery opportunities in fluvial-dominated deltaic (FDD) reservoirs. This program included a systematic and comprehensive collection and evaluation of information on all FDD oil reservoirs in Oklahoma and the recovery technologies that have been (or could be) applied to those reservoirs with commercial success. The execution of this project was approached in phases. The first phase began in January, 1993 and consisted of planning, play identification and analysis, data acquisition, database development, and computer systems design. By the middle of 1994, many of these tasks were completed or nearly finished including the identification of all FDD reservoirs in Oklahoma, data collection, and defining play boundaries. By early 1995, a preliminary workshop schedule had been developed for project implementation and technology transfer activities. Later in 1995, the play workshop and publication series was initiated with the Morrow and the Booch plays. Concurrent with the initiation of the workshop series was the opening of a computer user lab that was developed for use by the petroleum industry. Industry response to the facility initially was slow, but after the first year lab usage began to increase and is sustaining. The remaining six play workshops were completed through 1996 and 1997, with the project ending on December 31, 1997.

  9. Identification of full-length transmitted/founder viruses and their progeny in primary HIV-1 infection

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Korber, Bette [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hraber, Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Giorgi, Elena [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bhattacharya, T [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Identification of transmitted/founder virus genomes and their progeny by is a novel strategy for probing the molecular basis of HIV-1 transmission and for evaluating the genetic imprint of viral and host factors that act to constrain or facilitate virus replication. Here, we show in a cohort of twelve acutely infected subjects (9 clade B; 3 clade C), that complete genomic sequences of transmitted/founder viruses could be inferred using single genome amplification of plasma viral RNA, direct amplicon sequencing, and a model of random virus evolution. This allowed for the precise identification, chemical synthesis, molecular cloning, and biological analysis of those viruses actually responsible for productive clinical infection and for a comprehensive mapping of sequential viral genomes and proteomes for mutations that are necessary or incidental to the establishment of HIV-1 persistence. Transmitted/founder viruses were CD4 and CCR5 tropic, replicated preferentially in activated primary T-Iymphocytes but not monocyte-derived macrophages, and were effectively shielded from most heterologous or broadly neutralizing antibodies. By 3 months of infection, the evolving viral quasispecies in three subjects showed mutational fixation at only 2-5 discreet genomic loci. By 6-12 months, mutational fixation was evident at 18-27 genomic loci. Some, but not all, of these mutations were attributable to virus escape from cytotoxic Tlymphocytes or neutralizing antibodies, suggesting that other viral or host factors may influence early HIV -1 fitness.

  10. L: Shape-based peak identification for ChIPSeq

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valerie Hower; Steven N. Evans; Lior Pachter

    Abstract. We present a new algorithm for the identification of bound regions from ChIP-seq experiments. Our method for identifying statistically significant peaks from read coverage is inspired by the notion of persistence in topological data analysis and provides a non-parametric approach that is robust to noise in experiments. Specifically, our method reduces the peak calling problem to the study of tree-based statistics derived from the data. We demonstrate the accuracy of our method on existing datasets, and we show that it can discover previously missed regions and can more clearly discriminate between multiple binding events.

  11. Identification of cancer protein biomarkers using proteomic techniques

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mor, Gil G. (Cheshire, CT); Ward, David C. (Las Vegas, NV); Bray-Ward, Patricia (Las Vegas, NV)

    2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    The claimed invention describes methods to diagnose or aid in the diagnosis of cancer. The claimed methods are based on the identification of biomarkers which are particularly well suited to discriminate between cancer subjects and healthy subjects. These biomarkers were identified using a unique and novel screening method described herein. The biomarkers identified herein can also be used in the prognosis and monitoring of cancer. The invention comprises the use of leptin, prolactin, OPN and IGF-II for diagnosing, prognosis and monitoring of ovarian cancer.

  12. Time dependence of delayed neutron emission for fissionable isotope identification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kinlaw, M.T.; Hunt, A.W. [Idaho Accelerator Center, Idaho State University, Pocatello, Idaho 83209-8263 (United States); Department of Physics, Idaho State University, Pocatello, Idaho 83209-8106 (United States)

    2005-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The time dependence of delayed neutron emission was examined as a method of fissionable isotope identification. A pulsed bremsstrahlung photon beam was used to induce photofission reactions in {sup 238}U, {sup 232}Th, and {sup 239}Pu targets. The resulting delayed neutron emission was recorded between irradiating pulses and is a well-known technique for fissionable material detection. Monitoring the decay of delayed neutron emission between irradiating pulses demonstrates the ability to not only detect the presence of fissionable materials, but also to identify which fissionable isotope is present.

  13. Performance of ?q-lepton reconstruction and identification in CMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chatrchyan, Serguei; et al.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The performance of tau-lepton reconstruction and identification algorithms is studied using a data sample of proton-proton collisions at sqrt(s)=7 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36 inverse picobarns collected with the CMS detector at the LHC. The tau leptons that decay into one or three charged hadrons, zero or more short-lived neutral hadrons, and a neutrino are identified using final-state particles reconstructed in the CMS tracker and electromagnetic calorimeter. The reconstruction efficiency of the algorithms is measured using tau leptons produced in Z-boson decays. The tau-lepton misidentification rates for jets and electrons are determined.

  14. Identification of Learning Disabled Adolescents: A Bayesian Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alley, Gordon R.; Deshler, Donald D.; Warner, Michael M.

    1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    INSTITUTE RESEA~~~ lEARNIJ~ DISABILITIES [~r~~~~~~~~s~~.~~g:~ Emphasis on Adolescents and Young Adults Research Report #2 January, 1980 IDENTIFICATION OF LEARNING DISABLED ADOLESCENTS: A BAYESIAN APPROACH Gordon R. Alley, Donald D. Deshler..., and Michael M. Warner This study was conducted in cooperation with Lawrence USD 497, Lawrence Kansas • . This report was originally published in the Learning Disability Quarterly, 1979, £(2), 76-83. The University of Kansas Institute for Research...

  15. Genomics Populations for Characterization of Economically Important Traits Structured populations of beef cattle with extensive phenotypic records for economical-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Genomics Populations for Characterization of Economically Important Traits Structured populations efficiency and carcass merit, are a critical need in the post-genome sequencing era. Coupled with the availability of the 7.5x assembly of the bovine genome sequence and the single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP

  16. The blue plume population in dwarf spheroidal galaxies: genuine blue stragglers or young stellar population?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Momany; E. V. Held; I. Saviane; S. Zaggia; L. Rizzi; M. Gullieuszik

    2007-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Abridged... Blue stragglers (BSS) are thought to be the product of either primordial or collisional binary systems. In the context of dwarf spheroidal galaxies it is hard to firmly disentangle a genuine BSS population from young main sequence (MS) stars tracing a ~1-2 Gyr old star forming episode. Assuming that their blue plume populations are made of BSS, we estimate the BSS frequency for 8 Local Group non star-forming dwarf galaxies, using a compilation of ground and space based photometry. Our results can be summarized as follows: (i) The BSS frequency in dwarf galaxies, at any given Mv, is always higher than that in globular clusters of similar luminosities; (ii) the BSS frequency for the lowest luminosity dwarf galaxies is in excellent agreement with that observed in the Milky Way halo; and most interestingly (iii) derive a statistically significant anti-correlation between the BSS frequency and the galaxy Mv. The low density, almost collision-less, environments of our dwarf galaxy sample allow us to infer (i) their very low dynamical evolution; (ii) a negligible production of collisional BSS; and consequently (iii) that their blue plumes are mainly made of primordial binaries. The dwarf galaxies anti-correlation can be used as a discriminator: galaxies obeying the anti-correlation are more likely to possess genuine primordial BSS rather than young main sequence stars.

  17. Hazard categorization of 100K east and 100K west in-basin fuel characterization program activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alwardt, L.D.

    1994-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This report documents the determination that the in-basin activities at 105 K East (KE) and 105 K West (KW) on the Hanford Reservation associated with the fuel characterization program are classified as Hazard Category 3 (hazard analysis shows the potential for only significant localized consequences). Potential accident consequences, a description of significant activities around the site, and hazard identification and management were explored.

  18. SECPOP90: Sector population, land fraction, and economic estimation program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Humphreys, S.L.; Rollstin, J.A.; Ridgely, J.N.

    1997-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1973 Mr. W. Athey of the Environmental Protection Agency wrote a computer program called SECPOP which calculated population estimates. Since that time, two things have changed which suggested the need for updating the original program - more recent population censuses and the widespread use of personal computers (PCs). The revised computer program uses the 1990 and 1992 Population Census information and runs on current PCs as {open_quotes}SECPOP90.{close_quotes} SECPOP90 consists of two parts: site and regional. The site provides population and economic data estimates for any location within the continental United States. Siting analysis is relatively fast running. The regional portion assesses site availability for different siting policy decisions; i.e., the impact of available sites given specific population density criteria within the continental United States. Regional analysis is slow. This report compares the SECPOP90 population estimates and the nuclear power reactor licensee-provided information. Although the source, and therefore the accuracy, of the licensee information is unknown, this comparison suggests SECPOP90 makes reasonable estimates. Given the total uncertainty in any current calculation of severe accidents, including the potential offsite consequences, the uncertainty within SECPOP90 population estimates is expected to be insignificant. 12 refs., 55 figs., 7 tabs.

  19. Electricity Demand Evolution Driven by Storm Motivated Population Movement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Allen, Melissa R [ORNL; Fernandez, Steven J [ORNL; Fu, Joshua S [ORNL; Walker, Kimberly A [ORNL

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Managing the risks posed by climate change to energy production and delivery is a challenge for communities worldwide. Sea Level rise and increased frequency and intensity of natural disasters due to sea surface temperature rise force populations to move locations, resulting in changing patterns of demand for infrastructure services. Thus, Infrastructures will evolve to accommodate new load centers while some parts of the network are underused, and these changes will create emerging vulnerabilities. Combining climate predictions and agent based population movement models shows promise for exploring the universe of these future population distributions and changes in coastal infrastructure configurations. In this work, we created a prototype agent based population distribution model and developed a methodology to establish utility functions that provide insight about new infrastructure vulnerabilities that might result from these patterns. Combining climate and weather data, engineering algorithms and social theory, we use the new Department of Energy (DOE) Connected Infrastructure Dynamics Models (CIDM) to examine electricity demand response to increased temperatures, population relocation in response to extreme cyclonic events, consequent net population changes and new regional patterns in electricity demand. This work suggests that the importance of established evacuation routes that move large populations repeatedly through convergence points as an indicator may be under recognized.

  20. Multi-Tag Radio Frequency Identification Systems Leonid Bolotnyy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robins, Gabriel

    numerous useful applications (e.g., supply chain management, inventory tracking, ac- cess control-active. Active tags can initi- ate transmission on their own. Passive and semi-active tags rely on power from: inductive coupling and electromagnetic backscattering, or far-field propagation. In inductive cou- pling

  1. Unified Theory of Relativistic Identification of Information in a Systems Age: Proposed Convergence of Unique Identification with Syntax and Semantics through Internet Protocol version 6

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Datta, Shoumen

    2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper proposes to utilize internet protocol version six (IPv6) to uniquely identify not only things (objects) but also processes, relationships (syntax, semantics) and interfaces (sensors). Convergence of identification ...

  2. Western Renewable Energy Zones, Phase 1: QRA Identification Technical Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pletka, R.; Finn, J.

    2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the Western Renewable Energy Zones (WREZ) Initiative Phase 1 Qualified Resource Area identification process, including the identification and economic analysis of Qualified Resource Areas (QRAs) and 'non-REZ' resources. These data and analyses will assist the Western US in its renewable energy transmission planning goals. The economic analysis in this report produced the input data for the WREZ Generation and Transmission model, which is a screening-level model to determine the optimal routing for and cost of delivering renewable energy from QRAs to load centers throughout the Western Interconnection. In June 2009, the Western Governors' Association accepted the Western Governors' Association WREZ Phase 1 Report in which the QRAs were mapped and the entire WREZ Phase 1 process was explained in general. That same month the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory released the WREZ Generation and Transmission Model (GTM), which was also developed by Black & Veatch. This report details the assumptions and methodologies that were used to produce the maps and resource analyses in the WGA report as well as the economic data used by the WREZ GTM. This report also provides the results of the non-REZ resource analysis for the first time in the WREZ initiative.

  3. PROBABILISTIC SITE IDENTIFICATION ANALYSIS USING NUPEC RECORDED FREE FIELD MOTIONS.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    XU,J.; COSTANTINO,C.; HOFMAYER,C.; MURPHY,A.; KITADA,Y.

    2002-08-04T23:59:59.000Z

    THIS PAPER DESCRIBES A PROBABILISTIC SITE IDENTIFICATION ANALYSIS PERFORMED BY BNL, USING THE FREE FIELD EARTHQUAKE MOTIONS RECORDED AT THE NUPEC TEST SITE. THE BNL ANALYSIS WAS INTENDED TO PROVIDE ADEQUATE CHARACTERIZATION OF THE SOIL PROPERTIES FOR THE TEST SITE TO BE USED FOR SSI ANALYSES. THE FREE FIELD DATA WERE PROVIDED BY NUPEC. THE METHODOLOGY EMPLOYED IN THE BNL PROBABILISTIC ANALYSIS OF SITE IDENTIFICATION INCLUDES THE MONTE CARLO PROCESS IN CONJUNCTION WITH EQUIVALENT LINEARCONVOLUTION ANALYSES FOR GENERATING A LARGE NUMBER OF SITE PROFILES FOR USE IN CONVOLUTION STUDIES FROM WHICH MEAN ESTIMATES OF RESPONSE CAN BE GENERATED. THE RANDOM VARIABLE SELECTED TO CHARACTERIZE THE SITE PROFILE IS THE SHEAR WAVE VELOCITY IN EACH SOIL LAYER OF THE SITE PROFILE. A LOGNORMAL DISTRIBUTION WAS ASSUMED WITH THE STANDARD DEVIATION DETERMINED FROM AVAILABLE SITE DATA AND APPLICABLE REGULATORY REQUIREMENTS. THE CONVOLUTION ANALYSES WERE PERFORMED USING AN APPROPRIATE SOILDEGRADATION MODEL AN D THE OUTCROP INPUT MOTIONS GENERATED FROM THE RECORDED IN ROCK MOTIONS. THE BNL ANALYSIS PRODUCED RESULTS IN TERMS OF THE MEAN, MEDIAN AND VARIOUS FRACTILES OF FREE FIELD SOIL PROPERTIES AT THE TEST SITE, AND THE CORRESPONDING SURFACE RESPONSE SPECTRA, WHICH ARE PRESENTED IN THIS PAPER.

  4. HOM identification by bead pulling in the Brookhaven ERL cavity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hahn H.; Calaga, R.; Jain, P.; Johnson, E.C.; Xu, W.

    2012-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Several past measurements of the Brookhaven ERL at superconducting temperature produced a long list of higher order modes (HOMs). The Niobium 5-cell cavity is terminated with HOM ferrite dampers that successfully reduce the Q-factors to tolerable levels. However, a number of undamped resonances with Q {ge} 10{sup 6} were found at 4 K and their mode identification remained as a goal for this paper. The approach taken here consists in taking different S{sub 21} measurements on a copper cavity replica of the ERL which can be compared with the actual data and also with Microwave Studio computer simulations. Several different S{sub 21} transmission measurements are used, including those taken from the fundamental input coupler to the pick-up probe across the cavity, between probes in a single cell, and between beam-position monitor probes in the beam tubes. Mode identification is supported by bead pulling with a metallic needle or a dielectric sphere that are calibrated in the fundamental mode. This paper presents results for HOMs in the first two dipole bands with the prototypical 958 MHz trapped mode, the lowest beam tube resonances, and high-Q modes in the first quadrupole band and beyond.

  5. Basophile: Accurate Fragment Charge State Prediction Improves Peptide Identification Rates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Dong; Dasari, Surendra; Chambers, Matthew C.; Holman, Jerry D.; Chen, Kan; Liebler, Daniel; Orton, Daniel J.; Purvine, Samuel O.; Monroe, Matthew E.; Chung, Chang Y.; Rose, Kristie L.; Tabb, David L.

    2013-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    In shotgun proteomics, database search algorithms rely on fragmentation models to predict fragment ions that should be observed for a given peptide sequence. The most widely used strategy (Naive model) is oversimplified, cleaving all peptide bonds with equal probability to produce fragments of all charges below that of the precursor ion. More accurate models, based on fragmentation simulation, are too computationally intensive for on-the-fly use in database search algorithms. We have created an ordinal-regression-based model called Basophile that takes fragment size and basic residue distribution into account when determining the charge retention during CID/higher-energy collision induced dissociation (HCD) of charged peptides. This model improves the accuracy of predictions by reducing the number of unnecessary fragments that are routinely predicted for highly-charged precursors. Basophile increased the identification rates by 26% (on average) over the Naive model, when analyzing triply-charged precursors from ion trap data. Basophile achieves simplicity and speed by solving the prediction problem with an ordinal regression equation, which can be incorporated into any database search software for shotgun proteomic identification.

  6. Unambiguous coherent state identification: Searching a quantum database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michal Sedlak; Mario Ziman; Ondrej Pribyla; Vladimir Buzek; Mark Hillery

    2007-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider an unambiguous identification of an unknown coherent state with one of two unknown coherent reference states. Specifically, we consider two modes of an electromagnetic field prepared in unknown coherent states alpha_1 and alpha_2, respectively. The third mode is prepared either in the state alpha_1 or in the state alpha_2. The task is to identify (unambiguously) which of the two modes are in the same state. We present a scheme consisting of three beamsplitters capable to perform this task. Although we don't prove the optimality, we show that the performance of the proposed setup is better than the generalization of the optimal measurement known for a finite-dimensional case. We show that a single beamsplitter is capable to perform an unambiguous quantum state comparison for coherent states optimally. Finally we propose an experimental setup consisting of 2N-1 beamsplitters for unambiguous identification among N unknown coherent states. This setup can be considered as a search in a quantum database. The elements of the database are unknown coherent states encoded in different modes of an electromagnetic field. The task is to specify the two modes that are excited in the same, though unknown, coherent state.

  7. Snapshot Identification of Gamma Ray Burst Optical Afterglows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    James E. Rhoads

    2001-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma ray burst afterglows can be identified in single epoch observations using three or more optical filters. This method relies on color measurements to distinguish the power law spectrum of an afterglow from the curved spectra of stars. Observations in a fourth filter will further distinguish between afterglows and most galaxies up to redshifts z ~ 1. Many afterglows can also be identified with fewer filters using ultraviolet excess, infrared excess, or Lyman break techniques. By allowing faster identification of gamma ray burst afterglows, these color methods will increase the fraction of bursts for which optical spectroscopy and other narrow-field observations can be obtained. Because quasar colors can match those of afterglows, the maximum error box size where an unambiguous identification can be expected is set by the flux limit of the afterglow search and the quasar number-flux relation. For currently typical error boxes (10 -- 100 square arcminutes), little contamination is expected at magnitudes R < 21.5 +- 0.5. Archival data demonstrates that the afterglow of GRB 000301C could have been identified using this method. In addition to finding gamma ray burst counterparts, this method will have applications in ``orphan afterglow'' searches used to constrain gamma ray burst collimation.

  8. Blind Identification of Over-complete MixturEs of sources (BIOME)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Blind Identification of Over-complete MixturEs of sources (BIOME) Laurent Albera(1,2) , Anne Ferr Abstract The problem of Blind Identification of linear mixtures of independent random pro- cesses is known words: Blind Source Separation, Independent Component Analysis, Tensor, High Order Statistics, Joint

  9. Blind Identification of the Scrambling Code of a Reverse Link CDMA2000 Transmission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Blind Identification of the Scrambling Code of a Reverse Link CDMA2000 Transmission Mathieu des by the femto BS. The femto BS has to estimate blindly the state of the scrambling code. An algorithm which performs a blind identification of the scrambling code of a CDMA2000 reverse link transmission is proposed

  10. Blind Identification of the Uplink Scrambling Code Index of a WCDMA Transmission and Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Blind Identification of the Uplink Scrambling Code Index of a WCDMA Transmission and Application with the surrounding macro BSs. The femto BS has to estimate blindly this scrambling code index. An algorithm which performs a blind identification of the uplink scrambling code index of a WCDMA transmission is proposed

  11. Blind Equalization and Identification for Differential Space-time Modulated Communication Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schniter, Philip

    Blind Equalization and Identification for Differential Space-time Modulated Communication Systems A Thesis Presented in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements for the Degree Master of Science of blind identification and equalization for MIMO system with frequency- selective fading channels. We

  12. Identification of heat source fields from infra-red thermography: Determination of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Identification of heat source fields from infra-red thermography: Determination of `self-heating;Identification of heat source fields from infra-red thermography: Determination of `self-heating' in a dual this goal, and its application to an experimental case of self-heating at a single load level is shown

  13. Fuzzy membership function optimization for system identification using an extended Kalman filter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Dan

    Fuzzy membership function optimization for system identification using an extended Kalman filter an extended Kalman filter to optimize the membership functions for system modeling, or system identification is that the proposed system acts as a noise-reducing filter. We demonstrate that the extended Kalman filter can

  14. A Markov Random Field model of contamination source identification in porous media flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zabaras, Nicholas J.

    A Markov Random Field model of contamination source identification in porous media flow Jingbo Wang A contamination source identification problem in constant porous media flow is addressed by solving the advection-dispersion equation (ADE) with a hierarchical Bayesian computation method backward through time. The contaminant

  15. Parameter identification in large-scale models for oil and gas production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van den Hof, Paul

    Parameter identification in large-scale models for oil and gas production Jorn F.M. Van Doren: Models used for model-based (long-term) operations as monitoring, control and optimization of oil and gas information to the identification problem. These options are illustrated with examples taken from oil and gas

  16. Hyperspectral laboratory and remote sensing applied to clay minerals identification and mapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Hyperspectral laboratory and remote sensing applied to clay minerals identification and mapping contain clay minerals that change volume with water content and cause extensive and expensive damage susceptibility. At local scale, characterization of soil properties and identification of clay minerals using

  17. A Holistic Solution for Duplicate Entity Identification in Deep Web Data Integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A Holistic Solution for Duplicate Entity Identification in Deep Web Data Integration Wei Liu 1 in deep Web data integration, the goal of duplicate entity identification is to discover the duplicate to deep Web data integration systems. That is, one duplicate entity matcher trained over two specific Web

  18. Experimental identification and validation of an electrochemical model of a Lithium-Ion Battery

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stefanopoulou, Anna

    Experimental identification and validation of an electrochemical model of a Lithium-Ion Battery an experimental parameter iden- tification and validation for an electrochemical lithium-ion battery model. The identification procedure is based on experimental data collected from a 6.8 Ah lithium-ion battery during charge

  19. A Least-Parameterized Method for Subspace Identification of Hammerstein Systems*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Jiandong

    of identification problems are con- sidered by applying MOESP (Multivariable Output Error State sPace) method Analysis), MOESP and N4SID (Numerical Subspace State-Space System IDentification). The work of Gomez (SIMs) for Hammerstein systems, which is an ex- tension from the well-accepted SIMs for linear systems

  20. A Divide-and-Conquer Approach to Distributed Attack Identification Fabio Pasqualettia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bullo, Francesco

    A Divide-and-Conquer Approach to Distributed Attack Identification Fabio Pasqualettia , Florian D, University of California, Santa Barbara Abstract Identifying attacks is key to ensure security in cyber-physical systems. In this note we remark upon the computational complexity of the attack identification problem

  1. Experimental identification of turbulent fluid forces applied to fuel assemblies using an uncertain model and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Experimental identification of turbulent fluid forces applied to fuel assemblies using an uncertain with an experimental setup which is constituted of a half fuel assembly which bathes in a turbulent fluid This paper is devoted to the identification of stochastic loads applied to fuel assemblies using an uncertain

  2. Identification of sources of lead exposure in French children by lead isotope analysis: a cross-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Identification of sources of lead exposure in French children by lead isotope analysis: a cross://www.ehjournal.net/content/10/1/75 (28 August 2011) #12;RESEARCH Open Access Identification of sources of lead exposure in French children by lead isotope analysis: a cross- sectional study Youssef Oulhote1,2,3* , Barbara Le Bot

  3. PoS(EPS-HEP2011)405 Charged particle identification (PID) for SuperB

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    PoS(EPS-HEP2011)405 Charged particle identification (PID) for SuperB Nicolas ARNAUD Laboratoire de3.fr Charged particle identification (PID) is a key input for the physics program of the Super of SuperB to extend the PID coverage in this region. This innovative time-of-flight detector will use new

  4. Device for detection and identification of carbon- and nitrogen-containing materials

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Karev, Alexander Ivanovich; Raevsky, Valery Georgievich; Dzhilavyan, Leonid Zavenovich; Laptev, Valery Dmitrievich; Pakhomov, Nikolay Ivanovich; Shvedunov, Vasily Ivanovich; Rykalin, Vladimir Ivanovich; Brothers, Louis Joseph; Wilhide, Larry K

    2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A device for detection and identification of carbon- and nitrogen-containing materials is described. In particular, the device performs the detection and identification of carbon- and nitrogen-containing materials by photo-nuclear detection. The device may comprise a race-track microtron, a breaking target, and a water-filled Cherenkov radiation counter.

  5. A Novel Anti-Collision Protocol for Energy Efficient Identification and Monitoring in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chin, Kwan-Wu

    1 A Novel Anti-Collision Protocol for Energy Efficient Identification and Monitoring in RFID}@uow.edu.au Abstract-- This paper presents a dynamic framed slotted Aloha (DFSA) protocol that is energy efficient identification. Critically, they cannot be used to monitor tags in an energy efficient manner. Thus, making them

  6. Dopant location identification in Nd3+ -doped TiO2 nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frenkel, Anatoly

    Dopant location identification in Nd3+ -doped TiO2 nanoparticles W. Li Department of Materials. The identification of dopant position and its local environ- ment are essential to explore the effect of doping. X and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899, USA C. Ni Department of Materials Science and Engineering

  7. Control Engineering Practice 10 (2002) 315326 MIMO closed-loop identification of an MSW incinerator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van den Hof, Paul

    incinerator M. Leskensa, *, L.B.M. Van Kessela , P.M.J. Van den Hof b a TNO Environment, Energy and Process of a specific system identification procedure to a municipal solid waste (MSW) incinerator is discussed that with the proposed identification procedure a model of the MSW incinerator is obtained which, according to system

  8. Vehicle Re-Identification using Wireless Magnetic Sensors: Algorithm Revision, Modifications and Performance Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Horowitz, Roberto

    Vehicle Re-Identification using Wireless Magnetic Sensors: Algorithm Revision, Modifications, CA 94305, US. Email: ram.rajagopal@stanford.edu Abstract--A vehicle re-identification method based on match- ing vehicle signatures obtained from wireless magnetic sensors was studied on a single lane loop

  9. VIDEO IDENTIFICATION USING VIDEO TOMOGRAPHY Gustavo Leon, Hari Kalva, and Borko Furht

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalva, Hari

    VIDEO IDENTIFICATION USING VIDEO TOMOGRAPHY Gustavo Leon, Hari Kalva, and Borko Furht Department of Computer Science and Engineering, Florida Atlantic University, Boca Raton, FL, USA ABSTRACT Video popularity of online video services. The problem addressed in this paper is the identification of a given

  10. Blind System Identification KARIM ABED-MERAIM, WANZHI QIU, MEMBER, IEEE, AND YINGBO HUA, SENIOR MEMBER, IEEE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hua, Yingbo

    Blind System Identification KARIM ABED-MERAIM, WANZHI QIU, MEMBER, IEEE, AND YINGBO HUA, SENIOR MEMBER, IEEE Blind system identification (BSI) is a fundamental signal processing technology aimed applications such as mobile communications, speech reverberation cancellation, and blind image restoration

  11. REAL-TIME IDENTIFICATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF ASBESTOS AND CONCRETE MATERIALS WITH RADIOACTIVE CONTAMINATION

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    XU, X. George; Zhang, X.C.

    2002-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Concrete and asbestos-containing materials were widely used in DOE building construction in the 1940s and 1950s. Over the years, many of these porous materials have been contaminated with radioactive sources, on and below the surface. To improve current practice in identifying hazardous materials and in characterizing radioactive contamination, an interdisciplinary team from Rensselaer has conducted research in two aspects: (1) to develop terahertz time-domain spectroscopy and imaging system that can be used to analyze environmental samples such as asbestos in the field, and (2) to develop algorithms for characterizing the radioactive contamination depth profiles in real-time in the field using gamma spectroscopy. The basic research focused on the following: (1) mechanism of generating of broadband pulsed radiation in terahertz region, (2) optimal free-space electro-optic sampling for asbestos, (3) absorption and transmission mechanisms of asbestos in THz region, (4) the role of asbestos sample conditions on the temporal and spectral distributions, (5) real-time identification and mapping of asbestos using THz imaging, (7) Monte Carlo modeling of distributed contamination from diffusion of radioactive materials into porous concrete and asbestos materials, (8) development of unfolding algorithms for gamma spectroscopy, and (9) portable and integrated spectroscopy systems for field testing in DOE. Final results of the project show that the combination of these innovative approaches has the potential to bring significant improvement in future risk reduction and cost/time saving in DOE's D and D activities.

  12. THE MICRO-ARCSECOND SCINTILLATION-INDUCED VARIABILITY (MASIV) SURVEY. III. OPTICAL IDENTIFICATIONS AND NEW REDSHIFTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pursimo, Tapio [Nordic Optical Telescope, Apartado 474, 38700 Santa Cruz de La Palma (Spain)] [Nordic Optical Telescope, Apartado 474, 38700 Santa Cruz de La Palma (Spain); Ojha, Roopesh [NVI Inc./U. S. Naval Observatory, 3450 Massachusetts Ave NW, Washington DC (United States)] [NVI Inc./U. S. Naval Observatory, 3450 Massachusetts Ave NW, Washington DC (United States); Jauncey, David L. [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science and Mount Stromlo Observatory, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)] [CSIRO Astronomy and Space Science and Mount Stromlo Observatory, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia); Rickett, Barney J. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States)] [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Dutka, Michael S. [The Catholic University of America, 620 Michigan Ave., N.E., Washington DC 20064 (United States)] [The Catholic University of America, 620 Michigan Ave., N.E., Washington DC 20064 (United States); Koay, Jun Yi; Bignall, Hayley E.; Macquart, Jean-Pierre [ICRAR, Curtin University, Bentley, WA 6845 (Australia)] [ICRAR, Curtin University, Bentley, WA 6845 (Australia); Lovell, James E. J. [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Tasmania, TAS 7001 (Australia)] [School of Mathematics and Physics, University of Tasmania, TAS 7001 (Australia); Kedziora-Chudczer, Lucyna, E-mail: tpursimo@not.iac.es [School of Physics and Astrophysics, UNSW, Sydney NSW 2052 (Australia)] [School of Physics and Astrophysics, UNSW, Sydney NSW 2052 (Australia)

    2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Intraday variability (IDV) of the radio emission from active galactic nuclei is now known to be predominantly due to interstellar scintillation (ISS). The MASIV (The Micro-Arcsecond Scintillation-Induced Variability) survey of 443 flat spectrum sources revealed that the IDV is related to the radio flux density and redshift. A study of the physical properties of these sources has been severely handicapped by the absence of reliable redshift measurements for many of these objects. This paper presents 79 new redshifts and a critical evaluation of 233 redshifts obtained from the literature. We classify spectroscopic identifications based on emission line properties, finding that 78% of the sources have broad emission lines and are mainly FSRQs. About 16% are weak lined objects, chiefly BL Lacs, and the remaining 6% are narrow line objects. The gross properties (redshift, spectroscopic class) of the MASIV sample are similar to those of other blazar surveys. However, the extreme compactness implied by ISS favors FSRQs and BL Lacs in the MASIV sample as these are the most compact object classes. We confirm that the level of IDV depends on the 5 GHz flux density for all optical spectral types. We find that BL Lac objects tend to be more variable than broad line quasars. The level of ISS decreases substantially above a redshift of about two. The decrease is found to be generally consistent with ISS expected for beamed emission from a jet that is limited to a fixed maximum brightness temperature in the source rest frame.

  13. Preliminary Concept of Operations for a Global Cylinder Identification and Monitoring System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Whitaker, J. M. [ORNL; White-Horton, J. L. [ORNL; Morgan, J. B. [InSolves Associates

    2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a preliminary concept of operations for a Global Cylinder Identification and Monitoring System that could improve the efficiency of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) in conducting its current inspection activities and could provide a capability to substantially increase its ability to detect credible diversion scenarios and undeclared production pathways involving UF6 cylinders. There exist concerns that a proliferant State with access to enrichment technology could obtain a cylinder containing natural or low-enriched uranium hexafluoride (UF6) and produce a significant quantity (SQ)1 of highly enriched uranium in as little as 30 days. The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) through the Next Generation Safeguards Initiative sponsored a multi-laboratory team to develop an integrated system that provides for detecting scenarios involving 1) diverting an entire declared cylinder for enrichment at a clandestine facility, 2) misusing a declared cylinder at a safeguarded facility, and 3) using an undeclared cylinder at a safeguarded facility. An important objective in developing this integrated system was to improve the timeliness for detecting the cylinder diversion and undeclared production scenarios. Developing this preliminary concept required in-depth analyses of current operational and safeguards practices at conversion, enrichment, and fuel fabrication facilities. The analyses evaluated the processing, movement, and storage of cylinders at the facilities; the movement of cylinders between facilities (including cylinder fabrication); and the misuse of safeguarded facilities.

  14. Identification of cross-formation flow in multireservoir systems using isotopic techniques

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Szpakiewicz, M.

    1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This study was designed to add quantitative solutions to the problem of undesirable hydraulic communication which results in active fluid flow between productive horizons. Transfer of novel geochemical methods, based on effective, economic, and environmentally acceptable isotopic techniques for identification of leaking hydrocarbon reservoirs, is a major objective of this study. The effectiveness of a continuous trap's seal depends on an equilibrium between the capillary forces holding formation water in pore spaces of the seal and the buoyancy forces of the oil and gas column in a system. Therefore, some seals may leak selectively at changing pressure and temperature conditions with respect to different fluid phases (oil, gas, and water). A break in continuity of confining layers will promote relatively fast interreservoir migration of fluids. It may intensify in reservoirs subjected to high pressures during implementation of secondary and tertiary processes of recovery. Such fluid flow should result in identifiable chemical, isotopic, and often thermal anomalies in the area of an open flow path. Quantitative hydrodynamic reservoir modeling based on geochemical/isotopic and other evidence of fluid migration in a system require, however, more systematic methodological study. Such a study is being recommended in addition to a field demonstration of the method in a selected oil/gas reservoir where geochemical and production anomalies have been documented. 62 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. The development of a chemical biology pipeline for the identification of small molecules that induce cardiopoiesis in murine embryonic stem cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bushway, Paul Jay

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of a Chemical Biology Pipeline for the Identification ofof a Chemical Biology Pipeline for the Identification ofhinge on the drug development pipeline and the importance of

  16. Identification and Evaluation of Fluvial-Dominated Deltaic Reservoirs. Quarterly technical report, April 1 -June 30, 1997

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banken, M.K.; Andrews, R.

    1997-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is provided as a Quarterly Technical Progress Report for the program entitled `Identification and Evaluation of Fluvial- Dominated Deltaic (Class 1 Oil) Reservoirs in Oklahoma`, covering the reporting period of April 1 - June 30, 1997. Work is progressing as expected for the project. The FDD computer facility is fully operational. During this quarter, there were 27 industry individuals who used the facility. The Tonkawa Play workshop is scheduled for July 9, 1997 in Norman. The Tonkawa publication and presentation graphics are nearly completed. The Bartlesville workshop is scheduled for October and November, 1997, in three different sites. Text and illustrations for that play are in progress. This project is serving an extremely valuable role in the technology transfer activities for the Oklahoma petroleum industry, with very positive industry feedback.

  17. Identification and evaluation of alternatives for the disposition of fluoride fuel and flush salts from the molten salt reactor experiment at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This document presents an initial identification and evaluation of the alternatives for disposition of the fluoride fuel and flush salts stored in the drain tanks at the Molten Salt Reactor Experiment (MSRE) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). It will serve as a resource for the U.S. Department of Energy contractor preparing the feasibility study for this activity under the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). This document will also facilitate further discussion on the range of credible alternatives, and the relative merits of alternatives, throughout the time that a final alternative is selected under the CERCLA process.

  18. The use of vasectomy in stray cat population control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mahlow, Jane Caryl

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    1995) Jane Caryl Mahlow, B. S. , College of St. Francis; D. V. M. , University of Illinois Chair of Advisory Committee: Dr. Margaret R. Slater Despite concerted efforts by animal control agencies and animal welfare advocates, stray cats continue.... Peline Reproductive Physiology . . . 3 . 8 MATERIALS AND METHODS. . . . 10 Identification of Sampling Sites. . . Obtaining Consent and Cooperation. . Surveillance Intervention . . 10 . . 10 . . 11 . . 14 RESULTS. . 17 DISCUSSION AND SUMMARY...

  19. IDENTIFICATION OF STAPHYLOCOCCAL SPECIES BASED ON VARIATIONS IN PROTEIN SEQUENCES (MASS SPECTROMETRY) AND DNA SEQUENCE (sodA MICROARRAY)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kooken, Jennifer M.; Fox, Karen F.; Fox, Alvin; Altomare, Diego; Creek, Kim E.; Wunschel, David S.; Pajares-Merino, Sara; Martinez-Ballesteros, Ilargi; Garaizar, Javier; Oyarzabal, Omar A.; Samadpour, Mansour

    2014-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    IDENTIFICATION OF STAPHYLOCOCCAL SPECIES BASED ON VARIATIONS IN PROTEIN SEQUENCES (MASS SPECTROMETRY) AND DNA SEQUENCE (sodA MICROARRAY)

  20. Ion Uptake Determination of Dendrochronologically-Dated Trees Using Neutron Activation Analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenan Unlu; P.I. Kuniholm; D.K.H. Schwarz; N.O. Cetiner; J.J. Chiment

    2009-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Uptake of metal ions by plan roots is a function of the type and concentration of metal in the soil, the nutrient biochemistry of the plant, and the immediate environment of the root. Uptake of gold (Au) is known to be sensitive to soil pH for many species. Soil acidification due to acid precipitation following volcanic eruptions can dramatically increase Au uptake by trees. Identification of high Au content in tree rings in dendrochronologically-dated, overlapping sequences of trees allows the identification of temporally-conscribed, volcanically-influenced periods of environmental change. Ion uptake, specifically determination of trace amounts of gold, was performed for dendrochronologically-dated tree samples utilizing Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) technique. The concentration of gold was correlated with known enviironmental changes, e.g. volcanic activities, during historic periods.