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1

IDB-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power BasicsGermany:

2

Climate Change 2007: Mitigation of Climate Change.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2007: Mitigation of Climate Change. Full report. WorkingIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change www.webcda.it LaIntergovernmental Panel on Climate Change”. Il Rapporto

Schiavon, Stefano; Zecchin, Roberto

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Korea's Green Growth Strategy: Mitigating Climate Change and...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Korea's Green Growth Strategy: Mitigating Climate Change and Developing New Growth Engines Jump to: navigation, search Name Korea's Green Growth Strategy: Mitigating Climate Change...

4

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Synergisms between climate change mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

but increasingly so in developing countries and economies in transition. Certain measures that integrate climateORIGINAL ARTICLE Synergisms between climate change mitigation and adaptation: an insurance an aggregator of the impacts of climate change and a market actor able to play a material role in decreasing

5

Climate Change Basics: Science, Adaptation, & Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Science Global atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide have increased from ice cores spanning many thousands of years. The global increases in carbon dioxide concentrationClimate Change Basics: Science, Adaptation, & Mitigation with a Family Forest Perspective Baylor

Fox-Kemper, Baylor

6

Climate Change Mitigation in the Energy and Forestry Sectors...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

of Developing Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Climate Change Mitigation in the Energy and Forestry Sectors of Developing Countries...

7

Agricultural Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Agricultural Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation in Developing Countries: Policy Options for...

8

Characterizing Uncertainty for Regional Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation Decisions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This white paper describes the results of new research to develop an uncertainty characterization process to help address the challenges of regional climate change mitigation and adaptation decisions.

Unwin, Stephen D.; Moss, Richard H.; Rice, Jennie S.; Scott, Michael J.

2011-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

9

Mediterranean Seagrass Meadows: Resilience and Contribution to Climate Change Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mediterranean Seagrass Meadows: Resilience and Contribution to Climate Change Mitigation A Short to Climate Change Mitigation, A Short Summary / Les herbiers de Magnoliophytes marines de Méditerranée: 1 Evolution of the average temperature and level of the sea since 1850 (after Climate Change 2007

Boudouresque, Charles F.

10

Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mitigate 21 MtCO 2 . Cogeneration (also called Combined Heatefficiencies. Industrial cogeneration is an important partpotential for industrial cogeneration is estimated at almost

Worrell, Ernst

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Agriculture, Climate Change and Climate Change Mitigation Bruce A. McCarl  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agriculture, Climate Change and Climate Change Mitigation Bruce A. McCarl Regents Professor Change Happen Let's Avoid Climate Change Mitigation Effects Presented at Texas Recycling and Sustainability Summit San Antonio, Sept 29, 2004 #12;Climate Change has in part a human cause Source http

McCarl, Bruce A.

12

Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Industry contributes directly and indirectly (through consumed electricity) about 37% of the global greenhouse gas emissions, of which over 80% is from energy use. Total energy-related emissions, which were 9.9 GtCO2 in 2004, have grown by 65% since 1971. Even so, industry has almost continuously improved its energy efficiency over the past decades. In the near future, energy efficiency is potentially the most important and cost-effective means for mitigating greenhouse gas emissions from industry. This paper discusses the potential contribution of industrial energy efficiency technologies and policies to reduce energy use and greenhouse gas emissions to 2030.

Worrell, Ernst; Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Price, Lynn; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Harnisch, Jochen

2009-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

13

Global climate change and the mitigation challenge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases, especially carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), have led to increasing atmospheric concentrations, very likely the primary cause of the 0.8{sup o}C warming the Earth has experienced since the Industrial Revolution. With industrial activity and population expected to increase for the rest of the century, large increases in greenhouse gas emissions are projected, with substantial global additional warming predicted. This paper examines forces driving CO{sub 2} emissions, a concise sector-by-sector summary of mitigation options, and research and development (R&D) priorities. To constrain warming to below approximately 2.5{sup o}C in 2100, the recent annual 3% CO{sub 2} emission growth rate needs to transform rapidly to an annual decrease rate of from 1 to 3% for decades. Furthermore, the current generation of energy generation and end-use technologies are capable of achieving less than half of the emission reduction needed for such a major mitigation program. New technologies will have to be developed and deployed at a rapid rate, especially for the key power generation and transportation sectors. Current energy technology research, development, demonstration, and deployment (RDD&D) programs fall far short of what is required. 20 refs., 18 figs., 4 tabs.

Frank Princiotta [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, NC (United States). Air Pollution Prevention and Control Division

2009-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

14

Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

concerns about rising energy demand and cost, diminishing oil reserves, and climate change, Central depend exclu- sively on oil products, gasoline and diesel. Oil is imported mostly from the Middle East, Venezuela, and Africa, all of which face geo-political challenges. As future oil availability and price

15

Ocean Fertilization and Other Climate Change Mitigation Strategies: An Overview  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to evaluate ocean fertilization in the larger context of other proposed strategies for reducing the threat of the global warming, a wide range of different climate change mitigation approaches are compared in terms of their long-term potential, stage of development, relative costs and potential risks, as well as public acceptance. This broad comparative analysis is carried out for the following climate change mitigation strategies: supply-side and end-use efficiency improvements, terrestrial and geological carbon sequestration, CO2 ocean disposal and iron fertilization, nuclear power, and renewable energy generation from biomass, passive solar, solar thermal, photovoltaics, hydroelectric and wind. In addition, because of the inherent problems of conducting an objective comparative cost-benefit analysis, two non-technological solutions to global warming are also discussed: curbing population growth and transitioning to a steady-state economy.

Huesemann, Michael H.

2008-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

16

Invention and International Diffusion of Climate Change Mitigation Technologies: An Empirical Approach  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

International technology transfer..........................................................51 6 Conclusion ......................................................................................................62 Research paper 2: What Drives the International Transfer of Climate Change Mitigation Technologies1 Invention and International Diffusion of Climate Change Mitigation Technologies: An Empirical

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

17

Climate change mitigation through forestry measures: potentials, options, practice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

23.1 GtCO2 yr-1 Land-use change (including deforestation) 5.9 GtCO2 yr -1 Vegetation growth 11.0 Gt mitigation potential (Europe) 0 20 40 60 80 100 120 140 160 180 Avoided deforestation Afforestation Forest deforestation rates in Europe are generally small Will tend to be relevant to MS with areas of land available

18

Climate Change Mitigation: Climate, Health, and Equity Implications of the Visible and the Hidden  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

impacts of climate change on California agriculture. Climateby climate change in California, such as agriculture areas agriculture. Without proactive climate change mitigation

Shonkoff, Seth Berrin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

JICA's Assistance for Mitigation to Climate Change - The Co-Benefits...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

JICA's Assistance for Mitigation to Climate Change - The Co-Benefits Approach to Climate Change Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: JICA's Assistance for...

20

Implications of simultaneously mitigating and adapting to climate change: Initial experiments using GCAM  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Historically climate impacts research and climate mitigation research have been two separate and independent domains of inquiry. Climate mitigation research has investigated greenhouse gas emissions assuming that climate is unchanging. At the same time climate mitigation research has investigated the implications of climate change on the assumption that climate mitigation will proceed without affecting the degree of climate impacts or the ability of human and natural systems to adapt. The Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM) has largely been employed to study climate mitigation. Here we explore the development of capabilities to assess climate change impacts and adaptation within the GCAM model. These capabilities are being developed so as to be able to simultaneously reconcile the joint implications of climate change mitigation, impacts and adaptive potential. This is an important step forward in that it enables direct comparison between climate mitigation activities and climate impacts and the opportunity to understand interactions between the two.

Calvin, Katherine V.; Wise, Marshall A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.; Kyle, G. Page; Luckow, Patrick W.; Thomson, Allison M.

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "idb-climate change mitigation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Forestry Sectors Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and Forestry...

22

Assessing carbon tax and emissions trading as policy options for climate change mitigation in Australia.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The primary question explored by this thesis is what alternative, carbon tax or emissions trading, would be an optimal policy for climate change mitigation in… (more)

Guglyuvatyy, Evgeny

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Uruguay-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

mitigation options adapted to the farming conditions of each country. In Uruguay, Argentina and Colombia, agriculture is the main contributor to greenhouse gas emissions,...

24

Lifetime of carbon capture and storage as a climate-change mitigation technology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- logic storage capacities and sustainable injection rates, which has contributed to the absence for long-term storage (4, 5). Compared with other mitigation technologies such as renewable energy, CCSLifetime of carbon capture and storage as a climate-change mitigation technology Michael L

25

Climate change mitigation and co-benefits of feasible transport demand policies in Beijing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i n f o Keywords: Climate change mitigation Transport demand management External costs Urban and potential impacts of travel demand management help to define policy instruments that mitigate the damaging. The paper investi- gates the role of demand elasticities and demonstrates that joint demand and supply-side

Kammen, Daniel M.

26

Official Merit Promotion System and Its Impact on Climate Change Mitigation Policy in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on mitigating carbon emission, strengthening performance standards to control carbon standards and implementing in a long term in carbon dioxides reduction is to use its "iron hand". "Iron hand" came from Premier WenOfficial Merit Promotion System and Its Impact on Climate Change Mitigation Policy in China

Zhou, Pei

27

The Role of China in Mitigating Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore short- and long-term implications of several energy scenarios of China’s role in efforts to mitigate global climate risk. The focus is on the impacts on China’s energy system and GDP growth, and on global climate ...

Paltsev, S.

28

The Costs of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation with Induced Technological Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-analysis of the costs of mitigating global GHG emissions over the period to 2100, with and without the effects trading allowances at a regional or global level. It reports a wide range of costs with confusing-analyses done by the World Resources Institute for the US economy, 1997, and the IPCC post-SRES models

Watson, Andrew

29

Bioenergy crop productivity and potential climate change mitigation from marginal lands in the United States: An  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bioenergy crop productivity and potential climate change mitigation from marginal lands bioenergy crops grown on marginal lands in the United States. Two broadly tested cellulosic crops June 2014 Introduction Bioenergy, an important renewable energy produced from biological materials

Zhuang, Qianlai

30

Three Essays On Agricultural and Forestry Offsets In Climate Change Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

major crops. The implementation of climate change mitigation strategies, such as the expansion of bioenergy production, causes demand for the agricultural sector to increase substantially. The new demand would cause noticeable leakage effect if crop...

Feng, Siyi

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

31

The role of US agricultural and forest activities in global climate change mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE ROLE OF US AGRICULTURAL AND FOREST ACTIVITIES IN GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION A Dissertation by EN ZHU Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of DOCTOR OF PHILOSOPHY August 2007 Major Subject: Agricultural Economics THE ROLE OF US AGRICULTURAL AND FOREST ACTIVITIES IN GLOBAL CLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION A Dissertation...

Zhu, En

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

32

Financing Global Climate Change Mitigation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power Basics (TheEtelligence (Smart GridHomeFederatedCity CorporationMitigation

33

The Role of Asia in Mitigating Climate Change: Results from the Asia Modeling Exercise  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 2010, Asia accounted for 60% of global population, 39% of Gross World Product, 44% of global energy consumption and nearly half of the world’s energy system CO2 emissions. Thus, Asia is an important region to consider in any discussion of climate change or climate change mitigation. This paper explores the role of Asia in mitigating climate change, by comparing the results of 23 energy-economy and integrated assessment models. We focus our analysis on seven key areas: base year data, future energy use and emissions absent climate policy, the effect of urban and rural development on future energy use and emissions, the role of technology in emissions mitigation, regional emissions mitigation, and national climate policies

Calvin, Katherine V.; Clarke, Leon E.; Krey, Volker; Blanford, Geoffrey J.; Jiang, Kejun; Kainuma, M.; Kriegler, Elmar; Luderer, Gunnar; Shukla, Priyadarshi R.

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Climate change beliefs, concerns, and attitudes toward adaptation and mitigation among farmers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

). Because climate change-related threats to agriculture represent threats to quality of life on localLETTER Climate change beliefs, concerns, and attitudes toward adaptation and mitigation among and soybean revealed that 66 % of farmers believed climate change is occurring (8 % mostly anthropogenic, 33

Holland, Jeffrey

35

Planning for mitigating climate change risk to metropolitan areas (USA)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the last couple of decades, there has been increasing evidence of changes in global climate. With urban areas identified as the primary contributors to the climate change, there is an impetus for initiatives to persuade major contributors...

Grover, Himanshu

2009-06-02T23:59:59.000Z

36

The contribution of future agricultural trends in the US Midwest to global climate change mitigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Land use change is a complex response to changing environmental and socioeconomic systems. Historical drivers of land use change include changes in the natural resource availability of a region, changes in economic conditions for production of certain products and changing policies. Most recently, introduction of policy incentives for biofuel production have influenced land use change in the US Midwest, leading to concerns that bioenergy production systems may compete with food production and land conservation. Here we explore how land use may be impacted by future climate mitigation measures by nesting a high resolution agricultural model (EPIC – Environmental Policy Indicator Climate) for the US Midwest within a global integrated assessment model (GCAM – Global Change Assessment Model). This approach is designed to provide greater spatial resolution and detailed agricultural practice information by focusing on the climate mitigation potential of agriculture and land use in a specific region, while retaining the global economic context necessary to understand the far ranging effects of climate mitigation targets. We find that until the simulated carbon prices are very high, the US Midwest has a comparative advantage in producing traditional food and feed crops over bioenergy crops. Overall, the model responds to multiple pressures by adopting a mix of future responses. We also find that the GCAM model is capable of simulations at multiple spatial scales and agricultural technology resolution, which provides the capability to examine regional response to global policy and economic conditions in the context of climate mitigation.

Thomson, Allison M.; Kyle, G. Page; Zhang, Xuesong; Bandaru, Varaprasad; West, Tristram O.; Wise, Marshall A.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; Calvin, Katherine V.

2014-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

37

Reducing climate change impacts on agriculture: Global and regional effects of mitigation, 20002080  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and poor countries [7]. A consensus has emerged that developing countries are more vulnerable to climate change than developed countries, because of the predominance of agriculture in their economiesReducing climate change impacts on agriculture: Global and regional effects of mitigation, 2000

38

Review of geoengineering approaches to mitigating climate change* Zhihua Zhang a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the atmosphere has increased from a pre-industrial value of about 280Review of geoengineering approaches to mitigating climate change* Zhihua Zhang a , John C. Moore b 2014 Available online xxx Keywords: Climate change Carbon emissions reduction Geoengineering Cleaner

Moore, John

39

Graduate Assistantships in: FOREST CONSERVATION/CLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Scholarships are available to graduate students (M.S. or Ph.D.) seeking training in Forest Conservation approaches to understand how to manage forest tree species for long-term growth and survival in changing at The Hardwood Tree Improvement and Regeneration Center (HTIRC) at Purdue University. Qualifications: Candidates

40

Extracting CO2 from seawater: Climate change mitigation and renewable liquid fuel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Extracting CO2 from seawater: Climate change mitigation and renewable liquid fuel Matthew Eisaman and their impact · Technology: Extracting CO2 from seawater · Application: Renewable liquid fuel #12;Outline: Renewable liquid fuel #12;The data on atmospheric CO2 2000 years ago http://cdiac.ornl.gov/trends/co2

Homes, Christopher C.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "idb-climate change mitigation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Solar energy for heat and electricity: the potential for mitigating climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar energy for heat and electricity: the potential for mitigating climate change Dr N.J. Eki that powers the Earth's climate and ecosystem. Harnessing this energy for hot water and electrical power could electricity. solar hot water systems could be used to supply up to 70% of household hot water in the UK

42

DOE, States Seek Closer Collaboration on Oil and Gas Supply and Delivery, Climate Change Mitigation  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

An agreement aimed at improving cooperation and collaboration in the areas of oil and natural gas supply, delivery, and climate change mitigation, has been signed by the U.S. Department of Energy and the Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC).

43

International technology transfer for climate change mitigation and the cases of Russia and China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The environmental agenda for mitigating climate change through international transfers of technology is linked with a diverse literature, reviewed here within a framework that combines technological, agent/agenda, and market/transaction perspectives. Literature that bears on international technology transfer for climate change mitigation is similar in many ways for Russia and China: opportunities for energy efficiency and renewable energy, economic reform and restructuring, the difficulties enterprises face in responding to market conditions, international assistance policies, international joint ventures, market intermediation, and capacity building for market development. In both countries, capacity building means enhancing market-oriented capabilities in addition to technological capabilities. For Russia, institutional development is critical, such as new commercial legal codes and housing-sector changes beyond privatization. For China, technology policies and modernization programs significantly influence technology transfers. 234 refs., 3 tabs.

Martinot, E. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy and Resources Group] [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy and Resources Group; [Stockholm Environment Inst., Boston, MA (United States); Sinton, J.E. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy and Resources Group] [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Energy and Resources Group; [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States). International Energy Studies Group; Haddad, B.M. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)] [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

44

Global Climate Change and the Transportation Sector: An Update on Issues and Mitigation Options  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

It is clear from numerous energy/economic modeling exercises that addressing the challenges posed by global climate change will eventually require the active participation of all industrial sectors and all consumers on the planet. Yet, these and similar modeling exercises indicate that large stationary CO2 point sources (e.g., refineries and fossil-fired electric power plants) are often the first targets considered for serious CO2 emissions mitigation. Without participation of all sectors of the global economy, however, the challenges of climate change mitigation will not be met. Because of its operating characteristics, price structure, dependence on virtually one energy source (oil), enormous installed infrastructure, and limited technology alternatives, at least in the near-term, the transportation sector will likely represent a particularly difficult challenge for CO2 emissions mitigation. Our research shows that climate change induced price signals (i.e., putting a price on carbon that is emitted to the atmosphere) are in the near term insufficient to drive fundamental shifts in demand for energy services or to transform the way these services are provided in the transportation sector. We believe that a technological revolution will be necessary to accomplish the significant reduction of greenhouse gas emissions from the transportation sector. This paper presents an update of ongoing research into a variety of technological options that exist for decarbonizing the transportation sector and the various tradeoffs among them.

Geffen, CA; Dooley, JJ; Kim, SH

2003-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

45

Global climate change mitigation and sustainable forest management--The challenge of monitoring and verification  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, sustainable forest management is discussed within the historical and theoretical framework of the sustainable development debate. The various criteria and indicators for sustainable forest management put forth by different institutions are critically explored. Specific types of climate change mitigation policies/projects in the forest sector are identified and examined in the light of the general criteria for sustainable forest management. Areas of compatibility and contradiction between the climate mitigation objectives and the minimum criteria for sustainable forest management are identified and discussed. Emphasis is put on the problems of monitoring and verifying carbon benefits associated with such projects given their impacts on pre-existing policy objectives on sustainable forest management. The implications of such policy interactions on assignment of carbon credits from forest projects under Joint Implementation/Activities Implemented Jointly initiatives are discussed. The paper concludes that a comprehensive monitoring and verification regime must include an impact assessment on the criteria covered under other agreements such as the Biodiversity and/or Desertification Conventions. The actual carbon credit assigned to a specific project should at least take into account the negative impacts on the criteria for sustainable forest management. The value of the impacts and/or the procedure to evaluate them need to be established by interested parties such as the Councils of the respective Conventions.

Makundi, Willy R.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

46

The Value of Advanced Technologies in the U.S. Buildings Sector in Climate Change Mitigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is a wide body of research focused on the potential of advanced technologies to reduce energy consumption in buildings. How such improvements relate to global climate change, however, is less clear, due to the complexity of the climate change issue, and the implications for the energy system as a whole that need to be considered. This study uses MiniCAM, an integrated assessment model, to examine the contributions of several suites of advanced buildings technologies in meeting national carbon emissions reduction targets, as part of a global policy to mitigate climate change by stabilizing atmospheric CO2 concentrations at 450 ppmv. Focal technology areas include building shells, heat pumps for HVAC and water heating applications, solid-state lighting, and miscellaneous electric equipment. We find that advanced heat pumps and energy-efficient miscellaneous electric equipment show the greatest potential to reduce aggregate building sector future energy consumption and policy costs, but that all focal areas are important for reducing energy consumption. Because of assumed availability of low-cost, emissions-reduced electricity generation technologies in these scenarios, heat pumps are especially important for facilitating fuel-switching towards electricity. Buildings sector energy consumption is reduced by 28% and policy costs are reduced by 17% in a scenario with advanced technologies in all focal areas.

Kyle, G. Page; Clarke, Leon E.; Smith, Steven J.

2008-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Influence of Climate Change Mitigation Technology on Global Demands of Water for Electricity Generation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Globally, electricity generation accounts for a large and potentially growing water demand, and as such is an important component to assessments of global and regional water scarcity. However, the current suite—as well as potential future suites—of thermoelectric generation technologies has a very wide range of water demand intensities, spanning two orders of magnitude. As such, the evolution of the generation mix is important for the future water demands of the sector. This study uses GCAM, an integrated assessment model, to analyze the global electric sector’s water demands in three futures of climate change mitigation policy and two technology strategies. We find that despite five- to seven-fold expansion of the electric sector as a whole from 2005 to 2095, global electric sector water withdrawals remain relatively stable, due to the retirement of existing power plants with water-intensive once-through flow cooling systems. In the scenarios examined here, climate policies lead to the large-scale deployment of advanced, low-emissions technologies such as carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS), concentrating solar power, and engineered geothermal systems. In particular, we find that the large-scale deployment of CCS technologies does not increase long-term water consumption from hydrocarbon-fueled power generation as compared with a no-policy scenario without CCS. Moreover, in sensitivity scenarios where low-emissions electricity technologies are required to use dry cooling systems, we find that the consequent additional costs and efficiency reductions do not limit the utility of these technologies in achieving cost-effective whole-system emissions mitigation.

Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Dooley, James J.; Smith, Steven J.; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.; Hejazi, Mohamad I.

2013-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

48

The role of China in mitigating climate change* Sergey Paltsev, Jennifer Morris, Yongxia Cai, Valerie Karplus and Henry Jacoby  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The role of China in mitigating climate change* Sergey Paltsev, Jennifer Morris, Yongxia Cai interactions among natural and human climate system components; objectively assess uncertainty in economic, monitor and verify greenhouse gas emissions and climatic impacts. This reprint is one of a series intended

49

Integrated assessment of global water scarcity over the 21st century under multiple climate change mitigation policies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water scarcity conditions over the 21st century both globally and regionally are assessed in the context of climate change and climate mitigation policies, by estimating both water availability and water demand within the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), a leading community integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, climate, and water. To quantify changes in future water availability, a new gridded water-balance global hydrologic model – namely, the Global Water Availability Model (GWAM) – is developed and evaluated. Global water demands for six major demand sectors (irrigation, livestock, domestic, electricity generation, primary energy production, and manufacturing) are modeled in GCAM at the regional scale (14 geopolitical regions, 151 sub-regions) and then spatially downscaled to 0.5 o x 0.5o resolution to match the scale of GWAM. Using a baseline scenario (i.e., no climate change mitigation policy) with radiative forcing reaching 8.8 W/m2 (equivalent to the SRES A1Fi emission scenario) and three climate policy scenarios with increasing mitigation stringency of 7.7, 5.5, and 4.2 W/m2 (equivalent to the SRES A2, B2, and B1 emission scenarios, respectively), we investigate the effects of emission mitigation policies on water scarcity. Two carbon tax regimes (a universal carbon tax (UCT) which includes land use change emissions, and a fossil fuel and industrial emissions carbon tax (FFICT) which excludes land use change emissions) are analyzed. The baseline scenario results in more than half of the world population living under extreme water scarcity by the end of the 21st century. Additionally, in years 2050 and 2095, 36% (28%) and 44% (39%) of the global population, respectively, is projected to live in grid cells (in basins) that will experience greater water demands than the amount of available water in a year (i.e., the water scarcity index (WSI) > 1.0). When comparing the climate policy scenarios to the baseline scenario while maintaining the same baseline socioeconomic assumptions, water scarcity declines under a UCT mitigation policy but increases with a FFICT mitigation scenario by the year 2095 particularly with more stringent climate mitigation targets. Under the FFICT scenario, water scarcity is projected to increase driven by higher water demands for bio-energy crops.

Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Wise, Marshall A.; Patel, Pralit L.; Eom, Jiyong; Calvin, Katherine V.

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

iRESM INITIATIVE UNDERSTANDING DECISION SUPPORT NEEDS FOR CLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION AND ADAPTATION --US Midwest Region—  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The impacts of climate change are already affecting human and environmental systems worldwide, yet many uncertainties persist in the prediction of future climate changes and impacts due to limitations in scientific understanding of relevant causal factors. In particular, there is mounting urgency to efforts to improve models of human and environmental systems at the regional scale, and to integrate climate, ecosystem and energy-economic models to support policy, investment, and risk management decisions related to climate change mitigation (i.e., reducing greenhouse gas emissions) and adaptation (i.e., responding to climate change impacts). The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is developing a modeling framework, the integrated Regional Earth System Model (iRESM), to address regional human-environmental system interactions in response to climate change and the uncertainties therein. The framework will consist of a suite of integrated models representing regional climate change, regional climate policy, and the regional economy, with a focus on simulating the mitigation and adaptation decisions made over time in the energy, transportation, agriculture, and natural resource management sectors.

Rice, Jennie S.; Runci, Paul J.; Moss, Richard H.; Anderson, Kate L.

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Climate Change Mitigation: Climate, Health, and Equity Implications of the Visible and the Hidden  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Board. CARB (2008d). Climate change proposed scoping plan: aJ. (2009). "Cities, Climate Change and Urban Heat Islandet al. (2006). Climate change in California: health,

Shonkoff, Seth Berrin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Climate Change Mitigation: Climate, Health, and Equity Implications of the Visible and the Hidden  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a critical conversation on climate change, privatization andamounts due to climate change." Atmospheric Environment 41(Board. CARB (2008d). Climate change proposed scoping plan: a

Shonkoff, Seth Berrin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

Composting projects under the Clean Development Mechanism: Sustainable contribution to mitigate climate change  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) of the Kyoto Protocol aims to reduce greenhouse gas emissions in developing countries and at the same time to assist these countries in sustainable development. While composting as a suitable mitigation option in the waste sector can clearly contribute to the former goal there are indications that high rents can also be achieved regarding the latter. In this article composting is compared with other CDM project types inside and outside the waste sector with regards to both project numbers and contribution to sustainable development. It is found that, despite the high number of waste projects, composting is underrepresented and a major reason for this fact is identified. Based on a multi-criteria analysis it is shown that composting has a higher potential for contribution to sustainable development than most other best in class projects. As these contributions can only be assured if certain requirements are followed, eight key obligations are presented.

Rogger, Cyrill [Department for Management, Technology, and Economics, ETH Zurich, Kreuzplatz 5, 8032 Zurich (Switzerland); Beaurain, Francois [South Pole Carbon Asset Management Ltd., Switzerland, Technoparkstr. 1, 8005 Zurich (Switzerland); Schmidt, Tobias S., E-mail: tobiasschmidt@ethz.ch [Department for Management, Technology, and Economics, ETH Zurich, Kreuzplatz 5, 8032 Zurich (Switzerland)

2011-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

54

The potential for a nuclear renaissance : the development of nuclear power under climate change mitigation policies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Anthropogenic emissions of greenhouse gases are very likely to have already changed the Earth's climate, and will continue to change it for centuries if no action is taken. Nuclear power, a nearly carbon-free source of ...

Osouf, Nicolas

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Measuring Abatement Potentials When Multiple Change is Present: The Case of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation in U.S. Agriculture and Forestry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measuring Abatement Potentials When Multiple Change is Present: The Case of Greenhouse Gas;Measuring Abatement Potentials When Multiple Change is Present: The Case of Greenhouse Gas Mitigation in U.S. Agriculture and Forestry Uwe A. Schneider and Bruce A. McCarl Keywords Abatement Function, Agricultural Sector

McCarl, Bruce A.

56

Climate Change Mitigation: Climate, Health, and Equity Implications of the Visible and the Hidden  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2008). "Accountability of networked climate governance: Therise of transnational climate partnerships." GlobalBoard. CARB (2008d). Climate change proposed scoping plan: a

Shonkoff, Seth Berrin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Three Essays on Climate Change Impacts, Adaptation and Mitigation in Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

regionally detailed dynamic land allocation model is developed and applied for studying interrelationships between limited natural resources (e.g. land and groundwater), climate change, bioenergy demands and agricultural production. We find out...

Wang, Wei Wei

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

58

Mitigation Action Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) focuses on mitigation commitments stated in the Supplemental Environmental Impact Statement (SEIS) and the Record of Decision (ROD) for the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 1 (NPR-1). Specific commitments and mitigation implementation actions are listed in Appendix A-Mitigation Actions, and form the central focus of this MAP. They will be updated as needed to allow for organizational, regulatory, or policy changes. It is the intent of DOE to comply with all applicable federal, state, and local environmental, safety, and health laws and regulations. Eighty-six specific commitments were identified in the SEIS and associated ROD which pertain to continued operation of NPR-1 with petroleum production at the Maximum Efficient Rate (MER). The mitigation measures proposed are expected to reduce impacts as much as feasible, however, as experience is gained in actual implementation of these measures, some changes may be warranted.

Not Available

1994-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Integrated Assessment of Global Water Scarcity over the 21st Century under Multiple Climate Change Mitigation Policies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Water scarcity conditions over the 21st century both globally and regionally are assessed in the context of climate change, by estimating both water availability and water demand within the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), a leading community integrated assessment model of energy, agriculture, climate, and water. To quantify changes in future water availability, a new gridded water-balance global hydrologic model – namely, the Global Water Availability Model (GWAM) – is developed and evaluated. Global water demands for six major demand sectors (irrigation, livestock, domestic, electricity generation, primary energy production, and manufacturing) are modeled in GCAM at the regional scale (14 geopolitical regions, 151 sub-regions) and then spatially downscaled to 0.5 o x 0.5o resolution to match the scale of GWAM. Using a baseline scenario (i.e., no climate change mitigation policy) with radiative forcing reaching 8.8 W/m2 (equivalent to the SRES A1Fi emission scenario) and a global population of 14 billion by 2095, global annual water demand grows from about 9% of total annual renewable freshwater in 2005 to about 32% by 2095. This results in almost half of the world population living under extreme water scarcity by the end of the 21st century. Regionally, the demand for water exceeds the amount of water availability in two GCAM regions, the Middle East and India. Additionally, in years 2050 and 2095, 20% and 27% of the global population, respectively, is projected to live in areas (grid cells) that will experience greater water demands than the amount of available water in a year (i.e., the water scarcity index (WSI) > 1.0). This study implies an increasingly prominent role for water in future human decisions, and highlights the importance of including water in integrated assessment of global change.

Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Wise, Marshall A.; Patel, Pralit L.; Eom, Jiyong; Calvin, Katherine V.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Public Awareness of Carbon Capture and Storage: A Survey of Attitudes toward Climate Change Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Public Awareness of Carbon Capture and Storage: A Survey of Attitudes toward Climate Change, Technology and Policy Program #12;2 #12;3 Public Awareness of Carbon Capture and Storage: A Survey in Technology and Policy Abstract The Carbon Capture and Sequestration Technologies Program in the Laboratory

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "idb-climate change mitigation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Carbon Sequestration to Mitigate Climate Change Human activities, especially the burning of fossil fuels such as coal, oil, and gas, have caused a substantial increase  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Carbon Sequestration to Mitigate Climate Change Human activities, especially the burning of fossil-caused CO2 emissions and to remove CO2 from the atmosphere. 2.0 What is carbon sequestration? The term "carbon sequestration" is used to describe both natural and deliberate CARBON,INGIGATONSPERYEAR 1.5 Fossil

62

Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change (2006) 11: 377401 C Springer 2006 DOI: 10.1007/s11027-005-9005-6  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

emission site. Keywords: bio-mass, carbon dioxide, co-firing, coal-bed methane, cost, developing countriesMitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change (2006) 11: 377­401 C Springer 2006 DOI: 10. This shows that opportunity may be widespread, but needs more specific local investigations. Onshore sub

Haszeldine, Stuart

63

Income distribution impacts of climate change mitigation policy in the Susquehanna River Basin Economy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We examine the cost-side income distribution impacts of a carbon tax in the Susquehanna River Basin (SRB) Region of the United States utilizing a computable general equilibrium model. We find the aggregate impacts of a $25/ton carbon tax on the SRB economy are likely to be negative but modest-an approximately one-third of 1% reduction in Gross Regional Product (GRP) in the short-run and double that amount in the long-run. However, unlike many previous studies, we find that the carbon tax is mildly progressive as measured by income bracket changes, per capita equivalent variation, and Gini coefficient changes based on expenditure patterns. The dominant factors affecting the distributional impacts are the pattern of output, income and consumption impacts that affect lower income groups relatively less than higher income ones, an increase in transfer payments favoring lower income groups, and decreased corporate profits absorbed primarily by higher income groups.

Oladosu, Gbadebo A [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

Geologic Carbon Sequestration: Mitigating Climate Change by Injecting CO2 Underground (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Summer Lecture Series 2009: Climate change provides strong motivation to reduce CO2 emissions from the burning of fossil fuels. Carbon dioxide capture and storage involves the capture, compression, and transport of CO2 to geologically favorable areas, where its injected into porous rock more than one kilometer underground for permanent storage. Oldenburg, who heads Berkeley Labs Geologic Carbon Sequestration Program, will focus on the challenges, opportunities, and research needs of this innovative technology.

Oldenburg, Curtis M. (LBNL Earth Sciences Division) [LBNL Earth Sciences Division

2009-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

65

Three Essays on U.S. Agriculture under Climate Change: Active Engagement in Mitigation and Adaptation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

with different levels of specifications of bioenergy production activities. 9 Typically, the computable general equilibrium (CGE) approach allows the analysis of policies on the entire economy, including fossil fuel energy markets. Dixon et al... and management adjustments to deal with variability in climate, soil, market, and other factors. Also, non-climate factors such as changes in production technology, introduction of new crop varieties, and government farm programs can result in production...

Zhang, Yuquan

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

66

Geologic Carbon Sequestration: Mitigating Climate Change by Injecting CO2 Underground (LBNL Summer Lecture Series)  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Summer Lecture Series 2009: Climate change provides strong motivation to reduce CO2 emissions from the burning of fossil fuels. Carbon dioxide capture and storage involves the capture, compression, and transport of CO2 to geologically favorable areas, where its injected into porous rock more than one kilometer underground for permanent storage. Oldenburg, who heads Berkeley Labs Geologic Carbon Sequestration Program, will focus on the challenges, opportunities, and research needs of this innovative technology.

Oldenburg, Curtis M [LBNL Earth Sciences Division

2011-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

67

Geologic Carbon Sequestration: Mitigating Climate Change by Injecting CO2 Underground  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

July 21, 2009 Berkeley Lab summer lecture: Climate change provides strong motivation to reduce CO2 emissions from the burning of fossil fuels. Carbon dioxide capture and storage involves the capture, compression, and transport of CO2 to geologically favorable areas, where its injected into porous rock more than one kilometer underground for permanent storage. Oldenburg, who heads Berkeley Labs Geologic Carbon Sequestration Program, will focus on the challenges, opportunities, and research needs of this innovative technology.

Oldenburg

2009-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

68

JICA's Assistance for Mitigation to Climate Change - The Co-Benefits  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Powerstories on climate compatibleInformation offApproach to Climate Change

69

Mind the gap in SEA: An institutional perspective on why assessment of synergies amongst climate change mitigation, adaptation and other policy areas are missing  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article takes its point of departure in two approaches to integrating climate change into Strategic Environmental Assessment (SEA): Mitigation and adaptation, and in the fact that these, as well as the synergies between them and other policy areas, are needed as part of an integrated assessment and policy response. First, the article makes a review of how positive and negative synergies between a) climate change mitigation and adaptation and b) climate change and other environmental concerns are integrated into Danish SEA practice. Then, the article discusses the implications of not addressing synergies. Finally, the article explores institutional explanations as to why synergies are not addressed in SEA practice. A document analysis of 149 Danish SEA reports shows that only one report comprises the assessment of synergies between mitigation and adaptation, whilst 9,4% of the reports assess the synergies between climate change and other environmental concerns. The consequences of separation are both the risk of trade-offs and missed opportunities for enhancing positive synergies. In order to propose explanations for the lacking integration, the institutional background is analysed and discussed, mainly based on Scott's theory of institutions. The institutional analysis highlights a regulatory element, since the assessment of climate change synergies is underpinned by legislation, but not by guidance. This means that great focus is on normative elements such as the local interpretation of legislation and of climate change mitigation and adaptation. The analysis also focuses on how the fragmentation of the organisation in which climate change and SEA are embedded has bearings on both normative and cultural-cognitive elements. This makes the assessment of synergies challenging. The evidence gathered and presented in the article points to a need for developing the SEA process and methodology in Denmark with the aim to include climate change in the assessments in a more systematic and integrated manner. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synergies between climate change mitigation, adaptation and other environmental concerns are not addressed in Danish SEA. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Institutional explanations relate to organisational set-ups and understandings of climate change as a new planning issue. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The paper points to a need for developing SEA to include climate change in a more systematic and integrated manner.

Vammen Larsen, Sanne, E-mail: sannevl@plan.aau.dk [Aalborg University, Lautrupvang 1A, 2750 Ballerup (Denmark); Kornov, Lone, E-mail: lonek@plan.aau.dk [Aalborg University, Fibigerstraede 13, 9220 Aalborg O (Denmark); Wejs, Anja, E-mail: wejs@plan.aau.dk [Aalborg University, Fibigerstraede 13, 9220 Aalborg O (Denmark)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

70

Greenhouse gas mitigation by agricultural intensification  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

et al. (2007) Agriculture. Climate Change 2007: Mitigationagriculture’s future contributions to climate change,agriculture greenhouse gas emissions mitigation carbon price | land use change | climate

Burney, J. A; Davis, S. J; Lobell, D. B

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

October 2013 ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING, IMPACTS, AND MITIGATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

October 2013 4-1 CHAPTER 4 ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING, IMPACTS, AND MITIGATION MEASURES This chapter discusses the environmental setting, impacts, and mitigation measures for the 14 fully evaluated to measure changes that would result #12;Chapter 4 Environmental Setting, Impacts, and Mitigation Measures

Lee, Jason R.

72

Business Case for Energy Efficiency in Support of Climate Change Mitigation, Economic and Societal Benefits in the United States  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study seeks to provide policymakers and other stakeholders with actionable information towards a road map for reducing energy consumption in the most cost-effective way. A major difference between the current study and some others is that we focus on individual equipment types that might be the subject of policies - such as labels, energy performance standards, and incentives - to affect market transformation in the short term, and on high-efficiency technology options that are available today. The approach of the study is to assess the impact of short-term actions on long-term impacts. “Short term” market transformation is assumed to occur by 2015, while “long-term” energy demand reduction impacts are assessed in 2030. In the intervening years, most but not all of the equipment studied will turn over completely. The 15-year time frame is significant for many products however, indicating that delay of implementation postpones impacts such as net economic savings and mitigation of emissions of carbon dioxide. Such delays would result in putting in place energy-wasting technologies, postponing improvement until the end of their service life, or potentially resulting in expensive investment either in additional energy supplies or in early replacement to achieve future energy or emissions reduction targets.

Bojda, Nicholas; Ke, Jing; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; E. Letschert, Virginie; E. McMahon, James; McNeil, Michael A.

2011-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

The effect of climate change, population distribution, and climate mitigation on building energy use in the U.S. and China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A changing climate will affect the energy system in a number of ways, one of which is through changes in demands for heating and cooling in buildings. Understanding the potential effect of climate on heating and cooling demands must take into account not only the manner in which the building sector might evolve over time - including, for example, movements from rural to urban environments in developing countries - but also important uncertainty about the nature of climate change itself and the growth and movements of populations over time. In this study, we explored the uncertainty in climate change impacts on heating and cooling by constructing estimates of heating and cooling degree days for both a reference (no-policy) scenario and a climate mitigation scenario built from 0.5 degree latitude by 0.5 degree longitude resolution output from three different Global Climate Models (GCMs) and three gridded scenarios of population distribution. The implications that changing climate and population distribution might have for building energy consumption in the U.S. and China were then explored by using the heating and cooling degree days results as inputs to a detailed, building energy model, nested in the long-term global integrated assessment framework, Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM). Across the climate models and population distribution scenarios, the results indicate that unabated climate change would cause total final energy consumption to decrease modestly in both U.S. and China buildings by the end of the century, as decreased heating consumption is more than balanced by increased cooling using primarily electricity. However, the results also indicate that when indirect emissions from the power sector are also taken into account, climate change may have negligible effect on building sector CO2 emissions in the two countries. The variation in results due to variation of population distribution is noticeably smaller than variation due to the use of different climate models.

Zhou, Yuyu; Eom, Jiyong; Clarke, Leon E.

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Carbon and Greenhouse Gas Dynamics in Annual Grasslands: Effects of Management and Potential for Climate Change Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

organic wastes at different composting stages during theirbiological changes during composting of different organicand nitrogen dynamics in composting and in compost?amended

Ryals, Rebecca

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Business Case for Energy Efficiency in Support of Climate Change Mitigation, Economic and Societal Benefits in China  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study seeks to provide policymakers and other stakeholders with actionable information towards a road map for reducing energy consumption cost-effectively. We focus on individual end use equipment types (hereafter referred to as appliance groups) that might be the subject of policies - such as labels, energy performance standards, and incentives - to affect market transformation in the short term, and on high-efficiency technology options that are available today. As the study title suggests, the high efficiency or Business Case scenario is constructed around a model of cost-effective efficiency improvement. Our analysis demonstrates that a significant reduction in energy consumption and emissions is achievable at net negative cost, that is, as a profitable investment for consumers. Net savings are calculated assuming no additional costs to energy consumption such as carbon taxes. Savings relative to the base case as calculated in this way is often referred to as 'economic savings potential'. Chinese energy demand has grown dramatically over the last few decades. While heavy industry still plays a dominant role in greenhouse gas emissions, demand from residential and commercial buildings has also seen rapid growth in percentage terms. In the residential sector this growth is driven by internal migration from the countryside to cities. Meanwhile, income in both urban and rural subsectors allows ownership of major appliances. While residences are still relatively small by U.S. or European standards, nearly all households own a refrigerator, a television and an air conditioner. In the future, ownership rates are not expected to grow as much as in other developing countries, because they are already close to saturation. However, the gradual turnover of equipment in the world's largest consumer market provides a huge opportunity for greenhouse gas mitigation. In addition to residences, commercial floor space has expanded rapidly in recent years, and construction continues at a rapid pace. Growth in this sector means that commercial lighting and HVAC will play an increasingly important role in energy demand in China. The outlook for efficiency improvement in China is encouraging, since the Chinese national and local governments have implemented significant policies to contain energy intensity and announced their intention to continue and accelerate these. In particular, the Chinese appliance standards program, first established in 1989, was significantly strengthened and modernized after the passage of the Energy Conservation Law of 1997. Since then, the program has expanded to encompass over 30 equipment types (including motor vehicles). The current study suggests that, in spite of these efforts, there is significant savings to be captured through wide adoption of technologies already available on the Chinese market. The approach of the study is to assess the impact of short-term actions on long-term impacts. 'Short-term' market transformation is assumed to occur by 2015, while 'long-term' energy demand reduction impacts are assessed in 2030. In the intervening years, most but not all of the equipment studied will turn over completely. Early in 2011, the Chinese government announced a plan to reduce carbon dioxide emissions intensity (per unit GDP) by 16% by 2015 as part of the 12th five year plan. These targets are consistent with longer term goals to reduce emissions intensity 40-45% relative to 2005 levels by 2020. The efforts of the 12th FYP focus on short-term gains to meet the four-year targets, and concentrate mainly in industry. Implementation of cost-effective technologies for all new equipment in the buildings sector thus is largely complementary to the 12th FYP goals, and would provide a mechanism to sustain intensity reductions in the medium and long term. The 15-year time frame is significant for many products, in the sense that delay of implementation postpones economic benefits and mitigation of emissions of carbon dioxide. Such delays would result in putting in place energy-wasting technologies, postponin

McNeil, Michael A.; Bojda, Nicholas; Ke, Jing; Qin, Yining; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Fridley, David; Letschert, Virginie E.; McMahon, James E.

2011-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

76

Special Issue On Estimation Of Baselines And Leakage In Carbon Mitigation Forestry Projects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In Carbon Mitigation Forestry Projects Jayant A. Sathaye*,climate change. Interest in forestry mitigation activitiesled to the inclusion of forestry practices at the project

Sathaye, Jayant A.; Andrasko, Kenneth

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

The monitoring, evaluation, reporting, and verification of climate change mitigation projects: Discussion of issues and methodologies and review of existing protocols and guidelines  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Because of concerns with the growing threat of global climate change from increasing emissions of greenhouse gases, the US and other countries are implementing, by themselves or in cooperation with one or more other nations (i.e., joint implementation), climate change mitigation projects. These projects will reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions or sequester carbon, and will also result in non-GHG impacts (i.e., environmental, economic, and social impacts). Monitoring, evaluating, reporting, and verifying (MERV) guidelines are needed for these projects in order to accurately determine their net GHG, and other, benefits. Implementation of MERV guidelines is also intended to: (1) increase the reliability of data for estimating GHG benefits; (2) provide real-time data so that mid-course corrections can be made; (3) introduce consistency and transparency across project types and reporters; and (4) enhance the credibility of the projects with stakeholders. In this paper, the authors review the issues and methodologies involved in MERV activities. In addition, they review protocols and guidelines that have been developed for MERV of GHG emissions in the energy and non-energy sectors by governments, nongovernmental organizations, and international agencies. They comment on their relevance and completeness, and identify several topics that future protocols and guidelines need to address, such as (1) establishing a credible baseline; (2) accounting for impacts outside project boundaries through leakage; (3) net GHG reductions and other impacts; (4) precision of measurement; (5) MERV frequency; (6) persistence (sustainability) of savings, emissions reduction, and carbon sequestration; (7) reporting by multiple project participants; (8) verification of GHG reduction credits; (9) uncertainty and risk; (10) institutional capacity in conducting MERV; and (11) the cost of MERV.

Vine, E.; Sathaye, J.

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Climate Change 2007: Mitigation of Climate Change.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

mercato. Nessun settore o tecnologia da sola può mitigare leza energetica implementando una tecnologia o una pratica chedell’anidride carbonica, è una tecnologia che si propone di

Schiavon, Stefano; Zecchin, Roberto

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

assess mitigation strategies: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Websites Summary: *** May 7, 1995 (Paper for the May 15-19 workshop, "Terrestrial Carbon Sequestration: An Economic to mitigate global change through the sequestration of...

80

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Mitigation needs adaptation: Tropical forestry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ORIGINAL ARTICLE Mitigation needs adaptation: Tropical forestry and climate change Manuel R adapt to this change. This paper discusses how tropical forestry practices can contribute to maintaining Forestry Research, P.O. Box 6596 JKPWB, Jakarta 10065, Indonesia e-mail: m.guariguata@cgiar.org J. P

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "idb-climate change mitigation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

150 G. Marland et al. / Climate Policy 3 (2003) 149157 Strategies to mitigate anthropogenic climate change recognize that carbon sequestration in the terrestrial biosphere  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

anthropogenic climate change recognize that carbon sequestration in the terrestrial biosphere can reduce to create a system of credits and debits wherein emission or sequestration of carbon in the biosphere; Carbon sequestration; Land use change; Land surface change; Surface energy balance 1. Introduction Human

Niyogi, Dev

82

E-Print Network 3.0 - activation effects mitigated Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

2 3 4 5 > >> Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 61 6. Distribution of climate change mitigation costs across European Member States in both a CO2-only Summary: CO2 mitigation measures in...

83

Climate Change and the Transporation Sector - Challenges and...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Climate Change and the Transporation Sector - Challenges and Mitigation Options Climate Change and the Transporation Sector - Challenges and Mitigation Options 2003 DEER Conference...

84

Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation Ann E. Carlson*2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 175 stroke2001). 2008]HEAT WAVES, GLOBAL WARMING, AND MITIGATION 177

Carlson, Ann E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Engi 9601, In Class Assignment, 25 Sept. 2012 Shindell et al., 2012, Simultaneously Mitigating Near-Term Climate Change and Improving Human  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) Coal mining, oil and gas production, long distance gas transmission, municipal waste and landfills, wastewater, livestock manure, rice paddies, diesel vehicles, clean-burning biomass stoves, brick kilns, coke Change. (3 marks) coal mining in China, oil and gas production in Central Africa, the Middle East

Coles, Cynthia

86

wind engineering & natural disaster mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

wind engineering & natural disaster mitigation #12;wind engineering & natural disaster mitigation Investment WindEEE Dome at Advanced Manufacturing Park $31million Insurance Research Lab for Better Homes $8million Advanced Facility for Avian Research $9million #12;wind engineering & natural disaster mitigation

Denham, Graham

87

Mitigation Action Plan  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment SurfacesResource Program PreliminaryA3,0Statements |Mission73 4.17Mitigation Action

88

Road transport technology and climate change mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cost with established technologies such as engine downsizing, light- weighting and selection of smaller. Plug-in hybrid electric vehicles (PHevs) attempt to address this, but incur the extra costs in the use of vehicles in developing economies, and the dependence of low-carbon vehicles on the still

89

Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

world energy consumption. More than 90% of this energy is used in the productionworld steel production, finding potential CO 2 emission reductions due to energy

Worrell, Ernst

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Climate Change 2007: Causes, impacts, mitigation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

livelli. Nessun settore o tecnologia da sola può mitigare lee per la diffusione di tecnologia. Notevoli risultati sono

Schiavon, Stefano; Zecchin, Roberto

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Climate Change 2007: Causes, impacts, mitigation.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

il Rapporto il ruolo del governo nella mitigazione deiclimatici è importante. Il governo, attraverso i contributi

Schiavon, Stefano; Zecchin, Roberto

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

L. , S. de la Rue du Can, J. Sinton, E. Worrell, N. Zhou, J.industry. Energy 23: 725-32. Sinton, J.E. and D.G. Fridley (Roy, 2000; IEA, 2003a,b; Sinton and Fridley, 2000). Hence,

Worrell, Ernst

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

losses in power production to generate heat and/or cold for industrial processes and district heating,

Worrell, Ernst

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

94

Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

fuel used in the primary smelter, but exclude PFC emissionto current state-of-the art smelter electricity use and 50%

Worrell, Ernst

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

industry’s share of global primary energy use declined toused 91 EJ of primary energy, 40% of the global total of 227eq/yr. Global and sectoral data on final energy use, primary

Worrell, Ernst

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy efficiency and energy awareness in Botswana; ESI,awareness and training was the most frequently identified opportunity for improved energy

Worrell, Ernst

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

route used, product mix, energy and carbon intensities ofmix, different degrees of integration but mainly due to the age and type of technology and levels of retrofitting of energy

Worrell, Ernst

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and J. Bates (2001) Economic evaluation of carbon dioxideevaluation. Kim and Worrell (2002a) estimated socio-economic

Worrell, Ernst

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Place-based Mitigation of Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

electricity, fuel for University fleet. **7,100 students and 5,400 employees What about your workplace, church The post-industrial age features unprecedented private consumption. In industrialized countries more than 60% of oil is used in vehicles, more than 60% of electricity in buildings. #12;Efficient Use of Fuel

100

Climate Change Mitigation: Case Studies from Russia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Metallurguichesky District of Chelyabinsk Background 3 Approach 4 Project Evaluation 6 Case Study 2: An Industrial

October Climate Change; Sergei Avdiushin; Inna Gritsevich; Susan Legro (editor; Alexander Kolesov; Svetlana Sorokina; William U. Chandler

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "idb-climate change mitigation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Industrial Energy Efficiency and Climate Change Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EJ of primary energy, 40% of the global total of 227 EJ. Byof the global greenhouse gas emissions. Total energy-relatedglobal greenhouse gas emissions, of which over 80% is from energy use. Total

Worrell, Ernst

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Wind Engineering & Natural Disaster Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Wind Engineering & Natural Disaster Mitigation For more than 45 years, Western University has been internationally recognized as the leading university for wind engineering and wind- related research. Its of environmental disaster mitigation, with specific strengths in wind and earthquake research. Boundary Layer Wind

Denham, Graham

103

Implantation, Activation, Characterization and Prevention/Mitigation...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Activation, Characterization and PreventionMitigation of Internal Short Circuits in Lithium-Ion Cells Implantation, Activation, Characterization and PreventionMitigation of...

104

Distributed Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation RyanEnergy Resources for Carbon Emissions Mitigation Ryanand/or site-attributable carbon emissions at commercial and

Firestone, Ryan; Marnay, Chris

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Ultrasonic mitigation investigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The suggestion was made that the introduction of ultrasound into Tank 101-SY might serve to release the hydrogen bubbles trapped in the slurry. This would cause a continuous release of bubbles and thereby prevent the turnover phenomenon. Two major considerations were (1) the method for delivering the energy into the slurry and (2) the effective volume of action. In this study, we attached the former by designing and testing a liquid-filled waveguide and radiator, and the latter by making ultrasonic property measurements on synthetic waste. Our conclusion is that ultrasonic mitigation may not be feasible, primarily because of the very high attenuation (1000 to 50000 dB/m) factor to 10 to 30 kHz. Such a high attenuation would restrict the action volume to such a low value as to make the method impractical. Further investigations are recommended to identify the cause of this effect and determine if this same effect will be seen in real 101-SY waste.

Hildebrand, B.P.; Shepard, C.L.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Climate mitigation and the future of tropical landscapes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Land use change to meet 21st Century demands for food, fuel, and fiber will occur in the context of both a changing climate as well as societal efforts to mitigate climate change. This changing natural and human environment will have large consequences for forest resources, terrestrial carbon storage and emissions, and food and energy crop production over the next century. Any climate change mitigation policies enacted will change the environment under which land-use decisions are made and alter global land use change patterns. Here we use the GCAM integrated assessment model to explore how climate mitigation policies that achieve a climate stabilization at 4.5 W m-2 radiative forcing in 2100 and value carbon in terrestrial ecosystems interact with future agricultural productivity and food and energy demands to influence land use in the tropics. The regional land use results are downscaled from GCAM regions to produce gridded maps of tropical land use change. We find that tropical forests are preserved only in cases where a climate mitigation policy that values terrestrial carbon is in place, and crop productivity growth continues throughout the century. Crop productivity growth is also necessary to avoid large scale deforestation globally and enable the production of bioenergy crops. The terrestrial carbon pricing assumptions in GCAM are effective at avoiding deforestation even when cropland must expand to meet future food demand.

Thomson, Allison M.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Chini, Louise Parsons; Hurtt, George; Edmonds, James A.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Frolking, Steve; Wise, Marshall A.; Janetos, Anthony C.

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

107

Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from the Albeni Falls Hydroelectric Project #12;Biological Objective 1 Protect 900 acres of wetland hydroelectric project. · 1988 publication of the Final Report Albeni Falls Wildlife Protection, Mitigation effects on wildlife resulting from hydroelectric development. 2. Select target wildlife species

108

Estimating the potential of greenhouse gas mitigation in Kazakhstan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

As part of the studies related to the obligations of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change, the Republic of Kazakhstan started activities to inventory greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and assess of GHG mitigation options, The objective of this paper is to present an estimate of the possibility of mitigating GHG emissions and determine the mitigation priorities. It presents a compilation of the possible options and their assessment in terms of major criteria and implementation feasibility. Taking into account the structure of GHG emissions in Kazakhstan in 1990, preliminary estimates of the potential for mitigation are presented for eight options for the energy sector and agriculture and forestry sector. The reference scenario prepared by expert assessments assumes a reduction of CO{sub 2} emissions in 1996-1998 by about 26% from the 1990 level due to general economic decline, but then emissions increase. It is estimated that the total potential for the mitigation of CO{sub 2} emissions for the year 2000 is 3% of the CO{sub 2} emissions in the reference scenario. The annual reduction in methane emissions due to the estimated options can amount to 5%-6% of the 1990 level. 10 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

Monacrovich, E.; Pilifosova, O.; Danchuck, D. [Kazakh Scientific-Research Hydrometeorlogical Institute, Almaty (Kazakhstan)] [and others

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Restoration As Mitigation: Analysis of Stream Mitigation for Coal Mining Impacts in Southern Appalachia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Restoration As Mitigation: Analysis of Stream Mitigation for Coal Mining Impacts in Southern or degraded but little is known about the success of stream mitigation. This article presents a synthesis of information about 434 stream mitigation projects from 117 permits for surface mining in Appalachia. Data from

Palmer, Margaret A.

110

Libby Mitigation Program, 2007 Annual Progress Report: Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Libby Reservoir was created under an International Columbia River Treaty between the United States and Canada for cooperative water development of the Columbia River Basin (Columbia River Treaty 1964). Libby Reservoir inundated 109 stream miles of the mainstem Kootenai River in the United States and Canada, and 40 miles of tributary streams in the U.S. that provided habitat for spawning, juvenile rearing, and migratory passage (Figure 1). The authorized purpose of the dam is to provide power (91.5%), flood control (8.3%), and navigation and other benefits (0.2%; Storm et al. 1982). The Pacific Northwest Power Act of 1980 recognized possible conflicts stemming from hydroelectric projects in the northwest and directed Bonneville Power Administration to 'protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by the development and operation of any hydroelectric project of the Columbia River and its tributaries' (4(h)(10)(A)). Under the Act, the Northwest Power Planning Council was created and recommendations for a comprehensive fish and wildlife program were solicited from the region's federal, state, and tribal fish and wildlife agencies. Among Montana's recommendations was the proposal that research be initiated to quantify acceptable seasonal minimum pool elevations to maintain or enhance the existing fisheries (Graham et al. 1982). Research to determine how operations of Libby Dam affect the reservoir and river fishery and to suggest ways to lessen these effects began in May 1983. The framework for the Libby Reservoir Model (LRMOD) was completed in 1989. Development of Integrated Rule Curves (IRCs) for Libby Dam operation was completed in 1996 (Marotz et al. 1996). The Libby Reservoir Model and the IRCs continue to be refined (Marotz et al 1999). Initiation of mitigation projects such as lake rehabilitation and stream restoration began in 1996. The primary focus of the Libby Mitigation project now is to restore the fisheries and fish habitat in basin streams and lakes. 'Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam' is part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) resident fish and wildlife program. The program was mandated by the Northwest Planning Act of 1980, and is responsible for mitigating damages to fish and wildlife caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of Phase I of the project (1983 through 1987) was to maintain or enhance the Libby Reservoir fishery by quantifying seasonal water levels and developing ecologically sound operational guidelines. The objective of Phase II of the project (1988 through 1996) was to determine the biological effects of reservoir operations combined with biotic changes associated with an aging reservoir. The objectives of Phase III of the project (1996 through present) are to implement habitat enhancement measures to mitigate for dam effects, to provide data for implementation of operational strategies that benefit resident fish, monitor reservoir and river conditions, and monitor mitigation projects for effectiveness. This project completes urgent and high priority mitigation actions as directed by the Kootenai Subbasin Plan.

Dunnigan, James; DeShazer, J.; Garrow, L.

2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

111

Designing, implementing and monitoring social impact mitigation strategies: Lessons from Forest Industry Structural Adjustment Packages  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Social impact mitigation strategies are implemented by the proponents of policies and projects with the intent of reducing the negative, and increasing the positive social impacts of their activities, and facilitating the achievement of policy/project goals. Evaluation of mitigation strategies is critical to improving their future success and cost-effectiveness. This paper evaluates two Forest Industry Structural Adjustment Packages (FISAP) implemented in Australia in the 1990s to 2000s as part of broader policy changes that reduced access to timber from publicly owned native forests. It assesses the effectiveness of the structure, design, implementation and monitoring of the FISAPs, and highlights the interactions between these four elements and their influence on social impacts. The two FISAPs were found to be effective in terms of reducing negative impacts, encouraging positive impacts and contributing towards policy goals, although they did not mitigate negative impacts in all cases, and sometimes interacted with external factors and additional policy changes to contribute to significant short and long term negative impacts. -- Highlights: ? Mitigation strategies aim to reduce negative and enhance positive social impacts ? Mitigation strategy design, implementation, and monitoring are critical to success ? Effective mitigation enhanced the capacity of recipients to respond to change ? Mitigation strategies influenced multiple interacting positive and negative impacts ? Success required good communication, transparency, support, resources and timing.

Loxton, Edwina A., E-mail: Edwina.Loxton@anu.edu.au [Fenner School of Environment and Society, The Australian National University, Canberra, 0200 (Australia); Schirmer, Jacki, E-mail: Jacki.Schirmer@canberra.edu.au [Fenner School of Environment and Society, The Australian National University, Canberra, 0200 (Australia) [Fenner School of Environment and Society, The Australian National University, Canberra, 0200 (Australia); Cooperative Research Centre for Forestry, Hobart, 7001 (Australia); Kanowski, Peter, E-mail: P.Kanowski@cgiar.org [Fenner School of Environment and Society, The Australian National University, Canberra, 0200 (Australia) [Fenner School of Environment and Society, The Australian National University, Canberra, 0200 (Australia); Cooperative Research Centre for Forestry, Hobart, 7001 (Australia)

2013-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

112

Estimating Mitigation Potential of Agricultural Projects: an...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mitigation Potential of Agricultural Projects: an Application of the EX-Ante Carbon-balance Tool (EX-ACT) AgencyCompany Organization: Food and Agriculture Organization of...

113

Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation Ann E. Carlson*II. HEAT WAVE DEFINITIONS .. A . HCHANGE AND HEAT WAVES .. CLIMATE III. IV. HEAT

Carlson, Ann E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Advanced Technology Development and Mitigation | National Nuclear...  

National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

Technology Development and Mitigation This sub-program includes laboratory code and computer engineering and science projects that pursue long-term simulation and computing goals...

115

Environmental Mitigation Technology (Innovative System Testing...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Technology (Innovative System Testing)-Deployment and Testing of the Alden Hydropower Fish-Friendly Turbine Environmental Mitigation Technology (Innovative System...

116

Hungry Horse Mitigation : Flathead Lake : Annual Progress Report 2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) wrote the 'Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam' in March 1991 to define the fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives and recommendations to protect, mitigate and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by Hungry Horse Dam. On November 12, 1991, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) approved the mitigation plan with minor modifications, called for a detailed implementation plan, and amended measures 903(h)(1) through (7). A long-term mitigation plan was submitted in August 1992, was approved by the Council in 1993, and the first contract for this project was signed on November 11, 1993. The problem this project addresses is the loss of habitat, both in quality and quantity, in the Flathead Lake and River basin resulting from the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The purpose of the project is to both implement mitigation measures and monitor the biological responses to those measures including those implemented by Project Numbers 9101903 and 9101904. Goals and objectives of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (Section 10.1) addressed by this project are the rebuilding to sustainable levels weak, but recoverable, native populations injured by the hydropower system. The project mitigates the blockage of spawning runs by Hungry Horse Dam by restoring and even creating spawning habitats within direct drainages to Flathead Lake. The project also addresses the altered habitat within Flathead Lake resulting from species shifts and consequent dominance of new species that restricts the potential success of mitigation measures. Specific goals of this project are to create and restore habitat and quantitatively monitor changes in fish populations to verify the efficacy of our mitigation measures. The project consists of three components: monitoring, restoration and research. Monitoring, for example, includes a spring gillnetting series conducted annually in Flathead Lake and builds on an existing data set initiated in 1981. Monitoring of the experimental kokanee reintroduction was a primary activity of this project between 1992 and 1997. Lake trout, whose high densities have precluded successful mitigation of losses of other species in Flathead Lake, have been monitored since 1996 to measure several biological parameters. Results of this work have utility in determining the population status of this key predator in Flathead Lake. The project has also defined the baseline condition of the Flathead Lake fishery in 1992-1993 and has conducted annual lakewide surveys since 1998. The restoration component of the project has addressed several stream channel, riparian, and fish passage problems, and suppression of non-native fish. The research component of the project began in FY 2000 and measured trophic linkages between M. relicta and other species to assist in predicting the results of our efforts to suppress lake trout. Only Work Element A in the Statement of Work is funded entirely by Hungry Horse Mitigation funds. Additional funds are drawn from other sources to assist in completion of all remaining Work Elements.

Hansen, Barry; Evarts, Les [Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes

2009-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

117

Hungry Horse Mitigation : Flathead Lake : Annual Progress Report 2007.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) wrote the 'Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam' in March 1991 to define the fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives and recommendations to protect, mitigate and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by Hungry Horse Dam. On November 12, 1991, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) approved the mitigation plan with minor modifications, called for a detailed implementation plan, and amended measures 903(h)(1) through (7). A long-term mitigation plan was submitted in August 1992, was approved by the Council in 1993, and the first contract for this project was signed on November 11, 1993. The problem this project addresses is the loss of habitat, both in quality and quantity, in the Flathead Lake and River basin resulting from the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The purpose of the project is to both implement mitigation measures and monitor the biological responses to those measures including those implemented by Project Numbers 9101903 and 9101904. Goals and objectives of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (Section 10.1) addressed by this project are the rebuilding to sustainable levels weak, but recoverable, native populations injured by the hydropower system. The project mitigates the blockage of spawning runs by Hungry Horse Dam by restoring and even creating spawning habitats within direct drainages to Flathead Lake. The project also addresses the altered habitat within Flathead Lake resulting from species shifts and consequent dominance of new species that restricts the potential success of mitigation measures. Specific goals of this project are to create and restore habitat and quantitatively monitor changes in fish populations to verify the efficacy of our mitigation measures. The project consists of three components: monitoring, restoration and research. Monitoring, for example, includes a spring gillnetting series conducted annually in Flathead Lake and builds on an existing data set initiated in 1981. Monitoring of the experimental kokanee reintroduction was a primary activity of this project between 1992 and 1997. Lake trout, whose high densities have precluded successful mitigation of losses of other species in Flathead Lake, have been monitored since 1996 to measure several biological parameters. Results of this work have utility in determining the population status of this key predator in Flathead Lake. The project has also defined the baseline condition of the Flathead Lake fishery in 1992-1993 and has conducted annual lakewide surveys since 1998. The restoration component of the project has addressed several stream channel, riparian, and fish passage problems, and suppression of non-native fish. The research component of the project began in FY 2000 and measured trophic linkages between M. relicta and other species to assist in predicting the results of our efforts to suppress lake trout. Only Work Element A in the Statement of Work is funded entirely by Hungry Horse Mitigation funds. Additional funds are drawn from other sources to assist in completion of all remaining Work Elements.

Hansen, Barry; Evarts, Les [Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes

2008-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

118

Hungry Horse Mitigation; Flathead Lake, 2003-2004 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) and Montana Fish Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) wrote the ''Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam'' in March 1991 to define the fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives and recommendations to protect, mitigate and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by Hungry Horse Dam. On November 12, 1991, the Northwest Power Planning Council (NPPC) approved the mitigation plan with minor modifications, called for a detailed implementation plan, and amended measures 903(h)(1) through (7). A long-term mitigation plan was submitted in August 1992, was approved by the Council in 1993, and the first contract for this project was signed on November 11, 1993. The problem this project addresses is the loss of habitat, both in quality and quantity, in the Flathead Lake and River basin resulting from the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. The purpose of the project is to both implement mitigation measures and monitor the biological responses to those measures including those implemented by Project Numbers 9101903 and 9101904. Goals and objectives of the 1994 Fish and Wildlife Program (Section 10.1) addressed by this project are the rebuilding to sustainable levels weak, but recoverable, native populations injured by the hydropower system. The project mitigates the blockage of spawning runs by Hungry Horse Dam by restoring and even creating spawning habitats within direct drainages to Flathead Lake. The project also addresses the altered habitat within Flathead Lake resulting from species shifts and consequent dominance of new species that restricts the potential success of mitigation measures. Specific goals of this project are to create and restore habitat and quantitatively monitor changes in fish populations to verify the efficacy of our mitigation measures. The project consists of three components: monitoring, restoration and research. Monitoring, for example, includes a spring gillnetting series conducted annually in Flathead Lake and builds on an existing data set initiated in 1981. Monitoring of the experimental kokanee reintroduction was a primary activity of this project between 1992 and 1997. Lake trout, whose high densities have precluded successful mitigation of losses of other species in Flathead Lake, have been monitored since 1996 to measure several biological parameters. Results of this work have utility in determining the population status of this key predator in Flathead Lake. The project has also defined the baseline condition of the Flathead Lake fishery in 1992-1993 and has conducted annual lakewide surveys since 1998. The restoration component of the project has addressed several stream channel, riparian, and fish passage problems, and suppression of non-native fish. The research component of the project began in FY 2000 and measured trophic linkages between M. relicta and other species to assist in predicting the results of our efforts to suppress lake trout. Only Objective 1 in the workplan is funded entirely by Hungry Horse Mitigation funds. Additional funds are drawn from other sources to assist in completion of Objectives 2-8.

Hansen, Barry; Evarts, Les (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

CARBON MITIGATION HS 2014 Prof. Nicolas Gruber  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CARBON MITIGATION HS 2014 Prof. Nicolas Gruber Mondays 10-12, CHN E42 (nicolas & Introduction (Gruber) Introduction to the carbon mitigation problem 9/22 2 Geological CO2 sequestration (Mazzotti) Putting the CO2 underground... 9/29 3 No class ­ group formation 10/06 4 Carbon sinks on land

Fischlin, Andreas

120

CARBON MITIGATION HS 2013 Prof. Nicolas Gruber  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

CARBON MITIGATION HS 2013 Prof. Nicolas Gruber Mondays 10-12, CHN E42 (nicolas & Introduction (Gruber) Introduction to the carbon mitigation problem 9/23 2 Ocean Sequestration (Gruber) Putting2 sequestration (Mazzotti) Putting the CO2 underground... 10/14 5 Carbon sinks on land (Gruber) How

Fischlin, Andreas

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "idb-climate change mitigation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

1997 Monitoring report for the Gunnison, Colorado Wetlands Mitigation Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Under the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) cleaned up uranium mill tailings and other surface contamination near the town of Gunnison, Colorado. Remedial action resulted in the elimination of 4.3 acres (ac) (1.7 hectares [ha]) of wetlands. This loss is mitigated by the enhancement of six spring-fed areas on Bureau of Land Management (BLM) land (mitigation sites). Approximately 254 ac (1 03.3 ha) were fenced at the six sites to exclude grazing livestock. Of the 254 ac (103.3 ha), 17.8 ac (7.2 ha) are riparian plant communities; the rest are sagebrush communities. Baseline grazed conditions of the riparian plant communities at the mitigation sites were measured prior to fencing. This report discusses results of the fourth year of a monitoring program implemented to document the response of vegetation and wildlife to the exclusion of livestock. Three criteria for determining success of the mitigation were established: plant height, vegetation density (bare ground), and vegetation diversity. By 1996, Prospector Spring, Upper Long`s Gulch, and Camp Kettle met the criteria. The DOE requested transfer of these sites to BLM for long-term oversight. The 1997 evaluation of the three remaining sites, discussed in this report, showed two sites (Houston Gulch and Lower Long`s Gulch) meet the criteria. The DOE will request the transfer of these two sites to the BLM for long-term oversight. The last remaining site, Sage Hen Spring, has met only two of the criteria (percent bare ground and plant height). The third criterion, vegetation diversity, was not met. The vegetation appears to be changing from predominantly wet species to drier upland species, although the reason for this change is uncertain. It may be due to below-normal precipitation in recent years, diversion of water from the spring to the stock tank, or manipulation of the hydrology farther up gradient.

NONE

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

China-Transportation Demand Management in Beijing: Mitigation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mitigation of Emissions in Urban Transport Jump to: navigation, search Name Transportation Demand Management in Beijing - Mitigation of emissions in urban transport Agency...

123

Improving Department of Energy Capabilities for Mitigating Beyond...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Improving Department of Energy Capabilities for Mitigating Beyond Design Basis Events Improving Department of Energy Capabilities for Mitigating Beyond Design Basis Events April...

124

Recent Diesel Engine Emission Mitigation Activities of the Maritime...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Diesel Engine Emission Mitigation Activities of the Maritime Administration Energy Technologies Program Recent Diesel Engine Emission Mitigation Activities of the Maritime...

125

South Africa-Facilitating Implementation and Readiness for Mitigation...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

and Readiness for Mitigation (FIRM)" Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleSouthAfrica-FacilitatingImplementationandReadinessforMitigation(FIRM)&oldid70000...

126

Development of Micro-structural Mitigation Strategies for PEM...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Development of Micro-structural Mitigation Strategies for PEM Fuel Cells: Morphological Simulation and Experimental Approaches Development of Micro-structural Mitigation Strategies...

127

Mitigation of Vehicle Fast Charge Grid Impacts with Renewables...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

Mitigation of Vehicle Fast Charge Grid Impacts with Renewables and Energy Storage Mitigation of Vehicle Fast Charge Grid Impacts with Renewables and Energy Storage 2012 DOE...

128

Procedures for Interagency Consultation to Avoid or Mitigate...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Consultation to Avoid or Mitigate Adverse Effects on Rivers in the Nationwide Inventory Procedures for Interagency Consultation to Avoid or Mitigate Adverse Effects on...

129

Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam, 2000 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

''Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam'' is part of the Northwest Power Planning Council's resident fish and wildlife program. The program was mandated by the Northwest Planning Act of 1980, and is responsible for mitigating for damages to fish and wildlife caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of Phase I of the project (1983 through 1987) was to maintain or enhance the Libby Reservoir fishery by quantifying seasonal water levels and developing ecologically sound operational guidelines. The objective of Phase II of the project (1988 through 1996) was to determine the biological effects of reservoir operations combined with biotic changes associated with an aging reservoir. The objectives of Phase III of the project (1996 through present) are to implement habitat enhancement measures to mitigate for dam effects, to provide data for implementation of operational strategies that benefit resident fish, monitor reservoir and river conditions, and monitor mitigation projects for effectiveness.

Hoffman, Greg; Marotz, Brian L.; Dunnigan, James (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Libby, MT)

2002-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Climate Mitigation Policy Implications for Global Irrigation Water Demand  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Energy, water and land are scarce resources, critical to humans. Developments in each affect the availability and cost of the others, and consequently human prosperity. Measures to limit greenhouse gas concentrations will inevitably exact dramatic changes on energy and land systems and in turn alter the character, magnitude and geographic distribution of human claims on water resources. We employ the Global Change Assessment Model (GCAM), an integrated assessment model to explore the interactions of energy, land and water systems in the context of alternative policies to limit climate change to three alternative levels: 2.5 Wm-2 (445 ppm CO2-e), 3.5 Wm-2 (535 ppm CO2-e) and 4.5 Wm-2 (645 ppm CO2-e). We explore the effects of alternative land-use emissions mitigation policy options—one which values terrestrial carbon emissions equally with fossil fuel and industrial emissions, and an alternative which places no penalty on land-use change emissions. We find that increasing populations and economic growth could be anticipated to lead to increased demand for water for agricultural systems (+200%), even in the absence of climate change. In general policies to mitigate climate change will increase agricultural demands for water, regardless of whether or not terrestrial carbon is valued or not. Burgeoning demands for water are driven by the demand for bioenergy in response to emissions mitigation policies. We also find that the policy matters. Increases in the demand for water when terrestrial carbon emissions go un-prices are vastly larger than when terrestrial system carbon emissions are prices at the same rate as fossil fuel and industrial emissions. Our estimates for increased water demands when terrestrial carbon systems go un-priced are larger than earlier studies. We find that the deployment of improved irrigation delivery systems could mitigate some of the increase in water demands, but cannot reverse the increases in water demands when terrestrial carbon emissions go un-priced. Finally we estimates that the geospatial pattern of water demands could stress some parts of the world, e.g. China, India and other countries in south and east Asia, earlier and more intensely than in other parts of the world, e.g. North America.

Chaturvedi, Vaibhav; Hejazi, Mohamad I.; Edmonds, James A.; Clarke, Leon E.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Wise, Marshall A.

2013-08-22T23:59:59.000Z

131

Comprehensive mitigation assessment process (COMAP) - Description and instruction manual  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In order to prepare policies and plans to reduce GHG emissions, national policy-makers need information on the costs and benefits of different mitigation options in addition to their carbon implications. Policy-makers must weigh the costs, benefits, and impacts of climate change mitigation and adaptation options, in the face of competition for limited resources. The policy goal for mitigation options in the land use sector is to identify which mix of options is likely to best achieve the desired forestry service and production objectives at the least cost, while attempting to maximize economic and social benefits, and minimize negative environmental and social impacts. Improved national-level cost estimates of response options in the land use sector can be generated by estimating the costs and benefits of different forest management practices appropriate for specific country conditions which can be undertaken within the constraint of land availability and its opportunity cost. These co st and land use estimates can be combined to develop cost curves, which would assist policy-makers in constructing policies and programs to implement forest responses.

Makundi, Willy; Sathaye, Jayant

2001-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

132

Heading into the Amendment Process: Hydrosystem Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

reforms: Implementation of l ll d t d h t h iti ti lllegally mandated hatchery mitigation, as well uncertainties. Standardized metrics, protocols, reporting and HLIs are being adopted. A number of reforms

133

Composite Materials for Hazard Mitigation of Reactive Metal Hydrides.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In an attempt to mitigate the hazards associated with storing large quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials were synthesized and tested under simulated usage and accident conditions. The composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride. Composites with vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were also polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride reduced the inherent hydrogen storage capacity of the material. The composites were found to be initially effective at reducing the amount of heat released during oxidation. However, upon cycling the composites, the mitigating behavior was lost. While the polymer composites we investigated have mitigating potential and are physically robust, they undergo a chemical change upon cycling that makes them subsequently ineffective at mitigating heat release upon oxidation of the metal hydride. Acknowledgements The authors would like to thank the following people who participated in this project: Ned Stetson (U.S. Department of Energy) for sponsorship and support of the project. Ken Stewart (Sandia) for building the flow-through calorimeter and cycling test stations. Isidro Ruvalcaba, Jr. (Sandia) for qualitative experiments on the interaction of sodium alanate with water. Terry Johnson (Sandia) for sharing his expertise and knowledge of metal hydrides, and sodium alanate in particular. Marcina Moreno (Sandia) for programmatic assistance. John Khalil (United Technologies Research Corp) for insight into the hazards of reactive metal hydrides and real-world accident scenario experiments. Summary In an attempt to mitigate and/or manage hazards associated with storing bulk quantities of reactive metal hydrides, polymer composite materials (a mixture of a mitigating polymer and a metal hydride) were synthesized and tested under simulated usage and accident conditions. Mitigating the hazards associated with reactive metal hydrides during an accident while finding a way to keep the original capability of the active material intact during normal use has been the focus of this work. These composites were made by polymerizing vinyl monomers using free-radical polymerization chemistry, in the presence of the metal hydride, in this case a prepared sodium alanate (chosen as a representative reactive metal hydride). It was found that the polymerization of styrene and divinyl benzene could be initiated using AIBN in toluene at 70 degC. The resulting composite materials can be either hard or brittle solids depending on the cross-linking density. Thermal decomposition of these styrene-based composite materials is lower than neat polystyrene indicating that the chemical nature of the polymer is affected by the formation of the composite. The char-forming nature of cross-linked polystyrene is low and therefore, not an ideal polymer for hazard mitigation. To obtain composite materials containing a polymer with higher char-forming potential, siloxane-based monomers were investigated. Four vinyl-containing siloxane oligomers were polymerized with and without added styrene and divinyl benzene. Like the styrene materials, these composite materials exhibited thermal decomposition behavior significantly different than the neat polymers. Specifically, the thermal decomposition temperature was shifted approximately 100 degC lower than the neat polymer signifying a major chemical change to the polymer network. Thermal analysis of the cycled samples was performed on the siloxane-based composite materials. It was found that after 30 cycles the siloxane-containing polymer composite material has similar TGA/DSC-MS traces as the virgin composite material indicating that the polymer is physically intact upon cycling. Hydrogen capacity measurements revealed that addition of the polymer to the metal hydride in the form of a composite material reduced the inherent hydrogen storage capacity of the material. This

Pratt, Joseph William; Cordaro, Joseph Gabriel; Sartor, George B.; Dedrick, Daniel E.; Reeder, Craig L.

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

Insights from EMF Associated Agricultural and Forestry Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Studies  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Integrated assessment modeling (IAM) as employed by the Energy Modeling Forum (EMF) generally involves a multi-sector appraisal of greenhouse gas emission (GHGE) mitigation alternatives and climate change effects typically at the global level. Such a multi-sector evaluation encompasses potential climate change effects and mitigative actions within the agricultural and forestry (AF) sectors. In comparison with many of the other sectors covered by IAM, the AF sectors may require somewhat different treatment due to their critical dependence upon spatially and temporally varying resource and climatic conditions. In particular, in large countries like the United States, forest production conditions vary dramatically across the landscape. For example, some areas in the southern US present conditions favorable to production of fast growing, heat tolerant pine species, while more northern regions often favor slower-growing hardwood and softwood species. Moreover, some lands are currently not suitable for forest production (e.g., the arid western plains). Similarly, in agriculture, the US has areas where citrus and cotton can be grown and other areas where barley and wheat are more suitable. This diversity across the landscape causes differential GHGE mitigation potential in the face of climatic changes and/or responses to policy or price incentives. It is difficult for a reasonably sized global IAM system to reflect the full range of sub-national geographic AF production possibilities alluded to above. AF response in the face of climate change altered temperature precipitation regimes or mitigation incentives will likely involve region-specific shifts in land use and agricultural/forest production. This chapter addresses AF sectoral responses in climate change mitigation analysis. Specifically, we draw upon US-based studies of AF GHGE mitigation possibilities that incorporate sub-national detail drawing largely on a body of studies done by the authors in association with EMF activities. We discuss characteristics of AF sectoral responses that could be incorporated in future IAM efforts in climate change policy.

McCarl, Bruce A.; Murray, Brian; Kim, Man-Keun; Lee, Heng-Chi; Sands, Ronald D.; Schneider, Uwe

2007-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

135

Advanced Mitigating Measures for the Cell Internal Short Risk (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation describes mitigation measures for internal short circuits in lithium-ion battery cells.

Darcy, E.; Smith, K.

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Biofuels and indirect land use change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biofuels and indirect land use change The case for mitigation October 2011 #12;About this study), Malaysian Palm Oil Board, National Farmers Union, Novozymes, Northeast Biofuels Collaborative, Patagonia Bio contributed views on a confidential basis. #12;1Biofuels and indirect land use change The case for mitigation

137

America's Bottom-Up Climate Change Mitigation Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

large conventional hydroelectric power, municipal solidconventional large hydroelectric power). To quantify theby states that large hydroelectric is not counted toward the

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Modelling Innovation and Threshold Effects In Climate Change Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for Substitution, Investment, Costs, Prices and Emissions: 12.1 Solid Fuels 12.2 Oil Fuels 12.3 Gas 12.4 Hydrogen Technologies 5. Demand and Investment 6. Cost Dynamics 7. Prices, and Lags in the Effects of Policies 8. Emissions and Accumulations PART II: THE SPECIAL CASE OF HYDROGEN 9. Hydrogen and Electricity 10. Hydrogen

Watson, Andrew

139

Development based climate change adaptation and mitigation-conceptual...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

countries AgencyCompany Organization: Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) Sector: Climate, Energy, Land, Water Topics: Adaptation, Co-benefits assessment, -...

140

Climate Change Mitigation: An Analysis of Advanced Technology Scenarios  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents a scenario analysis that explores three advanced technology pathways toward climate stabilization using the MiniCAM model.

Clarke, Leon E.; Wise, Marshall A.; Placet, Marylynn; Izaurralde, R Cesar; Lurz, Joshua P.; Kim, Son H.; Smith, Steven J.; Thomson, Allison M.

2006-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "idb-climate change mitigation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

America's Bottom-Up Climate Change Mitigation Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

stabilize US GHG emissions at their 2010 levels until thefor US light-duty vehicle GHG emissions under varying levelsUS GHG emissions would be stabilized at 2010 levels by 2020—

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

142

America's Bottom-Up Climate Change Mitigation Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and developing emissions trading mechanisms to connect andand development of emissions trading or cap-and-tradesector market-based emissions trading system in the Western

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Mitigating Climate Change with Managed Forests: Balancing Expectations,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and biomass energy) and di- rect substitution for more energy-intensive building mate- rials (e.g., concrete. Carbon markets may in the future offer some potential for com- pensating forest landowners for actions Climate Action Registry, and Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative), some managed forest projects may prove

Vermont, University of

144

REVIEW ARTICLE Legumes for mitigation of climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and biorefineries. A review Erik Steen Jensen & Mark B. Peoples & Robert M. Boddey & Peter M. Gresshoff & Henrik source of biomass for the generation of biofuels and other materials in future biorefinery concepts. We for Integrative Legume Research, University of Queensland, St Lucia, QLD 4072, Australia H. Hauggaard

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

145

America's Bottom-Up Climate Change Mitigation Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

US Department of Energy’s Transportation Energy Data Book (Davis and Diegel, 2006). Baseline gasoline and ethanol usage

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

America's Bottom-Up Climate Change Mitigation Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

large conventional hydroelectric power, municipal solidconventional large hydroelectric power). To quantify thelarge conventional hydroelectric power is not included (this

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

How can cities mitigate and adapt to climate change?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, that it is possible for the global envir- onment to improve. The interesting papers in the special issue of Building; not only the obvious ones of biology, architecture, geography and eco- nomics, but also physics

Hunt, Julian

148

America's Bottom-Up Climate Change Mitigation Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

US 1990 GHG emissions None 684 US cities representing 26% ofGHG emissions by states sources and sectors 684 US cities,The overall US GHG emissions effect of the state and city

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

America's Bottom-Up Climate Change Mitigation Policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EC (2004). c US MCPA (2007). d RGGI (2005). e WGA (2006). fGHG emissions PTP WGA US MCPA WCG RGGI NEG/ECP Year Fig. 5.Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI), 2007. About RGGI /http://

Lutsey, Nicholas P.; Sperling, Dan

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation: Transport Sector | Open Energy  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop, Inc Place: MissouriProgramsCentralMWacTampaInformation

151

Korea's Green Growth Strategy: Mitigating Climate Change and Developing New  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to:46 - 429 Throttled (botOpen6Kentwood,GeorgeKlimaschutz eKodiak,Kooskia,Growth Engines |

152

Climate Change and the Transporation Sector - Challenges and Mitigation  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up fromDepartmentTieCelebrate Earth DayFuelsDepartmentPolicyClean, EERE SmallW H I T

153

Development based climate change adaptation and mitigation-conceptual  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump to:52c8ff988c1Dering Harbor, New York: EnergyEnergyguaGetOpenMauiAreaissues

154

Dominican Republic-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address:011-DNA Jump to:52c8ff988c1DeringDolgeville, New York: EnergyAmerica and the Caribbean |

155

Agricultural Technologies for Climate Change Mitigation and Adaptation in  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160 East 300 SouthWaterBrasil JumpAerowatt Energies JumpAgProMRV of agricultural

156

Climate Change Adaptation and Mitigation in the Tourism Sector | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDITOhioOglesby,Sullivan, MissouriWebsterElectricEnergy Information Tourism

157

Gas powered fluid gun with recoil mitigation  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A gas powered fluid gun for propelling a stream or slug of a fluid at high velocity toward a target. Recoil mitigation is provided that reduces or eliminates the associated recoil forces, with minimal or no backwash. By launching a quantity of water in the opposite direction, net momentum forces are reduced or eliminated. Examples of recoil mitigation devices include a cone for making a conical fluid sheet, a device forming multiple impinging streams of fluid, a cavitating venturi, one or more spinning vanes, or an annular tangential entry/exit.

Grubelich, Mark C; Yonas, Gerold

2013-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

158

Public Finance Mechanisms to Mobilize Investment in Climate Change...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Mechanisms to Mobilize Investment in Climate Change Mitigation Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Public Finance Mechanisms to Mobilize Investment in...

159

IDAHO HABITAT EVALUATION FOR OFFSITE MITIGATION RECORD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-1 #12;This report was funded by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), U.S. Department of Energy Mitigation Record, Annual Report FY 1984, Report to Bonneville Power Administration, Contract No. 1984BP13381 Administration Environment, Fish and Wildlife Division P.O. Box 3621 905 N.E. 11th Avenue Portland, OR 97208

160

Mitigating Performance Degradation of High-Energy Lithium-Ion...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Mitigating Performance Degradation of High-Energy Lithium-Ion Cells Mitigating Performance Degradation of High-Energy Lithium-Ion Cells 2013 DOE Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Program and...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "idb-climate change mitigation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Natural Gas Infrastructure R&D and Methane Emissions Mitigation...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

Natural Gas Infrastructure R&D and Methane Emissions Mitigation Workshop Natural Gas Infrastructure R&D and Methane Emissions Mitigation Workshop November 12, 2014 11:00AM EST to...

162

EIS-0380: Fiscal Year 2011 Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report...  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

EIS-0380: Fiscal Year 2011 Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report for the 2008 Los Alamos Site-Wide Environmental Impact Statement EIS-0380: Fiscal Year 2011 Mitigation Action Plan...

163

BMW v. Gore: Mitigating the Punitive Economics of Punitive Damages  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BMW v GORE: MITIGATING THE PUNITIVE ECONOMICS OF PUNITIVEE. Calfee, Mark F. Grady In BMW v Gore, the Supreme Courtadded). 480 US 102 (1987). BMW v. Gore: Mitigating the

Grady, Mark F.; Rubin, Paul H.; Calfee, John E

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Wetland mitigation banking for the oil and gas industry: Assessment, conclusions, and recommendations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Wetland mitigation banks are already in existence in the United States, and the number is increasing. To date, most of these banks have been created and operated for mitigation of impacts arising from highway or commercial development and have not been associated with the oil and gas industry. Argonne National Laboratory evaluated the positive and negative aspects of wetland mitigation banking for the oil and gas industry by examining banks already created for other uses by federal, state, and private entities. Specific issues addressed in this study include (1) the economic, ecological, and technical effectiveness of existing banks; (2) the changing nature of local, state, and federal jurisdiction; and (3) the unique regulatory and jurisdictional problems affecting bank developments associated with the oil and gas industry.

Wilkey, P.L.; Sundell, R.C.; Bailey, K.A.; Hayes, D.C.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam, 2004-2005 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

''Mitigation for the Construction and Operation of Libby Dam'' is part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's (NPCC) resident fish and wildlife program. The program was mandated by the Northwest Planning Act of 1980, and is responsible for mitigating damages to fish and wildlife caused by hydroelectric development in the Columbia River Basin. The objective of Phase I of the project (1983 through 1987) was to maintain or enhance the Libby Reservoir fishery by quantifying seasonal water levels and developing ecologically sound operational guidelines. The objective of Phase II of the project (1988 through 1996) was to determine the biological effects of reservoir operations combined with biotic changes associated with an aging reservoir. The objectives of Phase III of the project (1996 through present) are to implement habitat enhancement measures to mitigate for dam effects, to provide data for implementation of operational strategies that benefit resident fish, monitor reservoir and river conditions, and monitor mitigation projects for effectiveness. This project completes urgent and high priority mitigation actions as directed by the Kootenai Subbasin Plan. Montana Fish, Wildlife & Parks (MFWP) uses a combination of techniques to collect physical and biological data within the Kootenai River Basin. These data serve several purposes including: the development and refinement of models used in management of water resources and operation of Libby Dam; investigations into the limiting factors of native fish populations, gathering basic life history information, tracking trends in endangered and threatened species, and the assessment of restoration or management activities designed to restore native fishes and their habitats.

Dunnigan, James; DeShazer, Jay; Garrow, Larry (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Libby, MT)

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Recommendation 195: Mitigation of Contamination in Bear Creek Burial Grounds  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

The ORSSAB requests DOE provide possible remedial actions to mitigate releases of contamination from Bear Creek Burial Grounds.

167

2007 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document the status of revegetation projects and natural resources mitigation efforts that have been conducted for remediated waste sites and other activities associated with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA) cleanup of National Priorities List waste sites at Hanford. This report documents the results of revegetation and mitigation monitoring conducted in 2007 and includes 11 revegetation/restoration projects, one revegetation/mitigation project, and 3 bat habitat mitigation projects.

K. A. Gano; C. T. Lindsey

2007-09-27T23:59:59.000Z

168

2008 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of this report is to document the status of revegetation projects and natural resources mitigation efforts that have been conducted for remediated waste sites and other activities associated with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act cleanup of National Priorities List waste sites at Hanford. This report documents the results of revegetation and mitigation monitoring conducted in 2008 and includes 22 revegetation/restoration projects, one revegetation/mitigation project, and two bat habitat mitigation projects.

C. T. Lindsey; K. A. Gano

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

169

Mitigation options for accidental releases of hazardous gases  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this paper is to review and compare technologies available for mitigation of unconfined releases of toxic and flammable gases. These technologies include: secondary confinement, deinventory, vapor barriers, foam spraying, and water sprays/monitors. Guidelines for the design and/or operation of effective post-release mitigation systems and case studies involving actual industrial mitigation systems are also presented.

Fthenakis, V.M.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Buildings GHG Mitigation Estimator Worksheet, Version 1  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Xcel document describes Version 1 of the the Buildings GHG Mitigation Estimator tool. This tool assists federal agencies in estimating the greenhouse gas mitigation reduction from implementing energy efficiency measures across a portfolio of buildings. It is designed to be applied to groups of office buildings, for example, at a program level (regional or site) that can be summarized at the agency level. While the default savings and cost estimates apply to office buildings, users can define their own efficiency measures, costs, and savings estimates for inclusion in the portfolio assessment. More information on user-defined measures can be found in Step 2 of the buildings emission reduction guidance. The output of this tool is a prioritized set of activities that can help the agency to achieve its greenhouse gas reduction targets most cost-effectively.

171

EPR Severe Accident Threats and Mitigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Despite the extremely low EPR core melt frequency, an improved defence-in-depth approach is applied in order to comply with the EPR safety target: no stringent countermeasures should be necessary outside the immediate plant vicinity like evacuation, relocation or food control other than the first harvest in case of a severe accident. Design provisions eliminate energetic events and maintain the containment integrity and leak-tightness during the entire course of the accident. Based on scenarios that cover a broad range of physical phenomena and which provide a sound envelope of boundary conditions associated with each containment challenge, a selection of representative loads has been done, for which mitigation measures have to cope with. This paper presents the main critical threats and the approach used to mitigate those threats. (authors)

Azarian, G. [Framatome ANP SAS, Tour Areva, Place de la Coupole 92084 Paris la Defense (France); Kursawe, H.M.; Nie, M.; Fischer, M.; Eyink, J. [Framatome ANP GmbH, Freyeslebenstrasse, 1, D-91058 Erlangen (Germany); Stoudt, R.H. [Framatome ANP Inc. - 3315 Old Forest Rd, Lynchburgh, VA 24501 (United States)

2004-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Explosive parcel containment and blast mitigation container  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a containment structure for containing and mitigating explosions. The containment structure is installed in the wall of the building and has interior and exterior doors for placing suspicious packages into the containment structure and retrieving them from the exterior of the building. The containment structure has a blast deflection chute and a blowout panel to direct over pressure from explosions away from the building, surrounding structures and people.

Sparks, Michael H. (Frederick County, MD)

2001-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

173

Methodological Issues In Forestry Mitigation Projects: A CaseStudy Of Kolar District  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

There is a need to assess climate change mitigationopportunities in forest sector in India in the context of methodologicalissues such as additionality, permanence, leakage, measurement andbaseline development in formulating forestry mitigation projects. A casestudy of forestry mitigation project in semi-arid community grazing landsand farmlands in Kolar district of Karnataka, was undertaken with regardto baseline and project scenariodevelopment, estimation of carbon stockchange in the project, leakage estimation and assessment ofcost-effectiveness of mitigation projects. Further, the transaction coststo develop project, and environmental and socio-economic impact ofmitigation project was assessed.The study shows the feasibility ofestablishing baselines and project C-stock changes. Since the area haslow or insignificant biomass, leakage is not an issue. The overallmitigation potential in Kolar for a total area of 14,000 ha under variousmitigation options is 278,380 tC at a rate of 20 tC/ha for the period2005-2035, which is approximately 0.67 tC/ha/yr inclusive of harvestregimes under short rotation and long rotation mitigation options. Thetransaction cost for baseline establishment is less than a rupee/tC andfor project scenario development is about Rs. 1.5-3.75/tC. The projectenhances biodiversity and the socio-economic impact is alsosignificant.

Ravindranath, N.H.; Murthy, I.K.; Sudha, P.; Ramprasad, V.; Nagendra, M.D.V.; Sahana, C.A.; Srivathsa, K.G.; Khan, H.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Timelines for mitigating methane emissions from energy technologies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy technologies emitting differing proportions of methane and carbon dioxide vary in their relative climate impacts over time, due to the different atmospheric lifetimes of the two gases. Standard technology comparisons using the global warming potential (GWP) emissions equivalency metric do not reveal these dynamic impacts, and may not provide the information needed to assess technologies and emissions mitigation opportunities in the context of broader climate policy goals. Here we formulate a portfolio optimization model that incorporates changes in technology impacts as a radiative forcing (RF) stabilization target is approached. An optimal portfolio, maximizing allowed energy consumption while meeting the RF target, is obtained by year-wise minimization of the marginal RF impact in an intended stabilization year. The optimal portfolio calls for using certain higher methane-emitting technologies prior to an optimal switching year, followed by methane-light technologies as the stabilization year approac...

Roy, Mandira; Trancik, Jessika E

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Near-Term Climate Mitigation by Short-Lived Forcers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Emissions reductions focused on anthropogenic climate forcing agents with relatively short atmospheric lifetimes such as methane (CH4) and black carbon (BC) have been suggested as a strategy to reduce the rate of climate change over the next several decades. We find that reductions of methane and BC would likely have only a modest impact on near-term climate warming. Even with maximally feasible reductions phased in from 2015 to 2035, global mean temperatures in 2050 are reduced by 0.16 °C, with an uncertainty range of 0.04-0.36°C, with the high end of this range only possible if total historical aerosol forcing is small. More realistic mitigation scenarios would likely provide a smaller climate benefit. The climate benefits from targeted reductions in short-lived forcing agents are smaller than previously estimated and are not substantially different in magnitude from the benefits due to a comprehensive climate policy.

Smith, Steven J.; Mizrahi, Andrew H.

2013-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

176

Information Needs for Energy Mitigation and Siting  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomentheATLANTA,Fermi NationalBusiness PlanPosting Thomas F.Needs for Energy Mitigation

177

Property:EnvironmentalMitigation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revisionEnvReviewNonInvasiveExploration Jump to: navigation, search Property NameEnvironmentalMitigation Jump to:

178

Oil Shortages, Climate Change and Collective Action  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

strategies, all provide tools to guide policy analysis. Stern (2006) took over 600 pages to both quantify and analyse the economics of climate change, specifically asking how to estimate the social cost of carbon and the benefits of mitigating climate...

Newbery, David

179

Carbon Geography: The Political Economy of Congressional Support for Legislation Intended to Mitigate Greenhouse Gas Production  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the last five years, the U.S Congress has voted on several pieces of legislation intended to sharply reduce the nation’s greenhouse gas emissions. Given that climate change is a world public bad, standard economic logic would predict that the United States would ?free ride? and wait for other nations to reduce their emissions. Within the Congress, there are clear patterns to who votes in favor of mitigating greenhouse gas emissions. This paper presents a political economy analysis of the determinants of ?pro-green? votes on such legislation. Conservatives consistently vote against such legislation. Controlling for a Representative’s ideology, representatives from richer districts and districts with a lower per-capita carbon dioxide footprint are more likely to vote in favor of climate change mitigation legislation. Representatives from districts where industrial emissions represent a larger share of greenhouse gas emissions are more likely to vote no.

Cragg, Michael; Zhou, Yuyu; Gurney, Kevin R.; Kahn, Matthew

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Costa Rica-Mitigation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions through Avoided...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Avoided Deforestation of Tropical Rainforests on Privately-owned Lands in High Conservation Value Areas Jump to: navigation, search Name Costa Rica-Mitigation of Greenhouse Gas...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "idb-climate change mitigation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Financing Climate Adaptation and Mitigation in Rural Areas of...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Rural Areas of Developing Countries Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Financing Climate Adaptation and Mitigation in Rural Areas of Developing Countries...

182

Kenya-Standard Assessment of Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Livelihoods in Smallholder Systems (SAMPLES) Jump to: navigation, search Name Kenya-Standard Assessment of Mitigation Potential and Livelihoods in Smallholder Systems (SAMPLES)...

183

Webinar: Micro-Structural Mitigation Strategies for PEM Fuel Cells  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Video recording of the Fuel Cell Technologies Office webinar, Micro-Structural Mitigation Strategies for PEM Fuel Cells, originally presented on November 19, 2013.

184

E-Print Network 3.0 - abrupt climate change Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the practical... for climate change mitigation House et al. Nature 5 Humans in Earth System Models Cornell et al. Current... conservation implications ... Source: Watson, Andrew...

185

E-Print Network 3.0 - abrupt climatic change Sample Search Results  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

the practical... for climate change mitigation House et al. Nature 5 Humans in Earth System Models Cornell et al. Current... conservation implications ... Source: Watson, Andrew...

186

The Drivers for Divergence: Exploring Variation in New Zealand Organisational Responses to Climate Change.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??For many years, the development of an Emissions Trading Scheme to mitigate against climate change has been one of the most controversial political issues in… (more)

Phillips, Lara

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

International perspectives on mitigating laboratory biorisks.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The International Perspectives on Mitigating Laboratory Biorisks workshop, held at the Renaissance Polat Istanbul Hotel in Istanbul, Republic of Turkey, from October 25 to 27, 2010, sought to promote discussion between experts and stakeholders from around the world on issues related to the management of biological risk in laboratories. The event was organized by Sandia National Laboratories International Biological Threat Reduction program, on behalf of the US Department of State Biosecurity Engagement Program and the US Department of Defense Cooperative Biological Engagement Program. The workshop came about as a response to US Under Secretary of State Ellen O. Tauscher's statements in Geneva on December 9, 2009, during the Annual Meeting of the States Parties to the Biological Weapons Convention (BWC). Pursuant to those remarks, the workshop was intended to provide a forum for interested countries to share information on biorisk management training, standards, and needs. Over the course of the meeting's three days, participants discussed diverse topics such as the role of risk assessment in laboratory biorisk management, strategies for mitigating risk, measurement of performance and upkeep, international standards, training and building workforce competence, and the important role of government and regulation. The meeting concluded with affirmations of the utility of international cooperation in this sphere and recognition of positive prospects for the future. The workshop was organized as a series of short presentations by international experts on the field of biorisk management, followed by breakout sessions in which participants were divided into four groups and urged to discuss a particular topic with the aid of a facilitator and a set of guiding questions. Rapporteurs were present during the plenary session as well as breakout sessions and in particular were tasked with taking notes during discussions and reporting back to the assembled participants a brief summary of points discussed. The presentations and breakout sessions were divided into five topic areas: 'Challenges in Biorisk Management,' 'Risk Assessment and Mitigation Measures,' 'Biorisk Management System Performance,' 'Training,' and 'National Oversight and Regulations.' The topics and questions were chosen by the organizers through consultation with US Government sponsors. The Chattham House Rule on non-attribution was in effect during question and answer periods and breakout session discussions.

Pinard, William J.; Salazar, Carlos A.

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Heat Waves, Global Warming, and Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Demand Responses to Climate Change: Methodology and Application to the Com- monwealth of Massachusetts,

Carlson, Ann E.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Blast mitigation capabilities of aqueous foam.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A series of tests involving detonation of high explosive blanketed by aqueous foam (conducted from 1982 to 1984) are described in primarily terms of recorded peak pressure, positive phase specific impulse, and time of arrival. The investigation showed that optimal blast mitigation occurs for foams with an expansion ratio of about 60:1. Simple analyses representing the foam as a shocked single phase mixture are presented and shown inadequate. The experimental data demonstrate that foam slows down and broadens the propagated pressure disturbance relative to a shock in air. Shaped charges and flyer plates were evaluated for operation in foam and appreciable degradation was observed for the flyer plates due to drag created by the foam.

Hartman, William Franklin; Larsen, Marvin Elwood; Boughton, Bruce A.

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Mitigation of radiation induced surface contamination  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A process for mitigating or eliminating contamination and/or degradation of surfaces having common, adventitious atmospheric contaminants adsorbed thereon and exposed to radiation. A gas or a mixture of gases is introduced into the environment of a surface(s) to be protected. The choice of the gaseous species to be introduced (typically a hydrocarbon gas, water vapor, or oxygen or mixtures thereof) is dependent upon the contaminant as well as the ability of the gaseous species to bind to the surface to be protected. When the surface and associated bound species are exposed to radiation reactive species are formed that react with surface contaminants such as carbon or oxide films to form volatile products (e.g., CO, CO.sub.2) which desorb from the surface.

Klebanoff, Leonard E. (Dublin, CA); Stulen, Richard H. (Livermore, CA)

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

The optimal combined design of climate mitigation and geoengineering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Combined climate mitigation/geoengineering approach has better economic utility, less emission control rate and temperature increase than mitigation alone. If setting the 50% reduction rate and 2^\\circC temperature increase as constrains, we find there is no a feasible solution for emission control, but combined design is still available.

Liang, Wang

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

RESEARCH REPORT 1740-1 WETLANDS MITIGATION FORHIGHWAY IMPACTS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH REPORT 1740-1 WETLANDS MITIGATION FORHIGHWAY IMPACTS: A NATIONWIDESURVEY OF STATE; 8QFODVVLILHG 1RRISDJHV 3ULFH )RUP'27)#12; 5HSURGXFWLRQRIFRPSOHWHGSDJHDXWKRUL]HG #12;WETLANDS Title: Development of a Mechanism to Compare On-Site vs. Off-Site Wetlands Mitigation Conducted

Texas at Austin, University of

193

CO2 Emissions Mitigation and Technological Advance: An  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PNNL-18075 CO2 Emissions Mitigation and Technological Advance: An Updated Analysis of Advanced/2003) #12;PNNL-18075 CO2 Emissions Mitigation and Technological Advance: An Analysis of Advanced Technology of atmospheric CO2 concentrations at 450 parts per million by volume (ppmv) and 550 ppmv in MiniCAM. Each

194

Session: Avoiding, minimizing, and mitigating avian and bat impacts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This session at the Wind Energy and Birds/Bats workshop consisted of two presentations followed by a discussion/question answer period. The session addressed a variety of questions related to avoiding, minimizing, and mitigating the avian and bat impacts of wind power development including: what has been learned from operating turbines and mitigating impacts where they are unavoidable, such as at Altamont Pass WRA, and should there be mitigation measures such as habitat creation or land conservation where impacts occur. Other impact minimization and mitigation approaches discussed included: location and siting evaluations; options for construction and operation of wind facilities; turbine lighting; and the physical alignment/orientation. Titles and authors of the presentations were: 'Bird Fatalities in the Altamont Pass Wind Resource Area: A Case Study, Part II' by Carl Thelander and 'Prevention and Mitigation of Avian Impacts at Wind Power Facilities' by Paul Kerlinger.

Thelander, Carl; Kerlinger, Paul

2004-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

List of Texas Fuel Mitigation Vendors This list of fuel mitigation vendors that offer services in Texas is divided into two groups  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

List of Texas Fuel Mitigation Vendors This list of fuel mitigation vendors that offer services as a service to communities and landowners seeking assistance with fuel mitigation practices on their land Service Area Mu, Be, CP, Sc, Mo, FB Page 1 of 4Last updated on 10/16/2013 #12;List of Fuel Mitigation

Behmer, Spencer T.

196

Integrating Agricultural and Forestry GHG Mitigation Response into General Economy Frameworks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integrating Agricultural and Forestry GHG Mitigation Response into General Economy Frameworks. #12;2 Integrating Agricultural and Forestry GHG Mitigation Response into General Economy Frameworks for characterizing potential responses to greenhouse gas mitigation policies by the agriculture and forestry

McCarl, Bruce A.

197

Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for Libby Hydroelectric Project, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for wildlife losses attributable to the construction of the Libby hydroelectric project. Mitigation objectives and alternatives, the recommended mitigation projects, and the crediting system for each project are described by each target species. The report describes mitigation that has already taken place and 8 recommended mitigation projects designed to complete total wildlife mitigation. 8 refs., 2 figs., 12 tabs.

Mundinger, John

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

The Environmental Justice Dimensions of Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Environmental Justice Dimensions of Climate Change Marie Lynn Miranda, Douglas A. Hastings to mitigate the severe impacts of climate change predicted to occur in the twenty-first century. Many with climate change. This study investigates the varying degrees to which developing and developed nations

199

Sources and Mitigation of CO and UHC Emissions in Low-temperature...  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

and Mitigation of CO and UHC Emissions in Low-temperature Diesel Combustion Regimes: Insights Obtained via Homogeneous Reactor Modeling Sources and Mitigation of CO and UHC...

200

E-Print Network 3.0 - assess carbon mitigation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

, The potential for U.S. forest soils to sequester carbon and mitigate the greenhouse effect. CRC Press, New York... fields: assessment, measurement and mitigation. Plant...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "idb-climate change mitigation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

WHC natural phenomena hazards mitigation implementation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural phenomena hazards (NPH) are unexpected acts of nature which pose a threat or danger to workers, the public or to the environment. Earthquakes, extreme winds (hurricane and tornado),snow, flooding, volcanic ashfall, and lightning strike are examples of NPH at Hanford. It is the policy of U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to design, construct and operate DOE facilitiesso that workers, the public and the environment are protected from NPH and other hazards. During 1993 DOE, Richland Operations Office (RL) transmitted DOE Order 5480.28, ``Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation,`` to Westinghouse Hanford COmpany (WHC) for compliance. The Order includes rigorous new NPH criteria for the design of new DOE facilities as well as for the evaluation and upgrade of existing DOE facilities. In 1995 DOE issued Order 420.1, ``Facility Safety`` which contains the same NPH requirements and invokes the same applicable standards as Order 5480.28. It will supersede Order 5480.28 when an in-force date for Order 420.1 is established through contract revision. Activities will be planned and accomplished in four phases: Mobilization; Prioritization; Evaluation; and Upgrade. The basis for the graded approach is the designation of facilities/structures into one of five performance categories based upon safety function, mission and cost. This Implementation Plan develops the program for the Prioritization Phase, as well as an overall strategy for the implemention of DOE Order 5480.2B.

Conrads, T.J.

1996-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

202

Mitigation of Severe Accident Consequences Using Inherent Safety Principles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sodium-cooled fast reactors are designed to have a high level of safety. Events of high probability of occurrence are typically handled without consequence through reliable engineering systems and good design practices. For accidents of lower probability, the initiating events are characterized by larger and more numerous challenges to the reactor system, such as failure of one or more major engineered systems and can also include a failure to scram the reactor in response. As the initiating conditions become more severe, they have the potential for creating serious consequences of potential safety significance, including fuel melting, fuel pin disruption and recriticality. If the progression of such accidents is not mitigated by design features of the reactor, energetic events and dispersal of radioactive materials may result. For severe accidents, there are several approaches that can be used to mitigate the consequences of such severe accident initiators, which typically include fuel pin failures and core disruption. One approach is to increase the reliability of the reactor protection system so that the probability of an ATWS event is reduced to less than 1 x 10-6 per reactor year, where larger accident consequences are allowed, meeting the U.S. NRC goal of relegating such accident consequences as core disruption to these extremely low probabilities. The main difficulty with this approach is to convincingly test and guarantee such increased reliability. Another approach is to increase the redundancy of the reactor scram system, which can also reduce the probability of an ATWS event to a frequency of less than 1 x 10-6 per reactor year or lower. The issues with this approach are more related to reactor core design, with the need for a greater number of control rod positions in the reactor core and the associated increase in complexity of the reactor protection system. A third approach is to use the inherent reactivity feedback that occurs in a fast reactor to automatically respond to the change in reactor conditions and to result in a benign response to these events. This approach has the advantage of being relatively simple to implement, and does not face the issue of reliability since only fundamental physical phenomena are used in a passive manner, not active engineered systems. However, the challenge is to present a convincing case that such passive means can be implemented and used. The purpose of this paper is to describe this third approach in detail, the technical basis and experimental validation for the approach, and the resulting reactor performance that can be achieved for ATWS events.

R. A. Wigeland; J. E. Cahalan

2009-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Measuring & Mitigating Electric Vehicle Adoption Barriers.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Transitioning our cars to run on renewable sources of energy is crucial to addressing concerns over energy security and climate change. Electric vehicles (EVs), vehicles… (more)

Tommy, Carpenter

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Gearbox Typical Failure Modes, Detection, and Mitigation Methods (Presentation)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation was given at the AWEA Operations & Maintenance and Safety Seminar and focused on what the typical gearbox failure modes are, how to detect them using detection techniques, and strategies that help mitigate these failures.

Sheng, S.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Introduction to Administrative Programs that Mitigate the Insider Threat  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This presentation begins with the reality of the insider threat, then elaborates on these tools to mitigate the insider threat: Human Reliability Program (HRP); Nuclear Security Culture (NSC) Program; Employee Assistance Program (EAP).

Gerke, Gretchen K.; Rogers, Erin; Landers, John; DeCastro, Kara

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Development of Micro-structural Mitigation Strategies for PEM...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

R D P O W E R S Y S T E M S Development of Micro-structural Mitigation Strategies for PEM Fuel Cells: Morphological Simulation and Experimental Approaches DOE Fuel Cell Projects...

207

Design of innovative dynamic systems for seismic response mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Rocking wall systems consist of shear walls, laterally connected to a building, that are moment-released in their strong plane. Their purpose is to mitigate seismic structural response by constraining a building primarily ...

Seymour, Douglas (Douglas Benjamin)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Impacts of greenhouse gas mitigation policies on agricultural land  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions are widely acknowledged to be responsible for much of the global warming in the past century. A number of approaches have been proposed to mitigate GHG emissions. Since the burning of ...

Wang, Xiaodong, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Northwest Montana Wildlife Mitigation Habitat Protection : Advance Design : Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report summarizes the habitat protection process developed to mitigate for certain wildlife and wildlife habitat losses due to construction of Hungry Horse and Libby dams in northwestern Montana.

Wood, Marilyn A.

1993-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

2010 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents eh status of revegetation projects and natural resources mitigation efforts conducted for remediated waste sites and other activities associated with CERLA cleanup of National Priorities List waste sites at Hanford. This report contains vegetation monitoring data that were collected in the spring and summer of 2010 from the River Corridor Closure Contract’s revegetation and mitigation areas on the Hanford Site.

C. T. Lindsey, A. L. Johnson

2010-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

211

2011 River Corridor Closure Contractor Revegetation and Mitigation Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents the status of revegetation projects and natural resources mitigation efforts conducted for remediated waste sites and other activities associated with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 cleanup of National Priorities List waste sites at Hanford. This report contains the vegetation monitoring data that was collected in the spring and summer of 2011 from the River Corridor Closure Contractor’s revegetation and mitigation areas on the Hanford Site.

West, W. J.; Lucas, J. G.; Gano, K. A.

2011-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

212

Hellsgate Winter Range : Wildlife Mitigation Project. Preliminary Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Bonneville Power Administration proposes funding the Hellsgate Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project in cooperation with the Colville Convederated Tribes and Bureau of Indian Affairs. This Preliminary Environmental Assessment examines the potential environmental effects of acquiring and managing property for wildlife and wildlife habitat within a large project area. The Propose action is intended to meet the need for mitigation of wildlife and wild life habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Grand Coulee and Chief Joseph Dams and their reservoirs.

United States. Bonneville Power Administration.

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Insider Threat - Material Control and Accountability Mitigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The technical objectives of nuclear safeguards are (1) the timely detection of diversion of significant quantities of nuclear material from peaceful uses to the manufacture of nuclear weapons or other nuclear explosive devices or for purposes unknown and (2) the deterrence of such diversion by the risk of early detection. The safeguards and security program must address both outsider threats and insider threats. Outsider threats are primarily addressed by the physical protection system. Insider threats can be any level of personnel at the site including passive or active insiders that could attempt protracted or abrupt diversion. This could occur by an individual acting alone or by collusion between an individual with material control and accountability (MC&A) responsibilities and another individual who has responsibility or control within both the physical protection and the MC&A systems. The insider threat is one that must be understood and incorporated into the safeguards posture. There have been more than 18 documented cases of theft or loss of plutonium or highly enriched uranium. The insider has access, authority, and knowledge, as well as a set of attributes, that make him/her difficult to detect. An integrated safeguards program is designed as a defense-in-depth system that seeks to prevent the unauthorized removal of nuclear material, to provide early detection of any unauthorized attempt to remove nuclear material, and to rapidly respond to any attempted removal of nuclear material. The program is also designed to support protection against sabotage, espionage, unauthorized access, compromise, and other hostile acts that may cause unacceptable adverse impacts on national security, program continuity, the health and safety of employees, the public, or the environment. Nuclear MC&A play an essential role in the capabilities of an integrated safeguards system to deter and detect theft or diversion of nuclear material. An integrated safeguards system with compensating mitigation can decrease the risk of an insider performing a malicious act without detection.

Powell, Danny H [ORNL] [ORNL; Elwood Jr, Robert H [ORNL] [ORNL; Roche, Charles T [ORNL] [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Peaking of world oil production: Impacts, mitigation, & risk management  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The peaking of world oil production presents the U.S. and the world with an unprecedented risk management problem. As peaking is approached, liquid fuel prices and price volatility will increase dramatically, and, without timely mitigation, the economic, social, and political costs will be unprecedented. Viable mitigation options exist on both the supply and demand sides, but to have substantial impact, they must be initiated more than a decade in advance of peaking.... The purpose of this analysis was to identify the critical issues surrounding the occurrence and mitigation of world oil production peaking. We simplified many of the complexities in an effort to provide a transparent analysis. Nevertheless, our study is neither simple nor brief. We recognize that when oil prices escalate dramatically, there will be demand and economic impacts that will alter our simplified assumptions. Consideration of those feedbacks will be a daunting task but one that should be undertaken. Our aim in this study is to-- • Summarize the difficulties of oil production forecasting; • Identify the fundamentals that show why world oil production peaking is such a unique challenge; • Show why mitigation will take a decade or more of intense effort; • Examine the potential economic effects of oil peaking; • Describe what might be accomplished under three example mitigation scenarios. • Stimulate serious discussion of the problem, suggest more definitive studies, and engender interest in timely action to mitigate its impacts.

Hirsch, R.L. (SAIC); Bezdek, Roger (MISI); Wendling, Robert (MISI)

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Release mitigation spray safety systems for chemical demilitarization applications.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories has conducted proof-of-concept experiments demonstrating effective knockdown and neutralization of aerosolized CBW simulants using charged DF-200 decontaminant sprays. DF-200 is an aqueous decontaminant, developed by Sandia National Laboratories, and procured and fielded by the US Military. Of significance is the potential application of this fundamental technology to numerous applications including mitigation and neutralization of releases arising during chemical demilitarization operations. A release mitigation spray safety system will remove airborne contaminants from an accidental release during operations, to protect personnel and limit contamination. Sandia National Laboratories recently (November, 2008) secured funding from the US Army's Program Manager for Non-Stockpile Chemical Materials Agency (PMNSCMA) to investigate use of mitigation spray systems for chemical demilitarization applications. For non-stockpile processes, mitigation spray systems co-located with the current Explosive Destruction System (EDS) will provide security both as an operational protective measure and in the event of an accidental release. Additionally, 'tented' mitigation spray systems for native or foreign remediation and recovery operations will contain accidental releases arising from removal of underground, unstable CBW munitions. A mitigation spray system for highly controlled stockpile operations will provide defense from accidental spills or leaks during routine procedures.

Leonard, Jonathan; Tezak, Matthew Stephen; Brockmann, John E.; Servantes, Brandon; Sanchez, Andres L.; Tucker, Mark David; Allen, Ashley N.; Wilson, Mollye C.; Lucero, Daniel A.; Betty, Rita G.

2010-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

LIGA microsystems aging : evaluation and mitigation.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The deployment of LIGA structures in DP applications requires a thorough understanding of potential long term physical and chemical changes that may occur during service. While these components are generally fabricated from simple metallic systems such as copper, nickel and nickel alloys, the electroplating process used to form them creates microstructural features which differ from those found in conventional (e.g. ingot metallurgy) processing of such materials. Physical changes in non-equilibrium microstructures may occur due to long term exposure to temperatures sufficient to permit atomic and vacancy mobility. Chemical changes, particularly at the surfaces of LIGA parts, may occur in the presence of gaseous chemical species (e.g. water vapor, HE off-gassing compounds) and contact with other metallic structures. In this study, we have characterized the baseline microstructure of several nickel-based materials that are used to fabricate LIGA structures. Solute content and distribution was found to have a major effect on the electroplated microstructures. Microstructural features were correlated to measurements of hardness and tensile strength. Dormancy testing was conducted on one of the baseline compositions, nickel-sulfamate. Groups of specimens were exposed to controlled thermal cycles; subsequent examinations compared properties of 'aged' specimens to the baseline conditions. Results of our testing indicate that exposure to ambient temperatures (-54 C to 71 C) do not result in microstructural changes that might be expected to significantly effect mechanical performance. Additionally, no localized changes in surface appearance were found as a result of contact between electroplated parts.

Cadden, Charles H.; Yang, Nancy Y. C.; San Marchi, Christopher W.

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO2 Mitigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This quarterly report documents significant achievements in the Enhanced Practical Photosynthetic CO{sub 2} Mitigation project during the period from 4/2/2003 through 7/01/2003. As indicated in the list of accomplishments below we have completed some long-term model scale bioreactor tests and are prepared to begin pilot scale bioreactor testing. Specific results and accomplishments for the second quarter of 2003 include: (1) Bioreactor support systems and test facilities: (a) Qualitative long-term survivability tests for S.C.1.2(2) on Omnisil have been successfully completed and results demonstrate a growth rate that appears to be acceptable. (b) Quantitative tests of long-term growth productivity for S.C.1.2(2) on Omnisil have been completed and initial results are promising. Initial results show that the mass of organisms doubled (from 54.9 grams to 109.8 grams) in about 5 weeks. Full results will be available as soon as all membranes and filters are completely dried. The growth rate should increase significantly with the initiation of weekly harvesting during the long term tests. (c) The phase 1 construction of the pilot scale bioreactor has been completed, including the solar collector and light distribution system. We are now in the phase of system improvement as we wait for CRF-2 results in order to be able to finalize the design and construction of the pilot scale system. (d) A mass transfer experimental setup was constructed in order to measure the mass transfer rate from the gas to the liquid film flowing over a membrane and to study the hydrodynamics of the liquid film flowing over a membrane in the bioreactor. Results were reported for mass transfer coefficient, film thickness, and fluid velocity over an Omnisil membrane with a ''drilled hole'' header pipe design. (2) Organisms and Growth Surfaces: (a) A selectivity approach was used to obtain a cyanobacterial culture with elevated resistance to acid pH. Microlonies of ''3.2.2 S.C.1 Positive'' migrated towards light along a light gradient, and against acid gradient, in whole. Nonetheless, some microcolonies were able to generate ''secondary'' microcolonies with increased ability to move towards acid area. These microcolonies with elevated resistance to acidity have been isolated and inoculated in BG-11 with pH 6. They are still under incubation. (b) We have continued our work on the genotyping of unialgal cyanobacterial cultures isolated in YNP. Because partial sequence of 16S rRNA gene of the isolate 5.2 S.C.1 did not appear to be more than 93% identical to published cyanobacterial sequences, we carried out entire sequence of this gene using the combination of different primers. It appears that we have found a representative of putative new genus. We expect to publish all sequences. (c) The new species (even probably new genus) of cyanobacteria, 5.2 s. c. 1 that was isolated from La Duke Spring in Great Yellowstone Basin demonstrate an elevated resistance to some compounds of iron. This might be very important for our project, because plant gases may have elevated amount of iron. Our study of the effect of different concentration of FeCl3 6H2O on the growth of 5.2 S.C.1 isolate showed that iron additions stimulated rather then inhibited the growth of 5.2. S.C.1 isolate. Because of this we would recommend this isolate for further experiments.

Gregory Kremer; David J. Bayless; Morgan Vis; Michael Prudich; Keith Cooksey; Jeff Muhs

2003-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

218

Mitigating avian impacts: Applying the wetlands experience to wind farms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and state environmental laws spawned by NEPA, such as the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) and Washington State`s Environmental Policy Act (SEPA) have made us familiar with the concept of {open_quotes}mitigating{close_quotes} a project`s adverse environmental impacts. As wind energy projects expand to state with widely varying environmental regulation, the wind industry can look to other experiences in land use regulation, such as wetlands, for approaches to mitigation. Wetlands have been a point of friction between environmentalists, property rights advocates, local and state governments, and a host of federal agencies. A highly developed conceptual framework to mitigating environmental impacts has risen from this regulatory swamp of conflicting interests and overlapping jurisdictions.

Wolff, B. [Conservation and Renewable Energy System, Vancouver, WA (United States)

1995-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

219

Underwater Blast Experiments and Modeling for Shock Mitigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A simple but novel mitigation concept to enforce standoff distance and reduce shock loading on a vertical, partially-submerged structure is evaluated using scaled aquarium experiments and numerical modeling. Scaled, water tamped explosive experiments were performed using three gallon aquariums. The effectiveness of different mitigation configurations, including air-filled media and an air gap, is assessed relative to an unmitigated detonation using the same charge weight and standoff distance. Experiments using an air-filled media mitigation concept were found to effectively dampen the explosive response of the aluminum plate and reduce the final displacement at plate center by approximately half. The finite element model used for the initial experimental design compares very well to the experimental DIC results both spatially and temporally. Details of the experiment and finite element aquarium models are described including the boundary conditions, Eulerian and Lagrangian techniques, detonation models, experimental design and test diagnostics.

Glascoe, L; McMichael, L; Vandersall, K; Margraf, J

2010-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

220

Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2001 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group was actively engaged in implementing wildlife mitigation activities in 2001. The Work Group met quarterly to discuss management and budget issues affecting the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program. Work Group members protected 851 acres of wetland habitat in 2001. Wildlife habitat protected to date for the Albeni Falls project is approximately 5,248.31 acres ({approx}4,037.48 Habitat Units). Approximately 14% of the total wildlife habitat lost has been mitigated. Administrative activities increased as funding was more evenly distributed among Work Group members and protection opportunities became more time consuming. In 2001, Work Group members focused on development and implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program as well as completion of site-specific management plans. With the implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program, and as management plans are reviewed and executed, on the ground management activities are expected to increase in 2002.

Terra-Burns, Mary (Idaho Department of Fish and Game, Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group, Boise, ID)

2002-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "idb-climate change mitigation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Development Of Regional Climate Mitigation Baseline For A DominantAgro-Ecological Zone Of Karnataka, India  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Setting a baseline for carbon stock changes in forest andland use sector mitigation projects is an essential step for assessingadditionality of the project. There are two approaches for settingbaselines namely, project-specific and regional baseline. This paperpresents the methodology adopted for estimating the land available formitigation, for developing a regional baseline, transaction cost involvedand a comparison of project-specific and regional baseline. The studyshowed that it is possible to estimate the potential land and itssuitability for afforestation and reforestation mitigation projects,using existing maps and data, in the dry zone of Karnataka, southernIndia. The study adopted a three-step approach for developing a regionalbaseline, namely: i) identification of likely baseline options for landuse, ii) estimation of baseline rates of land-use change, and iii)quantification of baseline carbon profile over time. The analysis showedthat carbon stock estimates made for wastelands and fallow lands forproject-specific as well as the regional baseline are comparable. Theratio of wasteland Carbon stocks of a project to regional baseline is1.02, and that of fallow lands in the project to regional baseline is0.97. The cost of conducting field studies for determination of regionalbaseline is about a quarter of the cost of developing a project-specificbaseline on a per hectare basis. The study has shown the reliability,feasibility and cost-effectiveness of adopting regional baseline forforestry sectormitigation projects.

Sudha, P.; Shubhashree, D.; Khan, H.; Hedge, G.T.; Murthy, I.K.; Shreedhara, V.; Ravindranath, N.H.

2007-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

High Precision Astrometry in Asteroid Mitigation - the NEOShield Perspective  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Among the currently known Near Earth Objects (NEOs), roughly 1400 are classified as being potentially hazardous asteroids. The recent Chelyabinsk event has shown that these objects can pose a real threat to mankind. We illustrate that high precision asteroid astrometry plays a vital role in determining potential impact risks, selecting targets for deflection demonstration missions and evaluating mitigation mission success. After a brief introduction to the NEOShield project, an international effort initiated by the European Commission to investigate aspects of NEO mitigation in a comprehensive fashion, we discuss current astrometric performances, requirements and possible issues with NEO risk assessment and deflection demonstration missions.

Eggl, Siegfried; Hestroffer, Daniel; Perna, Davide; Bancelin, David; Thuillot, William

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Method to prevent/mitigate steam explosions in casting pits  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Steam explosions can be prevented or mitigated during a metal casting process by the placement of a perforated flooring system in the casting pit. An upward flow of compressed gas through this perforated flooring system is introduced during the casting process to produce a buffer layer between any spilled molten metal and the cooling water in the reservoir. This buffer layer provides a hydrodynamic layer which acts to prevent or mitigate steam explosions resulting from hot, molten metal being spilled into or onto the cooling water.

Taleyarkhan, Rusi P. (Knoxville, TN)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

Air Quality and Emissions Impacts of Heat Island Mitigation Strategies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Air Quality and Emissions Impacts of Heat Island Mitigation Strategies ENVIRONMENTAL AREA RESEARCH the temperature of the ground surface and the ambient air. This situation creates areas called urban heat summertime temperatures reduces electricity demand for air conditioning, which lowers air pollution levels

225

Mitigating the Hospital Area Communication's Interference using Cognitive Radio Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, their communications could greatly increase electromagnetic interference with other critical medical equip- ments. There is therefore a need to mitigate potential risks of electromagnetic interference between the patients wireless should be devel- oped to ensure efficient communications while minimizing electromagnetic interference

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

226

Wildlife mitigation and monitoring report Gunnison, Colorado, site  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project is administered by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE); its purpose is to cleanup uranium mill tailings and other contaminated material at 24 UMTRA Project sites in 10 states. This report summarizes the wildlife mitigation and monitoring program under way at the Gunnison UMTRA Project, Gunnison, Colorado. Remedial action at the Gunnison site was completed in December 1995 and is described in detail in the Gunnison completion report. The impacts of this activity were analyzed in the Gunnison environmental assessment (EA). These impacts included two important game species: the pronghorn antelope (Antilocapra americans) and sage grouse (Wentrocerus urophasianus). Haul truck traffic was predicted to limit antelope access to water sources north of the Tenderfoot Mountain haul road and that truck traffic along this and other haul roads could result in antelope road kills. Clearing land at the disposal cell, haul road and borrow site activities, and the associated human activities also were predicted to negatively impact (directly and indirectly) sage grouse breeding, nesting, loafing, and wintering habitat. As a result, an extensive mitigation and monitoring plan began in 1992. Most of the monitoring studies are complete and the results of these studies, written by different authors, appear in numerous reports. This report will: (1) Analyze existing impacts and compare them to predicted impacts. (2) Summarize mitigation measures. (3) Summarize all existing monitoring data in one report. (4) Analyze the effectiveness of the mitigation measures.

NONE

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Design of a Sediment Mitigation System for Conowingo Dam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Design of a Sediment Mitigation System for Conowingo Dam Rayhan Ain, Kevin Cazenas, Sheri Gravette as enhanced erosion of sediment due to significantly increased flow rates and constant interaction of water with the Dam. During these events, the sediment build up at Conowingo Dam in the Lower Susquehanna River has

228

0 1 & 2 -& 0 -* ! Forestry potential mitigation and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of forestry-based carbon offset investments and markets Voluntary investments Types of standards and shared forest management ·Increasing off-site C stocks in wood products ·Fossil fuel substitution (Bioenergy;Forestry (excluding bioenergy): Economic Mitigation Potential, at US$ 100 / tCO2, by 2030. (IPCC FAR, Vol

Pettenella, Davide

229

The Economic Impact of Drought and Mitigation in Agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Economic Impact of Drought and Mitigation in Agriculture Texas Drought and Beyond CIESS Austin · In Agriculture, it Began in 2010 ­ Wheat and other winter grazing crops are planted in the Fall ­ Lost value ­ Infrastructure losses #12;Agricultural Costs of Drought · Estimated $7.62 Billion ­ Corn, cotton, wheat, hay $4

Yang, Zong-Liang

230

U.S. Agriculture's Role Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation World  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

U.S. Agriculture's Role in a Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation World: An Economic Perspective and Research Associate, respectively, Department of Agricultural Economics, Texas A&M University. Seniority of Authorship is shared. This research was supported by the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station through

McCarl, Bruce A.

231

Mitigated subsurface transfer line leak resulting in a surface pool  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This analysis evaluates the mitigated consequences of a potential waste transfer spill from an underground pipeline. The spill forms a surface pool. One waste composite, a 67% liquid, 33% solid, from a single shell tank is evaluated. Even drain back from a very long pipeline (50,000 ft), does not pose dose consequences to the onsite or offsite individual above guideline values.

SCOTT, D.L.

1999-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

232

Unconventional Nuclear Warfare Defense (UNWD) containment and mitigation subtask.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The objective of this subtask of the Unconventional Nuclear Warfare Design project was to demonstrate mitigation technologies for radiological material dispersal and to assist planners with incorporation of the technologies into a concept of operations. The High Consequence Assessment and Technology department at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has studied aqueous foam's ability to mitigate the effects of an explosively disseminated radiological dispersal device (RDD). These benefits include particle capture of respirable radiological particles, attenuation of blast overpressure, and reduction of plume buoyancy. To better convey the aqueous foam attributes, SNL conducted a study using the Explosive Release Atmospheric Dispersion model, comparing the effects of a mitigated and unmitigated explosive RDD release. Results from this study compared health effects and land contamination between the two scenarios in terms of distances of effect, population exposure, and remediation costs. Incorporating aqueous foam technology, SNL created a conceptual design for a stationary containment area to be located at a facility entrance with equipment that could minimize the effects from the detonation of a vehicle transported RDD. The containment design was evaluated against several criteria, including mitigation ability (both respirable and large fragment particle capture as well as blast overpressure suppression), speed of implementation, cost, simplicity, and required space. A mock-up of the conceptual idea was constructed at SNL's 9920 explosive test site to demonstrate the containment design.

Wente, William Baker

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

RESEARCH PAPER Fouling and its mitigation in silicon microchannels used  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

RESEARCH PAPER Fouling and its mitigation in silicon microchannels used for IC chip cooling Jeffrey@rit.edu 123 Microfluid Nanofluid (2008) 5:357­371 DOI 10.1007/s10404-007-0254-4 #12;lE electrophoretic and micro- electronics. In recent years, the proliferation of Micro Electro Mechanical Systems (MEMS) has

Kandlikar, Satish

234

Efficient DHT attack mitigation through peers' ID distribution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Efficient DHT attack mitigation through peers' ID distribution Thibault Cholez, Isabelle Chrisment.festor}@loria.fr Abstract--We present a new solution to protect the widely deployed KAD DHT against localized attacks which DHT attacks by comparing real peers' ID distributions to the theoretical one thanks to the Kullback

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

235

Sensitivity of climate mitigation strategies to natural disturbances  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The present and future concentration of atmospheric carbon dioxide depends on both anthropogenic and natural sources and sinks of carbon. Most proposed climate mitigation strategies rely on a progressive transition to carbon12 efficient technologies to reduce industrial emissions, substantially supported by policies to maintain or enhance the terrestrial carbon stock in forests and other ecosystems. This strategy may be challenged if terrestrial sequestration capacity is affected by future climate feedbacks, but how and to what extent is little understood. Here, we show that climate mitigation strategies are highly sensitive to future natural disturbance rates (e.g. fires, hurricanes, droughts), because of potential effect of disturbances on the terrestrial carbon balance. Generally, altered disturbance rates affect the pace of societal and technological transitions required to achieve the mitigation target, with substantial consequences on the energy sector and on the global economy. Understanding the future dynamics and consequences of natural disturbances on terrestrial carbon balance is thus essential for developing robust climate mitigation strategies and policies

Le Page, Yannick LB; Hurtt, George; Thomson, Allison M.; Bond-Lamberty, Benjamin; Patel, Pralit L.; Wise, Marshall A.; Calvin, Katherine V.; Kyle, G. Page; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.; Janetos, Anthony C.

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

236

Mitigating Flood Loss through Local Comprehensive Planning in Florida  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and environment planning and policy. When sustainability was embraced by international organizations and governmental organizations managing development programs and projects, the term, ?sustainable development? became popular (Beatley, 1998). Currently...; and a more economically integrated and diverse population (Vale & Campanella, 2005). Based on previous literature (Beatley, 1998; Berke, 1995; Mileti, 1999), this study develops principles of sustainability that can be applied to flood mitigation...

Kang, Jung Eun

2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

237

1999 Leak Detection and Monitoring and Mitigation Strategy Update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a complete revision of WHC-SD-WM-ES-378, Rev 1. This update includes recent developments in Leak Detection, Leak Monitoring, and Leak Mitigation technologies, as well as, recent developments in single-shell tank retrieval technologies. In addition, a single-shell tank retrieval release protection strategy is presented.

OHL, P.C.

1999-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

238

NetPilot: Automating Datacenter Network Failure Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NetPilot: Automating Datacenter Network Failure Mitigation Xin Wu Daniel Turner Chao-Chih Chen Duke-on and fast-response online ser- vices have driven modern datacenter networks to undergo tremen- dous growth of critical failures commonly encountered in production datacenter networks. Categories and Subject

239

Mitigating the Risk of Insider Threats When Sharing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mitigating the Risk of Insider Threats When Sharing Credentials by Muntaha NourEddin Qasem Alawneh Thesis submitted to the University of London for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy Information Security Security Group as a candidate for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy. This work has not been submitted

Sheldon, Nathan D.

240

PEAKING OF WORLD OIL PRODUCTION: IMPACTS, MITIGATION, & RISK MANAGEMENT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

liquid fuels: 1) Improved Oil Recovery (IOR) can marginally increase production from existing reservoirs oil production declines from reservoirs that are past their peak production: 2) Heavy oil / oil sandsPEAKING OF WORLD OIL PRODUCTION: IMPACTS, MITIGATION, & RISK MANAGEMENT Robert L. Hirsch, SAIC

Laughlin, Robert B.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "idb-climate change mitigation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

ORIGINAL PAPER Adaptation and mitigation strategies in agriculture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

distri- bution. Major contributing factors will include increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide, rising gases, chiefly carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and nitrous oxide (N2O) (IPCC 2001a). CurrentlyORIGINAL PAPER Adaptation and mitigation strategies in agriculture: an analysis of potential

242

Transportation and Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Measurement, Causation and Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.S. CO2 emissions sources. U.S. CO2 transportation emissions sources by mode. #12;Center% of the carbon dioxide we produce. As such it is a leading candidate for greenhouse gas ((GHG) (CO2, NH4, HFCsTransportation and Greenhouse Gas Emissions: Measurement, Causation and Mitigation Oak Ridge

243

Market Based Risk Mitigation: Risk Management vs. Risk Avoidance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Market Based Risk Mitigation: Risk Management vs. Risk Avoidance Shmuel Oren University of the critical infrastructures in our society. Risk assessment and systematic consideration of risk in the design knowledge for engineers, like physics for instance, consideration of risk has penetrated all engineering

244

Global Climate Change: Why Understanding the Scientific Enterprise Matters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Global Climate Change: Why Understanding the Scientific Enterprise Matters Ellen MosleyPolar/ByrdPolarhttp://bprc.osu.edu/ Understanding Climate Change Risks and Identifying Opportunities for Mitigation & Adaptation in Ohio Ohio State University, May 15, 2014 #12;Key Points Earth's climate is changing - the world is warming ­ that debate

Howat, Ian M.

245

Mitigation of Sulfur Poisoning of Ni/Zirconia SOFC Anodes by...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Mitigation of Sulfur Poisoning of NiZirconia SOFC Anodes by Antimony and Tin . Mitigation of Sulfur Poisoning of NiZirconia SOFC Anodes by Antimony and Tin . Abstract: Surface...

246

Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Plan for Hungry Horse Hydroelectric Project, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for wildlife losses attributable to the construction of the Hungry Horse hydroelectric project. In this report, mitigation objectives and alternatives, the recommended mitigation projects, and the crediting system for each project are described by each target species. Mitigation objectives for each species (group) were established based on the loss estimates but tailored to the recommended projects. 13 refs., 3 figs., 19 tabs.

Bissell, Gael

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Effectiveness of advanced coating systems for mitigating blast effects on steel components  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effectiveness of advanced coating systems for mitigating blast effects on steel components C. Chen1 of this work is to study the effectiveness of an advanced coating material, polyurea, as a blast mitigation. Effects of thicknesses and locations of the polyurea on the blast mitigation are also studied

248

Numerical and probabilistic analysis of asteroid and comet impact hazard mitigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The possibility of asteroid and comet impacts on Earth has received significant recent media and scientific attention. Still, there are many outstanding questions about the correct response once a potentially hazardous object (PHO) is found. Nuclear munitions are often suggested as a deflection mechanism because they have a high internal energy per unit launch mass. However, major uncertainties remain about the use of nuclear munitions for hazard mitigation. There are large uncertainties in a PHO's physical response to a strong deflection or dispersion impulse like that delivered by nuclear munitions. Objects smaller than 100 m may be solid, and objects at all sizes may be 'rubble piles' with large porosities and little strength. Objects with these different properties would respond very differently, so the effects of object properties must be accounted for. Recent ground-based observations and missions to asteroids and comets have improved the planetary science community's understanding of these objects. Computational power and simulation capabilities have improved such that it is possible to numerically model the hazard mitigation problem from first principles. Before we know that explosive yield Y at height h or depth -h from the target surface will produce a momentum change in or dispersion of a PHO, we must quantify energy deposition into the system of particles that make up the PHO. Here we present the initial results of a parameter study in which we model the efficiency of energy deposition from a stand-off nuclear burst onto targets made of PHO constituent materials.

Plesko, Catherine S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Weaver, Robert P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Huebner, Walter F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

249

Tank vapor mitigation requirements for Hanford Tank Farms  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Westinghouse Hanford Company has contracted Los Alamos Technical Associates to listing of vapors and aerosols that are or may be emitted from the High Level Waste (HLW) tanks at Hanford. Mitigation requirements under Federal and State law, as well as DOE Orders, are included in the listing. The lists will be used to support permitting activities relative to tank farm ventilation system up-grades. This task is designated Task 108 under MJB-SWV-312057 and is an extension of efforts begun under Task 53 of Purchase Order MPB-SVV-03291 5 for Mechanical Engineering Support. The results of that task, which covered only thirty-nine tanks, are repeated here to provide a single source document for vapor mitigation requirements for all 177 HLW tanks.

Rakestraw, L.D.

1994-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

250

1996 monitoring report for the Gunnison, Colorado, wetlands mitigation plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The US Department of Energy (DOE) administers the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project to clean up uranium mill tailings and other surface contamination at 24 abandoned uranium mill sites in 10 states. One of these abandoned mill sites was near the town of Gunnison, Colorado. Surface remediation was completed at the Gunnison site in December 1995. Remedial action resulted in the elimination of 4.3 acres of wetlands and mitigation of this loss is through the enhancement of 17.8 acres of riparian plant communities in six spring-fed areas on US Bureau of Land Management mitigation sites. A five-year monitoring program was then implemented to document the response of vegetation and wildlife to the exclusion of livestock. This report provides the results of the third year of the monitoring program.

NONE

1996-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

Mitigating Pollution Concerns through Process Integration Technology Steps  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MITIGATING POLLUTION CONCERNS THROUGH PROCESS INTEGRATION TECHNOLOGY STEPS Paul Tripathi, D.Shukla TENSA Services, Houston, Tx and Steve Smith Duke Power, Charlotte, NC Abstract: With increasing concern to reduce the emission of SOx... of the studies to illustrate succesahow sful partnership can work. 1.0 Introduction: Over the past decade, there is an increasing concern for reducing environmental pollution. Some of the issues being addressed related to this topic...

Tripathi, P.; Shukla, D.; Smith, S.

252

Leak detection, monitoring, and mitigation technology trade study update  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is a revision and update to the initial report that describes various leak detection, monitoring, and mitigation (LDMM) technologies that can be used to support the retrieval of waste from the single-shell tanks (SST) at the Hanford Site. This revision focuses on the improvements in the technical performance of previously identified and useful technologies, and it introduces new technologies that might prove to be useful.

HERTZEL, J.S.

1998-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

253

EA-1617: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models |Conduct, Parent(CRADAMitigation Action Plan EA-1617: Mitigation

254

EA-1628: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models |Conduct, Parent(CRADAMitigation Action Plan EA-1617:Mitigation Action

255

EA-1636: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models |Conduct, Parent(CRADAMitigation Action PlanMitigation Action Plan

256

EA-1755: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models |Conduct, Parent(CRADAMitigation7: RevisedMonroe,Mitigation Action

257

EA-1440: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office of Audit ServicesMirant Potomac RiverEA-0847:Mitigation Action Plan EA-1440:

258

EA-1595: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office of Audit ServicesMirant Potomac RiverEA-0847:Mitigation7

259

Property:NEPA Resource Applicant Mitigation | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy ResourcesLoadingPenobscot County,ContAddr2 Jump to:ManagingFieldOfficeApplicant Mitigation Jump to:

260

Agriculture, Ecosystems, and Environment 193:37-41 http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.agee.2014.04.020 Spatial heterogeneity stabilizes livestock productivity in a changing climate  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.04.020 Spatial heterogeneity stabilizes livestock productivity in a changing climate Brady W Allred,1, John D in adapting to climate change and in mitigating livestock productivity loss caused by climatic variability variability email: allredbw@gmail.com and climate change on livestock productivity. Knowing how to mitigate

Allred, Brady

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "idb-climate change mitigation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

NATURE CLIMATE CHANGE | VOL 3 | FEBRUARY 2013 | www.nature.com/natureclimatechange 105 ossil fuels are expected to remain the dominant source of energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATURE CLIMATE CHANGE | VOL 3 | FEBRUARY 2013 | www.nature.com/natureclimatechange 105 F ossil in mitigating climate change. now. Pilot (up to 1/10 scale) testing and development integrated with commercial to inform climate mitigation strategy and to have any hope of limiting atmospheric CO2 levels to 450 ppm

Haszeldine, Stuart

262

Global climate change and international security.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report originates in a workshop held at Sandia National Laboratories, bringing together a variety of external experts with Sandia personnel to discuss 'The Implications of Global Climate Change for International Security.' Whatever the future of the current global warming trend, paleoclimatic history shows that climate change happens, sometimes abruptly. These changes can severely impact human water supplies, agriculture, migration patterns, infrastructure, financial flows, disease prevalence, and economic activity. Those impacts, in turn, can lead to national or international security problems stemming from aggravation of internal conflicts, increased poverty and inequality, exacerbation of existing international conflicts, diversion of national and international resources from international security programs (military or non-military), contribution to global economic decline or collapse, or international realignments based on climate change mitigation policies. After reviewing these potential problems, the report concludes with a brief listing of some research, technology, and policy measures that might mitigate them.

Karas, Thomas H.

2003-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

ADAPTATION OF FORESTS AND PEOPLETO CLIMATE CHANGE 1 Forest Ecosystem Services  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and inertia in the climate system. Sea level rise, melting of the polar ice caps and increased fre- quency) will affect the size of future changes. Re- gardless of mitigation activities implemented, today

Fischlin, Andreas

264

NGOs & climate change campaigns : understanding variations in motivations and activities of environmental and development organizations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The unequal distribution of climate change impacts exploits the existing vulnerabilities of developing nations. This inequity, coupled with an inadequate, climate mitigation-focused response, has prompted a growing movement ...

Reeve, Kara E

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

IPCC Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chapter 4 Geothermal Energy Chapter 5 Hydropower Chapter 6 Ocean Energy Chapter 7 Wind Energy Chapter 8#12;IPCC Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation Edited Summary Chapter 1 Renewable Energy and Climate Change Chapter 2 Bioenergy Chapter 3 Direct Solar Energy

Kammen, Daniel M.

266

Review of metallic surface treatments for corrosion mitigation. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Innovative metallic surface treatments for corrosion protection of facility systems and components were reviewed, including plasma spraying, electroless nickel plating, and ion plating. The work is part of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers effort to find coatings with properties superior to conventional polymeric types. The three methods were judged for adhesion, corrosion and erosion resistance, rust mitigation, and possible use in electromagnetic shielding. A brief description of physics is given for these methods along with case studies documenting their performance. Such metallic treatments may be a cost-effective, long-term corrosion protection alternative to traditional polymeric coatings, depending on component design and purpose.

Hock, V.F.; Rigsbee, J.M.; Boy, J.H.

1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Production and mitigation of acid chlorides in geothermal steam  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Measurements of the equilibrium distribution of relatively nonvolatile solutes between aqueous liquid and vapor phases have been made at temperatures to 350{degrees}C for HCl(aq) and chloride salts. These data are directly applicable to problems of corrosive-steam production in geothermal steam systems. Compositions of high-temperature brines which could produce steam having given concentrations of chlorides may be estimated at various boiling temperatures. Effects of mitigation methods (e.g., desuperheating) can be calculated based on liquid-vapor equilibrium constants and solute mass balances under vapor-saturation conditions.

Simonson, J.M.; Palmer, D.A.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Tritium Formation and Mitigation in High-Temperature Reactors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tritium is a radiologically active isotope of hydrogen. It is formed in nuclear reactors by neutron absorption and ternary fission events and can subsequently escape into the environment. To prevent the tritium contamination of proposed reactor buildings and surrounding sites, this study examines the root causes and potential mitigation strategies for permeation of tritium (such as: materials selection, inert gas sparging, etc...). A model is presented that can be used to predict permeation rates of hydrogen through metallic alloys at temperatures from 450–750 degrees C. Results of the diffusion model are presented for a steady production of tritium

Piyush Sabharwall; Carl Stoots

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Tritium Formation and Mitigation in High-Temperature Reactor Systems  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Tritium is a radiologically active isotope of hydrogen. It is formed in nuclear reactors by neutron absorption and ternary fission events and can subsequently escape into the environment. To prevent the tritium contamination of proposed reactor buildings and surrounding sites, this study examines the root causes and potential mitigation strategies for permeation of tritium (such as: materials selection, inert gas sparging, etc...). A model is presented that can be used to predict permeation rates of hydrogen through metallic alloys at temperatures from 450–750 degrees C. Results of the diffusion model are presented for a steady production of tritium

Piyush Sabharwall; Carl Stoots; Hans A. Schmutz

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

EA-1891: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergy DOEDealingVehicle1 Closing the2-A Dynegy-A7: H.Q6 New891: Mitigation

271

EA-1917: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergy DOEDealingVehicle1 Closing the2-A Dynegy-A7: H.Q6DraftMitigation

272

EIS-0457: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in Review: TopEnergy DOEDealingVehicle1: Draft6: Record of DecisionConductRecordMitigation

273

EA-1456: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models |Conduct, Parent(CRADA andDriving5-FEB. 15,61:1:6: Mitigation Action

274

EA-1508: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models |Conduct, Parent(CRADA andDriving5-FEB. 15,61:1:6:Final08: Mitigation

275

EA-1592: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models |Conduct, Parent(CRADA andDriving5-FEB.55: Finding4:Mitigation Action

276

EA-1679: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models |Conduct, Parent(CRADAMitigation Action50:0: FindingMitigation Action

277

EA-1704: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models |Conduct, Parent(CRADAMitigation Action50:0:0:6:Mitigation Action Plan

278

EA-1706: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models |Conduct, Parent(CRADAMitigation Action50:0:0:6:MitigationFinding

279

EA-1858: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models |Conduct, Parent(CRADAMitigation7:3:8:4:2: NoticeDepartmentMitigation

280

EA-1212: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Office of Environmental Management (EM)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergy CooperationRequirements Matrix U.S.7685 Vol. 76, No.5-FEB. 15, 200721:Final12: Mitigation

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "idb-climate change mitigation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

EIS-0026: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models |Conduct,Final9:Department of EnergyQCJuly8,EIS8:TheseMitigation

282

EIS-0186: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-UpHeat Pump Models |Conduct,Final9:Department ofofGNA Cliffs Energy6: Mitigation Action

283

EA-1611: Mitigation Action Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office of Audit ServicesMirant Potomac RiverEA-0847:Mitigation7East1 PSI: Finding of

284

EA-1731: Mitigation Acton Plan | Department of Energy  

Energy Savers [EERE]

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector General Office of Audit ServicesMirant Potomac RiverEA-0847:Mitigation7East1709: FinalFinding of

285

Mitigating Wind-Radar Interference | Department of Energy  

Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Year in3.pdfEnergy HealthComments MEMA:May1.docEx5.docofPotomac RiverVehicleSummaryMitigating

286

Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation Implementation Plan, 1990-2003 Progress (Annual) Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this document the authors present mitigation implementation activities to protect and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. This plan only addresses non-operational actions (mitigation measures that do not affect dam operation) described in the 'Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam' (Mitigation Plan) submitted to the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council) in March 1991 and in accordance with subsequent Council action on that Mitigation Plan. Operational mitigation was deferred for consideration under the Columbia Basin System Operation Review (SOR) process. This document represents an implementation plan considered and conditionally approved by the Council in March of 1993.

Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks; Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes

1993-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

287

Vehicle Investment and Operating Costs and Savings for Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

To help estimate costs of implementing greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation strategies for vehicles, the table below provides the initial investment, operating costs, and operating savings for each strategy.

288

Evaluating service mitigation proposals for the MBTA Green Line extension construction delay using simplified planning methods .  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??This thesis reviews a select group of transit environmental mitigation proposals through the application of ridership estimation methodologies. In recent years, rider demands and environmental… (more)

Rosen, Jamie C. (Jamie Cara)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

E-Print Network 3.0 - administration wildlife mitigation Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

IntroductionI. Introduction The Northwest Power Act of Summary: , mitigate and enhance fish and wildlife, including related spawning grounds and habitat, on the Columbia... to...

290

E-Print Network 3.0 - air pollution mitigation Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: air pollution mitigation Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Pacific Institute 654 13th Street,...

291

Functional requirements and technical criteria for the 241-SY-101 RAPID mitigation system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides functional, performance, and design criteria for the RAPID Mitigation System. In addition, critical interface, design assumptions, and analytical requirements are identified.

ERHART, M.F.

1999-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

292

Fabrication of mitigation pits for improving laser damage resistance in dielectric mirrors by femtosecond laser machining  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Femtosecond laser machining is used to create mitigation pits to stabilize nanosecond laser-induced damage in multilayer dielectric mirror coatings on BK7 substrates. In this paper, we characterize features and the artifacts associated with mitigation pits and further investigate the impact of pulse energy and pulse duration on pit quality and damage resistance. Our results show that these mitigation features can double the fluence-handling capability of large-aperture optical multilayer mirror coatings and further demonstrate that femtosecond laser macromachining is a promising means for fabricating mitigation geometry in multilayer coatings to increase mirror performance under high-power laser irradiation.

Wolfe, Justin E.; Qiu, S. Roger; Stolz, Christopher J.

2011-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

293

E-Print Network 3.0 - assessment protection mitigation Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Centres)1 Summary: risk assessment of all of its work in accordance with health and safety legislation (Regulation 3... by a mitigation strategy, with control mechanisms and...

294

Upcoming Webinar November 19: Micro-Structural Mitigation Strategies for PEM Fuel Cells  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

On November 19, the Energy Department will present a webinar on micro-structural mitigation strategies for PEM fuel cells focusing on morphological simulations and experimental approaches.

295

Mitigating Carbon Emissions: the Potential of Improving Efficiency of Household Appliances in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

onward. Table A-4: Carbon Emission Factors of ElectricityAdjustment factor Carbon Emission Factor (kg C/kWh)L ABORATORY Mitigating Carbon Emissions: the Potential of

Lin, Jiang

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Transforming trash: reuse as a waste management and climate change mitigation strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Composting energy production, composting, or direct reuse. Using wastepathways, to humus via composting, or it can be used

Vergara, Sintana Eugenia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Climate change under aggressive mitigation: the ENSEMBLES multi-model experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-10, 12165 Berlin, Germany H. Huebener Hessian Agency for the Environment and Geology, Rheingaustra�e 186, Italy W. May Á S. Yang Danish Climate Centre, Danish Meteorological Institute, Lyngbyvej 100, 2100.4) with reduced fossil fuel use for energy production aimed at stabilizing global warming below 2 K, is studied

Dufresne, Jean-Louis

298

Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

buildings to have a “net- zero-energy” impact. The issue hasto include such a net-zero-energy requirement by 2030 (CEC,like LEED certification or zero-net-energy are not directly

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

large conventional hydroelectric power, municipal solidconventional large hydroelectric power in the percentage).by states that large hydroelectric is not counted toward the

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vehicle rolling resistance, aerodynamics, engine efficiency, and transmission efficiency are ordered according to their initial cost-

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "idb-climate change mitigation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heavy- duty long-haul Class 8 trucks getting approximately 6which the trucks are sold from long-haul freight companiesof these trucks commonly involves initial use in long-haul

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

>50,000 sf buildings) Residential micro-CHP using Stirlingand micro- turbines. Residential micro-CHP systems are less

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

included. As technologies to produce biodiesel from varyinginitial technology and lifetime operating costs Biodiesel (biodiesel usage through 2020 reveals a relatively small biofuel content in future diesel trucks, there are policy and technology

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GHG rate and average cost-per-kWh of generation of thatas the incremental cost-per-kWh of the low-GHG technology (

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Transforming trash: reuse as a waste management and climate change mitigation strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

results in two products: syngas (a combination of CO, CH 4a carbon-rich solid). The syngas can then be burned as a

Vergara, Sintana Eugenia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Transforming trash: reuse as a waste management and climate change mitigation strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the nexus between the waste and energy systems is crucial toof biological matter. wastes – into energy and compost. Non-used to convert waste to energy. Where conventional

Vergara, Sintana Eugenia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Transforming trash: reuse as a waste management and climate change mitigation strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Small-scale entrepreneurs in the urban water and sanitationsmall-scale providers, who are very important sources of water and sanitationsmall-scale private providers for water services and 50% of the population relies on non-state actors for sanitation

Vergara, Sintana Eugenia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

hybrid (gas or diesel) electric vehicle technology (Langer,e.g. hybrid gasoline-electric vs. diesel vehicles). Dealing

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

area are Minnesota’s 20% ethanol fuel standard for gasolinearea are Minnesota’s 20% ethanol fuel standard for gasolinewith increased cellulosic ethanol Fuel carbon content (g

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heaters Walk-in refrigerators and freezers Single-voltagewashers, commercial refrigerators and freezers, commercialDay Domestic Refrigerator – Freezer. ” ASHRAE Transactions ,

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and developing emissions trading mechanisms to connect andand development of emissions trading or cap-and-tradesector market-based emissions trading system in the Western

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Climate Change Mitigation: Climate, Health, and Equity Implications of the Visible and the Hidden  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The European Union Emissions Trading Scheme: origins,assumptions behind emissions trading in non- market goods:eliminate the need for emissions trading in comparison to

Shonkoff, Seth Berrin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Update of States’ Combined Heat and Power Activities. ”M. Spurr, 1999. Combined Heat and Power: Capturing WastedElliot, 2001. “Combined Heat and Power: Saving Energy and

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Transforming trash: reuse as a waste management and climate change mitigation strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

scales using life-cycle assessment (LCA). In California,in solid waste life-cycle assessment (LCA) methodology usedAND POLICIES Life-cycle assessment (LCA) has emerged as an

Vergara, Sintana Eugenia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

315

Transforming trash: reuse as a waste management and climate change mitigation strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Biological treatment of waste solids. Waste Management andOF POLLUTANTS FROM SOLID WASTE Solid waste affects the32 5. Solid waste and its impact on the

Vergara, Sintana Eugenia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Transforming trash: reuse as a waste management and climate change mitigation strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

25 Incineration (add26 Environmental impacts from waste incinerationassessment of waste incineration in a life cycle

Vergara, Sintana Eugenia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Transforming trash: reuse as a waste management and climate change mitigation strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

solid waste: an overview. ” Water Science & Technology 53(Pablo Spiller. 1999. Spilled Water: Institutional Commitmentin the Provision of Water Services. Washington, D.C. :

Vergara, Sintana Eugenia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Climate Change Mitigation: Climate, Health, and Equity Implications of the Visible and the Hidden  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in a flood plain, and air and water pollution) (Shonkoff,the cost of providing water to the western United Statesreal estate losses, and water costs – alone are projected to

Shonkoff, Seth Berrin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

shift future projected coal generation increases to naturalthe reference of pulverized coal generation is applied, thusthrough 2040. All new coal generation was to be with one of

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

ASSESSING CLIMATE CHANGE MITIGATION WITH A HYBRID ENERGY-ECONOMY APPROACH FOR  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for enhanced oil recovery in depleted oil wells. A comparison of marginal abatement costs reveals somewhat

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "idb-climate change mitigation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

existing power plants (30-40 years), the transition to lower-GHG technologiesnatural gas technologies. Existing fossil fuel plants are

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

322

Transforming trash: reuse as a waste management and climate change mitigation strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of pollutants, including dioxins and furans, persistentCO, CO 2 , SO 2 , PM, dioxins, furans, and others), heat,in the emission of dioxins and furans (Polychlorinated-

Vergara, Sintana Eugenia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Corrigendum to "Influence of climate change mitigation technology on global demands of water for electricity generation"  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This corrigendum addresses errors in the printing of three figures that made the original version difficult to interpret.

Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan; Dooley, James J.; Smith, Steven J.; Clarke, Leon E.; Edmonds, James A.; Hejazi, Mohamad I.

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

large conventional hydroelectric power, municipal solidconventional large hydroelectric power in the percentage).large conventional hydroelectric power is not included (this

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Transforming trash: reuse as a waste management and climate change mitigation strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and gasification .. 26 Environmental impacts from wasteand gasification are two other thermal processes used to convert wastewastes is commonly practiced. I NCOMPLETE COMBUSTION : PYROLYSIS AND GASIFICATION

Vergara, Sintana Eugenia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Public awareness of carbon capture and storage : a survey of attitudes toward climate change mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Carbon Capture and Sequestration Technologies Program in the Laboratory for Energy and the Environment at MIT conducted a survey of public attitudes on energy use and environmental concerns. Over 1,200 people, representing ...

Curry, Thomas Edward, 1977-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Policies in the Electricity Sector. Discussion Paper 99-51,emissions from the electricity sector. Several states have2020 emissions from the electricity sector by 18%. Extending

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Transforming trash: reuse as a waste management and climate change mitigation strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

then landfill gas combustion), and landfilling (Williamssteam turbine, natural gas combustion turbine, natural gascomes from natural gas combustion (Marnay et al. 2002,

Vergara, Sintana Eugenia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1, 2007. Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative (RGGI), 2007.About RGGI. http://www.rggi.org/about.htm Accessed April 14,RI, VT, MD, Initiative d (RGGI) also DC and PA observing (

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Carbon capture technology: future fossil fuel use and mitigating climate change  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

sources for countries heavily reliant on imported fuels4 . Why CCS is not just a synonym for `clean coal

331

Colombia-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin: Energy, -105.3774934°CodaColden,CollingsColma,EnergyCaribbean

332

Uruguay-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia:FAQ < RAPID Jump to:Seadov PtyInformation UC 19-6-401Upson County, Georgia: EnergyUrbandale,

333

Greenhouse Gas Mitigation as a Structural Change and Policies that Offset Its Depressing Effects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The current economic modeling of emissions limitations does not embody economic features that are likely to be particularly important in the short term, yet the politics of limiting greenhouse gas emissions are often ...

Babiker, Mustafa H.M.

334

Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Through Greater Efficiency: The Potential for Conservation in California’s Residential Sector. Report

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2000. Assumptions to the Annual Energy Outlook 2000. U.S.EIA), 2005. Annual Energy Outlook 2005: With Projections toU.S. EIA), 2007. Annual Energy Outlook 2007. U.S. Department

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cost accounting Solar photovoltaic Cost effectiveness ($photovoltaic Average new plant (fossil, The GHG intensity and cost

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Transforming trash: reuse as a waste management and climate change mitigation strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

air pollution control technologies emit a variety of pollutants,air pollutants produced represent a burden. Modern incinerators are equipped with pollution controlspollutants formed during combustion, a number of air pollution controls

Vergara, Sintana Eugenia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

338

Transforming trash: reuse as a waste management and climate change mitigation strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Greenhouse gas emissions and biogas potential from livestock50-55 °C) conditions. Biogas (55- 65% CH 4 , remaining is COfuel. The production of biogas from the AD process is

Vergara, Sintana Eugenia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Argentina-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCT Biomass FacilityArdica Technologies Jump to:Arete Power Inc

340

Climate Change Mitigation in the Energy and Forestry Sectors of Developing  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartmentAUDITOhioOglesby,Sullivan, MissouriWebsterElectricEnergy Information

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "idb-climate change mitigation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Chile-Climate Change Mitigation and Agriculture in Latin America and the  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:Energy Information onChemithon842667°,Cheviot,3. ItFuels IncFund

342

Climate Change Mitigation Through Land-Use Measures in the Agriculture and  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 NoPublic Utilities Address: 160Benin:EnergyWisconsin: Energy ResourcesInformation is 045. ItSt.CareLoan Jump

343

Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2006; Wang, 2005). Cellulose-based ethanol is associatedemissions per gge for cellulose-based ethanol that displacescellolosic ethanol scenario Reference (AEO2007), cellulose-

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

Transforming trash: reuse as a waste management and climate change mitigation strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

coal and natural gas power in its life-cycle emissions, andemissions for each scenario if the waste-derived energy were instead displacing coal or wind power,

Vergara, Sintana Eugenia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The use of a heat pump water heater, with it use of a vaporResidential heat pump water heaters Walk-in refrigerators

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

P 4.3 MIADAC Modelling Climate Change Policies: Mitigation, Adaptation, and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in emission trading markets. · Analyze the political economy side of national and international climate policy in Switzerland We will extend our phase 2 work on adaptation measures (Gonseth, 2008) and refine existing estimates of impact costs for the Swiss economy (Ecoplan - Sigmaplan, 2007) in order to achieve more

Richner, Heinz

347

The Potential for a Nuclear Renaissance: The Development of Nuclear Power Under Climate Change Mitigation Policies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to the Engineering Systems Division and the Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering in Partial Fulfillment............................................................................................. Technology and Policy Program, Engineering Systems Division Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering May....................................................................................................... Richard K. Lester Professor of Nuclear Science and Engineering Director of the Industrial Performance

348

Transforming trash: reuse as a waste management and climate change mitigation strategy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

material recycling, energy production, composting, or directwith reduced energy production, reduced uncontrolled dumpingand Ahring 2006). Energy production from anaerobic digestion

Vergara, Sintana Eugenia

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Prioritizing Climate Change Mitigation Alternatives: Comparing Transportation Technologies to Options in Other Sectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

$/tonne CO2 eq) Greenhouse gas emission reduction in 2030 ($/tonne CO2 eq) Greenhouse gas emission reduction in 2030 ($/tonne CO2 eq) Greenhouse gas emission reduction in 2030 (

Lutsey, Nicholas P.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project, Annual Report 2003.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hydropower development within the Columbia and Snake River Basins has significantly affected riparian, riverine, and adjacent upland habitats and the fish and wildlife species dependent upon them. Hydroelectric dams played a major role in the extinction or major loss of both anadromous and resident salmonid populations and altered instream and adjacent upland habitats, water quality, and riparian/riverine function. Hydroelectric facility construction and inundation directly affected fish and wildlife species and habitats. Secondary and tertiary impacts including road construction, urban development, irrigation, and conversion of native habitats to agriculture, due in part to the availability of irrigation water, continue to affect wildlife and fish populations throughout the Columbia and Snake River Basins. Fluctuating water levels resulting from facility operations have created exposed sand, cobble, and/or rock zones. These zones are generally devoid of vegetation with little opportunity to re-establish riparian plant communities. To address the habitat and wildlife losses, the United States Congress in 1980 passed the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act (Act) (P.L. 96-501), which authorized the states of Idaho, Montana, Oregon, and Washington to create the Northwest Power Planning Council (Council). The Act directed the Council to prepare a program in conjunction with federal, state, and tribal wildlife resource authorities to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife species affected by the construction, inundation and operation of hydroelectric dams in the Columbia River Basin (NPPC 2000). Under the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program (Program), the region's fish and wildlife agencies, tribes, non-government organizations (NGOs), and the public propose fish and wildlife projects that address wildlife and fish losses resulting from dam construction and subsequent inundation. As directed by the Council, project proposals are subjected to a rigorous review process prior to receiving final approval. An eleven-member panel of scientists referred to as the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) examines project proposals. The ISRP recommends project approval based on scientific merit. The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA), the Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Authority (CBFWA), Council staff, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), and subbasin groups also review project proposals to ensure each project meets regional and subbasin goals and objectives. The Program also includes a public involvement component that gives the public an opportunity to provide meaningful input on management proposals. After a thorough review, the Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT) acquired the Malheur River Mitigation Project (Project) with BPA funds to compensate, in part, for the loss of fish and wildlife resources in the Columbia and Snake River Basins and to address a portion of the mitigation goals identified in the Council's Program (NPPC 2000).

Ashley, Paul

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Co-benefits of mitigating global greenhouse gas emissions for future air quality and human health  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions also influences air quality. We simulate the co-benefits of global GHG reductions on air quality and human health via two mechanisms: a) reducing co-emitted air pollutants, and b) slowing climate change and its effect on air quality. Relative to a reference scenario, global GHG mitigation in the RCP4.5 scenario avoids 0.5±0.2, 1.3±0.6, and 2.2±1.6 million premature deaths in 2030, 2050, and 2100, from changes in fine particulate matter and ozone. Global average marginal co-benefits of avoided mortality are $40-400 (ton CO2)-1, exceeding marginal abatement costs in 2030 and 2050, and within the low range of costs in 2100. East Asian co-benefits are 10-80 times the marginal cost in 2030. These results indicate that transitioning to a low-carbon future might be justified by air quality and health co-benefits.

West, Jason; Smith, Steven J.; Silva, Raquel; Naik, Vaishali; Zhang, Yuqiang; Adelman, Zacariah; Fry, Meridith M.; Anenberg, Susan C.; Horowitz, L.; Lamarque, Jean-Francois

2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

352

Hungry Horse Mitigation Plan; Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributable to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam, 1990-2003 Technical Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this document we present fisheries losses, mitigation alternatives, and recommendations to protect, mitigate, and enhance resident fish and aquatic habitat affected by the construction and operation of Hungry Horse Dam. This plan addresses six separate program measures in the 1987 Columbia Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. We designed the plan to be closely coordinated in terms of dam operations, funding, and activities with the Kerr Mitigation Plan presently before the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. This document represents a mitigation plan for consideration by the Northwest Power Planning Council process; it is not an implementation plan. Flathead Lake is one of the cleanest lakes of its size in the world. The exceptional water quality and unique native fisheries make the Flathead Lake/River system extremely valuable to the economy and quality of life in the basin. The recreational fishery in Flathead Lake has an estimated value of nearly eight million dollars annually. This mitigation process represents our best opportunity to reduce the impacts of hydropower in this valuable aquatic system and increase angling opportunity. We based loss estimates and mitigation alternatives on an extensive data base, agency reports, nationally and internationally peer-reviewed scientific articles, and an innovative biological model for Hungry Horse Reservoir and the Flathead River. We conducted an extensive, 14-month scoping and consultation process with agency representatives, representatives of citizen groups, and the general public. This consultation process helped identify issues, areas of agreement, areas of conflict, and advantages and disadvantages of mitigation alternatives. The results of the scoping and consultation process helped shape our mitigation plan. Our recommended plan is based firmly on principles of adaptive management and recognition of biological uncertainty. After we receive direction from the NPPC, we will add more detailed hypotheses and other features necessary for a long-term implementation plan.

Fraley, John J.; Marotz, Brian L. (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Helena, MT); DosSantos, Joseph M. (Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes of the Flathead Nation, Pablo, MT)

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Deriving Optimal Operational Rules for Mitigating Inter-area Oscillations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper introduces a new method to mitigate inter-area oscillations of a large scale interconnected power system by means of generation re-dispatch. The optimal operational control procedures are derived as the shortest distance from the current operating condition to a desired damping ratio of the oscillation mode by adjusting generator outputs. A sensitivity based method is used to select the most effective generators for generation re-dispatch and decision tree is trained to approximate the security boundary in a space characterized by the selected generators. The optimal operational rules can be found by solving an optimization problem where the boundary constraints are provided by the decision tree rules. This method is tested on a Western Electricity Coordinating Council (WECC) 179-bus simplified network model and simulation results have demonstrated the proof of concept and shown promising application in real time operation.

Diao, Ruisheng; Huang, Zhenyu; Zhou, Ning; Chen, Yousu; Tuffner, Francis K.; Fuller, Jason C.; Jin, Shuangshuang; Dagle, Jeffery E.

2011-05-23T23:59:59.000Z

354

Modeling radio communication blackout and blackout mitigation in hypersonic vehicles  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A procedure for the modeling and analysis of radio communication blackout of hypersonic vehicles is presented. A weakly ionized plasma generated around the surface of a hypersonic reentry vehicle traveling at Mach 23 was simulated using full Navier-Stokes equations in multi-species single fluid form. A seven species air chemistry model is used to compute the individual species densities in air including ionization - plasma densities are compared with experiment. The electromagnetic wave's interaction with the plasma layer is modeled using multi-fluid equations for fluid transport and full Maxwell's equations for the electromagnetic fields. The multi-fluid solver is verified for a whistler wave propagating through a slab. First principles radio communication blackout over a hypersonic vehicle is demonstrated along with a simple blackout mitigation scheme using a magnetic window.

Kundrapu, Madhusudhan; Beckwith, Kristian; Stoltz, Peter; Shashurin, Alexey; Keidar, Michael

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

355

Alternate VHTR/HTE INterface for mitigating tritum.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

High temperature creep in structures at the interface between the nuclear plant and the hydrogen plant and the migration of tritium from the core through structures in the interface are two key challenges for the Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) coupled to the High Temperature Electrolysis (HTE) process. The severity of these challenges, however, can be reduced by lowering the temperature at which the interface operates. Preferably this should be accomplished in a way that does not reduce combined plant efficiency and other performance measures. A means for doing so is described in this report. A heat pump is used to raise the temperature of near-waste heat from the PCU to the temperature at which nine-tenths of the HTE process heat is needed. In addition to mitigating tritium transport and creep of structures, structural material commodity costs are reduced and plant efficiency is increased by a couple of percent.

Vilim, R.; Nuclear Engineering Division

2009-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

356

Harvesting SSL Certificate Data to Mitigate Web-Fraud  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Web-fraud is one of the most unpleasant features of today's Internet. Two eminent examples of web-fraudulent activities are phishing and typosquatting. Phishing aims to elicit sensitive information from users by presenting them with mock-ups of legitimate web sites. Typosquatting is the nefarious practice of fielding web sites with names closely resembling those of legitimate and popular Internet destinations. Effects range from relatively benign (such as unwanted or unexpected ads) to downright sinister (especially, when typosquatting is combined with phishing). Prior work has assessed the risks of phishing and typosquatting and even attempted to profile and mitigate them. However, the problem remains largely unsolved. This paper presents a novel technique to detect web-fraud domains that utilize HTTPS. To achieve this, we conduct the first comprehensive study of SSL certificates for legitimate and popular domains, as opposed to those used for web-fraud. Drawing from extensive measurements, we build a classi...

Mishari, Mishari Al; Defrawy, Karim El; Tsudik, Gene

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Pressurized water nuclear reactor system with hot leg vortex mitigator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A pressurized water nuclear reactor system includes a vortex mitigator in the form of a cylindrical conduit between the hot leg conduit and a first section of residual heat removal conduit, which conduit leads to a pump and a second section of residual heat removal conduit leading back to the reactor pressure vessel. The cylindrical conduit is of such a size that where the hot leg has an inner diameter D.sub.1, the first section has an inner diameter D.sub.2, and the cylindrical conduit or step nozzle has a length L and an inner diameter of D.sub.3 ; D.sub.3 /D.sub.1 is at least 0.55, D.sub.2 is at least 1.9, and L/D.sub.3 is at least 1.44, whereby cavitation of the pump by a vortex formed in the hot leg is prevented.

Lau, Louis K. S. (Monroeville, PA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Electrodes mitigating effects of defects in organic electronic devices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A compound electrode for organic electronic devices comprises a thin first layer of a first electrically conducting material and a second electrically conducting material disposed on the first layer. In one embodiment, the second electrically conducting material is formed into a plurality of elongated members. In another embodiment, the second material is formed into a second layer. The elongated members or the second layer has a thickness greater than that of the first layer. The second layer is separated from the first layer by a conducting material having conductivity less than at least the material of the first layer. The compound electrode is capable of mitigating adverse effects of defects, such as short circuits, in the construction of the organic electronic devices, and can be included in light-emitting or photovoltaic devices.

Heller, Christian Maria Anton (Albany, NY)

2008-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

359

Environmental Responses to Carbon Mitigation through Geological Storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In summary, this DOE EPSCoR project is contributing to the study of carbon mitigation through geological storage. Both deep and shallow subsurface research needs are being addressed through research directed at improved understanding of environmental responses associated with large scale injection of CO{sub 2} into geologic formations. The research plan has two interrelated research objectives. ? Objective 1: Determine the influence of CO{sub 2}-related injection of fluids on pore structure, material properties, and microbial activity in rock cores from potential geological carbon sequestration sites. ? Objective 2: Determine the Effects of CO{sub 2} leakage on shallow subsurface ecosystems (microbial and plant) using field experiments from an outdoor field testing facility.

Cunningham, Alfred; Bromenshenk, Jerry

2013-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

360

Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project : 2008 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1998, the Burns Paiute Tribe (BPT) submitted a proposal to Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for the acquisition of the Malheur River Wildlife Mitigation Project (Project). The proposed mitigation site was for the Denny Jones Ranch and included Bureau of Land Management (BLM) and Oregon Division of State Lands (DSL) leases and grazing allotments. The Project approval process and acquisition negotiations continued for several years until the BPT and BPA entered into a Memorandum of Agreement, which allowed for purchase of the Project in November 2000. The 31,781 acre Project is located seven miles east of Juntura, Oregon and is adjacent to the Malheur River (Figure 1). Six thousand three hundred eighty-five acres are deeded to BPT, 4,154 acres are leased from DSL, and 21,242 acres are leased from BLM (Figure 2). In total 11 grazing allotments are leased between the two agencies. Deeded land stretches for seven miles along the Malheur River. It is the largest private landholding on the river between Riverside and Harper, Oregon. Approximately 938 acres of senior water rights are included with the Ranch. The Project is comprised of meadow, wetland, riparian and shrub-steppe habitats. The BLM grazing allotment, located south of the ranch, is largely shrub-steppe habitat punctuated by springs and seeps. Hunter Creek, a perennial stream, flows through both private and BLM lands. Similarly, the DSL grazing allotment, which lies north of the Ranch, is predominantly shrub/juniper steppe habitat with springs and seeps dispersed throughout the upper end of draws (Figure 2).

Kesling, Jason; Abel, Chad; Schwabe, Laurence

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "idb-climate change mitigation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Design review report for the SY-101 RAPID mitigation system  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report documents design reviews conducted of the SY-101 Respond And Pump In Days (RAPID) Mitigation System. As part of the SY-101 Surface-Level-Rise Remediation Project, the SY-101 WID Mitigation System will reduce the potential unacceptable consequences of crust growth in Tank 241-SY-101 (SY-101). Projections of the crust growth rate indicate that the waste level in the tank may reach the juncture of the primary and secondary confinement structures of the tank late in 1999. Because of this time constraint, many design activities are being conducted in parallel and design reviews were conducted for system adequacy as well as design implementation throughout the process. Design implementation, as used in this design review report, is the final component selection (e.g., which circuit breaker, valve, or thermocouple) that meets the approved design requirements, system design, and design and procurement specifications. Design implementation includes the necessary analysis, testing, verification, and qualification to demonstrate compliance with the system design and design requirements. Design implementation is outside the scope of this design review. The design activities performed prior to detailed design implementation (i.e., system mission requirements, functional design requirements, technical criteria, system conceptual design, and where design and build contracts were placed, the procurement specification) have been reviewed and are within the scope of this design review report. Detailed design implementation will be controlled, reviewed, and where appropriate, approved in accordance with Tank Waste Remediation System (TWRS) engineering procedures. Review of detailed design implementation will continue until all components necessary to perform the transfer function are installed and tested.

SCHLOSSER, R.L.

1999-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

362

Concepts for Wind Turbine Sound Mitigation Page 1 of 16 AWEA Windpower 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

influenced by turbine operational parameters such as rotational speed and blade pitch angle as well as wind turbine source noise mitigation techniques as well as how these technologies and turbine operation canConcepts for Wind Turbine Sound Mitigation Page 1 of 16 AWEA Windpower 2013 Chicago, IL May 6

McCalley, James D.

363

Impacts of ocean acidification and mitigative hydrated lime addition on Pacific oyster larvae  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Impacts of ocean acidification and mitigative hydrated lime addition on Pacific oyster larvae, and for other species. Keywords: Ocean acidification; Pacific oyster; Larval stages; Hydrated lime; Shellfish No.: 577 Title of Project: Impacts of ocean acidification and mitigative hydrated lime addition

364

Individual Pitch Control for Mitigation of Power Fluctuation of Variable Speed Wind Turbines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Individual Pitch Control for Mitigation of Power Fluctuation of Variable Speed Wind Turbines, China mcheng@seu.edu.cn Abstract-- Grid connected wind turbines are the sources of power fluctuations presents an individual pitch control (IPC) strategy to mitigate the wind turbine power fluctuation at both

Hu, Weihao

365

Experimental Astronomy (2004) 17: 261267 C Springer 2005 RFI MITIGATION AND THE SKA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimental Astronomy (2004) 17: 261­267 C Springer 2005 RFI MITIGATION AND THE SKA STEVEN W radio astronomy from its inception. The Workshop on the Mitigation of Radio Frequency Interference in Radio Astronomy (RFI2004) was held in Penticton, BC, Canada in July 2004 in order to consider

Ellingson, Steven W.

366

Cost Effectiveness of CO2 Mitigation Technologies and Policies in the Electricity Sector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

i Cost Effectiveness of CO2 Mitigation Technologies and Policies in the Electricity Sector. The costs and benefits of low carbon technology options are unique and affect different market participants in different ways. In this thesis, we examine the cost effectiveness of carbon mitigation technologies

367

Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility mitigation action plan. Annual report for 1998  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report (MAPAR) has been prepared as part of implementing the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility (DARHT) Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) to protect workers, soils, water, and biotic and cultural resources in and around the facility.

Haagenstad, T.

1999-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

368

Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program for continued operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program, required by the California Environmental Quality Act, was developed by UC as part of the Final EIS/EIR process. This document describing the program is a companion to the Final Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact Report (EIS/EIR) for the Continued Operation of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore (SNL, Livermore). The Final EIS/EIR analyzes the potential environmental impacts of the proposed action, which for the purposes of NEPA is: continued operation, including near-term (within 5 to 1 0 years) proposed projects, of LLNL and SNL, Livermore. The proposed action for the EIR is the renewal of the contract between DOE and UC for UC`s continued operation and management of LLNL. The Mitigation Monitoring and Reporting Program is for implementing and monitoring progress of measures taken to mitigate the significant impacts of the proposed action. A complete description of the impacts and proposed mitigations is in Section 5 of Volume I of the Final EIS/EIR. This report summarizes the mitigation measures, identifies the responsible party at the Laboratory for implementing the mitigation measure, states when monitoring will be implemented, when the mitigation measure will be in place and monitoring completed, and who will verify that the mitigation measure was implemented.

Not Available

1992-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Wildlife Protection, Mitigation, and Enhancement Planning Phase II, Dworshak Reservoir, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 directed that measures be implemented to protect, mitigate, and enhance fish and wildlife to the extent affected by development and operation of hydropower projects on the Columbia River System. This Act created the Northwest Power Planning Council, which in turn developed the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. This program established a four-part process: wildlife mitigation status reports; wildlife impact assessments; wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement plans; and implementation of protection, mitigation, and enhancement projects. This mitigation plan for the Dworshak Reservoir Hydroelectric Facility was developed to fulfill requirements of Sections 1003(b)(2) and (3) of the Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. Specific objectives of wildlife protection, mitigation, and enhancement planning for Dworshak Reservoir included: quantify net impacts to target wildlife species affected by hydroelectric development and operation of Dworshak Dam and Reservoir; develop protection, mitigation, and enhancement goals and objectives for the target wildlife species; recommend protection, mitigation, and enhancement actions for the target wildlife species; and coordination of project activities. 46 refs., 4 figs., 31 tabs.

Hansen, H. Jerome; Martin, Robert C.

1989-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

4/6/2014 EU Drafts Hydraulic Fracturing Guidelines to Mitigate Conflicting Laws | The DailyEnergyReport http://www.dailyenergyreport.com/eu-drafts-hydraulic-fracturing-guidelines-to-mitigate-conflicting-laws-2/ 1/7  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

4/6/2014 EU Drafts Hydraulic Fracturing Guidelines to Mitigate Conflicting Laws | The DailyEnergyReport http://www.dailyenergyreport.com/eu-drafts-hydraulic-fracturing Transportation Generation Finance Government Attend Watch EU Drafts Hydraulic Fracturing Guidelines to Mitigate

Chiao, Jung-Chih

371

Climate change impact, adaptation and associated costs for coastal risks in France  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Climate change impact, adaptation and associated costs for coastal risks in France Gonéri Le.Pons@developpement-durable.gouv.fr Abstract As part of the French climate plan, an inter-ministerial working group called "climate change by climate change and to identify possible mitigation measures. Seven thematic committees were organized

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

372

The potential to mitigate global warming with no-tillage management is only realized when practised in the long term  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The potential to mitigate global warming with no-tillageNT adoption reduces the net global warming potential (GWP)soil for purposes of global warming mitigation. Our results

Six, J; Ogle, S M; Breidt, F J; Conant, R T; Mosier, A R; Paustian, K

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Evaluating the effectiveness of wildlife accident mitigation installations with the wildlife accident reporting system (WARS) in British Columbia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTIVENESS OF WILDLIFE ACCIDENT MITIGATION INSTALLATIONSWITH THE WILDLIFE ACCIDENT REPORTING SYSTEM (WARS) INadministers the Wildlife Accident Reporting System (WARS), a

Sielecki, Leonard E.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Status of R&D on Mitigating the Effects of Pressure Waves for the Spallation Neutron Source Mercury Target  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been conducting R&D on mitigating the effects of pressure waves in mercury spallation targets since 2001. More precisely, cavitation damage of the target vessel caused by the short beam pulse threatens to limit its lifetime more severely than radiation damage as well as limit its ultimate power capacity and hence its neutron intensity performance. The R&D program has moved from verification of the beam-induced damage phenomena to study of material and surface treatments for damage resistance to the current emphasis on gas injection techniques for damage mitigation. Two techniques are being worked on: injection of small dispersed gas bubbles that mitigate the pressure waves volumetrically; and protective gas walls that isolate the vessel from the damaging effects of collapsing cavitation bubbles. The latter has demonstrated good damage mitigation during in-beam testing with limited pulses, and adequate gas wall coverage at the beam entrance window has been demonstrated with the SNS mercury target flow configuration using a full scale mercury test loop. A question on the required area coverage remains which depends on results from SNS target post irradiation examination. The small gas bubble technique has been less effective during past in-beam tests but those results were with un-optimized and un-verified bubble populations. Another round of in-beam tests with small gas bubbles is planned for 2011. The first SNS target was removed from service in mid 2009 and samples were cut from two locations at the target s beam entrance window. Through-wall damage was observed at the innermost mercury vessel wall (not a containment wall). The damage pattern suggested correlation with the local mercury flow condition which is nearly stagnant at the peak damage location. Detailed post irradiation examination of the samples is under way that will assess the erosion and measure irradiation-induced changes in mechanical properties. Similar samples were cut from the second SNS target after it was removed from service in mid 2010. More extensive damage was observed on the target inner wall but damage to the containment wall was minimal.

Riemer, Bernie [ORNL] [ORNL; Wendel, Mark W [ORNL] [ORNL; Felde, David K [ORNL] [ORNL; Abdou, Ashraf A [ORNL] [ORNL; McClintock, David A [ORNL] [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

The Effect of Debris on Collector Optics, its Mitigation and Repair: Next-Step a Gaseous Sn EUV DPP Source  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Effect of Debris on Collector Optics, its Mitigation and Repair: Next-Step a Gaseous Sn EUV DPP to advanced fuel plasma EUV sources is collector lifetime. The Illinois Debris-mitigation EUV Applications based on this work. Keywords: EUV source, debris, optics, collector lifetime, mitigation, plasma

Spila, Timothy P.

376

Annual Adaptive Management Report for Compensatory Mitigation at Keyport Lagoon: Mitigation of Pier B Development at the Bremerton Naval Facilities - Compensatory Mitigation at Keyport Lagoon - Naval Underwater Warfare Center Division - Keyport, Washington  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Unites States Navy capital improvement projects are designed to modernize and improve mission capacity. Such capital improvement projects often result in unavoidable environmental impacts by increasing over-water structures, which results in a loss of subtidal habitat within industrial areas of Navy bases. In the Pacific Northwest, compensatory mitigation often targets alleviating impacts to Endangered Species Act-listed salmon species. The complexity of restoring large systems requires limited resources to target successful and more coordinated mitigation efforts to address habitat loss and improvements in water quality that will clearly contribute to an improvement at the site scale and can then be linked to a cumulative net ecosystem improvement.

Vavrinec, John; Borde, Amy B.; Woodruff, Dana L.; Brandenberger, Jill M.; Thom, Ronald M.; Wright, Cynthia L.; Cullinan, Valerie I.

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

GHG Mitigation Potential, Costs and Benefits in Global Forests: ADynamic Partial Equilibrium Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper reports on the global potential for carbonsequestration in forest plantations, and the reduction of carbonemissions from deforestation, in response to six carbon price scenariosfrom 2000 to 2100. These carbon price scenarios cover a range typicallyseen in global integrated assessment models. The world forest sector wasdisaggregated into tenregions, four largely temperate, developedregions: the European Union, Oceania, Russia, and the United States; andsix developing, mostly tropical, regions: Africa, Central America, China,India, Rest of Asia, and South America. Three mitigation options -- long-and short-rotation forestry, and the reduction of deforestation -- wereanalyzed using a global dynamic partial equilibrium model (GCOMAP). Keyfindings of this work are that cumulative carbon gain ranges from 50.9 to113.2 Gt C by 2100, higher carbon prices early lead to earlier carbongain and vice versa, and avoided deforestation accounts for 51 to 78percent of modeled carbon gains by 2100. The estimated present value ofcumulative welfare change in the sector ranges from a decline of $158billion to a gain of $81 billion by 2100. The decline is associated witha decrease in deforestation.

Sathaye, Jayant; Makundi, Willy; Dale, Larry; Chan, Peter; Andrasko, Kenneth

2005-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

378

Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility mitigation action plan. Annual report for 1997  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report (MAPAR) has been prepared by the US Department of Energy (DOE) as part of implementing the Dual Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Test Facility (DARHT) Mitigation Action Plan (MAP). This MAPAR provides a status on specific DARHT facility design- and construction-related mitigation actions that have been initiated in order to fulfill DOE`s commitments under the DARHT MAP. The functions of the DARHT MAP are to (1) document potentially adverse environmental impacts of the Phased Containment Option delineated in the Final EIS, (2) identify commitments made in the Final EIS and ROD to mitigate those potential impacts, and (3) establish Action Plans to carry out each commitment (DOE 1996). The DARHT MAP is divided into eight sections. Sections 1--5 provide background information regarding the NEPA review of the DARHT project and an introduction to the associated MAP. Section 6 references the Mitigation Action Summary Table which summaries the potential impacts and mitigation measures; indicates whether the mitigation is design-, construction-, or operational-related; the organization responsible for the mitigation measure; and the projected or actual completion data for each mitigation measure. Sections 7 and 8 discuss the Mitigation Action Plan Annual Report and Tracking System commitment and the Potential Impacts, Commitments, and Action Plans respectively. Under Section 8, potential impacts are categorized into five areas of concern: General Environment, including impacts to air and water; Soils, especially impacts affecting soil loss and contamination; Biotic Resources, especially impacts affecting threatened and endangered species; Cultural/Paleontological Resources, especially impacts affecting the archeological site known as Nake`muu; and Human Health and Safety, especially impacts pertaining to noise and radiation. Each potential impact includes a brief statement of the nature of the impact and its cause(s). The commitment made to mitigate the potential impact is identified and the Action Plan for each commitment is described in detail, with a description of actions to be taken, pertinent time frames for the actions, verification of mitigation activities, and identification of agencies/organizations responsible for satisfying the requirements of the commitment.

Haagenstad, H.T.

1998-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

379

Hungry Horse Dam Fisheries Mitigation; Kokanee Stocking and Monitoring in Flathead Lake, 1995 Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The operation of Hungry Horse Dam on the South Fork-of the Flathead River reduced the reproductive success of kokanee (Oncorhynchus nerka) spawning in the Flathead River. Montana Fish, Wildlife and Parks (MFWP) and the Confederated Salish and Kootenai Tribes (CSKT) authored a mitigation plan to offset those losses. The mitigation goal, stated in the Fisheries Mitigation Plan for Losses Attributed to the Construction and Operation of Hungry Horse Dam, is to: {open_quotes}Replace lost annual production of 100,000 kokanee adults, initially through hatchery production and pen rearing in Flathead Lake, partially replacing lost forage for lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) in Flathead Lake.{close_quotes}

Fredenberg, Wade; Carty, Daniel (US Fish and Wildlife Service, Kalispell, MT); Cavigli, Jon (Montana Department of Fish, Wildlife and Parks, Kalispell, MT)

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Project; Idaho Department of Fish and Game 2007 Final Annual Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Idaho Department of Fish and Game maintained a total of about 2,743 acres of wildlife mitigation habitat in 2007, and protected another 921 acres. The total wildlife habitat mitigation debt has been reduced by approximately two percent (598.22 HU) through the Department's mitigation activities in 2007. Implementation of the vegetative monitoring and evaluation program continued across protected lands. For the next funding cycle, the IDFG is considering a package of restoration projects and habitat improvements, conservation easements, and land acquisitions in the project area.

Cousins, Katherine [Idaho Department of Fsh and Game

2009-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "idb-climate change mitigation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Corrosion mitigation considerations in planning for zero liquid discharge  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A reduction in the availability and in the quality of water, coupled with more significantly more stringent water discharge restrictions, has resulted in increasing numbers of industrial complexes investigating water reuse and zero liquid discharge. Their investigation generally includes a survey of the potential impact of increased dissolved solids on the formation of mineral salt scales on heat transfer surfaces. These predictive tools are readily available and fairly accurate. The prediction of corrosion potential, however, is not as clearly defined, and as a consequence, little consideration is given to the effects of increased solids on corrosion. In addition to the potential for accelerated corrosion related to increased dissolved solids, many reuse waters contain elevated levels of biological activity and are rich in the nutrients that feed these micro organisms. This paper looks at the reasons for selecting zero liquid discharge as a means of water conservation and discharge reduction, the unit operations available to achieve these goals, and the corrosion mechanisms and mitigation associated with reuse water.

DeWitt-Dick, D.B. [Ashland Chemical Co., Portland, TX (United States). Drew Industrial Division; Lee, B. [Ashland Chemical Co., Boonton, NJ (United States). Drew Industrial Division

1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Security Informatics Research Challenges for Mitigating Cyber Friendly Fire  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper addresses cognitive implications and research needs surrounding the problem of cyber friendly re (FF). We dene cyber FF as intentional o*ensive or defensive cyber/electronic actions intended to protect cyber systems against enemy forces or to attack enemy cyber systems, which unintentionally harms the mission e*ectiveness of friendly or neutral forces. We describe examples of cyber FF and discuss how it ts within a general conceptual framework for cyber security failures. Because it involves human failure, cyber FF may be considered to belong to a sub-class of cyber security failures characterized as unintentional insider threats. Cyber FF is closely related to combat friendly re in that maintaining situation awareness (SA) is paramount to avoiding unintended consequences. Cyber SA concerns knowledge of a system's topology (connectedness and relationships of the nodes in a system), and critical knowledge elements such as the characteristics and vulnerabilities of the components that comprise the system and its nodes, the nature of the activities or work performed, and the available defensive and o*ensive countermeasures that may be applied to thwart network attacks. We describe a test bed designed to support empirical research on factors a*ecting cyber FF. Finally, we discuss mitigation strategies to combat cyber FF, including both training concepts and suggestions for decision aids and visualization approaches.

Carroll, Thomas E.; Greitzer, Frank L.; Roberts, Adam D.

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

383

Willow Creek Wildlife Mitigation Project. Final Environmental Assessment.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Today`s notice announces BPA`s proposal to fund land acquisition or acquisition of a conservation easement and a wildlife management plan to protect and enhance wildlife habitat at the Willow Creek Natural Area in Eugene, Oregon. This action would provide partial mitigation for wildlife and wildlife habitat lost by the development of Federal hydroelectric projects in the Willamette River Basin. The project is consistent with BPA`s obligations under provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980 as outlined by the Northwest Power Planning Council`s 1994 Columbia River Basin Fish and Wildlife Program. BPA has prepared an environmental assessment (DOE/EA-1023) evaluating the proposed project. Based on the analysis in the EA, BPA has determined that the proposed action is not a major Federal action significantly affecting the quality of the human environment, within the meaning of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) of 1969. Therefore, the preparation of an environmental impact statement (EIS) is not required and BPA is issuing this FONSI.

NONE

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

ENVIRONMENTALLY BENIGN MITIGATION OF MICROBIOLOGICALLY INFLUENCED CORROSION (MIC)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall program objective is to develop and evaluate environmentally benign agents or products that are effective in the prevention, inhibition, and mitigation of microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) in the internal surfaces of metallic natural gas pipelines. The goal is to develop one or more environmentally benign (a.k.a. ''green'') products that can be applied to maintain the structure and dependability of the natural gas infrastructure. The technical approach for this quarter included the fractionation of extracts prepared from several varieties of pepper plants, and using several solvents, by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). A preliminary determination of antimicrobial activities of the new extracts and fractions using a growth inhibition assay, and evaluation of the extracts ability to inhibit biofilm formation was also performed. The analysis of multiple extracts of pepper plants and fractions of extracts of pepper plants obtained by HPLC illustrated that these extracts and fractions are extremely complex mixtures of chemicals. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to identify the chemical constituents of these extracts and fractions to the greatest degree possible. Analysis of the chemical composition of various extracts of pepper plants has illustrated the complexity of the chemical mixtures present, and while additional work will be performed to further characterize the extracts to identify bioactive compounds the focus of efforts should now shift to an evaluation of the ability of extracts to inhibit corrosion in mixed culture biofilms, and in pure cultures of bacterial types which are known or believed to be important in corrosion.

John J. Kilbane II; William Bogan

2004-01-31T23:59:59.000Z

385

The importance of food demand management for climate mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and fertiliser, and the inclusion of climate change as a driver of yield changes and irrigation demand. This would enable estimation of how shortfalls in irrigation water availability might affect future food production. Bioenergy scenarios also lie outside... the scope of the current paper; unless food demand patterns change significantly, there seems to be little spare land for bioenergy developments without a reduction of food availability. However, it is important to note that the model results we present...

Bajželj, Bojana; Richards, Keith S.; Allwood, Julian M.; Smith, Pete; Dennis, John S.; Curmi, Elizabeth; Gilligan, Christopher A.

2014-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

386

An Integrated Approach to Evaluating Risk Mitigation Measures for UAV Operational Concepts in the NAS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An integrated approach is outlined in this paper to evaluate risks posed by operating Unmanned Aerial Vehicles in the National Airspace System. The approach supports the systematic evaluation of potential risk mitigation ...

Weibel, Roland E

2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

387

Characterization and mitigation of process variation in digital circuits and systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Process variation threatens to negate a whole generation of scaling in advanced process technologies due to performance and power spreads of greater than 30-50%. Mitigating this impact requires a thorough understanding of ...

Drego, Nigel Anthony, 1980-

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

A program to design asphalt concrete overlays to mitigate reflection cracking  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the research are to understand the occurrence and behavior of reflection cracking and for devising ways of mitigating them and to put together an effective and complete package of computer programs to design asphalt concrete overlays. Another primary objective...

Satyanarayana Rao, Sindhu

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

389

Supplement Analysis for the Wildlife Mitigation Program EIS (DOE/EIS-0246/SA-39)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

BPA funds the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program, which is tasked with the acquisition and restoration of key habitats within the Pend Oreille Watershed. This mitigation program purchases private land to be owned and managed by program participants for the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of wildlife affected by the construction and operation of the Federal hydroelectric facilities on the Columbia River. BPA is currently working with the Kalispel Tribe of Indians to acquire and manage three parcels that total approximately 890 acres of land within Pend Oreille County, Washington. The properties proposed for acquisition contain habitats or potential habitats that will provide BPA with credits for partial mitigation of wildlife habitat losses due to the construction of Albeni Falls Dam. The current proposal includes only the fee title acquisition of these parcels; habitat enhancement activities will likely be carried out by the Kalispel Tribe of Indians in the future following the development of a management plan(s) for the lands.

N /A

2004-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

390

Strategies for Mitigating the Reduction in Economic Value of Variable Generation with Increasing Penetration Levels  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this report, we evaluate individual options that have the potential to stem the decline in the marginal value of variable generation (VG) with increasing penetration levels. We focus only on the effectiveness of mitigation measures for wind and PV.

Mills, Andrew; Wiser, Ryan

2014-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

391

Evaluating service mitigation proposals for the MBTA Green Line extension construction delay using simplified planning methods  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis reviews a select group of transit environmental mitigation proposals through the application of ridership estimation methodologies. In recent years, rider demands and environmental concerns have led many transit ...

Rosen, Jamie C. (Jamie Cara)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Monitoring and Mitigation Alternatives for Protection of North Atlantic Right Whales during Offshore Wind Farm Installation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Progress report on defining and determining monitoring and mitigation measures for protecting North Atlantic Right Whales from the effects of pile driving and other activities associated with installation of offshore wind farms.

Carlson, Thomas J.; Halvorsen, Michele B.; Matzner, Shari; Copping, Andrea E.; Stavole, Jessica

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Knock mitigation on boosted Controlled Auto-Ignition engines with fuel stratification and Exhaust Gas Recycling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This research is carried out to understand the mechanism of using fuel stratification and Exhaust Gas Recycling (EGR) for knock mitigation on boosted Controlled Auto-Ignition (CAl) engines. Experiments were first conducted ...

Sang, Wen, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Title: A Hierarchical, Geospatial Approach to Mitigate Shrub Invasion in the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Title: A Hierarchical, Geospatial Approach to Mitigate Shrub Invasion in the Southwestern United and decision products will be based on geospatial modeling coupled with field experiments and draw on a wealth

Nishiguchi, Michele

395

Strategies for mitigating adverse environmental impacts due to structural building materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis assesses the problem of adverse environmental impacts due to the use of Portland cement and structural steel in the construction industry. The thesis outlines three technology and policy strategies to mitigate ...

Chaturvedi, Swati, 1976-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

Urban agriculture and operational mosquito larvae control: mitigating malaria risk in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Urban agriculture and operational mosquito larvae control: mitigating malaria risk in Dar es Salaam ................................................................................................... 8 1.4 Study area: Dar es Salaam ...................................................................................10 1.5 Urban agriculture in Dar es Salaam

Richner, Heinz

397

Collective action for community-based hazard mitigation: a case study of Tulsa project impact  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

During the past two decades, community-based hazard mitigation (CBHM) has been newly proposed and implemented as an alternative conceptual model for emergency management to deal with disasters comprehensively in order to curtail skyrocketing...

Lee, Hee Min

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Expert systems: A new approach to radon mitigation training and quality assurance  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Training radon mitigators and ensuring that they provide high-quality work on the scale necessary to reduce radon to acceptable levels in the large number of homes and schools requiring some mitigation is a challenging problem. The US Environmental Protection Agency and several states have made commendable efforts to train mitigators and ensure that they provide quality services to the public. Expert systems could be used to extend and improve the effectiveness of these efforts. The purpose of this paper is to introduce the radon community to this promising new technology. The paper includes a description of a prototype system developed by Pacific Northwest Laboratory that illustrates several of the capabilities that expert systems can provide, a brief explanation of how the prototype works, and a discussion of the potential roles and benefits of fully-developed expert systems for radon mitigation. 4 refs., 3 figs.

Brambley, M.R.; Hanlon, R.L.; Parker, G.B.

1990-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

399

Agent-Based Simulation of an Automatic Mitigation Procedure Robert Entriken and Steve Wan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agent-Based Simulation of an Automatic Mitigation Procedure Robert Entriken and Steve Wan EPRI rentrike@epri.com, swan@epri.com Abstract This paper describes experiments using computer- based agents

Tesfatsion, Leigh

400

Aligned composite structures for mitigation of impact damage and resistance to wear in dynamic environments  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Fibrous monolith composites having architectures that provide increased flaw insensitivity, improved hardness, wear resistance and damage tolerance and methods of manufacture thereof are provided for use in dynamic environments to mitigate impact damage and increase wear resistance.

Mulligan, Anthony C.; Rigali, Mark J.; Sutaria, Manish P.; Popovich, Dragan; Halloran, Joseph P.; Fulcher, Michael L.; Cook, Randy C.

2005-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "idb-climate change mitigation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Aligned composite structures for mitigation of impact damage and resistance to wear in dynamic environments  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Fibrous monolith composites having architectures that provide increased flaw insensitivity, improved hardness, wear resistance and damage tolerance and methods of manufacture thereof are provided for use in dynamic environments to mitigate impact damage and increase wear resistance.

Mulligan, Anthony C. (Tucson, AZ); Rigali, Mark J. (Tucson, AZ); Sutaria, Manish P. (Malden, MA); Popovich, Dragan (Redmond, WA); Halloran, Joseph P. (Tucson, AZ); Fulcher, Michael L. (Tucson, AZ); Cook, Randy C. (Tucson, AZ)

2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

402

Gas jet disruption mitigation studies on Alcator C-Mod and DIII-D  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-pressure noble gas jet injection is a mitigation technique which potentially satisfies the requirements of fast response time and reliability, without degrading subsequent discharges. Previously reported gas jet ...

Hollmann, E. M.

403

Spatial Interference Mitigation for Multiple Input Multiple Output Ad Hoc Networks: MISO Gains  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spatial Interference Mitigation for Multiple Input Multiple Output Ad Hoc Networks: MISO Gains beamforming for a multiple input single output (MISO) ad hoc network to increase the density of successful

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

404

Development of a Digital Controller for a Vertical Wind Tunnel (VWT) Prototype to Mitigate Ball Fluctuations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this research was to mitigate fluctuations of a levitated ping pong ball within a vertical wind tunnel (VWT) prototype. This was made possible by remodeling the VWT system with its inherent nonlinear characteristics instead...

Silva, Ramon A.

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

405

L-325 Sagebrush Habitat Mitigation Project: FY2009 Compensation Area Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Annual monitoring in support of the Fluor Daniel Hanford Company (Fluor) Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) for Project L-325, Electrical Utility Upgrades was conducted in June 2009. MAP guidelines defined mitigation success for this project as 3000 established sagebrush transplants on a 4.5 ha mitigation site after five monitoring years. Annual monitoring results suggest that an estimated 2130 sagebrush transplants currently grow on the site. Additional activities in support of this project included gathering sagebrush seed and securing a local grower to produce between 2250 and 2500 10-in3 tublings for outplanting during the early winter months of FY2010. If the minimum number of seedlings grown for this planting meets quality specifications, and planting conditions are favorable, conservative survival estimates indicate the habitat mitigation goals outlined in the MAP will be met in FY2014.

Durham, Robin E.; Sackschewsky, Michael R.

2009-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

406

Blast simulator wall tests : experimental methods and mitigation strategies for reinforced concrete and concrete Masonry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

suited for testing reinforced concrete and concrete masonrytesting on mitigation strategies of reinforced concrete andConcrete Masonry Unit COR Coefficient of Restitution DIF Dynamic Increase Factor EMRTC Energetic Materials Research and Testing

Oesterle, Michael G.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

The Constant Voltage Transformer (CVT) for Mitigating Effects of Voltage Sags on Industrial Equipment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) an increase in loads that use power electronics in some type of power conversion configuration [1][2]. This paper presents applications of the constant-voltage transformer (CVT) for mitigating the effects of electric service voltage sags on industrial...

Ferraro, R. J.; Osborne, R.; Stephens, R.

408

Contributions to the analysis and mitigation of liquefaction in loose sand slopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This research analyzes the vulnerability of loose granular waterfront fills to liquefaction in seismic events and considers the effectiveness of Pre-fabricated Vertical (PV) drain systems in mitigating potential damage. ...

Vytiniotis, Antonios

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Estimate Costs to Implement Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Strategies for Employee Commuting  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

For greenhouse gas (GHG) mitigation, once a Federal agency identifies the employee commute alternatives and supporting strategies that will most effectively reduce trips to the worksite, costs of encouraging adoption of those methods can be estimated.

410

Summary for Policy Makers: Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change Special Report Renewable Energy Sources (SRREN)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Working Group III Special Report on Renewable Energy Sources and Climate Change Mitigation (SRREN) presents an assessment of the literature on the scientific, technological, environmental, economic and social aspects of the contribution of six renewable energy (RE) sources to the mitigation of climate change. It is intended to provide policy relevant information to governments, intergovernmental processes and other interested parties. This Summary for Policymakers provides an overview of the SRREN, summarizing the essential findings. The SRREN consists of 11 chapters. Chapter 1 sets the context for RE and climate change; Chapters 2 through 7 provide information on six RE technologies, and Chapters 8 through 11 address integrative issues.

Arvizu, Dan; Bruckner, Thomas; Christensen, John; Devernay, Jean-Michel; Faaij , Andre; Fischedick, Manfred; Goldstein, Barry; Hansen, Gerrit; Huckerby , John; Jager-Waldau, Arnulf; Kadner, Susanne; Kammen, Daniel; Krey, Volker; Kumar, Arun; Lewis , Anthony; Lucon, Oswaldo; Matschoss, Patrick; Maurice, Lourdes; Mitchell , Catherine; Moomaw, William; Moreira, Jose; Nadai, Alain; Nilsson, Lars J.; Nyboer, John; Rahman, Atiq; Sathaye, Jayant; Sawin, Janet; Schaeffer, Roberto; Schei, Tormod; Schlomer, Steffen; Sims, Ralph; von Stechow, Christoph; Verbruggen, Aviel; Urama, Kevin; Wiser, Ryan; Yamba, Francis; Zwickel, Timm

2011-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

411

L-325 Sagebrush Habitat Mitigation Project: Final Compensation Area Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a review and status of activities conducted in support of the Fluor Daniel Hanford Company (Fluor), now Mission Support Alliance (MSA), Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) for Project L-325, Electrical Utility Upgrades (2007). Three plantings have been installed on a 4.5-hectare mitigation area to date. This review provides a description and chronology of events, monitoring results, and mitigative actions through fiscal year (FY) 2012. Also provided is a review of the monitoring methods, transect layout, and FY 2012 monitoring activities and results for all planting years. Planting densities and performance criteria stipulated in the MAP were aimed at a desired future condition (DFC) of 10 percent mature sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata ssp wyomingensis) cover. Current recommendations for yielding this DFC are based upon a conceptual model planting of 1000 plants/ha (400/ac) exhibiting a 60-percent survival rate after 5 monitoring years (DOE 2003). Accordingly, a DFC after 5 monitoring years would not be less than 600 plants/ha (240/ac). To date, about 8700 sagebrush plants have been grown and transplanted onto the mitigation site. Harsh site conditions and low seedling survival have resulted in an estimated 489 transplants/ha on the mitigation site, which is 111 plants/ha short of the target DFC. Despite this apparent shortcoming, 71, 91, and 24 percent of the surviving seedlings planted in FY 2007 and FY 2008 and FY 2010, respectively, showed signs of blooming in FY 2012. Blooming status may be a positive indication of future sagebrush recruitment, and is therefore a potential source for reaching the target DFC of 600 plants/ha on this mitigation site over time. Because of the difficulty establishing small transplants on this site, we propose that no additional plantings be considered for this mitigation area and to rely upon the potential recruitment by established seedlings to achieve the mitigation commitment set forth in the MAP of 600 plants/ha.

Durham, Robin E.; Becker, James M.

2013-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

412

Gas Jet Disruption Mitigation Studies on Alcator C-Mod and DIII-D  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas Jet Disruption Mitigation Studies on Alcator C-Mod and DIII-D R.S. Granetz1, E.M. Hollmann2, D-pressure noble gas jet High-pressure noble gas jets can mitigate 3 problems arising from disruptions, without molybdenum Be, W, C #12;Specific goals of these DIII-D and C-Mod gas jet experiments · Determine penetration

413

Industrial fouling: problem characterization, economic assessment, and review of prevention, mitigation, and accommodation techniques  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A comprehensive overview of heat exchanger fouling in the manufacturing industries is provided. Specifically, this overview addresses: the characteristics of industrial fouling problems; the mitigation and accommodation techniques currently used by industry; and the types and magnitude of costs associated with industrial fouling. A detailed review of the fouling problems, costs and mitigation techniques is provided for the food, textile, pulp and paper, chemical, petroleum, cement, glass and primary metals industries.

Garrett-Price, B.A.; Smith, S.A.; Watts, R.L.

1984-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

L-325 Sagebrush Habitat Mitigation Project: FY2008 Compensation Area Monitoring Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document provides a review and status of activities conducted in support of the Fluor Daniel Hanford Company (Fluor) Mitigation Action Plan (MAP) for Project L-325, Electrical Utility Upgrades. It includes time-zero monitoring results for planting activities conducted in January 2008, annual survival monitoring for all planting years (2007 and 2008), and recommendations for the successful completion of DOE habitat mitigation commitments for this project.

Durham, Robin E.; Sackschewsky, Michael R.

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

415

Degradation of Thermal Barrier Coatings from Deposits and Its Mitigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ceramic thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) used in gas-turbine engines afford higher operating temperatures, resulting in enhanced efficiencies and performance. However, in the case of syngas-fired engines, fly ash particulate impurities that may be present in syngas can melt on the hotter TBC surfaces and form glassy deposits. These deposits can penetrate the TBCs leading to their failure. In experiments using lignite fly ash to simulate these conditions we show that conventional TBCs of composition 93wt% ZrO{sub 2} + 7wt% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (7YSZ) fabricated using the air plasma spray (APS) process are completely destroyed by the molten fly ash. The molten fly ash is found to penetrate the full thickness of the TBC. The mechanisms by which this occurs appear to be similar to those observed in degradation of 7YSZ TBCs by molten calcium-magnesium-aluminosilicate (CMAS) sand and by molten volcanic ash in aircraft engines. In contrast, APS TBCs of Gd{sub 2Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} composition are highly resistant to attack by molten lignite fly ash under identical conditions, where the molten ash penetrates ~25% of TBC thickness. This damage mitigation appears to be due to the formation of an impervious, stable crystalline layer at the fly ash/Gd{sub 2}Zr{sub 2}O{sub 7} TBC interface arresting the penetrating moltenfly- ash front. Additionally, these TBCs were tested using a rig with thermal gradient and simultaneous accumulation of ash. Modeling using an established mechanics model has been performed to illustrate the modes of delamination, as well as further opportunities to optimize coating microstructure. Transfer of the technology was developed in this program to all interested parties.

Nitin Padture

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

416

Mitigation and monitoring plan for impacted wetlands at the Gunnison UMTRA Project site, Gunnison, Colorado  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The U.S Department of Energy (DOE) administers the Uranium Mill Tailings Remedial Action (UMTRA) Project. The UMTRA Project is the result of the Uranium Mill Tailings Radiation Control Act(UMTRA) which was passed in response to the public`s concern over the potential public health hazards related to uranium mill tailings and associated contaminated material at abandoned or otherwise uncontrolled inactive processing sites throughout the United States. The Gunnison, Colorado abandoned uranium mill site is one of the sites slated for cleanup by the DOE under authority of UMTRA. The contaminated material at this site will be transported to a disposal site on US Bureau of Land Management (BLM) land east of Gunnison. Remedial action activities will temporarily disturb 0.8 acre and permanently eliminate 5.1 acres of wetlands. This report describes the proposed mitigation plan for the 5.9 acres of impacted wetlands. In conjunction with the mitigation of the permanently impacted wetlands through the enhancement of wetland and adjacent riparian areas, impacts to wildlife as a result of this project will also be mitigated. However, wildlife mitigation is not the focus of this document and is covered in relevant BLM permits for this project. This plan proposes the enhancement of a 3:1 ratio of impacted wetlands in accordance with US Environmental Protection Agency guidelines, plus the enhancement of riparian areas for wildlife mitigation. Included in this mitigation plan is a monitoring plan to ensure that the proposed measures are working and being maintained.

Not Available

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Searching for optimal mitigation geometries for laser-resistant multilayer high-reflector coatings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Growing laser damage sites on multilayer high-reflector coatings can limit mirror performance. One of the strategies to improve laser damage resistance is to replace the growing damage sites with predesigned benign mitigation structures. By mitigating the weakest site on the optic, the large-aperture mirror will have a laser resistance comparable to the intrinsic value of the multilayer coating. To determine the optimal mitigation geometry, the finite-difference time-domain method was used to quantify the electric-field intensification within the multilayer, at the presence of different conical pits. We find that the field intensification induced by the mitigation pit is strongly dependent on the polarization and the angle of incidence (AOI) of the incoming wave. Therefore, the optimal mitigation conical pit geometry is application specific. Furthermore, our simulation also illustrates an alternative means to achieve an optimal mitigation structure by matching the cone angle of the structure with the AOI of the incoming wave, except for the p-polarized wave at a range of incident angles between 30 deg. and 45 deg.

Qiu, S. Roger; Wolfe, Justin E.; Monterrosa, Anthony M.; Feit, Michael D.; Pistor, Thomas V.; Stolz, Christopher J.

2011-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

418

Author's personal copy Using the Landsat record to detect forest-cover changes during and after the collapse  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

forest-cover changes in the temperate zone of European Russia between 1985 and 2010 in 5-year increments that Russia's temperate forests underwent substantial changes during the observed period. Overall, forested mitigating climate change (Bonan, 2008; FAO, 2010). Remote sensing has played a key role in monitoring forest

Radeloff, Volker C.

419

Syllabus: Spring 2014 Natural Resources in a Changing Climate 1 Natural Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to natural resources and GCC. Policies to consider include but are not limited to: 1) wetland mitigation, 2Syllabus: Spring 2014 Natural Resources in a Changing Climate 1 Natural Resources in a Changing-Ziegler Hall Phone: (352) 846-0353 School of Forest Resources and Conservation Office Hours: T 3-5 pm Class

Watson, Craig A.

420

Syllabus: Spring 2014 Natural Resources in a Changing Climate 1 Natural Resources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to natural resources and GCC. Policies to consider include but are not limited to: 1) wetland mitigation, 2Syllabus: Spring 2014 Natural Resources in a Changing Climate 1 Natural Resources in a Changing: mclaugd@ufl.edu 319 Newins-Ziegler Hall Phone: (352) 846-0353 School of Forest Resources and Conservation

Watson, Craig A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "idb-climate change mitigation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

An Economic Exploration of Biofuel basedAn Economic Exploration of Biofuel based Greenhouse Gas Emission MitigationGreenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Economic Exploration of Biofuel basedAn Economic Exploration of Biofuel based Greenhouse Gas Afforestation, Forest management, Biofuels, Ag soil, Animals, Fertilization, Rice, Grassland expansion, Manure of Biofuel strategies Examine the dynamics of mitigation strategies #12;PolicyPolicy ContextContext U

McCarl, Bruce A.

422

CO? mitigation costs for Canada and the Alberta Oil Sands  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The threat of climate change proposes difficult problems for regulators and decision-makers in terms of uncertainties, varying exposures to risks and different attitudes towards risk among nations. Impact and cost assessments ...

Anderson, Justin David

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Geologic carbon sequestration as a global strategy to mitigate CO2 emissions: Sustainability and environmental risk  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fossil fuels are abundant, inexpensive to produce, and are easily converted to usable energy by combustion as demonstrated by mankind's dependence on fossil fuels for over 80% of its primary energy supply (13). This reliance on fossil fuels comes with the cost of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions that exceed the rate at which CO{sub 2} can be absorbed by terrestrial and oceanic systems worldwide resulting in increases in atmospheric CO{sub 2} concentration as recorded by direct measurements over more than five decades (14). Carbon dioxide is the main greenhouse gas linked to global warming and associated climate change, the impacts of which are currently being observed around the world, and projections of which include alarming consequences such as water and food shortages, sea level rise, and social disruptions associated with resource scarcity (15). The current situation of a world that derives the bulk of its energy from fossil fuel in a manner that directly causes climate change equates to an energy-climate crisis. Although governments around the world have only recently begun to consider policies to avoid the direst projections of climate change and its impacts, sustainable approaches to addressing the crisis are available. The common thread of feasible strategies to the energy climate crisis is the simultaneous use of multiple approaches based on available technologies (e.g., 16). Efficiency improvements (e.g., in building energy use), increased use of natural gas relative to coal, and increased development of renewables such as solar, wind, and geothermal, along with nuclear energy, are all available options that will reduce net CO{sub 2} emissions. While improvements in efficiency can be made rapidly and will pay for themselves, the slower pace of change and greater monetary costs associated with increased use of renewables and nuclear energy suggests an additional approach is needed to help bridge the time period between the present and a future when low-carbon energy is considered cheap enough to replace fossil fuels. Carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) is one such bridging technology (1). CCS has been the focus of an increasing amount of research over the last 15-20 years and is the subject of a comprehensive IPCC report that thoroughly covers the subject (1). CCS is currently being carried out in several countries around the world in conjunction with natural gas extraction (e.g., 2, 3) and enhanced oil recovery (17). Despite this progress, widespread deployment of CCS remains the subject of research and future plans rather than present action on the scale needed to mitigate emissions from the perspective of climate change. The reasons for delay in deploying CCS more widely are concerns about cost (18), regulatory and legal uncertainty (19), and potential environmental impacts (21). This chapter discusses the long-term (decadal) sustainability and environmental hazards associated with the geologic CO{sub 2} storage (GCS) component of large-scale CCS (e.g., 20). Discussion here barely touches on capture and transport of CO{sub 2} which will occur above ground and which are similar to existing engineering, chemical processing, and pipeline transport activities and are therefore easier to evaluate with respect to risk assessment and feasibility. The focus of this chapter is on the more uncertain part of CCS, namely geologic storage. The primary concern for sustainability of GCS is whether there is sufficient capacity in sedimentary basins worldwide to contain the large of amounts of CO{sub 2} needed to address climate change. But there is also a link between sustainability and environmental impacts. Specifically, if GCS is found to cause unacceptable impacts that are considered worse than its climate-change mitigation benefits, the approach will not be widely adopted. Hence, GCS has elements of sustainability insofar as capacity of the subsurface for CO{sub 2} is concerned, and also in terms of whether the associated environmental risks are acceptable or not to the public.

Oldenburg, C.M.

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

U.S. Postal Service radon assessment and mitigation program. Progress report, September 1993--November 1994  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In 1992, the US Postal Service (USPS) entered into an Interagency Agreement with the Department of Energy (DOE) whereby DOE would provide technical assistance in support of the USPS Radon Assessment and Mitigation Program. To aid in this effort, DOE tasked the Hazardous Waste Remedial Actions Program (HAZWRAP), which is managed by Martin Marietta Energy Systems, Inc., for DOE under contract AC05-84OR21400. Since that time, HAZWRAP has developed and finalized the sampling protocol, mitigation diagnostic protocol, and the quality assurance and quality control procedures. These procedures were validated during the Protocol Validation (1992-1993) and Pilot Study (1993-1994) phases of the program. To date, HAZWRAP has performed approximately 16,000 radon measurements in 250 USPS buildings. Mitigation diagnostics have been performed in 27 buildings. Thus far, 13% of the measurements have been above the Environmental Protection Agency action level of 4 pCi/L. This report summarizes the pilot program radon testing data and mitigation diagnostic data for 22 sites and contains recommendations for mitigation diagnostics.

Velazquez, L.E.; Petty, J.L. Jr.

1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

425

Wildlife Protection, Mitigation and Enhancement Planning for Grand Coulee Dam, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The development and operation of Grand Coulee Dam inundated approximately 70,000 acres of wildlife habitat under the jurisdictions of the Colville Confederated Tribes, the Spokane Tribe, and the State of Washington. Under the provisions of the Pacific Northwest Electric Power Planning and Conservation Act of 1980, this study reviews losses to wildlife and habitat, and proposes mitigation for those losses. Wildlife loss estimates were developed from information available in the literature. Habitat losses and potential habitat gains through mitigation were estimated by a modified Habitat Evaluation Procedure. The mitigation plan proposes (1) acquisition of sufficient land or management rights to land to protect Habitat Units equivalent to those lost (approximately 73,000 acres of land would be required), (2) improvement and management of those lands to obtain and perpetuate target Habitat Units, and (3) protection and enhancement of suitable habitat for bald eagles. Mitigation is presented as four actions to be implemented over a 10-year period. A monitoring program is proposed to monitor mitigation success in terms of Habitat Units and wildlife population trends.

Creveling, Jennifer

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Environmental mitigation at hydroelectric projects. Volume 2, Benefits and costs of fish passage and protection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study examines envirorunental mitigation practices that provide upstream and downstream fish passage and protection at hydroelectric projects. The study includes a survey of fish passage and protection mitigation practices at 1,825 hydroelectric plants regulated by the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) to determine frequencies of occurrence, temporal trends, and regional practices based on FERC regions. The study also describes, in general terms, the fish passage/protection mitigation costs at 50 non-Federal hydroelectric projects. Sixteen case studies are used to examine in detail the benefits and costs of fish passage and protection. The 16 case studies include 15 FERC licensed or exempted hydroelectric projects and one Federally-owned and-operated hydroelectric project. The 16 hydroelectric projects are located in 12 states and range in capacity from 400 kilowatts to 840 megawatts. The fish passage and protection mitigation methods at the case studies include fish ladders and lifts, an Eicher screen, spill flows, airburst-cleaned inclined and cylindrical wedgewire screens, vertical barrier screens, and submerged traveling screens. The costs, benefits, monitoring methods, and operating characteristics of these and other mitigation methods used at the 16 case studies are examined.

Francfort, J.E.; Rinehart, B.N.; Sommers, G.L. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cada, G.F.; Jones, D.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Dauble, D.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Hunt, R.T. [Hunt (Richard) Associates, Inc., Concord, NH (United States); Costello, R.J. [Northwest Water Resources Advisory Services (United States)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Densification and residual stress induced by CO2 laser-based mitigation of SiO2 surfaces  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Knowing the ultimate surface morphology resulting from CO{sub 2} laser mitigation of induced laser damage is important both for determining adequate treatment protocols, and for preventing deleterious intensification upon subsequent illumination of downstream optics. Physical effects such as evaporation, viscous flow and densification can strongly affect the final morphology of the treated site. Evaporation is a strong function of temperature and will play a leading role in determining pit shapes when the evaporation rate is large, both because of material loss and redeposition. Viscous motion of the hot molten material during heating and cooling can redistribute material due to surface tension gradients (Marangoni effect) and vapor recoil pressure effects. Less well known, perhaps, is that silica can densify as a result of structural relaxation, to a degree depending on the local thermal history. The specific volume shrinkage due to structural relaxation can be mistaken for material loss due to evaporation. Unlike evaporation, however, local density change can be reversed by post annealing. All of these effects must be taken into account to adequately describe the final morphology and optical properties of single and multiple-pass mitigation protocols. We have investigated, experimentally and theoretically, the significance of such densification on residual stress and under what circumstances it can compete with evaporation in determining the ultimate post treatment surface shape. In general, understanding final surface configurations requires taking all these factors including local structural relaxation densification, and therefore the thermal history, into account. We find that surface depressions due to densification can dominate surface morphology in the non-evaporative regime when peak temperatures are below 2100K.

Feit, M D; Matthews, M J; Soules, T F; Stolken, J S

2010-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

428

Feasibility Studies on Disturbance Feedforward Techniques to Improve Wind Turbine Load Mitigation Performance: January 2009 -- January 2010  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study investigates disturbance feedforward and preview control to better understand the best possible improvement in load mitigation using advanced wind measurement techniques.

Laks, J.H.; Dunne, F.; Pao, L. Y.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

Third Annual Report: 2006 Pre-Construction Eelgrass Monitoring and Propagation for King County Outfall Mitigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

King County proposes to build a new sewer outfall discharging to Puget Sound near Point Wells, Washington. Construction is scheduled for 2008. The Point Wells site was selected to minimize effects on the nearshore marine environment, but unavoidable impacts to eelgrass (Zostera marina) beds are anticipated during construction. To mitigate for these impacts and prepare for post-construction restoration, King County began implementation of a multi-year eelgrass monitoring and restoration program in 2004, with the primary goal of returning intertidal and shallow subtidal habitat and eelgrass to pre-construction conditions. Major program elements are a) pre-construction monitoring, i.e., documenting initial eelgrass conditions and degree of fluctuation over 5 years prior to construction, b) eelgrass transplanting, including harvesting, offsite propagating and stockpiling of local plantstock, and post-construction planting, and c) post-construction monitoring. The program is detailed in the Eelgrass Restoration and Biological Resources Implementation Workplan (King County 2006). This report describes calendar year 2006 pre-construction activities conducted by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in support of King County. Activities included continued propagation of eelgrass shoots and monitoring of the experimental harvest plots in the marine outfall corridor area to evaluate recovery rates relative to harvest rates. Approximately 1500 additional shoots were harvested from the marine outfall corridor in August 2006 to supplement the plants in the propagation tank at the PNNL Marine Sciences Laboratory in Sequim, Washington, bringing the total number of shoots to 4732. Eelgrass densities were monitored in the five experimental harvest plots established in the marine outfall corridor. Changes in eelgrass density were evaluated in year-to-year comparisons with initial harvest rates. Net eelgrass density decreased from 2004 post-harvest to 2006 in all plots, despite density increases observed in 2005 in some plots and at some harvest rates. Eelgrass densities within individual subplots were highly variable from year to year, and the change in density in any interannual period did not correlate to the initial 2004 harvest rate. Continued monitoring should help project managers determine an optimum harvest rate that supports rapid recovery of donor eelgrass beds.

Woodruff, Dana L.; Southard, Susan S.; Cullinan, Valerie I.; Kohn, Nancy P.; Anderson, Michael G.; Vavrinec, John

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

Pellet fuelling of plasmas with ELM mitigation by resonant magnetic perturbations in MAST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Shallow fuelling pellets are injected from the high field side into plasmas in which ELMs have been mitigated using external magnetic perturbation coils. The data are compared with ideal assumptions in the ITER fuelling model, namely that mitigated ELMs are not affected by fuelling pellets. Firstly it is shown that during the pellet evaporation an ELM is triggered, during which the amount particle loss could be larger (factor ~1.5) than the particle loss during an ELM which was not induced by pellet. Secondly, a favourable example is shown in which post-pellet particle losses due to mitigated ELMs are similar to the non-pellet case, however unfavourable counter-examples also exist.

Valovic, M; Garzotti, L; Gurl, C; Kirk, A; Naylor, G; Patel, A; Scannell, R; Thornton, A J

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Addendum to the 1996 Gunnison Monitoring Report for the Gunnison, Colorado Wetlands Mitigation Plan  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document is an addendum to the 1996 Gunnison Monitoring Report for the Gunnison, Colorado, Wetlands Mitigation Report, dated July 1997. The purpose of this addendum is to: (1) modify how information on plant height and plant species criteria are presented; and (2) provide more detailed information regarding the evaluation of the bare ground criteria at the Camp Ketle site. The information in this addendum is provided at the request of the Bureau of Land Management to aid in future monitoring and evaluation of the wetland mitigation sites.

NONE

1997-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Change Log  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Log NERSC-8 Trinity Benchmarks Change Log 09032013 Correction applied to MiniDFT web-page (to remove inconsistency with MiniDFT README). Capability Improvement measurements...

433

Greenhouse Gas Mitigation Through Energy Crops in the U.S. With Implications for Asian-Pacific Countries  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

into energy crop production will most likely carry this price through increased purchasing cost and all energy the production of energy crops and other agricultural mitigation strategies. This analysis estimates the economicGreenhouse Gas Mitigation Through Energy Crops in the U.S. With Implications for Asian

McCarl, Bruce A.

434

The impacts of direct seeding into mulch on the CO2 mitigation MR KHALEDIAN1,2  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The impacts of direct seeding into mulch on the CO2 mitigation MR KHALEDIAN1,2 , JC MAILHOL1 , P RUELLE1 1) UMR G-EAU CEMAGREF, BP 5095, 34196 Montpellier Cedex 05 France 2) Agricultural Faculty CO2 mitigation. Author-produced version of the article published in Agronomy Research, 2012, 10(1

Boyer, Edmond

435

A Mitigation Process for Impacts of the All American Pipeline on Oak Woodlands in Santa Barbara County1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A Mitigation Process for Impacts of the All American Pipeline on Oak Woodlands in Santa Barbara for pipeline construction impacts to oak tree habitat by describing the re- quirements for the Offsite Oak Mitigation Program for the All American Pipeline (AAPL) in Santa Barbara County, Califor- nia. After

Standiford, Richard B.

436

Guide for the Mitigation of Natural Phenomena Hazards for DOE Nuclear Facilities and NonNuclear Facilities  

Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

This document provides guidance in implementing the Natural Phenomena Hazard (NPH) mitigation requirements of DOE O 420.1, Facility Safety, Section 4.4, "Natural Phenomena Hazards Mitigation." This Guide does not establish or invoke any new requirements. Any apparent conflicts arising from the NPH guidance would defer to the requirements in DOE O 420.1. No cancellation.

2000-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

437

Mitigation of Voltage and Current Harmonics in Grid-Connected Microgrids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mitigation of Voltage and Current Harmonics in Grid-Connected Microgrids Mehdi Savaghebi1 , Josep M-connected microgrids. Two modes of compensation are considered, i.e. voltage and current compensation modes-electronic interface converter to the utility grid or microgrid. Microgrid is a local grid consisting of DGs, energy

Vasquez, Juan Carlos

438

Planning ahead for asteroid and comet hazard mitigation, phase 1: parameter space exploration and scenario modeling  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The mitigation of impact hazards resulting from Earth-approaching asteroids and comets has received much attention in the popular press. However, many questions remain about the near-term and long-term, feasibility and appropriate application of all proposed methods. Recent and ongoing ground- and space-based observations of small solar-system body composition and dynamics have revolutionized our understanding of these bodies (e.g., Ryan (2000), Fujiwara et al. (2006), and Jedicke et al. (2006)). Ongoing increases in computing power and algorithm sophistication make it possible to calculate the response of these inhomogeneous objects to proposed mitigation techniques. Here we present the first phase of a comprehensive hazard mitigation planning effort undertaken by Southwest Research Institute and Los Alamos National Laboratory. We begin by reviewing the parameter space of the object's physical and chemical composition and trajectory. We then use the radiation hydrocode RAGE (Gittings et al. 2008), Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP) radiation transport (see Clement et al., this conference), and N-body dynamics codes to explore the effects these variations in object properties have on the coupling of energy into the object from a variety of mitigation techniques, including deflection and disruption by nuclear and conventional munitions, and a kinetic impactor.

Plesko, Catherine S [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Clement, R Ryan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Weaver, Robert P [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bradley, Paul A [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Huebner, Walter F [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Materials Corrosion and Mitigation Strategies for APT: End of Year Report, FY '96  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Materials Corrosion and Mitigation Strategies for APT: End of Year Report, FY '96 R. Scott Lillard, Darryl P. Butt Materials Corrosion and Environmental Effects Laboratory MST-6, Metallurgy Los Alamos accomplishment in FY '96 was the design and fabrication of the corrosion probes to be used "In Beam" during

440

Materials Corrosion and Mitigation Strategies for APT, End of FY '97 Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Materials Corrosion and Mitigation Strategies for APT, End of FY '97 Report: I. Inconel 718 In-Beam Corrosion Rates from the '97 A6 Irradiation R. Scott Lillard, Donald L. Pile, Darryl P. Butt Materials Corrosion & Environmental Effects Lab MST-6, Metallurgy Group Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos NM

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "idb-climate change mitigation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Materials Corrosion and Mitigation Strategies for APT: Using Solution Resistivity as an Estimate of Tungsten Corrosion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Materials Corrosion and Mitigation Strategies for APT: Using Solution Resistivity as an Estimate of Tungsten Corrosion in Spallation Neutron Target Cooling Loops R. Scott Lillard, Darryl P. Butt Materials Corrosion and Environmental Effects Laboratory MST-6, Metallurgy Los Alamos National Laboratory Los Alamos

442

Materials Corrosion and Mitigation Strategies for APT, Weapons Neutron Research Facility Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Materials Corrosion and Mitigation Strategies for APT, Weapons Neutron Research Facility Experiments: The Effects of 800 MeV Proton Irradiation on the Corrosion of Tungsten, Tantalum, Stainless Steel, and Gold R. Scott Lillard, Darryl P. Butt Materials Corrosion & Environmental Effects Laboratory MST-6

443

Materials Corrosion and Mitigation Strategies for APT, End of FY '97 Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Materials Corrosion and Mitigation Strategies for APT, End of FY '97 Report: II. Out-of-Beam Corrosion Rates and Water Analysis from the '97 A6 Irradiation R. Scott Lillard, Donald L. Pile, Darryl P. Butt Materials Corrosion & Environmental Effects Lab MST-6, Metallurgy Group Los Alamos National

444

Optimal Pollution Mitigation in Monterey Bay Based on Coastal Radar Data and Nonlinear  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Optimal Pollution Mitigation in Monterey Bay Based on Coastal Radar Data and Nonlinear Dynamics run-off which is a typical source of pollution in the bay. We show that a HF radar-based pollution release scheme using this flow structure reduces the impact of pollution on the coastal envi- ronment

Marsden, Jerrold

445

"Improving the quality of life through the mitigation and prevention of injury  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of pedestrian accidents using Madymo models and Optimization Techniques. Crash Investigations The Crash Injury trauma to ballistics and blast. Our unique skills allow us to examine and prevent injuries from"Improving the quality of life through the mitigation and prevention of injury made possible

Acton, Scott

446

THE USE OF COMPACT TOROID INJECTION FOR TOKAMAK CENTRAL FUELLING AND RUNAWAY ELECTRON (RE) MITIGATION DURING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

gas or pellet injection, the high-velocity high-Z CTs ( > 100 km/sec) offer the potential to mitigate of an accelerated CT to reach the magnetic axis of a tokamak offers the advantage of affecting the RE production

447

EFFECTIVENESS OF DEBRIS FLOW MITIGATION METHODS IN BURNED AREAS Paul M. Santi1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

EFFECTIVENESS OF DEBRIS FLOW MITIGATION METHODS IN BURNED AREAS Paul M. Santi1 , Victor G. deWolfe2 generate debris flows and floods in response to relatively small rainstorms, is common in the Western United States. To reduce the likelihood and magnitude of these debris flows, hillslopes and channels

448

Effective mitigation of debris flows at Lemon Dam, La Plata County, Colorado  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Effective mitigation of debris flows at Lemon Dam, La Plata County, Colorado Victor G. deWolfe a May 2007 Abstract To reduce the hazards from debris flows in drainage basins burned by wildfire, erosion control measures such as construction of check dams, installation of log erosion barriers (LEBs

449

IV. Environmental Impact, Setting, and Mitigation Measures LBNL LRDP EIR IV.G-1 ESA / 201074  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IV. Environmental Impact, Setting, and Mitigation Measures LBNL LRDP EIR IV.G-1 ESA / 201074 Public discusses existing surface water and groundwater conditions at LBNL and analyzes the potential Setting IV.G.2.1 Hydrologic Setting Surface Water LBNL is situated within Blackberry and Strawberry

Lee, Jason R.

450

An idealized assessment of the economics of air capture of carbon dioxide in mitigation policy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the assumption that technol- ogies available today are used to fully offset net human emissions of carbon dioxideAn idealized assessment of the economics of air capture of carbon dioxide in mitigation policy, primarily carbon dioxide (CO2). During 2007, countries have been actively engaged in negotiating future

Colorado at Boulder, University of

451

Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project : Annual Report 2008.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate Project) was proposed by the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (CTCR) as partial mitigation for hydropower's share of the wildlife losses resulting from Chief Joseph and Grand Coulee Dams. At present, the Hellsgate Project protects and manages 57,418 acres (approximately 90 miles2) for the biological requirements of managed wildlife species; most are located on or near the Columbia River (Lake Rufus Woods and Lake Roosevelt) and surrounded by Tribal land. To date we have acquired about 34,597 habitat units (HUs) towards a total 35,819 HUs lost from original inundation due to hydropower development. In addition to the remaining 1,237 HUs left unmitigated, 600 HUs from the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife that were traded to the Colville Tribes and 10 secure nesting islands are also yet to be mitigated. This annual report for 2008 describes the management activities of the Hellsgate Big Game Winter Range Wildlife Mitigation Project (Hellsgate Project) during the past year.

Whitney, Richard P.; Berger, Matthew T.; Rushing, Samuel; Peone, Cory

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Cascading Dynamics and Mitigation Assessment in Power System Disturbances via a Hidden Failure Model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and control strategy. The sensitivity of power-law behavior with respect to each of these parameters; Protective Relaying hidden failures; Blackout mitigation Introduction An overriding factor in power system] in spite of technological progress and huge investments on the system reliability and security. Although

453

Design of a Sediment Mitigation System Sheri Gravette Kevin Cazenas Said Masoud Rayhan Ain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Design of a Sediment Mitigation System Sheri Gravette Kevin Cazenas Said Masoud Rayhan Ain · State the gap · Show how it creates a win-win · Asymptotic deposition of sediments · Expected capacity reached by 2030 · Sediment scour exponential increases as flow rate increases Max Recorded Flow Rates: 1. (1972

454

Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation, Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Columbia River Mainstem Facilities, 1984 Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report reviews the status of past, present, and proposed future wildlife planning and mitigation programs at existing hydroelectric projects in the Columbia River Basin. The project evaluations will form the basis for determining any needed remedial measures or additional project analysis. Each hydropower facility report is abstracted separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base.

Howerton, Jack; Hwang, Diana

1984-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

455

Staff summary of Issues & Recommendations Resident Fish Substitution/Blocked Area Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Staff summary of Issues & Recommendations Resident Fish Substitution/Blocked Area Mitigation *Preliminary draft, please refer to full recommendations for complete review 10/29/2013 10:08:05 AM 2009 Fish and Wildlife Program Section Section II.C. 1. Substitution for Anadromous Fish Losses Section II. D. 8

456

Bioenergy crop greenhouse gas mitigation potential under a range of management practices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Bioenergy crop greenhouse gas mitigation potential under a range of management practices T A R A W been proposed as viable bioenergy crops because of their potential to yield harvest- able biomass-senescence harvests are a more effective means than maximizing yield potential. Keywords: bioenergy, feedstocks, GHG

DeLucia, Evan H.

457

Mitigation of Fatigue Loads Using Individual Pitch Control of Wind Turbines Based on FAST  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mitigation of Fatigue Loads Using Individual Pitch Control of Wind Turbines Based on FAST Yunqian University, China jiz@seu.edu.cn Abstract-With the increase of wind turbine dimension and capacity, the wind turbine structures are subjected to prominent loads and fatigue which would reduce the lifetime of wind

Chen, Zhe

458

GREAT MINDSTHINK ELECTRIC / WWW.EVS26.ORG Mitigation of Vehicle Fast Charge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GREAT MINDSTHINK ELECTRIC / WWW.EVS26.ORG Mitigation of Vehicle Fast Charge Grid Impacts-55080 #12;GREAT MINDSTHINK ELECTRIC / WWW.EVS26.ORG Electric Vehicle Grid Integration 2 Cross Cutting & TESTING DEPLOYMENT & PARTNERSHIPS Tx Tx Tx #12;GREAT MINDSTHINK ELECTRIC / WWW.EVS26.ORG3 Vehicle Test

459

Grand Coulee Dam Wildlife Mitigation Program : Pygmy Rabbit Programmatic Management Plan, Douglas County, Washington.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Northwest Power Planning Council and the Bonneville Power Administration approved the pygmy rabbit project as partial mitigation for impacts caused by the construction of Grand Coulee Dam. The focus of this project is the protection and enhancement of shrub-steppe/pygmy rabbit habitat in northeastern Washington.

Ashley, Paul

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Mitigating Effects of Plastic Surgery: Fusing Face and Ocular Biometrics Raghavender Jillela and Arun Ross  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mitigating Effects of Plastic Surgery: Fusing Face and Ocular Biometrics Raghavender Jillela.Ross}@mail.wvu.edu Abstract The task of successfully matching face images obtained before and after plastic surgery is a challenging problem. The degree to which a face is altered depends on the type and number of plastic surgeries

Ross, Arun Abraham

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "idb-climate change mitigation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Malheur River Subbasin Assessment and Management Plan For Fish and Wildlife Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.H. Stute. 2001. Evaluation of Idaho Power hatchery mitigation program. In: Technical appendices for Hells Canyon Complex Hydroelectric project. Idaho Power, Boise, ID. Technical Report E.3.1-4. Agee, J. K. 1981. Armour, C. 1990. Options for reintroducing salmon and steelhead above mid-Snake River dams. U.S. Fish

462

Carbon Mitigation The goal of this project is to identify and develop standards and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

viable carbon capture and sequestration (CCS) technologies depend upon the added cost of generatingCarbon Mitigation CERAMICS The goal of this project is to identify and develop standards and measurement methods currently needed by the energy industry to enable the development of cost efficient carbon

Magee, Joseph W.

463

Long-Term Mitigation Strategies and Marginal Abatement Cost Curves: A Case Study on Brazil  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Long-Term Mitigation Strategies and Marginal Abatement Cost Curves: A Case Study on Brazil Adrien abatement targets need to decide which abatement mea- sures to implement, and in which order. This paper investigates the ability of marginal abatement cost (MAC) curves to inform this decision, reanalyzing a MAC

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

464

Marginal abatement cost curves and the optimal timing of mitigation measures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Marginal abatement cost curves and the optimal timing of mitigation measures Adrien Vogt-Schilb 1, Washington D.C., USA Abstract Decision makers facing abatement targets need to decide which abatement mea- sures to implement, and in which order. Measure-explicit marginal abatement cost curves depict the cost

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

465

Disruption mitigation for ITER Disruptions are sudden unplanned terminations of the plasma that can  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

damage the plasma chamber from thermal loads, high magnetic forces, and runaway electrons. A reliable fast acting tool to mitigate these effects in ITER burning plasmas by the injection of large quantities be located inside a port plug for close proximity to the plasma and fast injection. Multiple injectors can

466

Spring 2012 Denman Forestry Issues Series presents: Role of Forests and Forest Products in Carbon Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Concerns "Pursuing Carbon and Forest Sustainability in Forest Biomass Energy Production" Craig PartridgeSpring 2012 Denman Forestry Issues Series presents: Role of Forests and Forest Products in Carbon Mitigation and Energy Independence May 15, 2012, 1-5:30 p.m., NHS Hall at CUH, UW Botanic Gardens School

Borenstein, Elhanan

467

Principal Investigator: Guerrero, Thomas TITLE: Oral antisense oligonucleotides to mitigate GI crypt survival post-irradiation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

GI crypt survival post-irradiation A. SPECIFIC AIMS Gastrointestinal (GI) injury is a major cause and contributor of death after whole-body irradiation (Jarrett 1999; NCRP 2001), agents to mitigate the effects of antisense oligonucleotide drugs. Isis Pharmaceuticals was the first to secure Food and Drug Administration

Warren, Joe

468

Potential for Biofuel-based Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation: Rationale and Potential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Potential for Biofuel-based Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation: Rationale and Potential By Bruce biofuel usage. Biofuel feedstocks are a source of raw material that can be transformed into petroleum for coal. In the USA, liquid fuel biofuel production has not proven to be broadly economically feasible

McCarl, Bruce A.

469

Economic Implications of International Participation Alternatives for Agricultural Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of International Participation Alternatives for Agricultural Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation Abstract The world of biofuels. However, such options can be competitive with domestic food production. In a free trade arena of effects that would be observed due to the simplifying cost assumptions, indicate compliance causes supply

McCarl, Bruce A.

470

Key-Insulated Symmetric Key Cryptography and Mitigating Attacks against Cryptographic Cloud Software  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Key-Insulated Symmetric Key Cryptography and Mitigating Attacks against Cryptographic Cloud- sociated cryptographic keys in their entirety. In this paper, we investigate key-insulated symmetric key. To illustrate the feasibility of key-insulated symmetric key cryptography, we also report a proof

Dodis, Yevgeniy

471

Predicting and mitigating the global warming potential of agro-ecosystems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Predicting and mitigating the global warming potential of agro-ecosystems S. Lehugera 1 , B and methane are the main biogenic greenhouse gases (GHG) con-2 tributing to the global warming potential (GWP to design productive16 agro-ecosystems with low global warming impact.17 Keywords18 Global warming potential

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

472

Evaluation of a Stastical Technique to Mitigate Malicious Control Packets in Ad Hoc Networks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

traffic over TCP, we show that the rate control mechanism is very effective in detecting and mitigating. Intrusion detection systems [22] address DoS as part of a variety of other security attacks can be launched by malicious nodes without generating unusually high traffic. This makes the detection

Boppana, Rajendra V.

473

Status Review of Wildlife Mitigation at Columbia Basin Hydroelectric Projects, Oregon Facilities, Final Report.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The report presents a review and documentation of existing information on wildlife resources at Columbia River Basin hydroelectric facilities within Oregon. Effects of hydroelectric development and operation; existing agreements; and past, current and proposed wildlife mitigation, enhancement, and protection activities were considered. (ACR)

Bedrossian, Karen L.

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

TGF-.beta. antagonists as mitigators of radiation-induced tissue damage  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for treating tissue damage caused by radiation is described by use of a TGF-.beta. antagonist, such as an anti-TGF-.beta. antibody or a TGF-.beta. latency associated protein. It is administered not more than a week after exposure, and is particularly useful in mitigating the side effects of breast cancer therapy.

Barcellos-Hoff, Mary H. (Oakland, CA)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

TGF-{beta} antagonists as mitigators of radiation-induced tissue damage  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for treating tissue damage caused by radiation is described by use of a TGF-{beta} antagonist, such as an anti-TGF-{beta} antibody or a TGF-{beta} latency associated protein. It is administered not more than a week after exposure, and is particularly useful in mitigating the side effects of breast cancer therapy.

Barcellos-Hoff, M.H.

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Economic Potential of Biomass Based Fuels for Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Words): Use of biofuels diminishes fossil fuel combustion thereby also reducing net greenhouse gasEconomic Potential of Biomass Based Fuels for Greenhouse Gas Emission Mitigation Uwe A. Schneider emissions. However, subsidies are needed to make agricultural biofuel production economically feasible

McCarl, Bruce A.

477

Electrical Estimation of Conditional Probability for Maximum-likelihood Based PMD Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Xi, Tšulay Adali, and John Zweck Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering UniversityElectrical Estimation of Conditional Probability for Maximum-likelihood Based PMD Mitigation Wenze probability density functions in the presence of both all-order PMD and ASE noise are estimated electronically

Zweck, John

478

Continuous Change Institutional Change Principle  

Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

Because it takes time to establish institutional change, Federal agencies need multiyear plans that continuously work to achieve, reinforce, and improve significant and persistent sustainability...

479

Climate mitigation’s impact on global and regional electric power sector water use in the 21st Century  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Over the course of this coming century, global electricity use is expected to grow at least five fold and if stringent greenhouse gas emissions controls are in place the growth could be more than seven fold from current levels. Given that the electric power sector represents the second largest anthropogenic use of water and given growing concerns about the nature and extent of future water scarcity driven by population growth and a changing climate, significant concern has been expressed about the electricity sector’s use of water going forward. In this paper, the authors demonstrate that an often overlooked but absolutely critical issue that needs to be taken into account in discussions about the sustainability of the electric sector’s water use going forward is the tremendous turn over in electricity capital stock that will occur over the course of this century; i.e., in the scenarios examined here more than 80% of global electricity production in the year 2050 is from facilities that have not yet been built. The authors show that because of the large scale changes in the global electricity system, the water withdrawal intensity of electricity production is likely to drop precipitously with the result being relatively constant water withdrawals over the course of the century even in the face of the large growth in electricity usage. The ability to cost effectively reduce the water intensity of power plants with carbon dioxide capture and storage systems in particular is key to constraining overall global water use.

Dooley, James J.; Kyle, G. Page; Davies, Evan

2013-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

480

POLYETHERSULFONE COATING FOR MITIGATING CORROSION OF STEEL IN GEOTHERMAL ENVIRONMENT.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Emphasis was directed toward evaluating the usefulness of a polyethersulfone (PES)-dissolved N-methyl pyrrolidone (NMP) solvent precursor as a low-temperature film-forming anti-corrosion coating for carbon steel in simulated geothermal environments at brine temperatures up to 300 C. A {approx} 75 {micro}m thick PES coating performed well in protecting the steel against corrosion in brine at 200 C. However, at {>=} 250 C, the PES underwent severe hydrothermal oxidation that caused the cleavage of sulfone- and ether-linkages, and the opening of phenyl rings. These, in turn, led to sulfone {yields} benzosulfonic acid and ether {yields} benzophenol-type oxidation derivative transformations, and the formation of carbonyl-attached open rings, thereby resulting in the incorporation of the functional groups, hydroxyl and carbonyl, into the coating. The presence of these functional groups raised concerns about the diminutions in water-shedding and water-repellent properties that are important properties of the anti-corrosion coatings; such changes were reflected in an enhancement of the magnitude of susceptibility of the coatings surfaces to moisture. Consequently, the disintegration of the PES structure by hydrothermal oxidation was detrimental to the maximum efficacy of the coating in protecting the steel against corrosion, allowing the corrosive electrolytes to infiltrate easily through it.

SUGAMA, T.

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "idb-climate change mitigation" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Case Studies on the Effects of Climate Change on Water, Livestock and Hurricanes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Management ........................................................................................... 7 2.2.3. Bioenergy ..................................................................................................... 9 2.2.4. Technological Progress... to produce a given amount of production (Baker et al. 2013). In this review mitigation strategies will be classified into six broad categories: land use change, crop management, animal management, bioenergy production, forest management, and technological...

Yu, Chin-Hsien

2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

482

Climate Policy 3 (2003) 149157 The climatic impacts of land surface change and carbon  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

recognize that carbon sequestration in the terrestrial biosphere can reduce the build-up of carbon dioxide of the surface energy budget can affect the local, regional, and global climate. Given the goal of mitigatingClimate Policy 3 (2003) 149­157 The climatic impacts of land surface change and carbon management

Pielke, Roger A.

483

Rainwater Wildlife Area, Watershed Management Plan, A Columbia Basin Wildlife Mitigation Project, 2002.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This Management Plan has been developed by the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation (CTUIR) to document how the Rainwater Wildlife Area (formerly known as the Rainwater Ranch) will be managed. The plan has been developed under a standardized planning process developed by the Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) for Columbia River Basin Wildlife Mitigation Projects (See Appendix A and Guiding Policies Section below). The plan outlines the framework for managing the project area, provides an assessment of existing conditions and key resource issues, and presents an array of habitat management and enhancement strategies. The plan culminates into a 5-Year Action Plan that will focus our management actions and prioritize funding during the Fiscal 2001-2005 planning period. This plan is a product of nearly two years of field studies and research, public scoping, and coordination with the Rainwater Advisory Committee. The committee consists of representatives from tribal government, state agencies, local government, public organizations, and members of the public. The plan is organized into several sections with Chapter 1 providing introductory information such as project location, purpose and need, project goals and objectives, common elements and assumptions, coordination efforts and public scoping, and historical information about the project area. Key issues are presented in Chapter 2 and Chapter 3 discusses existing resource conditions within the wildlife area. Chapter 4 provides a detailed presentation on management activities and Chapter 5 outlines a monitoring and evaluation plan for the project that will help assess whether the project is meeting the intended purpose and need and the goals and objectives. Chapter 6 displays the action plan and provides a prioritized list of actions with associated budget for the next five year period. Successive chapters contain appendices, references, definitions, and a glossary. The purpose of the project is to protect, enhance, and mitigate fish and wildlife resources impacted by Columbia River Basin hydroelectric development. The effort is one of several wildlife mitigation projects in the region developed to compensate for terrestrial habitat losses resulting from the construction of McNary and John Day Hydroelectric facilities located on the mainstem Columbia River. While this project is driven primarily by the purpose and need to mitigate for wildlife habitat losses, it is also recognized that management strategies will also benefit many other non-target fish and wildlife species and associated natural resources. The Rainwater project is much more than a wildlife project--it is a watershed project with potential to benefit resources at the watershed scale. Goals and objectives presented in the following sections include both mitigation and non-mitigation related goals and objectives.

Childs, Allen B.

2002-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

s.haszeldine@ed.ac.uk Climate Change Briefing 10 April 2008 Royal Museum of Scotland 1 Mitigation and Adaptation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of Scotland 2 World energy prediction (Business as usual) 0 1 000 2 000 3 000 4 000 5 000 6 000 7 000 1970 in next 30yr IEA 2004 World Energy outlook Fossil fuels will still provide most of world energy #12;s Ambition: 80% cut by 2050 No carbon fuel efficiency Efficiency andbehaviour Agriculture, forest, soil

Haszeldine, Stuart

485

Business Case for Energy Efficiency in Support of Climate Change Mitigation, Economic and Societal Benefits in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

According to the Building Energy Data Book (BEDB 2010) 15 ,Renewable Energy – Building Energy Data Book 2010, available

Bojda, Nicholas

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

ER 100/200, PP C184/284 GSI Section Notes Energy & Society Week 15: Transportation, Climate Change Mitigation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- blending of low carbon fuels like ethanol with gasoline - increase use of bio-diesel (esp. from waste oil

Kammen, Daniel M.

487

Business Case for Energy Efficiency in Support of Climate Change Mitigation, Economic and Societal Benefits in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Levelized capital cost of $74.6/MWh for “Advanced Coal” plants according to EnergyLevelized capital cost of $74.6/MWh for “Advanced Coal” plants according to Energy

Bojda, Nicholas

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Business Case for Energy Efficiency in Support of Climate Change Mitigation, Economic and Societal Benefits in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heat pump product classes are given in Table A.2.5 Gas Furnaces Natural gas space heating contributes 67.1% of residential

Bojda, Nicholas

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

489

Business Case for Energy Efficiency in Support of Climate Change Mitigation, Economic and Societal Benefits in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Heat Pumps Room AC Residential AC (Cooling) Residential HP (Cooling + Heating)Residential space heating included both electric heat pumpsheating (residential sector only), we make the following regional assumptions: Northern Region: 20% of heat pump

McNeil, Michael A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Business Case for Energy Efficiency in Support of Climate Change Mitigation, Economic and Societal Benefits in India  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Agency (2006). World Energy Outlook 2006, OECD. Kumar, S. ,from IEA’s World Energy Outlook (WEO) 2006 (International

McNeil, Michael A.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Business Case for Energy Efficiency in Support of Climate Change Mitigation, Economic and Societal Benefits in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy Agency’s World Energy Outlook 1 . This corresponds togas per year in 2020 World Energy Outlook 2010 Appendix A “Energy Agency’s World Energy Outlook 30 . This corresponds

Bojda, Nicholas

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Business Case for Energy Efficiency in Support of Climate Change Mitigation, Economic and Societal Benefits in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

5W to 1 W, at a cost of two cents per kWh. Electric cookingassume a cost of conserved energy of two cents per kWh forCost of Conserved Energy Utility Price $ per MMbtu $ per kWh

Bojda, Nicholas

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Engaging on corporate social responsibility : the impact of FTSE4Good on environmental management, countering bribery and mitigating climate change   

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis examines the effect of a responsible investment index (FTSE4Good) on corporate social responsibility (CSR). In the first study I investigate the impact of the FTSE engagement reinforced by the threat of ...

Rodionova, Tatiana

2014-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

494

Business Case for Energy Efficiency in Support of Climate Change Mitigation, Economic and Societal Benefits in the Republic of Korea  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

KEMCO, 2012c. Korea's Energy Standards and Labeling: MarketBaseline Unit Energy Consumption Adjustment Market Sharesof Conserved Energy Table for Freezers Market Share Lifetime

McNeil, Michael A.

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

495

Business Case for Energy Efficiency in Support of Climate Change Mitigation, Economic and Societal Benefits in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Policy Can Deliver Demand-Side Management Benefits to aa portfolio of demand side management or energy efficiencymanufacturers, utility demand-side-management programs and

McNeil, Michael A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

496

Business Case for Energy Efficiency in Support of Climate Change Mitigation, Economic and Societal Benefits in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Taken together, refrigerators and freezers account for 8.9%Freezers   Refrigerator and Freezer Cases  without Doors Refrigerator, Refrigerator-Freezer and Freezers Rulemaking

Bojda, Nicholas

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

497

Business Case for Energy Efficiency in Support of Climate Change Mitigation, Economic and Societal Benefits in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Historical Shipment' Compact Refrigerator, Refrigerator?Freezer Refrigerator?Freezer and Freezers NOPR National Impact Analysis Spreadsheet, USDOE (2010g)  Price Source Location By Category* Shipments Table 8.4.x Lifetime 'Historical 

Bojda, Nicholas

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

498

Business Case for Energy Efficiency in Support of Climate Change Mitigation, Economic and Societal Benefits in the United States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of residential primary energy consumption (BEDB 2010). DOEof residential primary energy consumption (BEDB 2010). Five6.3% of primary residential energy consumption in the United

Bojda, Nicholas

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Business Case for Energy Efficiency in Support of Climate Change Mitigation, Economic and Societal Benefits in India  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study seeks to provide policymakers and other stakeholders with actionable information towards a road map for reducing energy consumption cost-effectively. We focus on individual end use equipment types (hereafter referred to as appliance groups) that might be the subject of policies - such as labels, energy performance standards, and incentives - to affect market transformation in the short term, and on high-efficiency technology options that are available today. the high efficiency or Business Case scenario is constructed around a model of cost-effective efficiency improvement. Our analysis demonstrates that a significant reduction in energy consumption and emissions is achievable at net negative cost, that is, as a profitable investment for consumers. Net savings are calculated assuming no additional costs to energy consumption such as carbon taxes. Savings relative to the base case as calculated in this way is often referred to as “economic savings potential”. So far, the Indian market has responded favorably to government efficiency initiatives, with Indian manufacturers producing a higher fraction of high-efficiency equipment than before program implementation. This study highlights both the financial benefit and the scope of potential impact for adopting this equipment, all of which is already readily available on the market. The approach of the study is to assess the impact of short-term actions on long-term impacts. “Short-term” market transformation is assumed to occur by 2015, while “long-term” energy demand reduction impacts are assessed in 2030. In the intervening years, most but not all of the equipment studied will turn over completely. The Business Case concentrates on technologies for which cost-effectiveness can be clearly demonstrated.

McNeil, Michael A.; Ke, Jing; Can, Stephane de la Rue du; Letschert, Virginie E.; McMahon, James E.

2011-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

500

Business Case for Energy Efficiency in Support of Climate Change Mitigation, Economic and Societal Benefits in China  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Commercial and Industrial End Uses Incandescent Lamps Refrigerators Residential AC (Including Heat Pumps) Washing Machines Fluorescent Ballasts Electric Water Heaters

McNeil, Michael A.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z