National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for id soil ph

  1. Adsorption behavior of copper and zinc in soils: Influence of pH on adsorption characteristics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Msaky, J.J. ); Calvet, R. )

    1990-08-01

    The authors studied adsorption of copper and zinc on three different soils: a brown silty soil, an Oxisol, and a Podzol. They determined the amounts adsorbed and the shapes of adsorption isotherms as a function of the pH of the adsorbing medium at a constant ionic strength. The adsorbed amount-pH relationship depended strongly on the natures of the metallic cation and of the soil. The pH greatly influenced the characteristics of adsorption isotherms. They based interpretation on the variations with the pH of both adsorbent affinity for the metal in relation to the surface electric charge and chemical speciation in solution. The adsorption mechanism in the Oxisol probably involves monohydroxylated cations but is more determined by bivalent cations in the brown silty soil and the Podzol. From a general point of view, adsorption of copper and zinc cannot be represented with a single adsorption constant, but should be described by adsorption isotherms obtained at various pH values.

  2. Leaching characteristics of toxic constituents from coal fly ash mixed soils under the influence of pH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Komonweeraket, Kanokwan; Cetin, Bora; Benson, Craig H.; Aydilek, Ahmet H.; Edil, Tuncer B.

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: • The impact of pH on the leaching of elements and metals from fly ash mixed soils. • Generally Ca, Cd, Mg, and Sr follows a cationic leaching pattern. • The leaching of As and Se shows an oxyanionic leaching pattern. • The leaching behavior of elements does not change based on material type. • Different fly ash types show different abilities in immobilizing trace elements. - Abstract: Leaching behaviors of Arsenic (As), Barium (Ba), Calcium (Ca), Cadmium (Cd), Magnesium (Mg), Selenium (Se), and Strontium (Sr) from soil alone, coal fly ash alone, and soil-coal fly ash mixtures, were studied at a pH range of 2–14 via pH-dependent leaching tests. Seven different types of soils and coal fly ashes were tested. Results of this study indicated that Ca, Cd, Mg, and Sr showed cationic leaching pattern while As and Se generally follows an oxyanionic leaching pattern. On the other hand, leaching of Ba presented amphoteric-like leaching pattern but less pH-dependent. In spite of different types and composition of soil and coal fly ash investigated, the study reveals the similarity in leaching behavior as a function of pH for a given element from soil, coal fly ash, and soil-coal fly ash mixtures. The similarity is most likely due to similar controlling mechanisms (e.g., solubility, sorption, and solid-solution formation) and similar controlling factors (e.g., leachate pH and redox conditions). This offers the opportunity to transfer knowledge of coal fly ash that has been extensively characterized and studied to soil stabilized with coal fly ash. It is speculated that unburned carbon in off-specification coal fly ashes may provide sorption sites for Cd resulting in a reduction in concentration of these elements in leachate from soil-coal fly ash mixture. Class C fly ash provides sufficient CaO to initiate the pozzolanic reaction yielding hydrated cement products that oxyanions, including As and Se, can be incorporated into.

  3. 4-ID beamline layout

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sector 4 beamline layout Overview Sector 4 uses a canted undulator straight section to operate two beamlines The 4-ID-C beamline operates between 500 and 3000 eV while the 4-ID-D...

  4. Badging, Real ID

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Office » Badging, Real ID Badging, Real ID Effective Nov. 3, 2014, the Lab will implement requirements of the REAL ID Act. Contact Badge Office (505) 667-6901 Email Badge requirements US citizen employees must present a photo ID and proof of US citizenship. See Security Smart on Proof of United States Citizenship for the Badge Office (pdf). Foreign national guests and employees must have an approved visit and present a valid passport and documentation of US legal status and work authorizations.

  5. ID@Work

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ID@Work ID@Work ID@Work is a video feature that introduces DOE-ID employees and the jobs they perform. These videos are created in Windows Media Video (wmv) format and have no scripts are available. 2013, January Morris Hall is the Radiological Controls Manager for the Idaho Operations Office 2 minutes, (18 MB) 2012, December Mark Arenaz, Director of ID's Office of Project Management Support 2 minutes, (14 MB) 2012, January Carol Henning, Safety Team Lead for Quality and Safety Division 2

  6. Beamline 29-ID

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Milestones IEX Advisory Committees FDR Beamline Information RSXS ARPES APS Ring Status Current APS Schedule Intermediate Energy X-Rays (29-ID): The Intermediate Energy...

  7. 4-ID-D optics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4-ID-D Beamline Optics A schetch of the major optical components for beam line 4-ID-D are shown above. All these components located in the B-station upstream from the D...

  8. Real ID Act in brief

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Real Estate Approvals Real Estate Approvals Real Estate Approvals Policy Flash 2011-61, Acquisition Guide Chapter 17.3, Acquisition, Use, and Disposal of Real Estate (attachment)

    Visitors » Badging, Badge Office » Real ID Act in brief Real ID Act in brief Effective Nov. 3, 2014, the Lab will implement requirements of the REAL ID Act. Contact Badge Office (505) 667-6901 Email REAL ID Act in brief REAL ID is a coordinated effort by the states and the Federal Government to improve the

  9. Blind Modal ID

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Projects » Blind Modal ID Blind separation of high-resolution vibration modes High-resolution video camera measurement of the structural vibration (the top video) could be separated into individual, monotone, vibration modes, which enable high-resolution visualization and analysis of structural dynamics. Contact Yongchao Yang (832) 335-3003 Email David Mascarenas dmascarenas@lanl.gov (505) 665-0881 Original video = Mode 1 - 6.34 Hz + Mode 2 - 17.96 Hz + Mode 3 - 25.89 Hz (higher

  10. Data ID Service

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ID Service First DOI for a DOE dataset was minted by OSTI and registered with DataCite on 8/10/2011 from the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory http://dx.doi.org/10.5439/1021460 Disseminate Our Results: "Our success should be measured not when a project is completed or an experiment concluded, but when scientifc and technical information is disseminated. Beyond broad availability of technical reports, e-prints and

  11. T ID CODE I

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    T ID CODE I DE- , I AC52- AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATlON OF CONTRACT I. CONTRAC I 06NA25396 I Los Alamos National Security, LLC 4200 West Jernez Road Suite 400 Los Alamos, NM 87544 PAGE 1 OF 1 PAGES 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. A029 U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Manager, Los Alamos Site Office 528 3sth Street Los Alamos, NM 87544 I 9B. DATED (SEE ITEM 11) 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, state, ZIP Code) 10A. MODIFICATION OF

  12. DHSIsotopeID

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2007-12-18

    DHSIsotopeID is an application designed to read and analyze radiation measurement files taken by radiation measurement files taken by radiation portal monitors, and in particular, by the advanced spectroscopic portals. It requires that the data files be in the N42 file format, compliant with the interface control documents for DNDO radiation measurement files. It carries out an automated analysis to determine which isotopes are present in the spectra, and then presents the results in graphicalmore » form to the user. It also enables further post-processing and analysis, for example by performing further analysis on selected regions of interest of the spectrum, as designated by the user via the graphical interface.« less

  13. APS Beamline 6-ID-B,C

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6-ID-B,C Home Recent Publications Beamline Info Optics Instrumentation Software User Info Beamline 6-ID-B,C Beamline 6-ID-B,C is operated by the Magnetic Materials Group in the...

  14. APS Beamline 6-ID-D

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MM-Group Home MMG Advisory Committees 6-ID-D Home Recent Publications Beamline Info Optics Instrumentation Software User Info Beamline 6-ID-D Beamline 6-ID-D is operated by the...

  15. DOE-ID Operations Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June 5, 2013 DOE-ID Operations Summary For the Period May 16, through May 30, 2013 EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is a summary of contractor operations at the Idaho National Laboratory, managed by DOE- Idaho Operations Office. It has been compiled in response to a request from stakeholders for more information on health, safety and environmental incidents at DOE facilities in Idaho. It also includes a brief summary of accomplishments at the Site. POC - Shannon Brennan, DOE-ID, (208) 526-3993.

  16. DOE-ID Operations Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    24, 2013 DOE-ID Operations Summary For the Period May 30, 2013 through June 12, 2013 EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is a summary of contractor operations at the Idaho National Laboratory, managed by DOE- Idaho Operations Office. It has been compiled in response to a request from stakeholders for more information on health, safety and environmental incidents at DOE facilities in Idaho. It also includes a brief summary of accomplishments at the Site. POC - Shannon Brennan, DOE-ID, (208) 526-3993.

  17. DOE-ID Twitter Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bradley Bugger doeidbug Bradley Bugger Want to know what's going on at DOE-Idaho? Follow DOE-ID public affairs supervisor Brad Bugger on Twitter at doeidbug. https://twitter.com/#!/doeidbug Editorial Date May 9, 2911 By Brad Bugger

  18. DOE-ID Operations Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    07, 2013 DOE-ID Operations Summary For the Period July 8, 2013 through July 28, 2013 EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is a summary of contractor operations at the Idaho National Laboratory, managed by DOE- Idaho Operations Office. It has been compiled in response to a request from stakeholders for more information on health, safety and environmental incidents at DOE facilities in Idaho. It also includes a brief summary of accomplishments at the Site. POC -Danielle Miller, (208) 526-5709. Advanced

  19. DOE-ID Operations Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6, 2013 DOE-ID Operations Summary For the Period July 29, 2013 through August 12, 2013 EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is a summary of contractor operations at the Idaho National Laboratory, managed by DOE- Idaho Operations Office. It has been compiled in response to a request from stakeholders for more information on health, safety and environmental incidents at DOE facilities in Idaho. It also includes a brief summary of accomplishments at the Site. POC -Danielle Miller, (208) 526-5709. Advanced

  20. DOE-ID Operations Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    8, 2013 DOE-ID Operations Summary For the Period September 30, 2013 through October 31, 2013 EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is a summary of contractor operations at the Idaho National Laboratory, managed by DOE- Idaho Operations Office. It has been compiled in response to a request from stakeholders for more information on health, safety and environmental incidents at DOE facilities in Idaho. It also includes a brief summary of accomplishments at the Site. POC -Danielle Miller, (208) 526-5709.

  1. DOE-ID Operations Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6, 2014 DOE-ID Operations Summary For the Period November 01, 2013 through November 30, 2013 EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is a summary of contractor operations at the Idaho National Laboratory, managed by DOE- Idaho Operations Office. It has been compiled in response to a request from stakeholders for more information on health, safety and environmental incidents at DOE facilities in Idaho. It also includes a brief summary of accomplishments at the Site. POC -Danielle Miller, (208) 526-5709.

  2. DOE-ID Operations Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    27, 2014 DOE-ID Operations Summary For the Period December 01, 2013 through January 15, 2014 EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is a summary of contractor operations at the Idaho National Laboratory, managed by DOE- Idaho Operations Office. It has been compiled in response to a request from stakeholders for more information on health, safety and environmental incidents at DOE facilities in Idaho. It also includes a brief summary of accomplishments at the Site. POC -Danielle Miller, (208) 526-5709.

  3. DOE-ID Operations Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3, 2015 Updated on April 28, 2015 DOE-ID Operations Summary For the Period September 30, 2014 through November 1, 2014 EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is a summary of contractor operations at the Idaho National Laboratory, managed by DOE- Idaho Operations Office. It has been compiled in response to a request from stakeholders for more information on health, safety and environmental incidents at DOE facilities in Idaho. It also includes a brief summary of accomplishments at the Site. POC -Danielle

  4. DOE-ID Operations Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7, 2015 DOE-ID Operations Summary For the Period January 1, 2015 - January 31, 2015 EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is a summary of contractor operations at the Idaho National Laboratory Site, managed by the DOE- Idaho Operations Office. It has been compiled in response to a request from stakeholders for more information on health, safety and environmental incidents at DOE facilities in Idaho. It also includes a brief summary of accomplishments at the Site. POC: Danielle Miller, (208) 526-5709.

  5. DOE-ID Operations Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6, 2015 DOE-ID Operations Summary For the Period February 1, 2015 - February 28, 2015 EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is a summary of contractor operations at the Idaho National Laboratory Site, managed by the DOE- Idaho Operations Office. It has been compiled in response to a request from stakeholders for more information on health, safety and environmental incidents at DOE facilities in Idaho. It also includes a brief summary of accomplishments at the Site. POC: Danielle Miller, (208) 526-5709.

  6. DOE-ID Operations Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    23, 2015 DOE-ID Operations Summary For the Period March 1, 2015 -March 31, 2015 EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is a summary of contractor operations at the Idaho National Laboratory Site, managed by the DOE- Idaho Operations Office. It has been compiled in response to a request from stakeholders for more information on health, safety and environmental incidents at DOE facilities in Idaho. It also includes a brief summary of accomplishments at the Site. POC: Danielle Miller, (208) 526-5709.

  7. DOE-ID Operations Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1, 2015 DOE-ID Operations Summary For the Period April 1, 2015 - April 30, 2015 EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is a summary of contractor operations at the Idaho National Laboratory Site, managed by the DOE- Idaho Operations Office. It has been compiled in response to a request from stakeholders for more information about health, safety and environmental incidents at DOE facilities in Idaho. It also includes a brief summary of accomplishments at the Site. POC: Danielle Miller, (208) 526-5709.

  8. DOE-ID Operations Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4, 2015 DOE-ID Operations Summary For the Period May 1, 2015 - May 31, 2015 EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is a summary of contractor operations at the Idaho National Laboratory Site, managed by the DOE- Idaho Operations Office. It has been compiled in response to a request from stakeholders for more information on health, safety and environmental incidents at DOE facilities in Idaho. It also includes a brief summary of accomplishments at the Site. POC: Danielle Miller, (208) 526-5709. Advanced

  9. DOE-ID Operations Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    25, 2015 DOE-ID Operations Summary For the Period June 1, 2015 - June 30, 2015 EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is a summary of contractor operations at the Idaho National Laboratory Site, managed by the DOE- Idaho Operations Office. It has been compiled in response to a request from stakeholders for more information on health, safety and environmental incidents at DOE facilities in Idaho. It also includes a brief summary of accomplishments at the Site. POC: Danielle Miller, (208) 526-5709. Advanced

  10. DOE-ID Operations Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    December 2, 2015 DOE-ID Operations Summary For the Period September 1, 2015 - September 30, 2015 EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is a summary of contractor operations at the Idaho National Laboratory Site, managed by the DOE- Idaho Operations Office. It has been compiled in response to a request from stakeholders for more information on health, safety and environmental incidents at DOE facilities in Idaho. It also includes a brief summary of accomplishments at the Site. POC: Danielle Miller, (208)

  11. DOE-ID Operations Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7, 2015 DOE-ID Operations Summary For the Period August 1, 2015 - August 31, 2015 EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is a summary of contractor operations at the Idaho National Laboratory Site, managed by the DOE- Idaho Operations Office. It has been compiled in response to a request from stakeholders for more information on health, safety and environmental incidents at DOE facilities in Idaho. It also includes a brief summary of accomplishments at the Site. POC: Danielle Miller, (208) 526-5709.

  12. DOE-ID Operations Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    February 11, 2016 DOE-ID Operations Summary For the Period November 1, 2015 - November 30, 2015 EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is a summary of contractor operations at the Idaho National Laboratory Site, managed by the DOE- Idaho Operations Office. It has been compiled in response to a request from stakeholders for more information on health, safety and environmental incidents at DOE facilities in Idaho. It also includes a brief summary of accomplishments at the Site. POC: Danielle Miller, (208)

  13. DOE-ID Operations Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    December 1, 2015 -December 31, 2015 EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is a summary of contractor operations at the Idaho National Laboratory Site, managed by the DOE- Idaho Operations Office. It has been compiled in response to a request from stakeholders for more information on health, safety and environmental incidents at DOE facilities in Idaho. It also includes a brief summary of accomplishments at the Site. POC: Danielle Miller, (208) 526-5709. Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) December 17: The

  14. APS Beamline 6-ID-B,C

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    B,C Home Recent Publications Beamline Info Optics Instrumentation Software User Info Beamline 6-ID-B,C Beamline 6-ID-B,C is operated by the Magnetic Materials Group in the X-ray...

  15. APS Beamline 6-ID-D

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    D Home Recent Publications Beamline Info Optics Instrumentation Software User Info Beamline 6-ID-D Beamline 6-ID-D is operated by the Magnetic Materials Group in the X-ray Science...

  16. DOE-ID Mission and Vision

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ID Mission and Vision You are here: DOE-ID Home > Inside ID > Our Mission and Vision The Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID)/INL mission is: To develop and deliver cost-effective solutions to both fundamental and advanced challenges in nuclear energy and other energy resources, national security, and environmental management. The Department's expectations of its operations offices and laboratories are: to advance the national, economic and energy security of the United States; to promote

  17. II.CONTRACT ID CODE

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    1 II.CONTRACT ID CODE ~AGE 1 of AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATIONIMODIFICATION OF CONTRACT PAGES AC 5. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) 3. EFFECTNE DATE 2. AMENDMENTfMODIFICA TION NO. 4. REQUISITIONIPURCHASE REQ. NO. See Block 16c. NOPR 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE 05008 6. ISSUED BY CODE 05008 U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration P.O. Box 2050 Oak Ridge, TN 37831 P.O. Box 2050 Oak Ridge, TN

  18. Department of Energy Idaho - Inside DOE-ID

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Inside ID Inside Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) DOE-ID Mission and Vision Brief History of the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) DOE-ID Agreement in Principle Organization Chart...

  19. DOEDataID_24X30poster112515

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    osti.gov/home/doe-data-id-service

  20. Mo Year Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER:

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Mo Year Report Period: EIA ID NUMBER: http:www.eia.govsurveyformeia14instructions.pdf Mailing Address: Secure File Transfer option available at: (e.g., PO Box, RR) https:...

  1. 1-ID Home Page | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1-ID Home Infrastructure Techniques Data Analysis Publications X-ray Resources Materials Physics and Engineering Group Useful Links Current APS status ESAF System GUP System X-Ray...

  2. Page 1, About DOE-ID

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 of 11 Previous Page About the U.S. Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID) As a new employee of the Department of Energy (DOE), you are entering a Cabinet-Level Executive Branch Agency with a long history of achievement. The Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID)/INL mission is to develop and deliver cost-effective solutions to both fundamental and advanced challenges in nuclear energy and other energy resources, national security, and environmental management. The Department's

  3. IDS Climate Change and Development Centre Resources | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    IDS Climate Change and Development Centre Resources Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary Name: IDS Climate Change and Development Centre Resources AgencyCompany Organization:...

  4. Id-1 and Id-2 genes and products as markers of epithelial cancer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith

    2008-09-30

    A method for detection and prognosis of breast cancer and other types of cancer. The method comprises detecting expression, if any, for both an Id-1 and an Id-2 genes, or the ratio thereof, of gene products in samples of breast tissue obtained from a patient. When expressed, Id-1 gene is a prognostic indicator that breast cancer cells are invasive and metastatic, whereas Id-2 gene is a prognostic indicator that breast cancer cells are localized and noninvasive in the breast tissue.

  5. Id-1 and Id-2 genes and products as markers of epithelial cancer

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith

    2011-10-04

    A method for detection and prognosis of breast cancer and other types of cancer. The method comprises detecting expression, if any, for both an Id-1 and an Id-2 genes, or the ratio thereof, of gene products in samples of breast tissue obtained from a patient. When expressed, Id-1 gene is a prognostic indicator that breast cancer cells are invasive and metastatic, whereas Id-2 gene is a prognostic indicator that breast cancer cells are localized and noninvasive in the breast tissue.

  6. Employee Assistance Self-ID Form | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Employee Assistance Self-ID Form Employee Assistance Self-ID Form Request Emergency Assistance Self-ID Form-HQ PDF icon Employee Assistance Self-ID Form More Documents & Publications DOE HQ Special Needs Assistance in an Emergency DOE Emergency Special Needs Self-Identification Form DOE Emergency Exercise Feedback Form

  7. I.D I VI Figure

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ~press - ,~,.--;~ 3.1 ,,~-.::;:.--- ~ ( 3.1 ( ;-; t\ I.D I VI Figure 9-1. Location of the original Cypress Grove Set-Aside and the Stave Island and Georgia Power replacement Areas. Set-Aside 9: Cypress Grove, Stave Island, and Georgia Power

  8. Facility Representative Program Outstanding at ID

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    June 19, 2007 Facility Representative Program Outstanding at ID Idaho's three DOE Complex-wide Facility Representative of the Year (FROTY) recipients at this year's conference pose for a photo shoot with Elvis. L to R: Dary Newbry 2005 FROTY, Bob Seal 2006 FROTY, Bob Knighten 2004 FROTY Facility representatives (FRs) are the eyes and ears of the federal government at the Idaho National Laboratory. They oversee the people, processes, facilities and systems that ensure safety at INL facilities.

  9. CHANGE IN ACCEPTABLE ID DOCUMENTS FOR JLAB ACCESS:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JLAB ACCESS: The REAL ID Act (Public Law 109-13) now determines which state driver's license can be presented and accepted as a valid ID document for access to Jefferson Lab. The...

  10. Beamline 4-ID-D Publications

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Phys. Rev. B 91, 094413 (2015). "Competing Superexchange Interactions in Double Perovskite Osmates," Ryan C. Morrow, Ph.D.-Thesis, Ohio State University, 2015. "Effects of...

  11. Underground Storage Tank Integrated Demonstration (UST-ID). Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The DOE complex currently has 332 underground storage tanks (USTs) that have been used to process and store radioactive and chemical mixed waste generated from weapon materials production. Very little of the over 100 million gallons of high-level and low-level radioactive liquid waste has been treated and disposed of in final form. Two waste storage tank design types are prevalent across the DOE complex: single-shell wall and double-shell wall designs. They are made of stainless steel, concrete, and concrete with carbon steel liners, and their capacities vary from 5000 gallons (19 m{sup 3}) to 10{sup 6} gallons (3785 m{sup 3}). The tanks have an overburden layer of soil ranging from a few feet to tens of feet. Responding to the need for remediation of tank waste, driven by Federal Facility Compliance Agreements (FFCAs) at all participating sites, the Underground Storage Tank Integrated Demonstration (UST-ID) Program was created by the US DOE Office of Technology Development in February 1991. Its mission is to focus the development, testing, and evaluation of remediation technologies within a system architecture to characterize, retrieve, treat to concentrate, and dispose of radioactive waste stored in USTs at DOE facilities. The ultimate goal is to provide safe and cost-effective solutions that are acceptable to the public and the regulators. The UST-ID has focused on five DOE locations: the Hanford Site, which is the host site, in Richland, Washington; the Fernald Site in Fernald, Ohio; the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory near Idaho Falls, Idaho; the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the Savannah River Site in Savannah River, South Carolina.

  12. Facility Representative Program ID Selects FR of the Year

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Facility Representative Program ID Selects FR of the Year John Martin DOE-ID Facility Representative John Martin DOE-ID Facility Representative of the Year. John Martin was selected as DOE-ID's Facility Representative of the Year and the office's nominee for the 2007 DOE Facility Representative of the Year Award. John was selected from an exceptional field of candidates to represent DOE-ID at the Facility Representative Annual Workshop in Las Vegas this May. Each year the Department of Energy

  13. CHANGE IN ACCEPTABLE ID DOCUMENTS FOR JLAB ACCESS:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CHANGE IN ACCEPTABLE ID DOCUMENTS FOR JLAB ACCESS: The REAL ID Act (Public Law 109-13) now determines which state driver's license can be presented and accepted as a valid ID document for access to Jefferson Lab. The following states/US territories have been determined by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to have failed to comply with the REAL ID Act: American Samoa, Illinois, Minnesota, Missouri, and Washington. As of March 2, 2015, Jefferson Lab will begin using the REAL ID Act

  14. SLAC Dosimeter / ID Request Form A

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Feb 2009 (updated 13 May 2010) SLAC-I-760-0A07J-006-R010 1 of 2 SLAC Dosimeter / ID Request Form A (For applicants who have completed SLAC Environment, Safety, and Health Training) Sections 1-5 completed by applicant. Section 1: Contact Information Last name: First name: MI: Male Female Birth year (yyyy): Job title: Contact information/mailing address: City: State: Zip code: Country: Dept/Group: Phone number: Mail stop: Users or non-SLAC employees only: List employer, company, or university :

  15. Airless drying -- Developments since IDS'94

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stubbing, T.J.

    1999-09-01

    Since its introduction to IDS'94 delegates, significant progress has been made with the development of airless drying technology. The ceramic industry internationally is beginning to benefit from both the energy use and drying time reductions it achieves, while on the basis of further theoretical work carried out since 1993 other industries, including the bioenergy sector, should also soon begin to exploit its advantages. As global warming becomes a reality and oil reserves decline, superheated steam drying and gasification of biomass will contribute to the mitigation of those problems.

  16. RAPID/Roadmap/14-ID-d | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit BETA About Bulk Transmission Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools Contribute Contact Us 401 Water Quality Certification (14-ID-d) IDEQ is...

  17. RAPID/Roadmap/3-ID-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit BETA About Bulk Transmission Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools Contribute Contact Us State Land Access Overview (3-ID-b) If a project is...

  18. RAPID/Roadmap/14-ID-f | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit BETA About Bulk Transmission Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools Contribute Contact Us 401 NPDES Water Quality Certification (14-ID-f) Idaho...

  19. RAPID/Roadmap/4-ID-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit BETA About Bulk Transmission Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools Contribute Contact Us State Exploration Process (4-ID-a) 04IDAStateExploration...

  20. 2011 Annual Planning Summary for Idaho Operations Office (ID...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2011 and 2012 within the Idaho Operations Office (ID) (See Environmental Management). ...

  1. RAPID/Roadmap/11-ID-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Toolkit BETA About Bulk Transmission Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools Contribute Contact Us State Cultural Considerations (11-ID-a) Idaho has a statute that provides state...

  2. RAPID/Roadmap/5-ID-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools Contribute Contact Us Drilling and Well Development (5-ID-a) 05IDADrillingWellDevelopment.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in...

  3. RAPID/Roadmap/17-ID-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Contact Us Aesthetic Resource Assessment (17-ID-a) 17IDAAestheticResourceAssessment.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number...

  4. RAPID/Roadmap/9-ID-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Environmental Review Process (9-ID-a) Add overview. 09IDAStateEnvironmentalProcess.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number...

  5. DOE - Office of Legacy Management -- Lowman Mill Site - ID 01

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Mill Site (ID.01) Designated Name: Alternate Name: Location: Evaluation Year: Site Operations: Site Disposition: Radioactive Materials Handled: Primary Radioactive Materials...

  6. RAPID/Roadmap/14-ID-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools Contribute Contact Us Underground Injection Control Permit (14-ID-c) Rule 40 of the Idaho Department of Water Resources' Drilling for...

  7. Temporary EPA ID Number Request | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Temporary EPA ID Number RequestLegal Abstract A developer that may "generate hazardous waste only from an episodic event" may instead apply for a temporary hazardous waste...

  8. RAPID/Roadmap/8-ID-e | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ID-e < RAPID | Roadmap Jump to: navigation, search RAPID Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit BETA About Bulk Transmission Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools...

  9. RAPID/Roadmap/3-ID-e | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ID-e < RAPID | Roadmap Jump to: navigation, search RAPID Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit BETA About Bulk Transmission Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools...

  10. RAPID/Roadmap/14-ID-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    RAPIDRoadmap14-ID-b < RAPID | Roadmap Jump to: navigation, search RAPID Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit BETA About Bulk Transmission Geothermal...

  11. RAPID/Roadmap/8-ID-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    RAPIDRoadmap8-ID-a < RAPID | Roadmap Jump to: navigation, search RAPID Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit BETA About Bulk Transmission Geothermal Hydropower...

  12. RAPID/Roadmap/6-ID-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    RAPIDRoadmap6-ID-b < RAPID | Roadmap Jump to: navigation, search RAPID Regulatory and Permitting Information Desktop Toolkit BETA About Bulk Transmission Geothermal Hydropower...

  13. RAPID/Roadmap/15-ID-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BETA About Bulk Transmission Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools Contribute Contact Us Air Quality Permit - Tier II Operating Permit (15-ID-b) Tier II Operating Permits are...

  14. RAPID/Roadmap/15-ID-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    BETA About Bulk Transmission Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools Contribute Contact Us Air Quality Permit - Permit to Construct (15-ID-a) The Idaho Department of Environmental...

  15. RAPID/Roadmap/12-ID-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Contact Us State Biological Resource Considerations (12-ID-a) The Idaho Department of Fish & Game preserves wildlife against any direct take, including wild animals, birds, and...

  16. Id-1 and Id-2 genes and products as therapeutic targets for treatment of breast cancer and other types of carcinoma

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith

    2014-09-30

    A method for treatment and amelioration of breast, cervical, ovarian, endometrial, squamous cells, prostate cancer and melanoma in a patient comprising targeting Id-1 or Id-2 gene expression with a delivery vehicle comprising a product which modulates Id-1 or Id-2 expression.

  17. McPhD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    is a research code designed to explore the applications of the Haskell programming language to Monte Carlo algorithms. June 29, 2013 software McPhD is a research code designed...

  18. JLab Registration/International Services - Researcher/Visitor ID

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Requirements Researcher/Visitor ID Requirements CHANGE IN ACCEPTABLE ID DOCUMENTS FOR JLAB ACCESS U.S. Citizens must bring a valid Government issued ID card that contains a photo such as a passport or valid driver's license. Non-driver photo identification cards issued by the Department of Motor Vehicles can be used as proof of identification. Lawful Permanent Resident of the United States must bring their Green Card or passport with valid I-551 stamp AND a valid government issued

  19. Beamline 4-ID-C | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    C 4-ID-C Home Recent Publications XSD-MM Home MM Advisory Committees FAQs Beamline Info Instrumentation Magnet Materials Internal Useful Links Current APS status ESAF System GUP...

  20. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-15-070.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE-ID-INL-15-070 excluded petroleum and natural gas products that pre-exist in the environment such that there would be uncontrolled or unpermitted releases; (4) have the...

  1. RAPID/Roadmap/3-ID-d | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Toolkit BETA About Bulk Transmission Geothermal Hydropower Solar Tools Contribute Contact Us Land Use Permit (3-ID-d) The Idaho Department of Lands issues Land Use Permits for...

  2. RAPID/Roadmap/6-ID-c | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tools Contribute Contact Us Drinking Water Permit (6-ID-c) 06IDCDrinkingWaterPermit.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number...

  3. RAPID/Roadmap/7-ID-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Contact Us Power Plant Siting Process (7-ID-a) 07IDAPowerPlantSitingConstruction.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number...

  4. RAPID/Roadmap/13-ID-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Contribute Contact Us State Land Use Assessment (13-ID-a) 13IDALandUseAssessment.pdf Error creating thumbnail: Page number not in range. Error creating thumbnail: Page number...

  5. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-14-034.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    No.: DOE-ID-INL-14-034 pollutants, contaminants, or CERCLA-excluded petroleum and natural gas products that pre-exist in the environment such that there would be uncontrolled...

  6. RAPID/Roadmap/19-ID-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to 19-ID-a.5 - Is a Change in Point of Diversion, Place of Use, Period of Use, or Nature of Use Needed for an Existing Water Right If the proposed activity will require a...

  7. RAPID/Roadmap/6-ID-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    load A load is overlegal if the load is: width over 8'6"; Over 14' tall; Truck and trailer combined are over 75' long; or The load weighs over 80,000 pounds. 6-ID-a.2 - Meet...

  8. RAPID/Roadmap/18-ID-b | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    demonstrate insurance coverage that would protect the community from incurring clean-up costs in the event of the developer's insolvency. 18-ID-b.5 - Facility siting license...

  9. Vermont Hazardous Waste Handler Site ID Form | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to library Legal Document- Permit ApplicationPermit Application: Vermont Hazardous Waste Handler Site ID FormLegal Abstract This form is used to notify the Vermont Agency of...

  10. RAPID/Roadmap/3-ID-a | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the IDL becomes involved only if they are notified and the Land Board requests their involvement. 3-ID-a.3 - Consultation (optional) IDL may meet with any other state agency to...

  11. T-642: RSA SecurID update to Customers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RSA investigation has revealed that the attack resulted in certain information being extracted from RSA's systems. Some of that information is related to RSA's SecurID two-factor authentication products

  12. NERSC Helps Physicists ID New Molecules With Unique Features

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NERSC Helps Physicists ID New Molecules With Unique Features NERSC Helps Physicists ID New Molecules With Unique Features Hollow magnetic cage molecules may have applications in technology, healthcare August 10, 2013 NERSC supercomputing resources helped Virginia Commonwealth University (VCU) researchers determine it may be possible to create large, hollow magnetic cage molecules that could be used in medicine as a drug delivery system to noninvasively treat tumors and in other emerging

  13. Physicists ID Mechanism that Stabilizes Plasma in Tokamaks

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Physicists ID Mechanism that Stabilizes Plasma in Tokamaks Physicists ID Mechanism that Stabilizes Plasma in Tokamaks Calculations Run at NERSC Create 3D Simulations of Fusion Plasmas January 4, 2016 Contact: Kathy Kincade, kkincade@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2124 jardinfusion A cross-section of the virtual plasma showing where the magnetic field lines intersect the plane. The central section has field lines that rotate exactly once. Image: Stephen Jardin A team of physicists led by Stephen Jardin of

  14. Final Report: DOE/ID/14215

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kenneth Bryden; J. Richard Hess; Thomas Ulrich; Robert Zemetra

    2008-08-18

    The proposed straw separation system developed in the research project harvests the large internode sections of the straw which has the greater potential as a feedstock for lignocellulosic ethanol production while leaving the chaff and nodes in the field. This strategy ensures sustainable agriculture by preventing the depletion of soil minerals, and it restores organic matter to the soil in amounts and particle sizes that accommodate farmers needs to keep tillage and fertilizer costs low. A ton of these nutrient-rich plant tissues contains as much as $10.55 worth of fertilizer (economic and energy benefits), in terms of nitrogen, phosphorus, potassium, and other nutrients provided to the soil when incorporated by tillage instead of being burned. Biomass conversion to fermentable sugars for the purpose of producing fuels, chemicals, and other industrial products is well understood. Most bioenergy strategies rely on low-cost fermentable sugars for sustainability and economic viability in the marketplace. Exploitation of the whole cropspecifically, wheat straw or other plant material currently regarded as residue or wasteis a practical approach for obtaining a reliable and low-cost source of sugars. However, industrial-scale production of sugars from wheat straw, while technically feasible, is plagued by obstacles related to capital costs, energy consumption, waste streams, production logistics, and the quality of the biomass feedstock. Currently available separation options with combine harvesters are not able to achieve sufficient separation of the straw/stover and chaff streams to realize the full potential of selective harvest. Since ethanol yield is a function of feedstock structural carbohydrate content, biomass anatomical fractions of higher product yield can have a significant beneficial impact on minimum ethanol selling price. To address this advanced biomass separation computation engineering models were developed to more effectively and efficiently engineer high-fidelity and high throughput separation systems for biomass components. INL and Iowa State University developed a computational modeling strategy for simulating multi-phase flow with an integrated solver using various computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes. ISU set up a classic multi-phase test problem to be solved by the various CFD codes. The benchmark case was based on experimental data for bubble gas holdup and bed expansion for a gas/solid fluidized bed. Preliminary fluidization experiments identified some unexpected fluidization behavior, where rather than the bed uniformly fluidizing, a blow out would occur where a hole would open up in the bed through which the air would preferentially flow, resulting in erratic fluidization. To improve understanding of this phenomena and aid in building a design tool, improved computational tools were developed. The virtual engineering techniques developed were tested and utilized to design a separation baffle in a CNH combine. A computational engineering approach involving modeling, analysis, and simulation was used in the form of virtual engineering to design a baffle separator capable of accomplishing the high-fidelity residue separation established by the performance targets. Through the use of the virtual engineering model, baffle designs were simulated to (1) determine the effect of the baffle on the airflow of the combine cleaning system, and (2) predict the effectiveness of the baffle in separating the residue streams. A baffle design was selected based on the virtual engineering modeling, built into the INL selective harvest test combine. The result of the baffle changes improved the crop separation capability of the combine, enabling downstream improvement in composition and theoretical ethanol yield. In addition, the positive results from the application of the virtual engineering tools to the CNH combine design resulted in further application of these tools to other INL areas of research. INL and the University of Idaho identified, characterized, and modified a key plant biosynt

  15. pH optrode

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Northrup, M. Allen; Langry, Kevin C.

    1993-01-01

    A process is provided for forming a long-lasting, stable, pH-sensitive dye-acrylamide copolymer useful as a pH-sensitive material for use in an optrode or other device sensitive to pH. An optrode may be made by mechanically attaching the copolymer to a sensing device such as an optical fiber.

  16. DOE-ID FOIA Electronic Reading Room Documents

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Electronic Reading Room Documents Electronic Reading Room Documents The information contained here represents DOE-ID's responses to FOIA requests that have been or are likely to be of broad public interest, as stipulated under the Electronic Freedom of Information Act Amendments of 1996. As required by the Act, documents created after November 1997, which meet the criteria for electronic presentation, will be made available here. Other documents requested under the FOIA will also be made

  17. Poster - DOE Data ID Service | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Scientific and Technical Information ID Service Document Files and References Available Downloads for this Document: application/pdf icon Poster DOE Data ID Service Last updated on Tuesday 22 December

  18. DOI-BLM-ID-T020-2012-0003-CX | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ID-T020-2012-0003-CX Jump to: navigation, search NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-ID-T020-2012-0003-CX CX for GeothermalExploration CX for Seismic Survey at ?? Geothermal...

  19. Finding Utility Companies Under a Given Utility ID | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    utility company pages under a given utility id. From the Special Ask page, in the query box enter the following: Category:Utility CompaniesEiaUtilityId::15248 substituting...

  20. EIS-0471: Areva Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility in Bonneville County, ID |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy 1: Areva Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility in Bonneville County, ID EIS-0471: Areva Eagle Rock Enrichment Facility in Bonneville County, ID May 20, 2011 delete me old download page duplicate

  1. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-16-007.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    contaminants, collection and analysis of samples, direct measurement of air, soil, water, ... Proposed activities would include, but not be limited to, the following: (a) Geological, ...

  2. Material Safety Data Sheet MSDS ID NO.: 0137SPE012

    Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center [Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)]

    Material Safety Data Sheet MSDS ID NO.: 0137SPE012 Revision date: 05/25/2011 1. CHEMICAL PRODUCT AND COMPANY INFORMATION Product name: Speedway E85 Synonym: Speedway ED75/ED85; E-75; E75; E-85; E85; Ethanol/Gasoline Fuel Blend; Fuel Ethanol ED75/ED85 Chemical Family: Gasoline/Ethanol Formula: Mixture Manufacturer: Speedway LLC P.O. Box 1500 Enon, OH 45501 Other information: 419-421-3070 Emergency telephone number: 877-627-5463 2. COMPOSITION/INFORMATION ON INGREDIENTS E85 is a mixture of ethyl

  3. DOE-ID Procurement Services � the action team

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE-ID Procurement Services � the action team Passage of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 included billions of dollars in additional funding for energy efficiency improvements to U.S. homes and businesses. By early July, the U.S. Department of Energy was hard pressed to get that funding to the communities who needed it to reduce their power bills. That�s when DOE�s Office of Energy Efficiency asked the department�s Idaho Operations Office for support from DOE-ID�s

  4. IdJOO2 UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6/2004 13:39 FAX IdJOO2 UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY WASHINGTON, D.C. 20460 MAR 26 2004 OFFICE OF AIR AND RADIATION R. Paul Detwiler, Acting Manager Carlsbad Field Office U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 3090 Carlsbad, NM 88221-3090 Dear Dr. Detwiler: This letter announces the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA's) final decision to approve the Department of Energy's (DOE's) remote handled (RH) transuranic (TRU) Waste Characterization Program Implementation Plan

  5. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-10-017.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    DOE-ID-INL-10-017 SECTION A. Project Title: ATR Complex Dial Room. SECTION B. Project Description: The proposed project is to construct and operate a new dial room at the Advanced Test Reactor Complex (ATR Complex) (formerly known as the Test Reactor Area [TRA]) in order to meet the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy programmatic needs and to provide ongoing critical support at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The existing telecommunication and data systems located at the

  6. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-12-016.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    No.: DOE-ID-INL-12-016 SECTION A. Project Title: Reverse Osmosis System Removal SECTION B. Project Description: The project will remove a reverse osmosis water treatment system (FU-HA-101) from TAN 681 room 182. The system is out-of-service, with no intent of future use. Work will involve removal of the reverse osmosis system, and associated plumbing/piping and electrical lines and conduit. The project will clear the area of obstacles and tripping hazards associated with unused/unnecessary

  7. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATIONIMODIFICATION OF CONTRACT I '. CONTRACT ID CODE

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    SOLICITATIONIMODIFICATION OF CONTRACT I '. CONTRACT ID CODE BWXT Pantex, LLC Route 726, Mt. Athos Road Lynchburg, VA 24506 PAGE I OF 12 PAGES Albuquerque, NM 871 85-5400 I Amarillo, TX 79120 I I 90. DATED (SEE ITEM 1 1 ) 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, state, ZIP Code) I 10A. MODIFICATION OF CONTRACTIORDER NO. 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. MI67 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. I 1 DE-AC04-00AL66620 100. DATED (SEE ITEM 13) 3. EFFECTIVE DATE See Block 16C Offers must

  8. Soil Sampling At Kilauea East Rift Geothermal Area (Cox, 1981...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in the area. Mercury concentrations are dependent on factors such as soil development, ph., ground gasses, and organic content, so linking the measurements with geothermal...

  9. IDS-NF Impact of Neutrino Cross Section Impact of Neutrino Cross Section

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    IDS-NF Impact of Neutrino Cross Section Impact of Neutrino Cross Section Knowledge on Oscillation Knowledge on Oscillation Measurements Measurements M. Sorel, IFIC (CSIC and U. of Valencia) IDS-NF, RAL, Jan 16-17 2008 M. Sorel - IFIC (Valencia U. & CSIC) 2 IDS-NF Neutrino Cross Sections: At What Energies Needed? Superbeams: Solid: T2K Dashed: NovA M. Sorel - IFIC (Valencia U. & CSIC) 3 IDS-NF Neutrino Cross Sections: At What Energies Needed? Superbeams: Solid: T2K Dashed: NovA Beta

  10. DOE Data ID Service | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    increase access to digital data from DOE-funded scientific research. Through the DOE Data ID Service, OSTI assigns persistent identifiers, known as Digital Object Identifiers ...

  11. Soils Soil Series

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 Soils Soil Series and Phase D Fa D LaB TrB D TrC VeC .Wm '" Vegetation Compartment 28 Community D Mixed PineHardwood D Upland Hardwod D Bottomland Hardwood Water D Sandhill...

  12. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-16-040.docx

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    40 SECTION A. Project Title: Cleanup of Test Reactor Area (TRA)-786 Diesel Spill SECTION B. Project Description and Purpose: Diesel fuel from the supply tank for TRA-786-M-1 diesel was released to soil when the supply line failed. This proposed action is to complete the cleanup of diesel contaminated soil that could not be removed at the time of the spill due to the location of the stabilizer barriers located under the 786-M-1 trailer. The 786-M-1 diesel trailer, electrical wiring, control

  13. Femtosecond dark-field imaging with an X-ray free electron laser (CXIDB ID 19)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Martin, A. V.

    2012-08-25

    This data was collected as part of the same experiment as the data deposited in [ID16](id-16.html). Experiment details are given in [Loh, N.D. et al.](http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature11222)

  14. Femtosecond dark-field imaging with an X-ray free electron laser (CXIDB ID 19)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Martin, A. V.

    This data was collected as part of the same experiment as the data deposited in [ID16](id-16.html). Experiment details are given in [Loh, N.D. et al.](http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature11222)

  15. Summer Ferreira, Ph.D.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ferreira, Ph.D. - Sandia Energy Energy Search Icon Sandia Home Locations Contact Us Employee Locator Energy & Climate Secure & Sustainable Energy Future Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Wind Energy Water Power Supercritical CO2 Geothermal Natural Gas Safety, Security & Resilience of the Energy Infrastructure Energy Storage Nuclear Power & Engineering Grid Modernization Battery Testing Nuclear Fuel Cycle Defense Waste Management Programs Advanced Nuclear

  16. Effect of Dead Algae on Soil Permeability

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey, R.S.

    2003-02-21

    Since existing basins support heavy growths of unicellular green algae which may be killed by temperature variation or by inadvertent pH changes in waste and then deposited on the basin floor, information on the effects of dead algae on soil permeability was needed. This study was designed to show the effects of successive algal kills on the permeability of laboratory soil columns.

  17. A short Id2 protein fragment containing the nuclear export signal forms amyloid-like fibrils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colombo, Noemi [Fakultaet fuer Chemie und Pharmazie, Universitaet Regensburg, Universitaetsstrasse 31, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Schroeder, Josef [Institut fuer Pathologie, Zentrales EM-Labor, Fakultaet fuer Medizin, Universitaet Regensburg, Franz-Josef-Strauss-Allee 11, 93053 Regensburg (Germany); Cabrele, Chiara [Fakultaet fuer Chemie und Pharmazie, Universitaet Regensburg, Universitaetsstrasse 31, 93053 Regensburg (Germany)]. E-mail: chiara.cabrele@chemie.uni-regensburg.de

    2006-07-21

    The negative regulator of DNA-binding/cell-differentiation Id2 is a small protein containing a central helix-loop-helix (HLH) motif and a C-terminal nuclear export signal (NES). Whereas the former is essential for Id2 dimerization and nuclear localization, the latter is responsible for the transport of Id2 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Whereas the isolated Id2 HLH motif is highly helical, large C-terminal Id2 fragments including the NES sequence are either unordered or aggregation-prone. To study the conformational properties of the isolated NES region, we synthesized the Id2 segment 103-124. The latter was insoluble in water and only temporarily soluble in water/alcohol mixtures, where it formed quickly precipitating {beta}-sheets. Introduction of a positively charged N-terminal tail prevented aggressive precipitation and led to aggregates consisting of long fibrils that bound thioflavin T. These results show an interesting structural aspect of the Id2 NES region, which might be of significance for both protein folding and function.

  18. Id-1 gene and gene products as therapeutic targets for treatment of breast cancer and other types of carcinoma

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Desprez, Pierre-Yves; Campisi, Judith

    2014-08-19

    A method for treatment of breast cancer and other types of cancer. The method comprises targeting and modulating Id-1 gene expression, if any, for the Id-1 gene, or gene products in breast or other epithelial cancers in a patient by delivering products that modulate Id-1 gene expression. When expressed, Id-1 gene is a prognostic indicator that cancer cells are invasive and metastatic.

  19. YEAR","UTILITY_ID","UTILITY_NAME","PLANT_ID","PLANT_NAME","SCHEDULE","LINENO","A

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    UTILITY_ID","UTILITY_NAME","PLANT_ID","PLANT_NAME","SCHEDULE","LINENO","AMOUNTS","DESCRIPTION" 2001,298,"Alexandria City of",6558,"DG Hunter",9,"Line 1","STEAM","Kind of Plant" 2001,298,"Alexandria City of",6558,"DG Hunter",9,"Line 2",1956,"Year Originally Constructed" 2001,298,"Alexandria City of",6558,"DG

  20. Surface Soil

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Surface Soil Surface Soil We compare local soil samples with samples collected from northern New Mexico locations that are beyond the range of potential influence from normal Laboratory operations. April 12, 2012 Farm soil sampling Two LANL environmental field team members take soil samples from a farm. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email Measurements are compared to samples from the regional sites and

  1. Lasagna{trademark} soil remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1996-04-01

    Lasagna{trademark} is an integrated, in situ remediation technology being developed which remediates soils and soil pore water contaminated with soluble organic compounds. Lasagna{trademark} is especially suited to sites with low permeability soils where electroosmosis can move water faster and more uniformly than hydraulic methods, with very low power consumption. The process uses electrokinetics to move contaminants in soil pore water into treatment zones where the contaminants can be captured and decomposed. Initial focus is on trichloroethylene (TCE), a major contaminant at many DOE and industrial sites. Both vertical and horizontal configurations have been conceptualized, but fieldwork to date is more advanced for the vertical configuration. Major features of the technology are electrodes energized by direct current, which causes water and soluble contaminants to move into or through the treatment layers and also heats the soil; treatment zones containing reagents that decompose the soluble organic contaminants or adsorb contaminants for immobilization or subsequent removal and disposal; and a water management system that recycles the water that accumulates at the cathode (high pH) back to the anode (low pH) for acid-base neutralization. Alternatively, electrode polarity can be reversed periodically to reverse electroosmotic flow and neutralize pH.

  2. File:08-ID-c - Certificate of Public Convenience and Necessity...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    modified from its original state, some details may not fully reflect the modified file. Image title Lucidchart Author None Short title 08-ID-c - Certificate of Public Convenience...

  3. File:USDA-CE-Production-GIFmaps-ID.pdf | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ID.pdf Jump to: navigation, search File File history File usage Idaho Ethanol Plant Locations Size of this preview: 776 600 pixels. Full resolution (1,650 1,275 pixels,...

  4. DOI-BLM-ID-B010-2010-0083-CX | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    0083-CX Jump to: navigation, search NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-ID-B010-2010-0083-CX CX for GeothermalExploration, CX for Thermal Gradient Holes for Geothermal...

  5. DOI-BLM-ID-I020-2012-0017-CX | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    I020-2012-0017-CX Jump to: navigation, search NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-ID-I020-2012-0017-CX CX at Bingham-Caribou Geothermal Area for GeothermalExploration CX for...

  6. DOI-BLM-ID-B010-2010-??-CX | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ??-CX Jump to: navigation, search NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-ID-B010-2010-??-CX CX at Weiser Geothermal Area for GeothermalExploration CX at Weiser Geothermal Area for...

  7. DOI-BLM-ID-110-2009-3825-CE | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    110-2009-3825-CE Jump to: navigation, search NEPA Document Collection for: DOI-BLM-ID-110-2009-3825-CE CX at Crane Creek Geothermal Area for GeothermalExploration Crane Creek...

  8. High-resolution x-ray diffraction microscopy of specifically labeled yeast cells (CXIDB ID 6)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Nelson, Johanna

    2011-07-22

    This is the third of five exposures of the same sample at different tilts. This one is at +30 degrees tilt. Check CXI IDs 4 to 8 for the complete set.

  9. High-resolution x-ray diffraction microscopy of specifically labeled yeast cells (CXIDB ID 5)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Nelson, Johanna

    2011-07-22

    This is the second of five exposures of the same sample at different tilts. This one is at +15 degrees tilt. Check CXI IDs 4 to 8 for the complete set.

  10. High-resolution x-ray diffraction microscopy of specifically labeled yeast cells (CXIDB ID 8)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Nelson, Johanna

    2011-07-22

    This is the fifth of five exposures of the same sample at different tilts. This one is at -30 degrees tilt. Check CXI IDs 4 to 8 for the complete set.

  11. High-resolution x-ray diffraction microscopy of specifically labeled yeast cells (CXIDB ID 4)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Nelson, Johanna

    2011-07-22

    This is the first of five exposures of the same sample at different tilts. This one is at +0 degrees tilt. Check CXI IDs 4 to 8 for the complete set.

  12. High-resolution x-ray diffraction microscopy of specifically labeled yeast cells (CXIDB ID 7)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Nelson, Johanna

    2011-07-22

    This is the fourth of five exposures of the same sample at different tilts. This one is at -15 degrees tilt. Check CXI IDs 4 to 8 for the complete set.

  13. 11. CONTRACT ID CODE PAGE OF PAGES I AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION...

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    11. CONTRACT ID CODE PAGE OF PAGES I AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATIONMODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 1 I 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. 258 6. ISSUED BY CODE 3. EFFECTIVE DATE See Block 16C ...

  14. How the DOE Data ID Service Works | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Scientific and Technical Information the DOE Data ID Service Works DataCite | Contact DOE Data ID Service A DOE researcher, organization, or grantee determines that important datasets exist which need to be announced in DOE's scientific and technical databases and assigned DOIs. DOE Order 241.1B instructs that bibliographic information for these datasets be submitted to OSTI. First time submitters may contact OSTI at 865-576-6784 for help in deciding what submittal method will be used,

  15. PERSONAL PROPERTY TRANSFER MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING DE..GM07..04ID11457

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PERSONAL PROPERTY TRANSFER MEMORANDUM OF UNDERSTANDING DE..GM07..04ID11457 BETWEEN THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY IDAHO OPERATIONS OFFICE AND THE COMMUNITY REUSE ORGANIZATION, INC. I. INTRODUCTION This plan establishes conditions under which personal property may be transferred from the United States Department of Energy, Idaho Operations Office (DOE-ID), an agency of the United States Government, to the Community Reuse Organization, Inc. (CRO), an Idaho Corporation. A. Background Section 3] 55 of

  16. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-12-028-1.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    EC Document No.: DOE-ID-INL-12-028 SECTION A. Project Title: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Birch Creek Canyon Wind Study SECTION B. Project Description: The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Birch Creek Valley Wind Study would be conducted under the umbrella of the NOAA/Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Meteorological Research Partnership Memorandum of Agreement between NOAA and the Idaho Office of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE-ID). The project

  17. pH Meter probe assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hale, C.J.

    1983-11-15

    An assembly for mounting a pH probe in a flowing solution, such as a sanitary sewer line, which prevents the sensitive glass portion of the probe from becoming coated with grease, oil, and other contaminants, whereby the probe gives reliable pH indication over an extended period of time. The pH probe assembly utilizes a special filter media and a timed back-rinse feature for flushing clear surface contaminants of the filter. The flushing liquid is of a known pH and is utilized to check performance of the probe. 1 fig.

  18. pH Meter probe assembly

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hale, Charles J.

    1983-01-01

    An assembly for mounting a pH probe in a flowing solution, such as a sanitary sewer line, which prevents the sensitive glass portion of the probe from becoming coated with grease, oil, and other contaminants, whereby the probe gives reliable pH indication over an extended period of time. The pH probe assembly utilizes a special filter media and a timed back-rinse feature for flushing clear surface contaminants of the filter. The flushing liquid is of a known pH and is utilized to check performance of the probe.

  19. DOE Data ID Service Benefits | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Scientific and Technical Information Benefits DataCite | Contact DOE Data ID Service When you submit metadata to OSTI about a dataset, you are basically "announcing" that it exists and you are describing it. That's why you will see the name of the basic submittal tool for data referred to as "Announcement Notice 241.6." Note that the DOE Data ID Service does not accept the dataset itself; only the metadata is submitted. The metadata loads into the OSTI processing system

  20. How to Use the DOE Data ID Service: For Data Centers and High Volume/High

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Frequency Submitters | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information Data Centers and High Volume/High Frequency Submitters DataCite | Contact DOE Data ID Service Call or email your organization's Scientific and Technical Information (STI) Manager. Your STI Manager will refer you to the correct contact at OSTI. Or, if someone else has suggested you contact OSTI directly, you may do so through the DOE Data ID Service email. OSTI will work with you to discover your

  1. Comments on Docket ID: DOE-HQ-2011-0014 | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    on Docket ID: DOE-HQ-2011-0014 Comments on Docket ID: DOE-HQ-2011-0014 This letter comprises the comments of the Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E), Southern California Gas Company (SCGC), San Diego Gas and Electric (SDG&E), and Southern California Edison (SCE) in response to the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Request for Information on Regulatory Burden. The signatories of this letter, collectively referred to herein as the California Investor Owned Utilities (CA IOUs) represent

  2. Idaho National Lab Contract DE-AC07-05ID14517

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contract No. DE-AC07-05ID14517 Modifications You are here: DOE-ID Home > Contracts, Financial Assistance & Solicitations > INL Contract > INL Basic Contract Blue Line Free Acrobat Reader Link The documents listed below represent an electronic copy of modifications to the contract for the Management and Operation of the INL awarded to Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC. These documents are in PDF format. The Adobe Reader is required to access them. If you do not currently have the Acrobat

  3. A Better Way to ID Extreme Weather Events in Climate Models

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Better Way to ID Extreme Weather Events in Climate Models A Better Way to ID Extreme Weather Events in Climate Models Berkeley Lab scientists help automate the search for hurricanes and other storms in huge datasets December 7, 2011 Dan Krotz, dakrotz@lbl.gov, +1 510-486-4019 You'd think that spotting a category 5 hurricane would never be difficult. But when the hurricane is in a global climate model that spans several decades, it becomes a fleeting wisp among mountains of data. That's a

  4. Artificial Soiling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Artificial Soiling of Photovoltaic Module Surfaces using Traceable Soil Components Patrick D. Burton and Bruce H. King Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque NM 87185 USA Email: pdburto@sandia.gov Abstract-Effective evaluation and prediction of photovoltaic performance loss due to soiling requires consistent test methods. Natural grime accumulation is time-consuming and location- specific, and thus does not provide reproducible results across different geographic regions. Therefore, we have

  5. Surface Soil

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    environmental field team members take soil samples from a farm. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505)...

  6. Determination Of Ph Including Hemoglobin Correction

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maynard, John D.; Hendee, Shonn P.; Rohrscheib, Mark R.; Nunez, David; Alam, M. Kathleen; Franke, James E.; Kemeny, Gabor J.

    2005-09-13

    Methods and apparatuses of determining the pH of a sample. A method can comprise determining an infrared spectrum of the sample, and determining the hemoglobin concentration of the sample. The hemoglobin concentration and the infrared spectrum can then be used to determine the pH of the sample. In some embodiments, the hemoglobin concentration can be used to select an model relating infrared spectra to pH that is applicable at the determined hemoglobin concentration. In other embodiments, a model relating hemoglobin concentration and infrared spectra to pH can be used. An apparatus according to the present invention can comprise an illumination system, adapted to supply radiation to a sample; a collection system, adapted to collect radiation expressed from the sample responsive to the incident radiation; and an analysis system, adapted to relate information about the incident radiation, the expressed radiation, and the hemoglobin concentration of the sample to pH.

  7. Heavy metal movement in metal-contaminated soil profiles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Zhenbin; Shuman, L.M.

    1996-10-01

    Heavy metal movement in soil profiles is a major environmental concern because even slow transport through the soil may eventually lead to deterioration of groundwater quality. In this study, three metal-contaminated soil (Fuquay, Dothan, and Clarendon) were selected from cropland were a high-metal flue dust had been applied annually for 6 years to raise soil pH, with application ending 4 years before sampling. One uncontaminated soil (Tifton) from the same physiographic area was also sampled as a control. Soil samples were collected in 15-cm increments from the surface to 105 cm in depth. Total contents of Zn, Cd, and Pb in the soils samples were determined. To better understand metal movement in relation to metal fractions in the soil profile, soil samples were also extracted sequentially for exchangeable (EXC), organic matter (OM), Mn oxide (MNO), amorphous Fe oxide (AFEO), crystalline Fe oxide (CFEO), and residual (RES) fractions. 35 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Single mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser (CXIDB ID 1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Seibert, M. Marvin; Ekeberg, Tomas; Maia, Filipe R.N.C.

    2011-02-02

    These are the files used to reconstruct the images in the paper "Single Mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser". Besides the diffracted intensities, the Hawk configuration files used for the reconstructions are also provided. The files from CXIDB ID 1 are the pattern and configuration files for the pattern showed in Figure 2a in the paper.

  9. Single mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser (CXIDB ID 2)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Seibert, M. Marvin; Ekeberg, Tomas

    2011-02-02

    These are the files used to reconstruct the images in the paper "Single Mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser". Besides the diffracted intensities, the Hawk configuration files used for the reconstructions are also provided. The files from CXIDB ID 2 are the pattern and configuration files for the pattern showed in Figure 2b in the paper.

  10. Single mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser (CXIDB ID 1)

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Seibert, M. Marvin; Ekeberg, Tomas; Maia, Filipe R.N.C.

    These are the files used to reconstruct the images in the paper "Single Mimivirus particles intercepted and imaged with an X-ray laser". Besides the diffracted intensities, the Hawk configuration files used for the reconstructions are also provided. The files from CXIDB ID 1 are the pattern and configuration files for the pattern showed in Figure 2a in the paper.

  11. Id1 expression promotes peripheral CD4{sup +} T cell proliferation and survival upon TCR activation without co-stimulation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Chen; Jin, Rong; Wang, Hong-Cheng; Tang, Hui; Liu, Yuan-Feng; Qian, Xiao-Ping; Sun, Xiu-Yuan; Ge, Qing; Sun, Xiao-Hong; Zhang, Yu

    2013-06-21

    Highlights: •Id1 expression enables naïve T cell proliferation without anti-CD28 co-stimulation. •Id1 expression facilitates T cells survival when stimulated with anti-CD3. •Elevation of IL-2 production by Id1 contributes increased proliferation and survival. •Id1 potentiates NF-κB activation by anti-CD3 stimulation. -- Abstract: Although the role of E proteins in the thymocyte development is well documented, much less is known about their function in peripheral T cells. Here we demonstrated that CD4 promoter-driven transgenic expression of Id1, a naturally occurring dominant-negative inhibitor of E proteins, can substitute for the co-stimulatory signal delivered by CD28 to facilitate the proliferation and survival of naïve CD4{sup +} cells upon anti-CD3 stimulation. We next discovered that IL-2 production and NF-κB activity after anti-CD3 stimulation were significantly elevated in Id1-expressing cells, which may be, at least in part, responsible for the augmentation of their proliferation and survival. Taken together, results from this study suggest an important role of E and Id proteins in peripheral T cell activation. The ability of Id proteins to by-pass co-stimulatory signals to enable T cell activation has significant implications in regulating T cell immunity.

  12. Jeff Griffin, Ph. D. Associate Laboratory...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Griffin, Ph. D. Associate Laboratory Director Environmental Stewardship Savannah River National Laboratory DOE-EM Robotics Team Visit to SRNL SRNL-MS-2015-00246 Rev. 0 December 7,...

  13. Review. Ernie Perry, PhD

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mid-America Freight Coalition comments for the Quadrennial Energy Review. Ernie Perry, PhD University of Wisconsin - Madison ebperry@wisc.edu August 8 2014 Chicago, Il. Thank you ...

  14. Lieve Laurens, Ph.D. | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lieve Laurens, Ph.D. Lieve Laurens, Ph.D. Senior Scientist, Bioprocess Research Lieve.Laurens@nrel.gov | 303-384-6196 Research Interests Dynamic biochemical composition of bioenergy-relevant biomass Coproduct development from primary algal biomass components Biofuel precursor behavior during biomass conversion processes Algae-derived green crude valorization High-throughput screening technologies for compositional analysis of microbial biomass Standardization of algal biomass compositional

  15. Seonah Kim, Ph.D. | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Seonah Kim, Ph.D. Seonah Kim, Ph.D. Senior Scientist, Computational Catalyst Design R&D Seonah.Kim@nrel.gov | 303-384-7323 Research Interests New reaction mechanisms of lignocellulosic biomass enzymes Design of new catalysts for vapor phase upgrading of biomass pyrolysis Enzymatic reaction with cellulase enzymes Lignin deconstruction Affiliated Research Programs Fatty Acid Decarboxylase Engineering for Continuous Hydrocarbon Fuel Production (PI) Computational Pyrolysis Consortium - Zeolite

  16. Adam Bratis, Ph.D. | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Adam Bratis, Ph.D. Adam Bratis, Ph.D. Biofuels Program Manager Adam.Bratis@nrel.gov | 303-384-7852 Areas of Expertise Adam Bratis joined the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) in 2008. His role is to manage NREL's research and development efforts in support of the Department of Energy's mission in the biomass arena. This includes technical and managerial oversight in the areas of biochemical conversion, thermochemical conversion, algal biofuels, techno-economic and life-cycle analyses,

  17. Selenium in Oklahoma ground water and soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atalay, A.; Vir Maggon, D.

    1991-03-30

    Selenium with a consumption of 2 liters per day (5). The objectives of this study are: (1) to determine the concentrations of Se in Oklahoma ground water and soil samples. (2) to map the geographical distribution of Se species in Oklahoma. (3) to relate groundwater depth, pH and geology with concentration of Se.

  18. Effect of organic waste amendments on zinc adsorption by two soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shuman, L.M. . Georgia Experiment station)

    1999-03-01

    Two soils (fine and coarse textured) were amended with five organic wastes or humic acid. One adsorption experiment was carried out at 1 mmol L[sup [minus]1] Zn and at pH levels from 4 to 8. A second experiment was at pH 6 and 0 to 4 mmol/L[sup [minus]1] Zn. The greatest variation in Zn adsorption among organic treatments came at pH 6, with a lesser range for the fine textured soil (pH 5--6) and a wider range for the sandy soil (pH 5--7). Adsorption followed a two-site Langmuir model, and maxima were higher for the finer textured soil compared with the sandy soil. Adsorption maxima were not changed by the organic wastes for the fine textured soil, but all were increased over the controls for the sandy soil. Zinc adsorption for poultry litter was lower than the control for the sandy soil. Industrial sewage sludge and humic acid increased Zn adsorption more than did commercial compost, spent mushroom compost, and cotton litter. It was concluded that organic materials have more influence on Zn adsorption for sandy soils than for fine textured soils and that most materials will increase Zn adsorption, whereas those with high soluble C can decrease Zn adsorption.

  19. VOCs in Non-Arid Soils Integrated Demonstration: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-02-01

    The Volatile Organic Compounds (VOCs) in Non-Arid Soils Integrated Demonstration (ID) was initiated in 1989. Objectives for the ID were to test the integrated demonstration concept, demonstrate and evaluate innovative technologies/systems for the remediation of VOC contamination in soils and groundwater, and to transfer technologies and systems to internal and external customers for use in fullscale remediation programs. The demonstration brought together technologies from DOE laboratories, other government agencies, and industry for demonstration at a single test bed. The Savannah River Site was chosen as the location for this ID as the result of having soil and groundwater contaminated with VOCS. The primary contaminants, trichlorethylene and tetrachloroethylene, originated from an underground process sewer line servicing a metal fabrication facility at the M-Area. Some of the major technical accomplishments for the ID include the successful demonstration of the following: In situ air stripping coupled with horizontal wells to remediate sites through air injection and vacuum extraction; Crosshole geophysical tomography for mapping moisture content and lithologic properties of the contaminated media; In situ radio frequency and ohmic heating to increase mobility, of the contaminants, thereby speeding recovery and the remedial process; High-energy corona destruction of VOCs in the off-gas of vapor recovery wells; Application of a Brayton cycle heat pump to regenerate carbon adsorption media used to trap VOCs from the offgas of recovery wells; In situ permeable flow sensors and the colloidal borescope to determine groundwater flow; Chemical sensors to rapidly quantify chlorinated solvent contamination in the subsurface; In situ bioremediation through methane/nutrient injection to enhance degradation of contaminants by methanotrophic bateria.

  20. DOE Data ID Service Background | OSTI, US Dept of Energy, Office of

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Scientific and Technical Information Background DataCite | Contact DOE Data ID Service In 2011, the DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI) joined DataCite to facilitate citing, accessing, and reusing publicly available scientific research datasets produced by DOE-funded researchers. DataCite is an international organization that supports data visibility, ease of data citation in scholarly publications, data preservation and future re-use, and data access and

  1. How to Use the DOE Data ID Service: For Grantees | OSTI, US Dept of Energy,

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information Grantees DataCite | Contact DOE Data ID Service Grantees who are not stationed at one of DOE's laboratories may access the E-Link website at https://www.osti.gov/elink/. Select the link for Financial Assistance Recipients. Choose Scientific Research Datasets (AN 241.6) from the menu and begin entering the metadata that is asked for. Ensure all required fields are completed with the appropriate information. Required fields are: Dataset Type,

  2. Microsoft PowerPoint - ID 876 TourBooklet_revb_Geology [Compatibility Mode]

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Field Office Bob Andrews Navarro-Intera December 10, 2014 Nevada National Security Site Underground Test Area (UGTA) Tour Page 2 Page 2Title ID 876 Tour Booklet 12/10/2014 - Page 2 Log No. 2014-xxx Nevada National Security Site (NNSS) * NNSS has many diverse roles to support the U.S. nuclear weapons stockpile stewardship missions and also supports other U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Department of Defense, and Department of Homeland

  3. How to Use the DOE Data ID Service: For Individual Lab Researchers | OSTI,

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    US Dept of Energy, Office of Scientific and Technical Information Individual Lab Researchers DataCite | Contact DOE Data ID Service Call or email your organization's Scientific and Technical Information (STI) Manager. Explain your need to submit a dataset to support a publication and/or to receive a DOI. Ask if your lab has been assigned a unique DOI prefix. The answer should be "yes." If it is not, the STI Manager will need to contact OSTI to obtain a prefix and then get back to

  4. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 11. CONTRACT ID CODE

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    -------------------------------------------------------- AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 11. CONTRACT ID CODE I PAGE OF PAGES 1 I 2 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE REQ. NO. 15. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) 0246 See Block 16C 6. ISSUED BY CODE 05003 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE 105003 NNSA/Los Alamos Site Office NNSA/Los Alamos Site Office U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy NNSA/Los Alamos Site Office Los

  5. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-INL-12-007_INL-12-033_.doc

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Page 1 of 2 CX Posting No.: DOE-ID-INL-12-007 SECTION A. Project Title: Geotechnical Core Drilling for USGS 138 SECTION B. Project Description: . The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) proposes to drill a 1,000-foot deep geotechnical corehole (USGS 138) into the eastern Snake River Plain aquifer. The location of the corehole will be about 4.0 mile(s) east of the city Howe and about 8.5 mile(s) north of the Naval Reactors Facility at the Southeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter, Section 7, Township

  6. Microsoft Word - DOE-ID-13-044 Idaho EC B3-6.doc

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    10-2008 CONCLUDING MATERIAL Review Activity: Preparing Activity: DOE Operations Offices Field Offices DOE-HS-11 NA NNSA Service Center HS CH OH Project Number: EM ID GFO FSC 6910-0069 NE NV SC OR RL OAK SR RP National Laboratories Area Offices BNL Pantex Site Office LLNL Ashtabula Area Office LANL Carlsbad Area Office PNNL Columbus Area Office Sandia Fernald Area Office FNL Los Alamos Area Office West Valley Area Office Kirtland Area Office Pinellas Area Office Kansas City Area Office Miamisburg

  7. 11. CONTRACT ID CODE PAGE OF PAGES I AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    11. CONTRACT ID CODE PAGE OF PAGES I AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 1 I 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. 258 6. ISSUED BY CODE 3. EFFECTIVE DATE See Block 16C 05008 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE REQ. NO. 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) 15. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) CODE 1 0 5 0 0 8 NNSA/Oakridge Site Office NNSA/Oakridge Site Office U.S. Department of Energy U. S. Department of Energy NNSA/Y-12 Site Office NNSA/Y-12 Site Office P.O. Box 2050 P.O. Box 2050 Building 9704-2

  8. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATIONIMODIFICATlON OF CONTRACT ( I- CONTRACT ID CODE PAGE I OF 2

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ( I- CONTRACT ID CODE PAGE I OF 2 PAGES I . . Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Pantex, LLC PO Box 30020 Amarillo, TX 79120 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. M I 51 Albuquerque, NM 87185-5400 I Amarillo, TX 79120 90. DATED (SEE ITEM 11) 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, state, ZIP Code) 3. EFFECTIVE DATE See Block 16C 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. extended. 6 . ISSUED BY CODE U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Service Center Property

  9. AMENDMENT OF SOLlClTATlONlMODlFlCATlON OF CONTRACT ( I. ID CODE

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ( I. ID CODE / DE-ACO4-OOAL6662O ' 10s. DATED (SEE ITEM 13) PAGE I OF 2 PAGES Babcock & W ~ ~ C O X Technical Services Pantex, LLC 800 Main Street Lynchburg, VA 24505 9B. DATED (SEE ITEM 11) 10A. MODIFICATION OF CONTRACTIORDER NO. Offers must acknowledge receipt of this amendment prior to the hour and date specified in the solicitation as amended, by one of the following methods: (a) By completing Items 8 and 15, and returning - copies of the amendment; (b) By acknowledging receipt of this

  10. AMENDMENT OF SOlLICITATION/MODIFICATlON OF CONTRACT I I. CONTRACr ID CODE

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    SOlLICITATION/MODIFICATlON OF CONTRACT I I. CONTRACr ID CODE BWXT Pantex, LLC Route 726, Mt. Athos Road Lynchburg, VA 24506 PAGE I OF 2 PAGES Albuquerque, NM 871 85-5400 I Amarillo, TX 79120 9B. DATED (SEE ITEM 1 1 ) 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, state, ZIP Code) DE-AC04-00AL66620 I I IOB. DATED (SEE ITEM 13) 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. MI41 9A. AMENDMENT OF Sol-ICITATION NO. CODE I ~ H L I L I I Y L U U ~ I I - 11. THlS ITEM ONLY APPLIES TO AMENDMENTS OF

  11. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT /1. CONTRACT ID CODE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT /1. CONTRACT ID CODE I PAGE OF PAGES 1 I 2 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4 REQUISITION/PURCHASE REQ. NO 1 5 PROJECT NO. (If applicable) 342 See Block 16C 12SCOO1256 Item 0001 6. ISSUED BY CODE 00518 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE 1 0 0518 Oak 'Ridge Oak Ridge U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 2001 P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge TN 37831 Oak Ridge TN 37831 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No .. street.

  12. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 1. CONTRACT ID CODE PAGE OF PAGES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 1. CONTRACT ID CODE PAGE OF PAGES 1 20 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. A001 3. EFFECTIVE DATE See Block 16C 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE REQ. NO. 5. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) 6. ISSUED BY CODE 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE U.S. Department of Energy National Energy Technology Laboratory PO Box 880, 3610 Collins Ferry Road Morgantown, WV 26507-0880 Attn: Amanda Lopez 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, State, and

  13. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 1.CNTAT ID CODE PAGE "OF PAGES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CNTAT ID CODE PAGE "OF PAGES 1 11 3 2. AMEN DME NT/MO0D IFICATION NO. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REOUISITION/PURCHASE REQ, NO. 5. PROJECT NO. (if applicable) 6. SSED Y ODE00037. ADMINISTERED BY (If'other than Item 6) CODE 00603 Office of River Protection Office of River Protection U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection Office of River Protection P.O. Box 450 P.O. Box 450 Richiand WA 99352 MS: H16-60 ____________________________________Richland WA 99352 8

  14. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 1.CONTRACT ID CODE PAGE OF PAGES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CONTRACT ID CODE PAGE OF PAGES T 1 1 13 2 AMENDIMENT/MODIFICATION NO 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4 -REGUISITION/PURCHASE RED. NO 5. PROJECT NO. (If epplicable) 032 04/14/2011 11EM002244 6 ISSUED BY CODE 00603 7 ADMINISTERED BY (Iftherthan temrt6) CODE J00603 Office of River Protection Office of River Protection U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection office of River Protection P.O. Box 450 P.O. Box 450 Richland WA 99352 Richland WA 99352 8 NAME AND ADDRESS OF

  15. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT \1. CONTRACT ID CODE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ID CODE I PAGE OF PAGES 1 I 2 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REOUISITIONIPURCHASE REO. NO. r' PROJECT NO. (If applicable) 356 See Block 16C 12SC001876 Item 7 6. ISSUED BY CODE 00518 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE \00518 Oak Ridge Oak Ridge U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy P.O. Box 2001 P.O. Box 2001 Oak Ridge TN 37831 Oak Ridge TN 37831 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., stroot, county, State and ZIP Code) J1 SA. AMENDMENT OF

  16. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATIONIMODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 1. CONTRACT ID CODE P AE

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    OF CONTRACT 1. CONTRACT ID CODE P AE 2. AMEN DMENT/MODIF ICATION NO. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE RED. NO. 5. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) 073 See Block 16C 12EM002951/12EM003004 6. ISSUED BY CODE 100603 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE 100603 Office of River Protection Office of River Protection U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection Office of River Protection P.O. Box 450 P.O. Box 450 Richland WA 99352 Richland WA 99352 8. NAME

  17. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATIONIMODIFICATION OF CONTRACT I CONTRACT ID CODE PAGE OF PAGES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    I CONTRACT ID CODE PAGE OF PAGES 1 14 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. 3 EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE RED. NO 5. PRtOJECT NO. (if pplicable) 186 See Block 16CL 6. ISSUED BY CODE j 0603 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE 00603 office of River Protection Office of River Protection U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy office of River Protection office of River Protection P.O. Box 450 P.O. Box 450 Richland WA 99352 MS: H6-60 Richland WA 99352 6. NAME AND ADDRESS OF

  18. AMENDMENT OF SOUCITATIONIMODIFICATION OF CONTRACT 1. CONTRACT ID CODE PAGE OF PAGES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1. CONTRACT ID CODE PAGE OF PAGES II 11 9 2. AMEN DMENTIMODIFICATION NO. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REOUISITIONIPURCHASE REQ. NO. 5. PROJECT NO. (If elpicable) 169 See Block 16C 12EM0020631 6. ISSUED BY CODE 00603 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If otherthan Item 6) CODE 100603 Office of River Protection Office of River Protection U.S. Department of Energy U.S. Department of Energy Office of River Protection Office of River Protection P.O. Box 450 P.O. Box 450 Richland WA 99352 MS: H6-60

  19. An interactive version of PropID for the aerodynamic design of horizontal axis wind turbines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ninham, C.P.; Selig, M.S.

    1997-12-31

    The original PROP code developed by AeroVironment, Inc. and its various versions have been in use for wind turbine performance predictions for over ten years. Due to its simplicity, rapid execution times and relatively accurate predictions, it has become an industry standard in the US. The Europeans have similar blade-element/momentum methods in use for design. Over the years, PROP has continued to be improved (in its accuracy and capability), e.g., PROPSH, PROPPC, PROP93, and PropID. The latter version incorporates a unique inverse design capability that allows the user to specify the desired aerodynamic characteristics from which the corresponding blade geometry is determined. Through this approach, tedious efforts related to manually adjusting the chord, twist, pitch and rpm to achieve desired aerodynamic/performance characteristics can be avoided, thereby making it possible to perform more extensive trade studies in an effort to optimize performance. Past versions of PropID did not have supporting graphics software. The more current version to be discussed includes a Matlab-based graphical user interface (GUI) and additional features that will be discussed in this paper.

  20. SEMINAR Ted Sargent PhD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SEMINAR Ted Sargent PhD Thursday, JAN. 17, 2013 * 3PM to 4PM 101 Guggenheim * Lees-Kubota Lecture Hall Refreshments Before Seminar at 2:45PM Optoelectronic Devices Based on Colloidal Quantum Dot Solids Biography Ted Sargent holds the Canada Research Chair in Nanotechnology at the University of Toronto, where he also serves as Vice Dean for Research for the Faculty of Applied Science and Engineering. He is Fellow of the AAAS "...for distinguished contributions to the development of solar

  1. TUNL Ph.D. Degrees Theses

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Link to M.S. and M.A. Degrees Theses Link to Associated Degrees Theses TUNL Ph.D. Degrees Theses Browse by year 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010 2009 2008 2007 2006 2005 2004 2003 2002 2001 2000 1999 1998 1997 1996 1995 1994 1993 1992 1991 1990 1989 1988 1987 1986 1985 1984 1983 1982 1981 1980 1979 1978 1977 1976 1975 1974 1973 1972 1971 1970 1969 1968 1967 1966 1965 1964 1963 1962 1961 1960 1959 1958 1957 1956 1955 1954 1949 2015 Sean W. Finch, Double-Beta Decay of 96Zr and Double-Electron Capture

  2. A comparison between sludge ash and fly ash on the improvement in soft soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng-Fong Lin; Kae-Long Lin; Huan-Lin Luo

    2007-01-15

    In this study, the strength of soft cohesive subgrade soil was improved by applying sewage sludge ash as a soil stabilizer. Test results obtained were compared with earlier tests conducted on soil samples treated with fly ash. Five different proportions of sludge ash and fly ash were mixed with soft cohesive soil, and tests such as pH value, compaction, California bearing ratio, unconfined compressive strength (UCS), and triaxial compression were performed to understand soil strength improvement because of the addition of both ashes. Results indicate that pH values increase with extending curing age for soil with sludge ash added. The UCS of sludge ash/soil were 1.4 2 times better than untreated soil. However, compressive strength of sludge ash/soil was 20 30 kPa less than fly ash/soil. The bearing capacities for both fly ash/soil and sludge ash/soil were five to six times and four times, respectively, higher than the original capacity. Moreover, the cohesive parameter of shear strength rose with increased amounts of either ash added. Friction angle, however, decreased with increased amounts of either ash. Consequently, results show that sewage sludge ash can potentially replace fly ash in the improvement of the soft cohesive soil. 9 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. North Portal Fuel Storage System Fire Hazard Analysis-ESF Surface Design Package ID

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    N.M. Ruonavaara

    1995-01-18

    The purpose of the fire hazard analysis is to comprehensively assess the risk from fire within the individual fire areas. This document will only assess the fire hazard analysis within the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) Design Package ID, which includes the fuel storage system area of the North Portal facility, and evaluate whether the following objectives are met: 1.1.1--This analysis, performed in accordance with the requirements of this document, will satisfy the requirements for a fire hazard analysis in accordance with U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5480.7A. 1.1.2--Ensure that property damage from fire and related perils does not exceed an acceptable level. 1.1.3--Provide input to the ESF Basis For Design (BFD) Document. 1.1.4 Provide input to the facility Safety Analysis Report (SAR) (Paragraph 3.8).

  4. Eastport, ID Natural Gas Pipeline Imports From Canada (Dollars per Thousand

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Cubic Feet) Decade Year-0 Year-1 Year-2 Year-3 Year-4 Year-5 Year-6 Year-7 Year-8 Year-9 1990's 1.22 1.60 1.60 2.04 2000's 3.79 4.71 2.83 4.72 5.30 7.13 6.22 6.31 7.88 3.86 2010's 4.19 3.90 2.59 3.34 4.14 2.34 - = No Data Reported; -- = Not Applicable; NA = Not Available; W = Withheld to avoid disclosure of individual company data. Release Date: 4/29/2016 Next Release Date: 5/31/2016 Referring Pages: U.S. Price of Natural Gas Pipeline Imports by Point of Entry Eastport, ID Natural Gas

  5. Yucca Mountain Project Integrated Data System (IDS); Final report, October 1, 1989--December 31, 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    1991-05-23

    This final report for LANL Subcontract 9-XS8-2604-1 includes copies of all formal letters, memorandums, and reports provided by CAG to support the IDS effort in the LANL Test Managers Office, Las Vegas, Nevada from October 1, 1989 through the end of the contract on December 31, 1990. The material is divided into two sections; the Functional Requirements Document (FRD) and other reports, letters, and memorandums. All documents are arranged in chronological order with most recent last. Numerous draft copies of the FRD were prepared and cover sheets for all drafts are included. The complete text of only the last version supplied (July 27, 1990) is included in this document.

  6. Mark Elless, Ph.D. | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Mark Elless, Ph.D. About Us Mark Elless, Ph.D. - Technology Manager, Bioenergy Technologies Office Most Recent Biofuels and Barbecue Chips: Small Business Develops Process to Create Versatile Chemicals May 16

  7. Thermal properties of soils and soils testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-02-17

    The thermal properties of soils are reviewed with reference to the use of soils as heat sources, heat sinks, or thermal storage. Specific heat and thermal conductivity are discussed. (ACR)

  8. ARM - Measurement - Soil moisture

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    : Soil Measurement from the SGP SWATS : Soil Water and Temperature System SEBS : Surface Energy Balance System External Instruments ECMWFDIAG : European Centre for Medium Range...

  9. Soils | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Soils Jump to: navigation, search Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleSoils&oldid612253" Feedback Contact needs updating Image needs updating Reference...

  10. https://bluedart.phe.com/owa/?ae=Item&t=IPM.Note&id=RgAAAAA%2f3

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Phyllis Radack Manager, Regulatory Services 702-295-6582 702-858-5587 (cell) 702-295-7699 ...idRgAAAAA%2f3mOqqZ%2bfSq... 702-858-5587 (cell) 702-295-7699 (fax) From: Morris, Patrick ...

  11. Seismic Ground Motion Response Using SHAKE, EERA and NERA for SRS Soil

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Profile | Department of Energy Seismic Ground Motion Response Using SHAKE, EERA and NERA for SRS Soil Profile Seismic Ground Motion Response Using SHAKE, EERA and NERA for SRS Soil Profile Seismic Ground Motion Response Using SHAKE, EERA and NERA for SRS Soil Profile Jay Amin - Structural Mechanics, Principal Engineer Shawn Carey, PhD, PE - Structural Mechanics, Structural Lead Rucker Williams, PE - Geotechnical Engineering Lead October 22, 2014 PDF icon Seismic Ground Motion Response Using

  12. Analyses of soils at commercial radioactive waste disposal sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piciulo, P.L.; Shea, C.E.; Barletta, R.E.

    1983-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory, in order to provide technical assistance to the NRC, has measured a number of physical and chemical characteristics of soils from three commercial low-level radioactive waste disposal sites. Samples were collected from an area adjacent to the disposal site at Sheffield, IL, and from two operating sites: one at Barnwell, SC, and the other near Richland, WA. The soil samples, which were analyzed from each site, were believed to include soil which was representative of that in contact with buried waste forms. Results of field measurements of earth resistivity and of soil pH will be presented. Additionally, the results of laboratory measurements of resistivity, moisture content, pH, exchange acidity and the soluble ion content of the soils will be discussed. The soluble ion content of the soils was determined by analysis of aqueous extracts of saturated soil pastes. The concentrations of the following ions were determined: Ca/sup 2 +/, Mg/sup 2 +/, K/sup +/, Na/sup +/, HCO/sub 3//sup -/, CO/sub 3//sup 2 -/, SO/sub 4//sup 2 -/, Cl/sup -/, S/sup 2 -/.

  13. A 12-MW-scale pilot study of in-duct scrubbing (IDS) using a rotary atomizer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Samuel, E.A.; Murphy, K.R.; Demian, A.

    1989-11-01

    A low-cost, moderate-removal efficiency, flue gas desulfurization (FGD) technology was selected by the US Department of Energy for pilot demonstration in its Acid Rain Precursor Control Technology Initiative. The process, identified as In-Duct Scrubbing (IDS), applies rotary atomizer techniques developed for lime-based spray dryer FGD while utilizing existing flue gas ductwork and particulate collectors. IDS technology is anticipated to result in a dry desulfurization process with a moderate removal efficiency (50% or greater) for high-sulfur coal-fired boilers. The critical elements for successful application are: (1) adequate mixing of sorbent droplets with flue gas for efficient reaction contact, (2) sufficient residence time to produce a non-wetting product, and (3) appropriate ductwork cross-sectional area to prevent deposition of wet reaction products before particle drying is comple. The ductwork in many older plants, previously modified to meet 1970 Clean Air Act requirements for particulate control, usually meet these criteria. A 12 MW-scale IDS pilot plant was constructed at the Muskingum River Plant of the American Electric Power System. The pilot plant, which operates from a slipstrem attached to the air-preheater outlet duct from the Unit 5 boiler at the Muskingum River Plant (which burns about 4% sulfur coal), is equipped with three atomizer stations to test the IDS concept in vertical and horizontal configurations. In addition, the pilot plant is equipped to test the effect of injecting IDS off- product upstream of the atomizer, on SO{sub 2}and NO{sub x} removals.

  14. In situ formation of phosphate barriers in soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Moore, Robert C.

    2002-01-01

    Reactive barriers and methods for making reactive barriers in situ in soil for sequestering soil ontaminants including actinides and heavy metals. The barrier includes phosphate, and techniques are disclosed for forming specifically apatite barriers. The method includes injecting dilute reagents into soil in proximity to a contamination plume or source such as a waste drum to achieve complete or partial encapsulation of the waste. Controlled temperature and pH facilitates rapid formation of apatite, for example, where dilute aqueous calcium chloride and dilute aqueous sodium phosphate are the selected reagents. Mixing of reagents to form precipitate is mediated and enhanced through movement of reagents in soil as a result of phenomena including capillary action, movement of groundwater, soil washing and reagent injection pressure.

  15. The soil microbiome influences grapevine-associated microbiota

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zarraonaindia, Iratxe; Owens, Sarah M.; Weisenhorn, Pamela; West, Kristin; Hampton-Marcell, Jarrad; Lax, Simon; Bokulich, Nicholas A.; Mills, David A.; Martin, Gilles; Taghavi, Safiyh; et al

    2015-03-24

    Grapevine is a well-studied, economically relevant crop, whose associated bacteria could influence its organoleptic properties. In this study, the spatial and temporal dynamics of the bacterial communities associated with grapevine organs (leaves, flowers, grapes, and roots) and soils were characterized over two growing seasons to determine the influence of vine cultivar, edaphic parameters, vine developmental stage (dormancy, flowering, preharvest), and vineyard. Belowground bacterial communities differed significantly from those aboveground, and yet the communities associated with leaves, flowers, and grapes shared a greater proportion of taxa with soil communities than with each other, suggesting that soil may serve as a bacterialmore » reservoir. A subset of soil microorganisms, including root colonizers significantly enriched in plant growth-promoting bacteria and related functional genes, were selected by the grapevine. In addition to plant selective pressure, the structure of soil and root microbiota was significantly influenced by soil pH and C:N ratio, and changes in leaf- and grape-associated microbiota were correlated with soil carbon and showed interannual variation even at small spatial scales. Diazotrophic bacteria, e.g., Rhizobiaceae and Bradyrhizobium spp., were significantly more abundant in soil samples and root samples of specific vineyards. Vine-associated microbial assemblages were influenced by myriad factors that shape their composition and structure, but the majority of organ-associated taxa originated in the soil, and their distribution reflected the influence of highly localized biogeographic factors and vineyard management.« less

  16. The soil microbiome influences grapevine-associated microbiota

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zarraonaindia, Iratxe; Owens, Sarah M.; Weisenhorn, Pamela; West, Kristin; Hampton-Marcell, Jarrad; Lax, Simon; Bokulich, Nicholas A.; Mills, David A.; Martin, Gilles; Taghavi, Safiyh; van der Lelie, Daniel; Gilbert, Jack A.

    2015-03-24

    Grapevine is a well-studied, economically relevant crop, whose associated bacteria could influence its organoleptic properties. In this study, the spatial and temporal dynamics of the bacterial communities associated with grapevine organs (leaves, flowers, grapes, and roots) and soils were characterized over two growing seasons to determine the influence of vine cultivar, edaphic parameters, vine developmental stage (dormancy, flowering, preharvest), and vineyard. Belowground bacterial communities differed significantly from those aboveground, and yet the communities associated with leaves, flowers, and grapes shared a greater proportion of taxa with soil communities than with each other, suggesting that soil may serve as a bacterial reservoir. A subset of soil microorganisms, including root colonizers significantly enriched in plant growth-promoting bacteria and related functional genes, were selected by the grapevine. In addition to plant selective pressure, the structure of soil and root microbiota was significantly influenced by soil pH and C:N ratio, and changes in leaf- and grape-associated microbiota were correlated with soil carbon and showed interannual variation even at small spatial scales. Diazotrophic bacteria, e.g., Rhizobiaceae and Bradyrhizobium spp., were significantly more abundant in soil samples and root samples of specific vineyards. Vine-associated microbial assemblages were influenced by myriad factors that shape their composition and structure, but the majority of organ-associated taxa originated in the soil, and their distribution reflected the influence of highly localized biogeographic factors and vineyard management.

  17. Soil & Groundwater Home - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Soil & Groundwater Home Soil & Groundwater Home Annual Reports Environmental Data Access Administrative Record Soil & Groundwater Home Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text...

  18. ARM - Measurement - Soil surface temperature

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Systems SOIL : Soil Measurement from the SGP SWATS : Soil Water and Temperature System MET : Surface Meteorological Instrumentation External Instruments ETA : Eta Model Runs...

  19. Young PhDs in Physics | Jefferson Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PhDs in Physics Young Ph.D.s in physics Young PhDs (left to right) William Luo, Jasmine Ellis, Shaun Lightfoot and Prakriti Verma made Oobleck with mechanical designer Joyce Miller during their visit to JLab. Young PhDs in Physics August 29, 2003 Jefferson Lab welcomes youngsters participating in summer science camp. Educating and exciting today's youth about science and technology is an important adjunct to Jefferson Lab's scientific mission. On July 16, the Department of Energy laboratory,

  20. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - John Wohlgemuth, Ph.D.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    John Wohlgemuth, Ph.D. Principal Scientist Photo of John Wohlgemuth. 303-384-7982 Task Focus: Standards development, module failure analysis and the development of accelerated...

  1. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Hasitha Mahabaduge, Ph.D.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hasitha Mahabaduge, Ph.D. Postdoctoral Researcher Photo of Hasitha Mahabaduge 303-384-7350 Hasitha.Mahabaduge@nrel.gov Dr. Hasitha Mahabaduge's primary research interests include...

  2. Energy Department Seeks Recent Ph.D. Recipients for Postdoctoral...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Research Projects to Spur Innovation in Solar Energy Energy Department Seeks Recent Ph.D. ... to solar energy deployment, using big data to solve solar's biggest challenges, and ...

  3. J. Chris Ford, Ph.D. | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Chris Ford, Ph.D. - Technical Advisor to the Director Office of Economic Impact and Diversity Most Recent by Chris Ford Unlocking Growth Opportunities for Minority Businesses...

  4. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Emily Warren, Ph.D.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    philosophy degree in engineering for sustainable development from the University of Cambridge in 2006. She completed her Ph.D. at Caltech, studying the growth and energy...

  5. Adaora Nwokoye, Ph.D | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Adaora Nwokoye, Ph.D - Science and Technology Policy Fellow, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Most Recent Small Business Innovation Research Projects to Make a Big ...

  6. ARM - Instrument - soil

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Instrument : Soil Measurement from the SGP (SOIL) Instrument Categories SurfaceSubsurface Properties...

  7. Consideration of Factors Affecting Strip Effluent PH and Sodium Content

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T.

    2015-07-29

    A number of factors were investigated to determine possible reasons for why the Strip Effluent (SE) can sometimes have higher than expected pH values and/or sodium content, both of which have prescribed limits. All of the factors likely have some impact on the pH values and Na content.

  8. ARM - Measurement - Soil characteristics

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Measurement : Soil characteristics Includes available water capacity, bulk density, permeability, porosity, rock fragment classification, rock fragment volume, percent clay,...

  9. Soil metagenomics and carbon cycling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Biosecurity, and Health Environmental Microbiology Soil metagenomics and carbon cycling Soil metagenomics and carbon cycling Establishing a foundational understanding...

  10. Testing Novel CR-39 Detector Deployment System For Identification of Subsurface Fractures, Soda Springs, ID

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLing, Travis; Carpenter, Michael; Brandon, William; Zavala, Bernie

    2015-06-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has teamed with Battelle Energy Alliance, LLC (BEA) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) to facilitate further testing of geologic-fracture-identification methodology at a field site near the Monsanto Superfund Site located in Soda Springs, Idaho. INL has the necessary testing and technological expertise to perform this work. Battelle Memorial Institute (BMI) has engaged INL to perform this work through a Work for Others (WFO) Agreement. This study continues a multi-year collaborative effort between INL and EPA to test the efficacy of using field deployed Cr-39 radon in soil portals. This research enables identification of active fractures capable of transporting contaminants at sites where fractures are suspected pathways into the subsurface. Current state of the art methods for mapping fracture networks are exceedingly expensive and notoriously inaccurate. The proposed WFO will evaluate the applicability of using cheap, readily available, passive radon detectors to identify conductive geologic structures (i.e. fractures, and fracture networks) in the subsurface that control the transport of contaminants at fracture-dominated sites. The proposed WFO utilizes proven off-the-shelf technology in the form of CR-39 radon detectors, which have been widely deployed to detect radon levels in homes and businesses. In an existing collaborative EPA/INL study outside of this workscope,. CR-39 detectors are being utilized to determine the location of active transport fractures in a fractured granitic upland adjacent to a landfill site at the Fort Devens, MA that EPA-designated as National Priorities List (NPL) site. The innovative concept of using an easily deployed port that allows the CR-39 to measure the Rn-222 in the soil or alluvium above the fractured rock, while restricting atmospheric Rn-222 and soil sourced Ra from contaminating the detector is unique to INL and EPA approach previously developed. By deploying a series of these inexpensive detector-casing combinations statistical samples of the Rn-222 flux can be measured, elucidating the most communicative fractures (i.e. fractures that are actively transporting water and gasses). The Rn-222 measurements can then be used as an input to create a more accurate conceptual model to be used for transport modeling and related cleanup activities. If the team’s approach is demonstrated to be applicable to a wide variety of rock types and soil conditions it might potentially offer significant cost saving without a reduction in data quality at Monsanto Superfund and other sites underlain by fracture-dominated bedrock.

  11. Active Layer Soil Carbon and Nutrient Mineralization, Barrow, Alaska, 2012

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Stan D. Wullschleger; Holly M. Vander Stel; Colleen Iversen; Victoria L. Sloan; Richard J. Norby; Mallory P. Ladd; Jason K. Keller; Ariane Jong; Joanne Childs; Deanne J. Brice

    2015-10-29

    This data set consists of bulk soil characteristics as well as carbon and nutrient mineralization rates of active layer soils manually collected from the field in August, 2012, frozen, and then thawed and incubated across a range of temperatures in the laboratory for 28 day periods in 2013-2015. The soils were collected from four replicate polygons in each of the four Areas (A, B, C, and D) of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Soil samples were coincident with the established Vegetation Plots that are located in center, edge, and trough microtopography in each polygon. Data included are 1) bulk soil characteristics including carbon, nitrogen, gravimetric water content, bulk density, and pH in 5-cm depth increments and also by soil horizon, 2) carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus mineralization rates for soil horizons incubated aerobically (and in one case both aerobically and anaerobically) for 28 days at temperatures that included 2, 4, 8, and 12 degrees C. Additional soil and incubation data are forthcoming. They will be available when published as part of another paper that includes additional replicate analyses.

  12. Approaches to the assessment of injuries to soil arising from discharges of hazardous substances and oil: Type B, Technical information document

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Van Voris, P.; Dawson, G.W.; Fredrickson, J.K.; Cataldo, D.A.; Rogers, L.E.; Novich, C.M.; Meuser, J.

    1987-06-01

    Methods for determining the nature and magnitude of injury to the following natural resources are described for: soil chemical characteristics (acidity or pH, cation exchange capacity, percent base saturation, salinity); soil physical characteristics (porosity, water holding capacity, aggregate stability); biological characteristics (microbial activities, invertebrate activities, vegetation); and contaminant transport potential (leaching, food chain). In addition, this document explains how injuries to the soil resource can be translated into a reduction in service provided by that soil and how to determine soil recovery potential. That portion of 43 CFR Part 11 that pertains to the soils portion of the geologic resource is explained.

  13. T-582: RSA systems has resulted in certain information being extracted from RSA systems that relates to RSA SecurID

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RSA investigation has revealed that the attack resulted in certain information being extracted from RSA's systems. Some of that information is related to RSA's SecurID two-factor authentication products.

  14. T-559: Stack-based buffer overflow in oninit in IBM Informix Dynamic Server (IDS) 11.50 allows remote execution

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Stack-based buffer overflow in oninit in IBM Informix Dynamic Server (IDS) 11.50 allows remote execution attackers to execute arbitrary code via crafted arguments in the USELASTCOMMITTED session environment option in a SQL SET ENVIRONMENT statement

  15. Method for producing rapid pH changes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clark, John H.; Campillo, Anthony J.; Shapiro, Stanley L.; Winn, Kenneth R.

    1981-01-01

    A method of initiating a rapid pH change in a solution by irradiating the solution with an intense flux of electromagnetic radiation of a frequency which produces a substantial pK change to a compound in solution. To optimize the resulting pH change, the compound being irradiated in solution should have an excited state lifetime substantially longer than the time required to establish an excited state acid-base equilibrium in the solution. Desired pH changes can be accomplished in nanoseconds or less by means of picosecond pulses of laser radiation.

  16. Method for producing rapid pH changes

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Clark, J.H.; Campillo, A.J.; Shapiro, S.L.; Winn, K.R.

    A method of initiating a rapid pH change in a solution comprises irradiating the solution with an intense flux of electromagnetic radiation of a frequency which produces a substantial pK change to a compound in solution. To optimize the resulting pH change, the compound being irradiated in solution should have an excited state lifetime substantially longer than the time required to establish an excited state acid-base equilibrium in the solution. Desired pH changes can be accomplished in nanoseconds or less by means of picosecond pulses of laser radiation.

  17. Analyses of soils at commercial radioactive-waste-disposal sites. [Barnwell, SC; Richland, WA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piciulo, P.L.; Shea, C.E.; Barletta, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory, in order to provide technical assistance to the NRC, has measured a number of physical and chemical characteristics of soils from two currently operating commercial radioactive waste disposal sites; one at Barnwell, SC, and the other near Richland, WA. Soil samples believed to be representative of the soil that will contact the buried waste were collected and analyzed. Earth resistivities (field measurements), from both sites, supply information to identify variations in subsurface material. Barnwell soil resistivities (laboratory measurements) range from 3.6 x 10/sup 5/ ohm-cm to 8.9 x 10/sup 4/ ohm-cm. Soil resistivities of the Hanford sample vary from 3.0 x 10/sup 5/ ohm-cm to 6.6 x 10/sup 3/ ohm-cm. The Barnwell and Hanford soil pH ranges from 4.8 to 5.4 and from 4.0 to 7.2 respectively. The pH of a 1:2 mixture of soil to 0.01 M CaCl/sub 2/ resulted in a pH for the Barnwell samples of 3.9 +- 0.1 and for the Hanford samples of 7.4 +- 0.2. These values are comparable to the pH measurements of the water extract of the soils used for the analyses of soluble ion content of the soils. The exchange acidity of the soils was found to be approximately 7 mg-eq per 100 g of dry soil for clay material from Barnwell, whereas the Hanford soils showed an alkaline reaction. Aqueous extracts of saturated pastes were used to determine the concentrations of the following ions: Ca/sup 2 +/, Mg/sup 2 +/, K/sup +/, Na/sup +/, HCO/sub 3//sup -/, SO/sub 4//sup =/, and Cl/sup -/. The sulfide content of each of the soils was measured in a 1:2.5 mixture of soil to an antioxidant buffer solution. The concentrations of soluble ions found in the soils from both sites are consistent with the high resistivities.

  18. Complete genome sequence of Catenulispora acidiphila type strain (ID 139908T)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Copeland, Alex; Lapidus, Alla; Rio, Tijana GlavinaDel; Nolan, Matt; Lucas, Susan; Chen, Feng; Tice, Hope; Cheng, Jan-Fang; Bruce, David; Goodwin, Lynne; Pitluck, Sam; Mikhailova, Natalia; Pati, Amrita; Ivanova, Natalia; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Chen, Amy; Palaniappan, Krishna; Chain, Patrick; Land, Miriam; Hauser, Loren; Chang, Yun-Juan; Jefferies, Cynthia C.; Chertkov, Olga; Brettin, Thomas; Detter, John C.; Han, Cliff; Ali, Zahid; Tindall, Brian J.; Goker, Markus; Bristow, James; Eisen, Jonathan A.; Markowitz, Victor; Hugenholtz, Philip; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Klenk, Hans-Peter

    2009-05-20

    Catenulispora acidiphila Busti et al. 2006 is the type species of the genus Catenulispora, and is of interest because of the rather isolated phylogenetic location of the genomically little studied suborder Catenulisporineae within the order Actinomycetales. C. acidiphilia is known for its acidophilic, aerobic lifestyle, but can also grow scantly under anaerobic conditions. Under regular conditions C. acidiphilia grows in long filaments of relatively short aerial hyphae with marked septation. It is a free living, non motile, Gram-positive bacterium isolated from a forest soil sample taken from a wooded area in Gerenzano, Italy. Here we describe the features of this organism, together with the complete genome sequence and annotation. This is the first complete genome sequence of the actinobacterial family Catenulisporaceae, and the 10,467,782 bp long single replicon genome with its 9056 protein-coding and 69 RNA genes is a part of the Genomic Encyclopedia of Bacteria and Archaea project.

  19. Mass Transport within Soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKone, Thomas E.

    2009-03-01

    Contaminants in soil can impact human health and the environment through a complex web of interactions. Soils exist where the atmosphere, hydrosphere, geosphere, and biosphere converge. Soil is the thin outer zone of the earth's crust that supports rooted plants and is the product of climate and living organisms acting on rock. A true soil is a mixture of air, water, mineral, and organic components. The relative proportions of these components determine the value of the soil for agricultural and for other human uses. These proportions also determine, to a large extent, how a substance added to soil is transported and/or transformed within the soil (Spositio, 2004). In mass-balance models, soil compartments play a major role, functioning both as reservoirs and as the principal media for transport among air, vegetation, surface water, deeper soil, and ground water (Mackay, 2001). Quantifying the mass transport of chemicals within soil and between soil and atmosphere is important for understanding the role soil plays in controlling fate, transport, and exposure to multimedia pollutants. Soils are characteristically heterogeneous. A trench dug into soil typically reveals several horizontal layers having different colors and textures. As illustrated in Figure 1, these multiple layers are often divided into three major horizons: (1) the A horizon, which encompasses the root zone and contains a high concentration of organic matter; (2) the B horizon, which is unsaturated, lies below the roots of most plants, and contains a much lower organic carbon content; and (3) the C horizon, which is the unsaturated zone of weathered parent rock consisting of bedrock, alluvial material, glacial material, and/or soil of an earlier geological period. Below these three horizons lies the saturated zone - a zone that encompasses the area below ground surface in which all interconnected openings within the geologic media are completely filled with water. Similarly to the unsaturated zone with three major horizons, the saturated zone can be further divided into other zones based on hydraulic and geologic conditions. Wetland soils are a special and important class in which near-saturation conditions exist most of the time. When a contaminant is added to or formed in a soil column, there are several mechanisms by which it can be dispersed, transported out of the soil column to other parts of the environment, destroyed, or transformed into some other species. Thus, to evaluate or manage any contaminant introduced to the soil column, one must determine whether and how that substance will (1) remain or accumulate within the soil column, (2) be transported by dispersion or advection within the soil column, (3) be physically, chemically, or biologically transformed within the soil (i.e., by hydrolysis, oxidation, etc.), or (4) be transported out of the soil column to another part of the environment through a cross-media transfer (i.e., volatilization, runoff, ground water infiltration, etc.). These competing processes impact the fate of physical, chemical, or biological contaminants found in soils. In order to capture these mechanisms in mass transfer models, we must develop mass-transfer coefficients (MTCs) specific to soil layers. That is the goal of this chapter. The reader is referred to other chapters in this Handbook that address related transport processes, namely Chapter 13 on bioturbation, Chapter 15 on transport in near-surface geological formations, and Chapter 17 on soil resuspention. This chapter addresses the following issues: the nature of soil pollution, composition of soil, transport processes and transport parameters in soil, transformation processes in soil, mass-balance models, and MTCs in soils. We show that to address vertical heterogeneity in soils in is necessary to define a characteristic scaling depth and use this to establish process-based expressions for soil MTCs. The scaling depth in soil and the corresponding MTCs depend strongly on (1) the composition of the soil and physical state of the soil, (2) the chemical and physical properties of the substance of interest, and (3) transformation rates in soil. Our particular focus is on approaches for constructing soil-transport algorithms and soil-transport parameters for incorporation within multimedia fate models. We show how MTC's can be developed to construct a simple two-compartment air-soil system. We then demonstrate how a multi-layer-box-model approach for soil-mass balance converges to the exact analytical solution for concentration and mass balance. Finally, we demonstrate and evaluate the performance of the algorithms in a model with applications to the specimen chemicals benzene, hexachlorobenzene, lindane gammahexachlorocyclohexane, benzo(a)pyrene, nickel, and copper.

  20. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Nick Bosco, PhD

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nick Bosco, PhD Senior Scientist Photo of vv 303-384-6337 Nick.Bosco@nrel.gov Task Focus: Failure Analysis and Accelerated Testing Specializes in: Infrared imaging and other...

  1. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Andriy Zakutayev, Ph.D.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Andriy Zakutayev, Ph.D. Scientist 303-384-6467 Andriy.Zakutayev@nrel.gov Andriy Zakutayev is a scientist working in the field of renewable energy technologies. The applied...

  2. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Mark Campanelli, Ph.D.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mark Campanelli, Ph.D. Postdoctoral Researcher 303-384-6469 Mark.Campanelli@nrel.gov Mark Campanelli graduated with a master's degree and a doctorate in mathematics from Montana...

  3. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Teresa Barnes, Ph.D.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Teresa Barnes, Ph.D. Senior Scientist 303-384-6682 Teresa.Barnes@nrel.gov Dr. Barnes received a bachelor's degree in chemical engineering from the University of Maryland in 2000...

  4. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Benjamin G. Lee, Ph.D.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Benjamin G. Lee, Ph.D. Research Scientist Photo of Benjamin Lee 303-384-7869 Benjamin.Lee@nrel.gov Benjamin Lee earned his bachelor's degree from the California Institute of...

  5. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Stephan Lany, Ph.D.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Stephan Lany, Ph.D. Scientist V Photo of Stephan Lany 303-384-6652 Stephan.Lany@nrel.gov Stephan Lany is a computational materials scientist with a background in electronic...

  6. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Bill McMahon, Ph.D.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Bill McMahon, Ph.D. Senior Scientist 303-384-6578 Bill.McMahon@nrel.gov Dr. Bill McMahon received a bachelor's degree in engineering physics from the Colorado School of Mines in...

  7. Tina Kaarsberg, Ph.D. | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tina Kaarsberg, Ph.D. About Us Tina Kaarsberg, Ph.D. - SBIR/STTR Program Manager, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Most Recent New SBIR All-in-One Web Tool Helps Small Businesses Navigate Nine Websites October 27 Small Business Innovation Research Projects to Make a Big Impact on Clean Energy Economy June 16 Small Business Innovation Research: Bringing Clean Energy Technologies to the Marketplace May

  8. Richard J. French, Ph.D. | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Richard J. French Richard J. French, Ph.D. Senior Scientist Richard.French@nrel.gov | 303-384-6135 Research Interests Biomass thermal processing Hydrotreating Catalytic pyrolysis Steam reforming to hydrogen Gasification Bench-scale reactors Process monitoring Molecular beam mass spectrometry Molecular structure Instrumentation and controls Laboratory equipment design and construction Computer-aided design (CAD) Education Ph.D., Chemistry, Oregon State University B.S., Chemistry, Wheaton College

  9. Daniel A. Ruddy, Ph.D. | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A. Ruddy Daniel A. Ruddy, Ph.D. Inorganic and Materials Chemist, Senior Scientist Dan.Ruddy@nrel.gov | 303-384-6322 Research Interests Inorganic chemistry and catalysis New synthetic pathways to functional materials Renewable fuels production and processes Biomass conversion catalysis Areas of Expertise Dan received a Ph.D. degree in Inorganic Chemistry from the University of California, Berkeley in 2008. His doctoral research combined synthetic molecular and materials chemistry with detailed

  10. 1. CON'I'AC'r ID CODE PAGE OF PAGES AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATIONIMODIFICATION OF CONTRACT II 11 3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    CON'I'AC'r ID CODE PAGE OF PAGES AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATIONIMODIFICATION OF CONTRACT II 11 3 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE (M/D.'F) 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE RE-Q. NO. S. PROJECT1 NO. t7fapplieoble) 27See Block 16C 12EM001839 6. ISUED13Y ODE7. ADMINISTER.ED BY (If uI/wr ius /tem 6) CODE U.S. Department of Energy Office or River Protection P. 0. Box 450, MS 146-60 Richland, WA 99352 1. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No.,stree, county State and Z11' code) 9A, AMENDMEN f

  11. 1. CONTRACT ID CODE PAGE OF PAGES AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT I11 5

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Ap5,sval 2700042 1. CONTRACT ID CODE PAGE OF PAGES AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT I11 5 2. AMENDMENT/MOOIFICATION NO. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE REQ. NO.5 PROJECT NO. (If applicable) A077 See 16C 06-08RL-14383.O1 1 6. ISSUED BY CODE 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODEJ US. Department of Energy Same as item 6. Richland Operations Office DOE Contracting POC: Richard Stimmrrel P. 0. Box 550, MSIN A7-80 (509) 376-2882 Richland, WA 99352 8 NAME AND

  12. RESULTS OF RADIOLOGICAL I'IEASUREMENTS HIGHT{AYS 18 AI.ID IO4 IN NIAGARA

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    9s' RESULTS OF RADIOLOGICAL I'IEASUREMENTS HIGHT{AYS 18 AI.ID IO4 IN NIAGARA az76 rl//.ry' ORNL/RASA.85/ 40 TAKEN AT JUNCTION FALLS, NEH YORK Accesr to the information in thit rcport ir limiled to tho!' inOllateO on tho dl3tribution li3t and to OePartment ot Encrgy and Oepartmcnt ol Enotgy Gontracton This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neitherth€ U nited StatesGovernment norany agency thereof, nor any of their employees, makes

  13. AMENDMENT OF SOLlClTATlONlMODlFlCATION OF CONTRACT 1 I . CONTR"CT ID CODE

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    SOLlClTATlONlMODlFlCATION OF CONTRACT 1 I . CONTR"CT ID CODE BWXT Pantex, LLC Route 726, Mt. Athos Road Lynchburg, VA 24506 PAGE 1 OF 2 PAGES Albuquerque, NM 8718Ii4400 I Amarillo, TX 79120 9B. DATED (SEE m M 11) 10A. MODIFICATION OF CONTRACTIORDER NO. 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, &ate, ZIP Code) I ( DE-ACOCOOAL66620 10B. DATED (SEE / E M 13) 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. M097 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. Offera must a d t n d e d p rsceipt of this m e n

  14. AMENDMENT OF SOLlClTATlONlMODlFlCATlON OF CONTRACT I ' CONTRACT ID CODE

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    ' CONTRACT ID CODE BWXT Pantex, LLC Route 726, Mt. Athos Road Lynchburg, VA 24506 PAGE 1 OF 12 PAGES 9B. DATED (SEE ITEM 11) 5. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) 4. REQUlSlTlONlPURCHASE REQ. NO. 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. MI39 extended. 6. ISSUED BY CODE U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Service Center Property and M&O Contract Support Department P.O. Box 5400 Albuquerque, NM 871 85-5400 3. EFFECTIVE DATE See Block 16C CODE I FACILITY CODE Offers must

  15. AMENDMENT OF SOLlClTATlONlMODlFlCATlON OF CONTRACT I CONTRACT ID CODE

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    CONTRACT ID CODE Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Pantex, LLC 9B. DATED (SEE ITEM 11) PO Box 30020 Amarillo, T X 79120 PAGE 1 OF 2 PAGES Albuquerque, NM 87185-5400 I Amarillo, TX 79120 I I DE-AC04-00AL66620 10B. DATED (SEE ITEM 13) 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, state, ZIP Code) 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. MI74 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. extended. CODE I FACILITY CODE Offers must acknowledge receipt of this amendment prior to the hour and date specified

  16. AMENDMENT OF SOLlClTATlONlMODlFlCATlON OF CONTRACT I I, CONTRACT ID CODE

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    I, CONTRACT ID CODE BWXT Pantex, LLC Route 726, Mt. Athos Road Lynchburg, V A 24506 PAGE I OF 2 PAGES Albuquerque, NM 87185-5400 I Amarillo, TX 79120 9B. DATED (SEE ITEM I I ) 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No.. street, county, state, ZIP Code) I ( DE-AC04-00AL66620 10B. DATED (SEE ITEM 13) 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. M I 3 8 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. extended. 3. EFFECTIVE DATE See Block 16C CODE I FACILITY CODE Offers must acknowledge receipt of this amendment prior to the hour

  17. AMENDMENT OF SOLlClTATlONlMODlFlCATlON OF CONTRACT I I. CONT" ID CODE

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    CONT" ID CODE Babcock & Wilcox Technical Services Pantex, LLC I 1 98. DATED (SEE ITEM 11) PAGE I OF 2 PAGES Albuquerque, NM 87185-5400 I Amarillo, TX 79120 PO Box 30020 Amarillo, TX 79120 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, state, ZIP Code) 10A. MODIFICATION OF CONTRACTIORDER NO. 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. MI64 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. DE-AC04-00AL66620 1 I IOB. DATED (SEE ITEM 13) 3. EFFECTIVE DATE See Block 16C Offers must acknowledge receipt of this

  18. AMENDMENT OF SOLlClTATlONlMODlFlCATlON OF CONTRACT I I. CONTRA'T ID CODE

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    CONTRA'T ID CODE BWXT Pantex, LLC Route 726, Mt. Athos Road Lynchburg, V A 24506 PAGE I OF 2 PAGES Albuquerque, NM 871 85-5400 / Amarillo, TX 79120 I I 9B. DATED (SEE ITEM 11) 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, state, ZIP Code) I 10A. MODIFICATION OF CONTRACTIORDER NO. 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. M I 0 8 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. DE-AC04-00AL66620 1 1 108. DATED (SEE ITEM 13) 3. EFFECTIVE DATE See Block 16C Offers must acknowledge receipt of this amendment prior to

  19. AMENDMENT OF SOLlClTATlONlMODlFlCATlON OF CONTRACT ID PAGE I OF 2

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    / ' ID PAGE I OF 2 PAGES - . Albuquerque, NM 87185-5400 I Amarillo, TX 79120 I ( DE-AC04-00AL66620 10B. DATED (SEE ITEM 13) 8. NAME AND ADDRESS OF CONTRACTOR (No., street, county, state, ZIP Code) Babcock & W ~ ~ C O X Technical Services Pantex, LLC 800 Main Street Lynchburg, VA 24505 2 . AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. MI50 9A. AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION NO. 9B. DATED (SEE ITEM 11) 10A. MODIFICATION OF CONTRACTIORDER NO. Offers must acknowledge receipt of this amendment prior to the hour and date

  20. Comparing Metal Leaching and Toxicity from High pH, Low pH, and High Ammonia Fly Ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Phillips, Jana Randolph; Fagan, Lisa Anne; Drake, Meghan M; Ruther, Rose Emily; Fisher, L. Suzanne; Amonette, J. E.

    2007-01-01

    Previous work with both class F and class C fly ash indicated minimal leaching from most fly ashes tested. However, the addition of NOx removal equipment might result in higher levels of ammonia in the fly ash. We have recently been testing fly ash with a wide range of pH (3.7-12.4) originating from systems with NOx removal equipment. Leaching experiments were done using dilute CaCl2 solutions in batch and columns and a batch nitric acid method. All methods indicated that the leaching of heavy metals was different in the highest ammonia sample tested and the high pH sample. However, toxicity testing with the Microtox system has indicated little potential toxicity in leachates except for the fly ash at the highest pH (12.4). When the leachate from the high pH fly ash was neutralized, toxicity was eliminated.

  1. Comparing metal leaching and toxicity from high pH, low pH, and high ammonia fly ash

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palumbo, Anthony V.; Tarver, Jana R.; Fagan, Lisa A.; McNeilly, Meghan S.; Ruther, Rose; Fisher, L. S.; Amonette, James E.

    2007-07-01

    Previous work with both class F and class C fly ash indicated minimal leaching from most fly ashes tested. However, the addition of NOx removal equipment might result in higher levels of ammonia in the fly ash. We have recently been testing fly ash with a wide range of pH (3.712.4) originating from systems with NOx removal equipment. Leaching experiments were done using dilute CaCl2 solutions in batch and columns and a batch nitric acid method. All methods indicated that the leaching of heavy metals was different in the highest ammonia sample tested and the high pH sample. However, toxicity testing with the Microtox* system has indicated little potential toxicity in leachates except for the fly ash at the highest pH (12.4). When the leachate from the high pH fly ash was neutralized, toxicity was eliminated.

  2. Soil and Groundwater

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Legacy soil and groundwater remediation activities at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are conducted in accordance with regulatory requirements, DOE regulations, and other applicable environmental laws.

  3. Near-infrared noninvasive spectroscopic determination of pH

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Alam, Mary K.; Robinson, Mark R.

    1998-08-11

    Methods and apparatus for, preferably, determining noninvasively and in vitro pH in a human. The non-invasive method includes the steps of: generating light at three or more different wavelengths in the range of 1000 nm to 2500 nm; irradiating blood containing tissue; measuring the intensities of the wavelengths emerging from the blood containing tissue to obtain a set of at least three spectral intensities v. wavelengths; and determining the unknown values of pH. The determination of pH is made by using measured intensities at wavelengths that exhibit change in absorbance due to histidine titration. Histidine absorbance changes are due to titration by hydrogen ions. The determination of the unknown pH values is performed by at least one multivariate algorithm using two or more variables and at least one calibration model. The determined pH values are within the physiological ranges observed in blood containing tissue. The apparatus includes a tissue positioning device, a source, at least one detector, electronics, a microprocessor, memory, and apparatus for indicating the determined values.

  4. Effectiveness of mineral soil to adsorb the natural occurring radioactive material (norm), uranium and thorium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Amir, Muhammad Nur Iman; Ismail, Nurul Izzatiafifi; Wood, Ab. Khalik Saat, Ahmad; Hamzah, Zaini

    2015-04-29

    A study has been performed on U-soil and Th-soil adsorption of three types of soil collected from Selangor State of Malaysia which are Saujana Putra, Bukit Changgang and Jenderam Hilir. In this study, natural radionuclide (U and Th) soil adsorption based on batch experiments with various initial concentrations of the radionuclide elements were carried out. Parameters that were set constant include pH at 5;amount of soil used was 5 g each, contact time was 24 hour and different initial concentration for each solution of U and Th which is 5 mg/L, 10 mg/L, 15 mg/L, 20 mg/L, 25 mg/L and 40 mg/L were used. The K{sub d} values for each type of soil were determined in this batch experiments which was based on US-EPA method, in order to estimate adsorption capacity of the soil.The K{sub d} values of Th found higher than Kd values of U for all of the soil samples, and the highest was found on the soil collected from Bukit Changgang. The soil clay content was one of factors to influence the adsorption of both U and Th from dilute initial solution. The U-soil and Th-soil adsorption process for all the soil samples studied are generally obeying unimolecular layer Langmuir isotherm model. From Langmuir isotherm, the maximum adsorption capacity for U was 0.393mg/g and for Th was 1.53 mg/g for the soil that was taken from Bukit Changgang. From the study, it suggested that the soil from Bukit Changgang applicable as potential enhanced barrier for site disposing waste containing U and Th.

  5. PhD Comics' guide to fusion makes the complex understandable...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    PhD Comics' guide to fusion makes the complex understandable June 12, 2014 (Photo by PhD Comics, www.phdcomics.comTV) A scene from PhD Comics' Jorge Cham's video "What is Fusion" ...

  6. Measurement and control of pH in hydrothermal solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wesolowski, D.J.; Palmer, D.A.; Mesmer, R.E.

    1995-12-31

    Hydrogen-electrode concentration cells with liquid junction are routinely used to measure the pH of aqueous solutions from 0 to 300 C. Results include the dissociation constants of common acids and bases and the hydrolysis and complexation of metal ions in aqueous electrolytes over a wide range of salinities. Recently, we have utilized these cells to examine the sorption of H{sup +} on mineral surfaces, the solubility of minerals with continuous in situ pH measurement, and the thermal decompositon rates of organic acids.

  7. Leachate concentrations from water leach and column leach tests on fly ash-stabilized soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bin-Shafique, S.; Benson, C.H.; Edil, T.B.; Hwang, K.

    2006-01-15

    Batch water leaching tests (WLTs) and column leaching tests (CLTs) were conducted on coal-combustion fly ashes, soil, and soil-fly ash mixtures to characterize leaching of Cd, Cr, Se, and Ag. The concentrations of these metals were also measured in the field at two sites where soft fine-grained soils were mechanically stabilized with fly ash. Concentrations in leachate from the WLTs on soil-fly ash mixtures are different from those on fly ash alone and cannot be accurately estimated based on linear dilution calculations using concentrations from WLTs on fly ash alone. The concentration varies nonlinearly with fly ash content due to the variation in pH with fly ash content. Leachate concentrations are low when the pH of the leachate or the cation exchange capacity (CEC) of the soil is high. Initial concentrations from CLTs are higher than concentrations from WLTs due to differences in solid-liquid ratio, pH, and solid-liquid contact. However, both exhibit similar trends with fly ash content, leachate pH, and soil properties. Scaling factors can be applied to WLT concentrations (50 for Ag and Cd, 10 for Cr and Se) to estimate initial concentrations for CLTs. Concentrations in leachate collected from the field sites were generally similar or slightly lower than concentrations measured in CLTs on the same materials. Thus, CLTs appear to provide a good indication of conditions that occur in the field provided that the test conditions mimic the field conditions. In addition, initial concentrations in the field can be conservatively estimated from WLT concentrations using the aforementioned scaling factors provided that the pH of the infiltrating water is near neutral.

  8. AMENDMENT OF SOLIr ATI ON/MODIFI CATION OF CONTRACT 1. CONTRACT ID CODE PAGE OF PAGES

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    SOLIr ATI ON/MODIFI CATION OF CONTRACT 1. CONTRACT ID CODE PAGE OF PAGES 2 AMENDMENT/lIVDDIFICATiON NC 3. EFFECTIVE DATE [4 REDUISITION/PURCHASE REC NO IE PR3JECT NC (if applicable) 09 ISoe Bloo , 16- - ISee Soheoule S ISSUED D> CODE 7 ~ ADMINISTERED BY (if otnertrian ItemS CO DE Of fice of Ri-.er PoDLecOLODn office of Riv'er P-oCQ-ec-.iQ .S. Cet:F O<men of E-nerov,, I.S. Deparo:merio c-' Enrgv P.O. Box 4'5C 0 ... Box 45C .io ao 1 31 W YS: (-876 B. NAME AND ADDRESS CF CONTRACTOR (No seve

  9. Selenium in Oklahoma ground water and soil. Quarterly report No. 6

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atalay, A.; Vir Maggon, D.

    1991-03-30

    Selenium with a consumption of 2 liters per day (5). The objectives of this study are: (1) to determine the concentrations of Se in Oklahoma ground water and soil samples. (2) to map the geographical distribution of Se species in Oklahoma. (3) to relate groundwater depth, pH and geology with concentration of Se.

  10. Soil & Groundwater Remediation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) manages one of the largest groundwater and soil remediation efforts in the world.  The inventory at the DOE sites includes 6.5 trillion liters of contaminated...

  11. Automated soil gas monitoring chamber

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Edwards, Nelson T.; Riggs, Jeffery S.

    2003-07-29

    A chamber for trapping soil gases as they evolve from the soil without disturbance to the soil and to the natural microclimate within the chamber has been invented. The chamber opens between measurements and therefore does not alter the metabolic processes that influence soil gas efflux rates. A multiple chamber system provides for repetitive multi-point sampling, undisturbed metabolic soil processes between sampling, and an essentially airtight sampling chamber operating at ambient pressure.

  12. SAMPLING DEVICE FOR pH MEASUREMENT IN PROCESS STREAMS

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Michelson, C.E.; Carson, W.N. Jr.

    1958-11-01

    A pH cell is presented for monitoring the hydrogen ion concentration of a fluid in a process stream. The cell is made of glass with a side entry arm just above a reservoir in which the ends of a glass electrode and a reference electrode are situated. The glass electrode contains the usual internal solution which is connected to a lead. The reference electrode is formed of saturated calomel having a salt bridge in its bottom portion fabricated of a porous glass to insure low electrolyte flow. A flush tube leads into the cell through which buffer and flush solutions are introduced. A ground wire twists about both electrode ends to insure constant electrical grounding of the sample. The electrode leads are electrically connected to a pH meter of aay standard type.

  13. Flexible high-temperature pH probe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bielawski, John C.; Outwater, John O.; Halbfinger, George P.

    2003-04-22

    A flexible pH probe device is provided for use in hot water and other high temperature environments up to about 590.degree. F. The pH probe includes a flexible, inert tubular probe member, an oxygen anion conducting, solid state electrolyte plug located at the distal end of the tubular member, oxide powder disposed at the distal end of the tubular member; a metal wire extending along the tubular member and having a distal end in contact with the oxide powder so as to form therewith an internal reference electrode; and a compression fitting forming a pressure boundary seal around a portion of the tubular member remote from the distal end thereof. Preferably, the tubular member is made of polytetrafluoroethylene, and the solid state electrolyte plug is made of stabilized zirconia. The flexibility of the probe member enables placement of the electrode into the area of interest, including around corners, into confined areas and the like.

  14. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Nancy M. Haegel, Ph.D.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nancy M. Haegel, Ph.D. Center Director, Materials Science Photo of Nancy Haegel 303 384 6548 Nancy.Haegel@nrel.gov Dr. Nancy Haegel is Center Director of the Materials Science Center in the Materials and Chemical Science and Technology Directorate. Prior to joining NREL in 2014, Haegel was Distinguished Professor of Physics at the Naval Postgraduate School. Previously, she held faculty positions at Fairfield University and UCLA. Her research interests are in electronic materials and materials

  15. Yannick J. Bomble, Ph.D. | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Yannick J. Bomble Yannick J. Bomble, Ph.D. Senior Research Scientist Yannick.Bomble@nrel.gov | 303-384-7729 Research Interests Development of thermophilic bacteria for improved biomass deconstruction Biomass degrading mechanisms of thermophilic bacteria Metabolic modeling and pathway engineering in microbes for upgrading sugar to fuels and high value chemicals Metabolic enzyme characterization, modeling, and engineering (thermostability, cofactor specificity, binding, rate limiting step)

  16. David W. Mulder, Ph.D. | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    W. Mulder David W. Mulder, Ph.D. Research Scientist, Scientist III David.Mulder@nrel.gov | 303-384-7486 Research Interests David W. Mulder's research interests revolve around metalloenzymes that catalyze primary oxidation-reduction reactions and biofuel production. Of particular interest is understanding how these enzymes link electron-transfer reactions to energy-conversion reactions, such as hydrogenases, which activate molecular H2 from 2e- and 2H+. David has technical expertise in applying

  17. Maybell Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Maybell Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Maybell Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Maybell Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports PDF icon Maybell - Maybell...

  18. Amchitka Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Amchitka Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Amchitka Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Amchitka Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports PDF icon Amchitka -...

  19. Ashtabula Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Ashtabula Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Ashtabula Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Ashtabula Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports PDF icon Ashtabula -...

  20. Shiprock Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Shiprock Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Shiprock Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Shiprock Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports PDF icon Shiprock -...

  1. ARM - Campaign Instrument - soil

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    govInstrumentssoil Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Campaign Instrument : Soil Measurement from the SGP (SOIL) Instrument Categories Surface/Subsurface Properties Campaigns COSMOS Network [ Download Data ] Southern Great Plains, 2010.08.05 - 2017.03.01 Cloud LAnd Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) [ Download Data ] Southern Great Plains, 2007.06.01 - 2007.06.30 Cloud LAnd Surface Interaction Campaign (CLASIC) [ Download Data ]

  2. NREL: Photovoltaics Research - Lorelle Mansfield, Ph.D.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lorelle Mansfield, Ph.D. Scientist 303-384-7884 Lorelle.Mansfield@nrel.gov Lorelle Mansfield is a Scientist in the Thin Film Material Science &amp; Processing group at NREL. Her current work focuses on Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) thin films for photovoltaic applications. In particular, she is developing rapid two-step selenization processes for high-efficiency solar cells. Other topics of interest include enhancing the Voc of CIGS devices through alkali post-deposition treatments, increasing the Ga

  3. W. Alexander Williams, Ph.D Designation and Certification Manager

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    March 20, 1995 W. Alexander Williams, Ph.D Designation and Certification Manager EM-421 Quince Orchard U.S. Department of Energy Washington, DC 20585-0002 L -=kj SUBJECT: FINAL REPORT-RADIOLOGICAL SURVEY OF THE F AMERICAN MANUFACTURING COMPANY OF TEXA WORTH, TEXAS I ,d Sl I lRMER , FORT Dear Dr. Williams: The Environmental,Survey and Site Assessment Program (ESSAP) of the C for Science and Education (ORISE) conducted radiological survey activii American Manufacturing Company of Texas Site in

  4. Miamisburg Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwate...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Miamisburg Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Miamisburg Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports ...

  5. Fernald Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwater...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Fernald Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Fernald Environmental Management Project Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Fernald ...

  6. Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil Gas Geochemistry and Structural...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil Gas Geochemistry and Structural Analysis to Identify Hidden, High Enthalpy, Extensional Geothermal Systems Intergrating Magnetotellurics, Soil ...

  7. DOE/ID-Number

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    data from short-term tests. To collect the necessary data as part of the R&D program and engineering-scale demonstration, more effective monitoring systems must be developed to...

  8. ID-2011-01526

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  9. DOE/ID-Number

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Prepared for US Department of Energy Used Fuel Disposition Campaign J.-A. Wang, H. Wang, and H. Jiang B. B. Bevard and R. L. Howard Oak Ridge National Laboratory September 2014 ...

  10. Beamline 29-ID

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sided bounce Mirror (M1) 31.3 m Heat-sink, side bounce Monochromater (M2, LEG, MEG, HEG) 39.7 m In-Focus VLS-PGM Exit Slit 59.7 m Both RSXS and ARPES branchlines Mirror...

  11. ID.pdf

    Energy Savers [EERE]

  12. DOE/ID-Number

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    INEELEXT-04-02423 ABB SCADAEMS System INEEL Baseline Summary Test Report J. R. Davidson ... SCADAEMS System INEEL Baseline Summary Test Report J. R. Davidson M. R. Permann B. L. ...

  13. DOE/ID-Number

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    in the energy sector NSTB National SCADA Test Bed Common Cyber Security Vulnerabilities ... of the National Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) Test Bed (NSTB) program. ...

  14. 2-ID-E

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    General Users. For example, in collaboration with G. Woloschak et al, we have looked at TiO2-DNA nanocomposites in mammalian cells 1; B. Twining et al investigate trace elements...

  15. Badging, Real ID

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Foreign national guests and employees must have an approved visit and present a valid passport and documentation of US legal status and work authorizations. Official visitors are...

  16. DOE/ID-Number

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    production of a range of liquid fuels and fuel blendstocks from lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks by funding fundamental and applied research that advances the state of...

  17. DOE/ID-Number

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    non-industrial private forest land who wish to establish, produce, and deliver biomass feedstocks. It provides two categories of assistance: (1) Matching payments may be...

  18. DOE/ID-Number

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... 21, 2015 ACRONYMS ASME B&PVC American Society of Mechanical Engineers Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code ASTM American Society for Testing and Materials CISCC Chloride Induced ...

  19. DOE/ID-Number

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A Summary of Control System Security Standards Activities in the Energy Sector October 2005 National SCADA Test Bed A Summary of Control System Security Standards Activities in the Energy Sector October 2005 Sandia National Laboratories Idaho National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy Reliability 2 iii ABSTRACT This document is a compilation of the activities and

  20. Blind Modal ID

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    high-resolution visualization and analysis of structural dynamics. Contact Yongchao Yang (832) 335-3003 Email David Mascarenas dmascarenas@lanl.gov (505) 665-0881 Original...

  1. DOE/ID-Number

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Signage and Posting Guidelines CAES is a destination point for world-renowned researchers, private industry partners, politicians, CAES patrons and other dignitaries. For this...

  2. DOE/ID-Number

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... greatest control on chemical and physical properties of both illite and smectite clays. ... U(VI) species predominant under these chemical solution conditions, as well as the ...

  3. Beamline 29-ID

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    eV Energy resolution: 1.8 meV, Angular resolution: 0.01 6-axis cryomanipulator Polar Rotation: 180 Tilt Rotation:-10 to 35 Azimutal Rotation: 45 Temperature: 800-10K...

  4. DOE/ID-Number

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    ... source term and decay heat with higher discharge burnup. ... that can challenge pressure boundaries and ... LWR core components * Melting temperature * Thermal conductivity ...

  5. Beamline 29-ID

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Resonant Soft X-ray Scattering (RSXS) Diffractometer: 7-axes "kappa" geometry 10 K closed-cycle cryostat Detectors: Microchannel plate, area detector Electron yield detector TES...

  6. DOE/ID-Number

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    M. J. Robinson Pacific Northwest National Laboratory September 2012 FCRD-SWF-2012-000214 DISCLAIMER This information was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of...

  7. DOE/ID-Number

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Microfluidic Sampling System for High Temperature Electrochemical MC&A September 26, 2013 II DISCLAIMER This information was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency...

  8. Beamline 29-ID

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    component; implementation of beamline controls and safety systems (cleanroom, FOE progress, FOE progress2) Fall 2012 FDR approval (October 15) Installation of...

  9. DOE/ID-Number

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    for Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Waste Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy ... management of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) a and high-level waste (HLW) for 54 years. ...

  10. acceptable-ID.pdf

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  11. DOE/ID-Number

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Disposal in Crystalline Rocks 9262014 v Used Fuel Disposal in Crystalline Rocks: ... DEPTH AND DOSE RATE PROFILE USED IN MPM V2 287 9.6 INCORPORATION OF RADIOLYSIS MODEL ...

  12. DOE/ID-Number

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Disposal Options for Research and Development for Spent Nuclear Fuel and High Basis for Identification of Disposal Options for Research and Development for Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Waste Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Rob P. Rechard Barry Goldstein Larry H. Brush Sandia National Laboratories James A. Blink Mark Sutton Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Frank V. Perry Los Alamos National Laboratory March FCRD-USED-2011-0000 asis for

  13. DOE/ID-Number

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    INEEL/EXT-04-02423 ABB SCADA/EMS System INEEL Baseline Summary Test Report J. R. Davidson M. R. Permann B. L. Rolston S. J. Schaeffer November 2004 Prepared by: Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory INEEL/EXT-04-02423 ABB SCADA/EMS System INEEL Baseline Summary Test Report J. R. Davidson M. R. Permann B. L. Rolston S. J. Schaeffer November 2004 Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory INEEL National Security Division Idaho Falls, Idaho 83415 Prepared for the U.S.

  14. DOE/ID-Number

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Public Preferences Related to Consent-Based Siting of Radioactive Waste Management Facilities for Storage and Disposal: Analyzing Variations over Time, Events, and Program Designs Prepared for US Department of Energy Nuclear Fuel Storage and Transportation Planning Project Hank C. Jenkins-Smith Carol L. Silva Kerry G. Herron Kuhika G. Ripberger Matthew Nowlin Joseph Ripberger Center for Risk and Crisis Management, University of Oklahoma Evaristo "Tito" Bonano Rob P. Rechard Sandia

  15. Beamline 29-ID

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lab, APS) Christa Benson Dr. Jonathan Lang Dr. Jessica McChesney Dr. Mohan Ramanathan Dr. Ruben Reininger Dr. Richard Rosenberg Dr. George Srajer IEX - Advisory Committee Dr Dario...

  16. DOE/ID-Number

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Planning Project Hank C. Jenkins-Smith Carol L. Silva Kerry G. Herron Kuhika G. ... in public support for nuclear technologies can occur (Jenkins-Smith et al. 2011). ...

  17. DOE/ID-Number

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    storage, conveying systems and a pellet 110 pulverizer to insure that the appropriate recipe of material enters the throat of the conversion reactor in the appropriate blends and...

  18. DOE/ID-Number

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Disposal Options for Research and Development for Spent Nuclear Fuel and High Basis for Identification of Disposal Options for Research and Development for Spent Nuclear Fuel and High-Level Waste Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Used Fuel Disposition Campaign Rob P. Rechard Barry Goldstein Larry H. Brush Sandia National Laboratories James A. Blink Mark Sutton Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Frank V. Perry Los Alamos National Laboratory March FCRD-USED-2011-0000 asis for

  19. DOE/ID-Number

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Affecting Performance of a Salt Repository for Disposal of Heat-Generating Nuclear Waste Prepared for U.S. Department of Energy Used Nuclear Fuel S. David Sevougian, SNL Geoff...

  20. DOE/ID-Number

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    76 Idaho National Laboratory Radiological Response Training Range Environmental Assessment Final October 2010 DOE/EA-1776 Idaho National Laboratory Radiological Response Training Range Environmental Assessment Final October 2010 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office i CONTENTS GLOSSARY ................................................................................................................................................ iii EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

  1. DOE/ID-Number

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    822 Idaho National Laboratory Stand-Off Experiment (SOX) Range Environmental Assessment Final March 2011 DOE/EA-1822 Idaho National Laboratory Stand-Off Experiment (SOX) Range Environmental Assessment Final March 2011 Prepared for the U.S. Department of Energy Idaho Operations Office i CONTENTS ACRONYMS ............................................................................................................................................... iii GLOSSARY

  2. DOE/ID-Number

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    ... automation industry is the Industrial Process Monitoring (IPM) profile, which is under development by ... recommended best practice to pre-load the keys into the ZigBee devices ...

  3. 11. CONTRACT ID CODE

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    1 PAGE 1 OF2 AMENDMENT OF SOLICITATION/MODIFICATION OF CONTRACT PAGES 2. AMENDMENT/MODIFICATION NO. I 3. EFFECTIVE DATE M191 See Block 16C 4. REQUISITION/PURCHASE I 5. PROJECT NO. (If applicable) REQ. NO. 6.ISSUED BY CODE U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Service Center Property and M&O Contract Support Department P.O. Box 5400 Albuquerque, NM 87185-5400 7. ADMINISTERED BY (If other than Item 6) CODE U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security

  4. YEAR","MONTH","STATE","UTILITY_ID","UTILITY_NAME","RESIDENTIAL_GP REVENUES (Tho

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    UTILITY_ID","UTILITY_NAME","RESIDENTIAL_GP REVENUES (Thousand $)","COMMERCIAL_GP REVENUES (Thousand $)","INDUSTRIAL_GP REVENUES (Thousand $)","TRANS_GP REVENUES (Thousand $)","TOTAL_GP REVENUES (Thousand $)","RESIDENTIAL_GP SALES (MWh)","COMMERCIAL_GP SALES (MWh)","INDUSTRIAL_GP SALES (MWh)","TRANS_GP SALES (MWh)","TOTAL_GP SALES (MWh)","RESIDENTIAL_GP

  5. With 400th Ph.D. grad, UW-Madison celebrates a half century of...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    With 400th Ph.D. grad, UW-Madison celebrates a half century of fusion energy American Fusion News Category: U.S. Universities Link: With 400th Ph.D. grad, UW-Madison celebrates a...

  6. Brine pH Modification Scale Control Technology. 2. A Review.pdf...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Brine pH Modification Scale Control Technology. 2. A Review.pdf Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Brine pH Modification Scale...

  7. PH adjustment of power plant cooling water with flue gas/fly...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    PH adjustment of power plant cooling water with flue gasfly ash Citation Details In-Document Search Title: PH adjustment of power plant cooling water with flue gasfly ash A...

  8. Permafrost soils and carbon cycling

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ping, C. L.; Jastrow, J. D.; Jorgenson, M. T.; Michaelson, G. J.; Shur, Y. L.

    2015-02-05

    Knowledge of soils in the permafrost region has advanced immensely in recent decades, despite the remoteness and inaccessibility of most of the region and the sampling limitations posed by the severe environment. These efforts significantly increased estimates of the amount of organic carbon stored in permafrost-region soils and improved understanding of how pedogenic processes unique to permafrost environments built enormous organic carbon stocks during the Quaternary. This knowledge has also called attention to the importance of permafrost-affected soils to the global carbon cycle and the potential vulnerability of the region's soil organic carbon (SOC) stocks to changing climatic conditions. Inmore » this review, we briefly introduce the permafrost characteristics, ice structures, and cryopedogenic processes that shape the development of permafrost-affected soils, and discuss their effects on soil structures and on organic matter distributions within the soil profile. We then examine the quantity of organic carbon stored in permafrost-region soils, as well as the characteristics, intrinsic decomposability, and potential vulnerability of this organic carbon to permafrost thaw under a warming climate. Overall, frozen conditions and cryopedogenic processes, such as cryoturbation, have slowed decomposition and enhanced the sequestration of organic carbon in permafrost-affected soils over millennial timescales. Due to the low temperatures, the organic matter in permafrost soils is often less humified than in more temperate soils, making some portion of this stored organic carbon relatively vulnerable to mineralization upon thawing of permafrost.« less

  9. Pneumatic soil removal tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neuhaus, J.E.

    1992-10-13

    A soil removal tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and other debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder mounted on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably mounted on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator valve mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw. 3 figs.

  10. Pneumatic soil removal tool

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Neuhaus, John E.

    1992-01-01

    A soil removal tool is provided for removing radioactive soil, rock and other debris from the bottom of an excavation, while permitting the operator to be located outside of a containment for that excavation. The tool includes a fixed jaw, secured to one end of an elongate pipe, which cooperates with a movable jaw pivotably mounted on the pipe. Movement of the movable jaw is controlled by a pneumatic cylinder mounted on the pipe. The actuator rod of the pneumatic cylinder is connected to a collar which is slidably mounted on the pipe and forms part of the pivotable mounting assembly for the movable jaw. Air is supplied to the pneumatic cylinder through a handle connected to the pipe, under the control of an actuator valve mounted on the handle, to provide movement of the movable jaw.

  11. Canted Undulator Upgrade for GeoSoilEnviroCARS Sector 13 at the Advanced Photon Source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sutton, Stephen

    2013-02-02

    Support for the beamline component of the canted undulator upgrade of Sector 13 (GeoSoilEnviroCARS; managed and operated by the University of Chicago) at the Advanced Photon Source (APS; Argonne National Laboratory) was received from three agencies (equally divided): NASA-SRLIDAP (now LARS), NSF-EAR-IF (ARRA) and DOE-Single Investigator Small Group (SISGR). The associated accelerator components (undulators, canted front end) were provided by the APS using DOE-ARRA funding. The intellectual merit of the research enabled by the upgrade lies in advancing our knowledge of the composition, structure and properties of earth materials; the processes they control; and the processes that produce them. The upgrade will facilitate scientific advances in the following areas: high pressure mineral physics and chemistry, non-crystalline and nano-crystalline materials at high pressure, chemistry of hydrothermal fluids, reactions at mineral-water interfaces, biogeochemistry, oxidation states of magmas, flow dynamics of fluids and solids, and cosmochemistry. The upgrade, allowing the microprobe to operate 100% of the time and the high pressure and surface scattering and spectroscopy instruments to receive beam time increases, will facilitate much more efficient use of the substantial investment in these instruments. The broad scientific community will benefit by the increase in the number of scientists who conduct cutting-edge research at GSECARS. The user program in stations 13ID-C (interface scattering) and 13ID-D (laser heated diamond anvil cell and large volume press) recommenced in June 2012. The operation of the 13ID-E microprobe station began in the Fall 2012 cycle (Oct.-Dec 2012). The upgraded canted beamlines double the amount of undulator beam time at Sector 13 and provide new capabilities including extended operations of the X-ray microprobe down to the sulfur K edge and enhanced brightness at high energy. The availability of the upgraded beamlines will advance the research being conducted at Sector 13.

  12. Barley seedling growth in soils amended with fly ash or agricultural lime followed by acidification

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Renken, R.R.; McCallister, D.L.; Tarkalson, D.D.; Hergert, G.W.; Marx, D.B.

    2006-05-15

    Calcium-rich coal combustion fly ash can be used as an amendment to neutralize soil acidity because of its oxides and carbonate content, but its aluminum content could inhibit plant growth if soil pH values fall below optimal agronomic levels. This study measured root and shoot growth of an acid-sensitive barley (Hordeum vulgare L. 'Kearney') grown in the greenhouse on three naturally acid soils. The soils were either untreated or amended with various liming materials (dry fly ash, wet fly ash, and agricultural lime) at application rates of 0, .5, 1, and 1.5 times the recommended lime requirement, then treated with dilute acid solutions to simulate management-induced acidification. Plant growth indexes were measured at 30 days after planting. Root mass per plant and root length per plant were greater for the limed treatments than in the acidified check. Root growth in the limed treatments did not differ from root growth in the original nonacidified soils. Top mass per plant in all limed soils was either larger than or not different from that in the original nonacidified soils. Based on top mass per plant, no liming material or application rate was clearly superior. Both fly ash and agricultural lime reduced the impact of subsequent acidification on young barley plants. Detrimental effects of aluminum release on plant growth were not observed. Calcium-rich fly ash at agronomic rates is an acceptable acid-neutralizing material with no apparent negative effects.

  13. In-situ vitrification of soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brouns, Richard A.; Buelt, James L.; Bonner, William F.

    1983-01-01

    A method of vitrifying soil at or below a soil surface location. Two or more conductive electrodes are inserted into the soil for heating of the soil mass between them to a temperature above its melting temperature. Materials in the soil, such as buried waste, can thereby be effectively immobilized.

  14. Soil Density/Moisture Gauge

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This scenario provides the planning instructions, guidance, and evaluation forms necessary to conduct an exercise involving a highway shipment of a soil moisture/density gauge (Class 7 -...

  15. Mobility of heavy metals through granitic soils using mini column infiltration test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zarime, Nur 'Aishah; Yaacob, W. Z.W.

    2014-09-03

    This study is about the mobility of cadmium through compacted granitic soils. Two granitic soils namely the Broga (BGR) and Kajang (KGR) granitic soils were collected in Selangor, Malaysia. Physical and chemical tests were applied for both granitic soils to determine the physical and chemical properties of soil materials. Physical test results shows granitic soils (BGR and KGR) have high percentage of sand ranging between 54%–63% and 46%–54% respectively, an intermediate and intermediate to high plasticity index as well as high specific gravity ie; 2.50–2.59 and 2.45–2.66 respectively. For chemical test, granitic soils shows acidic pH values ranged from 5.35–5.85 for BGR and pH 5.32–5.54 for KGR. For organic matter, SSA and CEC test, it shows low values ranged from 0.22%–0.34% and 0.39%– 0.50% respectively for organic matter test, 17.96 m{sup 2}/g–21.93 m{sup 2}/g and 25.76 m{sup 2}/g–26.83 m{sup 2}/g respectively for SSA test and 0.79 meq/100g–1.35 meq/100g and 1.31 meq/100g–1.35 meq/100g respectively for CEC test. Mini column infiltration test was conducted to determine the retention of cadmium while flowing through granite soils. This test conducted based on the falling head permeability concepts. Different G-force ranging from 231G to 1442G was used in this test. The breakthrough curves show the concentration of Cd becomes higher with the increasing of G-force for both granitic samples (BGR and KGR). The selectivity sorption for both granites ranked in the following decreasing order of; 231G>519G>923G>1442G. Results demonstrated that granitic soils also have low buffering capacity due to low resist of pH changes.

  16. Soil microbial responses to nitrogen addition in arid ecosystems

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sinsabaugh, Robert L.; Belnap, Jayne; Rudgers, Jennifer; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Martinez, Noelle; Sandquist, Darren

    2015-08-14

    The N cycle of arid ecosystems is influenced by low soil organic matter, high soil pH, and extremes in water potential and temperature that lead to open canopies and development of biological soil crusts (biocrusts). We investigated the effects of N amendment on soil microbial dynamics in a Larrea tridentata-Ambrosia dumosa shrubland site in southern Nevada USA. Sites were fertilized with a NO3-NH4 mix at 0, 7, and 15 kg N ha-1 y-1 from March 2012 to March 2013. In March 2013, biocrust (0–0.5 cm) and bulk soils (0–10 cm) were collected beneath Ambrosia canopies and in the interspaces betweenmore » plants. Biomass responses were assessed as bacterial and fungal SSU rRNA gene copy number and chlorophyll a concentration. Metabolic responses were measured by five ecoenzyme activities and rates of N transformation. With most measures, nutrient availability, microbial biomass, and process rates were greater in soils beneath the shrub canopy compared to the interspace between plants, and greater in the surface biocrust horizon compared to the deeper 10 cm soil profile. Most measures responded positively to experimental N addition. Effect sizes were generally greater for bulk soil than biocrust. Results were incorporated into a meta-analysis of arid ecosystem responses to N amendment that included data from 14 other studies. Effect sizes were calculated for biomass and metabolic responses. Regressions of effect sizes, calculated for biomass, and metabolic responses, showed similar trends in relation to N application rate and N load (rate × duration). The critical points separating positive from negative treatment effects were 88 kg ha-1 y-1 and 159 kg ha-1, respectively, for biomass, and 70 kg ha-1 y-1 and 114 kg ha-1, respectively, for metabolism. These critical values are comparable to those for microbial biomass, decomposition rates and respiration reported in broader meta-analyses of N amendment effects in mesic ecosystems. The large effect sizes at low N addition rates indicate that arid ecosystems are sensitive to modest increments in anthropogenic N deposition.« less

  17. Soil microbial responses to nitrogen addition in arid ecosystems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sinsabaugh, Robert L.; Belnap, Jayne; Rudgers, Jennifer; Kuske, Cheryl R.; Martinez, Noelle; Sandquist, Darren

    2015-08-14

    The N cycle of arid ecosystems is influenced by low soil organic matter, high soil pH, and extremes in water potential and temperature that lead to open canopies and development of biological soil crusts (biocrusts). We investigated the effects of N amendment on soil microbial dynamics in a Larrea tridentata-Ambrosia dumosa shrubland site in southern Nevada USA. Sites were fertilized with a NO3-NH4 mix at 0, 7, and 15 kg N ha-1 y-1 from March 2012 to March 2013. In March 2013, biocrust (0–0.5 cm) and bulk soils (0–10 cm) were collected beneath Ambrosia canopies and in the interspaces between plants. Biomass responses were assessed as bacterial and fungal SSU rRNA gene copy number and chlorophyll a concentration. Metabolic responses were measured by five ecoenzyme activities and rates of N transformation. With most measures, nutrient availability, microbial biomass, and process rates were greater in soils beneath the shrub canopy compared to the interspace between plants, and greater in the surface biocrust horizon compared to the deeper 10 cm soil profile. Most measures responded positively to experimental N addition. Effect sizes were generally greater for bulk soil than biocrust. Results were incorporated into a meta-analysis of arid ecosystem responses to N amendment that included data from 14 other studies. Effect sizes were calculated for biomass and metabolic responses. Regressions of effect sizes, calculated for biomass, and metabolic responses, showed similar trends in relation to N application rate and N load (rate × duration). The critical points separating positive from negative treatment effects were 88 kg ha-1 y-1 and 159 kg ha-1, respectively, for biomass, and 70 kg ha-1 y-1 and 114 kg ha-1, respectively, for metabolism. These critical values are comparable to those for microbial biomass, decomposition rates and respiration reported in broader meta-analyses of N amendment effects in mesic ecosystems. The large effect sizes at low N addition rates indicate that arid ecosystems are sensitive to modest increments in anthropogenic N deposition.

  18. AMENDMENT OF SOLlClTATlONlMODlFlCATlON OF CONTFWCT I 1 CONTRACT ID CODE PAGE I OF 2

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    CONTFWCT I 1 CONTRACT ID CODE PAGE I OF 2 PAGES MI10 I See Block 16C I REQ. NO. BWXT Pantex, LLC Route 726, Mt. Athos Road Lynchburg, VA 24506 2. AMENDMENTIMODIFICATION NO. 1 3. EFFECTIVE DATE 1 4. REQUISITIONIPURCHASE 1 5. PROJECT NO. (If a ~ ~ l i c a b l e l . a , U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Service Center Property and M&O Contract Support Department P.O. Box 5400 Albuquerque, NM 871 85-5400 96. DATED (SEE ITEM 1 1 ) 6. ISSUED BY CODE 1 7.

  19. Permafrost soils and carbon cycling

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Ping, C. L.; Jastrow, J. D.; Jorgenson, M. T.; Michaelson, G. J.; Shur, Y. L.

    2014-10-30

    Knowledge of soils in the permafrost region has advanced immensely in recent decades, despite the remoteness and inaccessibility of most of the region and the sampling limitations posed by the severe environment. These efforts significantly increased estimates of the amount of organic carbon (OC) stored in permafrost-region soils and improved understanding of how pedogenic processes unique to permafrost environments built enormous OC stocks during the Quaternary. This knowledge has also called attention to the importance of permafrost-affected soils to the global C cycle and the potential vulnerability of the region's soil OC stocks to changing climatic conditions. In this review,more » we briefly introduce the permafrost characteristics, ice structures, and cryopedogenic processes that shape the development of permafrost-affected soils and discuss their effects on soil structures and on organic matter distributions within the soil profile. We then examine the quantity of OC stored in permafrost-region soils, as well as the characteristics, intrinsic decomposability, and potential vulnerability of this OC to permafrost thaw under a warming climate.« less

  20. Microfluidic device having an immobilized pH gradient and PAGE gels for

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    protein separation and analysis (Patent) | SciTech Connect Microfluidic device having an immobilized pH gradient and PAGE gels for protein separation and analysis Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Microfluidic device having an immobilized pH gradient and PAGE gels for protein separation and analysis Disclosed is a novel microfluidic device enabling on-chip implementation of a two-dimensional separation methodology. Previously disclosed microscale immobilized pH gradients (IPG) are

  1. Microfluidic device having an immobilized pH gradient and page gels for

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    protein separation and analysis (Patent) | SciTech Connect Microfluidic device having an immobilized pH gradient and page gels for protein separation and analysis Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Microfluidic device having an immobilized pH gradient and page gels for protein separation and analysis Disclosed is a novel microfluidic device enabling on-chip implementation of a two-dimensional separation methodology. Previously disclosed microscale immobilized pH gradients (IPG) are

  2. Microfluidic device having an immobilized pH gradient and page gels for

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    protein separation and analysis (Patent) | DOEPatents Microfluidic device having an immobilized pH gradient and page gels for protein separation and analysis Title: Microfluidic device having an immobilized pH gradient and page gels for protein separation and analysis Disclosed is a novel microfluidic device enabling on-chip implementation of a two-dimensional separation methodology. Previously disclosed microscale immobilized pH gradients (IPG) are combined with perpendicular polyacrylamide

  3. Microfluidic device having an immobilized pH gradient and page gels for

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    protein separation and analysis (Patent) | DOEPatents Microfluidic device having an immobilized pH gradient and page gels for protein separation and analysis Title: Microfluidic device having an immobilized pH gradient and page gels for protein separation and analysis Disclosed is a novel microfluidic device enabling on-chip implementation of a two-dimensional separation methodology. Previously disclosed microscale immobilized pH gradients (IPG) are combined with perpendicular polyacrylamide

  4. Contrasting soil microbial community functional structures in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Contrasting soil microbial community functional structures in two major landscapes of the Tibetan alpine meadow Prev Next Title: Contrasting soil microbial community...

  5. PhD Comics' guide to fusion makes the complex understandable | Princeton

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Plasma Physics Lab PhD Comics' guide to fusion makes the complex understandable By Jeanne Jackson DeVoe June 12, 2014 Tweet Widget Google Plus One Share on Facebook A scene from PhD Comics' Jorge Cham's video "What is Fusion" features interviews with PPPL physicists on location and employs animation to allow the scientists to explain magnetic fusion. (Photo by PhD Comics, www.phdcomics.com/TV) A scene from PhD Comics' Jorge Cham's video "What is Fusion" features

  6. Increase of available phosphorus by fly-ash application in paddy soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, C.H.; Lee, H.; Lee, Y.B.; Chang, H.H.; Ali, M.A.; Min, W.; Kim, S.; Kim, P.J.

    2007-07-01

    Fly ash from the coal- burning industry may be a potential inorganic soil amendment to increase rice productivity and to restore the soil nutrient balance in paddy soil. In this study, fly ash was applied at rates of 0, 40, 80, and 120 Mg ha{sup -1} in two paddy soils (silt loam in Yehari and loamy sand in Daegok). During rice cultivation, available phosphorus (P) increased significantly with fly ash application, as there was high content of P (786 mg kg{sup -1}) in the applied fly ash. In addition, high content of silicon (Si) and high pH of fly ash contributed to increased available-P content by ion competition between phosphate and silicate and by neutralization of soil acidity, respectively. With fly-ash application, water-soluble P (W-P) content increased significantly together with increasing aluminum- bound P (Al- P) and calcium- bound P (Ca- P) fractions. By contrast, iron- bound P (Fe- P) decreased significantly because of reduction of iron under the flooded paddy soil during rice cultivation. The present experiment indicated that addition of fly ash had a positive benefit on increasing the P availability.

  7. Method and apparatus for maintaining the pH in zinc-bromine battery systems

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grimes, Patrick G.

    1985-09-10

    A method and apparatus for maintaining the pH level in a zinc-bromine battery features reacting decomposition hydrogen with bromine in the presence of a catalyst. The catalyst encourages the formation of hydrogen and bromine ions. The decomposition hydrogen is therefore consumed, alloying the pH of the system to remain substantially at a given value.

  8. Consideration of factors affecting strip effluent pH and sodium content

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, T. B.

    2015-07-29

    A number of factors were investigated to determine possible reasons for why the Strip Effluent (SE) can sometimes have higher than expected pH values and/or sodium content, both of which have prescribed limits. All of the factors likely have some impact on the pH values and Na content.

  9. Worldwide organic soil carbon and nitrogen data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zinke, P.J.; Stangenberger, A.G.; Post, W.M.; Emanual, W.R.; Olson, J.S.

    1986-09-01

    The objective of the research presented in this package was to identify data that could be used to estimate the size of the soil organic carbon pool under relatively undisturbed soil conditions. A subset of the data can be used to estimate amounts of soil carbon storage at equilibrium with natural soil-forming factors. The magnitude of soil properties so defined is a resulting nonequilibrium values for carbon storage. Variation in these values is due to differences in local and geographic soil-forming factors. Therefore, information is included on location, soil nitrogen content, climate, and vegetation along with carbon density and variation.

  10. ARM - Measurement - Soil heat flux

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    heat flux ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Soil heat flux A quantity ...

  11. Soil metagenomics and carbon cycling

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Soil metagenomics and carbon cycling Soil metagenomics and carbon cycling Establishing a foundational understanding of the microbial and ecosystem factors that control carbon cycling to improve climate modeling and carbon management. Get Expertise Principle Investigator Cheryl Kuske Bioscience Division 505 665 4800 Email Get Expertise John Dunbar Bioscience Division Email Get Expertise Chris Yeager Bioscience Division Email Get Expertise Jean Challacombe Bioscience Division Email This

  12. Nuclear forensics: Soil content

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beebe, Merilyn Amy

    2015-08-31

    Nuclear Forensics is a growing field that is concerned with all stages of the process of creating and detonating a nuclear weapon. The main goal is to prevent nuclear attack by locating and securing nuclear material before it can be used in an aggressive manner. This stage of the process is mostly paperwork; laws, regulations, treaties, and declarations made by individual countries or by the UN Security Council. There is some preliminary leg work done in the form of field testing detection equipment and tracking down orphan materials; however, none of these have yielded any spectacular or useful results. In the event of a nuclear attack, the first step is to analyze the post detonation debris to aid in the identification of the responsible party. This aspect of the nuclear forensics process, while reactive in nature, is more scientific. A rock sample taken from the detonation site can be dissolved into liquid form and analyzed to determine its chemical composition. The chemical analysis of spent nuclear material can provide valuable information if properly processed and analyzed. In order to accurately evaluate the results, scientists require information on the natural occurring elements in the detonation zone. From this information, scientists can determine what percentage of the element originated in the bomb itself rather than the environment. To this end, element concentrations in soils from sixty-nine different cities are given, along with activity concentrations for uranium, thorium, potassium, and radium in various building materials. These data are used in the analysis program Python.

  13. Soil Moisture Sensor - Energy Innovation Portal

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Soil & Groundwater Remediation Soil & Groundwater Remediation Soil & Groundwater Remediation The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) manages one of the largest groundwater and soil remediation efforts in the world. The inventory at the DOE sites includes 6.5 trillion liters of contaminated groundwater, an amount equal to about four times the daily U.S. water consumption, and 40 million cubic meters of soil and debris contaminated with radionuclides, metals, and organics. The Office of

  14. Origin of the instability of octadecylamine Langmuir monolayer at low pH

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Avazbaeva, Zaure; Sung, Woongmo; Lee, Jonggwan; Phan, Minh Dinh; Shin, Kwanwoo; Vaknin, David; Kim, Doseok

    2015-11-30

    In this paper, it has been reported that an octadecylamine (ODA) Langmuir monolayer becomes unstable at low pH values with no measurable surface pressure at around pH 3.5, suggesting significant dissolution of the ODA molecule into the subphase solution (Albrecht, Colloids Surf. A 2006, 284–285, 166–174). However, by lowering the pH further, ODA molecules reoccupy the surface, and a full monolayer is recovered at pH 2.5. Using surface sum-frequency spectroscopy and pressure–area isotherms, it is found that the recovered monolayer at very low pH has a larger area per molecule with many gauche defects in the ODA molecules as comparedmore » to that at high pH values. This structural change suggests that the reappearance of the monolayer is due to the adsorbed Cl– counterions to the protonated amine groups, leading to partial charge neutralization. This proposition is confirmed by intentionally adding monovalent salts (i.e., NaCl, NaBr, or NaI) to the subphase to recover the monolayer at pH 3.5, in which the detailed structure of the monolayer is confirmed by sum frequency spectra and the adsorbed anions by X-ray reflectivity.« less

  15. Origin of the instability of octadecylamine Langmuir monolayer at low pH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Avazbaeva, Zaure; Sung, Woongmo; Lee, Jonggwan; Phan, Minh Dinh; Shin, Kwanwoo; Vaknin, David; Kim, Doseok

    2015-11-30

    In this paper, it has been reported that an octadecylamine (ODA) Langmuir monolayer becomes unstable at low pH values with no measurable surface pressure at around pH 3.5, suggesting significant dissolution of the ODA molecule into the subphase solution (Albrecht, Colloids Surf. A 2006, 284–285, 166–174). However, by lowering the pH further, ODA molecules reoccupy the surface, and a full monolayer is recovered at pH 2.5. Using surface sum-frequency spectroscopy and pressure–area isotherms, it is found that the recovered monolayer at very low pH has a larger area per molecule with many gauche defects in the ODA molecules as compared to that at high pH values. This structural change suggests that the reappearance of the monolayer is due to the adsorbed Cl– counterions to the protonated amine groups, leading to partial charge neutralization. This proposition is confirmed by intentionally adding monovalent salts (i.e., NaCl, NaBr, or NaI) to the subphase to recover the monolayer at pH 3.5, in which the detailed structure of the monolayer is confirmed by sum frequency spectra and the adsorbed anions by X-ray reflectivity.

  16. Category:Soil Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Soil Gas Sampling Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Geothermalpower.jpg Looking for the Soil Gas Sampling page? For detailed information on Soil Gas...

  17. STRUCTURE-SOIL-STRUCTURE INTERACTION AT SRS | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    STRUCTURE-SOIL-STRUCTURE INTERACTION AT SRS STRUCTURE-SOIL-STRUCTURE INTERACTION AT SRS Structure-Soil-Structure Interaction at SRS Structural Mechanics - SRS October 25, 2011 PDF...

  18. Treatment of radionuclide contaminated soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pettis, S.A.; Kallas, A.J.; Kochen, R.L.; McGlochlin, S.C.

    1988-06-01

    Rockwell, International, Rocky Flats Plants, is committed to remediating within the scope of RCRA/CERCLA, Solid Waste Managements Units (SWMUs) at Rocky Flats found to be contaminated with hazardous substances. SWMUs fund to have radionuclide (uranium, plutonium, and/or americium) concentrations in the soils and/or groundwater that exceed background levels or regulatory limits will also be included in this remediation effort. This paper briefly summarizes past and present efforts by Rockwell International, Rocky Flats Plant, to identify treatment technologies appropriate for remediating actinide contaminated soils. Many of the promising soil treatments evaluated in Rocky Flats' laboratories during the late 1970's and early 1980's are currently being revisited. These technologies are generally directed toward substantially reducing the volume of contaminated soils, with the subsequent intention of disposing of a small remaining concentrated fraction of contaminated soil in a facility approved to receive radioactive wastes. Treatment processes currently will be treated to remove actinides, and recycled back to the process. Past investigations have included evaluations of dry screening, wet screening, scrubbing, ultrasonics, chemical oxidation, calcination, desliming, flotation, and heavy-liquid density separation. 8 refs., 2 figs.

  19. Detection of explosives in soils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chambers, William B.; Rodacy, Philip J.; Phelan, James M.; Woodfin, Ronald L.

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus and method for detecting explosive-indicating compounds in subsurface soil. The apparatus has a probe with an adsorbent material on some portion of its surface that can be placed into soil beneath the ground surface, where the adsorbent material can adsorb at least one explosive-indicating compound. The apparatus additional has the capability to desorb the explosive-indicating compound through heating or solvent extraction. A diagnostic instrument attached to the probe detects the desorbed explosive-indicating compound. In the method for detecting explosive-indicating compounds in soil, the sampling probe with an adsorbent material on at least some portion of a surface of the sampling probe is inserted into the soil to contact the adsorbent material with the soil. The explosive-indicating compounds are then desorbed and transferred as either a liquid or gas sample to a diagnostic tool for analysis. The resulting gas or liquid sample is analyzed using at least one diagnostic tool selected from the group consisting of an ion-mobility spectrometer, a gas chromatograph, a high performance liquid chromatograph, a capillary electrophoresis chromatograph, a mass spectrometer, a Fourier-transform infrared spectrometer and a Raman spectrometer to detect the presence of explosive-indicating compounds.

  20. Arsenic chemistry in soils and sediments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fendorf, S.; Nico, P.; Kocar, B.D.; Masue, Y.; Tufano, K.J.

    2009-10-15

    Arsenic is a naturally occurring trace element that poses a threat to human and ecosystem health, particularly when incorporated into food or water supplies. The greatest risk imposed by arsenic to human health results from contamination of drinking water, for which the World Health Organization recommends a maximum limit of 10 {micro}g L{sup -1}. Continued ingestion of drinking water having hazardous levels of arsenic can lead to arsenicosis and cancers of the bladder, skin, lungs and kidneys. Unfortunately, arsenic tainted drinking waters are a global threat and presently having a devastating impact on human health within Asia. Nearly 100 million people, for example, are presently consuming drinking water having arsenic concentrations exceeding the World Health Organization's recommended limit (Ahmed et al., 2006). Arsenic contamination of the environment often results from human activities such as mining or pesticide application, but recently natural sources of arsenic have demonstrated a devastating impact on water quality. Arsenic becomes problematic from a health perspective principally when it partitions into the aqueous rather than the solid phase. Dissolved concentrations, and the resulting mobility, of arsenic within soils and sediments are the combined result of biogeochemical processes linked to hydrologic factors. Processes favoring the partitioning of As into the aqueous phase, potentially leading to hazardous concentrations, vary extensively but can broadly be grouped into four categories: (1) ion displacement, (2) desorption (or limited sorption) at pH values > 8.5, (3) reduction of arsenate to arsenite, and (4) mineral dissolution, particularly reductive dissolution of Fe and Mn (hydr)oxides. Although various processes may liberate arsenic from solids, a transition from aerobic to anaerobic conditions, and commensurate arsenic and iron/manganese reduction, appears to be a dominant, but not exclusive, means by which high concentrations of dissolved arsenic are generated. Within the subsequent sections of this chapter, we explore and describe the biological and chemical processes that control the partitioning of arsenic between the solid and aqueous phase.

  1. PAA-15-0001- In the Matter of Rolf E. Carlson, PhD

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    On July 31, 2015, OHA issued a decision denying a Privacy Act Appeal filed by Rolf E. Carlson, PhD from a determination issued to him by the DOE’s National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)....

  2. ORISE report shows number of health physics Ph.D.s declined in...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ORISE report shows number of health physics Ph.D.s declined in 2009 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE June 15, 2010 FY10-37 OAK RIDGE, Tenn.-Health physics undergraduate degrees increased...

  3. Influence of pH on the quantum-size-controlled photoelectrochemical...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Influence of pH on the quantum-size-controlled photoelectrochemical etching of epitaxial InGaN quantum dots Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly ...

  4. Remediation of heavy-metal-contaminated soil using chelant extraction: Feasibility studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, R.W.; Miller, G.; Taylor, J.D.; Schneider, J.F.; Zellmer, S.; Edgar, D.E.; Johnson, D.O.

    1993-08-01

    Results are presented of a laboratory investigation conducted to determine the efficacy of using chelating agents to extract heavy metals (Pb, Cd, Cr, Ba, Cu, and Zn) from soil, the primary focus being on the extraction of lead from the soil. Results from the batch-shaker studies and emphasizes the columnar extraction studies are described. The chelating agents studied included ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and citric acid, in addition to water. Concentrations of the chelants ranged from 0.01 to 0.05 M; the suspension pH was varied between 3 and 8. Results showed that the removal of lead using citric acid and water was somewhat pH-dependent. For the batch-shaker studies, the results indicated that EDTA was more effective at removing Cd, Cu, Pb, and Zn than was citric acid (both present at 0.01 M). EDTA and citric acid were equally effective in mobilizing Cr and Ba from the soil. Heavy metals removal was slightly more effective in the more acidic region (pH {le} 5).

  5. Formation of Zn-rich phyllosilicate, Zn-layered double hydroxide and hydrozincite in contaminated calcareous soils

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacquat, Olivier; Voegelin, Andreas; Villard, Andre; Marcus, Matthew A.; Kretzschmar, Ruben

    2007-10-15

    Recent studies demonstrated that Zn-phyllosilicate- and Zn-layered double hydroxide-type (Zn-LDH) precipitates may form in contaminated soils. However, the influence of soil properties and Zn content on the quantity and type of precipitate forming has not been studied in detail so far. In this work, we determined the speciation of Zn in six carbonate-rich surface soils (pH 6.2 to 7.5) contaminated by aqueous Zn in the runoff from galvanized power line towers (1322 to 30090 mg/kg Zn). Based on 12 bulk and 23 microfocused extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectra, the number, type and proportion of Zn species were derived using principal component analysis, target testing, and linear combination fitting. Nearly pure Zn-rich phyllosilicate and Zn-LDH were identified at different locations within a single soil horizon, suggesting that the local availabilities of Al and Si controlled the type of precipitate forming. Hydrozincite was identified on the surfaces of limestone particles that were not in direct contact with the soil clay matrix. With increasing Zn loading of the soils, the percentage of precipitated Zn increased from {approx}20% to {approx}80%, while the precipitate type shifted from Zn-phyllosilicate and/or Zn-LDH at the lowest studied soil Zn contents over predominantly Zn-LDH at intermediate loadings to hydrozincite in extremely contaminated soils. These trends were in agreement with the solubility of Zn in equilibrium with these phases. Sequential extractions showed that large fractions of soil Zn ({approx}30% to {approx}80%) as well as of synthetic Zn-kerolite, Zn-LDH, and hydrozincite spiked into uncontaminated soil were readily extracted by 1 M NH{sub 4}NO{sub 3} followed by 1 M NH{sub 4}-acetate at pH 6.0. Even though the formation of Zn precipitates allows for the retention of Zn in excess to the adsorption capacity of calcareous soils, the long-term immobilization potential of these precipitates is limited.

  6. ORISE: Recent Ph.D. recipients wanted for Energy Efficiency and Renewable

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Energy Research Awards Recent Ph.D. recipients wanted for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Research Awards Applications being accepted through the end of April FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE March 4, 2014 FY14-12 OAK RIDGE, Tenn.-ORAU and the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) are currently taking applications for the EERE Postdoctoral Research Awards, an opportunity for recent Ph.D. recipients to conduct applied research at universities,

  7. pH effect on the separation of uranium fluoride effluents by the reverse osmosis process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yun Chen ); Min-Lin Chu; Mu-Chang Shieh , Lung-tan, )

    1992-04-01

    Ammonium fluoride solutions and uranium fluoride effluents (UFE) with solute concentrations from 0.101 to 7,920 kg/m{sup 3}, at pH 2.80 to 9.60, have been treated with a continuous feedback reverse osmosis (RO) process. The solute rejections of NH{sub 4}{sup +}, F{sup {minus}}, and U{sup 6+} depend heavily on the feed pH value. For ammonium fluoride solutions, the rejection ratio of NH{sub 4}{sup +} decreases sharply from ca. 90 to 44.2% with the feed pH increased from 3.30 to 9.60, while that of F{sup {minus}} increases abruptly from 44.8 to 99.9% at the same pH change. For UFE solutions, the rejection ratio of U{sup 6+} remains greater than 90% at pH 2.80-7.13, while that of F{sup {minus}} decreases steadily from 96.4 to 18.8% with decreasing feed pH. Accordingly, the fluoride ions can be separated from UFE solutions under acidic conditions. The changes of solute rejection with feed pH can be explained by the different solubilities of the solutes in the membrane at different pH values. The UFE solutions with {alpha} and {beta} activities at 20.4-53.7 and 8.99-21.3 ({times} 10{sup 5} Baq/m{sup 3}) can be reduced to a level lower than 2.41 and 3.37 ({times}10{sup 5} Baq/m{sup 3}), respectively, by the current RO process.

  8. Final Report: Support for Polytechnic PhD Student, September 24, 1996 - June 30, 1999

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myerson, Allan S.

    2000-01-19

    Polytechnic University PhD student working on research projects in the area of fossil energy and renewable energy were supported in this program and did their research work at Brookhaven National Laboratory in the Department of Applied Sciences. One of these students had completed an MS degree in Chemical Engineering at Howard University while doing his research at Brookhaven. This student continued his studies by becoming a Polytechnic PhD student while doing his research work at Brookhaven.

  9. Violeta Sànchez i Nogué, Ph.D. | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Violeta Sànchez i Nogué Violeta Sànchez i Nogué, Ph.D. Postdoctoral Researcher, Biochemical Process Research Violeta.SancheziNogue@nrel.gov | 303-384-6641 Research Interests Production of chemicals and fuels from biomass feedstocks involving biotechnological steps Microbial tolerance to biomass feedstocks Metabolic engineering for the production of value-added compounds Areas of Expertise Fermentation technology Metabolic engineering Education Ph.D., Engineering, Division of Applied

  10. Terrestrial fate of coal-liquid constituents: behavior of alkyl anilines in soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felice, L.J.; Zachara, J.M.; Rogers, J.E.

    1982-07-01

    The low molecular weight aromatic amines (anilines) are important water soluble constituents of coal liquids. The impact of anilines released to the terrestrial environment will largely depend on their mobility and persistence. Studies were conducted to investigate those processes governing the mobility and persistence of the alkylanilines, namely, soil sorption and chemical/microbial degradation. Soil sorption measurements were conducted on aniline and several methyl substituted anilines on A and B horizons of a soil profile collected from Davies County, Kentucky. The magnitude of sorption was large in all horizons. Sorption in the B horizons was larger than in the A horizon for many of the anilines studied, indicating the importance of both the mineral matrix and organic carbon content of the soil in determining the magnitude of sorption. Results of these measurements indicate that movement of the anilines through the soil would be significantly attenuated by sorption reactions. Aniline sorption measurement in the A horizon after removal of the organic matter and in the B/sub 22/ horizon after removal of amorphous iron oxides and crystalline iron oxides indicate that organic matter largely controls aniline sorption in the A horizon, while crystalline iron oxides and phyllosilicates are important in the B horizons. The effects of pH on aniline sorption was also examined and shown to have significant effects on the magnitude of sorption in both A and B horizons. Soil degradation studies using /sup 14/C-3-methylaniline as a model for alkyl aniline degradation show that 3-methylaniline is readily metabolized by soil microorganisms during the 32-day period examined.

  11. Theory of signal and noise in double-gated nanoscale electronic pH sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Go, Jonghyun; Nair, Pradeep R.; Alam, Muhammad A.

    2012-08-01

    The maximum sensitivity of classical nanowire (NW)-based pH sensors is defined by the Nernst limit of 59 mV/pH. For typical noise levels in ultra-small single-gated nanowire sensors, the signal-to-noise ratio is often not sufficient to resolve pH changes necessary for a broad range of applications. Recently, a new class of double-gated devices was demonstrated to offer apparent 'super-Nernstian' response (>59 mV/pH) by amplifying the original pH signal through innovative biasing schemes. However, the pH-sensitivity of these nanoscale devices as a function of biasing configurations, number of electrodes, and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) remains poorly understood. Even the basic question such as 'Do double-gated sensors actually resolve smaller changes in pH compared to conventional single-gated sensors in the presence of various sources of noise?' remains unanswered. In this article, we provide a comprehensive numerical and analytical theory of signal and noise of double-gated pH sensors to conclude that, while the theoretical lower limit of pH-resolution does not improve for double-gated sensors, this new class of sensors does improve the (instrument-limited) pH resolution.

  12. Effect of CO{sub 2} air mixtures on the pH of air-stripped water...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    pH of air-stripped water at Treatment Facility D Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effect of COsub 2 air mixtures on the pH of air-stripped water at Treatment Facility ...

  13. “Nodal Gap” induced by the incommensurate diagonal spin density modulation in underdoped high- id='M1'>Tc superconductors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Tao; Gao, Yi; Zhu, Jian -Xin

    2015-03-07

    Recently it was revealed that the whole Fermi surface is fully gapped for several families of underdoped cuprates. The existence of the finite energy gap along the id='M2'>d-wave nodal lines (nodal gap) contrasts the common understanding of the id='M3'>d-wave pairing symmetry, which challenges the present theories for the high-id='M4'>Tcsuperconductors. Here we propose that the incommensurate diagonal spin-density-wave order can account for the above experimental observation. The Fermi surface and the local density of states are also studied. Our results are in good agreement with many important experiments in high-id='M5'>Tcsuperconductors.

  14. Electro-osmotic infusion for joule heating soil remediation techniques

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carrigan, Charles R.; Nitao, John J.

    1999-01-01

    Electro-osmotic infusion of ground water or chemically tailored electrolyte is used to enhance, maintain, or recondition electrical conductivity for the joule heating remediation technique. Induced flows can be used to infuse electrolyte with enhanced ionic conductivity into the vicinity of the electrodes, maintain the local saturation of near-electrode regions and resaturate a partially dried out zone with groundwater. Electro-osmotic infusion can also tailor the conductivity throughout the target layer by infusing chemically modified and/or heated electrolyte to improve conductivity contrast of the interior. Periodic polarity reversals will prevent large pH changes at the electrodes. Electro-osmotic infusion can be used to condition the electrical conductivity of the soil, particularly low permeability soil, before and during the heating operation. Electro-osmotic infusion is carried out by locating one or more electrodes adjacent the heating electrodes and applying a dc potential between two or more electrodes. Depending on the polarities of the electrodes, the induced flow will be toward the heating electrodes or away from the heating electrodes. In addition, electrodes carrying a dc potential may be located throughout the target area to tailor the conductivity of the target area.

  15. Automated soil gas monitoring chamber (Patent) | SciTech Connect

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Automated soil gas monitoring chamber A chamber for trapping soil gases as they evolve from the soil without disturbance to the soil and to the natural microclimate within ...

  16. Soil Gas Sampling | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    "normal" background soil gas contents of a particular geothermal area. References Toxic Substances Hydrology Program 2.0 2.1 The Application of Soil-Gas Technique to...

  17. Coal fly ash and phospho-gypsum mixture as an amendment to improve rice paddy soil fertility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, Y.B.; Ha, H.S.; Lee, C.H.; Kim, P.J.

    2008-04-15

    Rice is a plant that requires high levels of silica (Si). As a silicate NOD source to rice, coal fly ash (hereafter, fly ash), which has an alkaline pH and high available silicate and boron (B) contents, was mixed with phosphor-gypsum (hereafter, gypsum, 50%, wt wt{sup -1}), a by-product from the production of phosphate fertilizer, to improve the fly ash limitation. Field experiments were carried out to evaluate the effect of the mixture on soil properties and rice (Oryza sativa) productivity in silt loam (SiL) and loamy sand (LS) soils to which 0 (FG 0), 20 (FG 20), 40 (FG 40), and 60 (FG 60) Mg ha{sup -1} were added. The mixture increased the amount of available silicate and exchangeable calcium (Ca) contents in the soils and the uptake of silicate by rice plant. The mixture did not result in accumulation of heavy metals in soil and an excessive uptake of heavy metals by the rice grain. The available boron content in soil increased with the mixture application levels up to 1.42 mg kg{sup -1} following the application of 60 Mg ha{sup -1} but did not show toxicity. The mixture increased significantly rice yield and showed the highest yields following the addition of 30-40 Mg ha{sup -1} in two soils. It is concluded that the fly ash and gypsum mixture could be a good source of inorganic soil amendments to restore the soil nutrient balance in rice paddy soil.

  18. BTG/Tob family members Tob1 and Tob2 inhibit proliferation of mouse embryonic stem cells via Id3 mRNA degradation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Yuanfan; Wang, Chenchen; Wu, Jenny; Li, Lingsong

    2015-07-03

    The mammalian BTG/Tob family is a group of proteins with anti-proliferative ability, and there are six members including BTG1, BTG2/PC3/Tis21, BTG3/ANA, BTG4/PC3B, Tob1/Tob and Tob2. Among them, Tob subfamily members, specifically Tob1/Tob and Tob2, have the most extensive C-terminal regions. As previously reported, overexpression of BTG/Tob proteins is associated with the inhibition of G1 to S-phase cell cycle progression and decreased cell proliferation in a variety of cell types. Tob subfamily proteins have similar anti-proliferative effects on cell cycle progression in cultured tumor cells. An important unresolved question is whether or not they have function in rapidly proliferating cells, such as embryonic stem cells (ESCs). Tob1 and Tob2 were expressed ubiquitously in mouse ESCs (mESCs), suggesting a possible role in early embryonic development and mESCs. To address the above question and explore the possible functions of the Tob subfamily in ESCs, we established ESCs from different genotypic knockout inner cell mass (ICM). We found that Tob1{sup −/−}, Tob2{sup −/−}, and Tob1/2 double knockout (DKO, Tob1{sup −/−} & Tob2{sup −/−}) ESCs grew faster than wild type (WT) ESCs without losing pluripotency, and we provide a possible mechanistic explanation for these observations: Tob1 and Tob2 inhibit the cell cycle via degradation of Id3 mRNA, which is a set of directly targeted genes of BMP4 signaling in mESCs that play critical roles in the maintenance of ESC properties. Together, our data suggest that BTG/Tob family protein Tob1 and Tob2 regulation cell proliferation does not compromise the basic properties of mESCs. - Highlights: • We established mouse Tob1/2 double knockout embryonic stem cells. • Tob1 and Tob2 inhibit the proliferation of ESCs without effect on pluripotency. • Tob1 and Tob2 involved in the degradation of Id3 in mESCs.

  19. Multiple soil nutrient competition between plants, microbes,...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Journal Article: Multiple soil nutrient competition between plants, microbes, and mineral surfaces: model development, parameterization, and example applications in several...

  20. Source and Fate of Inorganic Soil Contamination Around the Abandoned Phillips Sulfide Mine Hudson Highlands New York

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S Gilchrist; A Gates; E Elzinga; M Gorring; z Szabo

    2011-12-31

    The abandoned Phillips sulfide mine in the critical Highlands watershed in New York has been shown to produce strongly acidic mine drainage (AMD) with anomalous metal contaminants in first-order streams that exceeded local water standards by up to several orders of magnitude (Gilchrist et al., 2009). The metal-sulfide-rich tailings also produce contaminated soils with pH < 4, organic matter < 2.5% and trace metals sequestered in soil oxides. A geochemical transect to test worst-case soil contamination showed that Cr, Co and Ni correlated positively with Mn, (r = 0.72, r = 0.89, r = 0.80, respectively), suggesting Mn-oxide sequestration and that Cu and Pb correlated with Fe (r = 0.76, r = 0.83, respectively), suggesting sequestration in goethite. Ubiquitous, yellow coating on the mine wastes, including jarosite and goethite, is a carrier of the metals. Geochemical and {mu}-SXRF analyses determined Cu to be the major soil contaminant, {mu}-SXRF also demonstrated that the heterogeneous nature of the soil chemistry at the micro-meter scale is self-similar to those in the bulk soil samples. Generally metals decreased, with some fluctuations, rapidly downslope through suspension of fines and dissolution in AMD leaving the area of substantial contamination << 0.5 km from the source.

  1. South Valley Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy South Valley Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports South Valley Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports South Valley Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports PDF icon South Valley - South Valley Plume More Documents & Publications Slick Rock Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Tuba City Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Spook Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports

  2. Spook Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Spook Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Spook Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Spook Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports PDF icon Spook - Spook More Documents & Publications Tuba City Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Slick Rock Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Weldon Spring Site Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports

  3. Influence of acidic pH on hydrogen and acetate production by an electrosynthetic microbiome

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    LaBelle, Edward V.; Marshall, Christopher W.; Gilbert, Jack A.; May, Harold D.; Battista, John R.

    2014-10-15

    Production of hydrogen and organic compounds by an electrosynthetic microbiome using electrodes and carbon dioxide as sole electron donor and carbon source, respectively, was examined after exposure to acidic pH (~5). Hydrogen production by biocathodes poised at -600 mV vs. SHE increased>100-fold and acetate production ceased at acidic pH, but ~5–15 mM (catholyte volume)/day acetate and>1,000 mM/day hydrogen were attained at pH ~6.5 following repeated exposure to acidic pH. Cyclic voltammetry revealed a 250 mV decrease in hydrogen overpotential and a maximum current density of 12.2 mA/cm2 at -765 mV (0.065 mA/cm2 sterile control at -800 mV) by the Acetobacterium-dominatedmore » community. Supplying -800 mV to the microbiome after repeated exposure to acidic pH resulted in up to 2.6 kg/m3/day hydrogen (≈2.6 gallons gasoline equivalent), 0.7 kg/m3/day formate, and 3.1 kg/m3/day acetate ( = 4.7 kg CO2 captured).« less

  4. pH control of the structure, composition, and catalytic activity of sulfated zirconia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ivanov, Vladimir K.; Materials Science Department, Moscow State University, Moscow 119991 ; Baranchikov, Alexander Ye.; Kopitsa, Gennady P.; Lermontov, Sergey A.; Yurkova, Lyudmila L.; Gubanova, Nadezhda N.; Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Orlova Roscha, Gatchina 188300 ; Ivanova, Olga S.; Lermontov, Anatoly S.; Rumyantseva, Marina N.; Vasilyeva, Larisa P.; Sharp, Melissa; Pranzas, P. Klaus; Tretyakov, Yuri D.

    2013-02-15

    We report a detailed study of structural and chemical transformations of amorphous hydrous zirconia into sulfated zirconia-based superacid catalysts. Precipitation pH is shown to be the key factor governing structure, composition and properties of amorphous sulfated zirconia gels and nanocrystalline sulfated zirconia. Increase in precipitation pH leads to substantial increase of surface fractal dimension (up to {approx}2.7) of amorphous sulfated zirconia gels, and consequently to increase in specific surface area (up to {approx}80 m{sup 2}/g) and simultaneously to decrease in sulfate content and total acidity of zirconia catalysts. Complete conversion of hexene-1 over as synthesized sulfated zirconia catalysts was observed even under ambient conditions. - Graphical abstract: Surface fractal dimension of amorphous sulfated zirconia and specific surface area and catalytic activity of crystalline sulfated zirconia as a function of precipitation pH. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Structural transformation of amorphous hydrous zirconia into sulfated zirconia is studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Precipitation pH controls surface fractal dimension of amorphous zirconia gels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Precipitation pH is the key factor governing properties of sulfated zirconia.

  5. Influence of acidic pH on hydrogen and acetate production by an electrosynthetic microbiome

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    LaBelle, Edward V.; Marshall, Christopher W.; Gilbert, Jack A.; May, Harold D.; Battista, John R.

    2014-10-15

    Production of hydrogen and organic compounds by an electrosynthetic microbiome using electrodes and carbon dioxide as sole electron donor and carbon source, respectively, was examined after exposure to acidic pH (~5). Hydrogen production by biocathodes poised at -600 mV vs. SHE increased>100-fold and acetate production ceased at acidic pH, but ~5–15 mM (catholyte volume)/day acetate and>1,000 mM/day hydrogen were attained at pH ~6.5 following repeated exposure to acidic pH. Cyclic voltammetry revealed a 250 mV decrease in hydrogen overpotential and a maximum current density of 12.2 mA/cm2 at -765 mV (0.065 mA/cm2 sterile control at -800 mV) by the Acetobacterium-dominated community. Supplying -800 mV to the microbiome after repeated exposure to acidic pH resulted in up to 2.6 kg/m3/day hydrogen (≈2.6 gallons gasoline equivalent), 0.7 kg/m3/day formate, and 3.1 kg/m3/day acetate ( = 4.7 kg CO2 captured).

  6. Emission switching in carbon dots coated CdTe quantum dots driving by pH

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    dependent hetero-interactions (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Emission switching in carbon dots coated CdTe quantum dots driving by pH dependent hetero-interactions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Emission switching in carbon dots coated CdTe quantum dots driving by pH dependent hetero-interactions Due to the different emission mechanism between fluorescent carbon dots and semiconductor quantum dots (QDs), it is of interest to explore the potential emission in

  7. Influence of pH on the quantum-size-controlled photoelectrochemical etching

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    of epitaxial InGaN quantum dots (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Influence of pH on the quantum-size-controlled photoelectrochemical etching of epitaxial InGaN quantum dots Citation Details In-Document Search This content will become publicly available on November 18, 2016 Title: Influence of pH on the quantum-size-controlled photoelectrochemical etching of epitaxial InGaN quantum dots Illumination by a narrow-band laser has been shown to enable photoelectrochemical (PEC) etching of InGaN

  8. Gating of the proton-gated ion channel from Gloeobacter violaceus at pH 4

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    as revealed by X-ray crystallography (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Gating of the proton-gated ion channel from Gloeobacter violaceus at pH 4 as revealed by X-ray crystallography Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Gating of the proton-gated ion channel from Gloeobacter violaceus at pH 4 as revealed by X-ray crystallography Authors: Gonzalez-Gutierrez, Giovanni ; Cuello, Luis G. ; Nair, Satish K. ; Grosman, Claudio [1] ; TTU) [2] + Show Author Affiliations UIUC (

  9. DOE/EH-0467 Interview with Dr. John W. Gofman, M.D., Ph.D.

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOE/EH-0467 Interview with Dr. John W. Gofman, M.D., Ph.D. Ju n e 1995 Setting: D ecem ber 20,1994, University of Califomia, San Francisco Interviewers; Karoline Gourley (DOE Office of Human Radiation Experiments) and Loretta Hefner (LBL) ORAL fflSTORY OF DR. JOHN W, GOFMAN, M.D., Ph.D. Conducted on December 20, 1994 in San Francisco, California, by Loretta Hefner, archivist for the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, and Karoline Gourley, a re- searcher for the Office o f Human Radiation Experiments,

  10. PH adjustment of power plant cooling water with flue gas/fly ash

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Brady, Patrick V.; Krumhansl, James L.

    2015-09-22

    A system including a vessel including a heat source and a flue; a turbine; a condenser; a fluid conduit circuit disposed between the vessel, the turbine and the condenser; and a diverter coupled to the flue to direct a portion of an exhaust from the flue to contact with a cooling medium for the condenser water. A method including diverting a portion of exhaust from a flue of a vessel; modifying the pH of a cooling medium for a condenser with the portion of exhaust; and condensing heated fluid from the vessel with the pH modified cooling medium.

  11. Innovative Vitrification for Soil Remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hnat, James G.; Patten, John S.; Jetta, Norman W.

    1996-12-31

    Vortec has successfully completed Phases 1 and 2 of a technology demonstration program for an ''Innovative Fossil Fuel Fired Vitrification Technology for Soil Remediation.'' The principal objective of the program is to demonstrate the ability of a Vortec Cyclone Melting System (CMS) to remediate DOE contaminated soils and other waste forms containing TM RCRA hazardous materials, low levels of radionuclides and TSCA (PCB) containing wastes. The demonstration program will verify the ability of this vitrification process to produce a chemically stable glass final waste form which passes both TCLP and PCT quality control requirements, while meeting all federal and state emission control regulations. The demonstration system is designed to process 36 ton/day of as-received drummed or bulk wastes. The processing capacity equates to approximately 160 barrels/day of waste materials containing 30% moisture at an average weight of 450 lbs./barrel.

  12. Document ID Number: RL-721

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    organisms, synthetic biology, governmentally designated D noxious weeds, or invasive species such that the action is NOT contained or confined in a manner designed,...

  13. DOE-ID Organization Chart

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Last Updated: 11/14/2011

  14. 4-ID-D Instrumentation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Area Diffractometors 8-Circle 4Tesla Magnet 13 Tesla Magnet Focussing Zone Plate Optics K-B Mirror System Temperature Control Low Temperature Displex (4.4 to 325 K) High...

  15. Real ID Act in brief

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    expertise and access to lab capabilities to help small businesses through the New Mexico Small Business Assistance Program. November 10, 2015 Molecular clocks control...

  16. DOE-ID Operations Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    November 1, 2014 - November 30, 2014 EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is a summary of contractor operations at the Idaho National Laboratory Site, managed by the DOE- Idaho Operations Office. It has been compiled in response to a request from stakeholders for more information on health, safety and environmental incidents at DOE facilities in Idaho. It also includes a brief summary of accomplishments at the Site. POC: Danielle Miller, (208) 526-5709. Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP)

  17. DOE-ID Operations Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    December 1, 2014 - December 31, 2014 EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is a summary of contractor operations at the Idaho National Laboratory Site, managed by the DOE- Idaho Operations Office. It has been compiled in response to a request from stakeholders for more information on health, safety and environmental incidents at DOE facilities in Idaho. It also includes a brief summary of accomplishments at the Site. POC: Danielle Miller, (208) 526-5709. Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP)

  18. DOE-ID Operations Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    January 1, 2016 -February 29, 2016 EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is a summary of contractor operations at the Idaho National Laboratory Site, managed by the DOE- Idaho Operations Office. It has been compiled in response to a request from stakeholders for more information on health, safety and environmental incidents at DOE facilities in Idaho. It also includes a brief summary of accomplishments at the Site. POC: Danielle Miller, (208) 526-5709. Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project (AMWTP)

  19. DOE-ID Operations Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The waste is primarily a product of experiments from the Engineering Test Reactor, Experimental Breeder Reactor-II and fast reactor tests. The Idaho Cleanup Project will treat the ...

  20. DOE-ID Operations Summary

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... The waste is primarily a product of experiments from the Engineering Test Reactor, Experimental Breeder Reactor-II and other fast reactor tests. ICP will treat the ...

  1. Recent Ph.D. Recipients Sought for Innovative Research in Solar Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    EERE’s SunShot Initiative is now accepting applications from recent Ph.D. graduates for postdoctoral research awards in solar energy. As part of the EERE Postdoctoral Research Award Program, up to five doctoral graduates will be offered a $65,000 stipend, plus the chance to do applied research, advancing solar energy technologies.

  2. Aqueous biphasic extraction process with pH and particle control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaiko, D.J.; Mensah-Biney, R.

    1995-05-02

    A process for aqueous biphasic extraction of metallic oxides and the like from substances containing silica. Control of media pH enables efficient and effective partition of mixture components. The inventive method may be employed to remove excess silica from kaolin clay. 2 figs.

  3. Aqueous biphasic extraction process with pH and particle control

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chaiko, David J.; Mensah-Biney, R.

    1995-01-01

    A process for aqueous biphasic extraction of metallic oxides and the like from substances containing silica. Control of media pH enables efficient and effective partition of mixture components. The inventive method may be employed to remove excess silica from kaolin clay.

  4. Dissolved oxygen and pH relationships in northern Australian mangrove waterways

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boto, K.G.; Bunt, J.S.

    1981-01-01

    Consistent, highly significant linear correlations (R2 greater than or equal to 0.8) between pH and dissolved oxygen levels have been found in northern Australian mangrove waterways. These properties seem to be influenced by dissolved organic matter, mainly polyphenolic compounds, present in the creeks and tidal channel waters.

  5. Hanford Deep Dig Removes Contaminated Soil

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    RICHLAND, Wash. – Workers at the Hanford site are digging deep into several waste sites near the Columbia River to remove soil contaminated with chromium.

  6. Soil Machine Dynamics Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Machine Dynamics Ltd Jump to: navigation, search Name: Soil Machine Dynamics Ltd Region: United Kingdom Sector: Marine and Hydrokinetic Website: http: This company is listed in the...

  7. Contrasting soil microbial community functional structures in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    two major landscapes of the Tibetan alpine meadow Prev Next Title: Contrasting soil microbial community functional structures in two major landscapes of the Tibetan alpine...

  8. Enhanced durability transparent superhydrophobic anti-soiling...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Title: Enhanced durability transparent superhydrophobic anti-soiling coatings for CSP applications Authors: Polyzos, Georgios 1 ; Schaeffer, Daniel A 1 ; Smith, Barton Barton ...

  9. Performance evaluation soil samples utilizing encapsulation technology

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dahlgran, J.R.

    1999-08-17

    Performance evaluation soil samples and method of their preparation uses encapsulation technology to encapsulate analytes which are introduced into a soil matrix for analysis and evaluation by analytical laboratories. Target analytes are mixed in an appropriate solvent at predetermined concentrations. The mixture is emulsified in a solution of polymeric film forming material. The emulsified solution is polymerized to form microcapsules. The microcapsules are recovered, quantitated and introduced into a soil matrix in a predetermined ratio to form soil samples with the desired analyte concentration. 1 fig.

  10. Performance evaluation soil samples utilizing encapsulation technology

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dahlgran, James R.

    1999-01-01

    Performance evaluation soil samples and method of their preparation using encapsulation technology to encapsulate analytes which are introduced into a soil matrix for analysis and evaluation by analytical laboratories. Target analytes are mixed in an appropriate solvent at predetermined concentrations. The mixture is emulsified in a solution of polymeric film forming material. The emulsified solution is polymerized to form microcapsules. The microcapsules are recovered, quantitated and introduced into a soil matrix in a predetermined ratio to form soil samples with the desired analyte concentration.

  11. 100 Area soil washing: Bench scale tests on 116-F-4 pluto crib soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Field, J.G.

    1994-06-10

    The Pacific Northwest Laboratory conducted a bench-scale treatability study on a pluto crib soil sample from 100 Area of the Hanford Site. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of physical separation (wet sieving), treatment processes (attrition scrubbing, and autogenous surface grinding), and chemical extraction methods as a means of separating radioactively-contaminated soil fractions from uncontaminated soil fractions. The soil washing treatability study was conducted on a soil sample from the 116-F-4 Pluto Crib that had been dug up as part of an excavation treatability study. Trace element analyses of this soil showed no elevated concentrations above typically uncontaminated soil background levels. Data on the distribution of radionuclide in various size fractions indicated that the soil-washing tests should be focused on the gravel and sand fractions of the 116-F-4 soil. The radionuclide data also showed that {sup 137}Cs was the only contaminant in this soil that exceeded the test performance goal (TPG). Therefore, the effectiveness of subsequent soil-washing tests for 116-F-4 soil was evaluated on the basis of activity attenuation of {sup 137}Cs in the gravel- and sand-size fractions.

  12. Record of Decision for Tank Farm Soil and INTEC Groundwater, Operable Unit 3-14

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    L. S. Cahn

    2007-05-16

    This decision document presents the selected remedy for Operable Unit (OU) 3-14 tank farm soil and groundwater at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center (INTEC), which is located on the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Site. The tank farm was initially evaluated in the OU 3-13 Record of Decision (ROD), and it was determined that additional information was needed to make a final decision. Additional information has been obtained on the nature and extent of contamination in the tank farm and on the impact to groundwater. The selected remedy was chosen in accordance with the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Liability and Compensation Act of 1980 (CERCLA) (42 USC 9601 et seq.), as amended by the Superfund Amendments and Reauthorization Act of 1986 (Public Law 99-499) and the National Oil and Hazardous Substances Pollution Contingency Plan (40 CFR 300). The selected remedy is intended to be the final action for tank farm soil and groundwater at INTEC. The response action selected in this ROD is necessary to protect the public health, welfare, or the environment from actual or threatened releases of hazardous substances into the environment. Such a release or threat of release may present an imminent and substantial endangerment to public health, welfare, or the environment. The remedial actions selected in this ROD are designed to reduce the potential threats to human health and the environment to acceptable levels. In addition, DOE-ID, EPA, and DEQ (the Agencies) have determined that no action is necessary under CERCLA to protect public health, welfare, or the environment at 16 sites located outside the tank farm boundary. The purposes of the selected remedy are to (1) contain contaminated soil as the radionuclides decay in place, (2) isolate current and future workers and biological receptors from contact with contaminated soil, and (3) restore the portion of Snake River Plain Aquifer contaminated by INTEC releases to Idaho Ground Water Quality standards (same as maximum contaminant levels) by reducing water infiltration through strontium-90 contaminated perched water and interbeds. In addition, the remedy will prevent future drinking water wells from being drilled into the contaminated portion of the aquifer that is in and near the INTEC facility until such time as the water is restored to maximum contaminant levels or below.

  13. Innovative vitrification for soil remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jetta, N.W.; Patten, J.S.; Hnat, J.G. [Vortec Corp., Collegeville, PA (United States)] [and others

    1996-03-01

    The objective of this DOE demonstration program is to validate the performance and operation of the Vortec Cyclone Melting System (CMS{trademark}) for the processing of LLW contaminated soils found at DOE sites. This DOE vitrification demonstration project has successfully progressed through the first two phases. Phase 1 consisted of pilot scale testing with surrogate wastes and the conceptual design of a process plant operating at a generic DOE site. The objective of Phase 2, which is scheduled to be completed the end of FY 95, is to develop a definitive process plant design for the treatment of wastes at a specific DOE facility. During Phase 2, a site specific design was developed for the processing of LLW soils and muds containing TSCA organics and RCRA metal contaminants. Phase 3 will consist of a full scale demonstration at the DOE gaseous diffusion plant located in Paducah, KY. Several DOE sites were evaluated for potential application of the technology. Paducah was selected for the demonstration program because of their urgent waste remediation needs as well as their strong management and cost sharing financial support for the project.

  14. Innovative vitrification for soil remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jetta, N.W.; Patten, J.S.; Hnat, J.G. [Vortec Corp., Collegeville, PA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The objective of this DOE demonstration program is to validate the performance and operation of the Vortec Cyclone Melting System (CMS{trademark}) for the processing of LLW contaminated soils found at DOE sites. This DOE vitrification demonstration project has successfully progressed through the first two phases. Phase I consisted of pilot scale testing with surrogate wastes and the conceptual design of a process plant operating at a generic DOE site. The objective of Phase 2, which is scheduled to be completed the end of FY 95, is to develop a definitive process plant design for the treatment of wastes at a specific DOE facility. During Phase 2, a site specific design was developed for the processing of LLW soils and muds containing TSCA organics and RCRA metal contaminants. Phase 3 will consist of a full scale demonstration at the DOE gaseous diffusion plant located in Paducah, KY. Several DOE sites were evaluated for potential application of the technology. Paducah was selected for the demonstration program because of their urgent waste remediation needs as well as their strong management and cost sharing financial support for the project.

  15. Thermoluminescence Characteristics of Nanocrystalline LiF Phosphors Synthesized at Different pH Values

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sharma, A. K.; Dogra, R.; Kumar, Shalendra; Mishra, S. K.; Lochab, S. P.; Kumar, Ravi

    2011-07-15

    Nanocrystalline lithium fluoride (LiF) phosphors have been prepared by the chemical co-precipitation method at different pH values (7.0, 8.0, 9.0). The formation of nanocrystalline structure has been confirmed by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscope. The thermolumniscence (TL) properties of LiF phosphors irradiated with gamma rays at different doses have been studied. The analysis of TL glow curve has revealed the existence of two well resolved glow peaks, one low temperature peak at around 145 deg. C and other one at higher temperature around 375 deg. C. The LiF nano-crystallites synthesized at 8.00 pH have been found to show maximum TL intensity at studied gamma doses (0.1 Gy-15 Gy).

  16. Proton mediated control of biochemical reactions with bioelectronic pH modulation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Deng, Yingxin; Miyake, Takeo; Keene, Scott; Josberger, Erik E.; Rolandi, Marco

    2016-04-07

    In Nature, protons (H+) can mediate metabolic process through enzymatic reactions. Examples include glucose oxidation with glucose dehydrogenase to regulate blood glucose level, alcohol dissolution into carboxylic acid through alcohol dehydrogenase, and voltage-regulated H+ channels activating bioluminescence in firefly and jellyfish. Artificial devices that control H+ currents and H+ concentration (pH) are able to actively influence biochemical processes. Here, we demonstrate a biotransducer that monitors and actively regulates pH-responsive enzymatic reactions by monitoring and controlling the flow of H+ between PdHx contacts and solution. The present transducer records bistable pH modulation from an “enzymatic flip-flop” circuit that comprises glucose dehydrogenasemore » and alcohol dehydrogenase. Furthermore, the transducer also controls bioluminescence from firefly luciferase by affecting solution pH.« less

  17. A Literature Survey Kathleen C. Pugh, Ph.D. Waste Management and Remediation

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Toxicity and Physical Properties of Atrazine and its Degradation Products: A Literature Survey Kathleen C. Pugh, Ph.D. Waste Management and Remediation Environmental Research Center Muscle Shoals, Alabama DECLAIMER This report was prepared as an account of work sponsored by an agency of the United States Government. Neither the United States Government nor any agency thereof, nor any of their employees, make any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liabiiity or responsibility for

  18. Thomas D. Foust, Ph.D, P.E. | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Thomas D. Foust Thomas D. Foust, Ph.D, P.E. Center Director, National Bioenergy Center Thomas.Foust@nrel.gov | 303-384-7755 Research Interests Computational and mathematical modeling of catalytic fast pyrolysis Fuels optimization for high-efficiency engines Biomass sustainability and land use issues Affiliated Research Programs United Nations Bioenergy and Sustainability Assessment (bioenergy sustainability across its whole lifeline including energy, food, and environmental and climate security)

  19. Paul W. King, Ph.D., M.S. | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Paul W. King Paul W. King, Ph.D., M.S. Scientist VI - Supervisor, Photobiology Group Paul.King@nrel.gov | 303-384-6277 Research Interests Paul King's research interests are broadly in the study of photobiological and artificial photosynthetic systems for converting solar energy into biofuels. Specific areas of interest include using molecular, biochemical and biophysical techniques to investigate the catalytic mechanisms and structure-function of hydrogenases; bioenergetics of hydrogen

  20. Method of determining pH by the alkaline absorption of carbon dioxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hobbs, David T.

    1992-01-01

    A method for measuring the concentration of hydroxides in alkaline solutions in a remote location using the tendency of hydroxides to absorb carbon dioxide. The method includes the passing of carbon dioxide over the surface of an alkaline solution in a remote tank before and after measurements of the carbon dioxide solution. A comparison of the measurements yields the absorption fraction from which the hydroxide concentration can be calculated using a correlation of hydroxide or pH to absorption fraction.

  1. pH Adjustment of Power Plant Cooling Water with Flue Gas/ Fly Ash - Energy

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Innovation Portal Advanced Materials Advanced Materials Find More Like This Return to Search pH Adjustment of Power Plant Cooling Water with Flue Gas/ Fly Ash Sandia National Laboratories Contact SNL About This Technology Publications: PDF Document Publication Market Sheet (801 KB) Technology Marketing SummaryIncreased recycling of power plant cooling water calls for low-cost means of preventing the formation of calcium carbonate and silicate scale. Hardness (Ca and Mg) and silica are two of

  2. J-Lab scientist wins award for graphene invention he developed as a Ph.D.

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    student at William & Mary (The College of William and Mary, Ideation) | Jefferson Lab J-Lab scientist wins award for graphene invention he developed as a Ph.D. student at William & Mary (The College of William and Mary, Ideation) External Link: http://www.wm.edu/research/ideation/science-and-technology/j-lab-scientist-wins-... By jlab_admin on Fri, 2012-06-1

  3. Data management system for organic soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stinnette, P.

    1999-07-01

    A Data Management System for Organic Soil (DMSOS) has been developed that enables the acquisition, management and analysis of organic soil data as well as the presentation of results to be conducted effectively through a common interface. This development was in response to the data management needs of research investigating the engineering properties of organic soil and its extension to the stabilization of organic soil through dynamic replacement (DR). It is shown how the above functions are implemented efficiently using Windows-based software to perform comprehensive data management and analysis of data gathered from both laboratory and field tests. When the engineering properties of a given organic soil deposit are needed, a build-in Computer Advisor for Organic Soil Projects (CAOSP) predicts the properties from DMSOS based correlations. A unique and useful feature of the CAOSP is its ability to estimate the anticipated ultimate settlement of an organic soil deposit given the loading conditions and the moisture or organic content. Also incorporated in the DMSOS is a quality control system that utilizes computerized data acquisition/data management techniques in order to evaluate the degree of improvement of an organic soil layer at a given stage of treatment using DR.

  4. Process for removing polychlorinated biphenyls from soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hancher, C.W.; Saunders, M.B.; Googin, J.M.

    1984-11-16

    The present invention relates to a method of removing polychlorinated biphenyls from soil. The polychlorinated biphenyls are extracted from the soil by employing a liquid organic solvent dispersed in water in the ratio of about 1:3 to 3:1. The organic solvent includes such materials as short-chain hydrocarbons including kerosene or gasoline which are immiscible with water and are nonpolar. The organic solvent has a greater affinity for the PCB's than the soil so as to extract the PCB's from the soil upon contact. The organic solvent phase is separated from the suspended soil and water phase and distilled for permitting the recycle of the organic solvent phase and the concentration of the PCB's in the remaining organic phase. The present process can be satisfactorily practiced with soil containing 10 to 20% petroleum-based oils and organic fluids such as used in transformers and cutting fluids, coolants and the like which contain PCB's. The subject method provides for the removal of a sufficient concentration of PCB's from the soil to provide the soil with a level of PCB's within the guidelines of the Environmental Protection Agency.

  5. Analysis of large soil samples for actinides

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Maxwell, III; Sherrod L.

    2009-03-24

    A method of analyzing relatively large soil samples for actinides by employing a separation process that includes cerium fluoride precipitation for removing the soil matrix and precipitates plutonium, americium, and curium with cerium and hydrofluoric acid followed by separating these actinides using chromatography cartridges.

  6. Synthesis and new structure shaping mechanism of silica particles formed at high pH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Henan; Zhao, Yu; Akins, Daniel L.

    2012-10-15

    For the sol-gel synthesis of silica particles under high pH catalytic conditions (pH>12) in water/ethanol solvent, we have deduced that the competing dynamics of chemical etching and sol-gel process can explain the types of silica particles formed and their morphologies. We have demonstrated that emulsion droplets that are generated by adding tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) to a water-ethanol solution serve as soft templates for hollow spherical silica (1-2 {mu}m). And if the emulsion is converted by the sol-gel process, one finds that suspended solid silica spheres of diameter of {approx}900 nm are formed. Moreover, several other factors are found to play fundamental roles in determining the final morphologies of silica particles, such as by variation of the pH (in our case, using OH{sup -}) to a level where condensation dominates; by changing the volume ratios of water/ethanol; and using an emulsifier (specifically, CTAB) - Graphical abstract: 'Local chemical etching' and sol-gel process have been proposed to interpret the control of morphologies of silica particles through varying initial pHs in syntheses. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Different initial pHs in our syntheses provides morphological control of silica particles. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer 'Local chemical etching' and sol-gel process describes the formation of silica spheres. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The formation of emulsions generates hollow silica particles.

  7. Diamond formation due to a pH drop during fluid–rock interactions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sverjensky, Dimitri A.; Huang, Fang

    2015-11-03

    Diamond formation has typically been attributed to redox reactions during precipitation from fluids or magmas. Either the oxidation of methane or the reduction of carbon dioxide has been suggested, based on simplistic models of deep fluids consisting of mixtures of dissolved neutral gas molecules without consideration of aqueous ions. The role of pH changes associated with water–silicate rock interactions during diamond formation is unknown. Here we show that diamonds could form due to a drop in pH during water–rock interactions. We use a recent theoretical model of deep fluids that includes ions, to show that fluid can react irreversibly with eclogite at 900 °C and 5.0 GPa, generating diamond and secondary minerals due to a decrease in pH at almost constant oxygen fugacity. Overall, our results constitute a new quantitative theory of diamond formation as a consequence of the reaction of deep fluids with the rock types that they encounter during migration. Diamond can form in the deep Earth during water–rock interactions without changes in oxidation state.

  8. Diamond formation due to a pH drop during fluid–rock interactions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Sverjensky, Dimitri A.; Huang, Fang

    2015-11-03

    Diamond formation has typically been attributed to redox reactions during precipitation from fluids or magmas. Either the oxidation of methane or the reduction of carbon dioxide has been suggested, based on simplistic models of deep fluids consisting of mixtures of dissolved neutral gas molecules without consideration of aqueous ions. The role of pH changes associated with water–silicate rock interactions during diamond formation is unknown. Here we show that diamonds could form due to a drop in pH during water–rock interactions. We use a recent theoretical model of deep fluids that includes ions, to show that fluid can react irreversibly withmore » eclogite at 900 °C and 5.0 GPa, generating diamond and secondary minerals due to a decrease in pH at almost constant oxygen fugacity. Overall, our results constitute a new quantitative theory of diamond formation as a consequence of the reaction of deep fluids with the rock types that they encounter during migration. Diamond can form in the deep Earth during water–rock interactions without changes in oxidation state.« less

  9. Soil Organic Carbon Degradation, Barrow, 2013-2014 (Dataset) | Data

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Explorer Data Explorer Search Results Soil Organic Carbon Degradation, Barrow, 2013-2014 Title: Soil Organic Carbon Degradation, Barrow, 2013-2014 This dataset provides information about soil organic carbon decomposition in Barrow soil incubation studies. The soil cores were collected from low-center polygon (Area A) and were incubated in the laboratory at different temperatures for up to 60 days. Transformations of soil organic carbon were characterized by UV and FT-IR, and small organic

  10. In Situ Spectrophotometric Determination of pH under Geologic CO2 Sequestration Conditions: Method Development and Application

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shao, Hongbo; Thompson, Christopher J.; Qafoku, Odeta; Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2013-02-25

    Injecting massive amounts of CO2 into deep geologic formations will cause a range of coupled thermal, hydrodynamic, mechanical, and chemical changes. A significant perturbation in water-saturated formations is the pH drop in the reservoir fluids due to CO2 dissolution. Knowing the pH under geological CO2 sequestration conditions is important for a better understanding of the short- and long-term risks associated with geological CO2 sequestration and will help in the design of sustainable sequestration projects. Most previous studies on CO2-rock-brine interactions have utilized thermodynamic modeling to estimate the pH. In this work, a spectrophotometric method was developed to determine the in-situ pH in CO2-H2O-NaCl systems in the presence and absence of reservoir rock by observing the spectra of a pH indicator, bromophenol blue, with a UV-visible spectrophotometer. Effects of temperature, pressure, and ionic strength on the pH measurement were evaluated. Measured pH values in CO2-H2O-NaCl systems were compared with several thermodynamic models. Results indicate that bromophenol blue can be used to accurately determine the pH of brine in contact with supercritical CO2 under geologic CO2 sequestration conditions.

  11. CONTAMINATED SOIL VOLUME ESTIMATE TRACKING METHODOLOGY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Durham, L.A.; Johnson, R.L.; Rieman, C.; Kenna, T.; Pilon, R.

    2003-02-27

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is conducting a cleanup of radiologically contaminated properties under the Formerly Utilized Sites Remedial Action Program (FUSRAP). The largest cost element for most of the FUSRAP sites is the transportation and disposal of contaminated soil. Project managers and engineers need an estimate of the volume of contaminated soil to determine project costs and schedule. Once excavation activities begin and additional remedial action data are collected, the actual quantity of contaminated soil often deviates from the original estimate, resulting in cost and schedule impacts to the project. The project costs and schedule need to be frequently updated by tracking the actual quantities of excavated soil and contaminated soil remaining during the life of a remedial action project. A soil volume estimate tracking methodology was developed to provide a mechanism for project managers and engineers to create better project controls of costs and schedule. For the FUSRAP Linde site, an estimate of the initial volume of in situ soil above the specified cleanup guidelines was calculated on the basis of discrete soil sample data and other relevant data using indicator geostatistical techniques combined with Bayesian analysis. During the remedial action, updated volume estimates of remaining in situ soils requiring excavation were calculated on a periodic basis. In addition to taking into account the volume of soil that had been excavated, the updated volume estimates incorporated both new gamma walkover surveys and discrete sample data collected as part of the remedial action. A civil survey company provided periodic estimates of actual in situ excavated soil volumes. By using the results from the civil survey of actual in situ volumes excavated and the updated estimate of the remaining volume of contaminated soil requiring excavation, the USACE Buffalo District was able to forecast and update project costs and schedule. The soil volume tracking methodology helped the USACE Buffalo District track soil quantity changes from projected excavation work over time and across space, providing the basis for an explanation of some of the project cost and schedule variances.

  12. Clean soil at Eniwetok and Johnston Atolls

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bramlitt, E.T.

    1990-01-01

    The Defense Nuclear Agency has managed two large-scale soil cleanups (landmass decontaminations) of plutonium contamination. Both are at Pacific Ocean atolls formerly used for nuclear weapons tests. The Eniwetok Atoll (EA) cleanup between 1977 and 1980 evaluated 390 ha of contaminated land and cleaned 50 ha by removing 80,000 m[sup 3] of contaminated soil. The Johnston Atoll (JA) cleanup is in process. It has checked 270 ha, will clean 15 ha, and plans for removal of 80,000 m[sup 3] of soil. The cleanups are similar in other respects including carbonate-based soil, in situ radiation surveys, contamination characteristics, soil excavation methods, safety, and weather. The two cleanups are in contrast relative to planning time, agencies involved, funding, documentation, environmental considerations, cleanup workforce, site beneficiaries, waste characterization, regulatory permits, management, and project duration. The most noteworthy differences are the rationale for cleanup, the cleanup process, the definition of clean, and the cost.

  13. Measuring spatial variability in soil characteristics

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoskinson, Reed L.; Svoboda, John M.; Sawyer, J. Wayne; Hess, John R.; Hess, J. Richard

    2002-01-01

    The present invention provides systems and methods for measuring a load force associated with pulling a farm implement through soil that is used to generate a spatially variable map that represents the spatial variability of the physical characteristics of the soil. An instrumented hitch pin configured to measure a load force is provided that measures the load force generated by a farm implement when the farm implement is connected with a tractor and pulled through or across soil. Each time a load force is measured, a global positioning system identifies the location of the measurement. This data is stored and analyzed to generate a spatially variable map of the soil. This map is representative of the physical characteristics of the soil, which are inferred from the magnitude of the load force.

  14. Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Archived Soil & Groundwater...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Rocky...

  15. Soil Sampling At Yellowstone Region (Hellman & Ramsey, 2004)...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Soil Sampling At Yellowstone Region (Hellman & Ramsey, 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Soil Sampling At Yellowstone Region...

  16. After More Than 20 Years Operating, Hanford's Soil Vapor Extraction...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Wise, Juan Aguilar, Doug Rybarski, and Christina Agular. The soil vapor extraction trailer is shown near Hanfords Plutonium Finishing Plant. The soil vapor extraction...

  17. Evaluation of the Mercury Soil Mapping Geothermal Exploration...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the Mercury Soil Mapping Geothermal Exploration Techniques Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Evaluation of the Mercury Soil...

  18. Mapping Soil Carbon from Cradle to Grave: Identifying the Microbial...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Mapping Soil Carbon from Cradle to Grave: Identifying the Microbial Blueprint for Root-carbon Transformations in Soil Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Mapping...

  19. Mapping Soil Carbon from Cradle to Grave: Identifying the Microbial...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    In-Document Search Title: Mapping Soil Carbon from Cradle to Grave: Identifying the Microbial Blueprint for Root-carbon Transformations in Soil Erin Nuccio, Lawrence...

  20. EM Soil and Groundwater Database Reports | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    EM Soil and Groundwater Database Reports EM Soil and Groundwater Database Reports Brookhaven National Laboratory - HFBR Tritium Groundwater Database Report - Brookhaven National ...

  1. System for Analysis of Soil-Structure Interaction (SASSI) Verification...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the System for Analysis of Soil-Structure Interaction, a computer code for performing finite element analyses of soil-structure interaction during seismic ground motions. It was...

  2. Plant stimulation of soil microbial community succession: how...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Plant stimulation of soil microbial community succession: how sequential expression mediates soil carbon stabilization and turnover Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Plant...

  3. Soil carbon sequestration and land use change associated with...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Soil carbon sequestration and land use change associated with biofuel production: empirical evidence Title Soil carbon sequestration and land use change associated with biofuel...

  4. Innovative vitrification for soil remediation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jetta, N.W.; Patten, J.S.; Hart, J.G.

    1995-12-01

    The objective of this DOE demonstration program is to validate the performance and operation of the Vortec Cyclone Melting System (CMS{trademark}) for the processing of LLW contaminated soils found at DOE sites. This DOE vitrification demonstration project has successfully progressed through the first two phases. Phase 1 consisted of pilot scale testing with surrogate wastes and the conceptual design of a process plant operating at a generic DOE site. The objective of Phase 2, which is scheduled to be completed the end of FY 95, is to develop a definitive process plant design for the treatment of wastes at a specific DOE facility. During Phase 2, a site specific design was developed for the processing of LLW soils and muds containing TSCA organics and RCRA metal contaminants. Phase 3 will consist of a full scale demonstration at the DOE gaseous diffusion plant located in Paducah, KY. Several DOE sites were evaluated for potential application of the technology. Paducah was selected for the demonstration program because of their urgent waste remediation needs as well as their strong management and cost sharing financial support for the project. During Phase 2, the basic nitrification process design was modified to meet the specific needs of the new waste streams available at Paducah. The system design developed for Paducah has significantly enhanced the processing capabilities of the Vortec vitrification process. The overall system design now includes the capability to shred entire drums and drum packs containing mud, concrete, plastics and PCB`s as well as bulk waste materials. This enhanced processing capability will substantially expand the total DOE waste remediation applications of the technology.

  5. PH Sensitive Polymers for Improving Reservoir Sweep and Conformance Control in Chemical Flooring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukul Sharma; Steven Bryant; Chun Huh

    2008-03-31

    There is an increasing opportunity to recover bypassed oil from depleted, mature oilfields in the US. The recovery factor in many reservoirs is low due to inefficient displacement of the oil by injected fluids (typically water). The use of chemical flooding methods to increase recovery efficiencies is severely constrained by the inability of the injected chemicals to contact the bypassed oil. Low sweep efficiencies are the primary cause of low oil recoveries observed in the field in chemical flooding operations even when lab studies indicate high oil recovery efficiency. Any technology that increases the ability of chemical flooding agents to better contact the remaining oil and reduce the amount of water produced in conjunction with the produced oil will have a significant impact on the cost of producing oil domestically in the US. This translates directly into additional economically recoverable reserves, which extends the economic lives of marginal and mature wells. The objective of this research project was to develop a low-cost, pH-triggered polymer for use in IOR processes to improve reservoir sweep efficiency and reservoir conformance in chemical flooding. Rheological measurements made on the polymer solution, clearly show that it has a low viscosity at low pH and exhibits a sudden increase in viscosity (by 2 orders of magnitude or more) at a pH of 3.5 to 4. This implies that the polymer would preferentially flow into zones containing water since the effective permeability to water is highest in these zones. As the pH of the zone increases due to the buffering capacity of the reservoir rock, the polymer solution undergoes a liquid to gel transition causing a sharp increase in the viscosity of the polymer solution in these zones. This allows operationally robust, in-depth conformance treatment of such water bearing zones and better mobility control. The rheological properties of HPAM solutions were measured. These include: steady-shear viscosity and viscoelastic behavior as functions of pH; shear rate; polymer concentration; salinity, including divalent ion effects; polymer molecular weight; and degree of hydrolysis. A comprehensive rheological model was developed for HPAM solution rheology in terms of: shear rate; pH; polymer concentration; and salinity, so that the spatial and temporal changes in viscosity during the polymer flow in the reservoir can be accurately modeled. A series of acid coreflood experiments were conducted to understand the geochemical reactions relevant for both the near-wellbore injection profile control and for conformance control applications. These experiments showed that the use hydrochloric acid as a pre-flush is not viable because of the high reaction rate with the rock. The use of citric acid as a pre-flush was found to be quite effective. This weak acid has a slow rate of reaction with the rock and can buffer the pH to below 3.5 for extended periods of time. With the citric acid pre-flush the polymer could be efficiently propagated through the core in a low pH environment i.e. at a low viscosity. The transport of various HPAM solutions was studied in sandstones, in terms of permeability reduction, mobility reduction, adsorption and inaccessible pore volume with different process variables: injection pH, polymer concentration, polymer molecular weight, salinity, degree of hydrolysis, and flow rate. Measurements of polymer effluent profiles and tracer tests show that the polymer retention increases at the lower pH. A new simulation capability to model the deep-penetrating mobility control or conformance control using pH-sensitive polymer was developed. The core flood acid injection experiments were history matched to estimate geochemical reaction rates. Preliminary scale-up simulations employing linear and radial geometry floods in 2-layer reservoir models were conducted. It is clearly shown that the injection rate of pH-sensitive polymer solutions can be significantly increased by injecting it at a pH below 3.5 (at a fixed bottom-hole pressure). This improvement in injectivity by a fa

  6. Effect of soiling in CPV systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vivar, M.; Herrero, R.; Anton, I.; Martinez-Moreno, F.; Moreton, R.; Sala, G.

    2010-07-15

    The effect of soiling in flat PV modules has been already studied, causing a reduction of the electrical output of 4% on average. For CPV's, as far as soiling produces light scattering at the optical collector surface, the scattered rays should be definitively lost because they cannot be focused onto the receivers again. While the theoretical study becomes difficult because soiling is variable at different sites, it becomes easier to begin the monitoring of the real field performance of concentrators and then raise the following question: how much does the soiling affect to PV concentrators in comparison with flat panels?' The answers allow to predict the PV concentrator electrical performance and to establish a pattern of cleaning frequency. Some experiments have been conducted at the IES-UPM and CSES-ANU sites, consisting in linear reflective concentration systems, a point focus refractive concentrator and a flat module. All the systems have been measured when soiled and then after cleaning, achieving different increases of I{sub SC}. In general, results show that CPV systems are more sensitive to soiling than flat panels, accumulating losses in I{sub SC} of about 14% on average in three different tests conducted at IES-UPM and CSES-ANU test sites in Madrid (Spain) and Canberra (Australia). Some concentrators can reach losses up to 26% when the system is soiled for 4 months of exposure. (author)

  7. Development of On-Line Spectroscopic pH Monitoring for Nuclear Fuel Reprocessing Plants: Weak Acid Schemes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Casella, Amanda J.; Hylden, Laura R.; Campbell, Emily L.; Levitskaia, Tatiana G.; Peterson, James M.; Smith, Frances N.; Bryan, Samuel A.

    2015-05-19

    Knowledge of real-time solution properties and composition is a necessity for any spent nuclear fuel reprocessing method. Metal-ligand speciation in aqueous solutions derived from the dissolved commercial spent fuel is highly dependent upon the acid concentration/pH, which influences extraction efficiency and the resulting speciation in the organic phase. Spectroscopic process monitoring capabilities, incorporated in a counter current centrifugal contactor bank, provide a pathway for on-line real-time measurement of solution pH. The spectroscopic techniques are process-friendly and can be easily configured for on-line applications, while classic potentiometric pH measurements require frequent calibration/maintenance and have poor long-term stability in aggressive chemical and radiation environments. Our research is focused on developing a general method for on-line determination of pH of aqueous solutions through chemometric analysis of Raman spectra. Interpretive quantitative models have been developed and validated under the range of chemical composition and pH using a lactic acid/lactate buffer system. The developed model was applied to spectra obtained on-line during solvent extractions performed in a centrifugal contactor bank. The model predicted the pH within 11% for pH > 2, thus demonstrating that this technique could provide the capability of monitoring pH on-line in applications such as nuclear fuel reprocessing.

  8. ORISE report shows number of health physics Ph.D.s declined in 2009

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ORISE report shows number of health physics Ph.D.s declined in 2009 FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE June 15, 2010 FY10-37 OAK RIDGE, Tenn.-Health physics undergraduate degrees increased slightly in 2009 continuing a six-year trend, but doctorate degrees reported a 40-year low, says a report recently released by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education. The report also showed the number of M.S. degrees was 21 percent less than in 2008. The ORISE report, Health Physics Enrollments and Degrees

  9. ORISE: After a Brief Decline, Recent Foreign Ph.D. Graduates are Staying in

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the U.S. at Near-record Levels After a Brief Decline, Recent Foreign Ph.D. Graduates are Staying in the U.S. at Near-record Levels FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: Feb. 3, 2010 FY10-20 OAK RIDGE, Tenn.-Two years after completing doctoral degrees at United States (U.S.) universities, 67% of foreign students graduating in 2005 remained in the U.S., according to a new report issued by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) and funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF). This is a

  10. Method of determining pH by the alkaline absorption of carbon dioxide

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hobbs, D.T.

    1992-10-06

    A method is described for measuring the concentration of hydroxides in alkaline solutions in a remote location using the tendency of hydroxides to absorb carbon dioxide. The method includes the passing of carbon dioxide over the surface of an alkaline solution in a remote tank before and after measurements of the carbon dioxide solution. A comparison of the measurements yields the absorption fraction from which the hydroxide concentration can be calculated using a correlation of hydroxide or pH to absorption fraction. 2 figs.

  11. Davinia Salvachúa Rodríguez, Ph.D. | Bioenergy | NREL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Davinia Salvachúa Rodríguez Davinia Salvachúa Rodríguez, Ph.D. Staff Scientist Davinia.Salvachua@nrel.gov | 303-384-7699 Research Interests Lignin conversion by fungi and bacteria to value-added compounds (Figure 1) Ligninolytic enzymes: a tool for lignin depolymerization (Figure 1) Biomass sugars upgrading to advanced biofuels and valuable co-products (Figure 2) Development of fermentation strategies to produce diverse organic acids (i.e. succinic acid, muconic acid, hexanoic acid) by

  12. WBU-14-0011 - In the Matter of Dr. Paul M. Cole, Ph.D | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy 1 - In the Matter of Dr. Paul M. Cole, Ph.D WBU-14-0011 - In the Matter of Dr. Paul M. Cole, Ph.D On November 3, 2014, the Office of Hearings and Appeals (OHA) issued a decision denying a jurisdictional appeal filed by Dr. Paul M. Cole, Ph.D (Dr. Cole), a former Oak Ridge Institute for Science Education (ORISE) fellow at the Department of Defense's (DOD) Joint POW/MIA Accounting Command (JPAC) at Hickam Air Force Base, Hawaii. Dr. Cole appealed the Oak Ridge Office's (ORO) Diversity

  13. Method for treatment of soils contaminated with organic pollutants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wickramanayake, Godage B.

    1993-01-01

    A method for treating soil contaminated by organic compounds wherein an ozone containing gas is treated with acid to increase the stability of the ozone in the soil environment and the treated ozone applied to the contaminated soil to decompose the organic compounds. The soil may be treated in situ or may be removed for treatment and refilled.

  14. Climate-change effects on soils: Accelerated weathering, soil carbon and elemental cycling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qafoku, Nikolla

    2015-04-01

    Climate change [i.e., high atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations (≥400 ppm); increasing air temperatures (2-4°C or greater); significant and/or abrupt changes in daily, seasonal, and inter-annual temperature; changes in the wet/dry cycles; intensive rainfall and/or heavy storms; extended periods of drought; extreme frost; heat waves and increased fire frequency] is and will significantly affect soil properties and fertility, water resources, food quantity and quality, and environmental quality. Biotic processes that consume atmospheric CO2, and create organic carbon (C) that is either reprocessed to CO2 or stored in soils are the subject of active current investigations, with great concern over the influence of climate change. In addition, abiotic C cycling and its influence on the inorganic C pool in soils is a fundamental global process in which acidic atmospheric CO2 participates in the weathering of carbonate and silicate minerals, ultimately delivering bicarbonate and Ca2+ or other cations that precipitate in the form of carbonates in soils or are transported to the rivers, lakes, and oceans. Soil responses to climate change will be complex, and there are many uncertainties and unresolved issues. The objective of the review is to initiate and further stimulate a discussion about some important and challenging aspects of climate-change effects on soils, such as accelerated weathering of soil minerals and resulting C and elemental fluxes in and out of soils, soil/geo-engineering methods used to increase C sequestration in soils, soil organic matter (SOM) protection, transformation and mineralization, and SOM temperature sensitivity. This review reports recent discoveries, identifies key research needs, and highlights opportunities offered by the climate-change effects on soils.

  15. Differential growth responses of soil bacterial taxa to carbon substrates of varying chemical recalcitrance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldfarb, K.C.; Karaoz, U.; Hanson, C.A.; Santee, C.A.; Bradford, M.A.; Treseder, K.K.; Wallenstein, M.D.; Brodie, E.L.

    2011-04-18

    Soils are immensely diverse microbial habitats with thousands of co-existing bacterial, archaeal, and fungal species. Across broad spatial scales, factors such as pH and soil moisture appear to determine the diversity and structure of soil bacterial communities. Within any one site however, bacterial taxon diversity is high and factors maintaining this diversity are poorly resolved. Candidate factors include organic substrate availability and chemical recalcitrance, and given that they appear to structure bacterial communities at the phylum level, we examine whether these factors might structure bacterial communities at finer levels of taxonomic resolution. Analyzing 16S rRNA gene composition of nucleotide analog-labeled DNA by PhyloChip microarrays, we compare relative growth rates on organic substrates of increasing chemical recalcitrance of >2,200 bacterial taxa across 43 divisions/phyla. Taxa that increase in relative abundance with labile organic substrates (i.e., glycine, sucrose) are numerous (>500), phylogenetically clustered, and occur predominantly in two phyla (Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria) including orders Actinomycetales, Enterobacteriales, Burkholderiales, Rhodocyclales, Alteromonadales, and Pseudomonadales. Taxa increasing in relative abundance with more chemically recalcitrant substrates (i.e., cellulose, lignin, or tannin-protein) are fewer (168) but more phylogenetically dispersed, occurring across eight phyla and including Clostridiales, Sphingomonadalaes, Desulfovibrionales. Just over 6% of detected taxa, including many Burkholderiales increase in relative abundance with both labile and chemically recalcitrant substrates. Estimates of median rRNA copy number per genome of responding taxa demonstrate that these patterns are broadly consistent with bacterial growth strategies. Taken together, these data suggest that changes in availability of intrinsically labile substrates may result in predictable shifts in soil bacterial composition.

  16. Upscaling of Bio-mediated Soil Improvement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. T. DeJong; B. C. Martinez; B. M. Mortensen; D. C. Nelson; J. T. Waller; M. H. Weil; T. R. Ginn; T. Weathers; T. Barkouki; Y. Fujita; G. Redden; C. Hunt; D. Major; B. Tunyu

    2009-10-01

    As demand for soil improvement continues to increase, new, sustainable, and innocuous methods are needed to alter the mechanical properties of soils. Recent research has demonstrated the potential of bio-mediated soil improvement for geotechnical applications (DeJong et al. 2006, Whiffin et al. 2007). Upscaling the bio-mediated treatment process for in situ implementation presents a number of challenges to be addressed, including soil and pore fluid interactions, bioaugmentation versus biostimulation of microbial communities, controlled distribution of mediated calcite precipitation, and permanence of the cementation. Current studies are utilizing large-scale laboratory experiments, non-destructive geophysical measurements, and modeling, to develop an optimized and predictable bio-mediated treatment method.

  17. Effects of soil moisture on the responses of soil temperatures to climate

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    change in cold regions (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Effects of soil moisture on the responses of soil temperatures to climate change in cold regions Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effects of soil moisture on the responses of soil temperatures to climate change in cold regions Authors: Subin, Z. M. ; Koven, C. D. ; Riley, W. J. ; Torn, M. S. ; Lawrence, D. M. ; Swenson, S. C. Publication Date: 2012-10-15 OSTI Identifier: 1171497 Report Number(s): LBNL-6423E DOE Contract

  18. Soil temperature, soil moisture and thaw depth, Barrow, Alaska, Ver. 1

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sloan, V.L.; J.A. Liebig; M.S. Hahn; J.B. Curtis; J.D. Brooks; A. Rogers; C.M. Iversen; R.J. Norby

    2014-01-10

    This dataset consists of field measurements of soil properties made during 2012 and 2013 in areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Included are i) weekly measurements of thaw depth, soil moisture, presence and depth of standing water, and soil temperature made during the 2012 and 2013 growing seasons (June - September) and ii) half-hourly measurements of soil temperature logged continuously during the period June 2012 to September 2013.

  19. Soil temperature, soil moisture and thaw depth, Barrow, Alaska, Ver. 1

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Sloan, V.L.; J.A. Liebig; M.S. Hahn; J.B. Curtis; J.D. Brooks; A. Rogers; C.M. Iversen; R.J. Norby

    This dataset consists of field measurements of soil properties made during 2012 and 2013 in areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Included are i) weekly measurements of thaw depth, soil moisture, presence and depth of standing water, and soil temperature made during the 2012 and 2013 growing seasons (June - September) and ii) half-hourly measurements of soil temperature logged continuously during the period June 2012 to September 2013.

  20. Nonlinear ultrasonic characterization of precipitation in 17-4PH stainless steel

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Matlack, Kathryn; Bradley, Harrison A.; Thiele, Sebastian; Kim, Jin-Yeon; Wall, James J.; Jung, Hee Joon; Qu, Jianmin; Jacobs, Laurence J.

    2015-04-01

    The extension of operational lifetime of most US nuclear reactors will cause reactor pressure vessel to be exposed to increased levels of neutron radiation damage. This research is part of a broader effort to develop a nondestructive evaluation technique to monitor radiation damage in reactor pressure vessel steels. The main contributor to radiation embrittlement in these steels is the formation of copper-rich precipitates. In this work, a precipitate hardenable martensitic alloy, 17-4PH stainless steel is exposed to thermal aging treatments, and used as a surrogate material to study the effects of copper precipitates on the measured acoustic nonlinearity parameter. Previous work has demonstrated the effectiveness of these nonlinear ultrasonic (NLU) measurements in the characterization of radiation-induced microstructural changes in neutron irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels. NLU measurements using Rayleigh surface waves are performed on 17-4PH samples subjected to isothermal aging. NLU measurements are interpreted with hardness, thermo-electric power, TEM, and atom probe tomography measurements. The Rayleigh wave measurements showed a decrease in the acoustic nonlinearity parameter with increasing aging time, consistent with evidence of increasing number density of nucleated precipitates.

  1. Monomer volume fraction profiles in pH responsive planar polyelectrolyte brushes

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Mahalik, Jyoti P.; Yang, Yubo; Deodhar, Chaitra V.; Ankner, John Francis; Lokitz, Bradley S.; Kilbey, II, S. Michael; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Kumar, Rajeev

    2016-03-06

    Spatial dependencies of monomer volume fraction profiles of pH responsive polyelectrolyte brushes were investigated using field theories and neutron reflectivity experiments. In particular, planar polyelectrolyte brushes in good solvent were studied and direct comparisons between predictions of the theories and experimental measurements are presented. The comparisons between the theories and the experimental data reveal that solvent entropy and ion-pairs resulting from adsorption of counterions from the added salt play key roles in affecting the monomer distribution and must be taken into account in modeling polyelectrolyte brushes. Furthermore, the utility of this physics-based approach based on these theories for the predictionmore » and interpretation of neutron reflectivity profiles in the context of pH responsive planar polyelectrolyte brushes such as polybasic poly(2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate) (PDMAEMA) and polyacidic poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA) brushes is demonstrated. The approach provides a quantitative way of estimating molecular weights of the polymers polymerized using surface-initiated atom transfer radical polymerization.« less

  2. Effectiveness of mineral soil to adsorb the natural occurring radioactive

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    material (norm), uranium and thorium (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Effectiveness of mineral soil to adsorb the natural occurring radioactive material (norm), uranium and thorium Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Effectiveness of mineral soil to adsorb the natural occurring radioactive material (norm), uranium and thorium A study has been performed on U-soil and Th-soil adsorption of three types of soil collected from Selangor State of Malaysia which are Saujana Putra, Bukit

  3. Soil washing: A preliminary assessment of its applicability to Hanford

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gerber, M A; Freeman, H D; Baker, E G; Riemath, W F

    1991-09-01

    Soil washing is being considered for treating soils at the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site. As a result of over 50 years of operations to produce plutonium for the US Department of Defense and research for DOE, soils in areas within the Site are contaminated with hazardous wastes and radionuclides. In the soil washing process, contaminated soil is mixed with a liquid and then physically and/or chemically treated to dissolve the contaminants into solution and/or concentrate them in a small fraction of the soil. The purpose of this procedure is to separate the contaminants from the bulk of the soil. The key to successful application is to match the types of contaminants and soil characteristics with physical-chemical methods that perform well under the existing conditions. The applicability of soil washing to Hanford Site contaminated soils must take into account both the characteristics of the oil and the type of contamination. Hanford soils typically contain up to 90% sand, gravel, and cobbles, which generally are favorable characteristics for soil washing. For example, in soil samples from the north pond in the 300 Area, 80% to 90% of the soil particles were larger than 250 {mu}m. The principal contaminants in the soil are radionuclides, heavy metals, and nitrate and sulfate salts. For most of the sites, organic contaminants are either not present or are found in very low concentration. 28 refs., 5 figs., 10 tabs.

  4. Lack of correlation between extended pH monitoring and scintigraphy in the evaluation of infants with gastroesophageal reflux

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tolia, V.; Calhoun, J.A.; Kuhns, L.R.; Kauffman, R.E. )

    1990-05-01

    Sixty-nine infants younger than 1 year of age, with symptoms of persistent vomiting, recurrent choking, apnea, persistent cough, or stridor, were evaluated for gastroesophageal reflux. All infants underwent extended intraesophageal pH monitoring for 16 to 24 hours as well as gastroesophageal scintigraphy with technetium 99m sulfur colloid to study the correlation between the two tests. Forty-eight infants exhibited reflux with extended pH monitoring whereas 46 infants showed reflux with scintigraphy. However, the diagnosis of reflux in individual patients by extended pH monitoring corresponded poorly with the diagnosis of reflux in the same patients by scintigraphy. Similarly, no correlation was observed between extended pH monitoring and scintigraphy results, whether expressed as percent gastric emptying or as gastroesophageal reflux ratio. We conclude that extended pH monitoring and scintigraphy measure different pathophysiologic phenomena and detect reflux under different conditions. The ability of these tests to detect reflux may be complementary and they may be of greatest value when used together to enhance the sensitivity and specificity of the diagnostic evaluation. Extended pH monitoring and scintigraphy should not be used interchangeably to monitor gastroesophageal reflux.

  5. Electrokinetic electrode system for extraction of soil contaminants from unsaturated soils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lindgren, E.R.; Mattson, E.D.

    1995-07-25

    An electrokinetic electrode assembly is described for use in extraction of soil contaminants from unsaturated soil in situ. The assembly includes a housing for retaining a liquid comprising an electrolyte solution, pure water, and soil water, the housing being in part of porous material capable of holding a vacuum. An electrode is mounted in the housing. The housing is provided with a vacuum orifice for effecting a vacuum within the housing selectively to control flow of soil water through the housing into the chamber and to control outflow of the liquid from the chamber. The assembly further includes conduit means for removing the liquid from the housing and returning the electrolyte solution to the housing, and a conduit for admitting pure water to the housing. An electrode system and method are also revealed for extraction of soil contaminants. The system and method utilize at least two electrode assemblies as described above. 5 figs.

  6. Electrokinetic electrode system for extraction of soil contaminants from unsaturated soils

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lindgren, Eric R.; Mattson, Earl D.

    1995-01-01

    There is presented an electrokinetic electrode assembly for use in extraction of soil contaminants from unsaturated soil in situ. The assembly includes a housing for retaining a liquid comprising an electrolyte solution, pure water, and soil water, the housing being in part of porous material capable of holding a vacuum. An electrode is mounted in the housing. The housing is provided with a vacuum orifice for effecting a vacuum within the housing selectively to control flow of soil water through the housing into the chamber and to control outflow of the liquid from the chamber. The assembly further includes conduit means for removing the liquid from the housing and returning the electrolyte solution to the housing, and a conduit for admitting pure water to the housing. There is further presented an electrode system and method for extraction of soil contaminants, the system and method utilizing at least two electrode assemblies as described above.

  7. Recovery of Depleted Uranium Fragments from Soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farr, C.P.; Alecksen, T.J.; Heronimus, R.S.; Simonds, M.H.; Farrar, D.R.; Baker, K.R.; Miller, M.L.

    2008-07-01

    A cost-effective method was demonstrated for recovering depleted uranium (DU) fragments from soil. A compacted clean soil pad was prepared adjacent to a pile of soil containing DU fragments. Soil from the contaminated pile was placed on the pad in three-inch lifts using conventional construction equipment. Each lift was scanned with an automatic scanning system consisting of an array of radiation detectors coupled to a detector positioning system. The data were downloaded into ArcGIS for data presentation. Areas of the pad exhibiting scaler counts above the decision level were identified as likely locations of DU fragments. The coordinates of these locations were downloaded into a PDA that was wirelessly connected to the positioning system. The PDA guided technicians to the locations where hand-held trowels and shovels were used to remove the fragments. After DU removal, the affected areas were re-scanned and the new data patched into the data base to replace the original data. This new data set along with soil sample results served as final status survey data. (authors)

  8. Controlling the pH of acid cheese whey in a two-stage anaerobic digester with sodium hydroxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghaly, A.E.; Ramkumar, D.R.

    1999-07-01

    Anaerobic digestion of cheese whey offers a two-fold benefit: pollution potential reduction and biogas production. The biogas, as an energy source, could be used to reduce the consumption of traditional fuels in the cheese plant. However, as a result of little or no buffering capacity of whey, the pH of the anaerobic digester drops drastically and the process is inhibited. In this study, the effect of controlling the pH of the second chamber of a two-stage, 150 L anaerobic digester operating on cheese whey on the quality and quantity of biogas and the pollution potential reduction, was investigated using sodium hydroxide. The digester was operated at a temperature of 35 C and a hydraulic retention time of 15 days for three runs (no pH control, pH control with no reseeding, and ph control with reseeding) each lasting 50 days. The results indicated that operating the digester without pH control resulted in a low pH (3.3) which inhibited the methanogenic bacteria. The inhibition was irreversible and the digester did not recover (no methane production) when the pH was restored to 7.0 without reseeding, as the observed increased gas production was a false indication of recovery because the gas was mainly carbon dioxide. The addition of base resulted in a total alkalinity of 12,000 mg/L as CaCO{sub 3}. When the system was reseeded and the pH controlled, the total volatile acid concentration was 15,100 mg/L (as acetic acid), with acetic (28%), propionic (21%), butyric (25%), valeric (8%), and caproic (15%) acids as the major constituents. The biogas production was 62.6 L/d (0.84 m{sup 3}/m{sup 3}/d) and the methane content was 60.7%. Reductions of 27.3, 30.4 and 23.3% in the total solids, chemical oxygen demand and total kjeldahl nitrogen were obtained, respectively. The ammonium nitrogen content increased significantly (140%).

  9. Effect of pH on Structural Changes in Perch Hemoglobin that Can Alter Redox Stability and Heme Affinity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Richards, Mark P.; Aranda, IV, Roman; He, Cai; Phillips, Jr., George N.

    2010-01-07

    pH can be manipulated to alter the oxidative stability of fish-based foods during storage. X-ray diffraction was used to investigate the ability of reduced pH to cause structural changes in fish hemoglobins that lead to enhanced oxidative degradation. Decreasing pH from 8.0 to 6.3 and 5.7 created a large channel for solvent entry into the heme crevice of perch hemoglobin beta chains. The proton-induced opening of this channel occurred between site CD3 and the heme-6-propionate. Solvent entry into the heme crevice can enhance metHb formation and hemin loss, processes that accelerate lipid oxidation. Reduced pH also decreased the distance between Ile at E11 in one of the alpha chains and the ligand above the heme iron atom. This sterically displaces O{sub 2} and protonated O{sub 2} which increases metHb formation. These studies demonstrate that pH reduction causes structural changes in perch hemoglobin which increase oxidative degradation of the heme pigment.

  10. Chemotactic selection of pollutant degrading soil bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hazen, T.C.

    1991-03-04

    A method is described for identifying soil microbial strains which may be bacterial degraders of pollutants. This method includes: Placing a concentration of a pollutant in a substantially closed container; placing the container in a sample of soil for a period of time ranging from one minute to several hours; retrieving the container and collecting its contents; microscopically determining the identity of the bacteria present. Different concentrations of the pollutant can be used to determine which bacteria respond to each concentration. The method can be used for characterizing a polluted site or for looking for naturally occurring biological degraders of the pollutant. Then bacteria identified as degraders of the pollutant and as chemotactically attracted to the pollutant are used to innoculate contaminated soil. To enhance the effect of the bacteria on the pollutant, nutrients are cyclicly provided to the bacteria then withheld to alternately build up the size of the bacterial colony or community and then allow it to degrade the pollutant.

  11. In situ removal of contamination from soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lindgren, Eric R.; Brady, Patrick V.

    1997-01-01

    A process of remediation of cationic heavy metal contamination from soil utilizes gas phase manipulation to inhibit biodegradation of a chelating agent that is used in an electrokinesis process to remove the contamination, and further gas phase manipulation to stimulate biodegradation of the chelating agent after the contamination has been removed. The process ensures that the chelating agent is not attacked by bioorganisms in the soil prior to removal of the contamination, and that the chelating agent does not remain as a new contaminant after the process is completed.

  12. In situ removal of contamination from soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lindgren, E.R.; Brady, P.V.

    1997-10-14

    A process of remediation of cationic heavy metal contamination from soil utilizes gas phase manipulation to inhibit biodegradation of a chelating agent that is used in an electrokinesis process to remove the contamination. The process also uses further gas phase manipulation to stimulate biodegradation of the chelating agent after the contamination has been removed. The process ensures that the chelating agent is not attacked by bioorganisms in the soil prior to removal of the contamination, and that the chelating agent does not remain as a new contaminant after the process is completed. 5 figs.

  13. Percolation behavior of tritiated water into a soil packed bed...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Percolation behavior of tritiated water into a soil packed bed Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Percolation behavior of tritiated water into a soil packed bed A large ...

  14. Soil Organic Carbon Degradation, Barrow, 2013-2014

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Gu, Baohua; Yang, Ziming

    2015-03-30

    This dataset provides information about soil organic carbon decomposition in Barrow soil incubation studies. The soil cores were collected from low-center polygon (Area A) and were incubated in the laboratory at different temperatures for up to 60 days. Transformations of soil organic carbon were characterized by UV and FT-IR, and small organic acids in water-soluble carbons were quantified by ion chromatography during the incubation

  15. Soil carbon sequestration and land use change associated with biofuel

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Services » Soil and Groundwater Soil and Groundwater Soil and Groundwater Legacy soil and groundwater remediation activities at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) are conducted in accordance with regulatory requirements, DOE regulations, and other applicable environmental laws. The scope of work requires investigation and remediation of contaminated sites known as solid waste management units (SWMUs) or areas of concern (AOCs). The protection of surface water and groundwater is also within

  16. Chemotactic selection of pollutant degrading soil bacteria (Patent) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    DOEPatents Chemotactic selection of pollutant degrading soil bacteria Title: Chemotactic selection of pollutant degrading soil bacteria A method is described for identifying soil microbial strains which may be bacterial degraders of pollutants. This method includes: Placing a concentration of a pollutant in a substantially closed container; placing the container in a sample of soil for a period of time ranging from one minute to several hours; retrieving the container and collecting its

  17. Soil Organic Carbon Degradation, Barrow, 2013-2014

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Gu, Baohua; Yang, Ziming

    This dataset provides information about soil organic carbon decomposition in Barrow soil incubation studies. The soil cores were collected from low-center polygon (Area A) and were incubated in the laboratory at different temperatures for up to 60 days. Transformations of soil organic carbon were characterized by UV and FT-IR, and small organic acids in water-soluble carbons were quantified by ion chromatography during the incubation

  18. A microbial fuel cell operating at low pH using an acidophile, Acidiphilium cryptum.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borole, Abhijeet P; Cesar, Scott A; O'Neill, Hugh Michael; Tsouris, Costas

    2008-01-01

    A microbial fuel cell using an acidophilic microorganism, Acidiphilium cryptum, as the anode biocatalyst was investigated. The mode of electron transfer by this organism to the electrode was studied. Electricity production in the presence of a mediator was demonstrated using its natural electron acceptor, iron, as well as phenosafranin as the electron mediating agent. Production of Fe(II), as a result of iron reduction, at a pH of 4.0 or below was found to support electricity production. Accumulation of the oxidized iron, Fe(III) as a result of electron donation to the electrode, however, restricted higher current output. Addition of nitrilotriacetic acid helped resolve the problem by redissolution of deposited Fe(III). Further, use of phenosafranin as a secondary mediator resulted in improvement in power output. At a cell loading equivalent to OD600 of 1.0, a power output of 12.7 mW/m2 was obtained in a two-chamber air-sparged fuel cell. Potential for direct electron transfer was also investigated but not detected under the conditions studied.

  19. Soil sampling kit and a method of sampling therewith

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, C.V.

    1991-02-05

    A soil sampling device and a sample containment device for containing a soil sample is disclosed. In addition, a method for taking a soil sample using the soil sampling device and soil sample containment device to minimize the loss of any volatile organic compounds contained in the soil sample prior to analysis is disclosed. The soil sampling device comprises two close fitting, longitudinal tubular members of suitable length, the inner tube having the outward end closed. With the inner closed tube withdrawn a selected distance, the outer tube can be inserted into the ground or other similar soft material to withdraw a sample of material for examination. The inner closed end tube controls the volume of the sample taken and also serves to eject the sample. The soil sample containment device has a sealing member which is adapted to attach to an analytical apparatus which analyzes the volatile organic compounds contained in the sample. The soil sampling device in combination with the soil sample containment device allows an operator to obtain a soil sample containing volatile organic compounds and minimizing the loss of the volatile organic compounds prior to analysis of the soil sample for the volatile organic compounds. 11 figures.

  20. Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Archived Soil & Groundwater Master Reports Amchitka Ashtabula Fernald Environmental Management Project Maybell Miamisburg Environmental Management Project Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site Shiprock Slick Rock South Valley Spook Tuba City Weldon Spring Miscellaneous

  1. Soil sampling kit and a method of sampling therewith

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thompson, Cyril V.

    1991-01-01

    A soil sampling device and a sample containment device for containing a soil sample is disclosed. In addition, a method for taking a soil sample using the soil sampling device and soil sample containment device to minimize the loss of any volatile organic compounds contained in the soil sample prior to analysis is disclosed. The soil sampling device comprises two close fitting, longitudinal tubular members of suitable length, the inner tube having the outward end closed. With the inner closed tube withdrawn a selected distance, the outer tube can be inserted into the ground or other similar soft material to withdraw a sample of material for examination. The inner closed end tube controls the volume of the sample taken and also serves to eject the sample. The soil sample containment device has a sealing member which is adapted to attach to an analytical apparatus which analyzes the volatile organic compounds contained in the sample. The soil sampling device in combination with the soil sample containment device allow an operator to obtain a soil sample containing volatile organic compounds and minimizing the loss of the volatile organic compounds prior to analysis of the soil sample for the volatile organic compounds.

  2. Sidewall tensiometer and method of determining soil moisture potential in below-grade earthen soil

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hubbell, Joel M.; Sisson, James B.

    2001-01-01

    A sidewall tensiometer to in situ determine below-grade soil moisture potential of earthen soil includes, a) a body adapted for insertion into an opening in earthen soil below grade, the body having lateral sidewalls; b) a laterally oriented porous material provided relative to the body lateral sidewalls, the laterally oriented porous material at least in part defining a fluid chamber within the body; c) a pressure a sensor in fluid communication with the fluid chamber; and d) sidewall engaging means for engaging a portion of a sidewall of an earth opening to laterally urge the porous material into hydraulic communication with earthen soil of another portion of the opening sidewall. Methods of taking tensiometric measurements are also disclosed.

  3. Chemical-Specific Representation of Air-Soil Exchange and Soil Penetration in Regional Multimedia Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McKone, T.E.; Bennett, D.H.

    2002-08-01

    In multimedia mass-balance models, the soil compartment is an important sink as well as a conduit for transfers to vegetation and shallow groundwater. Here a novel approach for constructing soil transport algorithms for multimedia fate models is developed and evaluated. The resulting algorithms account for diffusion in gas and liquid components; advection in gas, liquid, or solid phases; and multiple transformation processes. They also provide an explicit quantification of the characteristic soil penetration depth. We construct a compartment model using three and four soil layers to replicate with high reliability the flux and mass distribution obtained from the exact analytical solution describing the transient dispersion, advection, and transformation of chemicals in soil with fixed properties and boundary conditions. Unlike the analytical solution, which requires fixed boundary conditions, the soil compartment algorithms can be dynamically linked to other compartments (air, vegetation, ground water, surface water) in multimedia fate models. We demonstrate and evaluate the performance of the algorithms in a model with applications to benzene, benzo(a)pyrene, MTBE, TCDD, and tritium.

  4. THE SENSITIVITY OF CARBON STEELS' SUSCEPTIBILITY TO LOCALIZED CORROSION TO THE PH OF NITRATE BASED NUCLEAR WASTES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BOOMER KD

    2010-01-14

    The Hanford tank reservation contains approximately 50 million gallons of liquid legacy radioactive waste from cold war weapons production, which is stored in 177 underground storage tanks. The tanks will be in use until waste processing operations are completed. The wastes tend to be high pH (over 10) and nitrate based. Under these alkaline conditions carbon steels tend to be passive and undergo relatively slow uniform corrosion. However, the presence of nitrate and other aggressive species, can lead to pitting and stress corrosion cracking. This work is a continuation of previous work that investigated the propensity of steels to suffer pitting and stress corrosion cracking in various waste simulants. The focus of this work is an investigation of the sensitivity of the steels' pitting and stress corrosion cracking susceptibility tosimulant pH. Previous work demonstrated that wastes that are high in aggressive nitrate and low in inhibitory nitrite are susceptible to localized corrosion. However, the previous work involved wastes with pH 12 or higher. The current work involves wastes with lower pH of 10 or 11. It is expected that at these lower pHs that a higher nitrite-to-nitrate ratio will be necessary to ensure tank integrity. This experimental work involved both electrochemical testing, and slow strain rate testing at either the free corrosion potential or under anodic polarization. The results of the current work will be discussed, and compared to work previously presented.

  5. Draft Genome Sequence for Microbacterium laevaniformans Strain OR221, a Bacterium Tolerant to Metals, Nitrate, and Low pH

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Steven D; Palumbo, Anthony Vito; Panikov, Nikolai; Ariyawansa, Thilini; Klingeman, Dawn Marie; Johnson, Courtney M; Land, Miriam L; Utturkar, Sagar M; Epstein, Slava

    2012-01-01

    Microbacterium laevaniformans strain OR221 was isolated from subsurface sediments obtained from the Field Research Center (FRC) in Oak Ridge, TN. It was characterized as a bacterium tolerant to heavy metals such as uranium, nickel, cobalt, cadmium, as well as nitrate and low pH. We present its draft genome sequence.

  6. Separation of switchgrass bio-oil by water/organic solvent addition and pH adjustment

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Park, Lydia Kyoung-Eun; Ren, Shoujie; Yiacoumi, Sotira; Ye, X. Philip; Borole, Abhijeet P.; Tsouris, Costas

    2016-01-29

    Applications of bio-oil are limited by its challenging properties including high moisture content, low pH, high viscosity, high oxygen content, and low heating value. Separation of switchgrass bio-oil components by adding water, organic solvents (hexadecane and octane), and sodium hydroxide may help to overcome these issues. Acetic acid and phenolic compounds were extracted in aqueous and organic phases, respectively. Polar chemicals, such as acetic acid, did not partition in the organic solvent phase. Acetic acid in the aqueous phase after extraction is beneficial for a microbial-electrolysis-cell application to produce hydrogen as an energy source for further hydrodeoxygenation of bio-oil. Organicmore » solvents extracted more chemicals from bio-oil in combined than in sequential extraction; however, organic solvents partitioned into the aqueous phase in combined extraction. When sodium hydroxide was added to adjust the pH of aqueous bio-oil, organic-phase precipitation occurred. As the pH was increased, a biphasic aqueous/organic dispersion was formed, and phase separation was optimized at approximately pH 6. The neutralized organic bio-oil had approximately 37% less oxygen and 100% increased heating value than the initial centrifuged bio-oil. In conclusion, the less oxygen content and increased heating value indicated a significant improvement of the bio-oil quality through neutralization.« less

  7. Apparatus for treatment of soils contaminated with organic pollutants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wickramanayake, Godage B.

    1993-01-01

    An apparatus for treating soil contaminated by organic compounds wherein an ozone containing gas is treated with acid to increase the stability of the ozone in the soil environment and the treated ozone applied to the contaminated soil in a manner adapted to decompose the organic compounds; one embodiment of the apparatus comprises a means to supply ozone as a gas-ozone mixture, a stability means to treat ozone obtained from the supply and distribution means to apply the stabilized gas-ozone to soil. The soil may be treated in situ or may be removed for treatment and refilled.

  8. Molecular basis of the structural stability of a Top7-based scaffold at extreme pH and temperature conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Soares, Thereza A.; Boschek, Curt B.; Apiyo, David O.; Baird, Cheryl L.; Straatsma, TP

    2010-07-01

    The development of stable scaffolds that can tolerate environmental extremes has an immense potential for applications in industry and defense. Recently, we have engineered an eight-residue loop into the de novo designed Top7 protein, which specifically binds the glycoprotein CD4. The robust properties of the Top7, coupled with the ease in production, make it a robust scaffold to design novel functionalities for use under extreme environmental conditions. In the present work, a series of explicit-solvent molecular dynamics simulations are reported which investigates the effect of mutations and extreme conditions of temperature and pH on the structure, stability, and dynamics of the native and engineered Top7. These simulations indicate that i. The structural dynamics of the engineered and native Top7 in solution are equivalent under corresponding conditions of pH and temperature. Ensemble-averaged structures of the native and engineered Top7 maintain the overall tertiary structure pattern, albeit with loss of helical content when at low pH and high-temperature conditions. Mutations of residues E43A, D46A, E67A, E69A, EA81A along the ?-helices of the engineered Top7 did not lead to significant changes in the native fold under pH 2 and 400 K, suggesting that the helices can accommodate varying sequences. iii. The anti-parallel ?-sheet is the structural core responsible for the stability of the native and engineered Top7 and is well maintained under extreme pH and temperature conditions. These findings indicate that the insertion of an eight-residue loop into the structure of Top7 does not adversely affect the global fold or the structural stability of the Top7 scaffold.

  9. Soil Management Plan For The Potable Water System Upgrades Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Field, S. M.

    2007-04-01

    This plan describes and applies to the handling and management of soils excavated in support of the Y-12 Potable Water Systems Upgrades (PWSU) Project. The plan is specific to the PWSU Project and is intended as a working document that provides guidance consistent with the 'Soil Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Y-12 National Security Complex' (Y/SUB/92-28B99923C-Y05) and the 'Record of Decision for Phase II Interim Remedial Actions for Contaminated Soils and Scrapyard in Upper East Fork Popular Creek, Oak Ridge, Tennessee' (DOE/OR/01-2229&D2). The purpose of this plan is to prevent and/or limit the spread of contamination when moving soil within the Y-12 complex. The major feature of the soil management plan is the decision tree. The intent of the decision tree is to provide step-by-step guidance for the handling and management of soil from excavation of soil through final disposition. The decision tree provides a framework of decisions and actions to facilitate Y-12 or subcontractor decisions on the reuse of excavated soil on site and whether excavated soil can be reused on site or managed as waste. Soil characterization results from soil sampling in support of the project are also presented.

  10. Predicting the Spectral Effects of Soils on Concentrating Photovoltaic Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Burton, Patrick D.; King, Bruce Hardison; Riley, Daniel M.

    2014-12-15

    The soiling losses on high concentrating photovoltaic (HCPV) systems may be influenced by the spectral properties of accumulated soil. We predicted the response of an isotype cell to changes in spectral content and reduction in transmission due to soiling using measured UV/vis transmittance through soil films. Artificial soil test blends deposited on glass coupons were used to supply the transmission data, which was then used to calculate the effect on model spectra. Moreover, the wavelength transparency of the test soil was varied by incorporating red and yellow mineral pigments into graded sand. The more spectrally responsive (yellow) soils were predicted to alter the current balance between the top and middle subcells throughout a range of air masses corresponding to daily and seasonal variation.

  11. Predicting the Spectral Effects of Soils on Concentrating Photovoltaic Systems

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Burton, Patrick D.; King, Bruce Hardison; Riley, Daniel M.

    2014-12-15

    The soiling losses on high concentrating photovoltaic (HCPV) systems may be influenced by the spectral properties of accumulated soil. We predicted the response of an isotype cell to changes in spectral content and reduction in transmission due to soiling using measured UV/vis transmittance through soil films. Artificial soil test blends deposited on glass coupons were used to supply the transmission data, which was then used to calculate the effect on model spectra. Moreover, the wavelength transparency of the test soil was varied by incorporating red and yellow mineral pigments into graded sand. The more spectrally responsive (yellow) soils were predictedmore » to alter the current balance between the top and middle subcells throughout a range of air masses corresponding to daily and seasonal variation.« less

  12. Flow Partitioning in Fully Saturated Soil Aggregates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Xiaofan; Richmond, Marshall C.; Scheibe, Timothy D.; Perkins, William A.; Resat, Haluk

    2014-03-30

    Microbes play an important role in facilitating organic matter decomposition in soils, which is a major component of the global carbon cycle. Microbial dynamics are intimately coupled to environmental transport processes, which control access to labile organic matter and other nutrients that are needed for the growth and maintenance of microorganisms. Transport of soluble nutrients in the soil system is arguably most strongly impacted by preferential flow pathways in the soil. Since the physical structure of soils can be characterized as being formed from constituent micro aggregates which contain internal porosity, one pressing question is the partitioning of the flow among the inter-aggregate and intra-aggregate pores and how this may impact overall solute transport within heterogeneous soil structures. The answer to this question is particularly important in evaluating assumptions to be used in developing upscaled simulations based on highly-resolved mechanistic models. We constructed a number of diverse multi-aggregate structures with different packing ratios by stacking micro-aggregates containing internal pores and varying the size and shape of inter-aggregate pore spacing between them. We then performed pore-scale flow simulations using computational fluid dynamics methods to determine the flow patterns in these aggregate-of-aggregates structures and computed the partitioning of the flow through intra- and inter-aggregate pores as a function of the spacing between the aggregates. The results of these numerical experiments demonstrate that soluble nutrients are largely transported via flows through inter-aggregate pores. Although this result is consistent with intuition, we have also been able to quantify the relative flow capacity of the two domains under various conditions. For example, in our simulations, the flow capacity through the aggregates (intra-aggregate flow) was less than 2% of the total flow when the spacing between the aggregates was larger than 18 micron. Inter-aggregate pores continued to be the dominant flow pathways even at much smaller spacing; intra-aggregate flow was less than 10% of the total flow when the inter- and intra-aggregate pore sizes were comparable. Such studies are making it possible to identify which model upscaling assumptions are realistic and what computational methods are required for detailed numerical investigation of microbial carbon cycling dynamics in soil systems.

  13. REE Sorption Study on sieved -50 +100 mesh fraction of Media #1 in Brine #1 with Different Starting pH's at 70C

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Gary Garland

    2015-09-29

    This is a continuation of the REE sorption study for shaker bath tests on 2g media #1 in 150mL brine #1 with different starting pH's at 70C. In a previous submission we reported data for shaker bath tests for brine #1 with starting pH's of 3.5, 4.5 and 5.5. In this submission we these pH's compared to starting brine #1 pH's of 6, and 7.

  14. A microbial functional group-based module for simulating methane production and consumption: Application to an incubated permafrost soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Xiaofeng; Elias, Dwayne A.; Graham, David E.; Phelps, Tommy J.; Carroll, Sue L.; Wullschleger, Stan D.; Thornton, Peter E.

    2015-07-23

    In this study, accurately estimating methane (CH4) flux is critically important for investigating and predicting the biogeochemistry-climate feedback. Better simulating CH4 flux requires explicit representations of microbial processes on CH4 dynamics because all processes for CH4 production and consumption are actually carried out by microbes. A microbial functional group based module was developed and tested against an incubation experiment. The module considers four key mechanisms for CH4 production and consumption: methanogenesis from acetate or single-carbon compounds and CH4 oxidation using molecular oxygen or other inorganic electron acceptors. These four processes were carried out by four microbial functional groups: acetoclastic methanogens, hydrogenotrophic methanogens, aerobic methanotrophs, and anaerobic methanotrophs. This module was then linked with the decomposition subroutine of the Community Land Model, and was further used to simulate dynamics of carbon dioxide (CO2) and CH4 concentrations from an incubation experiment with permafrost soils. The results show that the model could capture the dynamics of CO2 and CH4 concentrations in microcosms with top soils, mineral layer soils and permafrost soils under natural and saturated moisture conditions and a temperature gradient of -2°C, 3°C, and 5°C. Sensitivity analysis confirmed the importance of acetic acid's direct contribution as substrate and indirect effects through pH feedback on CO2 and CH4 production and consumption. This study suggests that representing the microbial mechanisms is critical for modeling CH4 production and consumption; it is urgent to incorporate microbial mechanisms into Earth system models for better predicting the behavior of the climate system.

  15. A microbial functional group-based module for simulating methane production and consumption: Application to an incubated permafrost soil

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xu, Xiaofeng; Elias, Dwayne A.; Graham, David E.; Phelps, Tommy J.; Carroll, Sue L.; Wullschleger, Stan D.; Thornton, Peter E.

    2015-07-23

    In this study, accurately estimating methane (CH4) flux is critically important for investigating and predicting the biogeochemistry-climate feedback. Better simulating CH4 flux requires explicit representations of microbial processes on CH4 dynamics because all processes for CH4 production and consumption are actually carried out by microbes. A microbial functional group based module was developed and tested against an incubation experiment. The module considers four key mechanisms for CH4 production and consumption: methanogenesis from acetate or single-carbon compounds and CH4 oxidation using molecular oxygen or other inorganic electron acceptors. These four processes were carried out by four microbial functional groups: acetoclastic methanogens,more » hydrogenotrophic methanogens, aerobic methanotrophs, and anaerobic methanotrophs. This module was then linked with the decomposition subroutine of the Community Land Model, and was further used to simulate dynamics of carbon dioxide (CO2) and CH4 concentrations from an incubation experiment with permafrost soils. The results show that the model could capture the dynamics of CO2 and CH4 concentrations in microcosms with top soils, mineral layer soils and permafrost soils under natural and saturated moisture conditions and a temperature gradient of -2°C, 3°C, and 5°C. Sensitivity analysis confirmed the importance of acetic acid's direct contribution as substrate and indirect effects through pH feedback on CO2 and CH4 production and consumption. This study suggests that representing the microbial mechanisms is critical for modeling CH4 production and consumption; it is urgent to incorporate microbial mechanisms into Earth system models for better predicting the behavior of the climate system.« less

  16. Remediation of Soil at Nuclear Sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holmes, R.; Boardman, C.; Robbins, R; Fox, Robert Vincent; Mincher, Bruce Jay

    2000-03-01

    As the major nuclear waste and decontamination and decommissioning projects progress, one of the remaining problems that faces the nuclear industry is that of site remediation. The range of contamination levels and contaminants is wide and varied and there is likely to be a significant volume of soil contaminated with transuranics and hazardous organic materials that could qualify as mixed TRU waste. There are many technologies that offer the potential for remediating this waste but few that tackle all or most of the contaminants and even fewer that have been deployed with confidence. This paper outlines the progress made in proving the ability of Supercritical Fluid Extraction as a method of remediating soil, classified as mixed (TRU) transuranic waste.

  17. Remediation of soil at nuclear sites

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    R. Holmes; C. Boardman; R. Robbins; R. Fox; B. J. Mincher

    2000-02-28

    As the major nuclear waste and decontamination and decommissioning projects progress, one of the remaining problems that faces the nuclear industry is that of site remediation. The range of contamination levels and contaminants is wide and varied and there is likely to be a significant volume of soil contaminated with transuranics and hazardous organic materials that could qualify as mixed TRU waste. There are many technologies that offer the potential for remediating this waste but few that tackle all or most of the contaminants and even fewer that have been deployed with confidence. This paper outlines the progress made in proving the ability of Supercritical Fluid Extraction as a method of remediating soil, classified as mixed (TRU) transuranic waste

  18. Plant stimulation of soil microbial community succession: how sequential expression mediates soil carbon stabilization and turnover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Firestone, Mary

    2015-03-31

    It is now understood that most plant C is utilized or transformed by soil microorganisms en route to stabilization. Hence the composition of microbial communities that mediate decomposition and transformation of root C is critical, as are the metabolic capabilities of these communities. The change in composition and function of the C-transforming microbial communities over time in effect defines the biological component of soil C stabilization. Our research was designed to test 2 general hypotheses; the first two hypotheses are discussed first; H1: Root-exudate interactions with soil microbial populations results in the expression of enzymatic capacities for macromolecular, complex carbon decomposition; and H2: Microbial communities surrounding roots undergo taxonomic succession linked to functional gene activities as roots grow, mature, and decompose in soil. Over the term of the project we made significant progress in 1) quantifying the temporal pattern of root interactions with the soil decomposing community and 2) characterizing the role of root exudates in mediating these interactions.

  19. Chemotactic selection of pollutant degrading soil bacteria

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hazen, Terry C.

    1994-01-01

    A method for identifying soil microbial strains which may be bacterial degraders of pollutants comprising the steps of placing a concentration of a pollutant in a substantially closed container, placing the container in a sample of soil for a period of time ranging from one minute to several hours, retrieving the container, collecting the contents of the container, and microscopically determining the identity of the bacteria present. Different concentrations of the pollutant can be used to determine which bacteria respond to each concentration. The method can be used for characterizing a polluted site or for looking for naturally occurring biological degraders of the pollutant. Then bacteria identified as degraders of the pollutant and as chemotactically attracted to the pollutant are used to inoculate contaminated soil. To enhance the effect of the bacteria on the pollutant, nutrients are cyclicly provided to the bacteria then withheld to alternately build up the size of the bacterial colony or community and then allow it to degrade the pollutant.

  20. Correlating hydrogen oxidation and evolution activity on platinum at different pH with measured hydrogen binding energy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheng, WC; Zhuang, ZB; Gao, MR; Zheng, J; Chen, JGG; Yan, YS

    2015-01-08

    The hydrogen oxidation/evolution reactions are two of the most fundamental reactions in distributed renewable electrochemical energy conversion and storage systems. The identification of the reaction descriptor is therefore of critical importance for the rational catalyst design and development. Here we report the correlation between hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity and experimentally measured hydrogen binding energy for polycrystalline platinum examined in several buffer solutions in a wide range of electrolyte pH from 0 to 13. The hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity obtained using the rotating disk electrode method is found to decrease with the pH, while the hydrogen binding energy, obtained from cyclic voltammograms, linearly increases with the pH. Correlating the hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity to the hydrogen binding energy renders a monotonic decreasing hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity with the hydrogen binding energy, strongly supporting the hypothesis that hydrogen binding energy is the sole reaction descriptor for the hydrogen oxidation/evolution activity on monometallic platinum.

  1. Carbon Sequestration in Reclaimed Mined Soils of Ohio

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    K. Lorenz; R. Lal

    2007-12-31

    This research project was aimed at assessing the soil organic carbon (SOC) sequestration potential of reclaimed minesoils (RMS). The experimental sites were characterized by distinct age chronosequences of RMS and were located in Guernsey, Morgan, Noble, and Muskingum Counties of Ohio. Restoration of disturbed land is followed by the application of nutrients to the soil to promote the vegetation development. Reclamation is important both for preserving the environmental quality and increasing agronomic yields. Since reclamation treatments have significant influence on the rate of soil development, a study on subplots was designed with the objectives of assessing the potential of different biosolids on soil organic C (SOC) sequestration rate, soil development, and changes in soil physical and water transmission properties. All sites are owned and maintained by American Electric Power (AEP). These sites were reclaimed by two techniques: (1) with topsoil application, and (2) without topsoil application, and were under continuous grass or forest cover.

  2. Origin State>> CA CA ID ID ID IL KY MD MO NM NM NY NY OH SC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MO NM NM NY NY OH SC TN TN TN, WA, CA TN TN TN TN Total Shipments by Route Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory General Atomics Batelle Energy Alliance Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Argonne National Laboratory Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Aberdeen Proving Grounds National Security Technologies Sandia National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory Brookhaven National Laboratory CH2M Hill B&W West Valley, LLC Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

  3. Origin State>> CA CA ID ID ID IL KY MD NM NM NV NY NY OH TN

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NM NM NV NY NY OH TN TN TN, WA, CA TN TN TN TN TX Total Shipments by Route Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory General Atomics Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Batelle Energy Alliance Idaho National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Aberdeen Proving Ground Los Alamos National Laboratory Sandia National Laboratory National Security Technologies Brookhaven National Laboratory West Valley Environmental Services Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant

  4. Origin State>> CA ID ID ID IL KY MD NM NM NY NY OH SC TN TN

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    MD NM NM NY NY OH SC TN TN TN, WA, CA TN TN TN TN TX Total Shipments by Route Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Batelle Energy Alliance Idaho National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant Aberdeen Proving Ground Los Alamos National Laboratory Sandia National Laboratory Brookhaven National Laboratory West Valley Environmental Services Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Savannah River Site Duratek/Energy Solutions Babcox

  5. Origin State>> CA ID ID ID IL KY NV NY NY OH TN TN TN, WA, CA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NV NY NY OH TN TN TN, WA, CA TN TN TN TN TX Total Shipments by Route Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Batelle Energy Alliance Idaho National Laboratory Argonne National Laboratory Paducah Gaseous Diffusion Plant National Security Technologies Brookhaven National Laboratory West Valley Environmental Services Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Duratek/Energy Solutions Babcox & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12 Plant Materials & Energy Corporation

  6. Origin State>> CA ID ID ID IL MD NM NM NV NY NY OH SC TN TN

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NV NY NY OH SC TN TN TN, WA, CA TN TN TN Total Shipments by Route Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Batelle Energy Alliance Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Argonne National Laboratory Aberdeen Proving Ground Sandia National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory National Security Technologies Brookhaven National Laboratory West Valley Environmental Services Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Savannah River Site Duratek/Energy Solutions Babcox & Wilcox

  7. Origin State>> CA ID ID ID IL MD NM NM NY OH TN TN TN, WA, CA

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NY OH TN TN TN, WA, CA TN TN TN TX Total Shipments by Route Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Batelle Energy Alliance Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Argonne National Laboratory Aberdeen Proving Ground Sandia National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory Brookhaven National Laboratory Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Duratek/Energy Solutions Babcox & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12 Plant Materials & Energy Corporation (M&EC) Perma-Fix

  8. Origin State>> CA ID ID ID IL NM NM OH TN TN TN, WA, CA TN TN

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NM NM OH TN TN TN, WA, CA TN TN TN TN TX Total Shipments by Route Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Batelle Energy Alliance Idaho National Laboratory Advanced Mixed Waste Treatment Project Argonne National Laboratory Sandia National Laboratory Los Alamos National Laboratory Portsmouth Gaseous Diffusion Plant Duratek/Energy Solutions Babcox & Wilcox Technical Services Y-12 Plant Materials & Energy Corporation (M&EC) Perma-Fix Nuclear Fuels Services Wastren Advantage, Inc.

  9. Intercropped silviculture systems, a key to achieving soil fungal community

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    management in eucalyptus plantations (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Intercropped silviculture systems, a key to achieving soil fungal community management in eucalyptus plantations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Intercropped silviculture systems, a key to achieving soil fungal community management in eucalyptus plantations Fungi are ubiquitous and important contributors to soil nutrient cycling, playing a vital role in C, N and P turnover, with many fungi

  10. Overview of different aspects of climate change effects on soils.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qafoku, Nikolla

    2014-08-01

    Climate change [i.e., high atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) concentrations (≥400 ppm); increasing air temperatures (2-4°C or greater); significant and/or abrupt changes in daily, seasonal, and inter-annual temperature; changes in the wet/dry cycles; intensive rainfall and/or heavy storms; extended periods of drought; extreme frost; heat waves and increased fire frequency] is and will significantly affect soil properties and fertility, water resources, food quantity and quality, and environmental quality. Biotic processes that consume atmospheric CO2 and create organic carbon (C) that is either reprocessed to CO2 or stored in soils, are the subject of active current investigations with great concern over the influence of climate change. In addition, abiotic C cycling and its influence on the inorganic C pool in soils is a fundamental global process in which acidic atmospheric CO2 participates in the weathering of carbonate and silicate minerals, ultimately delivering bicarbonate and Ca2+ or other cations that precipitate in the form of carbonates in soils or are transported to the rivers, lakes, and oceans. Soil responses to climate change will be complex, and there are many uncertainties and unresolved issues. The objective of the review is to initiate and further stimulate a discussion about some important and challenging aspects of climate-change effects on soils, such as accelerated weathering of soil minerals and resulting C and elemental fluxes in and out of soils, soil/geo-engineering methods used to increase C sequestration in soils, soil organic matter (SOM) protection, transformation and mineralization, and SOM temperature sensitivity. This review reports recent discoveries and identifies key research needs required to understand the effects of climate change on soils.

  11. PROJECT PROFILE: Addressing Soiling: From Interface Chemistry to

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Practicality | Department of Energy Addressing Soiling: From Interface Chemistry to Practicality PROJECT PROFILE: Addressing Soiling: From Interface Chemistry to Practicality Funding Opportunity: SuNLaMP SunShot Subprogram: Photovoltaics Location: National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO Amount Awarded: $6,000,000 Natural soiling is responsible for about 4% output power loss and may be adding one cent per kilowatt hour to the levelized cost of energy (LCOE) depending on the site.

  12. Convergence of microbial assimilations of soil carbon, nitrogen,

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    phosphorus, and sulfur in terrestrial ecosystems (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Convergence of microbial assimilations of soil carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur in terrestrial ecosystems Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Convergence of microbial assimilations of soil carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus, and sulfur in terrestrial ecosystems How soil microbes assimilate carbon-C, nitrogen-N, phosphorus-P, and sulfur-S is fundamental for understanding nutrient cycling in

  13. AX Tank farm closure settlement estimates and soil testing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    BECKER, D.L.

    1999-03-25

    This study provides a conservative three-dimensional settlement study of the AX Tank Farm closure with fill materials and a surface barrier. The finite element settlement model constructed included the interaction of four tanks and the surface barrier with the site soil and bedrock. Also addressed are current soil testing techniques suitable for the site soil with recommendations applicable to the AX Tank Farm and the planned cone penetration testing.

  14. System for the removal of contaminant soil-gas vapors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weidner, J.R.; Downs, W.C.; Kaser, T.G.; Hall, H.J.

    1997-12-16

    A system extracts contaminated vapors from soil or other subsurface regions by using changes in barometric pressure to operate sensitive check valves that control air entry and removal from wells in the ground. The system creates an efficient subterranean flow of air through a contaminated soil plume and causes final extraction of the contaminants from the soil to ambient air above ground without any external energy sources. 4 figs.

  15. System for the removal of contaminant soil-gas vapors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weidner, Jerry R.; Downs, Wayne C.; Kaser, Timothy G.; Hall, H. James

    1997-01-01

    A system extracts contaminated vapors from soil or other subsurface regions by using changes in barometric pressure to operate sensitive check valves that control air entry and removal from wells in the ground. The system creates an efficient subterranean flow of air through a contaminated soil plume and causes final extraction of the contaminants from the soil to ambient air above ground without any external energy sources.

  16. Microsoft Word - Appendix C - Soil Disturbance Evaluation Procedure.docx

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Rocky Flats Site Soil Disturbance Evaluation Procedure This page intentionally left blank U.S. Department of Energy Rocky Flats Site Operations Guide July 2013 Doc. No. S03037-6.0 Page C-1 Soil Disturbance Evaluation Process Purpose: The purpose of this Soil Disturbance Evaluation Process is to identify hazards and regulatory requirements so that appropriate work control steps, including regulatory agency and/or engineering approvals, are implemented to address and mitigate the hazard and/or

  17. Soil Separator and Sampler and Method of Sampling - Energy Innovation...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Soil Separator and Sampler and Method of Sampling Fluidized Bed system Idaho National Laboratory Contact INL About This Technology Technology Marketing Summary INL has developed a...

  18. Soil Sampling At North Brawley Geothermal Area (Alan & G., 1977...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    North Brawley Geothermal Area (Alan & G., 1977) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Soil Sampling At North Brawley Geothermal Area...

  19. Water on Crop Biomass and Soil Permeability FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Irrigating with Treated Oil and Gas Product Water on Crop Biomass and Soil Permeability FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT Prepared By Terry Brown, Jeffrey Morris, Patrick Richards and Joel...

  20. Soil Sampling At Chena Geothermal Area (Kolker, 2008) | Open...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    studies through the University of Alaska Fairbanks' Geophysical Institute. Notes Mercury soil sampling correlated with the measured thermal anomaly (Biggar 1973) in the...