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1

Non-standard Neutrino Oscillations at Icecube  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this talk I review the potential of Icecube for revealing physics beyond the standard model in the oscillation of atmospheric neutrinos.

M. C. Gonzalez-Garcia

2006-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

2

Multimessenger search for sources of gravitational waves and high-energy neutrinos: Initial results for LIGO-Virgo and IceCube  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report the results of a multimessenger search for coincident signals from the LIGO and Virgo gravitational-wave observatories and the partially completed IceCube high-energy neutrino detector, including periods of joint ...

Aartsen, M.?G.

3

The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A report is given on the status of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory, presently under construction in the Creighton nickel mine near Sudbury, Ontario in Canada. Focus is upon the technical factors involving a measurement of the charged-current and neutral-current interactions of solar neutrinos on deuterium.

Hime, A.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

IceCube: An Instrument for Neutrino Astronomy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutrino astronomy beyond the Sun was first imagined in the late 1950s; by the 1970s, it was realized that kilometer-scale neutrino detectors were required. The first such instrument, IceCube, is near completion and taking data. The IceCube project transforms a cubic kilometer of deep and ultra-transparent Antarctic ice into a particle detector. A total of 5,160 optical sensors are embedded into a gigaton of Antarctic ice to detect the Cherenkov light emitted by secondary particles produced when neutrinos interact with nuclei in the ice. Each optical sensor is a complete data acquisition system, including a phototube, digitization electronics, control and trigger systems and LEDs for calibration. The light patterns reveal the type (flavor) of neutrino interaction and the energy and direction of the neutrino, making neutrino astronomy possible. The scientific missions of IceCube include such varied tasks as the search for sources of cosmic rays, the observation of Galactic supernova explosions, the search for dark matter, and the study of the neutrinos themselves. These reach energies well beyond those produced with accelerator beams. The outline of this review is as follows: Neutrino Astronomy and Kilometer-Scale Detectors. High-Energy Neutrino Telescopes: Methodologies of Neutrino Detection. IceCube Hardware. High-Energy Neutrino Telescopes: Beyond Astronomy. Future Projects

Francis Halzen; Spencer R. Klein

2010-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

5

Neutrino Data from IceCube and its Predecessor at the South Pole, the Antarctic Muon and Neutrino Detector Array (AMANDA)  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

IceCube is a neutrino observatory for astrophysics with parts buried below the surface of the ice at the South Pole and an air-shower detector array exposed above. The international group of sponsors, led by the National Science Foundation (NSF), that designed and implemented the experiment intends for IceCube to operate and provide data for 20 years. IceCube records the interactions produced by astrophysical neutrinos with energies above 100 GeV, observing the Cherenkov radiation from charged particles produced in neutrino interactions. Its goal is to discover the sources of high-energy cosmic rays. These sources may be active galactic nuclei (AGNs) or massive, collapsed stars where black holes have formed.[Taken from http://www.icecube.wisc.edu/] The data from IceCube's predecessor experiment and detector, AMANDA, IceCube’s predecessor detector and experiment is also available at this website. AMANDA pioneered neutrino detection in ice. Over a period of years in the 1990s, detecting “strings” were buried and activated and by 2000, AMANDA was successfully recording an average of 1,000 neutrino events per year. This site also makes available many images and video from the two experiments.

Abbasi, R.

6

High-Energy Neutrino Astronomy: from AMANDA to Icecube  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kilometer-scale neutrino detectors such as IceCube are discovery instruments covering nuclear and particle physics, cosmology and astronomy. Examples of their multidisciplinary missions include the search for the particle nature of dark matter and for additional small dimensions of space. In the end, their conceptual design is very much anchored to the observational fact that Nature accelerates protons and photons to energies in excess of 10^{20} and 10^{13} eV, respectively. The cosmic ray connection sets the scale of cosmic neutrino fluxes. In this context, we discuss the first results of the completed AMANDA detector and the reach of its extension, IceCube.

F. Halzen

2003-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

7

IceCube: An Instrument for Neutrino Astronomy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutrino astronomy beyond the Sun was first imagined in the late 1950s; by the 1970s, it was realized that kilometer-scale neutrino detectors were required. The first such instrument, IceCube, is near completion and taking data. The IceCube project transforms a cubic kilometer of deep and ultra-transparent Antarctic ice into a particle detector. A total of 5,160 optical sensors are embedded into a gigaton of Antarctic ice to detect the Cherenkov light emitted by secondary particles produced when neutrinos interact with nuclei in the ice. Each optical sensor is a complete data acquisition system, including a phototube, digitization electronics, control and trigger systems and LEDs for calibration. The light patterns reveal the type (flavor) of neutrino interaction and the energy and direction of the neutrino, making neutrino astronomy possible. The scientific missions of IceCube include such varied tasks as the search for sources of cosmic rays, the observation of Galactic supernova explosions, the search for dark matter, and the study of the neutrinos themselves. These reach energies well beyond those produced with accelerator beams.

IceCube Collaboration; Halzen, F.; Klein, S.

2010-06-04T23:59:59.000Z

8

Some possible sources of IceCube TeV-PeV neutrino events  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The IceCube Collaboration has observed 37 neutrino events in the energy range $30\\, {\\text TeV}\\lesssim E_{\

Sarira Sahu; Luis Salvador Miranda

2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

9

Neutrinos from Gamma Ray Bursts in the IceCube and ARA Era  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this review I discuss the ultra-high energy neutrinos (UHEN) originated from Cosmic-Rays propogation (GZK neutrinos) and from Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs), and discuss their detectability in kilometers scale detectors like ARA and IceCube. While GZK neutrinos are expected from cosmic ray interactions on the CMB, the GRB neutrinos depend on the physics inside the sources. GRBs are predicted to emit UHEN in the prompt and in the later 'after-glow' phase. I discuss the constraints on the hadronic component of GRBs derived from the search of four years of IceCube data for a prompt neutrino fux from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) and more in general I present the results of the search for high-energy neutrinos interacting within the IceCube detector between 2010 and 2013.

Guetta, Dafne

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Flavor Ratio of Astrophysical Neutrinos above 35 TeV in IceCube  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A diffuse flux of astrophysical neutrinos above $100\\,\\mathrm{TeV}$ has been observed at the IceCube Neutrino Observatory. Here we extend this analysis to probe the astrophysical flux down to $35\\,\\mathrm{TeV}$ and analyze its flavor composition by classifying events as showers or tracks. Taking advantage of lower atmospheric backgrounds for shower-like events, we obtain a shower-biased sample containing 129 showers and 8 tracks collected in three years from 2010 to 2013. We demonstrate consistency with the $(f_e:f_{\\mu}:f_\\tau)_\\oplus\\approx(1:1:1)_\\oplus$ flavor ratio at Earth commonly expected from the averaged oscillations of neutrinos produced by pion decay in distant astrophysical sources. Limits are placed on non-standard flavor compositions that cannot be produced by averaged neutrino oscillations but could arise in exotic physics scenarios. A maximally track-like composition of $(0:1:0)_\\oplus$ is excluded at $3.3\\sigma$, and a purely shower-like composition of $(1:0:0)_\\oplus$ is excluded at $2.3\\sigma$.

IceCube Collaboration; M. G. Aartsen; M. Ackermann; J. Adams; J. A. Aguilar; M. Ahlers; M. Ahrens; D. Altmann; T. Anderson; C. Arguelles; T. C. Arlen; J. Auffenberg; X. Bai; S. W. Barwick; V. Baum; R. Bay; J. J. Beatty; J. Becker Tjus; K. -H. Becker; S. BenZvi; P. Berghaus; D. Berley; E. Bernardini; A. Bernhard; D. Z. Besson; G. Binder; D. Bindig; M. Bissok; E. Blaufuss; J. Blumenthal; D. J. Boersma; C. Bohm; F. Bos; D. Bose; S. Böser; O. Botner; L. Brayeur; H. -P. Bretz; A. M. Brown; N. Buzinsky; J. Casey; M. Casier; E. Cheung; D. Chirkin; A. Christov; B. Christy; K. Clark; L. Classen; F. Clevermann; S. Coenders; D. F. Cowen; A. H. Cruz Silva; J. Daughhetee; J. C. Davis; M. Day; J. P. A. M. de André; C. De Clercq; H. Dembinski; S. De Ridder; P. Desiati; K. D. de Vries; M. de With; T. DeYoung; J. C. Díaz-Vélez; J. P. Dumm; M. Dunkman; R. Eagan; B. Eberhardt; T. Ehrhardt; B. Eichmann; J. Eisch; S. Euler; P. A. Evenson; O. Fadiran; A. R. Fazely; A. Fedynitch; J. Feintzeig; J. Felde; K. Filimonov; C. Finley; T. Fischer-Wasels; S. Flis; K. Frantzen; T. Fuchs; T. K. Gaisser; R. Gaior; J. Gallagher; L. Gerhardt; D. Gier; L. Gladstone; T. Glüsenkamp; A. Goldschmidt; G. Golup; J. G. Gonzalez; J. A. Goodman; D. Góra; D. Grant; P. Gretskov; J. C. Groh; A. Groß; C. Ha; C. Haack; A. Haj Ismail; P. Hallen; A. Hallgren; F. Halzen; K. Hanson; D. Hebecker; D. Heereman; D. Heinen; K. Helbing; R. Hellauer; D. Hellwig; S. Hickford; G. C. Hill; K. D. Hoffman; R. Hoffmann; A. Homeier; K. Hoshina; F. Huang; W. Huelsnitz; P. O. Hulth; K. Hultqvist; A. Ishihara; E. Jacobi; J. Jacobsen; G. S. Japaridze; K. Jero; M. Jurkovic; B. Kaminsky; A. Kappes; T. Karg; A. Karle; M. Kauer; A. Keivani; J. L. Kelley; A. Kheirandish; J. Kiryluk; J. Kläs; S. R. Klein; J. -H. Köhne; G. Kohnen; H. Kolanoski; A. Koob; L. Köpke; C. Kopper; S. Kopper; D. J. Koskinen; M. Kowalski; A. Kriesten; K. Krings; G. Kroll; M. Kroll; J. Kunnen; N. Kurahashi; T. Kuwabara; M. Labare; J. L. Lanfranchi; D. T. Larsen; M. J. Larson; M. Lesiak-Bzdak; M. Leuermann; J. Lünemann; J. Madsen; G. Maggi; R. Maruyama; K. Mase; H. S. Matis; R. Maunu; F. McNally; K. Meagher; M. Medici; A. Meli; T. Meures; S. Miarecki; E. Middell; E. Middlemas; N. Milke; J. Miller; L. Mohrmann; T. Montaruli; R. Morse; R. Nahnhauer; U. Naumann; H. Niederhausen; S. C. Nowicki; D. R. Nygren; A. Obertacke; A. Olivas; A. Omairat; A. O'Murchadha; T. Palczewski; L. Paul; Ö. Penek; J. A. Pepper; C. Pérez de los Heros; C. Pfendner; D. Pieloth; E. Pinat; J. Posselt; P. B. Price; G. T. Przybylski; J. Pütz; M. Quinnan; L. Rädel; M. Rameez; K. Rawlins; P. Redl; I. Rees; R. Reimann; M. Relich; E. Resconi; W. Rhode; M. Richman; B. Riedel; S. Robertson; J. P. Rodrigues; M. Rongen; C. Rott; T. Ruhe; B. Ruzybayev; D. Ryckbosch; S. M. Saba; H. -G. Sander; J. Sandroos; M. Santander; S. Sarkar; K. Schatto; F. Scheriau; T. Schmidt; M. Schmitz; S. Schoenen; S. Schöneberg; A. Schönwald; A. Schukraft; L. Schulte; O. Schulz; D. Seckel; Y. Sestayo; S. Seunarine; R. Shanidze; M. W. E. Smith; D. Soldin; G. M. Spiczak; C. Spiering; M. Stamatikos; T. Stanev; N. A. Stanisha; A. Stasik; T. Stezelberger; R. G. Stokstad; A. Stößl; E. A. Strahler; R. Ström; N. L. Strotjohann; G. W. Sullivan; M. Sutherland; H. Taavola; I. Taboada; A. Tamburro; S. Ter-Antonyan; A. Terliuk; G. Teši?; S. Tilav; P. A. Toale; M. N. Tobin; D. Tosi; M. Tselengidou; E. Unger; M. Usner; S. Vallecorsa; N. van Eijndhoven; J. Vandenbroucke; J. van Santen; S. Vanheule; M. Vehring; M. Voge; M. Vraeghe; C. Walck; M. Wallraff; Ch. Weaver; M. Wellons; C. Wendt; S. Westerhoff; B. J. Whelan; N. Whitehorn; C. Wichary; K. Wiebe; C. H. Wiebusch; D. R. Williams; H. Wissing; M. Wolf; T. R. Wood; K. Woschnagg; D. L. Xu; X. W. Xu; Y. Xu; J. P. Yanez; G. Yodh; S. Yoshida; P. Zarzhitsky; J. Ziemann; M. Zoll

2015-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

11

Photohadronic origin of $\\gamma$-ray BL Lac emission: implications for IceCube neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recent IceCube discovery of 0.1-1 PeV neutrinos of astrophysical origin opens up a new era for high-energy astrophysics. Although there are various astrophysical candidate sources, a firm association of the detected neutrinos with one (or more) of them is still lacking. A recent analysis of plausible astrophysical counterparts within the error circles of IceCube events showed that likely counterparts for nine of the IceCube neutrinos include mostly BL Lacs, among which Mrk 421. Motivated by this result and a previous independent analysis on the neutrino emission from Mrk 421, we test the BL Lac-neutrino connection in the context of a specific theoretical model for BL Lac emission. We model the spectral energy distribution (SED) of the BL Lacs selected as counterparts of the IceCube neutrinos using a one-zone leptohadronic model and mostly nearly simultaneous data. The neutrino flux for each BL Lac is self-consistently calculated, using photon and proton distributions specifically derived for every individ...

Petropoulou, Maria; Padovani, Paolo; Mastichiadis, Apostolos; Resconi, Elisa

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

12

First Evidence For Atmospheric Neutrino-Induced Cascades with the IceCube Detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IceCube is an all-flavor, cubic kilometer neutrino telescope currently under construction in the deep glacial ice at the South Pole. Its embedded optical sensors detect Cherenkov light from charged particles produced in neutrino interactions in the ice. For several years IceCube has been detecting muon tracks from charged-current muon neutrino interactions. However, IceCube has yet to observe the electromagnetic or hadronic particle showers or "cascades" initiated by charged-current or neutral-current neutrino interactions. The first detection of such an event signature is expected to come from the known flux of atmospheric electron and muon neutrinos. A search for atmospheric neutrino-induced cascades was performed using 275.46 days of data from IceCube's 22-string configuration. Reconstruction and background rejection techniques were developed to reach, for the first time, a signal-to-background ratio ~1. Above a reconstructed energy of 5 TeV, 12 candidate events were observed in the full dataset. The signa...

D'Agostino, Michelangelo

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

IceCube - A New Detector for Neutrino Astronomy and Particle Astrosphysics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

IceCube, currently under construction at the South Pole, will be a gigaton detector for high-energy neutrinos and muons. Half of the 5000 optical modules that make up IceCube are now installed in the ice and taking data. The main goal is to find high-energy neutrinos from distant astrophysical sources such as active galactic nuclei and exploding massive stars. I will describe how the detector works, show some current results and discuss status and future plans for the project.

McKay, Timothy (University of Michigan) [University of Michigan

2008-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

14

Coherent Propagation of PeV Neutrinos and the Dip in the Neutrino Spectrum at IceCube  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The energy spectrum of high-energy neutrinos reported by the IceCube collaboration shows a dip between 400 TeV and 1 PeV. One intriguing explanation is that high-energy neutrinos scatter with the cosmic neutrino background through a $\\sim$ MeV mediator. Since the coherence length of PeV neutrinos is much larger than the cosmic distance that they travel from the source to the IceCube detector, the quantum coherent effect in neutrino propagation plays an important role in determining flavor components of the PeV neutrino flux at the IceCube detector. Taking the density matrix approach, we develop a formalism to include the coherent effect in calculating the neutrino flux. If the new interaction is not flavor-blind such as the gauged $L_{\\mu}-L_{\\tau}$ model we consider, the resonant collision may not suppress the PeV neutrino flux completely. The new force mediator may also contribute to the number of effectively massless degrees of freedom in the early universe, and change the diffusion time of neutrinos from ...

Kamada, Ayuki

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Search for a Lorentz-violating sidereal signal with atmospheric neutrinos in IceCube  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A search for sidereal modulation in the flux of atmospheric muon neutrinos in IceCube was performed. Such a signal could be an indication of Lorentz-violating physics. Neutrino oscillationmodels, derivable from extensions to the Standard Model, allow for neutrino oscillations that depend on the neutrino's direction of propagation. No such direction-dependent variation was found. Adiscrete Fourier transform method was used to constrain the Lorentz and CPT-violating coefficients in one of these models. Due to the unique high energy reach of IceCube, it was possible to improveconstraints on certain Lorentz-violating oscillations by three orders of magnitude with respect to limits set by other experiments.

IceCube; etal, Abbasi, R,

2010-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

16

IceCube: An Instrument for Neutrino Astronomy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Instrument for Neutrino Astronomy Francis Halzen 1 andAn Instrument for Neutrino Astronomy Francis Halzen 1 and94720 Abstract Neutrino astronomy beyond the Sun was first

Halzen, F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Search for Prompt Neutrino Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts with IceCube  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present constraints derived from a search of four years of IceCube data for a prompt neutrino flux from gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). A single low-significance neutrino was found in coincidence with one of the 506 observed bursts, consistent with the expectation from atmospheric backgrounds. Although GRBs have been proposed as candidate sources for ultra-high energy cosmic rays, our limits on the neutrino flux disfavor much of the parameter space for the latest models. We also find that no more than $\\sim1\\%$ of the recently observed astrophysical neutrino flux consists of prompt emission from GRBs that are potentially observable by existing satellites.

Aartsen, M G; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Ahrens, M; Altmann, D; Anderson, T; Arguelles, C; Arlen, T C; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Bay, R; Beatty, J J; Tjus, J Becker; Becker, K -H; BenZvi, S; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bernhard, A; Besson, D Z; Binder, G; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bos, F; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Brayeur, L; Bretz, H -P; Brown, A M; Buzinsky, N; Casey, J; Casier, M; Cheung, E; Chirkin, D; Christov, A; Christy, B; Clark, K; Classen, L; Clevermann, F; Coenders, S; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cruz; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; Day, M; de André, J P A M; De Clercq, C; De Ridder, S; Desiati, P; de Vries, K D; de With, M; DeYoung, T; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dunkman, M; Eagan, R; Eberhardt, B; Ehrhardt, T; Eichmann, B; Eisch, J; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Felde, J; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Frantzen, K; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gaior, R; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gier, D; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Golup, G; Gonzalez, J G; Goodman, J A; Góra, D; Grant, D; Gretskov, P; Groh, J C; Groß, A; Ha, C; Haack, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallen, P; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Hebecker, D; Heereman, D; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hellwig, D; Hickford, S; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huang, F; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Jero, K; Jlelati, O; Jurkovic, M; Kaminsky, B; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kauer, M; Keivani, A; Kelley, J L; Kheirandish, A; Kiryluk, J; Kläs, J; Klein, S R; Köhne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Koob, A; Köpke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Kriesten, A; Krings, K; Kroll, G; Kroll, M; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Lanfranchi, J L; Larsen, D T; Larson, M J; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Leuermann, M; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Maggi, G; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; Maunu, R; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Medici, M; Meli, A; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Middlemas, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Niederhausen, H; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Obertacke, A; Odrowski, S; Olivas, A; Omairat, A; O'Murchadha, A; Palczewski, T; Paul, L; Penek, Ö; Pepper, J A; Heros, C Pérez de los; Pfendner, C; Pieloth, D; Pinat, E; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Pütz, J; Quinnan, M; Rädel, L; Rameez, M; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Rees, I; Reimann, R; Relich, M; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Robertson, S; Rodrigues, J P; Rongen, M; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Saba, S M; Sander, H -G; Sandroos, J; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Scheriau, F; Schmidt, T; Schmitz, M; Schoenen, S; Schöneberg, S; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Schulz, O; Seckel, D; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Shanidze, R; Smith, M W E; Soldin, D; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stanisha, N A; Stasik, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Strahler, E A; Ström, R; Strotjohann, N L; Sullivan, G W; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Tepe, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Terliuk, A; Teši?, G; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Tobin, M N; Tosi, D; Tselengidou, M; Unger, E; Usner, M; Vallecorsa, S; van Eijndhoven, N; Vandenbroucke, J; van Santen, J; Vanheule, S; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Vraeghe, M; Walck, C; Wallraff, M; Weaver, Ch; Wellons, M; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whelan, B J; Whitehorn, N; Wichary, C; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Xu, Y; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Ziemann, J; Zoll, M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

ANTARES Constrains a Blazar Origin of Two IceCube PeV Neutrino Events  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The source(s) of the neutrino excess reported by the IceCube Collaboration is unknown. The TANAMI Collaboration recently reported on the multiwavelength emission of six bright, variable blazars which are positionally coincident with two of the most energetic IceCube events. Such objects are prime candidates to be the source of the highest-energy cosmic rays, and thus of associated neutrino emission. We present an analysis of neutrino emission from the six blazars using observations with the ANTARES neutrino telescope. The standard methods of the ANTARES candidate list search are applied to six years of data to search for an excess of muons - and hence their neutrino progenitors - from the directions of the six blazars described by the TANAMI Collaboration, and which are possibly associated with two IceCube events. Monte Carlo simulations of the detector response to both signal and background particle fluxes are used to estimate the sensitivity of this analysis for different possible source neutrino spectra. A...

Adrián-Martínez, S; André, M; Anton, G; Ardid, M; Aubert, J -J; Baret, B; Barrios, J; Basa, S; Bertin, V; Biagi, S; Bogazzi, C; Bormuth, R; Bou-Cabo, M; Bouwhuis, M C; Bruijn, R; Brunner, J; Busto, J; Capone, A; Caramete, L; Carr, J; Chiarusi, T; Circella, M; Coniglione, R; Core, L; Costantini, H; Coyle, P; Creusot, A; De Rosa, G; Dekeyser, I; Deschamps, A; De Bonis, G; Distefano, C; Donzaud, C; Dornic, D; Dorosti, Q; Drouhin, D; Dumas, A; Eberl, T; Enzenhöfer, A; Escoffier, S; Fehn, K; Felis, I; Fermani, P; Folger, F; Fusco, L A; Galatà, S; Gay, P; Geißelsöder, S; Geyer, K; Giordano, V; Gleixner, A; Gómez-González, J P; Graf, K; Guillard, G; van Haren, H; Heijboer, A J; Hello, Y; Hernández-Rey, J J; Herold, B; Herrero, A; Hößl, J; Hofestädt, J; Hugon, C; James, C W; de Jong, M; Kalekin, O; Katz, U; Kießling, D; Kooijman, P; Kouchner, A; Kulikovskiy, V; Lahmann, R; Lambard, E; Lambard, G; Lefèvre, D; Leonora, E; Loehner, H; Loucatos, S; Mangano, S; Marcelin, M; Margiotta, A; Martínez-Mora, J A; Martini, S; Mathieu, A; Michael, T; Migliozzi, P; Neff, M; Nezri, E; Palioselitis, D; P?v?la?, G E; Pellegrino, C; Perrina, C; Piattelli, P; Popa, V; Pradier, T; Racca, C; Riccobene, G; Richter, R; Roensch, K; Rostovtsev, A; Saldaña, M; Samtleben, D F E; Sánchez-Losa, A; Sanguineti, M; Sapienza, P; Schmid, J; Schnabel, J; Schulte, S; Schüssler, F; Seitz, T; Sieger, C; Spies, A; Spurio, M; Steijger, J J M; Stolarczyk, Th; Taiuti, M; Tamburini, C; Tayalati, Y; Trovato, A; Vallage, B; Vallée, C; Van Elewyck, V; Visser, E; Vivolo, D; Wagner, S; de Wolf, E; Yatkin, K; Yepes, H; Zornoza, J D; Zúñiga, J; :,; Krauß, F; Kadler, M; Mannheim, K; Schulz, R; Trüstedt, J; Wilms, J; Ojha, R; Ros, E; Baumgartner, W; Beuchert, T; Blanchard, J; Bürkel, C; Carpenter, B; Edwards, P G; Glawion, D Eisenacher; Elsässer, D; Fritsch, U; Gehrels, N; Gräfe, C; Großberger, C; Hase, H; Horiuchi, S; Kappes, A; Kreikenbohm, A; Kreykenbohm, I; Langejahn, M; Leiter, K; Litzinger, E; Lovell, J E J; Müller, C; Phillips, C; Plötz, C; Quick, J; Steinbring, T; Stevens, J; Thompson, D J; Tzioumis, A K

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

On the origin of IceCube's PeV neutrinos  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The IceCube collaboration has recently reported the observation of two events with energies in excess of 1 PeV. While an atmospheric origin of these events cannot be ruled out at this time, this pair of showers may potentially represent the first observation of high-energy astrophysical neutrinos. In this paper, we argue that if these events are neutrino-induced, then the neutrinos are very likely to have been produced via photo-meson interactions taking place in the same class of astrophysical objects that are responsible for the acceleration of the ? 10{sup 17} eV cosmic ray spectrum. Among the proposed sources of such cosmic rays, gamma-ray bursts stand out as particularly capable of generating PeV neutrinos at the level implied by IceCube's two events. In contrast, the radiation fields in typical active galactic nuclei models are likely dominated by lower energy (UV) photons, and thus feature higher energy thresholds for pion production, leading to neutrino spectra which peak at EeV rather than PeV energies (models with significant densities of x-ray emission, however, could evade this problem). Cosmogenic neutrinos generated from the propagation of ultra-high energy cosmic rays similarly peak at energies that are much higher than those of the events reported by IceCube.

Cholis, Ilias; Hooper, Dan, E-mail: cholis@fnal.gov, E-mail: dhooper@fnal.gov [Center for Particle Astrophysics, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, P.O. Box 500, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States)

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Limits on Neutrino Emission from Gamma-Ray Bursts with the 40 String IceCube Detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IceCube has become the first neutrino telescope with a sensitivity below the TeV neutrino flux predicted from gamma-ray bursts if GRBs are responsible for the observed cosmic-ray flux above $10^{18}$ eV. Two separate analyses using the half-complete IceCube detector, one a dedicated search for neutrinos from $p \\gamma$-interactions in the prompt phase of the GRB fireball, and the other a generic search for any neutrino emission from these sources over a wide range of energies and emission times, produced no evidence for neutrino emission, excluding prevailing models at 90% confidence.

IceCube Collaboration; R. Abbasi; Y. Abdou; T. Abu-Zayyad; J. Adams; J. A. Aguilar; M. Ahlers; K. Andeen; J. Auffenberg; X. Bai; M. Baker; S. W. Barwick; R. Bay; J. L. Bazo Alba; K. Beattie; J. J. Beatty; S. Bechet; J. K. Becker; K. -H. Becker; M. L. Benabderrahmane; S. BenZvi; J. Berdermann; P. Berghaus; D. Berley; E. Bernardini; D. Bertrand; D. Z. Besson; D. Bindig; M. Bissok; E. Blaufuss; J. Blumenthal; D. J. Boersma; C. Bohm; D. Bose; S. Böser; O. Botner; J. Braun; A. M. Brown; S. Buitink; M. Carson; D. Chirkin; B. Christy; J. Clem; F. Clevermann; S. Cohen; C. Colnard; D. F. Cowen; M. V. D'Agostino; M. Danninger; J. Daughhetee; J. C. Davis; C. De Clercq; L. Demirörs; O. Depaepe; F. Descamps; P. Desiati; G. de Vries-Uiterweerd; T. DeYoung; J. C. Díaz-Vélez; M. Dierckxsens; J. Dreyer; J. P. Dumm; R. Ehrlich; J. Eisch; R. W. Ellsworth; O. Engdegård; S. Euler; P. A. Evenson; O. Fadiran; A. R. Fazely; A. Fedynitch; T. Feusels; K. Filimonov; C. Finley; T. Fischer-Wasels; M. M. Foerster; B. D. Fox; A. Franckowiak; R. Franke; T. K. Gaisser; J. Gallagher; M. Geisler; L. Gerhardt; L. Gladstone; T. Glüsenkamp; A. Goldschmidt; J. A. Goodman; D. Grant; T. Griesel; A. Groß; S. Grullon; M. Gurtner; C. Ha; A. Hallgren; F. Halzen; K. Han; K. Hanson; D. Heinen; K. Helbing; P. Herquet; S. Hickford; G. C. Hill; K. D. Hoffman; A. Homeier; K. Hoshina; D. Hubert; W. Huelsnitz; J. -P. Hülß; P. O. Hulth; K. Hultqvist; S. Hussain; A. Ishihara; J. Jacobsen; G. S. Japaridze; H. Johansson; J. M. Joseph; K. -H. Kampert; A. Kappes; T. Karg; A. Karle; J. L. Kelley; N. Kemming; P. Kenny; J. Kiryluk; F. Kislat; S. R. Klein; J. -H. Köhne; G. Kohnen; H. Kolanoski; L. Köpke; S. Kopper; D. J. Koskinen; M. Kowalski; T. Kowarik; M. Krasberg; T. Krings; G. Kroll; K. Kuehn; T. Kuwabara; M. Labare; S. Lafebre; K. Laihem; H. Landsman; M. J. Larson; R. Lauer; R. Lehmann; J. Lünemann; J. Madsen; P. Majumdar; A. Marotta; R. Maruyama; K. Mase; H. S. Matis; K. Meagher; M. Merck; P. Mészáros; T. Meures; E. Middell; N. Milke; J. Miller; T. Montaruli; R. Morse; S. M. Movit; R. Nahnhauer; J. W. Nam; U. Naumann; P. Nießen; D. R. Nygren; S. Odrowski; A. Olivas; M. Olivo; A. O'Murchadha; M. Ono; S. Panknin; L. Paul; C. Pérez de los Heros; J. Petrovic; A. Piegsa; D. Pieloth; R. Porrata; J. Posselt; P. B. Price; M. Prikockis; G. T. Przybylski; K. Rawlins; P. Redl; E. Resconi; W. Rhode; M. Ribordy; A. Rizzo; J. P. Rodrigues; P. Roth; F. Rothmaier; C. Rott; T. Ruhe; D. Rutledge; B. Ruzybayev; D. Ryckbosch; H. -G. Sander; M. Santander; S. Sarkar; K. Schatto; T. Schmidt; A. Schoenwald; A. Schukraft; A. Schultes; O. Schulz; M. Schunck; D. Seckel; B. Semburg; S. H. Seo; Y. Sestayo; S. Seunarine; A. Silvestri; A. Slipak; G. M. Spiczak; C. Spiering; M. Stamatikos; T. Stanev; G. Stephens; T. Stezelberger; R. G. Stokstad; S. Stoyanov; E. A. Strahler; T. Straszheim; G. W. Sullivan; Q. Swillens; H. Taavola; I. Taboada; A. Tamburro; O. Tarasova; A. Tepe; S. Ter-Antonyan; S. Tilav; P. A. Toale; S. Toscano; D. Tosi; D. Tur?an; N. van Eijndhoven; J. Vandenbroucke; A. Van Overloop; J. van Santen; M. Vehring; M. Voge; B. Voigt; C. Walck; T. Waldenmaier; M. Wallraff; M. Walter; C. Weaver; C. Wendt; S. Westerhoff; N. Whitehorn; K. Wiebe; C. H. Wiebusch; D. R. Williams; R. Wischnewski; H. Wissing; M. Wolf; K. Woschnagg; C. Xu; X. W. Xu; G. Yodh; S. Yoshida; P. Zarzhitsky

2011-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "icecube neutrino observatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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21

Searches for Time Dependent Neutrino Sources with IceCube Data from 2008 to 2012  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper searches for flaring astrophysical neutrino sources and sources with periodic emission with the IceCube neutrino telescope are presented. In contrast to time integrated searches, where steady emission is assumed, the analyses presented here look for a time dependent signal of neutrinos using the information from the neutrino arrival times to enhance the discovery potential. A search was performed for correlations between neutrino arrival times and directions as well as neutrino emission following time dependent lightcurves, sporadic emission or periodicities of candidate sources. These include active galactic nuclei, soft $\\gamma$-ray repeaters, supernova remnants hosting pulsars, micro-quasars and X-ray binaries. The work presented here updates and extends previously published results to a longer period that covers four years of data from 2008 April 5 to 2012 May 16 including the first year of operation of the completed 86-string detector. The analyses did not find any significant time dependen...

Aartsen, M G; Adams, J; Aguilar, J A; Ahlers, M; Ahrens, M; Altmann, D; Anderson, T; Arguelles, C; Arlen, T C; Auffenberg, J; Bai, X; Baker, M; Barwick, S W; Baum, V; Bay, R; Beatty, J J; Tjus, J Becker; Becker, K -H; BenZvi, S; Berghaus, P; Berley, D; Bernardini, E; Bernhard, A; Besson, D Z; Binder, G; Bindig, D; Bissok, M; Blaufuss, E; Blumenthal, J; Boersma, D J; Bohm, C; Bos, F; Bose, D; Böser, S; Botner, O; Brayeur, L; Bretz, H -P; Brown, A M; Buzinsky, N; Casey, J; Casier, M; Cheung, E; Chirkin, D; Christov, A; Christy, B; Clark, K; Classen, L; Clevermann, F; Coenders, S; Cowen, D F; Silva, A H Cruz; Daughhetee, J; Davis, J C; Day, M; de André, J P A M; De Clercq, C; Dembinski, H; De Ridder, S; Desiati, P; de Vries, K D; de Wasseige, G; de With, M; DeYoung, T; D\\'\\iaz-Vélez, J C; Dumm, J P; Dunkman, M; Eagan, R; Eberhardt, B; Ehrhardt, T; Eichmann, B; Eisch, J; Euler, S; Evenson, P A; Fadiran, O; Fazely, A R; Fedynitch, A; Feintzeig, J; Felde, J; Filimonov, K; Finley, C; Fischer-Wasels, T; Flis, S; Frantzen, K; Fuchs, T; Gaisser, T K; Gaior, R; Gallagher, J; Gerhardt, L; Gier, D; Gladstone, L; Glüsenkamp, T; Goldschmidt, A; Golup, G; Gonzalez, J G; Goodman, J A; Góra, D; Grant, D; Gretskov, P; Groh, J C; Groß, A; Ha, C; Haack, C; Ismail, A Haj; Hallen, P; Hallgren, A; Halzen, F; Hanson, K; Hebecker, D; Heereman, D; Heinen, D; Helbing, K; Hellauer, R; Hellwig, D; Hickford, S; Hignight, J; Hill, G C; Hoffman, K D; Hoffmann, R; Homeier, A; Hoshina, K; Huang, F; Huelsnitz, W; Hulth, P O; Hultqvist, K; In, S; Ishihara, A; Jacobi, E; Jacobsen, J; Japaridze, G S; Jero, K; Jurkovic, M; Kaminsky, B; Kappes, A; Karg, T; Karle, A; Kauer, M; Keivani, A; Kelley, J L; Kheirandish, A; Kiryluk, J; Kläs, J; Klein, S R; Köhne, J -H; Kohnen, G; Kolanoski, H; Koob, A; Köpke, L; Kopper, C; Kopper, S; Koskinen, D J; Kowalski, M; Kriesten, A; Krings, K; Kroll, G; Kroll, M; Kunnen, J; Kurahashi, N; Kuwabara, T; Labare, M; Lanfranchi, J L; Larsen, D T; Larson, M J; Lesiak-Bzdak, M; Leuermann, M; Lünemann, J; Madsen, J; Maggi, G; Mahn, K B M; Maruyama, R; Mase, K; Matis, H S; Maunu, R; McNally, F; Meagher, K; Medici, M; Meli, A; Meures, T; Miarecki, S; Middell, E; Middlemas, E; Milke, N; Miller, J; Mohrmann, L; Montaruli, T; Morse, R; Nahnhauer, R; Naumann, U; Niederhausen, H; Nowicki, S C; Nygren, D R; Obertacke, A; Olivas, A; Omairat, A; O'Murchadha, A; Palczewski, T; Paul, L; Penek, Ö; Pepper, J A; Heros, C Pérez de los; Pfendner, C; Pieloth, D; Pinat, E; Posselt, J; Price, P B; Przybylski, G T; Pütz, J; Quinnan, M; Rädel, L; Rameez, M; Rawlins, K; Redl, P; Rees, I; Reimann, R; Relich, M; Resconi, E; Rhode, W; Richman, M; Riedel, B; Robertson, S; Rodrigues, J P; Rongen, M; Rott, C; Ruhe, T; Ruzybayev, B; Ryckbosch, D; Saba, S M; Sander, H -G; Sandroos, J; Santander, M; Sarkar, S; Schatto, K; Scheriau, F; Schmidt, T; Schmitz, M; Schoenen, S; Schöneberg, S; Schönwald, A; Schukraft, A; Schulte, L; Schulz, O; Seckel, D; Sestayo, Y; Seunarine, S; Shanidze, R; Smith, M W E; Soldin, D; Spiczak, G M; Spiering, C; Stamatikos, M; Stanev, T; Stanisha, N A; Stasik, A; Stezelberger, T; Stokstad, R G; Stößl, A; Strahler, E A; Ström, R; Strotjohann, N L; Sullivan, G W; Sutherland, M; Taavola, H; Taboada, I; Tamburro, A; Ter-Antonyan, S; Terliuk, A; Teši?, G; Tilav, S; Toale, P A; Tobin, M N; Tosi, D; Tselengidou, M; Unger, E; Usner, M; Vallecorsa, S; van Eijndhoven, N; Vandenbroucke, J; van Santen, J; Vanheule, S; Vehring, M; Voge, M; Vraeghe, M; Walck, C; Wallraff, M; Weaver, Ch; Wellons, M; Wendt, C; Westerhoff, S; Whelan, B J; Whitehorn, N; Wichary, C; Wiebe, K; Wiebusch, C H; Williams, D R; Wissing, H; Wolf, M; Wood, T R; Woschnagg, K; Xu, D L; Xu, X W; Xu, Y; Yanez, J P; Yodh, G; Yoshida, S; Zarzhitsky, P; Ziemann, J; Zoll, M

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Cosmic-Ray Neutrinos from the Decay of Long-Lived Particle and the Recent IceCube Result  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Motivated by the recent IceCube result, we study high energy cosmic-ray neutrino flux from the decay of a long-lived particle. Because neutrinos are so transparent, high energy neutrinos produced in the past may also contribute to the present neutrino flux. We point out that the PeV neutrino events observed by IceCube may originate in the decay of a particle much heavier than PeV if its lifetime is shorter than the present cosmic time. It is shown that the mass of the particle responsible for the IceCube event can be as large as $\\sim 10^{10}\\ {\\rm GeV}$. We also discuss several possibilities to acquire information about the lifetime of the long-lived particle.

Ema, Yohei; Moroi, Takeo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Diffuse neutrinos from extragalactic supernova remnants: Dominating the 100 TeV IceCube flux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IceCube has measured a diffuse astrophysical flux of TeV-PeV neutrinos. The most plausible sources are unique high energy cosmic ray accelerators like hypernova remnants (HNRs) and remnants from gamma ray bursts in star-burst galaxies, which can produce primary cosmic rays with the required energies and abundance. In this case, however, ordinary supernova remnants (SNRs), which are far more abundant than HNRs, produce a comparable or larger neutrino flux in the ranges up to 100-150 TeV energies, implying a spectral break in the IceCube signal around these energies. The SNRs contribution in the diffuse flux up to these hundred TeV energies provides a natural baseline and then constrains the expected PeV flux.

Chakraborty, Sovan

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

SEARCH FOR MUON NEUTRINOS FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS WITH THE IceCube NEUTRINO TELESCOPE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the results of searches for high-energy muon neutrinos from 41 gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) in the northern sky with the IceCube detector in its 22 string configuration active in 2007/2008. The searches cover both the prompt and a possible precursor emission as well as a model-independent, wide time window of -1 hr to +3 hr around each GRB. In contrast to previous searches with a large GRB population, we do not utilize a standard Waxman-Bahcall GRB flux for the prompt emission but calculate individual neutrino spectra for all 41 GRBs from the burst parameters measured by satellites. For all of the three time windows, the best estimate for the number of signal events is zero. Therefore, we place 90% CL upper limits on the fluence from the prompt phase of 3.7 x 10{sup -3} erg cm{sup -2} (72 TeV-6.5 PeV) and on the fluence from the precursor phase of 2.3 x 10{sup -3} erg cm{sup -2} (2.2-55 TeV), where the quoted energy ranges contain 90% of the expected signal events in the detector. The 90% CL upper limit for the wide time window is 2.7 x 10{sup -3} erg cm{sup -2} (3 TeV-2.8 PeV) assuming an E {sup -2} flux.

Abbasi, R.; Aguilar, J. A.; Andeen, K.; Baker, M. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Abdou, Y. [Department of Subatomic and Radiation Physics, University of Gent, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Abu-Zayyad, T. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, River Falls, WI 54022 (United States); Adams, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Ahlers, M. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Auffenberg, J.; Becker, K.-H. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany); Bai, X. [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Barwick, S. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Bay, R. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bazo Alba, J. L.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; Berdermann, J. [DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen (Germany); Beattie, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Beatty, J. J. [Department of Physics and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Bechet, S. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Science Faculty CP230, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Becker, J. K. [Department of Physics, TU Dortmund University, D-44221 Dortmund (Germany)

2010-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

25

TANAMI counterparts to IceCube high-energy neutrino events  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Since the discovery of a neutrino flux in excess of the atmospheric background by the IceCube Collaboration, searches for the astrophysical sources have been ongoing. Due to the steeply falling background towards higher energies, the PeV events detected in three years of IceCube data are the most likely ones to be of extraterrestrial origin. Even excluding the PeV events detected so far, the neutrino flux is well above the atmospheric background, so it is likely that a number of sub-PeV events originate from the same astrophysical sources that produce the PeV events. We study the high-energy properties of AGN that are positionally coincident with the neutrino events from three years of IceCube data and show the results for event number 4. IC 4 is a event with a low angular error (7.1$^\\circ$) and a large deposited energy of 165 TeV. We use multiwavelength data, including Fermi/LAT and X-ray data, to construct broadband spectra and present parametrizations of the broadband spectral energy distributions with lo...

Krauß, Felicia; Baxter, Claire; Kadler, Matthias; Mannheim, Karl; Ojha, Roopesh; Gräfe, Christina; Müller, Cornelia; Wilms, Joern; Carpenter, Bryce; Schulz, Robert; TANAMI, on behalf of the

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

TANAMI Blazars in the IceCube PeV Neutrino Fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The IceCube Collaboration has announced the discovery of a neutrino flux in excess of the atmospheric background. Due to the steeply falling atmospheric background spectrum, events at PeV energies are most likely of extraterrestrial origin. We present the multiwavelength properties of the six radio brightest blazars positionally coincident with these events using contemporaneous data of the TANAMI blazar sample, including high-resolution images and spectral energy distributions. Assuming the X-ray to {\\gamma}-ray emission originates in the photoproduction of pions by accelerated protons, the integrated predicted neutrino luminosity of these sources is large enough to explain the two detected PeV events.

F. Krauß; M. Kadler; K. Mannheim; R. Schulz; J Trüstedt; J. Wilms; R. Ojha; E. Ros; G. Anton; W. Baumgartner; T. Beuchert; J. Blanchard; C. Bürkel; B. Carpenter; T. Eberl; P. G. Edwards; D. Eisenacher; D. Elsässer; K. Fehn; U. Fritsch; N. Gehrels; C. Gräfe; C. Großberger; H. Hase; S. Horiuchi; C. James; A. Kappes; U. Katz; A. Kreikenbohm; I. Kreykenbohm; M. Langejahn; K. Leiter; E. Litzinger; J. E. J. Lovell; C. Müller; C. Phillips; C. Plötz; J. Quick; T. Steinbring; J. Stevens; D. J. Thompson; A. K. Tzioumis

2014-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

27

Observation of High-Energy Astrophysical Neutrinos in Three Years of IceCube Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A search for high-energy neutrinos interacting within the IceCube detector between 2010 and 2012 provided the first evidence for a high-energy neutrino flux of extraterrestrial origin. Results from an analysis using the same methods with a third year (2012-2013) of data from the complete IceCube detector are consistent with the previously reported astrophysical flux in the 100 TeV - PeV range at the level of $10^{-8}\\, \\mathrm{GeV}\\, \\mathrm{cm}^{-2}\\, \\mathrm{s}^{-1}\\, \\mathrm{sr}^{-1}$ per flavor and reject a purely atmospheric explanation for the combined 3-year data at $5.7 \\sigma$. The data are consistent with expectations for equal fluxes of all three neutrino flavors and with isotropic arrival directions, suggesting either numerous or spatially extended sources. The three-year dataset, with a livetime of 988 days, contains a total of 37 neutrino candidate events with deposited energies ranging from 30 to 2000 TeV. The 2000 TeV event is the highest-energy neutrino interaction ever observed.

M. G. Aartsen; M. Ackermann; J. Adams; J. A. Aguilar; M. Ahlers; M. Ahrens; D. Altmann; T. Anderson; C. Arguelles; T. C. Arlen; J. Auffenberg; X. Bai; S. W. Barwick; V. Baum; J. J. Beatty; J. Becker Tjus; K. -H. Becker; S. BenZvi; P. Berghaus; D. Berley; E. Bernardini; A. Bernhard; D. Z. Besson; G. Binder; D. Bindig; M. Bissok; E. Blaufuss; J. Blumenthal; D. J. Boersma; C. Bohm; D. Bose; S. Böser; O. Botner; L. Brayeur; H. -P. Bretz; A. M. Brown; J. Casey; M. Casier; D. Chirkin; A. Christov; B. Christy; K. Clark; L. Classen; F. Clevermann; S. Coenders; D. F. Cowen; A. H. Cruz Silva; M. Danninger; J. Daughhetee; J. C. Davis; M. Day; J. P. A. M. de André; C. De Clercq; S. De Ridder; P. Desiati; K. D. de Vries; M. de With; T. DeYoung; J. C. D\\'\\iaz-Vélez; M. Dunkman; R. Eagan; B. Eberhardt; B. Eichmann; J. Eisch; S. Euler; P. A. Evenson; O. Fadiran; A. R. Fazely; A. Fedynitch; J. Feintzeig; J. Felde; T. Feusels; K. Filimonov; C. Finley; T. Fischer-Wasels; S. Flis; A. Franckowiak; K. Frantzen; T. Fuchs; T. K. Gaisser; J. Gallagher; L. Gerhardt; D. Gier; L. Gladstone; T. Glüsenkamp; A. Goldschmidt; G. Golup; J. G. Gonzalez; J. A. Goodman; D. Góra; D. T. Grandmont; D. Grant; P. Gretskov; J. C. Groh; A. Groß; C. Ha; C. Haack; A. Haj Ismail; P. Hallen; A. Hallgren; F. Halzen; K. Hanson; D. Hebecker; D. Heereman; D. Heinen; K. Helbing; R. Hellauer; D. Hellwig; S. Hickford; G. C. Hill; K. D. Hoffman; R. Hoffmann; A. Homeier; K. Hoshina; F. Huang; W. Huelsnitz; P. O. Hulth; K. Hultqvist; S. Hussain; A. Ishihara; E. Jacobi; J. Jacobsen; K. Jagielski; G. S. Japaridze; K. Jero; O. Jlelati; M. Jurkovic; B. Kaminsky; A. Kappes; T. Karg; A. Karle; M. Kauer; J. L. Kelley; A. Kheirandish; J. Kiryluk; J. Kläs; S. R. Klein; J. -H. Köhne; G. Kohnen; H. Kolanoski; A. Koob; L. Köpke; C. Kopper; S. Kopper; D. J. Koskinen; M. Kowalski; A. Kriesten; K. Krings; G. Kroll; J. Kunnen; N. Kurahashi; T. Kuwabara; M. Labare; D. T. Larsen; M. J. Larson; M. Lesiak-Bzdak; M. Leuermann; J. Leute; J. Lünemann; O. Mac\\'\\ias; J. Madsen; G. Maggi; R. Maruyama; K. Mase; H. S. Matis; F. McNally; K. Meagher; A. Meli; T. Meures; S. Miarecki; E. Middell; E. Middlemas; N. Milke; J. Miller; L. Mohrmann; T. Montaruli; R. Morse; R. Nahnhauer; U. Naumann; H. Niederhausen; S. C. Nowicki; D. R. Nygren; A. Obertacke; S. Odrowski; A. Olivas; A. Omairat; A. O'Murchadha; T. Palczewski; L. Paul; Ö. Penek; J. A. Pepper; C. Pérez de los Heros; C. Pfendner; D. Pieloth; E. Pinat; J. Posselt; P. B. Price; G. T. Przybylski; J. Pütz; M. Quinnan; L. Rädel; M. Rameez; K. Rawlins; P. Redl; I. Rees; R. Reimann; E. Resconi; W. Rhode; M. Richman; B. Riedel; S. Robertson; J. P. Rodrigues; M. Rongen; C. Rott; T. Ruhe; B. Ruzybayev; D. Ryckbosch; S. M. Saba; H. -G. Sander; M. Santander; S. Sarkar; K. Schatto; F. Scheriau; T. Schmidt; M. Schmitz; S. Schoenen; S. Schöneberg; A. Schönwald; A. Schukraft; L. Schulte; O. Schulz; D. Seckel; Y. Sestayo; S. Seunarine; R. Shanidze; C. Sheremata; M. W. E. Smith; D. Soldin; G. M. Spiczak; C. Spiering; M. Stamatikos; T. Stanev; N. A. Stanisha; A. Stasik; T. Stezelberger; R. G. Stokstad; A. Stößl; E. A. Strahler; R. Ström; N. L. Strotjohann; G. W. Sullivan; H. Taavola; I. Taboada; A. Tamburro; A. Tepe; S. Ter-Antonyan; A. Terliuk; G. Teši?; S. Tilav; P. A. Toale; M. N. Tobin; D. Tosi; M. Tselengidou; E. Unger; M. Usner; S. Vallecorsa; N. van Eijndhoven; J. Vandenbroucke; J. van Santen; M. Vehring; M. Voge; M. Vraeghe; C. Walck; M. Wallraff; Ch. Weaver; M. Wellons; C. Wendt; S. Westerhoff; B. J. Whelan; N. Whitehorn; C. Wichary; K. Wiebe; C. H. Wiebusch; D. R. Williams; H. Wissing; M. Wolf; T. R. Wood; K. Woschnagg; D. L. Xu; X. W. Xu; J. P. Yanez; G. Yodh; S. Yoshida; P. Zarzhitsky; J. Ziemann; S. Zierke; M. Zoll

2014-07-02T23:59:59.000Z

28

IceCube: An Instrument for Neutrino Astronomy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

such as quasars or gamma-ray bursts unfortunately point tosky with neutrinos from gamma-ray bursts and active galacticor MeV photons in gamma-ray-burst fireballs. Neutral and

Halzen, F.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Determining neutrino oscillation parameters from atmospheric muon neutrino disappearance with three years of IceCube DeepCore data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a measurement of neutrino oscillations via atmospheric muon neutrino disappearance with three years of data of the completed IceCube neutrino detector. DeepCore, a region of denser instrumentation, enables the detection and reconstruction of atmospheric muon neutrinos between 10\\,GeV and 100\\,GeV, where a strong disappearance signal is expected. The detector volume surrounding DeepCore is used as a veto region to suppress the atmospheric muon background. Neutrino events are selected where the detected Cherenkov photons of the secondary particles minimally scatter, and the neutrino energy and arrival direction are reconstructed. Both variables are used to obtain the neutrino oscillation parameters from the data, with the best fit given by $\\Delta m^2_{32}=2.72^{+0.19}_{-0.20}\\times 10^{-3}\\,\\mathrm{eV}^2$ and $\\sin^2\\theta_{23} = 0.53^{+0.09}_{-0.12}$ (normal mass hierarchy assumed). The results are compatible and comparable in precision to those of dedicated oscillation experiments.

IceCube Collaboration; M. G. Aartsen; M. Ackermann; J. Adams; J. A. Aguilar; M. Ahlers; M. Ahrens; D. Altmann; T. Anderson; C. Arguelles; T. C. Arlen; J. Auffenberg; X. Bai; S. W. Barwick; V. Baum; R. Bay; J. J. Beatty; J. Becker Tjus; K. -H. Becker; S. BenZvi; P. Berghaus; D. Berley; E. Bernardini; A. Bernhard; D. Z. Besson; G. Binder; D. Bindig; M. Bissok; E. Blaufuss; J. Blumenthal; D. J. Boersma; C. Bohm; F. Bos; D. Bose; S. Böser; O. Botner; L. Brayeur; H. -P. Bretz; A. M. Brown; J. Brunner; N. Buzinsky; J. Casey; M. Casier; E. Cheung; D. Chirkin; A. Christov; B. Christy; K. Clark; L. Classen; F. Clevermann; S. Coenders; D. F. Cowen; A. H. Cruz Silva; J. Daughhetee; J. C. Davis; M. Day; J. P. A. M. de André; C. De Clercq; S. De Ridder; P. Desiati; K. D. de Vries; M. de With; T. DeYoung; J. C. Díaz-Vélez; M. Dunkman; R. Eagan; B. Eberhardt; B. Eichmann; J. Eisch; S. Euler; P. A. Evenson; O. Fadiran; A. R. Fazely; A. Fedynitch; J. Feintzeig; J. Felde; T. Feusels; K. Filimonov; C. Finley; T. Fischer-Wasels; S. Flis; A. Franckowiak; K. Frantzen; T. Fuchs; T. K. Gaisser; R. Gaior; J. Gallagher; L. Gerhardt; D. Gier; L. Gladstone; T. Glüsenkamp; A. Goldschmidt; G. Golup; J. G. Gonzalez; J. A. Goodman; D. Góra; D. Grant; P. Gretskov; J. C. Groh; A. Groß; C. Ha; C. Haack; A. Haj Ismail; P. Hallen; A. Hallgren; F. Halzen; K. Hanson; D. Hebecker; D. Heereman; D. Heinen; K. Helbing; R. Hellauer; D. Hellwig; S. Hickford; G. C. Hill; K. D. Hoffman; R. Hoffmann; A. Homeier; K. Hoshina; F. Huang; W. Huelsnitz; P. O. Hulth; K. Hultqvist; S. Hussain; A. Ishihara; E. Jacobi; J. Jacobsen; G. S. Japaridze; K. Jero; O. Jlelati; M. Jurkovic; B. Kaminsky; A. Kappes; T. Karg; A. Karle; M. Kauer; A. Keivani; J. L. Kelley; A. Kheirandish; J. Kiryluk; J. Kläs; S. R. Klein; J. -H. Köhne; G. Kohnen; H. Kolanoski; A. Koob; L. Köpke; C. Kopper; S. Kopper; D. J. Koskinen; M. Kowalski; A. Kriesten; K. Krings; G. Kroll; M. Kroll; J. Kunnen; N. Kurahashi; T. Kuwabara; M. Labare; J. L. Lanfranchi; D. T. Larsen; M. J. Larson; M. Lesiak-Bzdak; M. Leuermann; J. Lünemann; J. Madsen; G. Maggi; R. Maruyama; K. Mase; H. S. Matis; R. Maunu; F. McNally; K. Meagher; M. Medici; A. Meli; T. Meures; S. Miarecki; E. Middell; E. Middlemas; N. Milke; J. Miller; L. Mohrmann; T. Montaruli; R. Morse; R. Nahnhauer; U. Naumann; H. Niederhausen; S. C. Nowicki; D. R. Nygren; A. Obertacke; S. Odrowski; A. Olivas; A. Omairat; A. O'Murchadha; T. Palczewski; L. Paul; Ö. Penek; J. A. Pepper; C. Pérez de los Heros; C. Pfendner; D. Pieloth; E. Pinat; J. Posselt; P. B. Price; G. T. Przybylski; J. Pütz; M. Quinnan; L. Rädel; M. Rameez; K. Rawlins; P. Redl; I. Rees; R. Reimann; M. Relich; E. Resconi; W. Rhode; M. Richman; B. Riedel; S. Robertson; J. P. Rodrigues; M. Rongen; C. Rott; T. Ruhe; B. Ruzybayev; D. Ryckbosch; S. M. Saba; H. -G. Sander; J. Sandroos; M. Santander; S. Sarkar; K. Schatto; F. Scheriau; T. Schmidt; M. Schmitz; S. Schoenen; S. Schöneberg; A. Schönwald; A. Schukraft; L. Schulte; O. Schulz; D. Seckel; Y. Sestayo; S. Seunarine; R. Shanidze; M. W. E. Smith; D. Soldin; G. M. Spiczak; C. Spiering; M. Stamatikos; T. Stanev; N. A. Stanisha; A. Stasik; T. Stezelberger; R. G. Stokstad; A. Stößl; E. A. Strahler; R. Ström; N. L. Strotjohann; G. W. Sullivan; H. Taavola; I. Taboada; A. Tamburro; A. Tepe; S. Ter-Antonyan; A. Terliuk; G. Teši?; S. Tilav; P. A. Toale; M. N. Tobin; D. Tosi; M. Tselengidou; E. Unger; M. Usner; S. Vallecorsa; N. van Eijndhoven; J. Vandenbroucke; J. van Santen; M. Vehring; M. Voge; M. Vraeghe; C. Walck; M. Wallraff; Ch. Weaver; M. Wellons; C. Wendt; S. Westerhoff; B. J. Whelan; N. Whitehorn; C. Wichary; K. Wiebe; C. H. Wiebusch; D. R. Williams; H. Wissing; M. Wolf; T. R. Wood; K. Woschnagg; D. L. Xu; X. W. Xu; J. P. Yanez; G. Yodh; S. Yoshida; P. Zarzhitsky; J. Ziemann; M. Zoll

2014-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

30

Are both BL Lacs and pulsar wind nebulae the astrophysical counterparts of IceCube neutrino events?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IceCube has recently reported the discovery of high-energy neutrinos of astrophysical origin, opening up the PeV (10^15 eV) sky. Because of their large positional uncertainties, these events have not yet been associated to any astrophysical source. We have found plausible astronomical counterparts in the GeV -- TeV bands by looking for sources in the available large area high-energy gamma-ray catalogues within the error circles of the IceCube events. We then built the spectral energy distribution of these sources and compared it with the energy and flux of the corresponding neutrino. Likely counterparts include mostly BL Lacs and two Galactic pulsar wind nebulae. On the one hand many objects, including the starburst galaxy NGC 253 and Centaurus A, despite being spatially coincident with neutrino events, are too weak to be reconciled with the neutrino flux. On the other hand, various GeV powerful objects cannot be assessed as possible counterparts due to their lack of TeV data. The definitive association between high-energy astrophysical neutrinos and our candidates will be significantly helped by new TeV observations but will be confirmed or disproved only by further IceCube data. Either way, this will have momentous implications for blazar jets, high-energy astrophysics, and cosmic-ray and neutrino astronomy.

P. Padovani; E. Resconi

2014-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

31

SEARCHES FOR PERIODIC NEUTRINO EMISSION FROM BINARY SYSTEMS WITH 22 AND 40 STRINGS OF ICECUBE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper, we present the results of searches for periodic neutrino emission from a catalog of binary systems. Such modulation, observed in the photon flux, would be caused by the geometry of these systems. In the analysis, the period is fixed by these photon observations, while the phase and duration of the neutrino emission are treated as free parameters to be fit with the data. If the emission occurs during {approx}20% or less of the total period, this analysis achieves better sensitivity than a time-integrated analysis. We use the IceCube data taken from 2007 May 31 to 2008 April 5 with its 22 string configuration and from 2008 April 5 to 2009 May 20 with its 40 string configuration. No evidence for neutrino emission is found, with the strongest excess occurring for Cygnus X-3 at 2.1{sigma} significance after accounting for trials. Neutrino flux upper limits for both periodic and time-integrated emission are provided.

Abbasi, R.; Aguilar, J. A.; Andeen, K.; Baker, M. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Abdou, Y. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Gent, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Abu-Zayyad, T. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, River Falls, WI 54022 (United States); Ackermann, M.; Bazo Alba, J. L. [DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen (Germany); Adams, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Ahlers, M. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Allen, M. M. [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Altmann, D. [III. Physikalisches Institut, RWTH Aachen University, D-52056 Aachen (Germany); Auffenberg, J. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany); Bai, X. [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Barwick, S. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Bay, R. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Beattie, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Beatty, J. J. [Department of Physics and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Bechet, S. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Science Faculty CP230, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Becker, J. K. [Fakultaet fuer Physik and Astronomie, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Collaboration: IceCube Collaboration; and others

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

FIRST NEUTRINO POINT-SOURCE RESULTS FROM THE 22 STRING ICECUBE DETECTOR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present new results of searches for neutrino point sources in the northern sky, using data recorded in 2007-2008 with 22 strings of the IceCube detector (approximately one-fourth of the planned total) and 275.7 days of live time. The final sample of 5114 neutrino candidate events agrees well with the expected background of atmospheric muon neutrinos and a small component of atmospheric muons. No evidence of a point source is found, with the most significant excess of events in the sky at 2.2{sigma} after accounting for all trials. The average upper limit over the northern sky for point sources of muon-neutrinos with E {sup -2} spectrum is E{sup 2} {phi}{sub {nu}{sub {mu}}}< 1.4 x 10{sup -11} TeV cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}, in the energy range from 3 TeV to 3 PeV, improving the previous best average upper limit by the AMANDA-II detector by a factor of 2.

Abbasi, R.; Aguilar, J.; Andeen, K.; Baker, M. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Abdou, Y. [Department of Subatomic and Radiation Physics, University of Gent, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Ackermann, M.; Bazo Alba, J. L.; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; Berdermann, J. [DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen (Germany); Adams, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Ahlers, M. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Auffenberg, J.; Becker, K.-H. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany); Bai, X. [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Barwick, S. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Bay, R. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Beattie, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Beatty, J. J. [Department of Physics and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Bechet, S. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Science Faculty CP230, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Becker, J. K. [Department of Physics, TU Dortmund University, D-44221 Dortmund (Germany)], E-mail: cfinley@icecube.wisc.edu, E-mail: jdumm@icecube.wisc.edu (and others)

2009-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

33

Combined analysis of all three phases of solar neutrino data from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report results from a combined analysis of solar neutrino data from all phases of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). By exploiting particle identification information obtained from the proportional counters installed ...

Formaggio, Joseph A.

34

MEASUREMENT OF THE 8 B SOLAR NEUTRINO ENERGY SPECTRUM AT THE SUDBURY NEUTRINO OBSERVATORY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MEASUREMENT OF THE 8 B SOLAR NEUTRINO ENERGY SPECTRUM AT THE SUDBURY NEUTRINO OBSERVATORY Monica me everything from the fine details of signal extraction, iii #12; Fortran and C++ to bird watching

Waltham, Chris

35

FIRST MEASUREMENT OF THE FLUX OF SOLAR NEUTRINOS FROM THE SUN AT THE SUDBURY NEUTRINO OBSERVATORY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

FIRST MEASUREMENT OF THE FLUX OF SOLAR NEUTRINOS FROM THE SUN AT THE SUDBURY NEUTRINO OBSERVATORY for approaching problems that I found to be more generally useful. Godwin Mayers, Chuck Alexander, Jim Cook and with me. v #12; ABSTRACT FIRST MEASUREMENT OF THE FLUX OF SOLAR NEUTRINOS FROM THE SUN AT THE SUDBURY

Waltham, Chris

36

SEARCHES FOR HIGH-ENERGY NEUTRINO EMISSION IN THE GALAXY WITH THE COMBINED ICECUBE-AMANDA DETECTOR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on searches for neutrino sources at energies above 200 GeV in the Northern sky of the Galactic plane, using the data collected by the South Pole neutrino telescope, IceCube, and AMANDA. The Galactic region considered in this work includes the local arm toward the Cygnus region and our closest approach to the Perseus Arm. The searches are based on the data collected between 2007 and 2009. During this time AMANDA was an integrated part of IceCube, which was still under construction and operated with 22 strings (2007-2008) and 40 strings (2008-2009) of optical modules deployed in the ice. By combining the advantages of the larger IceCube detector with the lower energy threshold of the more compact AMANDA detector, we obtain an improved sensitivity at energies below {approx}10 TeV with respect to previous searches. The analyses presented here are a scan for point sources within the Galactic plane, a search optimized for multiple and extended sources in the Cygnus region, which might be below the sensitivity of the point source scan, and studies of seven pre-selected neutrino source candidates. For one of them, Cygnus X-3, a time-dependent search for neutrino emission in coincidence with observed radio and X-ray flares has been performed. No evidence of a signal is found, and upper limits are reported for each of the searches. We investigate neutrino spectra proportional to E {sup -2} and E {sup -3} in order to cover the entire range of possible neutrino spectra. The steeply falling E {sup -3} neutrino spectrum can also be used to approximate neutrino energy spectra with energy cutoffs below 50 TeV since these result in a similar energy distribution of events in the detector. For the region of the Galactic plane visible in the Northern sky, the 90% confidence level muon neutrino flux upper limits are in the range E {sup 3} dN/dE {approx} 5.4-19.5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} TeV{sup 2} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} for point-like neutrino sources in the energy region [180.0 GeV-20.5 TeV]. These represent the most stringent upper limits for soft-spectra neutrino sources within the Galaxy reported to date.

Abbasi, R.; Ahlers, M.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; Baker, M. [Department of Physics and Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophysics Center, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophysics Center, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Abdou, Y. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Gent, B-9000 Gent (Belgium)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Gent, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Ackermann, M. [DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen (Germany)] [DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen (Germany); Adams, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Aguilar, J. A. [Departement de physique nucleaire et corpusculaire, Universite de Geneve, CH-1211 Geneve (Switzerland)] [Departement de physique nucleaire et corpusculaire, Universite de Geneve, CH-1211 Geneve (Switzerland); Altmann, D. [Institut fuer Physik, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, D-12489 Berlin (Germany)] [Institut fuer Physik, Humboldt-Universitaet zu Berlin, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Bai, X. [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States)] [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Barwick, S. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Baum, V. [Institute of Physics, University of Mainz, Staudinger Weg 7, D-55099 Mainz (Germany)] [Institute of Physics, University of Mainz, Staudinger Weg 7, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Bay, R. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)] [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Beattie, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)] [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Beatty, J. J. [Department of Physics and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Bechet, S. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Science Faculty CP230, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium)] [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Science Faculty CP230, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Becker Tjus, J. [Fakultaet fuer Physik and Astronomie, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)] [Fakultaet fuer Physik and Astronomie, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Becker, K.-H. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany)] [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany); Bell, M. [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Collaboration: IceCube Collaboration; and others

2013-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

37

TIME-DEPENDENT SEARCHES FOR POINT SOURCES OF NEUTRINOS WITH THE 40-STRING AND 22-STRING CONFIGURATIONS OF ICECUBE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents four searches for flaring sources of neutrinos using the IceCube neutrino telescope. For the first time, a search is performed over the entire parameter space of energy, direction, and time with sensitivity to neutrino flares lasting between 20 {mu}s and a year duration from astrophysical sources. Searches that integrate over time are less sensitive to flares because they are affected by a larger background of atmospheric neutrinos and muons that can be reduced by the use of additional timing information. Flaring sources considered here, such as active galactic nuclei, soft gamma-ray repeaters, and gamma-ray bursts, are promising candidate neutrino emitters. Two searches are 'untriggered' in the sense that they look for any possible flare in the entire sky and from a predefined catalog of sources from which photon flares have been recorded. The other two searches are triggered by multi-wavelength information on flares from blazars and from a soft gamma-ray repeater. One triggered search uses lightcurves from Fermi-LAT which provides continuous monitoring. A second triggered search uses information where the flux states have been measured only for short periods of time near the flares. The untriggered searches use data taken by 40 strings of IceCube between 2008 April 5 and 2009 May 20. The triggered searches also use data taken by the 22-string configuration of IceCube operating between 2007 May 31 and 2008 April 5. The results from all four searches are compatible with a fluctuation of the background.

Abbasi, R.; Aguilar, J. A.; Andeen, K.; Baker, M.; BenZvi, S. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Abdou, Y. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Gent, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Abu-Zayyad, T. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, River Falls, WI 54022 (United States); Adams, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Ahlers, M. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Auffenberg, J.; Becker, K.-H. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany); Bai, X. [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Barwick, S. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Bay, R. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bazo Alba, J. L.; Benabderrahmane, M. L. [DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen (Germany); Beattie, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Beatty, J. J. [Department of Physics and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Bechet, S. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Science Faculty CP230, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Becker, J. K. [Fakultaet fuer Physik and Astronomie, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Collaboration: IceCube Collaboration; and others

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

SEARCH FOR HIGH-ENERGY MUON NEUTRINOS FROM THE 'NAKED-EYE' GRB 080319B WITH THE IceCube NEUTRINO TELESCOPE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report on a search with the IceCube detector for high-energy muon neutrinos from GRB 080319B, one of the brightest gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) ever observed. The fireball model predicts that a mean of 0.1 events should be detected by IceCube for a bulk Lorentz boost of the jet of 300. In both the direct on-time window of 66 s and an extended window of about 300 s around the GRB, no excess was found above background. The 90% CL upper limit on the number of track-like events from the GRB is 2.7, corresponding to a muon neutrino fluence limit of 9.5 x 10{sup -3} erg cm{sup -2} in the energy range between 120 TeV and 2.2 PeV, which contains 90% of the expected events.

Abbasi, R.; Aguilar, J. A.; Andeen, K.; Baker, M. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Abdou, Y. [Department of Subatomic and Radiation Physics, University of Gent, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Abu-Zayyad, T. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, River Falls, WI 54022 (United States); Adams, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Ahlers, M. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Auffenberg, J.; Becker, K.-H. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany); Bai, X. [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Barwick, S. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Bay, R. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Alba, J. L. Bazo; Benabderrahmane, M. L.; Berdermann, J. [DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen (Germany); Beattie, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Beatty, J. J. [Department of Physics and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Bechet, S. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Science Faculty CP230, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Becker, J. K. [Department of Physics, TU Dortmund University, D-44221 Dortmund (Germany)], E-mail: kappes@icecube.wisc.edu (and others)

2009-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

39

Search for muon neutrinos from Gamma-Ray Bursts with the IceCube neutrino telescope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

2009, GCN: The Gamma ray bursts Coordinates Network, http://for muon neutrinos from Gamma-Ray Bursts with the IceCubeMereghetti, S. 2004, in Gamma-ray Bursts: 30 Years of

Abbasi, R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Looking for matter enhanced neutrino oscillations via day v. night asymmetries in the NCD phase of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To measure the regeneration of electron neutrinos during passage through the Earth via the MSW effect, the difference in electron neutrino flux between day and night is measured at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). ...

Ott, Richard Anthony, III

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "icecube neutrino observatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Technology Development for a Neutrino AstrophysicalObservatory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We propose a set of technology developments relevant to the design of an optimized Cerenkov detector for the study of neutrino interactions of astrophysical interest. Emphasis is placed on signal processing innovations that enhance significantly the quality of primary data. These technical advances, combined with field experience from a follow-on test deployment, are intended to provide a basis for the engineering design for a kilometer-scale Neutrino Astrophysical Observatory.

Chaloupka, V.; Cole, T.; Crawford, H.J.; He, Y.D.; Jackson, S.; Kleinfelder, S.; Lai, K.W.; Learned, J.; Ling, J.; Liu, D.; Lowder, D.; Moorhead, M.; Morookian, J.M.; Nygren, D.R.; Price, P.B.; Richards, A.; Shapiro, G.; Shen, B.; Smoot, George F.; Stokstad, R.G.; VanDalen, G.; Wilkes, J.; Wright, F.; Young, K.

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Technology development for a neutrino astrophysical observatory. Letter of intent  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors propose a set of technology developments relevant to the design of an optimized Cerenkov detector for the study of neutrino interactions of astrophysical interest. Emphasis is placed on signal processing innovations that enhance significantly the quality of primary data. These technical advances, combined with field experience from a follow-on test deployment, are intended to provide a basis for the engineering design for a kilometer-scale Neutrino Astrophysical Observatory.

Chaloupka, V.; Cole, T.; Crawford, H.J. [and others

1996-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

TIME-INTEGRATED SEARCHES FOR POINT-LIKE SOURCES OF NEUTRINOS WITH THE 40-STRING IceCube DETECTOR  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the results of time-integrated searches for astrophysical neutrino sources in both the northern and southern skies. Data were collected using the partially completed IceCube detector in the 40-string configuration recorded between 2008 April 5 and 2009 May 20, totaling 375.5 days livetime. An unbinned maximum likelihood ratio method is used to search for astrophysical signals. The data sample contains 36,900 events: 14,121 from the northern sky, mostly muons induced by atmospheric neutrinos, and 22,779 from the southern sky, mostly high-energy atmospheric muons. The analysis includes searches for individual point sources and stacked searches for sources in a common class, sometimes including a spatial extent. While this analysis is sensitive to TeV-PeV energy neutrinos in the northern sky, it is primarily sensitive to neutrinos with energy greater than about 1 PeV in the southern sky. No evidence for a signal is found in any of the searches. Limits are set for neutrino fluxes from astrophysical sources over the entire sky and compared to predictions. The sensitivity is at least a factor of two better than previous searches (depending on declination), with 90% confidence level muon neutrino flux upper limits being between E {sup 2} d{Phi}/dE {approx} 2-200 x 10{sup -12} TeV cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} in the northern sky and between 3-700 x 10{sup -12} TeV cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} in the southern sky. The stacked source searches provide the best limits to specific source classes. The full IceCube detector is expected to improve the sensitivity to d{Phi}/dE{proportional_to}E {sup -2} sources by another factor of two in the first year of operation.

Abbasi, R.; Aguilar, J. A.; Andeen, K.; Baker, M.; BenZvi, S. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Abdou, Y. [Department of Subatomic and Radiation Physics, University of Gent, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Abu-Zayyad, T. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, River Falls, WI 54022 (United States); Adams, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Ahlers, M. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Auffenberg, J.; Becker, K.-H. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany); Bai, X. [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Barwick, S. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Bay, R. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Alba, J. L. Bazo; Benabderrahmane, M. L. [DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen (Germany); Beattie, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Beatty, J. J. [Department of Physics and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Bechet, S. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Science Faculty CP230, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Becker, J. K. [Fakultaet fuer Physik and Astronomie, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Spectroscopy of low energy solar neutrinos by MOON -Mo Observatory Of Neutrinos-  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spectroscopy of low energy solar neutrinos by MOON -Mo Observatory Of Neutrinos- R. Hazamaa , P Be solar 's. The present status of MOON for the low energy solar experiment is briefly discussed the pp solar flux with good accuracy. 1. INTRODUCTION Realtime studies of the high-energy component of 8

Washington at Seattle, University of

45

Neutral Current Detectors for the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3 Neutral Current Detectors for the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory Peter Michael Thornewell Lincoln), a 1,000 tonne heavy water Cerenkov detector presently under construction. This detector will measure the 8B e flux and energy spectrum via a pure charge current reaction, and independently the 8B total

Waltham, Chris

46

IceCube: Neutrino Physics from GeV - PeV  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An update on recent discoveries by the IceCube project, which transforms approximately one cubic kilometer of natural Antarctic ice into a Cherenkov detector. This paper will be submitted to SLAC for inclusion in the Snowmass2013 proceedings

,

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

NEUTRINO ANALYSIS OF THE 2010 SEPTEMBER CRAB NEBULA FLARE AND TIME-INTEGRATED CONSTRAINTS ON NEUTRINO EMISSION FROM THE CRAB USING ICECUBE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present the results of a search for high-energy muon neutrinos with the IceCube detector in coincidence with the Crab Nebula flare reported on 2010 September by various experiments. Due to the unusual flaring state of the otherwise steady source we performed a prompt analysis of the 79-string configuration data to search for neutrinos that might be emitted along with the observed {gamma}-rays. We performed two different and complementary data selections of neutrino events in the time window of 10 days around the flare. One event selection is optimized for discovery of E{sup -2}{sub {nu}} neutrino spectrum typical of first-order Fermi acceleration. A similar event selection has also been applied to the 40-string data to derive the time-integrated limits to the neutrino emission from the Crab. The other event selection was optimized for discovery of neutrino spectra with softer spectral index and TeV energy cutoffs as observed for various Galactic sources in {gamma}-rays. The 90% confidence level (CL) best upper limits on the Crab flux during the 10 day flare are 4.73 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -11} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} TeV{sup -1} for an E{sup -2}{sub {nu}} neutrino spectrum and 2.50 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -10} cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} TeV{sup -1} for a softer neutrino spectra of E{sup -2.7}{sub {nu}}, as indicated by Fermi measurements during the flare. In this paper, we also illustrate the impact of the time-integrated limit on the Crab neutrino steady emission. The limit obtained using 375.5 days of the 40-string configuration is compared to existing models of neutrino production from the Crab and its impact on astrophysical parameters is discussed. The most optimistic predictions of some models are already rejected by the IceCube neutrino telescope with more than 90% CL.

Abbasi, R.; Aguilar, J. A.; Andeen, K.; Baker, M. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Abdou, Y. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Gent, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Abu-Zayyad, T. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, River Falls, WI 54022 (United States); Adams, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Ahlers, M. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Altmann, D. [III. Physikalisches Institut, RWTH Aachen University, D-52056 Aachen (Germany); Auffenberg, J.; Becker, K.-H. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany); Bai, X. [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Barwick, S. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Bay, R. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bazo Alba, J. L.; Benabderrahmane, M. L. [DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen (Germany); Beattie, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Beatty, J. J. [Department of Physics and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Bechet, S. [Science Faculty CP230, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Becker, J. K. [Fakultaet fuer Physik and Astronomie, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); and others

2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

48

The Final Results from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) was a water Cherenkov detector dedicated to investigate elementary particles called neutrinos. It successfully took data between 1999 and 2006. The detector was unique in its use of heavy water as a detection medium, permitting it to make a solar model-independent test of solar neutrino mixing. In fact, SNO conclusively showed that solar neutrinos oscillate on their way from the core of the Sun to the Earth. This groundbreaking observation was made during three independent phases of the experiment. Even if data taking ended, SNO is still in a mode of precise determination of the solar neutrino oscillation parameters because all along SNO had developed several methods to tell charged-current events apart from neutral-current events. This ability is crucial for the final and ultimate data analysis of all the phases. The physics reach of a combined three-phase solar analysis will be reviewed together with results and subtleties about solar neutrino physics.

None

2011-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

49

Optical calibration hardware for the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The optical properties of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) heavy water Cherenkov neutrino detector are measured in situ using a light diffusing sphere ("laserball"). This diffuser is connected to a pulsed nitrogen/dye laser via specially developed underwater optical fibre umbilical cables. The umbilical cables are designed to have a small bending radius, and can be easily adapted for a variety of calibration sources in SNO. The laserball is remotely manipulated to many positions in the D2O and H2O volumes, where data at six different wavelengths are acquired. These data are analysed to determine the absorption and scattering of light in the heavy water and light water, and the angular dependence of the response of the detector's photomultiplier tubes. This paper gives details of the physical properties, construction, and optical characteristics of the laserball and its associated hardware.

B. A. Moffat; R. J. Ford; F. A. Duncan; K. Graham; A. L. Hallin; C. A. W. Hearns; J. Maneira; P. Skensved; D. R. Grant

2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

50

SNO Data: Results from Experiments at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) was built 6800 feet under ground, in INCO's Creighton mine near Sudbury, Ontario. SNO is a heavy-water Cherenkov detector that is designed to detect neutrinos produced by fusion reactions in the sun. It uses 1000 tonnes of heavy water, on loan from Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), contained in a 12 meter diameter acrylic vessel. Neutrinos react with the heavy water (D2O) to produce flashes of light called Cherenkov radiation. This light is then detected by an array of 9600 photomultiplier tubes mounted on a geodesic support structure surrounding the heavy water vessel. The detector is immersed in light (normal) water within a 30 meter barrel-shaped cavity (the size of a 10 story building!) excavated from Norite rock. Located in the deepest part of the mine, the overburden of rock shields the detector from cosmic rays. The detector laboratory is extremely clean to reduce background signals from radioactive elements present in the mine dust which would otherwise hide the very weak signal from neutrinos. (From http://www.sno.phy.queensu.ca/]

The SNO website provides access to various datasets. See also the SNO Image Catalog at http://www.sno.phy.queensu.ca/sno/images/ and computer-generated images of SNO events at http://www.sno.phy.queensu.ca/sno/events/ and the list of published papers.

51

IceCube-Gen2: A Vision for the Future of Neutrino Astronomy in Antarctica  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recent observation by the IceCube neutrino observatory of an astrophysical flux of neutrinos represents the "first light" in the nascent field of neutrino astronomy. The observed diffuse neutrino flux seems to suggest a much larger level of hadronic activity in the non-thermal universe than previously thought and suggests a rich discovery potential for a larger neutrino observatory. This document presents a vision for an substantial expansion of the current IceCube detector, IceCube-Gen2, including the aim of instrumenting a $10\\,\\mathrm{km}^3$ volume of clear glacial ice at the South Pole to deliver substantial increases in the astrophysical neutrino sample for all flavors. A detector of this size would have a rich physics program with the goal to resolve the sources of these astrophysical neutrinos, discover GZK neutrinos, and be a leading observatory in future multi-messenger astronomy programs.

IceCube-Gen2 Collaboration; :; M. G. Aartsen; M. Ackermann; J. Adams; J. A. Aguilar; M. Ahlers; M. Ahrens; D. Altmann; T. Anderson; G. Anton; C. Arguelles; T. C. Arlen; J. Auffenberg; S. Axani; X. Bai; I. Bartos; S. W. Barwick; V. Baum; R. Bay; J. J. Beatty; J. Becker Tjus; K. -H. Becker; S. BenZvi; P. Berghaus; D. Berley; E. Bernardini; A. Bernhard; D. Z. Besson; G. Binder; D. Bindig; M. Bissok; E. Blaufuss; J. Blumenthal; D. J. Boersma; C. Bohm; F. Bos; D. Bose; S. Böser; O. Botner; L. Brayeur; H. -P. Bretz; A. M. Brown; N. Buzinsky; J. Casey; M. Casier; E. Cheung; D. Chirkin; A. Christov; B. Christy; K. Clark; L. Classen; F. Clevermann; S. Coenders; G. H. Collin; J. M. Conrad; D. F. Cowen; A. H. Cruz Silva; J. Daughhetee; J. C. Davis; M. Day; J. P. A. M. de André; C. De Clercq; S. De Ridder; P. Desiati; K. D. de Vries; M. de With; T. DeYoung; J. C. Dí andaz-Vélez; M. Dunkman; R. Eagan; B. Eberhardt; T. Ehrhardt; B. Eichmann; J. Eisch; S. Euler; J. J. Evans; P. A. Evenson; O. Fadiran; A. R. Fazely; A. Fedynitch; J. Feintzeig; J. Felde; K. Filimonov; C. Finley; T. Fischer-Wasels; S. Flis; K. Frantzen; T. Fuchs; T. K. Gaisser; R. Gaior; J. Gallagher; L. Gerhardt; D. Gier; L. Gladstone; T. Glüsenkamp; A. Goldschmidt; G. Golup; J. G. Gonzalez; J. A. Goodman; D. Góra; D. Grant; P. Gretskov; J. C. Groh; A. Groß; C. Ha; C. Haack; A. Haj Ismail; P. Hallen; A. Hallgren; F. Halzen; K. Hanson; J. Haugen; D. Hebecker; D. Heereman; D. Heinen; K. Helbing; R. Hellauer; D. Hellwig; S. Hickford; J. Hignight; G. C. Hill; K. D. Hoffman; R. Hoffmann; A. Homeier; K. Hoshina; F. Huang; W. Huelsnitz; P. O. Hulth; K. Hultqvist; A. Ishihara; E. Jacobi; J. Jacobsen; G. S. Japaridze; K. Jero; O. Jlelati; B. J. P. Jones; M. Jurkovic; O. Kalekin; A. Kappes; T. Karg; A. Karle; T. Katori; U. F. Katz; M. Kauer; A. Keivani; J. L. Kelley; A. Kheirandish; J. Kiryluk; J. Kläs; S. R. Klein; J. -H. Köhne; G. Kohnen; H. Kolanoski; A. Koob; L. Köpke; C. Kopper; S. Kopper; D. J. Koskinen; M. Kowalski; C. B. Krauss; A. Kriesten; K. Krings; G. Kroll; M. Kroll; J. Kunnen; N. Kurahashi; T. Kuwabara; M. Labare; J. L. Lanfranchi; D. T. Larsen; M. J. Larson; M. Lesiak-Bzdak; M. Leuermann; J. LoSecco; J. Lünemann; J. Madsen; G. Maggi; K. B. M. Mahn; S. Marka; Z. Marka; R. Maruyama; K. Mase; H. S. Matis; R. Maunu; F. McNally; K. Meagher; M. Medici; A. Meli; T. Meures; S. Miarecki; E. Middell; E. Middlemas; N. Milke; J. Miller; L. Mohrmann; T. Montaruli; R. W. Moore; R. Morse; R. Nahnhauer; U. Naumann; H. Niederhausen; S. C. Nowicki; D. R. Nygren; A. Obertacke; S. Odrowski; A. Olivas; A. Omairat; A. O'Murchadha; T. Palczewski; L. Paul; Ö. Penek; J. A. Pepper; C. Pérez de los Heros; C. Pfendner; D. Pieloth; E. Pinat; J. L. Pinfold; J. Posselt; P. B. Price; G. T. Przybylski; J. Pütz; M. Quinnan; L. Rädel; M. Rameez; K. Rawlins; P. Redl; I. Rees; R. Reimann; M. Relich; E. Resconi; W. Rhode; M. Richman; B. Riedel; S. Robertson; J. P. Rodrigues; M. Rongen; C. Rott; T. Ruhe; B. Ruzybayev; D. Ryckbosch; S. M. Saba; H. -G. Sander; J. Sandroos; P. Sandstrom; M. Santander; S. Sarkar; K. Schatto; F. Scheriau; T. Schmidt; M. Schmitz; S. Schoenen; S. Schöneberg; A. Schönwald; A. Schukraft; L. Schulte; O. Schulz; D. Seckel; Y. Sestayo; S. Seunarine; M. H. Shaevitz; R. Shanidze; M. W. E. Smith; D. Soldin; S. Söldner-Rembold; G. M. Spiczak; C. Spiering; M. Stamatikos; T. Stanev; N. A. Stanisha; A. Stasik; T. Stezelberger; R. G. Stokstad; A. Stöß andl; E. A. Strahler; R. Ström; N. L. Strotjohann; G. W. Sullivan; H. Taavola; I. Taboada; A. Taketa; A. Tamburro; H. K. M. Tanaka; A. Tepe; S. Ter-Antonyan; A. Terliuk; G. Teš; andi?; S. Tilav; P. A. Toale; M. N. Tobin; D. Tosi; M. Tselengidou; E. Unger; M. Usner; S. Vallecorsa; N. van Eijndhoven; J. Vandenbroucke; J. van Santen; S. Vanheule; M. Vehring; M. Voge; M. Vraeghe; C. Walck; M. Wallraff; Ch. Weaver; M. Wellons; C. Wendt; S. Westerhoff; B. J. Whelan; N. Whitehorn; C. Wichary; K. Wiebe; C. H. Wiebusch; D. R. Williams; H. Wissing; M. Wolf; T. R. Wood; K. Woschnagg; S. Wren; D. L. Xu; X. W. Xu; Y. Xu; J. P. Yanez; G. Yodh; S. Yoshida; P. Zarzhitsky; J. Ziemann; M. Zoll

2014-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

52

The IceCube Collaboration:contributions to the 30 th International Cosmic Ray Conference (ICRC 2007),  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper bundles 40 contributions by the IceCube collaboration that were submitted to the 30th International Cosmic Ray Conference ICRC 2007. The articles cover studies on cosmic rays and atmospheric neutrinos, searches for non-localized, extraterrestrial {nu}{sub e}, {nu}{sub {mu}} and {nu}{sub {tau}} signals, scans for steady and intermittent neutrino point sources, searches for dark matter candidates, magnetic monopoles and other exotic particles, improvements in analysis techniques, as well as future detector extensions. The IceCube observatory will be finalized in 2011 to form a cubic-kilometer ice-Cherenkov detector at the location of the geographic South Pole. At the present state of construction, IceCube consists of 52 paired IceTop surface tanks and 22 IceCube strings with a total of 1426 Digital Optical Modules deployed at depths up to 2350 m. The observatory also integrates the 19 string AMANDA subdetector, that was completed in 2000 and extends IceCube's reach to lower energies. Before the deployment of IceTop, cosmic air showers were registered with the 30 station SPASE-2 surface array. IceCube's low noise Digital Optical Modules are very reliable, show a uniform response and record waveforms of arriving photons that are resolvable with nanosecond precision over a large dynamic range. Data acquisition, reconstruction and simulation software are running in production mode and the analyses, profiting from the improved data quality and increased overall sensitivity, are well under way.

IceCube Collaboration; Ackermann, M.

2007-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

53

Mind the gap on Icecube: Cosmic neutrino spectrum and muon anomalous magnetic moment in the gauged L_{\\mu} - L_{\\tau} model  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The energy spectrum of cosmic neutrinos, which was recently reported by the IceCube collaboration, shows a gap between 400 TeV and 1 PeV. An unknown neutrino interaction mediated by a field with a mass of the MeV scale is one of the possible solutions to this gap. We examine if the leptonic gauge interaction L_{\\mu} - L_{\\tau} can simultaneously explain the two phenomena in the lepton sector: the gap in the cosmic neutrino spectrum and the unsettled disagreement in muon anomalous magnetic moment. We illustrate that there remains the regions in the model parameter space, which account for both the problems. Our results also provide a hint for the distance to the source of the high-energy cosmic neutrinos.

Araki, Takeshi; Konishi, Yasufumi; Ota, Toshihiko; Sato, Joe; Shimomura, Takashi

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Measurement of the nue and Total 8B Solar Neutrino Fluxes with the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory Phase I Data Set  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutrino Observatory Heavy Water, Earth Sciences Di- vision,17 O Measurement in Bruce Heavy Water Samples with 17 O NMR,O Analysis of Ontario Hydro Heavy Water, Center for Isotope

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Searching for sterile neutrinos in ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Oscillation interpretation of the results from the LSND, MiniBooNE and some other experiments requires existence of sterile neutrino with mass $\\sim 1$ eV and mixing with the active neutrinos $|U_{\\mu 0}|^2 \\sim (0.02 - 0.04)$. It has been realized some time ago that existence of such a neutrino affects significantly the fluxes of atmospheric neutrinos in the TeV range which can be tested by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory. In view of the first IceCube data release we have revisited the oscillations of high energy atmospheric neutrinos in the presence of one sterile neutrino. Properties of the oscillation probabilities are studied in details for various mixing schemes both analytically and numerically. The energy spectra and angular distributions of the $\

Soebur Razzaque; A. Yu. Smirnov

2011-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

56

Invited Review Article: IceCube: An instrument for neutrino astronomy Francis Halzen1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of galactic supernova explosions, the search for dark matter, and the study of the neutrinos themselves to the photon, except for one important at- tribute: its interactions with matter are extremely feeble. So, high volumes of natural water into Cherenkov detectors that catch the light produced when neu- trinos interact

Yavuz, Deniz

57

Measurement of the ?[subscript e] and total [superscript 8]B solar neutrino fluxes with the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory phase-III data set  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper details the solar neutrino analysis of the 385.17-day phase-III data set acquired by the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). An array of [superscript 3]He proportional counters was installed in the heavy-water ...

Formaggio, Joseph A.

58

IceCube: Construction Status and First Results  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IceCube is a 1 km3 neutrino telescope currently under construction at the South Pole. The detector will consist of 4800 optical sensors deployed at depths between 1450 m and 2450 m in clear Antarctic ice evenly distributed over 80 strings. An air shower array covering a surface area of 1 km^2 above the in-ice detector will measure cosmic ray air showers in the energy range from 300 TeV to above 1 EeV. The detector is designed to detect neutrinos of all flavors. With 40 strings currently in operation, construction is 50% complete. Based on data taken to date, the observatory meets its design goals and currently exceeds the sensitivity of AMANDA and previous neutrino telescopes. The construction outlook and possible future extensions are also discussed.

Albrecht Karle; for the IceCube Collaboration

2008-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

59

Production and counting of uncontained sources in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

I describe production and distribution of uncontained sources of {sup 24}Na and {sup 222}Rn inside the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). These unique sources provided a uniquely accurate calibration of the SNO detector of its response to neutrons, produced through photodisintegration of the deuterons in the heavy water target, and to low energy {beta}-{gamma} decays.

Peeters, Simon J. M. [Pevensey II, Falmer, Brighton, BN1 9QH (United Kingdom)

2011-04-27T23:59:59.000Z

60

SEARCH FOR NEUTRON ANTI-NEUTRON OSCILLATION AT THE SUDBURY NEUTRINO OBSERVATORY  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

SEARCH FOR NEUTRON ANTI-NEUTRON OSCILLATION AT THE SUDBURY NEUTRINO OBSERVATORY A Thesis Presented to explain the baryon asymmetry of the universe. In this thesis, a limit on the neutron anti-neutron (nnbar is sampled from the three phases of the SNO experiment to construct a three-phase blind analysis. The profile

Waltham, Chris

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "icecube neutrino observatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Probing low-x QCD with cosmic neutrinos at the Pierre Auger Observatory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The sources of the observed ultra-high energy cosmic rays must also generate ultra-high energy neutrinos. Deep inelastic scattering of these neutrinos with nucleons on Earth probe center-of-mass energies {radical}s {approx} 100 TeV, well beyond those attainable at terrestrial colliders. By comparing the rates for two classes of observable events, any departure from the benchmark (unscreened perturbative QCD) neutrino-nucleon cross-section can be constrained. Using the projected sensitivity of the Pierre Auger Observatory to quasi-horizontal showers and Earth-skimming tau neutrinos, we show that a ''Super-Auger'' detector can thus provide an unique probe of strong interaction dynamics.

Anchordoqui, Luis A.; /Northeastern U. /Wisconsin U., Milwaukee; Cooper-Sarkar, Amanda M.; /Oxford U.; Hooper, Dan; /Fermilab; Sarkar, Subir; /Oxford U.

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Low-energy-threshold analysis of the Phase I and Phase II data sets of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Results are reported from a joint analysis of Phase I and Phase II data from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory. The effective electron kinetic energy threshold used is Teff=3.5 MeV, the lowest analysis threshold yet achieved ...

Monroe, Jocelyn

63

Searching for Cosmic Accelerators via IceCube  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of the highest energy neutrinos ever reported, which have been named Bert and Ernie." The new results from IceCube, which were published in the journal Science, provide...

64

Enhanced crustal geo-neutrino production near the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory, Ontario, Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

records average crustal radio-activity over the whole crustal column and is unaffected by small-scale Observatory (SNO) has been in operation since November 1999. The upgrade of the facility to SNO+ in the coming

Long, Bernard

65

Search for high-energy muon neutrinos from the "naked-eye" GRB080319B with the IceCube neutrino telescope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

one of the brightest gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) ever observed.cosmic high-energy neutrinos, gamma-ray-burst, GRB 080319BLong duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are thought to

Abbasi, R.; IceCube Collaboration

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

amanda neutrino telescope: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

neutrino flux, permanent and transient point source analyses, and indirect dark matter searches. A brief outlook on the IceCube neutrino telescope currently under...

67

amanda neutrino telescopes: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

neutrino flux, permanent and transient point source analyses, and indirect dark matter searches. A brief outlook on the IceCube neutrino telescope currently under...

68

Day-night asymmetry of high and low energy solar neutrino events in Super-Kamiokande and in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the context of solar neutrino oscillations among active states, we briefly discuss the current likelihood of Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) solutions to the solar neutrino problem, which appear to be currently favored at large mixing, where small Earth regeneration effects might still be observable in Super-Kamiokande (SK) and in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). We point out that, since such effects are larger at high (low) solar neutrino energies for high (low) values of the mass square difference \\delta m^2, it may be useful to split the night-day rate asymmetry in two separate energy ranges. We show that the difference \\Delta of the night-day asymmetry at high and low energy may help to discriminate the two large-mixing solutions at low and high \\delta m^2 through a sign test, both in SK and in SNO, provided that the sensitivity to \\Delta can reach the (sub)percent level.

G. L. Fogli; E. Lisi; D. Montanino; A. Palazzo

2000-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

69

An array of low-background 3He proportional counters for theSudbury Neutrino Observatory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An array of Neutral-Current Detectors (NCDs) has been builtin order to make a unique measurement of the total active ux of solarneutrinos in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). Data in the thirdphase of the SNO experiment were collected between November 2004 andNovember 2006, after the NCD array was added to improve theneutral-current sensitivity of the SNO detector. This array consisted of36 strings of proportional counters lled with a mixture of 3He and CF4gas capable of detecting the neutrons liberated by the neutrino-deuteronneutral current reaction in the D2O, and four strings lled with a mixtureof 4He and CF4 gas for background measurements. The proportional counterdiameter is 5 cm. The total deployed array length was 398 m. The SNO NCDarray is the lowest-radioactivity large array of proportional countersever produced. This article describes the design, construction,deployment, and characterization of the NCD array, discusses theelectronics and data acquisition system, and considers event signaturesand backgrounds.

Amsbaugh, J.F.; Anaya, J.M.; Banar, J.; Bowles, T.J.; Browne,M.C.; Bullard, T.V.; Burritt, T.H.; Cox-Mobrand, G.A.; Dai, X.; H.Deng,X.; Di Marco, M.; Doe, P.J.; Dragowsky, M.R.; Duba, C.A.; Duncan, F.A.; Earle, E.D.; Elliott, S.R.; Esch, E.-I.; Fergani, H.; Formaggio, J.A.; Fowler, M.M.; Franklin, J.E.; Geissbuehler, P.; Germani, J.V.; Goldschmidt, A.; Guillian, E.; Hallin, A.L.; Harper, G.; Harvey, P.J.; Hazama, R.; Heeger, K.M.; Heise, J.; Hime, A.; Howe, M.A.; Huang, M.; Kormos, L.L.; Kraus, C.; Krauss, C.B.; Law, J.; Lawson, I.T.; Lesko,K.T.; Loach, J.C.; Majerus, S.; Manor, J.; McGee, S.; Miknaitis, K.K.S.; Miller, G.G.; Morissette, B.; Myers, A.; Oblath, N.S.; O'Kee, H.M.; Ollerhead, R.W.; Peeters, S.J.M.; Poon, A.W.P.; Prior, G.; Reitzner,S.D.; Rielage, K.; Robertson, R.G.H.; Skensved, P.; Smith, A.R.; Smith,M.W.E.; Steiger, T.D.; Stonehill,L.C.; Thornewell, P.M.; Tolich, N.; VanDevender, B.A.; VanWechel, T.D.; Wall, B.L.; Tseung, H.W.C.; Wendland,J.; West, N.; Wilhelmy, J.B.; Wilkerson, J.F.; Wouters, J.M.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

Energy and Matter: The design of a nature centre, tunnel, and neutrino observatory.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??Neutrino physics proposes radical new conceptions of matter. Contemplating the extraordinary and mysterious nature of neutrinos in architectural terms, Energy and Matter considers the ideas… (more)

Elsworthy, William

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

John Bahcall Postdoctoral Researcher The Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophysics Center (WIPAC) at the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

phenomena as diverse as neutrino physics, supernovae, dark matter, gamma ray bursts, active galaxies that have strong connections to IceCube. At present these include the High-Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC

Saffman, Mark

72

``STUDIES OF THE SUDBURY NEUTRINO OBSERVATORY DETECTOR AND SONOLUMINESCENCE USING A SONOLUMINESCENT SOURCE''  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

heavy water Cerenkov solar neutrino detector. 1000 metric tonnes of heavy water is used as a neutrino electron neutrinos via charged current interactions of electron neutrinos with deuterons in the heavy water Water, have taught me the most. It is incredible how willing they were to help at any time they were

73

Solar neutrino measurement in SK and larger detector a Kamioka observatory, ICRR, Univ. of Tokyo,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the solar neutrino ux but also its energy spectrum and time variations such as day-night and seasonal di#11). The advantages of the detector as a solar neutrino observation are the time variation measurements and very-I 2.1. Solar neutrino ux The observed solar neutrino ux in SK-I, whose energy threshold is 5.0Me

Tokyo, University of

74

A Search for Ultra-High Energy Neutrinos in Highly Inclined Events at the Pierre Auger Observatory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Surface Detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory is sensitive to neutrinos of all flavors above 0.1 EeV. These interact through charged and neutral currents in the atmosphere giving rise to extensive air showers. When interacting deeply in the atmosphere at nearly horizontal incidence, neutrinos can be distinguished from regular hadronic cosmic rays by the broad time structure of their shower signals in the water-Cherenkov detectors. In this paper we present for the first time an analysis based on down-going neutrinos. We describe the search procedure, the possible sources of background, the method to compute the exposure and the associated systematic uncertainties. No candidate neutrinos have been found in data collected from 1 January 2004 to 31 May 2010. Assuming an E-2 differential energy spectrum the limit on the single-flavor neutrino is E2dN/dE < 1.74 x 10-7 GeV cm-2s-1sr-1 at 90% C.L. in the energy range 1 x 1017eV < E < 1 x 1020 eV.

Abreu, P [LIP, Coimbra; Lisbon, IST; Aglietta, M; Ahlers, M; Ahn, E J; Albuquerque, I F.M.; Allard, D

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

75

A Search for Ultra-High Energy Neutrinos in Highly Inclined Events at the Pierre Auger Observatory  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

The Surface Detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory is sensitive to neutrinos of all flavors above 0.1 EeV. These interact through charged and neutral currents in the atmosphere giving rise to extensive air showers. When interacting deeply in the atmosphere at nearly horizontal incidence, neutrinos can be distinguished from regular hadronic cosmic rays by the broad time structure of their shower signals in the water-Cherenkov detectors. In this paper we present for the first time an analysis based on down-going neutrinos. We describe the search procedure, the possible sources of background, the method to compute the exposure and the associated systematic uncertainties. No candidate neutrinos have been found in data collected from 1 January 2004 to 31 May 2010. Assuming an E-2 differential energy spectrum the limit on the single-flavor neutrino is E2dN/dE -7 GeV cm-2s-1sr-1 at 90% C.L. in the energy range 1 x 1017eV 20 eV.

Abreu, P [LIP, Coimbra; Lisbon, IST; Aglietta, M; Ahlers, M; Ahn, E J; Albuquerque, I F.M.; Allard, D

2011-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

76

The IceCube data acquisition system: Signal capture, digitization,and timestamping  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

IceCube is a km-scale neutrino observatory under construction at the South Pole with sensors both in the deep ice (InIce) and on the surface (IceTop). The sensors, called Digital Optical Modules (DOMs), detect, digitize and timestamp the signals from optical Cherenkov-radiation photons. The DOM Main Board (MB) data acquisition subsystem is connected to the central DAQ in the IceCube Laboratory (ICL) by a single twisted copper wire-pair and transmits packetized data on demand. Time calibration ismaintained throughout the array by regular transmission to the DOMs of precisely timed analog signals, synchronized to a central GPS-disciplined clock. The design goals and consequent features, functional capabilities, and initial performance of the DOM MB, and the operation of a combined array of DOMs as a system, are described here. Experience with the first InIce strings and the IceTop stations indicates that the system design and performance goals have been achieved.

The IceCube Collaboration; Matis, Howard

2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

77

Angular correlation of cosmic neutrinos with ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays and implications for their sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Cosmic neutrino events detected by the IceCube Neutrino Observatory with energy $\\gtrsim 30$ TeV have poor angular resolutions to reveal their origin. Ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays (UHECRs), with better angular resolutions at $>60$ EeV energies, can be used to check if the same astrophysical sources are responsible for producing both neutrinos and UHECRs. We test this hypothesis, with statistical methods which emphasize invariant quantities, by using data from the Pierre Auger Observatory, Telescope Array and past cosmic-ray experiments. We find that the arrival directions of the cosmic neutrinos are correlated with $\\ge 100$ EeV UHECR arrival directions at confidence level $\\approx 93\\%$. The strength of the correlation decreases with decreasing UHECR energy and no correlation exists at energy $\\sim 60$ EeV. A search in astrophysical databases within $3^\\circ$ of the arrival directions of UHECRs with energy $\\ge 100$ EeV, that are correlated with the IceCube cosmic neutrinos, resulted in 18 sources from the S...

Moharana, Reetanjali

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

78

Measurement of the nue and Total 8B Solar Neutrino Fluxes with theSudbury Neutrino Observatory Phase I Data Set  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This article provides the complete description of resultsfrom the Phase I data set of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO). ThePhase I data set is based on a 0.65 kt-year exposure of heavy water tothe solar 8B neutrino flux. Included here are details of the SNO physicsand detector model, evaluations of systematic uncertainties, andestimates of backgrounds. Also discussed are SNO's approach tostatistical extraction of the signals from the three neutrino reactions(charged current, neutral current, and elastic scattering) and theresults of a search for a day-night asymmetry in the ?e flux. Under theassumption that the 8B spectrum is undistorted, the measurements fromthis phase yield a solar ?e flux of ?(?e) =1.76+0.05?0.05(stat.)+0.09?0.09 (syst.) x 106 cm?2 s?1, and a non-?ecomponent ?(? mu) = 3.41+0.45?0.45(stat.)+0.48?0.45 (syst.) x 106 cm?2s?1. The sum of these components provides a total flux in excellentagreement with the predictions of Standard Solar Models. The day-nightasymmetry in the ?e flux is found to be Ae = 7.0 +- 4.9 (stat.)+1.3?1.2percent (sys.), when the asymmetry in the total flux is constrained to bezero.

Aharmim, B.; Ahmad, Q.R.; Ahmed, S.N.; Allen, R.C.; Andersen,T.C.; Anglin, J.D.; Buehler, G.; Barton, J.C.; Beier, E.W.; Bercovitch,M.; Bergevin, M.; Bigu, J.; Biller, S.D.; Black, R.A.; Blevis, I.; Boardman, R.J.; Boger, J.; Bonvin, E.; Boulay, M.G.; Bowler, M.G.; Bowles, T.J.; Brice, S.J.; Browne, M.C.; Bullard, T.V.; Burritt, T.H.; Cameron, J.; Chan, Y.D.; Chen, H.H.; Chen, M.; Chen, X.; Cleveland, B.T.; Cowan, J.H.M.; Cowen, D.F.; Cox, G.A.; Currat, C.A.; Dai, X.; Dalnoki-Veress, F.; Davidson, W.F.; Deng, H.; DiMarco, M.; Doe, P.J.; Doucas, G.; Dragowsky, M.R.; Duba, C.A.; Duncan, F.A.; Dunford, M.; Dunmore, J.A.; Earle, E.D.; Elliott, S.R.; Evans, H.C.; Ewan, G.T.; Farine, J.; Fergani, H.; Ferraris, A.P.; Fleurot, F.; Ford, R.J.; Formaggio, J.A.; Fowler, M.M.; Frame, K.; Frank, E.D.; Frati, W.; Gagnon,N.; Germani, J.V.; Gil, S.; Goldschmidt, A.; Goon, J.T.M.; Graham, K.; Grant, D.R.; Guillian, E.; Hahn, R.L.; Hallin, A.L.; Hallman, E.D.; Hamer, A.S.; Hamian, A.A.; Handler, W.B.; Haq, R.U.; Hargrove, C.K.; Harvey, P.J.; Hazama, R.; Heeger, K.M.; Heintzelman, W.J.; Heise, J.; Helmer, R.L.; Henning, R.; Hepburn, J.D.; Heron, H.; Hewett, J.; Hime,A.; Howard, C.; Howe, M.A.; Huang, M.; Hykawy, J.G.; Isaac, M.C.P.; Jagam, P.; Jamieson, B.; Jelley, N.A.; Jillings, C.; Jonkmans, G.; Kazkaz, K.; Keener, P.T.; Kirch, K.; Klein, J.R.; Knox, A.B.; Komar,R.J.; Kormos, L.L.; Kos, M.; Kouzes, R.; Krueger, A.; Kraus, C.; Krauss,C.B.; Kutter, T.; Kyba, C.C.M.; Labranche, H.; Lange, R.; Law, J.; Lawson, I.T.; Lay, M.; Lee, H.W.; Lesko, K.T.; Leslie, J.R.; Levine, I.; Loach, J.C.; Locke, W.; Luoma, S.; Lyon, J.; MacLellan, R.; Majerus, S.; Mak, H.B.; Maneira, J.; Marino, A.D.; Martin, R.; McCauley, N.; McDonald,A.B.; McDonald, D.S.; McFarlane, K.; McGee, S.; McGregor, G.; MeijerDrees, R.; Mes, H.; Mifflin, C.; Miknaitis, K.K.S.; Miller, M.L.; Milton,G.; Moffat, B.A.; Monreal, B.; Moorhead, M.; Morrissette, B.; Nally,C.W.; Neubauer, M.S.; et al.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

Atmospheric neutrino oscillations and tau neutrinos in ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The main goal of the IceCube Deep Core Array is to search for neutrinos of astrophysical origins. Atmospheric neutrinos are commonly considered as a background for these searches. We show here that cascade measurements in the Ice Cube Deep Core Array can provide strong evidence for tau neutrino appearance in atmospheric neutrino oscillations. A careful study of these tau neutrinos is crucial, since they constitute an irreducible background for astrophysical neutrino detection.

Gerardo Giordano; Olga Mena; Irina Mocioiu

2010-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

80

Neutrino Induced Upward Going Muons from a Gamma Ray Burst in a Neutrino Telescope of Km^2 Area  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The number of neutrino induced upward going muons from a single Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) expected to be detected by the proposed kilometer scale IceCube detector at the South Pole location has been calculated. The effects of the Lorentz factor, total energy of the GRB emitted in neutrinos and its distance from the observer (red shift) on the number of neutrino events from the GRB have been examined. The present investigation reveals that there is possibility of exploring the early Universe with the proposed kilometer scale IceCube neutrino telescope.

Nayantara Gupta

2002-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "icecube neutrino observatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

High-Energy Neutrino Astronomy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kilometer-scale neutrino detectors such as IceCube are discovery instruments covering nuclear and particle physics, cosmology and astronomy. Examples of their multidisciplinary missions include the search for the particle nature of dark matter and for additional small dimensions of space. In the end, their conceptual design is very much anchored to the observational fact that Nature accelerates protons and photons to energies in excess of $10^{20}$ and $10^{13}$ eV, respectively. The cosmic ray connection sets the scale of cosmic neutrino fluxes. In this context, we discuss the first results of the completed AMANDA detector and the reach of its extension, IceCube. Similar experiments are under construction in the Mediterranean. Neutrino astronomy is also expanding in new directions with efforts to detect air showers, acoustic and radio signals initiated by super-EeV neutrinos.

F. Halzen

2004-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

82

High-Energy Neutrino Astronomy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Kilometer-scale neutrino detectors such as IceCube are discovery instruments covering nuclear and particle physics, cosmology and astronomy. Examples of their multidisciplinary missions include the search for the particle nature of dark matter and for additional small dimensions of space. In the end, their conceptual design is very much anchored to the observational fact that Nature accelerates protons and photons to energies in excess of 10^{20} and 10^{13} eV, respectively. The cosmic ray connection sets the scale of cosmic neutrino fluxes. In this context, we discuss the first results of the completed AMANDA detector and the reach of its extension, IceCube. Similar experiments are under construction in the Mediterranean. Neutrino astronomy is also expanding in new directions with efforts to detect air showers, acoustic and radio signals initiated by neutrinos with energies similar to those of the highest energy cosmic rays.

F. Halzen

2005-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

83

Neutrino mass hierarchy extraction using atmospheric neutrinos in ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that the measurements of 10 GeV atmospheric neutrinos by an upcoming array of densely packed phototubes buried deep inside the IceCube detector at the South Pole can be used to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy for values of sin^2(2theta13) close to the present bound, if the hierarchy is normal. These results are obtained for an exposure of 100 Mton years and systematic uncertainties up to 10%.

Olga Mena; Irina Mocioiu; Soebur Razzaque

2008-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

84

A radio air shower surface detector as an extension for IceCube and IceTop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The IceCube neutrino detector is built into the Antarctic ice sheet at the South Pole to measure high energy neutrinos. For this, 4800 photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) are being deployed at depths between 1450 and 2450 meters into the ice to measure neutrino induced charged particles like muons. IceTop is a surface air shower detector consisting of 160 Cherenkov ice tanks located on top of IceCube. To extend IceTop, a radio air shower detector could be built to significantly increase the sensitivity at higher shower energies and for inclined showers. As air showers induced by cosmic rays are a major part of the muonic background in IceCube, IceTop is not only an air shower detector, but also a veto to reduce the background in IceCube. Air showers are detectable by radio signals with a radio surface detector. The major emission process is the coherent synchrotron radiation emitted by e+ e- shower particles in the Earths magnetic field (geosynchrotron effect). Simulations of the expected radio signals of air showers are shown. The sensitivity and the energy threshold of different antenna field configurations are estimated.

J. Auffenberg; T. Gaisser; K. Helbing; T. Huege; T. Karg; A. Karle

2007-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

85

Neutrino  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andDataNational Library of1, 2007Transmission toBeam ExcitationNeutrino

86

IceCube Project Monthly Report -April 2010 Accomplishments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 IceCube Project Monthly Report - April 2010 Accomplishments · The IceCube Software Water Drill equipment (http://www.icecube.wisc.edu/disposition/index.php) and the site was circulated at Uppsala University are using Deep Core DOMs as flashers and receivers for low-intensity flasher runs

Saffman, Mark

87

MEASUREMENT OF THE ANISOTROPY OF COSMIC-RAY ARRIVAL DIRECTIONS WITH ICECUBE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We report the first observation of an anisotropy in the arrival direction of cosmic rays with energies in the multi-TeV region in the Southern sky using data from the IceCube detector. Between 2007 June and 2008 March, the partially deployed IceCube detector was operated in a configuration with 1320 digital optical sensors distributed over 22 strings at depths between 1450 and 2450 m inside the Antarctic ice. IceCube is a neutrino detector, but the data are dominated by a large background of cosmic-ray muons. Therefore, the background data are suitable for high-statistics studies of cosmic rays in the southern sky. The data include 4.3 billion muons produced by downward-going cosmic-ray interactions in the atmosphere; these events were reconstructed with a median angular resolution of 3{sup 0} and a median energy of {approx}20 TeV. Their arrival direction distribution exhibits an anisotropy in right ascension with a first-harmonic amplitude of (6.4 {+-} 0.2 stat. {+-} 0.8 syst.) x 10{sup -4}.

Abbasi, R.; Aguilar, J. A.; Andeen, K.; Baker, M.; BenZvi, S. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Abdou, Y. [Department of Subatomic and Radiation Physics, University of Gent, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Abu-Zayyad, T. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, River Falls, WI 54022 (United States); Adams, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Ahlers, M. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Auffenberg, J.; Becker, K.-H. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany); Bai, X. [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Barwick, S. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Bay, R. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Bazo Alba, J. L.; Benabderrahmane, M. L. [DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen (Germany); Beattie, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Beatty, J. J. [Department of Physics and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Bechet, S. [Science Faculty CP230, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Becker, J. K., E-mail: rasha.abbasi@icecube.wisc.ed, E-mail: paolo.desiati@icecube.wisc.ed [Fakultaet fuer Physik and Astronomie, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

IceCube Project Monthly Report Accomplishments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

;3 The latest revised estimates were modified to reflect the anticipated changes resulting from the Raytheon in Raytheon Polar Services completing the IceCube Laboratory. $1 million is from the lagging receipts. The on-ice Integrated Master Schedule is underway and being worked on this week with Raytheon Polar

Saffman, Mark

89

IceCube Project Monthly Report Accomplishments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

staff from UW, IceCube collaborators, and Raytheon. · Conducted a Quarterly Status Meeting at UW-loaded schedule for on-ice activities that is coordinated with the Raytheon on-ice schedules. Construction Cost accurate application of escalation rates and revisions to actual cost data. Raytheon earned value data

Saffman, Mark

90

Constraints on Neutrino Velocities Revisited  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With a minimally modified dispersion relation for neutrinos, we reconsider the constraints on superluminal neutrino velocities from bremsstrahlung effects in the laboratory frame. Employing both the direct calculation approach and the virtual Z-boson approach, we obtain the generic decay width and energy loss rate of a superluminal neutrino with general energy. The Cohen-Glashow's analytical results for neutrinos with a relatively low energy are confirmed in both approaches. We employ the survival probability instead of the terminal energy to assess whether a neutrino with a given energy is observable or not in the OPERA experiment. Moreover, using our general results we perform systematical analyses on the constraints arising from the Super-Kamiokande and IceCube experiments.

Yunjie Huo; Tianjun Li; Yi Liao; Dimitri V. Nanopoulos; Yonghui Qi

2012-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

91

Neutrino observations from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Agra-Monenco, Canatom,The heavy water was loaned by AECL with the cooperation of

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Solar Neutrino Matter Effects Redux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Following recent low-threshold analysis of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory and asymmetry measurements of the BOREXINO Collaboration of the solar neutrino flux, we revisit the analysis of the matter effects in the Sun. We show that solar neutrino data constrains the mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ poorly and that subdominant Standard Model effects can mimic the effects of the physics beyond the Standard Model.

A. B. Balantekin; A. Malkus

2011-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

93

IceCube Project Monthly Report August 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IceCube Project Monthly Report August 2005 Accomplishments All of the DOMs installed at the South additional emphasis on training and procedures. The training program for IceCube personnel scheduled to work-05 S-05 O-05 N-05 D-05 J-06 F-06 M-06 3&4 FY06 FY07 FY08 FY09 FY10 FY11 IceCube Project Baseline

Saffman, Mark

94

Science Potential of a Deep Ocean Antineutrino Observatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents science potential of a deep ocean antineutrino observatory under development at Hawaii. The observatory design allows for relocation from one site to another. Positioning the observatory some 60 km distant from a nuclear reactor complex enables precision measurement of neutrino mixing parameters, leading to a determination of neutrino mass hierarchy. At a mid-Pacific location the observatory measures the flux and ratio of uranium and thorium decay neutrinos from earth's mantle and performs a sensitive search for a hypothetical natural fission reactor in earth's core. A subsequent deployment at another mid-ocean location would test lateral heterogeneity of uranium and thorium in earth's mantle.

Steve Dye

2006-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

95

IceCube Project Monthly Report September 2005  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IceCube Project Monthly Report September 2005 Accomplishments All of the IceCube Digital Optical the long- term project goals of 90% first pass yield and 95% ultimate yield. The additional data handling at the Pole and one at McMurdo. The drilling procedures are nearing completion. A final review and sign

Saffman, Mark

96

Indirect Dark Matter search with large neutrino telescopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dark matter is one of the main goals of neutrino astronomy. At present, there are two big neutrino telescopes based on the Cherenkov technique in ice and water: IceCube at the South Pole and ANTARES in the northern hemisphere. Both telescopes are performing an indirect search for Dark Matter by looking for a statistical excess of neutrinos coming from astrophysical massive objects. This excess could be an evidence of the possible annihilation of dark matter particles in the centre of these objects. In one of the most popular scenarios the Dark Matter is composed of WIMP particles. The analysis and results of the ANTARES neutrino telescope for the indirect detection of Dark Matter fluxes from the Sun are here presented, as well as the latest IceCube published sensitivity results, for different Dark Matter models.

Fermani, Paolo

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Limits on a muon flux from Kaluza-Klein dark matter annihilations in the Sun from the IceCube 22-string detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A search for muon neutrinos from Kaluza-Klein dark matter annihilations in the Sun has been performed with the 22-string configuration of the IceCube neutrino detector using data collected in 104.3 days of live-time in 2007. No excess over the expected atmospheric background has been observed. Upper limits have been obtained on the annihilation rate of captured lightest Kaluza-Klein particle (LKP) WIMPs in the Sun and converted to limits on the LKP-proton cross-sections for LKP masses in the range 250 - 3000 GeV. These results are the most stringent limits to date on LKP annihilation in the Sun.

IceCube Collaboration; Abbasi, R.; al., et

2009-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

98

The Enriched Xenon Observatory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Enriched Xenon Observatory (EXO) experiment will search for neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 136}Xe. The EXO Collaboration is actively pursuing both liquid-phase and gas-phase Xe detector technologies with scalability to the ton-scale. The search for neutrinoless double beta decay of {sup 136}Xe is especially attractive because of the possibility of tagging the resulting Ba daughter ion, eliminating all sources of background other than the two neutrino decay mode. EXO-200, the first phase of the project, is a liquid Xe time projection chamber with 200 kg of Xe enriched to 80% in {sup 136}Xe. EXO-200, which does not include Ba-tagging, will begin taking data in 2009, with two-year sensitivity to the half-life for neutrinoless double beta decay of 6.4x10{sup 25} years. This corresponds to an effective Majorana neutrino mass of 0.13 to 0.19 eV.

Dolinski, M. J. [Stanford University Physics Department, 382 Via Pueblo Mall, Stanford, CA 94305-4060 (United States)

2009-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

99

The Energy Spectrum of Atmospheric Neutrinos between 2 and 200 TeV with the AMANDA-II Detector  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The muon and anti-muon neutrino energy spectrum is determined from 2000-2003 AMANDA telescope data using regularised unfolding. This is the first measurement of atmospheric neutrinos in the energy range 2-200 TeV. The result is compared to different atmospheric neutrino models and it is compatible with the atmospheric neutrinos from pion and kaon decays. No significant contribution from charm hadron decays or extraterrestrial neutrinos is detected. The capabilities to improve the measurement of the neutrino spectrum with the successor experiment IceCube are discussed.

IceCube Collaboration; Abbasi, R.

2010-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

100

IceCube Project Monthly Report January 2011 Accomplishments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Raytheon responsibilities. The excitement generated by the completion of IceCube construction led at the end of December 2010 was a favorable $2.042M, primarily due to Raytheon and New York Air National

Saffman, Mark

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "icecube neutrino observatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

IceCube Project Monthly Report -November 2009 Accomplishments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-speaking researchers. · IceCube participated with Raytheon Polar Services Company in an extremely successful emergency principally due to lower labor and on-ice support costs for Raytheon Polar Services Corporation and the Air

Saffman, Mark

102

The Icecube Data Acquisition Software: Lessons Learned During Distributed, Collaborative,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Icecube Data Acquisition Software: Lessons Learned During Distributed, Collaborative, Multi@mail.npxdesigns.com, CPMcParland@lbl.gov, SJPatton@lbl.gov Abstract. In this experiential paper we report on lessons learned

Geddes, Cameron Guy Robinson

103

Firewall Phenomenology with Astrophysical Neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the most fundamental features of a black hole in general relativity is its event horizon: a boundary from which nothing can escape. There has been a recent surge of interest in the nature of these event horizons and their local neighbourhoods. In an attempt to resolve black hole information paradox(es), and more generally, to better understand the path towards quantum gravity, firewalls have been proposed as an alternative to black hole event horizons. In this letter, we explore the phenomenological implications of black holes possessing a surface or firewall. We predict a potentially detectable signature of these firewalls in the form of a high energy astrophysical neutrino flux. We compute the spectrum of this neutrino flux in different models and show that it is a possible candidate for the source of the PeV neutrinos recently detected by IceCube. We further show that, independent of the generation mechanism, IceCube data can be explained (at $1\\sigma$ confidence level) by conversion of accretion on...

Afshordi, Niayesh

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

High energy cosmic rays, gamma rays and neutrinos from AGN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The author reviews a model for the emission of high energy cosmic rays, gamma-rays and neutrinos from AGN (Active Galactic Nuclei) that he has proposed since 1985. Further discussion of the knee energy phenomenon of the cosmic ray energy spectrum requires the existence of a heavy particle with mass in the knee energy range. A possible method of detecting such a particle in the Pierre Auger Project is suggested. Also presented is a relation between the spectra of neutrinos and gamma-rays emitted from AGN. This relation can be tested by high energy neutrino detectors such as ICECUBE, the Mediterranean Sea Detector and possibly by the Pierre Auger Project.

Yukio Tomozawa

2008-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

105

Neutrino Tomography of Gamma Ray Bursts and Massive Stellar Collapses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutrinos at energies above TeV can serve as probes of the stellar progenitor and jet dynamics of gamma ray bursts arising from stellar core collapses. They can also probe collapses which do not lead to gamma-rays, which may be much more numerous. We calculate detailed neutrino spectra from shock accelerated protons in jets just below the outer stellar envelope, before their emergence. We present neutrino flux estimates from such pre-burst jets for two different massive stellar progenitor models. These should be distinguishable by IceCube, and we discuss the implications.

Soebur Razzaque; Peter Meszaros; Eli Waxman

2003-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

106

High Energy Neutrino Signals from the Epoch of Reionization  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we perform a new estimate of the high energy neutrinos expected from GRBs associated with the first generation of stars in light of new models and constraints on the epoch of reionization and a more detailed evaluation of the neutrino emission yields. We also compare the diffuse high energy neutrino background from Population III stars with the one from ''ordinary stars'' (Population II), as estimated consistently within the same cosmological and astrophysical assumptions. In disagreement with previous literature, we find that high energy neutrinos from Population III stars will not be observable with current or near future neutrino telescopes, falling below both IceCube sensitivity and atmospheric neutrino background under the most extreme assumptions for the GRB rate. This rules them out as a viable diagnostic tool for these still elusive metal-free stars.

Iocco, F.; Murase, K.; Nagataki, S.; Serpico, P.D.

2007-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

107

High energy neutrinos from dissipative photospheric models of gamma ray bursts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We calculate the high energy neutrino spectrum from gamma-ray bursts where the emission arises in a dissipative jet photosphere determined by either baryonically or magnetically dominated dynamics, and compare these neutrino spectra to those obtained in conventional internal shock models. We also calculate the diffuse neutrino spectra based on these models, which appear compatible with the current IceCube 40+59 constraints. While a re-analysis based on the models discussed here and the data from the full array would be needed, it appears that only those models with the most extreme parameters are close to being constrained at present. A multi-year operation of the full IceCube and perhaps a next generation of large volume neutrino detectors may be required in order to distinguish between the various models discussed.

Gao, Shan; Mészáros, Peter [Department of Physics, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Center for Particle Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, 16802 (United States); Asano, Katsuaki, E-mail: sxg324@psu.edu, E-mail: asano@phys.titech.ac.jp, E-mail: pmeszaros@astro.psu.edu [Interactive Research Center of Science, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan)

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

DIFFUSE PeV NEUTRINOS FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The IceCube Collaboration recently reported the potential detection of two cascade neutrino events in the energy range 1-10 PeV. We study the possibility that these PeV neutrinos are produced by gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), paying special attention to the contribution by untriggered GRBs that elude detection due to their low photon flux. Based on the luminosity function, rate distribution with redshift and spectral properties of GRBs, we generate, using a Monte Carlo simulation, a GRB sample that reproduces the observed fluence distribution of Fermi/GBM GRBs and an accompanying sample of untriggered GRBs simultaneously. The neutrino flux of every individual GRB is calculated in the standard internal shock scenario, so that the accumulative flux of the whole samples can be obtained. We find that the neutrino flux in PeV energies produced by untriggered GRBs is about two times higher than that produced by the triggered ones. Considering the existing IceCube limit on the neutrino flux of triggered GRBs, we find that the total flux of triggered and untriggered GRBs can reach at most a level of {approx}10{sup -9} GeV cm{sup -2} s{sup -1} sr{sup -1}, which is insufficient to account for the reported two PeV neutrinos. Possible contributions to diffuse neutrinos by low-luminosity GRBs and the earliest population of GRBs are also discussed.

Liu, Ruo-Yu; Wang, Xiang-Yu [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)] [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

109

Integration Observatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hill, Stephen Wampler National Solar Observatory Piet Martens, Alisdair Davey Montana State University Joseph B. Gurman, George Dimitoglou Solar Data Analysis Center #12; VSO Overview 1 Perspective + From documents. ê Independent of platform and programming language + Three major components â Data encapsulation

Bogart, Richard S.

110

Cosmic PeV Neutrinos and the Sources of Ultrahigh Energy Protons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The IceCube experiment recently detected the first flux of high-energy neutrinos in excess of atmospheric backgrounds. We examine whether these neutrinos originate from within the same extragalactic sources as ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays. Starting from rather general assumptions about spectra and flavors, we find that producing a neutrino flux at the requisite level through pion photoproduction leads to a flux of protons well below the cosmic-ray data at ~10^18 eV, where the composition is light, unless pions/muons cool before decaying. This suggests a dominant class of accelerator that allows for cosmic rays to escape without significant neutrino yields.

Matthew D. Kistler; Todor Stanev; Hasan Yuksel

2014-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

111

Neutrinos from Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The observed fluxes of cosmic rays and gamma rays are used to infer the maximum allowed high-energy neutrino flux allowed for Gamma Ray Bursts (GRBs), following Mannheim, Protheroe, and Rachen (2000). It is shown that if GRBs produce the ultrahigh-energy cosmic rays, they should contribute (a) at least 10% of the extragalactic gamma ray background between 3 MeV and 30 GeV, contrary to their observed energy flux which is only a minute fraction of this flux, and (b) a cumulative neutrino flux a factor of 20 below the AMANDA (Neutrino 2000) limit on isotropic neutrinos. This could have two implications, either GRBs do not produce the ultrahigh energy cosmic rays or that the GRBs are strongly beamed and emit most of their power at energies well above 100 GeV implausibly increasing the energy requirements, but consistent with the marginal detections of a few low-redshift GRBs by MILAGRITO, HEGRA-AIROBICC, and the Tibet-Array. All crucial measurements to test the models will be available in the next few years. These are measurements of (i) high-energy neutrinos with AMANDA-ICECUBE or an enlarged ANTARES/NESTOR ocean detector, (ii) GRB redshifts from HETE-2 follow-up studies, and (iii) GRB spectra above 10 GeV with low-threshold imaging air Cherenkov telescopes such as MAGIC and the space telescopes AGILE and GLAST.

Karl Mannheim

2000-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

112

Methods for point source analysis in high energy neutrino telescopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutrino telescopes are moving steadily toward the goal of detecting astrophysical neutrinos from the most powerful galactic and extragalactic sources. Here we describe analysis methods to search for high energy point-like neutrino sources using detectors deep in the ice or sea. We simulate an ideal cubic kilometer detector based on real world performance of existing detectors such as AMANDA, IceCube, and ANTARES. An unbinned likelihood ratio method is applied, making use of the point spread function and energy distribution of simulated neutrino signal events to separate them from the background of atmospheric neutrinos produced by cosmic ray showers. The unbinned point source analyses are shown to perform better than binned searches and, depending on the source spectral index, the use of energy information is shown to improve discovery potential by almost a factor of two.

Jim Braun; Jon Dumm; Francesco De Palma; Chad Finley; Albrecht Karle; Teresa Montaruli

2008-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

113

IceCube Project Monthly Report -December 2008 Accomplishments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IceCube Project Monthly Report - December 2008 Accomplishments · Drilling and string installation of December 2008 and a total of 16 strings were deployed by January 15th . The deep core prototype string are filled with water, and the controlled freeze of the water in the tanks is underway. · Additional

Saffman, Mark

114

IceCube Project Monthly Report August 2009 Accomplishments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

IceCube Project Monthly Report ­ August 2009 Accomplishments · Driller and string installation officer was hired and received training and orientation to personnel, systems, and procedures. Cost and Schedule Performance ­ The project is 92.9% complete. Remaining contingency is $7.6 million. There has been

Saffman, Mark

115

IceCube Project Monthly Report September 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for glacial motion, and the other one using the IceCube Standard Candle that provides an absolute energy the planned filters (as designed by the individual physics groups). Two major shipments to Port Hueneme were. The remaining budget for spare hose segments does not fully satisfy the likely demand. The increased hose

Saffman, Mark

116

Multi-GeV Neutrino Emission from Magnetized Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the expected neutrino emissivity from nuclear collisions in magnetically dominated collisional models of gamma-ray bursts, motivated by recent observational and theoretical developments. The results indicate that significant multi-GeV neutrino fluxes are expected for model parameter values which are typical of electromagnetically detected bursts. We show that for detecting at least one muon event in Icecube and its Deep Core sub-array, a single burst must be near the high end of the luminosity function and at a redshift $z\\lesssim 0.2$. We also calculate the luminosity and distance ranges that can generate $0.01-1$ muon events per GRB in the same detectors, which may be of interest if simultaneously detected electromagnetically, or if measured with future extensions of Icecube or other neutrino detectors with larger effective volume and better sensitivity.

Shan Gao; Peter Meszaros

2012-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

117

IceCube-Plus: An Ultra-High Energy Neutrino Telescope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

While the first kilometer-scale neutrino telescope, IceCube, is under constructi on, alternative plans exist to build even larger detectors that will, however, b e limited by a much higher neutrino energy threshold of 10 PeV or higher rather than 10 to 100 GeV. These future projects detect radio and acoustic pulses as w ell as air showers initiated by ultra-high energy neutrinos. As an alternative, we here propose an expansion of IceCube, using the same strings, placed on a gri d with a spacing of order 500 m. Unlike other proposals, the expanded detector uses methods that are understood and calibrated on atmospheric neutrinos. Atmosp heric neutrinos represent the only background at the energies under consideratio n and is totally negligible. Also, the cost of such a detector is understood. We conclude that supplementing the 81 IceCube strings with a modest number of addi tional strings spaced at large distances can almost double the effective volume of the detector. Doubling the number of strings on a 800 m ...

Halzen, F; Halzen, Francis; Hooper, Dan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

IceCube-Plus: An Ultra-High Energy Neutrino Telescope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

While the first kilometer-scale neutrino telescope, IceCube, is under construction, alternative plans exist to build even larger detectors that will, however, b e limited by a much higher neutrino energy threshold of 10 PeV or higher rather than 10 to 100 GeV. These future projects detect radio and acoustic pulses as w ell as air showers initiated by ultra-high energy neutrinos. As an alternative, we here propose an expansion of IceCube, using the same strings, placed on a gri d with a spacing of order 500 m. Unlike other proposals, the expanded detector uses methods that are understood and calibrated on atmospheric neutrinos. Atmosp heric neutrinos represent the only background at the energies under consideratio n and is totally negligible. Also, the cost of such a detector is understood. We conclude that supplementing the 81 IceCube strings with a modest number of addi tional strings spaced at large distances can almost double the effective volume of the detector. Doubling the number of strings on a 800 m grid can deliver a d etector that this a factor of 5 larger for horizontal muons at modest cost.

Francis Halzen; Dan Hooper

2003-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

119

High-Energy Cosmology: gamma rays and neutrinos from beyond the galaxy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Our knowledge of the high-energy universe is undergoing a period of rapid change as new astronomical detectors of high-energy radiation start to operate at their design sensitivities. Now is a boomtime for high-energy astrophysics, with new discoveries from Swift and HESS, results from MAGIC and VERITAS starting to be reported, the upcoming launches of the gamma-ray space telescopes GLAST and AGILE, and anticipated data releases from IceCube and Auger. A formalism for calculating statistical properties of cosmological gamma-ray sources is presented. Application is made to model calculations of the statistical distributions of gamma-ray and neutrino emission from (i) beamed sources, specifically, long-duration GRBs, blazars, and extagalactic microquasars, and (ii) unbeamed sources, including normal galaxies, starburst galaxies and clusters. Expressions for the integrated intensities of faint beamed and unbeamed high-energy radiation sources are also derived. A toy model for the background intensity of radiation from dark-matter annihilation taking place in the early universe is constructed. Estimates for the gamma-ray fluxes of local group galaxies, starburst, and infrared luminous galaxies are briefly reviewed. Because the brightest extragalactic gamma-ray sources are flaring sources, and these are the best targets for sources of PeV -- EeV neutrinos and ultra-high energy cosmic rays, rapidly slewing all-sky telescopes like MAGIC and an all-sky gamma-ray observatory beyond Milagro will be crucial for optimal science return in the multi-messenger age.

Charles D. Dermer

2006-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

120

Limits on a muon flux from neutralino annihilations in the Sun with the IceCube 22-string detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

neutralino annihilations in the Sun with the IceCube 22-neutralino annihilations in the Sun with the IceCube 22-neutralino annihilations in the Sun has been performed with

Klein, Spencer; IceCube Collaboration

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "icecube neutrino observatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

PINGU and the neutrino mass hierarchy: Statistical and systematic aspects  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The proposed PINGU project (Precision IceCube Next Generation Upgrade) is expected to collect O(10^5) atmospheric muon and electron neutrino in a few years of exposure, and to probe the neutrino mass hierarchy through its imprint on the event spectra in energy and direction. In the presence of nonnegligible and partly unknown shape systematics, the analysis of high-statistics spectral variations will face subtle challenges that are largely unprecedented in neutrino physics. We discuss these issues both on general grounds and in the currently envisaged PINGU configuration, where we find that possible shape uncertainties at the (few) percent level can noticeably affect the sensitivity to the hierarchy. We also discuss the interplay between the mixing angle theta_23 and the PINGU sensitivity to the hierarchy. Our results suggest that more refined estimates of spectral uncertainties are needed in next-generation, large-volume atmospheric neutrino experiments.

Capozzi, F; Marrone, A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

High-Energy Neutrinos in Light of Fermi-LAT  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The production of high-energy astrophysical neutrinos is tightly linked to the emission of hadronic gamma-rays. I will discuss the recent observation of TeV to PeV neutrinos by the IceCube Cherenkov telescope in the context of gamma-ray astronomy. The corresponding energy range of hadronic gamma-rays is not directly accessible by extragalactic gamma-ray astronomy due to interactions with cosmic radiation backgrounds. Nevertheless, the isotropic sub-TeV gamma-ray background observed by the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT) contains indirect information from secondary emission produced in electromagnetic cascades and constrains hadronic emission scenarios. On the other hand, observation of PeV gamma-rays would provide a smoking-gun signal for Galactic emission. In general, the cross-correlation of neutrino emission with (extended) Galactic and extragalactic gamma-ray sources will serve as the most sensitive probe for a future identification of neutrino sources.

Ahlers, Markus

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Pionic Photons and Neutrinos from Cosmic Ray Accelerators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Identifying the accelerators that produce the Galactic and extragalactic cosmic rays has been a priority mission of several generations of high energy gamma ray and neutrino telescopes; success has been elusive so far. Detecting the gamma-ray and neutrino fluxes associated with cosmic rays reaches a new watershed with the completion of IceCube, the first neutrino detector with sensitivity to the anticipated fluxes, and the construction of CTA, a ground-based gamma ray detector that will map and study candidate sources with unprecedented precision. In this paper, we revisit the prospects for revealing the sources of the cosmic rays by a multiwavelength approach; after reviewing the methods, we discuss supernova remnants, gamma ray bursts, active galaxies and GZK neutrinos in some detail.

Francis Halzen

2011-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

124

nuclex/9910016 The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.T.H. Clifford, R. Deal, E.D. Earle, E. Gaudette, G. Milton, B.Sur Chalk River Laboratories, AECL Research, Chalk

Waltham, Chris

125

The Sudbury Neutrino Observatory The SNO Collaboration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1 CANADA2 C. Alexander, E.W. Beier, J.C. Cook, D.F. Cowen, E designed to determine whether the currently observed solar neutri

Waltham, Chris

126

Neutrino Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The fundamental properties of neutrinos are reviewed in these lectures. The first part is focused on the basic characteristics of neutrinos in the Standard Model and how neutrinos are detected. Neutrino masses and oscillations are introduced and a summary of the most important experimental results on neutrino oscillations to date is provided. Then, present and future experimental proposals are discussed, including new precision reactor and accelerator experiments. Finally, different approaches for measuring the neutrino mass and the nature (Majorana or Dirac) of neutrinos are reviewed. The detection of neutrinos from supernovae explosions and the information that this measurement can provide are also summarized at the end.

Gil-Botella, I

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Atmospheric Neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper is a brief overview of the theory and experimental data of atmospheric neutrino production at the fiftieth anniversary of the experimental discovery of neutrinos.

Thomas K. Gaisser

2006-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

128

Neutrino telescopes in the World  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutrino astronomy has rapidly developed these last years, being the only way to get specific and reliable information about astrophysical objects still poorly understood.Currently two neutrino telescopes are operational in the World: BAIKAL, in the lake of the same name in Siberia, and AMANDA, in the ices of the South Pole. Two telescopes of the same type are under construction in the Mediterranean Sea: ANTARES and NESTOR. All these telescopes belong to a first generation, with an instrumented volume smaller or equal to 0.02 km3. Also in the Mediterranean Sea, the NEMO project is just in its stag phase, within the framework of a cubic kilometer size neutrino telescope study. Lastly, the ICECUBE detector, with a volume reaching about 1 km3, is under construction on the site of AMANDA experiment, while an extension of the BAIKAL detector toward km3 is under study. We will present here the characteristics of these experiments, as well as the results of their observations.

Ernenwein, J.-P. [GRPHE, Universite de Haute Alsace, 61 rue Albert Camus, 68093 Mulhouse cedex (France)

2007-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

129

Neutrino Emission from Gamma-Ray Burst Fireballs, Revised  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review the neutrino flux from gamma-ray bursts, which is estimated from gamma-ray observations and used for the interpretation of recent IceCube data, from a particle physics perspective. We numerically calculate the neutrino flux for the same astrophysical assumptions as the analytical fireball neutrino model, including the dominant pion and kaon production modes, flavor mixing, and magnetic field effects on the secondary muons, pions, and kaons. We demonstrate that taking into account the full energy dependencies of all spectra, the normalization of the expected neutrino flux reduces by about one order of magnitude and the spectrum shifts to higher energies, where we can pin down the exact origin of the discrepancies by the re-computation of the analytical models. We also reproduce the IceCube-40 analysis for exactly the same bursts and same assumptions and illustrate the impact of uncertainties. We conclude that the baryonic loading of the fireballs, which is an important control parameter for the emission of cosmic rays, can be constrained significantly with the full-scale experiment after about ten years.

Svenja Hümmer; Philipp Baerwald; Walter Winter

2012-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

130

Searches for Point-like and extended neutrino sources close to the Galactic Centre using the ANTARES neutrino Telescope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A search for cosmic neutrino sources using six years of data collected by the ANTARES neutrino telescope has been performed. Clusters of muon neutrinos over the expected atmospheric background have been looked for. No clear signal has been found. The most signal-like accumulation of events is located at equatorial coordinates RA=$-$46.8$^{\\circ}$ and Dec=$-$64.9$^{\\circ}$ and corresponds to a 2.2$\\sigma$ background fluctuation. In addition, upper limits on the flux normalization of an E$^{-2}$ muon neutrino energy spectrum have been set for 50 pre-selected astrophysical objects. Finally, motivated by an accumulation of 7 events relatively close to the Galactic Centre in the recently reported neutrino sample of the IceCube telescope, a search for point sources in a broad region around this accumulation has been carried out. No indication of a neutrino signal has been found in the ANTARES data and upper limits on the flux normalization of an E$^{-2}$ energy spectrum of neutrinos from point sources in that region have been set. The 90% confidence level upper limits on the muon neutrino flux normalization vary between 3.5 and 5.1$\\times$10$^{-8}$ GeV$\\,$cm$^{-2}$s$^{-1}$, depending on the exact location of the source.

ANTARES Collaboration; S. Adrián-Martínez; A. Albert; M. André; M. Anghinolfi; G. Anton; M. Ardid; J. -J. Aubert; B. Baret; J. Barrios-Martí; S. Basa; V. Bertin; S. Biagi; C. Bogazzi; R. Bormuth; M. Bou-Cabo; M. C. Bouwhuis; R. Bruijn; J. Brunner; J. Busto; A. Capone; L. Caramete; C. Cârloganu; J. Carr; T. Chiarusi; M. Circella; L. Core; H. Costantini; P. Coyle; A. Creusot; C. Curtil; G. De Rosa; I. Dekeyser; A. Deschamps; G. De Bonis; C. Distefano; C. Donzaud; D. Dornic; Q. Dorosti; D. Drouhin; A. Dumas; T. Eberl; D. Elsässer; A. Enzenhöfer; S. Escoffier; K. Fehn; I. Felis; P. Fermani; F. Folger; L. A. Fusco; S. Galatà; P. Gay; S. Geißelsöder; K. Geyer; V. Giordano; A. Gleixner; J. P. Gómez-González; K. Graf; G. Guillard; H. van Haren; A. J. Heijboer; Y. Hello; J. J. Hernández-Rey; B. Herold; A. Herrero; J. Hößl; J. Hofestädt; C. W James; M. de Jong; M. Kadler; O. Kalekin; U. Katz; D. Kießling; P. Kooijman; A. Kouchner; I. Kreykenbohm; V. Kulikovskiy; R. Lahmann; E. Lambard; G. Lambard; D. Lattuada; D. Lefèvre; E. Leonora; H. Loehner; S. Loucatos; S. Mangano; M. Marcelin; A. Margiotta; J. A. Martínez-Mora; S. Martini; A. Mathieu; T. Michael; P. Migliozzi; C. Mueller; M. Neff; E. Nezri; D. Palioselitis; G. E. P?v?la?; C. Perrina; P. Piattelli; V. Popa; T. Pradier; C. Racca; G. Riccobene; R. Richter; K. Roensch; A. Rostovtsev; M. Saldaña; D. F. E. Samtleben; A. Sánchez-Losa; M. Sanguineti; P. Sapienza; J. Schmid; J. Schnabe; S. Schulte; F. Schüssler; T. Seitz; C. Sieger; A. Spies; M. Spurio; J. J. M. Steijger; Th. Stolarczyk; M. Taiuti; C. Tamburini; Y. Tayalati; A. Trovato; B. Vallage; C. Vallée; V. Van Elewyck; E. Visser; D. Vivolo; S. Wagner; J. Wilms; E. de Wolf; K. Yatkin; H. Yepes; J. D. Zornoza; J. Zúñiga

2014-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

131

Diffuse emission of high-energy neutrinos from gamma-ray burst fireballs  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been suggested as possible sources of the high-energy neutrino flux recently detected by the IceCube telescope. We revisit the fireball emission model and elaborate an analytical prescription to estimate the high-energy neutrino prompt emission from pion and kaon decays, assuming that the leading mechanism for the neutrino production is lepto-hadronic. To this purpose, we include hadronic, radiative and adiabatic cooling effects and discuss their relevance for long- (including high- and low-luminosity) and short-duration GRBs. The expected diffuse neutrino background is derived, by requiring that the GRB high-energy neutrino counterparts follow up-to-date gamma-ray luminosity functions and redshift evolutions of the long and short GRBs. Although dedicated stacking searches have been unsuccessful up to now, we find that the GRBs could contribute up to a few percents to the observed IceCube high-energy neutrino flux for sub-PeV energies, assuming that the latter has a diffuse origin...

Tamborra, Irene

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Fermi Limit on the Neutrino Flux from Gamma-ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

If gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) produce high energy cosmic rays, neutrinos are expected to be generated in GRBs due to photo-pion productions. However we stress that the same process also generates electromagnetic (EM) emission induced by the production of secondary electrons and photons, and that the EM emission is expected to be correlated to the neutrino flux. Using the Fermi/LAT observational results on gamma-ray flux from GRBs, the GRB neutrino emission is limited to be below ~20 GeV/m^2 per GRB event on average, which is independent of the unknown GRB proton luminosity. This neutrino limit suggests that the full IceCube needs stacking more than 130 GRBs in order to detect one GRB muon neutrino.

Zhuo Li

2013-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

133

FERMI LIMIT ON THE NEUTRINO FLUX FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

If gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) produce high-energy cosmic rays, neutrinos are expected to be generated in GRBs via photo-pion productions. However, we stress that the same process also generates electromagnetic (EM) emission induced by the secondary electrons and photons, and that the EM emission is expected to be correlated with neutrino flux. Using Fermi/Large Area Telescope results on gamma-ray flux from GRBs, the GRB neutrino emission is limited to be <20 GeV m{sup -2} per GRB event on average, which is independent of the unknown GRB proton luminosity. This neutrino limit suggests that IceCube, operating at full scale, requires stacking of more than 130 GRBs in order to detect one GRB muon neutrino.

Li Zhuo [Department of Astronomy and Kavli Institute for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Peking University, Beijing (China); Key Laboratory for the Structure and Evolution of Celestial Objects, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Kunming (China)

2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

134

Single Ion Trapping for the Enriched Xenon Observatory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the last decade, a variety of neutrino oscillation experiments have established that there is a mass difference between neutrino flavors, without determining the absolute neutrino mass scale. The Enriched Xenon Observatory for neutrinoless double beta decay (EXO) will search for the rare decays of xenon to determine the absolute value of the neutrino mass. The experiment uses a novel technique to minimize backgrounds, identifying the decay daughter product in real time using single ion spectroscopy. Here, we describe single ion trapping and spectroscopy compatible with the EXO detector. We extend the technique of single ion trapping in ultrahigh vacuum to trapping in xenon gas. With this technique, EXO will achieve a neutrino mass sensitivity of {approx_equal} .010 eV.

Waldman, Samuel J.; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC; ,

2006-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

135

Neutrino Mixing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this review we present the main features of the current status of neutrino physics. After a review of the theory of neutrino mixing and oscillations, we discuss the current status of solar and atmospheric neutrino oscillation experiments. We show that the current data can be nicely accommodated in the framework of three-neutrino mixing. We discuss also the problem of the determination of the absolute neutrino mass scale through Tritium beta-decay experiments and astrophysical observations, and the exploration of the Majorana nature of massive neutrinos through neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments. Finally, future prospects are briefly discussed.

Carlo Giunti; Marco Laveder

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Neutrinos and Gamma Rays from Galaxy Clusters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The next generation of neutrino and gamma-ray detectors should provide new insights into the creation and propagation of high-energy protons within galaxy clusters, probing both the particle physics of cosmic rays interacting with the background medium and the mechanisms for high-energy particle production within the cluster. In this paper we examine the possible detection of gamma-rays (via the GLAST satellite) and neutrinos (via the ICECUBE and Auger experiments) from the Coma cluster of galaxies, as well as for the gamma-ray bright clusters Abell 85, 1758, and 1914. These three were selected from their possible association with unidentified EGRET sources, so it is not yet entirely certain that their gamma-rays are indeed produced diffusively within the intracluster medium, as opposed to AGNs. It is not obvious why these inconspicuous Abell-clusters should be the first to be seen in gamma-rays, but a possible reason is that all of them show direct evidence of recent or ongoing mergers. Their identification with the EGRET gamma-ray sources is also supported by the close correlation between their radio and (purported) gamma-ray fluxes. Under favorable conditions (including a proton spectral index of 2.5 in the case of Abell 85, and sim 2.3 for Coma, and Abell 1758 and 1914), we expect ICECUBE to make as many as 0.3 neutrino detections per year from the Coma cluster of galaxies, and as many as a few per year from the Abell clusters 85, 1758, and 1914. Also, Auger may detect as many as 2 events per decade at ~ EeV energies from these gamma-ray bright clusters.

Brandon Wolfe; Fulvio Melia; Roland M. Crocker; Raymond R. Volkas

2008-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

137

Megaton Water Cerenkov Detectors and Astrophysical Neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Although formal proposals have not yet been made, the UNO and Hyper-Kamiokande projects are being developed to follow-up the tremendously successful program at Super-Kamiokande using a detector that is 20-50 times larger. The potential of such a detector to continue the study of astrophysical neutrinos is considered and contrasted with the program for cubic kilometer neutrino observatories.

Maury Goodman

2005-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

138

Solar neutrino oscillations and indications of matter effects in the Sun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assuming the current best-fit solutions to the solar neutrino problem at large mixing angle, we briefly illustrate how prospective data from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) and from the Kamioka Liquid scintillator Anti-Neutrino Detector (KamLAND) can increase our confidence in the occurrence of standard matter effects on active neutrino flavor oscillations in the Sun, which are starting to emerge from current data.

G. L. Fogli; E. Lisi; A. Palazzo; A. M. Rotunno

2003-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

139

Exploring the Universe with Very High Energy Neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

With the discovery of a high-energy neutrino flux in the 0.1 PeV to PeV range from beyond the Earth's atmosphere with the IceCube detector, neutrino astronomy has achieved a major breakthrough in the exploration of the high-energy universe. One of the main goals is the identification and investigation of the still mysterious sources of the cosmic rays which are observed at Earth with energies up to several $10^5$ PeV. In addition to being smoking-gun evidence for the presence of cosmic rays in a specific object, neutrinos escape even dense environments and can reach us from distant places in the universe, thereby providing us with a unique tool to explore cosmic accelerators. This article summarizes our knowledge about the observed astrophysical neutrino flux and current status of the search for individual cosmic neutrino sources. At the end, it gives an overview of plans for future neutrino telescope projects.

Kappes, A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Prospects for detecting Dark Matter with neutrino telescopes in Intermediate Mass Black Holes scenarios  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Current strategies of indirect Dark Matter detection with neutrino telescopes are based on the search for high-energy neutrinos from the Solar core or from the center of the Earth. Here, we propose a new strategy based on the detection of neutrinos from Dark Matter annihilations in 'mini-spikes' around Intermediate Mass Black Holes. Neutrino fluxes, in this case, depend on the annihilation cross-section of Dark Matter particles, whereas solar and terrestrial fluxes are sensitive to the scattering cross-section off nucleons, a circumstance that makes the proposed search complementary to the existing ones. We discuss the prospects for detection with upcoming under-water and under-ice experiments such as ANTARES and IceCube, and show that several, up to many, sources could be detected with both experiments. A kilometer scale telescope in the Mediterranean appears to be ideally suited for the proposed search.

Bertone, Gianfranco

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "icecube neutrino observatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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141

Prospects for detecting Dark Matter with neutrino telescopes in Intermediate Mass Black Holes scenarios  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Current strategies of indirect Dark Matter detection with neutrino telescopes are based on the search for high-energy neutrinos from the Solar core or from the center of the Earth. Here, we propose a new strategy based on the detection of neutrinos from Dark Matter annihilations in 'mini-spikes' around Intermediate Mass Black Holes. Neutrino fluxes, in this case, depend on the annihilation cross-section of Dark Matter particles, whereas solar and terrestrial fluxes are sensitive to the scattering cross-section off nucleons, a circumstance that makes the proposed search complementary to the existing ones. We discuss the prospects for detection with upcoming under-water and under-ice experiments such as ANTARES and IceCube, and show that several, up to many, sources could be detected with both experiments. A kilometer scale telescope in the Mediterranean appears to be ideally suited for the proposed search.

Gianfranco Bertone

2006-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

142

Limits on a muon flux from Kaluza-Klein dark matter annihilations in the Sun from the IceCube 22-string detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

matter annihilations in the Sun from the IceCube 22-stringmatter annihilations in the Sun from the IceCube 22-stringmatter annihilations in the Sun has been performed with the

Abbasi, R.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

OBSERVATION OF ANISOTROPY IN THE ARRIVAL DIRECTIONS OF GALACTIC COSMIC RAYS AT MULTIPLE ANGULAR SCALES WITH IceCube  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Between 2009 May and 2010 May, the IceCube neutrino detector at the South Pole recorded 32 billion muons generated in air showers produced by cosmic rays with a median energy of 20 TeV. With a data set of this size, it is possible to probe the southern sky for per-mil anisotropy on all angular scales in the arrival direction distribution of cosmic rays. Applying a power spectrum analysis to the relative intensity map of the cosmic ray flux in the southern hemisphere, we show that the arrival direction distribution is not isotropic, but shows significant structure on several angular scales. In addition to previously reported large-scale structure in the form of a strong dipole and quadrupole, the data show small-scale structure on scales between 15{sup 0} and 30{sup 0}. The skymap exhibits several localized regions of significant excess and deficit in cosmic ray intensity. The relative intensity of the smaller-scale structures is about a factor of five weaker than that of the dipole and quadrupole structure. The most significant structure, an excess localized at (right ascension {alpha} = 122.{sup 0}4 and declination {delta} = -47.{sup 0}4), extends over at least 20{sup 0} in right ascension and has a post-trials significance of 5.3{sigma}. The origin of this anisotropy is still unknown.

Abbasi, R.; Aguilar, J. A.; Andeen, K.; Baker, M. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Abdou, Y. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Gent, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Abu-Zayyad, T. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, River Falls, WI 54022 (United States); Adams, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Ahlers, M. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Altmann, D. [III. Physikalisches Institut, RWTH Aachen University, D-52056 Aachen (Germany); Auffenberg, J.; Becker, K.-H. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany); Bai, X. [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Barwick, S. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Bay, R. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Alba, J. L. Bazo; Benabderrahmane, M. L. [DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen (Germany); Beattie, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Beatty, J. J. [Department of Physics and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Bechet, S. [Universite Libre de Bruxelles, Science Faculty CP230, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Becker, J. K. [Fakultaet fuer Physik and Astronomie, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

2011-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

144

Studies of Cosmic Ray Composition and Air Shower Structure with the Pierre Auger Observatory  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

These are presentations to be presented at the 31st International Cosmic Ray Conference, in Lodz, Poland during July 2009. It consists of the following presentations: (1) Measurement of the average depth of shower maximum and its fluctuations with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (2) Study of the nuclear mass composition of UHECR with the surface detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory; (3) Comparison of data from the Pierre Auger Observatory with predictions from air shower simulations: testing models of hadronic interactions; (4) A Monte Carlo exploration of methods to determine the UHECR composition with the Pierre Auger Observatory; (5) The delay of the start-time measured with the Pierre Auger Observatory for inclined showers and a comparison of its variance with models; (6) UHE neutrino signatures in the surface detector of the Pierre Auger Observatory; and (7) The electromagnetic component of inclined air showers at the Pierre Auger Observatory.

Abraham, : J.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Aguirre, C.; Ahn, E.J.; Allard, D.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Ambrosio, M.; Anchordoqui, L.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Use of event-level neutrino telescope data in global fits for theories of new physics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a fast likelihood method for including event-level neutrino telescope data in parameter explorations of theories for new physics, and announce its public release as part of DarkSUSY 5.0.6. Our construction includes both angular and spectral information about neutrino events, as well as their total number. We also present a corresponding measure for simple model exclusion, which can be used for single models without reference to the rest of a parameter space. We perform a number of supersymmetric parameter scans with IceCube data to illustrate the utility of the method: example global fits and a signal recovery in the constrained minimal supersymmetric standard model (CMSSM), and a model exclusion exercise in a 7-parameter phenomenological version of the MSSM. The final IceCube detector configuration will probe almost the entire focus-point region of the CMSSM, as well as a number of MSSM-7 models that will not otherwise be accessible to e.g. direct detection. Our method accurately recovers the mock signal, and provides tight constraints on model parameters and derived quantities. We show that the inclusion of spectral information significantly improves the accuracy of the recovery, providing motivation for its use in future IceCube analyses.

Scott, P. [Dept. of Physics, McGill University, 3600 rue University, Montréal, QC, H3A 2T8 (Canada); Savage, C.; Edsjö, J. [Oskar Klein Centre for Cosmoparticle Physics and Dept. of Physics, Stockholm University, SE-10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Abbasi, R.; Ahlers, M.; Andeen, K.; Auffenberg, J.; Baker, M. [Dept. of Physics and Wisconsin IceCube Particle Astrophysics Center, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Abdou, Y. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of Gent, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Ackermann, M. [DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen (Germany); Adams, J. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Aguilar, J.A. [Département de physique nucléaire et corpusculaire, Université de Genève, CH-1211 Genève (Switzerland); Altmann, D. [Institut für Physik, Humboldt-Universität zu Berlin, D-12489 Berlin (Germany); Bai, X. [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Barwick, S.W. [Dept. of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Baum, V. [Institute of Physics, University of Mainz, Staudinger Weg 7, D-55099 Mainz (Germany); Bay, R. [Dept. of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Beattie, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Beatty, J.J. [Dept. of Physics and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Bechet, S., E-mail: patscott@physics.mcgill.ca, E-mail: danning@fysik.su.se, E-mail: savage@fysik.su.se [Université Libre de Bruxelles, Science Faculty CP230, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); and others

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

OBSERVATION OF ANISOTROPY IN THE GALACTIC COSMIC-RAY ARRIVAL DIRECTIONS AT 400 TeV WITH ICECUBE  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this paper we report the first observation in the Southern hemisphere of an energy dependence in the Galactic cosmic-ray anisotropy up to a few hundred TeV. This measurement was performed using cosmic-ray-induced muons recorded by the partially deployed IceCube observatory between 2009 May and 2010 May. The data include a total of 33 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} muon events with a median angular resolution of {approx}3 Degree-Sign . A sky map of the relative intensity in arrival direction over the Southern celestial sky is presented for cosmic-ray median energies of 20 and 400 TeV. The same large-scale anisotropy observed at median energies around 20 TeV is not present at 400 TeV. Instead, the high-energy sky map shows a different anisotropy structure including a deficit with a post-trial significance of -6.3{sigma}. This anisotropy reveals a new feature of the Galactic cosmic-ray distribution, which must be incorporated into theories of the origin and propagation of cosmic rays.

Abbasi, R.; Aguilar, J. A.; Andeen, K.; Baker, M. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Abdou, Y. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Gent, B-9000 Gent (Belgium); Abu-Zayyad, T. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin, River Falls, WI 54022 (United States); Ackermann, M.; Bazo Alba, J. L. [DESY, D-15735 Zeuthen (Germany); Adams, J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Canterbury, Private Bag 4800, Christchurch (New Zealand); Ahlers, M. [Department of Physics, University of Oxford, 1 Keble Road, Oxford OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Allen, M. M. [Department of Physics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Altmann, D. [III. Physikalisches Institut, RWTH Aachen University, D-52056 Aachen (Germany); Auffenberg, J. [Department of Physics, University of Wuppertal, D-42119 Wuppertal (Germany); Bai, X. [Bartol Research Institute and Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Delaware, Newark, DE 19716 (United States); Barwick, S. W. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Bay, R. [Department of Physics, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Beattie, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Beatty, J. J. [Department of Physics and Center for Cosmology and Astro-Particle Physics, Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Bechet, S. [Science Faculty CP230, Universite Libre de Bruxelles, B-1050 Brussels (Belgium); Becker, J. K. [Fakultaet fuer Physik and Astronomie, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Collaboration: IceCube Collaboration; and others

2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

147

SAGE: Solar Neutrino Data from SAGE, the Russian-American Gallium Solar Neutrino Experiment  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

SAGE is a solar neutrino experiment based on the reaction 71Ga + n goes to 71Ge + e-. The 71Ge atoms are chemically extracted from a 50-metric ton target of Ga metal and concentrated in a sample of germane gas mixed with xenon. The atoms are then individually counted by observing their decay back to 71Ga in a small proportional counter. The distinguishing feature of the experiment is its ability to detect the low-energy neutrinos from proton-proton fusion. These neutrinos, which are made in the primary reaction that provides the Sun's energy, are the major component of the solar neutrino flux and have not been observed in any other way. To shield the experiment from cosmic rays, it is located deep underground in a specially built facility at the Baksan Neutrino Observatory in the northern Caucasus mountains of Russia. Nearly 100 measurements of the solar neutrino flux have been made during 1990-2000, and their combined result is a neutrino capture rate that is well below the prediction of the Standard Solar Model. The significant suppression of the solar neutrino flux that SAGE and other solar neutrino experiments have observed gives a strong indication for the existence of neutrino oscillations. [copied from the SAGE homepage at http://ewi.npl.washington.edu/SAGE/SAGE.html

SAGE Collaboration

148

Sensors for Environmental Observatories  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sensors for Environmental Observatories Report of the NSF-Sponsored Workshop December 2004 #12 States of America. 2005. #12;Sensors for Environmental Observatories Report of the NSF Sponsored Workshop sensor technology and the networks that collect data from them. Present work clearly demonstrates

Hamilton, Michael P.

149

Search for a Lorentz-violating sidereal signal with atmospheric neutrinos in IceCube  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Standard Model Extension (SME) [7] is an e?ective-?eld-and CPT violating coe?cients in the SME, in the context of aX = 2 × 10 ?23 GeV. L The SME adds to the SM Lagrangian all

etal, Abbasi, R,

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

First Evidence For Atmospheric Neutrino-Induced Cascades with the IceCube Detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

49] P. Meszaros. Gamma-Ray Bursts. Rept. Prog. Phys. , 69:Revealing the supernova-gamma-ray burst connection with TeVcascades from gamma-ray bursts with AMANDA. Astrophys. J. ,

D'Agostino, Michelangelo

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

First Observation of PeV-Energy Neutrinos with IceCube  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Initiative (LONI) grid computing resources; Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, Compute Canada, and Compute West High Performance Computing; Swedish Research Council, Swedish Polar Research Secretariat, Swedish National Infrastructure...

Aartsen, M. G.; Besson, David Zeke

2013-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

152

Diffuse Neutrino Intensity from the Inner Jets of Active Galactic Nuclei: Impacts of External Photon Fields and the Blazar Sequence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study high-energy neutrino production in inner jets of radio-loud active galactic nuclei (AGN), taking into account effects of external photon fields and the blazar sequence. We show that the resulting diffuse neutrino intensity is dominated by quasar-hosted blazars, in particular, flat spectrum radio quasars, and that PeV-EeV neutrino production due to photohadronic interactions with broadline and dust radiation is unavoidable if the AGN inner jets are ultrahigh-energy cosmic-ray (UHECR) sources. Their neutrino spectrum has a cutoff feature around PeV energies since target photons are due to Ly$\\alpha$ emission. Because of infrared photons provided by the dust torus, neutrino spectra above PeV energies are too hard to be consistent with the IceCube data unless the proton spectral index is steeper than 2.5, or the maximum proton energy is $\\lesssim100$ PeV. Thus, the simple model has difficulty in explaining the IceCube data. For the cumulative neutrino intensity from blazars to exceed $\\sim{10}^{-8}~{\\rm GeV}~{\\rm cm}^{-2}~{\\rm s}^{-1}~{\\rm sr}^{-1}$, their local cosmic-ray energy generation rate would be $\\sim10-100$ times larger than the local UHECR emissivity, but is comparable to the averaged gamma-ray blazar emissivity. Interestingly, future detectors such as the Askaryan Radio Array can detect $\\sim0.1-1$ EeV neutrinos even in more conservative cases, allowing us to indirectly test the hypothesis that UHECRs are produced in the inner jets. We find that the diffuse neutrino intensity from radio-loud AGN is dominated by blazars with gamma-ray luminosity of $\\gtrsim10^{48}~{\\rm erg}~{\\rm s}^{-1}$, and the arrival directions of their $\\sim1-100$ PeV neutrinos correlate with the luminous blazars detected by Fermi.

Kohta Murase; Yoshiyuki Inoue; Charles D. Dermer

2014-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

153

Alexey Kuznetsov Armagh Observatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by the high-energy electrons that are the key factor in development of the flares. Therefore, radio Observatory 8 Radiometers / radiopolarimeters Full-disk observations * + " + , ' - & . $ / $ 0 $ $ 0 $ $ 1 2 3

154

Probing thermonuclear supernova explosions with neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Aims: We present neutrino light curves and energy spectra for two representative type Ia supernova explosion models: a pure deflagration and a delayed detonation. Methods: We calculate the neutrino flux from $\\beta$ processes using nuclear statistical equilibrium abundances convoluted with approximate neutrino spectra of the individual nuclei and the thermal neutrino spectrum (pair+plasma). Results: Although the two considered thermonuclear supernova explosion scenarios are expected to produce almost identical electromagnetic output, their neutrino signatures appear vastly different, which allow an unambiguous identification of the explosion mechanism: a pure deflagration produces a single peak in the neutrino light curve, while the addition of the second maximum characterizes a delayed-detonation. We identified the following main contributors to the neutrino signal: (1) weak electron neutrino emission from electron captures (in particular on the protons Co55 and Ni56) and numerous beta-active nuclei produced by the thermonuclear flame and/or detonation front, (2) electron antineutrinos from positron captures on neutrons, and (3) the thermal emission from pair annihilation. We estimate that a pure deflagration supernova explosion at a distance of 1 kpc would trigger about 14 events in the future 50 kt liquid scintillator detector and some 19 events in a 0.5 Mt water Cherenkov-type detector. Conclusions: While in contrast to core-collapse supernovae neutrinos carry only a very small fraction of the energy produced in the thermonuclear supernova explosion, the SN Ia neutrino signal provides information that allows us to unambiguously distinguish between different possible explosion scenarios. These studies will become feasible with the next generation of proposed neutrino observatories.

A. Odrzywolek; T. Plewa

2011-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

155

Low Energy Investigations at Kamioka Observatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

At Kamioka Observatory many activities for low energy rare event search are ongoing. Super-Kamiokande(SK), the largest water Cherenkov neutrino detector, currently continues data taking as the fourth phase of the experiment (SK-IV). In SK-IV, we have upgraded the water purification system and tuned water flow in the SK tank. Consequently the background level was lowered significantly. This allowed SK-IV to derive solar neutrino results down to 3.5MeV energy region. With these data, neutrino oscillation parameters are updated from global fit; $\\Delta m^2_{12}=7.44^{+0.2}_{-0.19}\\times10^{-5} {\\rm eV}^2$, $\\sin^2\\theta_{12}=0.304\\pm0.013$, $\\sin^2\\theta_{13}=0.030^{+0.017}_{-0.015}$. NEWAGE, the directional sensitive dark matter search experiment, is currently operated as "NEWAGE-0.3a" which is a $0.20\\times0.25\\times0.31$ m$^3$ micro-TPC filled with CF4 gas at 152 Torr. Recently we have developed "NEWAGE-0.3b". It was succeeded to lower the operation pressure down to 76 Torr and the threshold down to 50 keV (F...

Sekiya, Hiroyuki

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Gamma Ray Bursts: recent results and connections to very high energy Cosmic Rays and Neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamma-ray bursts are the most concentrated explosions in the Universe. They have been detected electromagnetically at energies up to tens of GeV, and it is suspected that they could be active at least up to TeV energies. It is also speculated that they could emit cosmic rays and neutrinos at energies reaching up to the $10^{18}-10^{20}$ eV range. Here we review the recent developments in the photon phenomenology in the light of \\swift and \\fermi satellite observations, as well as recent IceCube upper limits on their neutrino luminosity. We discuss some of the theoretical models developed to explain these observations and their possible contribution to a very high energy cosmic ray and neutrino background.

Péter Mészáros; Katsuaki Asano; Péter Veres

2012-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

157

Neutrino Theory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

operators in the Lagrangian (Majorana mass terms), or both. The ongoing neutrinoless double-beta decay searches may be able to shine light on the matter. But the neutrino sector...

158

Searching for Traces of Planck-Scale Physics with High Energy Neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High energy cosmic neutrino observations provide a sensitive test of Lorentz invariance violation, which may be a consequence of quantum gravity theories. We consider a class of non-renormalizable, Lorentz invariance violating operators that arise in an effective field theory description of Lorentz invariance violation in the neutrino sector inspired by Planck-scale physics and quantum gravity models. We assume a conservative generic scenario for the redshift distribution of extragalactic neutrino sources and employ Monte Carlo techniques to describe superluminal neutrino propagation, treating kinematically allowed energy losses of superluminal neutrinos caused by both vacuum pair emission and neutrino splitting. We consider EFTs with both non-renormalizable CPT-odd and non-renormalizable CPT-even operator dominance. We then compare the spectra derived using our Monte Carlo calculations in both cases with the spectrum observed by IceCube in order to determine the implications of our results regarding Planck-scale physics. We find that if the drop off in the neutrino flux above ~2 PeV is caused by Planck scale physics, rather than by a limiting energy in the source emission, a potentially significant pileup effect would be produced just below the drop off energy in the case of CPT-even operator dominance. However, such a clear drop off effect would not be observed if the CPT-odd, CPT-violating term dominates.

Floyd W. Stecker; Sean T. Scully; Stefano Liberati; David Mattingly

2015-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

159

Neutrinos at high energy accelerators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

PREAMBLE, BRIEF HISTORY AND PRELIMINARIES, QUICK REVIEW OF BASIC NEUTRINO PROPERTIES, CHARGED CURRENT NEUTRINO PROCESSES, NEUTRAL CURRENT NEUTRINO PROCESSES, VERY HEAVY NEUTRINOS, CONCLUDING SUMMARY

Probir Roy

1993-08-02T23:59:59.000Z

160

Detecting extra-galactic supernova neutrinos in the Antarctic ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Building on the technological success of the IceCube neutrino telescope, we outline a prospective low-energy extension that utilizes the clear ice of the South Pole. Aiming at a 10 Mton effective volume and a 10 MeV threshold, the detector would provide sufficient sensitivity to detect neutrino bursts from core-collapse supernovae (SNe) in nearby galaxies. The detector geometry and required density of instrumentation are discussed along with the requirements to control the various sources of background, such as solar neutrinos. In particular, the suppression of spallation events induced by atmospheric muons poses a challenge that will need to be addressed. Assuming this background can be controlled, we find that the resulting detector will be able to detect SNe from beyond 10 Mpc, delivering between 10 and 41 regular core-collapse SN detections per decade. It would further allow to study more speculative phenomena, such as optically dark (failed) SNe, where the collapse proceeds directly to a black hole, at a detection rate similar to that of regular SNe. We find that the biggest technological challenge lies in the required number of large area photo-sensors, with simultaneous strict limits on the allowed noise rates. If both can be realized, the detector concept we present will reach the required sensitivity with a comparatively small construction effort and hence offers a route to future routine observations of SNe with neutrinos.

Sebastian Böser; Marek Kowalski; Lukas Schulte; Nora Linn Strotjohann; Markus Voge

2014-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "icecube neutrino observatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Probing the coupling of heavy dark matter to nucleons by detecting neutrino signature from the Earth core  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We argue that the detection of neutrino signature from the Earth core is an ideal approach for probing the coupling of heavy dark matter ($m_{\\chi}>10^{4}$ GeV) to nucleons. We first note that direct searches for dark matter (DM) in such a mass range do not provide stringent constraints. Furthermore the energies of neutrinos arising from DM annihilations inside the Sun cannot exceed a few TeV at the Sun surface due to the attenuation effect. Therefore the sensitivity to the heavy DM coupling is lost. Finally, the detection of neutrino signature from galactic halo can only probe DM annihilation cross sections. After presenting the rationale of our studies, we discuss the event rates in IceCube and KM3NeT arising from the neutrino flux produced by annihilations of Earth-captured DM heavier than $10^{4}$ GeV. The IceCube and KM3NeT sensitivities to spin independent DM-proton scattering cross section $\\sigma_{\\chi p}$ and isospin violation effect in this mass range are presented. The implications of our results are also discussed.

Guey-Lin Lin; Yen-Hsun Lin

2014-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

162

Armagh Observatory Annual Report  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Media Mentions, 1998 21 F Public Queries, 1998 24 G Astropark Display Panels 27 #12; 1 Introduction, many of whom are engaged on fixed­term research contracts for periods ranging from one to three years Astrophysics, the Sun, Solar System astronomy, and the Earth's climate. Facilities at Armagh Observatory

163

Solar Neutrinos and the Decaying Neutrino Hypothesis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore, mostly using data from solar neutrino experiments, the hypothesis that the neutrino mass eigenstates are unstable. We find that, by combining $^8$B solar neutrino data with those on $^7$Be and lower-energy solar neutrinos, one obtains a mostly model-independent bound on both the $\

Jeffrey M. Berryman; Andre de Gouvea; Daniel Hernandez

2014-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

164

Solar Neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Experimental work with solar neutrinos has illuminated the properties of neutrinos and tested models of how the sun produces its energy. Three experiments continue to take data, and at least seven are in various stages of planning or construction. In this review, the current experimental status is summarized, and future directions explored with a focus on the effects of a non-zero theta-13 and the interesting possibility of directly testing the luminosity constraint. Such a confrontation at the few-percent level would provide a prediction of the solar irradiance tens of thousands of years in the future for comparison with the present-day irradiance. A model-independent analysis of existing low-energy data shows good agreement between the neutrino and electromagnetic luminosities at the +/- 20 % level.

R. G. H. Robertson

2006-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

165

The Green Computing Observatory: from  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Green Computing Observatory: from instrumentation to ontology Cécile Germain-Renaud1, Fredéric a gateway Files in XML format Available from the Grid Observatory portal GreenDays@LyonThe Green Computing) n GreenDays@LyonThe Green Computing Observatory #12;The GRIF-LAL computing room Green

Lefèvre, Laurent

166

Colliding neutrino beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

From several neutrino oscillation experiments, we understand now that neutrinos have mass. However, we really don't know what mechanism is responsible for producing this neutrino mass. Current or planned neutrino experiments utilize neutrino beams and long-baseline detectors to explore flavor mixing but do not address the question of the origin of neutrino mass. In order to answer that question, neutrino interactions need to be explored at much higher energies. This paper outlines a program to explore neutrinos and their interactions with various particles through a series of experiments involving colliding neutrino beams.

Reinhard Schwienhorst

2007-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

167

The Astrophysical Multimessenger Observatory Network (AMON) M.W.E. Smith a,b,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gravitational radiation Neutrinos Cosmic rays Gamma-ray bursts Supernovae a b s t r a c t We summarize including the Swift [6] and Fermi [7] satellites, the HESS [8], VERITAS [9], and MAGIC [10] TeV gamma-ray telescopes, and the HAWC [11] TeV gamma-ray observatory. Collectively, these facilities promise the first

Babu, G. Jogesh

168

High energy neutrino emission from the earliest gamma-ray bursts  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We discuss the high energy neutrino emission from gamma-ray bursts resulting from the earliest generation (''population III'') stars forming in the Universe, whose core collapses into a black hole. These gamma-ray bursts are expected to produce a highly relativistic, magnetically dominated jet, where protons can be accelerated to ultrahigh energies. These interact with the photons produced by the jet, leading to ultrahigh energy photomeson neutrinos as well as secondary leptons and photons. The photon luminosity and the shock properties, and thus the neutrino spectrum, depend on the mass of the black holes as well as on the density of the surrounding external gas. We calculate the individual source neutrino spectral fluxes and the expected diffuse neutrino flux for various source parameters and evolution scenarios. Both the individual and diffuse signals appear detectable in the 1-300 PeV range with current and planned neutrino detectors such as IceCube and ARIANNA, provided the black hole mass is in excess of 30-100 solar masses. This provides a possible test for the debated mass of the progenitor stellar objects, as well as a probe for the early cosmological environment and the formation rate of the earliest structures.

Gao Shan; Toma, Kenji; Meszaros, Peter [Department of Physics, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Center for Particle Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, 16802 (United States)

2011-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

169

8Li electron spectrum versus 8B neutrino spectrum Implications for measuring solar neutrinos with a heavy water detector  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The sensitivity of the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) to measure the shape of the recoil electron spectrum in the charged-current reaction of $^{8}$B solar neutrinos interacting with deuterium can be improved if the results of a $^{8}$Li beta-decay calibration experiment are included in the test. We calculate an improvement in sensitivity, under certain idealistic assumptions, of about a factor of 2, sufficient to resolve different neutrino-oscillation solutions to the solar-neutrino problem. We further examine the role of recoil and radiative corrections on both the $^{8}$B neutrino spectrum and the $^{8}$Li electron spectrum and conclude that the influence of these effects on the ratio of the two spectra as measured by SNO is very small.

Jonkmans, G; Sur, B

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

High Energy Neutrino Flashes from Far-Ultraviolet and X-ray Flares in Gamma-Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recent observations of bright optical and x-ray flares by the Swift satellite suggest these are produced by the late activities of the central engine. We study the neutrino emission from far-ultraviolet and x-ray flares under the late internal shock model. We show that the efficiency of pion production in the highest energy is comparable to or higher than the unity, and the contribution from such neutrino flashes to a diffuse very high energy neutrino background can be larger than that of prompt bursts if the total baryonic energy input into flares is comparable to the radiated energy of prompt bursts. These signals may be detected by IceCube and are very important because they have possibilities to probe the nature of flares (the baryon loading, the photon field, the magnetic field and so on).

Kohta Murase; Shigehiro Nagataki

2006-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

171

Electromagnetic properties of neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A short review on electromagnetic properties of neutrinos is presented. In spite of many efforts in the theoretical and experimental studies of neutrino electromagnetic properties, they still remain one of the main puzzles related to neutrinos.

Carlo Giunti; Alexander Studenikin

2010-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

172

Neutrino Factory Downstream Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutrino Factory Downstream Systems Michael S. Zisman*Factory accelerator systems downstream from the target andthe Neutrino Factory systems downstream of the target and

Zisman, Michael S.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Neutrinos: Theory and Phenomenology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The theory and phenomenology of neutrinos will be addressed, especially that relating to the observation of neutrino flavor transformations. The current status and implications for future experiments will be discussed with special emphasis on the experiments that will determine the neutrino mass ordering, the dominant flavor content of the neutrino mass eigenstate with the smallest electron neutrino content and the size of CP violation in the neutrino sector. Beyond the neutrino Standard Model, the evidence for and a possible definitive experiment to confirm or refute the existence of light sterile neutrinos will be briefly discussed.

Parke, Stephen

2013-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

174

Acoustic detection of astrophysical neutrinos in South Pole ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When high-energy particles interact in dense media to produce a particle shower, most of the shower energy is deposited in the medium as heat. This causes the medium to expand locally and emit a shock wave with a medium-dependent peak frequency on the order of 10 kHz. In South Pole ice in particular, the elastic properties of the medium have been theorized to provide good coupling of particle energy to acoustic energy. The acoustic attenuation length has been theorized to be several km, which could enable a sparsely instrumented large-volume detector to search for rare signals from high-energy astrophysical neutrinos. We simulated a hybrid optical/radio/acoustic extension to the IceCube array, specifically intended to detect cosmogenic (GZK) neutrinos with multiple methods simultaneously in order to achieve high confidence in a discovered signal and to measure angular, temporal, and spectral distributions of GZK neutrinos. This work motivated the design, deployment, and operation of the South Pole Acoustic Te...

Vandenbroucke, Justin

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Geo-neutrino Observation S.T. Dye^'^ M. Alderman^, M. Batygov^ J.G. Learned^ S. Matsuno^  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-neutrino observation and describes the scientific capabilities of the deep ocean observatory, with emphasis on geology are in the decay series of uranium-238 and thorium-232. Terrestrial antineutrino observation relies on detecting comprehensive reviews of geo-neutrinos exist in the literature''^. Uranium-238 and thorium-232, the parent

Mcdonough, William F.

176

The Intermediate Neutrino Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The US neutrino community gathered at the Workshop on the Intermediate Neutrino Program (WINP) at Brookhaven National Laboratory February 4-6, 2015 to explore opportunities in neutrino physics over the next five to ten years. Scientists from particle, astroparticle and nuclear physics participated in the workshop. The workshop examined promising opportunities for neutrino physics in the intermediate term, including possible new small to mid-scale experiments, US contributions to large experiments, upgrades to existing experiments, R&D plans and theory. The workshop was organized into two sets of parallel working group sessions, divided by physics topics and technology. Physics working groups covered topics on Sterile Neutrinos, Neutrino Mixing, Neutrino Interactions, Neutrino Properties and Astrophysical Neutrinos. Technology sessions were organized into Theory, Short-Baseline Accelerator Neutrinos, Reactor Neutrinos, Detector R&D and Source, Cyclotron and Meson Decay at Rest sessions.This report summarizes discussion and conclusions from the workshop.

C. Adams; J. R. Alonso; A. M. Ankowski; J. A. Asaadi; J. Ashenfelter; S. N. Axani; K. Babu; C. Backhouse; H. R. Band; P. S. Barbeau; N. Barros; A. Bernstein; M. Betancourt; M. Bishai; E. Blucher; J. Bouffard; N. Bowden; S. Brice; C. Bryan; L. Camilleri; J. Cao; J. Carlson; R. E. Carr; A. Chatterjee; M. Chen; S. Chen; M. Chiu; E. D. Church; J. I. Collar; G. Collin; J. M. Conrad; M. R. Convery; R. L. Cooper; D. Cowen; H. Davoudiasl; A. De Gouvea; D. J. Dean; G. Deichert; F. Descamps; T. DeYoung; M. V. Diwan; Z. Djurcic; M. J. Dolinski; J. Dolph; B. Donnelly; D. A. Dwyer; S. Dytman; Y. Efremenko; L. L. Everett; A. Fava; E. Figueroa-Feliciano; B. Fleming; A. Friedland; B. K. Fujikawa; T. K. Gaisser; M. Galeazzi; D. C. Galehouse; A. Galindo-Uribarri; G. T. Garvey; S. Gautam; K. E. Gilje; M. Gonzalez-Garcia; M. C. Goodman; H. Gordon; E. Gramellini; M. P. Green; A. Guglielmi; R. W. Hackenburg; A. Hackenburg; F. Halzen; K. Han; S. Hans; D. Harris; K. M. Heeger; M. Herman; R. Hill; A. Holin; P. Huber; D. E. Jaffe; R. A. Johnson; J. Joshi; G. Karagiorgi; L. J. Kaufman; B. Kayser; S. H. Kettell; B. J. Kirby; J. R. Klein; Yu. G. Kolomensky; R. M. Kriske; C. E. Lane; T. J. Langford; A. Lankford; K. Lau; J. G. Learned; J. Ling; J. M. Link; D. Lissauer; L. Littenberg; B. R. Littlejohn; S. Lockwitz; M. Lokajicek; W. C. Louis; K. Luk; J. Lykken; W. J. Marciano; J. Maricic; D. M. Markoff; D. A. Martinez Caicedo; C. Mauger; K. Mavrokoridis; E. McCluskey; D. McKeen; R. McKeown; G. Mills; I. Mocioiu; B. Monreal; M. R. Mooney; J. G. Morfin; P. Mumm; J. Napolitano; R. Neilson; J. K. Nelson; M. Nessi; D. Norcini; F. Nova; D. R. Nygren; G. D. Orebi Gann; O. Palamara; Z. Parsa; R. Patterson; P. Paul; A. Pocar; X. Qian; J. L. Raaf; R. Rameika; G. Ranucci; H. Ray; D. Reyna; G. C. Rich; P. Rodrigues; E. Romero Romero; R. Rosero; S. D. Rountree; B. Rybolt; M. C. Sanchez; G. Santucci; D. Schmitz; K. Scholberg; D. Seckel; M. Shaevitz; R. Shrock; M. B. Smy; M. Soderberg; A. Sonzogni; A. B. Sousa; J. Spitz; J. M. St. John; J. Stewart; J. B. Strait; G. Sullivan; R. Svoboda; A. M. Szelc; R. Tayloe; M. A. Thomson; M. Toups; A. Vacheret; M. Vagins; R. G. Van de Water; R. B. Vogelaar; M. Weber; W. Weng; M. Wetstein; C. White; B. R. White; L. Whitehead; D. W. Whittington; M. J. Wilking; R. J. Wilson; P. Wilson; D. Winklehner; D. R. Winn; E. Worcester; L. Yang; M. Yeh; Z. W. Yokley; J. Yoo; B. Yu; J. Yu; C. Zhang

2015-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

The Intermediate Neutrino Program  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The US neutrino community gathered at the Workshop on the Intermediate Neutrino Program (WINP) at Brookhaven National Laboratory February 4-6, 2015 to explore opportunities in neutrino physics over the next five to ten years. Scientists from particle, astroparticle and nuclear physics participated in the workshop. The workshop examined promising opportunities for neutrino physics in the intermediate term, including possible new small to mid-scale experiments, US contributions to large experiments, upgrades to existing experiments, R&D plans and theory. The workshop was organized into two sets of parallel working group sessions, divided by physics topics and technology. Physics working groups covered topics on Sterile Neutrinos, Neutrino Mixing, Neutrino Interactions, Neutrino Properties and Astrophysical Neutrinos. Technology sessions were organized into Theory, Short-Baseline Accelerator Neutrinos, Reactor Neutrinos, Detector R&D and Source, Cyclotron and Meson Decay at Rest sessions.This report summ...

Adams, C; Ankowski, A M; Asaadi, J A; Ashenfelter, J; Axani, S N; Babu, K; Backhouse, C; Band, H R; Barbeau, P S; Barros, N; Bernstein, A; Betancourt, M; Bishai, M; Blucher, E; Bouffard, J; Bowden, N; Brice, S; Bryan, C; Camilleri, L; Cao, J; Carlson, J; Carr, R E; Chatterjee, A; Chen, M; Chen, S; Chiu, M; Church, E D; Collar, J I; Collin, G; Conrad, J M; Convery, M R; Cooper, R L; Cowen, D; Davoudiasl, H; De Gouvea, A; Dean, D J; Deichert, G; Descamps, F; DeYoung, T; Diwan, M V; Djurcic, Z; Dolinski, M J; Dolph, J; Donnelly, B; Dwyer, D A; Dytman, S; Efremenko, Y; Everett, L L; Fava, A; Figueroa-Feliciano, E; Fleming, B; Friedland, A; Fujikawa, B K; Gaisser, T K; Galeazzi, M; Galehouse, D C; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Garvey, G T; Gautam, S; Gilje, K E; Gonzalez-Garcia, M; Goodman, M C; Gordon, H; Gramellini, E; Green, M P; Guglielmi, A; Hackenburg, R W; Hackenburg, A; Halzen, F; Han, K; Hans, S; Harris, D; Heeger, K M; Herman, M; Hill, R; Holin, A; Huber, P; Jaffe, D E; Johnson, R A; Joshi, J; Karagiorgi, G; Kaufman, L J; Kayser, B; Kettell, S H; Kirby, B J; Klein, J R; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kriske, R M; Lane, C E; Langford, T J; Lankford, A; Lau, K; Learned, J G; Ling, J; Link, J M; Lissauer, D; Littenberg, L; Littlejohn, B R; Lockwitz, S; Lokajicek, M; Louis, W C; Luk, K; Lykken, J; Marciano, W J; Maricic, J; Markoff, D M; Caicedo, D A Martinez; Mauger, C; Mavrokoridis, K; McCluskey, E; McKeen, D; McKeown, R; Mills, G; Mocioiu, I; Monreal, B; Mooney, M R; Morfin, J G; Mumm, P; Napolitano, J; Neilson, R; Nelson, J K; Nessi, M; Norcini, D; Nova, F; Nygren, D R; Gann, G D Orebi; Palamara, O; Parsa, Z; Patterson, R; Paul, P; Pocar, A; Qian, X; Raaf, J L; Rameika, R; Ranucci, G; Ray, H; Reyna, D; Rich, G C; Rodrigues, P; Romero, E Romero; Rosero, R; Rountree, S D; Rybolt, B; Sanchez, M C; Santucci, G; Schmitz, D; Scholberg, K; Seckel, D; Shaevitz, M; Shrock, R; Smy, M B; Soderberg, M; Sonzogni, A; Sousa, A B; Spitz, J; John, J M St; Stewart, J; Strait, J B; Sullivan, G; Svoboda, R; Szelc, A M; Tayloe, R; Thomson, M A; Toups, M; Vacheret, A; Vagins, M; Van de Water, R G; Vogelaar, R B; Weber, M; Weng, W; Wetstein, M; White, C; White, B R; Whitehead, L; Whittington, D W; Wilking, M J; Wilson, R J; Wilson, P; Winklehner, D; Winn, D R; Worcester, E; Yang, L; Yeh, M; Yokley, Z W; Yoo, J; Yu, B; Yu, J; Zhang, C

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Results from the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory Phase III  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

current interactions in heavy water and determine preciselySNO) is a 1 kton heavy water Cherenkov detector, located atNaCl) were added to the heavy water to enhance the neutron

Prior, G.; SNO Collaboration

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

Electron antineutrino search Sudbury Neutrino Observatory 9 Bellerive,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, California 94720, USA Alamos National Laboratory, Alamos Accelerator Center, Menlo Park, California, d Present address: Max­Planck­Institut Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg

180

High-Energy Neutrinos from Cosmic Rays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We introduce neutrino astronomy from the observational fact that Nature accelerates protons and photons to energies in excess of 10^{20} and 10^{13} eV, respectively. Although the discovery of cosmic rays dates back close to a century, we do not know how and where they are accelerated. We review the facts as well as the speculations about the sources. Among these gamma ray bursts and active galaxies represent well-motivated speculations because these are also the sources of the highest energy gamma rays, with emission observed up to 20 TeV, possibly higher. We discuss why cosmic accelerators are also expected to be cosmic beam dumps producing high-energy neutrino beams associated with the highest energy cosmic rays. Cosmic ray sources may produce neutrinos from MeV to EeV energy by a variety of mechanisms. The important conclusion is that, independently of the specific blueprint of the source, it takes a kilometer-scale neutrino observatory to detect the neutrino beam associated with the highest energy cosmic rays and gamma rays. The technology for commissioning such instruments exists.

F. Halzen

2002-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "icecube neutrino observatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Neutrino physics at accelerators  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Present and future neutrino experiments at accelerators are mainly concerned with understanding the neutrino oscillation phenomenon and its implications. Here a brief account of neutrino oscillations is given together with a description of the supporting data. Some current and planned accelerator neutrino experiments are also explained.

Enrique Fernandez

2006-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

182

Muons and Neutrinos 2007  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper is the written version of the rapporteur talk on Section HE-2, muons and neutrinos, presented at the 30th International Cosmic Ray Conference, Merida, Yucatan, July 11, 2007. Topics include atmospheric muons and neutrinos, solar neutrinos and astrophysical neutrinos as well as calculations and instrumentation related to these topics.

Thomas K. Gaisser

2008-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

183

Neutrinos in Nuclear Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Since the discovery of nuclear beta decay, nuclear physicists have studied the weak interaction and the nature of neutrinos. Many recent and current experiments have been focused on the elucidation of neutrino oscillations and neutrino mass. The quest for the absolute value of neutrino mass continues with higher precision studies of the tritium beta decay spectrum near the endpoint. Neutrino oscillations are studied through measurements of reactor neutrinos as a function of baseline and energy. And experiments searching for neutrinoless double beta decay seek to discover violation of lepton number and establish the Majorana nature of neutrino masses.

R. D. McKeown

2014-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

184

Neutrinos in Nuclear Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Since the discovery of nuclear beta decay, nuclear physicists have studied the weak interaction and the nature of neutrinos. Many recent and current experiments have been focused on the elucidation of neutrino oscillations and neutrino mass. The quest for the absolute value of neutrino mass continues with higher precision studies of the tritium beta decay spectrum near the endpoint. Neutrino oscillations are studied through measurements of reactor neutrinos as a function of baseline and energy. And experiments searching for neutrinoless double beta decay seek to discover violation of lepton number and establish the Majorana nature of neutrino masses.

McKeown, R D

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Neutrinos from the Galactic Center in the Light of its Gamma-Ray Detection at TeV Energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We re-evaluate the event rate expected in km^3-scale detectors for neutrinos from the direction of the Galactic Center (GC) in light of recent spectral measurements obtained by the HESS instrument for ~TeV gamma-radiation from this direction. In the most plausible scenario the re-evaluated event rate is smaller than that previously calculated--and here re-calculated--on the basis of EGRET data. However, the GC TeV gamma-ray detections by the Whipple, CANGAROO, and HESS instruments, together with the strong indications for an overabundance of cosmic rays coming from the GC at EeV energies, strengthen the expectation for a detectable, TeV-PeV GC neutrino signal from proton-proton interactions in that region. If the TeV gamma-ray--EeV cosmic ray anisotropy connection is correct, this signal will be detectable within a year and half for km^3-scale neutrino detectors in the Northern Hemisphere at super-TeV energies and, significantly, should also be detectable in 1.6 years by the South Polar IceCube detector at energies > 10^14 eV. The GC neutrino signal should also produce a detectable signal from neutrino showering and resonant W^- production by anti-electron-neutrinos in the volume of a km^3-scale detector.

Roland M. Crocker; Fulvio Melia; Raymond R. Volkas

2005-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

186

Experimental Neutrino Physics: Final Report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental studies of neutrino properties, with particular emphasis on neutrino oscillation, mass and mixing parameters. This research was pursued by means of underground detectors for reactor anti-neutrinos, measuring the flux and energy spectra of the neutrinos. More recent investigations have been aimed and developing detector technologies for a long-baseline neutrino experiment (LBNE) using a neutrino beam from Fermilab.

Lane, Charles E.; Maricic, Jelena

2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

187

Neutrino Physics at Fermilab  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Neutrino oscillations provide the first evidence for physics beyond the Standard Model. I will briefly overview the neutrino "hi-story", describing key discoveries over the past decades that shaped our understanding of neutrinos and their behavior. Fermilab was, is and hopefully will be at the forefront of the accelerator neutrino experiments.  NuMI, the most powerful accelerator neutrino beam in the world has ushered us into the era of precise measurements. Its further upgrades may give a chance to tackle the remaining mysteries of the neutrino mass hierarchy and possible CP violation.

Niki Saoulidou

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

188

Extragalactic star-forming galaxies with hypernovae and supernovae as high-energy neutrino and gamma-ray sources: the case of the 10 TeV neutrino data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In light of the latest IceCube data, we discuss the implications of the cosmic ray energy input from hypernovae and supernovae into the Universe, and their propagation in the hosting galaxy and galaxy clusters or groups. The magnetic confinement in these environments may lead to efficient $pp$ collisions, resulting in a diffuse neutrino spectrum extending from PeV down to 10 TeV energies, with a spectrum and flux level compatible with that recently reported by IceCube. If the diffuse 10 TeV neutrino background largely comes from such the CR reservoirs, the corresponding diffuse gamma-ray background should be compatible with the recent \\textit{Fermi} data. In this scenario, the CR energy input from hypernovae should be dominant over that of supernovae, implying that the starburst scenario does not work if the supernova energy budget is a factor of two larger than the hypernova energy budget. Thus, this strong case scenario can be supported or ruled out in near future.

Senno, Nicholas; Murase, Kohta; Baerwald, Philipp; Rees, Martin J

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

ON THE NEUTRINO NON-DETECTION OF GRB 130427A  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The recent gamma-ray burst GRB 130427A has an isotropic electromagnetic energy E{sup iso} {approx} 10{sup 54} erg, suggesting an ample supply of target photons for photo-hadronic interactions, which at its low redshift of z {approx} 0.34 would appear to make it a promising candidate for neutrino detection. However, the IceCube collaboration has reported a null result based on a search during the prompt emission phase. We show that this neutrino non-detection can provide valuable information about this gamma-ray burst's (GRB's) key physical parameters such as the emission radius R{sub d} , the bulk Lorentz factor {Gamma}, and the energy fraction converted into cosmic rays {epsilon}{sub p}. The results are discussed both in a model-independent way and in the specific scenarios of an internal shock (IS) model, a baryonic photospheric (BPH) model, and a magnetic photospheric (MPH) model. We find that the constraints are most stringent for the MPH model considered, but the constraints on the IS and the BPH models are fairly modest.

Gao Shan; Kashiyama, Kazumi; Meszaros, Peter, E-mail: sxg324@psu.edu, E-mail: kzk15@psu.edu, E-mail: pmeszaros@astro.psu.edu [Department of Physics, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Center for Particle Astrophysics, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

2013-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

190

Neutrinos from gamma-ray bursts: propagation of cosmic rays in their host galaxies  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) are proposed as candidate sources of ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs). We study the possibility that the PeV neutrinos recently observed by IceCube are produced by GRB cosmic rays interacting with the interstellar gas in the host galaxies. By studying the relation between the X-ray absorption column density N_H and the surface star-formation rate of GRB host galaxies, we find that N_H is a good indicator of the surface gas density of the host galaxies. Then we are able to calculate the neutrino production efficiency of CRs for GRBs with known N_H. We collect a sample of GRBs that have both measurements of N_H and accurate gamma-ray fluence, and attempt to calculate the accumulated neutrino flux based on the current knowledge about GRBs and their host galaxies. When the CR intensity produced by GRBs is normalized with the observed UHECR flux above $10^{19}{\\rm eV}$, the accumulated neutrino flux at PeV energies is estimated to be about $(0.3\\pm0.2)\\times10^{-8} \\rm{GeV\\ cm^{-2}\\ s...

Wang, Zi-Yi; Wang, Jun-Feng

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Solar neutrinos - Eclipse effect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It is pointed out that the enhancement of the solar neutrino rate in a real time detector like Super-Kamioka, SNO or Borexino due to neutrino oscillations in the moon during a partial or total solar eclipse may be observable. The enhancement is calculated as a function of the neutrino parameters in the case of three flavor mixing. This enhancement if seen, can further help to determine the neutrino parameters.

Mohan Narayan; G. Rajasekaran; Rahul Sinha

1997-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

192

Neutrino Astronomy Scott Wilbur  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

V protons, which should be created with neutrinos, have been seen Can be used to observe possible dark Particle Physics Extremely long baseline for neutrino oscillation studies Dark Matter Searches Many dark Detector Picture from AMANDA II Web Site: http://www.amanda.uci.edu #12;Advantages of Neutrino Astronomy

Golwala, Sunil

193

Constraining Sterile Neutrinos Using Reactor Neutrino Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Models of neutrino mixing involving one or more sterile neutrinos have resurrected their importance in the light of recent cosmological data. In this case, reactor antineutrino experiments offer an ideal place to look for signatures of sterile neutrinos due to their impact on neutrino flavor transitions. In this work, we show that the high-precision data of the Daya Bay experi\\-ment constrain the 3+1 neutrino scenario imposing upper bounds on the relevant active-sterile mixing angle $\\sin^2 2 \\theta_{14} \\lesssim 0.06$ at 3$\\sigma$ confidence level for the mass-squared difference $\\Delta m^2_{41}$ in the range $(10^{-3},10^{-1}) \\, {\\rm eV^2}$. The latter bound can be improved by six years of running of the JUNO experiment, $\\sin^22\\theta_{14} \\lesssim 0.016$, although in the smaller mass range $ \\Delta m^2_{41} \\in (10^{-4} ,10^{-3}) \\, {\\rm eV}^2$. We have also investigated the impact of sterile neutrinos on precision measurements of the standard neutrino oscillation parameters $\\theta_{13}$ and $\\Delta m^2_{31}$ (at Daya Bay and JUNO), $\\theta_{12}$ and $\\Delta m^2_{21}$ (at JUNO), and most importantly, the neutrino mass hierarchy (at JUNO). We find that, except for the obvious situation where $\\Delta m^2_{41}\\sim \\Delta m^2_{31}$, sterile states do not affect these measurements substantially.

Ivan Girardi; Davide Meloni; Tommy Ohlsson; He Zhang; Shun Zhou

2014-08-21T23:59:59.000Z

194

LSND neutrino oscillation results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the past several years, a number of experiments have searched for neutrino oscillations, where a neutrino of one type (say {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}}) spontaneously transforms into a neutrino of another type (say {bar {nu}}{sub e}). For this phenomenon to occur, neutrinos must be massive and the apparent conservation law of lepton families must be violated. In 1995 the LSND experiment published data showing candidate events that are consistent with {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} oscillations. Additional data are reported here which provide stronger evidence for neutrino oscillations.

Louis, W.C.

1996-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

195

Democratic Neutrino Theory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New theory of neutrino masses and mixing is introduced. This theory is based on a simple S_3 symmetric democratic neutrino mass matrix, and predicts the neutrino mass spectrum of normal ordering. Taking into account the matter effect and proper averaging of the oscillations, this theory agrees with the variety of atmospheric, solar and accelerator neutrino data. Moreover, the absolute scale of the neutrino masses m of 0.03 eV is determined in this theory, using the atmospheric neutrino oscillation data. In case of tiny perturbations in the democratic mass matrix only one this scale parameter m allows to explain the mentioned above neutrino results, and the theory has huge predictive power.

Dmitry Zhuridov

2014-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

196

Collective neutrino oscillations in supernovae  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In a dense neutrino medium neutrinos can experience collective flavor transformation through the neutrino-neutrino forward scattering. In this talk we present some basic features of collective neutrino flavor transformation in the context in core-collapse supernovae. We also give some qualitative arguments for why and when this interesting phenomenon may occur and how it may affect supernova nucleosynthesis.

Duan, Huaiyu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87131 (United States)

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

197

Shifts of neutrino oscillation parameters in reactor antineutrino experiments with non-standard interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss reactor antineutrino oscillations with non-standard interactions (NSIs) at the neutrino production and detection processes. The neutrino oscillation probability is calculated with a parametrization of the NSI parameters by splitting them into the averages and differences of the production and detection processes respectively. The average parts induce constant shifts of the neutrino mixing angles from their true values, and the difference parts can generate the energy (and baseline) dependent corrections to the initial mass-squared differences. We stress that only the shifts of mass-squared differences are measurable in reactor antineutrino experiments. Taking Jiangmen Underground Neutrino Observatory (JUNO) as an example, we analyze how NSIs influence the standard neutrino measurements and to what extent we can constrain the NSI parameters.

Yu-Feng Li; Ye-Ling Zhou

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Resonant oscillations of GeV - TeV neutrinos in internal shocks from gamma-ray burst jets inside the stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High-energy neutrinos generated in collimated jets inside the progenitors of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) have been related with the events detected by IceCube. These neutrinos, produced by hadronic interactions of Fermi-accelerated protons with thermal photons and hadrons in internal shocks, are the only signature when jet has not broken out or failed. Taking into account that the photon field is thermalized at keV energies and the standard assumption that the magnetic field maintains a steady value throughout the shock region (with a width of $10^{10} - 10^{11}$ cm in the observed frame), we study the effect of thermal and magnetized plasma generated in internal shocks on the neutrino oscillations. We calculate the neutrino effective potential generated by this plasma, the effects of the envelope of the star, and the vacuum on the path to Earth. By considering these three effects, the two (solar, atmospheric and accelerator parameters) and three neutrino mixing, we show that although GeV - TeV neutrinos can osci...

Fraija, Nissim

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

The Large Aperture GRB Observatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Large Aperture GRB Observatory (LAGO) is aiming at the detection of the high energy (around 100 GeV) component of Gamma Ray Bursts, using the single particle technique in arrays of Water Cherenkov Detectors (WCD) in high mountain sites (Chacaltaya, Bolivia, 5300 m a.s.l., Pico Espejo, Venezuela, 4750 m a.s.l., Sierra Negra, Mexico, 4650 m a.s.l). WCD at high altitude offer a unique possibility of detecting low gamma fluxes in the 10 GeV - 1 TeV range. The status of the Observatory and data collected from 2007 to date will be presented.

Allard, D; Asorey, H; Barros, H; Bertou, X; Castillo, M; Chirinos, J M; De Castro, A; Flores, S; González, J; Berisso, M Gomez; Grajales, J; Guada, C; Day, W R Guevara; Ishitsuka, J; López, J A; Martínez, O; Melfo, A; Meza, E; Loza, P Miranda; Barbosa, E Moreno; Murrugarra, C; Núñez, L A; Ormachea, L J Otiniano; Pérez, G; Perez, Y; Ponce, E; Quispe, J; Quintero, C; Rivera, H; Rosales, M; Rovero, A C; Saavedra, O; Salazar, H; Tello, J C; Peralda, R Ticona; Varela, E; Velarde, A; Villaseñor, L; Wahl, D; Zamalloa, M A

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

Experimental Signature for Black Hole Production in Neutrino Air Showers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The existence of extra degrees of freedom beyond the electroweak scale may allow the formation of black holes in nearly horizontal neutrino air showers. In this paper we examine the average properties of the light descendants of these black holes. Our analysis indicates that black hole decay gives rise to deeply penetrating showers with an electromagnetic component which differs substantially from that in conventional neutrino interactions, allowing a good characterization of the phenomenon against background. Naturally occurring black holes in horizontal neutrino showers could be detected and studied with the Auger air shower array. Since the expected black hole production rate at Auger is $> 1$ event/year, this cosmic ray observatory could be potentially powerful in probing models with extra dimensions and TeV-scale gravity.

Luis Anchordoqui; Haim Goldberg

2001-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "icecube neutrino observatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

MINOS Sterile Neutrino Search  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is a long-baseline accelerator neutrino experiment designed to measure properties of neutrino oscillation. Using a high intensity muon neutrino beam, produced by the Neutrinos at Main Injector (NuMI) complex at Fermilab, MINOS makes two measurements of neutrino interactions. The first measurement is made using the Near Detector situated at Fermilab and the second is made using the Far Detector located in the Soudan Underground laboratory in northern Minnesota. The primary goal of MINOS is to verify, and measure the properties of, neutrino oscillation between the two detectors using the {nu}{sub {mu}} {yields} V{sub {tau}} transition. A complementary measurement can be made to search for the existence of sterile neutrinos; an oft theorized, but experimentally unvalidated particle. The following thesis will show the results of a sterile neutrino search using MINOS RunI and RunII data totaling {approx}2.5 x 10{sup 20} protons on target. Due to the theoretical nature of sterile neutrinos, complete formalism that covers transition probabilities for the three known active states with the addition of a sterile state is also presented.

Koskinen, David Jason; /University Coll. London

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Acquiring information about neutrino parameters by detecting supernova neutrinos  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We consider the supernova shock effects, the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein effects, the collective effects, and the Earth matter effects in the detection of type II supernova neutrinos on the Earth. It is found that the event number of supernova neutrinos depends on the neutrino mass hierarchy, the neutrino mixing angle {theta}{sub 13}, and neutrino masses. Therefore, we propose possible methods to identify the mass hierarchy and acquire information about {theta}{sub 13} and neutrino masses by detecting supernova neutrinos. We apply these methods to some current neutrino experiments.

Huang, Ming-Yang; Guo, Xin-Heng [College of Nuclear Science and Technology, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Young, Bing-Lin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 5001 (United States); Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Space Telescope Programs Hubble Observatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assurance/Configuration Management Mr. Christopher Scholz EAG QA Manager #12;Space Telescope Programs Hubble · COS-UCB-002 QA Implementation Plan Released December 1, 1999 · COS-UCB-003 CM Plan released DecemberSpace Telescope Programs Hubble Observatory HST-COS FUV PER 11/8/00 FUV Detector System Quality

Colorado at Boulder, University of

204

Neutrinos and Collider Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review the collider phenomenology of neutrino physics and the synergetic aspects at energy, intensity and cosmic frontiers to test the new physics behind the neutrino mass mechanism. In particular, we focus on seesaw models within the minimal setup as well as with extended gauge and/or Higgs sectors, and on supersymmetric neutrino mass models with seesaw mechanism and with $R$-parity violation. In the simplest Type-I seesaw scenario with sterile neutrinos, we summarize and update the current experimental constraints on the sterile neutrino mass and its mixing with the active neutrinos. We also discuss the future experimental prospects of testing the seesaw mechanism at colliders and in related low-energy searches for rare processes, such as lepton flavor violation and neutrinoless double beta decay. The implications of the discovery of lepton number violation at the LHC for leptogenesis are also studied.

Deppisch, Frank F; Pilaftsis, Apostolos

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

Solar neutrino detection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

More than 40 years ago, neutrinos where conceived as a way to test the validity of the solar models which tell us that stars are powered by nuclear fusion reactions. The first measurement of the neutrino flux, in 1968 in the Homestake mine in South Dakota, detected only one third of the expected value, originating what has been known as the Solar Neutrino Problem. Different experiments were built in order to understand the origin of this discrepancy. Now we know that neutrinos undergo oscillation phenomenon changing their nature traveling from the core of the Sun to our detectors. In the work the 40 year long saga of the neutrino detection is presented; from the first proposals to test the solar models to last real time measurements of the low energy part of the neutrino spectrum.

Lino Miramonti

2009-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

206

Massive neutrinos and cosmology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The present experimental results on neutrino flavour oscillations provide evidence for non-zero neutrino masses, but give no hint on their absolute mass scale, which is the target of beta decay and neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments. Crucial complementary information on neutrino masses can be obtained from the analysis of data on cosmological observables, such as the anisotropies of the cosmic microwave background or the distribution of large-scale structure. In this review we describe in detail how free-streaming massive neutrinos affect the evolution of cosmological perturbations. We summarize the current bounds on the sum of neutrino masses that can be derived from various combinations of cosmological data, including the most recent analysis by the WMAP team. We also discuss how future cosmological experiments are expected to be sensitive to neutrino masses well into the sub-eV range.

Julien Lesgourgues; Sergio Pastor

2006-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

207

Physics of Massive Neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I summarize the present status of global analyses of neutrino oscillations, including the most recent KamLAND and K2K data, as well as the latest solar and atmospheric neutrino fluxes. I give the allowed ranges of the three--flavour oscillation parameters from the current worlds' global neutrino data sample, their best fit values and discuss the small parameters DeltaM_solar/DeltaM_atm and sin^2 theta_13, which characterize the strength of CP violation in neutrino oscillations. I briefly discuss neutrinoless double beta decay and the LSND neutrino oscillation hint, as well as the robustness of the neutrino oscillation results in the presence of non-standard physics.

J. W. F. Valle

2004-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

208

Neutrinos from Gamma Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We show that the detection of neutrinos from a typical gamma ray burst requires a kilometer-scale detector. We argue that large bursts should be visible with the neutrino telescopes under construction. We emphasize the 3 techniques by which neutrino telescopes can perform this search: by triggering on i) bursts of muons from muon neutrinos, ii) muons from air cascades initiated by high energy gamma rays and iii) showers made by relatively low energy ($\\simeq 100\\,\\mev$) electron neutrinos. Timing of neutrino-photon coincidences may yield a measurement of the neutrino mass to order $10^{-5}$~eV, an interesting range in light of the solar neutrino anomaly.

F. Halzen; G. Jaczko

1996-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

209

Neutrino Oscillation Studies with Reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear reactors are one of the most intense, pure, controllable, cost-effective, and well-understood sources of neutrinos. Reactors have played a major role in the study of neutrino oscillations, a phenomenon that indicates that neutrinos have mass and that neutrino flavors are quantum mechanical mixtures. Over the past several decades reactors were used in the discovery of neutrinos, were crucial in solving the solar neutrino puzzle, and allowed the determination of the smallest mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$. In the near future, reactors will help to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to solve the puzzling issue of sterile neutrinos.

Petr Vogel; Liangjian Wen; Chao Zhang

2015-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

210

Neutrino Oscillation Studies with Reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nuclear reactors are one of the most intense, pure, controllable, cost-effective, and well-understood sources of neutrinos. Reactors have played a major role in the study of neutrino oscillations, a phenomenon that indicates that neutrinos have mass and that neutrino flavors are quantum mechanical mixtures. Over the past several decades reactors were used in the discovery of neutrinos, were crucial in solving the solar neutrino puzzle, and allowed the determination of the smallest mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$. In the near future, reactors will help to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy and to solve the puzzling issue of sterile neutrinos.

Vogel, Petr; Zhang, Chao

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

UHECR ESCAPE MECHANISMS FOR PROTONS AND NEUTRONS FROM GAMMA-RAY BURSTS, AND THE COSMIC-RAY-NEUTRINO CONNECTION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The paradigm that gamma-ray burst fireballs are the sources of the ultra-high energy cosmic rays (UHECRs) is being probed by neutrino observations. Very stringent bounds can be obtained from the cosmic-ray (proton)-neutrino connection, assuming that the UHECRs escape as neutrons. In this study, we identify three different regimes as a function of the fireball parameters: the standard ''one neutrino per cosmic ray'' case, the optically thick (to neutron escape) case, and the case where leakage of protons from the boundaries of the shells (direct escape) dominates. In the optically thick regime, the photomeson production is very efficient, and more neutrinos will be emitted per cosmic ray than in the standard case, whereas in the direct escape-dominated regime, more cosmic rays than neutrinos will be emitted. We demonstrate that, for efficient proton acceleration, which is required to describe the observed UHECR spectrum, the standard case only applies to a very narrow region of the fireball parameter space. We illustrate with several observed examples that conclusions on the cosmic-ray-neutrino connection will depend on the actual burst parameters. We also show that the definition of the pion production efficiency currently used by the IceCube collaboration underestimates the neutrino production in the optically thick case. Finally, we point out that the direct escape component leads to a spectral break in the cosmic-ray spectrum emitted from a single source. The resulting ''two-component model'' can be used to even more strongly pronounce the spectral features of the observed UHECR spectrum than the dip model.

Baerwald, Philipp; Bustamante, Mauricio; Winter, Walter, E-mail: philipp.baerwald@physik.uni-wuerzburg.de, E-mail: mauricio.bustamante@physik.uni-wuerzburg.de, E-mail: winter@physik.uni-wuerzburg.de [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Universitaet Wuerzburg, D-97074 Wuerzburg (Germany)

2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

212

Neutrinos: Nature's Ghosts?  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Dr. Don Lincoln introduces one of the most fascinating inhabitants of the subatomic realm: the neutrino. Neutrinos are ghosts of the microworld, almost not interacting at all. In this video, he describes some of their properties and how they were discovered. Studies of neutrinos are expected to be performed at many laboratories across the world and to form one of the cornerstones of the Fermilab research program for the next decade or more.

Lincoln, Don

2014-08-12T23:59:59.000Z

213

Virtual Observatories A New Era for Astronomy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Virtual Observatories A New Era for Astronomy Reinaldo R. de Carvalho DAS-INPE/MCT 2010 Wednesday, April 7, 2010 #12;Virtual Observatories A New Era for Astronomy Reinaldo R. de Carvalho DAS!;#--&$G !!!$ ! ' !"#$%&'&#()*! !!!$#%& !( $ ' !%&$ $ ! (% +#&,&'- .'/0&#,& Wednesday, April 7, 2010 #12;Virtual Observatories A New Era for Astronomy Reinaldo R. de

214

Chandra X-ray Observatory Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chandra X-ray Observatory Center Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics 60 Garden St. Cambridge, MA 02138 USA http://chandra.harvard.edu Four Supernova Remnants: NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory's Chandra X-ray Observatory, four newly processed images of supernova remnants dramatically illustrate

215

Neutrino Oscillation Physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

To complement the neutrino-physics lectures given at the 2011 International School on Astro Particle Physics devoted to Neutrino Physics and Astrophysics (ISAPP 2011; Varenna, Italy), at the 2011 European School of High Energy Physics (ESHEP 2011; Cheila Gradistei, Romania), and, in modified form, at other summer schools, we present here a written description of the physics of neutrino oscillation. This description is centered on a new way of deriving the oscillation probability. We also provide a brief guide to references relevant to topics other than neutrino oscillation that were covered in the lectures.

Boris Kayser

2013-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

216

Composite Dirac Neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a mechanism that naturally produces light Dirac neutrinos. The basic idea is that the right-handed neutrinos are composite. Any realistic composite model must involve `hidden flavor' chiral symmetries. In general some of these symmetries may survive confinement, and in particular, one of them manifests itself at low energy as an exact $B-L$ symmetry. Dirac neutrinos are therefore produced. The neutrinos are naturally light due to compositeness. In general, sterile states are present in the model, some of them can naturally be warm dark matter candidates.

Yuval Grossman; Dean J Robinson

2011-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

217

Atmospheric Neutrino Fluxes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Starting with an historical review, I summarize the status of calculations of the flux of atmospheric neutrinos and how they compare to measurements.

Thomas K. Gaisser

2005-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

218

Solar Neutrino Experiments Neutrinos are ghostlike particles that  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

experiments by sci- entists around the world, all working to con- firm the solar neutrino deficit. First came#12;Solar Neutrino Experiments Neutrinos are ghostlike particles that were postulated by Wolfgang to Davis's major triumph, which came in the early 1970s, when he successfully de- tected solar neutrinos

219

Science with Virtual Observatory Tools  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Virtual Observatory is now mature enough to produce cutting-edge science results. The exploitation of astronomical data beyond classical identification limits with interoperable tools for statistical identification of sources has become a reality. I present the discovery of 68 optically faint, obscured (i.e., type 2) active galactic nuclei (AGN) candidates in the two GOODS fields using the Astrophysical Virtual Observatory (AVO) prototype. Thirty-one of these sources have high estimated X-ray powers (>10^44 erg/s) and therefore qualify as optically obscured quasars, the so-called QSO 2. The number of these objects in the GOODS fields is now 40, an improvement of a factor > 4 when compared to the only 9 such sources previously known. By going ~ 3 magnitudes fainter than previously known type 2 AGN in the GOODS fields the AVO is sampling a region of redshift -- power space much harder to reach with classical methods. I also discuss the AVO move to our next phase, the EURO-VO, and our short-term plans to continue doing science with the Virtual Observatory.

P. Padovani

2004-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

220

Determining Reactor Neutrino Flux  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Flux is an important source of uncertainties for a reactor neutrino experiment. It is determined from thermal power measurements, reactor core simulation, and knowledge of neutrino spectra of fuel isotopes. Past reactor neutrino experiments have determined the flux to (2-3)% precision. Precision measurements of mixing angle $\\theta_{13}$ by reactor neutrino experiments in the coming years will use near-far detector configurations. Most uncertainties from reactor will be canceled out. Understanding of the correlation of uncertainties is required for $\\theta_{13}$ experiments. Precise determination of reactor neutrino flux will also improve the sensitivity of the non-proliferation monitoring and future reactor experiments. We will discuss the flux calculation and recent progresses.

Jun Cao

2012-03-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "icecube neutrino observatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Absolute neutrino mass measurements  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The neutrino mass plays an important role in particle physics, astrophysics and cosmology. In recent years the detection of neutrino flavour oscillations proved that neutrinos carry mass. However, oscillation experiments are only sensitive to the mass-squared difference of the mass eigenvalues. In contrast to cosmological observations and neutrino-less double beta decay (0v2{beta}) searches, single {beta}-decay experiments provide a direct, model-independent way to determine the absolute neutrino mass by measuring the energy spectrum of decay electrons at the endpoint region with high accuracy.Currently the best kinematic upper limits on the neutrino mass of 2.2eV have been set by two experiments in Mainz and Troitsk, using tritium as beta emitter. The next generation tritium {beta}-experiment KATRIN is currently under construction in Karlsruhe/Germany by an international collaboration. KATRIN intends to improve the sensitivity by one order of magnitude to 0.2eV. The investigation of a second isotope ({sup 137}Rh) is being pursued by the international MARE collaboration using micro-calorimeters to measure the beta spectrum. The technology needed to reach 0.2eV sensitivity is still in the R and D phase. This paper reviews the present status of neutrino-mass measurements with cosmological data, 0v2{beta} decay and single {beta}-decay.

Wolf, Joachim [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), IEKP, Postfach 3640, 76021 Karlsruhe (Germany)

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

222

HAWC Observatory captures first image  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuided Self-Assembly of GoldHAWC Observatory captures first

223

HAWC Observatory captures first image  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky9, 2010 The meeting was called to order byHAWC Observatory

224

HAWC γ-Ray Observatory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun with Big Sky9, 2010 The meeting was called to order byHAWC ObservatoryHAWC

225

Solar mass-varying neutrino oscillations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose that the solar neutrino deficit may be due to oscillations of mass-varying neutrinos (MaVaNs). This scenario elucidates solar neutrino data beautifully while remaining comfortably compatible with atmospheric neutrino and K2K data...

Marfatia, Danny; Huber, P.; Barger, V.

2005-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

226

Neutrinos: Nature's Identity Thieves?  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The oscillation of neutrinos from one variety to another has long been suspected, but was confirmed only about 15 years ago. In order for these oscillations to occur, neutrinos must have a mass, no matter how slight. Since neutrinos have long been thought to be massless, in a very real way, this phenomena is a clear signal of physics beyond the known. In this video, Fermilab's Dr Don Lincoln explains how we know it occurs and hints at the rich experimental program at several international laboratories designed to understand this complex mystery.

Dr. Don Lincoln

2013-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

227

Neutrinos: Nature's Identity Thieves?  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

The oscillation of neutrinos from one variety to another has long been suspected, but was confirmed only about 15 years ago. In order for these oscillations to occur, neutrinos must have a mass, no matter how slight. Since neutrinos have long been thought to be massless, in a very real way, this phenomena is a clear signal of physics beyond the known. In this video, Fermilab's Dr Don Lincoln explains how we know it occurs and hints at the rich experimental program at several international laboratories designed to understand this complex mystery.

Lincoln, Don

2014-08-07T23:59:59.000Z

228

Neutrino astrophysics : recent advances and open issues  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We highlight recent advances in neutrino astrophysics, the open issues and the interplay with neutrino properties. We emphasize the important progress in our understanding of neutrino flavor conversion in media. We discuss the case of solar neutrinos, of core-collapse supernova neutrinos and of SN1987A, and of the recently discovered ultra-high energy neutrinos whose origin is to be determined.

Volpe, Cristina

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Phenomenology of Neutrino Oscillations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The phenomenology of solar, atmospheric, supernova and laboratory neutrino oscillations is described. Analytical formulae for matter effects are reviewed. The results from oscillations are confronted with neutrinoless double beta decay.

G. Rajasekaran

2000-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

230

WMAPping out Neutrino Masses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent data from from the Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) place important bounds on the neutrino sector. The precise determination of the baryon number in the universe puts a strong constraint on the number of relativistic species during Big-Bang Nucleosynthesis. WMAP data, when combined with the 2dF Galaxy Redshift Survey (2dFGRS), also directly constrain the absolute mass scale of neutrinos. These results impinge upon a neutrino oscillation interpretation of the result from the Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector (LSND). We also note that the Heidelberg--Moscow evidence for neutrinoless double beta decay is only consistent with the WMAP+2dFGRS data for the largest values of the nuclear matrix element.

Aaron Pierce; Hitoshi Murayama

2003-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

231

Electromagnetic properties of massive neutrinos  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The vertex function for a virtual massive neutrino is calculated in the limit of soft real photons. A method based on employing the neutrino self-energy operator in a weak external electromagnetic field in the approximation linear in the field is developed in order to render this calculation of the vertex function convenient. It is shown that the electric charge and the electric dipole moment of the real neutrino are zero; only the magnetic moment is nonzero for massive neutrinos. A fourth-generation heavy neutrino of mass not less than half of the Z-boson mass is considered as a massive neutrino.

Dobrynina, A. A., E-mail: aleksandradobrynina@rambler.ru; Mikheev, N. V.; Narynskaya, E. N. [Demidov Yaroslavl State University (Russian Federation)] [Demidov Yaroslavl State University (Russian Federation)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

232

Cosmological and supernova neutrinos  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Big Bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) and the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies are the pillars of modern cosmology. It has recently been suggested that axion which is a dark matter candidate in the framework of the standard model could condensate in the early universe and induce photon cooling before the epoch of the photon last scattering. Although this may render a solution to the overproduction problem of primordial {sup 7}Li abundance, there arises another serious difficulty of overproducing D abundance. We propose a hybrid dark matter model with both axions and relic supersymmetric (SUSY) particles to solve both overproduction problems of the primordial D and {sup 7}Li abundances simultaneously. The BBN also serves to constrain the nature of neutrinos. Considering non-thermal photons produced in the decay of the heavy sterile neutrinos due to the magnetic moment, we explore the cosmological constraint on the strength of neutrino magnetic moment consistent with the observed light element abundances. Core-collapse supernovae eject huge flux of energetic neutrinos which affect explosive nucleosynthesis of rare isotopes like {sup 7}Li, {sup 11}B, {sup 92}Nb, {sup 138}La and {sup 180}Ta and r-process elements. Several isotopes depend strongly on the neutrino flavor oscillation due to the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect. Combining the recent experimental constraints on ?{sub 13} with predicted and observed supernova-produced abundance ratio {sup 11}B/{sup 7}Li encapsulated in the presolar grains from the Murchison meteorite, we show a marginal preference for an inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. We also discuss supernova relic neutrinos (SRN) that may indicate the softness of the equation of state (EoS) of nuclear matter and adiabatic conditions of the neutrino oscillation.

Kajino, T. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588, Japan Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Aoki, W. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Balantekin, A. B. [Department of Physics, University of Wisconsin - Madison, Wisconsin 53706 (United States); Cheoun, M.-K. [Department of Physics, Soongsil University, Seoul 156-743 (Korea, Republic of); Hayakawa, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakara-Shirane 2-4, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Hidaka, J. [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Hirai, Y.; Shibagaki, S. [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588, Japan and Department of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Kusakabe, M. [School of Liberal Arts and Science, Korea Aerospace University, Goyang 412-791 (Korea, Republic of); Mathews, G. J. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Nakamura, K. [Waseda University, Ohkubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Pehlivan, Y. [Mimar Sinan GSÜ, Department of Physics, ?i?li, ?stanbul 34380 (Turkey); Suzuki, T. [Nihon University, Sakurajosui 3-25-40, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8550 (Japan)

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

233

Radiochemical solar neutrino experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiochemical experiments have been crucial to solar neutrino research. Even today, they provide the only direct measurement of the rate of the proton-proton fusion reaction, p + p --> d + e^+ + nu_e, which generates most of the Sun's energy. We first give a little history of radiochemical solar neutrino experiments with emphasis on the gallium experiment SAGE -- the only currently operating detector of this type. The combined result of all data from the Ga experiments is a capture rate of 67.6 +/- 3.7 SNU. For comparison to theory, we use the calculated flux at the Sun from a standard solar model, take into account neutrino propagation from the Sun to the Earth and the results of neutrino source experiments with Ga, and obtain 67.3 ^{+3.9}_{-3.5} SNU. Using the data from all solar neutrino experiments we calculate an electron neutrino pp flux at the earth of (3.41 ^{+0.76}_{-0.77}) x 10^{10}/(cm^2-s), which agrees well with the prediction from a detailed solar model of (3.30 ^{+0.13} _{-0.14}) x 10^{10}/(cm^2-s). Four tests of the Ga experiments have been carried out with very intense reactor-produced neutrino sources and the ratio of observed to calculated rates is 0.88 +/- 0.05. One explanation for this unexpectedly low result is that the cross section for neutrino capture by the two lowest-lying excited states in 71Ge has been overestimated. We end with consideration of possible time variation in the Ga experiments and an enumeration of other possible radiochemical experiments that might have been.

V. N. Gavrin; B. T. Cleveland

2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

234

Exploring the Earth matter effect with atmospheric neutrinos in ice  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the possibility to perform neutrino oscillation tomography and to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy in kilometer-scale ice Cerenkov detectors by means of the theta13-driven matter effects which occur during the propagation of atmospheric neutrinos deep through the Earth. We consider the ongoing IceCube/DeepCore neutrino observatory and future planned extensions, such as the PINGU detector, which has a lower energy threshold. Our simulations include the impact of marginalization over the neutrino oscillation parameters and a fully correlated systematic uncertainty on the total number of events. For the current best-fit value of the mixing angle theta13, the DeepCore detector, due to its relatively high-energy threshold, could only be sensitive to fluctuations on the normalization of the Earth's density of \\Delta\\rho \\simeq \\pm 10% at ~ 1.6 sigma CL after 10 years in the case of a true normal hierarchy. For the two PINGU configurations we consider, overall density fluctuations of \\Delta\\rho \\simeq \\pm 3% (\\pm 2%) could be measured at the 2 sigma CL after 10 years, also in the case of a normal mass hierarchy. We also compare the prospects to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy in these three configurations and find that this could be achieved at the 5 sigma CL, for both hierarchies, after 5 years in DeepCore and about 1 year in PINGU. This clearly shows the importance of lowering the energy threshold below 10 GeV so that detectors are fully sensitive to the resonant matter effects.

Sanjib Kumar Agarwalla; Tracey Li; Olga Mena; Sergio Palomares-Ruiz

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

235

Chandra X-ray Observatory Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chandra X-ray Observatory Center Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics 60 Garden St 200 million light years from Earth. (Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/UAH/M.Sun et al; Optical: NASA, ESA, & the Hubble Heritage Team (STScI/AURA) Caption: This composite image from the Chandra X-ray Observatory (blue

236

The Pierre Auger Cosmic Ray Observatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Pierre Auger Observatory, located on a vast, high plain in western Argentina, is the world's largest cosmic ray observatory. The objectives of the Observatory are to probe the origin and characteristics of cosmic rays above $10^{17}$ eV and to study the interactions of these, the most energetic particles observed in nature. The Auger design features an array of 1660 water-Cherenkov particle detector stations spread over 3000 km$^2$ overlooked by 24 air fluorescence telescopes. In addition, three high elevation fluorescence telescopes overlook a 23.5 km$^2$, 61 detector infill array. The Observatory has been in successful operation since completion in 2008 and has recorded data from an exposure exceeding 40,000 km$^2$ sr yr. This paper describes the design and performance of the detectors, related subsystems and infrastructure that make up the Auger Observatory.

,

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Advanced Neutrino Sources (Neutrino Factories and Beta Beams)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Advanced Neutrino Sources (Neutrino Factories and Beta Beams) · Design · R&D Status · Remaining R Meeting February, 2008 page 1 #12;· The stored beam properties & decay kinematics are well known uncertainties on neutrino flux & spectra are small PRECISION · Initial beams are flavor "pure" (BB) or "tagged

238

The Neutrino Eye: A Megaton Low Energy Neutrino  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from WIMPS and gamma ray bursts, and upon real time counting of solar neutrinos, are all from sensi­ tivity, and conduct a watch for for neutrino correlates to sporadic phenomenon such as gamma ray bursts. The main thrust would be to detect actual muon neutrino appearance as well as disappearance

Learned, John

239

Neutrino dispersion in magnetized plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The neutrino dispersion in the charge symmetric magnetized plasma is investigated. We have studied the plasma contribution into the additional energy of neutrino and obtained the simple expression for it. We consider in detail the neutrino self-energy under physical conditions of weak field, moderate field and strong field limits. It is shown that our result for neutrino dispersion in moderate magnetic field differ substantially from the previous one in the literature.

N. V. Mikheev; E. N. Narynskaya

2008-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

240

Supernova Neutrinos Detection On Earth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper, we first discuss the detection of supernova neutrino on Earth. Then we propose a possible method to acquire information about $\\theta_{13}$ smaller than $1.5^\\circ$ by detecting the ratio of the event numbers of different flavor supernova neutrinos. Such an sensitivity cannot yet be achieved by the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment.

Xin-Heng Guo; Ming-Yang Huang; Bing-Lin Young

2009-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "icecube neutrino observatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Neutrino Oscillations Experiments at Fermilab  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutrino oscillations provide an unique opportunity to probe physics beyond the Standard Model. Fermilab is constructing two new neutrino beams to provide a decicive test of two of the recent positive indications for neutrino oscillations: MiniBOONE experiment will settle the LSND controversy, MINOS will provide detailed studies of the region indicated by the SuperK results.

Adam Para

2000-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Electromagnetic neutrino: a short review  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A short review on selected issues related to the problem of neutrino electromagnetic properties is given. After a flash look at the theoretical basis of neutrino electromagnetic form factors, constraints on neutrino magnetic moments and electric millicharge from terrestrial experiments and astrophysical observations are discussed. We also focus on some recent studies of the problem and on perspectives.

Alexander I. Studenikin

2014-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

243

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA ELECTRONICS DIVISION TECHNICAL NOTE R. Lacasse #12;NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia 140-ft CASSEGRAIN BAa

Groppi, Christopher

244

Multi-Messenger Astronomy: Cosmic Rays, Gamma-Rays, and Neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Although cosmic rays were discovered a century ago, we do not know where or how they are accelerated. There is a realistic hope that the oldest problem in astronomy will be solved soon by ambitious experimentation: air shower arrays of 10,000 kilometer-square area, arrays of air Cerenkov telescopes and kilometer- scale neutrino observatories. Their predecessors are producing science. We will review the highlights: - Cosmic rays: the highest energy particles and the GZK cutoff, the search for cosmic accelerators and the the Cygnus region, top-down mechanisms: photons versus protons? - TeV-energy gamma rays: blazars, how molecular clouds may have revealed proton beams, first hints of the diffuse infrared background? - Neutrinos: first results and proof of concept for technologies to construct kilometer-scale observatories.

F. Halzen

2003-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

245

Plasmon decay to a neutrino pair via neutrino electromagnetic moments in a strongly magnetized medium  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate the neutrino luminosity of a degenerate electron gas in a strong magnetic field via plasmon decay to a neutrino pair due to neutrino electromagnetic moments and obtain the relative upper bounds on the effective neutrino magnetic moment.

A. V. Borisov; P. E. Sizin

2014-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

246

Y.Takeuchi (Y.Takeuchi (KamiokaKamioka Observatory, ICRR)Observatory, ICRR) Radon workshop @ NEUTRINO 2000  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

for water950L for water ·· RnRn--lessless--airair supply systemsupply system ·· Water purification systemWater (stainless steel) water (+50mmAq) 60cm SK dome air #12;Water purification systemWater purification system purification system ·· Membrane degassing module testMembrane degassing module test ·· SummarySummary #12

Takeuchi, Yasuo

247

Riddle of the Neutrino Mass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss some known approaches and results as well as few new ideas concerning origins and nature of neutrino mass. The key issues include (i) connections of neutrino and charged fermions masses, relation between masses and mixing, energy scale of new physics behind neutrino mass where possibilities spread from the Planck and GUT masses down to a sub-eV scale. The data hint two different new physics involved in generation of neutrino mass. Determination of the CP phase as well as mass hierarchy can play important role in identification of new physics. It may happen that sterile neutrinos provide the key to resolve the riddle.

Smirnov, A Yu

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Are neutrinos their own antiparticles?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We explain the relationship between Majorana neutrinos, which are their own antiparticles, and Majorana neutrino masses. We point out that Majorana masses would make the neutrinos very distinctive particles, and explain why many theorists strongly suspect that neutrinos do have Majorana masses. The promising approach to confirming this suspicion is to seek neutrinoless double beta decay. We introduce a toy model that illustrates why this decay requires nonzero neutrino masses, even when there are both right-handed and left-handed weak currents.

Kayser, Boris; /Fermilab

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Neutrino Physics: A Selective Overview  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutrinos in the Standard Model of particle physics are massless, neutral fermions that seemingly do little more than conserve 4-momentum, angular momentum, lepton number, and lepton flavour in weak interactions. In the last decade conclusive evidence has demonstrated that the Standard Model's description of neutrinos does not match reality. We now know that neutrinos undergo flavour oscillations, violating lepton flavour conservation and implying that neutrinos have non-zero mass. A rich oscillation phenomenology then becomes possible, including matter-enhanced oscillation and possibly CP violation in the neutrino sector. Extending the Standard Model to include neutrino masses requires the addition of new fields and mass terms, and possibly new methods of mass generation. In this review article I will discuss the evidence that has established the existence of neutrino oscillation, and then highlight unresolved issues in neutrino physics, such as the nature of three-generational mixing (including CP-violating effects), the origins of neutrino mass, the possible existence of light sterile neutrinos, and the difficult question of measuring the absolute mass scale of neutrinos.

Scott M. Oser

2006-04-11T23:59:59.000Z

250

Neutrinoless double beta decay and neutrino physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The connection of neutrino physics with neutrinoless double beta decay is reviewed. After presenting the current status of the PMNS matrix and the theoretical background of neutrino mass and lepton mixing, we will summarize the various implications of neutrino physics for double beta decay. The influence of light sterile neutrinos and other exotic modifications of the three neutrino picture is also discussed.

Werner Rodejohann

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

251

Nonstandard neutrino interactions and transition magnetic moments  

DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

We constrain generic nonstandard neutrino interactions with existing experimental data on neutrino transition magnetic moments and derive strong bounds on tensorial couplings of neutrinos to charged fermions. We also discuss how some of these tensorial couplings can be constrained by other experiments, e.g., on neutrino-electron and neutrino-nucleus scattering.

Healey, Kristopher J.; Petrov, Alexey A.; Zhuridov, Dmitry

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Neutrinos From Individual Gamma-Ray Bursts in the BATSE Catalog  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We calculate the neutrino emission from individual gamma-ray bursts observed by the BATSE detector on the Compton Gamma-Ray Observatory. Neutrinos are produced by photoproduction of pions when protons interact with photons in the region where the kinetic energy of the relativistic fireball is dissipated allowing the acceleration of electrons and protons. We also consider models where neutrinos are predominantly produced on the radiation surrounding the newly formed black hole. From the observed redshift and photon flux of each individual burst, we compute the neutrino flux in a variety of models based on the assumption that equal kinetic energy is dissipated into electrons and protons. Where not measured, the redshift is estimated by other methods. Unlike previous calculations of the universal diffuse neutrino flux produced by all gamma-ray bursts, the individual fluxes (compiled at http://www.arcetri.astro.it/~dafne/grb/) can be directly compared with coincident observations by the AMANDA telescope at the South Pole. Because of its large statistics, our predictions are likely to be representative for future observations with larger neutrino telescopes.

D. Guetta; D. Hooper; J. Alvarez-Muniz; F. Halzen; E. Reuveni

2003-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

253

Gamma-ray and neutrino fluxes from Heavy Dark Matter in the Galactic Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present a study of the Galactic Center region as a possible source of both secondary gamma-ray and neutrino fluxes from annihilating dark matter. We have studied the gamma-ray flux observed by the High Energy Stereoscopic System (HESS) from the J1745-290 Galactic Center source. The data are well fitted as annihilating dark matter in combination with an astrophysical background. The analysis was performed by means of simulated gamma spectra produced by Monte Carlo event generators packages. We analyze the differences in the spectra obtained by the various Monte Carlo codes developed so far in particle physics. We show that, within some uncertainty, the HESS data can be fitted as a signal from a heavy dark matter density distribution peaked at the Galactic Center, with a power-law for the background with a spectral index which is compatible with the Fermi-Large Area Telescope (LAT) data from the same region. If this kind of dark matter distribution generates the gamma-ray flux observed by HESS, we also expect to observe a neutrino flux. We show prospective results for the observation of secondary neutrinos with the Astronomy with a Neutrino Telescope and Abyss environmental RESearch project (ANTARES), Ice Cube Neutrino Observatory (Ice Cube) and the Cubic Kilometer Neutrino Telescope (KM3NeT). Prospects solely depend on the device resolution angle when its effective area and the minimum energy threshold are fixed.

V. Gammaldi; J. A. R. Cembranos; A. de la Cruz-Dombriz; R. A. Lineros; A. L. Maroto

2014-04-09T23:59:59.000Z

254

THE SAAO ASTRONOMICAL MUSEUM OBSERVATORY, CAPE TOWN  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

power came from the battery house next door. The batteries were charged by a steam-powered generator Observatory 1 #12;THE BUILDING The building which houses the museum is usually called the McClean, after its

Glass, Ian S.

255

CHAPTER 3.4 Observatory mathematics in the nineteenth  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of science was in fact inaugurated by a debate about Tycho Brahe's observatory (Hannaway 1986; Shackelford

Aubin, David

256

Synoptic Observing Programs at Big Bear Solar Observatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar Observatory in China, and will explore collaboration with observatories in Canary Island to extendSynoptic Observing Programs at Big Bear Solar Observatory Haimin Wang and Philip R. Goode Big Bear Solar Observatory, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ 07102, USA Abstract. New Jersey

257

New Neutrinos Algal Biofuels  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

New Neutrinos Algal Biofuels Charged-Particle Vision Primordial Soup LOS ALAMOS SCIENCE of Los Alamos and its top-secret laboratory was the mailing address--P. O. Box 1663, Santa Fe, New Mexico Seeing Green: Squeezing Power from Pond Scum OVERCOMING OBSTACLES TO IGNITE ALGAL FUELS THE (LIGHTWEIGHT

258

Neutrino and it's lepton  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper I cite p.p. 100-117 of book G. Quznetsov, Probabilistic Treatment of Gauge Theories, in series Contemporary Fundamental Physics,ed. V. Dvoeglazov, Nova Sci. Publ., NY (2007). There I research a bound between neutrino and it's lepton.

G. Quznetsov

2008-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

259

Neutrino Factory Mercury Vessel  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutrino Factory Mercury Vessel: Initial Cooling Calculations V. Graves Target Studies Nov 15, 2012 #12;2 Managed by UT-Battelle for the U.S. Department of Energy Cooling Calculations 15 Nov 2012 Target · Separates functionality, provides double mercury containment, simplifies design and remote handling · Each

McDonald, Kirk

260

Experimental Neutrino Physics  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

In this talk, I will review how a set of experiments in the last decade has given us our current understanding of neutrino properties.  I will show how experiments in the last year or two have clarified this picture, and will discuss how new experiments about to start will address remaining questions.  I will particularly emphasize the relationship between various experimental techniques.

Chris Walter

2010-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "icecube neutrino observatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Hint of non-standard MSW dynamics in solar neutrino conversion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Motivated by the recent low-threshold measurements of the solar 8B neutrino spectrum performed by Borexino, Super-Kamiokande and the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory -- all now monitoring the transition regime between low-energy (vacuum-like) and high-energy (matter-dominated) flavor conversions -- we consider the role of sub-dominant dynamical terms induced by new flavor-changing interactions. We find that the presence of such perturbations with strength ~ 0.1 G_F is favored by the analysis, being able to describe the anomalous behavior of the solar neutrino spectrum suggested by the new results, which show no sign of the typical low-energy upturn predicted by the standard MSW mechanism. Our findings, if interpreted as a positive indication, provide a hint of such new effects at the ~ 2 sigma level.

Palazzo, Antonio

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Pseudo-Dirac Neutrinos, a Challenge for Neutrino Telescopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutrinos may be pseudo-Dirac states, such that each generation is actually composed of two maximally-mixed Majorana neutrinos separated by a tiny mass difference. The usual active neutrino oscillation phenomenology would be unaltered if the pseudo-Dirac splittings are $\\delta m^2 \\alt 10^{-12}$ eV$^2$; in addition, neutrinoless double beta decay would be highly suppressed. However, it may be possible to distinguish pseudo-Dirac from Dirac neutrinos using high-energy astrophysical neutrinos. By measuring flavor ratios as a function of $L/E$, mass-squared differences down to $\\delta m^2 \\sim 10^{-18}$ eV$^2$ can be reached. We comment on the possibility of probing cosmological parameters with neutrinos.

John F. Beacom; Nicole F. Bell; Dan Hooper; John G. Learned; Sandip Pakvasa; Thomas J. Weiler

2004-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

263

Low-energy solar anti-neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

If neutrino conversions within the Sun result in partial polarization of initial solar neutrino fluxes, then a new opportunity arises to observe the anti-\

V. B. Semikoz; S. Pastor; J. W. F. Valle

1998-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

264

Advancements in solar neutrino physics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review the results of solar neutrino physics, with particular attention to the data obtained and the analyses performed in the last decades, which were determinant to solve the solar neutrino problem (SNP), proving that neutrinos are massive and oscillating particles and contributing to refine the solar models. We also discuss the perspectives of the presently running experiments in this sector and of the ones planned for the near future and the impact they can have on elementary particle physics and astrophysics.

Vito Antonelli; Lino Miramonti

2013-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

265

Neutrino Masses and Flavor Mixing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the neutrino oscillations, using texture zero mass matrices for the leptons. The reactor mixing angle $\\theta^{}_{l}$ is calculated. The ratio of the masses of two neutrinos is determined by the solar mixing angle. We can calculate the masses of the three neutrinos: $m_1$ $\\approx$ 0.003 eV - $m_2$ $\\approx$ 0.012 eV - $m_3$ $\\approx$ 0.048 eV.

Fritzsch, Harald

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Neutrino Masses and Flavor Mixing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the neutrino oscillations, using texture zero mass matrices for the leptons. The reactor mixing angle $\\theta^{}_{l}$ is calculated. The ratio of the masses of two neutrinos is determined by the solar mixing angle. We can calculate the masses of the three neutrinos: $m_1$ $\\approx$ 0.003 eV - $m_2$ $\\approx$ 0.012 eV - $m_3$ $\\approx$ 0.048 eV.

Harald Fritzsch

2015-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

267

New solar opacities, abundances, helioseismology, and neutrino fluxes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We construct solar models with the newly calculated radiative opacities from the Opacity Project (OP) and recently determined (lower) heavy element abundances. We compare results from the new models with predictions of a series of models that use OPAL radiative opacities, older determinations of the surface heavy element abundances, and refinements of nuclear reaction rates. For all the variations we consider, solar models that are constructed with the newer and lower heavy element abundances advocated by Asplund et al. (2005) disagree by much more than the estimated measuring errors with helioseismological determinations of the depth of the solar convective zone, the surface helium composition, the internal sound speeds, and the density profile. Using the new OP radiative opacities, the ratio of the 8B neutrino flux calculated with the older and larger heavy element abundances (or with the newer and lower heavy element abundances) to the total neutrino flux measured by the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory is 1.09 (0.87) with a 9% experimental uncertainty and a 16% theoretical uncertainty, 1 sigma errors.

John N. Bahcall; Aldo M. Serenelli; Sarbani Basu

2005-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

268

Supernova neutrinos and explosive nucleosynthesis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Core-collapse supernovae eject huge amount of flux of energetic neutrinos. We studied the explosive nucleosyn-thesis in supernovae and found that several isotopes {sup 7}Li, {sup 11}B, {sup 92}Nb, {sup 138}La and {sup 180}Ta as well as r-process nuclei are affected by the neutrino interactions. The abundance of these isotopes therefore depends strongly on the neutrino flavor oscillation due to the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) effect. We discuss first how to determine the neutrino temperatures in order to explain the observed solar system abundances of these isotopes, combined with Galactic chemical evolution of the light nuclei and the heavy r-process elements. We then study the effects of neutrino oscillation on their abundances, and propose a novel method to determine the still unknown neutrino oscillation parameters, mass hierarchy and ?{sub 13}, simultaneously. There is recent evidence that SiC X grains from the Murchison meteorite may contain supernova-produced light elements {sup 11}B and {sup 7}Li encapsulated in the presolar grains. Combining the recent experimental constraints on ?{sub 13}, we show that our method sug-gests at a marginal preference for an inverted neutrino mass hierarchy. Finally, we discuss supernova relic neutrinos that may indicate the softness of the equation of state (EoS) of nuclear matter as well as adiabatic conditions of the neutrino oscillation.

Kajino, T. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588, Japan and Department of Astronomy, Graduate School of Science, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1, Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan); Aoki, W. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Cheoun, M.-K. [Department of Physics, Soongsil University, Seoul 156-743 (Korea, Republic of); Hayakawa, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Shirakara-Shirane 2-4, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Hidaka, J.; Hirai, Y.; Shibagaki, S. [National Astronomical Observatory, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan); Mathews, G. J. [Center for Astrophysics, Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Nakamura, K. [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, Ohkubo 3-4-1, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Suzuki, T. [Department of Physics, College of Humanities and Sciences, Nihon University, Sakurajosui 3-25-40, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 156-8550 (Japan)

2014-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

269

Phenomenology of Absolute Neutrino Masses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The phenomenology of absolute neutrino masses is reviewed, focusing on tritium beta decay, cosmological measurements and neutrinoless double-beta decay.

Carlo Giunti

2004-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

270

Gravitational Correction in Neutrino Oscillations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the quantum mechanical oscillations of neutrinos propagating in weak gravitational field. The correction to the result in the flat space-time is derived.

Yasufumi Kojima

1996-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

271

The LAGUNA design study- towards giant liquid based underground detectors for neutrino physics and astrophysics and proton decay searches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The feasibility of a next generation neutrino observatory in Europe is being considered within the LAGUNA design study. To accommodate giant neutrino detectors and shield them from cosmic rays, a new very large underground infrastructure is required. Seven potential candidate sites in different parts of Europe and at several distances from CERN are being studied: Boulby (UK), Canfranc (Spain), Fr\\'ejus (France/Italy), Pyh\\"asalmi (Finland), Polkowice-Sieroszowice (Poland), Slanic (Romania) and Umbria (Italy). The design study aims at the comprehensive and coordinated technical assessment of each site, at a coherent cost estimation, and at a prioritization of the sites within the summer 2010.

LAGUNA Collaboration; D. Angus; A. Ariga; D. Autiero; A. Apostu; A. Badertscher; T. Bennet; G. Bertola; P. F. Bertola; O. Besida; A. Bettini; C. Booth; J. L. Borne; I. Brancus; W. Bujakowsky; J. E. Campagne; G. Cata Danil; F. Chipesiu; M. Chorowski; J. Cripps; A. Curioni; S. Davidson; Y. Declais; U. Drost; O. Duliu; J. Dumarchez; T. Enqvist; A. Ereditato; F. von Feilitzsch; H. Fynbo; T. Gamble; G. Galvanin; A. Gendotti; W. Gizicki; M. Goger-Neff; U. Grasslin; D. Gurney; M. Hakala; S. Hannestad; M. Haworth; S. Horikawa; A. Jipa; F. Juget; T. Kalliokoski; S. Katsanevas; M. Keen; J. Kisiel; I. Kreslo; V. Kudryastev; P. Kuusiniemi; L. Labarga; T. Lachenmaier; J. C. Lanfranchi; I. Lazanu; T. Lewke; K. Loo; P. Lightfoot; M. Lindner; A. Longhin; J. Maalampi; M. Marafini; A. Marchionni; R. M. Margineanu; A. Markiewicz; T. Marrodan-Undagoita; J. E. Marteau; R. Matikainen; Q. Meindl; M. Messina; J. W. Mietelski; B. Mitrica; A. Mordasini; L. Mosca; U. Moser; G. Nuijten; L. Oberauer; A. Oprina; S. Paling; S. Pascoli; T. Patzak; M. Pectu; Z. Pilecki; F. Piquemal; W. Potzel; W. Pytel; M. Raczynski; G. Rafflet; G. Ristaino; M. Robinson; R. Rogers; J. Roinisto; M. Romana; E. Rondio; B. Rossi; A. Rubbia; Z. Sadecki; C. Saenz; A. Saftoiu; J. Salmelainen; O. Sima; J. Slizowski; K. Slizowski; J. Sobczyk; N. Spooner; S. Stoica; J. Suhonen; R. Sulej; M. Szarska; T. Szeglowski; M. Temussi; J. Thompson; L. Thompson; W. H. Trzaska; M. Tippmann; A. Tonazzo; K. Urbanczyk; G. Vasseur; A. Williams; J. Winter; K. Wojutszewska; M. Wurm; A. Zalewska; M. Zampaolo; M. Zito

2009-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

272

Observables in Neutrino Mass Spectroscopy Using Atoms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The process of collective de-excitation of atoms in a metastable level into emission mode of a single photon plus a neutrino pair, called radiative emission of neutrino pair (RENP), is sensitive to the absolute neutrino mass scale, to the neutrino mass hierarchy and to the nature (Dirac or Majorana) of massive neutrinos. We investigate how the indicated neutrino mass and mixing observables can be determined from the measurement of the corresponding continuous photon spectrum taking the example of a transition between specific levels of the Yb atom. The possibility of determining the nature of massive neutrinos and, if neutrinos are Majorana fermions, of obtaining information about the Majorana phases in the neutrino mixing matrix, is analyzed in the cases of normal hierarchical, inverted hierarchical and quasi-degenerate types of neutrino mass spectrum. We find, in particular, that the sensitivity to the nature of massive neutrinos depends critically on the atomic level energy difference relevant in the RENP.

D. N. Dinh; S. T. Petcov; N. Sasao; M. Tanaka; M. Yoshimura

2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

273

Birth of Neutrino Astrophysics  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Based mainly on the results of two experiments, KamiokaNDE and Super-KamiokaNDE, the birth of neutrino astrophysics will be described. At the end, the result of the third generation Kamioka experiment, KamLAND, will be discussed together with the future possibilities.Organiser(s): Daniel Treille / EP DivisionNote: * Tea & coffee will be served at 16:00 hrs. Please note unusual day.

None

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

274

Neutrinos in the Electron  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We will show that one half of the rest mass of the electron is equal to the sum of the rest masses of electron neutrinos and that the other half of the rest mass of the electron is given by the energy in the sum of electric oscillations. With this composition we can explain the rest mass, the electric charge, the spin and the magnetic moment of the electron.

E. L. Koschmieder

2006-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

275

3D Spectroscopy and the Virtual Observatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Integral field, or 3D, spectroscopy is the technique of obtaining spectral information over a two-dimensional, hopefully contiguous, field of view. While there is some form of astronomical 3D spectroscopy at all wavelengths, there has been a rapid increase in interest in optical and near-infrared 3D spectroscopy. This has resulted in the deployment of a large variety of integral-field spectrographs on most of the large optical/infrared telescopes. The amount of IFU data available in observatory archives is large and growing rapidly. The complications of treating IFU data as both imaging and spectroscopy make it a special challenge for the virtual observatory. This article describes the various techniques of optical and near-infrared spectroscopy and some of the general needs and issues related to the handling of 3D data by the virtual observatory.

Bryan W. Miller

2007-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

276

ON SOLAR NEUTRINO PROBLEM TIAN MA AND SHOUHONG WANG  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ON SOLAR NEUTRINO PROBLEM TIAN MA AND SHOUHONG WANG Abstract. The current neutrino oscillation an alternative resolution to the solar neutrino loss problem. Contents 1. Introduction 1 2. Discrepancy of Solar, there are three flavors of neutrinos: the electron neutrino e, the tau neutrino and the mu neutrino µ. The solar

277

Status of the Milagro $\\gamma$ Ray Observatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory is the world's first large-area water Cherenkov detector capable of continuously monitoring the sky at TeV energies. Located in northern New Mexico, Milagro will perform an all sky survey of the Northern Hemisphere at energies between ~250 GeV and 50 TeV. With a high duty cycle, large detector area (~5000 square meters), and a wide field-of-view (~1 sr), Milagro is uniquely capable of searching for transient and DC sources of high-energy gamma-ray emission. Milagro has been operating since February, 1999. The current status of the Milagro Observatory and initial results will be discussed.

Atkins, R; Berley, D; Chen, M L; Coyne, D G; Delay, R S; Dingus, B L; Dorfan, D E; Ellsworth, R W; Evans, D; Falcone, A D; Fleysher, L; Fleysher, R; Gisler, G; Goodman, J A; Haines, T J; Hoffman, C M; Hugenberger, S; Kelley, L A; Leonor, I; Macri, J R; McConnell, M; McCullough, J F; McEnery, J E; Miller, R S; Mincer, A I; Morales, M F; Némethy, P; Ryan, J M; Schneider, M; Shen, B; Shoup, A L; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sullivan, G W; Thompson, T N; Tümer, T O; Wang, K; Wascko, M O; Westerhoff, S; Williams, D A; Yang, T; Yodh, G B

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Status of the Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Milagro Gamma Ray Observatory is the world's first large-area water Cherenkov detector capable of continuously monitoring the sky at TeV energies. Located in northern New Mexico, Milagro will perform an all sky survey of the Northern Hemisphere at energies between ~250 GeV and 50 TeV. With a high duty cycle, large detector area (~5000 square meters), and a wide field-of-view (~1 sr), Milagro is uniquely capable of searching for transient and DC sources of high-energy gamma-ray emission. Milagro has been operating since February, 1999. The current status of the Milagro Observatory and initial results will be discussed.

R. Atkins; W. Benbow; D. Berley; M. -L. Chen; D. G. Coyne; R. S. Delay; B. L. Dingus; D. E. Dorfan; R. W. Ellsworth; D. Evans; A. Falcone; L. Fleysher; R. Fleysher; G. Gisler; J. A. Goodman; T. J. Haines; C. M. Hoffman; S. Hugenberger; L. A. Kelley; I. Leonor; J. Macri; M. McConnell; J. F. McCullough; J. E. McEnery; R. S. Miller; A. I. Mincer; M. F. Morales; P. Nemethy; J. M. Ryan; M. Schneider; B. Shen; A. Shoup; G. Sinnis; A. J. Smith; G. W. Sullivan; T. N. Thompson; O. T. Tumer; K. Wang; M. O. Wascko; S. Westerhoff; D. A. Williams; T. Yang; G. B. Yodh

1999-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

279

Hybrid Performance of the Pierre Auger Observatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A key feature of the Pierre Auger Observatory is its hybrid design, in which ultra high energy cosmic rays are detected simultaneously by fluorescence telescopes and a ground array. The two techniques see air showers in complementary ways, providing important cross-checks and measurement redundancy. Much of the hybrid capability stems from the accurate geometrical reconstruction it achieves, with accuracy better than either the ground array detectors or a single telescope could achieve independently. We have studied the geometrical and longitudinal profile reconstructions of hybrid events. We present the results for the hybrid performance of the Observatory, including trigger efficiency, energy and angular resolution, and the efficiency of the event selection.

B. R. Dawson; for the Pierre Auger Collaboration

2007-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

280

Lepton textures and neutrino oscillations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Systematic analyses of the textures arising in lepton mass matrices have been carried out using unitary transformations and condition of naturalness for the Dirac and Majorana neutrino possibilities. It is observed that the recent three neutrino oscillation data together with the effective mass in neutrinoless double beta decay provide vital clues in predicting the general structures of these lepton mass matrices.

Verma, Rohit

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "icecube neutrino observatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Off-shell OPERA neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the OPERA experiment, superluminal propagation of neutrinos can occur if one of the neutrino masses is extremely small. However the effect only has appreciable amplitude at energies of order this mass and thus has negligible overlap with the multi-GeV scale of the experiment.

Tim R. Morris

2011-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

282

Cosmo MSW effect for mass varying neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider neutrinos with varying masses which arise in scenarios relating neutrino masses to the dark energy density in the universe. We point out that the neutrino mass variation can lead to level crossing and thus a cosmo MSW effect, having dramatic consequences for the flavor ratio of astrophysical neutrinos.

Pham Quang Hung; Heinrich Päs

2005-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

283

Solar Neutrinos and the Eclipse Effect  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The solar neutrino counting rate in a real time detector like Super--Kamiokanda, SNO, or Borexino is enhanced due to neutrino oscillations in the Moon during a partial or total solar eclipse. The enhancement is calculated as a function of the neutrino parameters in the case of three flavor mixing. This enhancement, if seen, can further help to determine the neutrino parameters.

Mohan Narayan; G. Rajasekaran; Rahul Sinha; C. P. Burgess

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Small entries of neutrino mass matrices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider phenomenologically allowed structures of the neutrino mass matrix in the case of three light neutrino species. Constraints from the solar, atmospheric and reactor neutrino experiments as well as those from the neutrinoless double beta decay are taken into account. Both hierarchical and quasi-degenerate neutrino mass cases are studied. Assuming maximal $\

E. Kh. Akhmedov

1999-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

285

Geo-neutrinos: recent developments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Radiogenic heating is a key component of the energy balance and thermal evolution of the Earth. It contributes to mantle convection, plate tectonics, volcanoes, and mountain building. Geo-neutrino observations estimate the present radiogenic power of our planet. This estimate depends on the quantity and distribution of heat-producing elements in various Earth reservoirs. Of particular geological importance is radiogenic heating in the mantle. This quantity informs the origin and thermal evolution of our planet. Here we present: currently reported geo-neutrino observations; estimates of the mantle geo-neutrino signal, mantle radiogenic heating, and mantle cooling; a comparison of chemical Earth model predictions of the mantle geo-neutrino signal and mantle radiogenic heating; a brief discussion of radiogenic heating in the core, including calculations of geo-neutrino signals per pW/kg; and finally a discussion of observational strategy.

Dye, Steve

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ UC OBSERVATORIES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ UC OBSERVATORIES POSTDOCTORAL SCHOLAR ­ EMPLOYEE The Inter Stellar+Galactic Medium Program of Studies (IMPS) at the University of California, Santa Cruz invites of funding. START DATE: October 2013 TO APPLY: Applicants should send curriculum vitae with list

California at Santa Cruz, University of

287

Solar Dynamics Observatory/ Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar Dynamics Observatory/ EVE Extreme Ultraviolet Variability Experiment Frequently Asked and model solar extreme ultraviolet irradiance variations due to solar flares, solar rotation, and solar and structure of the Sun. What is solar variability? Solar radiation varies on all time scales ranging from

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

288

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY CHARLOTTESVILLE) VA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY CHARLOTTESVILLE) VA ELECTRONICS DIVISION INTERNAL REPORT No ' : : lg Measurement Programs DETECTO R1 . · · · · .· · · . · · · · · · · NOISEL3.B. . 9· · . · · · · · · · · . . . Automated ' : : lg Measurement Programs DETECTO R1

Groppi, Christopher

289

Chandra X-ray Observatory Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chandra X-ray Observatory Center Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics 60 Garden St in hot gas about 250 million light years from Earth. (Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/SAO/E.Bulbul, et al-Newton has revealed a mysterious X-ray signal in the data. This signal is represented in the circled data

290

Chandra X-ray Observatory Center  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Chandra X-ray Observatory Center Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics 60 Garden St million light years from Earth. (Credit: X-ray: NASA/CXC/Wesleyan Univ./R.Kilgard, et al; Optical: NASA with optical data from the Hubble Space Telescope (red, green, and blue). The X-ray data reveal hundreds

291

ANTARES deep sea neutrino telescope results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The ANTARES experiment is currently the largest underwater neutrino telescope in the Northern Hemisphere. It is taking high quality data since 2007. Its main scientific goal is to search for high energy neutrinos that are expected from the acceleration of cosmic rays from astrophysical sources. This contribution reviews the status of the detector and presents several analyses carried out on atmospheric muons and neutrinos. For example it shows the results from the measurement of atmospheric muon neutrino spectrum and of atmospheric neutrino oscillation parameters as well as searches for neutrinos from steady cosmic point-like sources, for neutrinos from gamma ray bursts and for relativistic magnetic monopoles.

Mangano, Salvatore [IFIC - Instituto de Física Corpuscular, Edificio Institutos de Investigatión, 46071 Valencia (Spain); Collaboration: ANTARES Collaboration

2014-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

292

Measurement of the atmospheric neutrino energy spectrum from 100 GeV to 400 TeV with IceCube  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Standard Model Extension (SME) [7] is an e?ective-?eld-and CPT violating coe?cients in the SME, in the context of aX = 2 × 10 ?23 GeV. L The SME adds to the SM Lagrangian all

etal, Abbasi, R,

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

The endless mantra : innovation at the Keck Observatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A study of historical, current, and future developments at the Keck Observatory revealed a thriving philosophy of innovation. Intended to defy obsoletion and keep the observatory competitive over long time scales, this ...

Bobra, Monica Godha

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Neutrino Oscillations With Recently Measured Sterile-Active Neutrino Mixing Angle  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This brief report is an extension of a prediction of neutrino oscillation with a sterile neutrino using parameters of the sterile neutrino mass and mixing angle recently extracted from experiment.

Leonard S. Kisslinger

2014-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

295

Energy Dependence of Solar Neutrino Suppression and Bounds on the Neutrino Magnetic Moment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An analysis of neutrino electron scattering as applied to the SuperKamiokande solar neutrino experiment with the data from the Homestake experiment leads to an upper bound on the neutrino magnetic moment in the range $\\mu_{\

Joao Pulido; Ana M. Mourao

1998-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

296

Small scales structures and neutrino masses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We review the impact of massive neutrinos on cosmological observables at the linear order. By means of N-body simulations we investigate the signatures left by neutrinos on the fully non-linear regime. We present the effects induced by massive neutrinos on the matter power spectrum, the halo mass function and on the halo-matter bias in massive neutrino cosmologies. We also investigate the clustering of cosmic neutrinos within galaxy clusters.

Villaescusa-Navarro, Francisco

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Neutrino Nucleon Elastic Scattering  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the Contributions andDataNational Library of1, 2007Transmission toBeamN u F a c tNeutrino

298

Sterile Neutrino Oscillations  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBiSiteNeutron Scattering4American Physical SocietySterile Neutrino

299

MSW mediated neutrino decay and the solar neutrino problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the solar neutrino problem assuming simultaneous presence of MSW transitions in the sun and neutrino decay on the way from sun to earth. We do a global $\\chi^2$-analysis of the data on total rates in Cl, Ga and Superkamiokande (SK) experiments and the SK day-night spectrum data and determine the changes in the allowed region in the $\\dm - \\tan^2\\theta$ plane in presence of decay. We also discuss the implications for unstable neutrinos in the SNO experiment.

Abhijit Bandyopadhyay; Sandhya Choubey; Srubabati Goswami

2001-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

300

Updated Multichannel Infrared Solar Spectrograph at Purple Mountain Observatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Updated Multichannel Infrared Solar Spectrograph at Purple Mountain Observatory LI Hui( û), YOU Jianqi( � ), WU Qindi( ¸Ð) and YU Xingfeng(åÐ ) Purple Mountain Observatory, CAS, Nanjing 210008, China National Astronomical Observatories, CAS, Beijing 100012, China Email: lihui@mail.pmo.ac.cn Tel: 025

Li, Hui

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "icecube neutrino observatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Testing solar neutrino MSW oscillations at low delta m^2 through time variations of event rates in GNO and BOREXINO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) explanation of the solar neutrino problem is currently compatible with three distinct regions of the two-neutrino oscillation parameter space (delta m^2,sin^2 2theta). We focus on the region with the lowest value of delta m^2 (~10^{-7} eV^2), which implies significant Earth regeneration effects for low-energy solar neutrinos. We point out that such effects are not only observable as day-night variations of neutrino event rates in the real-time BOREXINO experiment, but also as seasonal variations in the radiochemical Gallium Neutrino Observatory (GNO) at Gran Sasso. We present detailed calculations of the difference between winter and summer rates in GNO (six months averages) in excess of the trivial seasonal variation due to the Earth orbital eccentricity. We show that, within the low-delta m^2 MSW solution, the net winter-summer GNO rate difference amounts to 4-6 SNU, with a dominant contribution from pp neutrinos. We also give analytical expressions for the winter and summer solar exposure functions at the Gran Sasso site.

G. L. Fogli; E. Lisi; D. Montanino; A. Palazzo

1999-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

302

Current Direct Neutrino Mass Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this contribution we review the status and perspectives of direct neutrino mass experiments. These experiments investigate the kinematics of $\\beta$-decays of specific isotopes ($^3$H, $^{187}$Re, $^{163}$Ho) to derive model-independent information on the averaged electron (anti-) neutrino mass, which is formed by the incoherent sum of the neutrino mass eigenstates contributing to the electron neutrino. We first review the kinematics of $\\beta$-decay and the determination of the neutrino mass, before giving a brief overview of past neutrino mass measurements (SN1987a-ToF studies, Mainz and Troitsk experiments for $^3$H, cryo-bolometers for $^{187}$Re). We then describe the Karlsruhe Tritium Neutrino (KATRIN) experiment which is currently under construction at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. The large-scale setup will use the MAC-E-Filter principle pioneered earlier to push the sensitivity down to a value of 200 meV(90% C.L.). KATRIN faces many technological challenges that have to be resolved with regar...

Drexlin, G; Mertens, S; Weinheimer, C

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Phenomenology Of Sterile Neutrinos At Different Mass Scales: Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay And Neutrino Oscillations.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??The existence of neutrino oscillation is the first evidence of physics beyond the Standard Model. It proves that neutrinos are massive and motivates the study… (more)

WONG, CHAN,FAI

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

LSND neutrino oscillation results  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The LSND (Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector) experiment at Los Alamos has conducted a search for muon antineutrino {r_arrow} electron antineutrino oscillations using muon neutrinos from antimuon decay at rest. The electron antineutrinos are detected via the reaction electron antineutrino + proton {r_arrow} positron + neutron, correlated with the 2.2-MeV gamma from neutron + proton {r_arrow} deuteron + gamma. The use of tight cuts to identify positron events with correlated gamma rays yields 22 events with positron energy between 36 and 60 MeV and only 4.6 {+-} 0.6 background events. The probability that this excess is due entirely to a statistical fluctuation is 4.1 {times} 10{sup -8}. A chi-squared fit to the entire positron sample results in a total excess of 51.8 {sup +18.7}{sub -16.9} {+-} 8.0 events with positron energy between 20 and 60 MeV. If attributed to muon antineutrino {r_arrow} electron antineutrino oscillations, this corresponds to an oscillation probability (averaged over the experimental energy and spatial acceptance) of (0.31 {+-} 0.12 {+-} 0.05){percent}. 10 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

Louis, W.C.; LSND Collaboration

1996-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

The IceCube Data Acquisition Software: Lessons Learned during Distributed, Collaborative, Multi-Disciplined Software Development.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this experiential paper we report on lessons learned during the development ofthe data acquisition software for the IceCube project - specifically, how to effectively address the unique challenges presented by a distributed, collaborative, multi-institutional, multi-disciplined project such as this. While development progress in software projects is often described solely in terms of technical issues, our experience indicates that non- and quasi-technical interactions play a substantial role in the effectiveness of large software development efforts. These include: selection and management of multiple software development methodologies, the effective useof various collaborative communication tools, project management structure and roles, and the impact and apparent importance of these elements when viewed through the differing perspectives of hardware, software, scientific and project office roles. Even in areas clearly technical in nature, success is still influenced by non-technical issues that can escape close attention. In particular we describe our experiences on software requirements specification, development methodologies and communication tools. We make observations on what tools and techniques have and have not been effective in this geographically disperse (including the South Pole) collaboration and offer suggestions on how similarly structured future projects may build upon our experiences.

Beattie, Keith S; Beattie, Keith; Day Ph.D., Christopher; Glowacki, Dave; Hanson Ph.D., Kael; Jacobsen Ph.D., John; McParland, Charles; Patton Ph.D., Simon

2007-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

306

Neutrino Physics with Thermal Detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The investigation of fundamental neutrino properties like its mass and its nature calls for the design of a new generation of experiments. High sensitivity, high energy resolution, and versatility together with the possibility of a simple multiplexing scheme are the key features of future detectors for these experiments. Thermal detectors can combine all these features. This paper reviews the status and the perspectives for what concerns the application of this type of detectors to neutrino physics, focusing on direct neutrino mass measurements and neutrinoless double beta decay searches.

Nucciotti, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita di Milano Bicocca and INFN Sezione di Milano-Bicocca Piazza della Scienza, 3, 20126 Milano (Italy)

2009-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

307

Discriminating MSW solutions to the solar neutrino problem with flux-independent information at SuperKamiokande and SNO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The two possible Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein (MSW) solutions of the solar neutrino problem (one at small and the other at large mixing angle), up to now tested mainly through absolute neutrino flux measurements, require flux-independent tests both for a decisive confirmation and for their discrimination. To this end, we perform a joint analysis of various flux-independent observables that can be measured at the SuperKamiokande and Sudbury Neutrino Observatory (SNO) experiments. In particular, we analyze the recent data collected at SuperKamiokande after 374 days of operation, work out the corresponding predictions for SNO, and study the interplay between SuperKamiokande and SNO observables. It is shown how, by using only flux-independent observables from SuperKamiokande and SNO, one can discriminate between the two MSW solutions and separate them from the no oscillation case.

G. L. Fogli; E. Lisi; D. Montanino

1998-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

308

Neutrino masses, leptogenesis, and sterile neutrino dark matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze a scenario in which the lightest heavy neutrino $N_1$ is a dark matter candidate and the second- heaviest neutrino $N_2$ decays producing a lepton number. If $N_1$ were in thermal equilibrium, its energy density today would be much larger than that of the observed dark matter, so we consider energy injection by the decay of $N_2$. In this paper, we show the parameters of this scenario that give the correct abundances of dark matter and baryonic matter and also induce the observed neutrino masses. This model can explain a possible sterile neutrino dark matter signal of $M_1$=7 keV in the x-ray observation of x-ray multi-mirror mission.

Takanao Tsuyuki

2014-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

309

An array of low-background 3He proportional counters for the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

tonnes of ultrapure heavy water (D 2 O) contained in aninteractions within SNO’s heavy water. It is essential thatabsorbing gas in the heavy water. It was decided to ?ll the

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Robust Signal Extraction Methods and Monte Carlo Sensitivity Studies for the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

+. An important part of the SNO+ physics program will be a search for neutrinoless double beta decay, carried out a reasonable choice for the 150 Nd neutrinoless double beta decay matrix element, these half lives correspond are competitive with those expected from all other near-term neutrinoless double beta decay experiments. ii #12

Waltham, Chris

311

The next-generation liquid-scintillator neutrino observatory LENA Michael Wurm a,b,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

ae , Walter Potzel a , Tomi Räihä k , Georg G. Raffelt af , Gioacchino Ranucci g , Soebur Razzaque ag of Fundamental Research, Mumbai, India j Hawaii Pacific University, Kaneohe, HI, USA k Oulu Southern Institute of Bucharest, Romania s Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, HI, USA

Mcdonough, William F.

312

An array of low-background 3He proportional counters for the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

constructed by Deep Ocean Engineering, Inc. 9 to operate in1 cm diameter Deep Ocean Engineering, San Leandro, CA, URL:

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Estimating concentrations of heat producing elements in the crust near the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory, Ontario, Canada  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the concentrations of uranium and thorium in the crust must be determined precisely for the future geoneutrino with measure- ments on outcrop and core samples, and with heat flow data. The concentrations of uranium, thorium, and po- tassium from radiometric surveys are correlated with geology, but heat production

314

Neutrino oscillation studies and the neutrino cross section  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The present uncertainties in the knowledge of the neutrino cross sections for E_nu \\sim 1 GeV, that is in the energy range most important for atmospheric and long baseline accelerator neutrinos, are large. These uncertainties do not play a significant role in the interpretation of existing data, however they could become a limiting factor in future studies that aim at a complete and accurate determination of the neutrino oscillation parameters. New data and theoretical understanding on nuclear effects and on the electromagnetic structure functions at low Q^2 and in the resonance production region are available, and can be valuable in reducing the present systematic uncertainties. The collaboration of physicists working in different subfields will be important to obtain the most from this available information. It is now also possible, with the facilities developed for long baseline beams, to produce high intensity and well controlled neutrino beams to measure the neutrino interaction properties with much better precision that what was done in the past. Several projects and ideas to fully exploit these possibilities are under active investigation. These topics have been the object of the first neutrino interaction (NUINT01) workshop.

Paolo Lipari

2002-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

315

Neutrino capital of the world  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutrinos are ubiquitous particles, but they don't like to mingle. Each second, billions of them pass through our bodies, slicing imperceptibly through our delicate internal organs. They can barrel through the sun, stars, ...

Johnson, Carolyn Y., 1980-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Neutrino Factories and Beta Beams  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

a Neutrino Factory Based on Muon Beams,” Proc. 2001 ParticleMD. [19] C. Rubbia et al. , “Beam Cooling with Ionisationthe required unstable ion beams has recently been suggested

Zisman, Michael S.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Research in Neutrino Physics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Research in Neutrino Physics We describe here the recent activities of our two groups over the first year of this award (effectively November 2010 through January 2012) and our proposed activities and associated budgets for the coming grant year. Both of our groups are collaborating on the Double Chooz reactor neutrino experiment and are playing major roles in calibration and analysis. A major milestone was reached recently: the collaboration obtained the first result on the search for 13 based on 100 days of data from the far detector. Our data indicates that 13 is not zero; specifically the best fit of the neutrino oscillation hypothesis to our data gives sin2 (2 13) = 0.086 ± 0.041 (stat) ± 0.030 (syst) The null oscillation hypothesis is excluded at the 94.6% C.L. This result1 has been submitted to Physical Review Letters. As we continue to take data with the far detector in the coming year, in parallel with completing the construction of the near lab and installing the near detector, we expect the precision of our measurement to improve as we gather significantly more statistics, gain better control of backgrounds through use of partial power data and improved event selection, and better understand the detector energy scale and detection efficiency from calibration data. With both detectors taking data starting in the second half of 2013, we expect to further drive down the uncertainty on our measurement of sin2 (2 13) to less than 0.02. Stancu’s group is also collaborating on the MiniBooNE experiment. Data taking is scheduled to continue through April, by which time 1.18 × 1021 POT is projected. The UA group is playing a leading role in the measurement of antineutrino cross sections, which should be the subject of a publication later this year as well as of Ranjan Dharmapalan’s Ph.D. thesis, which he is expected to defend by the end of this year. It is time to begin working on projects which will eventually succeed Double Chooz and MiniBooNE as the main foci of our efforts. The Stancu group plans to become re–involved in LBNE and possibly also to join NO A, and the Busenitz group has begun to explore joining a direct dark matter search.

Busenitz, Jerome [The University of Alabama

2014-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

318

Standard and non-standard primordial neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The standard cosmological model predicts the existence of a cosmic neutrino background with a present density of about 110 cm^{-3} per flavour, which affects big-bang nucleosynthesis, cosmic microwave background anisotropies, and the evolution of large scale structures. We report on a precision calculation of the cosmic neutrino background properties including the modification introduced by neutrino oscillations. The role of a possible neutrino-antineutrino asymmetry and the impact of non-standard neutrino-electron interactions on the relic neutrinos are also briefly discussed.

P. D. Serpico

2006-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

319

High Energy Neutrino Telescopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This paper presents a review of the history, motivation and current status of high energy neutrino telescopes. Many years after these detectors were first conceived, the operation of kilometer-cubed scale detectors is finally on the horizon at both the South Pole and in the Mediterranean Sea. These new detectors will perhaps provide us the first view of high energy astrophysical objects with a new messenger particle and provide us with our first real glimpse of the distant universe at energies above those accessible by gamma-ray instruments. Some of the topics that can be addressed by these new instruments include the origin of cosmic rays, the nature of dark matter, and the mechanisms at work in high energy astrophysical objects such as gamma-ray bursts, active galactic nuclei, pulsar wind nebula and supernova remnants.

K. D. Hoffman

2008-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

320

Neutrino factories: realization and physics potential  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutrino Factories offer an exciting option for the long-term neutrino physics program. This new type of neutrino facility will provide beams with unique properties. Low systematic uncertainties at a Neutrino Factory, together with a unique and precisely known neutrino flavor content, will enable neutrino oscillation measurements to be made with unprecedented sensitivity and precision. Over recent years, the resulting neutrino factory physics potential has been discussed extensively in the literature. In addition, over the last six years the R&D necessary to realize a Neutrino Factory has been progressing, and has developed into a significant international activity. It is expected that, within about five more years, the initial phase of this R&D program will be complete and, if the community chooses to build this new type of neutrino source within the following decade, neutrino factory technology will be ready for the final R&D phase prior to construction. In this paper (1) an overview is given of the technical ingredients needed for a Neutrino Factory, (2) beam properties are described, (3) the resulting neutrino oscillation physics potential is summarized, (4) a more detailed description is given for one representative Neutrino Factory design, and (5) the ongoing R&D program is summarized, and future plans briefly described.

Geer, S.; /Fermilab; Zisman, M.S.; /LBL, Berkeley

2006-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "icecube neutrino observatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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321

The LBNO long-baseline oscillation sensitivities with two conventional neutrino beams at different baselines  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The proposed Long Baseline Neutrino Observatory (LBNO) initially consists of $\\sim 20$ kton liquid double phase TPC complemented by a magnetised iron calorimeter, to be installed at the Pyh\\"asalmi mine, at a distance of 2300 km from CERN. The conventional neutrino beam is produced by 400 GeV protons accelerated at the SPS accelerator delivering 700 kW of power. The long baseline provides a unique opportunity to study neutrino flavour oscillations over their 1st and 2nd oscillation maxima exploring the $L/E$ behaviour, and distinguishing effects arising from $\\delta_{CP}$ and matter. In this paper we show how this comprehensive physics case can be further enhanced and complemented if a neutrino beam produced at the Protvino IHEP accelerator complex, at a distance of 1160 km, and with modest power of 450 kW is aimed towards the same far detectors. We show that the coupling of two independent sub-MW conventional neutrino and antineutrino beams at different baselines from CERN and Protvino will allow to measure CP violation in the leptonic sector at a confidence level of at least $3\\sigma$ for 50\\% of the true values of $\\delta_{CP}$ with a 20 kton detector. With a far detector of 70 kton, the combination allows a $3\\sigma$ sensitivity for 75\\% of the true values of $\\delta_{CP}$ after 10 years of running. Running two independent neutrino beams, each at a power below 1 MW, is more within today's state of the art than the long-term operation of a new single high-energy multi-MW facility, which has several technical challenges and will likely require a learning curve.

LAGUNA-LBNO Collaboration; :; S. K. Agarwalla; L. Agostino; M. Aittola; A. Alekou; B. Andrieu; F. Antoniou; R. Asfandiyarov; D. Autiero; O. Bésida; A. Balik; P. Ballett; I. Bandac; D. Banerjee; W. Bartmann; F. Bay; B. Biskup; A. M. Blebea-Apostu; A. Blondel; M. Bogomilov; S. Bolognesi; E. Borriello; I. Brancus; A. Bravar; M. Buizza-Avanzini; D. Caiulo; M. Calin; M. Calviani; M. Campanelli; C. Cantini; G. Cata-Danil; S. Chakraborty; N. Charitonidis; L. Chaussard; D. Chesneanu; F. Chipesiu; P. Crivelli; J. Dawson; I. De Bonis; Y. Declais; P. Del Amo Sanchez; A. Delbart; S. Di Luise; D. Duchesneau; J. Dumarchez; I. Efthymiopoulos; A. Eliseev; S. Emery; T. Enqvist; K. Enqvist; L. Epprecht; A. N. Erykalov; T. Esanu; D. Franco; M. Friend; V. Galymov; G. Gavrilov; A. Gendotti; C. Giganti; S. Gilardoni; B. Goddard; C. M. Gomoiu; Y. A. Gornushkin; P. Gorodetzky; A. Haesler; T. Hasegawa; S. Horikawa; K. Huitu; A. Izmaylov; A. Jipa; K. Kainulainen; Y. Karadzhov; M. Khabibullin; A. Khotjantsev; A. N. Kopylov; A. Korzenev; S. Kosyanenko; D. Kryn; Y. Kudenko; P. Kuusiniemi; I. Lazanu; C. Lazaridis; J. -M. Levy; K. Loo; J. Maalampi; R. M. Margineanu; J. Marteau; C. Martin-Mari; V. Matveev; E. Mazzucato; A. Mefodiev; O. Mineev; A. Mirizzi; B. Mitrica; S. Murphy; T. Nakadaira; S. Narita; D. A. Nesterenko; K. Nguyen; K. Nikolics; E. Noah; Yu. Novikov; A. Oprima; J. Osborne; T. Ovsyannikova; Y. Papaphilippou; S. Pascoli; T. Patzak; M. Pectu; E. Pennacchio; L. Periale; H. Pessard; B. Popov; M. Ravonel; M. Rayner; F. Resnati; O. Ristea; A. Robert; A. Rubbia; K. Rummukainen; A. Saftoiu; K. Sakashita; F. Sanchez-Galan; J. Sarkamo; N. Saviano; E. Scantamburlo; F. Sergiampietri; D. Sgalaberna; E. Shaposhnikova; M. Slupecki; D. Smargianaki; D. Stanca; R. Steerenberg; A. R. Sterian; P. Sterian; S. Stoica; C. Strabel; J. Suhonen; V. Suvorov; G. Toma; A. Tonazzo; W. H. Trzaska; R. Tsenov; K. Tuominen; M. Valram; G. Vankova-Kirilova; F. Vannucci; G. Vasseur; F. Velotti; P. Velten; V. Venturi; T. Viant; S. Vihonen; H. Vincke; A. Vorobyev; A. Weber; S. Wu; N. Yershov; L. Zambelli; M. Zito

2014-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

322

The sensitivity of the next generation of lunar Cherenkov observations to UHE neutrinos and cosmic rays  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present simulation results for the detection of ultra-high energy (UHE) cosmic ray (CR) and neutrino interactions in the Moon by radio-telescopes. We simulate the expected radio signal at Earth from such interactions, expanding on previous work to include interactions in the sub-regolith layer for single dish and multiple telescope systems. For previous experiments at Parkes, Goldstone, and Kalyazin we recalculate the sensitivity to an isotropic flux of UHE neutrinos. Our predicted sensitivity for future experiments using the Australia Telescope Compact Array (ATCA) and the Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) indicate these instruments will be able to detect the more optimistic UHE neutrino flux predictions, while the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will also be sensitive to all bar one prediction of a diffuse `cosmogenic', or `GZK', neutrino flux. Current uncertainties concerning the structure and roughness of the lunar surface prevents an accurate calculation of the sensitivity of the lunar Cherenkov technique for UHE cosmic ray astronomy at high frequencies. However, below 200 MHz we find that the proposed SKA low-frequency aperture array should be able to detect events above 56 EeV at a rate about 30 times that of the current Pierre Auger Observatory. This would allow directional analysis of UHE cosmic rays, and investigation of correlations with putative cosmic ray source populations, to be conducted with very high statistics.

C. W. James; R. J. Protheroe

2008-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

323

Los Alamos Science, Number 25 -- 1997: Celebrating the neutrino  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This issue is devoted to the neutrino and its remaining mysteries. It is divided into the following areas: (1) The Reines-Cowan experiment -- detecting the poltergeist; (2) The oscillating neutrino -- an introduction to neutrino masses and mixing; (3) A brief history of neutrino experiments at LAMPF; (4) A thousand eyes -- the story of LSND (Los Alamos neutrino oscillation experiment); (5) The evidence for oscillations; (6) The nature of neutrinos in muon decay and physics beyond the Standard Model; (7) Exorcising ghosts -- in pursuit of the missing solar neutrinos; (8) MSW -- a possible solution to the solar neutrino problem; (8) Neutrinos and supernovae; and (9) Dark matter and massive neutrinos.

Cooper, N.G. [ed.] [ed.

1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

324

Solar Neutrinos: Models, Observations, and New Opportunities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I discuss the development and resolution of the solar neutrino problem, as well as opportunities now open to us to extend our knowledge of main-sequence stellar evolution and neutrino astrophysics.

W. C. Haxton

2007-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

325

Neutrino mixing, flavor states and dark energy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We shortly summarize the quantum field theory formalism for the neutrino mixing and report on recent results showing that the vacuum condensate induced by neutrino mixing can be interpreted as a dark energy component of the Universe.

M. Blasone; A. Capolupo; S. Capozziello; G. Vitiello

2007-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

326

How Uncertain Are Solar Neutrino Predictions?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar neutrino fluxes and sound speeds are calculated using a systematic reevaluation of nuclear fusion rates. The largest uncertainties are identified and their effects on the solar neutrino fluxes are estimated.

John N. Bahcall; Sarbani Basu; M. H. Pinsonneault

1998-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

327

Earth Matter Effect on Democratic Neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The neutrino propagation through the Earth is investigated in the framework of the democratic neutrino theory. In this theory the neutrino mixing angle theta-1-3 is approximately determined, which allows one to make a well defined neutrino oscillogram driven by the 1-3 mixing in the matter of the Earth. Significant differences in this oscillogram from the case of models with relatively small theta-1-3 are discussed.

Dmitry Zhuridov

2014-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

328

European Strategy for Future Neutrino Physics  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

A workshop to discuss the possibilities for future neutrino investigations in Europe and the links to CERN.

None

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

329

Dark energy induced by neutrino mixing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The energy content of the vacuum condensate induced by the neutrino mixing is interpreted as dynamically evolving dark energy.

Antonio Capolupo; Salvatore Capozziello; Giuseppe Vitiello

2006-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

330

Neutrino mass limit from tritium beta decay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The paper reviews recent experiments on tritium beta spectroscopy searching for the absolute value of the electron neutrino mass $m(\

E. W. Otten; C. Weinheimer

2009-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

331

Do the Kamiokande results need neutrino oscillations?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutrino oscillations are a delicate and important subject. One needs to be sure that every aspect of it is well understood. The recent results of the Kamiokande experiment [1], indicate the possibility of -- neutrino oscillations. The period of oscillation observed by Kamiokande is not compatible with what one may deduce from the solar neutrino experiments [2]. In this letter, we examine if another mechanism could fake neutrino oscillations and could be measurement dependent

Baillon, Paul

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

Neutrino magnetic moment in a magnetized plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The contribution of a magnetized plasma to the neutrino magnetic moment is calculated. It is shown that only part of the additional neutrino energy in magnetized plasma connecting with its spin and magnetic field strength defines the neutrino magnetic moment. It is found that the presence of magnetized plasma does not lead to the considerable increase of the neutrino magnetic moment in contrast to the results presented in literature previously.

N. V. Mikheev; E. N. Narynskaya

2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

333

atmospheric observatory uao: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

of a 1 kiloton heavy water Cherenkov detector able to detect and reconstruct high-energy muons created from cosmic ray showers and atmospheric neutrino interactions. By...

334

The Virtual Observatory and Grid in Spain  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Virtual Observatory (VO) is nearing maturity, and in Spain the Spanish VO (SVO) exists since June 2004. There have also been numerous attempts at providing more or less encompassing grid initiatives at the national level, and finally Spain has an official National Grid Initiative (NGI). In this article we will show the VO and Grid development status of nationally funded initiatives in Spain, and we will hint at potential joint VO-Grid use-cases to be developed in Spain in the near future.

J. D. Santander-Vela

2008-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

335

Phase Space Constraints on Neutrino Luminosities  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

While the importance of phase space constraints for gravitational clustering of neutrinos (which are fermions) is well recognized, the explicit use of such constraints to limit neutrino emission from ultra energetic sources has not been stressed. Special and general relativistic phase space constraints are shown to limit neutrino luminosities in compact sources in various situations.

C. Sivaram; Kenath Arun; Samartha C A

2007-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

336

Lectures on Neutrino Astronomy: Theory and Experiment  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1. Overview of neutrino astronomy: multidisciplinary science. 2. Cosmic accelerators: the highest energy cosmic rays. 3. Neutrino beam dumps: supermassive black holes and gamma ray bursts. 4. Neutrino telescopes: water and ice. 5. Indirect dark matter detection. 6. Towards kilometer-scale detectors.

F. Halzen

1998-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

337

Improved Theory of Neutrino Oscillations in Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This is revision of the S-Matrix theory of neutrino oscillations used for many years. We evaluate the transition probability of a $\\mu$ to $e$ neutrino without an approximation used for many theoretical studies, and find important differences which could improve the extraction of neutrino parameters from experimental data in the future.

Leonard S. Kisslinger

2014-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

338

Muon neutrino disappearance at MINOS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A strong case has been made by several experiments that neutrinos oscillate, although important questions remain as to the mechanisms and precise values of the parameters. In the standard picture, two parameters describe the nature of how the neutrinos oscillate: the mass-squared difference between states and the mixing angle. The purpose of this thesis is to use data from the MINOS experiment to precisely measure the parameters associated with oscillations first observed in studies of atmospheric neutrinos. MINOS utilizes two similar detectors to observe the oscillatory nature of neutrinos. The Near Detector, located 1 km from the source, observes the unoscillated energy spectrum while the Far Detector, located 735 km away, is positioned to see the oscillation signal. Using the data in the Near Detector, a prediction of the expected neutrino spectrum at the Far Detector assuming no oscillations is made. By comparing this prediction with the MINOS data, the atmospheric mixing parameters are measured to be {Delta}m{sub 32}{sup 2} = 2.45{sub +0.12}{sup -0.12} x 10{sub -3} eV{sup 2} and sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 32}) = 1.00{sub -0.04}{sup +0.00} (> 0.90 at 90% confidence level).

Armstrong, R.; /Indiana U.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

auger observatory status: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pierre Auger Observatory is presently under construction in Malargue, Mendoza, Argentina. It combines two complementary air shower observation techniques; the detection of...

340

auger observatory closes: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pierre Auger Observatory (PAO), currently under construction in Province of Mendoza, Argentina, and with another site planned in the Northern hemisphere, is a major international...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "icecube neutrino observatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

auger observatory celebrates: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pierre Auger Observatory (PAO), currently under construction in Province of Mendoza, Argentina, and with another site planned in the Northern hemisphere, is a major international...

342

auger observatory estudo: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pierre Auger Observatory (PAO), currently under construction in Province of Mendoza, Argentina, and with another site planned in the Northern hemisphere, is a major international...

343

auger observatory progress: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

part of the Auger Observatory, now under construction in the Province of Mendoza, Argentina, is well over half finished. Active detectors have been recording events for one and...

344

auger observatory project: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Pierre Auger Observatory (PAO), currently under construction in Province of Mendoza, Argentina, and with another site planned in the Northern hemisphere, is a major international...

345

Stimulated Neutrino Transformation Through Turbulence  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We derive an analytical solution for the flavor evolution of a neutrino through a turbulent density profile which is found to accurately predict the amplitude and transition wavelength of numerical solutions on a case-by-case basis. The evolution is seen to strongly depend upon those Fourier modes in the turbulence which are approximately the same as the splitting between neutrino eigenvalues. Transitions are strongly enhanced by those Fourier modes in the turbulence which are approximately the same as the splitting between neutrino eigenvalues. We also find a suppression of transitions due to the long wavelength modes when the ratio of their amplitude and the wavenumber is of order, or greater than, the first root of the Bessel function $J_0$.

Kelly M. Patton; James P. Kneller; Gail C. McLaughlin

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

346

Neutrino Physics at DPF 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The field of neutrino physics was covered at DPF 2013 in 32 talks, including three on theoretical advances and the remainder on experiments that spanned at least 17 different detectors. This summary of those talks cannot do justice to the wealth of information presented, but will provide links to other material where possible. There were allso two plenary session contributions on neutrino physics at this meeting: the current status of what we know about neutrino (oscillation) physics was outlined by Huber, and the next steps in long baseline oscillation expeirments were described by Fleming. This article covers a subset of the topics discussed at the meeting, with emphasis given to those talks that showed data or new results.

Deborah A. Harris

2013-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

347

On solar neutrino fluxes in radiochemical experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze fluctuations of the solar neutrino flux using data from the Homestake, GALLEX, GNO, SAGE and Super Kamiokande experiments. Spectral analysis and direct quantitative estimations show that the most stable variation of the solar neutrino flux is a quasi-five-year periodicity. The revised values of the mean solar neutrino flux are presented in Table 4. They were used to estimate the observed pp-flux of the solar electron neutrinos near the Earth. We consider two alternative explanations for the origin of a variable component of the solar neutrino deficit.

R. N. Ikhsanov; Yu. N. Gnedin; E. V. Miletsky

2005-12-08T23:59:59.000Z

348

Feasibility of acoustic neutrino detection in ice: Design and performance of the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) has been built to evaluate the acoustic characteristics of the South Pole ice in the 10 to 100 kHz frequency range so that the feasibility and specific design of an acoustic neutrino detection array at South Pole can be evaluated. SPATS consists of three vertical strings that were deployed in the upper 400 meters of the South Pole ice cap in January 2007, using the upper part of IceCube holes. The strings form a triangular array with the longest baseline 421 meters. Each of them has 7 stages with one transmitter and one sensor module. Both are equipped with piezoelectric ceramic elements in order to produce or detect sound. Analog signals are brought to the surface on electric cables where they are digitized by a PC-based data acquisition system. The data from all three strings are collected on a master-PC in a central facility, from which they are sent to the northern hemisphere via a satellite link or locally stored on tape. A technical overview of the SPATS detect...

Boeser, S; Descamps, F; Fischer, J; Hallgren, A; Heller, R; Hundertmark, S; Krieger, K; Nahnhauer, R; Pohl, M; Price, P B; Sulanke, K -H; Tosi, D; Vandenbroucke, J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Feasibility of acoustic neutrino detection in ice: Design and performance of the South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) has been built to evaluate the acoustic characteristics of the South Pole ice in the 10 to 100 kHz frequency range so that the feasibility and specific design of an acoustic neutrino detection array at South Pole can be evaluated. SPATS consists of three vertical strings that were deployed in the upper 400 meters of the South Pole ice cap in January 2007, using the upper part of IceCube holes. The strings form a triangular array with the longest baseline 421 meters. Each of them has 7 stages with one transmitter and one sensor module. Both are equipped with piezoelectric ceramic elements in order to produce or detect sound. Analog signals are brought to the surface on electric cables where they are digitized by a PC-based data acquisition system. The data from all three strings are collected on a master-PC in a central facility, from which they are sent to the northern hemisphere via a satellite link or locally stored on tape. A technical overview of the SPATS detector and its performance is presented.

S. Boeser; C. Bohm; F. Descamps; J. Fischer; A. Hallgren; R. Heller; S. Hundertmark; K. Krieger; R. Nahnhauer; M. Pohl; P. B. Price; K. -H. Sulanke; D. Tosi; J. Vandenbroucke

2008-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

350

NEUTRINO OSCILLATION RESULTS FROM LSND  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector took data during the years 1993 through 1998. The results of a final analysis of the data are reported here. In summary, the analysis resulted in a cleaner sample of decay-at-rest oscillation candidates and provided a strong constraint on beam related backgrounds. The oscillation probability is fitted to the correlated photon parameter in the inclusive electron sample. The fit yields an excess of 83.3 {+-} 21.2 events attributable to neutrino oscillations. This corresponds to an oscillation probability of (0.25 {+-} 0.06 {+-} 0.04)% for that detector and beam configuration.

Mills, G.B.

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Solar neutrinos and the sun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present updated standard solar models (SSMs) that incorporate the latest results for nuclear fusion rates, recently published. We show helioseismic results for high and low metallicity compositions and also for an alternative set of solar abundance, derived from 3D model atmospheres, which give intermediate results. For the high and low metallicity models, we show that current solar neutrino data can not differentiate between models and that a measurement of the CNO fluxes is necessary to achieve that goal. A few additional implications of a hypothetical measurement of CNO neutrinos, both in terms of solar and stellar physics, are discussed.

Aldo Serenelli

2011-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

352

Probing Neutrino Hierarchy and Chirality via Wakes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The relic neutrinos are expected to acquire a bulk relative velocity with respect to the dark matter at low redshifts, and downstream of dark matter halos neutrino wakes are expected to develop. We propose a method of measuring the neutrino mass based on this mechanism. The neutrino wake will cause a dipole distortion of the galaxy-galaxy lensing pattern. This effect could be detected by combining upcoming lensing surveys, e.g. the LSST and Euclid surveys with a low redshift galaxy survey or a 21cm intensity mapping survey which can map the neutrino flow field. The data obtained with LSST and Euclid should enable us to make positive detection if the three neutrino masses are Quasi-Degenerate, and a future high precision 21cm lensing survey would allow the normal hierarchy and inverted hierarchy cases to be distinguished, and even the right handed Dirac neutrinos may be detectable.

Hong-Ming Zhu; Ue-Li Pen; Xuelei Chen; Derek Inman

2014-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

353

Progress in the physics of massive neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The current status of the physics of massive neutrinos is reviewed with a forward-looking emphasis. The article begins with the general phenomenology of neutrino oscillations in vacuum and matter and documents the experimental evidence for oscillations of solar, reactor, atmospheric and accelerator neutrinos. Both active and sterile oscillation possibilities are considered. The impact of cosmology (BBN, CMB, leptogenesis) and astrophysics (supernovae, highest energy cosmic rays) on neutrino observables and vice versa, is evaluated. The predictions of grand unified, radiative and other models of neutrino mass are discussed. Ways of determining the unknown parameters of three-neutrino oscillations are assessed, taking into account eight-fold degeneracies in parameters that yield the same oscillation probabilities, as well as ways to determine the absolute neutrino mass scale (from beta-decay, neutrinoless double-beta decay, large scale structure and Z-bursts). Critical unknowns at present are the amplitude of \

V. Barger; D. Marfatia; K. Whisnant

2003-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

354

Neutrino Majorana Mass from Black Hole  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a new mechanism to generate the neutrino Majorana mass in TeV-scale gravity models. The black hole violates all non-gauged symmetries and can become the origin of lepton number violating processes. The fluctuation of higher-dimensional spacetime can result in the production of a black hole, which emits 2 neutrinos. If neutrinos are Majorana particles, this process is equivalent to the free propagation of a neutrino with the insertion of the black hole. From this fact, we derive the neutrino Majorana mass. The result is completely consistent with the recently observed evidence of neutrinoless double beta decay. And the obtained neutrino Majorana mass satisfies the constraint from the density of the neutrino dark matter, which affects the cosmic structure formation. Furthermore, we can explain the ultrahigh energy cosmic rays by the Z-burst scenario with it.

Yosuke Uehara

2002-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

355

Ocean Observatories Initiative: Pacific Northwest The Endurance Array  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ocean Observatories Initiative: Pacific Northwest The Endurance Array The processes that shape. The Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI) will build a 25­30 year laboratory on the seafloor, in the water column, and at the ocean surface. It will make available novel platforms for oceanographic discovery

Kurapov, Alexander

356

National Radio Astronomy Observatory Electronics Division Technical Note No. 219  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 National Radio Astronomy Observatory Electronics Division Technical Note No. 219 Measurements of Automotive Radar Emissions received by a Radio Astronomy Observatory Darrel Emerson (National Radio Astronomy (Continental Corporation, A.D.C. Automotive Distance Control Systems GmbH, Germany), Juergen

Groppi, Christopher

357

THE CAMPUS OBSERVATORY at the University of Saskatchewan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE CAMPUS OBSERVATORY at the University of Saskatchewan ABOUT: The campus observatory provides facilities at the University of Saskatchewan are available for use by both uni- versity students and visitors-deductible contribution payable to the University of Saskatchewan. Adoption rates de- pend upon the star's apparent

Peak, Derek

358

Updated Multichannel Infrared Solar Spectrograph at Purple Mountain Observatory #  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in solar flare [12] , which is # Supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (NSFC, NoUpdated Multichannel Infrared Solar Spectrograph at Purple Mountain Observatory # LI Hui(©¿), YOU Jianqi(Æ?OÅ ), WU Qindi(Ã?,l) and YU Xingfeng(â?¢lb) Purple Mountain Observatory, CAS, Nanjing 210008, China

Li, Hui

359

Towards a Taxonomy for Web Observatories Web Science Institute  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Towards a Taxonomy for Web Observatories Ian Brown Web Science Institute University of Southampton University of Southampton Southampton, SO17 1BJ, UK +44 (0)23 8059 5000 wh@soton.ac.uk Lisa Harris Web.j.harris@soton.ac.uk ABSTRACT In this paper, we propose an initial structure to support a taxonomy for Web Observatories (WO

360

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA ELECTRONICS DIVISION INTERNAL REPORT and Ionospheric Center, Arecibo, Puerto Rico by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory at Green Bank, West Virginia. The general design concept was taken from previous receivers assembled at NRAO. S. Weinreb and N

Groppi, Christopher

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "icecube neutrino observatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green, Bank, West Virginia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green, Bank, West Virginia Electronics Division Internal Rep preformed by the Standard Receiver Section of the National Radio Astronomy Observatory at Green Bank, West Virginia. The following breakdown was used to divide the costs into various categories: (1) Emckajs.c1 . 1

Groppi, Christopher

362

EChO - Exoplanet Characterisation Observatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A dedicated mission to investigate exoplanetary atmospheres represents a major milestone in our quest to understand our place in the universe by placing our Solar System in context and by addressing the suitability of planets for the presence of life. EChO -the Exoplanet Characterisation Observatory- is a mission concept specifically geared for this purpose. EChO will provide simultaneous, multi-wavelength spectroscopic observations on a stable platform that will allow very long exposures. EChO will build on observations by Hubble, Spitzer and groundbased telescopes, which discovered the first molecules and atoms in exoplanetary atmospheres. EChO will simultaneously observe a broad enough spectral region -from the visible to the mid-IR- to constrain from one single spectrum the temperature structure of the atmosphere and the abundances of the major molecular species. The spectral range and resolution are tailored to separate bands belonging to up to 30 molecules to retrieve the composition and temperature str...

Tinetti, G; Henning, T; Meyer, M; Micela, G; Ribas, I; Stam, D; Swain, M; Krause, O; Ollivier, M; Pace, E; Swinyard, B; Aylward, A; van Boekel, R; Coradini, A; Encrenaz, T; Snellen, I; Zapatero-Osorio, M R; Bouwman, J; Cho, J Y-K; Foresto, V Coudé du; Guillot, T; Lopez-Morales, M; Mueller-Wodarg, I; Palle, E; Selsis, F; Sozzetti, A; Ade, P A R; Achilleos, N; Adriani, A; Agnor, C B; Afonso, C; Prieto, C Allende; Bakos, G; Barber, R J; Barlow, M; Bernath, P; Bezard, B; Bordé, P; Brown, L R; Cassan, A; Cavarroc, C; Ciaravella, A; Cockell, C O U; Coustenis, A; Danielski, C; Decin, L; De Kok, R; Demangeon, O; Deroo, P; Doel, P; Drossart, P; Fletcher, L N; Focardi, M; Forget, F; Fossey, S; Fouqué, P; Frith, J; Galand, M; Gaulme, P; Hernández, J I González; Grasset, O; Grassi, D; Grenfell, J L; Griffin, M J; Griffith, C A; Grözinger, U; Guedel, M; Guio, P; Hainaut, O; Hargreaves, R; Hauschildt, P H; Heng, K; Heyrovsky, D; Hueso, R; Irwin, P; Kaltenegger, L; Kervella, P; Kipping, D; Koskinen, T T; Kovács, G; La Barbera, A; Lammer, H; Lellouch, E; Leto, G; Morales, M Lopez; Valverde, M A Lopez; Lopez-Puertas, M; Lovis, C; Maggio, A; Maillard, J P; Prado, J Maldonado; Marquette, J B; Martin-Torres, F J; Maxted, P; Miller, S; Molinari, S; Montes, D; Moro-Martin, A; Moses, J I; Mousis, O; Tuong, N Nguyen; Nelson, R; Orton, G S; Pantin, E; Pascale, E; Pezzuto, S; Pinfield, D; Poretti, E; Prinja, R; Prisinzano, L; Rees, J M; Reiners, A; Samuel, B; Sanchez-Lavega, A; Forcada, J Sanz; Sasselov, D; Savini, G; Sicardy, B; Smith, A; Stixrude, L; Strazzulla, G; Tennyson, J; Tessenyi, M; Vasisht, G; Vinatier, S; Viti, S; Waldmann, I; White, G J; Widemann, T; Wordsworth, R; Yelle, R; Yung, Y; Yurchenko, S N

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

363

Client Interfaces to the Virtual Observatory Registry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Virtual Observatory Registry is a distributed directory of information systems and other resources relevant to astronomy. To make it useful, facilities to query that directory must be provided to humans and machines alike. This article reviews the development and status of such facilities, also considering the lessons learnt from about a decade of experience with Registry interfaces. After a brief outline of the history of the standards development, it describes the use of Registry interfaces in some popular clients as well as dedicated UIs for interrogating the Registry. It continues with a thorough discussion of the design of the two most recent Registry interface standards, RegTAP on the one hand and a full-text-based interface on the other hand. The article finally lays out some of the less obvious conventions that emerged in the interaction between providers of registry records and Registry users as well as remaining challenges and current developments.

Demleitner, Markus; Taylor, Mark; Normand, Jonathan

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

364

Radio Wavelength Observatories within the Exploration Architecture  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Observations at radio wavelengths address key problems in astrophysics, astrobiology, and lunar structure including the first light in the Universe (the Epoch of Reionization), the presence of magnetic fields around extrasolar planets, particle acceleration mechanisms, and the structure of the lunar ionosphere. Moreover, achieving the performance needed to address these scientific questions demands observations at wavelengths longer than those that penetrate the Earth's ionosphere, observations in extremely "radio quiet" locations such as the Moon's far side, or both. We describe a series of lunar-based radio wavelength interferometers of increasing capability. The Radio Observatory for Lunar Sortie Science (ROLSS) is an array designed to be deployed during the first lunar sorties (or even before via robotic rovers) and addressing particle acceleration and the lunar ionosphere. Future arrays would be larger, more capable, and deployed as experience is gained in working on the lunar surface.

J. Lazio; R. J. Macdowall; J. Burns; L. Demaio; D. L. Jones; K. W. Weiler

2007-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

365

Neutrino-2008: Where are we? Where are we going?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Our present knowledge of neutrinos can be summarized in terms of the "standard neutrino scenario". Phenomenology of this scenario as well as attempts to uncover physics behind neutrino mass and mixing are described. Goals of future studies include complete reconstruction of the neutrino mass and flavor spectrum, further test of the standard scenario and search for new physics beyond it. Developments of new experimental techniques may lead to construction of new neutrino detectors from table-top to multi-Megaton scales which will open new horizons in the field. With detection of neutrino bursts from the Galactic supernova and high energy cosmic neutrinos neutrino astrophysics will enter qualitatively new phase. Neutrinos and LHC (and future colliders), neutrino astronomy, neutrino structure of the Universe, and probably, neutrino technologies will be among leading topics of research.

Smirnov, Alexei Yu

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Neutrino-2008: Where are we? Where are we going?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Our present knowledge of neutrinos can be summarized in terms of the "standard neutrino scenario". Phenomenology of this scenario as well as attempts to uncover physics behind neutrino mass and mixing are described. Goals of future studies include complete reconstruction of the neutrino mass and flavor spectrum, further test of the standard scenario and search for new physics beyond it. Developments of new experimental techniques may lead to construction of new neutrino detectors from table-top to multi-Megaton scales which will open new horizons in the field. With detection of neutrino bursts from the Galactic supernova and high energy cosmic neutrinos neutrino astrophysics will enter qualitatively new phase. Neutrinos and LHC (and future colliders), neutrino astronomy, neutrino structure of the Universe, and probably, neutrino technologies will be among leading topics of research.

Alexei Yu. Smirnov

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

367

Cross section dependence of event rates at neutrino telescopes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We examine the dependence of event rates at neutrino telescopes on the neutrino-nucleon cross section for neutrinos with energy above 1 PeV, and contrast the results with those for cosmic ray experiments. Scaling of the ...

Marfatia, Danny; Seckel, D.; McKay, D. W.; Hussain, S.

2006-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

368

Discovering Long Wavelength Neutrino Oscillations in the Distorted Neutrino Spectrum of Galactic Supernova Remnants  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the muon neutrino event rate in km$^3$ neutrino telescopes due to a number of galactic supernova remnants expected on the basis of these objects' known $\\gamma$-ray signals. We evaluate the potential of these neutrino signals to exhibit evidence of the sub-dominant neutrino oscillations expected in various neutrino mixing schemes including pseudo-Dirac scenarios and the Exact Parity Model. With ten years' data, neutrino signals from Sgr A East should either discover or exclude neutrino oscillations governed by a $\\delta m^2$ parameter in the range $10^{-12}$ to $10^{-15}$ eV$^2$. Such a capability is not available to terrestrial or solar system neutrino experiments.

Roland M. Crocker; Fulvio Melia; Raymond R. Volkas

2001-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

369

Effective Mass Matrix for Light Neutrinos Consistent with Solar and Atmospheric Neutrino Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose an effective mass matrix for light neutrinos which is consistent with the mixing pattern indicated by solar and atmospheric neutrino experiments. Two scenarios for the mass eigenvalues are discussed and the connection with double beta decay is noted.

S. P. Rosen; Waikwok Kwong

1995-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

370

Emission angle distribution and flavor transformation of supernova neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Using moment equations we analyze collective flavor transformation of supernova neutrinos. We study the convergence of moment equations and find that numerical results using a few moment converge quite fast. We study effects of emission angle distribution of neutrinos on neutrino sphere. We study scaling law of the amplitude of neutrino self-interaction Hamiltonian and find that it depends on model of emission angle distribution of neutrinos. Dependence of neutrino oscillation on different models of emission angle distribution is studied.

Wei Liao

2009-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

371

E-Print Network 3.0 - auger observatory fluorescence Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

y Tcnica 12;Pierre Auger ... Source: Pierre Auger Observatory Collection: Physics 50 CERN Courier CERN COURIER Summary: -ray observatory bearing Auger's name is studying...

372

E-Print Network 3.0 - astrophysical observatory letter Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

restore and widen access... ; 15; strengthen the Observatory's research capacity in solar system and stellar astrophysics; 15... interests of Observatory sta11; currently...

373

Towards the detection of cosmological relic neutrino with neutrino capture on a beta decaying nuclei  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper we report on recent results in the Þeld of the phenomenology of very low energy neutrino interactions. We brießy describe the cross section calculation for Neutrino Capture on Beta decay nuclei (NCB). We show that the resulting cross section open the possibility to detect the cosmological relic neutrinos. With this achievement, the relic neutrino detection has been downscaled from a principle problem to a technological challenge. We also summarise the state of the art about possible detection techniques.

Messina, M; Mangano, G

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Neutrino-electron scattering and the choice between different MSW solutions of the solar neutrino problem  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We consider the scattering of solar neutrinos by electrons as a means for distinguishing between MSW solutions of the solar neutrino problem. In terms of the ratio R between the observed cross-section and that for pure electron-type neutrinos, we find that some correlation between the value R and the appropriate solution. 9 refs., 3 figs.

Rosen, S.P.; Gelb, J.M.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

375

Exotic Solutions to the Solar Neutrino Problem and Some Implications for Low Energy Solar Neutrino Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this talk, I review, from the phenomenological point of view, solutions to the solar neutrino problem, which are not provided by the conventional neutrino oscillation induced by mass and flavor mixing, and show that they can provide a good fit to the observed data. I also consider some simple implications for low energy solar neutrino experiments.

H. Nunokawa

2001-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

376

EA-1943: Proposed Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) at...  

Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

43: Proposed Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) at Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois EA-1943: Proposed Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) at Fermilab, Batavia, Illinois...

377

Majorana Neutrino Masses from Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay and Cosmology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

When three Majorana neutrinos describe the solar and atmospheric neutrino data via oscillations, a nonzero measurement of neutrinoless double beta ($0\

V. Barger; K. Whisnant

1999-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

378

Double Beta Decay, Majorana Neutrinos, and Neutrino Mass  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The theoretical and experimental issues relevant to neutrinoless double-beta decay are reviewed. The impact that a direct observation of this exotic process would have on elementary particle physics, nuclear physics, astrophysics and cosmology is profound. Now that neutrinos are known to have mass and experiments are becoming more sensitive, even the non-observation of neutrinoless double-beta decay will be useful. If the process is actually observed, we will immediately learn much about the neutrino. The status and discovery potential of proposed experiments are reviewed in this context, with significant emphasis on proposals favored by recent panel reviews. The importance of and challenges in the calculation of nuclear matrix elements that govern the decay are considered in detail. The increasing sensitivity of experiments and improvements in nuclear theory make the future exciting for this field at the interface of nuclear and particle physics.

Frank T. Avignone III; Steven R. Elliott; Jonathan Engel

2007-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

379

Double beta decay, Majorana neutrinos, and neutrino mass  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The theoretical and experimental issues relevant to neutrinoless double beta decay are reviewed. The impact that a direct observation of this exotic process would have on elementary particle physics, nuclear physics, astrophysics, and cosmology is profound. Now that neutrinos are known to have mass and experiments are becoming more sensitive, even the nonobservation of neutrinoless double beta decay will be useful. If the process is actually observed, we will immediately learn much about the neutrino. The status and discovery potential of proposed experiments are reviewed in this context, with significant emphasis on proposals favored by recent panel reviews. The importance of and challenges in the calculation of nuclear matrix elements that govern the decay are considered in detail. The increasing sensitivity of experiments and improvements in nuclear theory make the future exciting for this field at the interface of nuclear and particle physics.

Avignone, Frank T. III; Elliott, Steven R.; Engel, Jonathan [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of South Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina 29208 (United States); Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina 27599-3255 (United States)

2008-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

380

On the Electric Charge of the Neutrino  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Exact expression is obtained for the differential cross section of elastic electroweak scattering of longitudinal polarized massive Dirac neutrinos with the electric charge and anomalous magnetic moment on a spinless nucleus. This formula contains all necessary information about the nature of the neutrino mass, charge and magnetic moment. Some of them state that between the mass of the neutrino its electric charge there exists an interconnection.

Rasulkhozha S. Sarafiddinov

2010-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "icecube neutrino observatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Nuclear correction factors from neutrino DIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutrino Deep Inelastic Scattering on nuclei is an essential process to constrain the strange quark parton distribution functions in the proton. The critical component on the way to using the neutrino DIS data in a proton PDF analysis is understanding the nuclear effects in parton distribution functions. We parametrize these effects by nuclear parton distribution functions and we use this framework to analyze the consistency of neutrino DIS data with other nuclear data.

K. Kovarik

2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

382

Pion condensation in a dense neutrino gas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We argue that using an equilibrated gas of neutrinos it is possible to probe the phase diagram of QCD for finite isospin and small baryon chemical potentials. We discuss this region of the phase diagram in detail and demonstrate that for large enough neutrino densities a Bose-Einstein condensate of positively charged pions arises. Moreover, we show that for nonzero neutrino density the degeneracy in the lifetimes and masses of the charged pions is lifted.

Hiroaki Abuki; Tomas Brauner; Harmen J. Warringa

2009-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

383

Measuring neutrino oscillation parameters using $\  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

MINOS is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment. It consists of two large steel-scintillator tracking calorimeters. The near detector is situated at Fermilab, close to the production point of the NuMI muon-neutrino beam. The far detector is 735 km away, 716m underground in the Soudan mine, Northern Minnesota. The primary purpose of the MINOS experiment is to make precise measurements of the 'atmospheric' neutrino oscillation parameters ({Delta}m{sub atm}{sup 2} and sin{sup 2} 2{theta}{sub atm}). The oscillation signal consists of an energy-dependent deficit of {nu}{sub {mu}} interactions in the far detector. The near detector is used to characterize the properties of the beam before oscillations develop. The two-detector design allows many potential sources of systematic error in the far detector to be mitigated by the near detector observations. This thesis describes the details of the {nu}{sub {mu}}-disappearance analysis, and presents a new technique to estimate the hadronic energy of neutrino interactions. This estimator achieves a significant improvement in the energy resolution of the neutrino spectrum, and in the sensitivity of the neutrino oscillation fit. The systematic uncertainty on the hadronic energy scale was re-evaluated and found to be comparable to that of the energy estimator previously in use. The best-fit oscillation parameters of the {nu}{sub {mu}}-disappearance analysis, incorporating this new estimator were: {Delta}m{sup 2} = 2.32{sub -0.08}{sup +0.12} x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2}, sin {sup 2} 2{theta} > 0.90 (90% C.L.). A similar analysis, using data from a period of running where the NuMI beam was operated in a configuration producing a predominantly {bar {nu}}{sub {mu}} beam, yielded somewhat different best-fit parameters {Delta}{bar m}{sup 2} = (3.36{sub -0.40}{sup +0.46}(stat.) {+-} 0.06(syst.)) x 10{sup -3}eV{sup 2}, sin{sup 2} 2{bar {theta}} = 0.86{sub -0.12}{sup _0.11}(stat.) {+-} 0.01(syst.). The tension between these results is intriguing, and additional antineutrino data is currently being taken in order to further investigate this apparent discrepancy.

Backhouse, Christopher James; /Oxford U.

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Solar neutrino with Borexino: results and perspectives  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Borexino is a unique detector able to perform measurement of solar neutrinos fluxes in the energy region around 1 MeV or below due to its low level of radioactive background. It was constructed at the LNGS underground laboratory with a goal of solar $^{7}$Be neutrino flux measurement with 5\\% precision. The goal has been successfully achieved marking the end of the first stage of the experiment. A number of other important measurements of solar neutrino fluxes have been performed during the first stage. Recently the collaboration conducted successful liquid scintillator repurification campaign aiming to reduce main contaminants in the sub-MeV energy range. With the new levels of radiopurity Borexino can improve existing and challenge a number of new measurements including: improvement of the results on the Solar and terrestrial neutrino fluxes measurements; measurement of pp and CNO solar neutrino fluxes; search for non-standard interactions of neutrino; study of the neutrino oscillations on the short baseline with an artificial neutrino source (search for sterile neutrino) in context of SOX project.

O. Smirnov; G. Bellini; J. Benziger; D. Bick; G. Bonfini; D. Bravo; B. Caccianiga; F. Calaprice; A. Caminata; P. Cavalcante; A. Chavarria; A. Chepurnov; D. D'Angelo; S. Davini; A. Derbin; A. Empl; A. Etenko; K. Fomenko; D. Franco; G. Fiorentini; C. Galbiati; S. Gazzana; C. Ghiano; M. Giammarchi; M. Goeger-Neff; A. Goretti; C. Hagner; E. Hungerford; Aldo Ianni; Andrea Ianni; V. Kobychev; D. Korablev; G. Korga; D. Kryn; M. Laubenstein; B. Lehnert; T. Lewke; E. Litvinovich; F. Lombardi; P. Lombardi; L. Ludhova; G. Lukyanchenko; I. Machulin; S. Manecki; W. Maneschg; F. Mantovani; S. Marcocci; Q. Meindl; E. Meroni; M. Meyer; L. Miramonti; M. Misiaszek; P. Mosteiro; V. Muratova; L. Oberauer; M. Obolensky; F. Ortica; K. Otis; M. Pallavicini; L. Papp; L. Perasso; A. Pocar; G. Ranucci; A. Razeto; A. Re; B. Ricci; A. Romani; N. Rossi; R. Saldanha; C. Salvo; S. Schoenert; H. Simgen; M. Skorokhvatov; A. Sotnikov; S. Sukhotin; Y. Suvorov; R. Tartaglia; G. Testera; D. Vignaud; R. B. Vogelaar; F. von Feilitzsch; H. Wang; J. Winter; M. Wojcik; A. Wright; M. Wurm; O. Zaimidoroga; S. Zavatarelli; K. Zuber; G. Zuzel

2014-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

385

Testing nuclear models via neutrino scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent progresses on the relativistic modeling of neutrino-nucleus reactions are presented and the results are compared with high precision experimental data in a wide energy range.

Barbaro, M B; Amaro, J E; Antonov, A N; Caballero, J A; Donnelly, T W; Gonzalez-Jimenez, R; Ivanov, M V; de Guerra, E Moya; Megias, G D; Simo, I Ruiz; Udias, J M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Testing nuclear models via neutrino scattering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Recent progresses on the relativistic modeling of neutrino-nucleus reactions are presented and the results are compared with high precision experimental data in a wide energy range.

M. B. Barbaro; C. Albertus; J. E. Amaro; A. N. Antonov; J. A. Caballero; T. W. Donnelly; R. Gonzalez-Jimenez; M. V. Ivanov; E. Moya de Guerra; G. D. Megias; I. Ruiz Simo; J. M. Udias

2014-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

387

Non-Oscillation Probes of Neutrino Masses  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The absolute scale of neutrino masses is very important for understanding the evolution and the structure formation of the universe as well as for nuclear and particle physics beyond the present Standard Model. Complementary to deducing statements on the neutrino mass from cosmological observations, two different methods to determine the neutrino mass scale in the laboratory are pursued: the search for neutrinoless double beta decay and the direct neutrino mass search. For both methods currently experiments with a sensitivity of O(100) meV are being set up or commissioned.

Weinheimer, C. [Westfaelische Wilhelms-Universitaet Muenster Institut fuer Kernphysik, Wilhelm-Klemm-Str. 9, D-48149 Muenster (Germany)

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

388

Non-oscillation probes of neutrino masses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The absolute scale of neutrino masses is very important for understanding the evolution and the structure formation of the universe as well as for nuclear and particle physics beyond the present Standard Model. Complementary to deducing statements on the neutrino mass from cosmological observations two different methods to determine the neutrino mass scale in the laboratory are pursued: the search for neutrinoless double beta decay and the direct neutrino mass search. For both methods currently experiments with a sensitivity of order 100 meV are being set up or commissioned.

C. Weinheimer

2009-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

389

Gamma Ray Burst Neutrinos Probing Quantum Gravity  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Very high energy, short wavelength, neutrinos may interact with the space-time foam predicted by theories of quantum gravity. They would propagate like light through a crystal lattice and be delayed, with the delay depending on the energy. This will appear to the observer as a violation of Lorenz invariance. Back of the envelope calculations imply that observations of neutrinos produced by gamma ray bursts may reach Planck-scale sensitivity. We revisit the problem considering two essential complications: the imprecise timing of the neutrinos associated with their poorly understood production mechanism in the source and the indirect nature of their energy measurement made by high energy neutrino telescopes.

M. C. Gonzalez-Garcia; F. Halzen

2006-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

390

Scintillator yields glimpse of elusive solar neutrinos  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The low-energy neutrinos are byproducts of the first reaction in a chain that generates 99% of the Sun’s energy.

Smart, Ashley G.

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

391

The Search for Muon Neutrinos from Northern Hemisphere Gamma-Ray Bursts with AMANDA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

see also the Swift Gamma-Ray Burst Mission Page: http://from Northern Hemisphere Gamma-Ray Bursts with AMANDA A.Northern Hemisphere Gamma-Ray Bursts with AMANDA The IceCube

Achterberg, A.; IceCube Collaboration

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Neutrino physics with an intense \  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study some of the physics potential of an intense $1\\,\\mathrm{MCi}$ $^{51}\\mathrm{Cr}$ source combined with the {\\sc Majorana Demonstrator} enriched germanium detector array. The {\\sc Demonstrator} will consist of detectors with ultra-low radioactive backgrounds and extremely low energy thresholds of~$\\sim 400\\,\\mathrm{eV}$. We show that it can improve the current limit on the neutrino magnetic dipole moment. We briefly discuss physics applications of the charged-current reaction of the $^{51}\\mathrm{Cr} neutrino with the $^{73}\\mathrm{Ge} isotope. Finally, we argue that the rate from a realistic, intense tritium source is below the detectable limit of even a tonne-scale HPGe experiment

R. Henning

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

393

Constraints on the Sum of Neutrino Masses from Cosmology and their impact on world neutrino data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We derive upper limits on the sum of neutrino masses from an updated combination of data from Cosmic Microwave Background experiments and Galaxy Redshifts Surveys. The results are discussed in the context of three-flavor neutrino mixing and compared with neutrino oscillation data, with upper limits on the effective neutrino mass in Tritium beta decay from the Mainz and Troitsk experiments and with the claimed lower bound on the effective Majorana neutrino mass in neutrinoless double beta decay from the Heidelberg-Moscow experiment.

A. Melchiorri; G. L. Fogli; E. Lisi; A. Marrone; A. Palazzo; P. Serra; J. I. Silk

2005-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

394

First search for neutrinos in correlation with gamma-ray bursts with the ANTARES neutrino telescope  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A search for neutrino-induced muons in correlation with a selection of 40 gamma-ray bursts that occurred in 2007 has been performed with the ANTARES neutrino telescope. During that period, the detector consisted of 5 detection lines. The ANTARES neutrino telescope is sensitive to TeV–PeV neutrinos that are predicted from gamma-ray bursts. No events were found in correlation with the prompt photon emission of the gamma-ray bursts and upper limits have been placed on the flux and fluence of neutrinos for different models.

NONE

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Non-standard Neutrino Interactions  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Theories beyond the Standard Model must respect its gauge symmetry. This implies strict constraints on the possible models of Non-Standard Neutrino Interactions (NSIs). We review here the present status of NSIs from the point of view of effective field theory. Our recent work on the restrictions implied by Standard Model gauge invariance is provided along with some examples of possible gauge invariant models featuring non-standard interactions.

D. Hernandez

2009-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

396

Neutrino Factory Mercury Flow Loop  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Neutrino Factory Mercury Flow Loop V. GravesV. Graves C. Caldwell IDS-NF Videoconference March 9, 2010 #12;Flow Loop Review · 1 cm dia nozzle, 20 m/s jet requires 1.57 liter/sec mercury flow (94 2 liter/min 24 9 gpm)mercury flow (94.2 liter/min, 24.9 gpm). · MERIT experiment showed that a pump

McDonald, Kirk

397

Graphene, neutrino mass and oscillation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A resolution of the Abraham-Minkowski dilemma is presented that other constant velocities can play the role of c in the theory of relativity. For example, in 2005 electrons of graphene were discovered to behave as if the coefficient is a Fermi velocity. Then we propose a conjecture for neutrinos to avoid the contradiction among two-component theory, negative rest mass-square and oscillation.

Z. Y. Wang

2011-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

398

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia Elec-xonics Division Internal Report 140 MV The battery voltage as a function of temperature was also measured. The voltage was extremely

Groppi, Christopher

399

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia Electronics Division Internal Report with the calculator. It is constructed from CMOS logic for lowest power consumption and has a NiCad battery back

Groppi, Christopher

400

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia Electronics Division Internal Report an opposition battery, a DC Null Voltmeter and a recorder. With this set-up a variation in temperature of .02 °C

Groppi, Christopher

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "icecube neutrino observatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

auger southern observatory: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Auger Collaboration intends to extend the energy range of its southern observatory in Argentina for high quality data from 0.1 to 3 EeV. The extensions, described in accompanying...

402

apache point observatory: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

sky observatory's largest telescope is the versatile ARC 3.5-m, which Telescope, Dan LongAPO APOLLO and 3.5-m Observations One synoptic study is the APOLLO (Apache PointApache...

403

The Green Computing Observatory: status of acquisition and analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Green Computing Observatory: status of acquisition and analysis Cécile Germain-Renaud1, Julien, CNRS, INRIA 2: Laboratoire de l'Accélérateur Linéaire, CNRS-IN2P3 #12; Previous GreenDays talks o GreenDays@Paris The Green Computing Observatory: plans and scientific challenges o GreenDays@Lyon The Green Computing

Lefèvre, Laurent

404

Dark energy, cosmological constant and neutrino mixing  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The today estimated value of dark energy can be achieved by the vacuum condensate induced by neutrino mixing phenomenon. Such a tiny value is recovered for a cut-off of the order of Planck scale and it is linked to the sub eV neutrino mass scale. Contributions to dark energy from auxiliary fields or mechanisms are not necessary in this approach.

A. Capolupo; S. Capozziello; G. Vitiello

2007-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

405

MSW Implications of Solar Neutrino Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I discuss the implications for future solar neutrino experiments of the most recent gallium data in the context of the MSW mechanism. At the low energy end of the solar neutrino spectrum we need to measure the $^7$Be component directly; and at the high energy end, we need precise measurements of the shape of the spectrum.

S. P. Rosen

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

Neutrino oscillations and neutrinoless double beta decay  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The relation between neutrino oscillation parameters and neutrinoless double beta decay is studied, assuming normal and inverse hierarchies for Majorana neutrino masses. For normal hierarchy the crucial dependence on U_{e3} is explored. The link with tritium beta decay is also briefly discussed.

D. Falcone; F. Tramontano

2001-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

407

Neutrino optics and oscillations in gravitational fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the propagation of neutrinos in gravitational fields using wave functions that are exact to first order in the metric deviation. For illustrative purposes, the geometrical background is represented by the Lense-Thirring metric. We derive explicit expressions for neutrino deflection, helicity transitions, flavor oscillations and oscillation Hamiltonian.

G. Lambiase; G. Papini; R. Punzi; G. Scarpetta

2005-03-07T23:59:59.000Z

408

Solar opacity, neutrino signals and helioseismology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In connection with the recent suggestion by Tsytovich et al. that opacity in the solar core could be overestimated, we consider the following questions: i) What would a 10\\% opacity reduction imply for the solar neutrino puzzle? ii) Is there any hope of solving the solar neutrino puzzle by changing opacity? iii) Is a 10\\% opacity reduction testable with helioseismological data?

B. Ricci

1996-05-24T23:59:59.000Z

409

Neutrino SuperBeams at Fermilab  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this talk I will give a brief description of long baseline neutrino physics, the LBNE experiment and Project X at Fermilab. A brief outline of the physics of long baseline neutrino experiments, LBNE and Project X at Fermilab is given in this talk.

Parke, Stephen J.; /Fermilab

2011-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

410

Consistency of 8B neutrino spectra  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We identify and quantify systematic effects not accounted for in two previous measurements of the alpha-alpha relative-energy distribution in the beta decay of 8B, which can explain the apparent disagreement with respect to two newer measurements. This settles a current dispute concerning the shape of the 8B neutrino spectrum of importance to solar-neutrino studies.

Oliver S. Kirsebom; Hans O. U. Fynbo; Riccardo Raabe; Karsten Riisager; Thomas Roger

2014-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

411

Neutrino Balls and Gamma-Ray Bursts  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We propose a mechanism by which the neutrino emission from a supernova-type explosion can be converted into a gamma-ray burst of total energy $\\sim 10^{50}$ ergs. This occurs naturally if the explosion is situated inside a ball of trapped neutrinos, which in turn may lie at a galactic core. There are possible unique signatures of this scenario.

B. Holdom; R. A. Malaney

1993-06-17T23:59:59.000Z

412

Neutrino mixing and oscillations in astrophysical environments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A brief review of the current status of neutrino mixing and oscillations in astrophysical environments, with particular emphasis on the Sun and core-collapse supernovae, is given. Implications of the existence of sterile states which mix with the active neutrinos are discussed.

Balantekin, A. B. [Physics Department, University of Wisconsin, Madison WI 53706 (United States)

2014-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

413

E-Print Network 3.0 - approximative neutrino transport Sample...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

neutrino transport Page: << < 1 2 3 4 5 > >> 1 Solar Neutrinos: Solved and Unsolved Problems John N. Bahcall Summary: neutrino emission by its approximate dependence upon the...

414

The Effect of Sterile States on the Magnetic Moments of Neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We briefly review recent work exploring the effect of light sterile neutrino states on the neutrino magnetic moment as explored by the reactor and solar neutrino experiments.

A. B. Balantekin; N. Vassh

2014-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

415

Solar neutrino measurements in Super-Kamiokande-I  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The details of Super--Kamiokande--I's solar neutrino analysis are given. Solar neutrino measurement in Super--Kamiokande is a high statistics collection of $^8$B solar neutrinos via neutrino-electron scattering. The analysis method and results of the 1496 day data sample are presented. The final oscillation results for the data are also presented.

Super-Kamiokande Collaboration

2005-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

416

Mixed MSW and Vacuum Solutions of Solar Neutrino Problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Assuming three flavour neutrino mixing takes place in vacuum, we investigate the possibility that the solar $\

Qiu-Yu Liu

1997-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

417

Detectors for Neutrino Physics at the First Muon Collider  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider possible detector designs for short-baseline neutrino experiments using neutrino beams produced at the First Muon Collider complex. The high fluxes available at the muon collider make possible high statistics deep-inelastic scattering neutrino experiments with a low-mass target. A design of a low-energy neutrino oscillation experiment on the ``tabletop'' scale is also discussed.

Deborah A. Harris; Kevin S. McFarland

1998-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

418

Double Beta Decay and the Absolute Neutrino Mass Scale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

After a short review of the current status of three-neutrino mixing, the implications for the values of neutrino masses are discussed. The bounds on the absolute scale of neutrino masses from Tritium beta-decay and cosmological data are reviewed. Finally, we discuss the implications of three-neutrino mixing for neutrinoless double-beta decay.

Carlo Giunti

2003-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

419

Solar neutrinos and the solar composition problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Standard solar models (SSM) are facing nowadays a new puzzle: the solar composition problem. New determinations of solar metal abundances lead SSM calculations to conflict with helioseismological measurements, showing discrepancies that extend from the convection zone to the solar core and can not be easily assigned to deficiencies in the modelling of the solar convection zone. We present updated solar neutrino fluxes and uncertainties for two SSM with high (old) and low (new) solar metallicity determinations. The uncertainties in iron and carbon abundances are the largest contribution to the uncertainties of the solar neutrino fluxes. The uncertainty on the ^14N+p -> ^15O+g rate is the largest of the non-composition uncertainties to the CNO neutrino fluxes. We propose an independent method to help identify which SSM is the correct one. Present neutrino data can not distinguish the solar neutrino predictions of both models but ongoing measurements can help to solve the puzzle.

Carlos Pena-Garay; Aldo Serenelli

2008-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

420

Low-energy neutrino factory design  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The design of a low-energy (4 GeV) neutrino factory (NF) is described, along with its expected performance. The neutrino factory uses a high-energy proton beam to produce charged pions. The {pi}{sup {+-}} decay to produce muons ({mu}{sup {+-}}), which are collected, accelerated, and stored in a ring with long straight sections. Muons decaying in the straight sections produce neutrino beams. The scheme is based on previous designs for higher energy neutrino factories, but has an improved bunching and phase rotation system, and new acceleration, storage ring, and detector schemes tailored to the needs of the lower energy facility. Our simulations suggest that the NF scheme we describe can produce neutrino beams generated by {approx} 1.4 x 10{sup 21} {mu}{sup +} per year decaying in a long straight section of the storage ring, and a similar number of {mu}{sup -} decays.

Ankenbrandt, C.; /Fermilab /MUONS Inc., Batavia; Bogacz, S.A.; /Jefferson Lab; Bross, A.; Geer, S.; Johnstone, C.; Neuffer, D.; Popovic, M.; /Fermilab

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "icecube neutrino observatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

The MSW effect and Solar Neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The MSW (Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein) effect is the effect of transformation of one neutrino species (flavor) into another one in a medium with varying density. Three basic elements of the effect include: the refraction of neutrinos in matter, the resonance (level crossing) and the adiabaticity. The key notion is {\\it the neutrino eigenstates} in matter. Physical picture of the effect is described in terms of the flavors and the relative phases of eigenstates and the transitions between eigenstates. Features of the large mixing realization of the MSW effect are discussed. The large mixing MSW effect (LMA) provides the solution of the solar neutrino problem. We show in details how this mechanism works. Physics beyond the LMA solution is discussed. The lower $Ar$-production rate (in comparison with the LMA prediction) and absence of significant "turn up" of the spectrum at low energies can be due to an additional effect of the light sterile neutrino with very small mixing.

A. Yu. Smirnov

2003-05-09T23:59:59.000Z

422

Neutrinoless double beta decay in four-neutrino models  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The most stringent constraint on the so-called effective electron neutrino mass from the present neutrinoless double beta decay experiments is |M_{ee}| < 0.2 eV, while the planned next generation experiment GENIUS is anticipated to reach a considerably more stringent limit |M_{ee}|< 0.001 eV. We investigate the constraints these bounds set on the neutrino masses and mixings of neutrinos in four-neutrino models where there exists a sterile neutrino along with the three ordinary neutrinos. We find that the GENIUS experiment would be sensitive to the electron neutrino masses down to the limit m_{\

Anna Kalliomaki; Jukka Maalampi

2000-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

423

Neutrinos: in and out of the standard model  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The particle physics Standard Model has been tremendously successful in predicting the outcome of a large number of experiments. In this model Neutrinos are massless. Yet recent evidence points to the fact that neutrinos are massive particles with tiny masses compared to the other particles in the Standard Model. These tiny masses allow the neutrinos to change flavor and oscillate. In this series of Lectures, I will review the properties of Neutrinos In the Standard Model and then discuss the physics of Neutrinos Beyond the Standard Model. Topics to be covered include Neutrino Flavor Transformations and Oscillations, Majorana versus Dirac Neutrino Masses, the Seesaw Mechanism and Leptogenesis.

Parke, Stephen; /Fermilab

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

La Thuile 2014: Theoretical premises to neutrino round table  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This talk, dedicated to the memory of G. Giacomelli, introduced the round table on neutrinos held in February 2014. The topics selected for the discussion are: 1) the neutrinoless double beta decay rate (interpretation in terms of light neutrinos, nuclear uncertainties); 2) the physics in the gigantic water Cherenkov detectors (proton decay, atmospheric neutrinos); 3) the study of neutrino oscillations (mass hierarchy and CP violation; other neutrino states); 4) the neutrino astronomy at low and high energies (solar, supernova, cosmic neutrinos). The importance of an active interplay between theory and experiment is highlighted.

Francesco Vissani

2014-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

425

La Thuile 2014: Theoretical premises to neutrino round table  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This talk, dedicated to the memory of G. Giacomelli, introduced the round table on neutrinos held in February 2014. The topics selected for the discussion are: 1) the neutrinoless double beta decay rate (interpretation in terms of light neutrinos, nuclear uncertainties); 2) the physics in the gigantic water Cherenkov detectors (proton decay, atmospheric neutrinos); 3) the study of neutrino oscillations (mass hierarchy and CP violation; other neutrino states); 4) the neutrino astronomy at low and high energies (solar, supernova, cosmic neutrinos). The importance of an active interplay between theory and experiment is highlighted.

Vissani, Francesco

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Heavy sterile neutrinos, entropy and relativistic energy production, and the relic neutrino background  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore the implications of the existence of heavy neutral fermions (i.e., sterile neutrinos) for the thermal history of the early universe. In particular, we consider sterile neutrinos with rest masses in the 100 MeV to 500 MeV range, with couplings to ordinary active neutrinos large enough to guarantee thermal and chemical equilibrium at epochs in the early universe with temperatures T > 1 GeV, but in a range to give decay lifetimes from seconds to minutes. Such neutrinos would decouple early, with relic densities comparable to those of photons, but decay out of equilibrium, with consequent prodigious entropy generation prior to, or during, Big Bang Nucleosynthesis (BBN). Most of the ranges of sterile neutrino rest mass and lifetime considered are at odds with Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) limits on the relativistic particle contribution to energy density (e.g., as parameterized by N_eff). However, some sterile neutrino parameters can lead to an acceptable N_eff. These parameter ranges are accompanied by considerable dilution of the ordinary background relic neutrinos, possibly an adverse effect on BBN, but sometimes fall in a range which can explain measured neutrino masses in some particle physics models. A robust signature of these sterile neutrinos would be a measured N_eff not equal to 3 coupled with no cosmological signal for neutrino rest mass when the detection thresholds for these probes are below laboratory-established neutrino mass values, either as established by the atmospheric neutrino oscillation scale or direct measurements with, e.g., KATRIN or neutrino-less double beta decay experiments.

George M. Fuller; Chad T. Kishimoto; Alexander Kusenko

2011-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

427

Influence of flavor oscillations on neutrino beam instabilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We consider the collective neutrino plasma interactions and study the electron plasma instabilities produced by a nearly mono-energetic neutrino beam in a plasma. We describe the mutual interaction between neutrino flavor oscillations and electron plasma waves. We show that the neutrino flavor oscillations are not only perturbed by electron plasmas waves but also contribute to the dispersion relation and the growth rates of neutrino beam instabilities.

Mendonça, J. T., E-mail: titomend@ist.utl.pt [Instituto de Física, Universidade de São Paulo, 05508-090 São Paulo SP (Brazil); Haas, F. [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, 91501-970 Porto Alegre RS (Brazil); Bret, A. [ETSI Industriales, Universidad de Castilla-La Mancha, 13071 Ciudad Real, Spain and Instituto de Investigaciones Energeticas y Aplicaciones Industriales, Campus Universitario de Ciudad Real, 13071 Ciudad Real (Spain)

2014-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

428

Neutrino oscillation studies at LAMPF  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A search for {anti v}{sub {mu}} {yields} {anti v}{sub e} oscillations has been made by the Liquid Scintillator Neutrino Detector experiment at LAMPF after an initial month and a half run. The experiment observes eight events consistent with the reaction {anti v}{sub e}p {yields} e{sup +}n followed by np {yields} d{gamma} (2.2 MeV). The total estimated background is 0.9{plus_minus}0.2 events.

Louis, W.C.; LSND Collaboration

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

A Toroidal Magnetised Iron Neutrino Detector (MIND) for a Neutrino Factory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A neutrino factory has unparalleled physics reach for the discovery and measurement of CP violation in the neutrino sector. A far detector for a neutrino factory must have good charge identification with excellent background rejection and a large mass. An elegant solution is to construct a magnetized iron neutrino detector (MIND) along the lines of MINOS, where iron plates provide a toroidal magnetic field and scintillator planes provide 3D space points. In this report, the current status of a simulation of a toroidal MIND for a neutrino factory is discussed in light of the recent measurements of large $\\theta_{13}$. The response and performance using the 10 GeV neutrino factory configuration are presented. It is shown that this setup has equivalent $\\delta_{CP}$ reach to a MIND with a dipole field and is sensitive to the discovery of CP violation over 85% of the values of $\\delta_{CP}$.

A. Bross; R. Wands; R. Bayes; A. Laing; F. J. P. Soler; A. Cervera Villanueva; T. Ghosh; J. J. Gómez Cadenas; P. Hernández; J. Martín-Albo; J. Burguet-Castell

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

430

Solar Neutrino Results from Super-Kamiokande  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Super-Kamiokande-IV (SK-IV) data taking began in September of 2008, after upgrading the electronics and data acquisition system. Due to these upgrades and improvements to water system dynamics, calibration and analysis techniques, a solar neutrino signal could be extracted at recoil electron kinetic energies as low as 3.5 MeV. When the SK-IV data is combined with the previous three SK phases, the SK extracted solar neutrino flux is found to be $[2.37\\pm0.015\\mbox{(stat.)}\\pm0.04\\mbox{(syst.)}]\\times10^6$/(cm$^{2}$sec). The combination of the SK recoil electron energy spectra slightly favors distortions due to a changing electron flavor content. Such distortions are predicted when assuming standard solar neutrino oscillation solutions. An extended maximum likelihood fit to the amplitude of the expected solar zenith angle variation of the neutrino-electron elastic scattering rate results in a day-night asymmetry of $[-3.2\\pm1.1$(stat.)$\\pm0.5$(syst.)]$\\%$. A solar neutrino global oscillation analysis including all current solar neutrino data, as well as KamLAND reactor antineutrino data, measures the solar mixing angle as $\\sin^2\\theta_{12}=0.305\\pm0.013$, the solar neutrino mass squared splitting as $\\Delta m^2_{21}=7.49^{+0.19}_{-0.17}\\times10^{-5}$eV$^2$ and $\\sin^2\\theta_{13}=0.026^{+0.017}_{-0.012}$.

Andrew Renshaw

2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

431

Mass Varying Neutrinos in the Sun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this work we study the phenomenological consequences of the dependence of mass varying neutrinos on the neutrino density in the Sun, which we precisely compute in each point along the neutrino trajectory. We find that a generic characteristic of these scenarios is that they establish a connection between the effective Delta m^2 in the Sun and the absolute neutrino mass scale. This does not lead to any new allowed region in the oscillation parameter space. On the contrary, due to this effect, the description of solar neutrino data worsens for large absolute mass. As a consequence a lower bound on the level of degeneracy can be derived from the combined analysis of the solar and KamLAND data. In particular this implies that the analysis favours normal over inverted mass orderings. These results, in combination with a positive independent determination of the absolute neutrino mass, can be used as a test of these scenarios together with a precise determination of the energy dependence of the survival probability of solar neutrinos, in particular for low energies.

Marco Cirelli; M. C. Gonzalez-Garcia; Carlos Pena-Garay

2005-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

432

Can Neutrinos be Degenerate in Mass?  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We reconsider the possibility that the masses of the three light neutrinos of the Standard Model might be almost degenerate and close to the present upper limits from Tritium beta decay and cosmology. In such a scenario, the cancellations required by the latest upper limit on neutrinoless double-beta decay enforce near-maximal mixing that may be compatible only with the vacuum-oscillation scenario for solar neutrinos. We argue that the mixing angles yielded by degenerate neutrino mass-matrix textures are not in general stable under small perturbations. We evaluate within the MSSM the generation-dependent one-loop renormalization of neutrino mass-matrix textures that yielded degenerate masses and large mixing at the tree level. We find that m_{nu_e} > m_{nu_mu} > m_{nu_tau} after renormalization, excluding MSW effects on solar neutrinos. We verify that bimaximal mixing is not stable, and show that the renormalized masses and mixing angles are not compatible with all the experimental constraints, even for tanbeta as low as unity. These results hold whether the neutrino masses are generated by a see-saw mechanism with heavy neutrinos weighing approx. 10^{13} GeV or by non-renormalizable interactions at a scale approx. 10^5 GeV. We also comment on the corresponding renormalization effects in the minimal Standard Model, in which m_{nu_e} < m_{nu_mu} < m_{nu_tau}. Although a solar MSW effect is now possible, the perturbed neutrino masses and mixings are still not compatible with atmospheric- and solar-neutrino data.

John Ellis; Smaragda Lola

1999-04-13T23:59:59.000Z

433

A measurement of neutrino oscillations with muon neutrinos in the MINOS experiment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Experimental evidence has established that neutrino flavor states evolve over time. A neutrino of a particular flavor that travels some distance can be detected in a different neutrino flavor state. The Main Injector Neutrino Oscillation Search (MINOS) is a long-baseline experiment that is designed to study this phenomenon, called neutrino oscillations. MINOS is based at Fermilab near Chicago, IL, and consists of two detectors: the Near Detector located at Fermilab, and the Far Detector, which is located in an old iron mine in Soudan, MN. Both detectors are exposed to a beam of muon neutrinos from the NuMI beamline, and MINOS measures the fraction of muon neutrinos that disappear after traveling the 734 km between the two detectors. One can measure the atmospheric neutrino mass splitting and mixing angle by observing the energy-dependence of this muon neutrino disappearance. MINOS has made several prior measurements of these parameters. Here I describe recently-developed techniques used to enhance our sensitivity to the oscillation parameters, and I present the results obtained when they are applied to a dataset that is twice as large as has been previously analyzed. We measure the mass splitting {Delta}m{sub 23}{sup 2} = (2.32{sub -0.08}{sup +0.12}) x 10{sup -3} eV{sup 2}/c{sup 4} and the mixing angle sin{sup 2}(2{theta}{sub 32}) > 0.90 at 90% C.L. These results comprise the world's best measurement of the atmospheric neutrino mass splitting. Alternative disappearance models are also tested. The neutrino decay hypothesis is disfavored at 7.2{sigma} and the neutrino quantum decoherence hypothesis is disfavored at 9.0{sigma}.

Coleman, Stephen James; /William-Mary Coll.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

434

Gravitational Phase Transition of Heavy Neutrino Matter  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the phase transition of a system of self-gravitating neutrinos in the presence of a large radiation density background in the framework of the Thomas-Fermi model. We show that, by cooling a non-degenerate gas of massive neutrinos below some critical temperature, a condensed phase emerges, consisting of quasi-degenerate supermassive neutrino stars. These compact dark objects could play an important role in structure formation in this universe, as they might in fact provide the seeds for galactic nuclei and quasi-stellar objects.

Neven Bilic; Raoul D. Viollier

1996-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

435

Accelerator Design Concept for Future Neutrino Facilities  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This document summarizes the findings of the Accelerator Working Group (AWG) of the International Scoping Study (ISS) of a Future Neutrino Factory and Superbeam Facility. The work of the group took place at three plenary meetings along with three workshops, and an oral summary report was presented at the NuFact06 workshop held at UC-Irvine in August, 2006. The goal was to reach consensus on a baseline design for a Neutrino Factory complex. One aspect of this endeavor was to examine critically the advantages and disadvantages of the various Neutrino Factory schemes that have been proposed in recent years.

ISS Accelerator Working Group; Zisman, Michael S; Berg, J. S.; Blondel, A.; Brooks, S.; Campagne, J.-E.; Caspar, D.; Cevata, C.; Chimenti, P.; Cobb, J.; Dracos, M.; Edgecock, R.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fabich, A.; Fernow, R.; Filthaut, F.; Gallardo, J.; Garoby, R.; Geer, S.; Gerigk, F.; Hanson, G.; Johnson, R.; Johnstone, C.; Kaplan, D.; Keil, E.; Kirk, H.; Klier, A.; Kurup, A.; Lettry, J.; Long, K.; Machida, S.; McDonald, K.; Meot, F.; Mori, Y.; Neuffer, D.; Palladino, V.; Palmer, R.; Paul, K.; Poklonskiy, A.; Popovic, M.; Prior, C.; Rees, G.; Rossi, C.; Rovelli, T.; Sandstrom, R.; Sevior, R.; Sievers, P.; Simos, N.; Torun, Y.; Vretenar, M.; Yoshimura, K.; Zisman, Michael S

2008-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

436

On the 17-keV neutrino  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A brief review on the status of the 17-keV neutrino is presented. Several different experiments found spectral distortions which were consistently interpreted as evidence for a heavy neutrino admixture in {beta} decay. Recent experiments, however, rule out the existence of a 17-keV neutrino as well as escaping criticisms of earlier null results. Moreover, the majority of positive results have been reinterpreted in terms of instrumental effects, despite the need for a different explanation in each case. Anomalies persist in the low energy region of the tritium spectrum which deserve further investigation.

Hime, A.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

On the 17-keV neutrino  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A brief review on the status of the 17-keV neutrino is presented. Several different experiments found spectral distortions which were consistently interpreted as evidence for a heavy neutrino admixture in [beta] decay. Recent experiments, however, rule out the existence of a 17-keV neutrino as well as escaping criticisms of earlier null results. Moreover, the majority of positive results have been reinterpreted in terms of instrumental effects, despite the need for a different explanation in each case. Anomalies persist in the low energy region of the tritium spectrum which deserve further investigation.

Hime, A.

1993-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Fourth generation neutrinos and neutrino induced hadron production in the resonance region.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??We investigate two aspects in neutrino physics. First, we consider the extension of the standard model by a fourth fermion generation. Allowing finite mixing of… (more)

Schalla, Dario

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

On the MSW $?_e \\to ?_s$ transition solution of the solar neutrino problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the stability of the two--neutrino MSW solution of the solar neutrino problem, corresponding to solar $\

P. I. Krastev; S. T. Petcov; L. Qiuyu

1996-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

440

Light Dark Matter Detection Prospects at Neutrino Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We consider the prospects for the detection of relatively light dark matter through direct annihilation to neutrinos. We specifically focus on the detection possibilities of water Cherenkov and liquid scintillator neutrino detection devices. We find in particular that liquid scintillator detectors may potentially provide excellent detection prospects for dark matter in the 4-10 GeV mass range. These experiments can provide excellent corroborative checks of the DAMA/LIBRA annual modulation signal, but may yield results for low mass dark matter in any case. We identify important tests of the ratio of electron to muon neutrino events (and neutrino versus anti-neutrino events), which discriminate against background atmospheric neutrinos. In addition, the fraction of events which arise from muon neutrinos or anti-neutrinos ($R_{\\mu}$ and $R_{\\bar \\mu}$) can potentially yield information about the branching fractions of hypothetical dark matter annihilations into different neutrino flavors. These results apply to n...

Kumar, Jason; Smith, Stefanie

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "icecube neutrino observatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

CERN Neutrinos to Gran Sasso (CNGS) First Beam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The CNGS, CERN Neutrinos to Gran Sasso project, aims at directly detecting muon-neutrino to tau-neutrino oscillations. An intense muon-neutrino beam (10 to the 17 muon neutrinos)is generated at CERN per day and directed towards the Gran Sasso National Laboratory, LNGS, in Italy, 732 km away from CERN. In LNGS large and complex detectors will allow to detect, in particular, the rare tau-neutrinos created by â??oscillation' from muon-neutrinos on their way between CERN and LNGS. On average around three tau-neutrino events are predicted per year in each of the ~2000 ton detectors. The construction of the CNGS beam facility started in September 2000, and the first neutrino beam has been produced in July 2006. In the presently approved physics programme, it is foreseen to run the facility for five years.

Gschwendtner, E

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

442

The LMA MSW Solution of the Solar Neutrino Problem, Inverted Neutrino Mass Hierarchy and Reactor Neutrino Experiments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In the context of three-neutrino oscillations, we study the possibility of using antineutrinos from nuclear reactors to explore the 10^{-4} {\\rm eV^2} MSW solution of the solar neutrino problem and measure $\\ms$ with high precision. The KamLAND experiment is not expected to determine $\\ms$ if the latter happens to lie in the indicated region. By analysing both the total event rate suppression and the energy spectrum distortion caused by \\bar{\

S. T. Petcov; M. Piai

2002-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

443

FIRST STUDY OF DARK MATTER PROPERTIES WITH DETECTED SOLAR GRAVITY MODES AND NEUTRINOS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We derive new limits on the cold dark matter properties for weakly interacting massive particles (WIMPs), potentially trapped in the solar core by using for the first time the central temperature constrained by boron neutrinos and the central density constrained by the dipolar gravity modes detected with the Global Oscillations at Low Frequency/Solar Helioseismic Observatory instrument. These detections disfavor the presence of non-annihilating WIMPs for masses {<=}10 GeV and spin dependent cross-sections >5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -36} cm{sup 2} in the solar core but cannot constrain WIMP annihilation models. We suggest that in the coming years helio- and asteroseismology will provide complementary probes of dark matter.

Turck-Chieze, S.; Garcia, R. A. [CEA/DSM/IRFU/SAp-AIM, CE Saclay, Orme des Merisiers, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Lopes, I. [Centro Multidisciplinar de Astrofisica, Instituto Superior Tecnico, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); Ballot, J. [Institut de Recherche en Astrophysique et Planetologie, CNRS, 14 avenue Edouard Belin and Universite de Toulouse, UPS-OMP, IRAP, 31400 Toulouse (France); Couvidat, S. [W.W. Hansen. E. P. L., Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305 (United States); Mathur, S. [High Altitude Observatory, NCAR, P.O. Box 3000, Boulder, CO 80307 (United States); Salabert, D. [CNRS, Observatoire de la Cote d'Azur, Universite de Nice Sophia-Antipolis, BP 4229, 06304 Nice Cedex 4 (France); Silk, J., E-mail: Sylvaine.Turck-Chieze@cea.fr [UPMC-CNRS, UMR7095, Institut d'Astrophysique de Paris, F-75014 Paris (France)

2012-02-10T23:59:59.000Z

444

The Highest Energy Cosmic Rays, Gamma Rays and Neutrinos: Facts, Fancy and Resolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Although cosmic rays were discovered 90 years ago, we do not know how and where they are accelerated. There is compelling evidence that the highest energy cosmic rays are extra-galactic -- they cannot be contained by our galaxy's magnetic field anyway because their gyroradius exceeds its dimensions. Elementary elementary-particle physics dictates a universal upper limit on their energy of $5\\times10^{19}$ eV, the so-called Greisen-Kuzmin-Zatsepin cutoff; however, particles in excess of this energy have been observed, adding one more puzzle to the cosmic ray mystery. Mystery is nonetheless fertile ground for progress: we will review the facts and mention some very speculative interpretations. There is indeed a realistic hope that the oldest problem in astronomy will be resolved soon by ambitious experimentation: air shower arrays of $10^4$ km$^2$ area, arrays of air Cerenkov detectors and kilometer-scale neutrino observatories.

F. Halzen

2001-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

445

Neutrinos from Hell: the Dawn of Neutrino Geophysics  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Seismic waves have been for long time the only messenger reporting on the conditions deep inside the Earth. While global seismology provides amazing details about the structure of our planet, it is only sensitive to the mechanical properties of rocks and not to their chemical composition. In the last 5 years KamLAND and Borexino have started measuring anti-neutrinos produced by Uranium and Thorium inside the Earth. Such "Geoneutrinos" double the number of tools available to study the Earth's interior, enabling a sort of global chemical analysis of the planet, albeit for two elements only.I will discuss the results of these new measurements and put them in the context of the Earth Sciences."

None

2011-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

446

Neutrino Oscillation Experiments at Nuclear Reactors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this paper I give an overview of the status of neutrino oscillation experiments performed using nuclear reactors as sources of neutrinos. I review the present generation of experiments (Chooz and Palo Verde) with baselines of about 1 km as well as the next generation that will search for oscillations with a baseline of about 100 km. While the present detectors provide essential input towards the understanding of the atmospheric neutrino anomaly, in the future, the KamLAND reactor experiment represents our best opportunity to study very small mass neutrino mixing in laboratory conditions. In addition KamLAND with its very large fiducial mass and low energy threshold, will also be sensitive to a broad range of different physics.

Giorgio Gratta

1999-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

447

Helioseismology, MSW and the Solar Neutrino Problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In this talk I summarize recent work done in collaboration with Cliff Burgess and Denis Michaud, in which we performed a detailed investigation of how solar neutrinos propagate through helioseismic waves. We find that the MSW solar neutrino spectrum is not modified at all in the presence of seismic waves. This finding differs from earlier estimates mainly because most helioseismic waves are too weak in the vicinity of the MSW resonance to be of relevance for neutrino propagation. A special class of waves may however by subject to an instability and potentially have very large amplitudes. These waves do have long wavelengths, a situation for which the formalism employed in earlier analyses does not apply. Our numerical simulation significantly reduces their influence on neutrino propagation.

P. Bamert

1997-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

448

Test of Lorentz invariance with atmospheric neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A search for neutrino oscillations induced by Lorentz violation has been performed using 4,438 live-days of Super-Kamiokande atmospheric neutrino data. The Lorentz violation is included in addition to standard three-flavor oscillations using the non-perturbative Standard Model Extension (SME), allowing the use of the full range of neutrino path lengths, ranging from 15 to 12,800 km, and energies ranging from 100 MeV to more than 100 TeV in the search. No evidence of Lorentz violation was observed, so limits are set on the renormalizable isotropic SME coefficients in the $e\\mu$, $\\mu\\tau$, and $e\\tau$ sectors, improving the existing limits by up to seven orders of magnitude and setting limits for the first time in the neutrino $\\mu\\tau$ sector of the SME.

The Super-Kamiokande Collaboration; :; K. Abe; Y. Haga; Y. Hayato; M. Ikeda; K. Iyogi; J. Kameda; Y. Kishimoto; M. Miura; S. Moriyama; M. Nakahata; Y. Nakano; S. Nakayama; H. Sekiya; M. Shiozawa; Y. Suzuki; A. Takeda; H. Tanaka; T. Tomura; K. Ueno; R. A. Wendell; T. Yokozawa; T. Irvine; T. Kajita; I. Kametani; K. Kaneyuki; K. P. Lee; T. McLachlan; Y. Nishimura; E. Richard; K. Okumura; L. Labarga; P. Fernandez; J. Gustafson; E. Kearns; J. L. Raaf; S. Berkman; H. A. Tanaka; S. Tobayama; J. L. Stone; L. R. Sulak; M. Goldhaber; G. Carminati; W. R. Kropp; S. Mine; P. Weatherly; A. Renshaw; M. B. Smy; H. W. Sobel; V. Takhistov; K. S. Ganezer; B. L. Hartfiel; J. Hill; W. E. Keig; N. Hong; J. Y. Kim; I. T. Lim; T. Akiri; A. Himmel; K. Scholberg; C. W. Walter; T. Wongjirad; T. Ishizuka; S. Tasaka; J. S. Jang; J. G. Learned; S. Matsuno; S. N. Smith; T. Hasegawa; T. Ishida; T. Ishii; T. Kobayashi; T. Nakadaira; K. Nakamura; Y. Oyama; K. Sakashita; T. Sekiguchi; T. Tsukamoto; A. T. Suzuki; Y. Takeuchi; C. Bronner; S. Hirota; K. Huang; K. Ieki; T. Kikawa; A. Minamino; A. Murakami; T. Nakaya; K. Suzuki; S. Takahashi; K. Tateishi; Y. Fukuda; K. Choi; Y. Itow; G. Mitsuka; P. Mijakowski; J. Hignight; J. Imber; C. K. Jung; C. Yanagisawa; H. Ishino; A. Kibayashi; Y. Koshio; T. Mori; M. Sakuda; R. Yamaguchi; T. Yano; Y. Kuno; R. Tacik; S. B. Kim; H. Okazawa; Y. Choi; K. Nishijima; M. Koshiba; Y. Suda; Y. Totsuka; M. Yokoyama; K. Martens; Ll. Marti; M. R. Vagins; J. F. Martin; P. de Perio; A. Konaka; M. J. Wilking; S. Chen; Y. Zhang; K. Connolly; R. J. Wilkes

2015-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

449

Coherent neutrino scattering in dark matter detectors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus and weakly interacting massive particle-nucleus interaction signatures are expected to be quite similar. This paper discusses how a next-generation ton-scale dark matter detector could ...

Anderson, Alexander John

450

Geo-neutrinos and Earth's interior  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The deepest hole that has ever been dug is about 12 km deep. Geochemists analyze samples from the Earth's crust and from the top of the mantle. Seismology can reconstruct the density profile throughout all Earth, but not its composition. In this respect, our planet is mainly unexplored. Geo-neutrinos, the antineutrinos from the progenies of U, Th and K40 decays in the Earth, bring to the surface information from the whole planet, concerning its content of natural radioactive elements. Their detection can shed light on the sources of the terrestrial heat flow, on the present composition, and on the origins of the Earth. Geo-neutrinos represent a new probe of our planet, which can be exploited as a consequence of two fundamental advances that occurred in the last few years: the development of extremely low background neutrino detectors and the progress on understanding neutrino propagation. We review the status and the prospects of the field.

Gianni Fiorentini; Marcello Lissia; Fabio Mantovani

2007-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

451

Spectrometry of the Earth using Neutrino Oscillations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The unknown constituents of the interior of our home planet have provoked the human imagination and driven scientific exploration. We herein demonstrate that large neutrino detectors could be used in the near future to significantly improve our understanding of the Earth's inner chemical composition. Neutrinos, which are naturally produced in the atmosphere, traverse the Earth and undergo oscillations that depend on the Earth's electron density. The Earth's chemical composition can be determined by combining observations from large neutrino detectors with seismic measurements of the Earth's matter density. We present a method that will allow us to perform a measurement that can distinguish between composition models of the outer core. We show that the next-generation large-volume neutrino detectors can provide sufficient sensitivity to reject outer core models with large hydrogen content and thereby demonstrate the potential of this novel method. In the future, dedicated instruments could be capable of distin...

Rott, Carsten; Bose, Debanjan

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

The Superluminal Neutrinos from Deformed Lorentz Invariance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study two superluminal neutrino scenarios where \\delta v\\equiv (v-c)/c is a constant. To be consistent with the OPERA, Borexino, and ICARUS experiments and with the SN1987a observations, we assume that \\delta v_{\

Yunjie Huo; Tianjun Li; Yi Liao; Dimitri V. Nanopoulos; Yonghui Qi; Fei Wang

2012-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

453

An Independent Measurement of the Total Active 8B Solar Neutrino Flux Using an Array of 3He Proportional Counters at the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

current interactions in heavy water and precisely determinedNaCl to the ?1000 Mg of heavy water (D 2 O). This enhancedvated NaCl, into the heavy water in October 2005 and October

Aharmim,, B.; SNO Collaboration

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Constraints on Energy Independent Solutions of the Solar Neutrino Problem  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We analyze the latest published solar neutrino data assuming an arbitrary neutrino oscillation/conversion mechanism suppresses the electron neutrino flux from the Sun independent of energy. For oscillations/transitions into active (sterile) neutrinos such mechanisms are ruled out at 99.96 (99.9997) % C.L. assuming the standard solar model by Bahcall and Pinnsoneault '95 correctly predicts all solar neutrino fluxes within their estimated uncertainties. Even if one allows for $^8{\\rm B}$ and $^7{\\rm Be}$ solar neutrino fluxes that are vastly different from the ones in contemporary standard solar models these mechanisms are strongly disfavored by the data.

P. I. Krastev; S. T. Petcov

1996-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

455

KeV Warm Dark Matter and Composite Neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Elementary keV sterile Dirac neutrinos can be a natural ingredient of the composite neutrino scenario. For a certain class of composite neutrino theories, these sterile neutrinos naturally have the appropriate mixing angles to be resonantly produced warm dark matter (WDM). Alternatively, we show these sterile neutrinos can be WDM produced by an entropy-diluted thermal freeze-out, with the necessary entropy production arising not from an out-of-equilibrium decay, but rather from the confinement of the composite neutrino sector, provided there is sufficient supercooling.

Dean J Robinson; Yuhsin Tsai

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

456

Combining CPT-conjugate Neutrino channels at Fermilab  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We explore an alternative strategy to determine the neutrino mass hierarchy by making use of possible future neutrino facilities at Fermilab. Here, we use CPT-conjugate neutrino channels, exploiting a nu_mu beam from the NuMI beamline and a barnu_e beam from a betabeam experimental setup. Both experiments are performed at approximately the same E/L. We present different possible accelerator scenarios for the betabeam neutrino setup and fluxes. This CPT-conjugate neutrino channel scenario can extract the neutrino mass hierarchy down to sin^2 (2 theta_13) \\approx 0.02.

Andreas Jansson; Olga Mena; Stephen Parke; Niki Saoulidou

2007-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

457

Alternative Detection Methods for Highest Energy Neutrinos  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Several experimental techniques are currently under development, to measure the expected tiny fluxes of highest energy neutrinos above 10**18 eV. Projects in different stages of realisation are discussed here, which are based on optical and radio as well as acoustic detectors. For the detection of neutrino events in this energy range a combination of different detector concepts in one experiment seems to be most promising.

Rolf Nahnhauer

2004-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

458

Theory of Neutrinos: a White Paper  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During 2004, four divisions of the American Physical Society commissioned a study of neutrino physics to take stock of where the field is at the moment and where it is going in the near and far future. Several working groups looked at various aspects of this vast field. The summary was published as a main report entitled ''The Neutrino Matrix'' accompanied by short 50 page versions of the report of each working group. Theoretical research in this field has been quite extensive and touches many areas and the short 50 page report [1] provided only a brief summary and overview of few of the important points. The theory discussion group felt that it may be of value to the community to publish the entire study as a white paper and the result is the current article. After a brief overview of the present knowledge of neutrino masses and mixing and some popular ways to probe the new physics implied by recent data, the white paper summarizes what can be learned about physics beyond the Standard Model from the various proposed neutrino experiments. It also comments on the impact of the experiments on our understanding of the origin of the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe and the basic nature of neutrino interactions as well as the existence of possible additional neutrinos. Extensive references to original literature are provided.

Mohapatra, R.N.; Antusch, S.; Babu, K.S.; Barenboim, G.; Chen, Mu-Chun; Davidson, S.; de Gouvea, A.; de Holanda, P.; Dutta, Bhaskar; Grossman, Y.; Joshipura, A.; Kayser,; Kersten, J.; Keum, Y.Y.; King, S.F.; Langacker, P.; Lindner, M.; Loinaz, W.; Masina, I.; Mocioiu, I.; Mohanty, S.; /Maryland U. /Madrid, Autonoma U. /Southampton U. /Oklahoma

2006-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

459

Theory of neutrinos: A White paper  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

During 2004, four divisions of the American Physical Society commissioned a study of neutrino physics to take stock of where the field is at the moment and where it is going in the near and far future. Several working groups looked at various aspects of this vast field. The summary was published as a main report entitled ''The Neutrino Matrix'' accompanied by short 50 page versions of the report of each working group. Theoretical research in this field has been quite extensive and touches many areas and the short 50 page report [1] provided only a brief summary and overview of few of the important points. The theory discussion group felt that it may be of value to the community to publish the entire study as a white paper and the result is the current article. After a brief overview of the present knowledge of neutrino masses and mixing and some popular ways to probe the new physics implied by recent data, the white paper summarizes what can be learned about physics beyond the Standard Model from the various proposed neutrino experiments. It also comments on the impact of the experiments on our understanding of the origin of the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe and the basic nature of neutrino interactions as well as the existence of possible additional neutrinos. Extensive references to original literature are provided.

Mohapatra, R.N.; Antusch, S.; Babu, K.S.; Barenboim, G.; Chen, Mu-Chun; Davidson, S.; de Gouvea, A.; de Holanda, P.; Dutta, Bhaskar; Grossman, Y.; Joshipura, A.; Kayser,; Kersten, J.; Keum, Y.Y.; King, S.F.; Langacker, P.; Lindner, M.; Loinaz, W.; Masina, I.; Mocioiu, I.; Mohanty, S.; /Maryland U. /Madrid, Autonoma U. /Southampton U. /Oklahoma

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

Solar neutrino analysis of Super-Kamiokande  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Super-Kamiokande-IV data taking began in September of 2008, and with upgraded electronics and improvements to water system dynamics, calibration and analysis techniques, a clear solar neutrino signal could be extracted at recoil electron kinetic energies as low as 3.5 MeV. The SK-IV extracted solar neutrino flux between 3.5 and 19.5 MeV is found to be (2.36$\\pm$0.02(stat.)$\\pm$0.04(syst.))$\\times 10^6$ /(cm$^2$sec). The SK combined recoil electron energy spectrum favors distortions predicted by standard neutrino flavour oscillation parameters over a flat suppression at 1$\\sigma$ level. A maximum likelihood fit to the amplitude of the expected solar zenith angle variation of the elastic neutrino-electron scattering rate in SK, results in a day/night asymmetry of $-3.2\\pm1.1$(stat.)$\\pm$0.5(syst.)$%$. The 2.7 $\\sigma$ significance of non-zero asymmetry is the first indication of the regeneration of electron type solar neutrinos as they travel through Earth's matter. A fit to all solar neutrino data and KamLAND yields $\\sin^2 \\theta_{12} = 0.304 \\pm 0.013$, $\\sin^2 \\theta_{13} = 0.031^{+0.017}_{-0.015}$ and $\\Delta m^2_{21} = 7.45^{+0.20}_{-0.19} \\times 10^{-5} {\\rm eV}^2$.

Hiroyuki Sekiya; for the Super-Kamiokande Collaboration

2013-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "icecube neutrino observatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Current status of the LBNE neutrino beam  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Long Baseline Neutrino Experiment (LBNE) will utilize a neutrino beamline facility located at Fermilab. The facility is designed to aim a beam of neutrinos toward a detector placed in South Dakota. The neutrinos are produced in a three-step process. First, protons from the Main Injector hit a solid target and produce mesons. Then, the charged mesons are focused by a set of focusing horns into the decay pipe, towards the far detector. Finally, the mesons that enter the decay pipe decay into neutrinos. The parameters of the facility were determined by an amalgam of the physics goals, the Monte Carlo modeling of the facility, and the experience gained by operating the NuMI facility at Fermilab. The initial beam power is expected to be ~700 kW, however some of the parameters were chosen to be able to deal with a beam power of 2.3 MW. The LBNE Neutrino Beam has made significant changes to the initial design through consideration of numerous Value Engineering proposals and the current design is described.

Moore, Craig Damon; Crowley, Cory Francis; Hurh, Patrick; Hylen, James; Lundberg, Byron; Marchionni, Alberto; McGee, Mike; Mokhov, Nikolai V; Papadimitriou, Vaia; Plunkett, Rob; Reitzner, Sarah Diane; Stefanik, Andrew M; Velev, Gueorgui; Williams, Karlton; Zwaska, Robert Miles

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Theory of Neutrinos: A White Paper  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

During 2004, four divisions of the American Physical Society commissioned a study of neutrino physics to take stock of where the field is at the moment and where it is going in the near and far future. Several working groups looked at various aspects of this vast field. The summary was published as a main report entitled ``The Neutrino Matrix'' accompanied by short 50 page versions of the report of each working group. Theoretical research in this field has been quite extensive and touches many areas and the short 50 page report provided only a brief summary and overview of few of the important points. The theory discussion group felt that it may be of value to the community to publish the entire study as a white paper and the result is the current article. After a brief overview of the present knowledge of neutrino masses and mixing and some popular ways to probe the new physics implied by recent data, the white paper summarizes what can be learned about physics beyond the Standard Model from the various proposed neutrino experiments. It also comments on the impact of the experiments on our understanding of the origin of the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe and the basic nature of neutrino interactions as well as the existence of possible additional neutrinos. Extensive references to original literature are provided.

R. N. Mohapatra; S. Antusch; K. S. Babu; G. Barenboim; M. -C. Chen; S. Davidson; A. de Gouvea; P. de Holanda; B. Dutta; Y. Grossman; A. Joshipura; B. Kayser; J. Kersten; Y. Y. Keum; S. F. King; P. Langacker; M. Lindner; W. Loinaz; I. Masina; I. Mocioiu; S. Mohanty; H. Murayama; S. Pascoli; S. T. Petcov; A. Pilaftsis; P. Ramond; M. Ratz; W. Rodejohann; R. Shrock; T. Takeuchi; T. Underwood; L. Wolfenstein

2005-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

463

Is Cosmology Compatible with Sterile Neutrinos?  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

By combining data from cosmic microwave background experiments (including the recent WMAP third year results), large scale structure, and Lyman-{alpha} forest observations, we constrain the hypothesis of a fourth, sterile, massive neutrino. For the 3 massless+1 massive neutrino case, we bound the mass of the sterile neutrino to m{sub s}<0.26 eV (0.44 eV) at 95% (99.9%) C.L., which excludes at high significance the sterile neutrino hypothesis as an explanation of the LSND anomaly. We generalize the analysis to account for active neutrino masses and the possibility that the sterile abundance is not thermal. In the latter case, the contraints in the (mass,density) plane are nontrivial. For a mass of >1 or <0.05 eV, the cosmological energy density in sterile neutrinos is always constrained to be {omega}{sub {nu}}<0.003 at 95% C.L., but for a mass of {approx}0.25 eV, {omega}{sub {nu}} can be as large as 0.01.

Dodelson, Scott; Melchiorri, Alessandro; Slosar, Anze [Particle Astrophysics Center, FERMILAB, Batavia, Illinois 60510-0500 (United States); Physics Department and Sezione INFN, University of Rome 'La Sapienza', Ple Aldo Moro 2, 00185 Rome (Italy); Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

2006-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

464

Accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Neutrino oscillations were first discovered by experiments looking at neutrinos coming from extra-terrestrial sources, namely the sun and the atmosphere, but we will be depending on earth-based sources to take many of the next steps in this field. This article describes what has been learned so far from accelerator-based neutrino oscillation experiments, and then describe very generally what the next accelerator-based steps are. In section 2 the article discusses how one uses an accelerator to make a neutrino beam, in particular, one made from decays in flight of charged pions. There are several different neutrino detection methods currently in use, or under development. In section 3 these are presented, with a description of the general concept, an example of such a detector, and then a brief discussion of the outstanding issues associated with this detection technique. Finally, section 4 describes how the measurements of oscillation probabilities are made. This includes a description of the near detector technique and how it can be used to make the most precise measurements of neutrino oscillations.

Harris, Deborah A.; /Fermilab

2007-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Neutrino induced events in the MINOS detectors  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The MINOS experiment is designed to study neutrino oscillations. It uses an accelerator generated beam of neutrinos and two detectors, the smaller at a distance of 1km and the larger at 735 km. By comparing the spectrum and flavour composition of the beam at the two detectors precise determinations of the oscillation parameters are possible. This thesis concentrates on the analysis of data from the larger Far Detector. By studying the spectrum of neutral current events it is possible to look for evidence of non-interacting 'sterile' neutrinos. The thesis describes how events are selected for this analysis, and a method for discriminating between charged current and neutral current events. The systematic uncertainties resulting from these cuts are evaluated. Several techniques for using Near Detector data to eliminate systematic uncertainties in the predicted Far Detector spectrum are compared. An oscillation analysis, based on the first year of MINOS data, uses the selected events to make a measurement of f{sub s}, the fraction of unseen neutrinos that are sterile. The measured value is f{sub s} = 0.07{sup +0.32} at 68%C.L., and is consistent with the standard three-neutrino picture, which has no sterile neutrino.

Litchfield, Reuben Phillip; /Oxford U.

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

High intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The EUROnu project has studied three possible options for future, high intensity neutrino oscillation facilities in Europe. The first is a Super Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of pions created by bombarding targets with a 4 MW proton beam from the CERN High Power Superconducting Proton Linac. The far detector for this facility is the 500 kt MEMPHYS water Cherenkov, located in the Fr\\'ejus tunnel. The second facility is the Neutrino Factory, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of {\\mu}+ and {\\mu}- beams in a storage ring. The far detector in this case is a 100 kt Magnetised Iron Neutrino Detector at a baseline of 2000 km. The third option is a Beta Beam, in which the neutrinos come from the decay of beta emitting isotopes, in particular 6He and 18Ne, also stored in a ring. The far detector is also the MEMPHYS detector in the Fr\\'ejus tunnel. EUROnu has undertaken conceptual designs of these facilities and studied the performance of the detectors. Based on this, it has determined the ph...

Edgecock, T R; Davenne, T; Densham, C; Fitton, M; Kelliher, D; Loveridge, P; Machida, S; Prior, C; Rogers, C; Rooney, M; Thomason, J; Wilcox, D; Wildner, E; Efthymiopoulos, I; Garoby, R; Gilardoni, S; Hansen, C; Benedetto, E; Jensen, E; Kosmicki, A; Martini, M; Osborne, J; Prior, G; Stora, T; Melo-Mendonca, T; Vlachoudis, V; Waaijer, C; Cupial, P; Chancé, A; Longhin, A; Payet, J; Zito, M; Baussan, E; Bobeth, C; Bouquerel, E; Dracos, M; Gaudiot, G; Lepers, B; Osswald, F; Poussot, P; Vassilopoulos, N; Wurtz, J; Zeter, V; Bielski, J; Kozien, M; Lacny, L; Skoczen, B; Szybinski, B; Ustrycka, A; Wroblewski, A; Marie-Jeanne, M; Balint, P; Fourel, C; Giraud, J; Jacob, J; Lamy, T; Latrasse, L; Sortais, P; Thuillier, T; Mitrofanov, S; Loiselet, M; Keutgen, Th; Delbar, Th; Debray, F; Trophine, C; Veys, S; Daversin, C; Zorin, V; Izotov, I; Skalyga, V; Burt, G; Dexter, A C; Kravchuk, V L; Marchi, T; Cinausero, M; Gramegna, F; De Angelis, G; Prete, G; Collazuol, G; Laveder, M; Mazzocco, M; Mezzetto, M; Signorini, C; Vardaci, E; Di Nitto, A; Brondi, A; La Rana, G; Migliozzi, P; Moro, R; Palladino, V; Gelli, N; Berkovits, D; Hass, M; Hirsh, T Y; Schaumann, M; Stahl, A; Wehner, J; Bross, A; Kopp, J; Neuffer, D; Wands, R; Bayes, R; Laing, A; Soler, P; Agarwalla, S K; Villanueva, A Cervera; Donini, A; Ghosh, T; Cadenas, J J Gómez; Hernández, P; Martín-Albo, J; Mena, O; Burguet-Castell, J; Agostino, L; Buizza-Avanzini, M; Marafini, M; Patzak, T; Tonazzo, A; Duchesneau, D; Mosca, L; Bogomilov, M; Karadzhov, Y; Matev, R; Tsenov, R; Akhmedov, E; Blennow, M; Lindner, M; Schwetz, T; Martinez, E Fernández; Maltoni, M; Menéndez, J; Giunti, C; García, M C González; Salvado, J; Coloma, P; Huber, P; Li, T; López-Pavón, J; Orme, C; Pascoli, S; Meloni, D; Tang, J; Winter, W; Ohlsson, T; Zhang, H; Scotto-Lavina, L; Terranova, F; Bonesini, M; Tortora, L; Alekou, A; Aslaninejad, M; Bontoiu, C; Kurup, A; Jenner, L J; Long, K; Pasternak, J; Pozimski, J; Back, J J; Harrison, P; Beard, K; Bogacz, A; Berg, J S; Stratakis, D; Witte, H; Snopok, P; Bliss, N; Cordwell, M; Moss, A; Pattalwar, S; Apollonio, M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

Earthquake Forecast via Neutrino Tomography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the possibility of forecasting earthquakes by means of (anti)neutrino tomography. Antineutrinos emitted from reactors are used as a probe. As the antineutrinos traverse through a region prone to earthquakes, observable variations in the matter effect on the antineutrino oscillation would provide a tomography of the vicinity of the region. In this preliminary work, we adopt a simplified model for the geometrical profile and matter density in a fault zone. We calculate the survival probability of electron antineutrinos for cases without and with an anomalous accumulation of electrons which can be considered as a clear signal of the coming earthquake, at the geological region with a fault zone, and find that the variation may reach as much as 3% for $\\bar \

Bin Wang; Ya-Zheng Chen; Xue-Qian Li

2011-03-29T23:59:59.000Z

468

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia Electronics Division Internal Report line. A 12 V stor- e battery may be attached to the battery connector with pin 1 ground and pin 2 +12 V DC nominal. When the primary power fails, the battery will supply power to the clock. About 1 1/2 amp

Groppi, Christopher

469

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA ELECTRONICS DIVISION TECHNICAL NOTE .:41; CLOCK INFORMATION FOR AST 286 COMPUTERS Ronald B. Weimer The battery backed clock is only read (which does not set the battery clock) the AST keeps time from a second crystal oscillator. A rough block

Groppi, Christopher

470

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia Electronics Division Internal Report No. 109 BATTERY PACK FOR HEWLETT-PACKARD 5065A RUBIDIUM FREQUENCY STANDARD Michael Balister OCTOBER 1971 NUMBER OF COPIES: 150 #12;BATTERY PACK FOR HEWLETT-PACKARD 5065A RUBIDIUM FREQUENCY STANDARD

Groppi, Christopher

471

BIG BEAR SOLAR OBSERVATORY CENTER FOR SOLAR-TERRESTRIAL RESEARCH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

BIG BEAR SOLAR OBSERVATORY CENTER FOR SOLAR-TERRESTRIAL RESEARCH Faculty Position in Solar Physics, New Jersey Institute of Technology A tenure track faculty position in solar physics is available of NJIT's program in solar physics, visit http://solar.njit.edu. Applicants are required to have a Ph

472

The HAWC Gamma-Ray Observatory: Design, Calibration, and Operation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The High-Altitude Water Cherenkov Gamma Ray Observatory (HAWC) is under construction 4100 meters above sea level at Sierra Negra, Mexico. We describe the design and cabling of the detector, the characterization of the photomultipliers, and the timing calibration system. We also outline a next-generation detector based on the water Cherenkov technique.

Abeysekara, A U; Alvarez, C; Álvarez, J D; Arceo, R; Arteaga-Velázquez, J C; Solares, H A Ayala; Barber, A S; Baughman, B M; Bautista-Elivar, N; Belmont, E; BenZvi, S Y; Berley, D; Rosales, M Bonilla; Braun, J; Caballero-Lopez, R A; Caballero-Mora, K S; Carramiñana, A; Castillo, M; Cotti, U; Cotzomi, J; de la Fuente, E; De León, C; DeYoung, T; Hernandez, R Diaz; Díaz-Vélez, J C; Dingus, B L; DuVernois, M A; Ellsworth, R W; Fernandez, A; Fiorino, D W; Fraija, N; Galindo, A; Garfias, F; González, L X; González, M M; Goodman, J A; Grabski, V; Gussert, M; Hampel-Arias, Z; Hui, C M; Hüntemeyer, P; Imran, A; Iriarte, A; Karn, P; Kieda, D; Kunde, G J; Lara, A; Lauer, R J; Lee, W H; Lennarz, D; Vargas, H León; Linares, E C; Linnemann, J T; Longo, M; Luna-GarcIa, R; Marinelli, A; Martinez, H; Martinez, O; Martínez-Castro, J; Matthews, J A J; Miranda-Romagnoli, P; Moreno, E; Mostafá, M; Nava, J; Nellen, L; Newbold, M; Noriega-Papaqui, R; Oceguera-Becerra, T; Patricelli, B; Pelayo, R; Pérez-Pérez, E G; Pretz, J; Rivière, C; Rosa-González, D; Salazar, H; Salesa, F; Sanchez, F E; Sandoval, A; Santos, E; Schneider, M; Silich, S; Sinnis, G; Smith, A J; Sparks, K; Springer, R W; Taboada, I; Toale, P A; Tollefson, K; Torres, I; Ukwatta, T N; Villaseñor, L; Weisgarber, T; Westerhoff, S; Wisher, I G; Wood, J; Yodh, G B; Younk, P W; Zaborov, D; Zepeda, A; Zhou, H

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

11Chandra 'Sees' a Distant Planet Evaporating NASA's Chandra Observatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

energy. A simple model of this planet's interior suggests that its atmosphere might account for as much11Chandra 'Sees' a Distant Planet Evaporating NASA's Chandra Observatory has discovered that the star CoRot-2a is a powerful X-ray source. This is unfortunate because it is also known that a planet

474

NGEE Arctic Webcam Photographs, Barrow Environmental Observatory, Barrow, Alaska  

DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

The NGEE Arctic Webcam (PTZ Camera) captures two views of seasonal transitions from its generally south-facing position on a tower located at the Barrow Environmental Observatory near Barrow, Alaska. Images are captured every 30 minutes. Historical images are available for download. The camera is operated by the U.S. DOE sponsored Next Generation Ecosystem Experiments - Arctic (NGEE Arctic) project.

Bob Busey; Larry Hinzman

475

Early Science Results from SOFIA, the World's Largest Airborne Observatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy, or SOFIA, is the largest flying observatory ever built,consisting of a 2.7-meter diameter telescope embedded in a modified Boeing 747-SP aircraft. SOFIA is a joint project between NASA and the German Aerospace Center Deutsches Zentrum fur Luft und-Raumfahrt (DLR). By flying at altitudes up to 45000 feet, the observatory gets above 99.9 percent of the infrared-absorbing water vapor in the Earth's atmosphere. This opens up an almost uninterrupted wavelength range from 0.3-1600 microns that is in large part obscured from ground based observatories. Since its 'Initial Science Flight' in December 2010, SOFIA has flown several dozen science flights, and has observed a wide array of objects from Solar System bodies, to stellar nurseries, to distant galaxies. This paper reviews a few of the exciting new science results from these first flights which were made by three instruments: the mid-infrared camera FORCAST, the far-infrared heterodyne spectrometer GREAT, and...

De Buizer, James M

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

476

Results from the Milagro Gamma-Ray Observatory  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

V energies, and a search for transient emission above 100 GeV from gamma-ray bursts. 1 Introduction remnants and gamma-ray bursts (GRB). Gamma rays are also produced when high-energy cosmic rays interactResults from the Milagro Gamma-Ray Observatory E. Blaufuss for the Milagro Collaboration a,1 , a

California at Santa Cruz, University of

477

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia ELECTRONICS DIVISION INTERNAL REPORT the earth's axis and perpendic- ular to the Greenwich Meridian, call it the east-west plane. A telescope's rectangular cordinate components (x,y,z) are X = 882880.0208m Distance from the east-west plane, Greenwich

Groppi, Christopher

478

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia Electronics Division Internal Report which has been used on all systems mounted in the past at the 300-foot telescope. The East and West 14 are so made to allow the East and West 1410 MHz feeds to be positioned 2. 63, 5.24, 7.88 and 10. 52

Groppi, Christopher

479

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY Green Bank, West Virginia Electronics Division Internal Report (Polarization) Focus Declination Beam East on Sky (Feed West of Center) Beam North to West on Sky (Feed North to West on Sky) Feed moves down toward surface Beam South on Sky Position Read- out Sign 300-FOOT

Groppi, Christopher

480

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK ) WEST VIRGINIA  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

NATIONAL RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATORY GREEN BANK ) WEST VIRGINIA ELECTRONICS DIVISION INTERNAL REPORT No. 159 INTERFERENCE POTENTIAL FOR RADIO ASTRONOMY OBSERVATIONS AT GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA CRAIG ASTRONOMY OBSERVATIONS AT GREEN BANK, WEST VIRGINIA Craig R. Moore and James L. Dolan Introduction

Groppi, Christopher

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "icecube neutrino observatory" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.