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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water path" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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1

Determining Cloud Ice Water Path from High-Frequency Microwave...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Determining Cloud Ice Water Path from High-Frequency Microwave Measurements G. Liu Department of Meteorology Florida State University Tallahassee, Florida Introduction A better...

2

ARM - PI Product - Large Scale Ice Water Path and 3-D Ice Water Content  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsLarge Scale Ice Water Path and 3-D Ice Water ProductsLarge Scale Ice Water Path and 3-D Ice Water Content Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Large Scale Ice Water Path and 3-D Ice Water Content Site(s) SGP TWP General Description Cloud ice water concentration is one of the most important, yet poorly observed, cloud properties. Developing physical parameterizations used in general circulation models through single-column modeling is one of the key foci of the ARM program. In addition to the vertical profiles of temperature, water vapor and condensed water at the model grids, large-scale horizontal advective tendencies of these variables are also required as forcing terms in the single-column models. Observed horizontal advection of condensed water has not been available because the

3

Determination of Ice Water Path Over the ARM SGP Using Combined Surface and Satellite Datasets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Determination of Ice Water Path Over the ARM SGP Using Determination of Ice Water Path Over the ARM SGP Using Combined Surface and Satellite Datasets J. Huang, M. M. Khaiyer, and P. W. Heck Analytical Services & Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia P. Minnis and B. Lin Atmospheric Sciences National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia T.-F. Fan Science Applications International Corporation Hampton, Virginia Introduction Global information of cloud ice water path (IWP) is urgently needed for testing of global climate models (GCMs) and other applications. Accurate quantification of the IWP is essential for characterizing the hydrological and radiation budget. For example, the reflection of shortwave radiation by ice clouds reduces the solar energy reaching the earth's surface. Ice clouds can also trap the longwave radiation

4

Retrieval of cloud properties using CALIPSO Imaging Infrared Radiometer. Part II: effective diameter and ice water path  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper describes the version 3 Level 2 operational analysis of the Imaging Infrared Radiometer (IIR) data collected in the framework of the CALIPSO mission to retrieve cirrus cloud effective diameter and ice water path in synergy with the ...

Anne Garnier; Jacques Pelon; Philippe Dubuisson; Ping Yang; Michaël Faivre; Olivier Chomette; Nicolas Pascal; Pat Lucker; Tim Murray

5

Relationship between Ice Water Path and Downward Longwave Radiation for Clouds Optically Thin in the Infrared: Observations and Model Calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A vertically pointing 3.2-cm radar is used to observe altostratus and cirrus clouds as they pass overhead. Radar reflectivities are used in combination with an empirical Zi-IWC (ice water content) relationship developed by Sassen (1987) to ...

Taneil Uttal; Sergey Y. Matrosov; Jack B. Snider; Robert A. Kropfli

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

ARM - Measurement - Ice water content  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Ice water content The concentration (massvol) of ice water particles in a cloud....

7

Response of ice and liquid water paths of tropical cyclones to global warming simulated by a global nonhydrostatic model with explicit cloud microphysics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud feedback plays a key role in the future climate projection. Using global non-hydrostatic model (GNHM) simulation data for a present-day (CTL) and a warmer (GW) experiment, we estimate the contribution of tropical cyclones (TC) to ice/liquid ...

Yohei Yamada; Masaki Satoh

8

WATER ICE IN THE KUIPER BELT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We examine a large collection of low-resolution near-infrared spectra of Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs) and centaurs in an attempt to understand the presence of water ice in the Kuiper Belt. We find that water ice on the surface of these objects occurs in three separate manners: (1) Haumea family members uniquely show surfaces of nearly pure water ice, presumably a consequence of the fragmentation of the icy mantle of a larger differentiated proto-Haumea; (2) large objects with absolute magnitudes of H ice-perhaps mixed with ammonia-that appears to be related to possibly ancient cryovolcanism on these large objects; and (3) smaller KBOs and centaurs which are neither Haumea family members nor cold-classical KBOs appear to divide into two families (which we refer to as 'neutral' and 'red'), each of which is a mixture of a common nearly neutral component and either a slightly red or very red component that also includes water ice. A model suggesting that the difference between neutral and red objects due to formation in an early compact solar system either inside or outside, respectively, of the {approx}20 AU methanol evaporation line is supported by the observation that methanol is only detected on the reddest objects, which are those which would be expected to have the most of the methanol containing mixture.

Brown, M. E.; Fraser, W. C. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Schaller, E. L., E-mail: mbrown@caltech.edu [NASA Dryden Aircraft Operations Facility, Palmdale, CA 93550 (United States)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

9

Ice Age Epochs and the Sun's Path Through the Galaxy  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a calculation of the Sun's motion through the Milky Way Galaxy over the last 500 million years. The integration is based upon estimates of the Sun's current position and speed from measurements with Hipparcos and upon a realistic model for the Galactic gravitational potential. We estimate the times of the Sun's past spiral arm crossings for a range in assumed values of the spiral pattern angular speed. We find that for a difference between the mean solar and pattern speed of Omega_Sun - Omega_p = 11.9 +/- 0.7 km/s/kpc the Sun has traversed four spiral arms at times that appear to correspond well with long duration cold periods on Earth. This supports the idea that extended exposure to the higher cosmic ray flux associated with spiral arms can lead to increased cloud cover and long ice age epochs on Earth.

D. R. Gies; J. W. Helsel

2005-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

10

SURVIVAL OF AMORPHOUS WATER ICE ON CENTAURS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Centaurs are believed to be Kuiper Belt objects in transition between Jupiter and Neptune before possibly becoming Jupiter family comets. Some indirect observational evidence is consistent with the presence of amorphous water ice in Centaurs. Some of them also display a cometary activity, probably triggered by the crystallization of the amorphous water ice, as suggested by Jewitt and this work. Indeed, we investigate the survival of amorphous water ice against crystallization, using a fully three-dimensional thermal evolution model. Simulations are performed for varying heliocentric distances and obliquities. They suggest that crystallization can be triggered as far as 16 AU, though amorphous ice can survive beyond 10 AU. The phase transition is an efficient source of outgassing up to 10-12 AU, which is broadly consistent with the observations of the active Centaurs. The most extreme case is 167P/CINEOS, which barely crystallizes in our simulations. However, amorphous ice can be preserved inside Centaurs in many heliocentric distance-obliquity combinations, below a {approx}5-10 m crystallized crust. We also find that outgassing due to crystallization cannot be sustained for a time longer than 10{sup 4}-10{sup 4} years, leading to the hypothesis that active Centaurs might have recently suffered from orbital changes. This could be supported by both observations (although limited) and dynamical studies.

Guilbert-Lepoutre, Aurelie, E-mail: aguilbert@ucla.edu [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Water-Cooled Ice Machines, Purchasing Specifications for Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ice Makers. b) Measured in accordance with ARI Standard 810-2003. Does not include condenser water use. Buying Energy-Efficient Water-Cooled Ice Machines Several types of...

12

CYANATE ION IN COMPACT AMORPHOUS WATER ICE  

SciTech Connect

The 4.62 {mu}m infrared (2164.5 cm{sup -1}) absorption band, observed in ice mantels toward many young stellar objects, has been mostly attributed to the {nu}{sub 3} (CN stretch) band of OCN{sup -} ions. We present in this work a spectroscopic study of OCN{sup -} ions embedded in compact amorphous ice in a range of concentrations and temperatures relevant to astronomical observations together with quantum mechanical calculations of the {nu}{sub 3} band of OCN{sup -} in various H{sub 2}O environments. The ice samples containing the ions are prepared through hyperquenching of liquid droplets of K{sup +}OCN{sup -} solutions on a substrate at 14 K. The {nu}{sub 3} OCN{sup -} band appears as a broad feature peaking at 4.64 {mu}m with a secondary maximum at 4.54 {mu}m and is much weaker than the corresponding peak in the liquid solution or in the solid salt. A similar weakening is observed for other OCN{sup -} absorption peaks at 7.66 {mu}m (2{nu}{sub 2}) and 8.20 {mu}m ({nu}{sub 1}). The theoretical calculations for the {nu}{sub 3} vibration lead to a range of frequencies spanning the experimentally observed width. This frequency spread could help explain the pronounced drop in the band intensity in the ice. The OCN{sup -} {nu}{sub 3} band in the present compact ices is also broader and much weaker than that reported in the literature for OCN{sup -} ions obtained by variously processing porous ice samples containing suitable neutral precursors. The results of this study indicate that the astronomical detection of OCN{sup -} in ice mantels could be significantly impaired if the ion is embedded in a compact water network.

Mate, Belen; Herrero, Victor J.; Rodriguez-Lazcano, Yamilet; Moreno, Miguel A.; Escribano, Rafael [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, IEM-CSIC, Serrano 121, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Fernandez-Torre, Delia [Departamento de Fisica Teorica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28050 Madrid (Spain); Gomez, Pedro C. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica I, Universidad Complutense, Unidad Asociada UCM-CSIC, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

13

On water ice formation in interstellar clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model is proposed for the formation of water ice mantles on grains in interstellar clouds. This occurs by direct accretion of monomers from the gas, be they formed by gas or surface reactions. The model predicts the existence of a threshold in interstellar light extinction, A(v), which is mainly determined by the adsorption energy of water molecules on the grain material; for hydrocarbon material, chemical simulation places this energy between 0.5 and 2 kcal/mole, which sets the visible exctinction threshold at a few magnitudes, as observed. Once the threshold is crossed, all available water molecules in the gas are quickly adsorbed, forming an ice mantle, because the grain cools down and the adsorption energy on ice is higher than on bare grain. The model also predicts that the thickness of the mantle, and, hence, the optical thickness at 3 mu, grow linearly with A(v), as observed, with a slope which depends upon the total amount of water in the gas. Chemical simulation was also used to determine the adsorption sites and energies of O and OH on hydrocarbons, and study the dynamics of formation of water molecules by surface reactions with gaseous H atoms, as well as their chances of sticking in situ.

Renaud Papoular

2005-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

14

Dynamics of Ice Nucleation on Water Repellent Surfaces Azar Alizadeh,*,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for nonicing applications. 1. INTRODUCTION Ice accretion on surfaces of aircraft, wind turbine blades, oil on surfaces with various wettabilities during and subsequent to single water droplet impact. We use surface wetting and icing phase transition events. Our methodology provides insights into multiple ice

Dhinojwala, Ali

15

The Melting of Ice in Cold Stratified Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider the melting of ice in cold water vertically stratified with salt. The study extends previous investigations of ice melting in cold water at uniform salinity and in warm water with a salinity gradient. We find, in agreement with the ...

Herbert E. Huppert; Edward G. Josberger

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

THE FORMATION AND REACTIONS OF OXIDANTS IN WATER ICE .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation investigates the chemistry in water ice of radical species, such as OH and O, produced in radio-frequency discharge. This novel method of studying… (more)

Do, Nhut

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

A Parameterization of the Visible Extinction Coefficient of Ice Clouds in Terms of the Ice/Water Content  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes a parameterization of the visible extinction coefficient of cirrus and frontal ice cloud in terms of the ice/water content. The parameterization is based on the discovery that the ice cloud particle size spectra from a ...

C. Martin R. Platt

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

In Situ Aircraft Measurements of the Vertical Distribution of Liquid and Ice Water Content in Midlatitude Mixed-Phase Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vertical distribution of liquid and ice water content and their partitioning is studied using 34 cases of in situ measured microphysical properties in midlatitude mixed-phase clouds, with liquid water path ranging from near zero to ~248 g m?2, ...

Yoo-Jeong Noh; Curtis J. Seaman; Thomas H. Vonder Haar; Guosheng Liu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Liquid Water Oceans in Ice Giants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aptly named, ice giants such as Uranus and Neptune contain significant amounts of water. While this water cannot be present near the cloud tops, it must be abundant in the deep interior. We investigate the likelihood of a liquid water ocean existing in the hydrogen-rich region between the cloud tops and deep interior. Starting from an assumed temperature at a given upper tropospheric pressure (the photosphere), we follow a moist adiabat downward. The mixing ratio of water to hydrogen in the gas phase is small in the photosphere and increases with depth. The mixing ratio in the condensed phase is near unity in the photosphere and decreases with depth; this gives two possible outcomes. If at some pressure level the mixing ratio of water in the gas phase is equal to that in the deep interior, then that level is the cloud base. Alternately, if the mixing ratio of water in the condensed phase reaches that in the deep interior, then the surface of a liquid ocean will occur. We find that Neptune is both too warm (photospheric temperature too high) and too dry (mixing ratio of water in the deep interior too low) for liquid oceans to exist at present. To have a liquid ocean, Neptune's deep interior water to gas ratio would have to be higher than current models allow, and the density at 19 kbar would have to be ~ 0.8 g/cm^3. Such a high density is inconsistent with gravitational data obtained during the Voyager flyby. As Neptune cools, the probability of a liquid ocean increases. Extrasolar "hot Neptunes," which presumably migrate inward toward their parent stars, cannot harbor liquid water oceans unless they have lost almost all of the hydrogen and helium from their deep interiors.

Sloane J. Wiktorowicz; Andrew P. Ingersoll

2006-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

20

Ice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ice Ice Nature Bulletin No. 661-A january 7, 1978 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation ICE There was a time when ice, cut on frozen ponds and lakes, was transported by fast clipper ships from New England to New Orleans where it was worth its weight in gold. Nowadays this cold brittle colorless substance is commonplace everywhere. Few people, however, know that ice is one of the strangest of all solids; and that, because of its unique properties, life on earth is what it is. Those properties are due to the distinctive structure of a molecule of water, formed of three elemental particles or atoms -- two of hydrogen and one of oxygen -- expressed by the familiar symbol, H2O. The three atoms are held together by two chemical bonds expressed by another symbol, H-O-H. Briefly, the unique properties of water, water vapor, and ice arise from that bonding and the arrangement of electron pairs around the oxygen atom.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water path" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

An Evaluation of MWR Retrievals of Liquid Water Path  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Evaluation of MWR Retrievals Evaluation of MWR Retrievals of Liquid Water Path and Precipitable Water Vapor R. T. Marchand and T. P. Ackerman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction This paper offers some observations on the quality of Microwave Radiometer (MWR) retrievals of precipitable water vapor (PWV) and liquid water path (LWP). The paper shows case study comparisons between the standard "statistical" approach and those obtained using an iterative solution of the microwave radiative transfer equations. These examples show how improvements in the retrieval of LWP can be obtained by using an iterative approach, but that possible improvements are limited by the accuracy of the forward model absorption coefficients and errors in the brightness temperature measurements. Each of these effects limits the

22

Ice, Snow and Water: impacts of climate change on California and Himalayan Asia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sustainability BRIEFING NOTE  Ice, Snow  and Water: impacts light absorption of snow and ice as pollutants darken theAsian region of snow, ice, water, and mountains, with huge

Fenner, R. A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Radiation chemistry in ammonia-water ices  

SciTech Connect

We studied the effects of 100 keV proton irradiation on films of ammonia-water mixtures between 20 and 120 K. Irradiation destroys ammonia, leading to the formation and trapping of H{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, NO, and N{sub 2}O, the formation of cavities containing radiolytic gases, and ejection of molecules by sputtering. Using infrared spectroscopy, we show that at all temperatures the destruction of ammonia is substantial, but at higher temperatures (120 K), it is nearly complete ({approx}97% destroyed) after a fluence of 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}. Using mass spectroscopy and microbalance gravimetry, we measure the sputtering yield of our sample and the main components of the sputtered flux. We find that the sputtering yield depends on fluence. At low temperatures, the yield is very low initially and increases quadratically with fluence, while at 120 K the yield is constant and higher initially. The increase in the sputtering yield with fluence is explained by the formation and trapping of the ammonia decay products, N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}, which are seen to be ejected from the ice at all temperatures.

Loeffler, M. J. [Astrochemistry Laboratory, NASA GSFC, Code 691, Greenbelt, Maryland 20775 (United States); Laboratory for Atomic and Surface Physics, Engineering Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Raut, U.; Baragiola, R. A. [Laboratory for Atomic and Surface Physics, Engineering Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States)

2010-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

24

Retrieval of Ice Cloud Parameters Using the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An algorithm is developed to derive cloud ice water path (IWP) and ice particle effective diameters De from the advanced microwave sounding unit (AMSU) measurements. In the algorithm, both IWP and De are related to the ice particle scattering ...

Limin Zhao; Fuzhong Weng

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Interface limited growth of heterogeneously nucleated ice in supercooled water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heterogeneous ice growth exhibits a maximum in freezing rate arising from the competition between kinetics and the thermodynamic driving force between the solid and liquid states. Here, we use molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate the atomistic details of this competition, focusing on water properties in the interfacial region along the secondary prismatic direction. The crystal growth velocity is maximized when the efficiency of converting interfacial water molecules to ice, collectively known as the attachment kinetics, is greatest. We find water molecules that contact the intermediate ice layer in concave regions along the atomistically roughened surface are more likely to freeze directly. The increased roughening of the solid surface at large undercoolings consequently plays an important limiting role on the rate of ice growth, as water molecules are unable to integrate into increasingly deeper surface pockets. These results provide insights into the molecular mechanisms for self-assembly of solid phases that are important in many biological and atmospheric processes.

Razvan A. Nistor; Thomas E. Markland; B. J. Berne

2013-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

26

Cloud Liquid Water and Ice Content Retrieval by Multiwavelength Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud liquid water and ice content retrieval in precipitating clouds by the differential attenuation method using a dual-wavelength radar, as a function of the wavelength pair, is first discussed. In the presence of non-Rayleigh scatterers, ...

Nicolas Gaussiat; Henri Sauvageot; Anthony J. Illingworth

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

Ice Water Path Estimation and Characterization Using Passive Microwave Radiometry  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microwave emission emerging from a precipitating cloud top and lying in a radiometer's field of view represents the culmination of a complex interaction between emitted microwave radiation and its ongoing extinction through overlapping regions of ...

J. Vivekanandan; J. Turk; V. N. Bringi

1991-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

28

Anchored Clathrate Waters Bind Antifreeze Proteins to Ice  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The mechanism by which antifreeze proteins (AFPs) irreversibly bind to ice has not yet been resolved. The ice-binding site of an AFP is relatively hydrophobic, but also contains many potential hydrogen bond donors/acceptors. The extent to which hydrogen bonding and the hydrophobic effect contribute to ice binding has been debated for over 30 years. Here we have elucidated the ice-binding mechanism through solving the first crystal structure of an Antarctic bacterial AFP. This 34-kDa domain, the largest AFP structure determined to date, folds as a Ca{sup 2+}-bound parallel beta-helix with an extensive array of ice-like surface waters that are anchored via hydrogen bonds directly to the polypeptide backbone and adjacent side chains. These bound waters make an excellent three-dimensional match to both the primary prism and basal planes of ice and in effect provide an extensive X-ray crystallographic picture of the AFP{vert_ellipsis}ice interaction. This unobstructed view, free from crystal-packing artefacts, shows the contributions of both the hydrophobic effect and hydrogen bonding during AFP adsorption to ice. We term this mode of binding the 'anchored clathrate' mechanism of AFP action.

C Garnham; R Campbell; P Davies

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

29

Ice Cloud Retrievals and Analysis with the Compact Scanning Submillimeter Imaging Radiometer and the Cloud Radar System during CRYSTAL FACE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Submillimeter-wave radiometry is a new technique for determining ice water path (IWP) and particle size in upper-tropospheric ice clouds. The first brightness temperatures images of ice clouds above 340 GHz were measured by the Compact Scanning ...

K. Franklin Evans; James R. Wang; Paul E. Racette; Gerald Heymsfield; Lihua Li

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Retrieval of Ice Cloud Parameters Using a Microwave Imaging Radiometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the radiative transfer theory, the microwave radiance emanating from ice clouds at arbitrary viewing angles is expressed as an analytic function of the cloud ice water path (IWP), the particle effective diameter (De), and the particle ...

Fuzhong Weng; Norman C. Grody

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

New Phases of Water Ice Predicted at Megabar Pressures Burkhard Militzer1, 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New Phases of Water Ice Predicted at Megabar Pressures Burkhard Militzer1, 2 and Hugh F. Wilson1 1 and Cmcm symmetry at 7.6 and 15.5 Mbar, respectively. The known high pressure ice phases VII, VIII, X positions between nearest O atoms in the ice X, Pbcm, and Pbca phases. PACS numbers: Water ice is one

Militzer, Burkhard

32

Alaskan Ice Road Water Supplies Augmented by Snow Barriers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6, 2013 6, 2013 Alaskan Ice Road Water Supplies Augmented by Snow Barriers Washington, D.C. - In a project supported and managed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), researchers at the University of Alaska Fairbanks have demonstrated that the use of artificial barriers-snow fences-can significantly increase the amount of fresh water supplies in Arctic lakes at a fraction of the cost of bringing in water from nearby lakes. The results promise to enhance environmentally sound development of Alaska's natural resources, lowering the costs of building ice roads used for exploring for oil and natural gas in Alaska. They could also be used to help augment fresh water supplies at remote villages. Researcher Joel Bailey measures the density of the snow in this snow pit to determine the amount of snow in the drift and the water equivalent of the snow drift.

33

Water ice at low to midlatitudes on Mars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we analyze water ice occurrences at the surface of Mars using near-infrared observations, and we study their distribution with a climate model. Latitudes between 45{\\deg}S and 50{\\deg}N are considered. Data from the Observatoire pour la Min\\'eralogie, l'Eau, les Glaces et l'Actitit\\'e and the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars are used to assess the presence of surface water ice as a function of location and season. A modeling approach combining the 1-D and 3-D versions of the General Circulation Model of the Laboratoire de M\\'et\\'eorologie Dynamique de Jussieu is developed and successfully compared to observations. Ice deposits 2-200 \\mu m thick are observed during the day on pole facing slopes in local fall, winter and early spring. Ice extends down to 13{\\deg} latitude in the Southern Hemisphere but is restricted to latitudes higher than 32{\\deg} in the north. On a given slope, the pattern of ice observations at the surface is mainly controlled by the global variability of ...

Vincendon, Mathieu; Mustard, John

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

34

Water and Ice Dielectric Spectra Scaling at 0 °C  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dielectric spectra (10^4-10^11 Hz) of water and ice at 0 {\\deg}C are considered in terms of proton conductivity and compared to each other. In this picture, the Debye relaxations, centered at 1/{\\tau}_W ~ 20 GHz (in water) and 1/{\\tau}_I ~ 5 kHz (in ice), are seen as manifestations of diffusion of separated charges in the form of H3O+ and OH- ions. The charge separation results from the self-dissociation of H2O molecules, and is accompanied by recombination in order to maintain the equilibrium concentration, N. The charge recombination is a diffusion-controlled process with characteristic lifetimes of {\\tau}_W and {\\tau}_I, for water and ice respectively. The static permittivity, {\\epsilon}(0), is solely determined by N. Both, N and {\\epsilon}(0), are roughly constant at the water-ice phase transition, and both increase, due to a slowing down of the diffusion rate, as the temperature is lowered. The transformation of the broadband dielectric spectra at 0 {\\deg}C with the drastic change from {\\tau}_W to {\\tau}_I is mainly due to an abrupt (by 0.4 eV) change of the activation energy of the charge diffusion.

V. G. Artemov; A. A. Volkov

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

35

The Impact of Melting Ice on Ocean Waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ice melts when it is in contact with ocean waters that have temperatures above the in situ freezing point. The product is a mixture of meltwater and seawater having properties intermediate between those of the two components. Density is one of ...

Adrian Jenkins

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

A Model for the Formation and Melting of Ice on Surface Waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ice covers have an important influence on the hydrology of surface waters. The growth of ice layer on stationary waters, such as lakes or canals, depends primarily on meteorological parameters like temperature and humidity of the air, windspeed ...

H. A. R. De Bruin; H. R. A. Wessels

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

Water-Ice and Water-Updraft Relationships near ?10°C within Populations of Florida Cumuli  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From an in-cloud microphysical data set collected in Florida convective towers that were penetrated close to their tops near -10°C, evidence is presented to show a sequential development of cloud water, rainwater, graupel and crystalline ice as ...

Robert I. Sax; Vernon W. Keller

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

A Scheme for Parameterizing Ice-Cloud Water Content in General Circulation Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The optical properties of ice clouds are a primary issue for climate and climate change. Evaluating these optical properties in three-dimensional models for studying climate will require a method to calculate the ice water content of such clouds. ...

Andrew J. Heymsfield; Leo J. Donner

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Cirrus Cloud Ice Water Content Radar Algorithm Evaluation Using an Explicit Cloud Microphysical Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of cirrus cloud simulations performed using a model with explicit cloud microphysics is applied to testing ice water content retrieval algorithms based on millimeter-wave radar reflectivity measurements. The simulated ice particle size ...

Kenneth Sassen; Zhien Wang; Vitaly I. Khvorostyanov; Graeme L. Stephens; Angela Bennedetti

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

Discovery of water ice nearly everywhere in the solar system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the last decade we have discovered sources of accessible water in some form nearly everywhere in the solar system. Water ice has been found on the planet Mercury; probably on the Earth`s Moon; on Mars; on near Earth objects; on comets whose orbits frequently come close to that of Earth`s orbit; probably on Ceres, the largest inner asteroid; and on comets previously and incorrectly considered to be out of practical reach. The comets also provide massive quantities of hydrocarbons, similar to oil shale. The masses of either water or hydrocarbons are measured in units of cubic kilometers. The water is key to space transportation because it can be used as a rocket propellant directly, and because thermal process alone can be used to convert it and hydrocarbons into hydrogen, the highest performing rocket propellant. This presentation outlines what is currently known about the locations of the water ice, and sketches the requirements and environments of missions to prospect for and assay the water sources.

Zuppero, A.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water path" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Comparisons of SSM/I Liquid Water Paths with Aircraft Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Comparisons have been made between in situ aircraft measurements of integrated liquid water and retrievals of integrated liquid water path (LWP) from algorithms using SSM/I brightness temperatures. The aircraft measurements were made over the ...

Stewart G. Cober; Andre Tremblay; George A. Isaac

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Probability Density Functions of Liquid Water Path and Total Water Content of Marine Boundary Layer Clouds: Implications for Cloud Parameterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mathematical forms of probability density functions (PDFs) of liquid water path (LWP) and total water content for marine boundary layer clouds are investigated using the homogeneity, skewness, and kurtosis of PDFs of LWP obtained from observations ...

Hideaki Kawai; Joăo Teixeira

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Improved Measurements of the Ice Water Content in Cirrus Using a Total-Water Probe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This note describes an improved method for the measurement of the ice water content (IWC) of cirrus cloud using a total water content probe. A previous version of this technique assumed that the air in cloud-containing regions was saturated with ...

Philip R. A. Brown; Peter N. Francis

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

44

Determination of 3-D Cloud Ice Water Contents by Combining Multiple...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Determination of 3-D Cloud Ice Water Contents by Combining Multiple Data Sources from Satellite, Ground Radar, and a Numerical Model Liu, Guosheng Florida State University Seo,...

45

The Role of Eddy Diffusivity Profiles on Stratocumulus Liquid Water Path Biases  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results from simulations of the stratocumulus-topped boundary layer with one-dimensional versions of general simulation models typically exhibit a wide range of spread in the modeled liquid water path (LWP). These discrepancies are often ...

Stephan R. de Roode

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

A Comparison of Several Radiometric Methods of Deducing Path-Integrated Cloud Liquid Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using radiometer data collected during the Canadian Atlantic Storms Program, we have investigated five different methods of estimating the path-integrated, or columnar, cloud liquid water. The methods consist of one- and two-channel physical ...

Chong Wei; H. G. Leighton; R. R. Rogers

1989-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

Spatial Variability of Liquid Water Path in Marine Low Cloud: The Importance of Mesoscale Cellular Convection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Liquid water path (LWP) mesoscale spatial variability in marine low cloud over the eastern subtropical oceans is examined using two months of daytime retrievals from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on the NASA Terra ...

Robert Wood; Dennis L. Hartmann

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Entrainment Rate, Cloud Fraction, and Liquid Water Path of PBL Stratocumulus Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The large eddy simulation technique is used to search for key factors in determining the entrainment rate, cloud fraction, and liquid water path in the stratocumulus-topped boundary layer (STBL), with the goal of developing simple schemes of ...

Chin-Hoh Moeng

2000-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Solar Water Heater Roadmap Leads Path to Market Expansion (Fact...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Innovative strategy to reduce installed cost of solar water heater systems can rival conventional natural gas water heaters in the marketplace. Researchers in the Residential...

50

Molecular dynamics study of photodissociation of water in crystalline and amorphous ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present results of classical dynamics calculations, performed to study the photodissociation of water in crystalline and amorphous ice surfaces at a surface temperature of 10 K. Dissociation in the top six monolayers is considered. Desorption of H2O has a low probability (less than 0.5% yield per absorbed photon) for both types of ice. The final outcome strongly depends on the original position of the photodissociated molecule. For molecules in the first bilayer of crystalline ice and the corresponding layers in amorphous ice, desorption of H atoms dominates. In the second bilayer H atom desorption, trapping of the H and OH fragments in the ice, and recombination of H and OH are of roughly equal importance. Deeper into the ice H atom desorption becomes less important and trapping and recombination dominate. The distribution of distances traveled by H atoms in the ice peaks at 6 - 7 Angstroms with a tail going to about 60 Angstroms for both types of ice. The mobility of OH radicals is low within the ice with most probable distances traveled of 2 and 1 Angstroms for crystalline and amorphous ice, respectively. OH is however quite mobile on top of the surface, where it has been found to travel more than 80 Angstroms. Simulated absorption spectra of crystalline ice, amorphous ice, and liquid water are found to be in very good agreement with experiments.

Stefan Andersson; Ayman Al-Halabi; Geert-Jan Kroes; Ewine F. van Dishoeck

2005-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

51

Measurements of the Ice Water Content in Cirrus Using an Evaporative Technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technique for the measurement of the ice water content (IWC) of cirrus clouds is described. The IWC is obtained by the measurement of the total water content (TWC) and the subtraction of the saturation specific humidity with respect to ice at ...

Philip R. A. Brown

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Phase Diagram of Amorphous Solid Water: Low-Density, High-Density, and Very-High-Density Amorphous Ices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe the phase diagram of amorphous solid water by performing molecular dynamics simulations. Our simulations follow different paths in the phase diagram: isothermal compression/decompression, isochoric cooling/heating and isobaric cooling/heating. We are able to identify low-density amorphous (LDA), high-density amorphous (HDA), and very-high density amorphous (VHDA) ices. The density $\\rho$ of these glasses at different pressure $P$ and temperature $T$ agree well with experimental values. We also study the radial distribution functions of glassy water. We obtain VHDA by isobaric heating of HDA, as in experiment. We also find that ``other forms'' of glassy water can be obtained upon isobaric heating of LDA, as well as amorphous ices formed during the transformation of LDA to HDA. We argue that these other forms of amorphous ices, as well as VHDA, are not altogether new glasses but rather are the result of aging induced by heating. Samples of HDA and VHDA with different densities are recovered at normal $P$, showing that there is a continuum of glasses. Furthermore, the two ranges of densities of recovered HDA and recovered VHDA overlap at ambient $P$. Our simulations are consistent with the possibility of HDA$\\to$LDA and VHDA$\\to$LDA transformations, reproducing the experimental findings. We do not observe a VHDA$\\to$HDA transformation.

Nicolas Giovambattista; H. Eugene Stanley; Francesco Sciortino

2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

53

FEMP-Designated Product: Water-Cooled Ice Machines | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FEMP-Designated Product: Water-Cooled Ice Machines FEMP-Designated Product: Water-Cooled Ice Machines FEMP-Designated Product: Water-Cooled Ice Machines October 7, 2013 - 11:11am Addthis Federal agencies are required by the National Energy Conservation Policy Act (P.L. 95-619), Executive Order 13423, Executive Order 13514, and Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR) Subpart 23.2 and 53.223 to specify and buy ENERGY STAR® qualified products or, in categories not included in the ENERGY STAR program, FEMP designated products, which are among the highest 25% of equivalent products for energy efficiency. A PDF version of Water-Cooled Ice Machines is also available. Performance Requirements for Federal Purchases Type Ice Harvest Rate (pounds per 24 hours) Energy Usea (per 100 pounds) Potable Water Useb (per 100 pounds)

54

A New Look at Homogeneous Ice Nucleation in Supercooled Water Drops  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The classical theory for homogeneous ice nucleation in supercooled water is investigated in the light of recent data published in various physico-chemical journal on the physical properties of supercooled water and in the light of recent evidence ...

H. R. Pruppacher

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Simulations of the Effects of Water Vapor, Cloud Liquid Water, and Ice on AMSU Moisture Channel Brightness Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiative transfer simulations are performed to determine how water vapor and nonprecipitating cloud liquid water and ice particles within typical midlatitude atmospheres affect brightness temperatures TB's of moisture sounding channels used in ...

Bradley M. Muller; Henry E. Fuelberg; Xuwu Xiang

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Aircraft Measurements of Icing in Supercooled and Water Droplet/Ice Crystal Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Icing measurements were carried out in Spain during the Precipitation Enhancement Project experiment in 1979, with an instrumented DC-7 aircraft.

M. Bain; J. F. Gayet

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

DISCOVERY OF CRYSTALLIZED WATER ICE IN A SILHOUETTE DISK IN THE M43 REGION  

SciTech Connect

We present the 1.9-4.2 {mu}m spectra of the five bright (L {<=} 11.2) young stars associated with silhouette disks with a moderate to high inclination angle of 39 Degree-Sign -80 Degree-Sign in the M42 and M43 regions. The water ice absorption is seen toward d121-1925 and d216-0939, while the spectra of d182-316, d183-405, and d218-354 show no water ice feature around 3.1 {mu}m within the detection limits. By comparing the water ice features toward nearby stars, we find that the water ice absorption toward d121-1925 and d216-0939 most likely originates from the foreground material and the surrounding disk, respectively. The angle of the disk inclination is found to be mainly responsible for the difference of the optical depth of the water ice among the five young stars. Our results suggest that there is a critical inclination angle between 65 Degree-Sign and 75 Degree-Sign for the circumstellar disk where the water ice absorption becomes strong. The average density at the disk surface of d216-0939 was found to be 6.38 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -18} g cm{sup -3}. The water ice absorption band in the d216-0939 disk is remarkable in that the maximum optical depth of the water ice band is at a longer wavelength than detected before. It indicates that the primary carrier of the feature is purely crystallized water ice at the surface of the d216-0939 disk with characteristic size of {approx}0.8 {mu}m, which suggests grain growth. This is the first direct detection of purely crystallized water ice in a silhouette disk.

Terada, Hiroshi [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 North A'ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Tokunaga, Alan T., E-mail: terada@subaru.naoj.org [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu 96822 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

Heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake by field-collected atmospheric particles below 273 K  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric ice formation induced by particles with complex chemical and physical properties through heterogeneous nucleation is not well understood. Heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake by ambient particles collected from urban environments in Los Angeles and Mexico City are presented. Using a vapour controlled cooling system equipped with an optical microscopy, the range of onset conditions for ice nucleation and water uptake by the collected particles was determined as a function of temperature (200{273 K) and relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice) up to water saturation. Three distinctly different types of authentic atmospheric particles were investigated including soot particles associated with organics/inorganics, inorganic particles of marine origin coated with organic material, and Pb/Zn containing inorganic particles apportioned to anthropogenic emissions relevant to waste incineration. Single particle characterization was provided by micro-spectroscopic analyses using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption ne structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). Above 230 K, signicant differences in water uptake and immersion freezing effciencies of the different particle types were observed. Below 230 K, the particles exhibited high deposition ice nucleation effciencies and formed ice at RHice values well below homogeneous ice nucleation limits. The data show that the chemical composition of these eld{collected particles plays an important role in determining water uptake and immersion freezing. Heterogeneous ice nucleation rate coeffcients, cumulative ice nuclei (IN) spectrum, and IN activated fraction for deposition ice nucleation are derived. The presented ice nucleation data demonstrate that anthropogenic and marine particles comprising of various chemical and physical properties exhibit distinctly different ice nucleation effciencies and can serve as effcient IN at atmospheric conditions typical for cirrus and mixed phase clouds. This indicates a potential link between human activities and cloud formation, and thus climate.

Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander; Roedel, Tobias R.; Gilles, Marry K.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Knopf, Daniel A.

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

59

WATER ICE AND CARBON DIOXIDE ICE INTERACTIONS: CRATER INVESTIGATIONS IN RESIDUAL NORTH POLAR ICE CAP. M.A. Thueson and H. Xie, Earth and Environmental Science, The Uni-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78249, U.S.A. (misti.thueson@gmail.com) (Hongjie.xie@utsa.edu). Introduction sublimes. As summer progresses the walls of the crater, though above the temperature of CO2 sublima- tion (as seen in figure 2), keep a high albedo. This would imply that the walls are water ice. Inuvik

Texas at San Antonio, University of

60

VOLATILE TRANSPORT INSIDE SUPER-EARTHS BY ENTRAPMENT IN THE WATER-ICE MATRIX  

SciTech Connect

Whether volatiles can be entrapped in a background matrix composing planetary envelopes and be dragged via convection to the surface is a key question in understanding atmospheric fluxes, cycles, and composition. In this paper, we consider super-Earths with an extensive water mantle (i.e., water planets), and the possibility of entrapment of methane in their extensive water-ice envelopes. We adopt the theory developed by van der Waals and Platteeuw for modeling solid solutions, often used for modeling clathrate hydrates, and modify it in order to estimate the thermodynamic stability field of a new phase called methane filled ice Ih. We find that in comparison to water ice VII the filled ice Ih structure may be stable not only at the high pressures but also at the high temperatures expected at the core-water mantle transition boundary of water planets.

Levi, A.; Podolak, M. [Department of Geophysics and Planetary Science, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Sasselov, D., E-mail: amitlevi.planetphys@gmail.com [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water path" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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61

ON THE FORMATION OF INTERSTELLAR WATER ICE: CONSTRAINTS FROM A SEARCH FOR HYDROGEN PEROXIDE ICE IN MOLECULAR CLOUDS  

SciTech Connect

Recent surface chemistry experiments have shown that the hydrogenation of molecular oxygen on interstellar dust grains is a plausible formation mechanism, via hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), for the production of water (H{sub 2}O) ice mantles in the dense interstellar medium. Theoretical chemistry models also predict the formation of a significant abundance of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} ice in grain mantles by this route. At their upper limits, the predicted and experimental abundances are sufficiently high that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} should be detectable in molecular cloud ice spectra. To investigate this further, laboratory spectra have been obtained for H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O ice films between 2.5 and 200 {mu}m, from 10 to 180 K, containing 3%, 30%, and 97% H{sub 2}O{sub 2} ice. Integrated absorbances for all the absorption features in low-temperature H{sub 2}O{sub 2} ice have been derived from these spectra. For identifying H{sub 2}O{sub 2} ice, the key results are the presence of unique features near 3.5, 7.0, and 11.3 {mu}m. Comparing the laboratory spectra with the spectra of a group of 24 protostars and field stars, all of which have strong H{sub 2}O ice absorption bands, no absorption features are found that can definitely be identified with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} ice. In the absence of definite H{sub 2}O{sub 2} features, the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} abundance is constrained by its possible contribution to the weak absorption feature near 3.47 {mu}m found on the long-wavelength wing of the 3 {mu}m H{sub 2}O ice band. This gives an average upper limit for H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, as a percentage of H{sub 2}O, of 9% {+-} 4%. This is a strong constraint on parameters for surface chemistry experiments and dense cloud chemistry models.

Smith, R. G.; Wright, C. M.; Robinson, G. [School of Physical, Environmental and Mathematical Sciences, University of New South Wales, Australian Defence Force Academy, Canberra, ACT 2600 (Australia); Charnley, S. B. [Astrochemistry Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Pendleton, Y. J. [NASA Lunar Science Institute, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Maldoni, M. M., E-mail: r.smith@adfa.edu.au, E-mail: c.wright@adfa.edu.au, E-mail: g.robinson@adfa.edu.au, E-mail: Steven.B.Charnley@nasa.gov, E-mail: yvonne.pendleton@nasa.gov [Geoscience Australia, Canberra, ACT 2601 (Australia)

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

62

Improved Airborne Hot-Wire Measurements of Ice Water Content in Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Airborne measurements of ice water content (IWC) in both ice and mixed phase clouds remain one of the long standing problems in experimental cloud physics. For nearly three decades, IWC has been measured with the help of the Nevzorov hot-wire ...

A. Korolev; J. W. Strapp; G. A. Isaac; E. Emery

63

The correlation between molecular motions and heat capacity in normal ice and water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The heat capacities of ice and water at ambient pressure are reexamined to build an intrinsic correlation between H2O molecular motions and the heat capacity. Based on the evolution of H2O molecular motions, a satisfactory description of the heat capacity of ice and water is provided. The heat capacity of ice is related not only to H2O molecular vibrations, but also to the molecular rotations. In water, all H2O molecular vibrations, rotations and translations contribute to the heat capacity. The molecular translational motions are found to be the main contribution to the large heat capacity of water. The results provide a deep insight into the nature of water and ice at ambient pressure.

Ke, Hai Bo; Wang, Wei Hua

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

64

The phase diagram of ice: a quasi-harmonic study based on a flexible water model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The phase diagram of ice is studied by a quasi-harmonic approximation. The free energy of all experimentally known ice phases has been calculated with the flexible q-TIP4P/F model of water. The only exception is the high pressure ice X, in which the presence of symmetric O-H-O bonds prevents its modeling with this empirical interatomic potential. The simplicity of our approach allows us to study ice phases at state points of the T-P plane that have been omitted in previous simulations using free energy methods based on thermodynamic integration. The effect in the phase diagram of averaging the proton disorder that appears in several ice phases has been studied. It is found particularly relevant for ice III, at least for cell sizes typically used in phase coexistence simulations. New insight into the capability of the employed water model to describe the coexistence of ice phases is presented. We find that the H-ordered ices IX and XIV, as well as the H-disordered ice XII, are particularly stable for this wate...

Ramirez, R; Herrero, C P

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Retrieval of Vertical Profiles of Liquid Water and Ice Content in Mixed Clouds from Doppler Radar and Microwave Radiometer Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method to retrieve vertical profiles of liquid water content Mw(z), ice water content Mi(z), and ice particle size distribution Ni(D, z), (where D is the ice particle size and z the vertical coordinate) in mixed nonprecipitating clouds ...

Henri Sauvageot

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Sleuthing the Fate of Water in Ancient Aquifers and Ice Cores | U.S. DOE  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Sleuthing the Fate of Water in Ancient Aquifers and Ice Cores Sleuthing the Fate of Water in Ancient Aquifers and Ice Cores Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » October 2012 Sleuthing the Fate of Water in Ancient Aquifers and Ice Cores Precision analytical techniques developed for fundamental experiments in nuclear physics now enable routine measurements of ultra-low concentrations of Krypton radioisotopes in samples of water, ice, and gas. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page

67

Radar Reflectivity-Ice Water Content Relationships for Use above the Melting Level in Hurricanes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regression equations linking radar reflectivity (Ze) and ice water content (IWC) were calculated from airborne radar and particle image data that were collected above the melting level in two hurricanes. The Ze ? IWC equation from the stratiform ...

Robert A. Black

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Relationships for Deriving Thunderstorm Anvil Ice Mass for CCOPE Storm Water Budget Estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Relationships between radar reflectivity and ice water content are derived from pendmtions into thundemonn anvils in Montana on seven days during the Cooperative Convective Precipitation Experiment (CCOPE), using aircraft data and radar ...

Andrew J. Heymsfield; Alice G. Palmer

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Scaling relation for the bond length, mass density, and packing order of water ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The packing order of molecules and the distance between adjacent oxygen atoms (dOO) in water and ice are most basic yet puzzling. Here we present a scaling solution for this purpose based only on the mass density (gcm-3), (Equation) where dL is the length ({\\AA}) of the O:H van der Waals bond and dH the H-O polar-covalent bond projecting on the O---O line. Validated by the measured proton symmetrization of compressed ice, dOO of water and ice, and dOO expansion at water surface, this solution confirms that the fluctuated, tetrahedrally-coordinated structure is unique for water ice.

Chang Q Sun

2013-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

70

A Dual-Wavelength Radar Method for Ice-Water Characterization in Mixed-Phase Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dual-wavelength method to differentiate supercooled water from ice and to measure mass content in each phase in cold stratiform clouds is proposed and discussed. The differential attenuation Ad, whose direct measurement is available with dual-...

Marielle Gosset; Henri Sauvageot

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Relationships between Water Vapor Path and Precipitation over the Tropical Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The relationship between water vapor path W and surface precipitation rate P over tropical oceanic regions is analyzed using 4 yr of gridded daily SSM/I satellite microwave radiometer data. A tight monthly mean relationship P (mm day?1) = exp[...

Christopher S. Bretherton; Matthew E. Peters; Larissa E. Back

2004-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Water Vapor Cross-Sensitivity of Open Path H2O/CO2 Sensors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When measuring the flux of CO2 with an open-path infrared absorption sensor, cross-sensitivity by water vapor is a source of concern. This is particularly true if the flux is small, such as over the sea. In this paper some possible mechanisms for ...

W. Kohsiek

2000-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Water Ice on the Satellite of Kuiper Belt Object 2003 EL61  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have obtained a near infrared spectrum of the brightest satellite of the large Kuiper Belt Object, 2003 EL61. The spectrum has absorption features at 1.5 and 2.0 microns, indicating that water ice is present on the surface. We find that the satellite's absorption lines are much deeper than water ice features typically found on Kuiper Belt Objects. We argue that the unusual spectrum indicates that the satellite was likely formed by impact and not by capture.

K. M Barkume; M. E. Brown; E. L. Schaller

2006-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

74

Evidence of water ice near the lunar poles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lunar Prospector epithermal neutron data were studied to evaluate the probable chemical state of enhanced hydrogen, [H], reported previously to be near both lunar poles [1,2]. Improved versions of thermal and epithermal neutron data were developed for this purpose. Most important is the improved spatial resolution obtained by using shortened integration times. A new data set was created, Epi* = [Epithermal - 0.057 x Thermal], to reduce effects of composition variations other than those due to hydrogen. The Epi* counting rates are generally low near both lunar poles and high over terrane near recent impact events such as Tycho and Jackson. However, other lunar features are also associated with high Epi* rates, which represent a wide range of terrane types that seem to have little in common. If we postulate that one property all bright Epi* features do have in common is low [H], then measured Epi* counting rates appear to be quantitatively self consistent. If we assume that [H]=O above the top 98th percentile of Epi* counting rates at 2{sup o} x 2{sup o} spatial resolution, then [H]{sub ave} = 55 ppm for latitudes equatorward of [75{sup o}]. This value is close to the average found in returned lunar soil samples, [H]{sub ave} {approx} 50 ppm [3]. Using the foregoing physical interpretation of Epi* counting rates, we find that the Epi* counts within most of the large craters poleward of {+-}70{sup o} are higher, and therefore [H] is lower, than that in neighboring inter-crater plains, as shown in Figure 1. Fourteen of these craters that have areas larger than the LP epithermal spatial resolution (55 km diameter at 30 km altitude), were singled out for study. [H] is generally found to increase with decreasing distance from the poles (hence decreasing temperature). However, quantitative estimates of the diffusivity of hydrogen at low temperature show that diffusion can not be an important factor in explaining the difference between the relatively low [H] observed within the large sunlit polar craters and the relatively high [H] in neighboring inter-crater plains. A closer look at the 'inter-crater' plains near the poles, shows that they are covered by many small craters that harbor permanent shade [4]. The temperatures within many of these craters are low enough [5] that they can disable sublimation as a viable loss process of [H{sub 2}O]. It is therefore tempting to postulate that the enhanced hydrogen within most regions of permanent shade is in the form of water molecules. This postulate is certainly viable within the bottoms of several large, permanently shaded craters near the south pole. Predicted temperatures within them [5] fall well below the 100 K temperature that is needed to stabilize water ice for aeons. The picture is different near the north pole. Here, there are relatively few permanently-shaded craters that are large enough to harbor temperatures that are sufficiently low to stabilize water ice indefinitely against sublimation [5]. Instead, the 'inter-crater' polar plains are a jumble of many permanently-shaded craters that have diameters less than 10 km [4]. Although simulations of temperatures within this class of craters show they are only marginally cold enough to indefinitely stabilize water ice [5], this terrane appears to have the highest [H]. Nevertheless, predicted temperatures are close enough to that needed to permanently stabilize [H{sub 2}O] to suggest that sublimation is indeed the process that discriminates between polar terrane that contains enhanced [H] and those that do not (see, e.g., the temperature estimates for doubly-shaded craters [6]). If correct, then an important fraction of the hydrogen near the north pole must be in the form of H{sub 2}O, which then resides within these small craters. Estimates using our improved data set of [H] within craters near the south pole remain unchanged from those derived from our previous analysis [2], [H] = 1700{+-}900 ppm. This translates to [H{sub 2}O]=1.5{+-}0.8%. If all of the enhanced hydrogen in the north is in the form of H{sub 2}O and is confin

Feldman, W. C. (William C.); Maurice, S. (Sylvestre); Lawrence, David J. (David Jeffery),; Little, R. C. (Robert C.); Lawrence, S. L. (Stefanie L.); Gasnault, O. M. (Olivier M.); Wiens, R. C. (Roger C.); Barraclough, B. L. (Bruce L.); Elphic, Richard C.,; Prettyman, T. H. (Thomas H.); Steinberg, John Tyree; Binder, A. B.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Effect of Sea Ice on the Salinity of Antarctic Bottom Waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Brine rejection during the formation of Antarctic sea ice is known to enhance the salinity of dense shelf waters in the Weddell and Ross Seas. As these shelf waters flow off the shelves and descend to the bottom, they entrain ambient deep water ...

J. R. Toggweiler; B. Samuels

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

Impact of the Vertical Variation of Cloud Droplet Size on the Estimation of Cloud Liquid Water Path and Rain Detection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud droplet effective radius (DER) and liquid water path (LWP) are two key parameters for the quantitative assessment of cloud effects on the exchange of energy and water. Chang and Li presented an algorithm using multichannel measurements made ...

Ruiyue Chen; Fu-Lung Chang; Zhanqing Li; Ralph Ferraro; Fuzhong Weng

2007-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Equations Governing Space-Time Variability of Liquid Water Path in Stratus Clouds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Equations Governing Space-Time Variability of Equations Governing Space-Time Variability of Liquid Water Path in Stratus Clouds K. Ivanova Pennsylvania State University University Park, Pennsylvania T. P. Ackerman Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington M. Ausloos University of Liège B-4000 Liège, Belgium Abstract We present a method on how to derive an underlying mathematical (statistical or model free) equation for a liquid water path (LWP) signal directly from empirical data. The evolution of the probability density functions (PDFs) from small to large time scales is explicitly derived in the framework of Fokker-Planck equation. A drift and a diffusion term describing the deterministic and stochastic influences on the non-Gaussian fat tails of the liquid water probability distributions are obtained from

78

Structural transformation in supercooled water controls the crystallization rate of ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of water's unsolved puzzles is the question of what determines the lowest temperature to which it can be cooled before freezing to ice. The supercooled liquid has been probed experimentally to near the homogeneous nucleation temperature TH{\\approx}232 K, yet the mechanism of ice crystallization - including the size and structure of critical nuclei - has not yet been resolved. The heat capacity and compressibility of liquid water anomalously increase upon moving into the supercooled region according to a power law that would diverge at Ts{\\approx}225 K,(1,2) so there may be a link between water's thermodynamic anomalies and the crystallization rate of ice. But probing this link is challenging because fast crystallization prevents experimental studies of the liquid below TH. And while atomistic studies have captured water crystallization(3), the computational costs involved have so far prevented an assessment of the rates and mechanism involved. Here we report coarse-grained molecular simulations with the mW water model(4) in the supercooled regime around TH, which reveal that a sharp increase in the fraction of four-coordinated molecules in supercooled liquid water explains its anomalous thermodynamics and also controls the rate and mechanism of ice formation. The simulations reveal that the crystallization rate of water reaches a maximum around 225 K, below which ice nuclei form faster than liquid water can equilibrate. This implies a lower limit of metastability of liquid water just below TH and well above its glass transition temperature Tg{\\approx}136 K. By providing a relationship between the structural transformation in liquid water, its anomalous thermodynamics and its crystallization rate, this work provides a microscopic foundation to the experimental finding that the thermodynamics of water determines the rates of homogeneous nucleation of ice.(5)

Emily B. Moore; Valeria Molinero

2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

79

Integration of Global Positioning System and Scanning Water Vapor Radiometers for Precipitable Water Vapor and Cloud Liquid Path Estimates  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Integration of Global Positioning System and Scanning Integration of Global Positioning System and Scanning Water Vapor Radiometers for Precipitable Water Vapor and Cloud Liquid Path Estimates V. Mattioli and P. Basili Department of Electronic and Information Engineering University of Perugia Perugia, Italy E. R. Westwater Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado Introduction In recent years the Global Positioning System (GPS) has proved to be a reliable instrument for measuring precipitable water vapor (PWV) (Bevis et al. 1992), offering an independent source of information on water vapor when compared with microwave radiometers (MWRs), and/or radiosonde

80

Alaskan Ice Road Water Supplies Augmented by Snow Barriers | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alaskan Ice Road Water Supplies Augmented by Snow Barriers Alaskan Ice Road Water Supplies Augmented by Snow Barriers Alaskan Ice Road Water Supplies Augmented by Snow Barriers March 6, 2013 - 10:55am Addthis Monitoring equipment and part of the snowfence peek out of the snow drift. Monitoring equipment and part of the snowfence peek out of the snow drift. The aerial view shows the experimental lake at Franklin Bluffs used for the snowfence experiment. The aerial view shows the experimental lake at Franklin Bluffs used for the snowfence experiment. Researcher Joel Bailey measures the density of the snow in this snow pit to determine the amount of snow in the drift and the water equivalent of the snow drift. Researcher Joel Bailey measures the density of the snow in this snow pit to determine the amount of snow in the drift and the water equivalent of the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water path" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Alaskan Ice Road Water Supplies Augmented by Snow Barriers | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alaskan Ice Road Water Supplies Augmented by Snow Barriers Alaskan Ice Road Water Supplies Augmented by Snow Barriers Alaskan Ice Road Water Supplies Augmented by Snow Barriers March 6, 2013 - 10:55am Addthis Monitoring equipment and part of the snowfence peek out of the snow drift. Monitoring equipment and part of the snowfence peek out of the snow drift. The aerial view shows the experimental lake at Franklin Bluffs used for the snowfence experiment. The aerial view shows the experimental lake at Franklin Bluffs used for the snowfence experiment. Researcher Joel Bailey measures the density of the snow in this snow pit to determine the amount of snow in the drift and the water equivalent of the snow drift. Researcher Joel Bailey measures the density of the snow in this snow pit to determine the amount of snow in the drift and the water equivalent of the

82

Validation of Satellite-Derived Liquid Water Paths Using ARM SGP Microwave Radiometers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Satellite-Derived Liquid Water Paths Using Satellite-Derived Liquid Water Paths Using ARM SGP Microwave Radiometers M. M. Khaiyer and J. Huang Analytical Services & Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia P. Minnis, B. Lin, and W. L. Smith, Jr. National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia A. Fan Science Applications International Corporation Hampton, Virginia A. Rapp Colorado State University Fort Collins, Colorado Introduction Satellites are useful for monitoring climatological parameters over large domains. They are especially useful for measuring various cloud microphysical and radiative parameters where ground-based instruments are not available. The geostationary operational environmental satellite (GOES) has been used to retrieve cloud and radiative properties over an extended domain centered on the Atmospheric

83

Measurement of Total Water with a Tunable Diode Laser Hygrometer: Inlet Analysis, Calibration Procedure, and Ice Water Content Determination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The University of Colorado closed-path tunable diode laser hygrometer (CLH), a new instrument for the in situ measurement of enhanced total water (eTW, the sum of water vapor and condensed water enhanced by a subisokinetic inlet), has recently ...

Sean M. Davis; A. Gannet Hallar; Linnea M. Avallone; William Engblom

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

WATER ICE IN HIGH MASS-LOSS RATE OH/IR STARS  

SciTech Connect

We investigate water-ice features in spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of high mass-loss rate OH/IR stars. We use a radiative transfer code which can consider multiple components of dust shells to make model calculations for various dust species including water ice in the OH/IR stars. We find that the model SEDs are sensitively dependent on the location of the water-ice dust shell. For two sample stars (OH 127.8+0.0 and OH 26.5+0.6), we compare the detailed model results with the infrared observational data including the spectral data from the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). For the two sample stars, we reproduce the crystalline water-ice features (absorption at 3.1 {mu}m and 11.5 {mu}m; emission at 44 and 62 {mu}m) observed by ISO using a separate component of the water-ice dust shell that condensed at about 84-87 K (r {approx} 1500-1800 AU) as well as the silicate dust shell that condensed at about 1000 K (r {approx} 19-25 AU). For a sample of 1533 OH/IR stars, we present infrared two-color diagrams (2CDs) using the Infrared Astronomical Satellite and AKARI data compared with theoretical model results. We find that the theoretical models clearly show the effects of the crystalline water-ice features (absorption at 11.5 {mu}m and emission at 62 {mu}m) on the 2CDs.

Suh, Kyung-Won; Kwon, Young-Joo, E-mail: kwsuh@chungbuk.ac.kr [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju-City 361-763 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju-City 361-763 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

85

Toward a Standard Procedure for Validation of Satellite-Derived Cloud Liquid Water Path: A Study with SEVIRI Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Differences between satellite-derived and ground-based values of cloud liquid water path (LWPsat and LWPgr, respectively) in validation studies are partly associated with the validation itself, in particular with scale differences and parallax. ...

W. Greuell; R. A. Roebeling

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

Cloud Liquid Water Path from Satellite-Based Passive Microwave Observations: A New Climatology over the Global Oceans  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This work describes a new climatology of cloud liquid water path (LWP), termed the University of Wisconsin (UWisc) climatology, derived from 18 yr of satellite-based passive microwave observations over the global oceans. The climatology is based ...

Christopher W. O’Dell; Frank J. Wentz; Ralf Bennartz

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

Validation of Cloud Liquid Water Path Retrievals from SEVIRI Using One Year of CloudNET Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The accuracy and precision are determined of cloud liquid water path (LWP) retrievals from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) on board Meteosat-8 using 1 yr of LWP retrievals from microwave radiometer (MWR) measurements of ...

R. A. Roebeling; H. M. Deneke; A. J. Feijt

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Water-hydroxyl phases on an open metal surface: breaking the ice rules Matthew Forster,a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water-hydroxyl phases on an open metal surface: breaking the ice rules Matthew Forster,a Rasmita hexagonal c(2 Ă? 2) 2H2O:1OH network. None of these phases obey the conventional `ice rules', instead catalyzed redox reactions, yet establishing the phase diagram for water/hydroxyl adsorption on metal

Alavi, Ali

89

Theory for Dual-Wavelength C02 Lidar Method to Distinguish Ice, Mixed-Phase, and Water Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analytical study shows that the ratio of backscatter from ice particles at two CO2 lidar wavelengths is substantially different from the ratio from water drops. This forms the basis for a new method to discriminate between ice, water, and ...

Wynn L. Eberhard

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

X-ray absorption signatures of the molecular environment in water and ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The x-ray absorption spectra of water and ice are calculated with a many-body approach for electron-hole excitations. The experimental features, including the small effects of temperature change in the liquid, are quantitatively reproduced from molecular configurations generated by ab-initio molecular dynamics. The spectral difference between the solid and the liquid is due to two major short range order effects. One, due to breaking of hydrogen bonds, enhances the pre-edge intensity in the liquid. The other, due to a non-bonded molecular fraction in the first coordination shell, affects the main spectral edge in the conversion of ice to water. This effect may not involve hydrogen bond breaking as shown by experiment in high-density amorphous ice.

Wei Chen; Xifan Wu; Roberto Car

2009-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

91

Comparison of energy storage systems in the United States chilled water versus two types of ice storage systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Current US production non-storage heat pumps are compared to heat pumps using stored hot water and stored chilled water and to heat pumps using ice-on-coils as a means of using latent heat of fusion of water as a heat source. This equipment is also used as a means of stored cooling for air conditioning during hot weather. An ice-making heat pump which harvests ice as sheets of ice 3 to 4 times per hour and stores the ice in a large inexpensive bin is discussed. The advantages of such an ice-making heat pump to heat in cold weather and cool in hot weather is discussed as it relates to Electric Utility load management in different parts of the United States.

Fischer, H.C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Retrieval of Cloud Ice Water Path from Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS) aboard the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program F-16 spacecraft measures the Earth-emitted radiation at frequencies from 19 to 183 GHz. From its high-frequency channels at 91 and 150 GHz, ...

Ninghai Sun; Fuzhong Weng

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

Assessment of Ice Plugging of the Cooling Water Intake at American Electric Power's Conesville Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The American Electrical Power (AEP) Conesville power plant is shutting down the last unit that uses a once-through cooling system. Currently, warm water from the existing cooling system is routed to the intake area to control ice buildup. After the last unit is shut down, there will be no control of the ice buildup in the trash racks, making complete blockage of the intake facility a possibility. A sediment-control structure was built in 2000 to prevent sediment buildup at the intake facility. The sedime...

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

94

CHEMICAL PROCESSING OF PURE AMMONIA AND AMMONIA-WATER ICES INDUCED BY HEAVY IONS  

SciTech Connect

Cosmic rays are possibly the main agents to prevent the freeze-out of molecules onto grain surfaces in cold dense clouds. Ammonia (NH{sub 3}) is one of the most abundant molecules present in dust ice mantles, with a concentration of up to 15% relative to water (H{sub 2}O). FTIR spectroscopy is used to monitor pure NH{sub 3} and NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O ice samples as they are irradiated with Ni and Zn ion beams (500-600 MeV) at GANIL/France. New species, such as hydrazine (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}), diazene (N{sub 2}H{sub 2} isomers), molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}), and nitrogen (N{sub 2}) were identified after irradiation of pure NH{sub 3} ices. Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), nitrogen oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), and hydroxylamine (NH{sub 2}OH) are some of the products of the NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O ice radiolysis. The spectral band at 6.85 {mu}m was observed after irradiation of both types of ice. Besides the likely contribution of ammonium (NH{sub 4}{sup +}) and amino (NH{sub 2}) radicals, data suggest a small contribution of NH{sub 2}OH to this band profile after high fluences of irradiation of NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O ices. The spectral shift of the NH{sub 3} ''umbrella'' mode (9.3 {mu}m) band is parameterized as a function of NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O ratio in amorphous ices. Ammonia and water destruction cross-sections are obtained, as well as the rate of NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O (1:10) ice compaction, measured by the OH dangling bond destruction cross-section. Ammonia destruction is enhanced in the presence of H{sub 2}O in the ice and a power law relationship between stopping power and NH{sub 3} destruction cross-section is verified. Such results may provide relevant information for the evolution of molecular species in dense molecular clouds.

Bordalo, V.; Da Silveira, E. F. [Departamento de Fisica/Laboratorio do Acelerador Van de Graaff, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, Rua Marques de S. Vicente 225, 22451-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Lv, X. Y.; Domaracka, A.; Rothard, H.; Boduch, P. [Centre de Recherche sur les Ions, les Materiaux et la Photonique (CEA/CNRS/ENSICAEN/Universite de Caen-Basse Normandie), CIMAP-CIRIL-GANIL, Boulevard Henri Becquerel, BP 5133, F-14070 Caen Cedex 05 (France); Seperuelo Duarte, E., E-mail: vbordalo@fis.puc-rio.br [Grupo de Fisica e Astronomia, Instituto Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rua Lucio Tavares 1045, 26530-060 Nilopolis, RJ (Brazil)

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

95

Icing Wind Tunnel Tests on the CSIRO Liquid Water Probe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wet wind tunnel tests have been Performed on several versions of the CSIRO probe designed for the airborne measurement of liquid water content. Four different controller units and 17 different Probe sensors (including half-size and shielded ...

W. D. King; J. E. Dye; D. Baumgardner; J. W. Strapp; D. Huffman

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

Phase diagram of amorphous solid water: Low-density, high-density, and very-high-density amorphous ices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the understanding of the transformation between the different amorphous ices and the two hypothesized phasesPhase diagram of amorphous solid water: Low-density, high-density, and very-high-density amorphous ices Nicolas Giovambattista,1,2 H. Eugene Stanley,2 and Francesco Sciortino3 1 Department of Chemical

Sciortino, Francesco

97

Surface Wave Propagation in Shallow Water beneath an Inhomogeneous Ice Cover  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scattering of flexural–gravity waves in a layer of shallow fluid beneath an ice cover with irregularities is investigated. The irregularities considered are the ice edges, cracks, areas of finely broken ice, and ice ridges. Even this ...

A. V. Marchenko; K. I. Voliak

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Formation of Hydrogen, Oxygen, and Hydrogen Peroxide in Electron Irradiated Crystalline Water Ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water ice is abundant both astrophysically, for example in molecular clouds, and in planetary systems. The Kuiper belt objects, many satellites of the outer solar system, the nuclei of comets and some planetary rings are all known to be water-rich. Processing of water ice by energetic particles and ultraviolet photons plays an important role in astrochemistry. To explore the detailed nature of this processing, we have conducted a systematic laboratory study of the irradiation of crystalline water ice in an ultrahigh vacuum setup by energetic electrons holding a linear energy transfer of 4.3 +/- 0.1 keV mm-1. The irradiated samples were monitored during the experiment both on line and in situ via mass spectrometry (gas phase) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (solid state). We observed the production of hydrogen and oxygen, both molecular and atomic, and of hydrogen peroxide. The likely reaction mechanisms responsible for these species are discussed. Additional formation routes were derived from the sublimation profiles of molecular hydrogen (90-140 K), molecular oxygen (147 -151 K) and hydrogen peroxide (170 K). We also present evidence on the involvement of hydroxyl radicals and possibly oxygen atoms as building blocks to yield hydrogen peroxide at low temperatures (12 K) and via a diffusion-controlled mechanism in the warming up phase of the irradiated sample.

Weijun Zheng; David Jewitt; Ralf I. Kaiser

2005-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

99

Molecular origin of the difference in the HOH bend of the IR spectra between liquid water and ice  

SciTech Connect

The intensity of the HOH bend in the IR spectrum of ice is significantly smaller than the corresponding one in liquid water. This difference in the IR intensities of the HOH bend in the two systems is investigated using MD simulations with the flexible, polarizable, ab-initio based TTM3-F model for water, a potential that correctly reproduces the experimentally observed increase of the HOH bend in liquid water and ice from the water monomer value. We have identified two factors that are responsible for the difference in the intensity of the HOH bend in liquid water and ice: (i) the decrease of the intensity of the HOH bend in ice caused by the strong anti-correlation between the permanent dipole moment of a molecule and the induced dipole moment of a neighboring hydrogen bond acceptor molecule and (ii) the weakening of this anti-correlation by the disordered hydrogen bond network in liquid water. The presence of the anti-correlation in ice is further confirmed by ab initio electronic structure calculations of water pentamer clusters extracted from the trajectories of the MD simulations for ice and liquid water.

Imoto, Sho; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Saito, Shinji

2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

100

Parameterizing Size Distribution in Ice Clouds  

SciTech Connect

PARAMETERIZING SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS IN ICE CLOUDS David L. Mitchell and Daniel H. DeSlover ABSTRACT An outstanding problem that contributes considerable uncertainty to Global Climate Model (GCM) predictions of future climate is the characterization of ice particle sizes in cirrus clouds. Recent parameterizations of ice cloud effective diameter differ by a factor of three, which, for overcast conditions, often translate to changes in outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) of 55 W m-2 or more. Much of this uncertainty in cirrus particle sizes is related to the problem of ice particle shattering during in situ sampling of the ice particle size distribution (PSD). Ice particles often shatter into many smaller ice fragments upon collision with the rim of the probe inlet tube. These small ice artifacts are counted as real ice crystals, resulting in anomalously high concentrations of small ice crystals (D < 100 µm) and underestimates of the mean and effective size of the PSD. Half of the cirrus cloud optical depth calculated from these in situ measurements can be due to this shattering phenomenon. Another challenge is the determination of ice and liquid water amounts in mixed phase clouds. Mixed phase clouds in the Arctic contain mostly liquid water, and the presence of ice is important for determining their lifecycle. Colder high clouds between -20 and -36 oC may also be mixed phase but in this case their condensate is mostly ice with low levels of liquid water. Rather than affecting their lifecycle, the presence of liquid dramatically affects the cloud optical properties, which affects cloud-climate feedback processes in GCMs. This project has made advancements in solving both of these problems. Regarding the first problem, PSD in ice clouds are uncertain due to the inability to reliably measure the concentrations of the smallest crystals (D < 100 µm), known as the “small mode”. Rather than using in situ probe measurements aboard aircraft, we employed a treatment of ice cloud optical properties formulated in terms of PSD parameters in combination with remote measurements of thermal radiances to characterize the small mode. This is possible since the absorption efficiency (Qabs) of small mode crystals is larger at 12 µm wavelength relative to 11 µm wavelength due to the process of wave resonance or photon tunneling more active at 12 µm. This makes the 12/11 µm absorption optical depth ratio (or equivalently the 12/11 µm Qabs ratio) a means for detecting the relative concentration of small ice particles in cirrus. Using this principle, this project tested and developed PSD schemes that can help characterize cirrus clouds at each of the three ARM sites: SGP, NSA and TWP. This was the main effort of this project. These PSD schemes and ice sedimentation velocities predicted from them have been used to test the new cirrus microphysics parameterization in the GCM known as the Community Climate Systems Model (CCSM) as part of an ongoing collaboration with NCAR. Regarding the second problem, we developed and did preliminary testing on a passive thermal method for retrieving the total water path (TWP) of Arctic mixed phase clouds where TWPs are often in the range of 20 to 130 g m-2 (difficult for microwave radiometers to accurately measure). We also developed a new radar method for retrieving the cloud ice water content (IWC), which can be vertically integrated to yield the ice water path (IWP). These techniques were combined to determine the IWP and liquid water path (LWP) in Arctic clouds, and hence the fraction of ice and liquid water. We have tested this approach using a case study from the ARM field campaign called M-PACE (Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment). This research led to a new satellite remote sensing method that appears promising for detecting low levels of liquid water in high clouds typically between -20 and -36 oC. We hope to develop this method in future research.

DeSlover, Daniel; Mitchell, David L.

2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water path" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Role of dipolar correlations in the IR spectra of water and ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report simulated infrared spectra of deuterated water and ice using Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics with maximally localized Wannier functions. Experimental features are accurately reproduced within the harmonic approximation. By decomposing the lineshapes in terms of intra and intermolecular dipole correlation functions we find that short-range intermolecular dynamic charge fluctuations associated to hydrogen bonds are prominent over the entire spectral range. Our analysis reveals the origin of several spectral features and identifies network bending modes in the far IR range.

Wei Chen; Manu Sharma; Raffaele Resta; Giulia Galli; Roberto Car

2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

102

Determination of Ice-Phase Water Capture Temperatures Using Isotopic Composition and Habits of Ice Crystals?Relevance to Snowpack Augmentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The oxygen 18/oxygen 16 (18O/16O) and deuterium/hydrogen (D/H) ratios of snowmelt have been used for estimating the weighted mean temperatures in clouds where ice-phase water capture has occurred during the precipitation-forming process. The ...

Joseph A. Warburton

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

Accurate Liquid Water Path Retrieval from Low-Cost Microwave Radiometers Using Additional Information from a Lidar Ceilometer and Operational Forecast Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water clouds have an important impact on the radiative balance of the earth. The use of ground-based dual-frequency microwave radiometers to derive both liquid water path (LWP) and water vapor path (WVP) is well established, but uncertainties ...

Nicolas Gaussiat; Robin J. Hogan; Anthony J. Illingworth

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

Final Scientific/Technical Report. A closed path methane and water vapor gas analyzer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Robust, economical, low-power and reliable closed-path methane (CH4), carbon dioxide (CO2), and water vapor (H2O) analyzers suitable for long-term measurements are not readily available commercially. Such analyzers are essential for quantifying the amount of CH4 and CO2 released from various ecosystems (wetlands, rice paddies, forests, etc.) and other surface contexts (e.g. landfills, animal husbandry lots, etc.), and for understanding the dynamics of the atmospheric CH4 and CO2 budget and their impact on climate change and global warming. The purpose of this project is to develop a closed-path methane, carbon dioxide gas and water vapor analyzer capable of long-term measurements in remote areas for global climate change and environmental research. The analyzer will be capable of being deployed over a wide range of ecosystems to understand methane and carbon dioxide exchange between the atmosphere and the surface. Measurements of methane and carbon dioxide exchange need to be made all year-round with limited maintenance requirements. During this Phase II effort, we successfully completed the design of the electronics, optical bench, trace gas detection method and mechanical infrastructure. We are using the technologies of two vertical cavity surface emitting lasers, a multiple-pass Herriott optical cell, wavelength modulation spectroscopy and direct absorption to measure methane, carbon dioxide, and water vapor. We also have designed the instrument application software, Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), along with partial completion of the embedded software. The optical bench has been tested in a lab setting with very good results. Major sources of optical noise have been identified and through design, the optical noise floor is approaching -60dB. Both laser modules can be temperature controlled to help maximize the stability of the analyzer. Additionally, a piezo electric transducer has been utilized to randomize the noise introduced from potential etalons. It is expected that all original specifications contained within the initial proposal will be met. We are currently in the beginning stages of assembling the first generation prototypes and finalizing the remaining design elements. The first prototypes will initially be tested in our environmental calibration chamber in which specific gas concentrations, temperature and humidity levels can be controlled. Once operation in this controlled setting is verified, the prototypes will be deployed at LI-COR�¢����s Experimental Research Station (LERS). Deployment at the LERS site will test the instrument�¢����s robustness in a real-world situation.

Liukang, Xu; Dayle, McDermitt; Tyler, Anderson; Brad, Riensche; Anatoly, Komissarov; Julie, Howe

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Light tracking through ice and water -- Scattering and absorption in heterogeneous media with Photonics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the field of neutrino astronomy, large volumes of optically transparent matter like glacial ice, lake water, or deep ocean water are used as detector media. Elementary particle interactions are studied using in situ detectors recording time distributions and fluxes of the faint photon fields of Cherenkov radiation generated by ultra-relativistic charged particles, typically muons or electrons. The Photonics software package was developed to determine photon flux and time distributions throughout a volume containing a light source through Monte Carlo simulation. Photons are propagated and time distributions are recorded throughout a cellular grid constituting the simulation volume, and Mie scattering and absorption are realised using wavelength and position dependent parameterisations. The photon tracking results are stored in binary tables for transparent access through ANSI-C and C++ interfaces. For higher-level physics applications, like simulation or reconstruction of particle events, it is then possible to quickly acquire the light yield and time distributions for a pre-specified set of light source and detector properties and geometries without real-time photon propagation. In this paper the Photonics light propagation routines and methodology are presented and applied to the IceCube and Antares neutrino telescopes. The way in which inhomogeneities of the Antarctic glacial ice distort the signatures of elementary particle interactions, and how Photonics can be used to account for these effects, is described.

J. Lundberg; P. Miocinovic; K. Woschnagg; T. Burgess; J. Adams; S. Hundertmark; P. Desiati; P. Niessen

2007-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

106

A parameterisation of single and multiple muons in the deep water or ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric muons play an important role in underwater/ice neutrino detectors. In this paper, a parameterisation of the flux of single and multiple muon events, their lateral distribution and of their energy spectrum is presented. The kinematics parameters were modelled starting from a full Monte Carlo simulation of the interaction of primary cosmic rays with atmospheric nuclei; secondary muons reaching the sea level were propagated in the deep water. The parametric formulas are valid for a vertical depth of 1.5-5 km w.e. and up to 85 deg for the zenith angle, and can be used as input for a fast simulation of atmospheric muons in underwater/ice detectors.

Y. Becherini; A. Margiotta; M. Sioli; M. Spurio

2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

107

Effects of ice particle size vertical inhomogeneity on the passive remote sensing of ice clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The solar reflectance bi-spectral (SRBS) and infrared split-window (IRSpW) methods are two of the most popular techniques for passive ice cloud property retrievals from multispectral imagers. Ice clouds are usually assumed to be vertically homogeneous in global operational algorithms based on these methods, although significant vertical variations of ice particle size are typically observed in ice clouds. In this study we investigate uncertainties in retrieved optical thickness, effective particle size, and ice water path introduced by a homogeneous cloud assumption in both the SRBS and IRSpW methods, and focus on whether the assumption can lead to significant discrepancies between the two methods. The study simulates the upwelling spectral radiance associated with vertically structured clouds and passes the results through representative SRBS and IRSpW retrieval algorithms. Cloud optical thickness is limited to values for which IRSpW retrievals are possible (optical thickness less than about 7). When the ice cloud is optically thin and yet has a significant ice particle size vertical variation, it is found that both methods tend to underestimate the effective radius and ice water path. The reason for the underestimation is the nonlinear dependence of ice particle scattering properties (extinction and single scattering albedo) on the effective radius. Because the nonlinearity effect is stronger in the IRSpW than the SRBS method, the IRSpW-based IWP tends to be smaller than the SRBS counterpart. When the ice cloud is moderately optically thick and ice particle size increases monotonically towards cloud base, the two methods are in qualitative agreement; in the event that ice particle size decreases towards cloud base, the effective radius and ice water path retrievals based on the SRBS method are substantially larger than those from the IRSpW. The main findings of this study suggest that the homogenous cloud assumption can affect the SRBS and IRSpW methods to different extents and, consequently, can lead to significantly different retrievals. Therefore caution should be taken when comparing and combining the ice cloud property retrievals from these two methods.

Zhang, Zhibo; Platnick, Steven; Yang, Ping; Heidinger, Andrew K.; Comstock, Jennifer M.

2010-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

108

SIZE AND TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE IN THE FAR-IR SPECTRA OF WATER ICE PARTICLES  

SciTech Connect

Spectra of water-ice aerosol particles have been measured in the far-IR region using synchrotron radiation. The particles in the nanoscale size regime of 1-100 nm were formed by rapid collisional cooling at temperatures ranging from 4 to 190 K. The spectra show the characteristic bands centered near 44 {mu}m (230 cm{sup -1}) and 62 {mu}m (160 cm{sup -1}) associated with the intermolecular lattice modes of crystalline ice at all temperatures, in contrast to previous studies of thin films formed by vapor deposition where amorphous ice is generated below 140 K. The bands shift to higher wavenumber values as the temperature is reduced, consistent with the trend seen in earlier studies, but in our experiments the actual peak positions in the aerosol particle spectra are consistently higher by ca. 4 cm{sup -1}. This finding has implications for the potential use of these spectral features as a temperature probe. The particle sizes are small enough for their spectra to be free of scattering effects, and therefore provide a means to assess imaginary refractive index values obtained through Kramers-Kronig analyses of thin film spectra.

Medcraft, Chris; McNaughton, Don; Thompson, Chris D. [School of Chemistry, Monash University, Wellington Road, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Appadoo, Dominique [Australian Synchrotron, Blackburn Road, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Bauerecker, Sigurd [Institut fuer Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Technische Universitaet Braunschweig, Hans-Sommer-Strasse 10, D-38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Robertson, Evan G., E-mail: E.Robertson@latrobe.edu.au [Department of Chemistry and La Trobe Institute of Molecular Sciences, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria 3086 (Australia)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

109

DIFFRACTION STUDIES OF ICE Alexe BOSAK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as ice-nine [K. Vonnegut, Cat's Cradle] #12;Phase diagram of water #12;Phase diagram of water Here we areDIFFRACTION STUDIES OF ICE Alexeï BOSAK European Synchrotron Radiation Facility #12;Ice as the mild threat ice Ih the only ice in the crust #12;Ice as the absolute weapon Ice IX : melting point 45.8°C

Titov, Anatoly

110

Correlation between thermodynamic anomalies and pathways of ice nucleation in supercooled water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The well-known classical nucleation theory (CNT) for the free energy barrier towards formation of a nucleus of critical size of the new stable phase within the parent metastable phase fails to take into account the influence of other metastable phases having density/order intermediate between the parent metastable phase and the final stable phase. This lacuna can be more serious than capillary approximation or spherical shape assumption made in CNT. This issue is particularly significant in ice nucleation because liquid water shows rich phase diagram consisting of two (high and low density) liquid phases in supercooled state. The explanations of thermodynamic and dynamic anomalies of supercooled water often invoke the possible influence of a liquid-liquid transition between two metastable liquid phases. To investigate both the role of thermodynamic anomalies and presence of distinct metastable liquid phases in supercooled water on ice nucleation, we employ density functional theoretical approach to find nucleation free energy barrier in different regions of phase diagram. The theory makes a number of striking predictions, such as a dramatic lowering of nucleation barrier due to presence of a metastable intermediate phase and crossover in the dependence of free energy barrier on temperature near liquid-liquid critical point. These predictions can be tested by computer simulations as well as by controlled experiments.

Rakesh S. Singh; Biman Bagchi

2013-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

111

Simulation of Ultra High Energy Neutrino Interactions in Ice and Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The CORSIKA program, usually used to simulate extensive cosmic ray air showers, has been adapted to work in a water or ice medium. The adapted CORSIKA code was used to simulate hadronic showers produced by neutrino interactions. The simulated showers have been used to study the spatial distribution of the deposited energy in the showers. This allows a more precise determination of the acoustic signals produced by ultra high energy neutrinos than has been possible previously. The properties of the acoustic signals generated by such showers are described.

Bevan, S; Perkin, J; Ralph, S; Rhodes, C; Thompson, L; Sloan, T; Waters, D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Simulation of Ultra High Energy Neutrino Interactions in Ice and Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The CORSIKA program, usually used to simulate extensive cosmic ray air showers, has been adapted to work in a water or ice medium. The adapted CORSIKA code was used to simulate hadronic showers produced by neutrino interactions. The simulated showers have been used to study the spatial distribution of the deposited energy in the showers. This allows a more precise determination of the acoustic signals produced by ultra high energy neutrinos than has been possible previously. The properties of the acoustic signals generated by such showers are described.

S. Bevan; S. Danaher; J. Perkin; S. Ralph; C. Rhodes; L. Thompson; T. Sloan; D. Waters

2007-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

113

Thermodynamics of Icing Cylinder for Measurements of Liquid Water Content in Supercooled Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Rosemount Icing Detector (RICE) has been used extensively over the last three decades for aircraft measurements of the rate of ice riming in supercooled liquid and mixed clouds. Because of difficulties related to calibration and ...

I. P. Mazin; A. V. Korolev; A. Heymsfield; G. A. Isaac; S. G. Cober

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Homogeneous Ice Nucleation and Supercooled Liquid Water in Orographic Wave Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates ice nucleation mechanisms in cold lenticular wave clouds, a cloud type characterized by quasi-steady-state air motions and microphysical properties. It is concluded that homogeneous ice nucleation is responsible for the ...

Andrew J. Heymsfield; Larry M. Miloshevich

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Well-posedness of an extended model for water-ice phase transitions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose an improved model explaining the occurrence of high stresses due to the difference in specific volumes during phase transitions between water and ice. The unknowns of the resulting evolution problem are the absolute temperature, the volume increment, and the liquid fraction. The main novelty here consists in including the dependence of the specific heat and of the speed of sound upon the phase. These additional nonlinearities bring new mathematical difficulties which require new estimation techniques based on Moser iteration. We establish the existence of a global solution to the corresponding initial-boundary value problem, as well as lower and upper bounds for the absolute temperature. Assuming constant heat conductivity, we also prove uniqueness and continuous data dependence of the solution.

Krejci, Pavel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Evaluation of the Daylight Cycle of Model-Predicted Cloud Amount and Condensed Water Path over Europe with Observations from MSG SEVIRI  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The evaluation of the diurnal cycle of cloud amount (CA) and cloud condensed water path (CWP) as predicted by climate models receives relatively little attention, mostly because of the lack of observational data capturing the diurnal cycle of ...

R. A. Roebeling; E. van Meijgaard

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Nuclear quantum effects in water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work, a path integral Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulation of liquid water is performed. It is found that the inclusion of nuclear quantum effects systematically improves the agreement of first principles simulations of liquid water with experiment. In addition, the proton momentum distribution is computed utilizing a recently developed open path integral molecular dynamics methodology. It is shown that these results are in good agreement with neutron Compton scattering data for liquid water and ice.

Joseph A. Morrone; Roberto Car

2008-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

118

The Effect of Bubbles Released from a Melting Ice Wall on the Melt-Driven Convection in Salt Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The buoyancy created by the release of air bubbles from melting glacial ice walls results from both the upward drag of the bubbles and the density defect caused by the steady-state distribution of bubbles in the water. Calculations using typical ...

Edward G. Josberger

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Real-time Non-contact Millimeter Wave Characterization of Water-Freezing and Ice-Melting Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We applied millimeter wave radiometry for the first time to monitor water-freezing and ice-melting dynamics in real-time non-contact. The measurements were completed at a frequency of 137 GHz. Small amounts (about 2 mL) ...

Woskov, Paul P.

120

Solar Water Heater Roadmap Leads Path to Market Expansion (Fact Sheet)  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Innovative strategy to reduce installed cost of solar water heater systems can rival conventional natural gas water heaters in the marketplace.

Not Available

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water path" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The water ice rich surface of (145453) 2005 RR43: a case for a carbon-depleted population of TNOs?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent results suggest that there is a group of TNOs (2003 EL61 being the biggest member), with surfaces composed of almost pure water ice and with very similar orbital elements. We study the surface composition of another TNO that moves in a similar orbit, 2005 RR43, and compare it with the surface composition of the other members of this group. We report visible and near-infrared spectra, obtained with the 4.2m William Herschel Telescope and the 3.58m Telescopio Nazionale Galileo at the "Roque de los Muchachos" Observatory (La Palma, Spain). The spectrum of 2005 RR43 is neutral in color in the visible and dominated by very deep water ice absorption bands in the near infrared (D= 70.3 +/- 2.1 % and 82.8 +/- 4.9 % at 1.5 \\mu and 2.0 \\mu respectively). It is very similar to the spectrum of the group of TNOs already mentioned. All of them present much deeper water ice absorption bands (D>40 %) than any other TNO except Charon. Scattering models show that its surface is covered by water ice, a significant fraction in crytalline state with no trace (5 % upper limit) of complex organics. Possible scenarios to explain the existence of this population of TNOs are discussed: a giant collision, an originally carbon depleted composition, or a common process of continuous resurfacing. We conclude that TNO 2005 RR43 is member of a group, may be a population, of TNOs clustered in the space of orbital parameters that show abundant water ice and no signs of complex organics. The lack of complex organics in their surfaces suggests a significant smaller fraction of carbonaceous volatiles like CH4 in this population than in "normal" TNOs. A carbon depleted population of TNOs could be the origin of the population of carbon depleted Jupiter family comets already noticed by A'Hearn et al. (1995).

N. Pinilla-Alonso; J. Licandro; R. Gil-Hutton; R. Brunetto

2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

122

Absence of superheating for ice Ih with a free surface : a new method of determining the melting point of different water models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular dynamic simulations were performed for ice Ih with a free surface. The simulations were carried out at several temperatures and each run lasted more than 7ns. At high temperatures the ice melts. It is demonstrated that the melting process starts at the surface and propagates to the bulk of the ice block. Already at the temperatures below the melting point, we observe a thin liquid layer at the ice surface, but the block of ice remains stable along the run. As soon as the temperature reaches the melting point the entire ice block melts. Our results demonstrate that, unlike in the case of conventional simulations in the NpT ensemble, overheating of the ice Ih with a free surface does not occur. That allows to estimate the melting point of ice at zero pressure. We applied the method to the following models of water: SPC/E, TIP4P, TIP4P/Ew, TIP4P/Ice and TIP4P/2005, and found good agreement between the melting temperatures obtained by this procedure and the values obtained either from free energy calculations or from direct simulations of the ice/water interface.

Carlos Vega; Maria Martin-Conde; Andrzej Patrykiejew

2013-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

123

MWRRET Value-Added Product: The Retrieval of Liquid Water Path and Precipitable Water Vapor from Microwave Radiometer (MWR) Data Sets (Revision 2)  

SciTech Connect

This report provides a short description of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility microwave radiometer (MWR) Retrieval (MWRRET) value-added product (VAP) algorithm. This algorithm utilizes a complementary physical retrieval method and applies brightness temperature offsets to reduce spurious liquid water path (LWP) bias in clear skies resulting in significantly improved precipitable water vapor (PWV) and LWP retrievals. We present a general overview of the technique, input parameters, output products, and describe data quality checks. A more complete discussion of the theory and results is given in Turner et al. (2007b).

Gaustad, KL; Turner, DD; McFarlane, SA

2011-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

124

Path 15  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations > Transmission Planning > Path 15 Path 15 Pictures and Videos Jan 04 Feb 04 Mar 04 Apr 04 May 04 Jun 04 Jul 04 Aug 04 Mar 06 Path 15 is an 84-mile stretch of electrical...

125

Synoptic Aerial Surveys and Abundance Estimates for Ice-associated Seals in US and Russian Waters Michael Cameron, Peter Boveng, Erin Moreland and Jay Ver Hoef  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Synoptic Aerial Surveys and Abundance Estimates for Ice-associated Seals in US and Russian Waters synoptic aerial surveys of the eastern Bering Sea in tandem with Russian researchers employed to survey. Testing a ship-based Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) for surveying the Bering Sea pack ice. AFSC Quarterly

126

ADAPTIVE OPTICS OBSERVATIONS OF 3 {mu}m WATER ICE IN SILHOUETTE DISKS IN THE ORION NEBULA CLUSTER AND M43  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the near-infrared images and spectra of four silhouette disks in the Orion Nebula Cluster (M42) and M43 using the Subaru Adaptive Optics system. While d053-717 and d141-1952 show no water ice feature at 3.1 {mu}m, a moderately deep ({tau}{sub ice} {approx} 0.7) water ice absorption is detected toward d132-1832 and d216-0939. Taking into account the water ice so far detected in the silhouette disks, the critical inclination angle to produce a water ice absorption feature is confirmed to be 65 Degree-Sign -75 Degree-Sign . As for d216-0939, the crystallized water ice profile is exactly the same as in the previous observations taken 3.63 years ago. If the water ice material is located at 30 AU, then the observations suggest it is uniform at a scale of about 3.5 AU.

Terada, Hiroshi; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Minowa, Yosuke; Hayano, Yutaka; Oya, Shin; Hattori, Masayuki; Takami, Hideki [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 North A'ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Tokunaga, Alan T. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Watanabe, Makoto [Department of Cosmosciences, Hokkaido University, Kita 10, Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0810 (Japan); Saito, Yoshihiko [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Ito, Meguru [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Victoria, 3800 Finnerty Road, Victoria, BC, V8P 5C2 (Canada); Iye, Masanori, E-mail: terada@subaru.naoj.org [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

A Model for Predicting Ice Accretion and Ablation in Water Bodies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model is presented for computing ice growth and ablation. Downward long- and shortwave radiation is computed for variable cloud amount and base. Surface albedo depends on snow cover and age of the snow or ice. Thermal inertia of the snow and ...

Maurice Danard; Mark Gray; Goz Lyv

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Surface Melt Area and Water Balance Modeling on the Greenland Ice Sheet 1995–2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SnowModel, a physically based snow-evolution modeling system that includes four submodels—MicroMet, EnBal, SnowPack, and SnowTran-3D—was used to simulate variations in Greenland [including the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS)] surface snow and ice melt,...

Sebastian H. Mernild; Glen E. Liston; Christopher A. Hiemstra; Konrad Steffen

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

The Temperature Dependence of the Liquid Water Path of Low Clouds in the Southern Great Plains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Satellite observations of low-level clouds have challenged the idea that increasing liquid water content with temperature combined with constant physical thickness will lead to a negative cloud optics feedback in a decadal climate change. The ...

Anthony D. Del Genio; Audrey B. Wolf

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Water Vapor Transport Paths and Accumulation during Widespread Snowfall Events in Northeastern China  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study aims to identify the distinct characteristics of water vapor transport (WVT) and its role in supplying moisture for widespread snowfall (WS) events in northeastern China (NEC). Fifty WS events in NEC were selected based on cumulative ...

Bo Sun; Huijun Wang

2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

Ice electrode electrolytic cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a method and apparatus for removing heavy metals from waste water, soils, or process streams by electrolytic cell means. The method includes cooling a cell cathode to form an ice layer over the cathode and then applying an electric current to deposit a layer of the heavy metal over the ice. The metal is then easily removed after melting the ice. In a second embodiment, the same ice-covered electrode can be employed to form powdered metals.

Glenn, D.F.; Suciu, D.F.; Harris, T.L.; Ingram, J.C.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

132

Ice electrode electrolytic cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a method and apparatus for removing heavy metals from waste water, soils, or process streams by electrolytic cell means. The method includes cooling a cell cathode to form an ice layer over the cathode and then applying an electric current to deposit a layer of the heavy metal over the ice. The metal is then easily removed after melting the ice. In a second embodiment, the same ice-covered electrode can be employed to form powdered metals.

Glenn, David F. (Idaho Falls, ID); Suciu, Dan F. (Idaho Falls, ID); Harris, Taryl L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ingram, Jani C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Ice electrode electrolytic cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a method and apparatus for removing heavy metals from waste water, soils, or process streams by electrolytic cell means. The method includes cooling a cell cathode to form an ice layer over the cathode and then applying an electric current to deposit a layer of the heavy metal over the ice. The metal is then easily removed after melting the ice. In a second embodiment, the same ice-covered electrode can be employed to form powdered metals.

Glenn, D.F.; Suciu, D.F.; Harris, T.L.; Ingram, J.C.

1993-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

134

Arctic ice islands  

SciTech Connect

The development of offshore oil and gas resources in the Arctic waters of Alaska requires offshore structures which successfully resist the lateral forces due to moving, drifting ice. Ice islands are floating, a tabular icebergs, up to 60 meters thick, of solid ice throughout their thickness. The ice islands are thus regarded as the strongest ice features in the Arctic; fixed offshore structures which can directly withstand the impact of ice islands are possible but in some locations may be so expensive as to make oilfield development uneconomic. The resolution of the ice island problem requires two research steps: (1) calculation of the probability of interaction between an ice island and an offshore structure in a given region; and (2) if the probability if sufficiently large, then the study of possible interactions between ice island and structure, to discover mitigative measures to deal with the moving ice island. The ice island research conducted during the 1983-1988 interval, which is summarized in this report, was concerned with the first step. Monte Carlo simulations of ice island generation and movement suggest that ice island lifetimes range from 0 to 70 years, and that 85% of the lifetimes are less then 35 years. The simulation shows a mean value of 18 ice islands present at any time in the Arctic Ocean, with a 90% probability of less than 30 ice islands. At this time, approximately 34 ice islands are known, from observations, to exist in the Arctic Ocean, not including the 10-meter thick class of ice islands. Return interval plots from the simulation show that coastal zones of the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas, already leased for oil development, have ice island recurrences of 10 to 100 years. This implies that the ice island hazard must be considered thoroughly, and appropriate safety measures adopted, when offshore oil production plans are formulated for the Alaskan Arctic offshore. 132 refs., 161 figs., 17 tabs.

Sackinger, W.M.; Jeffries, M.O.; Lu, M.C.; Li, F.C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

A Comparison of the Water Budgets between Clouds from AMMA and TWP-ICE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two field campaigns, the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) and the Tropical Warm Pool–International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE), took place in 2006 near Niamey, Niger, and Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia, providing extensive ...

Xiping Zeng; Wei-Kuo Tao; Scott W. Powell; Robert A. Houze Jr.; Paul Ciesielski; Nick Guy; Harold Pierce; Toshihisa Matsui

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

The quantum nature of the OH stretching mode in ice and water probed by neutron scattering experiments  

SciTech Connect

The OH stretching vibrational spectrum of water was measured in a wide range of temperatures across the triple point, 269 K < T < 296 K, using Inelastic Neutron Scattering (INS). The hydrogen projected density of states and the proton mean kinetic energy, _OH, were determined for the first time within the framework of a harmonic description of the proton dynamics. We found that in the liquid the value of _OH is nearly constant as a function of T, indicating that quantum effects on the OH stretching frequency are weakly dependent on temperature. In the case of ice, ab initio electronic structure calculations, using non-local van der Waals functionals, provided _OH values in agreement with INS experiments. We also found that the ratio of the stretching (_OH) to the total (_exp) kinetic energy, obtained from the present measurements, increases in going from ice, where hydrogen bonding is the strongest, to the liquid at ambient conditions and then to the vapour phase, where hydrogen bonding is the weakest. The same ratio was also derived from the combination of previous deep inelastic neutron scattering data, which does not rely upon the harmonic approximation, and the present measurements. We found that the ratio of stretching to the total kinetic energy shows a minimum in the metastable liquid phase. This finding suggests that the strength of intermolecular interactions increases in the supercooled phase, with respect to that in ice, contrary to the accepted view that supercooled water exhibits weaker hydrogen bonding than ice.

Senesi, Roberto [ORNL; Flammini, Davide [ORNL; Kolesnikov, Alexander I [ORNL; Murray, Eamonn D. [University of California, Davis; Galli, Giulia [University of California, Davis; Andreani, Carla [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Ice Fishing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ice Fishing Ice Fishing Nature Bulletin No. 327-A January 11, 1969 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Richard B. Ogilvie, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation ICE FISHING We have a peculiar class of people known as the "Frosty-toed Tribe". As soon as winter comes and the ice permits, they put on all the clothes they own and what they can borrow, pack their automobiles with equipment, and start early in the morning for some inland body of water or a bay along one of the Great Lakes. Usually, two or three go together and they may drive 50 or 100 miles. For hours, even in below zero weather, they huddle around holes cut in the ice, fishing patiently, sustained by hope, hot coffee, and a lot of conversation. Some days a man may catch nothing. Other days he may bring home all the law allows. Sometimes he fishes vainly until almost sundown and then begins to haul them in, all of the same kind and size, as fast as he can re-bait his hook. In the meantime, other anglers have rushed over, cut holes, and are fishing all around him -- usually in vain, because one of the strange things about ice fishing is that, although you may catch fish out of one hole, you may get nothing out of another only a few feet from it, using the same kind of bait at the same depth. There are a lot of hotly contested theories but nobody knows why. After watching and questioning scores of ice fishermen, some of them noted for their prowess, we find that although each has his own secret techniques and favorite spots, good catches seem more a matter of luck than skill. Although they are sluggish and don't fight, fish caught in winter have the firmest flesh and finest flavor. The biggest thrill comes from the skillet.

138

Probability Density Functions of Liquid Water Path and Cloud Amount of Marine Boundary Layer Clouds: Geographical and Seasonal Variations and Controlling Meteorological Factors  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The subgrid-scale variability of the liquid water path (LWP) of marine boundary layer clouds in areas that correspond to the typical grid size of large-scale (global climate and weather prediction) atmospheric models (200 km × 200 km) is ...

Hideaki Kawai; Joăo Teixeira

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Relative Humidity Effect on the High-Frequency Attenuation of Water Vapor Flux Measured by a Closed-Path Eddy Covariance System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this study the high-frequency loss of carbon dioxide (CO2) and water vapor (H2O) fluxes, measured by a closed-path eddy covariance system, were studied, and the related correction factors through the cospectral transfer function method were ...

Ivan Mammarella; Samuli Launiainen; Tiia Gronholm; Petri Keronen; Jukka Pumpanen; Üllar Rannik; Timo Vesala

2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Monitoring of Precipitable Water Vapor and Cloud Liquid Path from Scanning Microwave Radiometers During the 2003 Cloudiness Inter-Comparison Experiment  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Monitoring of Precipitable Water Vapor and Cloud Liquid Monitoring of Precipitable Water Vapor and Cloud Liquid Path from Scanning Microwave Radiometers During the 2003 Cloudiness Inter-Comparison Experiment V. Mattioli Department of Electronic and Information Engineering University of Perugia Perugia, Italy E. R. Westwater Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences University of Colorado National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory Boulder, Colorado V. Morris Pacific Northwest National Laboratory Richland, Washington Introduction Ground-based microwave radiometers (MWR) are widely used to measure atmospheric precipitable water vapor (PWV) and cloud liquid path (CLP). Comparisons of PWV derived from MWRs with water vapor retrievals from instruments like radiosondes, Global Positioning System (GPS) and Raman

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water path" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Water-Cooled Ice Machines, Purchasing Specifications for Energy-Efficient Products (Fact Sheet), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

continued > continued > FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM PURCHASING SPECIFICATIONS FOR ENERGY-EFFICIENT PRODUCTS The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) facilitates the Federal Government's implementation of sound, cost-effective energy management and investment practices to enhance the nation's energy security and environmental stewardship. Water-Cooled Ice Machines Legal Authorities Federal agencies are required by the National Energy Conservation Policy Act (P.L. 95-619), Execu- tive Order 13423, Executive Order 13514, and Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR) Subpart 23.2 and 53.223 to specify and buy ENERGY STAR ® qualified products or, in categories not included in

142

A parameterisation of single and multiple muons in the deep water or ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new parameterisation of atmospheric muons deep underwater (or ice) is presented. It takes into account the simultaneous arrival of muons in bundle giving the multiplicity of the events and the muon energy spectrum as a function of their lateral distribution in a shower.

Annarita Margiotta

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Electrical Atomization of Water Dripping from Melting Ice Pieces and its Possible Role in Thunderstorms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When a small isolated ice piece of conical shape is suspended with its apex facing down between two horizontal parallel electrodes and an electric field of 1 to 1.6 kV cm?1 is applied between them with the lower electrode at negative potential, a ...

A. K. Kamra; D. V. Ahire

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Sensitivity of Circumpolar Deep Water Transport and Ice Shelf Basal Melt along the West Antarctic Peninsula to Changes in the Winds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW) can be found near the continental shelf break around most of Antarctica. Advection of this relatively warm water (up to 2°C) across the continental shelf to the base of floating ice shelves is thought to be a critical ...

Michael S. Dinniman; John M. Klinck; Eileen E. Hofmann

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Biogeochemistry in Sea Ice: CICE model developments  

SciTech Connect

Polar primary production unfolds in a dynamic sea ice environment, and the interactions of sea ice with ocean support and mediate this production. In spring, for example, fresh melt water contributes to the shoaling of the mixed layer enhancing ice edge blooms. In contrast, sea ice formation in the fall reduces light penetration to the upper ocean slowing primary production in marine waters. Polar biogeochemical modeling studies typically consider these types of ice-ocean interactions. However, sea ice itself is a biogeochemically active medium, contributing a significant and, possibly, essential source of primary production to polar regions in early spring and fall. Here we present numerical simulations using the Los Alamos Sea Ice Model (CICE) with prognostic salinity and sea ice biogeochemistry. This study investigates the relationship between sea ice multiphase physics and sea ice productivity. Of particular emphasis are the processes of gravity drainage, melt water flushing, and snow loading. During sea ice formation, desalination by gravity drainage facilitates nutrient exchange between ocean and ice maintaining ice algal blooms in early spring. Melt water flushing releases ice algae and nutrients to underlying waters limiting ice production. Finally, snow loading, particularly in the Southern Ocean, forces sea ice below the ocean surface driving an upward flow of nutrient rich water into the ice to the benefit of interior and freeboard communities. Incorporating ice microphysics in CICE has given us an important tool for assessing the importance of these processes for polar algal production at global scales.

Jeffery, Nicole [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hunke, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Elliott, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Turner, Adrian [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

146

vdW-DF Study of energetic, structural, and vibrational properties of small water clusters and ice Ih  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present results for a density functional theory study of small water clusters and hexagonal ice Ih, using the van der Waals density functional (vdW-DF). In particular, we examine energetic, structural, and vibrational properties of these systems. Our results exhibit excellent agreement with both experiment and quantum-chemistry calculations and show a systematic and consistent improvement over standard exchange-correlation functionals---making vdW-DF a promising candidate for resolving longstanding difficulties with density functional theory in describing water. In addition, by comparing our vdW-DF results with quantum-chemistry calculations and other standard exchange-correlation functionals, we shed light on the question of why standard functionals often fail to describe these systems accurately.

Brian Kolb; T. Thonhauser

2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

147

EVOLUTION OF SNOW LINE IN OPTICALLY THICK PROTOPLANETARY DISKS: EFFECTS OF WATER ICE OPACITY AND DUST GRAIN SIZE  

SciTech Connect

Evolution of a snow line in an optically thick protoplanetary disk is investigated with numerical simulations. The ice-condensing region in the disk is obtained by calculating the temperature and the density with the 1+1D approach. The snow line migrates as the mass accretion rate ( M-dot ) in the disk decreases with time. Calculations are carried out from an early phase with high disk accretion rates ( M-dot {approx}10{sup -7} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}) to a later phase with low disk accretion rates ( M-dot {approx}10{sup -12} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}) using the same numerical method. It is found that the snow line moves inward for M-dot {approx}>10{sup -10} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}, while it gradually moves outward in the later evolution phase with M-dot {approx}<10{sup -10} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. In addition to the silicate opacity, the ice opacity is taken into consideration. In the inward migration phase, the additional ice opacity increases the distance of the snow line from the central star by a factor of 1.3 for dust grains {approx}< 10 {mu}m in size and of 1.6 for {approx}> 100 {mu}m. It is inevitable that the snow line comes inside Earth's orbit in the course of the disk evolution if the viscosity parameter {alpha} is in the range 0.001-0.1, the dust-to-gas mass ratio is higher than a tenth of the solar abundance value, and the dust grains are smaller than 1 mm. The formation of water-devoid planetesimals in the terrestrial planet region seems to be difficult throughout the disk evolution, which imposes a new challenge to planet formation theory.

Oka, Akinori; Nakamoto, Taishi; Ida, Shigeru, E-mail: akinorioka1@gmail.com, E-mail: nakamoto@geo.titech.ac.jp [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

2011-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

148

The cloud condensation nuclei and ice nuclei effects on tropical anvil characteristics and water vapor of the tropical tropopause layer  

SciTech Connect

Cloud anvils from deep convective clouds are of great importance to the radiative energy budget and the aerosol impact on them is the least understood. Few studies examined the effects of both cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN) on anvil properties and water vapor content (WVC) in the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL). Using a 3-dimensional cloud-resolving model with size-resolved cloud microphysics, we focus on the CCN and IN effects on cloud anvil properties and WVC in the TTL. We find that cloud microphysical changes induced by CCN/IN play a very important role in determining cloud anvil area and WVC in the TTL, whether convection is enhanced or suppressed. Also, CCN effects on anvil microphysical properties, anvil size and lifetime are much more evident relative to IN. IN has little effect on convection, but can increase ice number and mass concentrations significantly under humid conditions. CCN in the PBL is found to have greater effects on convective strength and mid-tropospheric CCN has negligible effects on convection and cloud properties. Convective transport may only moisten the main convective outflow region but the cloud anvil size determines the WVC in the TTL domain. This study shows an important role of CCN in the lower-troposphere in modifying convection, the upper-level cloud properties. It also shows the effects of IN and the PBL CCN on the upper-level clouds depends on the humidity, resolving some contradictory results in past studies. 2

Fan, Jiwen; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail

2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

149

Skin supersolidity slipperizing ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Consistency between theory predictions and measurements and calculations revealed that the skin of ice, containing water molecules with fewer than four neighbours, forms a supersolid phase that is highly polarized, elastic, hydrophobic, with ultra-low density and high thermal stability. The supersolidity of skin sliperizes ice.

Xi Zhang; Yongli Huang; a Zengsheng Ma; Yichun Zhou; Chang Q Sun

2013-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

150

Effects of ice number concentration on dynamics of a shallow mixed-phase stratiform cloud  

SciTech Connect

Previous modeling studies have shown a high sensitivity of simulated properties of mixed-phase clouds to ice number concentration, Ni, with many models losing their ability to maintain the liquid phase as Ni increases. Although models differ widely at what Ni the mixed-phase cloud becomes unstable, the transition from a mixed-phase to an ice only cloud in many cases occurs over a narrow range of ice concentration. To gain better understanding of this non-linear model behavior, in this study, we analyze simulations of a mixed-phase stratiform Artic cloud observed on 26 April 2008 during recent Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC). The BASE simulation, in which Ni is constrained to match the measured value, produces a long-lived cloud in a quasi steady state similar to that observed. The simulation without the ice (NO_ICE) produces a comparable but slightly thicker cloud because more moisture is kept in the mixed layer due to lack of precipitation. When Ni is quadrupled relative to BASE (HI_ICE), the cloud starts loosing liquid water almost immediately and the liquid water path is reduced by half in less than two hours. The changes in liquid water are accompanied by corresponding reduction in the radiative cooling of the layer and a slow down in the vertical mixing, confirming the important role of interactions among microphysics, radiation and dynamics in this type of clouds. Deviations of BASE and HI_ICE from NO_ICE are used to explore the linearity of the model response to variation in Ni. It is shown that at early stages, changes in liquid and ice water as well as in radiative cooling/heating rates are proportional to the Ni change, while changes in the vertical buoyancy flux are qualitatively different in HI_ICE compared to BASE. Thus, while the positive feedback between the liquid water path and radiative cooling of the cloud layer is essential for glaciation of the cloud at higher Ni, the non-linear (with respect to Ni) reduction in positive buoyancy flux within and below the liquid cloud layer emerges as the process that influences the initial response of the mixed layer dynamics to the appearance of ice and subsequently determines the sustainability of liquid water in the cloud in this case.

Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Korolev, Alexei; Fan, Jiwen

2011-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

151

An ice lithography instrument  

SciTech Connect

We describe the design of an instrument that can fully implement a new nanopatterning method called ice lithography, where ice is used as the resist. Water vapor is introduced into a scanning electron microscope (SEM) vacuum chamber above a sample cooled down to 110 K. The vapor condenses, covering the sample with an amorphous layer of ice. To form a lift-off mask, ice is removed by the SEM electron beam (e-beam) guided by an e-beam lithography system. Without breaking vacuum, the sample with the ice mask is then transferred into a metal deposition chamber where metals are deposited by sputtering. The cold sample is then unloaded from the vacuum system and immersed in isopropanol at room temperature. As the ice melts, metal deposited on the ice disperses while the metals deposited on the sample where the ice had been removed by the e-beam remains. The instrument combines a high beam-current thermal field emission SEM fitted with an e-beam lithography system, cryogenic systems, and a high vacuum metal deposition system in a design that optimizes ice lithography for high throughput nanodevice fabrication. The nanoscale capability of the instrument is demonstrated with the fabrication of nanoscale metal lines.

Han, Anpan [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Chervinsky, John [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Branton, Daniel [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Golovchenko, J. A. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

152

Calibrations of Johnson-Williams Liquid Water Content Meters in a High-Speed Icing Tunnel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind tunnel tests have provided calibrations and intercomparisons of 14 Johnson-Williams (J–W) cloud liquid water content (LWC) measuring devices with 23 sensor heads from 10 research organizations. The absolute tunnel LWC was deduced using a ...

J. Walter Strapp; Robert S. Schemenauer

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

Design of a Shadowband Spectral Radiometer for the Retrieval of Thin Cloud Optical Depth, Liquid Water Path, and the Effective Radius  

SciTech Connect

The design and operation of a Thin-Cloud Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (TCRSR) described here was used to measure the radiative intensity of the solar aureole and enable the simultaneous retrieval of cloud optical depth, drop effective radius, and liquid water path. The instrument consists of photodiode sensors positioned beneath two narrow metal bands that occult the sun by moving alternately from horizon to horizon. Measurements from the narrowband 415-nm channel were used to demonstrate a retrieval of the cloud properties of interest. With the proven operation of the relatively inexpensive TCRSR instrument, its usefulness for retrieving aerosol properties under cloud-free skies and for ship-based observations is discussed.

Bartholomew M. J.; Reynolds, R. M.; Vogelmann, A. M.; Min, Q.; Edwards, R.; Smith, S.

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

The Post-Shock Chemical Lifetimes of Outflow Tracers and a Possible New Mechanism to Produce Water Ice Mantles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have used a coupled time-dependent chemical and dynamical model to investigate the lifetime of the chemical legacy left in the wake of C-type shocks. We concentrate this study on the chemistry of H2O and O2, two molecules which are predicted to have abundances that are significantly affected in shock-heated gas. Two models are presented: (1) a three-stage model of pre-shock, shocked, and post-shock gas; and (2) a Monte-Carlo cloud simulation where we explore the effects of stochastic shock activity on molecular gas over a cloud lifetime. In agreement with previous studies, we find that shock velocities in excess of 10 km s^-1 are required to convert all of the oxygen not locked in CO into H2O before the gas has an opportunity to cool. For pure gas-phase models the lifetime of the high water abundances, or ``H2O legacy'', in the post-shock gas is 4 - 7 x 10^5 years. Through the Monte Carlo cloud simulation we demonstrate that the time-average abundance of H2O is a sensitive function of the frequency of shocks. Thus we predict that the abundance of H2O and other known outflow tracers can be used to trace the history of shock activity in molecular gas. For gas-grain models we find that the abundance of water-ice on grain surfaces can be quite large and is comparable to that observed in molecular clouds. This offers a possible alternative method to create water mantles without resorting to grain surface chemistry: gas heating and chemical modification due to a C-type shock and subsequent depletion of the gas-phase species onto grain mantles.

Edwin A. Bergin; Gary J. Melnick; David A. Neufeld

1998-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

155

Measurement of Condensed Water Content in Liquid and Ice Clouds Using an Airborne Counterflow Virtual Impactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Condensed water content (CWC) measured using a counterflow virtual impactor (CVI) with a Lyman-? hygrometer downstream is compared with that measured by other airborne instruments (a hot-wire probe, a PMS FSSP, and a PMS 2D-C). Results indicate ...

Cynthia H. Twohy; Allen J. Schanot; William A. Cooper

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

Fish Smother Under Ice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Smother Under Ice Smother Under Ice A BULLETIN FOR THE CHICAGO PUBLIC SCHOOLS DESIGNED FOR INCLUSION IN THE WEEKLY ANNOUNCEMENT SENT OUT FROM THE OFFICE OF SUPT. WILLIAM H. JOHNSON Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation February 1, 1945 Nature Bulletin No. 1 FOREST PRESERVE NOTES Grown-ups, who used to kive on a farm or in a small town, are fond of talking about the old-fashioned winters "when I was a boy" and the winters that grandpa used to tell about. Well, one would have to go back a long, long time to find a winter as severe as this one. FISH SMOTHER UNDER ICE Lakes and streams breathe the same as living things. When they are covered with ice and snow they cannot get air and they much hold their breath until the ice thaws. While they are holding their breath the oxygen in the water is gradually used up by the living things sealed up in it -- fish, plants "bugs", snails, and hosts of microscopic life. If the ice lasts long enough, these living things die one after another as each kind reaches the point where it cannot stand any further oxygen starvation. Sometimes temporary relief is given by rains and melting snow that bring fresh, serated water under the ice, but no method of artificial respiration has been found that works. Sometimes, too, when water plants get enough sunlight through clear ice they produce small amounts of oxygen and delay the suffocation of the fish, etc.; but when snow and cloudy ice cuts off the light this does not happen.

157

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL: Dry Ice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dry Ice Dry ice is regulated as a hazardous material if shipped by air or water. Contact Shipping for any shipments that include dry ice (x5094, x4388, or shipping@lbl.gov)....

158

WATER-AMMONIUM ICES AND THE ELUSIVE 6.85 {mu}m BAND  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 6.85 {mu}m band observed in the spectra of young stellar objects has been analyzed recently and the most usually accepted assignment to the nu{sub 4} bending mode of NH{sub 4} {sup +} is still under debate. We present here a laboratory study of frozen solutions of NH{sub 4} {sup +}Cl{sup -} in water in an astrophysical range of concentrations and temperatures. The samples are prepared by hyper-quenching of liquid droplets on a cold substrate. The nu{sub 4} band of NH{sub 4} {sup +}, which is very strong in the pure crystal and in the liquid solution at ambient temperature, becomes almost blurred in IR spectra of the frozen solution. The effect of the chlorine anion is expected to be of little relevance in this study. The experimental results are supported by theoretical calculations, which predict a broad range of weak nu{sub 4} features for amorphous samples containing different ammonium environments. The present results indicate that the ammonium ion surrounded by water molecules only cannot suffice to explain this spectral feature. This paper contributes with new evidence to the discussion on the assignment of the 6.85 {mu}m band.

Mate, B.; Galvez, O.; Herrero, V. J.; Fernandez-Torre, D.; Moreno, M. A.; Escribano, R. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Bailey, D. A., P. B. Rhines, and S. Hkkinen, 2005: Formation and pathways of North Atlantic Deep Water in a coupled ice-ocean model of the Arctic-North Atlantic Oceans. Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water in a coupled ice-ocean model of the Arctic-North Atlantic Oceans. Climate Dyn., 25, doi:10.1007/s. P. Shen, World Scientific, Singapore, 360pp. Yeh, S.- W., and B. P. Kirtman, 2005: Pacific decadal

160

Sound Scattering from Sea Ice: Aspects Relevant to Ice-Draft Profiling by Sonar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate discrimination between thin ice and open water using sonar is an important practical concern for the calibration of ice-draft observations and for the use of ice-profiling sonar in climate-related studies of sea ice. To guide improvement ...

Humfrey Melling

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water path" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

An Open Path, Fast Response IR Spectrometer for Simultaneous Detection of C02 and Water Vapor Fluctuations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A fast response C02 and water vapor (H2O) analyzer was developed in this study for the measurement of atmospheric turbulence fluctuations and, in conjunction with a fast response anemometer, transport of these entities. High speed and high ...

M. J. Heikinheimo; G. W. Thurtell; G. E. Kidd

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Importance of Accurate Liquid Water Path for Estimation of Solar Radiation in Warm Boundary Layer Clouds: An Observational Study  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A 1-yr observational study of overcast boundary layer stratus at the U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program Southern Great Plains site illustrates that surface radiation has a higher sensitivity to cloud liquid water ...

Manajit Sengupta; Eugene E. Clothiaux; Thomas P. Ackerman; Seiji Kato; Qilong Min

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

District cooling: Phase 2, Direct freeze ice slurry system testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this research are to: extend the range of pressure drop data for ice-water slurry flows, and design and build a prototypical ice slurry distribution system which demonstrates ice slurry handling at an end user's heat exchanger, without sending ice slurry directly through the heat exchanger. The results of Phase 1 work demonstrated a 40% reduction in pump power required to move an ice-water slurry versus the same mass flow of water only. In addition to lower pressure drop, pumping ice slurries is advantageous because of the large latent and sensible heat cooling capacity stored in the ice compared to only sensible heat in chilled water. For example, an ice-water slurry with a 20% ice fraction (by mass) has a mass flow rate that is 70% less than the mass flow rate required for a chilled water system cooling and equivalent load. The greatly reduced mass flow combined with the friction reducing effects of ice-water slurries results in a total savings of 83% in pumping power. Therefore, a substantial savings potential exists for capital costs and system operating costs in ice-water slurry district cooling systems. One potential disadvantage of an ice-slurry district cooling system is the introduction of ice into equipment not so designed, such as air handlers at end user locations. A prototypic ice slurry distribution loop will demonstrate a cooling network which will provide ice slurry to an end user but sends ice free water into the actual heat transfer.

Winters, P.J.

1991-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

164

Global ice cloud observations: radiative properties and statistics from moderate-resolution imaging spectroradiometer measurements  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ice clouds occur quite frequently, yet so much about these clouds is unknown. In recent years, numerous investigations and field campaigns have been focused on the study of ice clouds, all with the ultimate goal of gaining a better understanding of microphysical and optical properties, as well as determining the radiative impact. Perhaps one of the most recognized instruments used for such research is the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), carried aboard the NASA EOS satellites Terra and Aqua. The present research aims to support ongoing efforts in the field of ice cloud research by use of observations obtained from Terra and Aqua MODIS. First, a technique is developed to infer ice cloud optical depth from the MODIS cirrus reflectance parameter. This technique is based on a previous method developed by Meyer et al. (2004). The applicability of the algorithm is demonstrated with retrievals from level-2 and -3 MODIS data. The technique is also evaluated with the operational MODIS cloud retrieval product and a method based on airborne ice cloud observations. From this technique, an archive of daily optical depth retrievals is constructed. Using simple statistics, the global spatial and temporal distributions of ice clouds are determined. Research has found that Aqua MODIS observes more frequent ice clouds and larger optical depths and ice water paths than does Terra MODIS. Finally, an analysis of the time series of daily optical depth values revealed that ice clouds at high latitudes, which are most likely associated with synoptic scale weather sytems, persist long enough to move with the upper level winds. Tropical ice clouds, however, dissipate more rapidly, and are in all likelihood associated with deep convective cells.

Meyer, Kerry Glynne

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Comparison of Cloud Fraction and Liquid Water Path between ECMWF simulations and ARM long-term Observations at the NSA Site  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

this poster, seasonal and annual variations of this poster, seasonal and annual variations of cloudiness and liquid water path (LWP) from European Center for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model were compared with surface measurement from the ARM Climate Research Facility (ARCF) North Slope of Alaska ( N S A ) s i t e b e t we e n J a n u a r y 1 9 9 9 and December 2004. â—Ź Model simulated large scale features match well with observations. â—Ź There are significant differences in cloud vertical and temporal distributions and in the magnitude. FIG. 1: Time-height display of cloud fraction from model simulations and observations in September 1999. â—Ź Model overestimates high clouds, especially in warm seasons. â—Ź Model makes close estimation for middle clouds. â—Ź Model underestimates low clouds in warm seasons, especially in

166

Automated Ice-Tethered Profilers for Seawater Observations under Pack Ice in All Seasons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automated, easily deployed Ice-Tethered Profiler (ITP) instrument system, developed for deployment on perennial sea ice in the polar oceans to measure changes in upper ocean water properties in all seasons, is described, and representative ...

R. Krishfield; J. Toole; A. Proshutinsky; M-L. Timmermans

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Quantifying the Impact of Dust on Heterogeneous Ice Generation in Midlevel Supercooled Stratiform Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dust aerosols have been regarded as effective ice nuclei (IN), but large uncertainties regarding their efficiencies remain. Here, four years of collocated CALIPSO and CloudSat measurements are used to quantify the impact of dust on heterogeneous ice generation in midlevel supercooled stratiform clouds (MSSCs) over the ‘dust belt’. The results show that the dusty MSSCs have an up to 20% higher mixed-phase cloud occurrence, up to 8 dBZ higher mean maximum Ze (Ze_max), and up to 11.5 g/m2 higher ice water path (IWP) than similar MSSCs under background aerosol conditions. Assuming similar ice growth and fallout history in similar MSSCs, the significant differences in Ze_max between dusty and non-dusty MSSCs reflect ice particle number concentration differences. Therefore, observed Ze_max differences indicate that dust could enhance ice particle concentration in MSSCs by a factor of 2 to 6 at temperatures colder than ?12°C. The enhancements are strongly dependent on the cloud top temperature, large dust particle concentration and chemical compositions. These results imply an important role of dust particles in modifying mixed-phase cloud properties globally.

Zhang, Damao; Wang, Zhien; Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Fan, Jiwen; Liu, Dong; Zhao, Ming

2012-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

168

Archimedean Ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The striking boundary dependency (the Arctic Circle phenomenon) exhibited in the ice model on the square lattice extends to other planar set-ups. We present these findings for the triangular and the Kagome lattices. Critical connectivity results guarantee that ice configurations can be generated using the simplest and most efficient local actions. Height functions are utilized throughout the analysis. At the end there is a surprise in store: on the remaining Archimedean lattice for which the ice model can be defined, the 3.4.6.4. lattice, the long range behavior is completely different from the other cases.

Kari Eloranta

2009-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

169

Accurate Liquid Water Path Retrieval from Low-Cost Microwave Radiometers Using Additional Information from a Lidar Ceilometer and Operational Forecast Models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, but their presence in the liquid rather than the ice phase can lead to shortwave flux changes of about 100 W m 2 (NWP). In most operational NWP models, production of rain by collision and coalescence is parameterized

Reading, University of

170

Global Ice and Land Climate Studies Using Scatterometer Image Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in sea ice, and canopy leaf density--as well as by the phase state of water (meltwater on sea ice1 Global Ice and Land Climate Studies Using Scatterometer Image Data David G. Long Brigham Young CA 91109 ben@pacific.jpl.nasa.gov Sasan.Saatchi@jpl.nasa.gov Cheryl Bertoia U. S. National Ice Center

Long, David G.

171

Surface Albedo of the Antarctic Sea Ice Zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In three ship-based field experiments, spectral albedos were measured at ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared wavelengths for open water, grease ice, nilas, young “grey” ice, young grey-white ice, and first-year ice, both with and without snow ...

Richard E. Brandt; Stephen G. Warren; Anthony P. Worby; Thomas C. Grenfell

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

Hydrogen ICE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chevrolet Silverado 1500HD Hydrogen ICE 1 Conversion Vehicle Specifications Engine: 6.0 L V8 Fuel Capacity: 10.5 GGE Nominal Tank Pressure: 5,000 psi Seatbelt Positions: Five...

173

Quantum Ice : a quantum Monte Carlo study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ice states, in which frustrated interactions lead to a macroscopic ground-state degeneracy, occur in water ice, in problems of frustrated charge order on the pyrochlore lattice, and in the family of rare-earth magnets collectively known as spin ice. Of particular interest at the moment are "quantum spin ice" materials, where large quantum fluctuations may permit tunnelling between a macroscopic number of different classical ground states. Here we use zero-temperature quantum Monte Carlo simulations to show how such tunnelling can lift the degeneracy of a spin or charge ice, stabilising a unique "quantum ice" ground state --- a quantum liquid with excitations described by the Maxwell action of 3+1-dimensional quantum electrodynamics. We further identify a competing ordered "squiggle" state, and show how both squiggle and quantum ice states might be distinguished in neutron scattering experiments on a spin ice material.

Nic Shannon; Olga Sikora; Frank Pollmann; Karlo Penc; Peter Fulde

2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

174

A Simplified Ice–Ocean Coupled Model for the Antarctic Ice Melt Season  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the Antarctic Ocean, sea ice melts mostly by warming of the ocean mixed layer through heat input (mainly solar radiation) in open water areas. A simplified ice–upper ocean coupled model is proposed in which sea ice melts only by the ocean heat ...

Kay I. Ohshima; Sohey Nihashi

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Energy Cost Calculator for Commercial Ice Machines | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ice Machines Ice Machines Energy Cost Calculator for Commercial Ice Machines October 8, 2013 - 2:25pm Addthis Vary capacity size, energy cost, hours of operation, and /or efficiency level. INPUT SECTION Input the following data (if any parameter is missing, calculator will set to default value). Defaults Type of Ice Cube Machine Ice Making Head Self-Contained Remote Condensing Unit Ice Making Head Type of Condenser Air Cooled Water Cooled Air Cooled Ice Harvest Rate (lbs. ice per 24 hrs.) lbs. per 24 hrs. 500 lbs. per 24 hrs. Energy Consumption (per 100 lbs. of ice) kWh 5.5 kWh Quantity of ice machines to be purchased 1 Energy Cost $/kWh 0.06 $/kWh Annual Hours of Operation hrs. 3000 hrs. Calculate Reset OUTPUT SECTION Performance per Ice Cube Machine Your

176

District cooling: Phase 2, Direct freeze ice slurry system testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this research are to: extend the range of pressure drop data for ice-water slurry flows; and design and build a prototypical ice slurry distribution system which demonstrates ice slurry handling at an end user's heat exchanger, without sending ice slurry directly through the heat exchanger. Previous research (Phase 1) conducted by CBI under DOE Contract FG01-86CE26564 has shown a friction reducing effect of ice crystals in water flow. The results of this work demonstrated a 40% reduction in pump power required to move an ice-water slurry versus the same mass flow of water only. In addition to lower pressure drop, pumping ice slurries is advantageous because of the large latent and sensible heat cooling capacity stored in the ice compared to only sensible heat in chilled water. For example, an ice-water slurry with a 20% ice fraction (by mass) has a mass flow rate that is 70% less than the mass flow rate required for a chilled water system cooling and equivalent load. The greatly reduced mass flow combined with the friction reducing effects of ice-water slurries results in a total savings of 83% in pumping power. Therefore, a substantial savings potential exists for capital costs and system operating costs in ice-water slurry district cooling systems.

Winters, P.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

Passive solar roof ice melter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An elongated passive solar roof ice melter is placed on top of accumulated ice and snow including an ice dam along the lower edge of a roof of a heated building and is held against longitudinal movement with respect to itself. The melter includes a bottom wall having an upper surface highly absorbent to radiant solar energy; a first window situated at right angles with respect to the bottom wall, and a reflecting wall connecting the opposite side edges of the bottom wall and the first window. The reflecting wall has a surface facing the bottom wall and the window which is highly reflective to radiant solar energy. Radiant solar energy passes through the first window and either strikes the highly absorbent upper surface of the bottom wall or first strikes the reflecting wall to be reflected down to the upper surface of the bottom wall. The heat generated thereby melts through the ice below the bottom wall causing the ice dam to be removed between the bottom wall and the top of the roof and immediately adjacent to the ice melter along the roof. Water dammed up by the ice dam can then flow down through this break in the dam and drain out harmlessly onto the ground. This prevents dammed water from seeping back under the shingles and into the house to damage the interior of the house.

Deutz, R.T.

1981-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

178

Development of a Sea Ice Model for Use in Zonally Averaged Energy Balance Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A sea ice model for use in zonally averaged energy balance climate models is presented which includes the following processes: surface melting, basal freezing and melting, lateral melting from ice-flee water or growth of new ice in leads, ...

L. D. Danny Harvey

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

179

The phase diagram of ice Ih, II, and III: a quasi-harmonic study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The phase diagram of ice Ih, II, and III is studied by a quasi-harmonic approximation. The results of this approach are compared to phase diagrams previously derived by thermodynamic integration using path integral and classical simulations, as well as to experimental data. The studied models are based on both flexible (q-TIP4P/F) and rigid (TIP4P/2005, TIP4PQ/2005) descriptions of the water molecule. Many aspects of the simulated phase diagrams are reasonably reproduced by the quasi-harmonic approximation. Advantages of this simple approach are that it is free from the statistical errors inherent to computer simulations, both classical and quantum limits are easily accessible, and the error of the approximation is expected to decrease in the zero temperature limit. We find that the calculated phase diagram of ice Ih, II, and III depends strongly on the hydrogen disorder of ice III, at least for cell sizes typically used in phase coexistence simulations. Either ice II (in the classical limit) or ice III (in t...

Ramirez, R; Herrero, C P; 10.1063/1.4757064

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

Modeling the Effect of Ice Nuclei on ARM Clouds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Upper-Tropospheric Ice Water Content in TWP-ICE Xiping Zeng, Wei-Kuo Tao, Minghua Zhang, and Shaochen Xie March 31, 2009 Papers Published Recently * Zeng, X., W.-K. Tao, M. Zhang,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water path" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Impacts of Ice Clouds on GPS Radio Occultation Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mathematical solutions accounting for the effects of liquid and ice clouds on the propagation of the GPS radio signals are first derived. The percentage contribution of ice water content (IWC) to the total refractivity increases linearly with the ...

X. Zou; S. Yang; P. S. Ray

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

182

Observations of Thermohaline Convection adjacent to Brunt Ice Shelf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations were made of ocean microstructure and horizontal currents adjacent to Brunt Ice Shelf in the southeastern Weddell Sea. Periods of in situ supercooled water extending as deep as 65 m were associated with ice nucleation and frazil ...

Ilker Fer; Keith Makinson; Keith W. Nicholls

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

183

FINAL REPORT FOR THE DOE/ARM PROJECT TITLED Representation of the Microphysical and Radiative Properties of Ice Clouds in SCMs and GCMs  

SciTech Connect

The broad goal of this research is to improve climate prediction through better representation of cirrus cloud microphysical and radiative properties in global climate models (GCMs). Clouds still represent the greatest source of uncertainty in climate prediction, and the representation of ice clouds is considerably more challenging than liquid water clouds. While about 40% of cloud condensate may be in the form of ice by some estimates, there have been no credible means of representing the ice particle size distribution and mass removal rates from ice clouds in GCMs. Both factors introduce large uncertainties regarding the global net flux, the latter factor alone producing a change of 10 W/m2 in the global net flux due to plausible changes in effective ice particle fallspeed. In addition, the radiative properties of ice crystals themselves are in question. This research provides GCMs with a credible means of representing the full (bimodal) ice particle size distribution (PSD) in ice clouds, including estimates of the small crystal (D < 65 microns) mode of the PSD. It also provides realistic estimates of mass sedimentation rates from ice clouds, which have a strong impact on their ice contents and radiative properties. This can be done through proper analysis of ice cloud microphysical data from ARM and other field campaigns. In addition, this research tests the ice cloud radiation treatment developed under two previous ARM projects by comparing it against laboratory measurements of ice cloud extinction efficiency and by comparing it with explicit theoretical calculations of ice crystal optical properties. The outcome of this project includes two PSD schemes for ice clouds; one appropriate for mid-latitude cirrus clouds and another for tropical anvil cirrus. Cloud temperature and ice water content (IWC) are the inputs for these PSD schemes, which are based on numerous PSD observations. The temperature dependence of the small crystal mode of the PSD for tropical anvils is opposite to that of mid-latitude cirrus, and this results in very different radiative properties for these two types of cirrus at temperatures less than about 50 C for a given ice water path. In addition, the representative PSD fall velocity is strongly influenced by the small crystal mode, and for temperatures less than 52 C, this fall velocity for mid-latitude cirrus is 2-8 times greater than for tropical anvil cirrus. Finally, the treatment of ice cloud optical properties was found to agree with laboratory measurements and exact theory within 15% for any given wavelength, PSD and ice particle shape. This treatment is analytical, formulated in terms of the PSD and ice particle shape properties. It thus provides the means for explicitly coupling the ice cloud microphysical and radiative properties, and can treat any combination of ice particle shape. It is very inexpensive regarding computer time. When these three deliverables were incorporated into the GCM at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) under another project, it was found that the sunlight reflected and the amount of upwelling heat absorbed by cirrus clouds depended strongly on the PSD scheme used (i.e. mid-latitude or tropical anvil). This was largely due to the fall velocities associated with the two PSD schemes, although the PSD shape was also important.

Mitchell, David L.

2005-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

184

Estimation of Thin Ice Thickness and Detection of Fast Ice from SSM/I Data in the Antarctic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Antarctic coastal polynyas are important areas of high sea ice production and dense water formation, and thus their detection including an estimate of thin ice thickness is essential. In this paper, the authors propose an algorithm that estimates ...

Takeshi Tamura; Kay I. Ohshima; Thorsten Markus; Donald J. Cavalieri; Sohey Nihashi; Naohiko Hirasawa

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

185

Ice Storm Database and Ice Severity Maps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historical icing information has several valuable uses in overhead transmission line ice loading design and research. Previously, this type of information was neither readily available nor easily acquired. This report describes the creation of an electronic ice storm database and regional ice severity maps for the United States.

1996-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

186

Potential Applications of the SSM/I Cloud Liquid Water Parameter to the Estimation of Marine Aircraft Icing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Images of integrated cloud liquid water derived from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) aboard the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program polar-orbiting satellite are presented. Examples with infrared and visible images and synoptic ...

Thomas F. Lee; James R. Clark; Steven D. Swadley

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

How Well Does Water Activity Determine Homogeneous Ice Nucleation Temperature in Aqueous Sulfuric Acid and Ammonium Sulfate Droplets?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Frozen fraction measurements made using a droplet free-fall freezing tube apparatus are presented and used, along with other recent laboratory measurements, to evaluate how well both the water activity idea and the translated melting-point curve ...

Brian D. Swanson

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

Method of forming clathrate ice  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of forming clathrate ice in a supercooled water-based liquid contained in a vessel is disclosed. Initially, an oscillator device is located in the liquid in the vessel. The oscillator device is then oscillated ultrasonically so that small crystals are formed in the liquid. These small crystals serve as seed crystals for ice formation in the liquid and thereby prevent supercooling of the liquid. Preferably, the oscillating device is controlled by a thermostat which initiates operation of the oscillator device when the temperature of the liquid is lowered to the freezing point. Thereafter, the operation of the oscillator device is terminated when ice is sensed in the liquid by an ice sensor.

Hino, Toshiyuki (Tokyo, JP); Gorski, Anthony J. (Lemont, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Method of forming calthrate ice  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of forming clathrate ice in a supercooled water-based liquid contained in a vessel is disclosed. Initially, an oscillator device is located in the liquid in the vessel. The oscillator device is then oscillated ultransonically so that small crystals are formed in the liquid. Thes small crystals serve as seed crystals for ice formation in the liquid and thereby prevent supercooling of the liquid. Preferably, the oscillating device is controlled by a thermostat which initiates operation of the oscillator device when the temperature of the liquid is lowered to the freezing point. Thereafter, the operation of the oscillator device is terminated when ice is sensed in the liquid by an ice sensor.

Hino, T.; Gorski, A.J.

1985-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

190

An Investigation of Laboratory-Grown "Ice Spikes"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have investigated the formation of 10-50 mm long ``ice spikes'' that sometimes appear on the free surface of water when it solidifies. By freezing water under different conditions, we measured the probability of ice spike formation as a function of: 1) the air temperature in the freezing chamber, 2) air motion in the freezing chamber (which promotes evaporative cooling), 3) the quantity of dissolved salts in the water, and 4) the size, shape, and composing material of the freezing vessel. We found that the probability of ice spike formation is greatest when the air temperature is near -7 C, the water is pure, and the air in the freezing chamber is moving. Even small quantities of dissolved solids greatly reduce the probability of ice spike formation. Under optimal conditions, approximately half the ice cubes in an ordinary ice cube tray will form ice spikes. Guided by these observations, we have examined the Bally-Dorsey model for the formation of ice spikes. In this model, the density change during solidification forces supercooled water up through a hollow ice tube, where it freezes around the rim to lengthen the tube. We propose that any dissolved solids in the water will tend to concentrate at the tip of a growing ice spike and inhibit its growth. This can qualitatively explain the observation that ice spikes do not readily form using water containing even small quantities of dissolved solids.

K. G. Libbrecht; K. Lui

2003-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

191

The Use of Polymeric Dispersants in the Condensate/Feedwater Line during Long-Path Recirculation Cleanup at Pressurized Water Reacto rs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Steam generator (SG) deposit fouling causes heat-transfer losses, tube and internals corrosion degradation, level instabilities, and reductions in plant output. Utilities routinely devote substantial resources to limiting or reducing the level of such deposit fouling. This report summarizes the results of a two-year EPRI effort to develop dispersant application during the long-path recirculation cleanup process as a SG deposit management strategy. The work showed that the addition of dispersant is very l...

2009-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

192

Passive ice freezing-releasing heat pipe  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat pipe device has been developed which permits completely passive ice formation and periodic release of ice without requiring the ambient temperature to rise above the melting point of water. This passive design enables the maximum amount of cooling capacity to be stored in the tank.

Gorski, Anthony J. (Lemont, IL); Schertz, William W. (Batavia, IL)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

193

Modeling of Antarctic sea ice in a general circulation model  

SciTech Connect

A dynamic-thermodynamic sea ice model is developed and coupled with the Melbourne University general circulation model to simulate the seasonal cycle of the Antarctic sea ice distributions The model is efficient, rapid to compute, and useful for a range of climate studies. The thermodynamic part of the sea ice model is similar to that developed by Parkinson and Washington, the dynamics contain a simplified ice rheology that resists compression. The thermodynamics is based on energy conservation at the top surface of the ice/snow, the ice/water interface, and the open water area to determine the ice formation, accretion, and ablation. A lead parameterization is introduced with an effective partitioning scheme for freezing between and under the ice floes. The dynamic calculation determines the motion of ice, which is forced with the atmospheric wind, taking account of ice resistance and rafting. The simulated sea ice distribution compares reasonably well with observations. The seasonal cycle of ice extent is well simulated in phase as well as in magnitude. Simulated sea ice thickness and concentration are also in good agreement with observations over most regions and serve to indicate the importance of advection and ocean drift in the determination of the sea ice distribution. 64 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

Wu, Xingren; Budd, W.F. [Antarctic Cooperative Research Centre, Tasmania (Australia)] [Antarctic Cooperative Research Centre, Tasmania (Australia); Simmonds, I. [School of Earth Sciences, Victoria (Australia)] [School of Earth Sciences, Victoria (Australia)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Glossary Term - Dry Ice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deuteron Previous Term (Deuteron) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Electron) Electron Dry Ice A block of dry ice sublimating on a table. Dry ice is the solid form of carbon dioxide...

195

A parameterisation of the flux and energy spectrum of single and multiple muons in deep water/ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper parametric formulas are presented to evaluate the flux of atmospheric muons in the range of vertical depth between 1.5 to 5 km of water equivalent (km w.e.) and up to 85^o for the zenith angle. We take into account their arrival in bundles with different muon multiplicities. The energy of muons inside bundles is then computed considering the muon distance from the bundle axis. This parameterisation relies on a full Monte Carlo simulation of primary Cosmic Ray (CR) interactions, shower propagation in the atmosphere and muon transport in deep water [1]. The primary CR flux and interaction models, in the range in which they can produce muons which may reach 1.5 km w.e., suffer from large experimental uncertainties. We used a primary CR flux and an interaction model able to correctly reproduce the flux, the multiplicity distribution, the spatial distance between muons as measured by the underground MACRO experiment.

M. Bazzotti; S. Biagi; G. Carminati; S. Cecchini; T. Chiarusi; G. Giacomelli; A. Margiotta; M. Sioli; M. Spurio

2009-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

196

The influence of ice nucleation mode and ice vapor growth on simulation of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The influence of ice nucleation mode and ice vapor growth on simulation of The influence of ice nucleation mode and ice vapor growth on simulation of arctic mixed-phase clouds Avramov, Alexander The Pennsylvania State University Category: Modeling Mixed-phase arctic stratus clouds are the predominant cloud type in the Arctic . Perhaps one of the most intriguing of their features is that they tend to have liquid tops that precipitate ice. Despite the fact that this situation is colloidally unstable, these cloud systems are quite long lived - from a few days to over a couple of weeks. Previous studies have suggested that this longevity may be due to a paucity of ice nucleating aerosols (ice nuclei, or IN) in the Arctic. Such studies have shown that small changes in IN concentrations can cause large changes in the amount of liquid water within a mixed-phase stratus deck. We use the Regional

197

AIM-94-0800 Effect of Initial Ice Roughness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ice accretion phase. Using5close-up photography and videography Hansman has studied the initial phase of ice accretion. At warm temperatures, a runback zone aft of the rough zone is observed. WaterAIM-94-0800 Effect of Initial Ice Roughness on Airfoil Aerodynamics M. Bragg, M. Kerho and M

Bragg, Michael B.

198

Effective Radius of Ice Particles in Cirrus and Contrails  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the ratio C between the volume mean radius and the effective radius of ice particles in cirrus and contrails. The volume mean radius is proportional to the third root of the ratio between ice water content and number of ice ...

U. Schumann; B. Mayer; K. Gierens; S. Unterstrasser; P. Jessberger; A. Petzold; C. Voigt; J-F. Gayet

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

A Bayesian Approach to Upscaling and Downscaling of Aircraft Measurements of Ice Particle Counts and Size Distributions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study addresses the issue of how to upscale cloud-sized in situ measurements of ice to yield realistic simulations of ice clouds for a variety of modeling studies. Aircraft measurements of ice particle counts along a 79 km zigzag path were ...

A. R. Jameson; A. J. Heymsfield

200

A Bayesian Approach to Upscaling and Downscaling of Aircraft Measurements of Ice Particle Counts and Size Distributions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study addresses the issue of how to upscale cloud-sized in situ measurements of ice to yield realistic simulations of ice clouds for a variety of modeling studies. Aircraft measurements of ice particle counts along a 79-km zigzag path were ...

A. R. Jameson; A. J. Heymsfield

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water path" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Theory of amorphous ices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use large-deviation theory to study nonequilibrium transitions between amorphous solids and liquid in an atomistic model of supercooled water. Along with nonequilibrium transitions between the ergodic liquid and two distinct amorphous solids, we establish coexistence between the two amorphous solids, a finding that is consistent with experiment. The phase diagram we predict includes a nonequilibrium triple point where the two amorphous phases and the liquid coexist. While the amorphous solids are long-lived and slowly-aging glasses, their melting leads quickly to the formation of ice. This irreversible behavior is demonstrated in our theoretical treatment and compared with experiment.

David T Limmer; David Chandler

2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

202

Arctic Sea Ice Retreat in 2007 Follows Thinning Trend  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The minimum of Arctic sea ice extent in the summer of 2007 was unprecedented in the historical record. A coupled ice–ocean model is used to determine the state of the ice and ocean over the past 29 yr to investigate the causes of this ice extent minimum within a historical perspective. It is found that even though the 2007 ice extent was strongly anomalous, the loss in total ice mass was not. Rather, the 2007 ice mass loss is largely consistent with a steady decrease in ice thickness that began in 1987. Since then, the simulated mean September ice thickness within the Arctic Ocean has declined from 3.7 to 2.6 m at a rate of ?0.57 m decade ?1. Both the area coverage of thin ice at the beginning of the melt season and the total volume of ice lost in the summer have been steadily increasing. The combined impact of these two trends caused a large reduction in the September mean ice concentration in the Arctic Ocean. This created conditions during the summer of 2007 that allowed persistent winds to push the remaining ice from the Pacific side to the Atlantic side of the basin and more than usual into the Greenland Sea. This exposed large areas of open water, resulting in the record ice extent anomaly. 1.

R. W. Lindsay; J. Zhang; A. Schweiger; M. Steele; H. Stern

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Urban Song Paths: place resounding  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The project Urban Song Paths took a traditional musical form, the Kaluli song path from Papua, New Guinea, and translated it for a contemporary urban situation. The Two Rivers Project explored a classic song path subject, the route of a ...

Viv Corringham

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Heat recovery anti-icing system  

SciTech Connect

A heat recovery anti-icing system is disclosed. The heat recovery system includes a blower which removes air from the air flow path of a combustion turbine power generating system and circulates the air through a heat exchanger located in the exhaust stack of the combustion turbine. The heated air circulating through the heat exchanger is returned to an inlet filter compartment in the air flow path so as to maintain the temperature of the air in the inlet filter compartment at an elevated level.

Cummins, J.R.

1982-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

205

Modeling Tidal Current Profiles and Vertical Mixing beneath Filchner–Ronne Ice Shelf, Antarctica  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the warmest water masses beneath Filchner–Ronne Ice Shelf (FRIS) is dense, high salinity shelf water (HSSW) that flows into the sub-ice-shelf cavity from the ice front and occupies the lower portion of the water column. A one-dimensional ...

Keith Makinson

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Snow and Ice Control Best Management Practices Parking Lots, Sidewalks, Roads  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Snow and Ice Control Best Management Practices Parking Lots, Sidewalks, Roads Minnesota Circuit opportunity to improve the way we manage snow and ice in Minnesota. By using snow and ice control best safer--while saving money and protecting water quality. Current Situation The snow and ice maintenance

Minnesota, University of

207

The Icing of an Unheated, Nonrotating Cylinder. Part II. Icing Wind Tunnel Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental investigation of icing on non-rotating cylinders, under both wet and dry conditions was undertaken. Airspeeds of 30, 61 and 122 m s?1 appropriate to aircraft icing, liquid water contents of 0.4, 0.8 and 1.2 g m?3 and temperatures ...

E. P. Lozowski; J. R. Stallabrass; P. F. Hearty

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Sampling diffusive transition paths  

SciTech Connect

We address the problem of sampling double-ended diffusive paths. The ensemble of paths is expressed using a symmetric version of the Onsager-Machlup formula, which only requires evaluation of the force field and which, upon direct time discretization, gives rise to a symmetric integrator that is accurate to second order. Efficiently sampling this ensemble requires avoiding the well-known stiffness problem associated with sampling infinitesimal Brownian increments of the path, as well as a different type of stiffness associated with sampling the coarse features of long paths. The fine-features sampling stiffness is eliminated with the use of the fast sampling algorithm (FSA), and the coarse-feature sampling stiffness is avoided by introducing the sliding and sampling (S&S) algorithm. A key feature of the S&S algorithm is that it enables massively parallel computers to sample diffusive trajectories that are long in time. We use the algorithm to sample the transition path ensemble for the structural interconversion of the 38-atom Lennard-Jones cluster at low temperature.

F. Miller III, Thomas; Predescu, Cristian

2006-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

209

Discrimination of Mixed- versus Ice-Phase Clouds Using Dual-Polarization Radar with Application to Detection of Aircraft Icing Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dual-polarization radar measurements and in situ measurements of supercooled liquid water and ice particles within orographic cloud systems are used to develop probabilistic criteria for identifying mixed-phase versus ice-phase regions of sub-0°C ...

David M. Plummer; Sabine Göke; Robert M. Rauber; Larry Di Girolamo

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Obtaining Best Estimates for the Microphysical and Radiative Properties of Tropical Ice Clouds from TWP-ICE In Situ Microphysical Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Best estimates of the bulk microphysical and radiative properties (ice water content, visible extinction, effective radius, and total concentration) are derived for three case studies of tropical ice clouds sampled during the Tropical Warm Pool ...

A. Protat; G. M. McFarquhar; J. Um; J. Delanoë

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

211

Electronic structure effects in liquid water studied by photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in comparison with gas-phase water, ice close to the meltingcrystalline ice at two different temperatures, and gas-phaseof gas-phase water, liquid water and crystalline ice using

Nordlund, Dennis

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Dry Ice vs. Liquid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Egg + Liquid Nitrogen + Time-lapse! Egg + Liquid Nitrogen + Time-lapse! Previous Video (Egg + Liquid Nitrogen + Time-lapse!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Liquid Nitrogen Cooled Dry Ice in Water!) Liquid Nitrogen Cooled Dry Ice in Water! Dry Ice vs. Liquid Nitrogen! Dry ice is cold. Liquid nitrogen is cold, too. What happens when the two are mixed together? [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: Have you ever wondered what happens when you mix dry ice and liquid nitrogen? Steve: Well, we just happen to have a chunk of dry ice left over from when we filmed 'How to Make a Cloud Chamber,' and here at Jefferson Lab, liquid nitrogen flows like water, so we're going to find out!

213

Ice Formation in Gas-Diffusion Layers  

SciTech Connect

Under sub-freezing conditions, ice forms in the gas-diffusion layer (GDL) of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) drastically reducing cell performance. Although a number of strategies exist to prevent ice formation, there is little fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of freezing within PEMFC components. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is used to elucidate the effects of hydrophobicity (Teflon® loading) and water saturation on the rate of ice formation within three commercial GDLs. We find that as the Teflon® loading increases, the crystallization temperature decreases due to a change in internal ice/substrate contact angle, as well as the attainable level of water saturation. Classical nucleation theory predicts the correct trend in freezing temperature with Teflon® loading.

Dursch, Thomas; Radke, Clayton J.; Weber, Adam Z.

2010-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

214

Relationships between Ice Water Content and Volume Extinction Coefficient from In Situ Observations for Temperatures from 0 C to ?86 C: Implications for Spaceborne Lidar Retrievals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An examination of two years of CALIPSO lidar observations and CloudSat cloud radar observations shows that ice clouds at temperatures below about ?45 C frequently fall below the CloudSat radar’s detection threshold, yet are readily detectable by ...

Andrew Heymsfield; Dave Winker; Melody Avery; Mark Vaughan; Glenn Diskin; Min Deng; Valentin Mitev

215

ARM - Measurement - Ice nuclei  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Ice nuclei Small particles around which ice particles form. Categories Cloud Properties...

216

Anemometry in Icing Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The accuracy of wind measurements in icing conditions is discussed, and wind tunnel calibrations as well as field comparisons are presented for three heated anemometers that use different measuring principles. It is pointed out that ice-free ...

Lasse Makkonen; Pertti Lehtonen; Lauri Helle

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Aging of Accreted Ice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of annealing in accreted ice has been investigated for artificially grown ice deposits after 100 days of storage in a deep freeze unit. Cross sections of the cylindrical deposits have been cut and replicated soon after growth and ...

F. Prodi; L. Levi

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Stability of ferroelectric ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We theoretically study the stability conditions of the ferroelectric ice of the Cmc21 structure, which has been considered, for decades, one of the most promising candidates of the low temperature proton-ordered phase of pure ice Ih. It turned out that the Cmc21 structure is stable only with a certain amount of dopant and the true proton-ordered phase of pure ice Ih remains to be found at lower temperature. Implication for spin ice is mentioned.

Iitaka, Toshiaki

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Smoothed particle hydrodynamics Non-Newtonian model for ice-sheet and ice-shelf dynamics  

SciTech Connect

Mathematical modeling of ice sheets is complicated by the non-linearity of the governing equations and boundary conditions. Standard grid-based methods require complex front tracking techniques and have limited capability to handle large material deformations and abrupt changes in bottom topography. As a consequence, numerical methods are usually restricted to shallow ice sheet and ice shelf approximations. We propose a new smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) non-Newtonian model for coupled ice sheet and ice shelf dynamics. SPH, a fully Lagrangian particle method, is highly scalable and its Lagrangian nature and meshless discretization are well suited to the simulation of free surface ?ows, large material deformation, and material fragmentation. In this paper, SPH is used to study 3D ice sheet/ice shelf behavior, and the dynamics of the grounding line. The steady state position of the grounding line obtained from SPH simulations is in good agreement with laboratory observations for a wide range of simulated bedrock slopes, and density ratios, similar to those of ice and sea water. The numerical accuracy of the SPH algorithm is veri?ed by simulating Poiseuille ?ow, plane shear ?ow with free surface and the propagation of a blob of ice along a horizontal surface. In the laboratory experiment, the ice was represented with a viscous Newtonian ?uid. In the present work, however, the ice is modeled as both viscous Newtonian ?uid and non-Newtonian ?uid, such that the e?ect of non-Newtonian rheology on the dynamics of grounding line was examined. The non-Newtonian constitutive relation is prescribed to be Glen’s law for the creep of polycrystalline ice. A V-shaped bedrock ramp is further introduced to model the real geometry of bedrock slope.

Pan, Wenxiao; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Monaghan, Joseph J.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

220

A Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Model for Ice Sheet and Ice Shelf Dynamics  

SciTech Connect

Mathematical modeling of ice sheets is complicated by the non-linearity of the governing equations and boundary conditions. Standard grid-based methods require complex front tracking techniques and have limited capability to handle large material deformations and abrupt changes in bottom topography. As a consequence, numerical methods are usually restricted to shallow ice sheet and ice shelf approximations. We propose a new smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) model for coupled ice sheet and ice shelf dynamics. SPH is a fully Lagrangian particle method. It is highly scalable and its Lagrangian nature and meshless discretization are well suited to the simulation of free surface flows, large material deformation, and material fragmentation. In this paper SPH is used to study ice sheet/ice shelf behavior, and the dynamics of the grounding line. The steady state position of the grounding line obtained from the SPH simulations is in good agreement with laboratory observations for a wide range of simulated bedrock slopes, and density ratios similar to those of ice and sea water. The numerical accuracy of the SPH algorithm is further verified by simulating the plane shear flow of two immiscible fluids and the propagation of a highly viscous blob of fluid along a horizontal surface. In the experiment, the ice was represented with a viscous newtonian fluid. For consistency, in the described SPH model the ice is also modeled as a viscous newtonian fluid. Typically, ice sheets are modeled as a non-Newtonian fluid, accounting for the changes in the mechanical properties of ice. Implementation of a non-Newtonian rheology in the SPH model is the subject of our ongoing research.

Pan, Wenxiao; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Monaghan, Joseph J.

2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water path" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Mesoscale Boundary Layer and Heat Flux Variations over Pack Ice–Covered Lake Erie  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of extensive pack ice fields on the Great Lakes significantly influences lake-effect storms and local airmass modification, as well as the regional hydrologic cycle and lake water levels. The evolution of the ice fields and their ...

Mathieu R. Gerbush; David A. R. Kristovich; Neil F. Laird

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

An Application of an Explicit Microphysics Mesoscale Model to a Regional Icing Event  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A hydrostatic regional prediction model is modified to permit the existence of both liquid and ice hydrometeors within the same grid volume. The modified model includes an efficient ice-water saturation adjustment and a simple procedure to create ...

George D. Modica; Scot T. Heckman; Roy M. Rasmussen

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Coupled Sea Ice–Ocean-State Estimation in the Labrador Sea and Baffin Bay  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sea ice variability in the Labrador Sea is of climatic interest because of its relationship to deep convection, mode-water formation, and the North Atlantic atmospheric circulation. Historically, quantifying the relationship between sea ice and ...

Ian Fenty; Patrick Heimbach

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

224

An Intercomparison of Mesoscale Forecasts of Aircraft Icing Using SSM/I Retrievals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technique for the detection of supercooled liquid water (SLW) from Special Sensor Microwave/ (SSM/I) data is discussed. For this study, these SLW retrievals depict areas of icing that are used to compare against different aircraft icing ...

André Tremblay; Stewart G. Cober; Anna Glazer; George Isaac; Jocelyn Mailhot

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Finding many optimal paths without growing any optimal path trees  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Many algorithms seek to compute actual optimal paths in weighted directed graphs. The standard approach for reporting an actual optimal path is based on building a single-source optimal path tree. A technique was given in [1] for a class of problems ...

Danny Z. Chen; Ewa Misiolek

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Minimalist Model of Ice Microphysics in Mixed-phase Stratiform Clouds  

SciTech Connect

The question of whether persistent ice crystal precipitation from super cooled layer clouds can be explained by time-dependent, stochastic ice nucleation is explored using an approximate, analytical model, and a large-eddy simulation (LES) cloud model. The updraft velocity in the cloud defines an accumulation zone, where small ice particles cannot fall out until they are large enough, which will increase the residence time of ice particles in the cloud. Ice particles reach a quasi-steady state between growth by vapor deposition and fall speed at cloud base. The analytical model predicts that ice water content (wi) has a 2.5 power law relationship with ice number concentration ni. wi and ni from a LES cloud model with stochastic ice nucleation also confirm the 2.5 power law relationship. The prefactor of the power law is proportional to the ice nucleation rate, and therefore provides a quantitative link to observations of ice microphysical properties.

Yang, F.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shaw, Raymond A.

2013-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

227

Testing ice microphysics parameterizations in the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model Version 3 using Tropical Warm Pool–International Cloud Experiment data  

SciTech Connect

Cloud properties have been simulated with a new double-moment microphysics scheme under the framework of the single column version of NCAR CAM3. For comparisons, the same simulation was made with the standard single-moment microphysics scheme of CAM3. Results from both simulations were compared favorably with observations during the Tropical Warm Pool- International Cloud Experiment by US Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Program in terms of the temporal variation and vertical distribution of cloud fraction and cloud condensate. Major differences between the two simulations are in the magnitude and distribution of ice water content within the mixed-phase cloud during the monsoon period, though the total frozen water (snow plus ice) content is similar. The ice mass content in the mixed-phase cloud from the new scheme is larger than that from the standard scheme, and extends 2 km further downward, which are closer to observations. The dependence of the frozen water mass fraction in total condensate on temperature from the new scheme is also closer to available observations. Outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) from the simulation with the new scheme is in general larger than that with the standard scheme, while the surface downward longwave radiation is similar. Sensitivity tests suggest that different treatments of the ice effective radius contribute significantly to the difference in the TOA OLR in addition to cloud water path. The deep convection process affects both TOA OLR and surface downward longwave radiation. The over-frequently-triggered deep convention process in the model is not the only mechanism for the excess middle and high level clouds. Further evaluation especially for ice cloud properties based on in-situ data is needed.

Wang, Weiguo; Liu, Xiaohong; Xie, Shaocheng; Boyle, James; McFarlane, Sally A.

2009-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

228

LIMITS TO ICE ON ASTEROIDS (24) THEMIS AND (65) CYBELE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present optical spectra of (24) Themis and (65) Cybele, two large main-belt asteroids on which exposed water ice has recently been reported. No emission lines, expected from resonance fluorescence in gas sublimated from the ice, were detected. Derived limits to the production rates of water are {approx}ice because the measured albedos of Themis and Cybele are low ({approx}0.05-0.07). We also rule out models in which a large fraction of the surface is occupied by low-albedo ('dirty') water ice because dirty ice would be warm and would sublimate strongly enough for gaseous products to have been detected. If ice exists on these bodies it must be relatively clean (albedo {approx}>0.3) and confined to a fraction of the Earth-facing surface {approx}ice. If the ice is even more reflective (albedo {approx}>0.6), then the timescale for sublimation of an optically thick layer can rival the {approx}10{sup 3} yr interval between impacts with bodies this size. In this sense, exposure by impact may be a quasi steady-state feature of ice-containing asteroids at 3 AU.

Jewitt, David; Guilbert-Lepoutre, Aurelie, E-mail: jewitt@ucla.edu [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, UCLA, CA 90095 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

229

Photophysiology and cellular composition of sea ice algae  

SciTech Connect

The productivity of sea ice algae depends on their physiological capabilities and the environmental conditions within various microhabitats. Pack ice is the dominant form of sea ice, but the photosynthetic activity of associated algae has rarely been studied. Biomass and photosynthetic rates of ice algae of the Weddell-Scotia Sea were investigated during autumn and winter, the period when ice cover grows from its minimum to maximum. Biomass-specific photosynthetic rates typically ranged from 0.3 to 3.0 {mu}g C {center dot} {mu}g chl{sup {minus}1} {center dot} h{sup {minus}1} higher than land-fast ice algae but similar to Antarctic phytoplankton. Primary production in the pack ice during winter may be minor compared to annual phytoplankton production, but could represent a vital seasonal contribution to the Antarctic ecosystem. Nutrient supply may limit the productivity of ice algae. In McMurdo Sound, congelation ice algae appeared to be more nutrient deficient than underlying platelet ice algae based on: lower nitrogen:carbon, chlorophyll:carbon, and protein:carbohydrate; and {sup 14}C-photosynthate distribution to proteins and phospholipids was lower, while distribution to polysaccharides and neutral lipids was higher. Depletion of nitrate led to decreased nitrogen:carbon, chlorophyll:carbon, protein:carbohydrate, and {sup 14}C-photosynthate to proteins. Studied were conducted during the spring bloom; therefore, nutrient limitation may only apply to dense ice algal communities. Growth limiting conditions may be alleviated when algae are released into seawater during the seasonal recession of the ice cover. To continue growth, algae must adapt to the variable light field encountered in a mixed water column. Photoadaptation was studied in surface ice communities and in bottom ice communities.

Lizotte, M.P.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

230

Liquid Nitrogen Ice Cream  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquid Nitrogen Ice Cream If you have access to liquid nitrogen and the proper safety equipment and training, try this in place of your normal cryogenics demonstration Download...

231

Transporting Dry Ice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Requirements for Shipping Dry Ice IATA PI 904 Source: Reg of the Day from ERCweb 2006 Environmental Resource Center | 919-469-1585 | webmaster@ercweb.com http:...

232

Mobile Ice Nucleus Spectrometer  

SciTech Connect

This first year report presents results from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study to assess the flow and temperature profiles within the mobile ice nucleus spectrometer.

Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Kok, G. L.

2012-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

233

Possible connection between the optimal path and flow in percolation clusters Eduardo Lpez,1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

path. We calculate the probability distribution P opt r,L of the optimal path length opt, and find the tracer path length tr of tracers inside percolation through their probability distribution P tr r,L . We in porous media related to second- ary oil extraction, in which an invading fluid water, steam, etc

Stanley, H. Eugene

234

Radar Backscattering of Microwaves by Spongy Ice Spheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radar backscattering cross section of a spongy ice hailstone—a mixture of ice and liquid water—depends on its size, shape and dielectric function. There are two types of theories of the effective dielectric function of two-component mixtures: ...

Craig F. Bohren; Louis J. Battan

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Observation of Ice Crystal Formation in Lower Arctic Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clear sky ice crystals or diamond dust displays are observed in polar regions, both remote and populated; when the temperature falls to ?20°C and where abundant sources of water vapor are present. In remote areas of the Arctic, these ice crystals ...

Takeshi Ohtake; Kolf Jayaweera; Ken-Ichi Sakurai

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Characterization of a Modified Hexagonal Silver Iodide Ice Nucleus Aerosol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new ice nucleant aerosol was produced by combustion of a 2% AgI-0.5 mole % Bil3-NH4I-acetone-water solution. The ice nucleating effectiveness of this aerosol is an order of magnitude greater than AgI alone at ?10°C. An X-ray powder analysis ...

Paul T. Scott; William G. Finnegan; Peter C. Sinclair

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Passive ice freezing-releasing heat pipe. [Patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat pipe device has been developed which permits completely passive ice formation and periodic release of ice without requiring the ambient temperature to rise above the melting point of water. This passive design enables the maximum amount of cooling capacity to be stored in the tank.

Gorski, A.J.; Schertz, W.W.

1980-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

238

Low-Dimensional Water on Ru(0001); Model System for X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Studies of Liquid Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

geometries other than ice and gas-phase. This approach has1-4 . In its condensed ice Ih phase each water molecule is150 K. Spectra of gas phase and ice 5, 15, 16 are shown as

Nordlund, D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Ice in Clouds Experiment—Layer Clouds. Part I: Ice Growth Rates Derived from Lenticular Wave Cloud Penetrations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lenticular wave clouds are used as a natural laboratory to estimate the linear and mass growth rates of ice particles at temperatures from ?20° to ?32°C and to characterize the apparent rate of ice nucleation at water saturation at a nearly ...

Andrew J. Heymsfield; Paul R. Field; Matt Bailey; Dave Rogers; Jeffrey Stith; Cynthia Twohy; Zhien Wang; Samuel Haimov

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

Note: Counting humps in Motzkin paths  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper we study the number of humps (peaks) in Dyck, Motzkin and Schroder paths. Recently A. Regev noticed that the number of peaks in all Dyck paths of order n is one half of the number of super-Dyck paths of order n. He also computed the number ... Keywords: Dyck paths, Humps, Motzkin paths, Narayana number, Peaks, Schröder paths

Yun Ding; Rosena R. X. Du

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water path" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

A New Path Forward  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

4, Fourth Quarter, 2011 4, Fourth Quarter, 2011 www.fossil.energy.gov/news/energytoday.html HigHligHts inside 2 A New Path Forward A Column from the Office of Fossil Energy's Chief Operating Officer 4 A Legacy of Benefit A Look at How the Office of Fossil Energy Has Returned National Benefit 5 Increasing Production and Storage New Study Explains How CO2 Injection in Oilfield Can Increase Production 6 A Medical Improvement NETL Helps Develop Improved Coronary Stents for Heart Patients 9 International Efforts CSLF Ministerial Reinforces Support for CCUS Construction activities began at an Illinois ethanol plant that will demon- strate carbon capture and storage. The project, sponsored by the Office of Fossil Energy, is the first large-scale

242

Classicalization via Path Integral  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently, it was suggested that a large class of non-renormalizable theories may need no UV completion. By analogy with gravity where classical black holes are expected to be created in high-energy scatterings, it is conjectured that similar classical solutions, so-called classicalons, should occur. In this way the theory protects itself against non-unitarity, for instead of probing small distances at high energies one enters a classical regime. An effective theory of Goldstone bosons provides and example in which the size of classicalons grows with energy, and the high energy scattering is cut-off by small momenta, inversely proportional to the classicalon size. In this note we offer an alternative, path integral discussion of this important result.

Borut Bajc; Arshad Momen; Goran Senjanovi?

2011-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

243

Classicalization via Path Integral  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recently, it was suggested that a large class of non-renormalizable theories may need no UV completion. By analogy with gravity where classical black holes are expected to be created in high-energy scatterings, it is conjectured that similar classical solutions, so-called classicalons, should occur. In this way the theory protects itself against non-unitarity, for instead of probing small distances at high energies one enters a classical regime. An effective theory of Goldstone bosons provides and example in which the size of classicalons grows with energy, and the high energy scattering is cut-off by small momenta, inversely proportional to the classicalon size. In this note we offer an alternative, path integral discussion of this important result.

Bajc, Borut; Senjanovi?, Goran

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

TWP-ICE Global Atmospheric Model Intercomparison: Convection Responsiveness and Resolution Impact  

SciTech Connect

Results are presented from an intercomparison of global atmospheric model (GAM) simulations of tropical convection during the Tropical Warm Pool-International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE). The distinct cloud properties, precipitation, radiation, and vertical diabatic heating profiles associated with three different monsoon regimes (wet, dry, and break) from available observations are used to evaluate 9 GAM forecasts initialized daily from realistic global analyses. All models well captured the evolution of large-scale circulation and the thermodynamic fields, but cloud properties differed substantially among models. For example, liquid water path and ice water path differed by up to two orders of magnitude. Compared with the relatively well simulated top-heavy heating structures during the wet and break period, most models had difficulty in depicting the bottom-heavy heating profiles associated with cumulus congestus. The best performing models during this period were the ones whose convection scheme was most responsive to the free tropospheric humidity. Compared with the large impact of cloud and convective parameterizations on model cloud and precipitation characteristics, resolution has relatively minor impact on simulated cloud properties. However, one feature that was influence by the resolution study in several models was the diurnal cycle of precipitation. Peaking at a different time from convective precipitation, large-scale precipitation generally increases in high resolution forecasts and modulates the total precipitation diurnal cycle. Overall, the study emphasizes the importance of more environmental responsive convective parameterizations to capture various types of convection and the substantial diversity among large-scale cloud and precipitation schemes in current GAMs. This experiment has also demonstrated itself to be a very useful testbed for those developing cloud and convection schemes in these models.

Lin, Yanluan; Donner, Leo J.; Petch, Jon C.; Bechtold, P.; Boyle, James; Klein, Stephen A.; Komori, T.; Wapler, K.; Willett, M.; Xie, X.; Zhao, M.; Xie, Shaocheng; McFarlane, Sally A.; Schumacher, Courtney

2012-05-08T23:59:59.000Z

245

Thermodynamic Metrics and Optimal Paths  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Thermodynamic metrics and optimal paths David A. Sivak ? andmanifold on the space of thermodynamic states. Within theconnection to the existing thermodynamic length formalism,

Sivak, David

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Collabortive Authoring of Walden's Paths  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Collaborative Authoring of Walden's Paths. Theory and Practice of Digital Libraries. Lecture Notes in Computer Sciences 2012.Lecture Notes in Computer Sciences 2012

Yuanling, Dr. Li [Texas A& M University; Bogen, Paul Logasa [ORNL; Pogue, Daniel [Halliburton Energy Services; Furuta, Dr. Richard Keith [Texas A& M University; ShipmanIII, Dr. Frank Major [Texas A& M University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

Reionization on ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The case for substantial far infrared ice emission in local ultraluminous infrared galaxies, expected based on the presence of mid-infrared ice absorption in their spectra and the known far infrared optical properties of ice, is still largely unsupported by direct observation owing to insufficient far infrared spectral coverage. Some marginal supportive evidence is presented here. A clear consequence of far infrared ice emission is the need to extend the range of redshifts considered for submillimeter sources. This is demonstrated via the example of HDF 850.1. The solid phase of the ISM during reionization may be dominated by ice, and this could lead to the presence of reionization sources in submillimeter source catalogs. Submillimeter sources not detected at 24 micron in the GOODS-N field are examined. Two candidate reionization sources are identified at 3.6 micron through possible Gunn-Peterson saturation in the Z band.

C. C. Dudley; M. Imanishi; P. R. Maloney

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

248

Water Data Report: An Annotated Bibliography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Towers Dishwashers Evaporative coolers Faucets Food steamers Hot water dispensers Ice machines Landscape irrigation Pre-rinse spray

Dunham Whitehead, Camilla; Melody, Moya

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Ice Cream with a Heart Create a new Clemson Ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ice Cream with a Heart Contest! Create a new Clemson Ice Cream flavor! Raise money for your favorite charity! Win a free Clemson Ice Cream party for your organization! Enter at www organizations. The contest is called Ice Cream with a Heart and its purpose is to help student organizations

Bolding, M. Chad

250

A Comparison of TWP-ICE Observational Data with Cloud-Resolving Model Results  

SciTech Connect

Observations made during the TWP-ICE campaign are used to drive and evaluate thirteen cloud-resolving model simulations with periodic lateral boundary conditions. The simulations employ 2D and 3D dynamics, one- and two-moment microphysics, several variations on large-scale forcing, and the use of observationally derived aerosol properties to prognose droplet numbers. When domain means are averaged over a 6-day active monsoon period, all simulations reproduce observed surface precipitation rate but not its structural distribution. Simulated fractional areas covered by convective and stratiform rain are uncorrelated with one another, and are both variably overpredicted by up to a factor of {approx}2. Stratiform area fractions are strongly anticorrelated with outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) but are negligibly correlated with ice water path (IWP), indicating that ice spatial distribution controls OLR more than mean IWP. Overpredictions of OLR tend to be accompanied by underpredictions of reflected shortwave radiation (RSR). When there are two simulations differing only in microphysics scheme or large-scale forcing, the one with smaller stratiform area tends to exhibit greater OLR and lesser RSR by similar amounts. After {approx}10 days, simulations reach a suppressed monsoon period with a wide range of mean precipitable water vapor, attributable in part to varying overprediction of cloud-modulated radiative flux divergence compared with observationally derived values. Differences across the simulation ensemble arise from multiple sources, including dynamics, microphysics, and radiation treatments. Close agreement of spatial and temporal averages with observations may not be expected, but the wide spreads of predicted stratiform fraction and anticorrelated OLR indicate a need for more rigorous observation-based evaluation of the underlying micro- and macrophysical properties of convective and stratiform structures.

Fridlind, A. M.; Ackerman, Andrew; Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre; Fan, Jiwen; Grabowski, Wojciech W.; Hill, A.; Jones, T. R.; Khaiyer, M. M.; Liu, G.; Minnis, Patrick; Morrison, H.; Nguyen, L.; Park, S.; Petch, Jon C.; Pinty, Jean-Pierre; Schumacher, Courtney; Shipway, Ben; Varble, A. C.; Wu, Xiaoqing; Xie, Shaocheng; Zhang, Minghua

2012-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

251

Ice Growth from the Vapor at ?5°C  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are summarized and illustrated from a long series of experiments on ice growth from the vapor, nearly all in a very small range of conditions: ?5°C, slightly below liquid water saturation, with minimal environmental gradients and no ...

Charles A. Knight

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

252

Hydrological and biogeochemical cycling along the Greenland ice sheet margin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global warming has led to a significant increase in Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) melt and runoff since 1990, resulting in escalated export of fresh water and associated sediment to the surrounding North Atlantic and Arctic ...

Bhatia, Maya Pilar, 1979-

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

The Growth of Ice Crystals by Molecular Diffusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mass transfer of water molecules by diffusion onto ice particles is best described by their Sherwood number (Sh), a dimensionless quantity, which combines molecular and convective effects and depends on the airflow as represented by the ...

Hyun Youk; Roland List; Theophilus Ola

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

254

The Effect of Stochastic Cloud Structure on the Icing Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current understanding of the icing process through collisions between a surface and supercooled cloud droplets is based upon two factors. First, for a given temperature, when the cloud liquid water content, W, exceeds a critical value, wc (the ...

A. R. Jameson; A. B. Kostinski

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

255

Contemporary data path design optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

power consumption, instead of performance, becomes the most critical concern in many data-path designs, especially for mobile devicePower consumption becomes more critical issue than performance in modern data-path designs, especially for mobile devicepower consumption. Furthermore, we also implement the PST algorithm on both ASIC and FPGA devices

Liu, Jianhua

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

GPU-accelerated path rendering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

For thirty years, resolution-independent 2D standards (e.g. PostScript, SVG) have depended on CPU-based algorithms for the filling and stroking of paths. Advances in graphics hardware have largely ignored accelerating resolution-independent 2D graphics ... Keywords: OpenGL, path rendering, stencil buffer, vector graphics

Mark J. Kilgard; Jeff Bolz

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

257

Path skyline for moving objects  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Skyline query has been used mainly for relatively static and low dimensional data sets. We develop the Skyline query for the moving objects coping with dynamic changes efficiently. This study is focused on deriving a fundamental algorithm for extracting ... Keywords: moving objects, path skyline, shortest path

Wookey Lee; Chris Soo-Hyun Eom; Tae-Chang Jo

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Limits to Ice on Asteroids (24) Themis and (65) Cybele  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present optical spectra of (24) Themis and (65) Cybele, two large main-belt asteroids on which exposed water ice has recently been reported. No emission lines, expected from resonance fluorescence in gas sublimated from the ice, were detected. Derived limits to the production rates of water are 0.3) and confined to a fraction of the Earth-facing surface 0.6) then the timescale for sublimation of an optically thick layer can rival the 10^3 yr interval between impacts with bodies this size. In this sense, exposure by impact may be a quasi steady-state feature of ice-containing asteroids at 3 AU.

Jewitt, D

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

Arctic Sea ice model sensitivities.  

SciTech Connect

Arctic sea ice is an important component of the global climate system and, due to feedback effects, the Arctic ice cover is changing rapidly. Predictive mathematical models are of paramount importance for accurate estimates of the future ice trajectory. However, the sea ice components of Global Climate Models (GCMs) vary significantly in their prediction of the future state of Arctic sea ice and have generally underestimated the rate of decline in minimum sea ice extent seen over the past thirty years. One of the contributing factors to this variability is the sensitivity of the sea ice state to internal model parameters. A new sea ice model that holds some promise for improving sea ice predictions incorporates an anisotropic elastic-decohesive rheology and dynamics solved using the material-point method (MPM), which combines Lagrangian particles for advection with a background grid for gradient computations. We evaluate the variability of this MPM sea ice code and compare it with the Los Alamos National Laboratory CICE code for a single year simulation of the Arctic basin using consistent ocean and atmospheric forcing. Sensitivities of ice volume, ice area, ice extent, root mean square (RMS) ice speed, central Arctic ice thickness,and central Arctic ice speed with respect to ten different dynamic and thermodynamic parameters are evaluated both individually and in combination using the Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications (DAKOTA). We find similar responses for the two codes and some interesting seasonal variability in the strength of the parameters on the solution.

Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston; Paskaleva, Biliana Stefanova

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

260

Vortex ice in nanostructured superconductors  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate using numerical simulations of nanostructured superconductors that it is possible to realize vortex ice states that are analogous to square and kagome ice. The system can be brought into a state that obeys either global or local ice rules by applying an external current according to an annealing protocol. We explore the breakdown of the ice rules due to disorder in the nanostructure array and show that in square ice, topological defects appear along grain boundaries, while in kagome ice, individual defects appear. We argue that the vortex system offers significant advantages over other artificial ice systems.

Reichhardt, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reichhardt, Cynthia J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Libal, Andras J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water path" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Prediction of Vessel Icing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vessel icing from wave-generated spray is a severe hazard to expanded marine operations in high latitudes. Hardships in making observations during operations, combined with differences in vessel type and heading, have resulted in great ...

J. E. Overland; C. H. Pease; R. W. Preisendorfer; A. L. Comiskey

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Global Warming, Soot, Ice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Warming, Soot, Ice Speaker(s): James Hansen Date: November 7, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Irreversible "dangerous anthropogenic interference" with the climate system...

263

Sublimation of Ice Crystals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent experiments on the sublimation of single crystals of ice in an atmosphere of air indicate that the sublimation rate is diffusion limited and initially solid prismatic crystals evolve into time-independent shapes similar to confocal ...

Jon Nelson

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Global ice sheet modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The University of Maine conducted this study for Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of a global climate modeling task for site characterization of the potential nuclear waste respository site at Yucca Mountain, NV. The purpose of the study was to develop a global ice sheet dynamics model that will forecast the three-dimensional configuration of global ice sheets for specific climate change scenarios. The objective of the third (final) year of the work was to produce ice sheet data for glaciation scenarios covering the next 100,000 years. This was accomplished using both the map-plane and flowband solutions of our time-dependent, finite-element gridpoint model. The theory and equations used to develop the ice sheet models are presented. Three future scenarios were simulated by the model and results are discussed.

Hughes, T.J.; Fastook, J.L. [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States). Institute for Quaternary Studies

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Contractor SOW Template - ICE | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SOW Template - ICE Contractor SOW Template - ICE Contractor SOW Template - ICE.pdf More Documents & Publications Contractor SOW Template - ICR Statement of Work (SOW) Template...

266

Learning for informative path planning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Through the combined use of regression techniques, we will learn models of the uncertainty propagation efficiently and accurately to replace computationally intensive Monte- Carlo simulations in informative path planning. ...

Park, Sooho, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Survivable paths in multilayer networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We consider the problem of protection in multilayer networks. In single-layer net- works, a pair of disjoint paths can be used to provide protection for a source-destination pair. However, this approach cannot be directly ...

Parandehgheibi, Marzieh

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Physarum can compute shortest paths  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Physarum Polycephalum is a slime mold that apparently is able to solve shortest path problems. A mathematical model has been proposed by biologists to describe the feedback mechanism used by the slime mold to adapt its tubular channels while foraging ...

Vincenzo Bonifaci; Kurt Mehlhorn; Girish Varma

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Field demonstration of the ICE 250[trademark] Cleaning System  

SciTech Connect

The ICE 250[trademark] Cleaning System was engineered to convert water into small ice particles for use in cleaning and decontamination applications. Ice crystals are produced in a special icemaker and pressured through a hose-nozzle onto the surface to be cleaned. The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center and Ice Cleaning Systems, Inc., conducted a test of this system at Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 to evaluate the system's cleaning capabilities in an oil field environment. Equipment cleaned included an oil storage tank, a rod pumping unit, a road grader, and a wellhead. Contaminants were unrefined sour crude oil, hydraulic fluid, paraffin, and dirt, occurring separately and as mixtures. In all four demonstration cleaning tasks, the ICE 250 System effectively removed surface contaminant mixtures in a timely manner and left no oily residue. A minimal amount of waste moistur2048s generated, thereby reducing cleanup and disposal costs.

Johnston, J.L.; Jackson, L.M.

1999-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

270

Field demonstration of the ICE 250{trademark} Cleaning System  

SciTech Connect

The ICE 250{trademark} Cleaning System was engineered to convert water into small ice particles for use in cleaning and decontamination applications. Ice crystals are produced in a special icemaker and pressured through a hose-nozzle onto the surface to be cleaned. The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center and Ice Cleaning Systems, Inc., conducted a test of this system at Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 to evaluate the system's cleaning capabilities in an oil field environment. Equipment cleaned included an oil storage tank, a rod pumping unit, a road grader, and a wellhead. Contaminants were unrefined sour crude oil, hydraulic fluid, paraffin, and dirt, occurring separately and as mixtures. In all four demonstration cleaning tasks, the ICE 250 System effectively removed surface contaminant mixtures in a timely manner and left no oily residue. A minimal amount of waste moisture was generated, thereby reducing cleanup and disposal costs.

Johnston, J.L.; Jackson, L.M.

1999-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

271

Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laws Envirosearch Institutional Controls NEPA Activities RCRA RQ*Calculator Water HSS Logo Water Laws Overview of water-related legislation affecting DOE sites Clean...

272

The Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis VI.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

PATH OF CkRBON IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS. VI. * Ni. Calvin Radiationdetermination of the path of carbon in photosynthesis. Theredark fixation of photosynthesis and methods of separation

Calvin, M.

1949-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

Interactions of Water and Energy Mediate Responses of High-Latitude Terrestrial Ecosystems to Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

referred to as “phase change”) and ice physics; (3)2.8.1). 2.3.1.2 Phase Change and Ice in the Lake Body Theany time ice occurs below water after phase change has been

Subin, Zachary Marc

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

Ice cream headache  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ice cream headache Ice cream headache Name: fath Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: What causes an "ice cream headache"? Are they dangerous? What would happen if I induced an ice cream headache when I had a regular headache? Replies: This is really a neat question. I am certainly no expert on headaches, but it has a lot to do blood circulation in the sinuses and around and within the brain. Why do some people get them easily and other seem resistant? The cold might restrict blood flow which is the basis for the problem. An Ice cream headache can be turned "on" or "off" by adjusting the rate of consumption, Slurpees work best, so really cold stuff enhances the effect. Are there stages: cold sensation, lingering headache, subsiding headache, warming, etc? Does the cold actually create similar headache "conditions" or does the brain confused cause it cannot directly feel pain? The difference in people is probably due to differences in arteriole branching and general circulation. In my experience smokers get worse headaches than nonsmokers of the same age. Do you find a similar trend? I am trying to stimulate discussion!

275

Metastable hydronium ions in UV-irradiated ice  

SciTech Connect

We show that the irradiation of UV light (10-11 eV) onto an ice film produces metastable hydronium (H{sub 3}O{sup +}) ions in the ice at low temperatures (53-140 K). Evidence of the presence of metastable hydronium ions was obtained by experiments involving adsorption of methylamine onto UV-irradiated ice films and hydrogen-deuterium (H/D) isotopic exchange reaction. The methylamine adsorption experiments showed that photogenerated H{sub 3}O{sup +} species transferred a proton to the methylamine arriving at the ice surface, thus producing the methyl ammonium ion, which was detected by low energy sputtering method. The H{sub 3}O{sup +} species induced the H/D exchange of water, which was monitored through the detection of water isotopomers on the surface by using the Cs{sup +} reactive ion scattering method. Thermal and temporal stabilities of H{sub 3}O{sup +} and its proton migration activity were examined. The lifetime of the hydronium ions in the amorphized ice was greater than 1 h at {approx}53 K and decreased to {approx}5 min at 140 K. Interestingly, a small portion of hydronium ions survived for an extraordinarily long time in the ice, even at 140 K. The average migration distance of protons released from H{sub 3}O{sup +} in the ice was estimated to be about two water molecules at {approx}54 K and about six molecules at 100 K. These results indicate that UV-generated hydronium ions can be efficiently stabilized in low-temperature ice. Such metastable hydronium ions may play a significant role in the acid-base chemistry of ice particles in interstellar clouds.

Moon, Eui-Seong; Kang, Heon [Department of Chemistry, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

276

Open Quantum to classical phases transition in the stochastic hydrodynamic analogy: the explanation of the Lindemann relation and the analogies between the maximum of density at He lambda point and that one at water-ice phase transition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the present paper the gas, liquid and solid phases made of structureless particles, are visited to the light of the quantum stochastic hydrodynamic analogy (SQHA). The SQHA shows that the open quantum mechanical behavior is maintained on a distance shorter than the theory-defined quantum correlation length (lc). When, the physical length of the problem is larger than lc, the model shows that the quantum (potential) interactions may have a finite range of interaction maintaining the non-local behavior on a finite distance quantum non-locality length lq. The present work shows that when the mean molecular distance is larger than the quantum non-locality length we have a classical phases (gas and van der Waals liquids) while when the mean molecular distance becomes smaller than lq or than lc we have phases such as the solid crystal or the superfluid one, respectively, that show quantum characteristics. The model agrees with Lindemann empirical law (and explains it), for the mean square deviation of atom from the equilibrium position at melting point of crystal, and shows a connection between the maximum density at the He lambda point and that one near the water-ice solidification point.

Piero Chiarelli

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

277

Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Designated Product: Water...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ice Makers. b Measured in accordance with ARI Standard 810-2003. Does not include condenser water use. Back to Top Buying Energy-Efficient Water-Cooled Ice Machines Several...

278

Recent Great Lakes Ice Trends  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of ice observations made by cooperative observers from shoreline stations reveals significant changes in the ice season on the North American Great Lakes over the past 35years. Although the dataset is highly inhomogeneous and year-to-...

Howard P. Hanson; Claire S. Hanson; Brenda H. Yoo

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Ice maker safety control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a refrigeration apparatus including an evaporator, a defrost heater for defrosting the evaporator, a defrost thermostat having a switch for de-energizing the defrost heater at a preselected high temperature of the evaporator, and an ice making apparatus having a mold, a mold heater, and a control circuit controllably energized the mold heater, a safety control for the ice making apparatus is described comprising: means for thermally coupling the defrost thermostat with the mold; and means electrically connecting the defrost thermostat switch with the control circuit for de-energizing the mold heater at a preselected high temperature of the mold to prevent overheating thereof.

Linstromberg, W.J.

1988-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

280

Dry Ice vs. Pipette Experiment Description  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dry Ice vs. Pipette Experiment Description Dry ice (solid) is put into the bulb of a pipette, plastic pipette 1 ice cube sized piece of dry ice Butter knife (or some object to break dry ice) Gloves (surgical gloves will not work, they must protect hands from dry ice) Safety glasses for demonstrator

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water path" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

The Path a Proton Takes Through a Fuel Cell Membrane  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Path a Proton Path a Proton Takes Through a Fuel Cell Membrane The Path a Proton Takes Through a Fuel Cell Membrane October 11, 2012 | Tags: Basic Energy Sciences (BES), Chemistry, Franklin, Hopper Linda Vu, lvu@lbl.gov, +1 510 495 2402 Ram.jpg The cover represents the environment around the side chain. The right side is the water network that exists between the sulfonate groups shown in yellow. The left side is the short chain with the sulfonate group. Many experts believe that fuel cells may someday serve as revolutionary clean energy conversion devices for transportation and other portable power applications. Because they generate electricity by converting chemical hydrogen and oxygen into water, fuel cells generate energy much more efficiently than combustion devices, and with near-zero pollutant

282

Ice–Ice Collisions: An Ice Multiplication Process in Atmospheric Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ice in atmospheric clouds undergoes complex physical processes, interacting especially with radiation, which leads to serious impacts on global climate. After their primary production, atmospheric ice crystals multiply extensively by secondary ...

J.-I. Yano; V. T. J. Phillips

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

THE SPITZER ICE LEGACY: ICE EVOLUTION FROM CORES TO PROTOSTARS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ices regulate much of the chemistry during star formation and account for up to 80% of the available oxygen and carbon. In this paper, we use the Spitzer c2d Legacy ice survey, complimented with data sets on ices in cloud cores and high-mass protostars, to determine standard ice abundances and to present a coherent picture of the evolution of ices during low- and high-mass star formation. The median ice composition H{sub 2}O:CO:CO{sub 2}:CH{sub 3}OH:NH{sub 3}:CH{sub 4}:XCN is 100:29:29:3:5:5:0.3 and 100:13:13:4:5:2:0.6 toward low- and high-mass protostars, respectively, and 100:31:38:4:-:-:- in cloud cores. In the low-mass sample, the ice abundances with respect to H{sub 2}O of CH{sub 4}, NH{sub 3}, and the component of CO{sub 2} mixed with H{sub 2}O typically vary by ice components, XCN, and CH{sub 3}OH vary by factors 2-10 between the lower and upper quartile. The XCN band correlates with CO, consistent with its OCN{sup -} identification. The origin(s) of the different levels of ice abundance variations are constrained by comparing ice inventories toward different types of protostars and background stars, through ice mapping, analysis of cloud-to-cloud variations, and ice (anti-)correlations. Based on the analysis, the first ice formation phase is driven by hydrogenation of atoms, which results in an H{sub 2}O-dominated ice. At later prestellar times, CO freezes out and variations in CO freezeout levels and the subsequent CO-based chemistry can explain most of the observed ice abundance variations. The last important ice evolution stage is thermal and UV processing around protostars, resulting in CO desorption, ice segregation, and the formation of complex organic molecules. The distribution of cometary ice abundances is consistent with the idea that most cometary ices have a protostellar origin.

Oeberg, Karin I. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Boogert, A. C. Adwin [IPAC, NASA Herschel Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Pontoppidan, Klaus M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Van den Broek, Saskia; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Bottinelli, Sandrine [Centre d'Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements (CESR), CNRS-UMR 5187, 31028 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Blake, Geoffrey A. [California Institute of Technology, Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Evans, Neal J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

284

Profiling all paths: A new profiling technique for both cyclic and acyclic paths  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As an important technique in dynamic program analysis, path profiling collects the execution frequency of different paths, and has been widely used in a variety of areas. However, existing intra-procedural profiling techniques cannot effectively deal ... Keywords: Breakpoint, Cyclic paths, Dynamic analysis, Path backwalk, Path profiling, Probe instrumentation

Bixin Li; Lulu Wang; Hareton Leung; Fei Liu

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Subglacial water presence classification from polar radar data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ground and airborne radar depth-sounding of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets have been used for many years to remotely determine characteristics such as ice thickness, subglacial topography, and mass balance of large bodies of ice. Ice coring efforts ... Keywords: Ensemble classification, Machine learning, Pattern recognition, Radar remote sensing, Subglacial water

Christopher M. Gifford; Arvin Agah

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

Field Sampling Report -Water 2005 SFEI PRISM-Methods Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

phase extraction). 2. Collect water samples from five sites for analysis of total chlorpyrifos and total remained in possession of Mr. Salop stored on wet ice / blue ice overnight. April 14, 2005 0730-0845 Mr. Salop stored on wet ice / blue ice overnight. April 15, 2005 0800-1130 Mr. Salop delivered appropriate

287

FREEZING WATER CLEANING A POSSIBLE IMPROVEMENT IN SRF CAVITY RINSING*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the cavity to be rinsed. Expansion of water in the phase transition to ice can lift particles from the surface and overcome van der Waals forces. Different expansion coefficients of ice and niobium make the ice surface unstable and self- removing. The ice crust falls off together with trapped surface

288

Impact of Solvent on Photocatalytic Mechanisms: Reactions of Photodesorption Products with Ice Overlayers on the TiO2(110) Surface  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effects of water and methanol ice overlayers on the photodecomposition of acetone on rutile TiO2(110) were evaluated in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) using photon stimulated desorption (PSD) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD). In the absence of ice overlayers, acetone photodecomposed on TiO2(110) at 95 K by ejection of a methyl radical into the gas phase and formation of acetate on the surface. With ice overlayers, the methyl radicals are trapped at the interface between TiO2(110) and the ice. When water ice was present, these trapped methyl radicals reacted either with each other to form ethane or with other molecules in the ice (e.g., water or displaced acetone) to form methane (CH4), ethane (CH3CH3) and other products (e.g., methanol), with all of these products trapped in the ice. The new products were free to revisit the surface or depart during desorption of the ice. When methanol ice was present, methane formation came about only from reaction of trapped methyl radicals with the methanol ice. Methane and ethane slowly leaked through methanol ice overlayers into vacuum at 95 K, but not through water ice overlayers. Different degrees of site competition between water and acetone, and between methanol and acetone led to different hydrogen abstraction pathways in the two ices. These results provide new insights into product formation routes and solution-phase radical formation mechanisms that are important in heterogeneous photocatalysis.

Shen, Mingmin; Henderson, Michael A.

2011-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

289

Hail ice impact on composite structures at glancing angles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

investigation of high velocity ice impacts on woven carbon/and ice sphere. .by trailing ice fragments. ..

Funai, Sho

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

Deactivation of ice nuclei due to atmospherically relevant surface coatings  

SciTech Connect

The ice nucleation characteristics of Arizona Test Dust (ATD) and illite clay, surrogates for atmospheric ice nuclei, have been determined at the Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) chamber located at the Research Center Karlsruhe in Germany. The objective of this research was to determine the effect of sulphuric acid and ammonium sulphate coatings on the ability of these mineral dust surrogates to nucleate ice in an environment where particles realistically compete for water vapor. Coated ATD particles required higher saturations at all investigated temperatures, from -20 to -45ş C, than did identical uncoated particles. Freezing of coated particles often required saturations approaching those for the homogeneous freezing of aqueous solutions of the coating material alone. Less pronounced effects were found for illite although the presence of a coating consistently increased the saturation or decreased the temperature required for ice formation. Analysis of ice residue at the single particle level suggests that the first coated particles to freeze had thinner or incomplete coatings when compared to particles that froze later in the expansion. This observation highlights a need to verify coating properties since an assumption of homogeneity of a group of coated aerosol may be incorrect. The increase in saturation ratio for freezing suggests that gas-phase uptake of sulphates, a large fraction of which are due to anthropogenic emissions, will reduce the ice and mixed-phase cloud formation potential of atmospheric ice nuclei.

Cziczo, Daniel J.; Froyd, Karl D.; Gallavardin, S. J.; Moehler, Ottmar; Benz, Stefan; Saathoff, Harald; Murphy, Daniel M.

2009-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

291

Testing Oil Saturation Distribution in Migration Paths Using MRI1 Jianzhao Yan 1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- 1 - Testing Oil Saturation Distribution in Migration Paths Using MRI1 Jianzhao Yan 1 , Xiaorong media, and to measure oil and water saturation. Although this technique has great advantages compared14. Using15 MRI, the oil secondary migration paths are scanned to measure the saturation distribution during

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

292

Observations on the Variability of the Gulf Stream Path between 74°W and 70°W  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Gulf Stream path varies in a wavelike fashion in the deep water downstream of Cape Hatteras, energetic within a range of wavelengths ? from 150 km to over 1000 km, and periods ? from 4 d to over 500 d. The authors determined the path from the ...

Harilaos Kontoyiannis; D. Randolph Watts

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Single Particle Laser Mass Spectrometry Applied to Differential Ice Nucleation Experiments at the AIDA Chamber  

SciTech Connect

Experiments conducted at the Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) chamber located in Karlsruhe, Germany permit investigation of particle properties that affect the nucleation of ice at temperature and water vapor conditions relevant to cloud microphysics and climate issues. Ice clouds were generated by heterogeneous nucleation of Arizona test dust (ATD), illite, and hematite and homogeneous nucleation of sulfuric acid. Ice crystals formed in the chamber were inertially separated from unactivated, or ‘interstitial’ aerosol particles with a pumped counterflow virtual impactor (PCVI), then evaporated. The ice residue (i.e., the aerosol which initiated ice nucleation plus any material which was scavenged from the gas- and/or particle-phase), was chemically characterized at the single particle level using a laser ionization mass spectrometer. In this manner the species that first nucleated ice could be identified out of a mixed aerosol population in the chamber. Bare mineral dust particles were more effective ice nuclei (IN) than similar particles with a coating. Metallic particles from contamination in the chamber initiated ice nucleation before other species but there were few enough that they did not compromise the experiments. Nitrate, sulfate, and organics were often detected on particles and ice residue, evidently from scavenging of trace gas-phase species in the chamber. Hematite was a more effective ice nucleus than illite. Ice residue was frequently larger than unactivated test aerosol due to the formation of aggregates due to scavenging, condensation of contaminant gases, and the predominance of larger aerosol in nucleation.

Gallavardin, S. J.; Froyd, Karl D.; Lohmann, U.; Moehler, Ottmar; Murphy, Daniel M.; Cziczo, Dan

2008-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

294

Image Content Engine (ICE)  

SciTech Connect

The Image Content Engine (ICE) is being developed to provide cueing assistance to human image analysts faced with increasingly large and intractable amounts of image data. The ICE architecture includes user configurable feature extraction pipelines which produce intermediate feature vector and match surface files which can then be accessed by interactive relational queries. Application of the feature extraction algorithms to large collections of images may be extremely time consuming and is launched as a batch job on a Linux cluster. The query interface accesses only the intermediate files and returns candidate hits nearly instantaneously. Queries may be posed for individual objects or collections. The query interface prompts the user for feedback, and applies relevance feedback algorithms to revise the feature vector weighting and focus on relevant search results. Examples of feature extraction and both model-based and search-by-example queries are presented.

Brase, J M

2007-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

295

Thermal desorption of CH4 retained in CO2 ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CO2 ices are known to exist in different astrophysical environments. In spite of this, its physical properties (structure, density, refractive index) have not been as widely studied as those of water ice. It would be of great value to study the adsorption properties of this ice in conditions related to astrophysical environments. In this paper, we explore the possibility that CO2 traps relevant molecules in astrophysical environments at temperatures higher than expected from their characteristic sublimation point. To fulfil this aim we have carried out desorption experiments under High Vacuum conditions based on a Quartz Crystal Microbalance and additionally monitored with a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer. From our results, the presence of CH4 in the solid phase above the sublimation temperature in some astrophysical scenarios could be explained by the presence of several retaining mechanisms related to the structure of CO2 ice.

R. Luna; C. Millan; M. Domingo; M. A. Satorre

2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

296

Surface Melting over Ice Shelves and Ice Sheets as Assessed from Modeled Surface Air Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Summer surface melting plays an important role in the evolution of ice shelves and their progenitor ice sheets. To explore the magnitude of surface melt occurring over modern ice shelves and ice sheets in a climate scenario forced by ...

Jeremy G. Fyke; Lionel Carter; Andrew Mackintosh; Andrew J. Weaver; Katrin J. Meissner

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Ice Nucleation and Droplet Formation by Bare and Coated Soot Particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have studied ice formation at temperatures relevant to homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation, as well as droplet activation and hygroscopicity, of soot particles of variable size and composition. Coatings of adipic, malic, and oleic acid were applied to span an atmospherically relevant range of solubility, and both uncoated and oleic acid coated soot particles were exposed to ozone to simulate atmospheric oxidation. The results are interpreted in terms of onset ice nucleation, with a comparison to a mineral dust particle that acts as an efficient ice nucleus, and particle hygroscopicity. At 253K and 243K, we found no evidence of heterogeneous ice nucleation occurring above the level of detection for our experimental conditions. Above water saturation, only droplet formation was observed. At 233K, we observe the occurrence of homogeneous ice nucleation for all particles studied. Coatings also did not significantly alter the ice nucleation behavior of soot particles, but aided in the uptake of water. Hygroscopicity studies confirmed that pure soot particles were hydrophobic, and coated soot particles activated as droplets at high water supersaturations. A small amount of heterogeneous ice nucleation either below the detection limit of our instrument or concurrent with droplet formation and/or homogeneous freezing cannot be precluded, but we are able to set limits for its frequency. We conclude that both uncoated and coated soot particles representative of those generated in our studies are unlikely to significantly contribute to the global budget of heterogeneous ice nuclei at temperatures between 233K and 253K.

Friedman, Beth J.; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Beranek, Josef; Zelenyuk, Alla; Thornton, Joel A.; Cziczo, Daniel J.

2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

298

The Spitzer ice legacy: Ice evolution from cores to protostars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ices regulate much of the chemistry during star formation and account for up to 80% of the available oxygen and carbon. In this paper, we use the Spitzer c2d ice survey, complimented with data sets on ices in cloud cores and high-mass protostars, to determine standard ice abundances and to present a coherent picture of the evolution of ices during low- and high-mass star formation. The median ice composition H2O:CO:CO2:CH3OH:NH3:CH4:XCN is 100:29:29:3:5:5:0.3 and 100:13:13:4:5:2:0.6 toward low- and high-mass protostars, respectively, and 100:31:38:4:-:-:- in cloud cores. In the low-mass sample, the ice abundances with respect to H2O of CH4, NH3, and the component of CO2 mixed with H2O typically vary by ice components, XCN and CH3OH vary by factors 2-10 between the lower and upper quartile. The XCN band correlates with CO, consistent with its OCN- identification. The origin(s) of the different levels of ice abundance variations are cons...

Oberg, Karin I; Pontoppidan, Klaus M; Broek, Saskia van den; van Dishoeck, Ewine F; Bottinelli, Sandrine; Blake, Geoffrey A; Evans, Neal J

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Ice slurry cooling research: Storage tank ice agglomeration and extraction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new facility has been built to conduct research and development on important issues related to implementing ice slurry cooling technology. Ongoing studies are generating important information on the factors that influence ice particle agglomeration in ice slurry storage tanks. The studies are also addressing the development of methods to minimize and monitor agglomeration and improve the efficiency and controllability of tank extraction of slurry for distribution to cooling loads. These engineering issues impede the utilization of the ice slurry cooling concept that has been under development by various groups.

Kasza, K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Hayashi, Kanetoshi [NKK Corp., Kawasaki (Japan)

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Accelerating cleanup: Paths to closure  

SciTech Connect

This document was previously referred to as the Draft 2006 Plan. As part of the DOE`s national strategy, the Richland Operations Office`s Paths to Closure summarizes an integrated path forward for environmental cleanup at the Hanford Site. The Hanford Site underwent a concerted effort between 1994 and 1996 to accelerate the cleanup of the Site. These efforts are reflected in the current Site Baseline. This document describes the current Site Baseline and suggests strategies for further improvements in scope, schedule and cost. The Environmental Management program decided to change the name of the draft strategy and the document describing it in response to a series of stakeholder concerns, including the practicality of achieving widespread cleanup by 2006. Also, EM was concerned that calling the document a plan could be misconstrued to be a proposal by DOE or a decision-making document. The change in name, however, does not diminish the 2006 vision. To that end, Paths to Closure retains a focus on 2006, which serves as a point in time around which objectives and goals are established.

Edwards, C.

1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water path" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

China Energy and Emissions Path to 2030  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

China Energy and Emissions Path to 2030 Title China Energy and Emissions Path to 2030 Publication Type Report LBNL Report Number LBNL-4866E Year of Publication 2013 Authors...

302

THE PATH OF CARBON IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis, Prentice-Hall, Ino. ,to StUdy the Products of Photosynthesis as Depending on the48 THE PATH OF CARBON IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS J. A. Bassham and

Bassham, J.A.; Calvin, Melvin

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

THE PATH OF CARBON IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Path ot Carbon in Photosynthesis. Science" l2J. , 476 (48 THE PATH OF CARBON IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS Melvin Calvin Nobel8-A Fig. 1. Elementary photosynthesis scheme. DES IOU OF THE

Calvin, Melvin Nobel Prize lecture

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

304

Field Guide: Turbine Steam Path Damage  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Steam path damage, particularly of blades, has long been recognized as a leading cause of steam turbine unavailability for large fossil fuel plants. Damage to steam path components by various mechanisms continues to result in significant economic impact domestically and internationally. Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) Report TR-108943, Turbine Steam Path Damage: Theory and Practice, Volumes 1 and 2, was prepared to compile the most recent knowledge about turbine steam path damage: identifying th...

2011-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

305

No Confinement Needed: Observation of a Metastable Hydrophobic Wetting Two-Layer Ice on Graphene  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The structure of water at interfaces is crucial for processes ranging from photocatalysis to protein folding. Here, we investigate the structure and lattice dynamics of two-layer crystalline ice films grown on a hydrophobic substrate - graphene on Pt(111) - with low energy electron diffraction, reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy, rare-gas adsorption/desorption, and ab-initio molecular dynamics. Unlike hexagonal ice, which consists of stacks of puckered hexagonal "bilayers", this new ice polymorph consists of two flat hexagonal sheets of water molecules in which the hexagons in each sheet are stacked directly on top of each other. Such two-layer ices have been predicted for water confined between hydrophobic slits, but not previously observed. Our results show that the two-layer ice forms even at zero pressure at a single hydrophobic interface by maximizing the number of hydrogen bonds at the expense of adopting a non-tetrahedral geometry with weakened bonds.

Kimmel, Gregory A.; Matthiesen, Jesper; Baer, Marcel; Mundy, Christopher J.; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Smith, R. Scott; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Kay, Bruce D.

2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

306

Stochastic path tracing on consumer graphics cards  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a path tracer using the GPU of a consumers graphics card to render images. It is implemented in Java and GLSL using GroIMP as modelling platform and runtime environment. The path tracer is capable of rendering primitives like sphere, cone, ... Keywords: GPU, HDR, global illumination, path tracing, procedural texturing, raytracing, texture mapping

Thomas Huwe; Reinhard Hemmerling

2008-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Climate Impacts of Ice Nucleation  

SciTech Connect

Several different ice nucleation parameterizations in two different General Circulation Models are used to understand the effects of ice nucleation on the mean climate state, and the climate effect of aerosol perturbations to ice clouds. The simulations have different ice microphysical states that are consistent with the spread of observations. These different states occur from different parameterizations of the ice cloud nucleation processes, and feature different balances of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation. At reasonable efficiencies, consistent with laboratory measurements and constrained by the global radiative balance, black carbon has a small (-0.06 Wm?2) and not statistically significant climate effect. Indirect effects of anthropogenic aerosols on cirrus clouds occur mostly due to increases in homogeneous nucleation fraction as a consequence of anthropogenic sulfur emissions. The resulting ice indirect effects do not seem strongly dependent on the ice micro-physical balance, but are slightly larger for those states with less homogeneous nucleation in the base state. The total ice AIE is estimated at 0.26±0.09 Wm?2 (1? uncertainty). This represents an offset of 20-30% of the simulated total Aerosol Indirect Effect for ice and liquid clouds.

Gettelman, A.; Liu, Xiaohong; Barahona, Donifan; Lohmann, U.; Chen, Chih-Chieh

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

308

Backhand tecniques in ice hockey.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The main objective of this project based multimedia thesis is to show video material of how to use a backhand side of the ice hockey… (more)

Luoma, Matti

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

309

Impact of variable atmospheric and oceanic form drag on simulations of Arctic sea ice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over Arctic sea ice, pressure ridges, floe and melt pond edges all introduce discrete obstructions to the flow of air or water past the ice, and are a source of form drag. In current climate models form drag is only accounted for by tuning the air-...

Michel Tsamados; Daniel L. Feltham; David Schroeder; Daniela Flocco; Sinead L. Farrell; Nathan Kurtz; Seymour W. Laxon; Sheldon Bacon

310

Sea Ice–Atmosphere Signal of the Southern Oscillation in the Weddell Sea, Antarctica  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Composite analysis of weekly ship and shore observations of the Weddell Sea pack ice for extreme events of the Southern Oscillation (SO) occurring in the 1929–62 period reveals strong variations in ice-water concentrations in the early and late ...

Andrew M. Carleton

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

311

Physical Response of Convective Clouds over the Sierra Nevada to Seeding with Dry Ice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of seeding convective clouds with dry ice was studied using simultaneous aircraft and radar observations. Clouds that were initially ice-free with supercooled liquid water contents of 0.5 g m?3 when the tops reached the ?10°C level had ...

Arlen W. Huggins; Alfred R. Rodi

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Adaptation of an Isopycnic Coordinate Ocean Model for the Study of Circulation beneath Ice Shelves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Much of the Antarctic coastline comprises large, floating ice shelves, beneath which waters from the open ocean circulate. The interaction of the seawater with the base of these ice shelves has a bearing both on the rate at which Antarctic Bottom ...

David M. Holland; Adrian Jenkins

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Sensitivity of the Amery Ice Shelf, Antarctica, to Changes in the Climate of the Southern Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coupled ocean–atmospheric general circulation models indicate that warming of up to 3°C may occur over the next century in waters immediately to the north of the Amery Ice Shelf. The impact of this warming on the ocean cavity under the Amery Ice ...

M. J. M. Williams; R. C. Warner; W. F. Budd

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Synchrotrons Explore Water's Molecular Mysteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fluoride crystal. This surface was expected to stimulate ice formation, but even when chilled to a temperature of about 6.5 F-well below water's normal freezing point-the water...

315

Modeling of Ice Accretion on Wires  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A time-dependent numerical model of ice accretion on wires, such as overhead conductors, is presented. Simulations of atmospheric icing are made with the model in order to examine the dependence of the accreted ice amount on atmospheric ...

Lasse Makkonen

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

ICE Raids: Compounding Production, Contradiction, and Capitalism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is just a cheap way of boosting ICE ‘criminal alien’ arrestRegardless of whether or not ICE is motivated by maintainingWorkers in America: Factories and ICE Raids Produce Citizens

Reas, Elizabeth I

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) Summary The COSIM project develops advanced ocean and ice models for evaluating the role of ocean and ice in high-latitude climate...

318

Virtual Floe Ice Drift Forecast Model Intercomparison  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Both sea ice forecast models and methods to measure their skill are needed for operational sea ice forecasting. Two simple sea ice models are described and tested here. Four different measures of skill are also tested. The forecasts from the ...

Robert W. Grumbine

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

319

Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Designated Product: Water-Cooled  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FEMP Designated FEMP Designated Product: Water-Cooled Ice Machines to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Designated Product: Water-Cooled Ice Machines on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Designated Product: Water-Cooled Ice Machines on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Designated Product: Water-Cooled Ice Machines on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Designated Product: Water-Cooled Ice Machines on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Designated Product: Water-Cooled Ice Machines on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Designated Product: Water-Cooled Ice Machines on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products Federal Requirements

320

Inclusion of Ice Microphysics in the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model Version 3 (CAM3)  

SciTech Connect

A prognostic equation for ice crystal number concentration together with an ice nucleation scheme are implemented in the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Atmospheric Model Version 3 (CAM3) with the aim of studying the indirect effect of aerosols on cold clouds. The effective radius of ice crystals which is used in the radiation and gravitational settlement calculations is now calculated from model predicted mass and number of ice crystals rather than diagnosed as a function of temperature. We add a water vapor deposition scheme to replace the condensation and evaporation (C-E) in the standard CAM3 for ice clouds. The repartitioning of total water into liquid and ice in mixed-phase clouds as a function of temperature is removed, and ice supersaturation is allowed. The predicted ice water content in the modified CAM3 is in better agreement with the Aura MLS data than that in the standard CAM3. The cirrus cloud fraction near the tropical tropopause, which is underestimated in the standard CAM3, is increased, and the cold temperature bias there is reduced by 1-2 °K. However, an increase in the cloud fraction in polar regions makes the underestimation of downwelling shortwave radiation in the standard CAM3 even worse. A sensitivity test reducing the threshold relative humidity with respective to ice (RHi) for heterogeneous ice nucleation from 120% to 105% (representing nearly perfert ice nuclei) increases the global cloud cover by 1.7%, temperature near the tropical tropopause by 4-5 °K, and water vapor in the stratosphere by 50-90%.

Liu, Xiaohong; Penner, Joyce E.; Ghan, Steven J.; Wang, M.

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water path" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

was not identified at many groundwater locations. 18. Was the presence or absence of ice in the cooler documented at every sample location? Yes 19. Were water levels measured...

322

BISICLES Captures Details of Retreating Antarctic Ice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BISICLES Captures Details of Retreating Antarctic Ice BISICLES Captures Details of Retreating Antarctic Ice March 30, 2013 | Tags: Climate Research, Hopper, Math & Computer Science...

323

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - Synchrotrons Explore Water...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fluoride crystal. This surface was expected to stimulate ice formation, but even when chilled to a temperature of about 6.5 degrees Fahrenheit - well below water's normal...

324

ARM - Measurement - Cloud ice particle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ice particle ice particle ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud ice particle Particles made of ice found in clouds. Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments MET : Surface Meteorological Instrumentation Field Campaign Instruments REPLICATOR : Balloon-borne Ice Crystal Replicator CPI : Cloud Particle Imager CVI-AIR : Counterflow Virtual Impactor LEARJET : Lear Jet PARTIMG : Particle imager UAV-PROTEUS-MICRO : Proteus Cloud Microphysics Instruments

325

Source and Pathway of the Western Arctic Upper Halocline in a Data-Constrained Coupled Ocean and Sea Ice Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A coupled ocean and sea ice model is used to investigate dense water (DW) formation in the Chukchi and Bering shelves and the pathways by which this water feeds the upper halocline. Two 1992–2008 data-constrained solutions ...

Nguyen, An T.

326

Ice Nucleation and Droplet Formation by Bare and Coated Black Carbon Particles  

SciTech Connect

We have studied the ice formation at heterogeneous and homogeneous temperatures, as well as droplet activation and hygroscopicity of soot particles of variable size and composition. Coatings of adipic, malic, and oleic acid were applied to span a relevant range of solubility, and both uncoated and oleic acid coated soot particles were exposed to ozone to simulate atmospheric oxidation. The results are interpreted in terms of onset ice nucleation with a comparison to a well characterized mineral dust particle that acts as an efficient ice nucleus, as well as particle hygroscopicity. At 253K and 243K, we found no evidence of heterogeneous ice nucleation occurring above the level of detection for our experimental conditions. Above water saturation, droplet formation was observed. At 233K, we observe the occurrence of homogeneous ice nucleation for all particles studied. Coatings also did not significantly alter the ice nucleation behavior of soot particles, but aided in the uptake of water. Hygroscopicity studies confirmed that pure soot particles were hydrophobic, and coated soot particles activated as droplets at high water supersaturations. A small amount of heterogeneous ice nucleation either below the detection limit of our instrument or concurrent with droplet formation and/or homogeneous freezing cannot be precluded, but we are able to set limits for its frequency. We conclude from our studies that both uncoated and coated soot particles are unlikely to contribute to the global budget of heterogeneous ice nuclei at temperatures between 233K and 253K.

Friedman, Beth J.; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Beranek, Josef; Zelenyuk, Alla; Thornton, Joel A.; Cziczo, Daniel J.

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

327

Dynamics of ice shelf rift propagation and iceberg calving inferred from geodetic and seismic observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2. Ice Shelves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. Ice Rheology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.vi Calving Glaciers and Ice

Bassis, Jeremy N.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Tracking the Motion of Sea Ice by Correlation Sonar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A prototype correlation sonar has been developed for the measurement of ice motion in polar seas. It operates in the very shallow-water mode as a two-pulse spatial correlation log. The design was guided by numerical signal simulations, which ...

James L. Galloway; Humfrey Melling

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

329

The Role of Spaceborne Millimeter-Wave Radar in the Global Monitoring of Ice Cloud  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to assess the potential of a spaceborne 94-GHz radar for providing useful measurements of the vertical distribution and water content of ice clouds on a global scale.

P. R. A. Brown; A. J. Illingworth; A. J. Heymsfield; G. M. McFarquhar; K. A. Browning; M. Gosset

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Effective Radius of Ice Cloud Particle Populations Derived from Aircraft Probes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effective radius (re) is a crucial variable in representing the radiative properties of cloud layers in general circulation models. This parameter is proportional to the condensed water content (CWC) divided by the extinction (?). For ice ...

Andrew J. Heymsfield; Carl Schmitt; Aaron Bansemer; Gerd-Jan van Zadelhoff; Matthew J. McGill; Cynthia Twohy; Darrel Baumgardner

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Coupled Sea Ice–Ocean-State Estimation in the Labrador Sea and Baffin Bay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sea ice variability in the Labrador Sea is of climatic interest because of its relationship to deep convection, mode-water formation, and the North Atlantic atmospheric circulation. Historically, quantifying the relationship ...

Fenty, Ian

332

Improvements of an Ice-Phase Microphysics Parameterization for Use in Numerical Simulations of Tropical Convection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is important to properly simulate the extent and ice water content of tropical anvil clouds in numerical models that explicitly include cloud formation because of the significant effects that these clouds have on the radiation budget. For this ...

Steven K. Krueger; Qiang Fu; K. N. Liou; Hung-Neng S. Chin

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Distributions of Liquid, Vapor, and Ice in an Orographic Cloud from Field Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The phase distribution of the water mass of a cold orographic cloud into vapor, liquid, and ice is calculated from measurements made from an instrumented aircraft. The vapor values are calculated from thermodynamic measurements, and the liquid is ...

Taneil Uttal; Robert M. Rauber; Lewis O. Grant

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Blowing Snow on Arctic Sea Ice: Results from an Improved Sea Ice–Snow–Blowing Snow Coupled System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A one-dimensional (1D) version of a blowing snow model, called PIEKTUK-D, has been incorporated into a snow–sea ice coupled system. Blowing snow results in sublimation of approximately 12 mm of snow water equivalent (SWE), which is equal to ...

Yi-Ching Chung; Stéphane Bélair; Jocelyn Mailhot

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Building Energy Software Tools Directory: Sol Path  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sol Path Sol Path Sol Path logo. Graphically displays path of sun in the sky for any date and location. Good for quickly obtaining rough sun angle data, or understanding the general nature of the sun's motion. Screen Shots Keywords solar, sun, sun path Validation/Testing N/A Expertise Required None required. Users Several hundred regular users, split approximately evenly between U.S. and other countries. Audience Architects, energy analysts, home owners, educators. Input Location, date. Output Graphical display of sun path in the sky. Computer Platform Web Programming Language Macromedia Director / Shockwave Strengths Easy to use, instantaneous graphical output. Weaknesses Sometimes displays incomplete results for equatorial regions (latitude < 23 degrees). Contact Company: Sustainable By Design

336

Forecast Verification of the Polar Ice Prediction System (PIPS) Sea Ice Concentration Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Ice Center relies upon a coupled ice–ocean model called the Polar Ice Prediction System (PIPS) to provide guidance for its 24–120-h sea ice forecasts. Here forecast skill assessments of the sea ice concentration (C) fields from PIPS ...

Michael L. Van Woert; Cheng-Zhi Zou; Walter N. Meier; Philip D. Hovey; Ruth H. Preller; Pamela G. Posey

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Compliance Verification Paths for Residential and Commercial...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Verification Paths for Residential and Commercial Energy Codes Conformity assessment is a term used to describe the processes followed to demonstrate that a product, service,...

338

Experimental investigation of ice slurry flow pressure drop in horizontal tubes  

SciTech Connect

Pressure drop behaviour of ice slurry based on ethanol-water mixture in circular horizontal tubes has been experimentally investigated. The secondary fluid was prepared by mixing ethyl alcohol and water to obtain initial alcohol concentration of 10.3% (initial freezing temperature -4.4 C). The pressure drop tests were conducted to cover laminar and slightly turbulent flow with ice mass fraction varying from 0% to 30% depending on test conditions. Results from flow tests reveal much higher pressure drop for higher ice concentrations and higher velocities in comparison to the single phase flow. However for ice concentrations of 15% and higher, certain velocity exists at which ice slurry pressure drop is same or even lower than for single phase flow. It seems that higher ice concentration delay flow pattern transition moment (from laminar to turbulent) toward higher velocities. In addition experimental results for pressure drop were compared to the analytical results, based on Poiseulle and Buckingham-Reiner models for laminar flow, Blasius, Darby and Melson, Dodge and Metzner, Steffe and Tomita for turbulent region and general correlation of Kitanovski which is valid for both flow regimes. For laminar flow and low buoyancy numbers Buckingham-Reiner method gives good agreement with experimental results while for turbulent flow best fit is provided with Dodge-Metzner and Tomita methods. Furthermore, for transport purposes it has been shown that ice mass fraction of 20% offers best ratio of ice slurry transport capability and required pumping power. (author)

Grozdek, Marino; Khodabandeh, Rahmatollah; Lundqvist, Per [Royal Institute of Technology, Department of Energy Technology, Division of Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration, Brinellvaegen 68, 10044 Stockholm (Sweden)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

339

Ice_slurry_fact_sheet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

new approach to saving stroke and cardiac arrest victims by using a specially engineered ice slurry to cool organs. The technology is also being investigated as a way to improve...

340

Melting of Ice under Pressure  

SciTech Connect

The melting of ice under pressure is investigated with a series of first principles molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, a two-phase approach is used to determine the melting temperature of the ice-VII phase in the range of 10 to 50 GPa. Our computed melting temperatures are consistent with existing diamond anvil cell experiments. We find that for pressures between 10 to 40 GPa, ice melts as a molecular solid. For pressures above {approx}45 GPa there is a sharp increase in the slope of the melting curve due to the presence of molecular dissociation and proton diffusion in the solid, prior to melting. The onset of significant proton diffusion in ice-VII as a function of increasing temperature is found to be gradual and bears many similarities to that of a type-II superionic solid.

Schwegler, E; Sharma, M; Gygi, F; Galli, G

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water path" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

An Inverse Method for Tracking Ice Motion in the Marginal Ice Zone Using Sequential Satellite Images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method for tracking ice motion and estimating ocean surface currents from sequential satellite images is presented. It is particularly suited for the marginal ice zone. A simple ice advection model, driven by wind and surface currents, is ...

Mark Buehner; Keith R. Thompson; Ingrid Peterson

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

342

Evaluation of Calcine Disposition Path Forward  

SciTech Connect

This document describes an evaluation of the baseline and two alternative disposition paths for the final disposition of the calcine wastes stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The pathways are evaluated against a prescribed set of criteria and a recommendation is made for the path forward.

Birrer, S.A.; Heiser, M.B.

2003-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

343

Evaluation of Calcine Disposition - Path Forward  

SciTech Connect

This document describes an evaluation of the baseline and two alternative disposition paths for the final disposition of the calcine wastes stored at the Idaho Nuclear Technology and Engineering Center at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory. The pathways are evaluated against a prescribed set of criteria and a recommendation is made for the path forward.

Steve Birrer

2003-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

344

On-The-Fly Path Reduction  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Path reduction is a well-known technique to alleviate the state-explosion problem incurred by explicit-state model checking, its key idea being to store states only at predetermined breaking points. This paper presents an adaptation of this technique ... Keywords: model checking, path reduction, state explosion, verification

Sebastian Biallas; Jörg Brauer; Dominique Gückel; Stefan Kowalewski

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Deep Space Formation Flying Spacecraft Path Planning  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Efficient algorithms for collision-free energy sub-optimal path planning for formations of spacecraft flying in deep space are presented. The idea is to introduce a set of way-points through which the spacecraft are required to pass, combined with ... Keywords: formation flying spacecraft, path planning for multiple mobile robot systems, trajectory generation

Cornel Sultan; Sanjeev Seereram; Raman K. Mehra

2007-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

346

Path dependent analysis of logic programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an abstract semantics that uses information about execution paths to improve precision of data flow analyses of logic programs. We illustrate the abstract semantics by abstracting execution paths using call strings of fixed length ... Keywords: Abstract interpretation, Call strings, Context sensitive analysis

Lunjin Lu

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Path Dependent Analysis of Logic Programs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper presents an abstract semantics that uses information about execution paths to improve precision of data flow analyses of logic programs. The abstract semantics is illustrated by abstracting execution paths using call strings of fixed length ... Keywords: abstract interpretation, call strings, context sensitive analysis

Lunjin Lu

2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

348

Bootstrapping path-based pronoun resolution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present an approach to pronoun resolution based on syntactic paths. Through a simple bootstrapping procedure, we learn the likelihood of coreference between a pronoun and a candidate noun based on the path in the parse tree between the two entities. ...

Shane Bergsma; Dekang Lin

2006-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

The Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis VI.  

DOE R&D Accomplishments (OSTI)

This paper is a compilation of the essential results of our experimental work in the determination of the path of carbon in photosynthesis. There are discussions of the dark fixation of photosynthesis and methods of separation and identification including paper chromatography and radioautography. The definition of the path of carbon in photosynthesis by the distribution of radioactivity within the compounds is described.

Calvin, M.

1949-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

350

THE PATH OF OXYGEN IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

48 THE PATH OF O Y m IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS X G Go D, Dorough andTm PATH OF O Y E I N PHOTOSYNTHESIS X G N by Go D, Doroughe s e workers found that, photosynthesis i s represented by

Dorough, G.D.; Calvin, M.

1950-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

The Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis VI.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper is a compilation of the essential results of our experimental work in the determination of the path of carbon in photosynthesis. There are discussions of the dark fixation of photosynthesis and methods of separation and identification including paper chromatography and radioautography. The definition of the path of carbon in photosynthesis by the distribution of radioactivity Within the compounds is described.

Calvin, M.

1949-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

352

Ice structures, patterns, and processes: A view across the ice-fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We look ahead from the frontiers of research on ice dynamics in its broadest sense; on the structures of ice, the patterns or morphologies it may assume, and the physical and chemical processes in which it is involved. We highlight open questions in the various fields of ice research in nature; ranging from terrestrial and oceanic ice on Earth, to ice in the atmosphere, to ice on other solar system bodies and in interstellar space.

Bartels-Rausch, Thorsten; Cartwright, Julyan H E; Escribano, Rafael; Finney, John L; Grothe, Hinrich; Gutiérrez, Pedro J; Haapala, Jari; Kuhs, Werner F; Pettersson, Jan B C; Price, Stephen D; Sainz-Díaz, C Ignacio; Stokes, Debbie J; Strazzulla, Giovanni; Thomson, Erik S; Trinks, Hauke; Uras-Aytemiz, Nevin; 10.1103/RevModPhys.84.885

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Effects of Surface Roughness and Surface Energy on Ice Adhesion ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ice adheres to steel surfaces when the environment temperature is low. In many cases, ice formation on surfaces is unwanted; therefore, anti-icing techniques ...

354

ICR-ICE Standard Operating Procedures | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ICR-ICE Standard Operating Procedures ICR-ICE Standard Operating Procedures ICE-ICR SOP.pdf More Documents & Publications External Independent Review (EIR) Standard Operating...

355

Fractionation of Dissolved Solutes and Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter During Experimental Sea Ice Formation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the past decade there has been an overall decrease in Arctic Ocean sea ice cover. Changes to the ice cover have important consequences for organic carbon cycling, especially over the continental shelves. When sea ice is formed, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and other tracers are fractionated in relation to the initial water. Two separate “freeze-out” experiments were conducted to observe the effects of fractionation during ice formation. In experiment 1, marine and freshwater end members were mixed together in different ratios to create four different salinities. In experiment 2, a brackish water sample was collected. The initial unfrozen water, ice melt, and post-freeze brine water were tested for dissolved organic carbon, total nitrogen (TN), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), fluorescence and absorption (optics), water isotopes (?18O and ?D), and lignin phenols. Results showed a clear fractionation effect for all parameters, where the ice samples contained much less of the dissolved species than the enriched brine samples. This information is important to consider when trying using these parameters to determine the fate of carbon and the freshwater budget to the Arctic Ocean.

Smith, Stephanie 1990-

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

356

Fluid Migration During Ice/Rock Planetesimal Differentiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Much speculation on extraterrestrial life has focused on finding environments where water is present. Heating of smaller icy bodies may create and sustain a possible liquid layer below the surface. If liquid water was sustained for geologically significant times (> 108 years) within the ubiquitous small bodies in the outer solar system, the opportunities for development of simple life are much greater. The lifetime of the liquid water layer will depend on several factors, including the rate of rock/water reaction, which will depend on the rate at which water can be segregated from a melting ice/rock core. For the liquid water phase to migrate toward the surface, the denser rock phase must compact. The primary question that this thesis will answer is how fast melt water can segregate from the core of an ice-rich planetesimal. To answer this question we treat the core as two phase flow problem: a compacting viscous “solid” (ice/rock mixture) and a segregating liquid (melt water). The model developed here is based on the approach derived to study a different partially molten solid: in the viscously deforming partially molten upper mantle. We model a planetesimal core that initially a uniform equal mixture of solid ice and rock. We assume chondritic levels of radiogenic heating as the only heat source, and numerically solve for the evolution of solid and melt velocities and the distribution of melt fraction (“porosity”) during the first few million years after accretion. From a suite of numerical models, we have determined that the meltwater is segregated out of the core as fast as it is created, except in the case of very fast melting times (0.75 My vs. 0.62 My), and small ore radius (~25 to 150 km, depending on the viscosity of the ice/rock mixture in the solid core). In these latter cases, segregation is slower than migration and a high water fraction develops in the core. Heat released by water-rock reactions (not included in this model) will tend to drive up melting rates in all cases, which may favor this latter endmember.

Raney, Robert 1987-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Ross Ice Shelf in situ radio-frequency ice attenuation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have measured the in situ average electric field attenuation length for radio-frequency signals broadcast vertically through the Ross Ice Shelf. We chose a location, Moore Embayment, south of Minna Bluff, known for its high reflectivity at the ice-sea interface. We confirmed specular reflection and used the return pulses to measure the average attenuation length from 75-1250 MHz over the round-trip distance of 1155 m. We find the average electric field attenuation length to vary from 500 m at 75 MHz to 300 m at 1250 MHz, with an experimental uncertainty of 55 to 15 m. We discuss the implications for neutrino telescopes that use the radio technique and include the Ross Ice Shelf as part of their sensitive volume.

Taylor Barrella; Steven Barwick; David Saltzberg

2010-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

358

Ice Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ice Energy Ice Energy Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Ice Energy Name Ice Energy Address 9351 Eastman Park Drive Place Windsor, Colorado Zip 80550 Sector Renewable energy Product Energy Storage Year founded 2003 Number of employees 51-200 Phone number 970-545-3630 Website http://www.ice-energy.com/ Coordinates 40.4651775°, -104.882° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.4651775,"lon":-104.882,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

359

Relative Dispersion of Ice Crystals in Seeded Cumuli  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Relative dispersion of ice crystals was measured in 30 seeded cumulus clouds. A quasi-instantaneous, vertical area source of ice was generated by releasing dry-ice pellets from an airplane. The ice concentration distribution and relative ...

Jeffrey C. Weil; R. Paul Lawson; Alfred R. Rodi

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

360

Rheology of Discrete Failure Regimes of Anisotropic Sea Ice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A rheological model of sea ice is presented that incorporates the orientational distribution of ice thickness in leads embedded in isotropic floe ice. Sea ice internal stress is determined by coulombic, ridging and tensile failure at orientations ...

Alexander V. Wilchinsky; Daniel L. Feltham

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water path" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Homogeneous ice nucleation at moderate supercooling from molecular simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Among all the freezing transitions, that of water into ice is probably the most relevant to biology, physics, geology or atmospheric science. In this work we investigate homogeneous ice nucleation by means of computer simulations. We evaluate the size of the critical cluster and the nucleation rate for temperatures ranging between 15K and 35K below melting. We use the TIP4P/2005 and the TIP4P/Ice water models. Both give similar results when compared at the same temperature difference with the model's melting temperature. The size of the critical cluster varies from $\\sim$8000 molecules (radius$ = 4$nm) at 15K below melting to $\\sim$600 molecules (radius$ = 1.7$nm) at 35K below melting. We use Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT) to estimate the ice-water interfacial free energy and the nucleation free energy barrier. We obtain an interfacial free energy of 29(3)mN/m from an extrapolation of our results to the melting temperature. This value is in good agreement both with experimental measurements and with previous estimates from computer simulations of TIP4P-like models. Moreover, we obtain estimates of the nucleation rate from simulations of the critical cluster at the barrier top. The values we get for both models agree within statistical error with experimental measurements. At temperatures higher than 20K below melting we get nucleation rates slower than the appearance of a critical cluster in all the water of the hydrosphere in the age of the universe. Therefore, our simulations predict that water freezing above this temperature must necessarily be heterogeneous.

E. Sanz; C. Vega; J. R. Espinosa; R. Caballero-Bernal; J. L. F. Abascal; C. Valeriani

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

362

ICE Solar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ICE Solar ICE Solar Jump to: navigation, search Name ICE Solar Place Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India Sector Solar Product India-based company focused on solar PV engineering, procurement and construction opportunities. Coordinates 17.6726°, 77.5971° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":17.6726,"lon":77.5971,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

363

Definition: Scheduling Path | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Scheduling Path Scheduling Path Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Scheduling Path The Transmission Service arrangements reserved by the Purchasing-Selling Entity for a Transaction.[1] Related Terms transmission lines, Purchasing-Selling Entity, Transmission Service, transmission line References ↑ Glossary of Terms Used in Reliability Standards An inl LikeLike UnlikeLike You like this.Sign Up to see what your friends like. ine Glossary Definition Retrieved from "http://en.openei.org/w/index.php?title=Definition:Scheduling_Path&oldid=480301" Categories: Definitions ISGAN Definitions What links here Related changes Special pages Printable version Permanent link Browse properties 429 Throttled (bot load) Error 429 Throttled (bot load) Throttled (bot load) Guru Meditation:

364

Path inference in data center networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Path inference is the ability to determine the sequence of devices traversed by a packet within an IP network. This is a fundamental building block for several network and service management applications such as troubleshooting, planning, and ...

Kyriaki Levanti, Vijay Gopalakrishnan, Hyong S. Kim, Seungjoon Lee, Emmanuil Mavrogiorgis, Aman Shaikh

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

365

Path integration for light transport in volumes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Simulating the transport of light in volumes such as clouds or objects with subsurface scattering is computationally expensive. We describe an approximation to such transport using path integration. Unlike the more commonly used diffusion approximation, ...

Simon Premože; Michael Ashikhmin; Peter Shirley

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

366

Path of Carbon in Photosynthesis III  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

TIIE PAT3 OF C R O IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS A B K A. A. Benson andin the early products of photosynthesis, we Stepka, W. , inP THE PATH OF CARBON IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS. 111. BY A. A. Benson

Benson, A.A.; Calvin, M.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

THE PATH OF OXYGEN IN PHOTOSYNTHESIS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

An experiment is described in which an attempt is made to follow the path of oxygen in photosynthesis by the use of O{sup 18} as a tracer.

Dorough, G.D.; Calvin, M.

1950-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

368

Geomagnetic Reversals: Rates, Timescales, Preferred Paths,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Geomagnetic Reversals: Rates, Timescales, Preferred Paths, Statistical Models and Simulations: Geomagnetic reversals, Reversal rates, Paleointensity, Statistics of Geodynamo September 30, 2001 #12;Abstract Paleomagnetic data on geomagnetic reversals are divided into two general categories: times of occurrence

Constable, Catherine G.

369

Steam Path Audits on Industrial Steam Turbines  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The electric utility industry has benefitted from steam path audits on steam turbines for several years. Benefits include the ability to identify areas of performance degradation during a turbine outage. Repair priorities can then be set in accordance with quantitative results from the steam path audit. As a result of optimized repair decisions, turbine efficiency increases, emissions decrease, and maintenance expenses decrease. These benefits can be achieved by using a computer program Encotech, Inc. developed for the utility industry to perform steam path audits. With the increased emphasis on industrial turbine efficiency, and as a result of the experience with the Destec Operating Company, Encotech is adapting the computer program to respond to the needs of the industrial steam turbine community. This paper describes the results of using the STPE computer program to conduct a steam path audit at Destec Energy's Lyondell Cogeneration power plant.

Mitchell, D. R.

1992-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

EnerPath | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

EnerPath EnerPath Jump to: navigation, search Logo: EnerPath Name EnerPath Address 1758 Orange Tree Lane Place Redlands, California Zip 92374 Sector Buildings, Efficiency, Services Product Energy Efficiency Programs Number of employees 51-200 Website http://www.enerpath.com Coordinates 34.0678193°, -117.2147181° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":34.0678193,"lon":-117.2147181,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

371

Non Hexagonal Ice at Hexagonal Surfaces: The Role of Lattice Mismatch  

SciTech Connect

Despite the fact that the process of heterogeneous ice nucleation has been known for years and its atmospheric and industrial relevance, little is known at the microscopic level about which properties of a material determine its effectiveness at nucleating ice. This work focuses on the long standing, conceptually simple, view on the role of a good crystallographic match between bulk ice and the underlying substrate. We use grand canonical Monte Carlo to generate the first overlayer of water at the surface and find that the traditional view of heterogeneous nucleation does not adequately account for the array of structures that water may form at the surface. We find that, in order to describe the structures formed, a good match between the substrate and the nearest neighbour oxygen-oxygen distance is a better descriptor than a good match to the bulk ice lattice constant.

Cox, Stephen J.; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Purton, John A.; Gillan, Michael J.; Michaelides, Angelos

2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

372

Modeling Sea Ice Transport Using Incremental Remapping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sea ice models contain transport equations for the area, volume, and energy of ice and snow in various thickness categories. These equations typically are solved with first-order-accurate upwind schemes, which are very diffusive; with second-...

William H. Lipscomb; Elizabeth C. Hunke

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Why Sequence Lake Vostok accretion ice?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sequence Lake Vostok accretion ice? Lake Vostok is the largest known subglacial lake in central Antarctica, though it's been buried under 4 kilometers (nearly 2.5 miles) of ice for...

374

Microsoft Word - IceMountainFinal.docx  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Tumbled-down boulders, called talus, on Ice Mountain's north- western slope collect ice during the winter. In the summer, cold air flows out of vents in the base of the talus,...

375

Icing Conditions Encountered by a Research Aircraft  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The characteristics of clouds which have led to airframe icing on an instrumented Beechcraft Super King Air are summarized. The icing encounters occurred at altitudes from 0–8000 m MSL, in summer and winter, in stratiform and cumuliform clouds, ...

Wayne R. Sand; William A. Cooper; Marcia K. Politovich; Donald L. Veal

1984-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

Ice Formation in Gas-Diffusion Layers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of California. Ice Formation in Gas-Diffusion Layers Thomasconditions, ice forms in the gas-diffusion layer (GDL) of areaction of reactant gases (1). A number of strategies exist

Dursch, Thomas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Ice Crystal Replication with Common Plastic Solutions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Use of common plastics, i.e., polystyrene, Plexiglas (polymethyl methacrylate) and Lexan (polycarbonate), was investigated for ice crystal replication. The results suggest that all common plastics tested are usable for ice crystal replication ...

Tsuneya Takahashi; Norihiko Fukuta

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

Airplane Instrument to Detect Ice Particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple instrument that detects ice particles has been developed for use in airplane studies of thunderstorms. Although sophisticated instruments are available for imaging atmospheric ice particles, the spatial resolution of the particle ...

J. J. Jones; C. Grotbeck; B. Vonnegut

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

379

Light Scattering by Single Natural Ice Crystals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

During the South Pole Ice Crystal Experiment, angular scattering intensities (ASIs) of single ice crystals formed in natural conditions were measured for the first time with the polar nephelometer instrument. The microphysical properties of the ...

Valery Shcherbakov; Jean-François Gayet; Brad Baker; Paul Lawson

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Off peak ice storage generation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Due to the high costs associated with peak demand charges imposed by most electrical companies today, various means of shifting the peak HVAC load have been identified by the industry. This paper discusses the results of a study based upon a building site located in the high desert of the southwestern United States that evaluated ice storage as a mechanism of operating cost reductions. The discussion addresses both the seasonal and the annual cost and energy impacts of an ice storage system when used in place of an air-to-air heat pump system.

Davis, R.E.; Cerbo, F.J.

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water path" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Smoothed particle hydrodynamics non-Newtonian model for ice-sheet and ice-shelf dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We propose a new three-dimensional smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) non-Newtonian model to study coupled ice-sheet and ice-shelf dynamics. Most existing ice-sheet numerical models use grid-based Eulerian discretizations, and are usually restricted ... Keywords: Grounding line, Ice sheet, Non-Newtonian fluid, Smoothed particle hydrodynamics

W. Pan, A. M. Tartakovsky, J. J. Monaghan

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

ICE™ and ICE/T™: tools to assist in compiler design and implementation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

ICE (Intermediate Code Engine) and ICE/T (ICE/Translator) are compiler back ends that execute on a Java Virtual Machine (JVM). They allow the student to complete a working compiler quickly and can execute on any platform that supplies a JVM. ICE is a ... Keywords: back-end, compiler, project, translator

Truman Parks Boyer; Mohsen Chitsaz

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Gas isotopes in ice reveal a vegetated central Greenland during ice sheet invasion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

on the ground surface as snow- drift and the ice sheet during a growing phase, with a mixing ratio of the localGas isotopes in ice reveal a vegetated central Greenland during ice sheet invasion R. Souchez,1 J prevailing during build-up of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) are not yet established. Here we use results from

Chappellaz, JĂ©rĂ´me

384

Global simulations of ice nucleation and ice supersaturation with an improved cloud scheme in the Community  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and supersaturation in CAM. The new model is able to reproduce field observations of ice mass and mixed phase cloudGlobal simulations of ice nucleation and ice supersaturation with an improved cloud scheme; accepted 3 June 2010; published 28 September 2010. [1] A processbased treatment of ice supersaturation

Gettelman, Andrew

385

Application in Advanced Laparoscopic Procedures: Medical Ice...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Applications Homeland Security Applications Biomedical Applications Medical Ice Slurry Coolants for Inducing Targeted-OrganTissue Protective Cooling Technology...

386

Event:Lighting Our Path: The Philips Experience in Promoting...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Lighting Our Path: The Philips Experience in Promoting Advanced Lighting Technologies Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png Lighting Our Path: The Philips Experience in...

387

Feasible Offset Region Based Tool Path Planning for Face Milling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Path Planning for Face Milling, Masters Report, UniversityPath Planning for Face Milling Prabhu Ramachandran Sponsoredburr formation while face milling powertrain components in

Ramachandran, Prabhu; Dornfeld, David A

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

BrightPath Energy LLC | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

New York . References "BrightPath Energy LLC" Retrieved from "http:en.openei.orgwindex.php?titleBrightPathEnergyLLC&oldid343040" Categories: Clean Energy Organizations...

389

Briefing: DOE EM Landfill Workshop & Path Forward | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Landfill Workshop & Path Forward Briefing: DOE EM Landfill Workshop & Path Forward By: Office of Groundwater and Soil Remediation Where: SSAB Teleconference 2 Subject: DOE EM...

390

SPECIALREPORT95-18 Structural Ice Control  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

described in this review are not limited to confluence ice situations. A second phase of the work unit will examine and select confluences with known ice problems for detailed analysis. A third phase will combineSPECIALREPORT95-18 Structural Ice Control Review of Existing Methods Andrew M. Tuthill July 1995

391

Analysis of Rotating Multicylinder Data in Measuring Cloud-Droplet Size and Liquid Water Content  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An objective method is presented for the analysis of rotating multicylinder data in measuring the liquid water content and median volume droplet diameter of icing clouds. The method is based on time-dependent numerical modeling of cylinder icing ...

Lasse Makkonen

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

392

Medical ice slurry production device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to an apparatus for producing sterile ice slurries for medical cooling applications. The apparatus is capable of producing highly loaded slurries suitable for delivery to targeted internal organs of a patient, such as the brain, heart, lungs, stomach, kidneys, pancreas, and others, through medical size diameter tubing. The ice slurry production apparatus includes a slurry production reservoir adapted to contain a volume of a saline solution. A flexible membrane crystallization surface is provided within the slurry production reservoir. The crystallization surface is chilled to a temperature below a freezing point of the saline solution within the reservoir such that ice particles form on the crystallization surface. A deflector in the form of a reciprocating member is provided for periodically distorting the crystallization surface and dislodging the ice particles which form on the crystallization surface. Using reservoir mixing the slurry is conditioned for easy pumping directly out of the production reservoir via medical tubing or delivery through other means such as squeeze bottles, squeeze bags, hypodermic syringes, manual hand delivery, and the like.

Kasza, Kenneth E. (Palos Park, IL); Oras, John (Des Plaines, IL); Son, HyunJin (Naperville, IL)

2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

393

Calmac Ice Storage Test report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Ice Storage Test Facility (ISTF) is designed to test commercial ice storage systems. Calmac provided a storage tank equipped with coils designed for use with a secondary fluid system. The Calmac ice storage system was tested over a wide range of operating conditions. Measured system performance during charging was similar to that reported by the manufacturer. Both the measured average and minimum brine temperatures were in close agreement with Calmac's literature values, and the ability to fully charge the tank was relatively unaffected by charging rate and brine flow rate. During discharge cycles, the storage tank outlet temperature was strongly affected by the discharge rate. The discharge capacity was dependent upon both the selected discharge rate and maximum allowable tank outlet temperature. Based on these tests, storage tank selection must depend most strongly on the discharge conditions required to serve the load. This report describes Calmac system performance fully under both charging and discharging conditions. Companion reports describe ISTF test procedures and ice-making efficiency test results that are common to many of the units tested. 11 refs., 31 figs., 9 tabs.

Stovall, T.K.

1991-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Ice-lens formation and geometrical supercooling in soils and other colloidal materials  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a new, physically-intuitive model of ice-lens formation and growth during the freezing of soils and other dense, particulate suspensions. Motivated by experimental evidence, we consider the growth of an ice-filled crack in a freezing soil. At low temperatures, ice in the crack exerts large pressures on the crack walls that will eventually cause the crack to split open. We show that the crack will then propagate across the soil to form a new lens. The process is controlled by two factors: the cohesion of the soil, and the geometrical supercooling of the water in the soil; a new concept introduced to measure the energy available to form a new ice lens. When the supercooling exceeds a critical amount (proportional to the cohesive strength of the soil) a new ice lens forms. This condition for ice-lens formation and growth does not appeal to any ad hoc, empirical assumptions, and explains how periodic ice lenses can form with or without the presence of a frozen fringe. The proposed mechanism is in good agreement with experiments, in particular explaining ice-lens pattern formation, and surges in heave rate associated with the growth of new lenses. Importantly for systems with no frozen fringe, ice-lens formation and frost heave can be predicted given only the unfrozen properties of the soil. We use our theory to estimate ice-lens growth temperatures obtaining quantitative agreement with the limited experimental data that is currently available. Finally we suggest experiments that might be performed in order to verify this theory in more detail. The theory is generalizable to complex natural-soil scenarios, and should therefore be useful in the prediction of macroscopic frost heave rates.

Robert W. Style; Stephen S. L. Peppin; Alan C. F. Cocks; John S. Wettlaufer

2011-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

395

The Melting of Ice in the Arctic Ocean: The Influence of Double-Diffusive Transport of Heat from Below  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This investigation was originally prompted by two oceanographic observations: an increased rate of melting of sea ice in the Arctic Ocean, and the advance of an anomalously warm tongue of Atlantic water intruding across the Arctic below the ...

J. S. Turner

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

396

MLS and CALIOP cloud ice measurements in the upper troposphere: A constraint from microwave on cloud microphysics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the consistency and microphysics assumptions among satellite ice water content (IWC) retrievals in the upper troposphere with collocated A-Train radiances from MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder) and lidar backscatters from CALIOP (...

Dong L. Wu; Alyn Lambert; William G. Read; Patrick Eriksson; Jie Gong

397

Liquid and Ice Cloud Microphysics in the CSU General Circulation Model. Part 1: Model Description and Simulated Microphysical Processes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microphysical processes responsible for the formation and dissipation of water and ice clouds have been incorporated into the Colorado State University General Circulation Model in order to 1) yield a more physically based representation of the ...

Laura D. Fowler; David A. Randall; Steven A. Rutledge

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Evaluating and Constraining Ice Cloud Parameterizations in CAM5 using Aircraft Measurements from the SPARTICUS Campaign  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study uses aircraft measurements of relative humidity and ice crystal size distribution collected in synoptic cirrus during the SPARTICUS (Small PARTicles In CirrUS) field campaign to evaluate and constrain ice cloud parameterizations in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5. The probability density function (PDF) of ice crystal number concentration (Ni) derived from high frequency (1 Hz) measurements features a strong dependence on ambient temperature. As temperature decreases from -35°C to -62°C, the peak in the PDF shifts from 10-20 L-1 to 200-1000 L-1, while the ice crystal number concentration shows a factor of 6-7 increase. Model simulations are performed with two different insitu ice nucleation schemes. One of the schemes can reproduce a clear increase of Ni with decreasing temperature, by using either an observation based ice nuclei spectrum or a classical theory based spectrum with a relatively low (5%-10%) maximum freezing ratio for dust aerosols. The simulation with the other scheme, which assumes a high maximum freezing ratio (100%), shows much weaker temperature dependence of Ni. Simulations are also performed to test empirical parameters related to water vapor deposition and the auto-conversion of ice crystals to snow. Results show that a value between 0.05 and 0.1 for the water vapor deposition coefficient and 250 um for the critical ice crystal size can produce good agreements between model simulation and the SPARTICUS measurements in terms of ice crystal number concentration and effective radius. The climate impact of perturbing these parameters is also discussed.

Zhang, Kai; Liu, Xiaohong; Wang, Minghuai; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Mitchell, David; Mishra, Subhashree; Mace, Gerald G.

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

399

WATER-TRAPPED WORLDS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Although tidally locked habitable planets orbiting nearby M-dwarf stars are among the best astronomical targets to search for extrasolar life, they may also be deficient in volatiles and water. Climate models for this class of planets show atmospheric transport of water from the dayside to the nightside, where it is precipitated as snow and trapped as ice. Since ice only slowly flows back to the dayside upon accumulation, the resulting hydrological cycle can trap a large amount of water in the form of nightside ice. Using ice sheet dynamical and thermodynamical constraints, I illustrate how planets with less than about a quarter the Earth's oceans could trap most of their surface water on the nightside. This would leave their dayside, where habitable conditions are met, potentially dry. The amount and distribution of residual liquid water on the dayside depend on a variety of geophysical factors, including the efficiency of rock weathering at regulating atmospheric CO{sub 2} as dayside ocean basins dry up. Water-trapped worlds with dry daysides may offer similar advantages as land planets for habitability, by contrast with worlds where more abundant water freely flows around the globe.

Menou, Kristen [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Sea Ice Cover and Related Atmospheric Conditions in Arctic Canada During the Summer of 1978  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Maps are presented of sea ice cover and open water in the Canadian Arctic for the final day of each month, June–September, 1978. The maps are derived from NOAA satellite imagery and show an extent of open water which is considerably smaller than ...

B. Dey

1980-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water path" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Linear water waves with vorticity: rotational features and particle paths  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Steady linear gravity waves of small amplitude travelling on a current of constant vorticity are found. For negative vorticity we show the appearance of internal waves and vortices, wherein the particle trajectories are not any more closed ellipses. For positive vorticity the situation resembles that of Stokes waves, but for large vorticity the trajectories are affected.

Mats Ehrnstrom; Gabriele Villari

2007-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

402

Remote Spectroscopic Sounding of Liquid Water Path in Thick Clouds...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

restored for this particular case. For sounding of the mixed clouds, three intervals in a spectrum of solar radiation are analyzed: 0.97-1.03 m; 1.60-1.70 m; and 2.15-2.35 m...

403

ELECTRON IRRADIATION OF CARBON DISULFIDE-OXYGEN ICES: TOWARD THE FORMATION OF SULFUR-BEARING MOLECULES IN INTERSTELLAR ICES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The formation of sulfur-bearing molecules in interstellar ices was investigated during the irradiation of carbon disulfide (CS{sub 2})-oxygen (O{sub 2}) ices with energetic electrons at 12 K. The irradiation-induced chemical processing of these ices was monitored online and in situ via Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to probe the newly formed products quantitatively. The sulfur-bearing molecules produced during the irradiation were sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}), and carbonyl sulfide (OCS). Formations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), carbon monoxide (CO), and ozone (O{sub 3}) were observed as well. To fit the temporal evolution of the newly formed products and to elucidate the underlying reaction pathways, kinetic reaction schemes were developed and numerical sets of rate constants were derived. Our studies suggest that carbon disulfide (CS{sub 2}) can be easily transformed to carbonyl sulfide (OCS) via reactions with suprathermal atomic oxygen (O), which can be released from oxygen-containing precursors such as water (H{sub 2}O), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), and/or methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) upon interaction with ionizing radiation. This investigation corroborates that carbonyl sulfide (OCS) and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) are the dominant sulfur-bearing molecules in interstellar ices.

Maity, Surajit; Kaiser, Ralf I. [Department of Chemistry, University of Hawai'i at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

404

Modelling pronunciation variation with single-path and multi-path syllable models: Issues to consider  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we construct context-independent single-path and multi-path syllable models aimed at improved pronunciation variation modelling. We use phonetic transcriptions to define the topologies of the syllable models and to initialise the model ... Keywords: ASR, HMM, Pronunciation variation, Syllable, Topology

Annika Hämäläinen; Louis ten Bosch; Lou Boves

2009-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

From fire to ice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Absorption chillers are heat-operate refrigeration without harmful environmental emissions (CFCs, HCFCS, and HFCS). The machine uses either steam or a gas-fired burner as the energy source and utilizes endothermic evaporation to provide refrigeration to an external process fluid, usually chilled water. In the United States, absorption chillers are used in regions where the cost of electricity is high relative to natural gas. Absorption chillers are also used in applications where steam is readily available or in areas where seasonal load peaks cause utilities to subsidize gas cooling. This paper will describe the history of absorption, the basic absorption refrigeration cycle and some advanced high efficiency cycles. Practical applications of absorption refrigeration to commercial end uses will also be discussed.

Adcock, P.W.

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

406

A survey on coverage path planning for robotics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coverage Path Planning (CPP) is the task of determining a path that passes over all points of an area or volume of interest while avoiding obstacles. This task is integral to many robotic applications, such as vacuum cleaning robots, painter robots, ... Keywords: Coverage path planning, Motion planning, Path planning

Enric Galceran, Marc Carreras

2013-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

A taxonomy of integral reaction path analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

W. C. Gardiner observed that achieving understanding through combustion modeling is limited by the ability to recognize the implications of what has been computed and to draw conclusions about the elementary steps underlying the reaction mechanism. This difficulty can be overcome in part by making better use of reaction path analysis in the context of multidimensional flame simulations. Following a survey of current practice, an integral reaction flux is formulated in terms of conserved scalars that can be calculated in a fully automated way. Conditional analyses are then introduced, and a taxonomy for bidirectional path analysis is explored. Many examples illustrate the resulting path analysis and uncover some new results about nonpremixed methane-air laminar jets.

Grcar, Joseph F.; Day, Marcus S.; Bell, John B.

2004-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

408

FEM analysis of in-flight ice break-up  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Using a fracture mechanics framework, this paper presents a finite element method to simulate the break-up of ice accreted on the wings of aircraft. The fully automated ice break-up module is integrated in FENSAP-ICE [1,2], which is an in-flight ice ... Keywords: Finite element methods, Fracture mechanics, Ice break-up, Ice shedding, In-flight icing, Multi-physics phenomenon

Shiping Zhang; Oubai El Kerdi; Rooh A. Khurram; Wagdi G. Habashi

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Ice Initiation by Aerosol Particles: Measured and Predicted Ice Nuclei Concentrations versus Measured Ice Crystal Concentrations in an Orographic Wave Cloud  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The initiation of ice in an isolated orographic wave cloud was compared with expectations based on ice nucleating aerosol concentrations and with predictions from new ice nucleation parameterizations applied in a cloud parcel model. Measurements ...

T. Eidhammer; P. J. DeMott; A. J. Prenni; M. D. Petters; C. H. Twohy; D. C. Rogers; J. Stith; A. Heymsfield; Z. Wang; K. A. Pratt; K. A. Prather; S. M. Murphy; J. H. Seinfeld; R. Subramanian; S. M. Kreidenweis

2010-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

410

Minimizing Discomfort during the injection of Radiesse™ with the use of either local anesthetic or ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comite SL, Storwick GS. Ice minimizes discomfort associatedeither local anesthetic or ice Stephen Comite MD 1 , Alexisinvolves the use of an ice cube for anesthesia. Ice has been

Comite, Stephen; Greene, Alexis; Cieszynski, Sabina A; Zaroovabeli, Pauline; Marks, Karen

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

411

Hydrogen ICE Vehicle Testing Activities  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity teamed with Electric Transportation Applications and Arizona Public Service to develop and monitor the operations of the APS Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant. The Pilot Plant provides 100% hydrogen, and hydrogen and compressed natural gas (H/CNG)-blended fuels for the evaluation of hydrogen and H/CNG internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles in controlled and fleet testing environments. Since June 2002, twenty hydrogen and H/CNG vehicles have accumulated 300,000 test miles and 5,700 fueling events. The AVTA is part of the Department of Energy’s FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program. These testing activities are managed by the Idaho National Laboratory. This paper discusses the Pilot Plant design and monitoring, and hydrogen ICE vehicle testing methods and results.

J. Francfort; D. Karner

2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

Pseudo-isothermal ice-crystallization kinetics in the gas-diffusion layer  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Pseudo-isothermal ice-crystallization kinetics in the gas-diffusion layer Pseudo-isothermal ice-crystallization kinetics in the gas-diffusion layer of a fuel cell from differential scanning calorimetry Title Pseudo-isothermal ice-crystallization kinetics in the gas-diffusion layer of a fuel cell from differential scanning calorimetry Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2013 Authors Dursch, Thomas J., Monica A. Ciontea, Gregory J. Trigub, Clayton J. Radke, and Adam Z. Weber Journal International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer Volume 60 Pagination 450 - 458 Date Published 5/2013 ISSN 00179310 Keywords crystallization, differential scanning calorimetry, gas-diffusion layer, Heat Transfer, kinetics, melt, nonisothermal crystallization, nucleation, polyesters, polymer crystallization, solidification Abstract Non-isothermal ice-crystallization kinetics in the fibrous gas-diffusion layer (GDL) of a proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell is investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Non-isothermal ice-crystallization rates and ice-crystallization temperatures are obtained from heat-flow measurements in a water-saturated commercial GDL at cooling rates of 2.5, 5, 10, and 25 K/min. Our previously developed isothermal ice-crystallization rate expression is extended to non-isothermal crystallization to predict ice-crystallization kinetics in a GDL at various cooling rates. Agreement between DSC experimental results and theory is good. Both show that as the cooling rate increases, ice-crystallization rates increase and crystallization temperatures decrease monotonically. Importantly, we find that the cooling rate during crystallization has a negligible effect on the crystallization rate when crystallization times are much faster than the time to decrease the sample temperature by the subcooling. Based on this finding, we propose a pseudo-isothermal method for obtaining non-isothermal crystallization kinetics using isothermal crystallization kinetics evaluated at the non-isothermal crystallization temperature.

413

PHAST: Hardware-Accelerated Shortest Path Trees  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present a novel algorithm to solve the nonnegative single-source shortest path problem on road networks and other graphs with low highway dimension. After a quick preprocessing phase, we can compute all distances from a given source in the graph with ...

Daniel Delling; Andrew V. Goldberg; Andreas Nowatzyk; Renato F. Werneck

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

VC-dimension and shortest path algorithms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We explore the relationship between VC-dimension and graph algorithm design. In particular, we show that set systems induced by sets of vertices on shortest paths have VC-dimension at most two. This allows us to use a result from learning theory to improve ...

Ittai Abraham; Daniel Delling; Amos Fiat; Andrew V. Goldberg; Renato F. Werneck

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Path specialization: reducing phased execution overheads  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

As garbage collected languages become widely used, the quest for reducing collection overheads becomes essential. In this paper, we propose a compiler optimization called path specialization that shrinks the cost of memory barriers for a wide ... Keywords: c#, garbage collection, memory management, read barriers, write barriers

Filip Pizlo; Erez Petrank; Bjarne Steensgaard

2008-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

416

Path selection in multi-layer networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multi-layer networks are computer networks where the configuration of the network can be changed dynamically at multiple layers. However, in practice, technologies at different layers may be incompatible to each other, which necessitates a careful choice ... Keywords: Multi-layer network, Network description, Path selection

Fernando Kuipers; Freek Dijkstra

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

417

Learning to improve path planning performance  

SciTech Connect

In robotics, path planning refers to finding a short. collision-free path from an initial robot configuration to a desired configuratioin. It has to be fast to support real-time task-level robot programming. Unfortunately, current planning techniques are still too slow to be effective, as they often require several minutes, if not hours of computation. To remedy this situation, we present and analyze a learning algorithm that uses past experience to increase future performance. The algorithm relies on an existing path planner to provide solutions to difficult tasks. From these solutions, an evolving sparse network of useful robot configurations is learned to support faster planning. More generally, the algorithm provides a speedup-learning framework in which a slow but capable planner may be improved both cost-wise and capability-wise by a faster but less capable planner coupled with experience. The basic algorithm is suitable for stationary environments, and can be extended to accommodate changing environments with on-demand experience repair and object-attached experience abstraction. To analyze the algorithm, we characterize the situations in which the adaptive planner is useful, provide quantitative bounds to predict its behavior, and confirm our theoretical results with experiments in path planning of manipulators. Our algorithm and analysis are sufficiently, general that they may also be applied to other planning domains in which experience is useful.

Chen, Pang C.

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

418

Current SPE Hydrodynamic Modeling and Path Forward  

SciTech Connect

Extensive work has been conducted on SPE analysis efforts: Fault effects Non-uniform weathered layer analysis MUNROU: material library incorporation, parallelization, and development of non-locking tets Development of a unique continuum-based-visco-plastic strain-rate-dependent material model With corrected SPE data path is now set for a multipronged approach to fully understand experimental series shot effects.

Knight, Earl E. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Rougier, Esteban [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

419

2, 4378, 2006 Ice-driven CO2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- dred thousand years, CO2 and ice volume (marine 18 O) have varied in phase both at the 41 000-yearCPD 2, 43­78, 2006 Ice-driven CO2 feedback on ice volume W. F. Ruddiman Title Page Abstract Discussions is the access reviewed discussion forum of Climate of the Past Ice-driven CO2 feedback on ice

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

420

Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Earth, Space Sciences » Earth, Space Sciences » Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) The COSIM project develops advanced ocean and ice models for evaluating the role of ocean and ice in high-latitude climate change and projecting the impacts of high-latitude change on regions throughout the globe. Get Expertise Phil Jones COSIM Email Matthew Hecht COSIM Email Elizabeth Hunke COSIM Email Mat Maltrud COSIM Email Bill Lipscomb COSIM Email Scott Elliott COSIM Email Todd Ringler COSIM Email We are also developing a set of next-generation ocean and ice models with variable resolution horizontal grids to focus resolution on regions of interest or regions where specific processes (like eddies) need to be resolved. Summary The COSIM project develops advanced ocean and ice models for evaluating the

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water path" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

ice rheology in HadCM3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. We present results of an implementation of the Elastic Viscous Plastic (EVP) sea ice dynamics scheme into the Hadley Centre coupled ocean-atmosphere climate model HadCM3. Although the large-scale simulation of sea ice in HadCM3 is quite good with this model, the lack of a full dynamical model leads to errors in the detailed representation of sea ice and limits our confidence in its future predictions. We find that introducing the EVP scheme results in a worse initial simulation of the sea ice. This paper documents various enhancements made to improve the simulation, resulting in a sea ice simulation that is better than the original HadCM3 scheme overall. Importantly, it is more physically based and provides a more solid foundation for future development. We then consider the interannual variability of the sea ice in the new model and demonstrate improvements over the HadCM3 simulation. 1

W. M. Connolley; A. B. Keen; A. J. Mclaren

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Dependence of Sea Ice Yield-Curve Shape on Ice Thickness  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this note, the authors discuss the contribution that frictional sliding of ice floes (or floe aggregates) past each other and pressure ridging make to the plastic yield curve of sea ice. Using results from a previous study that explicitly ...

Alexander V. Wilchinsky; Daniel L. Feltham

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Modeling Thermodynamic Ice–Ocean Interactions at the Base of an Ice Shelf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Models of ocean circulation beneath ice shelves are driven primarily by the heat and freshwater fluxes that are associated with phase changes at the ice–ocean boundary. Their behavior is therefore closely linked to the mathematical description of ...

David M. Holland; Adrian Jenkins

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

A Thermodynamic Coupled Ice-Ocean Model of the Marginal Ice Zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled ice-ocean model for thermodynamic growth of sea ice suitable for coupling with a similar dynamic model is considered. The model is balanced locally in that no horizontal (or vertical) advection or diffusion of properties are considered. ...

Lars Petter Rřed

1984-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

425

Assessment of Aircraft Icing Potential and Maximum Icing Altitude from Geostationary Meteorological Satellite Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A satellite product that displays regions of aircraft icing potential, along with corresponding cloud-top heights, has been developed using data from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) imager and sounder. The icing ...

Gary P. Ellrod; Andrew A. Bailey

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Ice Accretion on Wires and Anti-Icing Induced by Joule Effect  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study concerns both the formation of ice accreted around wires due to rotation from gravitational and aerodynamic forces, and the anti-icing induced by the Joule effect. The experiments have been carried out in an instrumented wind tunnel ...

P. Personne; J-F. Gayet

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Measurement of South Pole ice transparency with the IceCube LED calibration system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The IceCube Neutrino Observatory, approximately 1 km^3 in size, is now complete with 86 strings deployed in the Antarctic ice. IceCube detects the Cherenkov radiation emitted by charged particles passing through or created in the ice. To realize the full potential of the detector, the properties of light propagation in the ice in and around the detector must be well understood. This report presents a new method of fitting the model of light propagation in the ice to a data set of in-situ light source events collected with IceCube. The resulting set of derived parameters, namely the measured values of scattering and absorption coefficients vs. depth, is presented and a comparison of IceCube data with simulations based on the new model is shown.

IceCube Collaboration; M. G. Aartsen; R. Abbasi; Y. Abdou; M. Ackermann; J. Adams; J. A. Aguilar; M. Ahlers; D. Altmann; J. Auffenberg; X. Bai; M. Baker; S. W. Barwick; V. Baum; R. Bay; J. J. Beatty; S. Bechet; J. Becker Tjus; K. -H. Becker; M. Bell; M. L. Benabderrahmane; S. BenZvi; J. Berdermann; P. Berghaus; D. Berley; E. Bernardini; A. Bernhard; D. Bertrand; D. Z. Besson; G. Binder; D. Bindig; M. Bissok; E. Blaufuss; J. Blumenthal; D. J. Boersma; S. Bohaichuk; C. Bohm; D. Bose; S. Böser; O. Botner; L. Brayeur; A. M. Brown; R. Bruijn; J. Brunner; S. Buitink; M. Carson; J. Casey; M. Casier; D. Chirkin; B. Christy; K. Clark; F. Clevermann; S. Cohen; D. F. Cowen; A. H. Cruz Silva; M. Danninger; J. Daughhetee; J. C. Davis; C. De Clercq; S. De Ridder; P. Desiati; M. de With; T. DeYoung; J. C. Díaz-Vélez; M. Dunkman; R. Eagan; B. Eberhardt; J. Eisch; R. W. Ellsworth; S. Euler; P. A. Evenson; O. Fadiran; A. R. Fazely; A. Fedynitch; J. Feintzeig; T. Feusels; K. Filimonov; C. Finley; T. Fischer-Wasels; S. Flis; A. Franckowiak; R. Franke; K. Frantzen; T. Fuchs; T. K. Gaisser; J. Gallagher; L. Gerhardt; L. Gladstone; T. Glüsenkamp; A. Goldschmidt; G. Golup; J. A. Goodman; D. Góra; D. Grant; A. Groß; M. Gurtner; C. Ha; A. Haj Ismail; A. Hallgren; F. Halzen; K. Hanson; D. Heereman; P. Heimann; D. Heinen; K. Helbing; R. Hellauer; S. Hickford; G. C. Hill; K. D. Hoffman; R. Hoffmann; A. Homeier; K. Hoshina; W. Huelsnitz; P. O. Hulth; K. Hultqvist; S. Hussain; A. Ishihara; E. Jacobi; J. Jacobsen; G. S. Japaridze; K. Jero; O. Jlelati; B. Kaminsky; A. Kappes; T. Karg; A. Karle; J. L. Kelley; J. Kiryluk; F. Kislat; J. Kläs; S. R. Klein; J. -H. Köhne; G. Kohnen; H. Kolanoski; L. Köpke; C. Kopper; S. Kopper; D. J. Koskinen; M. Kowalski; M. Krasberg; G. Kroll; J. Kunnen; N. Kurahashi; T. Kuwabara; M. Labare; H. Landsman; M. J. Larson; M. Lesiak-Bzdak; J. Leute; J. Lünemann; J. Madsen; R. Maruyama; K. Mase; H. S. Matis; F. McNally; K. Meagher; M. Merck; P. Mészáros; T. Meures; S. Miarecki; E. Middell; N. Milke; J. Miller; L. Mohrmann; T. Montaruli; R. Morse; R. Nahnhauer; U. Naumann; H. Niederhausen; S. C. Nowicki; D. R. Nygren; A. Obertacke; S. Odrowski; A. Olivas; M. Olivo; A. O'Murchadha; L. Paul; J. A. Pepper; C. Pérez de los Heros; C. Pfendner; D. Pieloth; N. Pirk; J. Posselt; P. B. Price; G. T. Przybylski; L. Rädel; K. Rawlins; P. Redl; E. Resconi; W. Rhode; M. Ribordy; M. Richman; B. Riedel; J. P. Rodrigues; C. Rott; T. Ruhe; B. Ruzybayev; D. Ryckbosch; S. M. Saba; T. Salameh; H. -G. Sander; M. Santander; S. Sarkar; K. Schatto; M. Scheel; F. Scheriau; T. Schmidt; M. Schmitz; S. Schoenen; S. Schöneberg; L. Schönherr; A. Schönwald; A. Schukraft; L. Schulte; O. Schulz; D. Seckel; S. H. Seo; Y. Sestayo; S. Seunarine; C. Sheremata; M. W. E. Smith; M. Soiron; D. Soldin; G. M. Spiczak; C. Spiering; M. Stamatikos; T. Stanev; A. Stasik; T. Stezelberger; R. G. Stokstad; A. Stößl; E. A. Strahler; R. Ström; G. W. Sullivan; H. Taavola; I. Taboada; A. Tamburro; S. Ter-Antonyan; S. Tilav; P. A. Toale; S. Toscano; M. Usner; D. van der Drift; N. van Eijndhoven; A. Van Overloop; J. van Santen; M. Vehring; M. Voge; M. Vraeghe; C. Walck; T. Waldenmaier; M. Wallraff; R. Wasserman; Ch. Weaver; M. Wellons; C. Wendt; S. Westerhoff; N. Whitehorn; K. Wiebe; C. H. Wiebusch; D. R. Williams; H. Wissing; M. Wolf; T. R. Wood; C. Xu; D. L. Xu; X. W. Xu; J. P. Yanez; G. Yodh; S. Yoshida; P. Zarzhitsky; J. Ziemann; S. Zierke; A. Zilles; M. Zoll

2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

428

Siple Coast Ice Streams in a General Antarctic Ice Sheet Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In an earlier paper by Verbitsky and Saltzman, a vertically integrated, high-resolution, nonlinearly viscous, nonisothermal ice sheet model was presented to calculate the “present-day” equilibrium regime of the Antarctic ice sheet. Steady-state ...

Mikhail Verbitsky

2005-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

429

IceT users' guide and reference.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Image Composition Engine for Tiles (IceT) is a high-performance sort-last parallel rendering library. In addition to providing accelerated rendering for a standard display, IceT provides the unique ability to generate images for tiled displays. The overall resolution of the display may be several times larger than any viewport that may be rendered by a single machine. This document is an overview of the user interface to IceT.

Moreland, Kenneth D.

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

430

IceT users' guide and reference.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Image Composition Engine for Tiles (IceT) is a high-performance sort-last parallel rendering library. In addition to providing accelerated rendering for a standard display, IceT provides the unique ability to generate images for tiled displays. The overall resolution of the display may be several times larger than any viewport that may be rendered by a single machine. This document is an overview of the user interface to IceT.

Moreland, Kenneth D.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

431

Ice in Clouds Experiment–Layer Clouds. Part II: Testing Characteristics of Heterogeneous Ice Formation in Lee Wave Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heterogeneous ice nucleation is a source of uncertainty in models that represent ice clouds. The primary goal of the Ice in Clouds Experiment–Layer Clouds (ICE-L) field campaign was to determine if a link can be demonstrated between ice ...

P. R. Field; A. J. Heymsfield; B. J. Shipway; P. J. DeMott; K. A. Pratt; D. C. Rogers; J. Stith; K. A. Prather

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Microparticulate Ice Slurry For Renal Hypothermia: Laparoscopic...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MICROPARTICULATE ICE SLURRY FOR RENAL HYPOTHERMIA : LAPAROSCOPIC PARTIAL NEPHRECTOMY IN A PORCINE MODEL Sergey Shikanov a * , Mark Wille a , Michael Large a , Aria Razmaria a ,...

433

Ice Fall Doctors 5, Changing Route  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Base Camp. The recordings span a wide variety of topics from making and drinking chang to the work of Mount Everest's 'ice fall doctors'....

Loomis, Molly

434

Development of ice self-release mechanisms  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This study reports the results of a series of experiments that investigated a thermal storage technology whereby slush ice is grown on a submerged cold surface, and the resultant growth of slush ice releases without auxiliary thermal or mechanical means. The process investigated consists of growing slush ice from an electrolyte solution of low molarity. The cold surface (substrate) upon which the slush ice forms is submerged in the bulk solution. As the buoyancy force on the ice crystals exceeds the adhesion of the slush ice to the cold surface, the slush ice is forced from the substrate and floats away to the top of the solution. The results of this study reveal the relative insensitivity of the growth rate of ice crystals to solution initial bulk concentration over the range of values tested and to concentration of electrolyte during accumulation of ice crystals. The critical parameter appears to be substrate temperature, which cannot be less than {approximately}2{degrees}C below the freezing point temperature of the solution, because apparent adhesion increases rapidly with decreasing substrate temperature. 1 ref., 6 figs., 7 tabs.

Stewart, W.E. Jr. (Missouri Univ., Independence, MO (USA). Energy Research Lab.)

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Sea ice mapping method for seawinds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract—A sea ice mapping algorithm for SeaWinds is developed that incorporates statistical and spatial a priori information in a modified maximum a posteriori (MAP) framework. Spatial a priori data are incorporated in the loss terms of a Bayes risk formulation. Conditional distributions and priors for sea ice and ocean statistics are represented as empirical histograms that are forced to conform to a set of expected histograms via principal component filtering. Tuning parameters for the algorithm allow adjustments in the algorithm’s performance. Results of the algorithm exhibit high correlation with the Remund–Long sea ice mapping algorithm for SeaWinds and the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager National Aeronautics and Space Administration Team 30 % ice edge, and are verified with RADARSAT-1 ScanSAR imagery. The resulting sea ice maps exhibit high edge detail, preserve polynyas and ice bodies disjoint from the primary ice sheet, and thus are suitable for use with wind retrieval and sea ice studies. Principles employed in the algorithm may be of interest in other classification studies. Index Terms—Bayes method, maximum a posteriori (MAP), principal components, QuikSCAT, scatterometer, sea ice extent, SeaWinds. I.

Hyrum S. Anderson; Student Member; David G. Long; Senior Member

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Dynamics of colloidal particles in ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use X-ray Photon Correlation Spectroscopy (XPCS) to probe the dynamics of colloidal particles in polycrystalline ice. During freezing, the dendritic ice morphology and rejection of particles from the ice created regions of high-particle-density, where some of the colloids were forced into contact and formed disordered aggregates. We find that the particles in these high density regions underwent ballistic motion coupled with both stretched and compressed exponential decays of the intensity autocorrelation function, and that the particles' characteristic velocity increased with temperature. We explain this behavior in terms of ice grain boundary migration.

Melissa Spannuth; S. G. J. Mochrie; S. S. L. Peppin; J. S. Wettlaufer

2010-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

437

Ice hockey players' perceived legitimacy of aggression.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Recent incidents of aggressive and violent behavior in professional ice hockey have caused many in and out of the sport world to again question the… (more)

Visek, Amanda J.

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

438

Scouting technical skills in ice hockey.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The main objective was to create an effective scouting tool to evaluate technical skills of an ice hockey player. The purpose was to provide an… (more)

Räihä, Tuukka

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Guide for organizing ice hockey events.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The Purpose of making a Guide for Organizing Ice Hockey Events was to create an easy following guide for students at Vierumäki and other people… (more)

Maclean, Ross

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

440

Therapeutic Hypothermia: Protective Cooling Using Medical Ice ...  

Emergency Responders More Time • Video: Laparoscopic Partial Nephrectomy with Ice Slurry as Coolant in the Porcine Model License Status: Available for ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water path" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

A Potential Path to Emissions-Free Fossil EnergyA Potential Path...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3 A Potential Path to Emissions-Free Fossil Energy The National Energy Technology Laboratory's chemical looping reactor, above, is the only one of its kind in the Western...

442

Air–Ice–Ocean Momentum Exchange. Part 1:Energy Transfer between Waves and Ice Floes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The energy exchange between ocean surface waves and ice floes in the marginal ice zone (MIZ) involves the scattering and attenuation of wave energy and the excitation of oscillation modes of the ice floes, as open ocean waves propagate into the ...

W. Perrie; Y. Hu

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

443

Effects of Stochastic Ice Strength Perturbation on Arctic Finite Element Sea Ice Modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The ice strength parameter P* is a key parameter in dynamic/thermodynamic sea ice models that cannot be measured directly. Stochastically perturbing P* in the Finite Element Sea Ice–Ocean Model (FESOM) of the Alfred Wegener Institute aims at ...

Stephan Juricke; Peter Lemke; Ralph Timmermann; Thomas Rackow

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Ordered water structure at hydrophobic graphite interfaces observed by 4D, ultrafast  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ice-substrate structure and dynamics nonequilibrium phase transition Water at interfaces femtosecond pulse, the interfacial ice assembly goes through nonequilibrium phase transformation point'' in the diffraction profiles. The ice ``melting'' time is 10 ps and the new phase grows in 20 ps

La Rosa, Andres H.

445

The Origin of Ice in Mountain Cap Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ice crystal development in relatively simple layer clouds was studied using airborne instrumentation. The patterns in the development of ice in those clouds suggest that the ice originates in association with the initial condensation process, ...

William A. Cooper; Gabor Vali

1981-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

The Origin and Concentration of Ice Crystals in Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ice crystals in supercooled clouds may form upon ice nuclei, or they may arise through secondary processes. Two of these secondary ice “multiplication” mechanisms are discussed in some detail: the rime-splintering process and the mechanical ...

S. C. Mossop

1985-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

A Novel and Low Cost Sea Ice Mass Balance Buoy.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The understanding of sea ice mass balance processes requires continuous monitoring of the seasonal evolution of the ice thickness. While autonomous ice mass balance buoys (IMB buoys) deployed over the past two decades have contributed to our ...

Keith Jackson; Jeremy Wilkinson; Ted Maksym; Justin Beckers; Christian Haas; David Meldrum; David Mackenzie

448

Black carbon aerosols and the third polar ice cap  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

EASE-Grid weekly snow cover and sea ice extent version 3.USA, National Snow and Ice Data Center, Digital media, 2005.climate forcing via snow and ice albedos, Proc. Natl. Acad.

Menon, Surabi

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

449

A Bulk Microphysics Parameterization with Multiple Ice Precipitation Categories  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A single-moment bulk microphysics scheme with multiple ice precipitation categories is described. It has 2 liquid hydrometeor categories (cloud droplets and rain) and 10 ice categories that are characterized by habit, size, and density—two ice ...

Jerry M. Straka; Edward R. Mansell

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

450

Bio-based Deicing/Anti-Icing Fluids  

This invention relates in general to compositions to remove ice, snow and/or frost ("frozen precipitation") from surfaces and/or to prevent ice from forming on surfaces, and in particular to deicing/anti-icing fluids.

451

A Heat Balance for the Bering Sea Ice Edge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Detailed oceanographic, meteorological and sea ice observations were obtained from the Bering Sea marginal ice zone (MIZ) during the February–March 1983 Marginal Ice Zone Experiment (MIZEX West). These data have been used in estimating a mean ...

Peter J. Hendricks; Robin D. Muench; Gilbert R. Stegen

1985-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Atmospheric Icing Climatologies of Two New England Mountains  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The atmospheric icing climatologies of two New England mountaintops with different elevations are compared: Mount Mansfield in northern Vermont and Mount Washington in New Hampshire. Atmospheric icing, as measured with Rosemount ice detectors, is ...

Charles C. Ryerson

1988-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

ADWICE: Advanced Diagnosis and Warning System for Aircraft Icing Environments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the design of the Advanced Diagnosis and Warning System for Aircraft Icing Environments (ADWICE) and presents results for two different icing weather situations with typical icing conditions. ADWICE has been in development ...

A. Tafferner; T. Hauf; C. Leifeld; T. Hafner; H. Leykauf; U. Voigt

2003-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

The Structure of the First Coordination Shell in Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

< tr> In ice, each water molecule is surrounding by 4 other molecules in a tetrahedral arrangement (left). The ne w result on liquid water shows that the molecules are connected...

455

Laser driven quasi-isentropic compression experiments (ICE) for dynamically loading materials at high strain rates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We demonstrate the recently developed technique of laser driven isentropic compression (ICE) for dynamically compressing Al samples at high loading rates close to the room temperature isentrope and up to peak stresses above 100GPa. Upon analysis of the unloading profiles from a multi-stepped Al/LiF target a continuous path through Stress-Density space may be calculated. For materials with phase transformations ramp compression techniques reveals the location of equilibrium phase boundaries and provide information on the kinetics of the lattice re-ordering.

Smith, R; Eggert, J; Celliers, P; Jankowski, A; Lorenz, T; Moon, S; Edwards, M J; Collins, G

2006-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

456

Momentum distribution, vibrational dynamics and the potential of mean force in ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

By analyzing the momentum distribution obtained from path integral and phonon calculations we find that the protons in hexagonal ice experience an anisotropic quasi-harmonic effective potential with three distinct principal frequencies that reflect molecular orientation. Due to the importance of anisotropy, anharmonic features of the environment cannot be extracted from existing experimental distributions that involve the spherical average. The full directional distribution is required, and we give a theoretical prediction for this quantity that could be verified in future experiments. Within the quasi-harmonic context, anharmonicity in the ground state dynamics of the proton is substantial and has quantal origin, a finding that impacts the interpretation of several spectroscopies.

Lin Lin; Joseph A. Morrone; Roberto Car; Michele Parrinello

2011-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

457

The ice-limit of Coulomb gauge Yang-Mills theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we describe gauge invariant multi-quark states generalising the path integral framework developed by Parrinello, Jona-Lasinio and Zwanziger to amend the Faddeev-Popov approach. This allows us to produce states such that, in a limit which we call the ice-limit, fermions are dressed with glue exclusively from the fundamental modular region associated with Coulomb gauge. The limit can be taken analytically without difficulties, avoiding the Gribov problem. This is llustrated by an unambiguous construction of gauge invariant mesonic states for which we simulate the static quark--antiquark potential.

Thomas Heinzl; Anton Ilderton; Kurt Langfeld; Martin Lavelle; David McMullan

2008-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

458

The path forward: Monte Carlo Convergence discussion  

SciTech Connect

This is a summary of 'the path forward' discussion session of the NuInt09 workshop which focused on Monte Carlo event generators. The main questions raised as part of this discussion are: how to make Monte Carlo generators more reliable and how important it is to work on a universal Monte Carlo generator of events? In this contribution, several experts in the field summarize their views, as presented at the workshop.

Andreopoulos, Costas [Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, STFC Oxfordshire OX11 0QX (United Kingdom); Gallagher, Hugh [Tufts University, Medford, Massachusetts (United States); Hayato, Yoshinari [Kamioka Observatory, ICRR, University of Tokyo Higashi-Mozumi 456, Kamioka-cho, Hida-city Gifu 506-1205 (Japan); Sobczyk, Jan T. [Institute of Theoretical Physics, Wroclaw, University Poland (Poland); Walter, Chris [Department of Physics, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Zeller, Sam [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

2009-11-25T23:59:59.000Z

459

Free Energy Changes, Fluctuations, and Path Probabilities  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We illustrate some of the static and dynamic relations discovered by Cohen, Crooks, Evans, Jarzynski, Kirkwood, Morriss, Searles, and Zwanzig. These relations link nonequilibrium processes to equilibrium isothermal free energy changes and to dynamical path probabilities. We include ideas suggested by Dellago, Geissler, Oberhofer, and Schoell-Paschinger. Our treatment is intended to be pedagogical, for use in an updated version of our book: Time Reversibility, Computer Simulation, and Chaos. Comments are very welcome.

William G. Hoover; Carol G. Hoover

2011-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

460

A GCM Parameterization of Ice Particle Mean Effective Sizes for High Latitude Cirrus Clouds and It's Comparison with Mid-Latitude Parmaterization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GCM Parameterization of Ice Particle Mean Effective GCM Parameterization of Ice Particle Mean Effective Sizes for High Latitude Cirrus Clouds and It's Comparison with Mid-Latitude Parameterization F. S. Boudala Department of Oceanography Dalhousie University Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada Q. Fu Department of Atmospheric Sciences University of Washington Seattle, Washington G. A. Issac Meteorological Service of Canada Toronto, Ontario, Canada Introduction Single-scattering properties of ice clouds depend on both ice water content (IWC) and effective size of cloud particles (Fu 1996; Fu et al. 1998). However, only the IWC information is provided in numerical models. Stephens et al. (1990) showed that the ice cloud feedback on a CO 2 warming simulation could be either positive or negative depending on the value of the ice particle size assumed. Parameterizations

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water path" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Intercomparison of In-Flight Icing Algorithms. Part I: WISP94 Real-Time Icing Prediction and Evaluation Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of the Federal Aviation Administration’s Icing Forecasting Improvement Program is to conduct research on icing conditions both in flight and on the ground. This paper describes a portion of the in-flight aircraft icing prediction ...

Gregory Thompson; Roelof T. Bruintjes; Barbara G. Brown; Frank Hage

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Assessment of Superstructure Ice Protection as Applied to Offshore Oil Operations Safety Ice Protection Technologies, Safety Enhancements, and Development Needs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. COVER: Ice protection technologies—clockwise from upper left (reprinted with permission): 1. Feltwick Anti-Icing Grate from Innovative Dynamics Inc. 2. Ocean Bounty semi-submersible iced in Cook Inlet

Charles C. Ryerson April; Vacca Heater From Vacca Inc; Charles C. Ryerson

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

463

under a Creative Commons License. Climate of the Past Modelling the Early Weichselian Eurasian Ice Sheets: role of ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract. During the last glaciation, a marine ice sheet repeatedly appeared in Eurasia. The floating part of this ice sheet was essential to its rapid extension over the seas. During the earliest stage (90 kyr BP), large ice-dammed lakes formed south of the ice sheet. These lakes are believed to have cooled the climate at the margin of the ice. Using an ice sheet model, we investigated the role of ice shelves during the inception and the influence of ice-dammed lakes on the ice sheet evolution. Inception in Barents sea seems due to thickening of a large ice shelf. We observe a substantial impact of the lakes on the evolution of the ice sheets. Reduced summer ablation enhances ice extent and thickness, and the deglaciation is delayed by 2000 years. 1

V. Peyaud; C. Ritz; G. Krinner

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

464

Automatic tool path generation for finish machining  

SciTech Connect

A system for automatic tool path generation was developed at Sandia National Laboratories for finish machining operations. The system consists of a commercially available 5-axis milling machine controlled by Sandia developed software. This system was used to remove overspray on cast turbine blades. A laser-based, structured-light sensor, mounted on a tool holder, is used to collect 3D data points around the surface of the turbine blade. Using the digitized model of the blade, a tool path is generated which will drive a 0.375 inch diameter CBN grinding pin around the tip of the blade. A fuzzified digital filter was developed to properly eliminate false sensor readings caused by burrs, holes and overspray. The digital filter was found to successfully generate the correct tool path for a blade with intentionally scanned holes and defects. The fuzzified filter improved the computation efficiency by a factor of 25. For application to general parts, an adaptive scanning algorithm was developed and presented with simulation results. A right pyramid and an ellipsoid were scanned successfully with the adaptive algorithm.

Kwok, Kwan S.; Loucks, C.S.; Driessen, B.J.

1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Experimental and numerical investigation of phonon mean free path distribution  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Knowledge of phonon mean free path (MFP) distribution is critically important to engineering size effects. Phenomenological models of phonon relaxation times can give us some sense about the mean free path distribution, ...

Zeng, Lingping

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

466

Terminal area flight path generation using parallel constraint propagation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A Flight Path Generator is defined as the module of an automated Air Traffic Control system which plans aircraft trajectories in the terminal area with respect to operational constraints. The flight path plans have to be ...

Sadoune, Michel

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

467

China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030 (2nd Edition)  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030 (2nd Edition) Title China Energy and Emissions Paths to 2030 (2nd Edition) Publication Type Report Year of Publication 2012 Authors...

468

A Potential Path to Emissions-Free Fossil Energy | Department...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

A Potential Path to Emissions-Free Fossil Energy A Potential Path to Emissions-Free Fossil Energy August 20, 2013 - 10:00am Addthis The National Energy Technology Laboratory's...

469

Chairs: Ice, Ishikawa, Khounsary, Padmore, Shen Topic Speaker  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chairs: Ice, Ishikawa, Khounsary, Padmore, Shen Topic Speaker Affiliation Session 1 8:30-10 Chair: G. Ice Maskless patterning Enzo Di Fabrizo Elettra, Trieste, Italy Possible...

470

ICE Press Office U.S. Department of Homeland Security  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ICE Press Office U.S. Department of Homeland Security December 19, 2003 Contact: SEVP Fact Sheet) at (202) 353-3049. www.ice.gov #12;

Wisconsin at Madison, University of

471

SISIPHUS: Scalable Ice-Sheet Solvers and Infrastructure for Petascale...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SISIPHUS: Scalable Ice-Sheet Solvers and Infrastructure for Petascale, High-Resolution, Unstructured Simulations SISIPHUS: Scalable Ice-Sheet Solvers and Infrastructure for...

472

Historical Carbon Dioxide Record from the Vostok Ice Core  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Vostok Ice Core Historical Carbon Dioxide Record from the Vostok Ice Core graphics Graphics data Data Investigators J.-M. Barnola, D. Raynaud, C. Lorius Laboratoire de Glaciologie...

473

ICR-ICE Standard Operating Procedures (Update Sept 2013) | Department...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ICR-ICE Standard Operating Procedures (Update Sept 2013) ICR-ICE Standard Operating Procedures (Update Sept 2013) ICRICE SOPSep 2013Final.pdf More Documents & Publications...

474

Historical Carbon Dioxide Record from the Siple Station Ice Core  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Siple Station Ice Core Historical Carbon Dioxide Record from the Siple Station Ice Core graphics Graphics data Data Investigators A. Neftel, H. Friedli, E. Moor, H. Ltscher, H....

475

Laparoscopic Partial Nephrectomy with Ice Slurry as Coolant in...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

| Help | PrivacySecurity Notice Home > Capabilities > Biomedical Applications > Medical Ice Slurry Coolants > Laparoscopic Partial Nephrectomy with Ice Slurry as Coolant in the...

476

Observing Climate with Satellites Are We on Thin Ice?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observing Climate with Satellites Are We on Thin Ice? A glacial-melt stream on the top of the Greenland ice sheet in late summer. ...

2010-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

477

Ice hockey instructor's guide for EC Dornbirner Bulldogs.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The purpose of this thesis was to build an ice hockey instructor´s manual for Austrian ice hockey club EC Dornbirner Bulldogs. The manual consists of… (more)

Suomalainen, Juhani

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Maintenance of the Sea-Ice Edge  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A coupled global climate model is used to evaluate processes that determine the equilibrium location of the sea-ice edge and its climatological annual cycle. The extent to which the wintertime ice edge departs from a symmetric ring around either ...

C. M. Bitz; M. M. Holland; E. C. Hunke; R. E. Moritz

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Ice Fall Doctors 6, Long Conversation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ang Nima and Ang Kami discuss different elements of their lives as Ice Fall Doctors: what they like about the job; safety; what their wives think of the work; religion and how it keeps them safe in the ice; spirits in the Icefall and the surrounding...

Loomis, Molly

480

Modeling Linear Kinematic Features in Sea Ice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sea ice deformation is localized in narrow zones of high strain rate that extend hundreds of kilometers, for example, across the Arctic Basin. This paper demonstrates that these failure zones may be modeled with a viscous–plastic sea ice model, ...

Jennifer K. Hutchings; Petra Heil; William D. Hibler III

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water path" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Vapor Pressure Measurement of Supercooled Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new dewpoint hygrometer was developed for subfreezing temperature application. Vapor pressure of supercooled water was determined by measuring temperatures at the dew-forming surface and the vapor source ice under the flux density balance, and ...

N. Fukuta; C. M. Gramada

2003-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Influence of dipole interaction on lattice dynamics of crystalline ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Born effective charges of component atoms and phonon spectra of a tetrahedrally coordinated crystalline ice are calculated from the first principles method based on density functional theory within the generalized gradient approximation with the projected augmented wave method. Phonon dispersion relations in a 3×1×1 supercell were evaluated from Hellmann-Feynman forces with the direct method. This calculation is an additional work to the direct method in calculating the phonon spectra which does not take into account the polarization charges arising from dipole interaction of molecules of water in ice. The calculated Born effective polarization charges from linear response theory are supplied as the correction terms to the dynamical matrix in order to further investigate the LO-TO splitting of the polar modes of ice crystal at k = 0 which has long been speculated for this system especially in the region between 28 and 37 meV both in the theoretical and experimental studies. Our results clearly show the evidence of splitting of longitudinal and transverse optic modes at the k = 0-point in agreement with some experimental findings.

W. A. Adeagbo; P. Entel

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Magnetic Monopoles in Spin Ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrically charged particles, such as the electron, are ubiquitous. By contrast, no elementary particles with a net magnetic charge have ever been observed, despite intensive and prolonged searches. We pursue an alternative strategy, namely that of realising them not as elementary but rather as emergent particles, i.e., as manifestations of the correlations present in a strongly interacting many-body system. The most prominent examples of emergent quasiparticles are the ones with fractional electric charge e/3 in quantum Hall physics. Here we show that magnetic monopoles do emerge in a class of exotic magnets known collectively as spin ice: the dipole moment of the underlying electronic degrees of freedom fractionalises into monopoles. This enables us to account for a mysterious phase transition observed experimentally in spin ice in a magnetic field, which is a liquid-gas transition of the magnetic monopoles. These monopoles can also be detected by other means, e.g., in an experiment modelled after the celebrated Stanford magnetic monopole search.

Claudio Castelnovo; Roderich Moessner; Shivaji L. Sondhi

2007-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

484

ON THE FORMATION OF CO{sub 2} AND OTHER INTERSTELLAR ICES  

SciTech Connect

We investigate the formation and evolution of interstellar dust-grain ices under dark-cloud conditions, with a particular emphasis on CO{sub 2}. We use a three-phase model (gas/surface/mantle) to simulate the coupled gas-grain chemistry, allowing the distinction of the chemically active surface from the ice layers preserved in the mantle beneath. The model includes a treatment of the competition between barrier-mediated surface reactions and thermal-hopping processes. The results show excellent agreement with the observed behavior of CO{sub 2}, CO, and water ice in the interstellar medium. The reaction of the OH radical with CO is found to be efficient enough to account for CO{sub 2} ice production in dark clouds. At low visual extinctions, with dust temperatures {approx}>12 K, CO{sub 2} is formed by direct diffusion and reaction of CO with OH; we associate the resultant CO{sub 2}-rich ice with the observational polar CO{sub 2} signature. CH{sub 4} ice is well correlated with this component. At higher extinctions, with lower dust temperatures, CO is relatively immobile and thus abundant; however, the reaction of H and O atop a CO molecule allows OH and CO to meet rapidly enough to produce a CO:CO{sub 2} ratio in the range {approx}2-4, which we associate with apolar signatures. We suggest that the observational apolar CO{sub 2}/CO ice signatures in dark clouds result from a strongly segregated CO:H{sub 2}O ice, in which CO{sub 2} resides almost exclusively within the CO component. Observed visual-extinction thresholds for CO{sub 2}, CO, and H{sub 2}O are well reproduced by depth-dependent models. Methanol formation is found to be strongly sensitive to dynamical timescales and dust temperatures.

Garrod, R. T. [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Pauly, T., E-mail: rgarrod@astro.cornell.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

2011-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

485

Laboratory Measurements and Model Sensitivity Studies of Dust Deposition Ice Nucleation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigated the ice nucleating properties of mineral dust particles to understand the sensitivity of simulated cloud properties to two different representations of contact angle in the Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT). These contact angle representations are based on two sets of laboratory deposition ice nucleation measurements: Arizona Test Dust (ATD) particles of 100, 300 and 500 nm sizes were tested at three different temperatures (-25, -30 and -35 C), and 400 nm ATD and kaolinite dust species were tested at two different temperatures (-30 and -35 C). These measurements were used to derive the onset relative humidity with respect to ice (RH{sub ice}) required to activate 1% of dust particles as ice nuclei, from which the onset single contact angles were then calculated based on CNT. For the probability density function (PDF) representation, parameters of the log-normal contact angle distribution were determined by fitting CNT-predicted activated fraction to the measurements at different RH{sub ice}. Results show that onset single contact angles vary from {approx}18 to 24 degrees, while the PDF parameters are sensitive to the measurement conditions (i.e. temperature and dust size). Cloud modeling simulations were performed to understand the sensitivity of cloud properties (i.e. ice number concentration, ice water content, and cloud initiation times) to the representation of contact angle and PDF distribution parameters. The model simulations show that cloud properties are sensitive to onset single contact angles and PDF distribution parameters. The comparison of our experimental results with other studies shows that under similar measurement conditions the onset single contact angles are consistent within {+-}2.0 degrees, while our derived PDF parameters have larger discrepancies.

Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Fan, Jiwen; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Liu, Xiaohong; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail

2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

486

Recovery mechanisms of Arctic summer sea ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

[1] We examine the recovery of Arctic sea ice from prescribed ice?free summer conditions in simulations of 21st century climate in an atmosphere–ocean general circulation model. We find that ice extent recovers typically within two years. The excess oceanic heat that had built up during the ice?free summer is rapidly returned to the atmosphere during the following autumn and winter, and then leaves the Arctic partly through increased longwave emission at the top of the atmosphere and partly through reduced atmospheric heat advection from lower latitudes. Oceanic heat transport does not contribute significantly to the loss of the excess heat. Our results suggest that anomalous loss of Arctic sea ice during asinglesummerisreversible,astheice–albedo feedback is alleviated by large?scale recovery mechanisms. Hence, hysteretic threshold behavior (or a “tipping point”) is unlikely to occur during the decline of Arctic summer sea?

unknown authors

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487