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Sample records for ice water content

  1. Relationship between ice water content and equivalent radar reflectivity for clouds consisting of nonspherical ice particles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baum, Bryan A.

    Relationship between ice water content and equivalent radar reflectivity for clouds consisting investigates the relationship between ice water content (IWC) and equivalent radar reflectivity (Ze) at 94 GHz. Baum, and A. J. Heymsfield (2008), Relationship between ice water content and equivalent radar

  2. TRMM observations of the global relationship between ice water content and lightning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutledge, Steven

    TRMM observations of the global relationship between ice water content and lightning Walter A to retrieve ice water content. Citation: Petersen, W. A., H. J. Christian, and S. A. Rutledge (2005), TRMM observations of the global relationship between ice water content and lightning, Geophys. Res. Lett., 32, L

  3. On the correlation between ice water content and ice crystal size and its application to radiative transfer and general circulation models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liou, K. N.

    On the correlation between ice water content and ice crystal size and its application to radiative analysis involving ice water content (IWC) and mean effective ice crystal size (De) intended, K. N., Y. Gu, Q. Yue, and G. McFarguhar (2008), On the correlation between ice water content and ice

  4. Large Scale Ice Water Path and 3-D Ice Water Content

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Liu, Guosheng

    2008-01-15

    Cloud ice water concentration is one of the most important, yet poorly observed, cloud properties. Developing physical parameterizations used in general circulation models through single-column modeling is one of the key foci of the ARM program. In addition to the vertical profiles of temperature, water vapor and condensed water at the model grids, large-scale horizontal advective tendencies of these variables are also required as forcing terms in the single-column models. Observed horizontal advection of condensed water has not been available because the radar/lidar/radiometer observations at the ARM site are single-point measurement, therefore, do not provide horizontal distribution of condensed water. The intention of this product is to provide large-scale distribution of cloud ice water by merging available surface and satellite measurements. The satellite cloud ice water algorithm uses ARM ground-based measurements as baseline, produces datasets for 3-D cloud ice water distributions in a 10 deg x 10 deg area near ARM site. The approach of the study is to expand a (surface) point measurement to an (satellite) areal measurement. That is, this study takes the advantage of the high quality cloud measurements at the point of ARM site. We use the cloud characteristics derived from the point measurement to guide/constrain satellite retrieval, then use the satellite algorithm to derive the cloud ice water distributions within an area, i.e., 10 deg x 10 deg centered at ARM site.

  5. Large Scale Ice Water Path and 3-D Ice Water Content

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Liu, Guosheng

    Cloud ice water concentration is one of the most important, yet poorly observed, cloud properties. Developing physical parameterizations used in general circulation models through single-column modeling is one of the key foci of the ARM program. In addition to the vertical profiles of temperature, water vapor and condensed water at the model grids, large-scale horizontal advective tendencies of these variables are also required as forcing terms in the single-column models. Observed horizontal advection of condensed water has not been available because the radar/lidar/radiometer observations at the ARM site are single-point measurement, therefore, do not provide horizontal distribution of condensed water. The intention of this product is to provide large-scale distribution of cloud ice water by merging available surface and satellite measurements. The satellite cloud ice water algorithm uses ARM ground-based measurements as baseline, produces datasets for 3-D cloud ice water distributions in a 10 deg x 10 deg area near ARM site. The approach of the study is to expand a (surface) point measurement to an (satellite) areal measurement. That is, this study takes the advantage of the high quality cloud measurements at the point of ARM site. We use the cloud characteristics derived from the point measurement to guide/constrain satellite retrieval, then use the satellite algorithm to derive the cloud ice water distributions within an area, i.e., 10 deg x 10 deg centered at ARM site.

  6. Evaluation of Ice Water Content Retrievals from Cloud Radar Reflectivity and Temperature Using a Large Airborne In Situ Microphysical Database

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Protat, Alain

    Evaluation of Ice Water Content Retrievals from Cloud Radar Reflectivity and Temperature Using the performances of the proposed ice water content (IWC)­radar reflectivity Z and IWC­Z­temperature T relationships produce a very different ice water path, spanning an order of magnitude (Stephens et al. 2002). Clouds

  7. Cloud fraction, liquid and ice water contents derived from long-term radar, lidar, and microwave radiometer data are systematically compared to models to quantify and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogan, Robin

    Cloud fraction, liquid and ice water contents derived from long-term radar, lidar, and microwave a systematic evaluation of clouds in forecast models. Clouds and their associated microphysical processes for end users of weather forecasts, who may be interested not only in cloud cover, but in other variables

  8. Aircraft Measurements of Cloud Liquid Water Content using the Forward

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Delene, David J.

    Aircraft Measurements of Cloud Liquid Water Content using the Forward Scattering Spectrometer Probe Water Content? Basic Cloud Parameter (MPACE) Icing Studies (WISP04, Sikorsky) Comparison with Remote Sensing Measurements (THORpex, IOP1) #12;Liquid Water Content Calculation The amount of liquid water

  9. Heavy ion irradiation of crystalline water ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dartois, E; Boduch, P; Brunetto, R; Chabot, M; Domaracka, A; Ding, J J; Kamalou, O; Lv, X Y; Rothard, H; da Silveira, E F; Thomas, J C

    2015-01-01

    Under cosmic irradiation, the interstellar water ice mantles evolve towards a compact amorphous state. Crystalline ice amorphisation was previously monitored mainly in the keV to hundreds of keV ion energies. We experimentally investigate heavy ion irradiation amorphisation of crystalline ice, at high energies closer to true cosmic rays, and explore the water-ice sputtering yield. We irradiated thin crystalline ice films with MeV to GeV swift ion beams, produced at the GANIL accelerator. The ice infrared spectral evolution as a function of fluence is monitored with in-situ infrared spectroscopy (induced amorphisation of the initial crystalline state into a compact amorphous phase). The crystalline ice amorphisation cross-section is measured in the high electronic stopping-power range for different temperatures. At large fluence, the ice sputtering is measured on the infrared spectra, and the fitted sputtering-yield dependence, combined with previous measurements, is quadratic over three decades of electronic ...

  10. ARM - Measurement - Ice water content

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach Home Roomparticle sizefraction ARMGeometrytypes

  11. Vapor deposition of water on graphitic surfaces: Formation of amorphous ice, bilayer ice, ice I, and liquid water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lupi, Laura; Kastelowitz, Noah; Molinero, Valeria

    2014-11-14

    Carbonaceous surfaces are a major source of atmospheric particles and could play an important role in the formation of ice. Here we investigate through molecular simulations the stability, metastability, and molecular pathways of deposition of amorphous ice, bilayer ice, and ice I from water vapor on graphitic and atomless Lennard-Jones surfaces as a function of temperature. We find that bilayer ice is the most stable ice polymorph for small cluster sizes, nevertheless it can grow metastable well above its region of thermodynamic stability. In agreement with experiments, the simulations predict that on increasing temperature the outcome of water deposition is amorphous ice, bilayer ice, ice I, and liquid water. The deposition nucleation of bilayer ice and ice I is preceded by the formation of small liquid clusters, which have two wetting states: bilayer pancake-like (wetting) at small cluster size and droplet-like (non-wetting) at larger cluster size. The wetting state of liquid clusters determines which ice polymorph is nucleated: bilayer ice nucleates from wetting bilayer liquid clusters and ice I from non-wetting liquid clusters. The maximum temperature for nucleation of bilayer ice on flat surfaces, T{sub B}{sup max} is given by the maximum temperature for which liquid water clusters reach the equilibrium melting line of bilayer ice as wetting bilayer clusters. Increasing water-surface attraction stabilizes the pancake-like wetting state of liquid clusters leading to larger T{sub B}{sup max} for the flat non-hydrogen bonding surfaces of this study. The findings of this study should be of relevance for the understanding of ice formation by deposition mode on carbonaceous atmospheric particles, including soot.

  12. Viscosity of interfacial water regulates ice nucleation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Kaiyong; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Qiaolan; Zhang, Yifan; University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 ; Xu, Shun; Zhou, Xin; Cui, Dapeng; Wang, Jianjun Song, Yanlin

    2014-03-10

    Ice formation on solid surfaces is an important phenomenon in many fields, such as cloud formation and atmospheric icing, and a key factor for applications in preventing freezing. Here, we report temperature-dependent nucleation rates of ice for hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. The results show that hydrophilic surface presents a lower ice nucleation rate. We develop a strategy to extract the thermodynamic parameters, J{sub 0} and ?, in the context of classical nucleation theory. From the extracted J{sub 0} and ?, we reveal the dominant role played by interfacial water. The results provide an insight into freezing mechanism on solid surfaces.

  13. Crystalline water ice on the Kuiper belt object (50000) Quaoar

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jewitt, David C.

    .............................................................. Crystalline water ice on the Kuiper the presence of crystalline water ice and ammonia hydrate. Crystallinity indicates that the ice has been heated to at least 110 K. Both ammonia hydrate and crystalline water ice should be destroyed by energetic particle

  14. WATER ICE IN THE KUIPER BELT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, M. E.; Fraser, W. C. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Schaller, E. L., E-mail: mbrown@caltech.edu [NASA Dryden Aircraft Operations Facility, Palmdale, CA 93550 (United States)

    2012-06-15

    We examine a large collection of low-resolution near-infrared spectra of Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs) and centaurs in an attempt to understand the presence of water ice in the Kuiper Belt. We find that water ice on the surface of these objects occurs in three separate manners: (1) Haumea family members uniquely show surfaces of nearly pure water ice, presumably a consequence of the fragmentation of the icy mantle of a larger differentiated proto-Haumea; (2) large objects with absolute magnitudes of H < 3 (and a limited number to H = 4.5) have surface coverings of water ice-perhaps mixed with ammonia-that appears to be related to possibly ancient cryovolcanism on these large objects; and (3) smaller KBOs and centaurs which are neither Haumea family members nor cold-classical KBOs appear to divide into two families (which we refer to as 'neutral' and 'red'), each of which is a mixture of a common nearly neutral component and either a slightly red or very red component that also includes water ice. A model suggesting that the difference between neutral and red objects due to formation in an early compact solar system either inside or outside, respectively, of the {approx}20 AU methanol evaporation line is supported by the observation that methanol is only detected on the reddest objects, which are those which would be expected to have the most of the methanol containing mixture.

  15. Covered Product Category: Water-Cooled Ice Machines

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance and federal efficiency requirements for water-cooled ice machines.

  16. Turbulent heat exchange between water and ice at an evolving ice-water interface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramudu, Eshwan; Olson, Peter; Gnanadesikan, Anand

    2015-01-01

    We conduct laboratory experiments on the time evolution of an ice layer cooled from below and subjected to a turbulent shear flow of warm water from above. Our study is motivated by observations of warm water intrusion into the ocean cavity under Antarctic ice shelves, accelerating the melting of their basal surfaces. The strength of the applied turbulent shear flow in our experiments is represented in terms of its Reynolds number $\\textit{Re}$, which is varied over the range $2.0\\times10^3 \\le \\textit{Re} \\le 1.0\\times10^4$. Depending on the water temperature, partial transient melting of the ice occurs at the lower end of this range of $\\textit{Re}$ and complete transient melting of the ice occurs at the higher end. Following these episodes of transient melting, the ice reforms at a rate that is independent of $\\textit{Re}$. We fit our experimental measurements of ice thickness and temperature to a one-dimensional model for the evolution of the ice thickness in which the turbulent heat transfer is parameter...

  17. Fragmentation of colliding planetesimals with water content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maindl, Thomas I; Schäfer, Christoph; Speith, Roland

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the outcome of collisions of Ceres-sized planetesimals composed of a rocky core and a shell of water ice. These collisions are not only relevant for explaining the formation of planetary embryos in early planetary systems, but also provide insight into the formation of asteroid families and possible water transport via colliding small bodies. Earlier studies show characteristic collision velocities exceeding the bodies' mutual escape velocity which - along with the distribution of the impact angles - cover the collision outcome regimes 'partial accretion', 'erosion', and 'hit-and-run' leading to different expected fragmentation scenarios. Existing collision simulations use bodies composed of strengthless material; we study the distribution of fragments and their water contents considering the full elasto-plastic continuum mechanics equations also including brittle failure and fragmentation.

  18. Ionic content of Antarctic ice samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armitage, Kenneth

    1965-01-01

    0 0 0 004 001 0 10 4 0 0 0 40 400 1000 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 ND ND 0 0 0 0 ND ND 2 0 ND 6 0 ND 1 7-15 ND 230 1543 200 ND = Not determined. *B2 *B3 TGI TGM 2 Nov. 61 3 Nov. 61 2 Dec. 61 2 Dec. 61 Content (ppm) 0 0 16 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 50... ND 0 0 38 ND ND ND 0 4 0-4 0 0 0 0 ND ND ND 009 0 0 0 0 ~ 1 0 ND 200 2200 ND WPI 8 Jan. 62 0 0 12 0 ND...

  19. Liquid Water Oceans in Ice Giants

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sloane J. Wiktorowicz; Andrew P. Ingersoll

    2006-09-26

    Aptly named, ice giants such as Uranus and Neptune contain significant amounts of water. While this water cannot be present near the cloud tops, it must be abundant in the deep interior. We investigate the likelihood of a liquid water ocean existing in the hydrogen-rich region between the cloud tops and deep interior. Starting from an assumed temperature at a given upper tropospheric pressure (the photosphere), we follow a moist adiabat downward. The mixing ratio of water to hydrogen in the gas phase is small in the photosphere and increases with depth. The mixing ratio in the condensed phase is near unity in the photosphere and decreases with depth; this gives two possible outcomes. If at some pressure level the mixing ratio of water in the gas phase is equal to that in the deep interior, then that level is the cloud base. Alternately, if the mixing ratio of water in the condensed phase reaches that in the deep interior, then the surface of a liquid ocean will occur. We find that Neptune is both too warm (photospheric temperature too high) and too dry (mixing ratio of water in the deep interior too low) for liquid oceans to exist at present. To have a liquid ocean, Neptune's deep interior water to gas ratio would have to be higher than current models allow, and the density at 19 kbar would have to be ~ 0.8 g/cm^3. Such a high density is inconsistent with gravitational data obtained during the Voyager flyby. As Neptune cools, the probability of a liquid ocean increases. Extrasolar "hot Neptunes," which presumably migrate inward toward their parent stars, cannot harbor liquid water oceans unless they have lost almost all of the hydrogen and helium from their deep interiors.

  20. THE STICKINESS OF MICROMETER-SIZED WATER-ICE PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gundlach, B.; Blum, J.

    2015-01-01

    Water ice is one of the most abundant materials in dense molecular clouds and in the outer reaches of protoplanetary disks. In contrast to other materials (e.g., silicates), water ice is assumed to be stickier due to its higher specific surface energy, leading to faster or more efficient growth in mutual collisions. However, experiments investigating the stickiness of water ice have been scarce, particularly in the astrophysically relevant micrometer-sized region and at low temperatures. In this work, we present an experimental setup to grow aggregates composed of ?m-sized water-ice particles, which we used to measure the sticking and erosion thresholds of the ice particles at different temperatures between 114 K and 260 K. We show with our experiments that for low temperatures (below ?210 K), ?m-sized water-ice particles stick below a threshold velocity of 9.6 m s{sup –1}, which is approximately 10 times higher than the sticking threshold of ?m-sized silica particles. Furthermore, erosion of the grown ice aggregates is observed for velocities above 15.3 m s{sup –1}. A comparison of the experimentally derived sticking threshold with model predictions is performed to determine important material properties of water ice, i.e., the specific surface energy and the viscous relaxation time. Our experimental results indicate that the presence of water ice in the outer reaches of protoplanetary disks can enhance the growth of planetesimals by direct sticking of particles.

  1. The future of water, ice, snow underThe future of water, ice, snow under global warmingglobal warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hurricane Katrina, the Kerry--Gingrich debate over globalGingrich debate over global warming, the local and regional warming.effects of global warming. Climate extends beyond temperature and rainfall, toClimate extendsThe future of water, ice, snow underThe future of water, ice, snow under global warmingglobal

  2. 7, 40654083, 2007 Liquid water content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ACPD 7, 4065­4083, 2007 Liquid water content and effective number density Y. Hu et al. Title Page Chemistry and Physics Discussions Global statistics of liquid water content and effective number density: Y. Hu (yongxiang.hu-1@nasa.gov) 4065 #12;ACPD 7, 4065­4083, 2007 Liquid water content and effective

  3. Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society Q. J. R. Meteorol. Soc. 00: 110 (2011) Parametrizing the horizontal inhomogeneity of ice water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogan, Robin

    2011-01-01

    ) Parametrizing the horizontal inhomogeneity of ice water content using CloudSat data products Peter G. Hilla quantities in the presence of a cloud it is necessary to know not only the mean water content, but also the distribution of this water content. This article describes a study of the in-cloud horizontal inhomogeneity

  4. THE PHASES OF WATER ICE IN THE SOLAR NEBULA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ciesla, Fred J.

    2014-03-20

    Understanding the phases of water ice that were present in the solar nebula has implications for understanding cometary and planetary compositions as well as the internal evolution of these bodies. Here we show that amorphous ice formed more readily than previously recognized, with formation at temperatures <70 K being possible under protoplanetary disk conditions. We further argue that photodesorption and freeze-out of water molecules near the surface layers of the solar nebula would have provided the conditions needed for amorphous ice to form. This processing would be a natural consequence of ice dynamics and would allow for the trapping of noble gases and other volatiles in water ice in the outer solar nebula.

  5. Relationships between Water Wettability and Ice Adhesion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Meuler, Adam J.

    Ice formation and accretion may hinder the operation of many systems critical to national infrastructure, including airplanes, power lines, windmills, ships, and telecommunications equipment. Yet despite the pervasiveness ...

  6. Interface limited growth of heterogeneously nucleated ice in supercooled water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Razvan A. Nistor; Thomas E. Markland; B. J. Berne

    2013-12-30

    Heterogeneous ice growth exhibits a maximum in freezing rate arising from the competition between kinetics and the thermodynamic driving force between the solid and liquid states. Here, we use molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate the atomistic details of this competition, focusing on water properties in the interfacial region along the secondary prismatic direction. The crystal growth velocity is maximized when the efficiency of converting interfacial water molecules to ice, collectively known as the attachment kinetics, is greatest. We find water molecules that contact the intermediate ice layer in concave regions along the atomistically roughened surface are more likely to freeze directly. The increased roughening of the solid surface at large undercoolings consequently plays an important limiting role on the rate of ice growth, as water molecules are unable to integrate into increasingly deeper surface pockets. These results provide insights into the molecular mechanisms for self-assembly of solid phases that are important in many biological and atmospheric processes.

  7. The Development and Use of the Berkeley Fluorescence Spectrometer to Characterize Microbial Content and Detect Volcanic Ash in Glacial Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rohde, Robert Andrew

    2010-01-01

    optical log of dust, ash, and stratigraphy in South PoleContent and Detect Volcanic Ash in Glacial Ice by RobertContent and Detect Volcanic Ash in Glacial Ice by Robert

  8. Structure order, local potentials, and physical anomalies of water ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang Q Sun

    2014-07-11

    Hydrogen-bond forms a pair of asymmetric, coupled, H-bridged oscillators with ultra-short-range interactions and memory. hydrogen bond cooperative relaxation and the associated binding electron entrapment and nonbonding electron polarization discriminate water and ice from other usual materials in the physical anomalies. As a strongly correlated fluctuating system, water prefers the statistically mean of tetrahedrally-coordinated structure with a supersolid skin that is elastic, polarized, ice like, hydrophobic, with 3/4 density.

  9. Variations of air content in Dasuopu ice core from AD 1570e1927 and implications fore climate change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chappellaz, Jérôme

    Variations of air content in Dasuopu ice core from AD 1570e1927 and implications fore climate June 2010 a b s t r a c t An ice core air content record that was recovered from the refrozen-recrystallization ice formation zone in the Dasuopu Glacier was investigated in this work, which showed that the air

  10. CO and N$_2$ desorption energies from water ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fayolle, Edith C; Loomis, Ryan; Bergner, Jennifer; Graninger, Dawn M; Rajappan, Mahesh; Öberg, Karin I

    2015-01-01

    The relative desorption energies of CO and N$_2$ are key to interpretations of observed interstellar CO and N$_2$ abundance patterns, including the well-documented CO and N$_2$H$^+$ anti-correlations in disks, protostars and molecular cloud cores. Based on laboratory experiments on pure CO and N$_2$ ice desorption, the difference between CO and N$_2$ desorption energies is small; the N$_2$-to-CO desorption energy ratio is 0.93$\\pm$0.03. Interstellar ices are not pure, however, and in this study we explore the effect of water ice on the desorption energy ratio of the two molecules. We present temperature programmed desorption experiments of different coverages of $^{13}$CO and $^{15}$N$_2$ on porous and compact amorphous water ices and, for reference, of pure ices. In all experiments, $^{15}$N$_2$ desorption begins a few degrees before the onset of $^{13}$CO desorption. The $^{15}$N$_2$ and $^{13}$CO energy barriers are 770 and 866 K for the pure ices, 1034-1143 K and 1155-1298 K for different sub-monolayer co...

  11. Oil spreading in surface waters with an ice cover

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yapa, P.D.; Weerasuriya, S.A.; Belaskas, D.P.; Chowdhury, T.

    1993-02-01

    A study of oil spreading in surface waters in the presence of a floating ice cover is presented. The ice can be solid or fragmented. Both axi-symmetrical and uni-directional spreading are studied. The report describes the analytical and numerical model development, the experimental set-up, results from the laboratory experiments, and their comparison with the derived theory and the numerical simulation. To analyze the spreading of oil under solid ice, new equations are derived. These equations consider gravity (buoyancy) - inertia phase, gravity (buoyancy) - viscous phase, and the termination of spreading during the buoyancy - surface tension phase. The derivation considers both the constant discharge mode and the constant volume mode. Therefore, a complete description of the spreading phenomena from the time of initial spill to termination of spreading is presented. The emphasis of the study is on the dominant spreading mechanism for oil under ice, which is the buoyancy-viscous phase.

  12. Water and Ice Dielectric Spectra Scaling at 0 °C

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. G. Artemov; A. A. Volkov

    2013-08-06

    Dielectric spectra (10^4-10^11 Hz) of water and ice at 0 {\\deg}C are considered in terms of proton conductivity and compared to each other. In this picture, the Debye relaxations, centered at 1/{\\tau}_W ~ 20 GHz (in water) and 1/{\\tau}_I ~ 5 kHz (in ice), are seen as manifestations of diffusion of separated charges in the form of H3O+ and OH- ions. The charge separation results from the self-dissociation of H2O molecules, and is accompanied by recombination in order to maintain the equilibrium concentration, N. The charge recombination is a diffusion-controlled process with characteristic lifetimes of {\\tau}_W and {\\tau}_I, for water and ice respectively. The static permittivity, {\\epsilon}(0), is solely determined by N. Both, N and {\\epsilon}(0), are roughly constant at the water-ice phase transition, and both increase, due to a slowing down of the diffusion rate, as the temperature is lowered. The transformation of the broadband dielectric spectra at 0 {\\deg}C with the drastic change from {\\tau}_W to {\\tau}_I is mainly due to an abrupt (by 0.4 eV) change of the activation energy of the charge diffusion.

  13. Localization of water monomers inside ice-like clusters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    V. L. Golo; S. M. Pershin

    2012-04-04

    On the basis of the experimental data we suggest that water monomers could be trapped in channels running through ice-like clusters in water. Our argument relies on a simple model that describes the motion of a dipole particle inside a channel in the presence of an electric field with linear gradient. The model admits of both finite and infinite regimes of motion so that the finite one could correspond to the particle being confined to a channel.

  14. Electric fields in ice and near water clusters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batista, Enrique R. [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 351560, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1560 (United States) [Department of Physics, P.O. Box 351560, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1560 (United States); Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 351700, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1700 (United States); Xantheas, Sotiris S. [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 906 Battelle Boulevard, P.O. Box 999, MS K8-91, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)] [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 906 Battelle Boulevard, P.O. Box 999, MS K8-91, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Jonsson, Hannes [Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 351700, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1700 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, P.O. Box 351700, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1700 (United States)

    2000-02-15

    We have studied the electric field near water clusters and in ice Ih using first principles calculations. We employed Moeller-Plesset perturbation theory (MP2) for the calculations of the clusters up to and including the hexamer, and density functional theory (DFT) with a gradient dependent functional [Perdew-Wang (PW91)] for ice Ih as well as the clusters. The electric field obtained from the first principles calculations was used to test the predictions of an induction model based on single center multipole moments and polarizabilities of an isolated water molecule. We found that the fields obtained from the induction model agree well with the first principles results when the multipole expansion is carried out up to and including the hexadecapole moment, and when polarizable dipole and quadrupole moments are included. This implies that accurate empirical water interaction potential functions transferable to various environments such as water clusters and ice surfaces could be based on a single center multipole expansion carried out up to the hexadecapole. Since point charges are not included, the computationally intensive Ewald summations can be avoided. Molecular multipole moments were also extracted from the first principles charge density using zero flux dividing surfaces as proposed by Bader. Although the values of the various molecular multipoles obtained with this method are quite different from the ones resulting from the induction model, the rate of convergence of the electric field is, nevertheless, quite similar. (c) 2000 American Institute of Physics.

  15. Vegetation water content mapping using Landsat data derived normalized difference water index for corn and soybeans

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt Jr., E. Raymond

    Vegetation water content mapping using Landsat data derived normalized difference water index Information about vegetation water content (VWC) has widespread utility in agriculture, forestry. D 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. Keywords: Vegetation water content; Landsat; NDWI 1

  16. PHOSPHORUS CONTENT OF WATERS ALONG THE WEST COAST OF FLORIDA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    PHOSPHORUS CONTENT OF WATERS ALONG THE WEST COAST OF FLORIDA Marine Biological Laboratory WOODS PHOSPHORUS CONTENT OF WATERS ALONG THF WEST COAST OF FLORIDA Herbert Wo Graham, Fishery Biologist, John Mo of T richodesmium floating on the surface over water of very low phosphorus content. #12;CONTENTS Page Methods

  17. VARIATIONS IN THE DISSOLVED OXYGEN CONTENT OF INTRAGRAVEL WATER IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ^402: VARIATIONS IN THE DISSOLVED OXYGEN CONTENT OF INTRAGRAVEL WATER IN FOUR SPAWNING STREAMS IN THE DISSOLVED OXYGEN CONTENT OF INTRAGRAVEL WATER IN FOUR SPAWNING STREAMS OF SOUTHEASTERN ALASKA by William J Introduction 1 Sampling intragravel water for dissolved oxygen content 2 Obtaining water samples from

  18. Original article Estimation of leaf water content and specific leaf

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Original article Estimation of leaf water content and specific leaf weight from reflectance and transmittance spectra measured over the 1 300-2 400-nm domain and the corresponding water content (g.cm-2) for pure water. We then investigated the possibility of estimating leaf water content and specific weight

  19. Water, O2 and Ice in Molecular Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David Hollenbach; Michael J. Kaufman; Edwin A. Bergin; Gary J. Melnick

    2009-03-02

    We model the temperature and chemical structure of molecular clouds as a function of depth into the cloud, assuming a cloud of constant density n illuminated by an external FUV (6 eV < E < 13.6 eV) flux G_0 (scaling factor in multiples of the local interstellar field). Extending previous photodissociation region models, we include the freezing of species, simple grain surface chemistry, and desorption (including FUV photodesorption) of ices. We also treat the opaque cloud interior with time-dependent chemistry. Here, under certain conditions, gas phase elemental oxygen freezes out as water ice and the elemental C/O abundance ratio can exceed unity, leading to complex carbon chemistry. Gas phase H2O and O2 peak in abundance at intermediate depth into the cloud, roughly A_V~3-8 from the surface, the depth proportional to ln(G_0/n). Closer to the surface, molecules are photodissociated. Deeper into the cloud, molecules freeze to grain surfaces. At intermediate depths photodissociation rates are attenuated by dust extinction, but photodesorption prevents total freezeout. For G_0 < 500, abundances of H2O and O2 peak at values ~10^(-7), producing columns ~10^(15) per cm^2, independent of G_0 and n. The peak abundances depend primarily on the product of the photodesorption yield of water ice and the grain surface area per H nucleus. At higher values of G_0, thermal desorption of O atoms from grains enhances the gas phase H2O peak abundance and column slightly, whereas the gas phase O2 peak abundance rises to ~10^(-5) and the column to ~2x10^(16) per cm^2. We present simple analytic equations for the abundances as a function of depth which clarify the dependence on parameters. The models are applied to observations of H2O, O2, and water ice in a number of sources, including B68, NGC 2024, and Rho Oph.

  20. Determination of Large-Scale Cloud Ice Water Concentration by Combining Surface Radar and Satellite Data in Support of ARM SCM Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Guosheng

    2013-03-15

    Single-column modeling (SCM) is one of the key elements of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) research initiatives for the development and testing of various physical parameterizations to be used in general circulation models (GCMs). The data required for use with an SCM include observed vertical profiles of temperature, water vapor, and condensed water, as well as the large-scale vertical motion and tendencies of temperature, water vapor, and condensed water due to horizontal advection. Surface-based measurements operated at ARM sites and upper-air sounding networks supply most of the required variables for model inputs, but do not provide the horizontal advection term of condensed water. Since surface cloud radar and microwave radiometer observations at ARM sites are single-point measurements, they can provide the amount of condensed water at the location of observation sites, but not a horizontal distribution of condensed water contents. Consequently, observational data for the large-scale advection tendencies of condensed water have not been available to the ARM cloud modeling community based on surface observations alone. This lack of advection data of water condensate could cause large uncertainties in SCM simulations. Additionally, to evaluate GCMsâ�� cloud physical parameterization, we need to compare GCM results with observed cloud water amounts over a scale that is large enough to be comparable to what a GCM grid represents. To this end, the point-measurements at ARM surface sites are again not adequate. Therefore, cloud water observations over a large area are needed. The main goal of this project is to retrieve ice water contents over an area of 10 x 10 deg. surrounding the ARM sites by combining surface and satellite observations. Built on the progress made during previous ARM research, we have conducted the retrievals of 3-dimensional ice water content by combining surface radar/radiometer and satellite measurements, and have produced 3-D cloud ice water contents in support of cloud modeling activities. The approach of the study is to expand a (surface) point measurement to an (satellite) area measurement. That is, the study takes the advantage of the high quality cloud measurements (particularly cloud radar and microwave radiometer measurements) at the point of the ARM sites. We use the cloud ice water characteristics derived from the point measurement to guide/constrain a satellite retrieval algorithm, then use the satellite algorithm to derive the 3-D cloud ice water distributions within an 10�° (latitude) x 10�° (longitude) area. During the research period, we have developed, validated and improved our cloud ice water retrievals, and have produced and archived at ARM website as a PI-product of the 3-D cloud ice water contents using combined satellite high-frequency microwave and surface radar observations for SGP March 2000 IOP and TWP-ICE 2006 IOP over 10 deg. x 10 deg. area centered at ARM SGP central facility and Darwin sites. We have also worked on validation of the 3-D ice water product by CloudSat data, synergy with visible/infrared cloud ice water retrievals for better results at low ice water conditions, and created a long-term (several years) of ice water climatology in 10 x 10 deg. area of ARM SGP and TWP sites and then compared it with GCMs.

  1. A PHOTOMETRIC SYSTEM FOR DETECTION OF WATER AND METHANE ICES ON KUIPER BELT OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Trujillo, Chadwick A.; Sheppard, Scott S.; Schaller, Emily L. E-mail: sheppard@dtm.ciw.edu

    2011-04-01

    We present a new near-infrared photometric system for detection of water ice and methane ice in the solar system. The system consists of two medium-band filters in the K-band region of the near-infrared, which are sensitive to water ice and methane ice, plus continuum observations in the J band and Y band. The primary purpose of this system is to distinguish between three basic types of Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs)-those rich in water ice, those rich in methane ice, and those with little absorbance. In this work, we present proof-of-concept observations of 51 KBOs using our filter system, 21 of which have never been observed in the near-infrared spectroscopically. We show that our custom photometric system is consistent with previous spectroscopic observations while reducing telescope observing time by a factor of {approx}3. We use our filters to identify Haumea collisional family members, which are thought to be collisional remnants of a much larger body and are characterized by large fractions of water ice on their surfaces. We add 2009 YE{sub 7} to the Haumea collisional family based on our water ice band observations (J - H{sub 2}O = -1.03 {+-} 0.27) which indicate a high amount of water ice absorption, our calculated proper orbital elements, and the neutral optical colors we measured, V - R = 0.38 {+-} 0.04, which are all consistent with the rest of the Haumea family. We identify several objects dynamically similar to Haumea as being distinct from the Haumea family as they do not have water ice on their surfaces. In addition, we find that only the largest KBOs have methane ice, and Haumea itself has significantly less water ice absorption than the smaller Haumea family members. We find no evidence for other families in the Kuiper Belt.

  2. DERIVING PROGNOSTIC EQUATIONS FOR CLOUD FRACTION AND LIQUID WATER CONTENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DERIVING PROGNOSTIC EQUATIONS FOR CLOUD FRACTION AND LIQUID WATER CONTENT Vincent E. Larson1 1 that accounts for how liquid water varies with both total water content and temperature. The variable s has- ter content, ql , and cloud fraction, C. This provides in- formation about partial cloudiness. Tiedtke

  3. NEAR SURFACE WATER CONTENT ESTIMATION USING GPR DATA: INVESTIGATIONS WITHIN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Yoram

    NEAR SURFACE WATER CONTENT ESTIMATION USING GPR DATA: INVESTIGATIONS WITHIN CALIFORNIA VINEYARDS S (sshubbard@lbl.gov) Detailed estimates of water content are necessary for variety of hydrogeological inves to obtain sufficient information about the spatial variation of water content within the root zone using

  4. Dependence of seismoelectric amplitudes on water content Matthias Strahser

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Dependence of seismoelectric amplitudes on water content Matthias Strahser Institut de Physique of seismoelectric amplitudes on water content Matthias Strahser, Institut f¨ur Geowissenschaften, Abteilung of electrical properties to water content and permeability and the high spatial resolution of seismic surveys

  5. Ultra-low rare earth element content in accreted ice from sub-glacial Lake Vostok, Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howat, Ian M.

    Ultra-low rare earth element content in accreted ice from sub-glacial Lake Vostok, Antarctica Paolo. We suggest that such ultra-low concentrations are unlikely to be representative of the real REE

  6. A study of the ice-water interface using the TIP4P/2005 water model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jorge Benet; Luis G. MacDowell; Eduardo Sanz

    2014-10-01

    In this work we study the ice-water interface under coexistence conditions by means of molecular simulations using the TIP4P/2005 water model. Following the methodology proposed by Hoyt and co-workers [J. J. Hoyt, M. Asta and A. Karma, Phys. Rev. Lett., 86, 5530, (2001)] we measure the interfacial free energy of ice with liquid water by analysing the spectrum of capillary fluctuations of the interface. We get an orientationally averaged interfacial free energy of 27(2) mN/m, in good agreement with a recent estimate obtained from simulation data of the size of critical clusters [E. Sanz, C. Vega, J. R. Espinosa, R. Caballero-Bernal, J. L. F. Abascal and C. Valeriani, JACS, 135, 15008, (2013)]. We also estimate the interfacial free energy of different planes and obtain 27(2), 28(2)and 28(2) mN/m for the basal, the primary prismatic and the secondary prismatic planes respectively. Finally, we inspect the structure of the interface and find that its thickness is of approximately 4-5 molecular diameters. Moreover, we find that when the basal plane is exposed to the fluid the interface alternates regions of cubic ice with regions of hexagonal ice.

  7. Ice, Snow and Water: impacts of climate change on California and Himalayan Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fenner, R. A.

    2009-01-01

    BRIEFING NOTE  Ice, Snow  and Water: impacts of climate of declining mountain snows and glacier retreat  in impacts of declining mountain snows on water availability in

  8. What Determines the Sticking Probability of Water Molecules on Ice?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batista, Enrique; Ayotte, Patrick; Bilic , Ante; Kay, Bruce D.; Jonsson, Hannes

    2005-11-22

    We present both experimental and theoretical studies of the sticking of water molecules on ice. The sticking probability is unity over a wide range in energy (0.5 eV–1.5 eV) when the molecules are incident along the surface normal, but drops as the angle increases at high incident energy. This is explained in terms of the strong orientational dependence of the interaction of the molecule with the surface and the time required for the reorientation of the molecule. The sticking probability is found to scale with the component of the incident velocity in the plane of the surface, unlike the commonly assumed normal or total energy scaling.

  9. Molecular multipole moments of water molecules in ice Ih

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batista, E.R. [Department of Physics, Box 351560, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1560 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Box 351560, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1560 (United States); [Department of Chemistry, Box 351700, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1700 (United States); Xantheas, S.S. [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 906 Battelle Boulevard, PO Box 999, MS K1-96, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)] [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 906 Battelle Boulevard, PO Box 999, MS K1-96, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Jonsson, H. [Department of Chemistry, Box 351700, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1700 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, Box 351700, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1700 (United States)

    1998-09-01

    We have used an induction model including dipole, dipole{endash}quadrupole, quadrupole{endash}quadrupole polarizability and first hyperpolarizability as well as fixed octopole and hexadecapole moments to study the electric field in ice. The self-consistent induction calculations gave an average total dipole moment of 3.09 D, a 67{percent} increase over the dipole moment of an isolated water molecule. A previous, more approximate induction model study by Coulson and Eisenberg [Proc. R. Soc. Lond. A {bold 291}, 445 (1966)] suggested a significantly smaller average value of 2.6 D. This value has been used extensively in recent years as a reference point in the development of various polarizable interaction potentials for water as well as for assessment of the convergence of water cluster properties to those of bulk. The reason for this difference is not due to approximations made in the computational scheme of Coulson and Eisenberg but rather due to the use of less accurate values for the molecular multipoles in these earlier calculations. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Characterization of soil water content variability and soil texture using GPR groundwave techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grote, K.

    2010-01-01

    wave method for soil water content measurement: Hydrologicalfor estimating soil water content during irrigation andvariations of the soil water content in an agro-ecosystem

  11. The use of a permanent magnet for water content measurements of wood chips

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2001-01-01

    of a Permanent Magnet for Water Content Measurements of Wooda device that measures the water content of wood chips, pulpsystem. The results of water content measurements in wood

  12. ARM - PI Product - Large Scale Ice Water Path and 3-D Ice Water Content

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska OutreachCalendar NSA RelatedInhibitionProductsIn-SituProductsLarge

  13. Heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake by field-collected atmospheric particles below 273 K

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander; Roedel, Tobias R.; Gilles, Marry K.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Knopf, Daniel A.

    2012-09-25

    Atmospheric ice formation induced by particles with complex chemical and physical properties through heterogeneous nucleation is not well understood. Heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake by ambient particles collected from urban environments in Los Angeles and Mexico City are presented. Using a vapour controlled cooling system equipped with an optical microscopy, the range of onset conditions for ice nucleation and water uptake by the collected particles was determined as a function of temperature (200{273 K) and relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice) up to water saturation. Three distinctly different types of authentic atmospheric particles were investigated including soot particles associated with organics/inorganics, inorganic particles of marine origin coated with organic material, and Pb/Zn containing inorganic particles apportioned to anthropogenic emissions relevant to waste incineration. Single particle characterization was provided by micro-spectroscopic analyses using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption ne structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). Above 230 K, signicant differences in water uptake and immersion freezing effciencies of the different particle types were observed. Below 230 K, the particles exhibited high deposition ice nucleation effciencies and formed ice at RHice values well below homogeneous ice nucleation limits. The data show that the chemical composition of these eld{collected particles plays an important role in determining water uptake and immersion freezing. Heterogeneous ice nucleation rate coeffcients, cumulative ice nuclei (IN) spectrum, and IN activated fraction for deposition ice nucleation are derived. The presented ice nucleation data demonstrate that anthropogenic and marine particles comprising of various chemical and physical properties exhibit distinctly different ice nucleation effciencies and can serve as effcient IN at atmospheric conditions typical for cirrus and mixed phase clouds. This indicates a potential link between human activities and cloud formation, and thus climate.

  14. Errors in determination of soil water content using time-domain reflectometry caused by soil compaction around wave guides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghezzehei, T.A.

    2008-01-01

    as well as the water content and water retention propertiesvariations in soil-water content, Water Resources Research,eld soil. Subsequent to water content water measurement, the

  15. VOLATILE TRANSPORT INSIDE SUPER-EARTHS BY ENTRAPMENT IN THE WATER-ICE MATRIX

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levi, A.; Podolak, M.; Sasselov, D.

    2013-05-20

    Whether volatiles can be entrapped in a background matrix composing planetary envelopes and be dragged via convection to the surface is a key question in understanding atmospheric fluxes, cycles, and composition. In this paper, we consider super-Earths with an extensive water mantle (i.e., water planets), and the possibility of entrapment of methane in their extensive water-ice envelopes. We adopt the theory developed by van der Waals and Platteeuw for modeling solid solutions, often used for modeling clathrate hydrates, and modify it in order to estimate the thermodynamic stability field of a new phase called methane filled ice Ih. We find that in comparison to water ice VII the filled ice Ih structure may be stable not only at the high pressures but also at the high temperatures expected at the core-water mantle transition boundary of water planets.

  16. Original article Irrigation, faecal water content and development rate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Original article Irrigation, faecal water content and development rate of free-living stages- ent faecal water contents (FWC) simulating a submersion (7 or 16 h) or an alternance of spraying, T vitrinus in summer, but higher rates were observed in autumn. The action of water had more effect

  17. Water transfer in soil at low water content. Is the local equilibrium assumption still appropriate?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Water transfer in soil at low water content. Is the local equilibrium assumption still appropriate Montpellier, France Abstract The dynamics of water content in the superficial layers of soils is critical a retardation time and a decrease in phase change rate as the water content gets lower. Therefore, the objective

  18. Hydrogen isotope exchanges between water and methanol in interstellar ices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Faure, A; Theulé, P; Quirico, E; Schmitt, B

    2015-01-01

    The deuterium fractionation of gas-phase molecules in hot cores is believed to reflect the composition of interstellar ices. The deuteration of methanol is a major puzzle, however, because the isotopologue ratio [CH2DOH]/[CH3OD], which is predicted to be equal to 3 by standard grain chemistry models, is much larger (~20) in low-mass hot corinos and significantly lower (~1) in high-mass hot cores. This dichotomy in methanol deuteration between low-mass and massive protostars is currently not understood. In this study, we report a simplified rate equation model of the deuterium chemistry occurring in the icy mantles of interstellar grains. We apply this model to the chemistry of hot corinos and hot cores, with IRAS 16293-2422 and the Orion~KL Compact Ridge as prototypes, respectively. The chemistry is based on a statistical initial deuteration at low temperature followed by a warm-up phase during which thermal hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchanges occur between water and methanol. The exchange kinetics is incorpor...

  19. Water Drops Dancing on Ice: How Sublimation Leads to Drop Rebound C. Antonini,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daraio, Chiara

    physical mechanisms, which apparently share nothing in common (superhydrophobicity, evaporation Marconi 5, 24044 Dalmine (BG), Italy 2 Mechanical and Process Engineering Department, Laboratory] and spray cooling [5]), or highly beneficial to avoid water and ice accumulation (e.g., self

  20. Water Ice on the Satellite of Kuiper Belt Object 2003 EL61

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. M Barkume; M. E. Brown; E. L. Schaller

    2006-01-24

    We have obtained a near infrared spectrum of the brightest satellite of the large Kuiper Belt Object, 2003 EL61. The spectrum has absorption features at 1.5 and 2.0 microns, indicating that water ice is present on the surface. We find that the satellite's absorption lines are much deeper than water ice features typically found on Kuiper Belt Objects. We argue that the unusual spectrum indicates that the satellite was likely formed by impact and not by capture.

  1. Stomach contents of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) in Scottish waters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pierce, Graham

    Stomach contents of bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus) in Scottish waters M.B. Santos*P , G, Stratherrick Road, Inverness, IV24JZ. P E-mail: m.b.santos@abdn.ac.uk Data on stomach contents of ten information exists on the feeding habits of the species in Scottish waters. Cod (Gadus morhua), saithe

  2. Iced Coffee Iced Chai Tea Latte

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iced Coffee Iced Chai Tea Latte Iced Americano Iced Cappuccino Iced Latte Iced Mocha Iced White the Cooler Canned Soda Bottled Water Arizona Teas Energy Drinks Red Bull, SF Red Bull & Bing Jones Sodas $0.50 Listed prices do not include applicable sales tax. #12;Brewed Coffee Cafe au Lait Hot Tea Chai Tea Latte

  3. Direct Calculation of Ice Homogeneous Nucleation Rate for a Molecular Model of Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amir Haji-Akbari; Pablo G. Debenedetti

    2015-07-08

    Ice formation is ubiquitous in nature, with important consequences in a variety of environments, including biological cells, soil, aircraft, transportation infrastructure and atmospheric clouds. However, its intrinsic kinetics and microscopic mechanism are difficult to discern with current experiments. Molecular simulations of ice nucleation are also challenging, and direct rate calculations have only been performed for coarse-grained models of wate. For molecular models, only indirect estimates have been obtained, e.g. by assuming the validity of classical nucleation theory. We use a path sampling approach to perform the first direct rate calculation of homogeneous nucleation of ice in a molecular model of water. We use TIP4P/Ice, the most accurate among existing molecular models for studying ice polymorphs. By using a novel topological approach to distinguish different polymorphs, we are able to identify a freezing mechanism that involves a competition between cubic and hexagonal ice in the early stages of nucleation. In this competition, the cubic polymorph takes over since the addition of new topological structural motifs consistent with cubic ice leads to the formation of more compact crystallites. This is not true for topological hexagonal motifs, which give rise to elongated crystallites that are not able to grow. This leads to transition states that are rich in cubic ice, and not the thermodynamically stable hexagonal polymorph. This mechanism provides a molecular explanation to the earlier experimental and computational observations of the preference for cubic ice in the literature.

  4. Periodic fluctuations in deep water formation due to sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saha, Raj

    2015-01-01

    During the last ice age several quasi-periodic abrupt warming events took place. Known as Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events their effects were felt globally, although the North Atlantic experienced the largest temperature anomalies. Paleoclimate data shows that the fluctuations often occurred right after massive glacial meltwater releases in the North Atlantic and in bursts of three or four with progressively decreasing strengths. In this study a simple dynamical model of an overturning circulation and sea ice is developed with the goal of understanding the fundamental mechanisms that could have caused the DO events. Interaction between sea ice and the overturning circulation in the model produces self-sustained oscillations. Analysis and numerical experiments reveal that the insulating effect of sea ice causes the ocean to periodically vent out accumulated heat in the deep ocean into the atmosphere. Subjecting the model to idealized freshwater forcing mimicking Heinrich events causes modulation of the natural p...

  5. Structural transformation in supercooled water controls the crystallization rate of ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Emily B. Moore; Valeria Molinero

    2011-09-27

    One of water's unsolved puzzles is the question of what determines the lowest temperature to which it can be cooled before freezing to ice. The supercooled liquid has been probed experimentally to near the homogeneous nucleation temperature TH{\\approx}232 K, yet the mechanism of ice crystallization - including the size and structure of critical nuclei - has not yet been resolved. The heat capacity and compressibility of liquid water anomalously increase upon moving into the supercooled region according to a power law that would diverge at Ts{\\approx}225 K,(1,2) so there may be a link between water's thermodynamic anomalies and the crystallization rate of ice. But probing this link is challenging because fast crystallization prevents experimental studies of the liquid below TH. And while atomistic studies have captured water crystallization(3), the computational costs involved have so far prevented an assessment of the rates and mechanism involved. Here we report coarse-grained molecular simulations with the mW water model(4) in the supercooled regime around TH, which reveal that a sharp increase in the fraction of four-coordinated molecules in supercooled liquid water explains its anomalous thermodynamics and also controls the rate and mechanism of ice formation. The simulations reveal that the crystallization rate of water reaches a maximum around 225 K, below which ice nuclei form faster than liquid water can equilibrate. This implies a lower limit of metastability of liquid water just below TH and well above its glass transition temperature Tg{\\approx}136 K. By providing a relationship between the structural transformation in liquid water, its anomalous thermodynamics and its crystallization rate, this work provides a microscopic foundation to the experimental finding that the thermodynamics of water determines the rates of homogeneous nucleation of ice.(5)

  6. Soil-Water Characteristic Curve Modeling at Low Water Content: Empirical and Semi-Empirical Approaches

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Soil-Water Characteristic Curve Modeling at Low Water Content: Empirical and Semi model, the Modified Kovacs (MK) model for the determination of soil-water characteristic curve at the low water contents of two horizons of a soil from Burkina Faso. Combining terms from capillary state

  7. Periodic fluctuations in deep water formation due to sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raj Saha

    2015-02-21

    During the last ice age several quasi-periodic abrupt warming events took place. Known as Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events their effects were felt globally, although the North Atlantic experienced the largest temperature anomalies. Paleoclimate data shows that the fluctuations often occurred right after massive glacial meltwater releases in the North Atlantic and in bursts of three or four with progressively decreasing strengths. In this study a simple dynamical model of an overturning circulation and sea ice is developed with the goal of understanding the fundamental mechanisms that could have caused the DO events. Interaction between sea ice and the overturning circulation in the model produces self-sustained oscillations. Analysis and numerical experiments reveal that the insulating effect of sea ice causes the ocean to periodically vent out accumulated heat in the deep ocean into the atmosphere. Subjecting the model to idealized freshwater forcing mimicking Heinrich events causes modulation of the natural periodicity and produces burst patterns very similar to what is observed in temperature proxy data. Numerical experiments with the model also suggests that the characteristic period of 1,500 years is due to the geometry, or the effective heat capacity, of the ocean that comes under sea ice cover.

  8. Water ice in the dark dune spots of Richardson crater on Mars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kereszturi, A; Schmidt, F

    2010-01-01

    In this study we assess the presence, nature and properties of ices - in particular water ice - that occur within these spots using HIRISE and CRISM observations, as well as the LMD Global Climate Model. Our studies focus on Richardson crater (72{\\deg}S, 179{\\deg}E) and cover southern spring and summer (LS 175{\\deg} - 17 341{\\deg}). Three units have been identified of these spots: dark core, gray ring and bright halo. Each unit show characteristic changes as the season progress. In winter, the whole area is covered by CO2 ice with H2O ice contamination. Dark spots form during late winter and early spring. During spring, the dark spots are located in a 10 cm thick depression compared to the surrounding bright ice-rich layer. They are spectrally characterized by weak CO2 ice signatures that probably result from spatial mixing of CO2 ice rich and ice free regions within pixels, and from mixing of surface signatures due to aerosols scattering. The bright halo shaped by winds shows stronger CO2 absorptions than th...

  9. The sticking of atomic hydrogen on amorphous water ice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veeraghattam, Vijay K.; Manrodt, Katie; Lewis, Steven P.; Stancil, P. C. E-mail: lewis@physast.uga.edu

    2014-07-20

    Using classical molecular dynamics, we have simulated the sticking and scattering process of a hydrogen atom on an amorphous ice film to predict the sticking probability of hydrogen on ice surfaces. A wide range of initial kinetic energies of the incident hydrogen atom (10 K-600 K) and two different ice temperatures (10 K and 70 K) were used to investigate this fundamental process in interstellar chemistry. We report here the sticking probability of atomic hydrogen as a function of incident kinetic energy, gas temperature, and substrate temperature, which can be used in astrophysical models. The current results are compared to previous theoretical and experimental studies that have reported a wide range in the sticking coefficient.

  10. NOTE / NOTE New observations on urine contents in water-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vatnick, Itzick

    NOTE / NOTE New observations on urine contents in water- deprived Negev Desert rodents Carmi Korine of the murid subfamilies Gerbillinae and Cricetomyinae from the Namib Desert, when deprived of water, excreted much water. This phenomenon has not been reported in other rodents, and whether it is a trait

  11. On the water delivery to terrestrial embryos by ice pebble accretion

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sato, Takao; Ida, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    Standard accretion disk models suggest that the snow line in the solar nebula migrated interior to the Earth's orbit in a late stage of nebula evolution. In this late stage, a significant amount of ice could have been delivered to 1 AU from outer regions in the form of mm to dm-sized "pebbles." This raises the question why the present Earth is so depleted of water (with the ocean mass being as small as 0.023% of the Earth mass). Here we quantify the amount of icy pebbles accreted by terrestrial embryos after the migration of the snow line assuming that no mechanism halts the pebble flow in outer disk regions. We use a simplified version of the coagulation equation to calculate the formation and radial inward drift of icy pebbles in a protoplanetary disk. The pebble accretion cross section of an embryo is calculated using analytic expressions presented by recent studies. We find that the final mass and water content of terrestrial embryos strongly depends on the radial extent of the gas disk, the strength of d...

  12. A Review Of Water Contents Of Nominally Anhydrous Natural Minerals...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    A Review Of Water Contents Of Nominally Anhydrous Natural Minerals In The Mantles Of Earth, Mars And The Moon Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  13. Interferometric tomography of fuel cells for monitoring membrane water content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waller, Laura

    We have developed a system that uses two 1D interferometric phase projections for reconstruction of 2D water content changes over time in situ in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell system. By modifying the filtered ...

  14. Millennial-scale stable oscillations between sea ice and convective deep water formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saha, Raj

    2015-01-01

    During the last ice age there were several quasi-periodic abrupt warming events. The climatic effects of the so-called Dansgaard-Oeschger (DO) events were felt globally, although the North Atlantic experienced the largest and most abrupt temperature anomalies. Similar but weaker oscillations also took place during the interglacial period. This paper proposes an auto-oscillatory mechanism between sea ice and convective deep water formation in the north Atlantic as the source of the persistent cycles. A simple dynamical model is constructed by coupling and slightly modifying two existing models of ocean circulation and sea ice. The model exhibits mixed mode oscillations, consisting of decadal scale small amplitude oscillations, and a large amplitude relaxation fluctuation. The decadal oscillations occur due to the insulating effect of sea ice and leads to periodic ventilation of heat from the polar ocean. Gradually an instability builds up in the polar column and results in an abrupt initiation of convection an...

  15. Multipole moments of water molecules in clusters and ice Ih from first principles calculations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Batista, E.R. [Department of Physics, Box 351560, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1560 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Box 351560, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1560 (United States); [Department of Chemistry, Box 351700, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1700 (United States); Xantheas, S.S. [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 906 Battelle Boulevard, PO Box 999, MS K8-91, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States)] [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 906 Battelle Boulevard, PO Box 999, MS K8-91, Richland, Washington 99352 (United States); Jonsson, H. [Department of Chemistry, Box 351700, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1700 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, Box 351700, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195-1700 (United States)

    1999-10-01

    We have calculated {ital molecular} multipole moments for water molecules in clusters and in ice Ih by partitioning the charge density obtained from first principles calculations. Various schemes for dividing the electronic charge density among the water molecules were used. They include Bader{close_quote}s zero flux surfaces and Voronoi partitioning schemes. A comparison was also made with an induction model including dipole, dipole-quadrupole, quadrupole-quadrupole polarizability and first hyperpolarizability as well as fixed octopole and hexadecapole moments. We have found that the different density partitioning schemes lead to widely different values for the molecular multipoles, illustrating how poorly defined molecular multipoles are in clusters and condensed environments. For instance, the magnitude of the molecular dipole moment in ice Ih ranges between 2.3 D and 3.1 D depending on the partitioning scheme used. Within each scheme, though, the value for the molecular dipole moment in ice is larger than in the hexamer. The magnitude of the molecular dipole moment in the clusters shows a monotonic increase from the gas phase value to the one in ice Ih, with the molecular dipole moment in the water ring hexamer being smaller than the one in ice Ih for all the partitioning schemes used. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. "Ice cubes" in the center of the Milky Way - Water ice and hydrocarbons in the central parsec

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moultaka, Jihane; Muzic, Koralka

    2015-01-01

    The close environment of the central supermassive black hole of our Galaxy is studied thoroughly since decades in order to shed light on the behavior of the central regions of galaxies in general and of active galaxies in particular. The Galactic Center has shown a wealth of structures on different scales with a complicated mixture of early- and late-type stars, ionized and molecular gas, dust and winds. Here we aim at studying the distribution of water ices and hydrocarbons in the central parsec as well as along the line of sight. This study is made possible thanks to L-band spectroscopy. This spectral band, from 2.8 to 4.2$\\mu m$, hosts important signatures of the circumstellar medium and interstellar dense and diffuse media among which deep absorption features are attributed to water ices and hydrocarbons. We observed the Galactic Center in the L-band of ISAAC spectrograph located on UT1/VLT ESO telescope. By mapping the central half parsec using 27 slit positions, we were able to build the first data cube...

  17. De-coupling seasonal changes in water content and dry matter to predict live conifer foliar moisture content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    De-coupling seasonal changes in water content and dry matter to predict live conifer foliar growing seasons and quantified their LFMC, relative water content (RWC) and dry matter chemistry. LFMC a stronger control on seasonal LFMC dynamics than actual changes in water content, and they challenge

  18. Measurement of freezing point depression of water in glass capillaries and the associated ice front shape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wan, Richard G.

    Measurement of freezing point depression of water in glass capillaries and the associated ice front Variations of the Kelvin equation W. Thomson, Philos. Mag. 42, 448 1871 to describe the freezing point. The capillary freezing point depression for glass tubes with radii of 87 m­3 m was successfully measured

  19. Water ice deuteration: a tracer of the chemical history of protostars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taquet, Vianney; Kahane, Claudine; Ceccarelli, Cecilia; Lòpez-Sepulcre, Ana; Toubin, Céline; Duflot, Denis; Wiesenfeld, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    Context. Millimetric observations have measured large degrees of molecular deuteration in several species seen around low-mass protostars. The Herschel Space Telescope, launched in 2009, is now providing new measures of the deuterium fractionation of water, the main constituent of interstellar ices. Aims. We aim at theoretically studying the formation and the deuteration of water which is believed to be formed on interstellar grain surfaces in molecular clouds. Methods. We used our gas-grain astrochemical model GRAINOBLE which considers the multilayer formation of interstellar ices. We varied several input parameters to study their impact on water deuteration. We included the treatment of ortho and para states of key species, including H2, that affects the deuterium fractionation of all molecules. The model also includes relevant laboratory and theoretical works on water formation and deuteration on grain surfaces. In particular, we computed the transmission probabilities of surface reactions using the Eckart...

  20. Laboratory Determination of the Infrared Band Strengths of Pyrene Frozen in Water Ice: Implications for the Composition of Interstellar Ices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hardegree-Ullman, E E; Boogert, A C A; Lignell, H; Allamandola, L J; Stapelfeldt, K R; Werner, M

    2014-01-01

    Broad infrared emission features (e.g., at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, and 11.3 microns) from the gas phase interstellar medium have long been attributed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). A significant portion (10%-20%) of the Milky Way's carbon reservoir is locked in PAH molecules, which makes their characterization integral to our understanding of astrochemistry. In molecular clouds and the dense envelopes and disks of young stellar objects (YSOs), PAHs are expected to be frozen in the icy mantles of dust grains where they should reveal themselves through infrared absorption. To facilitate the search for frozen interstellar PAHs, laboratory experiments were conducted to determine the positions and strengths of the bands of pyrene mixed with H2O and D2O ices. The D2O mixtures are used to measure pyrene bands that are masked by the strong bands of H2O, leading to the first laboratory determination of the band strength for the CH stretching mode of pyrene in water ice near 3.25 microns. Our infrared band str...

  1. Use of in situ volumetric water content at field capacity to improve prediction of soil water retention properties

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Use of in situ volumetric water content at field capacity to improve prediction of soil water water content at field capacity to improve prediction of soil water retention properties. Most database. Results showed that use of in situ volumetric water content at field capacity as a predictor led

  2. Mobility of D atoms on porous amorphous water ice surfaces under interstellar conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. Matar; E. Congiu; F. Dulieu; A. Momeni; J. L. Lemaire

    2008-10-13

    Aims. The mobility of H atoms on the surface of interstellar dust grains at low temperature is still a matter of debate. In dense clouds, the hydrogenation of adsorbed species (i.e., CO), as well as the subsequent deuteration of the accreted molecules depend on the mobility of H atoms on water ice. Astrochemical models widely assume that H atoms are mobile on the surface of dust grains even if controversy still exists. We present here direct experimental evidence of the mobility of H atoms on porous water ice surfaces at 10 K. Methods. In a UHV chamber, O2 is deposited on a porous amorphous water ice substrate. Then D atoms are deposited onto the surface held at 10 K. Temperature-Programmed Desorption (TPD) is used and desorptions of O2 and D2 are simultaneously monitored. Results. We find that the amount of O2 that desorb during the TPD diminishes if we increase the deposition time of D atoms. O2 is thus destroyed by D atoms even though these molecules have previously diffused inside the pores of thick water ice. Our results can be easily interpreted if D is mobile at 10 K on the water ice surface. A simple rate equation model fits our experimental data and best fit curves were obtained for a D atoms diffusion barrier of 22(+-)2 meV. Therefore hydrogenation can take place efficiently on interstellar dust grains. These experimental results are in line with most calculations and validate the hypothesis used in several models.

  3. Interactive Evolution of Multiple Water-Ice Reservoirs on Mars: Insights from Hydrogen Isotope Compositions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kurokawa, Hiroyuki; Sato, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    Remote sensing data from orbiter missions have proposed that ground ice may currently exist on Mars, although the volume is still uncertain. Recent analyses of Martian meteorites have suggested that the water reservoirs have at least three distinct hydrogen isotope compositions (D/H ratios): primordial and high D/H ratios, which are approximately the same and six times that of ocean water on Earth, respectively, and a newly identified intermediate D/H ratio, which is approximately two to three times higher than that in ocean water on Earth. We calculate the evolution of the D/H ratios and the volumes of the water reservoirs on Mars by modeling the exchange of hydrogen isotopes between multiple water reservoirs and the atmospheric escape. The D/H ratio is slightly higher in the topmost thin surface-ice layer than that in the atmosphere because of isotopic fractionation by sublimation, whereas the water-ice reservoir just below the exchangeable topmost surface layer retains the intermediate D/H signature found ...

  4. REMOTE SENS. ENVIRON. 30:43-54 (1989) Detection of Changes in Leaf Water Content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hunt Jr., E. Raymond

    1989-01-01

    REMOTE SENS. ENVIRON. 30:43-54 (1989) Detection of Changes in Leaf Water Content Using Near the ability of the Leaf Water Content Index (LWCI) to determine leaf Relative Water content (RWC) of different with little adjustment (Jackson, 1982; Hunt et al., 1987). One such method is the Leaf Water Content Index

  5. An investigation of ice shape prediction methodologies and comparison with experimental data 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Britton, Randall Keith

    1989-01-01

    water content has allowed rime, mixed, and glaze ice shapes on the leading edge of an airfoil to be investigated. To my beloved parents, their 6rst grandson, and his mother ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS I would like to thank the members of my committee, Dr... water droplets. The free air temperature heavily inSuences what type and the extent which ice will accrete. Higher temperatures are usually associated with higher liquid water contents and thus lend themselves to the formation of glaze ice. Conversely...

  6. Near Surface Water Content Estimation using GPR Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Yoram

    waves can be used to estimate soil water content · Short pulses of High frequency EM energy · Variations) Improved irrigation management; 3) Improved understanding of ecosystem responses and terroir; 4) May assist, evapotranspiration, and groundwater storage From Or and Rubin, 1990 ** Accurate Spatial and Temporal Variations

  7. Microwave Heating of Water, Ice and Saline Solution: Molecular Dynamics Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Motohiko Tanaka; Motoyasu Sato

    2006-09-24

    In order to study the heating process of water by the microwaves of 2.5-20GHz frequencies, we have performed molecular dynamics simulations by adopting a non-polarized water model that have fixed point charges on rigid-body molecules. All runs are started from the equilibrated states derived from the I$_{c}$ ice with given density and temperature. In the presence of microwaves, the molecules of liquid water exhibit rotational motion whose average phase is delayed from the microwave electric field. Microwave energy is transferred to the kinetic and inter-molecular energies of water, where one third of the absorbed microwave energy is stored as the latter energy. The water in ice phase is scarcely heated by microwaves because of the tight hydrogen-bonded network of water molecules. Addition of small amount of salt to pure water substantially increases the heating rate because of the weakening by defects in the water network due to sloshing large-size negative ions.

  8. Effects of Water Content and Molecular Weight on Spin Probe and Water Mobility in Malto-oligomer Glasses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemminga, Marcus A.

    Effects of Water Content and Molecular Weight on Spin Probe and Water Mobility in Malto content from 10 to 30 wt % leads to a decrease in spin probe mobility at Tg while the water mobility increasing water content. From proton density measurements we conclude that the concomitant increase

  9. Soil water depletion by oak trees and the influence of root water uptake on the moisture content spatial statistics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Katul, Gabriel

    Soil water depletion by oak trees and the influence of root water uptake on the moisture content was used to assess the role of root water uptake on the spatial variability of moisture content the spa- tial variability in moisture content due to root water uptake from variability in soil hydraulic

  10. Formation of Hydrogen, Oxygen, and Hydrogen Peroxide in Electron Irradiated Crystalline Water Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weijun Zheng; David Jewitt; Ralf I. Kaiser

    2005-11-18

    Water ice is abundant both astrophysically, for example in molecular clouds, and in planetary systems. The Kuiper belt objects, many satellites of the outer solar system, the nuclei of comets and some planetary rings are all known to be water-rich. Processing of water ice by energetic particles and ultraviolet photons plays an important role in astrochemistry. To explore the detailed nature of this processing, we have conducted a systematic laboratory study of the irradiation of crystalline water ice in an ultrahigh vacuum setup by energetic electrons holding a linear energy transfer of 4.3 +/- 0.1 keV mm-1. The irradiated samples were monitored during the experiment both on line and in situ via mass spectrometry (gas phase) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (solid state). We observed the production of hydrogen and oxygen, both molecular and atomic, and of hydrogen peroxide. The likely reaction mechanisms responsible for these species are discussed. Additional formation routes were derived from the sublimation profiles of molecular hydrogen (90-140 K), molecular oxygen (147 -151 K) and hydrogen peroxide (170 K). We also present evidence on the involvement of hydroxyl radicals and possibly oxygen atoms as building blocks to yield hydrogen peroxide at low temperatures (12 K) and via a diffusion-controlled mechanism in the warming up phase of the irradiated sample.

  11. Laboratory determination of the infrared band strengths of pyrene frozen in water ice: Implications for the composition of interstellar ices

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardegree-Ullman, E. E. [New York Center for Astrobiology and Department of Physics, Applied Physics, and Astronomy, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, 110 8th Street, Troy, NY 12180 (United States); Gudipati, M. S.; Werner, M. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Boogert, A. C. A. [Infrared Processing and Analysis Center, Mail Code 100-22, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Lignell, H. [Department of Chemistry, University of California Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-2025 (United States); Allamandola, L. J. [Space Science Division, Mail Stop 245-6, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Stapelfeldt, K. R., E-mail: hardee@rpi.edu, E-mail: gudipati@jpl.nasa.gov [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Laboratory, Code 667, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Broad infrared emission features (e.g., at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, and 11.3 ?m) from the gas phase interstellar medium have long been attributed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). A significant portion (10%-20%) of the Milky Way's carbon reservoir is locked in PAH molecules, which makes their characterization integral to our understanding of astrochemistry. In molecular clouds and the dense envelopes and disks of young stellar objects (YSOs), PAHs are expected to be frozen in the icy mantles of dust grains where they should reveal themselves through infrared absorption. To facilitate the search for frozen interstellar PAHs, laboratory experiments were conducted to determine the positions and strengths of the bands of pyrene mixed with H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O ices. The D{sub 2}O mixtures are used to measure pyrene bands that are masked by the strong bands of H{sub 2}O, leading to the first laboratory determination of the band strength for the CH stretching mode of pyrene in water ice near 3.25 ?m. Our infrared band strengths were normalized to experimentally determined ultraviolet band strengths, and we find that they are generally ?50% larger than those reported by Bouwman et al. based on theoretical strengths. These improved band strengths were used to reexamine YSO spectra published by Boogert et al. to estimate the contribution of frozen PAHs to absorption in the 5-8 ?m spectral region, taking into account the strength of the 3.25 ?m CH stretching mode. It is found that frozen neutral PAHs contain 5%-9% of the cosmic carbon budget and account for 2%-9% of the unidentified absorption in the 5-8 ?m region.

  12. Molecular origin of the difference in the HOH bend of the IR spectra between liquid water and ice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Imoto, Sho; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Saito, Shinji

    2013-02-07

    The intensity of the HOH bend in the IR spectrum of ice is significantly smaller than the corresponding one in liquid water. This difference in the IR intensities of the HOH bend in the two systems is investigated using MD simulations with the flexible, polarizable, ab-initio based TTM3-F model for water, a potential that correctly reproduces the experimentally observed increase of the HOH bend in liquid water and ice from the water monomer value. We have identified two factors that are responsible for the difference in the intensity of the HOH bend in liquid water and ice: (i) the decrease of the intensity of the HOH bend in ice caused by the strong anti-correlation between the permanent dipole moment of a molecule and the induced dipole moment of a neighboring hydrogen bond acceptor molecule and (ii) the weakening of this anti-correlation by the disordered hydrogen bond network in liquid water. The presence of the anti-correlation in ice is further confirmed by ab initio electronic structure calculations of water pentamer clusters extracted from the trajectories of the MD simulations for ice and liquid water.

  13. Exploration of tektite formation processes through water and metal content measurements

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Cin-Ty Aeolus

    Exploration of tektite formation processes through water and metal content measurements Nigel WATT1 continental crust, although water contents are still extremely high for rocks melted at atmospheric pressure H2O and Zn or Pb contents. Combined with water contents of other tektites in the Australasian strewn

  14. NOTES ON THE DISSOLVED CONTENT OF WATER IN ITS EFFECT UPON FISHES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .. NOTES ON THE DISSOLVED CONTENT OF WATER IN ITS EFFECT UPON FISHES· JJ. By M. C. Marsh United at Washington. U. S. A.· September 22 to 26. 1908 #12;CONTENTS. Page. Natural impurities in water u n u _ _ u gas content- u u u u u 898 Dissolved air content of water from a driven weILuuu u______________ 898

  15. Observations of high energy neutrinos with water/ice neutrino telescopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albrecht Karle

    2006-02-01

    The search for high energy neutrinos of astrophysical origin is being conducted today with two water/ice Cherenkov experiments. New instruments of higher performance are now in construction and more are in the R&D phase. No sources have been found to date. Upper limits on neutrino fluxes are approaching model predictions. Results are reported on the search for point sources, diffuse fluxes, gamma ray bursts, dark matter and other sources.

  16. The interaction of radio frequency electromagnetic fields with atmospheric water droplets and application to aircraft ice prevention

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansman, Robert John

    1982-01-01

    In this work the physics of advanced microwave anti-icing systems, which pre-heat impinging supercooled water droplets prior to impact, is studied by means of a computer simulation and is found to be feasible. In order to ...

  17. The Hierarchic Theory of Liquids and Solids. Computerized applications for ice, water, and Biosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alex Kaivarainen

    2008-06-05

    This is a new book of quantum Hierarchic theory of condensed matter, general for liquids and solids, developed by this author during 20 years and its numerous applications. Computer program, based on new theory, was used for simulations of big number of physical properties of water and ice. Condensed matter is considered as a superposition of 3D standing waves (collective excitations) of different nature: thermal de Broglie waves, IR photons and thermal phonons. New theories of total internal energy, heat capacity, surface tension, vapor pressure, thermal conductivity, viscosity and self-diffusion are described. Hierarchic theory of osmotic pressure, based on new state equation, new theories of light refraction, Brillouin light scattering and Mossbauer effect are presented also and compared with available experimental data for water and ice. The agreement between theoretical and available experimental results for water and ice is very good. New approach to the turbulence, superfluidity and superconductivity is developed. A lot of applications of new theory to biophysics, including model of Quantum of Mind are described. New optoacoustic device: Comprehensive Analyzer of Matter Properties (CAMP) is proposed.

  18. Water Calibration Measurements for Neutron Radiography: Application to Water Content Quantification in Porous Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kang, Misun [ORNL; Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL; Voisin, Sophie [ORNL; Cheng, Chu-lin [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Perfect, Edmund [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Horita, Juske [Texas Tech University (TTU); Warren, Jeffrey [ORNL

    2013-04-01

    Using neutron radiography, the measurement of water thickness was performed using aluminum (Al) water calibration cells at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Cold-Guide (CG) 1D neutron imaging facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, USA. Calibration of water thickness is an important step to accurately measure water contents in samples of interest. Neutron attenuation by water does not vary linearly with thickness mainly due to beam hardening and scattering effects. Transmission measurements for known water thicknesses in water calibration cells allow proper correction of the underestimation of water content due to these effects. As anticipated, strong scattering effects were observed for water thicknesses greater than 2 mm when the water calibration cells were positioned close to the face of the detector / scintillator (0 and 2.4 cm away, respectively). The water calibration cells were also positioned 24 cm away from the detector face. These measurements resulted in less scattering and this position (designated as the sample position) was used for the subsequent experimental determination of the neutron attenuation coefficient for water. Neutron radiographic images of moist Flint sand in rectangular and cylindrical containers acquired at the sample position were used to demonstrate the applicability of the water calibration. Cumulative changes in the water volumes within the sand columns during monotonic drainage determined by neutron radiography were compared with those recorded by direct reading from a burette connected to a hanging water column. In general, the neutron radiography data showed very good agreement with those obtained volumetrically using the hanging water-column method. These results allow extension of the calibration equation to the quantification of unknown water contents within other samples of porous media.

  19. Assessment of shock effects on amphibole water contents and hydrogen isotope compositions: 2. Kaersutitic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Sarah T.

    Assessment of shock effects on amphibole water contents and hydrogen isotope compositions: 2 in kaersutite water contents (H2O=0.25­0.89 wt. %), decreases in Fe3+ /Fe (4­20%), and enrichments in hydrogen atmosphere led to increased water contents and reduced Fe. Fe reduction and water addition via the reaction

  20. PARAMETRIC STUDY ON THE WATER CONTENT PROFILES AND OXIDATION RATES IN NEARLY SATURATED TAILINGS ABOVE THE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aubertin, Michel

    PARAMETRIC STUDY ON THE WATER CONTENT PROFILES AND OXIDATION RATES IN NEARLY SATURATED TAILINGS of various factors on the water content profiles in reactive tailings. The results presented here show that the position of the water table has a large influence on the water content profiles and on the oxygen flux

  1. Water droplet behavior on superhydrophobic SiO{sub 2} nanocomposite films during icing/deicing cycles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lazauskas, A.; Guobien?, A.; Prosy?evas, I.; Baltrušaitis, V.; Grigali?nas, V.; Narmontas, P.; Baltrusaitis, J.

    2013-08-15

    This work investigates water droplet behavior on superhydrophobic (water contact angle value of 162 ± 1°) SiO{sub 2} nanocomposite films subjected to repetitive icing/deicing treatments, changes in SiO{sub 2} nanocomposite film surface morphology and their non-wetting characteristics. During the experiment, water droplets on SiO{sub 2} nanocomposite film surface are subjected to a series of icing and deicing cycles in a humid (? 70% relative humidity) atmosphere and the resulting morphological changes are monitored and characterized using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and contact angle measurements. Our data show that the formation of the frozen or thawed water droplet, with no further shape change, on superhydrophobic SiO{sub 2} nanocomposite film, is obtained faster within each cycle as the number of the icing/deicing cycles increases. After 10 icing and deicing cycles, the superhydrophobic SiO{sub 2} nanocomposite film had a water contact angle value of 146 ± 2° which is effectively non-superhydrophobic. AFM analysis showed that the superhydrophobic SiO{sub 2} nanocomposite film surface area under the water droplet undergoes gradual mechanical damage during the repetitive icing/deicing cycles. We propose a possible mechanism of the morphological changes to the film surface that take place during the consecutive icing/deicing experiments. - Highlights: • Superhydrophobic film is subjected to repetitive icing/deicing treatments. • Water droplet shape transition is recorded and characterized thereafter. • Atomic force microscopy and contact angle measurements are performed. • The surface undergoes gradual mechanical damage during repetitive icing/deicing. • Mechanism for the observed surface morphological changes is suggested.

  2. Water/Icy Super-Earths: Giant Impacts and Maximum Water Content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marcus, Robert A; Stewart, Sarah T; Hernquist, Lars

    2010-01-01

    Water-rich super-Earth exoplanets are expected to be common. We explore the effect of late giant impacts on the final bulk abundance of water in such planets. We present the results from smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of impacts between differentiated water(ice)-rock planets with masses between 0.5 and 5 M_Earth and projectile to target mass ratios from 1:1 to 1:4. We find that giant impacts between bodies of similar composition never decrease the bulk density of the target planet. If the commonly assumed maximum water fraction of 75wt% for bodies forming beyond the snow line is correct, giant impacts between similar composition bodies cannot serve as a mechanism for increasing the water fraction. Target planets either accrete materials in the same proportion, leaving the water fraction unchanged, or lose material from the water mantle, decreasing the water fraction. The criteria for catastrophic disruption of water-rock planets are similar to those found in previous work on super-Earths of terre...

  3. Photochemistry of the PAH pyrene in water ice: the case for ion-mediated solid-state astrochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bouwman, J; Bakker, A; Allamandola, L J; Linnartz, H

    2009-01-01

    Context. Icy dust grains play an important role in the formation of complex inter- and circumstellar molecules. Observational studies show that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are abundantly present in the ISM in the gas phase. It is likely that these non-volatile species freeze out onto dust grains as well and participate in the astrochemical solid-state network, but experimental PAH ice studies are largely lacking. Methods. Near UV/VIS spectroscopy is used to track the in situ VUV driven photochemistry of pyrene containing ices at temperatures ranging from 10 to 125 K. Results. The main photoproducts of VUV photolyzed pyrene ices are spectroscopically identified and their band positions are listed for two host ices, \\water and CO. Pyrene ionisation is found to be most efficient in \\water ices at low temperatures. The reaction products, triplet pyrene and the 1-hydro-1-pyrenyl radical are most efficiently formed in higher temperature water ices and in low temperature CO ice. Formation routes and band...

  4. A parameterisation of single and multiple muons in the deep water or ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Y. Becherini; A. Margiotta; M. Sioli; M. Spurio

    2005-07-19

    Atmospheric muons play an important role in underwater/ice neutrino detectors. In this paper, a parameterisation of the flux of single and multiple muon events, their lateral distribution and of their energy spectrum is presented. The kinematics parameters were modelled starting from a full Monte Carlo simulation of the interaction of primary cosmic rays with atmospheric nuclei; secondary muons reaching the sea level were propagated in the deep water. The parametric formulas are valid for a vertical depth of 1.5-5 km w.e. and up to 85 deg for the zenith angle, and can be used as input for a fast simulation of atmospheric muons in underwater/ice detectors.

  5. A Compact, Backscattering Deplolarization Cloud Spectrometer for Ice and Water Discrimination

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomson, David

    2014-05-15

    This project was to develop a compact optical particle spectrometer, small enough for operation on UAVS, that measures the optical diameter of cloud hydrometeors and differentiates their water phase (liquid or solid). To reach this goal, a work plan was laid out that would complete three objectives: 1) Evaluation of designs for an optical particle spectrometer that measures the component of light backscattered at two polarization angles. 2) Testing of selected designs on an optical bench. 3) Construction and preliminary testing of a prototype instrument based on the selected, optimum design. A protoype instrument was developed and tested in an icing wind tunnel where the results showed good measurement of cloud droplets and ice particles.

  6. 1 INTRODUCTION The volumetric water content, V, is a key variable

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    1 INTRODUCTION The volumetric water content, V, is a key variable in unsaturated soil mechanics of the dielectric permittivity of the soil, Ka, which is in turn related to the volumetric water content through

  7. Effect of higher water vapor content on TBC performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pint, Bruce A; Haynes, James A

    2012-01-01

    Coal gasification, or IGCC (integrated gasification combined cycle), is one pathway toward cleaner use of coal for power generation with lower emissions. However, when coal-derived synthesis gas (i.e., syngas) is burned in turbines designed for natural gas, turbine manufacturers recommend 'derating,' or lowering the maximum temperature, which lowers the efficiency of the turbine, making electricity from IGCC more expensive. One possible reason for the derating is the higher water vapor contents in the exhaust gas. Water vapor has a detrimental effect on many oxidation-resistant high-temperature materials. In a turbine hot section, Ni-base superalloys are coated with a thermal barrier coating (TBC) allowing the gas temperature to be higher than the superalloy solidus temperature. TBCs have a low thermal conductivity ceramic top coating (typically Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized ZrO{sub 2}, or YSZ) and an oxidation-resistant metallic bond coating. For land-based gas turbines, the industry standard is air plasma sprayed (APS) YSZ and high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) sprayed NiCoCrAlY bond coatings. To investigate the role of higher water vapor content on TBC performance and possible mitigation strategies, furnace cycling experiments were conducted in dry O{sub 2} and air with 10% (typical with natural gas or jet fuel) or 50 vol% water vapor. Cycle frequency and temperature were accelerated to one hour at 1100 C (with 10 minute cooling to {approx}30 C between each thermal cycle) to induce early failures in coatings that are expected to operate for several years with a metal temperature of {approx}900 C. Coupons (16 mm diameter x 2 mm thick) of commercial second-generation single crystal superalloy CMSX4 were HVOF coated on both sides with {approx}125 {micro}m of Ni-22wt%Co-17Cr-12Al either with 0.7Y or 0.7Y-0.3Hf-0.4Si. One side was then coated with 190-240 {micro}m of APS YSZ. Coatings were cycled until the YSZ top coating spalled. Figure 2 shows the results of the initial phase of experiments. Compared to dry O{sub 2}, the addition of 10% water vapor decreased the lifetime of MCrAlY by {approx}30% for the conventional CMSX4 substrates. Higher average lifetimes were observed with Hf in the bond coating, but a similar decrease in lifetime was observed when water vapor was added. The addition of Y and La to the superalloy substrate did not change the YSZ lifetime with 10% water vapor. However, increasing water vapor content from 10 to 50% did not further decrease the lifetime of either bond coating with the doped superalloy substrate. Thus, these results suggest that higher water vapor contents cannot explain the derating of syngas-fired turbines, and other factors such as sulfur and ash from imperfect syngas cleanup (or upset conditions) need to be explored. Researchers continue to study effects of water vapor on thermally grown alumina scale adhesion and growth rate, and are looking for bond coating compositions more resistant to oxidation in the presence of water vapor.

  8. Total reflection infrared spectroscopy of water-ice and frozen aqueous NaCl solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, Rachel L.; Searles, Keith; Willard, Jesse A.; Michelsen, Rebecca R. H., E-mail: RMichelsen@rmc.edu [Department of Chemistry, Randolph-Macon College, P.O. Box 5005, Ashland, Virginia 23005 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, Randolph-Macon College, P.O. Box 5005, Ashland, Virginia 23005 (United States)

    2013-12-28

    Liquid-like and liquid water at and near the surface of water-ice and frozen aqueous sodium chloride films were observed using attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR). The concentration of NaCl ranged from 0.0001 to 0.01 M and the temperature varied from the melting point of water down to 256 K. The amount of liquid brine at the interface of the frozen films with the germanium ATR crystal increased with salt concentration and temperature. Experimental spectra are compared to reflection spectra calculated for a simplified morphology of a uniform liquid layer between the germanium crystal and the frozen film. This morphology allows for the amount of liquid observed in an experimental spectrum to be converted to the thickness of a homogenous layer with an equivalent amount of liquid. These equivalent thickness ranges from a nanometer for water-ice at 260 K to 170 nm for 0.01 M NaCl close to the melting point. The amounts of brine observed are over an order of magnitude less than the total liquid predicted by equilibrium thermodynamic models, implying that the vast majority of the liquid fraction of frozen solutions may be found in internal inclusions, grain boundaries, and the like. Thus, the amount of liquid and the solutes dissolved in them that are available to react with atmospheric gases on the surfaces of snow and ice are not well described by thermodynamic equilibrium models which assume the liquid phase is located entirely at the surface.

  9. Profiling the atmospheric water vapor content using a GPS-Meteorology network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mountziaris, T. J.

    Profiling the atmospheric water vapor content using a GPS-Meteorology network Jayson Maldonado-Meteorological stations. Research Objectives · Develop the hardware necessary for the collection atmospheric water content gives the real Water Vapor Content (WVC) in 3D instead of the Zenith Delay. Future Work · Testing

  10. REMEDIATION OF HIGH WATER CONTENT GEOMATERIALS: A REVIEW OF GEOTEXTILE FILTER PERFORMANCE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Aydilek, Ahmet

    REMEDIATION OF HIGH WATER CONTENT GEOMATERIALS: A REVIEW OF GEOTEXTILE FILTER PERFORMANCE Ahmet H-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, USA ABSTRACT Remediation of contaminated high water content geomaterials for selection of geotextile filters; however, they are not directly applicable to high water content

  11. Stratocumulus Liquid Water Content from Dual-Wavelength Radar ROBIN J. HOGAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reading, University of

    Stratocumulus Liquid Water Content from Dual-Wavelength Radar ROBIN J. HOGAN , NICOLAS GAUSSIAT ABSTRACT A technique is described to retrieve stratocumulus liquid water content (LWC) using the integrated water content of the column, which is then partitioned with height according to the radar

  12. ORIGINAL PAPER Effects of elevated CO2 and soil water content on phytohormone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Effects of elevated CO2 and soil water content on phytohormone transcript induction CO2. A mild reduction in soil water content had no effect on leaf sugars but stimulated the induction and reduced soil water content suppressed the expression of transcripts related to JA and ET gene tran

  13. Characterization of Soil Water Content Variability and Soil Texture using GPR Groundwave Techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    Characterization of Soil Water Content Variability and Soil Texture using GPR Groundwave Techniques@ce.berkeley.edu ABSTRACT Accurate characterization of near-surface soil water content is vital for guiding agricultural. Characterizing the near-surface soil water content can be difficult, as this parameter is often both spatially

  14. Field-scale estimation of volumetric water content using ground-penetrating radar ground wave techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    Field-scale estimation of volumetric water content using ground- penetrating radar ground wave] Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) ground wave techniques were applied to estimate soil water content travel time measurements using 900 and 450 MHz antennas and analyzed these data to estimate water content

  15. Simulating the water content and temperature changes in an experimental embankment using meteorological data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Simulating the water content and temperature changes in an experimental embankment using on the soil response such as changes in water content and temperature as well as the induced vertical from the base of embankment. In this study, the changes in temperature, volumetric water content

  16. ORIGINAL PAPER Effects of elevated CO2 and soil water content on phytohormone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DeLucia, Evan H.

    ORIGINAL PAPER Effects of elevated CO2 and soil water content on phytohormone transcript induction the abundance of SA compared with plants grown in ambient CO2. A mild reduction in soil water content had herbivory. When applied in combination, elevated CO2 and reduced soil water content suppressed

  17. The influence of changes in water content on the electrical resistivity of a natural unsaturated loess

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 The influence of changes in water content on the electrical resistivity of a natural unsaturated relationship between the water content and the electrical resistivity of soils. In this work, a new electrical resistivity probe was developed to monitor the change in local water content in the triaxial apparatus

  18. submitted to Geophys. J. Int. Streaming potential dependence on water-content in

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    submitted to Geophys. J. Int. Streaming potential dependence on water-content in Fontainebleau sand saturation, un- saturated flow, water content SUMMARY The electrokinetic potential results from the coupling of the electrokinetic coefficient as a function of water content. Two drainage experiments have been performed within

  19. Variation in faecal water content may confound estimates of gastro-intestinal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Getz, Wayne M.

    Variation in faecal water content may confound estimates of gastro-intestinal parasite intensity-related variability in faecal water content for two wild ungulate species, springbok (Antidorcas marsupialis) and plains zebra (Equus quagga). We then assessed whether or not faecal water content biased conclusions

  20. Effects of Soil pH and Soil Water Content on Prosulfuron Dissipation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sims, Gerald K.

    Effects of Soil pH and Soil Water Content on Prosulfuron Dissipation RYAN P. HULTGREN,*, ROBERT J% dissipation of the herbicide (DT50) was determined for each soil and water content treatment. At equivalent water contents, prosulfuron DT50 values were positively correlated with soil pH (P

  1. The effect of water content on solute transport in unsaturated porous media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The effect of water content on solute transport in unsaturated porous media Ingrid Y. Padilla, T, Tucson Abstract. The effect of water content on NaCl transport in unsaturated porous media was investigated under steady state flow conditions for water contents ranging between full saturation and 15

  2. Dry matter content in silage maize; assessment of the role of growth and water loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Agronomie Dry matter content in silage maize; assessment of the role of growth and water loss JF variations in total dry matter content (MSt) as a function of growth in dry weight and loss of water by plant, as ripening proceeds. Beyond 25% dry matter content the major part of MSt increase was due to loss of water

  3. Normalized Microwave Reflection Index: Validation of Vegetation Water Content Estimates from Montana Grasslands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Larson, Kristine

    1 Normalized Microwave Reflection Index: Validation of Vegetation Water Content Estimates from NMRI as a metric for estimating vegetation water content (VWC) and evaluate the normalization procedure Reflection Index (NMRI). It is a measure of vegetation water content (VWC) estimated from data archived

  4. Influence of composition and thermal history of volcanic glasses on water content as determined by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Influence of composition and thermal history of volcanic glasses on water content as determined for quantification of water content in natural glasses requires the assessment of the dependence of the technique content (H2OT) and of water speciation (H2Om/OH) requires the development of micro-analytical techniques

  5. Variation in faecal water content may confound estimates of gastro-intestinal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Getz, Wayne M.

    Variation in faecal water content may confound estimates of gastro-intestinal parasite intensity. Here we evaluated the seasonal, age- and sex-related variability in faecal water content for two wild whether or not faecal water content biased conclusions regarding differences in strongyle infection rates

  6. High-Resolution Estimation of Near-Subsurface Water Content using Surface GPR Ground Wave Information

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rubin, Yoram

    1 High-Resolution Estimation of Near-Subsurface Water Content using Surface GPR Ground Wave, UC Berkeley, Berkeley, CA 94720 1. Introduction Information about near surface soil water content the applicability of a surface geophysical method, ground penetrating radar (GPR), for use as a water content

  7. Statistical distributions of water content and sizes for clouds above Europe

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Statistical distributions of water content and sizes for clouds above Europe R. P. H. Berton O and water content (IWC), horizontal and vertical sizes (L and H), and top temperatures (T) of clouds above and water contents) controlling radiation transfer in the cloud, and geo- metrical sizes used

  8. Quantification of water content and speciation in natural silicic glasses (phonolite, dacite, rhyolite) by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quantification of water content and speciation in natural silicic glasses (phonolite, dacite Sciences de la Terre d'Orléans, CNRS-UO, Orléans, France Abstract The determination of total water content dissolved water content and height or area of the H2OT Raman band. Accuracy of deconvolution procedure

  9. Field-scale estimation of volumetric water content using ground-penetrating radar ground wave techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    Field-scale estimation of volumetric water content using ground- penetrating radar ground wave that the GPR estimates had a root mean square error of volumetric water content of the order of 0 agriculture Citation: Grote, K., S. Hubbard, and Y. Rubin, Field-scale estimation of volumetric water content

  10. Outgassing of icy bodies in the solar system - I. The sublimation of hexagonal water ice through dust layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gundlach, Bastian; Blum, Jürgen

    2011-01-01

    Our knowledge about the physical processes determining the activity of comets were mainly influenced by several extremely successful space missions, the predictions of theoretical models and the results of laboratory experiments. However, novel computer models should not be treated in isolation but should be based on experimental results. Therefore, a new experimental setup was constructed to investigate the temperature dependent sublimation properties of hexagonal water ice and the gas diffusion through a dry dust layer covering the ice surface. We show that this experimental setup is capable to reproduce known gas production rates of pure hexagonal water ice. The reduction of the gas production rate due to an additional dust layer on top of the ice surface was measured and compared with the results of another experimental setup in which the gas diffusion through dust layers at room temperature was investigated. We found that the relative permeability of the dust layer is inversely proportional to its thickn...

  11. SIZE AND TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE IN THE FAR-IR SPECTRA OF WATER ICE PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Medcraft, Chris; McNaughton, Don; Thompson, Chris D. [School of Chemistry, Monash University, Wellington Road, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Appadoo, Dominique [Australian Synchrotron, Blackburn Road, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Bauerecker, Sigurd [Institut fuer Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Technische Universitaet Braunschweig, Hans-Sommer-Strasse 10, D-38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Robertson, Evan G., E-mail: E.Robertson@latrobe.edu.au [Department of Chemistry and La Trobe Institute of Molecular Sciences, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria 3086 (Australia)

    2012-10-10

    Spectra of water-ice aerosol particles have been measured in the far-IR region using synchrotron radiation. The particles in the nanoscale size regime of 1-100 nm were formed by rapid collisional cooling at temperatures ranging from 4 to 190 K. The spectra show the characteristic bands centered near 44 {mu}m (230 cm{sup -1}) and 62 {mu}m (160 cm{sup -1}) associated with the intermolecular lattice modes of crystalline ice at all temperatures, in contrast to previous studies of thin films formed by vapor deposition where amorphous ice is generated below 140 K. The bands shift to higher wavenumber values as the temperature is reduced, consistent with the trend seen in earlier studies, but in our experiments the actual peak positions in the aerosol particle spectra are consistently higher by ca. 4 cm{sup -1}. This finding has implications for the potential use of these spectral features as a temperature probe. The particle sizes are small enough for their spectra to be free of scattering effects, and therefore provide a means to assess imaginary refractive index values obtained through Kramers-Kronig analyses of thin film spectra.

  12. Iced Coffee Iced Yerba Mate "Tea"

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Iced Coffee Iced Yerba Mate "Tea" Iced Yerba Mate Latte Iced Chai Tea Latte Original, Green Tea Canned Soda Xing Tea Bottled Water Arizona Teas Energy Drinks Red Bull, SF Red Bull & Bing Jones Sodas $0 Cafe au Lait Hot Tea Yerba Mate "Tea" Yerba Mate Latte Chai Tea Latte - Original, Green Tea, or Sugar

  13. Correlation between thermodynamic anomalies and pathways of ice nucleation in supercooled water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Singh, Rakesh S.; Bagchi, Biman, E-mail: bbagchi@sscu.iisc.ernet.in [Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)] [Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

    2014-04-28

    The well-known classical nucleation theory (CNT) for the free energy barrier towards formation of a nucleus of critical size of the new stable phase within the parent metastable phase fails to take into account the influence of other metastable phases having density/order intermediate between the parent metastable phase and the final stable phase. This lacuna can be more serious than capillary approximation or spherical shape assumption made in CNT. This issue is particularly significant in ice nucleation because liquid water shows rich phase diagram consisting of two (high and low density) liquid phases in supercooled state. The explanations of thermodynamic and dynamic anomalies of supercooled water often invoke the possible influence of a liquid-liquid transition between two metastable liquid phases. To investigate both the role of thermodynamic anomalies and presence of distinct metastable liquid phases in supercooled water on ice nucleation, we employ density functional theoretical approach to find nucleation free energy barrier in different regions of phase diagram. The theory makes a number of striking predictions, such as a dramatic lowering of nucleation barrier due to presence of a metastable intermediate phase and crossover in the dependence of free energy barrier on temperature near liquid-liquid critical point. These predictions can be tested by computer simulations as well as by controlled experiments.

  14. Simulation of Ultra High Energy Neutrino Interactions in Ice and Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Bevan; S. Danaher; J. Perkin; S. Ralph; C. Rhodes; L. Thompson; T. Sloan; D. Waters

    2007-04-08

    The CORSIKA program, usually used to simulate extensive cosmic ray air showers, has been adapted to work in a water or ice medium. The adapted CORSIKA code was used to simulate hadronic showers produced by neutrino interactions. The simulated showers have been used to study the spatial distribution of the deposited energy in the showers. This allows a more precise determination of the acoustic signals produced by ultra high energy neutrinos than has been possible previously. The properties of the acoustic signals generated by such showers are described.

  15. Water-hydroxyl phases on an open metal surface: breaking the ice rules Matthew Forster,a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alavi, Ali

    Water-hydroxyl phases on an open metal surface: breaking the ice rules Matthew Forster,a Rasmitath July 2011 DOI: 10.1039/c1sc00355k Hydroxyl is a key reaction intermediate in many surface catalyzed redox reactions, yet establishing the phase diagram for water/hydroxyl adsorption on metal

  16. Spreading of crude petroleum in brash ice; Effects of oil`s physical properties and water current

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sayed, M.; Kotlyar, L.S.; Sparks, B.D.

    1994-12-31

    Experiments were conducted in a refrigerated, circulating current flume to examine crude oil spreading in brash ice. Amauligak, Hibernia and Norman Wells crudes were tested. Measurements of the physical properties of the oils were also conducted, including: surface and interfacial tensions as well as viscosities. Spreading coefficients were calculated from measured surface and interfacial tensions. Results were obtained for original and weathered oils. For the spreading tests, spill volumes up to 3 liters and water currents up to 0.55 m/s were used. Tests were done using both fresh water ice and saline ice. Slick dimensions were measured, and modes of oil spreading were observed. Slick dimensions depended on oil type, but were not influenced by water current. Oils of high spreading coefficient and low viscosity spread over larger areas than those with low spreading coefficient and high viscosity.

  17. TECHNICAL NOTES Long-Term Behavior of Water Content and Density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Champaign, Ill. in 1987. A pond of water 0.31 m deep was maintained on top of the 7.3 m X 14.6 m X 0.9 mTECHNICAL NOTES Long-Term Behavior of Water Content and Density in an Earthen Liner Timothy E of a compacted earthen liner by monitoring the long-term changes in water content and density. The water content

  18. Water in Low-Mass Star-Forming Regions with Herschel: The Link Between Water Gas and Ice in Protostellar Envelopes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmalzl, M; Walsh, C; Albertsson, T; van Dishoeck, E F; Kristensen, L E; Mottram, J C

    2014-01-01

    Aims: Our aim is to determine the critical parameters in water chemistry and the contribution of water to the oxygen budget by observing and modelling water gas and ice for a sample of eleven low-mass protostars, for which both forms of water have been observed. Methods: A simplified chemistry network, which is benchmarked against more sophisticated chemical networks, is developed that includes the necessary ingredients to determine the water vapour and ice abundance profiles in the cold, outer envelope in which the temperature increases towards the protostar. Comparing the results from this chemical network to observations of water emission lines and previously published water ice column densities, allows us to probe the influence of various agents (e.g., FUV field, initial abundances, timescales, and kinematics). Results: The observed water ice abundances with respect to hydrogen nuclei in our sample are 30-80ppm, and therefore contain only 10-30% of the volatile oxygen budget of 320ppm. The keys to reprodu...

  19. Microphysical Consequences of the Spatial Distribution of Ice Nucleation in Mixed-Phase Stratiform Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Fan; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shaw, Raymond A.

    2014-07-28

    Mixed-phase stratiform clouds can persist even with steady ice precipitation fluxes, and the origin and microphysical properties of the ice crystals are of interest. Vapor deposition growth and sedimentation of ice particles along with a uniform volume source of ice nucleation, leads to a power law relation between ice water content wi and ice number concentration ni with exponent 2.5. The result is independent of assumptions about the vertical velocity structure of the cloud and is therefore more general than the related expression of Yang et al. [2013]. The sensitivity of the wi-ni relationship to the spatial distribution of ice nucleation is confirmed by Lagrangian tracking and ice growth with cloud-volume, cloud-top, and cloud-base sources of ice particles through a time-dependent cloud field. Based on observed wi and ni from ISDAC, a lower bound of 0.006 m^3/s is obtained for the ice crystal formation rate.

  20. Minimalist Model of Ice Microphysics in Mixed-phase Stratiform Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, F.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shaw, Raymond A.

    2013-07-28

    The question of whether persistent ice crystal precipitation from super cooled layer clouds can be explained by time-dependent, stochastic ice nucleation is explored using an approximate, analytical model, and a large-eddy simulation (LES) cloud model. The updraft velocity in the cloud defines an accumulation zone, where small ice particles cannot fall out until they are large enough, which will increase the residence time of ice particles in the cloud. Ice particles reach a quasi-steady state between growth by vapor deposition and fall speed at cloud base. The analytical model predicts that ice water content (wi) has a 2.5 power law relationship with ice number concentration ni. wi and ni from a LES cloud model with stochastic ice nucleation also confirm the 2.5 power law relationship. The prefactor of the power law is proportional to the ice nucleation rate, and therefore provides a quantitative link to observations of ice microphysical properties.

  1. TABLE 1: TOTAL LEAD Content in Drinking Water Client: St. Francis Xavier University

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    TABLE 1: TOTAL LEAD Content in Drinking Water Client: St. Francis Xavier University Site Location;TABLE 1 (cont'd): TOTAL LEAD Content in Drinking Water Client: St. Francis Xavier University Site Laundry Room B3 - Sink 42 - 23 - NOTES: value - exceeds MAC 1 Guidelines for Canadian Drinking Water

  2. Polyaluminum chloride with high Al30 content as removal agent for arsenic-contaminated well water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wehrli, Bernhard

    Polyaluminum chloride with high Al30 content as removal agent for arsenic-contaminated well water-established coagulant in water treatment with high removal efficiency for arsenic. A high content of Al30 nanoclusters¨ berlandstrasse 133, 8600 Du¨bendorf, Switzerland c Water Research Institute (IRSA), National Research Council

  3. Capillary geochemistry in non-saturated zone of soils. Water content and geochemical signatures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Capillary geochemistry in non-saturated zone of soils. Water content and geochemical signatures change. The volumetric capillary water content of the soil at high suction can be calculated corresponds to a decreasing internal pressure of the water, which modifies its thermodynamic properties

  4. Assessing spatial variability of soil water content through Thermal Inertia and NDVI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poggi, Davide

    Assessing spatial variability of soil water content through Thermal Inertia and NDVI Pierluigi of the soil/canopy water content at the short time-scale. This is obtained by means of an indirect approach monitoring (McVicar and Jupp, 1998)3 or for the management of water resources in wide irrigation schemes

  5. Stable or unstable wetting fronts in water repellent soils effect of antecedent soil moisture content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    contents during the experiment, which caused the soil to be wettable instead of water repellent. The waterStable or unstable wetting fronts in water repellent soils ± effect of antecedent soil moisture content Coen J. Ritsemaa,* , John L. Nieberb , Louis W. Dekkera , T.S. Steenhuisc a DLO Winand Staring

  6. CRIRES Science Verification Proposal Determining the atmospheric precipitable water vapour content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liske, Jochen

    CRIRES Science Verification Proposal Determining the atmospheric precipitable water vapour content the precipitable water vapour (PWV) content over Paranal by determining the equivalent widths of 7 carefully. Scientific Case: Atmospheric precipitable water vapour (PWV) is one of the crucial parameters in infrared (IR

  7. Does Water Content or Flow Rate Control Colloid Transport in Unsaturated Porous Media?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thorsten Knappenberger; Markus Flury; Earl D. Mattson; James B. Harsh

    2014-03-01

    Mobile colloids can play an important role in contaminant transport in soils: many contaminants exist in colloidal form, and colloids can facilitate transport of otherwise immobile contaminants. In unsaturated soils, colloid transport is, among other factors, affected by water content and flow rate. Our objective was to determine whether water content or flow rate is more important for colloid transport. We passed negatively charged polystyrene colloids (220 nm diameter) through unsaturated sand-filled columns under steady-state flow at different water contents (effective water saturations Se ranging from 0.1 to 1.0, with Se = (? – ?r)/(?s – ?r)) and flow rates (pore water velocities v of 5 and 10 cm/min). Water content was the dominant factor in our experiments. Colloid transport decreased with decreasing water content, and below a critical water content (Se < 0.1), colloid transport was inhibited, and colloids were strained in water films. Pendular ring and water film thickness calculations indicated that colloids can move only when pendular rings are interconnected. The flow rate affected retention of colloids in the secondary energy minimum, with less colloids being trapped when the flow rate increased. These results confirm the importance of both water content and flow rate for colloid transport in unsaturated porous media and highlight the dominant role of water content.

  8. Water contents in mantle xenoliths from the Colorado Plateau and vicinity: Implications for the mantle rheology and hydration-induced

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Cin-Ty Aeolus

    Water contents in mantle xenoliths from the Colorado Plateau and vicinity: Implications infrared spectroscopy for water contents. Measured water contents range from 2 to 45 ppm for olivine, from the highest water contents (up to 45 ppm H2O in olivine, 402 ppm H2O in orthopyroxene, and 957 ppm H2O

  9. On-sample water content measurement for a complete local monitoring in triaxial testing of unsaturated soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 On-sample water content measurement for a complete local monitoring in triaxial testing sample during triaxial testing, a local water content measurement device was adapted to a triaxial device transducer). Water content was locally monitored by means of a resistivity probe. The water content

  10. Influence of Water Content and Temperature on Molecular Mobility and Intracellular Glasses in Seeds and Pollen1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hemminga, Marcus A.

    Influence of Water Content and Temperature on Molecular Mobility and Intracellular Glasses in Seeds heating. This temperature increased with decreasing water content of the samples. Differential scanning water content, the molecular mobility reached a minimum, and increased again at very low water content

  11. Soil water content dependent wetting front characteristics in sands T.W.J. Bautersa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Soil water content dependent wetting front characteristics in sands T.W.J. Bautersa , D.A. Di 94305, USA Received 2 April 1999; accepted 13 August 1999 Abstract The initial soil water content into a 20/30 sand with initial volumetric water contents of 0, 0.005, 0.01, 0.015, 0.02, 0.03, 0.04 and 0

  12. MEASURE-EENT OF WATER CONTENT I N POROUS MEDIA UNDER GEOTHERMAL FLUID FLOW CONDITIONS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    MEASURE-EENT OF WATER CONTENT I N POROUS MEDIA UNDER GEOTHERMAL FLUID FLOW CONDITIONS for t h e i n - s i t u measurement of water content i n porous media, expressed as a volume f r a c t i o n of t h e pore space; ( 2 ) t o measure water content i n t h e two-phase geothermal f l u i d flow

  13. Real-time Non-contact Millimeter Wave Characterization of Water-Freezing and Ice-Melting Dynamics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woskov, Paul P.

    We applied millimeter wave radiometry for the first time to monitor water-freezing and ice-melting dynamics in real-time non-contact. The measurements were completed at a frequency of 137 GHz. Small amounts (about 2 mL) ...

  14. The irradiation of water ice by C$^+$ ions in the cosmic environment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McBride, E J; Kohanoff, J J

    2014-01-01

    We present a first principles molecular dynamics (FPMD) study of the interaction of low energy, positively charged, carbon (C+) projectiles with amorphous solid water clusters at 30 K. Reactions involving the carbon ion at an initial energy of 11 eV and 1.7 eV with 30-molecule clusters have been investigated. Simulations indicate that the neutral isoformyl radical, COH, and carbon monoxide, CO, are the dominant products of these reactions. All these reactions are accompanied by the transfer of a proton from the reacting water molecule to the ice, where it forms a hydronium ion. We find that COH is formed either via a direct, "knock-out", mechanism following the impact of the C+ projectile upon a water molecule or by creation of a COH_2^+ intermediate. The direct mechanism is more prominent at higher energies. CO is generally produced following the dissociation of COH. More frequent production of the formyl radical, HCO, is observed here than in gas phase calculations. A less commonly occurring product is the ...

  15. The water ice rich surface of (145453) 2005 RR43: a case for a carbon-depleted population of TNOs?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    N. Pinilla-Alonso; J. Licandro; R. Gil-Hutton; R. Brunetto

    2007-05-26

    Recent results suggest that there is a group of TNOs (2003 EL61 being the biggest member), with surfaces composed of almost pure water ice and with very similar orbital elements. We study the surface composition of another TNO that moves in a similar orbit, 2005 RR43, and compare it with the surface composition of the other members of this group. We report visible and near-infrared spectra, obtained with the 4.2m William Herschel Telescope and the 3.58m Telescopio Nazionale Galileo at the "Roque de los Muchachos" Observatory (La Palma, Spain). The spectrum of 2005 RR43 is neutral in color in the visible and dominated by very deep water ice absorption bands in the near infrared (D= 70.3 +/- 2.1 % and 82.8 +/- 4.9 % at 1.5 \\mu and 2.0 \\mu respectively). It is very similar to the spectrum of the group of TNOs already mentioned. All of them present much deeper water ice absorption bands (D>40 %) than any other TNO except Charon. Scattering models show that its surface is covered by water ice, a significant fraction in crytalline state with no trace (5 % upper limit) of complex organics. Possible scenarios to explain the existence of this population of TNOs are discussed: a giant collision, an originally carbon depleted composition, or a common process of continuous resurfacing. We conclude that TNO 2005 RR43 is member of a group, may be a population, of TNOs clustered in the space of orbital parameters that show abundant water ice and no signs of complex organics. The lack of complex organics in their surfaces suggests a significant smaller fraction of carbonaceous volatiles like CH4 in this population than in "normal" TNOs. A carbon depleted population of TNOs could be the origin of the population of carbon depleted Jupiter family comets already noticed by A'Hearn et al. (1995).

  16. ABET Criterion 3: Outcomes Met By Course Content Course #: 474 Title: Water and Landscape Engineering Applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    ABET Criterion 3: Outcomes Met By Course Content Course #: 474 Title: Water and Landscape Proposed Action 1. Learn fundamental concepts of water storage and movement through soil, the basic processes affecting water movement, how to evaluate components of the soil-water budget, and techniques

  17. Agricultural Water Management 146 (2014) 7583 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nacional de San Luis, Universidad

    2014-01-01

    Agricultural Water Management 146 (2014) 75­83 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect Agricultural Water Management journal homepage: www.elsevier.com/locate/agwat Interactive effects of water January 2014 Accepted 13 July 2014 Available online 13 August 2014 Keywords: Water-table Maize Sowing date

  18. ORGANIC CONTENT OF LAKE WATER By EDWARD A. BIRGE and CHANCEY JUDAY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ORGANIC CONTENT OF LAKE WATER .:I- By EDWARD A. BIRGE and CHANCEY JUDAY Wisconsin Geological and Natural HistolY Sun'ey .:I- CONTENTS Page Introductlon; ~ - - _________ 185 I.-Data__u u n _ 186 Dissolved carbon; 194 n.-Discussion o(the data-Contd. Total organic content u _ Total organic matter, including

  19. The water ow regime is characterized by the water ux vector q[m=s] and the water content [m3=m3] satisfying the conservation equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    #12;The water ow regime is characterized by the water ux vector q[m=s] and the water content [m3 compared to the water ow, such that a quasi- stationary approach is feasible, describing the reaction. Due to the injection of water at @ " the normal mass ux is given as a convective ux

  20. Does Water Content or Flow Rate Control Colloid Transport in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    was inhibited, and colloids were strained in water films. Pendular ring and water film thickness calculations indicated that colloids can move only when pendular rings are...

  1. Effect of water washing on oxalic acid content of various fodders and its determination

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Effect of water washing on oxalic acid content of various fodders and its determination A Kumar CS that high oxalic acid content, producing oxalate toxicity and interfering with the calcium metabolism, reduces milk yield. If these fodders are washed with water, soluble oxalates are released up to a safe

  2. Comparison of the palatability of some compound feeds with different water content by tests on goats

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Comparison of the palatability of some compound feeds with different water content by tests and 20% soya oilmeal. To constitute humid feed, dehydrated beet pulp was rehydrated by adding 875 g water matter than DM but that will have to be confirmed with larger scale humidity contents. The presence

  3. Infiltration Estimates from Borehole Water Content Data using the Markov Chain Monte Carlo Method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Zhiming

    measurements of water content and chemical concentrations have been made. This theoretical development Neumann boundary segments N, n(x)=(n1,..., nd)T is an outward unit vector normal to the boundary, C[]= d/d is the specific moisture capacity, is the volumetric water content, and K[] is the unsaturated hydraulic

  4. Reconstructing the history of water ice formation from HDO/H2O and D2O/HDO ratios in protostellar cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furuya, K; Aikawa, Y

    2015-01-01

    Recent interferometer observations have found that the D2O/HDO abundance ratio is higher than that of HDO/H2O by about one order of magnitude in the vicinity of low-mass protostar NGC 1333-IRAS 2A, where water ice has sublimated. Previous laboratory and theoretical studies show that the D2O/HDO ice ratio should be lower than the HDO/H2O ice ratio, if HDO and D2O ices are formed simultaneously with H2O ice. In this work, we propose that the observed feature, D2O/HDO > HDO/H2O, is a natural consequence of chemical evolution in the early cold stages of low-mass star formation: 1) majority of oxygen is locked up in water ice and other molecules in molecular clouds, where water deuteration is not efficient, and 2) water ice formation continues with much reduced efficiency in cold prestellar/protostellar cores, where deuteration processes are highly enhanced due to the drop of the ortho-para ratio of H2, the weaker UV radiation field, etc. Using a simple analytical model and gas-ice astrochemical simulations tracin...

  5. Water content of 1997 vulcanian pumices at Soufriere Hills Volcano (Montserrat) and implications on pre-eruptive conduit conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Water content of 1997 vulcanian pumices at Soufriere Hills Volcano (Montserrat) and implications of the eruptive products. We used quantitative analysis of water content in residual glasses (matrix glass. To better link water content to structural level, we performed new water solubility experiments at low

  6. A NEW SOURCE OF CO{sub 2} IN THE UNIVERSE: A PHOTOACTIVATED ELEY-RIDEAL SURFACE REACTION ON WATER ICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yuan, Chunqing; Cooke, Ilsa R.; Yates, John T. Jr.

    2014-08-20

    CO{sub 2} is one of the most abundant components of ices in the interstellar medium; however, its formation mechanism has not been clearly identified. Here we report an experimental observation of an Eley-Rideal-type reaction on a water ice surface, where CO gas molecules react by direct collisions with surface OH radicals, made by photodissociation of H{sub 2}O molecules, to produce CO{sub 2} ice on the surface. The discovery of this source of CO{sub 2} provides a new mechanism to explain the high relative abundance of CO{sub 2} ice in space.

  7. Parameterizing Size Distribution in Ice Clouds

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeSlover, Daniel; Mitchell, David L.

    2009-09-25

    PARAMETERIZING SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS IN ICE CLOUDS David L. Mitchell and Daniel H. DeSlover ABSTRACT An outstanding problem that contributes considerable uncertainty to Global Climate Model (GCM) predictions of future climate is the characterization of ice particle sizes in cirrus clouds. Recent parameterizations of ice cloud effective diameter differ by a factor of three, which, for overcast conditions, often translate to changes in outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) of 55 W m-2 or more. Much of this uncertainty in cirrus particle sizes is related to the problem of ice particle shattering during in situ sampling of the ice particle size distribution (PSD). Ice particles often shatter into many smaller ice fragments upon collision with the rim of the probe inlet tube. These small ice artifacts are counted as real ice crystals, resulting in anomalously high concentrations of small ice crystals (D < 100 µm) and underestimates of the mean and effective size of the PSD. Half of the cirrus cloud optical depth calculated from these in situ measurements can be due to this shattering phenomenon. Another challenge is the determination of ice and liquid water amounts in mixed phase clouds. Mixed phase clouds in the Arctic contain mostly liquid water, and the presence of ice is important for determining their lifecycle. Colder high clouds between -20 and -36 oC may also be mixed phase but in this case their condensate is mostly ice with low levels of liquid water. Rather than affecting their lifecycle, the presence of liquid dramatically affects the cloud optical properties, which affects cloud-climate feedback processes in GCMs. This project has made advancements in solving both of these problems. Regarding the first problem, PSD in ice clouds are uncertain due to the inability to reliably measure the concentrations of the smallest crystals (D < 100 µm), known as the “small mode”. Rather than using in situ probe measurements aboard aircraft, we employed a treatment of ice cloud optical properties formulated in terms of PSD parameters in combination with remote measurements of thermal radiances to characterize the small mode. This is possible since the absorption efficiency (Qabs) of small mode crystals is larger at 12 µm wavelength relative to 11 µm wavelength due to the process of wave resonance or photon tunneling more active at 12 µm. This makes the 12/11 µm absorption optical depth ratio (or equivalently the 12/11 µm Qabs ratio) a means for detecting the relative concentration of small ice particles in cirrus. Using this principle, this project tested and developed PSD schemes that can help characterize cirrus clouds at each of the three ARM sites: SGP, NSA and TWP. This was the main effort of this project. These PSD schemes and ice sedimentation velocities predicted from them have been used to test the new cirrus microphysics parameterization in the GCM known as the Community Climate Systems Model (CCSM) as part of an ongoing collaboration with NCAR. Regarding the second problem, we developed and did preliminary testing on a passive thermal method for retrieving the total water path (TWP) of Arctic mixed phase clouds where TWPs are often in the range of 20 to 130 g m-2 (difficult for microwave radiometers to accurately measure). We also developed a new radar method for retrieving the cloud ice water content (IWC), which can be vertically integrated to yield the ice water path (IWP). These techniques were combined to determine the IWP and liquid water path (LWP) in Arctic clouds, and hence the fraction of ice and liquid water. We have tested this approach using a case study from the ARM field campaign called M-PACE (Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment). This research led to a new satellite remote sensing method that appears promising for detecting low levels of liquid water in high clouds typically between -20 and -36 oC. We hope to develop this method in future research.

  8. Modeling and High-Resolution-Imaging Studies of Water-Content Profiles in a Polymer-Electrolyte-Fuel-Cell Membrane-Electrode Assembly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, A.Z.

    2008-01-01

    the weighted sum of the water content in the membrane in theposition of the maximum water content and the water-contentgradient in the water content and capillary pressure,

  9. Mass hierarchy discrimination with atmospheric neutrinos in large volume ice/water Cherenkov detectors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. Franco; C. Jollet; A. Kouchner; V. Kulikovskiy; A. Meregaglia; S. Perasso; T. Pradier; A. Tonazzo; V. Van Elewyck

    2013-03-14

    Large mass ice/water Cherenkov experiments, optimized to detect low energy (1-20 GeV) atmospheric neutrinos, have the potential to discriminate between normal and inverted neutrino mass hierarchies. The sensitivity depends on several model and detector parameters, such as the neutrino flux profile and normalization, the Earth density profile, the oscillation parameter uncertainties, and the detector effective mass and resolution. A proper evaluation of the mass hierarchy discrimination power requires a robust statistical approach. In this work, the Toy Monte Carlo, based on an extended unbinned likelihood ratio test statistic, was used. The effect of each model and detector parameter, as well as the required detector exposure, was then studied. While uncertainties on the Earth density and atmospheric neutrino flux profiles were found to have a minor impact on the mass hierarchy discrimination, the flux normalization, as well as some of the oscillation parameter (\\Delta m^2_{31}, \\theta_{13}, \\theta_{23}, and \\delta_{CP}) uncertainties and correlations resulted critical. Finally, the minimum required detector exposure, the optimization of the low energy threshold, and the detector resolutions were also investigated.

  10. Correction of Lightning Effects on Water Content Reflectometer Soil Moisture Data John S. McCartney* and Jorge G. Zornberg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornberg, Jorge G.

    Correction of Lightning Effects on Water Content Reflectometer Soil Moisture Data John S. Mc content measured using WCR (water content reflectometer) probes are susceptible to lightning. Several lightning strikes at the site caused unrealistic shifts in the inferred moisture content (from 0

  11. Ice and water droplets on graphite: A comparison of quantum and classical simulations Rafael Ramrez, Jayant K. Singh, Florian Mller-Plathe, and Michael C. Bhm

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Jayant K.

    to reproduce the macroscopic contact angle of water droplets on graphite. Several energetic and structural compared with the values of ice Ih and liquid water as a function of temperature. The droplet kinetic properties of water droplets with sizes between 102 and 103 molecules were analyzed in a temperature interval

  12. A BIOMECHANICAL PERSPECTIVE ON THE ROLE OF LARGE STEM VOLUME AND HIGH WATER CONTENT IN BAOBAB TREES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Holbrook, N. Michele

    A BIOMECHANICAL PERSPECTIVE ON THE ROLE OF LARGE STEM VOLUME AND HIGH WATER CONTENT IN BAOBAB TREES storage capacity in the six Madagascar baobab species. Baobab wood has a high water content (up to 79 to that in temperate deciduous trees. Furthermore, the elastic modulus of the wood decreases with water content

  13. Non-invasive field measurements of soil water content using a pulsed 14 MeV neutron generator

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johnson, Peter D.

    Non-invasive field measurements of soil water content using a pulsed 14 MeV neutron generator S-3120, United States 1. Introduction Knowledge of soil water content is critical to agricultural, hydrological-rays from H will be a function of the soils' water-content. To the best of our knowledge

  14. Dual-energy synchrotron X ray measurements of rapid soil density and water content changes in swelling soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Walter, M.Todd

    Dual-energy synchrotron X ray measurements of rapid soil density and water content changes-energy synchrotron X ray to measure, for the first time, the water content and bulk density changes during the fast soils and materials is hampered by the difficulty of accurately mea- suring both the water content

  15. Flow at Low Water Contents: A Simple Approach for Inverse Estimation of van Genuchten-Mualem Soil Hydraulic Parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 Flow at Low Water Contents: A Simple Approach for Inverse Estimation of van Genuchten-Mualem Soil and civil engineering. Because of the strong dependency of these properties on water content. For gravimetric water contents greater than 0.04, numeral results agreed well with experimental data, while some

  16. Does Variation in Soil Water Content Induce Variation in the Size of Hatchling Snapping Turtles (Chelydra serpentina)?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finkler, Michael S.

    Does Variation in Soil Water Content Induce Variation in the Size of Hatchling Snapping Turtles in substrate water content during incubation on the size of hatchling Snapping Turtles from southeastern, 11, and 13% gravimetric water content). Eggs in the driest soil (3%) had a slight net loss of mass

  17. Influence of the water content on X-ray fluorescence core-scanning measurements in soft marine sediments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tjallingii, Rik

    Influence of the water content on X-ray fluorescence core- scanning measurements in soft marine properties such as density and water content on XRF core scanner data. Comparison of XRF scanner measurements for the radiation absorption of the water content in sediment core GeoB7920 off Cape Blanc, NW Africa. Components

  18. FDR for non destructive evaluation: inspection of external post-tensioned ducts and measurement of water content in concrete

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    of water content in concrete F. Visco-Comandini(1) , T. Bore(2) , G. Six(1) , F. Sagnard(1) , S. Delepine water content assessment technologies [18]. Another example concerns the bridges which include "external of post tensioned ducts or to measure the water content in concrete, we propose a structural health

  19. The effect of soil water content on the phytotoxicity of diuron, fluridone, metribuzin and trifluralin 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baumann, Paul A

    1979-01-01

    'HIE ~ OF SOIL WATER CONTENT ON 'IBE ~XICITY OF DIURON, FLURIDONE, NETMBUZIN AND TRIFLURALIN by Sutmitted to the Graduate College of Tom A&M University in partial fulfillnant of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1979... of Soil Water Content on the Phytotoxicity of Diuron, Fluridone, Netribuzin and Trifluralin (August 1979) Paul Alan Baumann, B. S. Southwest Missouri State (kuversity, Springfield Chairman of Advisory Ccnrnittee: Qr. Norris G. Nerkle 'The effect...

  20. Ice electrode electrolytic cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glenn, D.F.; Suciu, D.F.; Harris, T.L.; Ingram, J.C.

    1993-04-06

    This invention relates to a method and apparatus for removing heavy metals from waste water, soils, or process streams by electrolytic cell means. The method includes cooling a cell cathode to form an ice layer over the cathode and then applying an electric current to deposit a layer of the heavy metal over the ice. The metal is then easily removed after melting the ice. In a second embodiment, the same ice-covered electrode can be employed to form powdered metals.

  1. Ice electrode electrolytic cell

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glenn, David F. (Idaho Falls, ID); Suciu, Dan F. (Idaho Falls, ID); Harris, Taryl L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ingram, Jani C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1993-01-01

    This invention relates to a method and apparatus for removing heavy metals from waste water, soils, or process streams by electrolytic cell means. The method includes cooling a cell cathode to form an ice layer over the cathode and then applying an electric current to deposit a layer of the heavy metal over the ice. The metal is then easily removed after melting the ice. In a second embodiment, the same ice-covered electrode can be employed to form powdered metals.

  2. The quantum nature of the OH stretching mode in ice and water probed by neutron scattering experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Senesi, Roberto; Flammini, Davide; Kolesnikov, Alexander I; Murray, Eamonn D.; Galli, Giulia; Andreani, Carla

    2013-01-01

    The OH stretching vibrational spectrum of water was measured in a wide range of temperatures across the triple point, 269 K < T < 296 K, using Inelastic Neutron Scattering (INS). The hydrogen projected density of states and the proton mean kinetic energy, _OH, were determined for the first time within the framework of a harmonic description of the proton dynamics. We found that in the liquid the value of _OH is nearly constant as a function of T, indicating that quantum effects on the OH stretching frequency are weakly dependent on temperature. In the case of ice, ab initio electronic structure calculations, using non-local van der Waals functionals, provided _OH values in agreement with INS experiments. We also found that the ratio of the stretching (_OH) to the total (_exp) kinetic energy, obtained from the present measurements, increases in going from ice, where hydrogen bonding is the strongest, to the liquid at ambient conditions and then to the vapour phase, where hydrogen bonding is the weakest. The same ratio was also derived from the combination of previous deep inelastic neutron scattering data, which does not rely upon the harmonic approximation, and the present measurements. We found that the ratio of stretching to the total kinetic energy shows a minimum in the metastable liquid phase. This finding suggests that the strength of intermolecular interactions increases in the supercooled phase, with respect to that in ice, contrary to the accepted view that supercooled water exhibits weaker hydrogen bonding than ice.

  3. Determination of 3-D Cloud Ice Water Contents by Combining Multiple Data

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent BondingMeeting |Design CompetitionsFuelofSources from Satellite,

  4. Validation and determination of ice water content-radar reflectivity relationships during CRYSTAL-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by the absorption and scattering of solar and terrestrial radiation [Norris, 2000]. The extent to which clouds, and the radiative budget of the atmosphere. However, to date cloud processes represent one of the largest uncertain. Introduction [2] Clouds play a critical role in determining the radiative budget of the atmosphere and surface

  5. Modeling and High-Resolution-Imaging Studies of Water-Content Profiles in a Polymer-Electrolyte-Fuel-Cell Membrane-Electrode Assembly

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, A.Z.

    2008-01-01

    is the weighted sum of the water content in the membrane inResolution-Imaging Studies of Water-Content Profiles in aPark, PA 16802, USA. b Water-content profiles across the

  6. Arctic ice islands

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sackinger, W.M.; Jeffries, M.O.; Lu, M.C.; Li, F.C.

    1988-01-01

    The development of offshore oil and gas resources in the Arctic waters of Alaska requires offshore structures which successfully resist the lateral forces due to moving, drifting ice. Ice islands are floating, a tabular icebergs, up to 60 meters thick, of solid ice throughout their thickness. The ice islands are thus regarded as the strongest ice features in the Arctic; fixed offshore structures which can directly withstand the impact of ice islands are possible but in some locations may be so expensive as to make oilfield development uneconomic. The resolution of the ice island problem requires two research steps: (1) calculation of the probability of interaction between an ice island and an offshore structure in a given region; and (2) if the probability if sufficiently large, then the study of possible interactions between ice island and structure, to discover mitigative measures to deal with the moving ice island. The ice island research conducted during the 1983-1988 interval, which is summarized in this report, was concerned with the first step. Monte Carlo simulations of ice island generation and movement suggest that ice island lifetimes range from 0 to 70 years, and that 85% of the lifetimes are less then 35 years. The simulation shows a mean value of 18 ice islands present at any time in the Arctic Ocean, with a 90% probability of less than 30 ice islands. At this time, approximately 34 ice islands are known, from observations, to exist in the Arctic Ocean, not including the 10-meter thick class of ice islands. Return interval plots from the simulation show that coastal zones of the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas, already leased for oil development, have ice island recurrences of 10 to 100 years. This implies that the ice island hazard must be considered thoroughly, and appropriate safety measures adopted, when offshore oil production plans are formulated for the Alaskan Arctic offshore. 132 refs., 161 figs., 17 tabs.

  7. Estimating water content in an active landfill with the aid of GPR

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yochim, April, E-mail: ayochim@regionofwaterloo.ca [Region of Waterloo Waste Management Division, 925 Erb Street West, Waterloo, ON N2J 3Z4 (Canada); Zytner, Richard G., E-mail: rzytner@uoguelph.ca [School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1 (Canada); McBean, Edward A., E-mail: emcbean@uoguelph.ca [School of Engineering, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON N1G 2W1 (Canada); Endres, Anthony L., E-mail: alendres@sciborg.uwaterloo.ca [Dept. of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON N2L 3G1 (Canada)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Limited information in the literature on the use of GPR to measure in situ water content in a landfill. • Developed GPR method allows measurement of in situ water content in a landfill. • Developed GPR method is appealing to waste management professionals operating landfills. - Abstract: Landfill gas (LFG) receives a great deal of attention due to both negative and positive environmental impacts, global warming and a green energy source, respectively. However, predicting the quantity of LFG generated at a given landfill, whether active or closed is difficult due to the heterogeneities present in waste, and the lack of accurate in situ waste parameters like water content. Accordingly, ground penetrating radar (GPR) was evaluated as a tool for estimating in situ water content. Due to the large degree of subsurface heterogeneity and the electrically conductive clay cap covering landfills, both of which affect the transmission of the electromagnetic pulses, there is much scepticism concerning the use of GPR to quantify in situ water content within a municipal landfill. Two landfills were studied. The first landfill was used to develop the measurement protocols, while the second landfill provided a means of confirming these protocols. GPR measurements were initially completed using the surface GPR approach, but the lack of success led to the use of borehole (BH) GPR. Both zero offset profiling (ZOP) and multiple offset gathers (MOG) modes were tried, with the results indicating that BH GPR using the ZOP mode is the most simple and efficient method to measure in situ water content. The best results were obtained at a separation distance of 2 m, where higher the water content, smaller the effective separation distance. However, an increase in water content did appear to increase the accuracy of the GPR measurements. For the effective separation distance of 2 m at both landfills, the difference between GPR and lab measured water contents were reasonable at 33.9% for the drier landfill and 18.1% for the wetter landfill. Infiltration experiments also showed the potential to measure small increases in water content.

  8. Analysing chromatographic data using data mining to monitor petroleum content in water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank, Eibe

    Analysing chromatographic data using data mining to monitor petroleum content in water Geoffrey if they contain petroleum. These tests are mandated in many countries to enable environmental agencies the concentrations of petroleum compounds in water samples. Experiments demonstrate that the framework can be used

  9. The influence of changes in water content on the electrical resistivity of a natural unsaturated loess

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Munoz-Castelblanco, José; Delage, Pierre; Cui, Yu Jun

    2013-01-01

    Non-destructive methods of measuring water content in soils have been extensively developed in the last decades, especially in soil science. Among these methods, the measurements based on the electrical resistivity are simple and reliable thanks to the clear relationship between the water content and the electrical resistivity of soils. In this work, a new electrical resistivity probe was developed to monitor the change in local water content in the triaxial apparatus. The probe is composed of two-pair of electrodes, and an electrical current is induced through the soil at the vicinity of the contact between the probe and the specimen. Some experimental data on the changes in resistivity with the degree of saturation were obtained in specimens of a natural unsaturated loess from Northern France. Two theoretical models of resistivity were also used to analyze the obtained data. Results are finally discussed with respect to the loess's water retention properties.

  10. Ice, Snow and Water: impacts of climate change on California and Himalayan Asia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fenner, R. A.

    2009-01-01

    of Climate Change on Water, Biodiversity and Livelihoods”Dallas 5. The United Nations World Water Development Report3 (2009) “Water in a Changing World” Unesco Publishing (

  11. A parameterisation of single and multiple muons in the deep water or ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Annarita Margiotta

    2006-02-01

    A new parameterisation of atmospheric muons deep underwater (or ice) is presented. It takes into account the simultaneous arrival of muons in bundle giving the multiplicity of the events and the muon energy spectrum as a function of their lateral distribution in a shower.

  12. Accuracy of the Water Vapour Content Measurements in the Atmosphere Using Optical Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galkin, V D; Alekseeva, G A; Novikov, V V; Pakhomov, V P

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the accuracy and the errors of water vapour content measurements in the atmosphere using optical methods, especially starphotometer. After the general explanations of the used expressions for the star-magnitude observations of the water vapour absorption in section 3 the absorption model for the water vapour band will be discussed. Sections 4 and 5 give an overview on the technique to determine the model parameters both from spectroscopic laboratory and radiosonde observation data. Finally, the sections 6 and 7 are dealing with the details of the errors; that means errors of observable magnitude, of instrumental extraterrestrial magnitude, of atmospheric extinction determination and of water vapour content determination by radiosonde humidity measurements. The main conclusion is: Because of the high precision of the results the optical methods for water vapour observation are suited to validate and calibrate alternative methods (GPS, LIDAR, MICROWAVE) which are making constant progress wo...

  13. Investigating ice nucleation in cirrus clouds with an aerosol-enabled Multiscale Modeling Framework

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Chengzhu; Wang, Minghuai; Morrison, H.; Somerville, Richard C.; Zhang, Kai; Liu, Xiaohong; Li, J-L F.

    2014-11-06

    In this study, an aerosol-dependent ice nucleation scheme [Liu and Penner, 2005] has been implemented in an aerosol-enabled multi-scale modeling framework (PNNL MMF) to study ice formation in upper troposphere cirrus clouds through both homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation. The MMF model represents cloud scale processes by embedding a cloud-resolving model (CRM) within each vertical column of a GCM grid. By explicitly linking ice nucleation to aerosol number concentration, CRM-scale temperature, relative humidity and vertical velocity, the new MMF model simulates the persistent high ice supersaturation and low ice number concentration (10 to 100/L) at cirrus temperatures. The low ice numbermore »is attributed to the dominance of heterogeneous nucleation in ice formation. The new model simulates the observed shift of the ice supersaturation PDF towards higher values at low temperatures following homogeneous nucleation threshold. The MMF models predict a higher frequency of midlatitude supersaturation in the Southern hemisphere and winter hemisphere, which is consistent with previous satellite and in-situ observations. It is shown that compared to a conventional GCM, the MMF is a more powerful model to emulate parameters that evolve over short time scales such as supersaturation. Sensitivity tests suggest that the simulated global distribution of ice clouds is sensitive to the ice nucleation schemes and the distribution of sulfate and dust aerosols. Simulations are also performed to test empirical parameters related to auto-conversion of ice crystals to snow. Results show that with a value of 250 ?m for the critical diameter, Dcs, that distinguishes ice crystals from snow, the model can produce good agreement to the satellite retrieved products in terms of cloud ice water path and ice water content, while the total ice water is not sensitive to the specification of Dcs value.« less

  14. Investigating ice nucleation in cirrus clouds with an aerosol-enabled Multiscale Modeling Framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Chengzhu; Wang, Minghuai; Morrison, H.; Somerville, Richard C.; Zhang, Kai; Liu, Xiaohong; Li, J-L F.

    2014-12-01

    In this study, an aerosol-dependent ice nucleation scheme [Liu and Penner, 2005] has been implemented in an aerosol-enabled multi-scale modeling framework (PNNL MMF) to study ice formation in upper troposphere cirrus clouds through both homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation. The MMF model represents cloud scale processes by embedding a cloud-resolving model (CRM) within each vertical column of a GCM grid. By explicitly linking ice nucleation to aerosol number concentration, CRM-scale temperature, relative humidity and vertical velocity, the new MMF model simulates the persistent high ice supersaturation and low ice number concentration (10 to 100/L) at cirrus temperatures. The low ice number is attributed to the dominance of heterogeneous nucleation in ice formation. The new model simulates the observed shift of the ice supersaturation PDF towards higher values at low temperatures following homogeneous nucleation threshold. The MMF models predict a higher frequency of midlatitude supersaturation in the Southern hemisphere and winter hemisphere, which is consistent with previous satellite and in-situ observations. It is shown that compared to a conventional GCM, the MMF is a more powerful model to emulate parameters that evolve over short time scales such as supersaturation. Sensitivity tests suggest that the simulated global distribution of ice clouds is sensitive to the ice nucleation schemes and the distribution of sulfate and dust aerosols. Simulations are also performed to test empirical parameters related to auto-conversion of ice crystals to snow. Results show that with a value of 250 ?m for the critical diameter, Dcs, that distinguishes ice crystals from snow, the model can produce good agreement to the satellite retrieved products in terms of cloud ice water path and ice water content, while the total ice water is not sensitive to the specification of Dcs value.

  15. RAPID METHOD FOR DETERMINING WATER CONTENT IN OYSTER TISSUE By THOMAS C. CARVER, JR., Pishery Biologist (Research) I

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    RAPID METHOD FOR DETERMINING WATER CONTENT IN OYSTER TISSUE By THOMAS C. CARVER, JR., Pishery waiting period. Korringa (1956) reported a method by which the water content of oyster meats could- tained at 100° C. for 1 hour. The volume of water collected was measured and converted to weight

  16. Z .Marine Chemistry 64 1999 5769 A record of estuarine water contamination from the Cd content of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    van Geen, Alexander

    Z .Marine Chemistry 64 1999 57­69 A record of estuarine water contamination from the Cd content content of overlying water at the time of test formation. Pre-industrial foraminiferal CdrCa ratios-year dissolved Cd time series from San Francisco Bay and adjacent coastal water shows that the composition

  17. Results and prospects of deep under-ground, under-water and under-ice experiments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zornoza, J D

    2014-01-01

    Astroparticle experiments have provided a long list of achievements both for particle physics and astrophysics. Many of these experiments require to be protected from the background produced by cosmic rays in the atmosphere. The main options for such protection are to build detectors deep under ground (mines, tunnels) or in the deep sea or antarctic ice. In this proceeding we review the main results shown in the RICAP 2013 conference related with these kind of experiments and the prospects for the future.

  18. Now, Ze assumes |K|2 for water. But what about when we are looking at ice (Smith, 1984, J. Climate and Applied Met., 23, 1258-1260)?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutledge, Steven

    for the particle to appear as a large water drop. #12;Rain-Snow lines- with an advertisement for dual-Pol! ZDRZeNow, Ze assumes |K|2 for water. But what about when we are looking at ice (Smith, 1984, J. Climate and Applied Met., 23, 1258-1260)? For water drops in the Rayleigh regime Z = Ze. Ze applies for Mie regime

  19. Effect of temperature, WPS (water-phase salt) and phenolic contents on4 Listeria monocytogenes growth rates on cold-smoked salmon and evaluation5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 2 3 Effect of temperature, WPS (water-phase salt) and phenolic contents on4 Listeria models, taking into account the effects of temperature, water24 phase salt content, phenolic content

  20. Biogeochemistry in Sea Ice: CICE model developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeffery, Nicole; Hunke, Elizabeth; Elliott, Scott; Turner, Adrian

    2012-06-18

    Polar primary production unfolds in a dynamic sea ice environment, and the interactions of sea ice with ocean support and mediate this production. In spring, for example, fresh melt water contributes to the shoaling of the mixed layer enhancing ice edge blooms. In contrast, sea ice formation in the fall reduces light penetration to the upper ocean slowing primary production in marine waters. Polar biogeochemical modeling studies typically consider these types of ice-ocean interactions. However, sea ice itself is a biogeochemically active medium, contributing a significant and, possibly, essential source of primary production to polar regions in early spring and fall. Here we present numerical simulations using the Los Alamos Sea Ice Model (CICE) with prognostic salinity and sea ice biogeochemistry. This study investigates the relationship between sea ice multiphase physics and sea ice productivity. Of particular emphasis are the processes of gravity drainage, melt water flushing, and snow loading. During sea ice formation, desalination by gravity drainage facilitates nutrient exchange between ocean and ice maintaining ice algal blooms in early spring. Melt water flushing releases ice algae and nutrients to underlying waters limiting ice production. Finally, snow loading, particularly in the Southern Ocean, forces sea ice below the ocean surface driving an upward flow of nutrient rich water into the ice to the benefit of interior and freeboard communities. Incorporating ice microphysics in CICE has given us an important tool for assessing the importance of these processes for polar algal production at global scales.

  1. On-sample water content measurement for a complete local monitoring in triaxial testing of unsaturated soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Munoz-Castelblanco, José; Pereira, Jean-Michel; Cui, Yu-Jun

    2013-01-01

    To provide a complete local monitoring of the state of an unsaturated soil sample during triaxial testing, a local water content measurement device was adapted to a triaxial device comprising the measurement of local displacements (Hall effect transducers) and suction (High capacity transducer). Water content was locally monitored by means of a resistivity probe. The water content/resistivity calibration curves of an intact natural unsaturated loess from Northern France extracted by block sampling at two depths (1 and 3.3 m) were carefully determined, showing good accuracy and repeatability. The validity of two models giving the resistivity of unsaturated soils with respect to their water content was examined.

  2. EVOLUTION OF SNOW LINE IN OPTICALLY THICK PROTOPLANETARY DISKS: EFFECTS OF WATER ICE OPACITY AND DUST GRAIN SIZE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oka, Akinori; Nakamoto, Taishi; Ida, Shigeru, E-mail: akinorioka1@gmail.com, E-mail: nakamoto@geo.titech.ac.jp [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

    2011-09-10

    Evolution of a snow line in an optically thick protoplanetary disk is investigated with numerical simulations. The ice-condensing region in the disk is obtained by calculating the temperature and the density with the 1+1D approach. The snow line migrates as the mass accretion rate ( M-dot ) in the disk decreases with time. Calculations are carried out from an early phase with high disk accretion rates ( M-dot {approx}10{sup -7} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}) to a later phase with low disk accretion rates ( M-dot {approx}10{sup -12} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}) using the same numerical method. It is found that the snow line moves inward for M-dot {approx}>10{sup -10} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}, while it gradually moves outward in the later evolution phase with M-dot {approx}<10{sup -10} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. In addition to the silicate opacity, the ice opacity is taken into consideration. In the inward migration phase, the additional ice opacity increases the distance of the snow line from the central star by a factor of 1.3 for dust grains {approx}< 10 {mu}m in size and of 1.6 for {approx}> 100 {mu}m. It is inevitable that the snow line comes inside Earth's orbit in the course of the disk evolution if the viscosity parameter {alpha} is in the range 0.001-0.1, the dust-to-gas mass ratio is higher than a tenth of the solar abundance value, and the dust grains are smaller than 1 mm. The formation of water-devoid planetesimals in the terrestrial planet region seems to be difficult throughout the disk evolution, which imposes a new challenge to planet formation theory.

  3. Effects of Water Content and Alumino-Silicate Sources on the Structure and Properties of Geopolymers 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lizcano, Maricela

    2012-10-19

    for 21 days at ambient conditions. In addition, the effects of the initial water content, SiO2/Al2O3 ratio, and alkaline activator (Na or K) on the thermal and mechanical properties of GPs, indicate that the dominant factor controlling thermal...

  4. Cloud water contents and hydrometeor sizes during the FIRE Arctic Clouds Experiment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shupe, Matthew

    Cloud water contents and hydrometeor sizes during the FIRE Arctic Clouds Experiment Matthew D a 35-GHz cloud radar and the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program operated a suite Clouds Experiment took place during April­July 1998, with the primary goal of investigating cloud

  5. Spatial variability of throughfall water and chemistry and forest floor water content in a Douglas fir forest stand Hydrology and Earth System Sciences, 6(3), 363374 (2002) EGS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    2002-01-01

    Spatial variability of throughfall water and chemistry and forest floor water content in a Douglas variability of throughfall water and chemistry and forest floor water content in a Douglas fir forest stand K variability of throughfall water and chemistry and forest floor water content within a Douglas fir

  6. Textures, water content and degassing of silicic andesites from recent plinian and dome-forming eruptions at Mount Pele volcano (Martinique,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Textures, water content and degassing of silicic andesites from recent plinian and dome contents (glass inclusions in phenocrysts and matrix glasses) and microtextures. Water contents of glass-eruptive melt water content (i.e., 5.3­ 6.3 wt.%), whereas they are much lower in the dominant pelean

  7. The Influence of Running on Patellar Water Content and Bone Marrow Edema in Females with and without Patellofemoral , H. H. Hu2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Southern California, University of

    The Influence of Running on Patellar Water Content and Bone Marrow Edema in Females marrow water content changes in individuals with and without PFP. To accomplish this goal, we used the water content of the images measured. Equation 2 was used to estimate the water volume of local BME. Eq

  8. The convective desalination of sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rees Jones, David

    2014-07-01

    in the interstices of an ice matrix. My focus is on one of the processes by which the salt content of sea ice decreases, namely convective desalination, which is also often called gravity drainage by geophysicists. Modelling convective desalination requires...

  9. Ice thickness measurements by Raman scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pershin, Sergey M; Klinkov, Vladimir K; Yulmetov, Renat N; Bunkin, Alexey F

    2014-01-01

    A compact Raman LIDAR system with a spectrograph was used for express ice thickness measurements. The difference between the Raman spectra of ice and liquid water is employed to locate the ice-water interface while elastic scattering was used for air-ice surface detection. This approach yields an error of only 2 mm for an 80-mm-thick ice sample, indicating that it is promising express noncontact thickness measurements technique in field experiments.

  10. Fertilizer Facts: April 1997, Number 14 Safflower Seed Yield and Oil Content as Affected by Water and N

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lawrence, Rick L.

    Fertilizer Facts: April 1997, Number 14 Safflower Seed Yield and Oil Content as Affected by Water to combat weeds, diseases and insects. Although considered drought tolerant, production is affected by water. This study was undertaken to quantify the effect of available water on safflower yield potential and oil

  11. Desch_Answers N12.pdf Student questions: Steve Desch colloquium on "Predicting the water content of Earth,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shumway, John

    Desch_Answers N12.pdf 1 Student questions: Steve Desch colloquium on "Predicting the water content of water. The only way you could tell if there was an atmosphere is if you watch the planet in transit, but they will be. What defines solar mass to water mass fraction? We can observe absorption lines of O in the solar

  12. Eos, Vol. 91, No. 29, 20 July 2010 Water and wet sediments under ice sheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Priscu, John C.

    Research Drilling (WISSARD) project (http://www .wissard.org). Begun in 2009, WISSARD will assess how water diversity within glacial environments. Exact selection of drill sites will be based on safety considerations and accessibility as determined through radar, seismic, and satellite data. Surface geophysical surveys will also

  13. In Situ Imaging of Liquid Water and Ice Formation in an Operating PEFC during Cold Start

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Cold-start capability and survivability of polymer electrolyte fuel cells PEFCs in a subzero is insufficient to contain all of the accumulated water before the cell operating temperature rises above freezing to freeze/ thaw cycling between -40 and 80°C. St-Pierre et al.5 found that if a cell was purged with dry gas

  14. Water Determination Using Karl Fischer Titration Water content needs to be determined at all stages of the manufacturing process from raw materials to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nazarenko, Alexander

    of the manufacturing process from raw materials to finished goods. The quality of the product depends on it and effectiveness. In the food industry, the water content of both raw materials and the finished foodstuff needs

  15. Water Content Determination of Rubber Stoppers Utilized for Sealing Lyophilized Pharmaceutical Products: Assessment of Two Karl Fischer Titration Methods

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Voth, Laura Marie

    2013-08-31

    In the pharmaceutical industry, the success of a new drug product is strongly impacted by the stability of the drug formulation. For many formulations, stability is governed by the drug product's water content, thus the ...

  16. Measuring Soil Water Content with Ground Penetrating Radar: A Review J. A. Huisman,* S. S. Hubbard, J. D. Redman, and A. P. Annan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hubbard, Susan

    Measuring Soil Water Content with Ground Penetrating Radar: A Review J. A. Huisman,* S. S. Hubbard: soil water content determined from reflected climate anomalies, such as continental droughts andwave velocity, soil water content determined from ground wave veloc- large-scale precipitation events (Entekhabi

  17. A method to predict the soil susceptibility to compaction of surface layers as a function of water content and bulk density

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    of water content and bulk density K. Saffih-Hdadi1 , P. Défossez2 , G. Richard3 , Y-J. Cui4 , A-M. Tang4 physical properties. Because the soil compaction depends on its water content, bulk density and texture between soil mechanical properties and easily measurable soil properties as well as water content and bulk

  18. Covered Product Category: Water-Cooled Ice Machines | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum Based| Department of Energy Whole-Home Gas Tankless WaterEnergy

  19. Chemical Characterization and Water Content Determination of Bio-Oils Obtained from Various Biomass Species using 31P NMR Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David, K.; Ben, H.; Muzzy, J.; Feik, C.; Iisa, K.; Ragauskas, A.

    2012-03-01

    Pyrolysis is a promising approach to utilize biomass for biofuels. One of the key challenges for this conversion is how to analyze complicated components in the pyrolysis oils. Water contents of pyrolysis oils are normally analyzed by Karl Fischer titration. The use of 2-chloro-4,4,5,5,-tetramethyl-1,3,2-dioxaphospholane followed by {sup 31}P NMR analysis has been used to quantitatively analyze the structure of hydroxyl groups in lignin and whole biomass. Results: {sup 31}P NMR analysis of pyrolysis oils is a novel technique to simultaneously characterize components and analyze water contents in pyrolysis oils produced from various biomasses. The water contents of various pyrolysis oils range from 16 to 40 wt%. The pyrolysis oils obtained from Loblolly pine had higher guaiacyl content, while that from oak had a higher syringyl content. Conclusion: The comparison with Karl Fischer titration shows that {sup 31}P NMR could also reliably be used to measure the water content of pyrolysis oils. Simultaneously with analysis of water content, quantitative characterization of hydroxyl groups, including aliphatic, C-5 substituted/syringyl, guaiacyl, p-hydroxyl phenyl and carboxylic hydroxyl groups, could also be provided by {sup 31}P NMR analysis.

  20. Effect of the acrylic acid content on the permeability and water uptake of latex films

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reyes-Mercado, Yuri; Duda, Yurko

    2007-01-01

    Acrylic acid (AA) is a monomer commonly employed in emulsion polymerization to provide electrostatic colloidal stability and improve specific film performance. The addition of AA not only modifies the kinetics of the polymerization, but also it takes part in the interaction between colloidal particles, which has a strong influence on their packing and consequent latex film properties. In this contribution a theoretical modeling of the latex film formation is presented and compared to experimental results: water vapor permeability and latex film capacitance are studied as a function of AA content. It has been shown that water uptake is mainly affected by film morphology which in turn is defined by intercolloidal interaction and drying rate.

  1. 16/05/12 3:57 PMWATER: Floating robots use GPS-enabled smartphones to track water flow, help water management Page 1 of 4http://www.lakeconews.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article...o-track-water-flow-help-water-management&catid=1:latest&Itemid=1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    management Page 1 of 4http://www.lakeconews.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article...o-track-water-flow-help-water=com_content&view=article...o-track-water-flow-help-water-management&catid=1:latest&Itemid=19716/05/12 3:57 PMWATER: Floating robots use GPS-enabled smartphones to track water flow, help water

  2. Monitoring Phosphorus Content in a Tropical Estuary Lagoon using an Hyperspectral Sensor and its Application to Water Quality Modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    1 Monitoring Phosphorus Content in a Tropical Estuary Lagoon using an Hyperspectral Sensor and its Application to Water Quality Modeling Project Number: 2005PR20B Start: 03/01/2004 End: 12 Quality Board (EQB), conducted water and sediments sampling survey on the SJBNE. While on certain sections

  3. Improvements in Shortwave Bulk Scattering and Absorption Models for the Remote Sensing of Ice Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Baum, Bryan A.

    ) sensor, hyperspectral IR mea- surements from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS; Aumann et al. 2003 water content in the microphysical data spans six orders of magnitude. For evaluation, a library of ice suite of spaceborne sensors that compose the National Aero- nautics and Space Administration (NASA

  4. Effects of Frozen Soil on Snowmelt Runoff and Soil Water Storage at a Continental Scale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Yang, Zong-Liang

    Effects of Frozen Soil on Snowmelt Runoff and Soil Water Storage at a Continental Scale GUO-YUE NIU) ABSTRACT The presence of ice in soil dramatically alters soil hydrologic and thermal properties. Despite computes soil ice content and its modifications to soil hydrologic and thermal properties. However

  5. Conditions for water ice lines and Mars-mass exomoons around accreting super-Jovian planets at 1 - 20 AU from Sun-like stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Heller, René

    2015-01-01

    Exomoon detections might be feasible with NASA's Kepler or ESA's upcoming PLATO mission or the ground-based E-ELT. To use observational resources most efficiently we need to know where the largest, most easily detected moons can form. We explore the possibility of large exomoons by following the movement of water (H2O) ice lines in the accretion disks around young super-Jovian planets. We want to know how different heating sources in those disks affect the H2O ice lines. We simulate 2D rotationally symmetric accretion disks in hydrostatic equilibrium around super-Jovian exoplanets. The energy terms in our semi-analytical model -- (1) viscous heating, (2) planetary illumination, (3) accretional heating, and (4) stellar illumination -- are fed by precomputed planet evolution tracks. We consider planets accreting 1 to 12 Jupiter masses at distances between 1 and 20 AU to a Sun-like star. Accretion disks around Jupiter-mass planets closer than ~4.5 AU to Sun-like stars do not feature H2O ice lines, but the most m...

  6. Stratocumulus Liquid Water Content from Dual Wavelength Radar Robin J. Hogan # , Anthony J. Illingworth, John W. F. Goddard + , Suzanne C. H. M. Jongen # and Henri Sauvageot ++

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogan, Robin

    Stratocumulus Liquid Water Content from Dual Wavelength Radar Robin J. Hogan # , Anthony J­ quid water content (LWC) of such clouds, but active measure­ ments are required in order to obtain information on the vertical distribution of liquid water in the cloud. One of the main prob­ lems

  7. Binding Strength of Sodium Ions in Cellulose for Different Water Contents M. D. Deshpande,,| Ralph H. Scheicher,*,, Rajeev Ahuja,, and Ravindra Pandey*,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pandey, Ravi

    Binding Strength of Sodium Ions in Cellulose for Different Water Contents M. D. Deshpande,,| Ralph ions (Na+ ) with cellulose is investigated from first principles for varying degrees of water content OH groups in cellulose which we categorize as two different types. In the absence of water, Na+ forms

  8. The Retrieval of Ice Water Content from Radar Reflectivity Factor and Temperature and Its Use in Evaluating a Mesoscale Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hogan, Robin

    in Evaluating a Mesoscale Model ROBIN J. HOGAN, MARION P. MITTERMAIER,* AND ANTHONY J. ILLINGWORTH Department-GHz radar with the values held in the Met Office mesoscale forecast model, for eight precipitating

  9. Errors in determination of soil water content using time-domain reflectometry caused by soil compaction around wave guides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghezzehei, T.A.

    2008-05-29

    Application of time domain reflectometry (TDR) in soil hydrology often involves the conversion of TDR-measured dielectric permittivity to water content using universal calibration equations (empirical or physically based). Deviations of soil-specific calibrations from the universal calibrations have been noted and are usually attributed to peculiar composition of soil constituents, such as high content of clay and/or organic matter. Although it is recognized that soil disturbance by TDR waveguides may have impact on measurement errors, to our knowledge, there has not been any quantification of this effect. In this paper, we introduce a method that estimates this error by combining two models: one that describes soil compaction around cylindrical objects and another that translates change in bulk density to evolution of soil water retention characteristics. Our analysis indicates that the compaction pattern depends on the mechanical properties of the soil at the time of installation. The relative error in water content measurement depends on the compaction pattern as well as the water content and water retention properties of the soil. Illustrative calculations based on measured soil mechanical and hydrologic properties from the literature indicate that the measurement errors of using a standard three-prong TDR waveguide could be up to 10%. We also show that the error scales linearly with the ratio of rod radius to the interradius spacing.

  10. Characterization of soil water content variability and soil texture using GPR groundwave techniques

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grote, K.

    2010-01-01

    of soil moisture: Adv. Water Resourc. , 17, Fageria, N.K. ,SGP97) Hydrology Experiment: Water Resources Research, 35(6)variability across scales: Water Resources Research, 44,

  11. System and method for monitoring water content or other dielectric influences in a medium

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cherry, Robert S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Anderson, Allen A. (Firth, ID)

    2001-01-01

    A sensor system is provided that measures water content or other detectable properties in a medium along the entire length of the sensor at any point in time. The sensor system includes an electromagnetic signal generator and a transmission line disposed in a medium to be monitored. Alternatively, the transmission line can be configured for movement across a medium to be monitored, or the transmission line can be fixed relative to a moving medium being monitored. A signal is transmitted along the transmission line at predetermined frequencies, and the signal is returned back along the transmission line and/or into an optional receive line in proximity to the transmission line. The returned signal is processed to generate a one-dimensional data output profile that is a function of a detectable property of the medium. The data output profile can be mapped onto a physical system to generate a two-dimensional or three-dimensional profile if desired. The sensor system is useful in a variety of different applications such as agriculture, horticulture, biofiltration systems for industrial offgases, leak detection in landfills or drum storage facilities at buried waste sites, and in many other applications.

  12. Rapid Simultaneous Mapping of Total and Myelin Water Content, T1 and T2* in Multiple Sclerosis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arhelger, Volker; Gliedstein, Detlef; Lafontaine, Marie-Sofie; Tonkova, Vyara; Holz, Dietrich; Böer, Andreas; Schenk, Jochen; Neeb, Heiko; (,; Koblenz, University of Applied Sciences; Koblenz, Radiologisches Institut Hohenzollernstrasse; Engineering, Institute for Medical; Koblenz, Information Processing; Boeer, Neurologie Dr; Koblenz,

    2010-01-01

    Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging might provide a more specific insight into disease process, progression and therapeutic response of multiple sclerosis. We present an extension of a previously published approach for the simultaneous mapping of brain T1, T2* and total water content. In addition to those three parameters, the method presented in the current work allows for the measurement of myelin bound water content, a surrogate marker of tissue myelination. Myelin water was measured based on its distinct relaxation with reduced T2*, resulting in a multiexponential decay signal. However, only 10 points could be acquired on the relaxation curve within a maximum echo time of <40ms as the quantitative protocol has been adapted previously for fast acquisitions with whole brain coverage. The sparse sampling required an adaption of the optimisation approach with additional constraints necessary in order to obtain reliable results. Therefore, the corresponding pool fractions were determined using linear op...

  13. Interstellar Ices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boogert, A C A

    2003-01-01

    Currently ~36 different absorption bands have been detected in the infrared spectra of cold, dense interstellar and circumstellar environments. These are attributed to the vibrational transitions of ~17 different molecules frozen on dust grains. We review identification issues and summarize the techniques required to extract information on the physical and chemical evolution of these ices. Both laboratory simulations and line of sight studies are essential. Examples are given for ice bands observed toward high mass protostars, fields stars and recent work on ices in disks surrounding low mass protostars. A number of clear trends have emerged in recent years. One prominent ice component consists of an intimate mixture between H2O, CH3OH and CO2 molecules. Apparently a stable balance exists between low temperature hydrogenation and oxidation reactions on grain surfaces. In contrast, an equally prominent ice component, consisting almost entirely of CO, must have accreted directly from the gas phase. Thermal proc...

  14. TABLE OF CONTENTS Content Page

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jiuyong "John"

    #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS Content Page Version 5.1 iii September 2012 Contents 1 INTRODUCTION 1-1 1;TABLE OF CONTENTS Content Page Version 5.1 iv September 2012 3 PLANNING AND DESIGN GUIDELINES 3-1 3 Noise 3-25 3.3.15 Optimise Light 3-25 3.3.16 Save Water 3-25 3.3.17 Minimise Waste 3-25 3.4 Green Star

  15. An evaluation of hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical behavior of processed oil shale solid waste 2; The use of time domain reflectometry (TDR) for monitoring in-situ volumetric water content in processed oil shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reeves, T.L.; Elgezawi, S.M. (Wyoming Univ., Laramie, WY (USA). Dept. of Civil Engineering); Kaser, T.G. (GIGO Computer and Electronic, Laramie, WY (US))

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes the use of time domain reflectometry (TDR) for monitoring volumetric water contents in processed oil shale solid waste. TDR measures soil water content via a correlation between the dielectric constant (K) of the 3 phase (soil-water-air) system and the volumetric water content ({theta}{sub v}). An extensive bench top research program has been conducted to evaluate and verify the use of this technique in processed oil shale solid waste. This study utilizes columns of processed oil shale packed to known densities and varying water contents and compares the columetric water content measured via TDR and the volumetric water content measured through gravimetric determination.

  16. Glacial conditions that contribute to the regeneration of Fountain Glacier proglacial icing, Bylot Island, Canada

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moorman, Brian

    Glacial conditions that contribute to the regeneration of Fountain Glacier proglacial icing, Bylot icings are one of the most common forms of extrusive ice found in the Canadian Arctic. However, the icing. Its regeneration depends on the availability of subglacial water and on the balance between ice

  17. Hidden force floating ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chang Q. Sun

    2015-01-17

    Because of the segmental specific-heat disparity of the hydrogen bond (O:H-O) and the Coulomb repulsion between oxygen ions, cooling elongates the O:H-O bond at freezing by stretching its containing angle and shortening the H-O bond with an association of larger O:H elongation, which makes ice less dense than water, allowing it to float.

  18. Bulletin de la Socit Royale des Sciences de Lige, Vol. XX, X, 200X, pp. YY-ZZ Influence of the water content in the synthesis of fructose laurate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of the water content in the synthesis of fructose laurate by immobilized lipase B of Candida antarctica of these reactions can be modeled as a function of the initial water content by a three-parameter power law for the esterification and by an exponential law for the transesterification. The influence of the water content

  19. Effect of differing mineral contents in process water on the quantity and nitrogen concentration of protein isolates from defatted soy and cottonseed flours 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Heikyung

    1976-01-01

    EFFECT OF DIFFERING MINERAL CONTENTS IN PROCESS WATER ON THE QUANTITY AND NITROGEN CONCENTRATION OF PROTEIN ISOLATES FROM DEFATTED SOY AND COTTONSEED FLOURS A Thesis by HEIKYUNG KIM Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ASM University... in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December l976 Major Sub)ect: Food Technology EFFECT OF DIFFERING MINERAL CONTENTS IN PROCESS WATER ON THE QUANTITY AND NITROGEN CONCENTRATION OF PROTEIN ISOLATES FROM DEFATTED...

  20. The effect of water content, cooling rate, and growth temperature on the freezing temperature of 4 Tillandsia species 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hagar, Christopher Flint

    1990-01-01

    the exotherm initiation temperatures (EIT) of leaf sections. The effect of 2 growth temperatures (5 and 25oC) on the absolute water content and EIT of T. recurvata and T. usneoides was also determined. All p * * pt T. mb'1 ', f o t ld temperatures at 80... minimum winter temperatures of their different northern boundaries. Cooling rate affected the EIT of T. recurvata and T. d* b t t T. b~l' T. o tll . L f t of the former 2 species froze at colder temperatures when cooled at a rate of 25oC per hour than...

  1. Application of TDR technology to water content monitoring of capillary barriers made of pulp and paper residues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cabral, A.R.; Burnotte, F.; Lefebvre, G.

    1999-03-01

    Acid mine drainage (AMD) can be curbed by covering tailings with capillary barriers. The purposes of these barriers is to prevent O{sub 2} from interacting with mine residues. This control can be made by keeping a high degree of moisture inside the cover material. Saturation is thus a key parameter to be monitored. The purpose of this paper is to present how the time domain reflectometry (TDR) technique can be used in order to monitor the volumetric water content for pulp and paper residues that have been used as capillary barriers. Calibration curves for deinking residues are presented and compared to literature data relating to mineral and organic soils.

  2. Method of forming calthrate ice

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hino, T.; Gorski, A.J.

    1985-09-30

    A method of forming clathrate ice in a supercooled water-based liquid contained in a vessel is disclosed. Initially, an oscillator device is located in the liquid in the vessel. The oscillator device is then oscillated ultransonically so that small crystals are formed in the liquid. Thes small crystals serve as seed crystals for ice formation in the liquid and thereby prevent supercooling of the liquid. Preferably, the oscillating device is controlled by a thermostat which initiates operation of the oscillator device when the temperature of the liquid is lowered to the freezing point. Thereafter, the operation of the oscillator device is terminated when ice is sensed in the liquid by an ice sensor.

  3. Method of forming clathrate ice

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hino, Toshiyuki (Tokyo, JP); Gorski, Anthony J. (Lemont, IL)

    1987-01-01

    A method of forming clathrate ice in a supercooled water-based liquid contained in a vessel is disclosed. Initially, an oscillator device is located in the liquid in the vessel. The oscillator device is then oscillated ultrasonically so that small crystals are formed in the liquid. These small crystals serve as seed crystals for ice formation in the liquid and thereby prevent supercooling of the liquid. Preferably, the oscillating device is controlled by a thermostat which initiates operation of the oscillator device when the temperature of the liquid is lowered to the freezing point. Thereafter, the operation of the oscillator device is terminated when ice is sensed in the liquid by an ice sensor.

  4. A parameterisation of the flux and energy spectrum of single and multiple muons in deep water/ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Bazzotti; S. Biagi; G. Carminati; S. Cecchini; T. Chiarusi; G. Giacomelli; A. Margiotta; M. Sioli; M. Spurio

    2009-10-22

    In this paper parametric formulas are presented to evaluate the flux of atmospheric muons in the range of vertical depth between 1.5 to 5 km of water equivalent (km w.e.) and up to 85^o for the zenith angle. We take into account their arrival in bundles with different muon multiplicities. The energy of muons inside bundles is then computed considering the muon distance from the bundle axis. This parameterisation relies on a full Monte Carlo simulation of primary Cosmic Ray (CR) interactions, shower propagation in the atmosphere and muon transport in deep water [1]. The primary CR flux and interaction models, in the range in which they can produce muons which may reach 1.5 km w.e., suffer from large experimental uncertainties. We used a primary CR flux and an interaction model able to correctly reproduce the flux, the multiplicity distribution, the spatial distance between muons as measured by the underground MACRO experiment.

  5. Passive ice freezing-releasing heat pipe

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gorski, Anthony J. (Lemont, IL); Schertz, William W. (Batavia, IL)

    1982-01-01

    A heat pipe device has been developed which permits completely passive ice formation and periodic release of ice without requiring the ambient temperature to rise above the melting point of water. This passive design enables the maximum amount of cooling capacity to be stored in the tank.

  6. Ice Cover on the Great Lakes NATIONALOCEANIC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    : In the shallow waters where whitefish spawn, ice cover protects their eggs from destructive wind and wave action://coastwatch.glerl.noaa.gov/glsea/cur/glsea_cur.png #12;GLERL Research Forecast capability The capability to forecast and predict ice cover is important for recreational safety and rescue efforts as well as for navigation, weather forecasting, adapting to lake level

  7. Performances of the Electrical Spectroscopy employing a RESPER Probe for measuring the Salinity and Water Content of Concretes and Terrestrial Soils

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Settimi, A; Zirizzotti, A; Marchetti, M; Sapia, V

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes to discuss the performances of the electrical spectroscopy employing a RESPER probe to measure the salinity s and volumetric content {\\theta}W of water in concretes and terrestrial soils. The RESPER probe is an induction device for spectroscopy which performs simultaneous and non invasive measurements on the electrical RESistivity 1/{\\sigma} and relative dielectric PERmittivity {\\epsilon}r of a subjacent medium. The RESPER measures {\\sigma} and {\\epsilon} with inaccuracies below a prefixed limit (10%) in the band of middle and high frequencies (MF-HF). The conductivity is related to salinity and the dielectric permittivity to volumetric water content by suitable refined theoretical models which are consistent with the predictions of two empirical laws, respectively Archie's and Topp's. The better agreement, the lower the hygroscopic water content and the higher s; so a better agreement occurs for concretes, containing almost no bound water molecules, provided that are characterized by an h...

  8. FULLY SAMPLED MAPS OF ICES AND SILICATES IN FRONT OF CEPHEUS A EAST WITH THE SPITZER SPACE TELESCOPE1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerakines, Perry

    are relatively constant over the mapped region exhibiting both ice absorptions. The fraction of CO2 ice are invoked. The routine detection of solid CO2, with a fraction relative to water ice between 9% and 37 report the first fully sampled maps of the distribution of interstellar CO2 ices, H2O ices, and total

  9. Weakening of ice by magnesium perchlorate hydrate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lenferink, Hendrik J., 1985-

    2012-01-01

    I show that perchlorate hydrates, which have been indirectly detected at high Martian circumpolar latitudes by the Phoenix Mars Lander, have a dramatic effect upon the rheological behavior of polycrystalline water ice under ...

  10. A 1-D modelling of streaming potential dependence on water content during drainage experiment in sand

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Allègre, Vincent; Ackerer, Philippe; Jouniaux, Laurence; Sailhac, Pascal; 10.1111/j.1365-246X.2012.05371.x

    2012-01-01

    The understanding of electrokinetics for unsaturated conditions is crucial for numerous of geophysical data interpretation. Nevertheless, the behaviour of the streaming potential coefficient C as a function of the water saturation Sw is still discussed. We propose here to model both the Richards' equation for hydrodynamics and the Poisson's equation for electrical potential for unsaturated conditions using 1-D finite element method. The equations are first presented and the numerical scheme is then detailed for the Poisson's equation. Then, computed streaming potentials (SPs) are compared to recently published SP measurements carried out during drainage experiment in a sand column. We show that the apparent measurement of DV / DP for the dipoles can provide the SP coefficient in these conditions. Two tests have been performed using existing models for the SP coefficient and a third one using a new relation. The results show that existing models of unsaturated SP coefficients C(Sw) provide poor results in term...

  11. Aerosol Effects on Cirrus through Ice Nucleation in the Community Atmosphere Model CAM5 with a Statistical Cirrus Scheme

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Minghuai; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhang, Kai; Comstock, Jennifer M.

    2014-09-01

    A statistical cirrus cloud scheme that tracks ice saturation ratio in the clear-sky and cloudy portion of a grid box separately has been implemented into NCAR CAM5 to provide a consistent treatment of ice nucleation and cloud formation. Simulated ice supersaturation and ice crystal number concentrations strongly depend on the number concentrations of heterogeneous ice nuclei (IN), subgrid temperature formulas and the number concentration of sulfate particles participating in homogeneous freezing, while simulated ice water content is insensitive to these perturbations. 1% to 10% dust particles serving as heterogeneous IN is 20 found to produce ice supersaturaiton in better agreement with observations. Introducing a subgrid temperature perturbation based on long-term aircraft observations of meso-scale motion produces a better hemispheric contrast in ice supersaturation compared to observations. Heterogeneous IN from dust particles significantly alter the net radiative fluxes at the top of atmosphere (TOA) (-0.24 to -1.59 W m-2) with a significant clear-sky longwave component (0.01 to -0.55 W m-2). Different cirrus treatments significantly perturb the net TOA anthropogenic aerosol forcing from -1.21 W m-2 to -1.54 W m-2, with a standard deviation of 0.10 W m-2. Aerosol effects on cirrus clouds exert an even larger impact on the atmospheric component of the radiative fluxes (two or three times the changes in the TOA radiative fluxes) and therefore on the hydrology cycle through the fast atmosphere response. This points to the urgent need to quantify aerosol effects on cirrus clouds through ice nucleation and how these further affect the hydrological cycle.

  12. In situ PEM fuel cell water measurements

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Borup, Rodney L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Davey, John R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Spendalow, Jacob S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Efficient PEM fuel cell performance requires effective water management. The materials used, their durability, and the operating conditions under which fuel cells run, make efficient water management within a practical fuel cell system a primary challenge in developing commercially viable systems. We present experimental measurements of water content within operating fuel cells. in response to operational conditions, including transients and freezing conditions. To help understand the effect of components and operations, we examine water transport in operating fuel cells, measure the fuel cell water in situ and model the water transport within the fuel cell. High Frequency Resistance (HFR), AC Impedance and Neutron imaging (using NIST's facilities) were used to measure water content in operating fuel cells with various conditions, including current density, relative humidity, inlet flows, flow orientation and variable GDL properties. Ice formation in freezing cells was also monitored both during operation and shut-down conditions.

  13. (1) AGGELIDES, S., YOUNGS, E.G., 1978 -The dependance of the parameters in the Green and Ampt infiltration equation on the initial water content in draining and wetting states.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    infiltration equation on the initial water content in draining and wetting states. Water Resources Research, 14 analysis. Water Resources Research, vol. 2, n°4, p.729-738. (17) BOUWER, H., 1969 ­ Infiltration of water.L., 1977 ­ Estimating the effective capillary pressure in the Green and Ampt infiltration equation. Water

  14. The Laboratory Complex for the Calibration of Photometers Using the Optical Method for Determination of the Water Vapor Content in the Earth Atmosphere

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galkin, V D; Nikanorova, I N; Leiterer, U; Niebert, T; Alekseeva, G A; Novikov, V V; Ilyin, G N; Pakhomov, V P

    2010-01-01

    We describe the laboratory complex for the calibration of photometers that are used in weather service to measure the water vapor content in the Earth atmosphere. The complex was built up in Pulkovo Observatory and developed within the framework of collaboration between Pulkovo Observatory and Lindenberg Meteorological Observatory (Meteorologisches Observatorium Lindenberg - Richard-A{\\ss}mann-Observatorium, Lindenberg, Germany). It is used to obtain calibration dependences for individual devices, and also to develop and compare various methods of construction of calibration dependences. These techniques are based on direct calibration of the photometers, on the use of spectral laboratory transmission functions for water vapor, on calculation methods using spectroscopical databases for individual lines. We hope that when the parameters of the equipment are taken into account in detail and new results for the absorptive power of water vapor are used, the accuracy of determination of the water vapor content in ...

  15. Analysis of the Application of the Optical Method to the Measurements of the Water Vapor Content in the Atmosphere. I. Basic Concepts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galkin, V D; Alekseeva, G A; Berger, F -H; Leiterer, U; Naebert, T; Nikanorova, I N; Novikov, V V; Pakhomov, V P; Sal'nikov, I B

    2010-01-01

    We retrieved the total content of the atmospheric water vapor from extensive sets of photometric data obtained since 1995 at Lindenberg Meteorological Observatory with star and sun photometers. Different methods of determination of the empirical parameters that are necessary for the retrieval are discussed. The instruments were independently calibrated using laboratory measurements made at Pulkovo Observatory with the VKM-100 multi-pass vacuum cell. The empirical parameters were also calculated by the simulation of the atmospheric absorption by water vapor, using the MODRAN-4 program package for different model atmospheres. The results are compared to those presented in the literature, obtained with different instruments and methods of the retrieval. The accuracy of the empirical parameters used for the power approximation that links the water vapor content with the observed absorption is analyzed. Currently, the calibration and measurement errors yield the uncertainty of about 10% in the total column water v...

  16. Community Ice Sheet Model (CISM2) Development and Marine Ice...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Conference: Community Ice Sheet Model (CISM2) Development and Marine Ice Sheet Simulations Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Community Ice Sheet Model (CISM2) Development...

  17. ARM - Measurement - Ice water path

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach Home Roomparticle sizefraction ARMGeometrytypespath ARM Data

  18. Molecular simulations of heterogeneous ice nucleation. I. Controlling ice nucleation through surface hydrophilicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephen J. Cox; Shawn M. Kathmann; Ben Slater; Angelos Michaelides

    2015-05-29

    Ice formation is one of the most common and important processes on earth and almost always occurs at the surface of a material. A basic understanding of how the physicochemical properties of a material's surface affect its ability to form ice has remained elusive. Here, we use molecular dynamics simulations to directly probe heterogeneous ice nucleation at a hexagonal surface of a nanoparticle of varying hydrophilicity. Surprisingly, we find that structurally identical surfaces can both inhibit and promote ice formation and analogous to a chemical catalyst, it is found that an optimal interaction between the surface and the water exists for promoting ice nucleation. We use our microscopic understanding of the mechanism to design a modified surface in silico with enhanced ice nucleating ability.

  19. Modeling Water Management in Polymer-Electrolyte Fuel Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Weber, Adam; Department of Chemical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley

    2008-01-01

    of predicted water contents and water management in ani.e . , temperature and water content), and thus many modelsfor the water uptake and water content using macroscopic

  20. Evidence that ice forms primarily in supercooled liquid clouds at temperatures > -27C2 C. D. Westbrook and A. J. Illingworth3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reading, University of

    layer of supercooled liquid water droplets at the25 top of ice-phase clouds has been observed in several cases (Rauber and Tokay 1991), but the26 fraction of ice clouds which have liquid water at the top has case where the air35 was supersaturated with respect to ice but below liquid water saturation: ice

  1. Fluid Migration During Ice/Rock Planetesimal Differentiation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raney, Robert 1987-

    2012-12-12

    fast melt water can segregate from the core of an ice-rich planetesimal. To answer this question we treat the core as two phase flow problem: a compacting viscous “solid” (ice/rock mixture) and a segregating liquid (melt water). The model developed...

  2. Modeling and High-Resolution-Imaging Studies of Water-Content Profiles in a Polymer-Electrolyte-Fuel-Cell Membrane-Electrode Assembly

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevenson, Cynthia; Weber, A.Z.; Hickner, M.A.

    2008-03-06

    Water-content profiles across the membrane electrode assembly of a polymer-electrolyte fuel cell were measured using high-resolution neutron imaging and compared to mathematical-modeling predictions. It was found that the membrane held considerably more water than the other membrane-electrode constituents (catalyst layers, microporous layers, and macroporous gas-diffusion layers) at low temperatures, 40 and 60 C. The water content in the membrane and the assembly decreased drastically at 80 C where vapor transport and a heat-pipe effect began to dominate the water removal from the membrane-electrode assembly. In the regimes where vapor transport was significant, the through-plane water-content profile skewed towards the cathode. Similar trends were observed as the relative humidity of the inlet gases was lowered. This combined experimental and modeling approach has been beneficial in rationalizing the results of each and given insight into future directions for new experimental work and refinements to currently available models.

  3. Intercomparison of the Cloud Water Phase among Global Climate Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Komurcu, Muge; Storelvmo, Trude; Tan, Ivy; Lohmann, U.; Yun, Yuxing; Penner, Joyce E.; Wang, Yong; Liu, Xiaohong; Takemura, T.

    2014-03-27

    Mixed-phase clouds (clouds that consist of both cloud droplets and ice crystals) are frequently present in the Earth’s atmosphere and influence the Earth’s energy budget through their radiative properties, which are highly dependent on the cloud water phase. In this study, the phase partitioning of cloud water is compared among six global climate models (GCMs) and with Cloud and Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization retrievals. It is found that the GCMs predict vastly different distributions of cloud phase for a given temperature, and none of them are capable of reproducing the spatial distribution or magnitude of the observed phase partitioning. While some GCMs produced liquid water paths comparable to satellite observations, they all failed to preserve sufficient liquid water at mixed-phase cloud temperatures. Our results suggest that validating GCMs using only the vertically integrated water contents could lead to amplified differences in cloud radiative feedback. The sensitivity of the simulated cloud phase in GCMs to the choice of heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterization is also investigated. The response to a change in ice nucleation is quite different for each GCM, and the implementation of the same ice nucleation parameterization in all models does not reduce the spread in simulated phase among GCMs. The results suggest that processes subsequent to ice nucleation are at least as important in determining phase and should be the focus of future studies aimed at understanding and reducing differences among the models.

  4. Ethanol adsorbed on ice: A first-principles study C. Thierfelder*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmidt, Wolf Gero

    Ethanol adsorbed on ice: A first-principles study C. Thierfelder* Centre of Theoretical Chemistry of ethanol molecules on the ice Ih basal plane. Apart from smooth surfaces, also substrate models simulation for ethanol adsorbed on ice using the TIP4P potential16 for the water-water interaction. Recent

  5. Widespread Excess Ice in Arcadia Planitia, Mars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bramson, Ali M; Putzig, Nathaniel E; Sutton, Sarah; Plaut, Jeffrey J; Brothers, T Charles; Holt, John W

    2015-01-01

    The distribution of subsurface water ice on Mars is a key constraint on past climate, while the volumetric concentration of buried ice (pore-filling versus excess) provides information about the process that led to its deposition. We investigate the subsurface of Arcadia Planitia by measuring the depth of terraces in simple impact craters and mapping a widespread subsurface reflection in radar sounding data. Assuming that the contrast in material strengths responsible for the terracing is the same dielectric interface that causes the radar reflection, we can combine these data to estimate the dielectric constant of the overlying material. We compare these results to a three-component dielectric mixing model to constrain composition. Our results indicate a widespread, decameters-thick layer that is excess water ice ~10^4 km^3 in volume. The accumulation and long-term preservation of this ice is a challenge for current Martian climate models.

  6. Errors in determination of soil water content using time-domain reflectometry caused by soil compaction around wave guides

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghezzehei, T.A.

    2008-01-01

    soil bulk density and the water retention curve, Vadose ZoneA. Bruand, A conceptual model of the soil water retentioncurve, Water Resources Research, 34 (2), 223–231, 1998.

  7. Communication: On the stability of ice 0, ice i, and I{sub h}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quigley, D.; Alfè, D.; Slater, B.

    2014-10-28

    Using ab initio methods, we examine the stability of ice 0, a recently proposed tetragonal form of ice implicated in the homogeneous freezing of water [J. Russo, F. Romano, and H. Tanaka, Nat. Mater. 13, 670 (2014)]. Vibrational frequencies are computed across the complete Brillouin Zone using Density Functional Theory (DFT), to confirm mechanical stability and quantify the free energy of ice 0 relative to ice I{sub h}. The robustness of this result is tested via dispersion corrected semi-local and hybrid DFT, and Quantum Monte-Carlo calculation of lattice energies. Results indicate that popular molecular models only slightly overestimate the stability of ice zero. In addition, we study all possible realisations of proton disorder within the ice zero unit cell, and identify the ground state as ferroelectric. Comparisons are made to other low density metastable forms of ice, suggesting that the ice i structure [C. J. Fennel and J. D. Gezelter, J. Chem. Theory Comput. 1, 662 (2005)] may be equally relevant to ice formation.

  8. Using Temporal Information in an Automated Classification of Summer, Marginal Ice Zone Imagery*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kansas, University of

    * Donna Haverkamp and Costas Tsatsoulis Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science- analyzed temperature records and regional statistics in order to achieve an automated ice's ice/water concentrations and melt state with temperature and wind data, a current interpretation

  9. Incorporation of particulates into accreted ice above subglacial Vostok lake, Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christner, Brent C.

    polycarbonate membranes, and secondary electron images were collected at Â500 magnification using a scanning conductivity suggest that the ice comprises lake water which has refrozen to the underside of the ice sheet

  10. A Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Model for Ice Sheet and Ice Shelf Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Wenxiao; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Monaghan, Joseph J.

    2012-02-08

    Mathematical modeling of ice sheets is complicated by the non-linearity of the governing equations and boundary conditions. Standard grid-based methods require complex front tracking techniques and have limited capability to handle large material deformations and abrupt changes in bottom topography. As a consequence, numerical methods are usually restricted to shallow ice sheet and ice shelf approximations. We propose a new smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) model for coupled ice sheet and ice shelf dynamics. SPH is a fully Lagrangian particle method. It is highly scalable and its Lagrangian nature and meshless discretization are well suited to the simulation of free surface flows, large material deformation, and material fragmentation. In this paper SPH is used to study ice sheet/ice shelf behavior, and the dynamics of the grounding line. The steady state position of the grounding line obtained from the SPH simulations is in good agreement with laboratory observations for a wide range of simulated bedrock slopes, and density ratios similar to those of ice and sea water. The numerical accuracy of the SPH algorithm is further verified by simulating the plane shear flow of two immiscible fluids and the propagation of a highly viscous blob of fluid along a horizontal surface. In the experiment, the ice was represented with a viscous newtonian fluid. For consistency, in the described SPH model the ice is also modeled as a viscous newtonian fluid. Typically, ice sheets are modeled as a non-Newtonian fluid, accounting for the changes in the mechanical properties of ice. Implementation of a non-Newtonian rheology in the SPH model is the subject of our ongoing research.

  11. Smoothed particle hydrodynamics Non-Newtonian model for ice-sheet and ice-shelf dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Wenxiao; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Monaghan, Joseph J.

    2013-06-01

    Mathematical modeling of ice sheets is complicated by the non-linearity of the governing equations and boundary conditions. Standard grid-based methods require complex front tracking techniques and have limited capability to handle large material deformations and abrupt changes in bottom topography. As a consequence, numerical methods are usually restricted to shallow ice sheet and ice shelf approximations. We propose a new smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) non-Newtonian model for coupled ice sheet and ice shelf dynamics. SPH, a fully Lagrangian particle method, is highly scalable and its Lagrangian nature and meshless discretization are well suited to the simulation of free surface ?ows, large material deformation, and material fragmentation. In this paper, SPH is used to study 3D ice sheet/ice shelf behavior, and the dynamics of the grounding line. The steady state position of the grounding line obtained from SPH simulations is in good agreement with laboratory observations for a wide range of simulated bedrock slopes, and density ratios, similar to those of ice and sea water. The numerical accuracy of the SPH algorithm is veri?ed by simulating Poiseuille ?ow, plane shear ?ow with free surface and the propagation of a blob of ice along a horizontal surface. In the laboratory experiment, the ice was represented with a viscous Newtonian ?uid. In the present work, however, the ice is modeled as both viscous Newtonian ?uid and non-Newtonian ?uid, such that the e?ect of non-Newtonian rheology on the dynamics of grounding line was examined. The non-Newtonian constitutive relation is prescribed to be Glen’s law for the creep of polycrystalline ice. A V-shaped bedrock ramp is further introduced to model the real geometry of bedrock slope.

  12. SCHOOLOFSCIENCE Table of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varela, Carlos

    SCHOOLOFSCIENCE Table of Contents Degrees Offered and Associated Departments 330 Overview Environmental Science 403 Interdisciplinary Science 407 Multidisciplinary Science 409 The Darrin Fresh Water

  13. Ising model for melt ponds on Arctic sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ma, Y -P; Golden, K M

    2014-01-01

    The albedo of melting Arctic sea ice, a key parameter in climate modeling, is determined by pools of water on the ice surface. Recent observations show an onset of pond complexity at a critical area of about 100 square meters, attended by a transition in pond fractal dimension. To explain this behavior and provide a statistical physics approach to sea ice modeling, we introduce a two dimensional Ising model for pond evolution which incorporates ice-albedo feedback and the underlying thermodynamics. The binary magnetic spin variables in the Ising model correspond to the presence of melt water or ice on the sea ice surface. The model exhibits a second-order phase transition from isolated to clustered melt ponds, with the evolution of pond complexity in the clustered phase consistent with the observations.

  14. Structural and dynamical properties of nanoconfined supercooled water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oriol Vilanova; Giancarlo Franzese

    2011-02-14

    Bulk water presents a large number of crystalline and amorphous ices. Hydrophobic nanoconfinement is known to affect the tendency of water to form ice and to reduce the melting temperature. However, a systematic study of the ice phases in nanoconfinement is hampered by the computational cost of simulations at very low temperatures. Here we develop a coarse-grained model for a water monolayer in hydrophobic nanoconfinement and study the formation of ice by Mote Carlo simulations. We find two ice phases: low-density-crystal ice at low pressure and high-density hexatic ice at high pressure, an intermediate phase between liquid and high-density-crystal ice.

  15. Spreading of oil spilled under ice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yapa, P.D.; Chowdhury, T. )

    1990-12-01

    A new set of equations is presented to describe the process of oil spreading under ice in clam waters. These equations consider the gravity (buoyancy)-inertia phase, the gravity (buoyancy)-viscous phase, and the termination of spreading during the buoyancy-surface-tension phase. The derivation considers both the constant discharge mode and the constant volume mode. Therefore, a complete description of the spreading phenomena from the time of initial spill to the termination of spreading is presented. Laboratory experiments were conducted using both real ice covers in a cold room and artificial ice covers. The experiments included different ice-cover roughnesses from smooth to rough, oils of different viscosities, and a variety of discharge conditions. The experimental data show close agreement with the theory. These equations can be used during cleanup or environmental impact assessment to estimate the area of an oil slick with respect to time.

  16. Regulations and Basic Information Table of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    Regulations and Basic Information Table of Contents Safe and Effective Use.) for Various Quantities of Water

  17. Using radiative transfer models to study the atmospheric water vapor content and to eliminate telluric lines from high-resolution optical spectra

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gardini, A; Pérez, E; Quesada, J A; Funke, B

    2012-01-01

    The Radiative Transfer Model (RTM) and the retrieval algorithm, incorporated in the SCIATRAN 2.2 software package developed at the Institute of Remote Sensing/Institute of Enviromental Physics of Bremen University (Germany), allows to simulate, among other things, radiance/irradiance spectra in the 2400-24 000 {\\AA} range. In this work we present applications of RTM to two case studies. In the first case the RTM was used to simulate direct solar irradiance spectra, with different water vapor amounts, for the study of the water vapor content in the atmosphere above Sierra Nevada Observatory. Simulated spectra were compared with those measured with a spectrometer operating in the 8000-10 000 {\\AA} range. In the second case the RTM was used to generate telluric model spectra to subtract the atmospheric contribution and correct high-resolution stellar spectra from atmospheric water vapor and oxygen lines. The results of both studies are discussed.

  18. Integrated navigation for AUV operations under ice shelves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffiths, Gwyn

    2000 Heat Wipes Out Giant Antarctic Ice Shelf The Independent, 31 January 2000 Catastrophic Melting VI Pine Island Bay #12;The (virtual) mission ... #12;The first mission- March 2003: Pine Island Bay NASA 30 km Sea Ice Pine Island Glacier Open Water 9 February 2003 #12;The Pine Island Bay Glacier

  19. Passive ice freezing-releasing heat pipe. [Patent application

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gorski, A.J.; Schertz, W.W.

    1980-09-29

    A heat pipe device has been developed which permits completely passive ice formation and periodic release of ice without requiring the ambient temperature to rise above the melting point of water. This passive design enables the maximum amount of cooling capacity to be stored in the tank.

  20. UV Irradiation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Ices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    UV Irradiation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Ices: Production of Alcohols, Quinones. Clemett,3 Richard N. Zare3 Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in water ice were exposed to ultra, and ethers, and reduced, producing partially hydrogenated aromatic hydrocarbons, molecules that account

  1. A single fermentation tube method for the bacteriological analysis of drinking water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watts, John Wesley

    1980-01-01

    A SINGLE FERMENTATION 'ICE METHOD FOR THE BACTERIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF DRINKING WATER A Thesis by JOHN WESLEY WATTS Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A lk M University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1980 Major Subject: Civil Engineering A SINGLE FERMENTATION IIJBE METHOD FOR THE BACTERIOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF DRINKING WATER A Thesis by JOHN WESLEY WATTS Approved as to style and content by: ( Chairman of Committee y...

  2. Ice formation on nitric acid coated dust particles: Laboratory and modeling studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Zhang, Kai; Zhao, Chun; Nandasiri, Manjula I.; Shutthanandan, V.; Liu, Xiaohong; Fast, Jerome D.; Berg, Larry K.

    2015-08-16

    Changes in the ice nucleation characteristics of atmospherically relevant mineral dust particles due to nitric acid coating are not well understood. Further, the atmospheric implications of dust coating on ice-cloud properties under different assumptions of primary ice nucleation mechanisms are unknown. We investigated ice nucleation ability of Arizona test dust, illite, K-feldspar and quartz as a function of temperature (-25 to -30°C) and relative humidity with respect to water (75 to 110%). Particles were size selected at 250 nm and transported (bare or coated) to the ice nucleation chamber to determine the fraction of particles nucleating ice at various temperature and water saturation conditions. All dust nucleated ice at water-subsaturated conditions, but the coated particles showed a reduction in their ice nucleation ability compared to bare particles. However, at water-supersaturated conditions, we observed that bare and coated particles had nearly similar ice nucleation characteristics. X-ray diffraction patterns indicated that structural properties of bare dust particles modified after acid treatment. We found that lattice parameters were slightly different, but crystallite sizes of the coated particles were reduced compared to bare particles. Next, single-column model results show that simulated ice crystal number concentrations mostly depends upon fraction of particles that are coated, primary ice nucleation mechanisms, and the competition between ice nucleation mechanisms to nucleate ice. In general, we observed that coating modify the ice-cloud properties and the picture of ice and mixed-phase cloud evolution is complex when different primary ice nucleation mechanisms are competing for fixed water vapor mass.

  3. Evaluation of Cloud-Resolving Model Intercomparison Simulations Using TWP-ICE Observations: Precipitation and Cloud Structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varble, Adam; Fridlind, Ann; Zipser, Edward J.; Ackerman, Andrew; Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre; Fan, Jiwen; Hill, Adrian; McFarlane, Sally A.; Pinty, Jean-Pierre; Shipway, Ben

    2011-10-04

    The Tropical Warm Pool – International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) provided high quality model forcing and observational datasets through which detailed model and observational intercomparisons could be performed. In this first of a two part study, precipitation and cloud structures within nine cloud-resolving model simulations are compared with scanning radar reflectivity and satellite infrared brightness temperature observations during an active monsoon period from 19 to 25 January 2006. Most simulations slightly overestimate volumetric convective rainfall. Overestimation of simulated convective area by 50% or more in several simulations is somewhat offset by underestimation of mean convective rain rates. Stratiform volumetric rainfall is underestimated by 13% to 53% despite overestimation of stratiform area by up to 65% because stratiform rain rates in every simulation are much lower than observed. Although simulations match the peaked convective radar reflectivity distribution at low levels, they do not reproduce the peaked distributions observed above the melting level. Simulated radar reflectivity aloft in convective regions is too high in most simulations. In stratiform regions, there is a large spread in model results with none resembling observed distributions. Above the melting level, observed radar reflectivity decreases more gradually with height than simulated radar reflectivity. A few simulations produce unrealistically uniform and cold 10.8-?m infrared brightness temperatures, but several simulations produce distributions close to observed. Assumed ice particle size distributions appear to play a larger role than ice water contents in producing incorrect simulated radar reflectivity distributions aloft despite substantial differences in mean graupel and snow water contents across models.

  4. THE EXTENT OF PLEISTOCENE ICE CAP, GLACIAL DEPOSITS AND GLACIOKARST IN THE ALADAGLAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zreda, Marek

    holes, ice caves, glacial melt-water streams, stone circles and girlands represent glacialTHE EXTENT OF PLEISTOCENE ICE CAP, GLACIAL DEPOSITS AND GLACIOKARST IN THE ALADAGLAR MASSIF between 1100 m and 3756 m of altitudes. Many of the glacial landforms, such as moraines and ice

  5. A Computational Study of the Spreading of Oil Underneath a Sheet of Ice Mark Sussman

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sussman, Mark

    A Computational Study of the Spreading of Oil Underneath a Sheet of Ice Mark Sussman Department) The spreading of oil underneath a sheet of ice is computed using an adaptive level set method for incompressible of a body of oil under ice in water. The computational models are used to make further observations

  6. A Computational Study of the Spreading of Oil Underneath a Sheet of Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferguson, Thomas S.

    A Computational Study of the Spreading of Oil Underneath a Sheet of Ice Mark Sussman Department) Abstract The spreading of oil underneath a sheet of ice is computed using an adaptive level set method the final steady profile of a body of oil under ice in water. The computational models are used to make

  7. Global Simulations of Ice nucleation and Ice Supersaturation...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article: Global Simulations of Ice nucleation and Ice Supersaturation with an Improved Cloud Scheme in the Community Atmosphere Model Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

  8. Heterogeneous ice nucleation controlled by the coupling of surface crystallinity and surface hydrophilicity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bi, Yuanfei; Li, Tianshu

    2015-01-01

    The microscopic mechanisms controlling heterogeneous ice nucleation are complex and remain poorly understood. Although good ice nucleators are generally believed to match ice lattice and to bind water, counter examples are often identified. Here we show, by advanced molecular simulations, that the heterogeneous nucleation of ice on graphitic surface is controlled by the coupling of surface crystallinity and surface hydrophilicity. Molecular level analysis reveals that the crystalline graphitic lattice with an appropriate hydrophilicity may indeed template ice basal plane by forming a strained ice layer, thus significantly enhancing its ice nucleation efficiency. Remarkably, the templating effect is found to transit from within the first contact layer of water to the second as the hydrophilicity increases, yielding an oscillating distinction between the crystalline and amorphous graphitic surfaces in their ice nucleation efficiencies. Our study sheds new light on the long-standing question of what constitutes ...

  9. Autosub missions beneath Polar Ice: Preparation and Experience

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Griffiths, Gwyn

    events implemented (up from 1); ordered sequences of events to trigger next mission element added. J and shelf ice. 4 - 12 kHz chirp sub-bottom profiler to obtain the stratigraphy within sediments Water

  10. Hydrological and biogeochemical cycling along the Greenland ice sheet margin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bhatia, Maya Pilar, 1979-

    2012-01-01

    Global warming has led to a significant increase in Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) melt and runoff since 1990, resulting in escalated export of fresh water and associated sediment to the surrounding North Atlantic and Arctic ...

  11. Prediction of lake ice in the Netherlands

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    by HARMONIE ·Flake driven by ECMWF ensembles ·Conclusions and Outlook #12;Lake workshop sept 2012 Motivation Operational Observations ECMWF model #12;Lake workshop sept 2012 h D Air Water Ice ·Surface energy ·Radiative fluxes (Qs, Ql, absorbed solar radiation) ·Turbulent fluxes (sensible and latent heat fluxes

  12. Ice Concentration Retrieval in Stratiform Mixed-phase Clouds Using Cloud Radar Reflectivity Measurements and 1D Ice Growth Model Simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Damao; Wang, Zhien; Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Fan, Jiwen; Luo, Tao

    2014-10-01

    Measurement of ice number concentration in clouds is important but still challenging. Stratiform mixed-phase clouds (SMCs) provide a simple scenario for retrieving ice number concentration from remote sensing measurements. The simple ice generation and growth pattern in SMCs offers opportunities to use cloud radar reflectivity (Ze) measurements and other cloud properties to infer ice number concentration quantitatively. To understand the strong temperature dependency of ice habit and growth rate quantitatively, we develop a 1-D ice growth model to calculate the ice diffusional growth along its falling trajectory in SMCs. The radar reflectivity and fall velocity profiles of ice crystals calculated from the 1-D ice growth model are evaluated with the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) ground-based high vertical resolution radar measurements. Combining Ze measurements and 1-D ice growth model simulations, we develop a method to retrieve the ice number concentrations in SMCs at given cloud top temperature (CTT) and liquid water path (LWP). The retrieved ice concentrations in SMCs are evaluated with in situ measurements and with a three-dimensional cloud-resolving model simulation with a bin microphysical scheme. These comparisons show that the retrieved ice number concentrations are within an uncertainty of a factor of 2, statistically.

  13. INDICATOR: LAKE ERIE ICE COVER Winter ice cover on Lake Erie affects the amount of heat and moisture transferred

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    by impeding or stopping navigation, interfering with power plants and cooling water intakes, and damaging was virtually free of any significant ice cover in 1998 and, with the exception of portions of January, the same

  14. Probing the Interiors of the Ice Giants: Shock Compression of Water to 700 GPa and 3.8 g/cm³

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Knudson, M. D.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Lemke, R. W.; Mattsson, T. R.; French, M.; Nettelmann, N.; Redmer, R.

    2012-02-27

    Recently, there has been a tremendous increase in the number of identified extrasolar planetary systems. Our understanding of their formation is tied to exoplanet internal structure models, which rely upon equations of state of light elements and compounds such as water. Here, we present shock compression data for water with unprecedented accuracy that show that water equations of state commonly used in planetary modeling significantly overestimate the compressibility at conditions relevant to planetary interiors. Furthermore, we show that its behavior at these conditions, including reflectivity and isentropic response, is well-described by a recent first-principles based equation of state. These findingsmore »advocate that this water model be used as the standard for modeling Neptune, Uranus, and “hot Neptune” exoplanets and should improve our understanding of these types of planets.« less

  15. Probing the Interiors of the Ice Giants: Shock Compression of Water to 700 GPa and 3.8 g/cm³

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Knudson, M. D.; Desjarlais, M. P.; Lemke, R. W.; Mattsson, T. R.; French, M.; Nettelmann, N.; Redmer, R.

    2012-02-27

    Recently, there has been a tremendous increase in the number of identified extrasolar planetary systems. Our understanding of their formation is tied to exoplanet internal structure models, which rely upon equations of state of light elements and compounds such as water. Here, we present shock compression data for water with unprecedented accuracy that show that water equations of state commonly used in planetary modeling significantly overestimate the compressibility at conditions relevant to planetary interiors. Furthermore, we show that its behavior at these conditions, including reflectivity and isentropic response, is well-described by a recent first-principles based equation of state. These findings advocate that this water model be used as the standard for modeling Neptune, Uranus, and “hot Neptune” exoplanets and should improve our understanding of these types of planets.

  16. Energy conservation in ice skating rinks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dietrich, B.K.; McAvoy, T.J.

    1980-01-01

    An economic and energy analysis of ice rinks was made to examine the areas in which energy could be profitably conserved. The areas where new equipment could make a major reduction in energy use are: the use of waste heat for space heating, the installation of a low emissivity false ceiling to reduce radiant heat, the use of a load cycling controller to reduce refrigeration costs, and the installation of more efficient lighting systems. Changes in rink operating procedure that could cut energy use are: higher refrigerant temperatures, thinner ice, the use of colder resurfacing water, turning the compressors and pumps off at night, and reducing ventilation.

  17. Final scientific report for DOE award title: Improving the Representation of Ice Sedimentation Rates in Global Climate Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, David L.

    2013-09-05

    It is well known that cirrus clouds play a major role in regulating the earth’s climate, but the details of how this works are just beginning to be understood. This project targeted the main property of cirrus clouds that influence climate processes; the ice fall speed. That is, this project improves the representation of the mass-weighted ice particle fall velocity, Vm, in climate models, used to predict future climate on global and regional scales. Prior to 2007, the dominant sizes of ice particles in cirrus clouds were poorly understood, making it virtually impossible to predict how cirrus clouds interact with sunlight and thermal radiation. Due to several studies investigating the performance of optical probes used to measure the ice particle size distribution (PSD), as well as the remote sensing results from our last ARM project, it is now well established that the anomalously high concentrations of small ice crystals often reported prior to 2007 were measurement artifacts. Advances in the design and data processing of optical probes have greatly reduced these ice artifacts that resulted from the shattering of ice particles on the probe tips and/or inlet tube, and PSD measurements from one of these improved probes (the 2-dimensional Stereo or 2D-S probe) are utilized in this project to parameterize Vm for climate models. Our original plan in the proposal was to parameterize the ice PSD (in terms of temperature and ice water content) and ice particle mass and projected area (in terms of mass- and area-dimensional power laws or m-D/A-D expressions) since these are the microphysical properties that determine Vm, and then proceed to calculate Vm from these parameterized properties. But the 2D-S probe directly measures ice particle projected area and indirectly estimates ice particle mass for each size bin. It soon became apparent that the original plan would introduce more uncertainty in the Vm calculations than simply using the 2D-S measurements to directly calculate Vm. By calculating Vm directly from the measured PSD, ice particle projected area and estimated mass, more accurate estimates of Vm are obtained. These Vm values were then parameterized for climate models by relating them to (1) sampling temperature and ice water content (IWC) and (2) the effective diameter (De) of the ice PSD. Parameterization (1) is appropriate for climate models having single-moment microphysical schemes whereas (2) is appropriate for double-moment microphysical schemes and yields more accurate Vm estimates. These parameterizations were developed for tropical cirrus clouds, Arctic cirrus, mid-latitude synoptic cirrus and mid-latitude anvil cirrus clouds based on field campaigns in these regions. An important but unexpected result of this research was the discovery of microphysical evidence indicating the mechanisms by which ice crystals are produced in cirrus clouds. This evidence, derived from PSD measurements, indicates that homogeneous freezing ice nucleation dominates in mid-latitude synoptic cirrus clouds, whereas heterogeneous ice nucleation processes dominate in mid-latitude anvil cirrus. Based on these findings, De was parameterized in terms of temperature (T) for conditions dominated by (1) homo- and (2) heterogeneous ice nucleation. From this, an experiment was designed for global climate models (GCMs). The net radiative forcing from cirrus clouds may be affected by the means ice is produced (homo- or heterogeneously), and this net forcing contributes to climate sensitivity (i.e. the change in mean global surface temperature resulting from a doubling of CO2). The objective of this GCM experiment was to determine how a change in ice nucleation mode affects the predicted global radiation balance. In the first simulation (Run 1), the

  18. Arctic Sea ice model sensitivities.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston; Paskaleva, Biliana Stefanova

    2010-12-01

    Arctic sea ice is an important component of the global climate system and, due to feedback effects, the Arctic ice cover is changing rapidly. Predictive mathematical models are of paramount importance for accurate estimates of the future ice trajectory. However, the sea ice components of Global Climate Models (GCMs) vary significantly in their prediction of the future state of Arctic sea ice and have generally underestimated the rate of decline in minimum sea ice extent seen over the past thirty years. One of the contributing factors to this variability is the sensitivity of the sea ice state to internal model parameters. A new sea ice model that holds some promise for improving sea ice predictions incorporates an anisotropic elastic-decohesive rheology and dynamics solved using the material-point method (MPM), which combines Lagrangian particles for advection with a background grid for gradient computations. We evaluate the variability of this MPM sea ice code and compare it with the Los Alamos National Laboratory CICE code for a single year simulation of the Arctic basin using consistent ocean and atmospheric forcing. Sensitivities of ice volume, ice area, ice extent, root mean square (RMS) ice speed, central Arctic ice thickness,and central Arctic ice speed with respect to ten different dynamic and thermodynamic parameters are evaluated both individually and in combination using the Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications (DAKOTA). We find similar responses for the two codes and some interesting seasonal variability in the strength of the parameters on the solution.

  19. The Determination of the Water Vapor Content in the Pulkovo VKM-100 Multipass Vacuum Cell Using Polymer Sensors of Humidity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galkin, V D; Nikanorova, I N; Sal'nikov, I B; Leiterer, U; Alekseeva, G A; Novikov, V V; Dauß, D

    2010-01-01

    In spectral studies of water vapor under laboratory conditions (determination of molecular constants, measurement for spectral transmission functions), the amount of water vapor in the time of the measurements is one of the most essential parameters, which should be determined accurately. We discuss the application for this purpose of polymer sensors of humidity manufactured by Praktik-NC (Moscow) and used in the Pulkovo VKM-100 multipass vacuum cell. These sensors were examined in the laboratory of Lindenberg Meteorological observatory (Germany) by comparison between their readings and those of standard measuring devices for various values of relative humidity, pressure, and temperature. We also carried out measurements of relative humidity in boxes with saline solution, in which the relative humidity that corresponds to a given solution is guaranteed with the accuracy of several tenths of percent. The analysis of the results of the laboratory examination of the sensors and extended sets of measurements made...

  20. SCHOOLOFSCIENCE Table of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Varela, Carlos

    SCHOOLOFSCIENCE Table of Contents Degrees Offered and Associated Departments 324 Overview The Darrin Fresh Water Institute 401 New York Center for Studies on the Origins of Life 402 New York State

  1. Field demonstration of the ICE 250{trademark} Cleaning System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnston, J.L.; Jackson, L.M.

    1999-10-05

    The ICE 250{trademark} Cleaning System was engineered to convert water into small ice particles for use in cleaning and decontamination applications. Ice crystals are produced in a special icemaker and pressured through a hose-nozzle onto the surface to be cleaned. The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center and Ice Cleaning Systems, Inc., conducted a test of this system at Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 to evaluate the system's cleaning capabilities in an oil field environment. Equipment cleaned included an oil storage tank, a rod pumping unit, a road grader, and a wellhead. Contaminants were unrefined sour crude oil, hydraulic fluid, paraffin, and dirt, occurring separately and as mixtures. In all four demonstration cleaning tasks, the ICE 250 System effectively removed surface contaminant mixtures in a timely manner and left no oily residue. A minimal amount of waste moisture was generated, thereby reducing cleanup and disposal costs.

  2. Open Quantum to classical phases transition in the stochastic hydrodynamic analogy: the explanation of the Lindemann relation and the analogies between the maximum of density at He lambda point and that one at water-ice phase transition

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Piero Chiarelli

    2013-05-20

    In the present paper the gas, liquid and solid phases made of structureless particles, are visited to the light of the quantum stochastic hydrodynamic analogy (SQHA). The SQHA shows that the open quantum mechanical behavior is maintained on a distance shorter than the theory-defined quantum correlation length (lc). When, the physical length of the problem is larger than lc, the model shows that the quantum (potential) interactions may have a finite range of interaction maintaining the non-local behavior on a finite distance quantum non-locality length lq. The present work shows that when the mean molecular distance is larger than the quantum non-locality length we have a classical phases (gas and van der Waals liquids) while when the mean molecular distance becomes smaller than lq or than lc we have phases such as the solid crystal or the superfluid one, respectively, that show quantum characteristics. The model agrees with Lindemann empirical law (and explains it), for the mean square deviation of atom from the equilibrium position at melting point of crystal, and shows a connection between the maximum density at the He lambda point and that one near the water-ice solidification point.

  3. Ice Bear® Storage Module | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Ice Bear Storage Module Ice Bear Storage Module Thermal Energy Storage for Light Commercial Refrigerant-Based Air Conditioning Units The Ice Bear storage technology was...

  4. Storage of Dressed Chinook Salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, in Refrigerated Freshwater, Diluted Seawater, Seawater, and in Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Storage of Dressed Chinook Salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha, in Refrigerated Freshwater, Diluted during storage. Iced storage offers several advantages over the water chilling systems, including little by 25 per- cent within four days after transfer to ice, and weight gained during water storage was lost

  5. An icing physics study by using lifetime-based molecular tagging thermometry technique

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hu, Hui

    of water droplets Solidification process Micro scale heat transfer Wind turbine icing a b s t r a c to produce 20% of its total power from wind by 2030. According to American Wind Energy Association (AWEA within small icing water droplets in order to elucidate underlying physics to improve our under- standing

  6. THE STRUCTURE OF SURFACE H{sub 2}O LAYERS OF ICE-COVERED PLANETS WITH HIGH-PRESSURE ICE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ueta, S.; Sasaki, T. E-mail: takanori@geo.titech.ac.jp

    2013-10-01

    Many extrasolar (bound) terrestrial planets and free-floating (unbound) planets have been discovered. While the existence of bound and unbound terrestrial planets with liquid water is an important question, of particular importance is the question of these planets' habitability. Even for a globally ice-covered planet, geothermal heat from the planetary interior may melt the interior ice, creating an internal ocean covered by an ice shell. In this paper, we discuss the conditions that terrestrial planets must satisfy for such an internal ocean to exist on the timescale of planetary evolution. The question is addressed in terms of planetary mass, distance from a central star, water abundance, and abundance of radiogenic heat sources. In addition, we investigate the structure of the surface H{sub 2}O layers of ice-covered planets by considering the effects of ice under high pressure (high-pressure ice). As a fiducial case, a 1 M{sub ?} planet at 1 AU from its central star and with 0.6-25 times the H{sub 2}O mass of the Earth could have an internal ocean. We find that high-pressure ice layers may appear between the internal ocean and the rock portion on a planet with an H{sub 2}O mass over 25 times that of the Earth. The planetary mass and abundance of surface water strongly restrict the conditions under which an extrasolar terrestrial planet may have an internal ocean with no high-pressure ice under the ocean. Such high-pressure ice layers underlying the internal ocean are likely to affect the habitability of the planet.

  7. PET 424304 2015 Exercises 1+2 of 4 16 Jan + 30 Jan 2015 1. 1kg ice at 263 K 1 kg water at 293 K. Heat Q at T = T is supplied by the surroundings.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zevenhoven, Ron

    ,340] = 293·[(-21,99 ­ 5,339) + (149,13 ­ 65,13)·0,34)] = 361 (W/s)/mol ice The same result is found via lost,340·5141 = 1750 W/mol ice xout/H2O = 491,8 + 0,340·2612 = 1381 W/mol ice EX = 1381 / 1750 = 0/mol for ex4 PET 424304 2015 Exercises 1+2 of 4 16 Jan + 30 Jan 2015 3. Wmin = Ex°separation = 0,79·Ex°N2

  8. Inverse modelling of in situ soil water dynamics: investigating the effect of different prior distributions of the soil hydraulic parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scharnagl, B.; Vrugt, J. A; Vereecken, H.; Herbst, M.

    2011-01-01

    monitor- ing soil water contents, Water Resour. Res. , 26,spatial variation of soil water content at the field scaledetermination of soil water content: measurements in coaxial

  9. Electronic structure effects in liquid water studied by photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nordlund, Dennis

    2008-01-01

    Structure Effects in Liquid Water studied by Photoelectronphotoelectron emission spectra of liquid water in comparisonwith gas-phase water, ice close to the melting point, low

  10. Impact of Solvent on Photocatalytic Mechanisms: Reactions of Photodesorption Products with Ice Overlayers on the TiO2(110) Surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shen, Mingmin; Henderson, Michael A.

    2011-04-07

    The effects of water and methanol ice overlayers on the photodecomposition of acetone on rutile TiO2(110) were evaluated in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) using photon stimulated desorption (PSD) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD). In the absence of ice overlayers, acetone photodecomposed on TiO2(110) at 95 K by ejection of a methyl radical into the gas phase and formation of acetate on the surface. With ice overlayers, the methyl radicals are trapped at the interface between TiO2(110) and the ice. When water ice was present, these trapped methyl radicals reacted either with each other to form ethane or with other molecules in the ice (e.g., water or displaced acetone) to form methane (CH4), ethane (CH3CH3) and other products (e.g., methanol), with all of these products trapped in the ice. The new products were free to revisit the surface or depart during desorption of the ice. When methanol ice was present, methane formation came about only from reaction of trapped methyl radicals with the methanol ice. Methane and ethane slowly leaked through methanol ice overlayers into vacuum at 95 K, but not through water ice overlayers. Different degrees of site competition between water and acetone, and between methanol and acetone led to different hydrogen abstraction pathways in the two ices. These results provide new insights into product formation routes and solution-phase radical formation mechanisms that are important in heterogeneous photocatalysis.

  11. Table Of Contents Section: Page

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    US Army Corps of Engineers

    EM 385-1-1 XX Sep 13 i Section 2 SANITATION Table Of Contents Section: Page 02.A General Water......................................................... 2-1 02.D Non-Potable Water and openings. 02.C DRINKING WATER #12;EM 385-1-1 XX Sep 13 2-2 02.C.01 An adequate supply of potable water

  12. Ice Formation in Gas-Diffusion Layers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dursch, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    amounts of Teflon ® (PTFE) and levels of water saturation.for GDLs with varying PTFE content and level of saturation.investigated, each with varying PTFE loadings, as shown in

  13. Electro-Osmosis and Water Uptake in Polymer Electrolytes in Equilibrium with Water Vapor at Low Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallagher, K. G.; Pivovar, B. S.; Fuller, T. F.

    2009-01-01

    Water uptake and electro-osmosis are investigated to improve the understanding and aid the modeling of water transport in proton-exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) below 0 C. Measurements of water sorption isotherms show a significant reduction in the water capacity of polymer electrolytes below 0 C. This reduced water content is attributed to the lower vapor pressure of ice compared to supercooled liquid water. At -25 C, 1100 equivalent weight Nafion in equilibrium with vapor over ice has 8 moles of water per sulfonic acid group. Measurements of the electro-osmotic drag coefficient for Nafion and both random and multiblock copolymer sulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone) (BPSH) chemistries are reported for vapor equilibrated samples below 0 C. The electro-osmotic drag coefficient of BPSH chemistries is found to be {approx}0.4, and that of Nafion is {approx}1. No significant temperature effect on the drag coefficient is found. The implication of an electro-osmotic drag coefficient less than unity is discussed in terms of proton conduction mechanisms. Simulations of the ohmically limited current below 0 C show that a reduced water uptake below 0 C results in a significant decrease in PEMFC performance.

  14. Water content and wind acceleration in the envelope around the oxygen-rich AGB star IK Tau as seen by Herschel/HIFI

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Decin, L; De Beck, E; Lombaert, R; de Koter, A; Waters, L B F M

    2010-01-01

    During their asymptotic giant branch, evolution low-mass stars lose a significant fraction of their mass through an intense wind, enriching the interstellar medium with products of nucleosynthesis. We observed the nearby oxygen-rich asymptotic giant branch star IK Tau using the high-resolution HIFI spectrometer onboard Herschel. We report on the first detection of H_2^{16}O and the rarer isotopologues H_2^{17}O and H_2^{18}O in both the ortho and para states. We deduce a total water content (relative to molecular hydrogen) of 6.6x10^{-5}, and an ortho-to-para ratio of 3:1. These results are consistent with the formation of H_2O in thermodynamical chemical equilibrium at photospheric temperatures, and does not require pulsationally induced non-equilibrium chemistry, vaporization of icy bodies or grain surface reactions. High-excitation lines of 12CO, 13CO, 28SiO, 29SiO, 30SiO, HCN, and SO have also been detected. From the observed line widths, the acceleration region in the inner wind zone can be characterized...

  15. Sensor development and calibration for acoustic neutrino detection in ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karg, Timo; Laihem, Karim; Semburg, Benjamin; Tosi, Delia

    2009-01-01

    A promising approach to measure the expected low flux of cosmic neutrinos at the highest energies (E > 1 EeV) is acoustic detection. There are different in-situ test installations worldwide in water and ice to measure the acoustic properties of the medium with regard to the feasibility of acoustic neutrino detection. The parameters of interest include attenuation length, sound speed profile, background noise level and transient backgrounds. The South Pole Acoustic Test Setup (SPATS) has been deployed in the upper 500 m of drill holes for the IceCube neutrino observatory at the geographic South Pole. In-situ calibration of sensors under the combined influence of low temperature, high ambient pressure, and ice-sensor acoustic coupling is difficult. We discuss laboratory calibrations in water and ice. Two new laboratory facilities, the Aachen Acoustic Laboratory (AAL) and the Wuppertal Water Tank Test Facility, have been set up. They offer large volumes of bubble free ice (3 m^3) and water (11 m^3) for the devel...

  16. ARM - Measurement - Liquid water content

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, Alaska Outreach Home Roomparticlecontent ARM Data Discovery Browse Data

  17. Evaluation of Cloud-Resolving Model Intercomparison Simulations Using TWP-ICE Observations: Precipitation and Cloud Structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varble, Adam C.; Fridlind, Ann; Zipser, Ed; Ackerman, Andrew; Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre; Fan, Jiwen; Hill, Adrian; McFarlane, Sally A.; Pinty, Jean-Pierre; Shipway, Ben

    2011-06-24

    The Tropical Warm Pool - International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) provided high quality model forcing and observational datasets through which detailed model and observational intercomparisons could be performed. In this first of a two part study, precipitation and cloud structures within nine cloud-resolving model simulations are compared with scanning radar reflectivity and satellite infrared brightness temperature observations during an active monsoon period from 19 to 25 January 2006. Most simulations slightly overestimate volumetric convective rainfall. Overestimation of simulated convective area by 50% or more in several simulations is somewhat offset by underestimation of mean convective rain rates. Stratiform volumetric rainfall is underestimated by 13% to 53% despite overestimation of stratiform area by up to 65% because stratiform rain rates in every simulation are much lower than observed. Although simulations match the peaked convective radar reflectivity distribution at low levels, they do not reproduce the peaked distributions observed above the melting level. Simulated radar reflectivity aloft in convective regions is too high in most simulations. 29 In stratiform regions, there is a large spread in model results with none resembling 30 observed distributions. Above the melting level, observed radar reflectivity decreases 31 more gradually with height than simulated radar reflectivity. A few simulations produce 32 unrealistically uniform and cold 10.8-?m infrared brightness temperatures, but several 33 simulations produce distributions close to observed. Assumed ice particle size 34 distributions appear to play a larger role than ice water contents in producing incorrect 35 simulated radar reflectivity distributions aloft despite substantial differences in mean 36 graupel and snow water contents across models. 37

  18. Water Emissions from Fuel Cell Vehicles

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hydrogen fuel cell vehicles (FCVs) emit approximately the same amount of water per mile as vehicles using gasoline-powered internal combustion engines (ICEs).

  19. Thermal desorption of CH4 retained in CO2 ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Luna, R; Domingo, M; Satorre, M A

    2008-01-01

    CO2 ices are known to exist in different astrophysical environments. In spite of this, its physical properties (structure, density, refractive index) have not been as widely studied as those of water ice. It would be of great value to study the adsorption properties of this ice in conditions related to astrophysical environments. In this paper, we explore the possibility that CO2 traps relevant molecules in astrophysical environments at temperatures higher than expected from their characteristic sublimation point. To fulfil this aim we have carried out desorption experiments under High Vacuum conditions based on a Quartz Crystal Microbalance and additionally monitored with a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer. From our results, the presence of CH4 in the solid phase above the sublimation temperature in some astrophysical scenarios could be explained by the presence of several retaining mechanisms related to the structure of CO2 ice.

  20. Thermal desorption of CH4 retained in CO2 ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Luna; C. Millan; M. Domingo; M. A. Satorre

    2008-01-21

    CO2 ices are known to exist in different astrophysical environments. In spite of this, its physical properties (structure, density, refractive index) have not been as widely studied as those of water ice. It would be of great value to study the adsorption properties of this ice in conditions related to astrophysical environments. In this paper, we explore the possibility that CO2 traps relevant molecules in astrophysical environments at temperatures higher than expected from their characteristic sublimation point. To fulfil this aim we have carried out desorption experiments under High Vacuum conditions based on a Quartz Crystal Microbalance and additionally monitored with a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer. From our results, the presence of CH4 in the solid phase above the sublimation temperature in some astrophysical scenarios could be explained by the presence of several retaining mechanisms related to the structure of CO2 ice.

  1. No Confinement Needed: Observation of a Metastable Hydrophobic Wetting Two-Layer Ice on Graphene

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kimmel, Gregory A.; Matthiesen, Jesper; Baer, Marcel; Mundy, Christopher J.; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Smith, R. Scott; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Kay, Bruce D.

    2009-09-09

    The structure of water at interfaces is crucial for processes ranging from photocatalysis to protein folding. Here, we investigate the structure and lattice dynamics of two-layer crystalline ice films grown on a hydrophobic substrate - graphene on Pt(111) - with low energy electron diffraction, reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy, rare-gas adsorption/desorption, and ab-initio molecular dynamics. Unlike hexagonal ice, which consists of stacks of puckered hexagonal "bilayers", this new ice polymorph consists of two flat hexagonal sheets of water molecules in which the hexagons in each sheet are stacked directly on top of each other. Such two-layer ices have been predicted for water confined between hydrophobic slits, but not previously observed. Our results show that the two-layer ice forms even at zero pressure at a single hydrophobic interface by maximizing the number of hydrogen bonds at the expense of adopting a non-tetrahedral geometry with weakened bonds.

  2. Thermodynamic analysis and experimental study of the effect of atmospheric pressure on the ice point

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harvey, A. H. [Thermophysical Properties Division National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado (United States)] [Thermophysical Properties Division National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado (United States); McLinden, M. O. [Thermophysical Properties Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado (United States)] [Thermophysical Properties Division, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado (United States); Tew, W. L. [Sensor Science Division National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland (United States)] [Sensor Science Division National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland (United States)

    2013-09-11

    We present a detailed thermodynamic analysis of the temperature of the ice point as a function of atmospheric pressure. This analysis makes use of accurate international standards for the properties of water and ice, and of available high-accuracy data for the Henry's constants of atmospheric gases in liquid water. The result is an ice point of 273.150 019(5) K at standard atmospheric pressure, with higher ice-point temperatures (varying nearly linearly with pressure) at lower pressures. The effect of varying ambient CO{sub 2} concentration is analyzed and found to be significant in comparison to other uncertainties in the model. The thermodynamic analysis is compared with experimental measurements of the temperature difference between the ice point and the triple point of water performed at elevations ranging from 145 m to 4302 m, with atmospheric pressures from 101 kPa to 60 kPa.

  3. Section 4. Inventory Table of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Section 4. Inventory Table of Contents 4.1 Existing Legal Protections Protections Level Name Clean Water Act Endangered Species Act Migratory Bird Treaty Act National Environmental State Instream Water Rights ­ Oregon Water Resources Department Morrow County Zoning Ordinance ­ Morrow

  4. Atom addition reactions in interstellar ice analogues

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linnartz, Harold; Fedoseev, Gleb

    2015-01-01

    This review paper summarizes the state-of-the-art in laboratory based interstellar ice chemistry. The focus is on atom addition reactions, illustrating how water, carbon dioxide and methanol can form in the solid state at astronomically relevant temperatures, and also the formation of more complex species such as hydroxylamine, an important prebiotic molecule, and glycolaldehyde, the smallest sugar, is discussed. These reactions are particularly relevant during the dark ages of star and planet formation, i.e., when the role of UV light is restricted. A quantitative characterization of such processes is only possible through dedicated laboratory studies, i.e., under full control of a large set of parameters such as temperature, atom-flux, and ice morphology. The resulting numbers, physical and chemical constants, e.g., barrier heights, reaction rates and branching ratios, provide information on the molecular processes at work and are needed as input for astrochemical models, in order to bridge the timescales t...

  5. Ice Storm Supercomputer

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    None

    2013-05-28

    "A new Idaho National Laboratory supercomputer is helping scientists create more realistic simulations of nuclear fuel. Dubbed 'Ice Storm,' this 2048-processor machine allows researchers to model and predict the complex physics behind nuclear reactor behavior. And with a new visualization lab, the team can see the results of its simulations on the big screen." For more information about INL research, visit http://www.facebook.com/idahonationallaboratory.

  6. Cryoconite Hole Ecosystems in Antarctic Glacier Ice Brent C. Christner, Montana State University, Department of Land

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christner, Brent C.

    released from the melted glacial ice and attached to deposited airborne particulates provide the biological glacial melting. Cryoconite hole ecosystems exist and thrive under the harsh conditions associated, are warmed by the sun, and melt into the ice producing a cylindrical basin of liquid water. Organisms

  7. ICE SHEETS, GLOBAL WARMING, AND ARTICLE 2 OF THE UNFCCC An Editorial Essay

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oppenheimer, Michael

    in area and perhaps in mass since the Last Glacial Maximum (Bindschadler, 1998; Huybrechts, 2002) provides of ice loss by altering the mass balance between precipitation rates on the one hand, and melting and ice site has been tied to the availability of surface melt water, which percolates to and lubricates

  8. A network model for fluid transport through sea ice A. JABINI,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    ice also plays an important role in heat transfer between the ocean and atmosphere (Lytle and Ackley, 1996; Trodahl and others, 2000), and in the input of dense brine and fresh water into the upper ocean oriented brine channels penetrating much of the ice thickness (Cole and Shapiro, 1998). Correspondingly

  9. Constraints on the lake volume required for hydro-fracture through ice sheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skemer, Philip

    Constraints on the lake volume required for hydro-fracture through ice sheets M. J. Krawczynski,1 M April 2009; published 16 May 2009. [1] Water-filled cracks are an effective mechanism to drive hydro to rapidly drive hydro-fractures through 1­1.5 km of subfreezing ice. This represents $98% of the meltwater

  10. Origin and Phylogeny of Microbes Living in Permanent Antarctic Lake Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Priscu, John C.

    of bacteria and cyanobacteria colonizing sediment particles in the per- manent ice cover of an Antarctic lake in the surrounding region and opportunistically colonize the unusual habitat provided by the sediments suspended worlds [16]. This analogy is particularly relevant to Mars and the Jovian moon Europa, where water ice

  11. Rigid pile response to ice plate and current loads 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nolte, John George

    1986-01-01

    Using Light Ice-Breaking Recording Vessel, " Proceedinxls, Qffsbore Technolo Confer~ace, OTC Paper No. 2225, lloOl~J~ PP. McLeod, W. R. , Adamo, L. C. , and Hamilton, R. C. , "A Unique Strategy for Obtaining Wave and Wind Data in the Gulf of Alaska... stream_source_info 1986 Thesis N798.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 88765 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name 1986 Thesis N798.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 RIGID PILE...

  12. Climate Impacts of Ice Nucleation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gettelman, A.; Liu, Xiaohong; Barahona, Donifan; Lohmann, U.; Chen, Chih-Chieh

    2012-10-27

    Several different ice nucleation parameterizations in two different General Circulation Models are used to understand the effects of ice nucleation on the mean climate state, and the climate effect of aerosol perturbations to ice clouds. The simulations have different ice microphysical states that are consistent with the spread of observations. These different states occur from different parameterizations of the ice cloud nucleation processes, and feature different balances of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation. At reasonable efficiencies, consistent with laboratory measurements and constrained by the global radiative balance, black carbon has a small (-0.06 Wm?2) and not statistically significant climate effect. Indirect effects of anthropogenic aerosols on cirrus clouds occur mostly due to increases in homogeneous nucleation fraction as a consequence of anthropogenic sulfur emissions. The resulting ice indirect effects do not seem strongly dependent on the ice micro-physical balance, but are slightly larger for those states with less homogeneous nucleation in the base state. The total ice AIE is estimated at 0.26±0.09 Wm?2 (1? uncertainty). This represents an offset of 20-30% of the simulated total Aerosol Indirect Effect for ice and liquid clouds.

  13. arXiv:1408.2487v2[physics.ao-ph]22Aug2014 Ising model for melt ponds on Arctic sea ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    arXiv:1408.2487v2[physics.ao-ph]22Aug2014 Ising model for melt ponds on Arctic sea ice Yi-Ping Ma,1 of water on the ice surface. Recent observations show an onset of pond complexity at a critical area modeling, we introduce a two dimensional Ising model for pond evolution which incorporates ice

  14. Methods to Study Intervention Sustainability Using Pre-existing, Community Interventions: Examples from the Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Sector

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arnold, Benjamin Ford

    2009-01-01

    water treatment and ii Contents 3.4A.2 Water qualityfor using household water treatment . . . . . . . . . . . .

  15. Table of Contents Deschutes Subbasin Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Table of Contents Deschutes Subbasin Plan Table of Contents Executive Summary 1. Purpose and Scope.1. Physical, Natural and Human Landscape ................................................2.1 2.2. Water, Table of Contents Page 1 #12;Table of Contents 7. Limiting Factors and Conditions .........

  16. ARM - Ice Cores

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments? WeDatastreamstps DocumentationAtlanticENAField ParticipantsField Campaign StatisticsPastIce Cores

  17. Drilling deep in South Pole Ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karg, Timo

    2014-01-01

    To detect the tiny flux of ultra-high energy neutrinos from active galactic nuclei or from interactions of highest energy cosmic rays with the microwave background photons needs target masses of the order of several hundred cubic kilometers. Clear Antarctic ice has been discussed as a favorable material for hybrid detection of optical, radio and acoustic signals from ultra-high energy neutrino interactions. To apply these technologies at the adequate scale hundreds of holes have to be drilled in the ice down to depths of about 2500 m to deploy the corresponding sensors. To do this on a reasonable time scale is impossible with presently available tools. Remote drilling and deployment schemes have to be developed to make such a detector design reality. After a short discussion of the status of modern hot water drilling we present here a design of an autonomous melting probe, tested 50 years ago to reach a depth of about 1000 m in Greenland ice. A scenario how to build such a probe today with modern technologies...

  18. Resonant vibrational energy transfer in ice Ih

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, L.; Li, F.; Skinner, J. L.

    2014-06-28

    Fascinating anisotropy decay experiments have recently been performed on H{sub 2}O ice Ih by Timmer and Bakker [R. L. A. Timmer, and H. J. Bakker, J. Phys. Chem. A 114, 4148 (2010)]. The very fast decay (on the order of 100 fs) is indicative of resonant energy transfer between OH stretches on different molecules. Isotope dilution experiments with deuterium show a dramatic dependence on the hydrogen mole fraction, which confirms the energy transfer picture. Timmer and Bakker have interpreted the experiments with a Förster incoherent hopping model, finding that energy transfer within the first solvation shell dominates the relaxation process. We have developed a microscopic theory of vibrational spectroscopy of water and ice, and herein we use this theory to calculate the anisotropy decay in ice as a function of hydrogen mole fraction. We obtain very good agreement with experiment. Interpretation of our results shows that four nearest-neighbor acceptors dominate the energy transfer, and that while the incoherent hopping picture is qualitatively correct, vibrational energy transport is partially coherent on the relevant timescale.

  19. ICE CHEMISTRY IN EMBEDDED YOUNG STELLAR OBJECTS IN THE LARGE MAGELLANIC CLOUD

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oliveira, J. M.; Van Loon, J. Th. [School of Physical and Geographical Sciences, Lennard-Jones Laboratories, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Chen, C.-H. R.; Indebetouw, R. [Department of Astronomy, University of Virginia, P.O. Box 400325, Charlottesville, VA 22904 (United States); Tielens, A. G. G. M. [Leiden Observatory, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Sloan, G. C. [Department of Astronomy, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Woods, P. M.; Kemper, F. [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manchester, Oxford Road, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Gordon, K. D.; Boyer, M. L.; Shiao, B.; Meixner, M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Madden, S. [Service d'Astrophysique, Commissariat a L'Energie Atomique de Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Speck, A. K. [Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Marengo, M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50010 (United States)

    2009-12-20

    We present spectroscopic observations of a sample of 15 embedded young stellar objects (YSOs) in the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC). These observations were obtained with the Spitzer Infrared Spectrograph (IRS) as part of the SAGE-Spec Legacy program. We analyze the two prominent ice bands in the IRS spectral range: the bending mode of CO{sub 2} ice at 15.2 mum and the ice band between 5 and 7 mum that includes contributions from the bending mode of water ice at 6 mum among other ice species. The 5-7 mum band is difficult to identify in our LMC sample due to the conspicuous presence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon emission superimposed onto the ice spectra. We identify water ice in the spectra of two sources; the spectrum of one of those sources also exhibits the 6.8 mum ice feature attributed in the literature to ammonium and methanol. We model the CO{sub 2} band in detail, using the combination of laboratory ice profiles available in the literature. We find that a significant fraction (approx>50%) of CO{sub 2} ice is locked in a water-rich component, consistent with what is observed for Galactic sources. The majority of the sources in the LMC also require a pure-CO{sub 2} contribution to the ice profile, evidence of thermal processing. There is a suggestion that CO{sub 2} production might be enhanced in the LMC, but the size of the available sample precludes firmer conclusions. We place our results in the context of the star formation environment in the LMC.

  20. State estimation of the Labrador Sea with a coupled sea ice-ocean adjoint model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fenty, Ian Gouverneur

    2010-01-01

    Sea ice (SI) and ocean variability in marginal polar and subpolar seas are closely coupled. SI variability in the Labrador Sea is of climatic interest because of its relationship to deep convection/mode water formation, ...

  1. Fuel movement along grain boundaries in ice Steven M. Jepsen a,, Edward E. Adams a,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Priscu, John C.

    of hydrocarbon-based drilling fluids used to maintain lithostatic pressure in deep ice coring projects to the infiltration pro- cesses of a hydrocarbon fluid. Water veins are believed to be exceptionally large

  2. Therapeutic Hypothermia: Protective Cooling Using Medical Ice...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Therapeutic Hypothermia: Protective Cooling Using Medical Ice Slurry Technology available for licensing: Proprietary method and equipment for making an ice slurry coolant to induce...

  3. Light propagation in the South Pole ice

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Dawn; Collaboration: IceCube Collaboration

    2014-11-18

    The IceCube Neutrino Observatory is located in the ice near the geographic South Pole. Particle showers from neutrino interactions in the ice produce light which is detected by IceCube modules, and the amount and pattern of deposited light are used to reconstruct the properties of the incident neutrino. Since light is scattered and absorbed by ice between the neutrino interaction vertex and the sensor, IceCube event reconstruction depends on understanding the propagation of light through the ice. This paper presents the current status of modeling light propagation in South Pole ice, including the recent observation of an azimuthal anisotropy in the scattering.

  4. IceCube Project Monthly Report -April 2010 Accomplishments

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Saffman, Mark

    Water Drill equipment (http://www.icecube.wisc.edu/disposition/index.php) and the site was circulated to solicit interest in the equipment following the end of IceCube construction. · The training at shorter distances. #12; 2 Cost and Schedule Performance ­ The project is 94.7% complete

  5. GREAT LAKES ICE COVER RaymondA. Asset'

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the early fifteenth centllry. in central Japan. southern Germany,and Switzerland." I National Oceanographic hydropower production and cooling water intakes, and damaging shore structures. Ice cover also impacts, and spring energy exchanges between the lake and the planetary boundary layer. Although observations of shore

  6. Table of Contents Page i 2013 Residential Compliance Manual January 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Table of Contents Page i 2013 Residential Compliance Manual January 2014 Table of Contents 5. Water Heating Requirements ................................................................................................................................1 5.1.1 Water Heating Energy

  7. MEAT, POULTRY, Still contains ice

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    MEAT, POULTRY, SEAFOOD Still contains ice crystals and feels as cold, and ground meats Refreeze Discard Poultry and ground poultry Refreeze Discard Variety meats may safely re-freeze foods that s:ll contain ice crystals or that have been

  8. Changes in the firn structure of the western Greenland Ice Sheet caused by recent warming

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    de la Peña, S.; Howat, I. M.; Nienow, P. W.; van den Broeke, M. R.; Mosley-Thompson, E.; Price, S. F.; Mair, D.; Noël, B.; Sole, A. J.

    2015-06-11

    Atmospheric warming over the Greenland Ice Sheet during the last 2 decades has increased the amount of surface meltwater production, resulting in the migration of melt and percolation regimes to higher altitudes and an increase in the amount of ice content from refrozen meltwater found in the firn above the superimposed ice zone. Here we present field and airborne radar observations of buried ice layers within the near-surface (0–20 m) firn in western Greenland, obtained from campaigns between 1998 and 2014. We find a sharp increase in firn-ice content in the form of thick widespread layers in the percolation zone,more »which decreases the capacity of the firn to store meltwater. The estimated total annual ice content retained in the near-surface firn in areas with positive surface mass balance west of the ice divide in Greenland reached a maximum of 74 ± 25 Gt in 2012, compared to the 1958–1999 average of 13 ± 2 Gt, while the percolation zone area more than doubled between 2003 and 2012. Increased melt and column densification resulted in surface lowering averaging –0.80 ± 0.39 m yr?¹ between 1800 and 2800 m in the accumulation zone of western Greenland. Since 2007, modeled annual melt and refreezing rates in the percolation zone at elevations below 2100 m surpass the annual snowfall from the previous year, implying that mass gain in the region is retained after melt in the form of refrozen meltwater. If current melt trends over high elevation regions continue, subsequent changes in firn structure will have implications for the hydrology of the ice sheet and related abrupt seasonal densification could become increasingly significant for altimetry-derived ice sheet mass balance estimates.« less

  9. Development of an ultrasonic pulse-echo (UPE) technique for aircraft icing studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Yang; Hu, Hui [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Iowa State University, 2271 Howe Hall, Room 1200, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Chen, Wen-Li [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Iowa State University, 2271 Howe Hall, Room 1200, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); School of Civil Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin, Heilongjiang 150090 (China); Bond, Leonard J. [Department of Aerospace Engineering, Iowa State University, 2271 Howe Hall, Room 1200, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Center for Nondestructive Evaluation, Iowa State University, 1915 Scholl Road, 151 ASC II, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

    2014-02-18

    Aircraft operating in some cold weather conditions face the risk of icing. Icing poses a threat to flight safety and its management is expensive. Removing light frost on a clear day from a medium-size business jet can cost $300, heavy wet snow removal can cost $3,000 and removal of accumulated frozen/freezing rain can cost close to $10,000. Understanding conditions that lead to severe icing events is important and challenging. When an aircraft or rotorcraft flies in a cold climate, some of the super cooled droplets impinging on exposed aircraft surfaces may flow along the surface prior to freezing and give various forms and shapes of ice. The runback behavior of a water film on an aircraft affects the morphology of ice accretion and the rate of formation. In this study, we report the recent progress to develop an Ultrasonic Pulse-Echo (UPE) technique to provide real-time thickness distribution measurements of surface water flows driven by boundary layer airflows for aircraft icing studies. A series of initial experimental investigations are conducted in an ice wind tunnel employing an array of ultrasonic transducers placed underneath the surface of a flat plate. The water runback behavior on the plate is evaluated by measuring the thickness profile variation of the water film along the surface by using the UPE technique under various wind speed and flow rate conditions.

  10. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"10272015 9:02:05 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Crude Oil Production" "Sourcekey","MCRFPUS1","MCRFPP11","MCRFPFL1","MCRFPNY1","MCRFPPA1","MCRFPV...

  11. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"10272015 9:02:06 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Crude Oil Production" "Sourcekey","MCRFPUS1","MCRFPP11","MCRFPFL1","MCRFPNY1","MCRFPPA1","MCRFPV...

  12. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"2122015 2:09:18 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Distillate Fuel Oil Sales for Residential Use...

  13. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"6252015 11:11:13 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Crude Oil Production" "Sourcekey","MCRFPUS2","MCRFPP12","MCRFPFL2","MCRFPNY2","MCRFPPA2","MCRFPV...

  14. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"6272015 6:10:39 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (Summary) "...

  15. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"6272015 6:10:38 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (Summary) "...

  16. Workbook Contents

    U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

    ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"6272015 6:11:20 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Summary) "...

  17. Catalog of Studies Table of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capogna, Luca

    2014-15 GRADUATE Catalog of Studies TM #12;Table of Contents Welcome to the University of Arkansas ............................. 26 Arkansas Water Resources Center ................................................ 26 Bessie Boehm

  18. Catalog of Studies Table of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capogna, Luca

    2015-16 GRADUATE Catalog of Studies TM #12;Table of Contents Welcome to the University of Arkansas ............................. 26 Arkansas Water Resources Center ................................................ 26 Bessie Boehm

  19. Experimental investigation of ice slurry flow pressure drop in horizontal tubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grozdek, Marino; Khodabandeh, Rahmatollah; Lundqvist, Per [Royal Institute of Technology, Department of Energy Technology, Division of Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration, Brinellvaegen 68, 10044 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2009-01-15

    Pressure drop behaviour of ice slurry based on ethanol-water mixture in circular horizontal tubes has been experimentally investigated. The secondary fluid was prepared by mixing ethyl alcohol and water to obtain initial alcohol concentration of 10.3% (initial freezing temperature -4.4 C). The pressure drop tests were conducted to cover laminar and slightly turbulent flow with ice mass fraction varying from 0% to 30% depending on test conditions. Results from flow tests reveal much higher pressure drop for higher ice concentrations and higher velocities in comparison to the single phase flow. However for ice concentrations of 15% and higher, certain velocity exists at which ice slurry pressure drop is same or even lower than for single phase flow. It seems that higher ice concentration delay flow pattern transition moment (from laminar to turbulent) toward higher velocities. In addition experimental results for pressure drop were compared to the analytical results, based on Poiseulle and Buckingham-Reiner models for laminar flow, Blasius, Darby and Melson, Dodge and Metzner, Steffe and Tomita for turbulent region and general correlation of Kitanovski which is valid for both flow regimes. For laminar flow and low buoyancy numbers Buckingham-Reiner method gives good agreement with experimental results while for turbulent flow best fit is provided with Dodge-Metzner and Tomita methods. Furthermore, for transport purposes it has been shown that ice mass fraction of 20% offers best ratio of ice slurry transport capability and required pumping power. (author)

  20. Winter Driving Tips Driving in Ice & Snow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Capogna, Luca

    Winter Driving Tips Driving in Ice & Snow: When you must drive, clear the ice and snow from your in ice and snow, other drivers will be traveling cautiously. Don't disrupt the flow of traffic by driving handle better in ice and snow, but they do not have flawless traction, and skids can occur unexpectedly

  1. Table Contents Page i 2013 Nonresidential Compliance Manual January 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Table Contents Page i 2013 Nonresidential Compliance Manual January 2014 Table of Contents........................................................................5 Table F-1 Small Water Heater Test Methods ..................................................................................6 Table F-2 Large Water Heater Test Methods

  2. Volume III, Chapter 4 TABLE OF CONTENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volume III, Chapter 4 Eulachon #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS 4.0 EULACHON (Thaleichthys pacificus..................................................................................................................... 4-4 4.1.5 Movements in Fresh Water ........................................................... 4-8 4.4.1 Water Development

  3. RELATIONS BETWEEN THE DETECTION OF METHYL TERT-BUTYL ETHER (MTBE) IN SURFACE AND GROUND WATER AND ITS CONTENT IN GASOLINE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    AND ITS CONTENT IN GASOLINE By Michael J. Moran, Mike J. Halde, Rick M. Clawges and John S. Zogorski U in the United States as an octane enhancer and oxygenate in gasoline. Octane enhancement began in the late 1970's with the phase-out of tetraethyl lead from gasoline. The use of oxygenates was expanded

  4. Electro-Osmosis and Water Uptake in Polymer Electrolytes in Equilibrium with Water Vapor at Low Temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gallagher, K. G.; Pivovar, B. S.; Fuller, T. F.

    2008-01-01

    Measurements of the electro-osmotic drag coefficient for Nafion{reg_sign} and both random and multi-block co-polymer sulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone) (BPSH) chemistries are reported for vapor equilibrated samples below 0 C. No significant change in the drag coefficient behavior for Nafion from that reported above 0 C is found. However BPSH is found to have a drag coefficient of 0.4. The implication of a drag coefficient less than unity in the interpretation of conduction mechanisms is discussed. Measurements of water sorption isotherms below 0 C are also presented. A significant reduction in the capacity of polymer electrolytes to store water below 0 C is found. This reduced water content is a result of the lower vapor pressure of ice compared to supercooled liquid.

  5. WATER-TRAPPED WORLDS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Menou, Kristen [Department of Astronomy, Columbia University, 550 West 120th Street, New York, NY 10027 (United States)

    2013-09-01

    Although tidally locked habitable planets orbiting nearby M-dwarf stars are among the best astronomical targets to search for extrasolar life, they may also be deficient in volatiles and water. Climate models for this class of planets show atmospheric transport of water from the dayside to the nightside, where it is precipitated as snow and trapped as ice. Since ice only slowly flows back to the dayside upon accumulation, the resulting hydrological cycle can trap a large amount of water in the form of nightside ice. Using ice sheet dynamical and thermodynamical constraints, I illustrate how planets with less than about a quarter the Earth's oceans could trap most of their surface water on the nightside. This would leave their dayside, where habitable conditions are met, potentially dry. The amount and distribution of residual liquid water on the dayside depend on a variety of geophysical factors, including the efficiency of rock weathering at regulating atmospheric CO{sub 2} as dayside ocean basins dry up. Water-trapped worlds with dry daysides may offer similar advantages as land planets for habitability, by contrast with worlds where more abundant water freely flows around the globe.

  6. An experimental and theoretical study of the ice accretion process during artificial and natural icing conditions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, Mark Samuel

    1986-01-01

    Real-time measurements of ice growth during artificial and natural icing conditions were conducted using an ultrasonic pulse-echo technique. This technique allows ice thickness to be measured with an accuracy of ?0.5 mm; ...

  7. The effect of planets beyond the ice line on the accretion of volatiles by habitable-zone rocky planets

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Quintana, Elisa V. [SETI Institute, 189 Bernardo Avenue, Suite 100, Mountain View, CA 94043 (United States); Lissauer, Jack J., E-mail: elisa.quintana@nasa.gov [Space Science and Astrobiology Division 245-3, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    Models of planet formation have shown that giant planets have a large impact on the number, masses, and orbits of terrestrial planets that form. In addition, they play an important role in delivering volatiles from material that formed exterior to the snow line (the region in the disk beyond which water ice can condense) to the inner region of the disk where terrestrial planets can maintain liquid water on their surfaces. We present simulations of the late stages of terrestrial planet formation from a disk of protoplanets around a solar-type star and we include a massive planet (from 1 M {sub ?} to 1 M {sub J}) in Jupiter's orbit at ?5.2 AU in all but one set of simulations. Two initial disk models are examined with the same mass distribution and total initial water content, but with different distributions of water content. We compare the accretion rates and final water mass fraction of the planets that form. Remarkably, all of the planets that formed in our simulations without giant planets were water-rich, showing that giant planet companions are not required to deliver volatiles to terrestrial planets in the habitable zone. In contrast, an outer planet at least several times the mass of Earth may be needed to clear distant regions of debris truncating the epoch of frequent large impacts. Observations of exoplanets from radial velocity surveys suggest that outer Jupiter-like planets may be scarce, therefore, the results presented here suggest that there may be more habitable planets residing in our galaxy than previously thought.

  8. Marketing water 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2008-01-01

    stream_source_info Marketing water savings.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 9143 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name Marketing water savings.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 tx H2... are partnering with federal and state agencies and universities to develop new programs or market existing ones. In North Central Texas, the city of McKin- ney and Texas AgriLife Research and Exten- sion Urban Solutions Center at Dallas recently began...

  9. Dynamics of the sea ice edge in Davis Strait M.P. Heide-Jrgensen a,, H. Stern b

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laidre, Kristin L.

    ice concentration and plankton abundance could be detected but the recruitment of the offshore cod strong seasonal changes in sea ice extent and concentration, primarily driven by wind and current Strait. This water mass is transported from the Arctic Ocean through the Canadian high Arctic archi

  10. Evaluation of Cloud-resolving and Limited Area Model Intercomparison Simulations using TWP-ICE Observations. Part 2: Rain Microphysics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varble, Adam; Zipser, Edward J.; Fridlind, Ann; Zhu, Ping; Ackerman, Andrew; Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre; Fan, Jiwen; Hill, Adrian; Shipway, Ben; Williams, Christopher R.

    2014-12-27

    Ten 3D cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations and four 3D limited area model (LAM) simulations of an intense mesoscale convective system observed on January 23-24, 2006 during the Tropical Warm Pool – International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) are compared with each other and with observations and retrievals from a scanning polarimetric radar, co-located UHF and VHF vertical profilers, and a Joss-Waldvogel disdrometer in an attempt to explain published results showing a low bias in simulated stratiform rainfall. Despite different forcing methodologies, similar precipitation microphysics errors appear in CRMs and LAMs with differences that depend on the details of the bulk microphysics scheme used. One-moment schemes produce too many small raindrops, which biases Doppler velocities low, but produces rain water contents (RWCs) that are similar to observed. Two-moment rain schemes with a gamma shape parameter (?) of 0 produce excessive size sorting, which leads to larger Doppler velocities than those produced in one-moment schemes, but lower RWCs than observed. Two moment schemes also produce a convective median volume diameter distribution that is too broad relative to observations and thus, may have issues balancing raindrop formation, collision coalescence, and raindrop breakup. Assuming a ? of 2.5 rather than 0 for the raindrop size distribution improves one-moment scheme biases, and allowing ? to have values greater than 0 may improve two-moment schemes. Under-predicted stratiform rain rates are associated with under-predicted ice water contents at the melting level rather than excessive rain evaporation, in turn likely associated with convective detrainment that is too high in the troposphere and mesoscale circulations that are too weak. In addition to stronger convective updrafts than observed, limited domain size prevents a large, well-developed stratiform region from developing in CRMs, while a dry bias in ECMWF analyses does the same to the LAMs.

  11. Watershed and Receiving Water Modeling Introduction ....................................................................................................................................843

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitt, Robert E.

    APPENDIX H Watershed and Receiving Water Modeling CONTENTS Introduction ..................................................................................................................852 Receiving Water Models ......................................................................................................................................866 INTRODUCTION Models are important tools for watershed and receiving water analyses because

  12. Modeling the impediment of methane ebullition bubbles by seasonal lake ice

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Greene, S.; Walter Anthony, K. M.; Archer, D.; Sepulveda-Jauregui, A.; Martinez-Cruz, K.

    2014-12-08

    Microbial methane (CH4) ebullition (bubbling) from anoxic lake sediments comprises a globally significant flux to the atmosphere, but ebullition bubbles in temperate and polar lakes can be trapped by winter ice cover and later released during spring thaw. This "ice-bubble storage" (IBS) constitutes a novel mode of CH4 emission. Before bubbles are encapsulated by downward-growing ice, some of their CH4 dissolves into the lake water, where it may be subject to oxidation. We present field characterization and a model of the annual CH4 cycle in Goldstream Lake, a thermokarst (thaw) lake in interior Alaska. We find that summertime ebullition dominatesmore »annual CH4 emissions to the atmosphere. Eighty percent of CH4 in bubbles trapped by ice dissolves into the lake water column in winter, and about half of that is oxidized. The ice growth rate and the magnitude of the CH4 ebullition flux are important controlling factors of bubble dissolution. Seven percent of annual ebullition CH4 is trapped as IBS and later emitted as ice melts. In a future warmer climate, there will likely be less seasonal ice cover, less IBS, less CH4 dissolution from trapped bubbles, and greater CH4 emissions from northern lakes.« less

  13. Modeling the impediment of methane ebullition bubbles by seasonal lake ice

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Greene, S.; Walter Anthony, K. M.; Archer, D.; Sepulveda-Jauregui, A.; Martinez-Cruz, K.

    2014-07-15

    Microbial methane (CH4) ebullition (bubbling) from anoxic lake sediments comprises a globally significant flux to the atmosphere, but ebullition bubbles in temperate and polar lakes can be trapped by winter ice cover and later released during spring thaw. This "ice-bubble storage" (IBS) constitutes a novel mode of CH4 emission. Before bubbles are encapsulated by downward-growing ice, some of their CH4 dissolves into the lake water, where it may be subject to oxidation. We present field characterization and a model of the annual CH4 cycle in Goldstream Lake, a thermokarst (thaw) lake in interior Alaska. We find that summertime ebullition dominatesmore »annual CH4 emissions to the atmosphere. Eighty percent of CH4 in bubbles trapped by ice dissolves into the lake water column in winter, and about half of that is oxidized. The ice growth rate and the magnitude of the CH4 ebullition flux are important controlling factors of bubble dissolution. Seven percent of annual ebullition CH4 is trapped as IBS and later emitted as ice melts. In a future warmer climate, there will likely be less seasonal ice cover, less IBS, less CH4 dissolution from trapped bubbles, and greater CH4 emissions from northern lakes.« less

  14. Laboratory Investigation of Contact Freezing and the Aerosol to Ice Crystal Transformation Process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shaw, Raymond A.

    2014-10-28

    This project has been focused on the following objectives: 1. Investigations of the physical processes governing immersion versus contact nucleation, specifically surface-induced crystallization; 2. Development of a quadrupole particle trap with full thermodynamic control over the temperature range 0 to –40 °C and precisely controlled water vapor saturation ratios for continuous, single-particle measurement of the aerosol to ice crystal transformation process for realistic ice nuclei; 3. Understanding the role of ice nucleation in determining the microphysical properties of mixed-phase clouds, within a framework that allows bridging between laboratory and field measurements.

  15. An ecological study examining the correlation of end-stage renal disease and ground water heavy metal content in Texas counties 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bishop, Scott Alan

    1999-01-01

    An ecological study was conducted to examine the correlation of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and the ground water heavy metal level of lead, arsenic, cadmium, mercury and the cumulative level of all four metals in Texas counties. The heavy meal...

  16. Electrothermal Icing Protection of Aerosurfaces Using Conductive Polymer Nanocomposites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buschhorn, Samuel T.

    Ice protection systems (IPS) are critical components for many aerospace flight vehicles, including commercial transports and unmanned aerial systems (UAS), and can include anti-icing, de-icing, ice sensing, etc. Here, an ...

  17. Coherent radar ice thickness measurements over the Greenland ice sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gogineni, S. Prasad; Tammana, Dilip; Braaten, David A.; Leuschen, C.; Legarsky, J.; Kanagaratnam, P.; Stiles, J.; Allen, C.; Jezek, K.; Akins, T. L.

    2001-12-27

    averaged over a distance covered by aircraft in 1 s (-130 m).) tt(X, g = -d) = Sice(t: T, x). (6) The value t = - can be interpreted as the time when S ice(t, x) represents the wave energy due to scattering specifically from depth d, as opposed... of the Greenland ice sheet produced by Mark Fahnestock (Department of Meteorology, University of Maryland, College Park) and Ron Kwok (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasa- dena). The helpful suggestions and comments of two...

  18. Pressurized oceans and the eruption of liquid water on Europa and Enceladus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Manga, Michael

    expansion of water as it freezes from the top increases pressure in the water confined below the ice. We the pressure in water trapped below the ice, we present in Figure 1 the results of a straightforward demonPressurized oceans and the eruption of liquid water on Europa and Enceladus M. Manga1 and C

  19. An Unprecedented Constraint on Water Content in the Sunlit Lunar Exosphere Seen by Lunar-Based Ultraviolet Telescope of Chang'e-3 Mission

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, J; Qiu, Y L; Meng, X M; Cai, H B; Cao, L; Deng, J S; Han, X H; Wei, J Y

    2015-01-01

    The content of $\\mathrm{OH/H_2O}$ molecules in the tenuous exosphere of the Moon is still an open issue at present. We here report an unprecedented upper limit of the content of the OH radicals, which is obtained from the in-situ measurements carried out \\rm by the Lunar-based Ultraviolet Telescope, a payload of Chinese Chang'e-3 mission. By analyzing the diffuse background in the images taken by the telescope, the column density and surface concentration of the OH radicals are inferred to be $<10^{11}\\ \\mathrm{cm^{-2}}$ and $<10^{4}\\ \\mathrm{cm^{-3}}$ (by assuming a hydrostatic equilibrium with a scale height of 100km), respectively, by assuming that the recorded background is fully contributed by their resonance fluorescence emission. The resulted concentration is lower than the previously reported value by about two orders of magnitude, and is close to the prediction of the sputtering model. In addition, the same measurements and method allow us to derive a surface concentration of $<10^{2}\\ \\math...

  20. Rubber friction on ice and snow surfaces 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Skouvaklis, Gerasimos

    2011-06-28

    The friction of rubber on ice and snow surfaces is complex. Deeper scientific understanding is important for optimising performance of tyres in winter. Rubber, ice and snow systems exhibit frictional behaviour which ...

  1. Thermal Storage with Ice Harvesting Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Knebel, D. E.

    1986-01-01

    Application of Harvesting Ice Storage Systems. Thermal storage systems are becoming widely accepted techniques for utility load management. This paper discusses the principles of ice harvesting equipment and their application to the multi...

  2. Electrical properties of saline ices and ice-silicate mixtures: geophysical and astrobiological consequences (Invited)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stillman, David E.

    MR22A-05 Electrical properties of saline ices and ice-silicate mixtures: geophysical) electrical-properties measurements of laboratory- produced saline ice, salt hydrates, and ice of interior properties, and habitability. The electrical properties of saline H2O are controlled by the binary

  3. A PRECISE WATER ABUNDANCE MEASUREMENT FOR THE HOT JUPITER WASP-43b

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kreidberg, Laura; Bean, Jacob L.; Stevenson, Kevin B. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, 5640 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Désert, Jean-Michel [CASA, Department of Astrophysical and Planetary Sciences, University of Colorado, 389-UCB, Boulder, CO 80309 (United States); Line, Michael R.; Fortney, Jonathan J. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Madhusudhan, Nikku [Institute for Astronomy, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB3 OHA (United Kingdom); Showman, Adam P.; Kataria, Tiffany [Department of Planetary Sciences and Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, The University of Arizona, Tuscon, AZ 85721 (United States); Charbonneau, David [Department of Astronomy, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); McCullough, Peter R. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Seager, Sara [Department of Physics, Massachussetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Burrows, Adam [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Henry, Gregory W.; Williamson, Michael [Center of Excellence in Information Systems, Tennessee State University, Nashville, TN 37209 (United States); Homeier, Derek, E-mail: laura.kreidberg@uchicago.edu [Centre de Recherche Astrophysique de Lyon, UMR 5574, CNRS, Université de Lyon, École Normale Supérieure de Lyon, 46 Allée d'Italie, F-69364 Lyon Cedex 07 (France)

    2014-10-01

    The water abundance in a planetary atmosphere provides a key constraint on the planet's primordial origins because water ice is expected to play an important role in the core accretion model of planet formation. However, the water content of the solar system giant planets is not well known because water is sequestered in clouds deep in their atmospheres. By contrast, short-period exoplanets have such high temperatures that their atmospheres have water in the gas phase, making it possible to measure the water abundance for these objects. We present a precise determination of the water abundance in the atmosphere of the 2 M {sub Jup} short-period exoplanet WASP-43b based on thermal emission and transmission spectroscopy measurements obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope. We find the water content is consistent with the value expected in a solar composition gas at planetary temperatures (0.4-3.5 × solar at 1? confidence). The metallicity of WASP-43b's atmosphere suggested by this result extends the trend observed in the solar system of lower metal enrichment for higher planet masses.

  4. Evaluating and Constraining Ice Cloud Parameterizations in CAM5 using Aircraft Measurements from the SPARTICUS Campaign

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Kai; Liu, Xiaohong; Wang, Minghuai; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Mitchell, David; Mishra, Subhashree; Mace, Gerald G.

    2013-01-01

    This study uses aircraft measurements of relative humidity and ice crystal size distribution collected in synoptic cirrus during the SPARTICUS (Small PARTicles In CirrUS) field campaign to evaluate and constrain ice cloud parameterizations in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5. The probability density function (PDF) of ice crystal number concentration (Ni) derived from high frequency (1 Hz) measurements features a strong dependence on ambient temperature. As temperature decreases from -35°C to -62°C, the peak in the PDF shifts from 10-20 L-1 to 200-1000 L-1, while the ice crystal number concentration shows a factor of 6-7 increase. Model simulations are performed with two different insitu ice nucleation schemes. One of the schemes can reproduce a clear increase of Ni with decreasing temperature, by using either an observation based ice nuclei spectrum or a classical theory based spectrum with a relatively low (5%-10%) maximum freezing ratio for dust aerosols. The simulation with the other scheme, which assumes a high maximum freezing ratio (100%), shows much weaker temperature dependence of Ni. Simulations are also performed to test empirical parameters related to water vapor deposition and the auto-conversion of ice crystals to snow. Results show that a value between 0.05 and 0.1 for the water vapor deposition coefficient and 250 um for the critical ice crystal size can produce good agreements between model simulation and the SPARTICUS measurements in terms of ice crystal number concentration and effective radius. The climate impact of perturbing these parameters is also discussed.

  5. Ice-lens formation and geometrical supercooling in soils and other colloidal materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robert W. Style; Stephen S. L. Peppin; Alan C. F. Cocks; John S. Wettlaufer

    2011-09-09

    We present a new, physically-intuitive model of ice-lens formation and growth during the freezing of soils and other dense, particulate suspensions. Motivated by experimental evidence, we consider the growth of an ice-filled crack in a freezing soil. At low temperatures, ice in the crack exerts large pressures on the crack walls that will eventually cause the crack to split open. We show that the crack will then propagate across the soil to form a new lens. The process is controlled by two factors: the cohesion of the soil, and the geometrical supercooling of the water in the soil; a new concept introduced to measure the energy available to form a new ice lens. When the supercooling exceeds a critical amount (proportional to the cohesive strength of the soil) a new ice lens forms. This condition for ice-lens formation and growth does not appeal to any ad hoc, empirical assumptions, and explains how periodic ice lenses can form with or without the presence of a frozen fringe. The proposed mechanism is in good agreement with experiments, in particular explaining ice-lens pattern formation, and surges in heave rate associated with the growth of new lenses. Importantly for systems with no frozen fringe, ice-lens formation and frost heave can be predicted given only the unfrozen properties of the soil. We use our theory to estimate ice-lens growth temperatures obtaining quantitative agreement with the limited experimental data that is currently available. Finally we suggest experiments that might be performed in order to verify this theory in more detail. The theory is generalizable to complex natural-soil scenarios, and should therefore be useful in the prediction of macroscopic frost heave rates.

  6. EXPLORATION OF UNDER-ICE REGIONS WITH OCEAN PROFILING AGENTS (EUROPA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Virginia Tech

    EXPLORATION OF UNDER-ICE REGIONS WITH OCEAN PROFILING AGENTS (EUROPA) D. W. Allen, M. Jones, L. Mc for exploration ­ the nearest reaches of what may be a vast new "habitable zone" of interior oceans warmed's ocean over its entire depth. i #12;Contents List Of Abbreviations xi 1 Introduction 1 1.1 Objectives

  7. Medical ice slurry production device

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kasza, Kenneth E. (Palos Park, IL); Oras, John (Des Plaines, IL); Son, HyunJin (Naperville, IL)

    2008-06-24

    The present invention relates to an apparatus for producing sterile ice slurries for medical cooling applications. The apparatus is capable of producing highly loaded slurries suitable for delivery to targeted internal organs of a patient, such as the brain, heart, lungs, stomach, kidneys, pancreas, and others, through medical size diameter tubing. The ice slurry production apparatus includes a slurry production reservoir adapted to contain a volume of a saline solution. A flexible membrane crystallization surface is provided within the slurry production reservoir. The crystallization surface is chilled to a temperature below a freezing point of the saline solution within the reservoir such that ice particles form on the crystallization surface. A deflector in the form of a reciprocating member is provided for periodically distorting the crystallization surface and dislodging the ice particles which form on the crystallization surface. Using reservoir mixing the slurry is conditioned for easy pumping directly out of the production reservoir via medical tubing or delivery through other means such as squeeze bottles, squeeze bags, hypodermic syringes, manual hand delivery, and the like.

  8. ELECTRON IRRADIATION OF CARBON DISULFIDE-OXYGEN ICES: TOWARD THE FORMATION OF SULFUR-BEARING MOLECULES IN INTERSTELLAR ICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Maity, Surajit; Kaiser, Ralf I. [Department of Chemistry, University of Hawai'i at Manoa, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States)

    2013-08-20

    The formation of sulfur-bearing molecules in interstellar ices was investigated during the irradiation of carbon disulfide (CS{sub 2})-oxygen (O{sub 2}) ices with energetic electrons at 12 K. The irradiation-induced chemical processing of these ices was monitored online and in situ via Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy to probe the newly formed products quantitatively. The sulfur-bearing molecules produced during the irradiation were sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}), sulfur trioxide (SO{sub 3}), and carbonyl sulfide (OCS). Formations of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), carbon monoxide (CO), and ozone (O{sub 3}) were observed as well. To fit the temporal evolution of the newly formed products and to elucidate the underlying reaction pathways, kinetic reaction schemes were developed and numerical sets of rate constants were derived. Our studies suggest that carbon disulfide (CS{sub 2}) can be easily transformed to carbonyl sulfide (OCS) via reactions with suprathermal atomic oxygen (O), which can be released from oxygen-containing precursors such as water (H{sub 2}O), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}), and/or methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) upon interaction with ionizing radiation. This investigation corroborates that carbonyl sulfide (OCS) and sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) are the dominant sulfur-bearing molecules in interstellar ices.

  9. Arctic sea ice animation (Tom Agnew, Environment Canada) Lecture 12 HAS222d Intro to energy and environment 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arctic sea ice animation (Tom Agnew, Environment Canada) #12;Lecture 12 HAS222d Intro to energy. moisture streamers: (1 Sverdrup...106 m3/sec tranport of water carries 2.2 x 1015 watt thermal energy and environment 2009 slides on water in the atmosphere P.B. Rhines #12;Satellite image of water vapor (not cloud

  10. What's your water footprint? 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jordan, Leslie

    2009-01-01

    stream_source_info What's your water footprint.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 6622 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name What's your water footprint.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859...-1 tx H2O | pg. 21 What?s your water footprint? When it comes to your water use, do you tread lightly or are you an H2O Sasquatch? How much water do you think you consume every day? You might initially consider the length of your daily shower...

  11. The measured compositions of Uranus and Neptune from their formation on the CO ice line

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali-Dib, Mohamad; Mousis, Olivier; Petit, Jean-Marc

    2014-09-20

    The formation mechanisms of the ice giants Uranus and Neptune, and the origin of their elemental and isotopic compositions, have long been debated. The density of solids in the outer protosolar nebula is too low to explain their formation, and spectroscopic observations show that both planets are highly enriched in carbon, very poor in nitrogen, and the ices from which they originally formed might have had deuterium-to-hydrogen ratios lower than the predicted cometary value, unexplained properties that were observed in no other planets. Here, we show that all these properties can be explained naturally if Uranus and Neptune both formed at the carbon monoxide ice line. Due to the diffusive redistribution of vapors, this outer region of the protosolar nebula intrinsically has enough surface density to form both planets from carbon-rich solids but nitrogen-depleted gas, in abundances consistent with their observed values. Water-rich interiors originating mostly from transformed CO ices reconcile the D/H value of Uranus's and Neptune's building blocks with the cometary value. Finally, our scenario generalizes a well known hypothesis that Jupiter formed on an ice line (water snow line) for the two ice giants, and might be a first step toward generalizing this mechanism for other giant planets.

  12. Water Quality Criteria Introduction ....................................................................................................................................798

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitt, Robert E.

    APPENDIX G Water Quality Criteria CONTENTS Introduction ....................................................................................................................................798 EPA's Water Quality Criteria and Standards Plan -- Priorities for the Future............................798 Compilation of Recommended Water Quality Criteria and EPA's Process for Deriving New

  13. CO2 hydrate dissociation at low temperatures - formation and annealing of ice Ic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Falenty, Andrzej; Kuhs, Werner F

    2015-01-01

    Dissociation of gas hydrates below 240 K leads to the formation of a metastable form of water ice, so called cubic ice (Ic). Through its defective nature and small particle size the surface film composed of such material is incapable of creating any significant diffusion barrier. Above 160 K, cubic ice gradually transforms to the stable hexagonal (Ih) form on laboratory time scales. The annealing, coupled with a parallel decomposition of gas hydrates, accelerates as temperature rises but already above 190 K the first process prevails, transforming cubic stacking sequences in-to ordinary Ih ice within a few minutes. Remaining stacking faults are removed through very slow isothermal annealing or after heating up above 240 K. The role of the proportion of cubic stacking on the decomposition rate is discussed. A better understanding of the dissociation kinetics at low temperatures is particularly im-portant for the critical evaluation of existing hypotheses that consider clathrates as a potential medium that acti...

  14. FUNDAMENTALSTUDY FOR IMPROVEMENT OF ESTIMATION ACCURACY CHLORIDE CONTENT USING

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    by the electromagnetic wave radar that chloride contents and water contents, and temperature affected the electricalFUNDAMENTALSTUDY FOR IMPROVEMENT OF ESTIMATION ACCURACY CHLORIDE CONTENT USING ELECTROMAGNETIC, Tokyo, Japan mami.uchida.4k@stu.hosei.ac.jp ABSTRACT Chloride contents estimation using electromagnetic

  15. Ice Nucleation of Bare and Sulfuric Acid-coated Mineral Dust Particles and Implication for Cloud Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Sanders, Cassandra N.; Zhang, Kai; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhao, Chun

    2014-08-27

    Ice nucleation properties of different dust species coated with soluble material are not well understood. We determined the ice nucleation ability of bare and sulfuric acid coated mineral dust particles as a function of temperature (-25 to -35 deg C) and relative humidity with respect to water (RHw). Five different mineral dust species: Arizona test dust (ATD), illite, montmorillonite, quartz and kaolinite were dry dispersed and size-selected at 150 nm and exposed to sulfuric acid vapors in the coating apparatus. The condensed sulfuric acid soluble mass fraction per particle was estimated from the cloud condensation nuclei activated fraction measurements. The fraction of dust particles nucleating ice at various temperatures and RHw was determined using a compact ice chamber. In water-subsaturated conditions, compared to bare dust particles, we found that only coated ATD particles showed suppression of ice nucleation ability while other four dust species did not showed the effect of coating on the fraction of particles nucleating ice. The results suggest that interactions between the dust surface and sulfuric acid vapor are important, such that interactions may or may not modify the surface via chemical reactions with sulfuric acid. At water-supersaturated conditions we did not observed the effect of coating, i.e. the bare and coated dust particles had similar ice nucleation behavior.

  16. Bedmap2: improved ice bed, surface and thickness datasets for Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    Surface configuration, ice thick- ness, volume and bedrockconstruction of the ice thick- ness grids. between flightof the physical ice thick- ness, rather than an “ice-

  17. EERE Website Content Checklist

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This checklist is a tool to guide EERE content developers and editors in creating and reviewing content for websites.

  18. Density and water content of nanoscale solid C-S-H formed in alkali-activated slag (AAS) paste and implications for chemical shrinkage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thomas, Jeffrey J., E-mail: jthomas39@slb.com [Schlumberger-Doll Research, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Allen, Andrew J. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Jennings, Hamlin M. [CSHub, Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States)

    2012-02-15

    Alkali-activated slag (AAS) paste was analyzed using small-angle neutron scattering (SANS). The scattering response indicates that the microstructure consists of a uniform matrix of hydration product with a high surface area studded with unhydrated cores of slag particles. In contrast with portland cement paste, no surface fractal scattering regime was detected, and elevated temperature curing (at 60 Degree-Sign C) had no detectable effect on the microstructure at any length scale studied. The specific surface area of the AAS pastes is about 25% higher than that of a portland cement paste cured under the same conditions. The composition and mass density of the nanoscale solid C-S-H phase formed in the AAS paste was determined using a previously developed neutron scattering method, in conjunction with a hydration model. The result ((CaO){sub 0.99}-SiO{sub 2}-(Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}){sub 0.06}-(H{sub 2}O){sub 0.97}, d = (2.73 {+-} 0.02) g/cm{sup 3}) is significantly lower in calcium and in water as compared to portland cement or pure tricalcium silicate paste. These values were used to calculate the chemical shrinkage that would result from complete hydration of the AAS paste. The result, (12.2 {+-} 1.5) cm{sup 3} of volumetric shrinkage per 100 g of unhydrated cement, is about twice the amount of chemical shrinkage exhibited by normal cement pastes.

  19. Laboratory investigations of irradiated acetonitrile-containing ices on an interstellar dust analog

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abdulgalil, Ali G. M.; Marchione, Demian; Rosu-Finsen, Alexander; Collings, Mark P.; McCoustra, Martin R. S.

    2012-07-15

    Reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy is used to study the impact of low-energy electron irradiation of acetonitrile-containing ices, under conditions close to those in the dense star-forming regions in the interstellar medium. Both the incident electron energy and the surface coverage were varied. The experiments reveal that solid acetonitrile is desorbed from its ultrathin solid films with a cross section of the order of 10{sup -17} cm{sup 2}. Evidence is presented for a significantly larger desorption cross section for acetonitrile molecules at the water-ice interface, similar to that previously observed for the benzene-water system.

  20. Modeling the Alaskan Continental Shelf waters. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, S.K.; Leendertse, J.J.

    1987-10-01

    This report describes a three-dimensional ocean circulation model and two dimensional stochastic weather model used to calculate hypothetical oil-spill trajectories over the Alaskan Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) areas. Special consideration is given to the movement of sea ice in areas characterized by the presence of seasonal ice, and to ice/water interaction under different current and wind conditions. Spreading, dispersion, and weathering of crude oil, and probable landfalls of trajectories are calculated under hypothetical scenarios of oil spills from tanker accidents and well blow-outs. The report also provides comparisons between simulated data on water and sea ice motion with available field observations.

  1. Hydrogen ICE Vehicle Testing Activities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J. Francfort; D. Karner

    2006-04-01

    The Advanced Vehicle Testing Activity teamed with Electric Transportation Applications and Arizona Public Service to develop and monitor the operations of the APS Alternative Fuel (Hydrogen) Pilot Plant. The Pilot Plant provides 100% hydrogen, and hydrogen and compressed natural gas (H/CNG)-blended fuels for the evaluation of hydrogen and H/CNG internal combustion engine (ICE) vehicles in controlled and fleet testing environments. Since June 2002, twenty hydrogen and H/CNG vehicles have accumulated 300,000 test miles and 5,700 fueling events. The AVTA is part of the Department of Energy’s FreedomCAR and Vehicle Technologies Program. These testing activities are managed by the Idaho National Laboratory. This paper discusses the Pilot Plant design and monitoring, and hydrogen ICE vehicle testing methods and results.

  2. Water in protoplanetary disks: Deuteration and turbulent mixing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Furuya, Kenji; Aikawa, Yuri; Nomura, Hideko; Hersant, Franck; Wakelam, Valentine

    2013-12-10

    We investigate water and deuterated water chemistry in turbulent protoplanetary disks. Chemical rate equations are solved with the diffusion term, mimicking turbulent mixing in a vertical direction. Water near the midplane is transported to the disk atmosphere by turbulence and is destroyed by photoreactions to produce atomic oxygen, while the atomic oxygen is transported to the midplane and reforms water and/or other molecules. We find that this cycle significantly decreases column densities of water ice at r ? 30 AU, where dust temperatures are too high to reform water ice effectively. The radial extent of such region depends on the desorption energy of atomic hydrogen. Our model indicates that water ice could be deficient even outside the sublimation radius. Outside this radius, the cycle decreases the deuterium-to-hydrogen (D/H) ratio of water ice from ?2 × 10{sup –2}, which is set by the collapsing core model, to 10{sup –4}-10{sup –2} in 10{sup 6} yr, without significantly decreasing the water ice column density. The resultant D/H ratios depend on the strength of mixing and the radial distance from the central star. Our finding suggests that the D/H ratio of cometary water (?10{sup –4}) could be established (i.e., cometary water could be formed) in the solar nebula, even if the D/H ratio of water ice delivered to the disk was very high (?10{sup –2}).

  3. Molecular interactions with ice: Molecular embedding, adsorption, detection, and release

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gibson, K. D.; Langlois, Grant G.; Li, Wenxin; Sibener, S. J.; Killelea, Daniel R.

    2014-11-14

    The interaction of atomic and molecular species with water and ice is of fundamental importance for chemistry. In a previous series of publications, we demonstrated that translational energy activates the embedding of Xe and Kr atoms in the near surface region of ice surfaces. In this paper, we show that inert molecular species may be absorbed in a similar fashion. We also revisit Xe embedding, and further probe the nature of the absorption into the selvedge. CF{sub 4} molecules with high translational energies (?3 eV) were observed to embed in amorphous solid water. Just as with Xe, the initial adsorption rate is strongly activated by translational energy, but the CF{sub 4} embedding probability is much less than for Xe. In addition, a larger molecule, SF{sub 6}, did not embed at the same translational energies that both CF{sub 4} and Xe embedded. The embedding rate for a given energy thus goes in the order Xe > CF{sub 4} > SF{sub 6}. We do not have as much data for Kr, but it appears to have a rate that is between that of Xe and CF{sub 4}. Tentatively, this order suggests that for Xe and CF{sub 4}, which have similar van der Waals radii, the momentum is the key factor in determining whether the incident atom or molecule can penetrate deeply enough below the surface to embed. The more massive SF{sub 6} molecule also has a larger van der Waals radius, which appears to prevent it from stably embedding in the selvedge. We also determined that the maximum depth of embedding is less than the equivalent of four layers of hexagonal ice, while some of the atoms just below the ice surface can escape before ice desorption begins. These results show that energetic ballistic embedding in ice is a general phenomenon, and represents a significant new channel by which incident species can be trapped under conditions where they would otherwise not be bound stably as surface adsorbates. These findings have implications for many fields including environmental science, trace gas collection and release, and the chemical composition of astrophysical icy bodies in space.

  4. Exploiting User Generated Content for Mountain Peak Detection

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tagliasacchi, Marco

    Exploiting User Generated Content for Mountain Peak Detection Roman Fedorov Politecnico di Milano.g. snow water availability maps based on mountain peaks states extracted from photographs hosting services). User Generated Content(UGC); collective intelligence; passive crowdsourcing; environmental models

  5. FAFCO Ice Storage test report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stovall, T.K.

    1993-11-01

    The Ice Storage Test Facility (ISTF) is designed to test commercial ice storage systems. FAFCO provided a storage tank equipped with coils designed for use with a secondary fluid system. The FAFCO ice storage system was tested over a wide range of operating conditions. Measured system performance during charging showed the ability to freeze the tank fully, storing from 150 to 200 ton-h. However, the charging rate showed significant variations during the latter portion of the charge cycle. During discharge cycles, the storage tank outlet temperature was strongly affected by the discharge rate and tank state of charge. The discharge capacity was dependent upon both the selected discharge rate and maximum allowable tank outlet temperature. Based on these tests, storage tank selection must depend on both charge and discharge conditions. This report describes FAFCO system performance fully under both charging and discharging conditions. While the test results reported here are accurate for the prototype 1990 FAFCO Model 200, currently available FAFCO models incorporate significant design enhancements beyond the Model 200. At least one major modification was instituted as a direct result of the ISTF tests. Such design improvements were one of EPRI`s primary goals in founding the ISTF.

  6. Local Investigation of Femtosecond Laser Induced Dynamics of Water Nanoclusters on Cu(111) Michael Mehlhorn,1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alavi, Ali

    .37.Ef, 68.43.Bc, 82.30.Rs, 82.53.St There is broad interest in supported water-ice and the mechanims

  7. Further observations of a decreasing atmospheric CO2 uptake capacity in the Canada Basin (Arctic Ocean) due to sea ice loss

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    decayed ice cover, we found surprisingly high pCO2sw (~290­320 matm), considering that surface waterFurther observations of a decreasing atmospheric CO2 uptake capacity in the Canada Basin (Arctic as an atmospheric CO2 sink under the summertime ice-free conditions expected in the near future. Beneath a heavily

  8. Evaluation of Cloud-resolving and Limited Area Model Intercomparison Simulations using TWP-ICE Observations. Part 1: Deep Convective Updraft Properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Varble, A. C.; Zipser, Edward J.; Fridlind, Ann; Zhu, Ping; Ackerman, Andrew; Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre; Collis, Scott M.; Fan, Jiwen; Hill, Adrian; Shipway, Ben

    2014-12-27

    Ten 3D cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulations and four 3D limited area model (LAM) simulations of an intense mesoscale convective system observed on January 23-24, 2006 during the Tropical Warm Pool – International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) are compared with each other and with observed radar reflectivity fields and dual-Doppler retrievals of vertical wind speeds in an attempt to explain published results showing a high bias in simulated convective radar reflectivity aloft. This high bias results from ice water content being large, which is a product of large, strong convective updrafts, although hydrometeor size distribution assumptions modulate the size of this bias. Snow reflectivity can exceed 40 dBZ in a two-moment scheme when a constant bulk density of 100 kg m-3 is used. Making snow mass more realistically proportional to area rather than volume should somewhat alleviate this problem. Graupel, unlike snow, produces high biased reflectivity in all simulations. This is associated with large amounts of liquid water above the freezing level in updraft cores. Peak vertical velocities in deep convective updrafts are greater than dual-Doppler retrieved values, especially in the upper troposphere. Freezing of large rainwater contents lofted above the freezing level in simulated updraft cores greatly contributes to these excessive upper tropospheric vertical velocities. Strong simulated updraft cores are nearly undiluted, with some showing supercell characteristics. Decreasing horizontal grid spacing from 900 meters to 100 meters weakens strong updrafts, but not enough to match observational retrievals. Therefore, overly intense simulated updrafts may partly be a product of interactions between convective dynamics, parameterized microphysics, and large-scale environmental biases that promote different convective modes and strengths than observed.

  9. A Fluidized Bed Chiller: A New Approach in Making Slush-Ice 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klaren, D. G.; Van Der Meer, J. S.

    1991-01-01

    stream_source_info ESL-IE-91-06-05.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 29778 Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 stream_name ESL-IE-91-06-05.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=ISO-8859-1 A FLUIDIZED BED... CHILLER: A NEW APPROACH IN MAKING SLUSH-ICE Dr.Ir. D.G. Klaren M.Sc. Technical Director Gebr. Scheffers B.V. Schiedam, The Netherlands ABSTRACT A fluidized bed heat exchanger already successfully applied for heat transfer applications involving...

  10. Geol 795 Paleoceanography Ice Sheet Dynamics and Climate Change

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Barranco, Joseph

    Geol 795 ­ Paleoceanography Ice Sheet Dynamics and Climate Change Class Meetings: Tuesday 9 of articles related ice sheet dynamics and the role of ice sheets in past, present, and future climate change ice sheet dynamics and the role of ice sheets in climate change. We will discuss effective ways

  11. BSc (Hons) Building Surveying Course content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evans, Paul

    BSc (Hons) Building Surveying Course content Year One Year One modules Professional, Academic and openings o Upper floor construction o Internal walls and partitions o Roofs, roof coverings and rain water

  12. Ices in the edge-on disk CRBR 2422.8-3423: Spitzer spectroscopy and Monte Carlo radiative transfer modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klaus M. Pontoppidan; Cornelis P. Dullemond; Ewine F. van Dishoeck; Geoffrey A. Blake; Adwin C. A. Boogert; Neal J. Evans II; Jacqueline E. Kessler-Silacci; Fred Lahuis

    2004-11-13

    We present 5.2-37.2 micron spectroscopy of the edge-on circumstellar disk CRBR 2422.8-3423 obtained using the InfraRed Spectrograph (IRS) of the Spitzer Space Telescope. The IRS spectrum is combined with ground-based 3-5 micron spectroscopy to obtain a complete inventory of solid state material present along the line of sight toward the source. We model the object with a 2D axisymmetric (effectively 3D) Monte Carlo radiative transfer code. It is found that the model disk, assuming a standard flaring structure, is too warm to contain the very large observed column density of pure CO ice, but is possibly responsible for up to 50% of the water, CO2 and minor ice species. In particular the 6.85 micron band, tentatively due to NH4+, exhibits a prominent red wing, indicating a significant contribution from warm ice in the disk. It is argued that the pure CO ice is located in the dense core Oph-F in front of the source seen in the submillimeter imaging, with the CO gas in the core highly depleted. The model is used to predict which circumstances are most favourable for direct observations of ices in edge-on circumstellar disks. Ice bands will in general be deepest for inclinations similar to the disk opening angle, i.e. ~70 degrees. Due to the high optical depths of typical disk mid-planes, ice absorption bands will often probe warmer ice located in the upper layers of nearly edge-on disks. The ratios between different ice bands are found to vary by up to an order of magnitude depending on disk inclination due to radiative transfer effects caused by the 2D structure of the disk. Ratios between ice bands of the same species can therefore be used to constrain the location of the ices in a circumstellar disk. [Abstract abridged

  13. The Sodium Content of Your Food. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anonymous,

    1982-01-01

    ............................ ............................. Pear nectar Pineapple juice .......................... Prune juice .............................. ................ Mineral Water. imported Tea ............................. Hot brewed .............................. Hot instant... .................................... Condiments, fats and oils 2t ........ Sodium Content of Selected Non-prescription Drugs 2t The Sodium Content of Your Food Extension food and nutrition specialists, The Texas A&M University System. Introduction Sodium is a mineral element necessary...

  14. IceT users' guide and reference.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moreland, Kenneth D.

    2011-01-01

    The Image Composition Engine for Tiles (IceT) is a high-performance sort-last parallel rendering library. In addition to providing accelerated rendering for a standard display, IceT provides the unique ability to generate images for tiled displays. The overall resolution of the display may be several times larger than any viewport that may be rendered by a single machine. This document is an overview of the user interface to IceT.

  15. In situ cosmogenic radiocarbon production and 2-D ice flow line modeling for an Antarctic blue ice area

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Severinghaus, Jeffrey P.

    In situ cosmogenic radiocarbon production and 2-D ice flow line modeling for an Antarctic blue ice; accepted 12 April 2012; published 24 May 2012. [1] Radiocarbon measurements at ice margin sites and blue and 2-D ice flow line modeling for an Antarctic blue ice area, J. Geophys. Res., 117, F02029, doi:10

  16. Novel two-step laser ablation and ionization mass spectrometry (2S-LAIMS) of actor-spectator ice layers: Probing chemical composition of D{sub 2}O ice beneath a H{sub 2}O ice layer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Rui Gudipati, Murthy S.

    2014-03-14

    In this work, we report for the first time successful analysis of organic aromatic analytes imbedded in D{sub 2}O ices by novel infrared (IR) laser ablation of a layered non-absorbing D{sub 2}O ice (spectator) containing the analytes and an ablation-active IR-absorbing H{sub 2}O ice layer (actor) without the analyte. With these studies we have opened up a new method for the in situ analysis of solids containing analytes when covered with an IR laser-absorbing layer that can be resonantly ablated. This soft ejection method takes advantage of the tenability of two-step infrared laser ablation and ultraviolet laser ionization mass spectrometry, previously demonstrated in this lab to study chemical reactions of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in cryogenic ices. The IR laser pulse tuned to resonantly excite only the upper H{sub 2}O ice layer (actor) generates a shockwave upon impact. This shockwave penetrates the lower analyte-containing D{sub 2}O ice layer (spectator, a non-absorbing ice that cannot be ablated directly with the wavelength of the IR laser employed) and is reflected back, ejecting the contents of the D{sub 2}O layer into the vacuum where they are intersected by a UV laser for ionization and detection by a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Thus, energy is transmitted from the laser-absorbing actor layer into the non-absorbing spectator layer resulting its ablation. We found that isotope cross-contamination between layers was negligible. We also did not see any evidence for thermal or collisional chemistry of PAH molecules with H{sub 2}O molecules in the shockwave. We call this “shockwave mediated surface resonance enhanced subsurface ablation” technique as “two-step laser ablation and ionization mass spectrometry of actor-spectator ice layers.” This method has its roots in the well-established MALDI (matrix assisted laser desorption and ionization) method. Our method offers more flexibility to optimize both the processes—ablation and ionization. This new technique can thus be potentially employed to undertake in situ analysis of materials imbedded in diverse media, such as cryogenic ices, biological samples, tissues, minerals, etc., by covered with an IR-absorbing laser ablation medium and study the chemical composition and reaction pathways of the analyte in its natural surroundings.

  17. BISICLES Captures Details of Retreating Antarctic Ice

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    software framework, and linked them to the existing Community Ice Sheet Model code (CISM). With AMR, researchers can now model dynamic points of interest at extremely high...

  18. The Next ICE Age | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    More Documents & Publications The Next ICE Age Fuel Modification t Facilitate Future Combustion Regimes? Optimization of Advanced Diesel Engine Combustion Strategies...

  19. The Stability of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biasutti, Michela

    , distribution and seasonality · Solid Earth: · Geothermal heatflux Abrupt Climate Change Studies Symposium 21 Rebound (GIA) GPS stations measure vertical deformation of solid Earth as ice

  20. Mathematics Of Ice To Aid Global Warming Forecasts Mathematics Of Ice To Aid Global Warming Forecasts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Golden, Kenneth M.

    Mathematics Of Ice To Aid Global Warming Forecasts Mathematics Of Ice To Aid Global Warming forecasts of how global warming will affect polar icepacks. See also: Earth & Climate q Global Warming q the effects of climate warming, and its presence greatly reduces solar heating of the polar oceans." "Sea ice

  1. A New Approach for Exploring Ice Sheets and Sub-Ice Geology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kristoffersen, Yngve

    A New Approach for Exploring Ice Sheets and Sub-Ice Geology Active seismic measurements were geology driven by ice flow [Smith et al., 2007] and the long record of seismic exploration of subglacial sur- veys because of the considerable logistical effort necessary for seismic data acquisition

  2. Satellite SAR Remote Sensing of Great Lakes Ice Cover, Part 2. Ice Classification and Mapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (look-up table) for different ice types. The library is used in the computer classifica- tion (freshwater) ice types using the Jet Propulsion Laboratory C-band scatterometer, together with surface data set, composed of over 20 variations of different ice types measured at incident angles from 0

  3. On the Fluctuations that Order and Frustrate Liquid Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Limmer, David

    2013-01-01

    Quantitative water model . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5.3 Determining T g for water . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .iv Contents 6 Frustrating water at ordered surfaces 6.1

  4. Ice Surface Entropy Induction by Humidity or How Humidity Prompts Freezing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jose Luis Perez-Diaz; Marco Antonio Alvarez-Valenzuela; Juan Sanchez-Garcia-Casarrubios; Sergio Jimenez-Lopez

    2015-09-22

    In this work we measured Surface Energy and Freezing Temperature of supercooled water droplets in air. We find that freezing of water droplets is triggered at the water-air interface and that freezing progresses faster on the surface than in the bulk. The Freezing Point of water droplets is strongly depressed by dryness in air and how humidity triggers freezing. Additionally it is shown to be a Surface phenomenon related to a transfer of Entropy from water vapour to the surface of ice.

  5. ARKTOS: An intelligent system for SAR sea ice image classification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Soh, L. K.; Tsatsoulis, Costas; Gineris, D.; Bertoia, C.

    2004-01-01

    We present an intelligent system for satellite sea ice image analysis named Advanced Reasoning using Knowledge for T ping Of Sea ice (ARKTOS). ARKTOS performs fully automated analysis of synthetic aperture radar (SAR) sea ice images by mimicking...

  6. HORTICULTURAL & FOREST CROPS 2013 Table of Contents 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    HORTICULTURAL & FOREST CROPS 2013 Table of Contents 1 1 Regulations and Basic Information Safe Quantities of Water ............................................................................ 1-29 Table 1

  7. CONTENT ADAPTIVE WATERMARKING BASED ON A STOCHASTIC MULTIRESOLUTION IMAGE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Genève, Université de

    CONTENT ADAPTIVE WATERMARKING BASED ON A STOCHASTIC MULTIRESOLUTION IMAGE MODELING Sviatoslav to provide wa­ termark invisibility. Thirdly, a new principle of water­ mark spatial allocation, based

  8. Environmental Health and Safety -Safety Manual Table of Contents

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, X. Rong

    1 Environmental Health and Safety - Safety Manual Table of Contents I. Assignment of Responsibility Management Program..................................81 XIX. Water Vessel Safety Program

  9. HORTICULTURAL & FOREST CROPS 2014 Table of Contents 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    HORTICULTURAL & FOREST CROPS 2014 Table of Contents 1 1 Regulations and Basic Information Safe Quantities of Water ............................................................................ 1-29 Table 1

  10. LABORATORY STUDIES ON THE FORMATION OF FORMIC ACID (HCOOH) IN INTERSTELLAR AND COMETARY ICES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bennett, Chris J.; Kim, Yong Seol; Kaiser, Ralf I.; Hama, Tetsuya; Kawasaki, Masahiro

    2011-01-20

    Mixtures of water (H{sub 2}O) and carbon monoxide (CO) ices were irradiated at 10 K with energetic electrons to simulate the energy transfer processes that occur in the track of galactic cosmic-ray particles penetrating interstellar ices. We identified formic acid (HCOOH) through new absorption bands in the infrared spectra at 1690 and 1224 cm{sup -1} (5.92 and 8.17 {mu}m, respectively). During the subsequent warm-up of the irradiated samples, formic acid is evident from the mass spectrometer signal at the mass-to-charge ratio, m/z = 46 (HCOOH{sup +}) as the ice sublimates. The detection of formic acid was confirmed using isotopically labeled water-d2 with carbon monoxide, leading to formic acid-d2 (DCOOD). The temporal fits of the reactants, reaction intermediates, and products elucidate two reaction pathways to formic acid in carbon monoxide-water ices. The reaction is induced by unimolecular decomposition of water forming atomic hydrogen (H) and the hydroxyl radical (OH). The dominating pathway to formic acid (HCOOH) was found to involve addition of suprathermal hydrogen atoms to carbon monoxide forming the formyl radical (HCO); the latter recombined with neighboring hydroxyl radicals to yield formic acid (HCOOH). To a lesser extent, hydroxyl radicals react with carbon monoxide to yield the hydroxyformyl radical (HOCO), which recombined with atomic hydrogen to produce formic acid. Similar processes are expected to produce formic acid within interstellar ices, cometary ices, and icy satellites, thus providing alternative processes for the generation of formic acid whose abundance in hot cores such as Sgr-B2 cannot be accounted for solely by gas-phase chemistry.

  11. Solar Works in Seattle: Domestic Hot Water

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Seattle's residential solar hot water workshop. Content also covers general solar resource assessment, siting, and financial incentives.

  12. Sugar, water and free volume networks in concentrated sucrose solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goddard III, William A.

    ) in these mixtures shows a non-monotonic behavior with water content which is consistent with experimental than 38 Æ 4% w/w [5] while the diffusion of water and sucrose decouples for water contents below $50% w/w [6]. Water diffusion in- creases with water content and decreases with temperature

  13. Nuclear quantum effects in water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joseph A. Morrone; Roberto Car

    2008-03-25

    In this work, a path integral Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics simulation of liquid water is performed. It is found that the inclusion of nuclear quantum effects systematically improves the agreement of first principles simulations of liquid water with experiment. In addition, the proton momentum distribution is computed utilizing a recently developed open path integral molecular dynamics methodology. It is shown that these results are in good agreement with neutron Compton scattering data for liquid water and ice.

  14. A direct evidence of vibrationally delocalized response at ice surface

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ishiyama, Tatsuya; Morita, Akihiro

    2014-11-14

    Surface-specific vibrational spectroscopic responses at isotope diluted ice and amorphous ice are investigated by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations combined with quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics calculations. The intense response specific to the ordinary crystal ice surface is predicted to be significantly suppressed in the isotopically diluted and amorphous ices, demonstrating the vibrational delocalization at the ordinary ice surface. The collective vibration at the ice surface is also analyzed with varying temperature by the MD simulation.

  15. ARM - TWP-ICE Maps

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Comments?govInstrumentsnoaacrnBarrow, AlaskaManus Site-Inactive TWP Related Links Facilities andTWP-ICE Maps

  16. IceCube at NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation CurrentHenry Bellamy, Ph.D.FoodHydropower,Principal InvestigatorsIceCube at

  17. Results from IceCube/IceTop Ooty, 17/12/12 Tom Gaisser for the IceCube Collab. 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaisser, Thomas K.

    , 17/12/12 Tom Gaisser for the IceCube Collab. 3 #12;Mumbai, 11/12/12 Tom;Mumbai, 11/12/12 Tom Gaisser for the IceCube Collab. 5 DetecMng neutrinos in H of interac,ons IceTop #12;Mumbai, 11/12/12 Tom Gaisser for the IceCube Collab. 6

  18. Achievements and Outlook 2012 SA Water Centre for Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mayer, Wolfgang

    Achievements and Outlook 2012 SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse #12;Contents Our Breaking News 35 SA Water Centre for Water Management and Reuse University of South Australia Mawson Lakes Campus Mawson Lakes SA 5095 Telephone: +61 (08) 8302 3338 Fax: +61 (08) 8302 3386 Web: unisa.edu.au/water

  19. Radar attenuation and temperature within the Greenland Ice Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    on obliquely propagating radio waves, IEEE Trans. Geosci.dielectric attenuation of radio waves through ice is alsoattenuation of radio waves through ice is also temperature

  20. ICR-ICE Standard Operating Procedures (Update Sept 2013) | Department...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ICR-ICE Standard Operating Procedures (Update Sept 2013) ICR-ICE Standard Operating Procedures (Update Sept 2013) ICRICE SOPSep 2013Final.pdf More Documents & Publications...

  1. Rapid development of an ice sheet climate application using the...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Technical Report: Rapid development of an ice sheet climate application using the components-based approach Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Rapid development of an ice...

  2. Complex systems influence melting of Greenland ice sheet

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Complex systems influence melting of Greenland ice sheet Complex systems influence melting of Greenland ice sheet International research team's field work shows that, well, things...

  3. Cosmic-ray results from IceCube/ Mumbai, 12/12/12 Tom Gaisser for the IceCube Collab. 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gaisser, Thomas K.

    Cosmic-ray results from IceCube/ IceTop Mumbai, 12/12/12 Tom Gaisser for the IceCube Collab. 1 #12;Mumbai, 12/12/12 Tom Gaisser for the IceCube Collab. 2 events ­ IceTop/deep IceCube Mumbai, 12/12/12 Tom Gaisser for the IceCube Collab

  4. Some Thoughts on the Freezing and Melting of Sea Ice and Their Effects on the Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Washington at Seattle, University of

    Some Thoughts on the Freezing and Melting of Sea Ice and Their Effects on the Ocean K. Aagaard. The high-latitude freezing and melting cycle can variously result in haline con- vection, freshwater of this process is that water distilled at the surface of the Arctic Ocean by freezing ends up at mid

  5. Toward ice formation closure in Arctic mixedphase boundary layer clouds during ISDAC

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    above water saturation) and another in which initial IN concentrations were vertically uniform. A key aspect of the latter was an IN reservoir under the wellmixed cloud layer: as the simulations progressed, the reservoir IN slowly mixed upward, helping to maintain ice concentrations close to those observed. Given

  6. The Ross Sea Response to Evolving Ocean-Ice Interactions in a Changing Climate 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiederwohl, Christina 1980-

    2012-12-03

    decade (1994–2007) mostly (50%) from larger melt water inputs from the Pine Island (17.7 km^3 per decade) and Dotson (14.8 km^3 per decade) glaciers. Two decades of steady (1978-2000) strengthening of sea ice productivity (200 km^3 per decade) within...

  7. An update on modeling land-ice/ocean interactions in CESM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Asay-davis, Xylar

    2011-01-24

    This talk is an update on ongoing land-ice/ocean coupling work within the Community Earth System Model (CESM). The coupling method is designed to allow simulation of a fully dynamic ice/ocean interface, while requiring minimal modification to the existing ocean model (the Parallel Ocean Program, POP). The method makes use of an immersed boundary method (IBM) to represent the geometry of the ice-ocean interface without requiring that the computational grid be modified in time. We show many of the remaining development challenges that need to be addressed in order to perform global, century long climate runs with fully coupled ocean and ice sheet models. These challenges include moving to a new grid where the computational pole is no longer at the true south pole and several changes to the coupler (the software tool used to communicate between model components) to allow the boundary between land and ocean to vary in time. We discuss benefits for ice/ocean coupling that would be gained from longer-term ocean model development to allow for natural salt fluxes (which conserve both water and salt mass, rather than water volume).

  8. Sensitivity of CAM5-Simulated Arctic Clouds and Radiation to Ice Nucleation Parameterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, Shaocheng; Liu, Xiaohong; Zhao, Chuanfeng; Zhang, Yuying

    2013-08-01

    Sensitivity of Arctic clouds and radiation in the Community Atmospheric Model version 5 to the ice nucleation process is examined by testing a new physically based ice nucleation scheme that links the variation of ice nuclei (IN) number concentration to aerosol properties. The default scheme parameterizes the IN concentration simply as a function of ice supersaturation. The new scheme leads to a significant reduction in simulated IN number concentrations at all latitudes while changes in cloud amount and cloud properties are mainly seen in high latitudes and middle latitude storm tracks. In the Arctic, there is a considerable increase in mid-level clouds and a decrease in low clouds, which result from the complex interaction among the cloud macrophysics, microphysics, and the large-scale environment. The smaller IN concentrations result in an increase in liquid water path and a decrease in ice water path due to the slow-down of the Bergeron-Findeisen process in mixed-phase clouds. Overall, there is an increase in the optical depth of Arctic clouds, which leads to a stronger cloud radiative forcing (net cooling) at the top of the atmosphere. The comparison with satellite data shows that the new scheme slightly improves low cloud simulations over most of the Arctic, but produces too many mid-level clouds. Considerable improvements are seen in the simulated low clouds and their properties when compared to Arctic ground-based measurements. Issues with the observations and the model-observation comparison in the Arctic region are discussed.

  9. Ice formation in PEM fuel cells operated isothermally at sub-freezing temperatures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mukundan, Rangachary; Luhan, Roger W; Davey, John R; Spendelow, Jacob S; Borup, Rodney L; Hussey, Daniel S; Jacobson, David L; Arif, Muhammad

    2009-01-01

    The effect of MEA and GDL structure and composition on the performance of single-PEM fuel cells operated isothermally at subfreezing temperatures is presented. The cell performance and durability are not only dependent on the MEA/GDL materials used but also on their interfaces. When a cell is operated isothermally at sub-freezing temperatures in constant current mode, the water formation due to the current density initially hydrates the membrane/ionomer and then forms ice in the catalyst layer/GDL. An increase in high frequency resistance was also observed in certain MEAs where there is a possibility of ice formation between the catalyst layer and GDL leading to a loss in contact area. The total water/ice holding capacity for any MEA was lower at lower temperatures and higher current densities. The durability of MEAs subjected to multiple isothermal starts was better for LANL prepared MEAs as compared to commercial MEAs, and cloth GDLs when compared to paper GDLs. The ice formation was monitored using high-resolution neutron radiography and was found to be concentrated near the cathode catalyst layer. However, there was significant ice formation in the GDLs especially at the higher temperature ({approx} -10 C) and lower current density (0.02 A/cm{sup 2}) operations. These results are consistent with the longer-term durability observations that show more severe degradation at the lower temperatures.

  10. Enhancing the resolution of sea ice in long-term global ocean general circulation model (gcm) integrations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Joong Tae

    2007-09-17

    Open water in sea ice, such as leads and polynyas, plays a crucial role in determining the formation of deep- and bottom-water, as well as their long-term global properties and circulation. Ocean general circulation models (GCMs) designed...

  11. Infrared characterization of amorphous and polycrystalline D2O ice on controlled wettability self-assembled alkanethiolate monolayers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Parikh, Atul N.

    °, where is the static contact angle with water. Dosing of D2O and infrared measurements were carried out at selected sample temperatures between 82 and 150 K. Experimental spectra of ice overlayers recorded below the interactions of water with a large set of SAMs of single and mixed chemical function- alities.

  12. HOME GROUNDS & ANIMALS 2014 Table of Contents 3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liskiewicz, Maciej

    HOME GROUNDS & ANIMALS 2014 Table of Contents 3 1 Regulations and Basic Information How to Use of Water ..................................................................... 1-26 Table 1.6 - Equivalent Quantities of Liquid Materials (Emulsifiable Concentrates, etc.) for Various Quantities of Water

  13. Field Devices for Monitoring Soil Water Content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    (ADR): Impedance 2.1.2.4. Phase Transmission 2.1.2.5. Time Domain Transmission (TDT) 2.1.3. Other.2.2.1. Gypsum (Bouyoucos) Block 2.2.2.2. Granular Matrix Sensors (GMS) 2.2.3. Heat Dissipation 2.2.4. Soil

  14. Supplementary content for Evaluating Air Blown Gasification for Energy Recovery from Wastewater Solids: Impact

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , drying the solids to 10% (wt) water content. Dried solids are briquetted and fed to the gasifier where

  15. Volume III, Chapter 7 TABLE OF CONTENTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volume III, Chapter 7 Walleye #12;TABLE OF CONTENTS 7.0 Walleye (Stizostedium vitreum................................................................................................... 7-7 7.4.3 Water Development only in fresh water, as illustrated by the map in Figure 7-1 (Scott and Crossman 1998).Walleye also

  16. Atlas Finding Aid Contents/Index

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ward, Karen

    Atlas Finding Aid Contents/Index A (1) City & State Atlas A (2) Astronomy Atlas A (3) U.S. Atlas A (4) Water Atlas A (5) South America & Central America A (6) Africa, Asia, &, Antarctica A (7) Mexico) SAN ANTONIO QUICK FINDER MAPS F 1373 .B46 F4 1990 33. A (1) SURFACE WATER RESOURCES OF TEXAS MAPS G

  17. Critical Mechanisms for the Formation of Extreme Arctic Sea-Ice Extent in the Summers of 2007 and 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dong, Xiquan; Zib, Benjamin J.; Xi, Baike; Stanfield, Ryan; Deng, Yi; Zhang, Xiangdong; Lin, B.; Long, Charles N.

    2014-07-29

    A warming Arctic climate is undergoing significant e 21 nvironmental change, most evidenced by the reduction of Arctic sea-ice extent during the summer. In this study, we examine two extreme anomalies of September sea-ice extent in 2007 and 1996, and investigate the impacts of cloud fraction (CF), atmospheric precipitable water vapor (PWV), downwelling longwave flux (DLF), surface air temperature (SAT), pressure and winds on the sea-ice variation in 2007 and 1996 using both satellite-derived sea-ice products and MERRA reanalysis. The area of the Laptev, East Siberian and West Chukchi seas (70-90oN, 90-180oE) has experienced the largest variation in sea-ice extent from year-to-year and defined here as the Area Of Focus (AOF). The record low September sea-ice extent in 2007 was associated with positive anomalies 30 of CF, PWV, DLF, and SAT over the AOF. Persistent anti-cyclone positioned over the Beaufort Sea coupled with low pressure over Eurasia induced easterly zonal and southerly meridional winds. In contrast, negative CF, PWV, DLF and SAT anomalies, as well as opposite wind patterns to those in 2007, characterized the 1996 high September sea-ice extent. Through this study, we hypothesize the following positive feedbacks of clouds, water vapor, radiation and atmospheric variables on the sea-ice retreat during the summer 2007. The record low sea-ice extent during the summer 2007 is initially triggered by the atmospheric circulation anomaly. The southerly winds across the Chukchi and East Siberian seas transport warm, moist air from the north Pacific, which is not only enhancing sea-ice melt across the AOF, but also increasing clouds. The positive cloud feedback results in higher SAT and more sea-ice melt. Therefore, 40 more water vapor could be evaporated from open seas and higher SAT to form more clouds, which will enhance positive cloud feedback. This enhanced positive cloud feedback will then further increase SAT and accelerate the sea-ice retreat during the summer 2007.

  18. University of California, San Diego Water Action Plan

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gleeson, Joseph G.

    University of California, San Diego Water Action Plan December 20, 2013 #12;i Table of Contents of the Water Action Plan Water Action Plan Committee Regional Scope of the Water Action Plan HISTORICAL PROGRESS IN WATER REDUCTION.......................................................... 5 Campus Irrigation

  19. Ice Thermal Storage Systems for Nuclear Power Plant Supplemental Cooling and Peak Power Shifting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Haihua Zhao; Hongbin Zhang; Phil Sharpe; Blaise Hamanaka; Wei Yan; WoonSeong Jeong

    2013-03-01

    Availability of cooling water has been one of the major issues for the nuclear power plant site selection. Cooling water issues have frequently disrupted the normal operation at some nuclear power plants during heat waves and long draught. One potential solution is to use ice thermal storage (ITS) systems that reduce cooling water requirements and boost the plant’s thermal efficiency in hot hours. ITS uses cheap off-peak electricity to make ice and uses the ice for supplemental cooling during peak demand time. ITS also provides a way to shift a large amount of electricity from off peak time to peak time. For once-through cooling plants near a limited water body, adding ITS can bring significant economic benefits and avoid forced derating and shutdown during extremely hot weather. For the new plants using dry cooling towers, adding the ITS systems can effectively reduce the efficiency loss during hot weather so that new plants could be considered in regions lack of cooling water. This paper will review light water reactor cooling issues and present the feasibility study results.

  20. A Study of the Occurrence of Supercooling of Water

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    K. -C. Tan; W. Ho; J. I. Katz; S. -J. Feng

    2014-12-30

    Water supercooling has received considerable research attention. The parameters influencing supercooling include the initial temperature of the water and the temperature of the chilling medium. In this study, we investigated an additional parameter, the type of chilling medium. We correlated the occurrence of supercooling with the minimum temperature anywhere in the water. If the minimum temperature is higher, ice nucleation is unlikely and supercooling will take place. Besides distilled water, we also investigated supercooling of water found in nature, and found that impurities in such water do not facilitate ice nucleation.

  1. Privacy in encrypted content distribution using private broadcast encryption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Waters, Brent

    @cs.stanford.edu Dan Boneh dabo@cs.stanford.edu Brent Waters bwaters@cs.stanford.edu Abstract In many contentPrivacy in encrypted content distribution using private broadcast encryption Adam Barth abarth distribution systems it is important to both restrict access of content to au- thorized users and to protect

  2. Near-Optimal Content Replication for Interactive Multiview Video Streaming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chan, Shueng-Han Gary

    Near-Optimal Content Replication for Interactive Multiview Video Streaming Huan Huang S.-H. Gary Chan Dept. of Comp. Sci. & Eng. The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology Clear Water Bay services, a content provider often deploys distributed content servers with heterogeneous storage

  3. Radiostratigraphy and age structure of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-01-01

    is 3.15, equivalent to a radio-wave velocity in ice of 168.9to be vertical) that a radio wave travels through ice during?t is where v ice is the radio-wave velocity in ice, ?z ¼ v

  4. Preliminary results of a comparison between 4 pig breeds in chemical composition of fatty tissue and intramuscular fat content

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    and relatively slow growth rate, gave a fatty tissue with higher water content, and the lipids of this tissue water content did not exceed 12 p. 100 in the other breeds. Backfat with so much water was not suitable hand, carcass fatness and growth rate on the other hand. Water content and degree of unsaturation

  5. Table Contents Page i 2013 Nonresidential Compliance Manual June 2014

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Table Contents Page i 2013 Nonresidential Compliance Manual June 2014 Table of Contents 13.........................................................7 13.8 NRCA-MCH-09-A: Supply Water Temperature Reset Controls Acceptance ....................7 13: Condenser Water Supply Temperature Reset Controls Acceptance 8 13.17 NRCA-MCH-18-A: Energy Management

  6. ContentsContents3399the normal distribution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vickers, James

    ContentsContents3399the normal distribution 1. The normal distribution 2. The normal approximation to the binomial distribution 3. Sums and differences of random variables Learning outcomes In a previous Workbook of a continuous random variables: the normal distribution. The probabilities of the normal distribution have

  7. ContentsContents4343Regression and correlation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vickers, James

    ContentsContents4343Regression and correlation 1. Regression 2. Correlation Learning outcomes You. 1 #12;Regression 43.1 Introduction Problems in engineering often involve the exploration of the relationship(s) between two or more variables. The technique of regression analysis is very useful and well

  8. ContentsContents1133integration integration

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vickers, James

    ContentsContents1133integration integration 1. Basic concepts of integration 2. Definite integrals 3. The area bounded by a curve 4. Integration by parts 5. Integration by substitution and using partial fractions 6. Integration of trigonometric functions Learning outcomes In this workbook you

  9. Remote sensing of seawater and drifting ice in Svalbard fjords by compact Raman LIDAR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bunkin, Alexey F; Lednev, Vasily N; Lushnikov, Dmitry L; Marchenko, Aleksey V; Morozov, Eugene G; Pershin, Sergey M; Yulmetov, Renat N

    2013-01-01

    A compact Raman LIDAR system for remote sensing of sea and drifting ice was developed at the Wave Research Center at the Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the RAS. The developed system is based on a diode pumped solid state YVO4:Nd laser combined with compact spectrograph equipped with gated detector. The system exhibits high sensitivity and can be used for mapping or depth profiling of different parameters within many oceanographic problems. Light weight (~20 kg) and low power consumption (300 W) make possible to install the device on any vehicle including unmanned aircraft or submarine system. The Raman LIDAR presented was used for Svalbard fjords study and analysis of different influence of the open sea and glaciers on the water properties. Temperature, phytoplankton, and dissolved organic matter distributions in the seawater were studied in the Ice Fjord, Van Mijen Fjord and Rinders Fjord. Drifting ice and seawater in the Rinders Fjord were characterized by the Raman spectroscopy and fluorescence. It...

  10. Do blue-ice moraines in the Heritage Range show the West Antarctic ice sheet survived the last interglacial?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Do blue-ice moraines in the Heritage Range show the West Antarctic ice sheet survived the last in revised form 10 January 2011 Accepted 28 January 2011 Available online xxxx Keywords: Blue-ice moraine cosmogenic isotope data on blue-ice moraines in the Heritage Range, West Antarctica. The age of the moraines

  11. Inter-annual sea-ice dynamics and micro-algal biomass in winter pack ice of Marguerite Bay, Antarctica

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stewart, Frank

    in this region (Stammerjohn et al., 2003; Stammerjohn and Smith, 1996). Changes in mesoscale ice dynamics

  12. Processes driving sea ice variability in the Bering Sea in an eddying ocean/sea ice model: Mean seasonal cycle

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eisenman, Ian

    the southern ice edge, especially on the western side. The sea ice force balance analysis shows that sea ice air from northerly winds and ice motion away from the coast. South of St Lawrence Island, winds drive is important both climatically and economically. Understanding the processes that control the temporal

  13. CONTENT MODEL HOW-TO

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    003241MLTPL00 Content Model Guidelines  https://github.com/usgin/usginspecs/wiki/Content-Model-Guidelines 

  14. Largest Ice-Bank Promotes Load Management 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brarmann, G. L.

    1983-01-01

    conservation measures were incorporated in the design of the new research facility, the ice-bank system has been the most cost-effective of the load management projects at Union Oil....

  15. Glaciers and Ice Sheets Mapping Orbiter concept

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jezek, Kenneth; Rodriguez, Ernesto; Gogineni, Sivaprasad; Freeman, Anthony; Curlander, John; Paden, John D.; Allen, Christopher Thomas

    2006-05-13

    We describe a concept for a spaceborne radar system designed to measure the surface and basal topography of terrestrial ice sheets and to determine the physical properties of the glacier bed. Our primary objective is to ...

  16. Recent vs from IceCube

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klein, Spencer R.; IceCube Collaboration

    2008-01-01

    in the Sun and the Earth, look for low-energy (10 MeV)Sun. IceTop has made a preliminary measurement of the cosmic-ray energy

  17. WATER TRAPPING ON TIDALLY LOCKED TERRESTRIAL PLANETS REQUIRES SPECIAL CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, Jun; Abbot, Dorian S.; Liu, Yonggang; Hu, Yongyun

    2014-12-01

    Surface liquid water is essential for standard planetary habitability. Calculations of atmospheric circulation on tidally locked planets around M stars suggest that this peculiar orbital configuration lends itself to the trapping of large amounts of water in kilometers-thick ice on the night side, potentially removing all liquid water from the day side where photosynthesis is possible. We study this problem using a global climate model including coupled atmosphere, ocean, land, and sea ice components as well as a continental ice sheet model driven by the climate model output. For a waterworld, we find that surface winds transport sea ice toward the day side and the ocean carries heat toward the night side. As a result, nightside sea ice remains O(10 m) thick and nightside water trapping is insignificant. If a planet has large continents on its night side, they can grow ice sheets O(1000 m) thick if the geothermal heat flux is similar to Earth's or smaller. Planets with a water complement similar to Earth's would therefore experience a large decrease in sea level when plate tectonics drives their continents onto the night side, but would not experience complete dayside dessiccation. Only planets with a geothermal heat flux lower than Earth's, much of their surface covered by continents, and a surface water reservoir O(10%) of Earth's would be susceptible to complete water trapping.

  18. Asynchronous ice lobe retreat and glacial Lake Bascom: Deglaciation of the Hoosic and Vermont valleys, southwestern Vermont

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Small, E.; Desimone, D. (Williams Coll., Williamstown, MA (United States). Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Deglaciation of the Hoosic River drainage basin in southwestern Vermont was more complex than previously described. Detailed surficial mapping, stratigraphic relationships, and terrace levels/delta elevations reveal new details in the chronology of glacial Lake Bascom: (1) a pre-Wisconsinan proglacial lake was present in a similar position to Lake Bascom as ice advanced: (2) the northern margin of 275m (900 ft) glacial Lake Bascom extended 10 km up the Vermont Valley; (3) the 215m (705 ft) Bascom level was stable and long lived; (4) intermediate water planes existed between 215m and 190m (625 ft) levels; and (5) a separate ice tongue existed in Shaftsbury Hollow damming a small glacial lake, here named glacial Lake Emmons. This information is used to correlate ice margins to different lake levels. Distance of ice margin retreat during a lake level can be measured. Lake levels are then used as control points on a Lake Bascom relative time line to compare rate of retreat of different ice tongues. Correlation of ice margins to Bascom levels indicates ice retreat was asynchronous between nearby tongues in southwestern Vermont. The Vermont Valley ice tongue retreated between two and four times faster than the Hoosic Valley tongue during the Bascom 275m level. Rate of retreat of the Vermont Valley tongue slowed to one-half of the Hoosic tongue during the 215m--190m lake levels. Factors responsible for varying rates of retreat are subglacial bedrock gradient, proximity to the Hudson-Champlain lobe, and the presence of absence of a calving margins. Asynchronous retreat produced splayed ice margins in southwestern Vermont. Findings from this study do not support the model of parallel, synchronous retreat proposed by many workers for this region.

  19. FORESTS AND WATER. effects of forest

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    FORESTS AND WATER. effects of forest management on floods, sedimentation, and water supply HENRY FOREST SERVICE GENERAL TECHNICAL REPORT PSW- 18I1976 #12;CONTENTS Page Introduction ................................ 6 Water Inputs .........................................6 Precipitation Measurement

  20. The Western Water Assessment Annual RISA Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neff, Jason

    ;Western Water Assessment 2007 Annual Report 2 Table of Contents I. Areas of FocusThe Western Water Assessment Annual RISA Report Reporting Period: January 2007-December 2007 #12-30 #12;Western Water Assessment 2007 Annual Report 3

  1. Intercomparison of Large-eddy Simulations of Arctic Mixed-phase Clouds: Importance of Ice Size Distribution Assumptions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Ackerman, Andrew; Avramov, Alex; Cheng, Anning; Fan, Jiwen; Fridlind, Ann; Ghan, Steven J.; Harrington, Jerry Y.; Hoose, Corinna; Korolev, Alexei; McFarquhar, Greg; Morrison, H.; Paukert, Marco; Savre, Julien; Shipway, Ben; Shupe, Matthew D.; Solomon, Amy; Sulia, Kara

    2014-03-14

    Large-eddy simulations of mixed-phase Arctic clouds by 11 different models are analyzed with the goal of improving understanding and model representation of processes controlling the evolution of these clouds. In a case based on observations from the Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC), it is found that ice number concentration, Ni, exerts significant influence on the cloud structure. Increasing Ni leads to a substantial reduction in liquid water path (LWP) and potential cloud dissipation, in agreement with earlier studies. By comparing simulations with the same microphysics coupled to different dynamical cores as well as the same dynamics coupled to different microphysics schemes, it is found that the ice water path (IWP) is mainly controlled by ice microphysics, while the inter-model differences in LWP are largely driven by physics and numerics of the dynamical cores. In contrast to previous intercomparisons, all models here use the same ice particle properties (i.e., mass-size, mass-fall speed, and mass-capacitance relationships) and a common radiation parameterization. The constrained setup exposes the importance of ice particle size distributions (PSD) in influencing cloud evolution. A clear separation in LWP and IWP predicted by models with bin and bulk microphysical treatments is documented and attributed primarily to the assumed shape of ice PSD used in bulk schemes. Compared to the bin schemes that explicitly predict the PSD, schemes assuming exponential ice PSD underestimate ice growth by vapor deposition and overestimate mass-weighted fall speed leading to an underprediction of IWP by a factor of two in the considered case.

  2. Development of a Mobile Ice Nucleus Counter

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kok, Gregory; Kulkarni, Gourihar

    2014-07-10

    An ice nucleus counter has been constructed. The instrument uses built-in refrigeration systems for wall cooling. A cascade refrigeration system will allow the cold wall to operate as low as -70 deg C, and a single stage system can operate the warm wall at -45 deg C. A unique optical particle counter has been constructed using polarization detection of the scattered light. This allows differentiation of the particles exiting the chamber to determine if they are ice or liquid.

  3. IceCube: Performance, Status, and Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Carsten Rott; for the IceCube Collaboration

    2006-11-28

    High-energy neutrinos are uniquely suited to study a large variety of physics as they traverse the universe almost untouched, in contrast to conventional astronomical messengers like photons or cosmic rays which are limited by interactions with radiation and matter at high energies or deflected by ambient magnetic fields. Located at the South Pole, IceCube combined with its predecessor AMANDA comprise the world's largest neutrino telescope. IceCube currently consists of nine strings, each containing 60 digital optical modules, deployed at depths of 1.5 to 2.5km in the ice and an array of 16 surface air-shower stations. IceCube is expected to be completed in early 2011 at which time it will instrument a volume of one km^3 below the IceTop air-shower array covering an area of one km^2. The current IceCube detector performance is described and an outlook given into the large variety of physics that it can address, with an emphasis on the search for ultra-high-energy neutrinos which may shed light on the origins of the highest energy cosmic rays.

  4. IceCube: Performance, Status, and Future

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rott, C

    2006-01-01

    High-energy neutrinos are uniquely suited to study a large variety of physics as they traverse the universe almost untouched, in contrast to conventional astronomical messengers like photons or cosmic rays which are limited by interactions with radiation and matter at high energies or deflected by ambient magnetic fields. Located at the South Pole, IceCube combined with its predecessor AMANDA comprise the world's largest neutrino telescope. IceCube currently consists of nine strings, each containing 60 digital optical modules, deployed at depths of 1.5 to 2.5km in the ice and an array of 16 surface air-shower stations. IceCube is expected to be completed in early 2011 at which time it will instrument a volume of one km^3 below the IceTop air-shower array covering an area of one km^2. The current IceCube detector performance is described and an outlook given into the large variety of physics that it can address, with an emphasis on the search for ultra-high-energy neutrinos which may shed light on the origins ...

  5. Ice chemistry in starless molecular cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kalvans, Juris

    2015-01-01

    Starless molecular cores are natural laboratories for interstellar molecular chemistry research. The chemistry of ices in such objects was investigated with a three-phase (gas, surface, and mantle) model. We considered the center part of five starless cores, with their physical conditions derived from observations. The ice chemistry of oxygen, nitrogen, sulfur, and complex organic molecules (COMs) was analyzed. We found that an ice-depth dimension, measured, e.g., in monolayers, is essential for modeling of chemistry in interstellar ices. Particularly, the H2O:CO:CO2:N2:NH3 ice abundance ratio regulates the production and destruction of minor species. It is suggested that photodesorption during core collapse period is responsible for high abundance of interstellar H2O2 and O2H, and other species synthesized on the surface. The calculated abundances of COMs in ice were compared to observed gas-phase values. Smaller activation barriers for CO and H2CO hydrogenation may help explain the production of a number of...

  6. Technology demonstration of Ka-band digitally-beamformed radar for ice topography mapping

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadowy, G; Heavey, B; Moller, D; Rignot, E; Zawadzki, M; Rengarajan, S

    2007-01-01

    Beamformed Radar for Ice Topography Mapping Gregory Sadowy,Glacier and Land Ice Surface Topography Interferometer) is aGLISTIN will collect ice topography measurements over a wide

  7. Application of an online-coupled regional climate model, WRF-CAM5, over East Asia for examination of ice nucleation schemes. Part II. Sensitivity to heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterizations and dust emissions

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zhang, Yang; Chen, Ying; Fan, Jiwen; Leung, Lai -Yung

    2015-09-14

    Aerosol particles can affect cloud microphysical properties by serving as ice nuclei (IN). Large uncertainties exist in the ice nucleation parameterizations (INPs) used in current climate models. In this Part II paper, to examine the sensitivity of the model predictions to different heterogeneous INPs, WRF-CAM5 simulation using the INP of Niemand et al. (N12) [1] is conducted over East Asia for two full years, 2006 and 2011, and compared with simulation using the INP of Meyers et al. (M92) [2], which is the original INP used in CAM5. M92 calculates the nucleated ice particle concentration as a function of icemore »supersaturation, while N12 represents the nucleated ice particle concentration as a function of temperature and the number concentrations and surface areas of dust particles. Compared to M92, the WRF-CAM5 simulation with N12 produces significantly higher nucleated ice crystal number concentrations (ICNCs) in the northern domain where dust sources are located, leading to significantly higher cloud ice number and mass concentrations and ice water path, but the opposite is true in the southern domain where temperatures and moistures play a more important role in ice formation. Overall, the simulation with N12 gives lower downward shortwave radiation but higher downward longwave radiation, cloud liquid water path, cloud droplet number concentrations, and cloud optical depth. The increase in cloud optical depth and the decrease in downward solar flux result in a stronger shortwave and longwave cloud forcing, and decreases temperature at 2-m and precipitation. Changes in temperature and radiation lower surface concentrations of OH, O?, SO?²?, and PM2.5, but increase surface concentrations of CO, NO?, and SO? over most of the domain. By acting as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and IN, dust particles have different impacts on cloud water and ice number concentrations, radiation, and temperature at 2-m and precipitation depending on whether the dominant role of dust is CCN or IN. These results indicate the importance of the heterogeneous ice nucleation treatments and dust emissions in accurately simulating regional climate and air quality.« less

  8. Electrochimica Acta 53 (2008) 63376343 Contents lists available at ScienceDirect

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-01-01

    the fuel cell, thus avoiding ice formation and blockage when exposed to sub-freezing tempera- tures. Much April 2008 Keywords: Automotive fuel cells Gas purge Water removal High-frequency resistance Experimental a b s t r a c t Gas purge intended to minimize residual water in a polymer electrolyte fuel cell

  9. Assimilation of Ice Concentration in an IceOcean Model R. W. LINDSAY AND J. ZHANG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Jinlun

    of the actual fields. The simulated ice thickness can then be used to determine the major modes of variability of the ice thickness and the physical processes that are important in their formation. The simulations from concentration measured by satellites is subject to errors (Kwok 2002), particularly during the summer when

  10. ICED'09/148 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ENGINEERING DESIGN, ICED'09

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papalambros, Panos

    , marketing, and psychology. Quantitative models from these disciplines can be integrated into a design for teaching product design and for designing products taking into account market and policy environments alongICED'09/148 INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON ENGINEERING DESIGN, ICED'09 24 - 27 AUGUST 2009, STANFORD

  11. Water in Protoplanetary Disks: Deuteration and Turbulent Mixing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Furuya, Kenji; Nomura, Hideko; Hersant, Franck; Wakelam, Valentine

    2013-01-01

    We investigate water and deuterated water chemistry in turbulent protoplanetary disks. Chemical rate equations are solved with the diffusion term, mimicking turbulent mixing in vertical direction. Water near the midplane is transported to the disk atmosphere by turbulence and destroyed by photoreactions to produce atomic oxygen, while the atomic oxygen is transported to the midplane and reforms water and/or other molecules. We find that this cycle significantly decreases column densities of water ice at r < 30 AU, where dust temperatures are too high to reform water ice effectively. The radial extent of such region depends on the desorption energy of atomic hydrogen. Our model indicates that water ice could be deficient even outside the sublimation radius. Outside this radius, the cycle decreases the D/H ratio of water ice from 2x10^-2, which is set by the collapsing core model, to 10^-4-10^-2 in 10^6 yr, without significantly decreasing the water ice column density. The resultant D/H ratios depend on the ...

  12. A Comprehensive Parameterization of Heterogeneous Ice Nucleation of Dust Surrogate: Laboratory Study with Hematite Particles and Its Application to Atmospheric Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hiranuma, Naruki; Paukert, Marco; Steinke, Isabelle; Zhang, Kai; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Hoose, Corinna; Schnaiter, Martin; Saathoff, Harald; Mohler, Ottmar

    2014-12-10

    A new heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterization that covers a wide temperature range (-36 ?C to -78 ?C) is presented. Developing and testing such an ice nucleation parameterization, which is constrained through identical experimental conditions, is critical in order to accurately simulate the ice nucleation processes in cirrus clouds. The surface-scaled ice nucleation efficiencies of hematite particles, inferred by ns, were derived from AIDA (Aerosol Interaction and Dynamics in the Atmosphere) cloud chamber measurements under water subsaturated conditions that were realized by continuously changing temperature (T) and relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice) in the chamber. Our measurements showed several different pathways to nucleate ice depending on T and RHice conditions. For instance, almost independent freezing was observed at -60 ?C < T < -50 ?C, where RHice explicitly controlled ice nucleation efficiency, while both T and RHice played roles in other two T regimes: -78 ?C < T < -60 ?C and -50 ?C < T < -36 ?C. More specifically, observations at T colder than -60 ?C revealed that higher RHice was necessary to maintain constant ns, whereas T may have played a significant role in ice nucleation at T warmer than -50 ?C. We implemented new ns parameterizations into two cloud models to investigate its sensitivity and compare with the existing ice nucleation schemes towards simulating cirrus cloud properties. Our results show that the new AIDA-based parameterizations lead to an order of magnitude higher ice crystal concentrations and inhibition of homogeneous nucleation in colder temperature regions. Our cloud simulation results suggest that atmospheric dust particles that form ice nuclei at lower temperatures, below -36 ?C, can potentially have stronger influence on cloud properties such as cloud longevity and initiation when compared to previous parameterizations.

  13. Assessing the Quality of a Water Right

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peck, John C.

    2001-05-01

    stream_size 12 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Assessing_the_quality_of_a_water_right.pdf.txt stream_source_info Assessing_the_quality_of_a_water_right.pdf.txt Content-Encoding ISO-8859-1 Content-Type text...

  14. Heat transfer in ice hockey halls: measurements, energy analysis and analytical ice pad temperature profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferrantelli, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    We consider heat transfer processes in an ice hockey hall, during operating conditions, with a bottom-up approach based upon on-site measurements. Detailed temperature data of both the ice pad and the air above the ice rink are used for a heat balance calculation in the steady-state regime, which quantifies the impact of each single heat source. We solve the heat equation in the ice slab in transient regime, and obtain a general analytical formula for the temperature profile. This solution is then applied to the resurfacing process by using our measurements as (time-dependent) boundary conditions (b.c.), and compared to an analogous numerical computation with good agreement. Our analytical formula is given with implicit initial condition and b.c., therefore it can be used not only in ice halls, but in a large variety of engineering applications.

  15. Heat transfer in ice hockey halls: measurements, energy analysis and analytical ice pad temperature profile

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Andrea Ferrantelli; Klaus Viljanen

    2015-06-30

    We consider heat transfer processes in an ice hockey hall, during operating conditions, with a bottom-up approach based upon on-site measurements. Detailed temperature data of both the ice pad and the air above the ice rink are used for a heat balance calculation in the steady-state regime, which quantifies the impact of each single heat source. We solve the heat equation in the ice slab in transient regime, and obtain a general analytical formula for the temperature profile. This solution is then applied to the resurfacing process by using our measurements as (time-dependent) boundary conditions (b.c.), and compared to an analogous numerical computation with good agreement. Our analytical formula is given with implicit initial condition and b.c., therefore it can be used not only in ice halls, but in a large variety of engineering applications.

  16. A three-phase free boundary problem with melting ice and dissolving gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maurizio Ceseri; John M. Stockie

    2014-11-05

    We develop a mathematical model for a three-phase free boundary problem in one dimension that involves the interactions between gas, water and ice. The dynamics are driven by melting of the ice layer, while the pressurized gas also dissolves within the meltwater. The model incorporates a Stefan condition at the water-ice interface along with Henry's law for dissolution of gas at the gas-water interface. We employ a quasi-steady approximation for the phase temperatures and then derive a series solution for the interface positions. A non-standard feature of the model is an integral free boundary condition that arises from mass conservation owing to changes in gas density at the gas-water interface, which makes the problem non-self-adjoint. We derive a two-scale asymptotic series solution for the dissolved gas concentration, which because of the non-self-adjointness gives rise to a Fourier series expansion in eigenfunctions that do not satisfy the usual orthogonality conditions. Numerical simulations of the original governing equations are used to validate the series approximations.

  17. New age water chillers with water as refrigerant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kühnl-Kinel, J

    1998-01-01

    Vacuum-process technology producing chilled water needs no refrigerant of the conventional kind, but water from the process itself is used to generate cooling. This eye-catching novelty incorporates many of the considerations about the future of refrigerants: "ozone friendly", no extra demands for safety measures or for skilful operators, no special requirements concerning the installation's components, lower maintenance costs since leakages can be accommodated from the system. Vacuum-process technology may be used not only for production of chilled water but also for Binary Ice - pumpable suspension of minute ice crystals in an aqueous solution. This means that all the advantages related to a latent heat system may become available.

  18. THE INTERIOR DYNAMICS OF WATER PLANETS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fu, Roger; O'Connell, Richard J.; Sasselov, Dimitar D. E-mail: richard_oconnell@harvard.ed

    2010-01-10

    The ever-expanding catalog of detected super-Earths calls for theoretical studies of their properties in the case of a substantial water layer. This work considers such water planets with a range of masses and water mass fractions (2-5 M{sub Earth}, 0.02%-50% H{sub 2}O). First, we model the thermal and dynamical structure of the near-surface for icy and oceanic surfaces, finding separate regimes where the planet is expected to maintain a subsurface liquid ocean and where it is expected to exhibit ice tectonics. Newly discovered exoplanets may be placed into one of these regimes given estimates of surface temperature, heat flux, and gravity. Second, we construct a parameterized convection model for the underlying ice mantle of higher ice phases, finding that materials released from the silicate-iron core should traverse the ice mantle on the timescale of 0.1 to 100 megayears. We present the dependence of the overturn times of the ice mantle and the planetary radius on total mass and water mass fraction. Finally, we discuss the implications of these internal processes on atmospheric observables.

  19. The Role of Snow and Ice in the Climate System

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Barry, Roger G.

    2007-12-19

    Global snow and ice cover (the 'cryosphere') plays a major role in global climate and hydrology through a range of complex interactions and feedbacks, the best known of which is the ice - albedo feedback. Snow and ice cover undergo marked seasonal and long term changes in extent and thickness. The perennial elements - the major ice sheets and permafrost - play a role in present-day regional and local climate and hydrology, but the large seasonal variations in snow cover and sea ice are of importance on continental to hemispheric scales. The characteristics of these variations, especially in the Northern Hemisphere, and evidence for recent trends in snow and ice extent are discussed.

  20. The Role of Snow and Ice in the Climate System

    ScienceCinema (OSTI)

    Barry, Roger G.

    2009-09-01

    Global snow and ice cover (the 'cryosphere') plays a major role in global climate and hydrology through a range of complex interactions and feedbacks, the best known of which is the ice - albedo feedback. Snow and ice cover undergo marked seasonal and long term changes in extent and thickness. The perennial elements - the major ice sheets and permafrost - play a role in present-day regional and local climate and hydrology, but the large seasonal variations in snow cover and sea ice are of importance on continental to hemispheric scales. The characteristics of these variations, especially in the Northern Hemisphere, and evidence for recent trends in snow and ice extent are discussed.