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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water content" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


1

ARM - Measurement - Ice water content  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Ice water content The concentration (massvol) of ice water particles in a cloud....

2

ARM - PI Product - Large Scale Ice Water Path and 3-D Ice Water Content  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsLarge Scale Ice Water Path and 3-D Ice Water ProductsLarge Scale Ice Water Path and 3-D Ice Water Content Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Large Scale Ice Water Path and 3-D Ice Water Content Site(s) SGP TWP General Description Cloud ice water concentration is one of the most important, yet poorly observed, cloud properties. Developing physical parameterizations used in general circulation models through single-column modeling is one of the key foci of the ARM program. In addition to the vertical profiles of temperature, water vapor and condensed water at the model grids, large-scale horizontal advective tendencies of these variables are also required as forcing terms in the single-column models. Observed horizontal advection of condensed water has not been available because the

3

Cloud Liquid Water and Ice Content Retrieval by Multiwavelength Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud liquid water and ice content retrieval in precipitating clouds by the differential attenuation method using a dual-wavelength radar, as a function of the wavelength pair, is first discussed. In the presence of non-Rayleigh scatterers, ...

Nicolas Gaussiat; Henri Sauvageot; Anthony J. Illingworth

2003-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

A Parameterization of the Visible Extinction Coefficient of Ice Clouds in Terms of the Ice/Water Content  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This article describes a parameterization of the visible extinction coefficient of cirrus and frontal ice cloud in terms of the ice/water content. The parameterization is based on the discovery that the ice cloud particle size spectra from a ...

C. Martin R. Platt

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

A Scheme for Parameterizing Ice-Cloud Water Content in General Circulation Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The optical properties of ice clouds are a primary issue for climate and climate change. Evaluating these optical properties in three-dimensional models for studying climate will require a method to calculate the ice water content of such clouds. ...

Andrew J. Heymsfield; Leo J. Donner

1990-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

6

Cirrus Cloud Ice Water Content Radar Algorithm Evaluation Using an Explicit Cloud Microphysical Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A series of cirrus cloud simulations performed using a model with explicit cloud microphysics is applied to testing ice water content retrieval algorithms based on millimeter-wave radar reflectivity measurements. The simulated ice particle size ...

Kenneth Sassen; Zhien Wang; Vitaly I. Khvorostyanov; Graeme L. Stephens; Angela Bennedetti

2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

7

Determination of 3-D Cloud Ice Water Contents by Combining Multiple...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Determination of 3-D Cloud Ice Water Contents by Combining Multiple Data Sources from Satellite, Ground Radar, and a Numerical Model Liu, Guosheng Florida State University Seo,...

8

Improved Measurements of the Ice Water Content in Cirrus Using a Total-Water Probe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This note describes an improved method for the measurement of the ice water content (IWC) of cirrus cloud using a total water content probe. A previous version of this technique assumed that the air in cloud-containing regions was saturated with ...

Philip R. A. Brown; Peter N. Francis

1995-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

9

Measurements of the Ice Water Content in Cirrus Using an Evaporative Technique  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technique for the measurement of the ice water content (IWC) of cirrus clouds is described. The IWC is obtained by the measurement of the total water content (TWC) and the subtraction of the saturation specific humidity with respect to ice at ...

Philip R. A. Brown

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Radar Reflectivity-Ice Water Content Relationships for Use above the Melting Level in Hurricanes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Regression equations linking radar reflectivity (Ze) and ice water content (IWC) were calculated from airborne radar and particle image data that were collected above the melting level in two hurricanes. The Ze ? IWC equation from the stratiform ...

Robert A. Black

1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Improved Airborne Hot-Wire Measurements of Ice Water Content in Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Airborne measurements of ice water content (IWC) in both ice and mixed phase clouds remain one of the long standing problems in experimental cloud physics. For nearly three decades, IWC has been measured with the help of the Nevzorov hot-wire ...

A. Korolev; J. W. Strapp; G. A. Isaac; E. Emery

12

Retrieval of Vertical Profiles of Liquid Water and Ice Content in Mixed Clouds from Doppler Radar and Microwave Radiometer Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method to retrieve vertical profiles of liquid water content Mw(z), ice water content Mi(z), and ice particle size distribution Ni(D, z), (where D is the ice particle size and z the vertical coordinate) in mixed nonprecipitating clouds ...

Henri Sauvageot

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

13

In Situ Aircraft Measurements of the Vertical Distribution of Liquid and Ice Water Content in Midlatitude Mixed-Phase Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The vertical distribution of liquid and ice water content and their partitioning is studied using 34 cases of in situ measured microphysical properties in midlatitude mixed-phase clouds, with liquid water path ranging from near zero to ~248 g m?2, ...

Yoo-Jeong Noh; Curtis J. Seaman; Thomas H. Vonder Haar; Guosheng Liu

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Image Content Engine (ICE)  

SciTech Connect

The Image Content Engine (ICE) is being developed to provide cueing assistance to human image analysts faced with increasingly large and intractable amounts of image data. The ICE architecture includes user configurable feature extraction pipelines which produce intermediate feature vector and match surface files which can then be accessed by interactive relational queries. Application of the feature extraction algorithms to large collections of images may be extremely time consuming and is launched as a batch job on a Linux cluster. The query interface accesses only the intermediate files and returns candidate hits nearly instantaneously. Queries may be posed for individual objects or collections. The query interface prompts the user for feedback, and applies relevance feedback algorithms to revise the feature vector weighting and focus on relevant search results. Examples of feature extraction and both model-based and search-by-example queries are presented.

Brase, J M

2007-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

15

Calibrations of Johnson-Williams Liquid Water Content Meters in a High-Speed Icing Tunnel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wind tunnel tests have provided calibrations and intercomparisons of 14 Johnson-Williams (J–W) cloud liquid water content (LWC) measuring devices with 23 sensor heads from 10 research organizations. The absolute tunnel LWC was deduced using a ...

J. Walter Strapp; Robert S. Schemenauer

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Thermodynamics of Icing Cylinder for Measurements of Liquid Water Content in Supercooled Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Rosemount Icing Detector (RICE) has been used extensively over the last three decades for aircraft measurements of the rate of ice riming in supercooled liquid and mixed clouds. Because of difficulties related to calibration and ...

I. P. Mazin; A. V. Korolev; A. Heymsfield; G. A. Isaac; S. G. Cober

2001-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Measurement of Condensed Water Content in Liquid and Ice Clouds Using an Airborne Counterflow Virtual Impactor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Condensed water content (CWC) measured using a counterflow virtual impactor (CVI) with a Lyman-? hygrometer downstream is compared with that measured by other airborne instruments (a hot-wire probe, a PMS FSSP, and a PMS 2D-C). Results indicate ...

Cynthia H. Twohy; Allen J. Schanot; William A. Cooper

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

18

Measurement of Total Water with a Tunable Diode Laser Hygrometer: Inlet Analysis, Calibration Procedure, and Ice Water Content Determination  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The University of Colorado closed-path tunable diode laser hygrometer (CLH), a new instrument for the in situ measurement of enhanced total water (eTW, the sum of water vapor and condensed water enhanced by a subisokinetic inlet), has recently ...

Sean M. Davis; A. Gannet Hallar; Linnea M. Avallone; William Engblom

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Analysis of Rotating Multicylinder Data in Measuring Cloud-Droplet Size and Liquid Water Content  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An objective method is presented for the analysis of rotating multicylinder data in measuring the liquid water content and median volume droplet diameter of icing clouds. The method is based on time-dependent numerical modeling of cylinder icing ...

Lasse Makkonen

1992-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

WATER ICE IN THE KUIPER BELT  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We examine a large collection of low-resolution near-infrared spectra of Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs) and centaurs in an attempt to understand the presence of water ice in the Kuiper Belt. We find that water ice on the surface of these objects occurs in three separate manners: (1) Haumea family members uniquely show surfaces of nearly pure water ice, presumably a consequence of the fragmentation of the icy mantle of a larger differentiated proto-Haumea; (2) large objects with absolute magnitudes of H ice-perhaps mixed with ammonia-that appears to be related to possibly ancient cryovolcanism on these large objects; and (3) smaller KBOs and centaurs which are neither Haumea family members nor cold-classical KBOs appear to divide into two families (which we refer to as 'neutral' and 'red'), each of which is a mixture of a common nearly neutral component and either a slightly red or very red component that also includes water ice. A model suggesting that the difference between neutral and red objects due to formation in an early compact solar system either inside or outside, respectively, of the {approx}20 AU methanol evaporation line is supported by the observation that methanol is only detected on the reddest objects, which are those which would be expected to have the most of the methanol containing mixture.

Brown, M. E.; Fraser, W. C. [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Schaller, E. L., E-mail: mbrown@caltech.edu [NASA Dryden Aircraft Operations Facility, Palmdale, CA 93550 (United States)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water content" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

SURVIVAL OF AMORPHOUS WATER ICE ON CENTAURS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Centaurs are believed to be Kuiper Belt objects in transition between Jupiter and Neptune before possibly becoming Jupiter family comets. Some indirect observational evidence is consistent with the presence of amorphous water ice in Centaurs. Some of them also display a cometary activity, probably triggered by the crystallization of the amorphous water ice, as suggested by Jewitt and this work. Indeed, we investigate the survival of amorphous water ice against crystallization, using a fully three-dimensional thermal evolution model. Simulations are performed for varying heliocentric distances and obliquities. They suggest that crystallization can be triggered as far as 16 AU, though amorphous ice can survive beyond 10 AU. The phase transition is an efficient source of outgassing up to 10-12 AU, which is broadly consistent with the observations of the active Centaurs. The most extreme case is 167P/CINEOS, which barely crystallizes in our simulations. However, amorphous ice can be preserved inside Centaurs in many heliocentric distance-obliquity combinations, below a {approx}5-10 m crystallized crust. We also find that outgassing due to crystallization cannot be sustained for a time longer than 10{sup 4}-10{sup 4} years, leading to the hypothesis that active Centaurs might have recently suffered from orbital changes. This could be supported by both observations (although limited) and dynamical studies.

Guilbert-Lepoutre, Aurelie, E-mail: aguilbert@ucla.edu [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

22

Relationships between Ice Water Content and Volume Extinction Coefficient from In Situ Observations for Temperatures from 0 C to ?86 C: Implications for Spaceborne Lidar Retrievals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An examination of two years of CALIPSO lidar observations and CloudSat cloud radar observations shows that ice clouds at temperatures below about ?45 C frequently fall below the CloudSat radar’s detection threshold, yet are readily detectable by ...

Andrew Heymsfield; Dave Winker; Melody Avery; Mark Vaughan; Glenn Diskin; Min Deng; Valentin Mitev

23

Relationships for Deriving Thunderstorm Anvil Ice Mass for CCOPE Storm Water Budget Estimates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Relationships between radar reflectivity and ice water content are derived from pendmtions into thundemonn anvils in Montana on seven days during the Cooperative Convective Precipitation Experiment (CCOPE), using aircraft data and radar ...

Andrew J. Heymsfield; Alice G. Palmer

1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

A Dual-Wavelength Radar Method for Ice-Water Characterization in Mixed-Phase Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A dual-wavelength method to differentiate supercooled water from ice and to measure mass content in each phase in cold stratiform clouds is proposed and discussed. The differential attenuation Ad, whose direct measurement is available with dual-...

Marielle Gosset; Henri Sauvageot

1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

Water-Cooled Ice Machines, Purchasing Specifications for Energy...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ice Makers. b) Measured in accordance with ARI Standard 810-2003. Does not include condenser water use. Buying Energy-Efficient Water-Cooled Ice Machines Several types of...

26

CYANATE ION IN COMPACT AMORPHOUS WATER ICE  

SciTech Connect

The 4.62 {mu}m infrared (2164.5 cm{sup -1}) absorption band, observed in ice mantels toward many young stellar objects, has been mostly attributed to the {nu}{sub 3} (CN stretch) band of OCN{sup -} ions. We present in this work a spectroscopic study of OCN{sup -} ions embedded in compact amorphous ice in a range of concentrations and temperatures relevant to astronomical observations together with quantum mechanical calculations of the {nu}{sub 3} band of OCN{sup -} in various H{sub 2}O environments. The ice samples containing the ions are prepared through hyperquenching of liquid droplets of K{sup +}OCN{sup -} solutions on a substrate at 14 K. The {nu}{sub 3} OCN{sup -} band appears as a broad feature peaking at 4.64 {mu}m with a secondary maximum at 4.54 {mu}m and is much weaker than the corresponding peak in the liquid solution or in the solid salt. A similar weakening is observed for other OCN{sup -} absorption peaks at 7.66 {mu}m (2{nu}{sub 2}) and 8.20 {mu}m ({nu}{sub 1}). The theoretical calculations for the {nu}{sub 3} vibration lead to a range of frequencies spanning the experimentally observed width. This frequency spread could help explain the pronounced drop in the band intensity in the ice. The OCN{sup -} {nu}{sub 3} band in the present compact ices is also broader and much weaker than that reported in the literature for OCN{sup -} ions obtained by variously processing porous ice samples containing suitable neutral precursors. The results of this study indicate that the astronomical detection of OCN{sup -} in ice mantels could be significantly impaired if the ion is embedded in a compact water network.

Mate, Belen; Herrero, Victor J.; Rodriguez-Lazcano, Yamilet; Moreno, Miguel A.; Escribano, Rafael [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, IEM-CSIC, Serrano 121, E-28006 Madrid (Spain); Fernandez-Torre, Delia [Departamento de Fisica Teorica de la Materia Condensada, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28050 Madrid (Spain); Gomez, Pedro C. [Departamento de Quimica Fisica I, Universidad Complutense, Unidad Asociada UCM-CSIC, E-28040 Madrid (Spain)

2012-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

27

On water ice formation in interstellar clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A model is proposed for the formation of water ice mantles on grains in interstellar clouds. This occurs by direct accretion of monomers from the gas, be they formed by gas or surface reactions. The model predicts the existence of a threshold in interstellar light extinction, A(v), which is mainly determined by the adsorption energy of water molecules on the grain material; for hydrocarbon material, chemical simulation places this energy between 0.5 and 2 kcal/mole, which sets the visible exctinction threshold at a few magnitudes, as observed. Once the threshold is crossed, all available water molecules in the gas are quickly adsorbed, forming an ice mantle, because the grain cools down and the adsorption energy on ice is higher than on bare grain. The model also predicts that the thickness of the mantle, and, hence, the optical thickness at 3 mu, grow linearly with A(v), as observed, with a slope which depends upon the total amount of water in the gas. Chemical simulation was also used to determine the adsorption sites and energies of O and OH on hydrocarbons, and study the dynamics of formation of water molecules by surface reactions with gaseous H atoms, as well as their chances of sticking in situ.

Renaud Papoular

2005-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

28

Dynamics of Ice Nucleation on Water Repellent Surfaces Azar Alizadeh,*,  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for nonicing applications. 1. INTRODUCTION Ice accretion on surfaces of aircraft, wind turbine blades, oil on surfaces with various wettabilities during and subsequent to single water droplet impact. We use surface wetting and icing phase transition events. Our methodology provides insights into multiple ice

Dhinojwala, Ali

29

Determining Cloud Ice Water Path from High-Frequency Microwave...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Determining Cloud Ice Water Path from High-Frequency Microwave Measurements G. Liu Department of Meteorology Florida State University Tallahassee, Florida Introduction A better...

30

THE FORMATION AND REACTIONS OF OXIDANTS IN WATER ICE .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This dissertation investigates the chemistry in water ice of radical species, such as OH and O, produced in radio-frequency discharge. This novel method of studying… (more)

Do, Nhut

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

The Melting of Ice in Cold Stratified Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We consider the melting of ice in cold water vertically stratified with salt. The study extends previous investigations of ice melting in cold water at uniform salinity and in warm water with a salinity gradient. We find, in agreement with the ...

Herbert E. Huppert; Edward G. Josberger

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

32

Liquid Water Oceans in Ice Giants  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aptly named, ice giants such as Uranus and Neptune contain significant amounts of water. While this water cannot be present near the cloud tops, it must be abundant in the deep interior. We investigate the likelihood of a liquid water ocean existing in the hydrogen-rich region between the cloud tops and deep interior. Starting from an assumed temperature at a given upper tropospheric pressure (the photosphere), we follow a moist adiabat downward. The mixing ratio of water to hydrogen in the gas phase is small in the photosphere and increases with depth. The mixing ratio in the condensed phase is near unity in the photosphere and decreases with depth; this gives two possible outcomes. If at some pressure level the mixing ratio of water in the gas phase is equal to that in the deep interior, then that level is the cloud base. Alternately, if the mixing ratio of water in the condensed phase reaches that in the deep interior, then the surface of a liquid ocean will occur. We find that Neptune is both too warm (photospheric temperature too high) and too dry (mixing ratio of water in the deep interior too low) for liquid oceans to exist at present. To have a liquid ocean, Neptune's deep interior water to gas ratio would have to be higher than current models allow, and the density at 19 kbar would have to be ~ 0.8 g/cm^3. Such a high density is inconsistent with gravitational data obtained during the Voyager flyby. As Neptune cools, the probability of a liquid ocean increases. Extrasolar "hot Neptunes," which presumably migrate inward toward their parent stars, cannot harbor liquid water oceans unless they have lost almost all of the hydrogen and helium from their deep interiors.

Sloane J. Wiktorowicz; Andrew P. Ingersoll

2006-09-26T23:59:59.000Z

33

Ice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ice Ice Nature Bulletin No. 661-A january 7, 1978 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation ICE There was a time when ice, cut on frozen ponds and lakes, was transported by fast clipper ships from New England to New Orleans where it was worth its weight in gold. Nowadays this cold brittle colorless substance is commonplace everywhere. Few people, however, know that ice is one of the strangest of all solids; and that, because of its unique properties, life on earth is what it is. Those properties are due to the distinctive structure of a molecule of water, formed of three elemental particles or atoms -- two of hydrogen and one of oxygen -- expressed by the familiar symbol, H2O. The three atoms are held together by two chemical bonds expressed by another symbol, H-O-H. Briefly, the unique properties of water, water vapor, and ice arise from that bonding and the arrangement of electron pairs around the oxygen atom.

34

Ice, Snow and Water: impacts of climate change on California and Himalayan Asia  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sustainability BRIEFING NOTE  Ice, Snow  and Water: impacts light absorption of snow and ice as pollutants darken theAsian region of snow, ice, water, and mountains, with huge

Fenner, R. A.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Radiation chemistry in ammonia-water ices  

SciTech Connect

We studied the effects of 100 keV proton irradiation on films of ammonia-water mixtures between 20 and 120 K. Irradiation destroys ammonia, leading to the formation and trapping of H{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, NO, and N{sub 2}O, the formation of cavities containing radiolytic gases, and ejection of molecules by sputtering. Using infrared spectroscopy, we show that at all temperatures the destruction of ammonia is substantial, but at higher temperatures (120 K), it is nearly complete ({approx}97% destroyed) after a fluence of 10{sup 16} ions/cm{sup 2}. Using mass spectroscopy and microbalance gravimetry, we measure the sputtering yield of our sample and the main components of the sputtered flux. We find that the sputtering yield depends on fluence. At low temperatures, the yield is very low initially and increases quadratically with fluence, while at 120 K the yield is constant and higher initially. The increase in the sputtering yield with fluence is explained by the formation and trapping of the ammonia decay products, N{sub 2} and H{sub 2}, which are seen to be ejected from the ice at all temperatures.

Loeffler, M. J. [Astrochemistry Laboratory, NASA GSFC, Code 691, Greenbelt, Maryland 20775 (United States); Laboratory for Atomic and Surface Physics, Engineering Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States); Raut, U.; Baragiola, R. A. [Laboratory for Atomic and Surface Physics, Engineering Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia 22904 (United States)

2010-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

36

Interface limited growth of heterogeneously nucleated ice in supercooled water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Heterogeneous ice growth exhibits a maximum in freezing rate arising from the competition between kinetics and the thermodynamic driving force between the solid and liquid states. Here, we use molecular dynamics simulations to elucidate the atomistic details of this competition, focusing on water properties in the interfacial region along the secondary prismatic direction. The crystal growth velocity is maximized when the efficiency of converting interfacial water molecules to ice, collectively known as the attachment kinetics, is greatest. We find water molecules that contact the intermediate ice layer in concave regions along the atomistically roughened surface are more likely to freeze directly. The increased roughening of the solid surface at large undercoolings consequently plays an important limiting role on the rate of ice growth, as water molecules are unable to integrate into increasingly deeper surface pockets. These results provide insights into the molecular mechanisms for self-assembly of solid phases that are important in many biological and atmospheric processes.

Razvan A. Nistor; Thomas E. Markland; B. J. Berne

2013-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

37

Anchored Clathrate Waters Bind Antifreeze Proteins to Ice  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The mechanism by which antifreeze proteins (AFPs) irreversibly bind to ice has not yet been resolved. The ice-binding site of an AFP is relatively hydrophobic, but also contains many potential hydrogen bond donors/acceptors. The extent to which hydrogen bonding and the hydrophobic effect contribute to ice binding has been debated for over 30 years. Here we have elucidated the ice-binding mechanism through solving the first crystal structure of an Antarctic bacterial AFP. This 34-kDa domain, the largest AFP structure determined to date, folds as a Ca{sup 2+}-bound parallel beta-helix with an extensive array of ice-like surface waters that are anchored via hydrogen bonds directly to the polypeptide backbone and adjacent side chains. These bound waters make an excellent three-dimensional match to both the primary prism and basal planes of ice and in effect provide an extensive X-ray crystallographic picture of the AFP{vert_ellipsis}ice interaction. This unobstructed view, free from crystal-packing artefacts, shows the contributions of both the hydrophobic effect and hydrogen bonding during AFP adsorption to ice. We term this mode of binding the 'anchored clathrate' mechanism of AFP action.

C Garnham; R Campbell; P Davies

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

38

Measurements of the Total Water Content of Cirrus Clouds. Part I: Instrument Details and Calibration  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes an instrument designed to measure the sum of gas phase and solid phase water, or total water, in cirrus clouds, and to be mounted in a pallet in the underbelly of the NASA WB-57 research aircraft. The ice water content of ...

E. M. Weinstock; J. B. Smith; D. Sayres; J. R. Spackman; J. V. Pittman; N. Allen; J. Demusz; M. Greenberg; M. Rivero; L. Solomon; J. G. Anderson

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

New Phases of Water Ice Predicted at Megabar Pressures Burkhard Militzer1, 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

New Phases of Water Ice Predicted at Megabar Pressures Burkhard Militzer1, 2 and Hugh F. Wilson1 1 and Cmcm symmetry at 7.6 and 15.5 Mbar, respectively. The known high pressure ice phases VII, VIII, X positions between nearest O atoms in the ice X, Pbcm, and Pbca phases. PACS numbers: Water ice is one

Militzer, Burkhard

40

Alaskan Ice Road Water Supplies Augmented by Snow Barriers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6, 2013 6, 2013 Alaskan Ice Road Water Supplies Augmented by Snow Barriers Washington, D.C. - In a project supported and managed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), researchers at the University of Alaska Fairbanks have demonstrated that the use of artificial barriers-snow fences-can significantly increase the amount of fresh water supplies in Arctic lakes at a fraction of the cost of bringing in water from nearby lakes. The results promise to enhance environmentally sound development of Alaska's natural resources, lowering the costs of building ice roads used for exploring for oil and natural gas in Alaska. They could also be used to help augment fresh water supplies at remote villages. Researcher Joel Bailey measures the density of the snow in this snow pit to determine the amount of snow in the drift and the water equivalent of the snow drift.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water content" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

A Model for the Formation and Melting of Ice on Surface Waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ice covers have an important influence on the hydrology of surface waters. The growth of ice layer on stationary waters, such as lakes or canals, depends primarily on meteorological parameters like temperature and humidity of the air, windspeed ...

H. A. R. De Bruin; H. R. A. Wessels

1988-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Water ice at low to midlatitudes on Mars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, we analyze water ice occurrences at the surface of Mars using near-infrared observations, and we study their distribution with a climate model. Latitudes between 45{\\deg}S and 50{\\deg}N are considered. Data from the Observatoire pour la Min\\'eralogie, l'Eau, les Glaces et l'Actitit\\'e and the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars are used to assess the presence of surface water ice as a function of location and season. A modeling approach combining the 1-D and 3-D versions of the General Circulation Model of the Laboratoire de M\\'et\\'eorologie Dynamique de Jussieu is developed and successfully compared to observations. Ice deposits 2-200 \\mu m thick are observed during the day on pole facing slopes in local fall, winter and early spring. Ice extends down to 13{\\deg} latitude in the Southern Hemisphere but is restricted to latitudes higher than 32{\\deg} in the north. On a given slope, the pattern of ice observations at the surface is mainly controlled by the global variability of ...

Vincendon, Mathieu; Mustard, John

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Water and Ice Dielectric Spectra Scaling at 0 °C  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dielectric spectra (10^4-10^11 Hz) of water and ice at 0 {\\deg}C are considered in terms of proton conductivity and compared to each other. In this picture, the Debye relaxations, centered at 1/{\\tau}_W ~ 20 GHz (in water) and 1/{\\tau}_I ~ 5 kHz (in ice), are seen as manifestations of diffusion of separated charges in the form of H3O+ and OH- ions. The charge separation results from the self-dissociation of H2O molecules, and is accompanied by recombination in order to maintain the equilibrium concentration, N. The charge recombination is a diffusion-controlled process with characteristic lifetimes of {\\tau}_W and {\\tau}_I, for water and ice respectively. The static permittivity, {\\epsilon}(0), is solely determined by N. Both, N and {\\epsilon}(0), are roughly constant at the water-ice phase transition, and both increase, due to a slowing down of the diffusion rate, as the temperature is lowered. The transformation of the broadband dielectric spectra at 0 {\\deg}C with the drastic change from {\\tau}_W to {\\tau}_I is mainly due to an abrupt (by 0.4 eV) change of the activation energy of the charge diffusion.

V. G. Artemov; A. A. Volkov

2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

44

The Impact of Melting Ice on Ocean Waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ice melts when it is in contact with ocean waters that have temperatures above the in situ freezing point. The product is a mixture of meltwater and seawater having properties intermediate between those of the two components. Density is one of ...

Adrian Jenkins

1999-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Water-Ice and Water-Updraft Relationships near ?10°C within Populations of Florida Cumuli  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

From an in-cloud microphysical data set collected in Florida convective towers that were penetrated close to their tops near -10°C, evidence is presented to show a sequential development of cloud water, rainwater, graupel and crystalline ice as ...

Robert I. Sax; Vernon W. Keller

1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

Relationship between Ice Water Path and Downward Longwave Radiation for Clouds Optically Thin in the Infrared: Observations and Model Calculations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A vertically pointing 3.2-cm radar is used to observe altostratus and cirrus clouds as they pass overhead. Radar reflectivities are used in combination with an empirical Zi-IWC (ice water content) relationship developed by Sassen (1987) to ...

Taneil Uttal; Sergey Y. Matrosov; Jack B. Snider; Robert A. Kropfli

1994-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

47

A Thermal Device for Aircraft Measurement of the Solid Water Content of Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A constant temperature probe for the measurement of solid water content of clouds is described. The probe is operated at a temperature of approximately 25°C, and is designed to collect and melt ice particles that impact in an open half-cylinder, ...

W. D. King; D. E. Turvey

1986-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Discovery of water ice nearly everywhere in the solar system  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

During the last decade we have discovered sources of accessible water in some form nearly everywhere in the solar system. Water ice has been found on the planet Mercury; probably on the Earth`s Moon; on Mars; on near Earth objects; on comets whose orbits frequently come close to that of Earth`s orbit; probably on Ceres, the largest inner asteroid; and on comets previously and incorrectly considered to be out of practical reach. The comets also provide massive quantities of hydrocarbons, similar to oil shale. The masses of either water or hydrocarbons are measured in units of cubic kilometers. The water is key to space transportation because it can be used as a rocket propellant directly, and because thermal process alone can be used to convert it and hydrocarbons into hydrogen, the highest performing rocket propellant. This presentation outlines what is currently known about the locations of the water ice, and sketches the requirements and environments of missions to prospect for and assay the water sources.

Zuppero, A.

1995-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Icing Wind Tunnel Tests on the CSIRO Liquid Water Probe  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wet wind tunnel tests have been Performed on several versions of the CSIRO probe designed for the airborne measurement of liquid water content. Four different controller units and 17 different Probe sensors (including half-size and shielded ...

W. D. King; J. E. Dye; D. Baumgardner; J. W. Strapp; D. Huffman

1985-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

Molecular dynamics study of photodissociation of water in crystalline and amorphous ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present results of classical dynamics calculations, performed to study the photodissociation of water in crystalline and amorphous ice surfaces at a surface temperature of 10 K. Dissociation in the top six monolayers is considered. Desorption of H2O has a low probability (less than 0.5% yield per absorbed photon) for both types of ice. The final outcome strongly depends on the original position of the photodissociated molecule. For molecules in the first bilayer of crystalline ice and the corresponding layers in amorphous ice, desorption of H atoms dominates. In the second bilayer H atom desorption, trapping of the H and OH fragments in the ice, and recombination of H and OH are of roughly equal importance. Deeper into the ice H atom desorption becomes less important and trapping and recombination dominate. The distribution of distances traveled by H atoms in the ice peaks at 6 - 7 Angstroms with a tail going to about 60 Angstroms for both types of ice. The mobility of OH radicals is low within the ice with most probable distances traveled of 2 and 1 Angstroms for crystalline and amorphous ice, respectively. OH is however quite mobile on top of the surface, where it has been found to travel more than 80 Angstroms. Simulated absorption spectra of crystalline ice, amorphous ice, and liquid water are found to be in very good agreement with experiments.

Stefan Andersson; Ayman Al-Halabi; Geert-Jan Kroes; Ewine F. van Dishoeck

2005-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

51

CONTENTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CONTENTS CONTENTS Introduction ........................................................................................................3 ON THE HORIZON: Promising Research Efforts Currently Underway A Smarter Charge .........................................................................................4 Unlocking Fire Ice .........................................................................................5 CRISP Crunches Cyber Threats ....................................................................6 Gel Zeroes in on Cancer ...............................................................................7 Liquid Solvent: A Solid Solution for CO 2 .....................................................8 Real-time Grid Stability ................................................................................9

52

FEMP-Designated Product: Water-Cooled Ice Machines | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FEMP-Designated Product: Water-Cooled Ice Machines FEMP-Designated Product: Water-Cooled Ice Machines FEMP-Designated Product: Water-Cooled Ice Machines October 7, 2013 - 11:11am Addthis Federal agencies are required by the National Energy Conservation Policy Act (P.L. 95-619), Executive Order 13423, Executive Order 13514, and Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR) Subpart 23.2 and 53.223 to specify and buy ENERGY STAR® qualified products or, in categories not included in the ENERGY STAR program, FEMP designated products, which are among the highest 25% of equivalent products for energy efficiency. A PDF version of Water-Cooled Ice Machines is also available. Performance Requirements for Federal Purchases Type Ice Harvest Rate (pounds per 24 hours) Energy Usea (per 100 pounds) Potable Water Useb (per 100 pounds)

53

A New Look at Homogeneous Ice Nucleation in Supercooled Water Drops  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The classical theory for homogeneous ice nucleation in supercooled water is investigated in the light of recent data published in various physico-chemical journal on the physical properties of supercooled water and in the light of recent evidence ...

H. R. Pruppacher

1995-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

DISCOVERY OF CRYSTALLIZED WATER ICE IN A SILHOUETTE DISK IN THE M43 REGION  

SciTech Connect

We present the 1.9-4.2 {mu}m spectra of the five bright (L {<=} 11.2) young stars associated with silhouette disks with a moderate to high inclination angle of 39 Degree-Sign -80 Degree-Sign in the M42 and M43 regions. The water ice absorption is seen toward d121-1925 and d216-0939, while the spectra of d182-316, d183-405, and d218-354 show no water ice feature around 3.1 {mu}m within the detection limits. By comparing the water ice features toward nearby stars, we find that the water ice absorption toward d121-1925 and d216-0939 most likely originates from the foreground material and the surrounding disk, respectively. The angle of the disk inclination is found to be mainly responsible for the difference of the optical depth of the water ice among the five young stars. Our results suggest that there is a critical inclination angle between 65 Degree-Sign and 75 Degree-Sign for the circumstellar disk where the water ice absorption becomes strong. The average density at the disk surface of d216-0939 was found to be 6.38 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -18} g cm{sup -3}. The water ice absorption band in the d216-0939 disk is remarkable in that the maximum optical depth of the water ice band is at a longer wavelength than detected before. It indicates that the primary carrier of the feature is purely crystallized water ice at the surface of the d216-0939 disk with characteristic size of {approx}0.8 {mu}m, which suggests grain growth. This is the first direct detection of purely crystallized water ice in a silhouette disk.

Terada, Hiroshi [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 North A'ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Tokunaga, Alan T., E-mail: terada@subaru.naoj.org [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu 96822 (United States)

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Simulations of the Effects of Water Vapor, Cloud Liquid Water, and Ice on AMSU Moisture Channel Brightness Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Radiative transfer simulations are performed to determine how water vapor and nonprecipitating cloud liquid water and ice particles within typical midlatitude atmospheres affect brightness temperatures TB's of moisture sounding channels used in ...

Bradley M. Muller; Henry E. Fuelberg; Xuwu Xiang

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Aircraft Measurements of Icing in Supercooled and Water Droplet/Ice Crystal Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Icing measurements were carried out in Spain during the Precipitation Enhancement Project experiment in 1979, with an instrumented DC-7 aircraft.

M. Bain; J. F. Gayet

1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

Heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake by field-collected atmospheric particles below 273 K  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Atmospheric ice formation induced by particles with complex chemical and physical properties through heterogeneous nucleation is not well understood. Heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake by ambient particles collected from urban environments in Los Angeles and Mexico City are presented. Using a vapour controlled cooling system equipped with an optical microscopy, the range of onset conditions for ice nucleation and water uptake by the collected particles was determined as a function of temperature (200{273 K) and relative humidity with respect to ice (RHice) up to water saturation. Three distinctly different types of authentic atmospheric particles were investigated including soot particles associated with organics/inorganics, inorganic particles of marine origin coated with organic material, and Pb/Zn containing inorganic particles apportioned to anthropogenic emissions relevant to waste incineration. Single particle characterization was provided by micro-spectroscopic analyses using computer controlled scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (CCSEM/EDX) and scanning transmission X-ray microscopy with near edge X-ray absorption ne structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS). Above 230 K, signicant differences in water uptake and immersion freezing effciencies of the different particle types were observed. Below 230 K, the particles exhibited high deposition ice nucleation effciencies and formed ice at RHice values well below homogeneous ice nucleation limits. The data show that the chemical composition of these eld{collected particles plays an important role in determining water uptake and immersion freezing. Heterogeneous ice nucleation rate coeffcients, cumulative ice nuclei (IN) spectrum, and IN activated fraction for deposition ice nucleation are derived. The presented ice nucleation data demonstrate that anthropogenic and marine particles comprising of various chemical and physical properties exhibit distinctly different ice nucleation effciencies and can serve as effcient IN at atmospheric conditions typical for cirrus and mixed phase clouds. This indicates a potential link between human activities and cloud formation, and thus climate.

Wang, Bingbing; Laskin, Alexander; Roedel, Tobias R.; Gilles, Marry K.; Moffet, Ryan C.; Tivanski, Alexei V.; Knopf, Daniel A.

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

58

Technical Review Report for the Application for Contents Amendment for Shipping Isentropic Compression Experiment (ICE) Apparatus in 9977 Packaging  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report documents the review of Application for Contents Amendment for Shipping Isentropic Compression Experiment (ICE) Apparatus in 9977 Packaging, prepared by Savannah River Packaging Technology (SRPT) of Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) of Savannah River Nuclear Solutions, LLC, -- the Submittal -- at the request of the Department of Energy's (DOE) National Nuclear Security Agency's (NNSA) Albuquerque Facility Operations Division, for the shipment of the ICE apparatus from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), to Sandia National Laboratory (SNL). The ICE apparatus consists of a stainless steel assembly containing about 8 grams of {sup 239}Pu or its dose equivalent as noted in Table 1, Comparison of 9977 Content C.1 and the ICE Radioactive Contents, of the Submittal. The ICE target is mounted on the transport container assembly base. A Viton{sup R} O-ring seals the transport container base to the transport container body. Another Viton{sup R} O-ring seals the transport container handle to the transport container body. The ICE apparatus weighs less than 30 pounds and has less than 0.6 watts decay heat rate. For the Model 9977 Package, the maximum payload weight is 100 pounds and the maximum decay heat rate is 19 watts. Thus, the maximum payload weight and the maximum decay heat rate for the Model 9977 Package easily bound those for the ICE apparatus. This Addendum supplements the Safety Analysis Report for Packaging (SARP), Revision 2, for the Model 9977 Package and Addendum 1, Revision 2, to Revision 2 of the Model 9977 Package SARP. The ICE apparatus is considered as part of Content Envelope C.6, Samples and Sources, under the submittal for the Model 9978 Package SARP currently under review. The Staff at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) recommends that the Submittal be approved by the DOE-Headquarters Certifying Official (EM-60), and incorporated into a subsequent revision to the current Certificate of Compliance (CoC), to the Model 9977-96 Packaging.

West, M

2009-04-16T23:59:59.000Z

59

WATER ICE AND CARBON DIOXIDE ICE INTERACTIONS: CRATER INVESTIGATIONS IN RESIDUAL NORTH POLAR ICE CAP. M.A. Thueson and H. Xie, Earth and Environmental Science, The Uni-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78249, U.S.A. (misti.thueson@gmail.com) (Hongjie.xie@utsa.edu). Introduction sublimes. As summer progresses the walls of the crater, though above the temperature of CO2 sublima- tion (as seen in figure 2), keep a high albedo. This would imply that the walls are water ice. Inuvik

Texas at San Antonio, University of

60

Modeling the Effect of Ice Nuclei on ARM Clouds  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Upper-Tropospheric Ice Water Content in TWP-ICE Xiping Zeng, Wei-Kuo Tao, Minghua Zhang, and Shaochen Xie March 31, 2009 Papers Published Recently * Zeng, X., W.-K. Tao, M. Zhang,...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water content" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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61

Impacts of Ice Clouds on GPS Radio Occultation Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mathematical solutions accounting for the effects of liquid and ice clouds on the propagation of the GPS radio signals are first derived. The percentage contribution of ice water content (IWC) to the total refractivity increases linearly with the ...

X. Zou; S. Yang; P. S. Ray

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Airborne Measurement of Liquid and Total Water Content  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two identical liquid water content (LWC) King probes—one total water content/liquid water content (TWC/LWC) Nevzorov probe and two constant-temperature T probes that are different in size to distinguish particles of different densities and ...

German Vidaurre; John Hallett; David C. Rogers

2011-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

VOLATILE TRANSPORT INSIDE SUPER-EARTHS BY ENTRAPMENT IN THE WATER-ICE MATRIX  

SciTech Connect

Whether volatiles can be entrapped in a background matrix composing planetary envelopes and be dragged via convection to the surface is a key question in understanding atmospheric fluxes, cycles, and composition. In this paper, we consider super-Earths with an extensive water mantle (i.e., water planets), and the possibility of entrapment of methane in their extensive water-ice envelopes. We adopt the theory developed by van der Waals and Platteeuw for modeling solid solutions, often used for modeling clathrate hydrates, and modify it in order to estimate the thermodynamic stability field of a new phase called methane filled ice Ih. We find that in comparison to water ice VII the filled ice Ih structure may be stable not only at the high pressures but also at the high temperatures expected at the core-water mantle transition boundary of water planets.

Levi, A.; Podolak, M. [Department of Geophysics and Planetary Science, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Sasselov, D., E-mail: amitlevi.planetphys@gmail.com [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2013-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

64

ON THE FORMATION OF INTERSTELLAR WATER ICE: CONSTRAINTS FROM A SEARCH FOR HYDROGEN PEROXIDE ICE IN MOLECULAR CLOUDS  

SciTech Connect

Recent surface chemistry experiments have shown that the hydrogenation of molecular oxygen on interstellar dust grains is a plausible formation mechanism, via hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}), for the production of water (H{sub 2}O) ice mantles in the dense interstellar medium. Theoretical chemistry models also predict the formation of a significant abundance of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} ice in grain mantles by this route. At their upper limits, the predicted and experimental abundances are sufficiently high that H{sub 2}O{sub 2} should be detectable in molecular cloud ice spectra. To investigate this further, laboratory spectra have been obtained for H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O ice films between 2.5 and 200 {mu}m, from 10 to 180 K, containing 3%, 30%, and 97% H{sub 2}O{sub 2} ice. Integrated absorbances for all the absorption features in low-temperature H{sub 2}O{sub 2} ice have been derived from these spectra. For identifying H{sub 2}O{sub 2} ice, the key results are the presence of unique features near 3.5, 7.0, and 11.3 {mu}m. Comparing the laboratory spectra with the spectra of a group of 24 protostars and field stars, all of which have strong H{sub 2}O ice absorption bands, no absorption features are found that can definitely be identified with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} ice. In the absence of definite H{sub 2}O{sub 2} features, the H{sub 2}O{sub 2} abundance is constrained by its possible contribution to the weak absorption feature near 3.47 {mu}m found on the long-wavelength wing of the 3 {mu}m H{sub 2}O ice band. This gives an average upper limit for H{sub 2}O{sub 2}, as a percentage of H{sub 2}O, of 9% {+-} 4%. This is a strong constraint on parameters for surface chemistry experiments and dense cloud chemistry models.

Smith, R. G.; Wright, C. M.; Robinson, G. [School of Physical, Environmental and Mathematical Sciences, University of New South Wales, Australian Defence Force Academy, Canberra, ACT 2600 (Australia); Charnley, S. B. [Astrochemistry Laboratory, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Pendleton, Y. J. [NASA Lunar Science Institute, NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035 (United States); Maldoni, M. M., E-mail: r.smith@adfa.edu.au, E-mail: c.wright@adfa.edu.au, E-mail: g.robinson@adfa.edu.au, E-mail: Steven.B.Charnley@nasa.gov, E-mail: yvonne.pendleton@nasa.gov [Geoscience Australia, Canberra, ACT 2601 (Australia)

2011-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

65

Determination of Ice Water Path Over the ARM SGP Using Combined Surface and Satellite Datasets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Determination of Ice Water Path Over the ARM SGP Using Determination of Ice Water Path Over the ARM SGP Using Combined Surface and Satellite Datasets J. Huang, M. M. Khaiyer, and P. W. Heck Analytical Services & Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia P. Minnis and B. Lin Atmospheric Sciences National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia T.-F. Fan Science Applications International Corporation Hampton, Virginia Introduction Global information of cloud ice water path (IWP) is urgently needed for testing of global climate models (GCMs) and other applications. Accurate quantification of the IWP is essential for characterizing the hydrological and radiation budget. For example, the reflection of shortwave radiation by ice clouds reduces the solar energy reaching the earth's surface. Ice clouds can also trap the longwave radiation

66

Wind Tunnel Measurements of the Response of Hot-Wire Liquid Water Content Instruments to Large Droplets  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Wet wind tunnel tests were performed on more than 23 cloud liquid water content (LWC) probes and drop spectrometers at the NASA Icing Research Tunnel, with a main objective to characterize their response to large-droplet conditions. As a part of ...

J. W. Strapp; J. Oldenburg; R. Ide; L. Lilie; S. Bacic; Z. Vukovic; M. Oleskiw; D. Miller; E. Emery; G. Leone

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

The correlation between molecular motions and heat capacity in normal ice and water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The heat capacities of ice and water at ambient pressure are reexamined to build an intrinsic correlation between H2O molecular motions and the heat capacity. Based on the evolution of H2O molecular motions, a satisfactory description of the heat capacity of ice and water is provided. The heat capacity of ice is related not only to H2O molecular vibrations, but also to the molecular rotations. In water, all H2O molecular vibrations, rotations and translations contribute to the heat capacity. The molecular translational motions are found to be the main contribution to the large heat capacity of water. The results provide a deep insight into the nature of water and ice at ambient pressure.

Ke, Hai Bo; Wang, Wei Hua

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

The phase diagram of ice: a quasi-harmonic study based on a flexible water model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The phase diagram of ice is studied by a quasi-harmonic approximation. The free energy of all experimentally known ice phases has been calculated with the flexible q-TIP4P/F model of water. The only exception is the high pressure ice X, in which the presence of symmetric O-H-O bonds prevents its modeling with this empirical interatomic potential. The simplicity of our approach allows us to study ice phases at state points of the T-P plane that have been omitted in previous simulations using free energy methods based on thermodynamic integration. The effect in the phase diagram of averaging the proton disorder that appears in several ice phases has been studied. It is found particularly relevant for ice III, at least for cell sizes typically used in phase coexistence simulations. New insight into the capability of the employed water model to describe the coexistence of ice phases is presented. We find that the H-ordered ices IX and XIV, as well as the H-disordered ice XII, are particularly stable for this wate...

Ramirez, R; Herrero, C P

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Sleuthing the Fate of Water in Ancient Aquifers and Ice Cores | U.S. DOE  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Sleuthing the Fate of Water in Ancient Aquifers and Ice Cores Sleuthing the Fate of Water in Ancient Aquifers and Ice Cores Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » October 2012 Sleuthing the Fate of Water in Ancient Aquifers and Ice Cores Precision analytical techniques developed for fundamental experiments in nuclear physics now enable routine measurements of ultra-low concentrations of Krypton radioisotopes in samples of water, ice, and gas. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page

70

Scaling relation for the bond length, mass density, and packing order of water ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The packing order of molecules and the distance between adjacent oxygen atoms (dOO) in water and ice are most basic yet puzzling. Here we present a scaling solution for this purpose based only on the mass density (gcm-3), (Equation) where dL is the length ({\\AA}) of the O:H van der Waals bond and dH the H-O polar-covalent bond projecting on the O---O line. Validated by the measured proton symmetrization of compressed ice, dOO of water and ice, and dOO expansion at water surface, this solution confirms that the fluctuated, tetrahedrally-coordinated structure is unique for water ice.

Chang Q Sun

2013-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

71

CONTENTS Water Issues Dominate Oil and  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Water Issues Dominate Oil and Gas Production ...1 Editor's Letter ...2 Zero Discharge Water Management for Horizontal Shale...

72

Water Ice on the Satellite of Kuiper Belt Object 2003 EL61  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have obtained a near infrared spectrum of the brightest satellite of the large Kuiper Belt Object, 2003 EL61. The spectrum has absorption features at 1.5 and 2.0 microns, indicating that water ice is present on the surface. We find that the satellite's absorption lines are much deeper than water ice features typically found on Kuiper Belt Objects. We argue that the unusual spectrum indicates that the satellite was likely formed by impact and not by capture.

K. M Barkume; M. E. Brown; E. L. Schaller

2006-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

73

Evidence of water ice near the lunar poles  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Lunar Prospector epithermal neutron data were studied to evaluate the probable chemical state of enhanced hydrogen, [H], reported previously to be near both lunar poles [1,2]. Improved versions of thermal and epithermal neutron data were developed for this purpose. Most important is the improved spatial resolution obtained by using shortened integration times. A new data set was created, Epi* = [Epithermal - 0.057 x Thermal], to reduce effects of composition variations other than those due to hydrogen. The Epi* counting rates are generally low near both lunar poles and high over terrane near recent impact events such as Tycho and Jackson. However, other lunar features are also associated with high Epi* rates, which represent a wide range of terrane types that seem to have little in common. If we postulate that one property all bright Epi* features do have in common is low [H], then measured Epi* counting rates appear to be quantitatively self consistent. If we assume that [H]=O above the top 98th percentile of Epi* counting rates at 2{sup o} x 2{sup o} spatial resolution, then [H]{sub ave} = 55 ppm for latitudes equatorward of [75{sup o}]. This value is close to the average found in returned lunar soil samples, [H]{sub ave} {approx} 50 ppm [3]. Using the foregoing physical interpretation of Epi* counting rates, we find that the Epi* counts within most of the large craters poleward of {+-}70{sup o} are higher, and therefore [H] is lower, than that in neighboring inter-crater plains, as shown in Figure 1. Fourteen of these craters that have areas larger than the LP epithermal spatial resolution (55 km diameter at 30 km altitude), were singled out for study. [H] is generally found to increase with decreasing distance from the poles (hence decreasing temperature). However, quantitative estimates of the diffusivity of hydrogen at low temperature show that diffusion can not be an important factor in explaining the difference between the relatively low [H] observed within the large sunlit polar craters and the relatively high [H] in neighboring inter-crater plains. A closer look at the 'inter-crater' plains near the poles, shows that they are covered by many small craters that harbor permanent shade [4]. The temperatures within many of these craters are low enough [5] that they can disable sublimation as a viable loss process of [H{sub 2}O]. It is therefore tempting to postulate that the enhanced hydrogen within most regions of permanent shade is in the form of water molecules. This postulate is certainly viable within the bottoms of several large, permanently shaded craters near the south pole. Predicted temperatures within them [5] fall well below the 100 K temperature that is needed to stabilize water ice for aeons. The picture is different near the north pole. Here, there are relatively few permanently-shaded craters that are large enough to harbor temperatures that are sufficiently low to stabilize water ice indefinitely against sublimation [5]. Instead, the 'inter-crater' polar plains are a jumble of many permanently-shaded craters that have diameters less than 10 km [4]. Although simulations of temperatures within this class of craters show they are only marginally cold enough to indefinitely stabilize water ice [5], this terrane appears to have the highest [H]. Nevertheless, predicted temperatures are close enough to that needed to permanently stabilize [H{sub 2}O] to suggest that sublimation is indeed the process that discriminates between polar terrane that contains enhanced [H] and those that do not (see, e.g., the temperature estimates for doubly-shaded craters [6]). If correct, then an important fraction of the hydrogen near the north pole must be in the form of H{sub 2}O, which then resides within these small craters. Estimates using our improved data set of [H] within craters near the south pole remain unchanged from those derived from our previous analysis [2], [H] = 1700{+-}900 ppm. This translates to [H{sub 2}O]=1.5{+-}0.8%. If all of the enhanced hydrogen in the north is in the form of H{sub 2}O and is confin

Feldman, W. C. (William C.); Maurice, S. (Sylvestre); Lawrence, David J. (David Jeffery),; Little, R. C. (Robert C.); Lawrence, S. L. (Stefanie L.); Gasnault, O. M. (Olivier M.); Wiens, R. C. (Roger C.); Barraclough, B. L. (Bruce L.); Elphic, Richard C.,; Prettyman, T. H. (Thomas H.); Steinberg, John Tyree; Binder, A. B.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Effect of Sea Ice on the Salinity of Antarctic Bottom Waters  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Brine rejection during the formation of Antarctic sea ice is known to enhance the salinity of dense shelf waters in the Weddell and Ross Seas. As these shelf waters flow off the shelves and descend to the bottom, they entrain ambient deep water ...

J. R. Toggweiler; B. Samuels

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

A Review Of Water Contents Of Nominally Anhydrous Natural Minerals...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A Review Of Water Contents Of Nominally Anhydrous Natural Minerals In The Mantles Of Earth, Mars And The Moon Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal...

76

Structural transformation in supercooled water controls the crystallization rate of ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

One of water's unsolved puzzles is the question of what determines the lowest temperature to which it can be cooled before freezing to ice. The supercooled liquid has been probed experimentally to near the homogeneous nucleation temperature TH{\\approx}232 K, yet the mechanism of ice crystallization - including the size and structure of critical nuclei - has not yet been resolved. The heat capacity and compressibility of liquid water anomalously increase upon moving into the supercooled region according to a power law that would diverge at Ts{\\approx}225 K,(1,2) so there may be a link between water's thermodynamic anomalies and the crystallization rate of ice. But probing this link is challenging because fast crystallization prevents experimental studies of the liquid below TH. And while atomistic studies have captured water crystallization(3), the computational costs involved have so far prevented an assessment of the rates and mechanism involved. Here we report coarse-grained molecular simulations with the mW water model(4) in the supercooled regime around TH, which reveal that a sharp increase in the fraction of four-coordinated molecules in supercooled liquid water explains its anomalous thermodynamics and also controls the rate and mechanism of ice formation. The simulations reveal that the crystallization rate of water reaches a maximum around 225 K, below which ice nuclei form faster than liquid water can equilibrate. This implies a lower limit of metastability of liquid water just below TH and well above its glass transition temperature Tg{\\approx}136 K. By providing a relationship between the structural transformation in liquid water, its anomalous thermodynamics and its crystallization rate, this work provides a microscopic foundation to the experimental finding that the thermodynamics of water determines the rates of homogeneous nucleation of ice.(5)

Emily B. Moore; Valeria Molinero

2011-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

77

Alaskan Ice Road Water Supplies Augmented by Snow Barriers | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alaskan Ice Road Water Supplies Augmented by Snow Barriers Alaskan Ice Road Water Supplies Augmented by Snow Barriers Alaskan Ice Road Water Supplies Augmented by Snow Barriers March 6, 2013 - 10:55am Addthis Monitoring equipment and part of the snowfence peek out of the snow drift. Monitoring equipment and part of the snowfence peek out of the snow drift. The aerial view shows the experimental lake at Franklin Bluffs used for the snowfence experiment. The aerial view shows the experimental lake at Franklin Bluffs used for the snowfence experiment. Researcher Joel Bailey measures the density of the snow in this snow pit to determine the amount of snow in the drift and the water equivalent of the snow drift. Researcher Joel Bailey measures the density of the snow in this snow pit to determine the amount of snow in the drift and the water equivalent of the

78

Alaskan Ice Road Water Supplies Augmented by Snow Barriers | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alaskan Ice Road Water Supplies Augmented by Snow Barriers Alaskan Ice Road Water Supplies Augmented by Snow Barriers Alaskan Ice Road Water Supplies Augmented by Snow Barriers March 6, 2013 - 10:55am Addthis Monitoring equipment and part of the snowfence peek out of the snow drift. Monitoring equipment and part of the snowfence peek out of the snow drift. The aerial view shows the experimental lake at Franklin Bluffs used for the snowfence experiment. The aerial view shows the experimental lake at Franklin Bluffs used for the snowfence experiment. Researcher Joel Bailey measures the density of the snow in this snow pit to determine the amount of snow in the drift and the water equivalent of the snow drift. Researcher Joel Bailey measures the density of the snow in this snow pit to determine the amount of snow in the drift and the water equivalent of the

79

Obtaining Best Estimates for the Microphysical and Radiative Properties of Tropical Ice Clouds from TWP-ICE In Situ Microphysical Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Best estimates of the bulk microphysical and radiative properties (ice water content, visible extinction, effective radius, and total concentration) are derived for three case studies of tropical ice clouds sampled during the Tropical Warm Pool ...

A. Protat; G. M. McFarquhar; J. Um; J. Delanoë

2011-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

A new soil water content sensor with temperature compensation design  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The design and construction of a soil water content sensor with temperature compensation using the piecewise linear interpolation method was presented in this paper. The sensor out put often influenced by temperature, so temperature compensation must ... Keywords: circuitry system, geological disaster, interpolation method, piecewise linear, soil water content sensor, temperature compensation

Shi Ge; Li Qing

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water content" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Effective Radius of Ice Particles in Cirrus and Contrails  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper discusses the ratio C between the volume mean radius and the effective radius of ice particles in cirrus and contrails. The volume mean radius is proportional to the third root of the ratio between ice water content and number of ice ...

U. Schumann; B. Mayer; K. Gierens; S. Unterstrasser; P. Jessberger; A. Petzold; C. Voigt; J-F. Gayet

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

WATER ICE IN HIGH MASS-LOSS RATE OH/IR STARS  

SciTech Connect

We investigate water-ice features in spectral energy distributions (SEDs) of high mass-loss rate OH/IR stars. We use a radiative transfer code which can consider multiple components of dust shells to make model calculations for various dust species including water ice in the OH/IR stars. We find that the model SEDs are sensitively dependent on the location of the water-ice dust shell. For two sample stars (OH 127.8+0.0 and OH 26.5+0.6), we compare the detailed model results with the infrared observational data including the spectral data from the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO). For the two sample stars, we reproduce the crystalline water-ice features (absorption at 3.1 {mu}m and 11.5 {mu}m; emission at 44 and 62 {mu}m) observed by ISO using a separate component of the water-ice dust shell that condensed at about 84-87 K (r {approx} 1500-1800 AU) as well as the silicate dust shell that condensed at about 1000 K (r {approx} 19-25 AU). For a sample of 1533 OH/IR stars, we present infrared two-color diagrams (2CDs) using the Infrared Astronomical Satellite and AKARI data compared with theoretical model results. We find that the theoretical models clearly show the effects of the crystalline water-ice features (absorption at 11.5 {mu}m and emission at 62 {mu}m) on the 2CDs.

Suh, Kyung-Won; Kwon, Young-Joo, E-mail: kwsuh@chungbuk.ac.kr [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju-City 361-763 (Korea, Republic of)] [Department of Astronomy and Space Science, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju-City 361-763 (Korea, Republic of)

2013-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

83

Water-hydroxyl phases on an open metal surface: breaking the ice rules Matthew Forster,a  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water-hydroxyl phases on an open metal surface: breaking the ice rules Matthew Forster,a Rasmita hexagonal c(2 Ã? 2) 2H2O:1OH network. None of these phases obey the conventional `ice rules', instead catalyzed redox reactions, yet establishing the phase diagram for water/hydroxyl adsorption on metal

Alavi, Ali

84

Theory for Dual-Wavelength C02 Lidar Method to Distinguish Ice, Mixed-Phase, and Water Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An analytical study shows that the ratio of backscatter from ice particles at two CO2 lidar wavelengths is substantially different from the ratio from water drops. This forms the basis for a new method to discriminate between ice, water, and ...

Wynn L. Eberhard

1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Comparison of energy storage systems in the United States chilled water versus two types of ice storage systems  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Current US production non-storage heat pumps are compared to heat pumps using stored hot water and stored chilled water and to heat pumps using ice-on-coils as a means of using latent heat of fusion of water as a heat source. This equipment is also used as a means of stored cooling for air conditioning during hot weather. An ice-making heat pump which harvests ice as sheets of ice 3 to 4 times per hour and stores the ice in a large inexpensive bin is discussed. The advantages of such an ice-making heat pump to heat in cold weather and cool in hot weather is discussed as it relates to Electric Utility load management in different parts of the United States.

Fischer, H.C.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

86

X-ray absorption signatures of the molecular environment in water and ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The x-ray absorption spectra of water and ice are calculated with a many-body approach for electron-hole excitations. The experimental features, including the small effects of temperature change in the liquid, are quantitatively reproduced from molecular configurations generated by ab-initio molecular dynamics. The spectral difference between the solid and the liquid is due to two major short range order effects. One, due to breaking of hydrogen bonds, enhances the pre-edge intensity in the liquid. The other, due to a non-bonded molecular fraction in the first coordination shell, affects the main spectral edge in the conversion of ice to water. This effect may not involve hydrogen bond breaking as shown by experiment in high-density amorphous ice.

Wei Chen; Xifan Wu; Roberto Car

2009-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

87

Stratocumulus Liquid Water Content from Dual-Wavelength Radar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technique is described to retrieve stratocumulus liquid water content (LWC) using the differential attenuation measured by vertically pointing radars at 35 and 94 GHz. Millimeter-wave attenuation is proportional to LWC and increases with ...

Robin J. Hogan; Nicolas Gaussiat; Anthony J. Illingworth

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

88

Assessment of Vertically Integrated Liquid (VIL) Water Content Radar Measurement  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertically integrated liquid (VIL) water content is a parameter obtained from a radar performing voluminal scanning. This parameter has proven useful in the detection of severe storms and may be a worthwhile indicator for very short-term rainfall ...

Brice Boudevillain; Hervé Andrieu

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

89

Determination of Supercooled Liquid Water Content by Measuring Rime Rate  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A ground-based technique is described for determining the liquid water content of supercooled clouds orfog by measuring the mass rate of rime accumulation on a small rotating wire. Development of the techniqueis described, examples of the data ...

David C. Rogers; Darrel Baumgardner; Gabor Vali

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Effect of Water Content on SOFC Single Cell Testing: Materials ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The cell was tested at 800C using pure H2 with different water content (~3% and ~30%). Impedance, IV curve, and power density were recorded. SEM and OM ...

91

Spectral Density of Cloud Liquid Water Content at High Frequencies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Aircraft measurements of liquid water content (LWC) made at sampling frequencies of 1 and 2 kHz with a particle volume monitor (PVM) probe from horizontal traverses in stratocumulus clouds during the Southern Ocean Cloud Experiment and cumulus ...

H. Gerber; J. B. Jensen; A. B. Davis; A. Marshak; W. J. Wiscombe

2001-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Assessment of Ice Plugging of the Cooling Water Intake at American Electric Power's Conesville Power Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The American Electrical Power (AEP) Conesville power plant is shutting down the last unit that uses a once-through cooling system. Currently, warm water from the existing cooling system is routed to the intake area to control ice buildup. After the last unit is shut down, there will be no control of the ice buildup in the trash racks, making complete blockage of the intake facility a possibility. A sediment-control structure was built in 2000 to prevent sediment buildup at the intake facility. The sedime...

2011-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

93

CHEMICAL PROCESSING OF PURE AMMONIA AND AMMONIA-WATER ICES INDUCED BY HEAVY IONS  

SciTech Connect

Cosmic rays are possibly the main agents to prevent the freeze-out of molecules onto grain surfaces in cold dense clouds. Ammonia (NH{sub 3}) is one of the most abundant molecules present in dust ice mantles, with a concentration of up to 15% relative to water (H{sub 2}O). FTIR spectroscopy is used to monitor pure NH{sub 3} and NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O ice samples as they are irradiated with Ni and Zn ion beams (500-600 MeV) at GANIL/France. New species, such as hydrazine (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}), diazene (N{sub 2}H{sub 2} isomers), molecular hydrogen (H{sub 2}), and nitrogen (N{sub 2}) were identified after irradiation of pure NH{sub 3} ices. Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O), nitrogen oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}), and hydroxylamine (NH{sub 2}OH) are some of the products of the NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O ice radiolysis. The spectral band at 6.85 {mu}m was observed after irradiation of both types of ice. Besides the likely contribution of ammonium (NH{sub 4}{sup +}) and amino (NH{sub 2}) radicals, data suggest a small contribution of NH{sub 2}OH to this band profile after high fluences of irradiation of NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O ices. The spectral shift of the NH{sub 3} ''umbrella'' mode (9.3 {mu}m) band is parameterized as a function of NH{sub 3}/H{sub 2}O ratio in amorphous ices. Ammonia and water destruction cross-sections are obtained, as well as the rate of NH{sub 3}-H{sub 2}O (1:10) ice compaction, measured by the OH dangling bond destruction cross-section. Ammonia destruction is enhanced in the presence of H{sub 2}O in the ice and a power law relationship between stopping power and NH{sub 3} destruction cross-section is verified. Such results may provide relevant information for the evolution of molecular species in dense molecular clouds.

Bordalo, V.; Da Silveira, E. F. [Departamento de Fisica/Laboratorio do Acelerador Van de Graaff, Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Rio de Janeiro, Rua Marques de S. Vicente 225, 22451-900 Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Lv, X. Y.; Domaracka, A.; Rothard, H.; Boduch, P. [Centre de Recherche sur les Ions, les Materiaux et la Photonique (CEA/CNRS/ENSICAEN/Universite de Caen-Basse Normandie), CIMAP-CIRIL-GANIL, Boulevard Henri Becquerel, BP 5133, F-14070 Caen Cedex 05 (France); Seperuelo Duarte, E., E-mail: vbordalo@fis.puc-rio.br [Grupo de Fisica e Astronomia, Instituto Federal do Rio de Janeiro, Rua Lucio Tavares 1045, 26530-060 Nilopolis, RJ (Brazil)

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

94

The Development and Use of the Berkeley Fluorescence Spectrometer to Characterize Microbial Content and Detect Volcanic Ash in Glacial Ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

V. M. Pashkevich, “Antarctic Ice Sheet as a model in Searchmethods for discovery of ice-entrapped microorganisms inV. M. Pashkevich, “Antarctic Ice Sheet as Object for Solving

Rohde, Robert Andrew

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Phase diagram of amorphous solid water: Low-density, high-density, and very-high-density amorphous ices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for the understanding of the transformation between the different amorphous ices and the two hypothesized phasesPhase diagram of amorphous solid water: Low-density, high-density, and very-high-density amorphous ices Nicolas Giovambattista,1,2 H. Eugene Stanley,2 and Francesco Sciortino3 1 Department of Chemical

Sciortino, Francesco

96

Recent content in Water Power Forum | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Recent content in Water Power Forum Recent content in Water Power Forum Home Name Post date sort icon Type OpenEI launches new Water Power Gateway and Community Forum Graham7781 28 Mar 2013 - 15:16 Blog entry Global Marine Renewable Energy Conference (GMREC) Kch 3 Apr 2013 - 14:26 Event MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft Kch 9 Apr 2013 - 13:30 Document MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft Ocop 18 Apr 2013 - 13:41 Document Comments on MHK Cost Reduction Pathway White Papers Alison.labonte 26 Nov 2013 - 11:43 Question 2013 projects and funding Vanessa.gregory 13 Dec 2013 - 09:12 Question Hi Vanessa-I connected wit... NickL 13 Dec 2013 - 14:38 Answer Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Hi Vanessa-I connected wit... 2013 projects and funding

97

Surface Wave Propagation in Shallow Water beneath an Inhomogeneous Ice Cover  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scattering of flexural–gravity waves in a layer of shallow fluid beneath an ice cover with irregularities is investigated. The irregularities considered are the ice edges, cracks, areas of finely broken ice, and ice ridges. Even this ...

A. V. Marchenko; K. I. Voliak

1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

MODELING OF WATER SOLUBLE ORGANIC CONTENT IN PRODUCED WATER J. McFarlane  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

MODELING OF WATER SOLUBLE ORGANIC CONTENT IN PRODUCED WATER J. McFarlane Oak Ridge National Laboratory P.O. Box 2008 Oak Ridge, TN 37830-6181 INTRODUCTION Off-shore discharge of produced water into the North Sea is limited to a monthly average of 40 mg·L-1 3 . Effective remediation of produced water off

99

Formation of Hydrogen, Oxygen, and Hydrogen Peroxide in Electron Irradiated Crystalline Water Ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water ice is abundant both astrophysically, for example in molecular clouds, and in planetary systems. The Kuiper belt objects, many satellites of the outer solar system, the nuclei of comets and some planetary rings are all known to be water-rich. Processing of water ice by energetic particles and ultraviolet photons plays an important role in astrochemistry. To explore the detailed nature of this processing, we have conducted a systematic laboratory study of the irradiation of crystalline water ice in an ultrahigh vacuum setup by energetic electrons holding a linear energy transfer of 4.3 +/- 0.1 keV mm-1. The irradiated samples were monitored during the experiment both on line and in situ via mass spectrometry (gas phase) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (solid state). We observed the production of hydrogen and oxygen, both molecular and atomic, and of hydrogen peroxide. The likely reaction mechanisms responsible for these species are discussed. Additional formation routes were derived from the sublimation profiles of molecular hydrogen (90-140 K), molecular oxygen (147 -151 K) and hydrogen peroxide (170 K). We also present evidence on the involvement of hydroxyl radicals and possibly oxygen atoms as building blocks to yield hydrogen peroxide at low temperatures (12 K) and via a diffusion-controlled mechanism in the warming up phase of the irradiated sample.

Weijun Zheng; David Jewitt; Ralf I. Kaiser

2005-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

100

Molecular origin of the difference in the HOH bend of the IR spectra between liquid water and ice  

SciTech Connect

The intensity of the HOH bend in the IR spectrum of ice is significantly smaller than the corresponding one in liquid water. This difference in the IR intensities of the HOH bend in the two systems is investigated using MD simulations with the flexible, polarizable, ab-initio based TTM3-F model for water, a potential that correctly reproduces the experimentally observed increase of the HOH bend in liquid water and ice from the water monomer value. We have identified two factors that are responsible for the difference in the intensity of the HOH bend in liquid water and ice: (i) the decrease of the intensity of the HOH bend in ice caused by the strong anti-correlation between the permanent dipole moment of a molecule and the induced dipole moment of a neighboring hydrogen bond acceptor molecule and (ii) the weakening of this anti-correlation by the disordered hydrogen bond network in liquid water. The presence of the anti-correlation in ice is further confirmed by ab initio electronic structure calculations of water pentamer clusters extracted from the trajectories of the MD simulations for ice and liquid water.

Imoto, Sho; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Saito, Shinji

2013-02-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water content" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

The Icing of an Unheated, Nonrotating Cylinder. Part II. Icing Wind Tunnel Experiments  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An experimental investigation of icing on non-rotating cylinders, under both wet and dry conditions was undertaken. Airspeeds of 30, 61 and 122 m s?1 appropriate to aircraft icing, liquid water contents of 0.4, 0.8 and 1.2 g m?3 and temperatures ...

E. P. Lozowski; J. R. Stallabrass; P. F. Hearty

1983-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Role of dipolar correlations in the IR spectra of water and ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We report simulated infrared spectra of deuterated water and ice using Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics with maximally localized Wannier functions. Experimental features are accurately reproduced within the harmonic approximation. By decomposing the lineshapes in terms of intra and intermolecular dipole correlation functions we find that short-range intermolecular dynamic charge fluctuations associated to hydrogen bonds are prominent over the entire spectral range. Our analysis reveals the origin of several spectral features and identifies network bending modes in the far IR range.

Wei Chen; Manu Sharma; Raffaele Resta; Giulia Galli; Roberto Car

2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

103

Retrieval of cloud properties using CALIPSO Imaging Infrared Radiometer. Part II: effective diameter and ice water path  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The paper describes the version 3 Level 2 operational analysis of the Imaging Infrared Radiometer (IIR) data collected in the framework of the CALIPSO mission to retrieve cirrus cloud effective diameter and ice water path in synergy with the ...

Anne Garnier; Jacques Pelon; Philippe Dubuisson; Ping Yang; Michaël Faivre; Olivier Chomette; Nicolas Pascal; Pat Lucker; Tim Murray

104

Microwave measurement of water content in flowing crude oil  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A microwave method and a microwave device for measurement of water content in flowing crude oil are proposed. The method is based on measuring power of electromagnetic waves propagated through a transmission line and reflected from the load that is a ...

Yu. V. Makeev; A. P. Lifanov; A. S. Sovlukov

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

Determination of Ice-Phase Water Capture Temperatures Using Isotopic Composition and Habits of Ice Crystals?Relevance to Snowpack Augmentation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The oxygen 18/oxygen 16 (18O/16O) and deuterium/hydrogen (D/H) ratios of snowmelt have been used for estimating the weighted mean temperatures in clouds where ice-phase water capture has occurred during the precipitation-forming process. The ...

Joseph A. Warburton

1994-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

The cloud condensation nuclei and ice nuclei effects on tropical anvil characteristics and water vapor of the tropical tropopause layer  

SciTech Connect

Cloud anvils from deep convective clouds are of great importance to the radiative energy budget and the aerosol impact on them is the least understood. Few studies examined the effects of both cloud condensation nuclei (CCN) and ice nuclei (IN) on anvil properties and water vapor content (WVC) in the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL). Using a 3-dimensional cloud-resolving model with size-resolved cloud microphysics, we focus on the CCN and IN effects on cloud anvil properties and WVC in the TTL. We find that cloud microphysical changes induced by CCN/IN play a very important role in determining cloud anvil area and WVC in the TTL, whether convection is enhanced or suppressed. Also, CCN effects on anvil microphysical properties, anvil size and lifetime are much more evident relative to IN. IN has little effect on convection, but can increase ice number and mass concentrations significantly under humid conditions. CCN in the PBL is found to have greater effects on convective strength and mid-tropospheric CCN has negligible effects on convection and cloud properties. Convective transport may only moisten the main convective outflow region but the cloud anvil size determines the WVC in the TTL domain. This study shows an important role of CCN in the lower-troposphere in modifying convection, the upper-level cloud properties. It also shows the effects of IN and the PBL CCN on the upper-level clouds depends on the humidity, resolving some contradictory results in past studies. 2

Fan, Jiwen; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail

2010-11-10T23:59:59.000Z

107

The use of a permanent magnet for water content measurements of wood chips  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water Content Measurements of Wood Chips * P. J. Barale, C.measures the water content of wood chips, pulp and brownwater content measurements in wood chips in a magnetic field

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Light tracking through ice and water -- Scattering and absorption in heterogeneous media with Photonics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the field of neutrino astronomy, large volumes of optically transparent matter like glacial ice, lake water, or deep ocean water are used as detector media. Elementary particle interactions are studied using in situ detectors recording time distributions and fluxes of the faint photon fields of Cherenkov radiation generated by ultra-relativistic charged particles, typically muons or electrons. The Photonics software package was developed to determine photon flux and time distributions throughout a volume containing a light source through Monte Carlo simulation. Photons are propagated and time distributions are recorded throughout a cellular grid constituting the simulation volume, and Mie scattering and absorption are realised using wavelength and position dependent parameterisations. The photon tracking results are stored in binary tables for transparent access through ANSI-C and C++ interfaces. For higher-level physics applications, like simulation or reconstruction of particle events, it is then possible to quickly acquire the light yield and time distributions for a pre-specified set of light source and detector properties and geometries without real-time photon propagation. In this paper the Photonics light propagation routines and methodology are presented and applied to the IceCube and Antares neutrino telescopes. The way in which inhomogeneities of the Antarctic glacial ice distort the signatures of elementary particle interactions, and how Photonics can be used to account for these effects, is described.

J. Lundberg; P. Miocinovic; K. Woschnagg; T. Burgess; J. Adams; S. Hundertmark; P. Desiati; P. Niessen

2007-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

109

A parameterisation of single and multiple muons in the deep water or ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Atmospheric muons play an important role in underwater/ice neutrino detectors. In this paper, a parameterisation of the flux of single and multiple muon events, their lateral distribution and of their energy spectrum is presented. The kinematics parameters were modelled starting from a full Monte Carlo simulation of the interaction of primary cosmic rays with atmospheric nuclei; secondary muons reaching the sea level were propagated in the deep water. The parametric formulas are valid for a vertical depth of 1.5-5 km w.e. and up to 85 deg for the zenith angle, and can be used as input for a fast simulation of atmospheric muons in underwater/ice detectors.

Y. Becherini; A. Margiotta; M. Sioli; M. Spurio

2005-07-19T23:59:59.000Z

110

DIFFRACTION STUDIES OF ICE Alexe BOSAK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

as ice-nine [K. Vonnegut, Cat's Cradle] #12;Phase diagram of water #12;Phase diagram of water Here we areDIFFRACTION STUDIES OF ICE Alexeï BOSAK European Synchrotron Radiation Facility #12;Ice as the mild threat ice Ih the only ice in the crust #12;Ice as the absolute weapon Ice IX : melting point 45.8°C

Titov, Anatoly

111

Water content test for EOR crude simulates desalter  

SciTech Connect

Crude oil produced from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) projects employing micellar/polymer flooding can require an alternative test method for water content to the ASTM centrifuge test, or grindout procedure. The reason is that centrifuging cannot break the surfactant-stabilized emulsion. As an alternative, Marathon Oil Co. has developed a simulated desalter test (SDT) and necessary apparatus for the accurate evaluation of the quality of crude oil from such projects. Oil quality parameters such as basic sediment and water values are used almost universally for determining the acceptability of crude oil into pipeline or refinery systems.

Duke, R.B. (Marathon Oil Co., Littleton, CO (US))

1991-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

112

The Effect of Stochastic Cloud Structure on the Icing Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Current understanding of the icing process through collisions between a surface and supercooled cloud droplets is based upon two factors. First, for a given temperature, when the cloud liquid water content, W, exceeds a critical value, wc (the ...

A. R. Jameson; A. B. Kostinski

2000-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

SIZE AND TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE IN THE FAR-IR SPECTRA OF WATER ICE PARTICLES  

SciTech Connect

Spectra of water-ice aerosol particles have been measured in the far-IR region using synchrotron radiation. The particles in the nanoscale size regime of 1-100 nm were formed by rapid collisional cooling at temperatures ranging from 4 to 190 K. The spectra show the characteristic bands centered near 44 {mu}m (230 cm{sup -1}) and 62 {mu}m (160 cm{sup -1}) associated with the intermolecular lattice modes of crystalline ice at all temperatures, in contrast to previous studies of thin films formed by vapor deposition where amorphous ice is generated below 140 K. The bands shift to higher wavenumber values as the temperature is reduced, consistent with the trend seen in earlier studies, but in our experiments the actual peak positions in the aerosol particle spectra are consistently higher by ca. 4 cm{sup -1}. This finding has implications for the potential use of these spectral features as a temperature probe. The particle sizes are small enough for their spectra to be free of scattering effects, and therefore provide a means to assess imaginary refractive index values obtained through Kramers-Kronig analyses of thin film spectra.

Medcraft, Chris; McNaughton, Don; Thompson, Chris D. [School of Chemistry, Monash University, Wellington Road, Clayton, Victoria 3800 (Australia); Appadoo, Dominique [Australian Synchrotron, Blackburn Road, Clayton, Victoria 3168 (Australia); Bauerecker, Sigurd [Institut fuer Physikalische und Theoretische Chemie, Technische Universitaet Braunschweig, Hans-Sommer-Strasse 10, D-38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Robertson, Evan G., E-mail: E.Robertson@latrobe.edu.au [Department of Chemistry and La Trobe Institute of Molecular Sciences, La Trobe University, Bundoora, Victoria 3086 (Australia)

2012-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

114

Effect of higher water vapor content on TBC performance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coal gasification, or IGCC (integrated gasification combined cycle), is one pathway toward cleaner use of coal for power generation with lower emissions. However, when coal-derived synthesis gas (i.e., syngas) is burned in turbines designed for natural gas, turbine manufacturers recommend 'derating,' or lowering the maximum temperature, which lowers the efficiency of the turbine, making electricity from IGCC more expensive. One possible reason for the derating is the higher water vapor contents in the exhaust gas. Water vapor has a detrimental effect on many oxidation-resistant high-temperature materials. In a turbine hot section, Ni-base superalloys are coated with a thermal barrier coating (TBC) allowing the gas temperature to be higher than the superalloy solidus temperature. TBCs have a low thermal conductivity ceramic top coating (typically Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized ZrO{sub 2}, or YSZ) and an oxidation-resistant metallic bond coating. For land-based gas turbines, the industry standard is air plasma sprayed (APS) YSZ and high velocity oxygen fuel (HVOF) sprayed NiCoCrAlY bond coatings. To investigate the role of higher water vapor content on TBC performance and possible mitigation strategies, furnace cycling experiments were conducted in dry O{sub 2} and air with 10% (typical with natural gas or jet fuel) or 50 vol% water vapor. Cycle frequency and temperature were accelerated to one hour at 1100 C (with 10 minute cooling to {approx}30 C between each thermal cycle) to induce early failures in coatings that are expected to operate for several years with a metal temperature of {approx}900 C. Coupons (16 mm diameter x 2 mm thick) of commercial second-generation single crystal superalloy CMSX4 were HVOF coated on both sides with {approx}125 {micro}m of Ni-22wt%Co-17Cr-12Al either with 0.7Y or 0.7Y-0.3Hf-0.4Si. One side was then coated with 190-240 {micro}m of APS YSZ. Coatings were cycled until the YSZ top coating spalled. Figure 2 shows the results of the initial phase of experiments. Compared to dry O{sub 2}, the addition of 10% water vapor decreased the lifetime of MCrAlY by {approx}30% for the conventional CMSX4 substrates. Higher average lifetimes were observed with Hf in the bond coating, but a similar decrease in lifetime was observed when water vapor was added. The addition of Y and La to the superalloy substrate did not change the YSZ lifetime with 10% water vapor. However, increasing water vapor content from 10 to 50% did not further decrease the lifetime of either bond coating with the doped superalloy substrate. Thus, these results suggest that higher water vapor contents cannot explain the derating of syngas-fired turbines, and other factors such as sulfur and ash from imperfect syngas cleanup (or upset conditions) need to be explored. Researchers continue to study effects of water vapor on thermally grown alumina scale adhesion and growth rate, and are looking for bond coating compositions more resistant to oxidation in the presence of water vapor.

Pint, Bruce A [ORNL; Haynes, James A [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

115

Simulation of Ultra High Energy Neutrino Interactions in Ice and Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The CORSIKA program, usually used to simulate extensive cosmic ray air showers, has been adapted to work in a water or ice medium. The adapted CORSIKA code was used to simulate hadronic showers produced by neutrino interactions. The simulated showers have been used to study the spatial distribution of the deposited energy in the showers. This allows a more precise determination of the acoustic signals produced by ultra high energy neutrinos than has been possible previously. The properties of the acoustic signals generated by such showers are described.

S. Bevan; S. Danaher; J. Perkin; S. Ralph; C. Rhodes; L. Thompson; T. Sloan; D. Waters

2007-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

116

Simulation of Ultra High Energy Neutrino Interactions in Ice and Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The CORSIKA program, usually used to simulate extensive cosmic ray air showers, has been adapted to work in a water or ice medium. The adapted CORSIKA code was used to simulate hadronic showers produced by neutrino interactions. The simulated showers have been used to study the spatial distribution of the deposited energy in the showers. This allows a more precise determination of the acoustic signals produced by ultra high energy neutrinos than has been possible previously. The properties of the acoustic signals generated by such showers are described.

Bevan, S; Perkin, J; Ralph, S; Rhodes, C; Thompson, L; Sloan, T; Waters, D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Correlation between thermodynamic anomalies and pathways of ice nucleation in supercooled water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The well-known classical nucleation theory (CNT) for the free energy barrier towards formation of a nucleus of critical size of the new stable phase within the parent metastable phase fails to take into account the influence of other metastable phases having density/order intermediate between the parent metastable phase and the final stable phase. This lacuna can be more serious than capillary approximation or spherical shape assumption made in CNT. This issue is particularly significant in ice nucleation because liquid water shows rich phase diagram consisting of two (high and low density) liquid phases in supercooled state. The explanations of thermodynamic and dynamic anomalies of supercooled water often invoke the possible influence of a liquid-liquid transition between two metastable liquid phases. To investigate both the role of thermodynamic anomalies and presence of distinct metastable liquid phases in supercooled water on ice nucleation, we employ density functional theoretical approach to find nucleation free energy barrier in different regions of phase diagram. The theory makes a number of striking predictions, such as a dramatic lowering of nucleation barrier due to presence of a metastable intermediate phase and crossover in the dependence of free energy barrier on temperature near liquid-liquid critical point. These predictions can be tested by computer simulations as well as by controlled experiments.

Rakesh S. Singh; Biman Bagchi

2013-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

118

Minimalist Model of Ice Microphysics in Mixed-phase Stratiform Clouds  

SciTech Connect

The question of whether persistent ice crystal precipitation from super cooled layer clouds can be explained by time-dependent, stochastic ice nucleation is explored using an approximate, analytical model, and a large-eddy simulation (LES) cloud model. The updraft velocity in the cloud defines an accumulation zone, where small ice particles cannot fall out until they are large enough, which will increase the residence time of ice particles in the cloud. Ice particles reach a quasi-steady state between growth by vapor deposition and fall speed at cloud base. The analytical model predicts that ice water content (wi) has a 2.5 power law relationship with ice number concentration ni. wi and ni from a LES cloud model with stochastic ice nucleation also confirm the 2.5 power law relationship. The prefactor of the power law is proportional to the ice nucleation rate, and therefore provides a quantitative link to observations of ice microphysical properties.

Yang, F.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shaw, Raymond A.

2013-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

119

Homogeneous Ice Nucleation and Supercooled Liquid Water in Orographic Wave Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study investigates ice nucleation mechanisms in cold lenticular wave clouds, a cloud type characterized by quasi-steady-state air motions and microphysical properties. It is concluded that homogeneous ice nucleation is responsible for the ...

Andrew J. Heymsfield; Larry M. Miloshevich

1993-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Well-posedness of an extended model for water-ice phase transitions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We propose an improved model explaining the occurrence of high stresses due to the difference in specific volumes during phase transitions between water and ice. The unknowns of the resulting evolution problem are the absolute temperature, the volume increment, and the liquid fraction. The main novelty here consists in including the dependence of the specific heat and of the speed of sound upon the phase. These additional nonlinearities bring new mathematical difficulties which require new estimation techniques based on Moser iteration. We establish the existence of a global solution to the corresponding initial-boundary value problem, as well as lower and upper bounds for the absolute temperature. Assuming constant heat conductivity, we also prove uniqueness and continuous data dependence of the solution.

Krejci, Pavel

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water content" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

The Effect of Bubbles Released from a Melting Ice Wall on the Melt-Driven Convection in Salt Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The buoyancy created by the release of air bubbles from melting glacial ice walls results from both the upward drag of the bubbles and the density defect caused by the steady-state distribution of bubbles in the water. Calculations using typical ...

Edward G. Josberger

1980-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Real-time Non-contact Millimeter Wave Characterization of Water-Freezing and Ice-Melting Dynamics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We applied millimeter wave radiometry for the first time to monitor water-freezing and ice-melting dynamics in real-time non-contact. The measurements were completed at a frequency of 137 GHz. Small amounts (about 2 mL) ...

Woskov, Paul P.

123

The Development and Use of the Berkeley Fluorescence Spectrometer to Characterize Microbial Content and Detect Volcanic Ash in Glacial Ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

so even though drilling fluid is a common contaminant, itdrill fluid at high pressure during the mechanical drillingfluid, designed to match the density of ice, will be used to continue drilling

Rohde, Robert Andrew

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

The water ice rich surface of (145453) 2005 RR43: a case for a carbon-depleted population of TNOs?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent results suggest that there is a group of TNOs (2003 EL61 being the biggest member), with surfaces composed of almost pure water ice and with very similar orbital elements. We study the surface composition of another TNO that moves in a similar orbit, 2005 RR43, and compare it with the surface composition of the other members of this group. We report visible and near-infrared spectra, obtained with the 4.2m William Herschel Telescope and the 3.58m Telescopio Nazionale Galileo at the "Roque de los Muchachos" Observatory (La Palma, Spain). The spectrum of 2005 RR43 is neutral in color in the visible and dominated by very deep water ice absorption bands in the near infrared (D= 70.3 +/- 2.1 % and 82.8 +/- 4.9 % at 1.5 \\mu and 2.0 \\mu respectively). It is very similar to the spectrum of the group of TNOs already mentioned. All of them present much deeper water ice absorption bands (D>40 %) than any other TNO except Charon. Scattering models show that its surface is covered by water ice, a significant fraction in crytalline state with no trace (5 % upper limit) of complex organics. Possible scenarios to explain the existence of this population of TNOs are discussed: a giant collision, an originally carbon depleted composition, or a common process of continuous resurfacing. We conclude that TNO 2005 RR43 is member of a group, may be a population, of TNOs clustered in the space of orbital parameters that show abundant water ice and no signs of complex organics. The lack of complex organics in their surfaces suggests a significant smaller fraction of carbonaceous volatiles like CH4 in this population than in "normal" TNOs. A carbon depleted population of TNOs could be the origin of the population of carbon depleted Jupiter family comets already noticed by A'Hearn et al. (1995).

N. Pinilla-Alonso; J. Licandro; R. Gil-Hutton; R. Brunetto

2007-03-06T23:59:59.000Z

125

Absence of superheating for ice Ih with a free surface : a new method of determining the melting point of different water models  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Molecular dynamic simulations were performed for ice Ih with a free surface. The simulations were carried out at several temperatures and each run lasted more than 7ns. At high temperatures the ice melts. It is demonstrated that the melting process starts at the surface and propagates to the bulk of the ice block. Already at the temperatures below the melting point, we observe a thin liquid layer at the ice surface, but the block of ice remains stable along the run. As soon as the temperature reaches the melting point the entire ice block melts. Our results demonstrate that, unlike in the case of conventional simulations in the NpT ensemble, overheating of the ice Ih with a free surface does not occur. That allows to estimate the melting point of ice at zero pressure. We applied the method to the following models of water: SPC/E, TIP4P, TIP4P/Ew, TIP4P/Ice and TIP4P/2005, and found good agreement between the melting temperatures obtained by this procedure and the values obtained either from free energy calculations or from direct simulations of the ice/water interface.

Carlos Vega; Maria Martin-Conde; Andrzej Patrykiejew

2013-04-18T23:59:59.000Z

126

Parameterizing Size Distribution in Ice Clouds  

SciTech Connect

PARAMETERIZING SIZE DISTRIBUTIONS IN ICE CLOUDS David L. Mitchell and Daniel H. DeSlover ABSTRACT An outstanding problem that contributes considerable uncertainty to Global Climate Model (GCM) predictions of future climate is the characterization of ice particle sizes in cirrus clouds. Recent parameterizations of ice cloud effective diameter differ by a factor of three, which, for overcast conditions, often translate to changes in outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) of 55 W m-2 or more. Much of this uncertainty in cirrus particle sizes is related to the problem of ice particle shattering during in situ sampling of the ice particle size distribution (PSD). Ice particles often shatter into many smaller ice fragments upon collision with the rim of the probe inlet tube. These small ice artifacts are counted as real ice crystals, resulting in anomalously high concentrations of small ice crystals (D < 100 µm) and underestimates of the mean and effective size of the PSD. Half of the cirrus cloud optical depth calculated from these in situ measurements can be due to this shattering phenomenon. Another challenge is the determination of ice and liquid water amounts in mixed phase clouds. Mixed phase clouds in the Arctic contain mostly liquid water, and the presence of ice is important for determining their lifecycle. Colder high clouds between -20 and -36 oC may also be mixed phase but in this case their condensate is mostly ice with low levels of liquid water. Rather than affecting their lifecycle, the presence of liquid dramatically affects the cloud optical properties, which affects cloud-climate feedback processes in GCMs. This project has made advancements in solving both of these problems. Regarding the first problem, PSD in ice clouds are uncertain due to the inability to reliably measure the concentrations of the smallest crystals (D < 100 µm), known as the “small mode”. Rather than using in situ probe measurements aboard aircraft, we employed a treatment of ice cloud optical properties formulated in terms of PSD parameters in combination with remote measurements of thermal radiances to characterize the small mode. This is possible since the absorption efficiency (Qabs) of small mode crystals is larger at 12 µm wavelength relative to 11 µm wavelength due to the process of wave resonance or photon tunneling more active at 12 µm. This makes the 12/11 µm absorption optical depth ratio (or equivalently the 12/11 µm Qabs ratio) a means for detecting the relative concentration of small ice particles in cirrus. Using this principle, this project tested and developed PSD schemes that can help characterize cirrus clouds at each of the three ARM sites: SGP, NSA and TWP. This was the main effort of this project. These PSD schemes and ice sedimentation velocities predicted from them have been used to test the new cirrus microphysics parameterization in the GCM known as the Community Climate Systems Model (CCSM) as part of an ongoing collaboration with NCAR. Regarding the second problem, we developed and did preliminary testing on a passive thermal method for retrieving the total water path (TWP) of Arctic mixed phase clouds where TWPs are often in the range of 20 to 130 g m-2 (difficult for microwave radiometers to accurately measure). We also developed a new radar method for retrieving the cloud ice water content (IWC), which can be vertically integrated to yield the ice water path (IWP). These techniques were combined to determine the IWP and liquid water path (LWP) in Arctic clouds, and hence the fraction of ice and liquid water. We have tested this approach using a case study from the ARM field campaign called M-PACE (Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment). This research led to a new satellite remote sensing method that appears promising for detecting low levels of liquid water in high clouds typically between -20 and -36 oC. We hope to develop this method in future research.

DeSlover, Daniel; Mitchell, David L.

2009-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

127

Retrieval of Cloud Water and Water Vapor Contents from Doppler Radar Data in a Tropical Squall Line  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the retrieval of cloud water and water vapor contents from Doppler radar data. The convective part of a tropical squall line (22 June 1981) observed during the COPT 81 (Convection Profonde Tropicale 1981) West African ...

Danièle Hauser; Paul Amayenc

1986-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

Probability Density Functions of Liquid Water Path and Total Water Content of Marine Boundary Layer Clouds: Implications for Cloud Parameterization  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Mathematical forms of probability density functions (PDFs) of liquid water path (LWP) and total water content for marine boundary layer clouds are investigated using the homogeneity, skewness, and kurtosis of PDFs of LWP obtained from observations ...

Hideaki Kawai; João Teixeira

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

129

Synoptic Aerial Surveys and Abundance Estimates for Ice-associated Seals in US and Russian Waters Michael Cameron, Peter Boveng, Erin Moreland and Jay Ver Hoef  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Synoptic Aerial Surveys and Abundance Estimates for Ice-associated Seals in US and Russian Waters synoptic aerial surveys of the eastern Bering Sea in tandem with Russian researchers employed to survey. Testing a ship-based Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) for surveying the Bering Sea pack ice. AFSC Quarterly

130

ADAPTIVE OPTICS OBSERVATIONS OF 3 {mu}m WATER ICE IN SILHOUETTE DISKS IN THE ORION NEBULA CLUSTER AND M43  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present the near-infrared images and spectra of four silhouette disks in the Orion Nebula Cluster (M42) and M43 using the Subaru Adaptive Optics system. While d053-717 and d141-1952 show no water ice feature at 3.1 {mu}m, a moderately deep ({tau}{sub ice} {approx} 0.7) water ice absorption is detected toward d132-1832 and d216-0939. Taking into account the water ice so far detected in the silhouette disks, the critical inclination angle to produce a water ice absorption feature is confirmed to be 65 Degree-Sign -75 Degree-Sign . As for d216-0939, the crystallized water ice profile is exactly the same as in the previous observations taken 3.63 years ago. If the water ice material is located at 30 AU, then the observations suggest it is uniform at a scale of about 3.5 AU.

Terada, Hiroshi; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Minowa, Yosuke; Hayano, Yutaka; Oya, Shin; Hattori, Masayuki; Takami, Hideki [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 North A'ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Tokunaga, Alan T. [Institute for Astronomy, University of Hawaii, 2680 Woodlawn Drive, Honolulu, HI 96822 (United States); Watanabe, Makoto [Department of Cosmosciences, Hokkaido University, Kita 10, Nishi 8, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0810 (Japan); Saito, Yoshihiko [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8551 (Japan); Ito, Meguru [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Victoria, 3800 Finnerty Road, Victoria, BC, V8P 5C2 (Canada); Iye, Masanori, E-mail: terada@subaru.naoj.org [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

131

The Role of Spaceborne Millimeter-Wave Radar in the Global Monitoring of Ice Cloud  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this paper is to assess the potential of a spaceborne 94-GHz radar for providing useful measurements of the vertical distribution and water content of ice clouds on a global scale.

P. R. A. Brown; A. J. Illingworth; A. J. Heymsfield; G. M. McFarquhar; K. A. Browning; M. Gosset

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Effective Radius of Ice Cloud Particle Populations Derived from Aircraft Probes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effective radius (re) is a crucial variable in representing the radiative properties of cloud layers in general circulation models. This parameter is proportional to the condensed water content (CWC) divided by the extinction (?). For ice ...

Andrew J. Heymsfield; Carl Schmitt; Aaron Bansemer; Gerd-Jan van Zadelhoff; Matthew J. McGill; Cynthia Twohy; Darrel Baumgardner

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Improvements of an Ice-Phase Microphysics Parameterization for Use in Numerical Simulations of Tropical Convection  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

It is important to properly simulate the extent and ice water content of tropical anvil clouds in numerical models that explicitly include cloud formation because of the significant effects that these clouds have on the radiation budget. For this ...

Steven K. Krueger; Qiang Fu; K. N. Liou; Hung-Neng S. Chin

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

134

A Model for Predicting Ice Accretion and Ablation in Water Bodies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model is presented for computing ice growth and ablation. Downward long- and shortwave radiation is computed for variable cloud amount and base. Surface albedo depends on snow cover and age of the snow or ice. Thermal inertia of the snow and ...

Maurice Danard; Mark Gray; Goz Lyv

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

135

Surface Melt Area and Water Balance Modeling on the Greenland Ice Sheet 1995–2005  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

SnowModel, a physically based snow-evolution modeling system that includes four submodels—MicroMet, EnBal, SnowPack, and SnowTran-3D—was used to simulate variations in Greenland [including the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS)] surface snow and ice melt,...

Sebastian H. Mernild; Glen E. Liston; Christopher A. Hiemstra; Konrad Steffen

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Ice electrode electrolytic cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a method and apparatus for removing heavy metals from waste water, soils, or process streams by electrolytic cell means. The method includes cooling a cell cathode to form an ice layer over the cathode and then applying an electric current to deposit a layer of the heavy metal over the ice. The metal is then easily removed after melting the ice. In a second embodiment, the same ice-covered electrode can be employed to form powdered metals.

Glenn, David F. (Idaho Falls, ID); Suciu, Dan F. (Idaho Falls, ID); Harris, Taryl L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Ingram, Jani C. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Ice electrode electrolytic cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a method and apparatus for removing heavy metals from waste water, soils, or process streams by electrolytic cell means. The method includes cooling a cell cathode to form an ice layer over the cathode and then applying an electric current to deposit a layer of the heavy metal over the ice. The metal is then easily removed after melting the ice. In a second embodiment, the same ice-covered electrode can be employed to form powdered metals.

Glenn, D.F.; Suciu, D.F.; Harris, T.L.; Ingram, J.C.

1993-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

138

Ice electrode electrolytic cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a method and apparatus for removing heavy metals from waste water, soils, or process streams by electrolytic cell means. The method includes cooling a cell cathode to form an ice layer over the cathode and then applying an electric current to deposit a layer of the heavy metal over the ice. The metal is then easily removed after melting the ice. In a second embodiment, the same ice-covered electrode can be employed to form powdered metals.

Glenn, D.F.; Suciu, D.F.; Harris, T.L.; Ingram, J.C.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

139

Arctic ice islands  

SciTech Connect

The development of offshore oil and gas resources in the Arctic waters of Alaska requires offshore structures which successfully resist the lateral forces due to moving, drifting ice. Ice islands are floating, a tabular icebergs, up to 60 meters thick, of solid ice throughout their thickness. The ice islands are thus regarded as the strongest ice features in the Arctic; fixed offshore structures which can directly withstand the impact of ice islands are possible but in some locations may be so expensive as to make oilfield development uneconomic. The resolution of the ice island problem requires two research steps: (1) calculation of the probability of interaction between an ice island and an offshore structure in a given region; and (2) if the probability if sufficiently large, then the study of possible interactions between ice island and structure, to discover mitigative measures to deal with the moving ice island. The ice island research conducted during the 1983-1988 interval, which is summarized in this report, was concerned with the first step. Monte Carlo simulations of ice island generation and movement suggest that ice island lifetimes range from 0 to 70 years, and that 85% of the lifetimes are less then 35 years. The simulation shows a mean value of 18 ice islands present at any time in the Arctic Ocean, with a 90% probability of less than 30 ice islands. At this time, approximately 34 ice islands are known, from observations, to exist in the Arctic Ocean, not including the 10-meter thick class of ice islands. Return interval plots from the simulation show that coastal zones of the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas, already leased for oil development, have ice island recurrences of 10 to 100 years. This implies that the ice island hazard must be considered thoroughly, and appropriate safety measures adopted, when offshore oil production plans are formulated for the Alaskan Arctic offshore. 132 refs., 161 figs., 17 tabs.

Sackinger, W.M.; Jeffries, M.O.; Lu, M.C.; Li, F.C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

Estimating the Atmospheric Water Vapor Content from Sun Photometer Measurements  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The differential absorption technique for estimating columnar water vapor values from the analysis of sunphotometric measurements with wide- and narrowband interferential filters centered near 0.94 ?m is discussed and adapted. Water vapor line ...

Artemio Plana-Fattori; Michel Legrand; Didier Tanré; Claude Devaux; Anne Vermeulen; Philippe Dubuisson

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water content" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Phase Diagram of Amorphous Solid Water: Low-Density, High-Density, and Very-High-Density Amorphous Ices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We describe the phase diagram of amorphous solid water by performing molecular dynamics simulations. Our simulations follow different paths in the phase diagram: isothermal compression/decompression, isochoric cooling/heating and isobaric cooling/heating. We are able to identify low-density amorphous (LDA), high-density amorphous (HDA), and very-high density amorphous (VHDA) ices. The density $\\rho$ of these glasses at different pressure $P$ and temperature $T$ agree well with experimental values. We also study the radial distribution functions of glassy water. We obtain VHDA by isobaric heating of HDA, as in experiment. We also find that ``other forms'' of glassy water can be obtained upon isobaric heating of LDA, as well as amorphous ices formed during the transformation of LDA to HDA. We argue that these other forms of amorphous ices, as well as VHDA, are not altogether new glasses but rather are the result of aging induced by heating. Samples of HDA and VHDA with different densities are recovered at normal $P$, showing that there is a continuum of glasses. Furthermore, the two ranges of densities of recovered HDA and recovered VHDA overlap at ambient $P$. Our simulations are consistent with the possibility of HDA$\\to$LDA and VHDA$\\to$LDA transformations, reproducing the experimental findings. We do not observe a VHDA$\\to$HDA transformation.

Nicolas Giovambattista; H. Eugene Stanley; Francesco Sciortino

2005-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

142

Physical Response of Convective Clouds over the Sierra Nevada to Seeding with Dry Ice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of seeding convective clouds with dry ice was studied using simultaneous aircraft and radar observations. Clouds that were initially ice-free with supercooled liquid water contents of 0.5 g m?3 when the tops reached the ?10°C level had ...

Arlen W. Huggins; Alfred R. Rodi

1985-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Contents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Volume 98, Number 6, November-December 1993 Journal of Research of the National Institute of Standards and Technology Contents ...

2003-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

144

Contents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Volume 96, Number 4, July-August 1991 Journal of Research of the National Institute of Standards and Technology Contents Articles ...

2003-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

145

CONTENTS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. JOURNAL OF RESEARCH of the National Bureau of Standards Vol. 88, No. 6, November-December 1983 CONTENTS Page ...

2003-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

146

Contents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Volume 97, Number 5, September-October 1992 Journal of Research of the National Institute of Standards and Technology Contents ...

2003-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

147

Contents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Volume 96, Number 2, March-April 1991 Journal of Research of the National Institute of Standards and Technology Contents Articles ...

2003-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

148

Contents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Volume 96, Number 6, November-December 1991 Journal of Research of the National Institute of Standards and Technology Contents ...

2003-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

149

Contents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Page 1. Volume 97, Number 6, November-December 1992 Journal of Research of the National Institute of Standards and Technology Contents ...

2003-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

150

Ice Fishing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ice Fishing Ice Fishing Nature Bulletin No. 327-A January 11, 1969 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Richard B. Ogilvie, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation ICE FISHING We have a peculiar class of people known as the "Frosty-toed Tribe". As soon as winter comes and the ice permits, they put on all the clothes they own and what they can borrow, pack their automobiles with equipment, and start early in the morning for some inland body of water or a bay along one of the Great Lakes. Usually, two or three go together and they may drive 50 or 100 miles. For hours, even in below zero weather, they huddle around holes cut in the ice, fishing patiently, sustained by hope, hot coffee, and a lot of conversation. Some days a man may catch nothing. Other days he may bring home all the law allows. Sometimes he fishes vainly until almost sundown and then begins to haul them in, all of the same kind and size, as fast as he can re-bait his hook. In the meantime, other anglers have rushed over, cut holes, and are fishing all around him -- usually in vain, because one of the strange things about ice fishing is that, although you may catch fish out of one hole, you may get nothing out of another only a few feet from it, using the same kind of bait at the same depth. There are a lot of hotly contested theories but nobody knows why. After watching and questioning scores of ice fishermen, some of them noted for their prowess, we find that although each has his own secret techniques and favorite spots, good catches seem more a matter of luck than skill. Although they are sluggish and don't fight, fish caught in winter have the firmest flesh and finest flavor. The biggest thrill comes from the skillet.

151

A Comparison of the Water Budgets between Clouds from AMMA and TWP-ICE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Two field campaigns, the African Monsoon Multidisciplinary Analysis (AMMA) and the Tropical Warm Pool–International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE), took place in 2006 near Niamey, Niger, and Darwin, Northern Territory, Australia, providing extensive ...

Xiping Zeng; Wei-Kuo Tao; Scott W. Powell; Robert A. Houze Jr.; Paul Ciesielski; Nick Guy; Harold Pierce; Toshihisa Matsui

2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

152

The Vertical Profile of Liquid and Ice Water Content in Midlatitude Mixed-Phase Altocumulus Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The microphysical properties of mixed-phase altocumulus clouds are investigated using in situ airborne measurements acquired during the ninth Cloud Layer Experiment (CLEX-9) over a midlatitude location. Approximately ? of the sampled profiles are ...

Lawrence D. Carey; Jianguo Niu; Ping Yang; J. Adam Kankiewicz; Vincent E. Larson; Thomas H. Vonder Haar

2008-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

The quantum nature of the OH stretching mode in ice and water probed by neutron scattering experiments  

SciTech Connect

The OH stretching vibrational spectrum of water was measured in a wide range of temperatures across the triple point, 269 K < T < 296 K, using Inelastic Neutron Scattering (INS). The hydrogen projected density of states and the proton mean kinetic energy, _OH, were determined for the first time within the framework of a harmonic description of the proton dynamics. We found that in the liquid the value of _OH is nearly constant as a function of T, indicating that quantum effects on the OH stretching frequency are weakly dependent on temperature. In the case of ice, ab initio electronic structure calculations, using non-local van der Waals functionals, provided _OH values in agreement with INS experiments. We also found that the ratio of the stretching (_OH) to the total (_exp) kinetic energy, obtained from the present measurements, increases in going from ice, where hydrogen bonding is the strongest, to the liquid at ambient conditions and then to the vapour phase, where hydrogen bonding is the weakest. The same ratio was also derived from the combination of previous deep inelastic neutron scattering data, which does not rely upon the harmonic approximation, and the present measurements. We found that the ratio of stretching to the total kinetic energy shows a minimum in the metastable liquid phase. This finding suggests that the strength of intermolecular interactions increases in the supercooled phase, with respect to that in ice, contrary to the accepted view that supercooled water exhibits weaker hydrogen bonding than ice.

Senesi, Roberto [ORNL; Flammini, Davide [ORNL; Kolesnikov, Alexander I [ORNL; Murray, Eamonn D. [University of California, Davis; Galli, Giulia [University of California, Davis; Andreani, Carla [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Column Water Vapor Content in Clear and Cloudy Skies  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

With radiosonde data from 15 Northern Hemisphere stations, surface-to-400-mb column water vapor is computed from daytime soundings for 1988–1990. On the basis of simultaneous surface visual cloud observations, the data are categorized according ...

Dian J. Gaffen; William P. Elliott

1993-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

A New Fast Response Instrument for Measuring Total Water Content from Aircraft  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A device for measuring the total water content of a parcel of air from an aircraft has been developed. The total water of a parcel of air is a conserved quantity, independent of phase changes, provided there is no transport of water through the ...

S. Nicholls; J. Leighton; R. Barker

1990-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

156

MLS and CALIOP cloud ice measurements in the upper troposphere: A constraint from microwave on cloud microphysics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study examines the consistency and microphysics assumptions among satellite ice water content (IWC) retrievals in the upper troposphere with collocated A-Train radiances from MLS (Microwave Limb Sounder) and lidar backscatters from CALIOP (...

Dong L. Wu; Alyn Lambert; William G. Read; Patrick Eriksson; Jie Gong

157

Contents  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

... initially to meet the O&M needs of wastewater and water treatment systems designed ... OMI has a unique, high-energy team culture, developed ...

2001-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

Accurate measurement of the through-plane water content of proton-exchange  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accurate measurement of the through-plane water content of proton-exchange Accurate measurement of the through-plane water content of proton-exchange membranes using neutron radiography Title Accurate measurement of the through-plane water content of proton-exchange membranes using neutron radiography Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Hussey, Daniel S., Dusan Spernjak, Adam Z. Weber, Rangachary Mukundan, Joseph Fairweather, Eric L. Brosha, John Davey, Jacob S. Spendelow, David L. Jacobson, and Rodney L. Borup Journal Journal of Applied Physics Volume 112 Issue 10 Pagination 104906 Date Published 2012 ISSN 00218979 Keywords electrolyte fuel-cells, in-situ, liquid water, microchannel plate detectors, model, nafion, polymer electrolytes, schroeders-paradox, transport, x-ray-scattering Abstract The water sorption of proton-exchange membranes (PEMs) was measured in situ using high-resolution neutron imaging in small-scale fuel cell test sections. A detailed characterization of the measurement uncertainties and corrections associated with the technique is presented. An image-processing procedure resolved a previously reported discrepancy between the measured and predicted membrane water content. With high-resolution neutron-imaging detectors, the water distributions across N1140 and N117 Nafion membranes are resolved in vapor-sorption experiments and during fuel cell and hydrogen-pump operation. The measured in situ water content of a restricted membrane at 80 degrees C is shown to agree with ex situ gravimetric measurements of free-swelling membranes over a water activity range of 0.5 to 1.0 including at liquid equilibration. Schroeder's paradox was verified by in situ water-content measurements which go from a high value at supersaturated or liquid conditions to a lower one with fully saturated vapor. At open circuit and during fuel cell operation, the measured water content indicates that the membrane is operating between the vapor-and liquid-equilibrated states.

159

Biogeochemistry in Sea Ice: CICE model developments  

SciTech Connect

Polar primary production unfolds in a dynamic sea ice environment, and the interactions of sea ice with ocean support and mediate this production. In spring, for example, fresh melt water contributes to the shoaling of the mixed layer enhancing ice edge blooms. In contrast, sea ice formation in the fall reduces light penetration to the upper ocean slowing primary production in marine waters. Polar biogeochemical modeling studies typically consider these types of ice-ocean interactions. However, sea ice itself is a biogeochemically active medium, contributing a significant and, possibly, essential source of primary production to polar regions in early spring and fall. Here we present numerical simulations using the Los Alamos Sea Ice Model (CICE) with prognostic salinity and sea ice biogeochemistry. This study investigates the relationship between sea ice multiphase physics and sea ice productivity. Of particular emphasis are the processes of gravity drainage, melt water flushing, and snow loading. During sea ice formation, desalination by gravity drainage facilitates nutrient exchange between ocean and ice maintaining ice algal blooms in early spring. Melt water flushing releases ice algae and nutrients to underlying waters limiting ice production. Finally, snow loading, particularly in the Southern Ocean, forces sea ice below the ocean surface driving an upward flow of nutrient rich water into the ice to the benefit of interior and freeboard communities. Incorporating ice microphysics in CICE has given us an important tool for assessing the importance of these processes for polar algal production at global scales.

Jeffery, Nicole [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hunke, Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Elliott, Scott [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Turner, Adrian [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-06-18T23:59:59.000Z

160

Rain Rate and Water Content in Hurricanes Compared with Summer Rain in Miami, Florida  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Liquid water content (g m?3), precipitation rate (mm h?1), and radar reflectivity (dBZ) are inferred from cross sections of particle images obtained by aircraft. Each dataset is presented in a probability format to display changing functional ...

Robert A. Black; John Hallett

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water content" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Estimating Soil Water Contents from Soil Temperature Measurements by Using an Adaptive Kalman Filter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple soil heat transfer model is used together with an adaptive Kalman filter to estimate the daily averaged soil volumetric water contents from diurnal variations of the soil temperatures measured at different depths. In this method, the ...

Shu-Wen Zhang; Chong-Jian Qiu; Qin Xu

2004-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Comments on “Estimating Soil Water Contents from Soil Temperature Measurements by Using an Adaptive Kalman Filter”  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A scheme was proposed by Zhang et al. to estimate soil water content from soil temperature measurements by using an adaptive Kalman filter. Their scheme is based on the fact that soil heat capacity and thermal conductivity are a monotonic ...

Kun Yang; Toshio Koike

2005-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Sources of Error in Dual-Wavelength Radar Remote Sensing of Cloud Liquid Water Content  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dual-wavelength ratio (DWR) techniques offer the prospect of producing high-resolution mapping of cloud microphysical properties, including retrievals of cloud liquid water content (LWC) from reflectivity measured by millimeter-wavelength radars. ...

John K. Williams; J. Vivekanandan

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Diurnal Water Content Changes in the Bare Soil of a Coastal Desert  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The deposition of dew is a common meteorological phenomenon that has been recognized as an important ecosystem element, especially in arid areas. There is some evidence that indicates that there is an increase in the water content of the topsoil ...

Nurit Agam (Ninari)P. R. Berliner

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Comparison of Nimbus-7 SMMR and GOES-1 VISSR Atmospheric Liquid Water Content  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vertically integrated atmospheric liquid water content derived from Nimbus-7 Scanning Multichannel Microwave Radiometer (SMMR) brightness temperatures and from GOES-1 Visible and Infrared Spin-Scan Radiometer (VISSR) radiances in the visible are ...

Jean-Yves Lojou; Robert Frouin; René Bernard

1991-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

Experimental Verification of the Linear Relationship between IR Extinction and Liquid Water Content of Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The IR extinction of clouds has been measured with a CO2 laster transmissometer (? = 10.6 ?m). Using an established linear relationship (based on the Chýlek approximation to the Mie theory) between extinction and liquid water content, the liquid ...

Alan W. Gertler; Roger L. Steele

1980-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

A Technique for Deriving Column-integrated Water Content Using VAS Split-Window Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An algorithm is examined that uses Visible?Infrared Spin Scan Radiometer (VISSR) Atmospheric Sounder (VAS) 11- and 12-µm (split-window) data to derive column-integrated water content (IWC) at mesoscale resolution. The algorithm is physically ...

Anthony R. Guillory; Gary J. Jedlovec; Henry E. Fuelberg

1993-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

Ground-Based FSSP and PVM Measurements of Liquid Water Content  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recently published ground-based measurements of liquid water content (LWC) measured in fogs by two microphysical instruments, the FSSP-100 and PVM-100, are evaluated. These publications had suggested that the PVM-100 underestimated LWC ...

H. Gerber; Glendon Frick; Alfred R. Rodi

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

Initialization of Soil-Water Content in Regional-Scale Atmospheric Prediction Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this study is to demonstrate the feasibility of determining the soil-water content fields required as initial conditions for land surface components within atmospheric prediction models. This is done using a model of the hydrologic ...

Christopher B. Smith; Mercedes N. Lakhtakia; William J. Capehart; Toby N. Carlson

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

170

Water-Cooled Ice Machines, Purchasing Specifications for Energy-Efficient Products (Fact Sheet), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

continued > continued > FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM PURCHASING SPECIFICATIONS FOR ENERGY-EFFICIENT PRODUCTS The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) facilitates the Federal Government's implementation of sound, cost-effective energy management and investment practices to enhance the nation's energy security and environmental stewardship. Water-Cooled Ice Machines Legal Authorities Federal agencies are required by the National Energy Conservation Policy Act (P.L. 95-619), Execu- tive Order 13423, Executive Order 13514, and Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR) Subpart 23.2 and 53.223 to specify and buy ENERGY STAR ® qualified products or, in categories not included in

171

The use of a permanent magnet for water content measurements ofwood chips  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has developed a device that measures the water content of wood chips, pulp and brown stock for the paper industry. This device employs a permanent magnet as the central part of a NMR measurement system. This report describes the magnet and the NMR measurement system. The results of water content measurements in wood chips in a magnetic field of 0.47 T are presented.

Barale, P.J.; Fong, C.G.; Green, M.A.; Luft, P.A.; McInturff,A.D.; Reimer, J.A.; Yahnke, M.

2001-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

172

A parameterisation of single and multiple muons in the deep water or ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new parameterisation of atmospheric muons deep underwater (or ice) is presented. It takes into account the simultaneous arrival of muons in bundle giving the multiplicity of the events and the muon energy spectrum as a function of their lateral distribution in a shower.

Annarita Margiotta

2006-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

173

Electrical Atomization of Water Dripping from Melting Ice Pieces and its Possible Role in Thunderstorms  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

When a small isolated ice piece of conical shape is suspended with its apex facing down between two horizontal parallel electrodes and an electric field of 1 to 1.6 kV cm?1 is applied between them with the lower electrode at negative potential, a ...

A. K. Kamra; D. V. Ahire

1984-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Sensitivity of Circumpolar Deep Water Transport and Ice Shelf Basal Melt along the West Antarctic Peninsula to Changes in the Winds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW) can be found near the continental shelf break around most of Antarctica. Advection of this relatively warm water (up to 2°C) across the continental shelf to the base of floating ice shelves is thought to be a critical ...

Michael S. Dinniman; John M. Klinck; Eileen E. Hofmann

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

A Review Of Water Contents Of Nominally Anhydrous Natural Minerals In The  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A Review Of Water Contents Of Nominally Anhydrous Natural Minerals In The A Review Of Water Contents Of Nominally Anhydrous Natural Minerals In The Mantles Of Earth, Mars And The Moon Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Review Of Water Contents Of Nominally Anhydrous Natural Minerals In The Mantles Of Earth, Mars And The Moon Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Olivine, pyroxene and garnet are nominally anhydrous but can accommodate tens to hundreds of parts per million (ppm) H2O or "water" in the form of protons incorporated in defects in their mineral structure. This review concerns the amount of water in nominally anhydrous minerals from mantle and mantle-derived rocks: peridotites, eclogites, megacrysts, basalts and kimberlites. Trends between internal and external parameters

176

CONTENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

February 2010This document is in the public domain and may be freely copied or reprinted. Disclaimer Mention of any company or product does not constitute endorsement by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH). In addition, citations to Web sites external to NIOSH do not constitute NIOSH endorsement of the sponsoring organizations or their programs or products. Furthermore, NIOSH is not responsible for the content of these Web sites. Ordering Information To receive documents or other information about occupational safety and health topics, contact NIOSH at

A. Breslin, Ph.D.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

177

vdW-DF Study of energetic, structural, and vibrational properties of small water clusters and ice Ih  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present results for a density functional theory study of small water clusters and hexagonal ice Ih, using the van der Waals density functional (vdW-DF). In particular, we examine energetic, structural, and vibrational properties of these systems. Our results exhibit excellent agreement with both experiment and quantum-chemistry calculations and show a systematic and consistent improvement over standard exchange-correlation functionals---making vdW-DF a promising candidate for resolving longstanding difficulties with density functional theory in describing water. In addition, by comparing our vdW-DF results with quantum-chemistry calculations and other standard exchange-correlation functionals, we shed light on the question of why standard functionals often fail to describe these systems accurately.

Brian Kolb; T. Thonhauser

2011-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

178

Relating x-ray attenuation measurements to water content and distribution in SB-15D core  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Making improved estimates of the water content of The Geysers reservoir is fundamental to efficient and economic long term production of steam power from the resource. A series of coordinated physical properties measurements form core recovered from the SB-15D, reported in this volume in a series of papers, have been made to better understand water storage and to relate water content and distribution to observable geophysical properties such as electrical conductivity and seismic velocities. A principal objective here is to report new interpretations of x-ray scans made within 72 hours of core recovery from SB-15D, which suggest, taking advantage of preliminary measurements of capillary suction for metagraywacke, that water content was low in much of the preserved core.

Bonner, B.P.; Roberts, J.J.; Schneberk, D.J

1996-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

179

The influence of changes in water content on the electrical resistivity of a natural unsaturated loess  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-destructive methods of measuring water content in soils have been extensively developed in the last decades, especially in soil science. Among these methods, the measurements based on the electrical resistivity are simple and reliable thanks to the clear relationship between the water content and the electrical resistivity of soils. In this work, a new electrical resistivity probe was developed to monitor the change in local water content in the triaxial apparatus. The probe is composed of two-pair of electrodes, and an electrical current is induced through the soil at the vicinity of the contact between the probe and the specimen. Some experimental data on the changes in resistivity with the degree of saturation were obtained in specimens of a natural unsaturated loess from Northern France. Two theoretical models of resistivity were also used to analyze the obtained data. Results are finally discussed with respect to the loess's water retention properties.

Munoz-Castelblanco, José; Delage, Pierre; Cui, Yu Jun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

CONTENTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This report was prepared by Sargent & Lundy, L.L.C., hereinafter referred to as S&L, expressly for Perrin Quarles Associates, Inc., hereinafter referred to as PQA, under EPA Contract No. EP-W-07-064. Neither S&L nor any person acting on its behalf (a) makes any warranty, express or implied, with respect to the use of any information or methods disclosed in this report or (b) assumes any liability with respect to the use of any information or methods disclosed in this report. Although prepared with EPA funding and reviewed by the EPA, this report has not been approved by the EPA for publication as an EPA report. The contents do not necessarily reflect the views or policies of the EPA, nor does mention of trade names or commercial products constitute endorsement or recommendation for use. COAL-FIRED POWER PLANT HEAT RATE REDUCTIONS i

unknown authors

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water content" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Skin supersolidity slipperizing ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Consistency between theory predictions and measurements and calculations revealed that the skin of ice, containing water molecules with fewer than four neighbours, forms a supersolid phase that is highly polarized, elastic, hydrophobic, with ultra-low density and high thermal stability. The supersolidity of skin sliperizes ice.

Xi Zhang; Yongli Huang; a Zengsheng Ma; Yichun Zhou; Chang Q Sun

2013-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

182

EVOLUTION OF SNOW LINE IN OPTICALLY THICK PROTOPLANETARY DISKS: EFFECTS OF WATER ICE OPACITY AND DUST GRAIN SIZE  

SciTech Connect

Evolution of a snow line in an optically thick protoplanetary disk is investigated with numerical simulations. The ice-condensing region in the disk is obtained by calculating the temperature and the density with the 1+1D approach. The snow line migrates as the mass accretion rate ( M-dot ) in the disk decreases with time. Calculations are carried out from an early phase with high disk accretion rates ( M-dot {approx}10{sup -7} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}) to a later phase with low disk accretion rates ( M-dot {approx}10{sup -12} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}) using the same numerical method. It is found that the snow line moves inward for M-dot {approx}>10{sup -10} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}, while it gradually moves outward in the later evolution phase with M-dot {approx}<10{sup -10} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. In addition to the silicate opacity, the ice opacity is taken into consideration. In the inward migration phase, the additional ice opacity increases the distance of the snow line from the central star by a factor of 1.3 for dust grains {approx}< 10 {mu}m in size and of 1.6 for {approx}> 100 {mu}m. It is inevitable that the snow line comes inside Earth's orbit in the course of the disk evolution if the viscosity parameter {alpha} is in the range 0.001-0.1, the dust-to-gas mass ratio is higher than a tenth of the solar abundance value, and the dust grains are smaller than 1 mm. The formation of water-devoid planetesimals in the terrestrial planet region seems to be difficult throughout the disk evolution, which imposes a new challenge to planet formation theory.

Oka, Akinori; Nakamoto, Taishi; Ida, Shigeru, E-mail: akinorioka1@gmail.com, E-mail: nakamoto@geo.titech.ac.jp [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

2011-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

183

An ice lithography instrument  

SciTech Connect

We describe the design of an instrument that can fully implement a new nanopatterning method called ice lithography, where ice is used as the resist. Water vapor is introduced into a scanning electron microscope (SEM) vacuum chamber above a sample cooled down to 110 K. The vapor condenses, covering the sample with an amorphous layer of ice. To form a lift-off mask, ice is removed by the SEM electron beam (e-beam) guided by an e-beam lithography system. Without breaking vacuum, the sample with the ice mask is then transferred into a metal deposition chamber where metals are deposited by sputtering. The cold sample is then unloaded from the vacuum system and immersed in isopropanol at room temperature. As the ice melts, metal deposited on the ice disperses while the metals deposited on the sample where the ice had been removed by the e-beam remains. The instrument combines a high beam-current thermal field emission SEM fitted with an e-beam lithography system, cryogenic systems, and a high vacuum metal deposition system in a design that optimizes ice lithography for high throughput nanodevice fabrication. The nanoscale capability of the instrument is demonstrated with the fabrication of nanoscale metal lines.

Han, Anpan [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Chervinsky, John [School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Branton, Daniel [Department of Molecular and Cellular Biology, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); Golovchenko, J. A. [Department of Physics, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States); School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02138 (United States)

2011-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

184

Evaluating Soil Water Content in a WRF-NOAH Downscaling Experiment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Soil water content (SWC) depends on and impacts the energy flux partitioning at the land atmosphere interface. Above all, the latent heat flux is limited by SWC of the root zone on the one hand side and radiation on the other hand side. Therefore ...

Peter Greve; Kirsten Warrach-Sagi; Volker Wulfmeyer

185

Liquid Water Content of Fogs and Hazes from Visible Light Scattering  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method is proposed for measuring the liquid water content of fogs and hazes. It consists of a planar circular light sensor placed perpendicular to and coaxial with a narrow collimated light beam of a visible wavelength. The direct light ...

H. Gerber

1984-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Results of Sun Photometer–Derived Precipitable Water Content over a Tropical Indian Station  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A compact, hand-held multiband sun photometer (ozone monitor) has been used to measure total precipitable water content (PWC) at the low-latitude tropical station in Pune, India (18°32?N, 73°51?E). Data collected in the daytime (0730–1800 LT) ...

P. Ernest Raj; P. C. S. Devara; R. S. Maheskumar; G. Pandithurai; K. K. Dani; S. K. Saha; S. M. Sonbawne; Y. K. Tiwari

2004-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Extinction and Liquid Water Content Measurements at CO2 Laser wavelengths  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Measurements have been made of both extinction coefficients in an evaporating laboratory cloud at wavelength ? = 10.591 ?m using a CO2 laser, and of liquid water content (LWC) at the center of the cloud using a continuous filtration LWC device. ...

P. F. Nolan; S. G. Jennings

1987-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

188

On-sample water content measurement for a complete local monitoring in triaxial testing of unsaturated soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To provide a complete local monitoring of the state of an unsaturated soil sample during triaxial testing, a local water content measurement device was adapted to a triaxial device comprising the measurement of local displacements (Hall effect transducers) and suction (High capacity transducer). Water content was locally monitored by means of a resistivity probe. The water content/resistivity calibration curves of an intact natural unsaturated loess from Northern France extracted by block sampling at two depths (1 and 3.3 m) were carefully determined, showing good accuracy and repeatability. The validity of two models giving the resistivity of unsaturated soils with respect to their water content was examined.

Munoz-Castelblanco, José; Pereira, Jean-Michel; Cui, Yu-Jun

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

Inclusion of Ice Microphysics in the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model Version 3 (CAM3)  

SciTech Connect

A prognostic equation for ice crystal number concentration together with an ice nucleation scheme are implemented in the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Community Atmospheric Model Version 3 (CAM3) with the aim of studying the indirect effect of aerosols on cold clouds. The effective radius of ice crystals which is used in the radiation and gravitational settlement calculations is now calculated from model predicted mass and number of ice crystals rather than diagnosed as a function of temperature. We add a water vapor deposition scheme to replace the condensation and evaporation (C-E) in the standard CAM3 for ice clouds. The repartitioning of total water into liquid and ice in mixed-phase clouds as a function of temperature is removed, and ice supersaturation is allowed. The predicted ice water content in the modified CAM3 is in better agreement with the Aura MLS data than that in the standard CAM3. The cirrus cloud fraction near the tropical tropopause, which is underestimated in the standard CAM3, is increased, and the cold temperature bias there is reduced by 1-2 °K. However, an increase in the cloud fraction in polar regions makes the underestimation of downwelling shortwave radiation in the standard CAM3 even worse. A sensitivity test reducing the threshold relative humidity with respective to ice (RHi) for heterogeneous ice nucleation from 120% to 105% (representing nearly perfert ice nuclei) increases the global cloud cover by 1.7%, temperature near the tropical tropopause by 4-5 °K, and water vapor in the stratosphere by 50-90%.

Liu, Xiaohong; Penner, Joyce E.; Ghan, Steven J.; Wang, M.

2007-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

190

Transporting & Shipping Hazardous Materials at LBNL: Dry Ice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Dry Ice Dry ice is regulated as a hazardous material if shipped by air or water. Contact Shipping for any shipments that include dry ice (x5094, x4388, or shipping@lbl.gov)....

191

Fish Smother Under Ice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Smother Under Ice Smother Under Ice A BULLETIN FOR THE CHICAGO PUBLIC SCHOOLS DESIGNED FOR INCLUSION IN THE WEEKLY ANNOUNCEMENT SENT OUT FROM THE OFFICE OF SUPT. WILLIAM H. JOHNSON Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation February 1, 1945 Nature Bulletin No. 1 FOREST PRESERVE NOTES Grown-ups, who used to kive on a farm or in a small town, are fond of talking about the old-fashioned winters "when I was a boy" and the winters that grandpa used to tell about. Well, one would have to go back a long, long time to find a winter as severe as this one. FISH SMOTHER UNDER ICE Lakes and streams breathe the same as living things. When they are covered with ice and snow they cannot get air and they much hold their breath until the ice thaws. While they are holding their breath the oxygen in the water is gradually used up by the living things sealed up in it -- fish, plants "bugs", snails, and hosts of microscopic life. If the ice lasts long enough, these living things die one after another as each kind reaches the point where it cannot stand any further oxygen starvation. Sometimes temporary relief is given by rains and melting snow that bring fresh, serated water under the ice, but no method of artificial respiration has been found that works. Sometimes, too, when water plants get enough sunlight through clear ice they produce small amounts of oxygen and delay the suffocation of the fish, etc.; but when snow and cloudy ice cuts off the light this does not happen.

192

The Post-Shock Chemical Lifetimes of Outflow Tracers and a Possible New Mechanism to Produce Water Ice Mantles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have used a coupled time-dependent chemical and dynamical model to investigate the lifetime of the chemical legacy left in the wake of C-type shocks. We concentrate this study on the chemistry of H2O and O2, two molecules which are predicted to have abundances that are significantly affected in shock-heated gas. Two models are presented: (1) a three-stage model of pre-shock, shocked, and post-shock gas; and (2) a Monte-Carlo cloud simulation where we explore the effects of stochastic shock activity on molecular gas over a cloud lifetime. In agreement with previous studies, we find that shock velocities in excess of 10 km s^-1 are required to convert all of the oxygen not locked in CO into H2O before the gas has an opportunity to cool. For pure gas-phase models the lifetime of the high water abundances, or ``H2O legacy'', in the post-shock gas is 4 - 7 x 10^5 years. Through the Monte Carlo cloud simulation we demonstrate that the time-average abundance of H2O is a sensitive function of the frequency of shocks. Thus we predict that the abundance of H2O and other known outflow tracers can be used to trace the history of shock activity in molecular gas. For gas-grain models we find that the abundance of water-ice on grain surfaces can be quite large and is comparable to that observed in molecular clouds. This offers a possible alternative method to create water mantles without resorting to grain surface chemistry: gas heating and chemical modification due to a C-type shock and subsequent depletion of the gas-phase species onto grain mantles.

Edwin A. Bergin; Gary J. Melnick; David A. Neufeld

1998-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

193

Sound Scattering from Sea Ice: Aspects Relevant to Ice-Draft Profiling by Sonar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Accurate discrimination between thin ice and open water using sonar is an important practical concern for the calibration of ice-draft observations and for the use of ice-profiling sonar in climate-related studies of sea ice. To guide improvement ...

Humfrey Melling

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

Non-invasive Field Measurements of Soil Water Content Using a Pulsed 14 MeV Neutron Generator  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Current techniques of soil water content measurement are invasive and labor-intensive. Here, we demonstrate that an in situ soil carbon (C) analyzer with a multi-elemental analysis capability, developed for studies of terrestrial C sequestration, can be used concurrently to non-invasively measure the water content of large-volume ({approx}0.3 m{sup 3}) soil samples. Our objectives were to investigate the correlations of the hydrogen (H) and oxygen (O) signals with water to the changes in the soil water content in laboratory experiments, and in an agricultural field. Implementing prompt gamma neutron activation analyses we showed that in the field, the signal from the H nucleus better indicates the soil water content than does that from the O nucleus. Using a field calibration, we were able to use the H signal to estimate a minimum detectable change of {approx}2% volumetric water in a 0-30 cm depth of soil.

Mitra S.; Wielopolski L.; Omonode, R.; Novak, J.; Frederick, J.; Chan, A.

2012-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

195

Bailey, D. A., P. B. Rhines, and S. Hkkinen, 2005: Formation and pathways of North Atlantic Deep Water in a coupled ice-ocean model of the Arctic-North Atlantic Oceans. Climate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water in a coupled ice-ocean model of the Arctic-North Atlantic Oceans. Climate Dyn., 25, doi:10.1007/s. P. Shen, World Scientific, Singapore, 360pp. Yeh, S.- W., and B. P. Kirtman, 2005: Pacific decadal

196

District cooling: Phase 2, Direct freeze ice slurry system testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this research are to: extend the range of pressure drop data for ice-water slurry flows, and design and build a prototypical ice slurry distribution system which demonstrates ice slurry handling at an end user's heat exchanger, without sending ice slurry directly through the heat exchanger. The results of Phase 1 work demonstrated a 40% reduction in pump power required to move an ice-water slurry versus the same mass flow of water only. In addition to lower pressure drop, pumping ice slurries is advantageous because of the large latent and sensible heat cooling capacity stored in the ice compared to only sensible heat in chilled water. For example, an ice-water slurry with a 20% ice fraction (by mass) has a mass flow rate that is 70% less than the mass flow rate required for a chilled water system cooling and equivalent load. The greatly reduced mass flow combined with the friction reducing effects of ice-water slurries results in a total savings of 83% in pumping power. Therefore, a substantial savings potential exists for capital costs and system operating costs in ice-water slurry district cooling systems. One potential disadvantage of an ice-slurry district cooling system is the introduction of ice into equipment not so designed, such as air handlers at end user locations. A prototypic ice slurry distribution loop will demonstrate a cooling network which will provide ice slurry to an end user but sends ice free water into the actual heat transfer.

Winters, P.J.

1991-01-02T23:59:59.000Z

197

Quantifying the Water Content in the Cathode of Enzyme Fuel Cells via Neutron Imaging  

SciTech Connect

Neutron imaging was used to study cathode water content over time in a three-dimensional-cathode enzyme fuel cell (EFC). A porous carbon felt cathode allowed air to flow through the electrode. A solution with laccase and a mediator formed an aqueous layer on the electrode surface. Water loss was observed in situ via neutron imaging for varying experimental conditions, including flow rates of hydrogen and air, cathode inlet humidity, volume of enzyme solution, and its composition. Cathode water loss occurred for all experimental conditions, but the loss rate was noticeably reduced when a high-salt-concentration enzyme solution was used in the cathode in conjunction with increased humidity in the air feed stream. Results from neutron imaging and power density analysis were used in analyzing the causes that could contribute to EFC water loss. An increase in temperature due to the exothermic cathode reaction is considered a plausible cause of cathode water loss via evaporation. This is the first reported application of neutron imaging as a technique to study EFC water management. The results suggest that neutron imaging can be employed to provide a better understanding of EFC phenomena and thereby contribute to design and operational improvements of EFCs.

Aaron, D [Georgia Institute of Technology; Borole, Abhijeet P [ORNL; Hussey (NIST), Daniel [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Jacobson, David [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST); Yiacoumi, Sotira [Georgia Institute of Technology; Tsouris, Costas [ORNL

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

WATER-AMMONIUM ICES AND THE ELUSIVE 6.85 {mu}m BAND  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The 6.85 {mu}m band observed in the spectra of young stellar objects has been analyzed recently and the most usually accepted assignment to the nu{sub 4} bending mode of NH{sub 4} {sup +} is still under debate. We present here a laboratory study of frozen solutions of NH{sub 4} {sup +}Cl{sup -} in water in an astrophysical range of concentrations and temperatures. The samples are prepared by hyper-quenching of liquid droplets on a cold substrate. The nu{sub 4} band of NH{sub 4} {sup +}, which is very strong in the pure crystal and in the liquid solution at ambient temperature, becomes almost blurred in IR spectra of the frozen solution. The effect of the chlorine anion is expected to be of little relevance in this study. The experimental results are supported by theoretical calculations, which predict a broad range of weak nu{sub 4} features for amorphous samples containing different ammonium environments. The present results indicate that the ammonium ion surrounded by water molecules only cannot suffice to explain this spectral feature. This paper contributes with new evidence to the discussion on the assignment of the 6.85 {mu}m band.

Mate, B.; Galvez, O.; Herrero, V. J.; Fernandez-Torre, D.; Moreno, M. A.; Escribano, R. [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, CSIC, Serrano 123, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

A Parameterization of the Particle Size Spectrum of Ice Clouds in Terms of the Ambient Temperature and the Ice Water Content  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A data set obtained in cirrus clouds has been examined to deduce any dependencies of the particle size spectral form or the crystal habit on the temperature. It was found that both form of the spectra and crystal habit changed systematically with ...

Andrew J. Heymsfield; C. M. R. Platt

1984-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

200

The Use of Routine Weather Observations to Calculate Liquid Water Content in Summertime High-Elevation Fog  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper represents a stage within a larger project to estimate acid ion deposition from cloud impacting on high-elevation forests. Acid ion deposition depends principally on three factors: the liquid water content (LWC), the ion concentration(...

John L. Walmsley; William R. Burrows; Robert S. Schemenauer

1999-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water content" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Retrieval of Soil Moisture and Vegetation Water Content Using SSM/I Data over a Corn and Soybean Region  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The potential for soil moisture and vegetation water content retrieval using Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) brightness temperature over a corn and soybean field region was analyzed and assessed using datasets from the Soil Moisture ...

Jun Wen; Thomas J. Jackson; Rajat Bindlish; Ann Y. Hsu; Z. Bob Su

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Chemical Characterization and Water Content Determination of Bio-Oils Obtained from Various Biomass Species using 31P NMR Spectroscopy  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Pyrolysis is a promising approach to utilize biomass for biofuels. One of the key challenges for this conversion is how to analyze complicated components in the pyrolysis oils. Water contents of pyrolysis oils are normally analyzed by Karl Fischer titration. The use of 2-chloro-4,4,5,5,-tetramethyl-1,3,2-dioxaphospholane followed by {sup 31}P NMR analysis has been used to quantitatively analyze the structure of hydroxyl groups in lignin and whole biomass. Results: {sup 31}P NMR analysis of pyrolysis oils is a novel technique to simultaneously characterize components and analyze water contents in pyrolysis oils produced from various biomasses. The water contents of various pyrolysis oils range from 16 to 40 wt%. The pyrolysis oils obtained from Loblolly pine had higher guaiacyl content, while that from oak had a higher syringyl content. Conclusion: The comparison with Karl Fischer titration shows that {sup 31}P NMR could also reliably be used to measure the water content of pyrolysis oils. Simultaneously with analysis of water content, quantitative characterization of hydroxyl groups, including aliphatic, C-5 substituted/syringyl, guaiacyl, p-hydroxyl phenyl and carboxylic hydroxyl groups, could also be provided by {sup 31}P NMR analysis.

David, K.; Ben, H.; Muzzy, J.; Feik, C.; Iisa, K.; Ragauskas, A.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

203

Automated Ice-Tethered Profilers for Seawater Observations under Pack Ice in All Seasons  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An automated, easily deployed Ice-Tethered Profiler (ITP) instrument system, developed for deployment on perennial sea ice in the polar oceans to measure changes in upper ocean water properties in all seasons, is described, and representative ...

R. Krishfield; J. Toole; A. Proshutinsky; M-L. Timmermans

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Performance of a Counterflow Virtual Impactor in the NASA Icing Research Tunnel  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A counterflow virtual impactor (CVI) designed for aircraft use was evaluated at the NASA Icing Research Tunnel in Cleveland, Ohio. Tests were conducted for tunnel speeds of 67 and 100 m s?1, for liquid water contents of 0.23–1.4 g m?3, and for a ...

C. H. Twohy; J. W. Strapp; M. Wendisch

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

A GCM Parameterization of Ice Particle Mean Effective Sizes for High Latitude Cirrus Clouds and It's Comparison with Mid-Latitude Parmaterization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GCM Parameterization of Ice Particle Mean Effective GCM Parameterization of Ice Particle Mean Effective Sizes for High Latitude Cirrus Clouds and It's Comparison with Mid-Latitude Parameterization F. S. Boudala Department of Oceanography Dalhousie University Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada Q. Fu Department of Atmospheric Sciences University of Washington Seattle, Washington G. A. Issac Meteorological Service of Canada Toronto, Ontario, Canada Introduction Single-scattering properties of ice clouds depend on both ice water content (IWC) and effective size of cloud particles (Fu 1996; Fu et al. 1998). However, only the IWC information is provided in numerical models. Stephens et al. (1990) showed that the ice cloud feedback on a CO 2 warming simulation could be either positive or negative depending on the value of the ice particle size assumed. Parameterizations

206

Surface Albedo of the Antarctic Sea Ice Zone  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In three ship-based field experiments, spectral albedos were measured at ultraviolet, visible, and near-infrared wavelengths for open water, grease ice, nilas, young “grey” ice, young grey-white ice, and first-year ice, both with and without snow ...

Richard E. Brandt; Stephen G. Warren; Anthony P. Worby; Thomas C. Grenfell

2005-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

207

Global Ice and Land Climate Studies Using Scatterometer Image Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in sea ice, and canopy leaf density--as well as by the phase state of water (meltwater on sea ice1 Global Ice and Land Climate Studies Using Scatterometer Image Data David G. Long Brigham Young CA 91109 ben@pacific.jpl.nasa.gov Sasan.Saatchi@jpl.nasa.gov Cheryl Bertoia U. S. National Ice Center

Long, David G.

208

Archimedean Ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The striking boundary dependency (the Arctic Circle phenomenon) exhibited in the ice model on the square lattice extends to other planar set-ups. We present these findings for the triangular and the Kagome lattices. Critical connectivity results guarantee that ice configurations can be generated using the simplest and most efficient local actions. Height functions are utilized throughout the analysis. At the end there is a surprise in store: on the remaining Archimedean lattice for which the ice model can be defined, the 3.4.6.4. lattice, the long range behavior is completely different from the other cases.

Kari Eloranta

2009-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

209

Quantum Ice : a quantum Monte Carlo study  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ice states, in which frustrated interactions lead to a macroscopic ground-state degeneracy, occur in water ice, in problems of frustrated charge order on the pyrochlore lattice, and in the family of rare-earth magnets collectively known as spin ice. Of particular interest at the moment are "quantum spin ice" materials, where large quantum fluctuations may permit tunnelling between a macroscopic number of different classical ground states. Here we use zero-temperature quantum Monte Carlo simulations to show how such tunnelling can lift the degeneracy of a spin or charge ice, stabilising a unique "quantum ice" ground state --- a quantum liquid with excitations described by the Maxwell action of 3+1-dimensional quantum electrodynamics. We further identify a competing ordered "squiggle" state, and show how both squiggle and quantum ice states might be distinguished in neutron scattering experiments on a spin ice material.

Nic Shannon; Olga Sikora; Frank Pollmann; Karlo Penc; Peter Fulde

2011-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

210

Hydrogen ICE  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Chevrolet Silverado 1500HD Hydrogen ICE 1 Conversion Vehicle Specifications Engine: 6.0 L V8 Fuel Capacity: 10.5 GGE Nominal Tank Pressure: 5,000 psi Seatbelt Positions: Five...

211

A Simplified Ice–Ocean Coupled Model for the Antarctic Ice Melt Season  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the Antarctic Ocean, sea ice melts mostly by warming of the ocean mixed layer through heat input (mainly solar radiation) in open water areas. A simplified ice–upper ocean coupled model is proposed in which sea ice melts only by the ocean heat ...

Kay I. Ohshima; Sohey Nihashi

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

212

Energy Cost Calculator for Commercial Ice Machines | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ice Machines Ice Machines Energy Cost Calculator for Commercial Ice Machines October 8, 2013 - 2:25pm Addthis Vary capacity size, energy cost, hours of operation, and /or efficiency level. INPUT SECTION Input the following data (if any parameter is missing, calculator will set to default value). Defaults Type of Ice Cube Machine Ice Making Head Self-Contained Remote Condensing Unit Ice Making Head Type of Condenser Air Cooled Water Cooled Air Cooled Ice Harvest Rate (lbs. ice per 24 hrs.) lbs. per 24 hrs. 500 lbs. per 24 hrs. Energy Consumption (per 100 lbs. of ice) kWh 5.5 kWh Quantity of ice machines to be purchased 1 Energy Cost $/kWh 0.06 $/kWh Annual Hours of Operation hrs. 3000 hrs. Calculate Reset OUTPUT SECTION Performance per Ice Cube Machine Your

213

Errors in determination of soil water content using time-domain reflectometry caused by soil compaction around wave guides  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Application of time domain reflectometry (TDR) in soil hydrology often involves the conversion of TDR-measured dielectric permittivity to water content using universal calibration equations (empirical or physically based). Deviations of soil-specific calibrations from the universal calibrations have been noted and are usually attributed to peculiar composition of soil constituents, such as high content of clay and/or organic matter. Although it is recognized that soil disturbance by TDR waveguides may have impact on measurement errors, to our knowledge, there has not been any quantification of this effect. In this paper, we introduce a method that estimates this error by combining two models: one that describes soil compaction around cylindrical objects and another that translates change in bulk density to evolution of soil water retention characteristics. Our analysis indicates that the compaction pattern depends on the mechanical properties of the soil at the time of installation. The relative error in water content measurement depends on the compaction pattern as well as the water content and water retention properties of the soil. Illustrative calculations based on measured soil mechanical and hydrologic properties from the literature indicate that the measurement errors of using a standard three-prong TDR waveguide could be up to 10%. We also show that the error scales linearly with the ratio of rod radius to the interradius spacing.

Ghezzehei, T.A.

2008-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

214

Development of a Sea Ice Model for Use in Zonally Averaged Energy Balance Climate Models  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A sea ice model for use in zonally averaged energy balance climate models is presented which includes the following processes: surface melting, basal freezing and melting, lateral melting from ice-flee water or growth of new ice in leads, ...

L. D. Danny Harvey

1988-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Retrieval of Ice Cloud Parameters Using the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An algorithm is developed to derive cloud ice water path (IWP) and ice particle effective diameters De from the advanced microwave sounding unit (AMSU) measurements. In the algorithm, both IWP and De are related to the ice particle scattering ...

Limin Zhao; Fuzhong Weng

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

District cooling: Phase 2, Direct freeze ice slurry system testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this research are to: extend the range of pressure drop data for ice-water slurry flows; and design and build a prototypical ice slurry distribution system which demonstrates ice slurry handling at an end user's heat exchanger, without sending ice slurry directly through the heat exchanger. Previous research (Phase 1) conducted by CBI under DOE Contract FG01-86CE26564 has shown a friction reducing effect of ice crystals in water flow. The results of this work demonstrated a 40% reduction in pump power required to move an ice-water slurry versus the same mass flow of water only. In addition to lower pressure drop, pumping ice slurries is advantageous because of the large latent and sensible heat cooling capacity stored in the ice compared to only sensible heat in chilled water. For example, an ice-water slurry with a 20% ice fraction (by mass) has a mass flow rate that is 70% less than the mass flow rate required for a chilled water system cooling and equivalent load. The greatly reduced mass flow combined with the friction reducing effects of ice-water slurries results in a total savings of 83% in pumping power. Therefore, a substantial savings potential exists for capital costs and system operating costs in ice-water slurry district cooling systems.

Winters, P.J.

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Structure and Dynamics of Forsterite-scCO2/H2O Interfaces as a Function of Water Content  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of forsterite surfaces in contact with supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO2) fluids of varying water content were performed to determine the partition of water between the scCO2 fluid and the mineral surface, the nature of CO2 and H2O bonding at the interface, and the regions of the interface that may be conducive to HxCO3(2-x)- formation. Calculations of the free energy of the associative adsorption of water onto the (010) forsterite surface from the scCO2 phase indicated that the formation of a water film up to three-monolayer thick can be exothermic even for water contents below the water saturation concentration of the scCO2 fluid. In MD simulations of scCO2/H2O mixtures in contact with the (010) forsterite surface, H2O was found to readily displace CO2 at the surface and, therefore, CO2 directly contacted the surface only for water coverages below two monolayers. For thicker water films, a two-monolayer hydration layer formed that CO2 could not penetrate. Simulations of the hydroxylated (010) surface and of the (011) surface suggested that this conclusion can be extended to forsterite surfaces with different surface structures and/or compositions. The density, diffusion, and degree of hydration of CO2 as well as the extent of CO2/H2O mixing at the interface were all predicted to depend strongly on the thickness of the water-rich film, i.e., on the water content of the scCO2 fluid.

Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Weare, John H.; Felmy, Andrew R.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

System and method for monitoring water content or other dielectric influences in a medium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sensor system is provided that measures water content or other detectable properties in a medium along the entire length of the sensor at any point in time. The sensor system includes an electromagnetic signal generator and a transmission line disposed in a medium to be monitored. Alternatively, the transmission line can be configured for movement across a medium to be monitored, or the transmission line can be fixed relative to a moving medium being monitored. A signal is transmitted along the transmission line at predetermined frequencies, and the signal is returned back along the transmission line and/or into an optional receive line in proximity to the transmission line. The returned signal is processed to generate a one-dimensional data output profile that is a function of a detectable property of the medium. The data output profile can be mapped onto a physical system to generate a two-dimensional or three-dimensional profile if desired. The sensor system is useful in a variety of different applications such as agriculture, horticulture, biofiltration systems for industrial offgases, leak detection in landfills or drum storage facilities at buried waste sites, and in many other applications.

Cherry, Robert S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Anderson, Allen A. (Firth, ID)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

Passive solar roof ice melter  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An elongated passive solar roof ice melter is placed on top of accumulated ice and snow including an ice dam along the lower edge of a roof of a heated building and is held against longitudinal movement with respect to itself. The melter includes a bottom wall having an upper surface highly absorbent to radiant solar energy; a first window situated at right angles with respect to the bottom wall, and a reflecting wall connecting the opposite side edges of the bottom wall and the first window. The reflecting wall has a surface facing the bottom wall and the window which is highly reflective to radiant solar energy. Radiant solar energy passes through the first window and either strikes the highly absorbent upper surface of the bottom wall or first strikes the reflecting wall to be reflected down to the upper surface of the bottom wall. The heat generated thereby melts through the ice below the bottom wall causing the ice dam to be removed between the bottom wall and the top of the roof and immediately adjacent to the ice melter along the roof. Water dammed up by the ice dam can then flow down through this break in the dam and drain out harmlessly onto the ground. This prevents dammed water from seeping back under the shingles and into the house to damage the interior of the house.

Deutz, R.T.

1981-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

220

Observations of Thermohaline Convection adjacent to Brunt Ice Shelf  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Observations were made of ocean microstructure and horizontal currents adjacent to Brunt Ice Shelf in the southeastern Weddell Sea. Periods of in situ supercooled water extending as deep as 65 m were associated with ice nucleation and frazil ...

Ilker Fer; Keith Makinson; Keith W. Nicholls

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water content" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Retrieval of Ice Cloud Parameters Using a Microwave Imaging Radiometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Based on the radiative transfer theory, the microwave radiance emanating from ice clouds at arbitrary viewing angles is expressed as an analytic function of the cloud ice water path (IWP), the particle effective diameter (De), and the particle ...

Fuzhong Weng; Norman C. Grody

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Atmospheric Water Content over the Tropical Pacific Derived from the Nimbus-6 Scanning Microwave Spectrometer  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The scanning microwave spectrometer (SCAMS) aboard Nimbus-6 contains a 22.23 GHz water vapor channel and 31.65 GHz window channel for deriving integrated water vapor (precipitable water) and cloud liquid water through a column over the oceans. ...

N. C. Grody; A. Gruber; W. C. Shen

1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Rapid Cooling Using Ice Slurries for Industrial and Medical ...  

Because of the high energy content of ice slurry, its cooling capacity is many times greater than that of single-phase fluids. ... Wind Energy; Partners (27)

224

Estimation of Thin Ice Thickness and Detection of Fast Ice from SSM/I Data in the Antarctic Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Antarctic coastal polynyas are important areas of high sea ice production and dense water formation, and thus their detection including an estimate of thin ice thickness is essential. In this paper, the authors propose an algorithm that estimates ...

Takeshi Tamura; Kay I. Ohshima; Thorsten Markus; Donald J. Cavalieri; Sohey Nihashi; Naohiko Hirasawa

2007-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Ice Storm Database and Ice Severity Maps  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Historical icing information has several valuable uses in overhead transmission line ice loading design and research. Previously, this type of information was neither readily available nor easily acquired. This report describes the creation of an electronic ice storm database and regional ice severity maps for the United States.

1996-12-17T23:59:59.000Z

226

Method of forming clathrate ice  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of forming clathrate ice in a supercooled water-based liquid contained in a vessel is disclosed. Initially, an oscillator device is located in the liquid in the vessel. The oscillator device is then oscillated ultrasonically so that small crystals are formed in the liquid. These small crystals serve as seed crystals for ice formation in the liquid and thereby prevent supercooling of the liquid. Preferably, the oscillating device is controlled by a thermostat which initiates operation of the oscillator device when the temperature of the liquid is lowered to the freezing point. Thereafter, the operation of the oscillator device is terminated when ice is sensed in the liquid by an ice sensor.

Hino, Toshiyuki (Tokyo, JP); Gorski, Anthony J. (Lemont, IL)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Method of forming calthrate ice  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of forming clathrate ice in a supercooled water-based liquid contained in a vessel is disclosed. Initially, an oscillator device is located in the liquid in the vessel. The oscillator device is then oscillated ultransonically so that small crystals are formed in the liquid. Thes small crystals serve as seed crystals for ice formation in the liquid and thereby prevent supercooling of the liquid. Preferably, the oscillating device is controlled by a thermostat which initiates operation of the oscillator device when the temperature of the liquid is lowered to the freezing point. Thereafter, the operation of the oscillator device is terminated when ice is sensed in the liquid by an ice sensor.

Hino, T.; Gorski, A.J.

1985-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

228

An Investigation of Laboratory-Grown "Ice Spikes"  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have investigated the formation of 10-50 mm long ``ice spikes'' that sometimes appear on the free surface of water when it solidifies. By freezing water under different conditions, we measured the probability of ice spike formation as a function of: 1) the air temperature in the freezing chamber, 2) air motion in the freezing chamber (which promotes evaporative cooling), 3) the quantity of dissolved salts in the water, and 4) the size, shape, and composing material of the freezing vessel. We found that the probability of ice spike formation is greatest when the air temperature is near -7 C, the water is pure, and the air in the freezing chamber is moving. Even small quantities of dissolved solids greatly reduce the probability of ice spike formation. Under optimal conditions, approximately half the ice cubes in an ordinary ice cube tray will form ice spikes. Guided by these observations, we have examined the Bally-Dorsey model for the formation of ice spikes. In this model, the density change during solidification forces supercooled water up through a hollow ice tube, where it freezes around the rim to lengthen the tube. We propose that any dissolved solids in the water will tend to concentrate at the tip of a growing ice spike and inhibit its growth. This can qualitatively explain the observation that ice spikes do not readily form using water containing even small quantities of dissolved solids.

K. G. Libbrecht; K. Lui

2003-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

229

FINAL REPORT FOR THE DOE/ARM PROJECT TITLED Representation of the Microphysical and Radiative Properties of Ice Clouds in SCMs and GCMs  

SciTech Connect

The broad goal of this research is to improve climate prediction through better representation of cirrus cloud microphysical and radiative properties in global climate models (GCMs). Clouds still represent the greatest source of uncertainty in climate prediction, and the representation of ice clouds is considerably more challenging than liquid water clouds. While about 40% of cloud condensate may be in the form of ice by some estimates, there have been no credible means of representing the ice particle size distribution and mass removal rates from ice clouds in GCMs. Both factors introduce large uncertainties regarding the global net flux, the latter factor alone producing a change of 10 W/m2 in the global net flux due to plausible changes in effective ice particle fallspeed. In addition, the radiative properties of ice crystals themselves are in question. This research provides GCMs with a credible means of representing the full (bimodal) ice particle size distribution (PSD) in ice clouds, including estimates of the small crystal (D < 65 microns) mode of the PSD. It also provides realistic estimates of mass sedimentation rates from ice clouds, which have a strong impact on their ice contents and radiative properties. This can be done through proper analysis of ice cloud microphysical data from ARM and other field campaigns. In addition, this research tests the ice cloud radiation treatment developed under two previous ARM projects by comparing it against laboratory measurements of ice cloud extinction efficiency and by comparing it with explicit theoretical calculations of ice crystal optical properties. The outcome of this project includes two PSD schemes for ice clouds; one appropriate for mid-latitude cirrus clouds and another for tropical anvil cirrus. Cloud temperature and ice water content (IWC) are the inputs for these PSD schemes, which are based on numerous PSD observations. The temperature dependence of the small crystal mode of the PSD for tropical anvils is opposite to that of mid-latitude cirrus, and this results in very different radiative properties for these two types of cirrus at temperatures less than about 50 C for a given ice water path. In addition, the representative PSD fall velocity is strongly influenced by the small crystal mode, and for temperatures less than 52 C, this fall velocity for mid-latitude cirrus is 2-8 times greater than for tropical anvil cirrus. Finally, the treatment of ice cloud optical properties was found to agree with laboratory measurements and exact theory within 15% for any given wavelength, PSD and ice particle shape. This treatment is analytical, formulated in terms of the PSD and ice particle shape properties. It thus provides the means for explicitly coupling the ice cloud microphysical and radiative properties, and can treat any combination of ice particle shape. It is very inexpensive regarding computer time. When these three deliverables were incorporated into the GCM at the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) under another project, it was found that the sunlight reflected and the amount of upwelling heat absorbed by cirrus clouds depended strongly on the PSD scheme used (i.e. mid-latitude or tropical anvil). This was largely due to the fall velocities associated with the two PSD schemes, although the PSD shape was also important.

Mitchell, David L.

2005-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

230

Modeling of Antarctic sea ice in a general circulation model  

SciTech Connect

A dynamic-thermodynamic sea ice model is developed and coupled with the Melbourne University general circulation model to simulate the seasonal cycle of the Antarctic sea ice distributions The model is efficient, rapid to compute, and useful for a range of climate studies. The thermodynamic part of the sea ice model is similar to that developed by Parkinson and Washington, the dynamics contain a simplified ice rheology that resists compression. The thermodynamics is based on energy conservation at the top surface of the ice/snow, the ice/water interface, and the open water area to determine the ice formation, accretion, and ablation. A lead parameterization is introduced with an effective partitioning scheme for freezing between and under the ice floes. The dynamic calculation determines the motion of ice, which is forced with the atmospheric wind, taking account of ice resistance and rafting. The simulated sea ice distribution compares reasonably well with observations. The seasonal cycle of ice extent is well simulated in phase as well as in magnitude. Simulated sea ice thickness and concentration are also in good agreement with observations over most regions and serve to indicate the importance of advection and ocean drift in the determination of the sea ice distribution. 64 refs., 15 figs., 2 tabs.

Wu, Xingren; Budd, W.F. [Antarctic Cooperative Research Centre, Tasmania (Australia)] [Antarctic Cooperative Research Centre, Tasmania (Australia); Simmonds, I. [School of Earth Sciences, Victoria (Australia)] [School of Earth Sciences, Victoria (Australia)

1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

231

Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds: Sensitivity to ice initiationmechanisms  

SciTech Connect

The importance of Arctic mixed-phase clouds on radiation and the Arctic climate is well known. However, the development of mixed-phase cloud parameterization for use in large scale models is limited by lack of both related observations and numerical studies using multidimensional models with advanced microphysics that provide the basis for understanding the relative importance of different microphysical processes that take place in mixed-phase clouds. To improve the representation of mixed-phase cloud processes in the GISS GCM we use the GISS single-column model coupled to a bin resolved microphysics (BRM) scheme that was specially designed to simulate mixed-phase clouds and aerosol-cloud interactions. Using this model with the microphysical measurements obtained from the DOE ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) campaign in October 2004 at the North Slope of Alaska, we investigate the effect of ice initiation processes and Bergeron-Findeisen process (BFP) on glaciation time and longevity of single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds. We focus on observations taken during October 9th-10th, which indicated the presence of a single-layer mixed-phase clouds. We performed several sets of 12-hour simulations to examine model sensitivity to different ice initiation mechanisms and evaluate model output (hydrometeors concentrations, contents, effective radii, precipitation fluxes, and radar reflectivity) against measurements from the MPACE Intensive Observing Period. Overall, the model qualitatively simulates ice crystal concentration and hydrometeors content, but it fails to predict quantitatively the effective radii of ice particles and their vertical profiles. In particular, the ice effective radii are overestimated by at least 50%. However, using the same definition as used for observations, the effective radii simulated and that observed were more comparable. We find that for the single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds simulated, process of ice phase initiation due to freezing of supercooled water in both saturated and subsaturated (w.r.t. water) environments is as important as primary ice crystal origination from water vapor. We also find that the BFP is a process mainly responsible for the rates of glaciation of simulated clouds. These glaciation rates cannot be adequately represented by a water-ice saturation adjustment scheme that only depends on temperature and liquid and solid hydrometeors contents as is widely used in bulk microphysics schemes and are better represented by processes that also account for supersaturation changes as the hydrometeors grow.

Sednev, I.; Menon, S.; McFarquhar, G.

2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

232

Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds: sensitivity to ice initiation mechanisms  

SciTech Connect

The importance of Arctic mixed-phase clouds on radiation and the Arctic climate is well known. However, the development of mixed-phase cloud parameterization for use in large scale models is limited by lack of both related observations and numerical studies using multidimensional models with advanced microphysics that provide the basis for understanding the relative importance of different microphysical processes that take place in mixed-phase clouds. To improve the representation of mixed-phase cloud processes in the GISS GCM we use the GISS single-column model coupled to a bin resolved microphysics (BRM) scheme that was specially designed to simulate mixed-phase clouds and aerosol-cloud interactions. Using this model with the microphysical measurements obtained from the DOE ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) campaign in October 2004 at the North Slope of Alaska, we investigate the effect of ice initiation processes and Bergeron-Findeisen process (BFP) on glaciation time and longevity of single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds. We focus on observations taken during 9th-10th October, which indicated the presence of a single-layer mixed-phase clouds. We performed several sets of 12-h simulations to examine model sensitivity to different ice initiation mechanisms and evaluate model output (hydrometeors concentrations, contents, effective radii, precipitation fluxes, and radar reflectivity) against measurements from the MPACE Intensive Observing Period. Overall, the model qualitatively simulates ice crystal concentration and hydrometeors content, but it fails to predict quantitatively the effective radii of ice particles and their vertical profiles. In particular, the ice effective radii are overestimated by at least 50%. However, using the same definition as used for observations, the effective radii simulated and that observed were more comparable. We find that for the single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds simulated, process of ice phase initiation due to freezing of supercooled water in both saturated and undersaturated (w.r.t. water) environments is as important as primary ice crystal origination from water vapor. We also find that the BFP is a process mainly responsible for the rates of glaciation of simulated clouds. These glaciation rates cannot be adequately represented by a water-ice saturation adjustment scheme that only depends on temperature and liquid and solid hydrometeors contents as is widely used in bulk microphysics schemes and are better represented by processes that also account for supersaturation changes as the hydrometeors grow.

Sednev, Igor; Sednev, I.; Menon, S.; McFarquhar, G.

2008-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

233

An evaluation of hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical behavior of processed oil shale solid waste 2; The use of time domain reflectometry (TDR) for monitoring in-situ volumetric water content in processed oil shale  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the use of time domain reflectometry (TDR) for monitoring volumetric water contents in processed oil shale solid waste. TDR measures soil water content via a correlation between the dielectric constant (K) of the 3 phase (soil-water-air) system and the volumetric water content ({theta}{sub v}). An extensive bench top research program has been conducted to evaluate and verify the use of this technique in processed oil shale solid waste. This study utilizes columns of processed oil shale packed to known densities and varying water contents and compares the columetric water content measured via TDR and the volumetric water content measured through gravimetric determination.

Reeves, T.L.; Elgezawi, S.M. (Wyoming Univ., Laramie, WY (USA). Dept. of Civil Engineering); Kaser, T.G. (GIGO Computer and Electronic, Laramie, WY (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

Passive ice freezing-releasing heat pipe  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat pipe device has been developed which permits completely passive ice formation and periodic release of ice without requiring the ambient temperature to rise above the melting point of water. This passive design enables the maximum amount of cooling capacity to be stored in the tank.

Gorski, Anthony J. (Lemont, IL); Schertz, William W. (Batavia, IL)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

235

Measurements of the Total Water Content of Cirrus Clouds. Part II: Instrument Performance and Validation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper describes the performance and in-flight validation of an instrument mounted in a pallet on the NASA WB-57 research aircraft that measures the sum of gas phase and solid phase water, or total water, in cirrus clouds. Using a heated ...

E. M. Weinstock; J. B. Smith; D. Sayres; J. V. Pittman; N. Allen; J. G. Anderson

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

236

Potential Applications of the SSM/I Cloud Liquid Water Parameter to the Estimation of Marine Aircraft Icing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Images of integrated cloud liquid water derived from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) aboard the Defense Meteorological Satellite Program polar-orbiting satellite are presented. Examples with infrared and visible images and synoptic ...

Thomas F. Lee; James R. Clark; Steven D. Swadley

1994-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

How Well Does Water Activity Determine Homogeneous Ice Nucleation Temperature in Aqueous Sulfuric Acid and Ammonium Sulfate Droplets?  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Frozen fraction measurements made using a droplet free-fall freezing tube apparatus are presented and used, along with other recent laboratory measurements, to evaluate how well both the water activity idea and the translated melting-point curve ...

Brian D. Swanson

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

238

Ice Cloud Retrievals and Analysis with the Compact Scanning Submillimeter Imaging Radiometer and the Cloud Radar System during CRYSTAL FACE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Submillimeter-wave radiometry is a new technique for determining ice water path (IWP) and particle size in upper-tropospheric ice clouds. The first brightness temperatures images of ice clouds above 340 GHz were measured by the Compact Scanning ...

K. Franklin Evans; James R. Wang; Paul E. Racette; Gerald Heymsfield; Lihua Li

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

The influence of ice nucleation mode and ice vapor growth on simulation of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The influence of ice nucleation mode and ice vapor growth on simulation of The influence of ice nucleation mode and ice vapor growth on simulation of arctic mixed-phase clouds Avramov, Alexander The Pennsylvania State University Category: Modeling Mixed-phase arctic stratus clouds are the predominant cloud type in the Arctic . Perhaps one of the most intriguing of their features is that they tend to have liquid tops that precipitate ice. Despite the fact that this situation is colloidally unstable, these cloud systems are quite long lived - from a few days to over a couple of weeks. Previous studies have suggested that this longevity may be due to a paucity of ice nucleating aerosols (ice nuclei, or IN) in the Arctic. Such studies have shown that small changes in IN concentrations can cause large changes in the amount of liquid water within a mixed-phase stratus deck. We use the Regional

240

Glossary Term - Dry Ice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Deuteron Previous Term (Deuteron) Glossary Main Index Next Term (Electron) Electron Dry Ice A block of dry ice sublimating on a table. Dry ice is the solid form of carbon dioxide...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water content" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

AIM-94-0800 Effect of Initial Ice Roughness  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ice accretion phase. Using5close-up photography and videography Hansman has studied the initial phase of ice accretion. At warm temperatures, a runback zone aft of the rough zone is observed. WaterAIM-94-0800 Effect of Initial Ice Roughness on Airfoil Aerodynamics M. Bragg, M. Kerho and M

Bragg, Michael B.

242

Laboratory Measurements and Model Sensitivity Studies of Dust Deposition Ice Nucleation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We investigated the ice nucleating properties of mineral dust particles to understand the sensitivity of simulated cloud properties to two different representations of contact angle in the Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT). These contact angle representations are based on two sets of laboratory deposition ice nucleation measurements: Arizona Test Dust (ATD) particles of 100, 300 and 500 nm sizes were tested at three different temperatures (-25, -30 and -35 C), and 400 nm ATD and kaolinite dust species were tested at two different temperatures (-30 and -35 C). These measurements were used to derive the onset relative humidity with respect to ice (RH{sub ice}) required to activate 1% of dust particles as ice nuclei, from which the onset single contact angles were then calculated based on CNT. For the probability density function (PDF) representation, parameters of the log-normal contact angle distribution were determined by fitting CNT-predicted activated fraction to the measurements at different RH{sub ice}. Results show that onset single contact angles vary from {approx}18 to 24 degrees, while the PDF parameters are sensitive to the measurement conditions (i.e. temperature and dust size). Cloud modeling simulations were performed to understand the sensitivity of cloud properties (i.e. ice number concentration, ice water content, and cloud initiation times) to the representation of contact angle and PDF distribution parameters. The model simulations show that cloud properties are sensitive to onset single contact angles and PDF distribution parameters. The comparison of our experimental results with other studies shows that under similar measurement conditions the onset single contact angles are consistent within {+-}2.0 degrees, while our derived PDF parameters have larger discrepancies.

Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Fan, Jiwen; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Liu, Xiaohong; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail

2012-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

243

Arctic Sea Ice Retreat in 2007 Follows Thinning Trend  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The minimum of Arctic sea ice extent in the summer of 2007 was unprecedented in the historical record. A coupled ice–ocean model is used to determine the state of the ice and ocean over the past 29 yr to investigate the causes of this ice extent minimum within a historical perspective. It is found that even though the 2007 ice extent was strongly anomalous, the loss in total ice mass was not. Rather, the 2007 ice mass loss is largely consistent with a steady decrease in ice thickness that began in 1987. Since then, the simulated mean September ice thickness within the Arctic Ocean has declined from 3.7 to 2.6 m at a rate of ?0.57 m decade ?1. Both the area coverage of thin ice at the beginning of the melt season and the total volume of ice lost in the summer have been steadily increasing. The combined impact of these two trends caused a large reduction in the September mean ice concentration in the Arctic Ocean. This created conditions during the summer of 2007 that allowed persistent winds to push the remaining ice from the Pacific side to the Atlantic side of the basin and more than usual into the Greenland Sea. This exposed large areas of open water, resulting in the record ice extent anomaly. 1.

R. W. Lindsay; J. Zhang; A. Schweiger; M. Steele; H. Stern

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

244

Theory of amorphous ices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We use large-deviation theory to study nonequilibrium transitions between amorphous solids and liquid in an atomistic model of supercooled water. Along with nonequilibrium transitions between the ergodic liquid and two distinct amorphous solids, we establish coexistence between the two amorphous solids, a finding that is consistent with experiment. The phase diagram we predict includes a nonequilibrium triple point where the two amorphous phases and the liquid coexist. While the amorphous solids are long-lived and slowly-aging glasses, their melting leads quickly to the formation of ice. This irreversible behavior is demonstrated in our theoretical treatment and compared with experiment.

David T Limmer; David Chandler

2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

245

A parameterisation of the flux and energy spectrum of single and multiple muons in deep water/ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper parametric formulas are presented to evaluate the flux of atmospheric muons in the range of vertical depth between 1.5 to 5 km of water equivalent (km w.e.) and up to 85^o for the zenith angle. We take into account their arrival in bundles with different muon multiplicities. The energy of muons inside bundles is then computed considering the muon distance from the bundle axis. This parameterisation relies on a full Monte Carlo simulation of primary Cosmic Ray (CR) interactions, shower propagation in the atmosphere and muon transport in deep water [1]. The primary CR flux and interaction models, in the range in which they can produce muons which may reach 1.5 km w.e., suffer from large experimental uncertainties. We used a primary CR flux and an interaction model able to correctly reproduce the flux, the multiplicity distribution, the spatial distance between muons as measured by the underground MACRO experiment.

M. Bazzotti; S. Biagi; G. Carminati; S. Cecchini; T. Chiarusi; G. Giacomelli; A. Margiotta; M. Sioli; M. Spurio

2009-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

246

Snow and Ice Control Best Management Practices Parking Lots, Sidewalks, Roads  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Snow and Ice Control Best Management Practices Parking Lots, Sidewalks, Roads Minnesota Circuit opportunity to improve the way we manage snow and ice in Minnesota. By using snow and ice control best safer--while saving money and protecting water quality. Current Situation The snow and ice maintenance

Minnesota, University of

247

Modeling Tidal Current Profiles and Vertical Mixing beneath Filchner–Ronne Ice Shelf, Antarctica  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

One of the warmest water masses beneath Filchner–Ronne Ice Shelf (FRIS) is dense, high salinity shelf water (HSSW) that flows into the sub-ice-shelf cavity from the ice front and occupies the lower portion of the water column. A one-dimensional ...

Keith Makinson

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

248

Sensitivity of Cloud Liquid Water Content Estimates to the Temperature-Dependent Thermodynamic Phase: A Global Study Using CloudSat Data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The main purpose of this study is to underline the sensitivity of cloud liquid water content (LWC) estimates purely to 1) the shape of computationally simplified temperature-dependent thermodynamic phase and 2) the range of subzero temperatures ...

Abhay Devasthale; Manu Anna Thomas

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Subsurface monitoring of reservoir pressure, temperature, relative humidity, and water content at the CAES Field Experiment, Pittsfield, Illinois: system design  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This subsurface-instrumentation design has been developed for the first Compressed Air Energy Storage (CAES) field experiment to be performed in porous media. Energy storage will be accomplished by alternating the injection and withdrawal of compressed air in a confined sandstone aquifer near Pittsfield, Illinois. The overall experiment objective is to characterize the reservoir's geochemical and thermohydraulic response to imposed CAES conditions. Specific experiment objectives require monitoring: air-bubble development; thermal development; cyclic pressure response; reservoir dehydration; and water coning. Supporting these objectives, four parameters will be continuously monitored at depth in the reservoir. They are: temperature; pressure; pore-air relative humidity; and pore-water content. Reservoir temperatures and pressures will range to maximum values approaching 200/sup 0/C and 300 psi, respectively. Both pore-air relative humidity and pore-water content will range from approx. 0 to 100%. This report discusses: instrumentation design; sensor and sensor system calibration; field installation and testing; and instrument-system operation. No comprehensive off-the-shelf instrument package exists to adequately monitor CAES reservoir parameters at depth. The best available sensors were selected and adapted for use under expected ranges of reservoir conditions. The instrumentation design criteria required: suitable sensor accuracy; continuous monitoring capability; redundancy; maximum sensor integrity; contingency planning; and minimum cost-information ratio. Three wells will be instrumented: the injection/withdrawal (I/W) well and the two instrument wells. Sensors will be deployed by wireline suspension in both open and backfilled (with sand) wellbores. The sensors deployed in the I/W well will be retrievable; the instrument-well sensors will not.

Hostetler, D.D.; Childs, S.W.; Phillips, S.J.

1983-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Discrimination of Mixed- versus Ice-Phase Clouds Using Dual-Polarization Radar with Application to Detection of Aircraft Icing Regions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Dual-polarization radar measurements and in situ measurements of supercooled liquid water and ice particles within orographic cloud systems are used to develop probabilistic criteria for identifying mixed-phase versus ice-phase regions of sub-0°C ...

David M. Plummer; Sabine Göke; Robert M. Rauber; Larry Di Girolamo

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

251

UtahWaterResearchLaboratoryUtahWaterResearchLaboratory Utah Water Research Laboratory, Utah State University, Logan UT 84322-8200, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

equivalence and energy content relative to a reference state of water in the ice phase at 0oC. This energy-based calculations of radiative, sensible, latent and advective heat exchanges. An equilibrium parameterization ideas from the many existing models and parameterize the processes involved in as simple, yet physically

Tarboton, David

252

Electronic structure effects in liquid water studied by photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in comparison with gas-phase water, ice close to the meltingcrystalline ice at two different temperatures, and gas-phaseof gas-phase water, liquid water and crystalline ice using

Nordlund, Dennis

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

253

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Dry Ice vs. Liquid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Egg + Liquid Nitrogen + Time-lapse! Egg + Liquid Nitrogen + Time-lapse! Previous Video (Egg + Liquid Nitrogen + Time-lapse!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Liquid Nitrogen Cooled Dry Ice in Water!) Liquid Nitrogen Cooled Dry Ice in Water! Dry Ice vs. Liquid Nitrogen! Dry ice is cold. Liquid nitrogen is cold, too. What happens when the two are mixed together? [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: Have you ever wondered what happens when you mix dry ice and liquid nitrogen? Steve: Well, we just happen to have a chunk of dry ice left over from when we filmed 'How to Make a Cloud Chamber,' and here at Jefferson Lab, liquid nitrogen flows like water, so we're going to find out!

254

Ice Formation in Gas-Diffusion Layers  

SciTech Connect

Under sub-freezing conditions, ice forms in the gas-diffusion layer (GDL) of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) drastically reducing cell performance. Although a number of strategies exist to prevent ice formation, there is little fundamental understanding of the mechanisms of freezing within PEMFC components. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is used to elucidate the effects of hydrophobicity (Teflon® loading) and water saturation on the rate of ice formation within three commercial GDLs. We find that as the Teflon® loading increases, the crystallization temperature decreases due to a change in internal ice/substrate contact angle, as well as the attainable level of water saturation. Classical nucleation theory predicts the correct trend in freezing temperature with Teflon® loading.

Dursch, Thomas; Radke, Clayton J.; Weber, Adam Z.

2010-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

255

Aging of Accreted Ice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The effect of annealing in accreted ice has been investigated for artificially grown ice deposits after 100 days of storage in a deep freeze unit. Cross sections of the cylindrical deposits have been cut and replicated soon after growth and ...

F. Prodi; L. Levi

1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

256

ARM - Measurement - Ice nuclei  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to hear from you Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Ice nuclei Small particles around which ice particles form. Categories Cloud Properties...

257

Anemometry in Icing Conditions  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The accuracy of wind measurements in icing conditions is discussed, and wind tunnel calibrations as well as field comparisons are presented for three heated anemometers that use different measuring principles. It is pointed out that ice-free ...

Lasse Makkonen; Pertti Lehtonen; Lauri Helle

2001-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

258

Smoothed particle hydrodynamics Non-Newtonian model for ice-sheet and ice-shelf dynamics  

SciTech Connect

Mathematical modeling of ice sheets is complicated by the non-linearity of the governing equations and boundary conditions. Standard grid-based methods require complex front tracking techniques and have limited capability to handle large material deformations and abrupt changes in bottom topography. As a consequence, numerical methods are usually restricted to shallow ice sheet and ice shelf approximations. We propose a new smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) non-Newtonian model for coupled ice sheet and ice shelf dynamics. SPH, a fully Lagrangian particle method, is highly scalable and its Lagrangian nature and meshless discretization are well suited to the simulation of free surface ?ows, large material deformation, and material fragmentation. In this paper, SPH is used to study 3D ice sheet/ice shelf behavior, and the dynamics of the grounding line. The steady state position of the grounding line obtained from SPH simulations is in good agreement with laboratory observations for a wide range of simulated bedrock slopes, and density ratios, similar to those of ice and sea water. The numerical accuracy of the SPH algorithm is veri?ed by simulating Poiseuille ?ow, plane shear ?ow with free surface and the propagation of a blob of ice along a horizontal surface. In the laboratory experiment, the ice was represented with a viscous Newtonian ?uid. In the present work, however, the ice is modeled as both viscous Newtonian ?uid and non-Newtonian ?uid, such that the e?ect of non-Newtonian rheology on the dynamics of grounding line was examined. The non-Newtonian constitutive relation is prescribed to be Glen’s law for the creep of polycrystalline ice. A V-shaped bedrock ramp is further introduced to model the real geometry of bedrock slope.

Pan, Wenxiao; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Monaghan, Joseph J.

2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

A Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics Model for Ice Sheet and Ice Shelf Dynamics  

SciTech Connect

Mathematical modeling of ice sheets is complicated by the non-linearity of the governing equations and boundary conditions. Standard grid-based methods require complex front tracking techniques and have limited capability to handle large material deformations and abrupt changes in bottom topography. As a consequence, numerical methods are usually restricted to shallow ice sheet and ice shelf approximations. We propose a new smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) model for coupled ice sheet and ice shelf dynamics. SPH is a fully Lagrangian particle method. It is highly scalable and its Lagrangian nature and meshless discretization are well suited to the simulation of free surface flows, large material deformation, and material fragmentation. In this paper SPH is used to study ice sheet/ice shelf behavior, and the dynamics of the grounding line. The steady state position of the grounding line obtained from the SPH simulations is in good agreement with laboratory observations for a wide range of simulated bedrock slopes, and density ratios similar to those of ice and sea water. The numerical accuracy of the SPH algorithm is further verified by simulating the plane shear flow of two immiscible fluids and the propagation of a highly viscous blob of fluid along a horizontal surface. In the experiment, the ice was represented with a viscous newtonian fluid. For consistency, in the described SPH model the ice is also modeled as a viscous newtonian fluid. Typically, ice sheets are modeled as a non-Newtonian fluid, accounting for the changes in the mechanical properties of ice. Implementation of a non-Newtonian rheology in the SPH model is the subject of our ongoing research.

Pan, Wenxiao; Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.; Monaghan, Joseph J.

2012-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

260

Stability of ferroelectric ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We theoretically study the stability conditions of the ferroelectric ice of the Cmc21 structure, which has been considered, for decades, one of the most promising candidates of the low temperature proton-ordered phase of pure ice Ih. It turned out that the Cmc21 structure is stable only with a certain amount of dopant and the true proton-ordered phase of pure ice Ih remains to be found at lower temperature. Implication for spin ice is mentioned.

Iitaka, Toshiaki

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water content" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

A Reformulated Three-Layer Sea Ice Model  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A model is presented that provides an efficient approximation to sea ice thermodynamics for climate studies. Semtner’s three-layer framework is used, but the brine content of the upper ice is represented with a variable heat capacity as is done ...

Michael Winton

2000-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

262

Coupled Sea Ice–Ocean-State Estimation in the Labrador Sea and Baffin Bay  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sea ice variability in the Labrador Sea is of climatic interest because of its relationship to deep convection, mode-water formation, and the North Atlantic atmospheric circulation. Historically, quantifying the relationship between sea ice and ...

Ian Fenty; Patrick Heimbach

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Mesoscale Boundary Layer and Heat Flux Variations over Pack Ice–Covered Lake Erie  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of extensive pack ice fields on the Great Lakes significantly influences lake-effect storms and local airmass modification, as well as the regional hydrologic cycle and lake water levels. The evolution of the ice fields and their ...

Mathieu R. Gerbush; David A. R. Kristovich; Neil F. Laird

2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

An Application of an Explicit Microphysics Mesoscale Model to a Regional Icing Event  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A hydrostatic regional prediction model is modified to permit the existence of both liquid and ice hydrometeors within the same grid volume. The modified model includes an efficient ice-water saturation adjustment and a simple procedure to create ...

George D. Modica; Scot T. Heckman; Roy M. Rasmussen

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

An Intercomparison of Mesoscale Forecasts of Aircraft Icing Using SSM/I Retrievals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A technique for the detection of supercooled liquid water (SLW) from Special Sensor Microwave/ (SSM/I) data is discussed. For this study, these SLW retrievals depict areas of icing that are used to compare against different aircraft icing ...

André Tremblay; Stewart G. Cober; Anna Glazer; George Isaac; Jocelyn Mailhot

1996-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

266

Comparative ICE genomics: insights into the evolution of the SXT/R391 family of ICEs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Integrating and conjugative elements (ICEs) are one of the three principal types of self-transmissible mobile genetic elements in bacteria. ICEs, like plasmids, transfer via conjugation; but unlike plasmids and similar to many phages, these elements integrate into and replicate along with the host chromosome. Members of the SXT/R391 family of ICEs have been isolated from several species of gram-negative bacteria, including Vibrio cholerae, the cause of cholera, where they have been important vectors for disseminating genes conferring resistance to antibiotics. Here we developed a plasmid-based system to capture and isolate SXT/R391 ICEs for sequencing. Comparative analyses of the genomes of 13 SXT/R391 ICEs derived from diverse hosts and locations revealed that they contain 52 perfectly syntenic and nearly identical core genes that serve as a scaffold capable of mobilizing an array of variable DNA. Furthermore, selection pressure to maintain ICE mobility appears to have restricted insertions of variable DNA into intergenic sites that do not interrupt core functions. The variable genes confer diverse element-specific phenotypes, such as resistance to antibiotics. Functional analysis of a set of deletion mutants revealed that less than half of the conserved core genes are required for ICE mobility; the functions of most of the dispensable core genes are unknown. Several lines of evidence suggest that there has been extensive recombination between SXT/R391 ICEs, resulting in re-assortment of their respective variable gene content. Furthermore,

Rachel A. F. Wozniak; Derrick E. Fouts; Matteo Spagnoletti; Mauro M. Colombo

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Response of ice and liquid water paths of tropical cyclones to global warming simulated by a global nonhydrostatic model with explicit cloud microphysics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Cloud feedback plays a key role in the future climate projection. Using global non-hydrostatic model (GNHM) simulation data for a present-day (CTL) and a warmer (GW) experiment, we estimate the contribution of tropical cyclones (TC) to ice/liquid ...

Yohei Yamada; Masaki Satoh

268

Effects of ice particle size vertical inhomogeneity on the passive remote sensing of ice clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The solar reflectance bi-spectral (SRBS) and infrared split-window (IRSpW) methods are two of the most popular techniques for passive ice cloud property retrievals from multispectral imagers. Ice clouds are usually assumed to be vertically homogeneous in global operational algorithms based on these methods, although significant vertical variations of ice particle size are typically observed in ice clouds. In this study we investigate uncertainties in retrieved optical thickness, effective particle size, and ice water path introduced by a homogeneous cloud assumption in both the SRBS and IRSpW methods, and focus on whether the assumption can lead to significant discrepancies between the two methods. The study simulates the upwelling spectral radiance associated with vertically structured clouds and passes the results through representative SRBS and IRSpW retrieval algorithms. Cloud optical thickness is limited to values for which IRSpW retrievals are possible (optical thickness less than about 7). When the ice cloud is optically thin and yet has a significant ice particle size vertical variation, it is found that both methods tend to underestimate the effective radius and ice water path. The reason for the underestimation is the nonlinear dependence of ice particle scattering properties (extinction and single scattering albedo) on the effective radius. Because the nonlinearity effect is stronger in the IRSpW than the SRBS method, the IRSpW-based IWP tends to be smaller than the SRBS counterpart. When the ice cloud is moderately optically thick and ice particle size increases monotonically towards cloud base, the two methods are in qualitative agreement; in the event that ice particle size decreases towards cloud base, the effective radius and ice water path retrievals based on the SRBS method are substantially larger than those from the IRSpW. The main findings of this study suggest that the homogenous cloud assumption can affect the SRBS and IRSpW methods to different extents and, consequently, can lead to significantly different retrievals. Therefore caution should be taken when comparing and combining the ice cloud property retrievals from these two methods.

Zhang, Zhibo; Platnick, Steven; Yang, Ping; Heidinger, Andrew K.; Comstock, Jennifer M.

2010-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

269

Active probing of cloud multiple scattering, optical depth, vertical thickness, and liquid water content using wide-angle imaging LIDAR.  

SciTech Connect

At most optical wavelengths, laser light in a cloud lidar experiment is not absorbed but merely scattered out of the beam, eventually escaping the cloud via multiple scattering. There is much information available in this light scattered far from the input beam, information ignored by traditional 'on-beam' lidar. Monitoring these off-beam returns in a fully space- and time-resolved manner is the essence of our unique instrument, Wide Angle Imaging Lidar (WAIL). In effect, WAIL produces wide-field (60-degree full-angle) 'movies' of the scattering process and records the cloud's radiative Green functions. A direct data product of WAIL is the distribution of photon path lengths resulting from multiple scattering in the cloud. Following insights from diffusion theory, we can use the measured Green functions to infer the physical thickness and optical depth of the cloud layer, and, from there, estimate the volume-averaged liquid water content. WAIL is notable in that it is applicable to optically thick clouds, a regime in which traditional lidar is reduced to ceilometry. Here we present recent WAIL data oti various clouds and discuss the extension of WAIL to full diurnal monitoring by means of an ultra-narrow magneto-optic atomic line filter for daytime measurements.

Love, Steven P.; Davis, A. B. (Anthony B.); Rohde, C. A. (Charles A.); Tellier, L. L. (Larry L.); Ho, Cheng,

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

STATEMENT OF WORK (SOW) TEMPLATE FOR ICE SUPPORT CONTRACTOR  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ICE SUPPORT CONTRACTOR ICE SUPPORT CONTRACTOR The template presented below is a Statement of Work (SOW) for services of an ICE Support Contractor for assisting OECM in conducting an ICE. Project and review specific information should be incorporated. Explanatory text appears in italics, while information that should be selected appears in >. The format and contents of this SOW is not compulsory, and the use is at the discretion of the OECM Analysts, tailored as appropriate for the desired contractor support activities. If no contractor support is required, this appendix is not used. Statement of Work for Independent Cost Estimate (ICE) > <ICE (i.e., Alternative Selection and Cost Range (CD-1), Establish

271

Organic Tank Safety Project: development of a method to measure the equilibrium water content of Hanford organic tank wastes and demonstration of method on actual waste  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Some of Hanford`s underground waste storage tanks contain Organic- bearing high level wastes that are high priority safety issues because of potentially hazardous chemical reactions of organics with inorganic oxidants in these wastes such as nitrates and nitrites. To ensure continued safe storage of these wastes, Westinghouse Hanford Company has placed affected tanks on the Organic Watch List and manages them under special rules. Because water content has been identified as the most efficient agent for preventing a propagating reaction and is an integral part of the criteria developed to ensure continued safe storage of Hanford`s organic-bearing radioactive tank wastes, as part of the Organic Tank Safety Program the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory developed and demonstrated a simple and easily implemented procedure to determine the equilibrium water content of these potentially reactive wastes exposed to the range of water vapor pressures that might be experienced during the wastes` future storage. This work focused on the equilibrium water content and did not investigate the various factors such as @ ventilation, tank surface area, and waste porosity that control the rate that the waste would come into equilibrium, with either the average Hanford water partial pressure 5.5 torr or other possible water partial pressures.

Scheele, R.D.; Bredt, P.R.; Sell, R.L.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

LIMITS TO ICE ON ASTEROIDS (24) THEMIS AND (65) CYBELE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We present optical spectra of (24) Themis and (65) Cybele, two large main-belt asteroids on which exposed water ice has recently been reported. No emission lines, expected from resonance fluorescence in gas sublimated from the ice, were detected. Derived limits to the production rates of water are {approx}ice because the measured albedos of Themis and Cybele are low ({approx}0.05-0.07). We also rule out models in which a large fraction of the surface is occupied by low-albedo ('dirty') water ice because dirty ice would be warm and would sublimate strongly enough for gaseous products to have been detected. If ice exists on these bodies it must be relatively clean (albedo {approx}>0.3) and confined to a fraction of the Earth-facing surface {approx}ice. If the ice is even more reflective (albedo {approx}>0.6), then the timescale for sublimation of an optically thick layer can rival the {approx}10{sup 3} yr interval between impacts with bodies this size. In this sense, exposure by impact may be a quasi steady-state feature of ice-containing asteroids at 3 AU.

Jewitt, David; Guilbert-Lepoutre, Aurelie, E-mail: jewitt@ucla.edu [Department of Earth and Space Sciences, UCLA, CA 90095 (United States)

2012-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

273

Testing ice microphysics parameterizations in the NCAR Community Atmospheric Model Version 3 using Tropical Warm Pool–International Cloud Experiment data  

SciTech Connect

Cloud properties have been simulated with a new double-moment microphysics scheme under the framework of the single column version of NCAR CAM3. For comparisons, the same simulation was made with the standard single-moment microphysics scheme of CAM3. Results from both simulations were compared favorably with observations during the Tropical Warm Pool- International Cloud Experiment by US Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Program in terms of the temporal variation and vertical distribution of cloud fraction and cloud condensate. Major differences between the two simulations are in the magnitude and distribution of ice water content within the mixed-phase cloud during the monsoon period, though the total frozen water (snow plus ice) content is similar. The ice mass content in the mixed-phase cloud from the new scheme is larger than that from the standard scheme, and extends 2 km further downward, which are closer to observations. The dependence of the frozen water mass fraction in total condensate on temperature from the new scheme is also closer to available observations. Outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) at the top of the atmosphere (TOA) from the simulation with the new scheme is in general larger than that with the standard scheme, while the surface downward longwave radiation is similar. Sensitivity tests suggest that different treatments of the ice effective radius contribute significantly to the difference in the TOA OLR in addition to cloud water path. The deep convection process affects both TOA OLR and surface downward longwave radiation. The over-frequently-triggered deep convention process in the model is not the only mechanism for the excess middle and high level clouds. Further evaluation especially for ice cloud properties based on in-situ data is needed.

Wang, Weiguo; Liu, Xiaohong; Xie, Shaocheng; Boyle, James; McFarlane, Sally A.

2009-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

274

Photophysiology and cellular composition of sea ice algae  

SciTech Connect

The productivity of sea ice algae depends on their physiological capabilities and the environmental conditions within various microhabitats. Pack ice is the dominant form of sea ice, but the photosynthetic activity of associated algae has rarely been studied. Biomass and photosynthetic rates of ice algae of the Weddell-Scotia Sea were investigated during autumn and winter, the period when ice cover grows from its minimum to maximum. Biomass-specific photosynthetic rates typically ranged from 0.3 to 3.0 {mu}g C {center dot} {mu}g chl{sup {minus}1} {center dot} h{sup {minus}1} higher than land-fast ice algae but similar to Antarctic phytoplankton. Primary production in the pack ice during winter may be minor compared to annual phytoplankton production, but could represent a vital seasonal contribution to the Antarctic ecosystem. Nutrient supply may limit the productivity of ice algae. In McMurdo Sound, congelation ice algae appeared to be more nutrient deficient than underlying platelet ice algae based on: lower nitrogen:carbon, chlorophyll:carbon, and protein:carbohydrate; and {sup 14}C-photosynthate distribution to proteins and phospholipids was lower, while distribution to polysaccharides and neutral lipids was higher. Depletion of nitrate led to decreased nitrogen:carbon, chlorophyll:carbon, protein:carbohydrate, and {sup 14}C-photosynthate to proteins. Studied were conducted during the spring bloom; therefore, nutrient limitation may only apply to dense ice algal communities. Growth limiting conditions may be alleviated when algae are released into seawater during the seasonal recession of the ice cover. To continue growth, algae must adapt to the variable light field encountered in a mixed water column. Photoadaptation was studied in surface ice communities and in bottom ice communities.

Lizotte, M.P.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

275

Radar Backscattering of Microwaves by Spongy Ice Spheres  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The radar backscattering cross section of a spongy ice hailstone—a mixture of ice and liquid water—depends on its size, shape and dielectric function. There are two types of theories of the effective dielectric function of two-component mixtures: ...

Craig F. Bohren; Louis J. Battan

1982-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

Observation of Ice Crystal Formation in Lower Arctic Atmosphere  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Clear sky ice crystals or diamond dust displays are observed in polar regions, both remote and populated; when the temperature falls to ?20°C and where abundant sources of water vapor are present. In remote areas of the Arctic, these ice crystals ...

Takeshi Ohtake; Kolf Jayaweera; Ken-Ichi Sakurai

1982-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

277

Characterization of a Modified Hexagonal Silver Iodide Ice Nucleus Aerosol  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new ice nucleant aerosol was produced by combustion of a 2% AgI-0.5 mole % Bil3-NH4I-acetone-water solution. The ice nucleating effectiveness of this aerosol is an order of magnitude greater than AgI alone at ?10°C. An X-ray powder analysis ...

Paul T. Scott; William G. Finnegan; Peter C. Sinclair

1989-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Passive ice freezing-releasing heat pipe. [Patent application  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat pipe device has been developed which permits completely passive ice formation and periodic release of ice without requiring the ambient temperature to rise above the melting point of water. This passive design enables the maximum amount of cooling capacity to be stored in the tank.

Gorski, A.J.; Schertz, W.W.

1980-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

279

CEDR Content  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CEDR Content" CEDR Content" "The Consolidated Energy Data Report (CEDR) consists of 27 worksheets that should be completed by each site, as applicable, and included as part each site's SSP in a MS Excel electronic format. The CEDR is due to the SPO no later than December 9th." "Worksheet",,"Overview","Action" 1.1,"Content","Stand-alone overview of the CEDR tabs.","None" 2.1,"Funds, Meters, Training","Collects information on energy and water spending, and metering status.","If applicable, complete cells highlighted in orange. Edited and new data cells should be highlighted in light blue." 3.1,"BTU & Gal Key","Reference tab containing all factors and dropdown menu information for all tabs starting with ""3"". If you need to divide up the CEDR, please keep all tabs starting with ""3"" together to ensure calculation links are not broken. ","None"

280

Liquid Nitrogen Ice Cream  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Liquid Nitrogen Ice Cream If you have access to liquid nitrogen and the proper safety equipment and training, try this in place of your normal cryogenics demonstration Download...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water content" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Transporting Dry Ice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Requirements for Shipping Dry Ice IATA PI 904 Source: Reg of the Day from ERCweb 2006 Environmental Resource Center | 919-469-1585 | webmaster@ercweb.com http:...

282

Mobile Ice Nucleus Spectrometer  

SciTech Connect

This first year report presents results from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study to assess the flow and temperature profiles within the mobile ice nucleus spectrometer.

Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Kok, G. L.

2012-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

283

Low-Dimensional Water on Ru(0001); Model System for X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy Studies of Liquid Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

geometries other than ice and gas-phase. This approach has1-4 . In its condensed ice Ih phase each water molecule is150 K. Spectra of gas phase and ice 5, 15, 16 are shown as

Nordlund, D.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Ice in Clouds Experiment—Layer Clouds. Part I: Ice Growth Rates Derived from Lenticular Wave Cloud Penetrations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lenticular wave clouds are used as a natural laboratory to estimate the linear and mass growth rates of ice particles at temperatures from ?20° to ?32°C and to characterize the apparent rate of ice nucleation at water saturation at a nearly ...

Andrew J. Heymsfield; Paul R. Field; Matt Bailey; Dave Rogers; Jeffrey Stith; Cynthia Twohy; Zhien Wang; Samuel Haimov

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Ice Formation in Arctic Mixed-Phase Clouds: Insights from a 3-D Cloud-Resolving Model with Size-Resolved Aerosol and Cloud Microphysics  

SciTech Connect

The single-layer mixed-phase clouds observed during the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program’s Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) are simulated with a 3-dimensional cloud-resolving model the System for Atmospheric Modeling (SAM) coupled with an explicit bin microphysics scheme and a radar-lidar simulator. Two possible ice enhancement mechanisms – activation of droplet evaporation residues by condensation-followed-by-freezing and droplet freezing by contact freezing inside-out, are scrutinized by extensive comparisons with aircraft and radar and lidar measurements. The locations of ice initiation associated with each mechanism and the role of ice nuclei (IN) in the evolution of mixed-phase clouds are mainly addressed. Simulations with either mechanism agree well with the in-situ and remote sensing measurements on ice microphysical properties but liquid water content is slightly underpredicted. These two mechanisms give very similar cloud microphysical, macrophysical, dynamical, and radiative properties, although the ice nucleation properties (rate, frequency and location) are completely different. Ice nucleation from activation of evaporation nuclei is most efficient near cloud top areas concentrated on the edges of updrafts, while ice initiation from the drop freezing process has no significant location preference (occurs anywhere that droplet evaporation is significant). Both enhanced nucleation mechanisms contribute dramatically to ice formation with ice particle concentration of 10-15 times higher relative to the simulation without either of them. The contribution of ice nuclei (IN) recycling from ice particle evaporation to IN and ice particle concentration is found to be very significant in this case. Cloud can be very sensitive to IN initially and form a nonquilibrium transition condition, but become much less sensitive as cloud evolves to a steady mixed-phase condition. The parameterization of Meyers et al. [1992] with the observed MPACE IN concentration is able to predict the observed mixed-phase clouds reasonably well. This validation may facilitate the application of this parameterization in the cloud and climate models to simulate Arctic clouds.

Fan, Jiwen; Ovtchinnikov, Mikhail; Comstock, Jennifer M.; McFarlane, Sally A.; Khain, Alexander

2009-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

286

Reionization on ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The case for substantial far infrared ice emission in local ultraluminous infrared galaxies, expected based on the presence of mid-infrared ice absorption in their spectra and the known far infrared optical properties of ice, is still largely unsupported by direct observation owing to insufficient far infrared spectral coverage. Some marginal supportive evidence is presented here. A clear consequence of far infrared ice emission is the need to extend the range of redshifts considered for submillimeter sources. This is demonstrated via the example of HDF 850.1. The solid phase of the ISM during reionization may be dominated by ice, and this could lead to the presence of reionization sources in submillimeter source catalogs. Submillimeter sources not detected at 24 micron in the GOODS-N field are examined. Two candidate reionization sources are identified at 3.6 micron through possible Gunn-Peterson saturation in the Z band.

C. C. Dudley; M. Imanishi; P. R. Maloney

2006-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

287

Water Data Report: An Annotated Bibliography  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Towers Dishwashers Evaporative coolers Faucets Food steamers Hot water dispensers Ice machines Landscape irrigation Pre-rinse spray

Dunham Whitehead, Camilla; Melody, Moya

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

288

Ice Growth from the Vapor at ?5°C  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Results are summarized and illustrated from a long series of experiments on ice growth from the vapor, nearly all in a very small range of conditions: ?5°C, slightly below liquid water saturation, with minimal environmental gradients and no ...

Charles A. Knight

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

289

Hydrological and biogeochemical cycling along the Greenland ice sheet margin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Global warming has led to a significant increase in Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) melt and runoff since 1990, resulting in escalated export of fresh water and associated sediment to the surrounding North Atlantic and Arctic ...

Bhatia, Maya Pilar, 1979-

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

290

The Growth of Ice Crystals by Molecular Diffusion  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The mass transfer of water molecules by diffusion onto ice particles is best described by their Sherwood number (Sh), a dimensionless quantity, which combines molecular and convective effects and depends on the airflow as represented by the ...

Hyun Youk; Roland List; Theophilus Ola

2006-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Ice Cream with a Heart Create a new Clemson Ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ice Cream with a Heart Contest! Create a new Clemson Ice Cream flavor! Raise money for your favorite charity! Win a free Clemson Ice Cream party for your organization! Enter at www organizations. The contest is called Ice Cream with a Heart and its purpose is to help student organizations

Bolding, M. Chad

292

Gas processing/The boiling behavior of LPG and liquid ethane, ethylene, propane, and n-butane spilled on water  

SciTech Connect

Boiling-rate calorimeter studies showed that unlike liquid nitrogen, methane, and LNG, LPG (84.7% propane, 6.0% ethane, and 9.3% n-butane; 442/sup 0/C bp), or pure propane, when rapidly spilled on water, reacted violently, ejecting water and ice into the vapor space; but in 1-2 sec, a coherent ice layer was formed and further boiloff was quiet and well predicted by a simple one-dimensional, moving-boundary-value, heat transfer model with a growing ice shield. Increasing the content of ethane and butane in LPG to 20% and 10%, respectively, had almost no effect on the LPG boiling, indicating that boiling may be modeled by using pure propane. Ethane, ethylene, and n-butane behaved quite differently from LPG. In spills of pure liquid propane on solid ice, the boiloff rate was almost identical to that predicted by the moving-boundary model.

Reid, R.C.; Smith, K.A.

1978-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Limits to Ice on Asteroids (24) Themis and (65) Cybele  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present optical spectra of (24) Themis and (65) Cybele, two large main-belt asteroids on which exposed water ice has recently been reported. No emission lines, expected from resonance fluorescence in gas sublimated from the ice, were detected. Derived limits to the production rates of water are 0.3) and confined to a fraction of the Earth-facing surface 0.6) then the timescale for sublimation of an optically thick layer can rival the 10^3 yr interval between impacts with bodies this size. In this sense, exposure by impact may be a quasi steady-state feature of ice-containing asteroids at 3 AU.

Jewitt, D

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

294

Evaluation of Cloud-Resolving Model Intercomparison Simulations Using TWP-ICE Observations: Precipitation and Cloud Structure  

SciTech Connect

The Tropical Warm Pool – International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) provided high quality model forcing and observational datasets through which detailed model and observational intercomparisons could be performed. In this first of a two part study, precipitation and cloud structures within nine cloud-resolving model simulations are compared with scanning radar reflectivity and satellite infrared brightness temperature observations during an active monsoon period from 19 to 25 January 2006. Most simulations slightly overestimate volumetric convective rainfall. Overestimation of simulated convective area by 50% or more in several simulations is somewhat offset by underestimation of mean convective rain rates. Stratiform volumetric rainfall is underestimated by 13% to 53% despite overestimation of stratiform area by up to 65% because stratiform rain rates in every simulation are much lower than observed. Although simulations match the peaked convective radar reflectivity distribution at low levels, they do not reproduce the peaked distributions observed above the melting level. Simulated radar reflectivity aloft in convective regions is too high in most simulations. In stratiform regions, there is a large spread in model results with none resembling observed distributions. Above the melting level, observed radar reflectivity decreases more gradually with height than simulated radar reflectivity. A few simulations produce unrealistically uniform and cold 10.8-?m infrared brightness temperatures, but several simulations produce distributions close to observed. Assumed ice particle size distributions appear to play a larger role than ice water contents in producing incorrect simulated radar reflectivity distributions aloft despite substantial differences in mean graupel and snow water contents across models.

Varble, Adam; Fridlind, Ann; Zipser, Edward J.; Ackerman, Andrew; Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre; Fan, Jiwen; Hill, Adrian; McFarlane, Sally A.; Pinty, Jean-Pierre; Shipway, Ben

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

295

Arctic Sea ice model sensitivities.  

SciTech Connect

Arctic sea ice is an important component of the global climate system and, due to feedback effects, the Arctic ice cover is changing rapidly. Predictive mathematical models are of paramount importance for accurate estimates of the future ice trajectory. However, the sea ice components of Global Climate Models (GCMs) vary significantly in their prediction of the future state of Arctic sea ice and have generally underestimated the rate of decline in minimum sea ice extent seen over the past thirty years. One of the contributing factors to this variability is the sensitivity of the sea ice state to internal model parameters. A new sea ice model that holds some promise for improving sea ice predictions incorporates an anisotropic elastic-decohesive rheology and dynamics solved using the material-point method (MPM), which combines Lagrangian particles for advection with a background grid for gradient computations. We evaluate the variability of this MPM sea ice code and compare it with the Los Alamos National Laboratory CICE code for a single year simulation of the Arctic basin using consistent ocean and atmospheric forcing. Sensitivities of ice volume, ice area, ice extent, root mean square (RMS) ice speed, central Arctic ice thickness,and central Arctic ice speed with respect to ten different dynamic and thermodynamic parameters are evaluated both individually and in combination using the Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications (DAKOTA). We find similar responses for the two codes and some interesting seasonal variability in the strength of the parameters on the solution.

Peterson, Kara J.; Bochev, Pavel Blagoveston; Paskaleva, Biliana Stefanova

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Vortex ice in nanostructured superconductors  

SciTech Connect

We demonstrate using numerical simulations of nanostructured superconductors that it is possible to realize vortex ice states that are analogous to square and kagome ice. The system can be brought into a state that obeys either global or local ice rules by applying an external current according to an annealing protocol. We explore the breakdown of the ice rules due to disorder in the nanostructure array and show that in square ice, topological defects appear along grain boundaries, while in kagome ice, individual defects appear. We argue that the vortex system offers significant advantages over other artificial ice systems.

Reichhardt, Charles [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Reichhardt, Cynthia J [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Libal, Andras J [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Utah Water Research Laboratory, Utah State University, Logan UT 843228200, USA (801)7973172: FAX:(801)7973663  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

equivalence and energy content relative to a reference state of water in the ice phase at 0 o C. This energy­based calculations of radiative, sensible, latent and advective heat exchanges. An equilibrium parameterization ideas from the many existing models and parameterize the processes involved in as simple, yet physically

Tarboton, David

298

ARM - Measurement - Total cloud water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cloud water cloud water ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Total cloud water The total concentration (mass/vol) of ice and liquid water particles in a cloud; this includes condensed water content (CWC). Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. External Instruments NCEPGFS : National Centers for Environment Prediction Global Forecast System Field Campaign Instruments CSI : Cloud Spectrometer and Impactor PDI : Phase Doppler Interferometer

299

Prediction of Vessel Icing  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Vessel icing from wave-generated spray is a severe hazard to expanded marine operations in high latitudes. Hardships in making observations during operations, combined with differences in vessel type and heading, have resulted in great ...

J. E. Overland; C. H. Pease; R. W. Preisendorfer; A. L. Comiskey

1986-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

Sublimation of Ice Crystals  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recent experiments on the sublimation of single crystals of ice in an atmosphere of air indicate that the sublimation rate is diffusion limited and initially solid prismatic crystals evolve into time-independent shapes similar to confocal ...

Jon Nelson

1998-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water content" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Global Warming, Soot, Ice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Global Warming, Soot, Ice Speaker(s): James Hansen Date: November 7, 2003 - 12:00pm Location: 90-3122 Irreversible "dangerous anthropogenic interference" with the climate system...

302

Global ice sheet modeling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The University of Maine conducted this study for Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) as part of a global climate modeling task for site characterization of the potential nuclear waste respository site at Yucca Mountain, NV. The purpose of the study was to develop a global ice sheet dynamics model that will forecast the three-dimensional configuration of global ice sheets for specific climate change scenarios. The objective of the third (final) year of the work was to produce ice sheet data for glaciation scenarios covering the next 100,000 years. This was accomplished using both the map-plane and flowband solutions of our time-dependent, finite-element gridpoint model. The theory and equations used to develop the ice sheet models are presented. Three future scenarios were simulated by the model and results are discussed.

Hughes, T.J.; Fastook, J.L. [Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States). Institute for Quaternary Studies

1994-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Contractor SOW Template - ICE | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

SOW Template - ICE Contractor SOW Template - ICE Contractor SOW Template - ICE.pdf More Documents & Publications Contractor SOW Template - ICR Statement of Work (SOW) Template...

304

ICE Cleaning Test Report.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

16 16 FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF THE ICE 250 TM CLEANING SYSTEM AT THE ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER CASPER, WYOMING August 18-19, 1999 Date Published: October 5, 1999 J.L. Johnston L.M. Jackson PREPARED FOR THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY/ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER Work Performed Under Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) CRADA No. 99-009 TABLE OF CONTENTS Abstract.............................................................................................................................................1 Introduction.......................................................................................................................................1 Product Description ...........................................................................................................................1

305

Field demonstration of the ICE 250[trademark] Cleaning System  

SciTech Connect

The ICE 250[trademark] Cleaning System was engineered to convert water into small ice particles for use in cleaning and decontamination applications. Ice crystals are produced in a special icemaker and pressured through a hose-nozzle onto the surface to be cleaned. The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center and Ice Cleaning Systems, Inc., conducted a test of this system at Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 to evaluate the system's cleaning capabilities in an oil field environment. Equipment cleaned included an oil storage tank, a rod pumping unit, a road grader, and a wellhead. Contaminants were unrefined sour crude oil, hydraulic fluid, paraffin, and dirt, occurring separately and as mixtures. In all four demonstration cleaning tasks, the ICE 250 System effectively removed surface contaminant mixtures in a timely manner and left no oily residue. A minimal amount of waste moistur2048s generated, thereby reducing cleanup and disposal costs.

Johnston, J.L.; Jackson, L.M.

1999-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

306

Field demonstration of the ICE 250{trademark} Cleaning System  

SciTech Connect

The ICE 250{trademark} Cleaning System was engineered to convert water into small ice particles for use in cleaning and decontamination applications. Ice crystals are produced in a special icemaker and pressured through a hose-nozzle onto the surface to be cleaned. The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center and Ice Cleaning Systems, Inc., conducted a test of this system at Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 to evaluate the system's cleaning capabilities in an oil field environment. Equipment cleaned included an oil storage tank, a rod pumping unit, a road grader, and a wellhead. Contaminants were unrefined sour crude oil, hydraulic fluid, paraffin, and dirt, occurring separately and as mixtures. In all four demonstration cleaning tasks, the ICE 250 System effectively removed surface contaminant mixtures in a timely manner and left no oily residue. A minimal amount of waste moisture was generated, thereby reducing cleanup and disposal costs.

Johnston, J.L.; Jackson, L.M.

1999-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

307

Interactions of Water and Energy Mediate Responses of High-Latitude Terrestrial Ecosystems to Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

referred to as “phase change”) and ice physics; (3)2.8.1). 2.3.1.2 Phase Change and Ice in the Lake Body Theany time ice occurs below water after phase change has been

Subin, Zachary Marc

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Ice emission and the redshifts of submillimeter sources  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Observations at submillimeter wavelengths have revealed a population of sources thought to be at relatively large redshifts. The position of the 850 $\\mu$m passband on the Rayleigh-Jeans portion of the Planck function leads to a maximum redshift estimate of $z\\sim$4.5 since sources will not retain their redshift independent brightness close to the peak of the Planck function and thus drop out of surveys. Here we review evidence that ice absorption is present in the spectra of local ultraluminous infrared galaxies which are often taken as analogs for the 850 $\\mu$m source population. We consider the implication of this absorption for ice induced spectral structure at far infrared wavelengths and present marginal astronomical evidence that amorphous ice may have a feature similar to crystalline ice near 150 $\\mu$m. Recent corroborative laboratory evidence is supportive of this conclusion. It is argued that early metal enrichment by pair instability SN may lead to a high ice content relative to refractory dust at high redshift and a fairly robust detection of ice emission in a $z=6.42$ quasar is presented. It is further shown that ice emission is needed to understand the 450 $\\mu$m sources observed in the GOODS-N field. We are thus encouraged to apply far infrared ice emission models to the available observations of HDF 850.1, the brightest submillimeter source in the {\\it Hubble Deep Field}. We suggest that a redshift as large as 13 may need to be considered for this source, nearly a factor of three above the usual top estimate. Inclusion of the possibility of far infrared ice emission in the spectral energy distributions of model sources generally broadens the range of redshifts to be considered for submillimeter sources compared to models without ice emission.

C. C. Dudley; M. Imanishi; P. R. Maloney

2008-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

309

Metastable hydronium ions in UV-irradiated ice  

SciTech Connect

We show that the irradiation of UV light (10-11 eV) onto an ice film produces metastable hydronium (H{sub 3}O{sup +}) ions in the ice at low temperatures (53-140 K). Evidence of the presence of metastable hydronium ions was obtained by experiments involving adsorption of methylamine onto UV-irradiated ice films and hydrogen-deuterium (H/D) isotopic exchange reaction. The methylamine adsorption experiments showed that photogenerated H{sub 3}O{sup +} species transferred a proton to the methylamine arriving at the ice surface, thus producing the methyl ammonium ion, which was detected by low energy sputtering method. The H{sub 3}O{sup +} species induced the H/D exchange of water, which was monitored through the detection of water isotopomers on the surface by using the Cs{sup +} reactive ion scattering method. Thermal and temporal stabilities of H{sub 3}O{sup +} and its proton migration activity were examined. The lifetime of the hydronium ions in the amorphized ice was greater than 1 h at {approx}53 K and decreased to {approx}5 min at 140 K. Interestingly, a small portion of hydronium ions survived for an extraordinarily long time in the ice, even at 140 K. The average migration distance of protons released from H{sub 3}O{sup +} in the ice was estimated to be about two water molecules at {approx}54 K and about six molecules at 100 K. These results indicate that UV-generated hydronium ions can be efficiently stabilized in low-temperature ice. Such metastable hydronium ions may play a significant role in the acid-base chemistry of ice particles in interstellar clouds.

Moon, Eui-Seong; Kang, Heon [Department of Chemistry, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

310

Ice cream headache  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ice cream headache Ice cream headache Name: fath Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: What causes an "ice cream headache"? Are they dangerous? What would happen if I induced an ice cream headache when I had a regular headache? Replies: This is really a neat question. I am certainly no expert on headaches, but it has a lot to do blood circulation in the sinuses and around and within the brain. Why do some people get them easily and other seem resistant? The cold might restrict blood flow which is the basis for the problem. An Ice cream headache can be turned "on" or "off" by adjusting the rate of consumption, Slurpees work best, so really cold stuff enhances the effect. Are there stages: cold sensation, lingering headache, subsiding headache, warming, etc? Does the cold actually create similar headache "conditions" or does the brain confused cause it cannot directly feel pain? The difference in people is probably due to differences in arteriole branching and general circulation. In my experience smokers get worse headaches than nonsmokers of the same age. Do you find a similar trend? I am trying to stimulate discussion!

311

Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Designated Product: Water...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ice Makers. b Measured in accordance with ARI Standard 810-2003. Does not include condenser water use. Back to Top Buying Energy-Efficient Water-Cooled Ice Machines Several...

312

Recent Great Lakes Ice Trends  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Analysis of ice observations made by cooperative observers from shoreline stations reveals significant changes in the ice season on the North American Great Lakes over the past 35years. Although the dataset is highly inhomogeneous and year-to-...

Howard P. Hanson; Claire S. Hanson; Brenda H. Yoo

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

Dry Ice vs. Pipette Experiment Description  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Dry Ice vs. Pipette Experiment Description Dry ice (solid) is put into the bulb of a pipette, plastic pipette 1 ice cube sized piece of dry ice Butter knife (or some object to break dry ice) Gloves (surgical gloves will not work, they must protect hands from dry ice) Safety glasses for demonstrator

314

Ice maker safety control  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In a refrigeration apparatus including an evaporator, a defrost heater for defrosting the evaporator, a defrost thermostat having a switch for de-energizing the defrost heater at a preselected high temperature of the evaporator, and an ice making apparatus having a mold, a mold heater, and a control circuit controllably energized the mold heater, a safety control for the ice making apparatus is described comprising: means for thermally coupling the defrost thermostat with the mold; and means electrically connecting the defrost thermostat switch with the control circuit for de-energizing the mold heater at a preselected high temperature of the mold to prevent overheating thereof.

Linstromberg, W.J.

1988-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

315

Investigation on the Parameters Affecting the De-Icing Salt Scaling Resistance of Fly Ash Concrete  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In scaling of concrete by de-icing salts, the mortar near the surface flakes or peels away. This report presents the results of an R&D laboratory study to examine the scaling of high ash content concrete from the use of salts used routinely in cold climates to melt ice and snow on roads and sidewalks.

1998-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

316

Ice–Ice Collisions: An Ice Multiplication Process in Atmospheric Clouds  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ice in atmospheric clouds undergoes complex physical processes, interacting especially with radiation, which leads to serious impacts on global climate. After their primary production, atmospheric ice crystals multiply extensively by secondary ...

J.-I. Yano; V. T. J. Phillips

2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Open Quantum to classical phases transition in the stochastic hydrodynamic analogy: the explanation of the Lindemann relation and the analogies between the maximum of density at He lambda point and that one at water-ice phase transition  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the present paper the gas, liquid and solid phases made of structureless particles, are visited to the light of the quantum stochastic hydrodynamic analogy (SQHA). The SQHA shows that the open quantum mechanical behavior is maintained on a distance shorter than the theory-defined quantum correlation length (lc). When, the physical length of the problem is larger than lc, the model shows that the quantum (potential) interactions may have a finite range of interaction maintaining the non-local behavior on a finite distance quantum non-locality length lq. The present work shows that when the mean molecular distance is larger than the quantum non-locality length we have a classical phases (gas and van der Waals liquids) while when the mean molecular distance becomes smaller than lq or than lc we have phases such as the solid crystal or the superfluid one, respectively, that show quantum characteristics. The model agrees with Lindemann empirical law (and explains it), for the mean square deviation of atom from the equilibrium position at melting point of crystal, and shows a connection between the maximum density at the He lambda point and that one near the water-ice solidification point.

Piero Chiarelli

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

318

Impact of Solvent on Photocatalytic Mechanisms: Reactions of Photodesorption Products with Ice Overlayers on the TiO2(110) Surface  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The effects of water and methanol ice overlayers on the photodecomposition of acetone on rutile TiO2(110) were evaluated in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) using photon stimulated desorption (PSD) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD). In the absence of ice overlayers, acetone photodecomposed on TiO2(110) at 95 K by ejection of a methyl radical into the gas phase and formation of acetate on the surface. With ice overlayers, the methyl radicals are trapped at the interface between TiO2(110) and the ice. When water ice was present, these trapped methyl radicals reacted either with each other to form ethane or with other molecules in the ice (e.g., water or displaced acetone) to form methane (CH4), ethane (CH3CH3) and other products (e.g., methanol), with all of these products trapped in the ice. The new products were free to revisit the surface or depart during desorption of the ice. When methanol ice was present, methane formation came about only from reaction of trapped methyl radicals with the methanol ice. Methane and ethane slowly leaked through methanol ice overlayers into vacuum at 95 K, but not through water ice overlayers. Different degrees of site competition between water and acetone, and between methanol and acetone led to different hydrogen abstraction pathways in the two ices. These results provide new insights into product formation routes and solution-phase radical formation mechanisms that are important in heterogeneous photocatalysis.

Shen, Mingmin; Henderson, Michael A.

2011-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

319

THE SPITZER ICE LEGACY: ICE EVOLUTION FROM CORES TO PROTOSTARS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ices regulate much of the chemistry during star formation and account for up to 80% of the available oxygen and carbon. In this paper, we use the Spitzer c2d Legacy ice survey, complimented with data sets on ices in cloud cores and high-mass protostars, to determine standard ice abundances and to present a coherent picture of the evolution of ices during low- and high-mass star formation. The median ice composition H{sub 2}O:CO:CO{sub 2}:CH{sub 3}OH:NH{sub 3}:CH{sub 4}:XCN is 100:29:29:3:5:5:0.3 and 100:13:13:4:5:2:0.6 toward low- and high-mass protostars, respectively, and 100:31:38:4:-:-:- in cloud cores. In the low-mass sample, the ice abundances with respect to H{sub 2}O of CH{sub 4}, NH{sub 3}, and the component of CO{sub 2} mixed with H{sub 2}O typically vary by ice components, XCN, and CH{sub 3}OH vary by factors 2-10 between the lower and upper quartile. The XCN band correlates with CO, consistent with its OCN{sup -} identification. The origin(s) of the different levels of ice abundance variations are constrained by comparing ice inventories toward different types of protostars and background stars, through ice mapping, analysis of cloud-to-cloud variations, and ice (anti-)correlations. Based on the analysis, the first ice formation phase is driven by hydrogenation of atoms, which results in an H{sub 2}O-dominated ice. At later prestellar times, CO freezes out and variations in CO freezeout levels and the subsequent CO-based chemistry can explain most of the observed ice abundance variations. The last important ice evolution stage is thermal and UV processing around protostars, resulting in CO desorption, ice segregation, and the formation of complex organic molecules. The distribution of cometary ice abundances is consistent with the idea that most cometary ices have a protostellar origin.

Oeberg, Karin I. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Boogert, A. C. Adwin [IPAC, NASA Herschel Science Center, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Pontoppidan, Klaus M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Van den Broek, Saskia; Van Dishoeck, Ewine F. [Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, 2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Bottinelli, Sandrine [Centre d'Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements (CESR), CNRS-UMR 5187, 31028 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Blake, Geoffrey A. [California Institute of Technology, Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Evans, Neal J. [Department of Astronomy, University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712 (United States)

2011-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

320

Subglacial water presence classification from polar radar data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ground and airborne radar depth-sounding of the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets have been used for many years to remotely determine characteristics such as ice thickness, subglacial topography, and mass balance of large bodies of ice. Ice coring efforts ... Keywords: Ensemble classification, Machine learning, Pattern recognition, Radar remote sensing, Subglacial water

Christopher M. Gifford; Arvin Agah

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water content" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Field Sampling Report -Water 2005 SFEI PRISM-Methods Development  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

phase extraction). 2. Collect water samples from five sites for analysis of total chlorpyrifos and total remained in possession of Mr. Salop stored on wet ice / blue ice overnight. April 14, 2005 0730-0845 Mr. Salop stored on wet ice / blue ice overnight. April 15, 2005 0800-1130 Mr. Salop delivered appropriate

322

FREEZING WATER CLEANING A POSSIBLE IMPROVEMENT IN SRF CAVITY RINSING*  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the cavity to be rinsed. Expansion of water in the phase transition to ice can lift particles from the surface and overcome van der Waals forces. Different expansion coefficients of ice and niobium make the ice surface unstable and self- removing. The ice crust falls off together with trapped surface

323

Water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Laws Envirosearch Institutional Controls NEPA Activities RCRA RQ*Calculator Water HSS Logo Water Laws Overview of water-related legislation affecting DOE sites Clean...

324

Hail ice impact on composite structures at glancing angles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

investigation of high velocity ice impacts on woven carbon/and ice sphere. .by trailing ice fragments. ..

Funai, Sho

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Deactivation of ice nuclei due to atmospherically relevant surface coatings  

SciTech Connect

The ice nucleation characteristics of Arizona Test Dust (ATD) and illite clay, surrogates for atmospheric ice nuclei, have been determined at the Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) chamber located at the Research Center Karlsruhe in Germany. The objective of this research was to determine the effect of sulphuric acid and ammonium sulphate coatings on the ability of these mineral dust surrogates to nucleate ice in an environment where particles realistically compete for water vapor. Coated ATD particles required higher saturations at all investigated temperatures, from -20 to -45º C, than did identical uncoated particles. Freezing of coated particles often required saturations approaching those for the homogeneous freezing of aqueous solutions of the coating material alone. Less pronounced effects were found for illite although the presence of a coating consistently increased the saturation or decreased the temperature required for ice formation. Analysis of ice residue at the single particle level suggests that the first coated particles to freeze had thinner or incomplete coatings when compared to particles that froze later in the expansion. This observation highlights a need to verify coating properties since an assumption of homogeneity of a group of coated aerosol may be incorrect. The increase in saturation ratio for freezing suggests that gas-phase uptake of sulphates, a large fraction of which are due to anthropogenic emissions, will reduce the ice and mixed-phase cloud formation potential of atmospheric ice nuclei.

Cziczo, Daniel J.; Froyd, Karl D.; Gallavardin, S. J.; Moehler, Ottmar; Benz, Stefan; Saathoff, Harald; Murphy, Daniel M.

2009-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

326

Single Particle Laser Mass Spectrometry Applied to Differential Ice Nucleation Experiments at the AIDA Chamber  

SciTech Connect

Experiments conducted at the Aerosol Interactions and Dynamics in the Atmosphere (AIDA) chamber located in Karlsruhe, Germany permit investigation of particle properties that affect the nucleation of ice at temperature and water vapor conditions relevant to cloud microphysics and climate issues. Ice clouds were generated by heterogeneous nucleation of Arizona test dust (ATD), illite, and hematite and homogeneous nucleation of sulfuric acid. Ice crystals formed in the chamber were inertially separated from unactivated, or ‘interstitial’ aerosol particles with a pumped counterflow virtual impactor (PCVI), then evaporated. The ice residue (i.e., the aerosol which initiated ice nucleation plus any material which was scavenged from the gas- and/or particle-phase), was chemically characterized at the single particle level using a laser ionization mass spectrometer. In this manner the species that first nucleated ice could be identified out of a mixed aerosol population in the chamber. Bare mineral dust particles were more effective ice nuclei (IN) than similar particles with a coating. Metallic particles from contamination in the chamber initiated ice nucleation before other species but there were few enough that they did not compromise the experiments. Nitrate, sulfate, and organics were often detected on particles and ice residue, evidently from scavenging of trace gas-phase species in the chamber. Hematite was a more effective ice nucleus than illite. Ice residue was frequently larger than unactivated test aerosol due to the formation of aggregates due to scavenging, condensation of contaminant gases, and the predominance of larger aerosol in nucleation.

Gallavardin, S. J.; Froyd, Karl D.; Lohmann, U.; Moehler, Ottmar; Murphy, Daniel M.; Cziczo, Dan

2008-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

327

Thermal desorption of CH4 retained in CO2 ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

CO2 ices are known to exist in different astrophysical environments. In spite of this, its physical properties (structure, density, refractive index) have not been as widely studied as those of water ice. It would be of great value to study the adsorption properties of this ice in conditions related to astrophysical environments. In this paper, we explore the possibility that CO2 traps relevant molecules in astrophysical environments at temperatures higher than expected from their characteristic sublimation point. To fulfil this aim we have carried out desorption experiments under High Vacuum conditions based on a Quartz Crystal Microbalance and additionally monitored with a Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer. From our results, the presence of CH4 in the solid phase above the sublimation temperature in some astrophysical scenarios could be explained by the presence of several retaining mechanisms related to the structure of CO2 ice.

R. Luna; C. Millan; M. Domingo; M. A. Satorre

2008-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

328

Ice Nucleation and Droplet Formation by Bare and Coated Soot Particles  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have studied ice formation at temperatures relevant to homogeneous and heterogeneous ice nucleation, as well as droplet activation and hygroscopicity, of soot particles of variable size and composition. Coatings of adipic, malic, and oleic acid were applied to span an atmospherically relevant range of solubility, and both uncoated and oleic acid coated soot particles were exposed to ozone to simulate atmospheric oxidation. The results are interpreted in terms of onset ice nucleation, with a comparison to a mineral dust particle that acts as an efficient ice nucleus, and particle hygroscopicity. At 253K and 243K, we found no evidence of heterogeneous ice nucleation occurring above the level of detection for our experimental conditions. Above water saturation, only droplet formation was observed. At 233K, we observe the occurrence of homogeneous ice nucleation for all particles studied. Coatings also did not significantly alter the ice nucleation behavior of soot particles, but aided in the uptake of water. Hygroscopicity studies confirmed that pure soot particles were hydrophobic, and coated soot particles activated as droplets at high water supersaturations. A small amount of heterogeneous ice nucleation either below the detection limit of our instrument or concurrent with droplet formation and/or homogeneous freezing cannot be precluded, but we are able to set limits for its frequency. We conclude that both uncoated and coated soot particles representative of those generated in our studies are unlikely to significantly contribute to the global budget of heterogeneous ice nuclei at temperatures between 233K and 253K.

Friedman, Beth J.; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Beranek, Josef; Zelenyuk, Alla; Thornton, Joel A.; Cziczo, Daniel J.

2011-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

329

Surface Melting over Ice Shelves and Ice Sheets as Assessed from Modeled Surface Air Temperatures  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Summer surface melting plays an important role in the evolution of ice shelves and their progenitor ice sheets. To explore the magnitude of surface melt occurring over modern ice shelves and ice sheets in a climate scenario forced by ...

Jeremy G. Fyke; Lionel Carter; Andrew Mackintosh; Andrew J. Weaver; Katrin J. Meissner

2010-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

The Spitzer ice legacy: Ice evolution from cores to protostars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ices regulate much of the chemistry during star formation and account for up to 80% of the available oxygen and carbon. In this paper, we use the Spitzer c2d ice survey, complimented with data sets on ices in cloud cores and high-mass protostars, to determine standard ice abundances and to present a coherent picture of the evolution of ices during low- and high-mass star formation. The median ice composition H2O:CO:CO2:CH3OH:NH3:CH4:XCN is 100:29:29:3:5:5:0.3 and 100:13:13:4:5:2:0.6 toward low- and high-mass protostars, respectively, and 100:31:38:4:-:-:- in cloud cores. In the low-mass sample, the ice abundances with respect to H2O of CH4, NH3, and the component of CO2 mixed with H2O typically vary by ice components, XCN and CH3OH vary by factors 2-10 between the lower and upper quartile. The XCN band correlates with CO, consistent with its OCN- identification. The origin(s) of the different levels of ice abundance variations are cons...

Oberg, Karin I; Pontoppidan, Klaus M; Broek, Saskia van den; van Dishoeck, Ewine F; Bottinelli, Sandrine; Blake, Geoffrey A; Evans, Neal J

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Ice slurry cooling research: Storage tank ice agglomeration and extraction  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A new facility has been built to conduct research and development on important issues related to implementing ice slurry cooling technology. Ongoing studies are generating important information on the factors that influence ice particle agglomeration in ice slurry storage tanks. The studies are also addressing the development of methods to minimize and monitor agglomeration and improve the efficiency and controllability of tank extraction of slurry for distribution to cooling loads. These engineering issues impede the utilization of the ice slurry cooling concept that has been under development by various groups.

Kasza, K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Hayashi, Kanetoshi [NKK Corp., Kawasaki (Japan)

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

332

No Confinement Needed: Observation of a Metastable Hydrophobic Wetting Two-Layer Ice on Graphene  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The structure of water at interfaces is crucial for processes ranging from photocatalysis to protein folding. Here, we investigate the structure and lattice dynamics of two-layer crystalline ice films grown on a hydrophobic substrate - graphene on Pt(111) - with low energy electron diffraction, reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy, rare-gas adsorption/desorption, and ab-initio molecular dynamics. Unlike hexagonal ice, which consists of stacks of puckered hexagonal "bilayers", this new ice polymorph consists of two flat hexagonal sheets of water molecules in which the hexagons in each sheet are stacked directly on top of each other. Such two-layer ices have been predicted for water confined between hydrophobic slits, but not previously observed. Our results show that the two-layer ice forms even at zero pressure at a single hydrophobic interface by maximizing the number of hydrogen bonds at the expense of adopting a non-tetrahedral geometry with weakened bonds.

Kimmel, Gregory A.; Matthiesen, Jesper; Baer, Marcel; Mundy, Christopher J.; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Smith, R. Scott; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Kay, Bruce D.

2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

333

Adaptation of an Isopycnic Coordinate Ocean Model for the Study of Circulation beneath Ice Shelves  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Much of the Antarctic coastline comprises large, floating ice shelves, beneath which waters from the open ocean circulate. The interaction of the seawater with the base of these ice shelves has a bearing both on the rate at which Antarctic Bottom ...

David M. Holland; Adrian Jenkins

2001-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

334

Sea Ice–Atmosphere Signal of the Southern Oscillation in the Weddell Sea, Antarctica  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Composite analysis of weekly ship and shore observations of the Weddell Sea pack ice for extreme events of the Southern Oscillation (SO) occurring in the 1929–62 period reveals strong variations in ice-water concentrations in the early and late ...

Andrew M. Carleton

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Sensitivity of the Amery Ice Shelf, Antarctica, to Changes in the Climate of the Southern Ocean  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Coupled ocean–atmospheric general circulation models indicate that warming of up to 3°C may occur over the next century in waters immediately to the north of the Amery Ice Shelf. The impact of this warming on the ocean cavity under the Amery Ice ...

M. J. M. Williams; R. C. Warner; W. F. Budd

2002-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Impact of variable atmospheric and oceanic form drag on simulations of Arctic sea ice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Over Arctic sea ice, pressure ridges, floe and melt pond edges all introduce discrete obstructions to the flow of air or water past the ice, and are a source of form drag. In current climate models form drag is only accounted for by tuning the air-...

Michel Tsamados; Daniel L. Feltham; David Schroeder; Daniela Flocco; Sinead L. Farrell; Nathan Kurtz; Seymour W. Laxon; Sheldon Bacon

337

Climate Impacts of Ice Nucleation  

SciTech Connect

Several different ice nucleation parameterizations in two different General Circulation Models are used to understand the effects of ice nucleation on the mean climate state, and the climate effect of aerosol perturbations to ice clouds. The simulations have different ice microphysical states that are consistent with the spread of observations. These different states occur from different parameterizations of the ice cloud nucleation processes, and feature different balances of homogeneous and heterogeneous nucleation. At reasonable efficiencies, consistent with laboratory measurements and constrained by the global radiative balance, black carbon has a small (-0.06 Wm?2) and not statistically significant climate effect. Indirect effects of anthropogenic aerosols on cirrus clouds occur mostly due to increases in homogeneous nucleation fraction as a consequence of anthropogenic sulfur emissions. The resulting ice indirect effects do not seem strongly dependent on the ice micro-physical balance, but are slightly larger for those states with less homogeneous nucleation in the base state. The total ice AIE is estimated at 0.26±0.09 Wm?2 (1? uncertainty). This represents an offset of 20-30% of the simulated total Aerosol Indirect Effect for ice and liquid clouds.

Gettelman, A.; Liu, Xiaohong; Barahona, Donifan; Lohmann, U.; Chen, Chih-Chieh

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

338

Backhand tecniques in ice hockey.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The main objective of this project based multimedia thesis is to show video material of how to use a backhand side of the ice hockey… (more)

Luoma, Matti

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

339

Modeling of Ice Accretion on Wires  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A time-dependent numerical model of ice accretion on wires, such as overhead conductors, is presented. Simulations of atmospheric icing are made with the model in order to examine the dependence of the accreted ice amount on atmospheric ...

Lasse Makkonen

1984-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

340

ICE Raids: Compounding Production, Contradiction, and Capitalism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is just a cheap way of boosting ICE ‘criminal alien’ arrestRegardless of whether or not ICE is motivated by maintainingWorkers in America: Factories and ICE Raids Produce Citizens

Reas, Elizabeth I

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water content" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Climate, Ocean and Sea Ice Modeling (COSIM) Summary The COSIM project develops advanced ocean and ice models for evaluating the role of ocean and ice in high-latitude climate...

342

Virtual Floe Ice Drift Forecast Model Intercomparison  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Both sea ice forecast models and methods to measure their skill are needed for operational sea ice forecasting. Two simple sea ice models are described and tested here. Four different measures of skill are also tested. The forecasts from the ...

Robert W. Grumbine

1998-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Designated Product: Water-Cooled  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FEMP Designated FEMP Designated Product: Water-Cooled Ice Machines to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Designated Product: Water-Cooled Ice Machines on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Designated Product: Water-Cooled Ice Machines on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Designated Product: Water-Cooled Ice Machines on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Designated Product: Water-Cooled Ice Machines on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Designated Product: Water-Cooled Ice Machines on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Designated Product: Water-Cooled Ice Machines on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products Federal Requirements

344

ARM - Measurement - Liquid water content  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Instruments ETA : Eta Model Runs ECMWFDIAG : European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts Diagnostic Analyses ECMWF : European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts Model...

345

Evaluation of Cloud-Resolving Model Intercomparison Simulations Using TWP-ICE Observations: Precipitation and Cloud Structure  

SciTech Connect

The Tropical Warm Pool - International Cloud Experiment (TWP-ICE) provided high quality model forcing and observational datasets through which detailed model and observational intercomparisons could be performed. In this first of a two part study, precipitation and cloud structures within nine cloud-resolving model simulations are compared with scanning radar reflectivity and satellite infrared brightness temperature observations during an active monsoon period from 19 to 25 January 2006. Most simulations slightly overestimate volumetric convective rainfall. Overestimation of simulated convective area by 50% or more in several simulations is somewhat offset by underestimation of mean convective rain rates. Stratiform volumetric rainfall is underestimated by 13% to 53% despite overestimation of stratiform area by up to 65% because stratiform rain rates in every simulation are much lower than observed. Although simulations match the peaked convective radar reflectivity distribution at low levels, they do not reproduce the peaked distributions observed above the melting level. Simulated radar reflectivity aloft in convective regions is too high in most simulations. 29 In stratiform regions, there is a large spread in model results with none resembling 30 observed distributions. Above the melting level, observed radar reflectivity decreases 31 more gradually with height than simulated radar reflectivity. A few simulations produce 32 unrealistically uniform and cold 10.8-?m infrared brightness temperatures, but several 33 simulations produce distributions close to observed. Assumed ice particle size 34 distributions appear to play a larger role than ice water contents in producing incorrect 35 simulated radar reflectivity distributions aloft despite substantial differences in mean 36 graupel and snow water contents across models. 37

Varble, Adam C.; Fridlind, Ann; Zipser, Ed; Ackerman, Andrew; Chaboureau, Jean-Pierre; Fan, Jiwen; Hill, Adrian; McFarlane, Sally A.; Pinty, Jean-Pierre; Shipway, Ben

2011-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

346

BISICLES Captures Details of Retreating Antarctic Ice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

BISICLES Captures Details of Retreating Antarctic Ice BISICLES Captures Details of Retreating Antarctic Ice March 30, 2013 | Tags: Climate Research, Hopper, Math & Computer Science...

347

Synchrotrons Explore Water's Molecular Mysteries  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fluoride crystal. This surface was expected to stimulate ice formation, but even when chilled to a temperature of about 6.5 F-well below water's normal freezing point-the water...

348

Dynamics of ice shelf rift propagation and iceberg calving inferred from geodetic and seismic observations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

2. Ice Shelves . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5. Ice Rheology . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6.vi Calving Glaciers and Ice

Bassis, Jeremy N.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Ice Nucleation and Droplet Formation by Bare and Coated Black Carbon Particles  

SciTech Connect

We have studied the ice formation at heterogeneous and homogeneous temperatures, as well as droplet activation and hygroscopicity of soot particles of variable size and composition. Coatings of adipic, malic, and oleic acid were applied to span a relevant range of solubility, and both uncoated and oleic acid coated soot particles were exposed to ozone to simulate atmospheric oxidation. The results are interpreted in terms of onset ice nucleation with a comparison to a well characterized mineral dust particle that acts as an efficient ice nucleus, as well as particle hygroscopicity. At 253K and 243K, we found no evidence of heterogeneous ice nucleation occurring above the level of detection for our experimental conditions. Above water saturation, droplet formation was observed. At 233K, we observe the occurrence of homogeneous ice nucleation for all particles studied. Coatings also did not significantly alter the ice nucleation behavior of soot particles, but aided in the uptake of water. Hygroscopicity studies confirmed that pure soot particles were hydrophobic, and coated soot particles activated as droplets at high water supersaturations. A small amount of heterogeneous ice nucleation either below the detection limit of our instrument or concurrent with droplet formation and/or homogeneous freezing cannot be precluded, but we are able to set limits for its frequency. We conclude from our studies that both uncoated and coated soot particles are unlikely to contribute to the global budget of heterogeneous ice nuclei at temperatures between 233K and 253K.

Friedman, Beth J.; Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Beranek, Josef; Zelenyuk, Alla; Thornton, Joel A.; Cziczo, Daniel J.

2011-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

350

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"From PADD 1 to PADD 2 Movements by Tanker, Pipeline, and Barge" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

351

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Price for Natural Gas Pipeline and Distribution Use " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

352

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Crude Oil and Petroleum Products Movements by Tanker, Pipeline, and Barge between PAD Districts" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data"...

353

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Imports by Point of Entry " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

354

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Exports by Point of Exit " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

355

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Texas Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

356

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Texas Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

357

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Texas Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Late...

358

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Texas Natural Gas Marketed Production (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","La...

359

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Texas Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

360

Inactive Content  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Inactive Content. This page is in the process of being created or has temporarily been inactivated. If you have any questions ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water content" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Average Commercial Price " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

362

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Nevada Natural Gas Repressuring (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

363

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Natural Gas Citygate Price " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

364

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"U.S. Total Exports " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data...

365

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Contents" ,"Maryland Natural Gas Repressuring (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

366

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Utah Natural Gas Repressuring (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

367

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Contents" ,"Tennessee Natural Gas Repressuring (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

368

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Contents" ,"Kentucky Natural Gas Repressuring (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

369

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Natural Gas Industrial Price " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

370

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Alaska Natural Gas Repressuring (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

371

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Contents" ,"Utah Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

372

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Contents" ,"Missouri Natural Gas Repressuring (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

373

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Natural Gas Exports Price " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

374

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Contents" ,"Oklahoma Natural Gas Repressuring (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

375

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Contents" ,"Montana Natural Gas Repressuring (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

376

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Natural Gas Vehicle Fuel Price " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data...

377

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Natural Gas Exports (Summary) " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

378

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Natural Gas Consumption " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

379

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Natural Gas Electric Power Price " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data...

380

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Contents" ,"Arkansas Natural Gas Repressuring (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water content" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Natural Gas Imports (Summary) " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

382

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Contents" ,"Florida Natural Gas Repressuring (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

383

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Average Residential Price " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

384

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Contents" ,"Michigan Natural Gas Repressuring (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

385

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Contents" ,"Nebraska Natural Gas Repressuring (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

386

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Natural Gas Wellhead Price " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

387

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Contents" ,"Wyoming Natural Gas Repressuring (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

388

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Natural Gas Imports Price " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for"...

389

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Oregon Natural Gas Repressuring (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

390

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Contents" ,"Alabama Natural Gas Repressuring (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

391

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Contents" ,"Arizona Natural Gas Repressuring (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

392

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Contents" ,"Weekly Working Gas in Underground Storage" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

393

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Contents" ,"Hawaii Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

394

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Contents" ,"Kansas Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

395

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Contents" ,"Maine Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

396

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Natural Gas Marketed Production " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data...

397

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Kansas Natural Gas Repressuring (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

398

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data...

399

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Balancing Item (Bcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data...

400

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Contents" ,"Colorado Natural Gas Repressuring (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water content" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Contents" ,"California Natural Gas Repressuring (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

402

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Contents" ,"Nevada Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

403

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Contents" ,"Oregon Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

404

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Texas Natural Gas Repressuring (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

405

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Contents" ,"Pennsylvania Natural Gas Repressuring (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest...

406

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"South Dakota Natural Gas Repressuring (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","La...

407

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"South Dakota Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data"...

408

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in South Dakota (Including Vehicle Fuel) (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

409

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Natural Gas Citygate Price in South Dakota (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

410

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"South Dakota Natural Gas Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

411

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"South Dakota Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data"...

412

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in South Dakota Represented by the Price (%)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

413

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"South Dakota Natural Gas Withdrawals from Gas Wells (MMcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

414

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"South Dakota Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (MMcf) " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","...

415

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"Percentage of Total Natural Gas Residential Deliveries included in Prices " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet...

416

Source and Pathway of the Western Arctic Upper Halocline in a Data-Constrained Coupled Ocean and Sea Ice Model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A coupled ocean and sea ice model is used to investigate dense water (DW) formation in the Chukchi and Bering shelves and the pathways by which this water feeds the upper halocline. Two 1992–2008 data-constrained solutions ...

Nguyen, An T.

417

ARM - Measurement - Cloud ice particle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ice particle ice particle ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud ice particle Particles made of ice found in clouds. Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments MET : Surface Meteorological Instrumentation Field Campaign Instruments REPLICATOR : Balloon-borne Ice Crystal Replicator CPI : Cloud Particle Imager CVI-AIR : Counterflow Virtual Impactor LEARJET : Lear Jet PARTIMG : Particle imager UAV-PROTEUS-MICRO : Proteus Cloud Microphysics Instruments

418

September 2004 Water Sampling  

Office of Legacy Management (LM)

was not identified at many groundwater locations. 18. Was the presence or absence of ice in the cooler documented at every sample location? Yes 19. Were water levels measured...

419

SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory - Synchrotrons Explore Water...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

fluoride crystal. This surface was expected to stimulate ice formation, but even when chilled to a temperature of about 6.5 degrees Fahrenheit - well below water's normal...

420

Coupled Sea Ice–Ocean-State Estimation in the Labrador Sea and Baffin Bay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sea ice variability in the Labrador Sea is of climatic interest because of its relationship to deep convection, mode-water formation, and the North Atlantic atmospheric circulation. Historically, quantifying the relationship ...

Fenty, Ian

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water content" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Distributions of Liquid, Vapor, and Ice in an Orographic Cloud from Field Observations  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The phase distribution of the water mass of a cold orographic cloud into vapor, liquid, and ice is calculated from measurements made from an instrumented aircraft. The vapor values are calculated from thermodynamic measurements, and the liquid is ...

Taneil Uttal; Robert M. Rauber; Lewis O. Grant

1988-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Tracking the Motion of Sea Ice by Correlation Sonar  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A prototype correlation sonar has been developed for the measurement of ice motion in polar seas. It operates in the very shallow-water mode as a two-pulse spatial correlation log. The design was guided by numerical signal simulations, which ...

James L. Galloway; Humfrey Melling

1997-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Modeling and High-Resolution-Imaging Studies of Water-Content Profiles in a Polymer-Electrolyte-Fuel-Cell Membrane-Electrode Assembly  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

is much lower and water is produced at the cathode. However,transport. Liquid water is produced at the catalyst layer

Weber, A.Z.

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

424

Nature Bulletin Table of Contents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Table of Contents: Table of Contents: Here is our table of contents for the Forset Preserve District of Cook Country Nature Bulletins. To search, go to the Natuere Bulletin's Search Engine and type in your topic. You can also use your browser's "FIND" command to search the 750+ article titles here for a specific subject! Fish Smother Under Ice Coyotes in Cook County Tough Times for the Muskrats Wild Geese and Ducks Fly North Squirrels Spring Frogs Snapping Turtles A Phenomenal Spring Good People Do Not Pick Wildflowers Fire is the Enemy of Field and Forest Crows Earthworms Bees Crayfish Floods Handaxes and Knives in the Forest Preserves Ant Sanctuary Conservation Mosquitoes More About Mosquitoes Fishing in the Forest Preserve Our River Grasshoppers Chiggers Ticks Poison Ivy Fireflies

425

Blowing Snow on Arctic Sea Ice: Results from an Improved Sea Ice–Snow–Blowing Snow Coupled System  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A one-dimensional (1D) version of a blowing snow model, called PIEKTUK-D, has been incorporated into a snow–sea ice coupled system. Blowing snow results in sublimation of approximately 12 mm of snow water equivalent (SWE), which is equal to ...

Yi-Ching Chung; Stéphane Bélair; Jocelyn Mailhot

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Forecast Verification of the Polar Ice Prediction System (PIPS) Sea Ice Concentration Fields  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The National Ice Center relies upon a coupled ice–ocean model called the Polar Ice Prediction System (PIPS) to provide guidance for its 24–120-h sea ice forecasts. Here forecast skill assessments of the sea ice concentration (C) fields from PIPS ...

Michael L. Van Woert; Cheng-Zhi Zou; Walter N. Meier; Philip D. Hovey; Ruth H. Preller; Pamela G. Posey

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Electro-Osmosis and Water Uptake in Polymer Electrolytes in Equilibrium with Water Vapor at Low Temperatures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Water uptake and electro-osmosis are investigated to improve the understanding and aid the modeling of water transport in proton-exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) below 0 C. Measurements of water sorption isotherms show a significant reduction in the water capacity of polymer electrolytes below 0 C. This reduced water content is attributed to the lower vapor pressure of ice compared to supercooled liquid water. At -25 C, 1100 equivalent weight Nafion in equilibrium with vapor over ice has 8 moles of water per sulfonic acid group. Measurements of the electro-osmotic drag coefficient for Nafion and both random and multiblock copolymer sulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone) (BPSH) chemistries are reported for vapor equilibrated samples below 0 C. The electro-osmotic drag coefficient of BPSH chemistries is found to be {approx}0.4, and that of Nafion is {approx}1. No significant temperature effect on the drag coefficient is found. The implication of an electro-osmotic drag coefficient less than unity is discussed in terms of proton conduction mechanisms. Simulations of the ohmically limited current below 0 C show that a reduced water uptake below 0 C results in a significant decrease in PEMFC performance.

Gallagher, K. G.; Pivovar, B. S.; Fuller, T. F.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

428

Experimental investigation of ice slurry flow pressure drop in horizontal tubes  

SciTech Connect

Pressure drop behaviour of ice slurry based on ethanol-water mixture in circular horizontal tubes has been experimentally investigated. The secondary fluid was prepared by mixing ethyl alcohol and water to obtain initial alcohol concentration of 10.3% (initial freezing temperature -4.4 C). The pressure drop tests were conducted to cover laminar and slightly turbulent flow with ice mass fraction varying from 0% to 30% depending on test conditions. Results from flow tests reveal much higher pressure drop for higher ice concentrations and higher velocities in comparison to the single phase flow. However for ice concentrations of 15% and higher, certain velocity exists at which ice slurry pressure drop is same or even lower than for single phase flow. It seems that higher ice concentration delay flow pattern transition moment (from laminar to turbulent) toward higher velocities. In addition experimental results for pressure drop were compared to the analytical results, based on Poiseulle and Buckingham-Reiner models for laminar flow, Blasius, Darby and Melson, Dodge and Metzner, Steffe and Tomita for turbulent region and general correlation of Kitanovski which is valid for both flow regimes. For laminar flow and low buoyancy numbers Buckingham-Reiner method gives good agreement with experimental results while for turbulent flow best fit is provided with Dodge-Metzner and Tomita methods. Furthermore, for transport purposes it has been shown that ice mass fraction of 20% offers best ratio of ice slurry transport capability and required pumping power. (author)

Grozdek, Marino; Khodabandeh, Rahmatollah; Lundqvist, Per [Royal Institute of Technology, Department of Energy Technology, Division of Applied Thermodynamics and Refrigeration, Brinellvaegen 68, 10044 Stockholm (Sweden)

2009-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

429

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"9302013 5:41:19 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural...

430

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1092013 12:45:25 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural...

431

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"9302013 5:47:49 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Oklahoma...

432

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"9302013 5:47:48 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Ohio...

433

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"9302013 5:40:49 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural...

434

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"9302013 5:47:39 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Indiana...

435

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"9302013 5:41:58 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural...

436

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"9302013 5:44:37 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Nebraska...

437

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"9302013 5:50:33 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1:...

438

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"U.S. Price of Natural Gas Pipeline Exports by Point of Exit " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

439

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Workbook Contents" ,"U.S. Price of Natural Gas Pipeline Imports by Point of Entry " ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

440

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"9302013 9:14:27 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Wisconsin Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water content" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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441

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"9302013 9:13:24 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Wisconsin Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic...

442

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"9302013 5:40:28 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Wisconsin Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010WI2" "Date","Wisconsin...

443

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"9302013 5:43:56 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Wisconsin Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3035WI2" "Date","Wisconsin...

444

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"9302013 5:45:05 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Wisconsin Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3045WI2"...

445

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"9302013 5:45:04 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Wisconsin Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3045WI2"...

446

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Pennsylvania Represented by the Price (%)" "Sourcekey","N3020PA4" "Date","Percent of Commercial...

447

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"9302013 9:13:15 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Pennsylvania Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"...

448

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"9302013 9:14:13 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Pennsylvania Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"...

449

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

586-8800",,,"9302013 9:16:27 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Citygate Price in Pennsylvania (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3050PA3"...

450

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

586-8800",,,"9302013 9:16:28 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Citygate Price in Pennsylvania (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3050PA3"...

451

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"172014 2:49:36 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Idaho Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"...

452

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"172014 2:48:16 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Idaho Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010ID2" "Date","Idaho...

453

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

72014 2:54:14 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Citygate Price in Idaho (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3050ID3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate...

454

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

72014 2:54:52 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Idaho (Including Vehicle Fuel) (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3060ID2" "Date","Natural Gas Delivered...

455

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"172014 2:53:12 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Idaho Natural Gas Deliveries to Electric Power Consumers (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3045ID2"...

456

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

72014 2:54:13 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Citygate Price in Idaho (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3050ID3" "Date","Natural Gas Citygate...

457

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2:49:37 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in Idaho Represented by the Price (%)" "Sourcekey","N3020ID4" "Date","Percent of Commercial...

458

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"172014 2:51:34 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Idaho Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3035ID2" "Date","Idaho...

459

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

72014 2:54:53 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in Idaho (Including Vehicle Fuel) (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3060ID2" "Date","Natural Gas Delivered...

460

Spectral Content  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Spectral Content of the NLC Bunch Train due to Long Range Wakefields Peter Tenenbaum LCC-Note-0015 10-May-1999 Abstract The functional specifications of the sub-train position...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water content" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2:08:06 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Price of Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports to Brazil (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0PNGNUS-NBRDMCF"...

462

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2:08:07 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Price of Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports to Brazil (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0PNGNUS-NBRDMCF"...

463

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

132014 2:06:54 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports to Brazil (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0ENGNUS-NBRMMCF" "Date","Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas...

464

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

312013 3:21:41 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells (Summary) " "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSNUSMMCF","NGMEPG0FGSR3FMMMCF","NG...

465

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

312013 3:21:40 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Shale Gas Wells (Summary) " "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0FGSNUSMMCF","NGMEPG0FGSR3FMMMCF","NG...

466

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

4:58:30 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports to South Korea (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0ENGNUS-NKSMMCF" "Date","Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas...

467

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2:08:11 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alaska Liquefied Natural Gas Exports Price to China (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0PNGSAK-NCHDMCF"...

468

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2:08:07 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Price of Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports to China (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0PNGNUS-NCHDMCF"...

469

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

132014 2:06:55 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports to China (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0ENGNUS-NCHMMCF" "Date","Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas...

470

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

2:08:12 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alaska Liquefied Natural Gas Exports Price to China (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0PNGSAK-NCHDMCF"...

471

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11252013 9:01:19 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Total Crude Oil and Products Imports from All Countries" "Sourcekey","MTTIPP11","MTTIPP21","MTTIPP31",...

472

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"9302013 5:41:31 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1:...

473

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"9302013 6:13:51 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1:...

474

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"172014 2:58:22 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Federal Offshore--Gulf of Mexico Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9010FX2"...

475

Ice_slurry_fact_sheet  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

new approach to saving stroke and cardiac arrest victims by using a specially engineered ice slurry to cool organs. The technology is also being investigated as a way to improve...

476

Melting of Ice under Pressure  

SciTech Connect

The melting of ice under pressure is investigated with a series of first principles molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, a two-phase approach is used to determine the melting temperature of the ice-VII phase in the range of 10 to 50 GPa. Our computed melting temperatures are consistent with existing diamond anvil cell experiments. We find that for pressures between 10 to 40 GPa, ice melts as a molecular solid. For pressures above {approx}45 GPa there is a sharp increase in the slope of the melting curve due to the presence of molecular dissociation and proton diffusion in the solid, prior to melting. The onset of significant proton diffusion in ice-VII as a function of increasing temperature is found to be gradual and bears many similarities to that of a type-II superionic solid.

Schwegler, E; Sharma, M; Gygi, F; Galli, G

2008-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

477

An Inverse Method for Tracking Ice Motion in the Marginal Ice Zone Using Sequential Satellite Images  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A new method for tracking ice motion and estimating ocean surface currents from sequential satellite images is presented. It is particularly suited for the marginal ice zone. A simple ice advection model, driven by wind and surface currents, is ...

Mark Buehner; Keith R. Thompson; Ingrid Peterson

1997-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

478

Relationships between tropical cyclone intensity and satellite based indicators of inner core convection: 85 GHz ice scattering signature and lightning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A key component in the maintenance and intensification of tropical cyclones is the transverse circulation, which transports mass and momentum and provides latent heat release via inner core convective updrafts. This study examines these updrafts indirectly, using satellite-borne observations of the scattering of upwelling microwave radiation by precipitation sized ice and satellite-borne observations of lightning. The observations are then compared to tropical cyclone intensity and the resulting relationships are assessed. The size of ice particles is tied to updraft strength, in that stronger updrafts produce more supercooled liquid water, leading to larger graupel through riming. Large graupel and a high supercooled liquid water content are necessary ingredients for charge separation, leading to lightning. Various parameters derived from the inner core ice scattering signature are computed for regions encircling hurricanes and typhoons, and observations of lightning activity or inactivity are analyzed. As expected, increasing ice scattering signature is found to correspond to increasing tropical cyclone intensity. However, the highest correlations do not involve indicators of convective intensity, as they were expected to. Instead, the highest correlations with tropical cyclone intensity result from the ice scattering signature parameters most closely associated with the areal extent of at least moderate precipitation rates. Correlations tend to be of the same sign for both present cyclone intensity at the time of the satellite overpass and subsequent intensity change. Correlations are higher for future cyclone intensity than for either of these. These correlations are much higher for the Atlantic and the Eastern North Pacific than for the Western North Pacific. It is hypothesized that processes involved with the most intense or rapidly intensifying tropical cyclones (more commonly found in the Western North Pacific) are responsible for these differences. The lightning observations are more limited than the microwave observations, because the short amount of time in which lightning can be detected may not adequately represent a particular storms electrical activity. These observations reveal no clear relationships between electrical activity and tropical cyclone intensity. In the examination of case studies, the paradoxical situation of much greater lightning activity in rainbands than in eyewalls is noted.

Cecil, Daniel Joseph

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

479

Effects of Surface Roughness and Surface Energy on Ice Adhesion ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ice adheres to steel surfaces when the environment temperature is low. In many cases, ice formation on surfaces is unwanted; therefore, anti-icing techniques ...

480

ICR-ICE Standard Operating Procedures | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ICR-ICE Standard Operating Procedures ICR-ICE Standard Operating Procedures ICE-ICR SOP.pdf More Documents & Publications External Independent Review (EIR) Standard Operating...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water content" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Ice structures, patterns, and processes: A view across the ice-fields  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We look ahead from the frontiers of research on ice dynamics in its broadest sense; on the structures of ice, the patterns or morphologies it may assume, and the physical and chemical processes in which it is involved. We highlight open questions in the various fields of ice research in nature; ranging from terrestrial and oceanic ice on Earth, to ice in the atmosphere, to ice on other solar system bodies and in interstellar space.

Bartels-Rausch, Thorsten; Cartwright, Julyan H E; Escribano, Rafael; Finney, John L; Grothe, Hinrich; Gutiérrez, Pedro J; Haapala, Jari; Kuhs, Werner F; Pettersson, Jan B C; Price, Stephen D; Sainz-Díaz, C Ignacio; Stokes, Debbie J; Strazzulla, Giovanni; Thomson, Erik S; Trinks, Hauke; Uras-Aytemiz, Nevin; 10.1103/RevModPhys.84.885

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Fractionation of Dissolved Solutes and Chromophoric Dissolved Organic Matter During Experimental Sea Ice Formation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In the past decade there has been an overall decrease in Arctic Ocean sea ice cover. Changes to the ice cover have important consequences for organic carbon cycling, especially over the continental shelves. When sea ice is formed, dissolved organic carbon (DOC) and other tracers are fractionated in relation to the initial water. Two separate “freeze-out” experiments were conducted to observe the effects of fractionation during ice formation. In experiment 1, marine and freshwater end members were mixed together in different ratios to create four different salinities. In experiment 2, a brackish water sample was collected. The initial unfrozen water, ice melt, and post-freeze brine water were tested for dissolved organic carbon, total nitrogen (TN), dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), fluorescence and absorption (optics), water isotopes (?18O and ?D), and lignin phenols. Results showed a clear fractionation effect for all parameters, where the ice samples contained much less of the dissolved species than the enriched brine samples. This information is important to consider when trying using these parameters to determine the fate of carbon and the freshwater budget to the Arctic Ocean.

Smith, Stephanie 1990-

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Estimating Seasonal Changes in Volumetric Soil Water Content at Landscape Scales in a Savanna Ecosystem Using Two-Dimensional Resistivity Profiling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water distributed in deep soil reservoirs is an important factor determining the ecosystem structure of water-limited environments, such as the seasonal tropical savannas of South America. In this study a two-dimensional (2D) geoelectrical ...

Diana C. Garcia-Montiel; Michael T. Coe; Meyr P. Cruz; Joice N. Ferreira; Euzebio M. da Silva; Eric A. Davidson

2008-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

484

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Workbook Contents" Workbook Contents" ,"U.S. State-to-State capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","Units of Measurement","Frequency","Updated Date" ,"Pipeline State-to-State Capacity","State-to-State capacity","Million cubic feet per day (MMcf/d)","Quarterly","application/vnd.ms-excel" ,"State Inflow Capacity","Inflow capacity from other States","Million cubic feet per day (MMcf/d)","Quarterly","application/vnd.ms-excel" ,"State Outflow Capacity","Outflow capacity to other States","Million cubic feet per day (MMcf/d)","Quarterly","application/vnd.ms-excel"

485

Fluid Migration During Ice/Rock Planetesimal Differentiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Much speculation on extraterrestrial life has focused on finding environments where water is present. Heating of smaller icy bodies may create and sustain a possible liquid layer below the surface. If liquid water was sustained for geologically significant times (> 108 years) within the ubiquitous small bodies in the outer solar system, the opportunities for development of simple life are much greater. The lifetime of the liquid water layer will depend on several factors, including the rate of rock/water reaction, which will depend on the rate at which water can be segregated from a melting ice/rock core. For the liquid water phase to migrate toward the surface, the denser rock phase must compact. The primary question that this thesis will answer is how fast melt water can segregate from the core of an ice-rich planetesimal. To answer this question we treat the core as two phase flow problem: a compacting viscous “solid” (ice/rock mixture) and a segregating liquid (melt water). The model developed here is based on the approach derived to study a different partially molten solid: in the viscously deforming partially molten upper mantle. We model a planetesimal core that initially a uniform equal mixture of solid ice and rock. We assume chondritic levels of radiogenic heating as the only heat source, and numerically solve for the evolution of solid and melt velocities and the distribution of melt fraction (“porosity”) during the first few million years after accretion. From a suite of numerical models, we have determined that the meltwater is segregated out of the core as fast as it is created, except in the case of very fast melting times (0.75 My vs. 0.62 My), and small ore radius (~25 to 150 km, depending on the viscosity of the ice/rock mixture in the solid core). In these latter cases, segregation is slower than migration and a high water fraction develops in the core. Heat released by water-rock reactions (not included in this model) will tend to drive up melting rates in all cases, which may favor this latter endmember.

Raney, Robert 1987-

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

586-8800",,,"12122013 6:56:58 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports by Point of Entry " "Sourcekey","N9103US2","NGAEPG0IMLYCAM-Z00MMCF","NAEP...

487

POLICY CONTENT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

March 31, 1999. It lists in alphabetical order the National Customs Rulings (NCR) that were made since the Memorandum was published. 2. Appendix B – Supplement 1 is a supplement to Appendix B of Memorandum D11-11-2. It presents the policy content of the more recent NCRs, which are listed by numerical order of tariff items for greater ease of reference.

Um D; National Customs Rulings (ncrs

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

488

Fire in the Ice, Fall 2004  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ CONTENTS AAPG Hedberg Research Conference ............................ 1 Oak Ridge Facilities .............. 4 Relic Gas Hydrates of Northwestern Siberia ............. 8 Announcements .................. 11 * JIP Tests in the Gulf of Mexico * Planning Workshop Slated for Early Next Year Spotlight on Research ........ 12 Ingo Pecher CONTACT POINT Ray Boswell National Energy Technology Laboratory (304) 285-4541 (304) 285-4216 fax Ray.Boswell@netl.doe.gov The Fire in the Ice Newsletter is also available online at our website (http://www.netl.doe.gov/ scngo/Natural%20Gas/hydrates/)

489

Fire in the Ice, Summer 2004  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R R Vol. 4, Iss. 3 â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ CONTENTS Gulf of Mexico Remote Observatory Update ............... 1 Hydrate Decomposition Studies at USGS .................... 5 NETL's HP View Cell Operational .......................... 10 Announcements .................. 13 * AAPG Hedberg Conference * JIP Drilling Delayed * TOUGH-Fx/HYDRATE v1.0 * Advisory Committee Meeting * Anaximander project Spotlight on Research ........ 16 Dr. Keith Kvenvolden CONTACT POINT Ray Boswell National Energy Technology Laboratory (304) 285-4541 (304) 285-4469 fax Ray.Boswell@netl.doe.gov The Fire in the Ice Newsletter is

490

An Educational Resource Based on Water and Health as a Teaching Aid in French Primary Schools Part I: Identification of Needs and Content  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: It is a commonplace that water is essential for life, but to what extent is the general public, and children in particular, aware of how water affects health? The aim of this review was to consider the relationship between water and health under three main headings: the importance of hydration for children, dietary intake of water, and water as an essential factor in hygiene contributing to good health. The literature was reviewed to provide a rationale for the implementation of teaching about water and health in French primary schools under three main areas: (i) the importance of hydration for school children and water promotion in primary schools; (ii) the problem of overweight/obesity and the need to adopt healthy drinking habits as defined in French nutritional policy; (iii) the survey of the quality of drinking water in France and its relationship with good hygiene practices. There are currently few educational resources in France on water and health that teachers can use in the classroom. This review gives reasons why a “Water and Health ” learning resource is a useful tool and shows how it can be developed within the constraints imposed by the school syllabus and in accordance with French nutritional and environmental policy. Educ. Sci. 2013, 3 301

Chantal Savanovitch; Marie-pierre Sauvant-rochat

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

491

Relative Dispersion of Ice Crystals in Seeded Cumuli  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Relative dispersion of ice crystals was measured in 30 seeded cumulus clouds. A quasi-instantaneous, vertical area source of ice was generated by releasing dry-ice pellets from an airplane. The ice concentration distribution and relative ...

Jeffrey C. Weil; R. Paul Lawson; Alfred R. Rodi

1993-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

492

Rheology of Discrete Failure Regimes of Anisotropic Sea Ice  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A rheological model of sea ice is presented that incorporates the orientational distribution of ice thickness in leads embedded in isotropic floe ice. Sea ice internal stress is determined by coulombic, ridging and tensile failure at orientations ...

Alexander V. Wilchinsky; Daniel L. Feltham

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

493

Ross Ice Shelf in situ radio-frequency ice attenuation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have measured the in situ average electric field attenuation length for radio-frequency signals broadcast vertically through the Ross Ice Shelf. We chose a location, Moore Embayment, south of Minna Bluff, known for its high reflectivity at the ice-sea interface. We confirmed specular reflection and used the return pulses to measure the average attenuation length from 75-1250 MHz over the round-trip distance of 1155 m. We find the average electric field attenuation length to vary from 500 m at 75 MHz to 300 m at 1250 MHz, with an experimental uncertainty of 55 to 15 m. We discuss the implications for neutrino telescopes that use the radio technique and include the Ross Ice Shelf as part of their sensitive volume.

Taylor Barrella; Steven Barwick; David Saltzberg

2010-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

494

Ice Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ice Energy Ice Energy Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Ice Energy Name Ice Energy Address 9351 Eastman Park Drive Place Windsor, Colorado Zip 80550 Sector Renewable energy Product Energy Storage Year founded 2003 Number of employees 51-200 Phone number 970-545-3630 Website http://www.ice-energy.com/ Coordinates 40.4651775°, -104.882° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.4651775,"lon":-104.882,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

495

Effects of ice number concentration on dynamics of a shallow mixed-phase stratiform cloud  

SciTech Connect

Previous modeling studies have shown a high sensitivity of simulated properties of mixed-phase clouds to ice number concentration, Ni, with many models losing their ability to maintain the liquid phase as Ni increases. Although models differ widely at what Ni the mixed-phase cloud becomes unstable, the transition from a mixed-phase to an ice only cloud in many cases occurs over a narrow range of ice concentration. To gain better understanding of this non-linear model behavior, in this study, we analyze simulations of a mixed-phase stratiform Artic cloud observed on 26 April 2008 during recent Indirect and Semi-Direct Aerosol Campaign (ISDAC). The BASE simulation, in which Ni is constrained to match the measured value, produces a long-lived cloud in a quasi steady state similar to that observed. The simulation without the ice (NO_ICE) produces a comparable but slightly thicker cloud because more moisture is kept in the mixed layer due to lack of precipitation. When Ni is quadrupled relative to BASE (HI_ICE), the cloud starts loosing liquid water almost immediately and the liquid water path is reduced by half in less than two hours. The changes in liquid water are accompanied by corresponding reduction in the radiative cooling of the layer and a slow down in the vertical mixing, confirming the important role of interactions among microphysics, radiation and dynamics in this type of clouds. Deviations of BASE and HI_ICE from NO_ICE are used to explore the linearity of the model response to variation in Ni. It is shown that at early stages, changes in liquid and ice water as well as in radiative cooling/heating rates are proportional to the Ni change, while changes in the vertical buoyancy flux are qualitatively different in HI_ICE compared to BASE. Thus, while the positive feedback between the liquid water path and radiative cooling of the cloud layer is essential for glaciation of the cloud at higher Ni, the non-linear (with respect to Ni) reduction in positive buoyancy flux within and below the liquid cloud layer emerges as the process that influences the initial response of the mixed layer dynamics to the appearance of ice and subsequently determines the sustainability of liquid water in the cloud in this case.

Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Korolev, Alexei; Fan, Jiwen

2011-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

496

Homogeneous ice nucleation at moderate supercooling from molecular simulation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Among all the freezing transitions, that of water into ice is probably the most relevant to biology, physics, geology or atmospheric science. In this work we investigate homogeneous ice nucleation by means of computer simulations. We evaluate the size of the critical cluster and the nucleation rate for temperatures ranging between 15K and 35K below melting. We use the TIP4P/2005 and the TIP4P/Ice water models. Both give similar results when compared at the same temperature difference with the model's melting temperature. The size of the critical cluster varies from $\\sim$8000 molecules (radius$ = 4$nm) at 15K below melting to $\\sim$600 molecules (radius$ = 1.7$nm) at 35K below melting. We use Classical Nucleation Theory (CNT) to estimate the ice-water interfacial free energy and the nucleation free energy barrier. We obtain an interfacial free energy of 29(3)mN/m from an extrapolation of our results to the melting temperature. This value is in good agreement both with experimental measurements and with previous estimates from computer simulations of TIP4P-like models. Moreover, we obtain estimates of the nucleation rate from simulations of the critical cluster at the barrier top. The values we get for both models agree within statistical error with experimental measurements. At temperatures higher than 20K below melting we get nucleation rates slower than the appearance of a critical cluster in all the water of the hydrosphere in the age of the universe. Therefore, our simulations predict that water freezing above this temperature must necessarily be heterogeneous.

E. Sanz; C. Vega; J. R. Espinosa; R. Caballero-Bernal; J. L. F. Abascal; C. Valeriani

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

497

Non Hexagonal Ice at Hexagonal Surfaces: The Role of Lattice Mismatch  

SciTech Connect

Despite the fact that the process of heterogeneous ice nucleation has been known for years and its atmospheric and industrial relevance, little is known at the microscopic level about which properties of a material determine its effectiveness at nucleating ice. This work focuses on the long standing, conceptually simple, view on the role of a good crystallographic match between bulk ice and the underlying substrate. We use grand canonical Monte Carlo to generate the first overlayer of water at the surface and find that the traditional view of heterogeneous nucleation does not adequately account for the array of structures that water may form at the surface. We find that, in order to describe the structures formed, a good match between the substrate and the nearest neighbour oxygen-oxygen distance is a better descriptor than a good match to the bulk ice lattice constant.

Cox, Stephen J.; Kathmann, Shawn M.; Purton, John A.; Gillan, Michael J.; Michaelides, Angelos

2012-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

498

Ice Formation in Gas-Diffusion Layers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of California. Ice Formation in Gas-Diffusion Layers Thomasconditions, ice forms in the gas-diffusion layer (GDL) of areaction of reactant gases (1). A number of strategies exist

Dursch, Thomas

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

499

Modeling Sea Ice Transport Using Incremental Remapping  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Sea ice models contain transport equations for the area, volume, and energy of ice and snow in various thickness categories. These equations typically are solved with first-order-accurate upwind schemes, which are very diffusive; with second-...

William H. Lipscomb; Elizabeth C. Hunke

2004-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

500

Why Sequence Lake Vostok accretion ice?  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Sequence Lake Vostok accretion ice? Lake Vostok is the largest known subglacial lake in central Antarctica, though it's been buried under 4 kilometers (nearly 2.5 miles) of ice for...