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1

ARM - PI Product - Large Scale Ice Water Path and 3-D Ice Water Content  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ProductsLarge Scale Ice Water Path and 3-D Ice Water ProductsLarge Scale Ice Water Path and 3-D Ice Water Content Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send PI Product : Large Scale Ice Water Path and 3-D Ice Water Content Site(s) SGP TWP General Description Cloud ice water concentration is one of the most important, yet poorly observed, cloud properties. Developing physical parameterizations used in general circulation models through single-column modeling is one of the key foci of the ARM program. In addition to the vertical profiles of temperature, water vapor and condensed water at the model grids, large-scale horizontal advective tendencies of these variables are also required as forcing terms in the single-column models. Observed horizontal advection of condensed water has not been available because the

2

Large Scale Ice Water Path and 3-D Ice Water Content  

DOE Data Explorer (OSTI)

Cloud ice water concentration is one of the most important, yet poorly observed, cloud properties. Developing physical parameterizations used in general circulation models through single-column modeling is one of the key foci of the ARM program. In addition to the vertical profiles of temperature, water vapor and condensed water at the model grids, large-scale horizontal advective tendencies of these variables are also required as forcing terms in the single-column models. Observed horizontal advection of condensed water has not been available because the radar/lidar/radiometer observations at the ARM site are single-point measurement, therefore, do not provide horizontal distribution of condensed water. The intention of this product is to provide large-scale distribution of cloud ice water by merging available surface and satellite measurements. The satellite cloud ice water algorithm uses ARM ground-based measurements as baseline, produces datasets for 3-D cloud ice water distributions in a 10 deg x 10 deg area near ARM site. The approach of the study is to expand a (surface) point measurement to an (satellite) areal measurement. That is, this study takes the advantage of the high quality cloud measurements at the point of ARM site. We use the cloud characteristics derived from the point measurement to guide/constrain satellite retrieval, then use the satellite algorithm to derive the cloud ice water distributions within an area, i.e., 10 deg x 10 deg centered at ARM site.

Liu, Guosheng

3

Optimizing the Probability of Flying in High Ice Water Content Conditions in the Tropics Using a Regional-Scale Climatology of Convective Cell Properties  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper, statistical properties of rainfall are derived from 14 years of Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission data to optimize the use of flight hours for the upcoming High Altitude Ice Crystals (HAIC)/High Ice Water Content (HIWC) program. ...

A. Protat; S. Rauniyar; V. V. Kumar; J. W. Strapp

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

4

TRMM observations of the global relationship between ice water content and lightning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to study the fundamental relationship between precipitation ice mass and lightning flash density water path and lightning flash density is relatively invariant between land, ocean and coastal regimes proportionality between charge generation rates on ice and lightning flash rates, predict a linear to slightly non

Rutledge, Steven

5

Image Content Engine (ICE)  

SciTech Connect

The Image Content Engine (ICE) is being developed to provide cueing assistance to human image analysts faced with increasingly large and intractable amounts of image data. The ICE architecture includes user configurable feature extraction pipelines which produce intermediate feature vector and match surface files which can then be accessed by interactive relational queries. Application of the feature extraction algorithms to large collections of images may be extremely time consuming and is launched as a batch job on a Linux cluster. The query interface accesses only the intermediate files and returns candidate hits nearly instantaneously. Queries may be posed for individual objects or collections. The query interface prompts the user for feedback, and applies relevance feedback algorithms to revise the feature vector weighting and focus on relevant search results. Examples of feature extraction and both model-based and search-by-example queries are presented.

Brase, J M

2007-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

6

Cloud fraction, liquid and ice water contents derived from long-term radar, lidar, and microwave radiometer data are systematically compared to models to quantify and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Cloud fraction, liquid and ice water contents derived from long-term radar, lidar, and microwave a systematic evaluation of clouds in forecast models. Clouds and their associated microphysical processes for end users of weather forecasts, who may be interested not only in cloud cover, but in other variables

Hogan, Robin

7

Measurement of Total Water with a Tunable Diode Laser Hygrometer: Inlet Analysis, Calibration Procedure, and Ice Water Content Determination  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The University of Colorado closed-path tunable diode laser hygrometer (CLH), a new instrument for the in situ measurement of enhanced total water (eTW, the sum of water vapor and condensed water enhanced by a subisokinetic inlet), has recently ...

Sean M. Davis; A. Gannet Hallar; Linnea M. Avallone; William Engblom

2007-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

8

Viscosity of interfacial water regulates ice nucleation  

SciTech Connect

Ice formation on solid surfaces is an important phenomenon in many fields, such as cloud formation and atmospheric icing, and a key factor for applications in preventing freezing. Here, we report temperature-dependent nucleation rates of ice for hydrophilic and hydrophobic surfaces. The results show that hydrophilic surface presents a lower ice nucleation rate. We develop a strategy to extract the thermodynamic parameters, J{sub 0} and ?, in the context of classical nucleation theory. From the extracted J{sub 0} and ?, we reveal the dominant role played by interfacial water. The results provide an insight into freezing mechanism on solid surfaces.

Li, Kaiyong; Chen, Jing; Zhang, Qiaolan; Zhang, Yifan [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), Key Laboratory of Green Printing, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China) [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), Key Laboratory of Green Printing, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Xu, Shun; Zhou, Xin [School of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China)] [School of Physics, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100049 (China); Cui, Dapeng; Wang, Jianjun, E-mail: wangj220@iccas.ac.cn; Song, Yanlin [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), Key Laboratory of Green Printing, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)] [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), Key Laboratory of Green Printing, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

2014-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

9

The Effects of Rotation and Ice Shelf Topography on Frazil-Laden Ice Shelf Water Plumes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Antarctica. In addition, it is found that the model only produces reasonable marine ice formation rates whenThe Effects of Rotation and Ice Shelf Topography on Frazil-Laden Ice Shelf Water Plumes PAUL R of the dynamics and thermodynamics of a plume of meltwater at the base of an ice shelf is presented. Such ice

Feltham, Daniel

10

Sea ice control of water isotope transport to Antarctica and implications for ice core interpretation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

associated with diabatic heating. The interior deuterium excess response is more strongly affected by sea ice ice and the local conditions may have remote influences [Jacobs and Comiso, 1997; StammerjohnSea ice control of water isotope transport to Antarctica and implications for ice core

Noone, David

11

High-resolution subsurface water-ice distributions on Mars  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... Theoretical models indicate that water ice is stable in the shallow subsurface (depths of water-ice table that steadily increases in depth with decreasing latitude. More detailed modelling has ...

Joshua L. Bandfield

2007-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

12

Covered Product Category: Water-Cooled Ice Machines  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

The Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) provides acquisition guidance and federal efficiency requirements for water-cooled ice machines.

13

Heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake by field-collected...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

properties through heterogeneous nucleation is not well understood. Heterogeneous ice nucleation and water uptake by ambient particles collected from urban environments in...

14

Relationships between Water Wettability and Ice Adhesion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ice formation and accretion may hinder the operation of many systems critical to national infrastructure, including airplanes, power lines, windmills, ships, and telecommunications equipment. Yet despite the pervasiveness ...

Meuler, Adam J.

15

Ice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ice Ice Nature Bulletin No. 661-A january 7, 1978 Forest Preserve District of Cook County George W. Dunne, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation ICE There was a time when ice, cut on frozen ponds and lakes, was transported by fast clipper ships from New England to New Orleans where it was worth its weight in gold. Nowadays this cold brittle colorless substance is commonplace everywhere. Few people, however, know that ice is one of the strangest of all solids; and that, because of its unique properties, life on earth is what it is. Those properties are due to the distinctive structure of a molecule of water, formed of three elemental particles or atoms -- two of hydrogen and one of oxygen -- expressed by the familiar symbol, H2O. The three atoms are held together by two chemical bonds expressed by another symbol, H-O-H. Briefly, the unique properties of water, water vapor, and ice arise from that bonding and the arrangement of electron pairs around the oxygen atom.

16

The stickiness of micrometer-sized water-ice particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water ice is one of the most abundant materials in dense molecular clouds and in the outer reaches of protoplanetary disks. In contrast to other materials (e.g., silicates) water ice is assumed to be stickier due to its higher specific surface energy, leading to faster or more efficient growth in mutual collisions. However, experiments investigating the stickiness of water ice have been scarce, particularly in the astrophysically relevant micrometer-size region and at low temperatures. In this work, we present an experimental setup to grow aggregates composed of $\\mathrm{\\mu}$m-sized water-ice particles, which we used to measure the sticking and erosion thresholds of the ice particles at different temperatures between $114 \\, \\mathrm{K}$ and $260 \\, \\mathrm{K}$. We show with our experiments that for low temperatures (below $\\sim 210 \\, \\mathrm{K}$), $\\mathrm{\\mu}$m-sized water-ice particles stick below a threshold velocity of $9.6 \\, \\mathrm{m \\, s^{-1}}$, which is approximately ten times higher than the stic...

Gundlach, B

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

Alaskan Ice Road Water Supplies Augmented by Snow Barriers  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

6, 2013 6, 2013 Alaskan Ice Road Water Supplies Augmented by Snow Barriers Washington, D.C. - In a project supported and managed by the Office of Fossil Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), researchers at the University of Alaska Fairbanks have demonstrated that the use of artificial barriers-snow fences-can significantly increase the amount of fresh water supplies in Arctic lakes at a fraction of the cost of bringing in water from nearby lakes. The results promise to enhance environmentally sound development of Alaska's natural resources, lowering the costs of building ice roads used for exploring for oil and natural gas in Alaska. They could also be used to help augment fresh water supplies at remote villages. Researcher Joel Bailey measures the density of the snow in this snow pit to determine the amount of snow in the drift and the water equivalent of the snow drift.

18

Interactions of Water and Energy Mediate Responses of High-Latitude Terrestrial Ecosystems to Climate Change  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

air, water, and ice content, snow insulation is modeledinhibition of ice formation from snow insulation (Brown andeliminating snow insulation caused declines in ice surface

Subin, Zachary Marc

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Modeling the Dynamics of the North Water Polynya Ice Bridge  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The North Water polynya, the largest polynya in the world, forms annually and recurrently in Smith Sound in northern Baffin Bay. Its formation is governed in part by the formation of an ice bridge in the narrow channel of Nares Strait below Kane ...

Dany Dumont; Yves Gratton; Todd E. Arbetter

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

20

Application of FLake for the prediction of ice thickness for inland waters in the Netherlands  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Application of FLake for the prediction of ice thickness for inland waters in the Netherlands Cisco in the Netherlands. In cold spells numerous ditches, canals and lakes get frozen and many people go out for ice in the Netherlands. in ice thickness predictions. KNMI issues ice thickness predictions, based on a model of De Bruin

Stoffelen, Ad

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water content" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Thermal Desorption of Water-Ice in the Interstellar Medium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water (H2O) ice is an important solid constituent of many astrophysical environments. To comprehend the role of such ices in the chemistry and evolution of dense molecular clouds and comets, it is necessary to understand the freeze-out, potential surface reactivity, and desorption mechanisms of such molecular systems. Consequently, there is a real need from within the astronomical modelling community for accurate empirical molecular data pertaining to these processes. Here we give the first results of a laboratory programme to provide such data. Measurements of the thermal desorption of H2O ice, under interstellar conditions, are presented. For ice deposited under conditions that realistically mimic those in a dense molecular cloud, the thermal desorption of thin films (~50 molecular layers) is found to occur with zero order kinetics characterised by a surface binding energy, E_{des}, of 5773 +/- 60 K, and a pre-exponential factor, A, of 10^(30 +/- 2) molecules cm^-2 s^-1. These results imply that, in the dense interstellar medium, thermal desorption of H2O ice will occur at significantly higher temperatures than has previously been assumed.

Helen J. Fraser; Mark P. Collings; Martin R. S. McCoustra; David A. Williams

2001-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

22

Laboratory evidence for efficient water formation in interstellar ices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Even though water is the main constituent in interstellar icy mantles, its chemical origin is not well understood. Three different formation routes have been proposed following hydrogenation of O, O2, or O3, but experimental evidence is largely lacking. We present a solid state astrochemical laboratory study in which one of these routes is tested. For this purpose O2 ice is bombarded by H- or D-atoms under ultra high vacuum conditions at astronomically relevant temperatures ranging from 12 to 28 K. The use of reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) permits derivation of reaction rates and shows efficient formation of H2O (D2O) with a rate that is surprisingly independent of temperature. This formation route converts O2 into H2O via H2O2 and is found to be orders of magnitude more efficient than previously assumed. It should therefore be considered as an important channel for interstellar water ice formation as illustrated by astrochemical model calculations.

S. Ioppolo; H. M. Cuppen; C. Romanzin; E. F. van Dishoeck; H. Linnartz

2008-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

23

Determination of Large-Scale Cloud Ice Water Concentration by Combining Surface Radar and Satellite Data in Support of ARM SCM Activities  

SciTech Connect

Single-column modeling (SCM) is one of the key elements of Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) research initiatives for the development and testing of various physical parameterizations to be used in general circulation models (GCMs). The data required for use with an SCM include observed vertical profiles of temperature, water vapor, and condensed water, as well as the large-scale vertical motion and tendencies of temperature, water vapor, and condensed water due to horizontal advection. Surface-based measurements operated at ARM sites and upper-air sounding networks supply most of the required variables for model inputs, but do not provide the horizontal advection term of condensed water. Since surface cloud radar and microwave radiometer observations at ARM sites are single-point measurements, they can provide the amount of condensed water at the location of observation sites, but not a horizontal distribution of condensed water contents. Consequently, observational data for the large-scale advection tendencies of condensed water have not been available to the ARM cloud modeling community based on surface observations alone. This lack of advection data of water condensate could cause large uncertainties in SCM simulations. Additionally, to evaluate GCMsâ�� cloud physical parameterization, we need to compare GCM results with observed cloud water amounts over a scale that is large enough to be comparable to what a GCM grid represents. To this end, the point-measurements at ARM surface sites are again not adequate. Therefore, cloud water observations over a large area are needed. The main goal of this project is to retrieve ice water contents over an area of 10 x 10 deg. surrounding the ARM sites by combining surface and satellite observations. Built on the progress made during previous ARM research, we have conducted the retrievals of 3-dimensional ice water content by combining surface radar/radiometer and satellite measurements, and have produced 3-D cloud ice water contents in support of cloud modeling activities. The approach of the study is to expand a (surface) point measurement to an (satellite) area measurement. That is, the study takes the advantage of the high quality cloud measurements (particularly cloud radar and microwave radiometer measurements) at the point of the ARM sites. We use the cloud ice water characteristics derived from the point measurement to guide/constrain a satellite retrieval algorithm, then use the satellite algorithm to derive the 3-D cloud ice water distributions within an 10�° (latitude) x 10�° (longitude) area. During the research period, we have developed, validated and improved our cloud ice water retrievals, and have produced and archived at ARM website as a PI-product of the 3-D cloud ice water contents using combined satellite high-frequency microwave and surface radar observations for SGP March 2000 IOP and TWP-ICE 2006 IOP over 10 deg. x 10 deg. area centered at ARM SGP central facility and Darwin sites. We have also worked on validation of the 3-D ice water product by CloudSat data, synergy with visible/infrared cloud ice water retrievals for better results at low ice water conditions, and created a long-term (several years) of ice water climatology in 10 x 10 deg. area of ARM SGP and TWP sites and then compared it with GCMs.

Liu, Guosheng

2013-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

24

A study of the ice-water interface using the TIP4P/2005 water model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work we study the ice-water interface under coexistence conditions by means of molecular simulations using the TIP4P/2005 water model. Following the methodology proposed by Hoyt and co-workers [J. J. Hoyt, M. Asta and A. Karma, Phys. Rev. Lett., 86, 5530, (2001)] we measure the interfacial free energy of ice with liquid water by analysing the spectrum of capillary fluctuations of the interface. We get an orientationally averaged interfacial free energy of 27(2) mN/m, in good agreement with a recent estimate obtained from simulation data of the size of critical clusters [E. Sanz, C. Vega, J. R. Espinosa, R. Caballero-Bernal, J. L. F. Abascal and C. Valeriani, JACS, 135, 15008, (2013)]. We also estimate the interfacial free energy of different planes and obtain 27(2), 28(2)and 28(2) mN/m for the basal, the primary prismatic and the secondary prismatic planes respectively. Finally, we inspect the structure of the interface and find that its thickness is of approximately 4-5 molecular diameters. Moreover, we find that when the basal plane is exposed to the fluid the interface alternates regions of cubic ice with regions of hexagonal ice.

Jorge Benet; Luis G. MacDowell; Eduardo Sanz

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

FEMP-Designated Product: Water-Cooled Ice Machines | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

FEMP-Designated Product: Water-Cooled Ice Machines FEMP-Designated Product: Water-Cooled Ice Machines FEMP-Designated Product: Water-Cooled Ice Machines October 7, 2013 - 11:11am Addthis Federal agencies are required by the National Energy Conservation Policy Act (P.L. 95-619), Executive Order 13423, Executive Order 13514, and Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR) Subpart 23.2 and 53.223 to specify and buy ENERGY STAR® qualified products or, in categories not included in the ENERGY STAR program, FEMP designated products, which are among the highest 25% of equivalent products for energy efficiency. A PDF version of Water-Cooled Ice Machines is also available. Performance Requirements for Federal Purchases Type Ice Harvest Rate (pounds per 24 hours) Energy Usea (per 100 pounds) Potable Water Useb (per 100 pounds)

26

CONTENTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CONTENTS CONTENTS Introduction ........................................................................................................3 ON THE HORIZON: Promising Research Efforts Currently Underway A Smarter Charge .........................................................................................4 Unlocking Fire Ice .........................................................................................5 CRISP Crunches Cyber Threats ....................................................................6 Gel Zeroes in on Cancer ...............................................................................7 Liquid Solvent: A Solid Solution for CO 2 .....................................................8 Real-time Grid Stability ................................................................................9

27

On the State of Water Ice on Saturn's Moon Titan and Implications to Icy Bodies in the Outer Solar System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

experimental study to investigate the amorphization of crystalline water ice via ionizing radiation irradiation water ice in the 10-50 K and 10-140 K temperature ranges, respectively, and conducted a systematic at doses of up to 160 ( 30 eV per molecule. We found that crystalline water ice can be converted only

Jewitt, David C.

28

Determination of Ice Water Path Over the ARM SGP Using Combined Surface and Satellite Datasets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Determination of Ice Water Path Over the ARM SGP Using Determination of Ice Water Path Over the ARM SGP Using Combined Surface and Satellite Datasets J. Huang, M. M. Khaiyer, and P. W. Heck Analytical Services & Materials, Inc. Hampton, Virginia P. Minnis and B. Lin Atmospheric Sciences National Aeronautics and Space Administration Langley Research Center Hampton, Virginia T.-F. Fan Science Applications International Corporation Hampton, Virginia Introduction Global information of cloud ice water path (IWP) is urgently needed for testing of global climate models (GCMs) and other applications. Accurate quantification of the IWP is essential for characterizing the hydrological and radiation budget. For example, the reflection of shortwave radiation by ice clouds reduces the solar energy reaching the earth's surface. Ice clouds can also trap the longwave radiation

29

Can xenon in water inhibit ice growth? Molecular dynamics of phase transitions in water$-$Xe system  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Motivated by recent experiments showing the promise of noble gases as cryoprotectants, we perform molecular dynamics modeling of phase transitions in water with xenon under cooling. We study the structure and dynamics of xenon water solution as a function of temperature. Homogeneous nucleation of clathrate hydrate phase is observed and characterized. As the temperature is further reduced we observe hints of dissociation of clathrate due to stronger hydrophobic hydration, pointing towards a possible instability of clathrate at cryogenic temperatures and conversion to an amorphous phase comprised of "xenon + hydration shell" Xe$\\cdot$(H$_{2}$O)$_{21.5}$ clusters. Simulations of ice$-$xenon solution interface in equilibrium and during ice growth reveal the effects of xenon on the ice$-$liquid interface, where adsorbed xenon causes roughening of ice surface but does not preferentially form clathrate. These results provide evidence against the ice-blocker mechanism of xenon cryoprotection.

Vasilii I. Artyukhov; Alexander Yu. Pulver; Alex Peregudov; Igor Artyuhov

2014-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

30

Sleuthing the Fate of Water in Ancient Aquifers and Ice Cores | U.S. DOE  

Office of Science (SC) Website

Sleuthing the Fate of Water in Ancient Aquifers and Ice Cores Sleuthing the Fate of Water in Ancient Aquifers and Ice Cores Nuclear Physics (NP) NP Home About Research Facilities Science Highlights Benefits of NP Funding Opportunities Nuclear Science Advisory Committee (NSAC) News & Resources Contact Information Nuclear Physics U.S. Department of Energy SC-26/Germantown Building 1000 Independence Ave., SW Washington, DC 20585 P: (301) 903-3613 F: (301) 903-3833 E: sc.np@science.doe.gov More Information » October 2012 Sleuthing the Fate of Water in Ancient Aquifers and Ice Cores Precision analytical techniques developed for fundamental experiments in nuclear physics now enable routine measurements of ultra-low concentrations of Krypton radioisotopes in samples of water, ice, and gas. Print Text Size: A A A Subscribe FeedbackShare Page

31

Water Content in Biodiesel, Diesel, and Biodiesel–Diesel Blends  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Water Content in Biodiesel, Diesel, and Biodiesel–Diesel Blends ... In what concerns road transportation, biodiesel is being considered a good alternative to conventional diesels. ...

Patricia Bogalhos Lucente Fregolente; Leonardo Vasconcelos Fregolente; Maria Regina Wolf Maciel

2012-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

32

Kinetic energy of protons in ice Ih and water: A path integral study  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The kinetic energy of H and O nuclei has been studied by path integral molecular-dynamics simulations of ice Ih and water at ambient pressure. The simulations were performed by using the q-TIP4P/F model, a point-charge empirical potential that includes molecular flexibility and anharmonicity in the OH stretch of the water molecule. Ice Ih was studied in a temperature range between 210 and 290 K, and water between 230 and 320 K. Simulations of an isolated water molecule were performed in the range 210–320 K to estimate the contribution of the intramolecular vibrational modes to the kinetic energy. Our results for the proton kinetic energy KH in water and ice Ih show both agreement and discrepancies with different published data based on deep inelastic neutron-scattering experiments. Agreement is found for water at the experimental melting point and in the range 290–300 K. Discrepancies arise because data derived from the scattering experiments predict in water two maxima of KH around 270 and 277 K, and that KH is lower in ice than in water at 269 K. As a check of the validity of the employed water potential, we show that our simulations are consistent with other experimental thermodynamic properties related to KH, such as the temperature dependence of the liquid density, the heat capacity of water and ice at constant pressure, and the isotopic shift in the melting temperature of ice upon isotopic substitution of either H or O atoms. Moreover, the temperature dependence of KH predicted by the q-TIP4P/F model for ice Ih is found to be in good agreement with results of path integral simulations using ab initiodensity-functional theory.

R. Ramírez and C. P. Herrero

2011-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

33

Alaskan Ice Road Water Supplies Augmented by Snow Barriers | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alaskan Ice Road Water Supplies Augmented by Snow Barriers Alaskan Ice Road Water Supplies Augmented by Snow Barriers Alaskan Ice Road Water Supplies Augmented by Snow Barriers March 6, 2013 - 10:55am Addthis Monitoring equipment and part of the snowfence peek out of the snow drift. Monitoring equipment and part of the snowfence peek out of the snow drift. The aerial view shows the experimental lake at Franklin Bluffs used for the snowfence experiment. The aerial view shows the experimental lake at Franklin Bluffs used for the snowfence experiment. Researcher Joel Bailey measures the density of the snow in this snow pit to determine the amount of snow in the drift and the water equivalent of the snow drift. Researcher Joel Bailey measures the density of the snow in this snow pit to determine the amount of snow in the drift and the water equivalent of the

34

Alaskan Ice Road Water Supplies Augmented by Snow Barriers | Department of  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Alaskan Ice Road Water Supplies Augmented by Snow Barriers Alaskan Ice Road Water Supplies Augmented by Snow Barriers Alaskan Ice Road Water Supplies Augmented by Snow Barriers March 6, 2013 - 10:55am Addthis Monitoring equipment and part of the snowfence peek out of the snow drift. Monitoring equipment and part of the snowfence peek out of the snow drift. The aerial view shows the experimental lake at Franklin Bluffs used for the snowfence experiment. The aerial view shows the experimental lake at Franklin Bluffs used for the snowfence experiment. Researcher Joel Bailey measures the density of the snow in this snow pit to determine the amount of snow in the drift and the water equivalent of the snow drift. Researcher Joel Bailey measures the density of the snow in this snow pit to determine the amount of snow in the drift and the water equivalent of the

35

Adaptive Optics Observations of 3 micron Water Ice in Silhouette Disks in the Orion Nebula Cluster and M43  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the near-infrared images and spectra of four silhouette disks in the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC; M42) and M43 using the Subaru Adaptive Optics system. While d053-717 and d141-1952 show no water ice feature at 3.1 micron, a moderately deep (tau~0.7) water ice absorption is detected toward d132-1832 and d216-0939. Taking into account the water ice so far detected in the silhouette disks, the critical inclination angle to produce a water ice absorption feature is confirmed to be 65-75deg. As for d216-0939, the crystallized water ice profile is exactly the same as in the previous observations taken 3.63 years ago. If the water ice material is located at 30AU, then the observations suggest it is uniform at a scale of about 3.5AU.

Terada, Hiroshi; Pyo, Tae-Soo; Minowa, Yosuke; Hayano, Yutaka; Oya, Shin; Watanabe, Makoto; Hattori, Masayuki; Saito, Yoshihiko; Ito, Meguru; Takami, Hideki; Iye, Masanori

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

Soil-Water Characteristic Curve Modeling at Low Water Content: Empirical and Semi-Empirical Approaches  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Soil-Water Characteristic Curve Modeling at Low Water Content: Empirical and Semi model, the Modified Kovacs (MK) model for the determination of soil-water characteristic curve at the low water contents of two horizons of a soil from Burkina Faso. Combining terms from capillary state

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

37

The D/H Ratio of Water Ice at Low Temperatures  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the modeling results of deuterium fractionation of water ice, H2, and the primary deuterium isotopologues of H3+ adopting physical conditions associated with the star and planet formation process. We calculated the deuterium chemistry for a range of gas temperatures (T_gas ~ 10 - 30 K), molecular hydrogen density (n(H2)~ 10^4 - 10^7), and ortho/para ratio (opr) of H2 based on state-to-state reaction rates and explore the resulting fractionation including the formation of a water ice mantle coating grain surfaces. We find that the deuterium fractionation exhibits the expected temperature dependence of large enrichments at low gas temperature. More significantly the inclusion of water ice formation leads to large D/H ratios in water ice (>= 10^-2 at 10 K) but also alters the overall deuterium chemistry. For T < 20 K the implantation of deuterium into ices lowers the overall abundance of HD which reduces the efficiency of deuterium fractionation at high density. In agreement with an earlier study, ...

Lee, Jeong-Eun

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Interferometric tomography of fuel cells for monitoring membrane water content  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have developed a system that uses two 1D interferometric phase projections for reconstruction of 2D water content changes over time in situ in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell system. By modifying the filtered ...

Waller, Laura

39

Water content and morphology of sodium chloride aerosol particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to explain the H2O content. The model in which the NaCl particles contain pockets of aqueous NaCl solution was found to be most consistent with the spectroscopic observations. The relevance of salt particle morphology and water content to atmospheric aerosol...

Weis, David D.; Ewing, George E.

1999-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

40

Measuring the Muon Content of Air Showers with IceTop  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IceTop, the surface component of the IceCube detector, has been used to measure the energy spectrum of cosmic ray primaries in the range between 1.58 PeV and 1.26 EeV. It can also be used to study the low energy muons in air showers by looking at large distances (> 300m) from the shower axis. We will show the muon lateral distribution function at large lateral distances as measured with IceTop and discuss the implications of this measurement. We also discuss the prospects for low energy muon studies with IceTop.

Gonzalez, Javier G

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water content" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

On the State of Water Ice on Saturn's Moon Titan and Implications to Icy Bodies in the Outer Solar System  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The crystalline state of water ice in the Solar System depends on the temperature history of the ice and the influence of energetic particles to which it has been exposed. We measured the infrared absorption spectra of amorphous and crystalline water ice in the 10-50 K and 10-140 K temperature range, respectively, and conducted a systematic experimental study to investigate the amorphization of crystalline water ice via ionizing radiation irradiation at doses of up to 160 \\pm 30 eV per molecule. We found that crystalline water ice can be converted only partially to amorphous ice by electron irradiation. The experiments showed that a fraction of the 1.65 \\mum band, which is characteristic for crystalline water ice, survived the irradiation, to a degree that strongly depends on the temperature. Quantitative kinetic fits of the temporal evolution of the 1.65 \\mum band clearly demonstrate that there is a balance between thermal recrystallization and irradiation-induced amorphization, with thermal recrystallizaton dominant at higher temperatures. Our experiments show the amorphization at 40K was incomplete, in contradiction to Mastrapa and Brown's conclusion (Icarus 2006, 183, 207.). At 50 K, the recrystallization due to thermal effects is strong, and most of the crystalline ice survived. Temperatures of most icy objects in the Solar System, including Jovian satellites, Saturnian satellites (including Titan), and Kuiper Belt Objects, are equal to or above 50 K; this explains why water ice detected on those objects is mostly crystalline.

Weijun Zheng; David Jewitt; Ralf I. Kaiser

2008-01-18T23:59:59.000Z

42

Melt and collapse of buried water ice: An alternative hypothesis for the formation of chaotic terrains on Mars  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Melt and collapse of buried water ice: An alternative hypothesis for the formation of chaotic: T. Spohn Keywords: Mars chaotic terrain heat flux outflow channel Chaotic terrains if these features can form by melting and collapse of buried water ice in a confined basin. 2D thermal modelling

Utrecht, Universiteit

43

Project EARTH-13-RK2: Melting and water drainage from ice-stream margins: theory and computation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Project EARTH-13-RK2: Melting and water drainage from ice-stream margins: theory and computation sheets that represent an enormous reservoir of water. The mass of this reservoirs is set by a balance importance. Answers will require a deep understanding of the mechanics of ice sheets, and in particular

Henderson, Gideon

44

Laboratory Determination of the Infrared Band Strengths of Pyrene Frozen in Water Ice: Implications for the Composition of Interstellar Ices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Broad infrared emission features (e.g., at 3.3, 6.2, 7.7, 8.6, and 11.3 microns) from the gas phase interstellar medium have long been attributed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). A significant portion (10%-20%) of the Milky Way's carbon reservoir is locked in PAH molecules, which makes their characterization integral to our understanding of astrochemistry. In molecular clouds and the dense envelopes and disks of young stellar objects (YSOs), PAHs are expected to be frozen in the icy mantles of dust grains where they should reveal themselves through infrared absorption. To facilitate the search for frozen interstellar PAHs, laboratory experiments were conducted to determine the positions and strengths of the bands of pyrene mixed with H2O and D2O ices. The D2O mixtures are used to measure pyrene bands that are masked by the strong bands of H2O, leading to the first laboratory determination of the band strength for the CH stretching mode of pyrene in water ice near 3.25 microns. Our infrared band str...

Hardegree-Ullman, E E; Boogert, A C A; Lignell, H; Allamandola, L J; Stapelfeldt, K R; Werner, M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

Mobility of D atoms on porous amorphous water ice surfaces under interstellar conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Aims. The mobility of H atoms on the surface of interstellar dust grains at low temperature is still a matter of debate. In dense clouds, the hydrogenation of adsorbed species (i.e., CO), as well as the subsequent deuteration of the accreted molecules depend on the mobility of H atoms on water ice. Astrochemical models widely assume that H atoms are mobile on the surface of dust grains even if controversy still exists. We present here direct experimental evidence of the mobility of H atoms on porous water ice surfaces at 10 K. Methods. In a UHV chamber, O2 is deposited on a porous amorphous water ice substrate. Then D atoms are deposited onto the surface held at 10 K. Temperature-Programmed Desorption (TPD) is used and desorptions of O2 and D2 are simultaneously monitored. Results. We find that the amount of O2 that desorb during the TPD diminishes if we increase the deposition time of D atoms. O2 is thus destroyed by D atoms even though these molecules have previously diffused inside the pores of thick water ice. Our results can be easily interpreted if D is mobile at 10 K on the water ice surface. A simple rate equation model fits our experimental data and best fit curves were obtained for a D atoms diffusion barrier of 22(+-)2 meV. Therefore hydrogenation can take place efficiently on interstellar dust grains. These experimental results are in line with most calculations and validate the hypothesis used in several models.

E. Matar; E. Congiu; F. Dulieu; A. Momeni; J. L. Lemaire

2008-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

46

Strongly bonded water monomers on the ice Ih basal plane: Density-functional calculations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The adsorption of water monomers on noncrystallographic sites of the ice Ih basal plane is calculated from first principles. The results presented here do not support previous theoretical findings that state molecular adsorption energies in excess of the bulk cohesive energy. Still, due to an enhanced strength of the surface hydrogen bonds compared to the bulk, the admolecules are found to lower the ice surface energy. For the surface structures investigated here, the monomer adsorption energies are found to be rather insensitive with respect to the detailed microscopic structure of the underlying substrate. The latter, however, determines the adsorption-induced changes of the surface dipole layer.

C. Thierfelder; A. Hermann; P. Schwerdtfeger; W. G. Schmidt

2006-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

47

Recent content in Water Power Forum | OpenEI Community  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Recent content in Water Power Forum Recent content in Water Power Forum Home Name Post date sort icon Type OpenEI launches new Water Power Gateway and Community Forum Graham7781 28 Mar 2013 - 15:16 Blog entry Global Marine Renewable Energy Conference (GMREC) Kch 3 Apr 2013 - 14:26 Event MHK Cost Breakdown Structure Draft Kch 9 Apr 2013 - 13:30 Document MHK LCOE Reporting Guidance Draft Ocop 18 Apr 2013 - 13:41 Document Comments on MHK Cost Reduction Pathway White Papers Alison.labonte 26 Nov 2013 - 11:43 Question 2013 projects and funding Vanessa.gregory 13 Dec 2013 - 09:12 Question Hi Vanessa-I connected wit... NickL 13 Dec 2013 - 14:38 Answer Groups Menu You must login in order to post into this group. Recent content Hi Vanessa-I connected wit... 2013 projects and funding

48

Mass-density and Phonon-frequency Relaxation Dynamics of Water and Ice at Cooling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Coulomb repulsion between the bonding electron pair in the H-O covalent bond (denoted by "-") and the nonbonding electron pair of O (":") and the specific-heat disparity between the O:H and the H-O segments of the entire hydrogen bond (O:H-O) are shown to determine the O:H-O bond angle-length-stiffness relaxation dynamics and the density anomalies of water and ice. The bonding part with relatively lower specific-heat is more easily activated by cooling, which serves as the "master" and contracts, while forcing the "slave" with higher specific-heat to elongate (via Coulomb repulsion) by different amounts. In the liquid and solid phases, the O:H van der Waals bond serves as the master and becomes significantly shorter and stiffer while the H-O bond becomes slightly longer and softer (phonon frequency is a measure of bond stiffness), resulting in an O:H-O cooling contraction and the seemingly "regular" process of cooling densification. In the water-ice transition phase, the master and the slave swap roles, thus resulting in an O:H-O elongation and volume expansion during freezing. In ice, the O--O distance is longer than it is in water, resulting in a lower density, so that ice floats.

Chang Q. Sun

2013-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

49

The effect of water content, cooling rate, and growth temperature on the freezing temperature of 4 Tillandsia species  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the exotherm initiation temperatures (EIT) of leaf sections. The effect of 2 growth temperatures (5 and 25oC) on the absolute water content and EIT of T. recurvata and T. usneoides was also determined. All p * * pt T. mb'1 ', f o t ld temperatures at 80... used to detect ice formation in plant tissues by exotherm detection. An electronic device is used to measure the heat released (exotherm) when water freezes. From this information, the freezing and supercooling temperatures of plant tissues can...

Hagar, Christopher Flint

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

50

The Thermal Insulation Properties for Wall Material with Various Water Contents  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The thermal conductivities of wall material were measured under various water contents to investigate the effect of water content on the thermal insulation properties. The results show that water contents have adverse impact to heat insulation of wall ... Keywords: the thermal conductivity, water contents, the thermal insulation properties

Zhang Chuancheng; Lu Haijun

2010-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

51

Near Surface Water Content Estimation using GPR Data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

waves can be used to estimate soil water content � Short pulses of High frequency EM energy � Variations) Improved irrigation management; 3) Improved understanding of ecosystem responses and terroir; 4) May assist, evapotranspiration, and groundwater storage From Or and Rubin, 1990 ** Accurate Spatial and Temporal Variations

Rubin, Yoram

52

Formation of Hydrogen, Oxygen, and Hydrogen Peroxide in Electron Irradiated Crystalline Water Ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water ice is abundant both astrophysically, for example in molecular clouds, and in planetary systems. The Kuiper belt objects, many satellites of the outer solar system, the nuclei of comets and some planetary rings are all known to be water-rich. Processing of water ice by energetic particles and ultraviolet photons plays an important role in astrochemistry. To explore the detailed nature of this processing, we have conducted a systematic laboratory study of the irradiation of crystalline water ice in an ultrahigh vacuum setup by energetic electrons holding a linear energy transfer of 4.3 +/- 0.1 keV mm-1. The irradiated samples were monitored during the experiment both on line and in situ via mass spectrometry (gas phase) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (solid state). We observed the production of hydrogen and oxygen, both molecular and atomic, and of hydrogen peroxide. The likely reaction mechanisms responsible for these species are discussed. Additional formation routes were derived from the sublimation profiles of molecular hydrogen (90-140 K), molecular oxygen (147 -151 K) and hydrogen peroxide (170 K). We also present evidence on the involvement of hydroxyl radicals and possibly oxygen atoms as building blocks to yield hydrogen peroxide at low temperatures (12 K) and via a diffusion-controlled mechanism in the warming up phase of the irradiated sample.

Weijun Zheng; David Jewitt; Ralf I. Kaiser

2005-11-18T23:59:59.000Z

53

Analysis of soil and water for TATB content  

SciTech Connect

A reverse-phase liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was developed for the analysis of TATB in soil samples. The soil samples were extracted with dimethylformamide (DMF). The extract was analyzed to determine the TATB content in the soil. The detection limit using this procedure was 2 parts/million (ppm) for TATB in the soil. An organic free sample of water was saturated with TATB. The water was filtered through a 0.2-{mu} filter, then injected into both a reverse-phase and normal-phase liquid chromatograph system. No peaks were detected. Therefore, the solubility of TATB in water is less than the detection limits of the chromatograph methods.

Schaffer, C.L.

1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

The use of a permanent magnet for water content measurements of wood chips  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Diagram of a Wood Chip Moisture Content Measurement DeviceMeasurement of Moisture Content in Wood Chips Using NMR andWood chip water-content tests were done over a broad range of moisture contents

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Ice-water and liquid-vapor phase transitions by a Ginzburg–Landau model  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

A model for the first order phase transitions as ice-water and liquid-vapor is proposed using the Ginzburg–Landau equation for the order parameter ? . In this model the density ? is composed of two quantities ? 0 and ? 1 such that 1 / ? = 1 / ? 0 + 1 / ? 1 where ? 1 is strictly connected to the order parameter ? . By means of this decomposition we are able to represent the Andrew diagram without the use of the heuristic van der Waals equation.

Mauro Fabrizio

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

56

Neutron scattering from polycrystalline ice (Ih): Some keys to understanding the collective behavior of liquid water  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The phonon dispersion in the second Brillouin zone of polycrystalline ice (Ih) has been measured. The results confirm the predictions of a previous lattice-dynamics calculation [A. Criado, F.J. Bermejo, M. García-Hernández, and J.L. Martínez, Phys. Rev. E 47, 3516 (1993)] where anomalously steep dispersion curves of an apparent acoustic origin were found. The relevance of the present findings for explaining some apparently anomalous features concerning the collective dynamics of liquid water is finally discussed.

F. J. Bermejo; E. Frikkee; M. García-Hernández; J. L. Martínez; A. Criado

1993-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

57

The interaction of radio frequency electromagnetic fields with atmospheric water droplets and application to aircraft ice prevention  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this work the physics of advanced microwave anti-icing systems, which pre-heat impinging supercooled water droplets prior to impact, is studied by means of a computer simulation and is found to be feasible. In order to ...

Hansman, Robert John

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

58

THE RADIAL DISTRIBUTION OF WATER ICE AND CHROMOPHORES ACROSS SATURN'S SYSTEM  

SciTech Connect

Over the past eight years, the Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) on board the Cassini orbiter has returned hyperspectral images in the 0.35-5.1 {mu}m range of the icy satellites and rings of Saturn. These very different objects show significant variations in surface composition, roughness, and regolith grain size as a result of their evolutionary histories, endogenic processes, and interactions with exogenic particles. The distributions of surface water ice and chromophores, i.e., organic and non-icy materials, across the Saturnian system, are traced using specific spectral indicators (spectral slopes and absorption band depths) obtained from rings mosaics and disk-integrated satellites observations by VIMS. Moving from the inner C ring to Iapetus, we found a marking uniformity in the distribution of abundance of water ice. On the other hand, the distribution of chromophores is much more concentrated in the rings particles and on the outermost satellites (Rhea, Hyperion, and Iapetus). A reduction of red material is observed on the satellites' surfaces orbiting within the E ring environment likely due to fine particles from Enceladus' plumes. Once the exogenous dark material covering the Iapetus' leading hemisphere is removed, the texture of the water ice-rich surfaces, inferred through the 2 {mu}m band depth, appears remarkably uniform across the entire system.

Filacchione, G.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Tosi, F.; Ciarniello, M. [INAF-IAPS, Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, Area di Ricerca di Tor Vergata, via del Fosso del Cavaliere, 100, I-00133, Rome (Italy)] [INAF-IAPS, Istituto di Astrofisica e Planetologia Spaziali, Area di Ricerca di Tor Vergata, via del Fosso del Cavaliere, 100, I-00133, Rome (Italy); Clark, R. N. [Federal Center, US Geological Survey, Denver, CO 80228 (United States)] [Federal Center, US Geological Survey, Denver, CO 80228 (United States); Nicholson, P. D.; Lunine, J. I.; Hedman, M. M. [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, 418 Space Sciences Building, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)] [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, 418 Space Sciences Building, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Cruikshank, D. P.; Cuzzi, J. N. [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035-1000 (United States)] [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA 94035-1000 (United States); Brown, R. H. [Lunar Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Kuiper Space Sciences 431A, Tucson, AZ 85721-0092 (United States)] [Lunar Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Kuiper Space Sciences 431A, Tucson, AZ 85721-0092 (United States); Buratti, B. J. [NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States)] [NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, 4800 Oak Grove Drive, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Flamini, E., E-mail: gianrico.filacchione@iaps.inaf.it [ASI, Italian Space Agency, viale Liegi 26, I-00198 Rome (Italy)

2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Water content test for EOR crude simulates desalter  

SciTech Connect

Crude oil produced from enhanced oil recovery (EOR) projects employing micellar/polymer flooding can require an alternative test method for water content to the ASTM centrifuge test, or grindout procedure. The reason is that centrifuging cannot break the surfactant-stabilized emulsion. As an alternative, Marathon Oil Co. has developed a simulated desalter test (SDT) and necessary apparatus for the accurate evaluation of the quality of crude oil from such projects. Oil quality parameters such as basic sediment and water values are used almost universally for determining the acceptability of crude oil into pipeline or refinery systems.

Duke, R.B. (Marathon Oil Co., Littleton, CO (US))

1991-02-25T23:59:59.000Z

60

Water Calibration Measurements for Neutron Radiography: Application to Water Content Quantification in Porous Media  

SciTech Connect

Using neutron radiography, the measurement of water thickness was performed using aluminum (Al) water calibration cells at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) Cold-Guide (CG) 1D neutron imaging facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, USA. Calibration of water thickness is an important step to accurately measure water contents in samples of interest. Neutron attenuation by water does not vary linearly with thickness mainly due to beam hardening and scattering effects. Transmission measurements for known water thicknesses in water calibration cells allow proper correction of the underestimation of water content due to these effects. As anticipated, strong scattering effects were observed for water thicknesses greater than 2 mm when the water calibration cells were positioned close to the face of the detector / scintillator (0 and 2.4 cm away, respectively). The water calibration cells were also positioned 24 cm away from the detector face. These measurements resulted in less scattering and this position (designated as the sample position) was used for the subsequent experimental determination of the neutron attenuation coefficient for water. Neutron radiographic images of moist Flint sand in rectangular and cylindrical containers acquired at the sample position were used to demonstrate the applicability of the water calibration. Cumulative changes in the water volumes within the sand columns during monotonic drainage determined by neutron radiography were compared with those recorded by direct reading from a burette connected to a hanging water column. In general, the neutron radiography data showed very good agreement with those obtained volumetrically using the hanging water-column method. These results allow extension of the calibration equation to the quantification of unknown water contents within other samples of porous media.

Kang, Misun [ORNL; Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL; Voisin, Sophie [ORNL; Cheng, Chu-lin [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Perfect, Edmund [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Horita, Juske [Texas Tech University (TTU); Warren, Jeffrey [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water content" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

A Compact, Backscattering Deplolarization Cloud Spectrometer for Ice and Water Discrimination  

SciTech Connect

This project was to develop a compact optical particle spectrometer, small enough for operation on UAVS, that measures the optical diameter of cloud hydrometeors and differentiates their water phase (liquid or solid). To reach this goal, a work plan was laid out that would complete three objectives: 1) Evaluation of designs for an optical particle spectrometer that measures the component of light backscattered at two polarization angles. 2) Testing of selected designs on an optical bench. 3) Construction and preliminary testing of a prototype instrument based on the selected, optimum design. A protoype instrument was developed and tested in an icing wind tunnel where the results showed good measurement of cloud droplets and ice particles.

Thomson, David

2014-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

62

Total reflection infrared spectroscopy of water-ice and frozen aqueous NaCl solutions  

SciTech Connect

Liquid-like and liquid water at and near the surface of water-ice and frozen aqueous sodium chloride films were observed using attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR). The concentration of NaCl ranged from 0.0001 to 0.01 M and the temperature varied from the melting point of water down to 256 K. The amount of liquid brine at the interface of the frozen films with the germanium ATR crystal increased with salt concentration and temperature. Experimental spectra are compared to reflection spectra calculated for a simplified morphology of a uniform liquid layer between the germanium crystal and the frozen film. This morphology allows for the amount of liquid observed in an experimental spectrum to be converted to the thickness of a homogenous layer with an equivalent amount of liquid. These equivalent thickness ranges from a nanometer for water-ice at 260 K to 170 nm for 0.01 M NaCl close to the melting point. The amounts of brine observed are over an order of magnitude less than the total liquid predicted by equilibrium thermodynamic models, implying that the vast majority of the liquid fraction of frozen solutions may be found in internal inclusions, grain boundaries, and the like. Thus, the amount of liquid and the solutes dissolved in them that are available to react with atmospheric gases on the surfaces of snow and ice are not well described by thermodynamic equilibrium models which assume the liquid phase is located entirely at the surface.

Walker, Rachel L.; Searles, Keith; Willard, Jesse A.; Michelsen, Rebecca R. H., E-mail: RMichelsen@rmc.edu [Department of Chemistry, Randolph-Macon College, P.O. Box 5005, Ashland, Virginia 23005 (United States)] [Department of Chemistry, Randolph-Macon College, P.O. Box 5005, Ashland, Virginia 23005 (United States)

2013-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

63

Rapid Cooling Using Ice Slurries for Industrial and Medical Applicatio...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

to replace chilled-water cooling systems in building complexes. Because of the high energy content of ice slurry, its cooling capacity is many times greater than that of...

64

Changes in Free Water Content and Energy Metabolism of the Brain in Experimental Hydrocephalus  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In acute and subacute hydrocephalus periventricular oedema is most prominent. At these stages of hydrocephalus, the free water content is increased and the bound water content, to the contrary, significantly d...

N. Tamaki M.D.; T. Nagashima; K. Ehara; M. Kimura; S. Matsumoto…

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Correlation between thermodynamic anomalies and pathways of ice nucleation in supercooled water  

SciTech Connect

The well-known classical nucleation theory (CNT) for the free energy barrier towards formation of a nucleus of critical size of the new stable phase within the parent metastable phase fails to take into account the influence of other metastable phases having density/order intermediate between the parent metastable phase and the final stable phase. This lacuna can be more serious than capillary approximation or spherical shape assumption made in CNT. This issue is particularly significant in ice nucleation because liquid water shows rich phase diagram consisting of two (high and low density) liquid phases in supercooled state. The explanations of thermodynamic and dynamic anomalies of supercooled water often invoke the possible influence of a liquid-liquid transition between two metastable liquid phases. To investigate both the role of thermodynamic anomalies and presence of distinct metastable liquid phases in supercooled water on ice nucleation, we employ density functional theoretical approach to find nucleation free energy barrier in different regions of phase diagram. The theory makes a number of striking predictions, such as a dramatic lowering of nucleation barrier due to presence of a metastable intermediate phase and crossover in the dependence of free energy barrier on temperature near liquid-liquid critical point. These predictions can be tested by computer simulations as well as by controlled experiments.

Singh, Rakesh S.; Bagchi, Biman, E-mail: bbagchi@sscu.iisc.ernet.in [Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)] [Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560012 (India)

2014-04-28T23:59:59.000Z

66

Simulation of Ultra High Energy Neutrino Interactions in Ice and Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The CORSIKA program, usually used to simulate extensive cosmic ray air showers, has been adapted to work in a water or ice medium. The adapted CORSIKA code was used to simulate hadronic showers produced by neutrino interactions. The simulated showers have been used to study the spatial distribution of the deposited energy in the showers. This allows a more precise determination of the acoustic signals produced by ultra high energy neutrinos than has been possible previously. The properties of the acoustic signals generated by such showers are described.

S. Bevan; S. Danaher; J. Perkin; S. Ralph; C. Rhodes; L. Thompson; T. Sloan; D. Waters

2007-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

67

Simulation of Ultra High Energy Neutrino Interactions in Ice and Water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The CORSIKA program, usually used to simulate extensive cosmic ray air showers, has been adapted to work in a water or ice medium. The adapted CORSIKA code was used to simulate hadronic showers produced by neutrino interactions. The simulated showers have been used to study the spatial distribution of the deposited energy in the showers. This allows a more precise determination of the acoustic signals produced by ultra high energy neutrinos than has been possible previously. The properties of the acoustic signals generated by such showers are described.

Bevan, S; Perkin, J; Ralph, S; Rhodes, C; Thompson, L; Sloan, T; Waters, D

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

68

Detections of water ice, hydrocarbons, and 3.3um PAH in z~2 ULIRGs  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present the first detections of the 3um water ice and 3.4um amorphous hydrocarbon (HAC) absorption features in z~2 ULIRGs. These are based on deep rest-frame 2-8um Spitzer IRS spectra of 11 sources selected for their appreciable silicate absorption. The HAC-to-silicate ratio for our z~2 sources is typically higher by a factor of 2-5 than that observed in the Milky Way. This HAC `excess' suggests compact nuclei with steep temperature gradients as opposed to predominantly host obscuration. Beside the above molecular absorption features, we detect the 3.3um PAH emission feature in one of our sources with three more individual spectra showing evidence for it. Stacking analysis suggests that water ice, hydrocarbons, and PAH are likely present in the bulk of this sample even when not individually detected. The most unexpected result of our study is the lack of clear detections of the 4.67um CO gas absorption feature. Only three of the sources show tentative signs of this feature and at significantly lower levels...

Sajina, A; Yan, L; Imanishi, M; Fadda, D; Elitzur, M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Water and ice structure in the range 220 - 365K from radiation total scattering experiments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The past decade or so has witnessed a large number of articles about water structure. The most incisive experiments involve radiation with a wavelength compatible with the observed inter-molecular separations found in water, of order $\\sim 3$\\AA, in other words mostly $$10keV x-rays. Because x-rays are scattered by electrons while neutrons are scattered by nuclei, the two probes give complementary information about the three site-site radial distribution functions for water, namely O-O, O-H and H-H. Here a version of Monte Carlo simulation called Empirical Potential Structure Refinement is used to devise an empirical intermolecular potential which attempts to drive the simulated radial distribution functions as close as possible to the data. New x-ray and neutron scattering data on water in the temperature range 280 - 365K are presented for the first time, alongside a new analysis of some much older neutron data on ice 1h at 220K. This temperature analysis, above and below the water freezing point of water, r...

Soper, Alan K

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

70

A common column density threshold for scattering at 3.6 mum and water-ice in molecular clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Context: Observations of scattered light in the 1-5 $\\mu$m range have revealed dust grains in molecular cores with sizes larger than commonly inferred for the diffuse interstellar medium. It is currently unclear whether these grains are grown within the molecular cores or are an ubiquitous component of the interstellar medium. Aims: We investigate whether the large grains necessary for efficient scattering at 1-5 mum are associated with the abundance of water-ice within molecular clouds and cores. Methods: We combined water-ice abundance measurements for sight lines through the Lupus IV molecular cloud complex with measurements of the scattered light at 3.6 mum for the same sight lines. Results: We find that there is a similar threshold for the cores in emission in scattered light at 3.6 mum (tau_9.7=0.15pm0.05, A_K=0.4pm0.2 as water-ice (tau_9.7=0.11pm0.01, A_K=0.19pm0.04) and that the scattering efficiency increases as the relative water-ice abundance increases. The ice layer increases the average grain siz...

Andersen, M; Steinacker, J; Tothill, N

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Minimalist Model of Ice Microphysics in Mixed-phase Stratiform Clouds  

SciTech Connect

The question of whether persistent ice crystal precipitation from super cooled layer clouds can be explained by time-dependent, stochastic ice nucleation is explored using an approximate, analytical model, and a large-eddy simulation (LES) cloud model. The updraft velocity in the cloud defines an accumulation zone, where small ice particles cannot fall out until they are large enough, which will increase the residence time of ice particles in the cloud. Ice particles reach a quasi-steady state between growth by vapor deposition and fall speed at cloud base. The analytical model predicts that ice water content (wi) has a 2.5 power law relationship with ice number concentration ni. wi and ni from a LES cloud model with stochastic ice nucleation also confirm the 2.5 power law relationship. The prefactor of the power law is proportional to the ice nucleation rate, and therefore provides a quantitative link to observations of ice microphysical properties.

Yang, F.; Ovchinnikov, Mikhail; Shaw, Raymond A.

2013-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

72

Mars gets new icing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... north pole. Here the ice-cap shrinks each summer as a veneer of carbon dioxide burns off, revealing plenty of less volatile water ice beneath. The ice-cap at the ... beneath. The ice-cap at the red planet's south pole is covered with strange pits, called Swiss-cheese features. They have flat bottoms and steep sides; some are ...

Philip Ball

2003-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

73

Electric resistance of water films on the surface of ice near the phase transition temperature  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The electric resistance of the surface layer of a polycrystalline ... ice melting, a monotonic decrease in the resistance of the ice surface changes to growth, ... of melting. In the growth stage, the resistance ...

G. S. Bordonski?; S. D. Krylov

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Does Water Content or Flow Rate Control Colloid Transport in Unsaturated Porous Media?  

SciTech Connect

Mobile colloids can play an important role in contaminant transport in soils: many contaminants exist in colloidal form, and colloids can facilitate transport of otherwise immobile contaminants. In unsaturated soils, colloid transport is, among other factors, affected by water content and flow rate. Our objective was to determine whether water content or flow rate is more important for colloid transport. We passed negatively charged polystyrene colloids (220 nm diameter) through unsaturated sand-filled columns under steady-state flow at different water contents (effective water saturations Se ranging from 0.1 to 1.0, with Se = (? – ?r)/(?s – ?r)) and flow rates (pore water velocities v of 5 and 10 cm/min). Water content was the dominant factor in our experiments. Colloid transport decreased with decreasing water content, and below a critical water content (Se < 0.1), colloid transport was inhibited, and colloids were strained in water films. Pendular ring and water film thickness calculations indicated that colloids can move only when pendular rings are interconnected. The flow rate affected retention of colloids in the secondary energy minimum, with less colloids being trapped when the flow rate increased. These results confirm the importance of both water content and flow rate for colloid transport in unsaturated porous media and highlight the dominant role of water content.

Thorsten Knappenberger; Markus Flury; Earl D. Mattson; James B. Harsh

2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

75

Ice Heating Up Cold Clouds | EMSL  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ice Heating Up Cold Clouds Ice Heating Up Cold Clouds In a heated battle, ice crystals win the competition for cloud water vapor The mighty cloud ice crystal appears deceptively...

76

Field-scale estimation of volumetric water content using ground-penetrating radar ground wave techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sampling, time domain reflectometry (TDR), neutron probe logging, and tensiometers [Prichard, 1999 were compared to gravimetric water content, time domain reflectometry, and soil texture measurements

Hubbard, Susan

77

STABILIZATION OF THE NITRITE CONTENT OF SEA WATER BY ...  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Figure 2 shows the ZG5 content of 11 samples of ... However, the ZnC” content of both salps. ( collected before ... Uses of Atomic Energy, 18: 434-438. MURTHY ...

1999-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

78

Real-time Non-contact Millimeter Wave Characterization of Water-Freezing and Ice-Melting Dynamics  

SciTech Connect

We applied millimeter wave radiometry for the first time to monitor water-freezing and ice-melting dynamics in real-time non-contact. The measurements were completed at a frequency of 137 GHz. Small amounts (about 2 mL) of freshwater or saltwater were frozen over a Peltier cooler and the freezing and melting sequence was recorded. Saltwater was prepared in the laboratory that contained 3.5% of table salt to simulate the ocean water. The dynamics of freezing-melting was observed by measuring the millimeter wave temperature as well as the changes in the ice or water surface reflectivity and position. This was repeated using large amounts of freshwater and saltwater (800 mL) mimicking glaciers. Millimeter wave surface level fluctuations indicated as the top surface melted, the light ice below floated up indicating lower surface temperature until the ice completely melted. Our results are useful for remote sensing and tracking temperature for potentially large-scale environmental applications, e.g., global warming.

Sundaram, S. K.; Woskov, Paul P.

2008-11-12T23:59:59.000Z

79

A Content Validity Study of the Water Training Institute Curriculum.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Content validity methods, such as matching matrices, have been used to assist in the design and evaluation of training programs. In the present study, the… (more)

Turner, Alicia

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

80

The influence of changes in water content on the electrical resistivity of a natural unsaturated loess  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 The influence of changes in water content on the electrical resistivity of a natural unsaturated these methods, the measurements based on the electrical resistivity are simple and reliable thanks to the clear relationship between the water content and the electrical resistivity of soils. In this work, a new electrical

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water content" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Characterization of Soil Water Content Variability and Soil Texture using GPR Groundwave Techniques  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

measurements. Precipitation and irrigation were both shown to increase the spatial variability of water content the soil water content is well character- ized across a field. In addition to crop yield, the quality JEEG, September 2010, Volume 15, Issue 3, pp. 93­110 #12;of some crops, such as wine grapes, partially

Hubbard, Susan

82

Estimating the Atmospheric Water Vapor Content from Sun Photometer Measurements  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The differential absorption technique for estimating columnar water vapor values from the analysis of sunphotometric measurements with wide- and narrowband interferential filters centered near 0.94 ?m is discussed and adapted. Water vapor line ...

Artemio Plana-Fattori; Michel Legrand; Didier Tanré; Claude Devaux; Anne Vermeulen; Philippe Dubuisson

1998-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Water content of 1997 vulcanian pumices at Soufriere Hills Volcano (Montserrat) and implications on pre-eruptive conduit conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Water content of 1997 vulcanian pumices at Soufriere Hills Volcano (Montserrat) and implications of the eruptive products. We used quantitative analysis of water content in residual glasses (matrix glass. To better link water content to structural level, we performed new water solubility experiments at low

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

84

Formation of high density amorphous ice by decompression of ice VII and ice VIII at 135 K  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of ice Ih and are found to have very similar structures. By cooling liquid water along the water trans- forms into ice VIII when cooled . With this in mind Klug et al. were able to produce low densityFormation of high density amorphous ice by decompression of ice VII and ice VIII at 135 K Carl Mc

McBride, Carl

85

Accurate measurement of the through-plane water content of proton-exchange  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accurate measurement of the through-plane water content of proton-exchange Accurate measurement of the through-plane water content of proton-exchange membranes using neutron radiography Title Accurate measurement of the through-plane water content of proton-exchange membranes using neutron radiography Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Hussey, Daniel S., Dusan Spernjak, Adam Z. Weber, Rangachary Mukundan, Joseph Fairweather, Eric L. Brosha, John Davey, Jacob S. Spendelow, David L. Jacobson, and Rodney L. Borup Journal Journal of Applied Physics Volume 112 Issue 10 Pagination 104906 Date Published 2012 ISSN 00218979 Keywords electrolyte fuel-cells, in-situ, liquid water, microchannel plate detectors, model, nafion, polymer electrolytes, schroeders-paradox, transport, x-ray-scattering Abstract The water sorption of proton-exchange membranes (PEMs) was measured in situ using high-resolution neutron imaging in small-scale fuel cell test sections. A detailed characterization of the measurement uncertainties and corrections associated with the technique is presented. An image-processing procedure resolved a previously reported discrepancy between the measured and predicted membrane water content. With high-resolution neutron-imaging detectors, the water distributions across N1140 and N117 Nafion membranes are resolved in vapor-sorption experiments and during fuel cell and hydrogen-pump operation. The measured in situ water content of a restricted membrane at 80 degrees C is shown to agree with ex situ gravimetric measurements of free-swelling membranes over a water activity range of 0.5 to 1.0 including at liquid equilibration. Schroeder's paradox was verified by in situ water-content measurements which go from a high value at supersaturated or liquid conditions to a lower one with fully saturated vapor. At open circuit and during fuel cell operation, the measured water content indicates that the membrane is operating between the vapor-and liquid-equilibrated states.

86

Arctic ice islands  

SciTech Connect

The development of offshore oil and gas resources in the Arctic waters of Alaska requires offshore structures which successfully resist the lateral forces due to moving, drifting ice. Ice islands are floating, a tabular icebergs, up to 60 meters thick, of solid ice throughout their thickness. The ice islands are thus regarded as the strongest ice features in the Arctic; fixed offshore structures which can directly withstand the impact of ice islands are possible but in some locations may be so expensive as to make oilfield development uneconomic. The resolution of the ice island problem requires two research steps: (1) calculation of the probability of interaction between an ice island and an offshore structure in a given region; and (2) if the probability if sufficiently large, then the study of possible interactions between ice island and structure, to discover mitigative measures to deal with the moving ice island. The ice island research conducted during the 1983-1988 interval, which is summarized in this report, was concerned with the first step. Monte Carlo simulations of ice island generation and movement suggest that ice island lifetimes range from 0 to 70 years, and that 85% of the lifetimes are less then 35 years. The simulation shows a mean value of 18 ice islands present at any time in the Arctic Ocean, with a 90% probability of less than 30 ice islands. At this time, approximately 34 ice islands are known, from observations, to exist in the Arctic Ocean, not including the 10-meter thick class of ice islands. Return interval plots from the simulation show that coastal zones of the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas, already leased for oil development, have ice island recurrences of 10 to 100 years. This implies that the ice island hazard must be considered thoroughly, and appropriate safety measures adopted, when offshore oil production plans are formulated for the Alaskan Arctic offshore. 132 refs., 161 figs., 17 tabs.

Sackinger, W.M.; Jeffries, M.O.; Lu, M.C.; Li, F.C.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

87

High-Resolution Estimation of Near-Subsurface Water Content using Surface GPR Ground Wave Information  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-scarce agricultural areas. Conventional measurements of water content (such as from time domain reflectometry [TDR], neutron probe or gravimetric techniques) are intrusive and provide information at a 'point' scale, which

Rubin, Yoram

88

The use of a permanent magnet for water content measurements ofwood chips  

SciTech Connect

The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has developed a device that measures the water content of wood chips, pulp and brown stock for the paper industry. This device employs a permanent magnet as the central part of a NMR measurement system. This report describes the magnet and the NMR measurement system. The results of water content measurements in wood chips in a magnetic field of 0.47 T are presented.

Barale, P.J.; Fong, C.G.; Green, M.A.; Luft, P.A.; McInturff,A.D.; Reimer, J.A.; Yahnke, M.

2001-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

89

Effect of Upgraded Lignite Product Water Content on the Propensity for Spontaneous Ignition  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

At the end of 2005, worldwide lignite reserves were 207.4 billion tons and accounted for 17.7% of total coal. ... Therefore, there is still considerable interest in the propensity for spontaneous ignition of upgraded lignites products with different moisture contents and also the recommended water content for upgraded lignite products. ...

Kai Zhang; Changfu You

2012-12-11T23:59:59.000Z

90

CONTENTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Operations Office RPD relative percent difference RSD relative standard deviation TIC tentatively identified compound DOERL-96-68, HASQARD Table of Contents, Rev. 3 Volume...

91

CONTENTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

3.0 - CRITICAL, SPECIAL, & ENGINEERED LIFTS March 21, 2013 Rev 1 Page 1 CHAPTER 3.0 TABLE OF CONTENTS 3.0 CRITICAL LIFTS ......

92

CONTENTS  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

assurancecontrol) 3. Responsible operations manager 4. Equipment custodian 5. Cognizant engineer. *Reviewapproval is mandatory. 18.3.3 Hostile Environment Plan Contents The plan...

93

A Review Of Water Contents Of Nominally Anhydrous Natural Minerals In The  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

A Review Of Water Contents Of Nominally Anhydrous Natural Minerals In The A Review Of Water Contents Of Nominally Anhydrous Natural Minerals In The Mantles Of Earth, Mars And The Moon Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Journal Article: A Review Of Water Contents Of Nominally Anhydrous Natural Minerals In The Mantles Of Earth, Mars And The Moon Details Activities (0) Areas (0) Regions (0) Abstract: Olivine, pyroxene and garnet are nominally anhydrous but can accommodate tens to hundreds of parts per million (ppm) H2O or "water" in the form of protons incorporated in defects in their mineral structure. This review concerns the amount of water in nominally anhydrous minerals from mantle and mantle-derived rocks: peridotites, eclogites, megacrysts, basalts and kimberlites. Trends between internal and external parameters

94

Ice Fishing  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ice Fishing Ice Fishing Nature Bulletin No. 327-A January 11, 1969 Forest Preserve District of Cook County Richard B. Ogilvie, President Roland F. Eisenbeis, Supt. of Conservation ICE FISHING We have a peculiar class of people known as the "Frosty-toed Tribe". As soon as winter comes and the ice permits, they put on all the clothes they own and what they can borrow, pack their automobiles with equipment, and start early in the morning for some inland body of water or a bay along one of the Great Lakes. Usually, two or three go together and they may drive 50 or 100 miles. For hours, even in below zero weather, they huddle around holes cut in the ice, fishing patiently, sustained by hope, hot coffee, and a lot of conversation. Some days a man may catch nothing. Other days he may bring home all the law allows. Sometimes he fishes vainly until almost sundown and then begins to haul them in, all of the same kind and size, as fast as he can re-bait his hook. In the meantime, other anglers have rushed over, cut holes, and are fishing all around him -- usually in vain, because one of the strange things about ice fishing is that, although you may catch fish out of one hole, you may get nothing out of another only a few feet from it, using the same kind of bait at the same depth. There are a lot of hotly contested theories but nobody knows why. After watching and questioning scores of ice fishermen, some of them noted for their prowess, we find that although each has his own secret techniques and favorite spots, good catches seem more a matter of luck than skill. Although they are sluggish and don't fight, fish caught in winter have the firmest flesh and finest flavor. The biggest thrill comes from the skillet.

95

Analysing chromatographic data using data mining to monitor petroleum content in water  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Analysing chromatographic data using data mining to monitor petroleum content in water Geoffrey the concentrations of petroleum compounds in water samples. Experiments demonstrate that the framework can be used, New Zealand. Abstract Chromatography is an important analytical technique that has wide- spread use

Frank, Eibe

96

Water-Cooled Ice Machines, Purchasing Specifications for Energy-Efficient Products (Fact Sheet), Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP)  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

continued > continued > FEDERAL ENERGY MANAGEMENT PROGRAM PURCHASING SPECIFICATIONS FOR ENERGY-EFFICIENT PRODUCTS The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Federal Energy Management Program (FEMP) facilitates the Federal Government's implementation of sound, cost-effective energy management and investment practices to enhance the nation's energy security and environmental stewardship. Water-Cooled Ice Machines Legal Authorities Federal agencies are required by the National Energy Conservation Policy Act (P.L. 95-619), Execu- tive Order 13423, Executive Order 13514, and Federal Acquisition Regulations (FAR) Subpart 23.2 and 53.223 to specify and buy ENERGY STAR ® qualified products or, in categories not included in

97

Non-invasive field measurements of soil water content using a pulsed 14 MeV neutron generator  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Non-invasive field measurements of soil water content using a pulsed 14 MeV neutron generator S to the atmosphere. Soil water sensors routinely are used in applications such as research on crop production, water-3120, United States 1. Introduction Knowledge of soil water content is critical to agricultural, hydrological

Johnson, Peter D.

98

Drought stress influences leaf water content, photosynthesis, and water-use efficiency of Hibiscus rosa-sinensis at three potassium concentrations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The influence of drought stress (DS) upon whole-plant water content, water relations, photosynthesis, and water-use efficiency of Hibiscus rosa-sinensis cv. Leprechaun (Hibiscus...) plants at three levels of pota...

J. N. Egilla; F. T. Davies Jr.; T. W. Boutton

99

EVOLUTION OF SNOW LINE IN OPTICALLY THICK PROTOPLANETARY DISKS: EFFECTS OF WATER ICE OPACITY AND DUST GRAIN SIZE  

SciTech Connect

Evolution of a snow line in an optically thick protoplanetary disk is investigated with numerical simulations. The ice-condensing region in the disk is obtained by calculating the temperature and the density with the 1+1D approach. The snow line migrates as the mass accretion rate ( M-dot ) in the disk decreases with time. Calculations are carried out from an early phase with high disk accretion rates ( M-dot {approx}10{sup -7} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}) to a later phase with low disk accretion rates ( M-dot {approx}10{sup -12} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}) using the same numerical method. It is found that the snow line moves inward for M-dot {approx}>10{sup -10} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}, while it gradually moves outward in the later evolution phase with M-dot {approx}<10{sup -10} M{sub sun} yr{sup -1}. In addition to the silicate opacity, the ice opacity is taken into consideration. In the inward migration phase, the additional ice opacity increases the distance of the snow line from the central star by a factor of 1.3 for dust grains {approx}< 10 {mu}m in size and of 1.6 for {approx}> 100 {mu}m. It is inevitable that the snow line comes inside Earth's orbit in the course of the disk evolution if the viscosity parameter {alpha} is in the range 0.001-0.1, the dust-to-gas mass ratio is higher than a tenth of the solar abundance value, and the dust grains are smaller than 1 mm. The formation of water-devoid planetesimals in the terrestrial planet region seems to be difficult throughout the disk evolution, which imposes a new challenge to planet formation theory.

Oka, Akinori; Nakamoto, Taishi; Ida, Shigeru, E-mail: akinorioka1@gmail.com, E-mail: nakamoto@geo.titech.ac.jp [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Tokyo (Japan)

2011-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

100

TECHNICAL NOTES Long-Term Behavior of Water Content and Density  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in Champaign, Ill. in 1987. A pond of water 0.31 m deep was maintained on top of the 7.3 m X 14.6 m X 0.9 mTECHNICAL NOTES Long-Term Behavior of Water Content and Density in an Earthen Liner Timothy E thick liner for 14 years. One of the goals of the project was to evaluate the long-term performance

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water content" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Trapping of volatiles in amorphous water ice. R. M. E. Mastrapa , R. H. Brown  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

were re- leased into the sample chamber at the same pressure as the water, measurements will be taken with a solar system composition gas with the proper ratios of water to volatile. References: [1] Bar-Nun, A., G

Cohen, Barbara Anne

102

Ice age paleotopography  

SciTech Connect

A gravitationally self-consistent theory of postglacial relative sea level change is used to infer the variation of surface ice and water cover since the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). The results show that LGM ice volume was approximately 35 percent lower than suggested by the CLIMAP reconstruction and the maximum heights of the main Laurentian and Fennoscandian ice complexes are inferred to have been commensurately lower with respect to sea level. Use of these Ice Age boundary conditions in atmospheric general circulation models will yield climates that differ significantly from those previously inferred on the basis of the CLIMAP data set.

Peltier, W.R. (Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada))

1994-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

103

The effect of soil water content on the phytotoxicity of diuron, fluridone, metribuzin and trifluralin  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of Soil Water Content on the Phytotoxicity of Diuron, Fluridone, Netribuzin and Trifluralin (August 1979) Paul Alan Baumann, B. S. Southwest Missouri State (kuversity, Springfield Chairman of Advisory Ccnrnittee: Qr. Norris G. Nerkle 'The effect... that simazine hect less effective in reducing top growth of oats (Avena sativa L. var. "Rodney") as the moisture level of the soil decreased. Almost three times as much simazine was required to give 50% reduction in growth when the xoisture level of the soil...

Baumann, Paul A

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

104

Ice mechanics and risks to offshore structures  

SciTech Connect

This volume brings together the results of all salient research development in ice engineering, from smaller scale to full size tests on ice strength and ice mechanics which is essential criteria for the design of safe, cost effective structures. Much of the data has been released from confidential industry files and thus allows, for the first time, a full appraisal of the subject. Contents include - Types and Distribution of Ice, Mechanical Properties, Measurements of Ice-Structure Interaction, and Analysis of Ice Failure and Design Ice Loads. This work is completed with a full literary review and subject index.

Sanderson, T.J.O.

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

105

The Post-Shock Chemical Lifetimes of Outflow Tracers and a Possible New Mechanism to Produce Water Ice Mantles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have used a coupled time-dependent chemical and dynamical model to investigate the lifetime of the chemical legacy left in the wake of C-type shocks. We concentrate this study on the chemistry of H2O and O2, two molecules which are predicted to have abundances that are significantly affected in shock-heated gas. Two models are presented: (1) a three-stage model of pre-shock, shocked, and post-shock gas; and (2) a Monte-Carlo cloud simulation where we explore the effects of stochastic shock activity on molecular gas over a cloud lifetime. In agreement with previous studies, we find that shock velocities in excess of 10 km s^-1 are required to convert all of the oxygen not locked in CO into H2O before the gas has an opportunity to cool. For pure gas-phase models the lifetime of the high water abundances, or ``H2O legacy'', in the post-shock gas is 4 - 7 x 10^5 years. Through the Monte Carlo cloud simulation we demonstrate that the time-average abundance of H2O is a sensitive function of the frequency of shocks. Thus we predict that the abundance of H2O and other known outflow tracers can be used to trace the history of shock activity in molecular gas. For gas-grain models we find that the abundance of water-ice on grain surfaces can be quite large and is comparable to that observed in molecular clouds. This offers a possible alternative method to create water mantles without resorting to grain surface chemistry: gas heating and chemical modification due to a C-type shock and subsequent depletion of the gas-phase species onto grain mantles.

Edwin A. Bergin; Gary J. Melnick; David A. Neufeld

1998-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

106

Fish Smother Under Ice  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Smother Under Ice Smother Under Ice A BULLETIN FOR THE CHICAGO PUBLIC SCHOOLS DESIGNED FOR INCLUSION IN THE WEEKLY ANNOUNCEMENT SENT OUT FROM THE OFFICE OF SUPT. WILLIAM H. JOHNSON Clayton F. Smith, President Roberts Mann, Superintendent of Conservation February 1, 1945 Nature Bulletin No. 1 FOREST PRESERVE NOTES Grown-ups, who used to kive on a farm or in a small town, are fond of talking about the old-fashioned winters "when I was a boy" and the winters that grandpa used to tell about. Well, one would have to go back a long, long time to find a winter as severe as this one. FISH SMOTHER UNDER ICE Lakes and streams breathe the same as living things. When they are covered with ice and snow they cannot get air and they much hold their breath until the ice thaws. While they are holding their breath the oxygen in the water is gradually used up by the living things sealed up in it -- fish, plants "bugs", snails, and hosts of microscopic life. If the ice lasts long enough, these living things die one after another as each kind reaches the point where it cannot stand any further oxygen starvation. Sometimes temporary relief is given by rains and melting snow that bring fresh, serated water under the ice, but no method of artificial respiration has been found that works. Sometimes, too, when water plants get enough sunlight through clear ice they produce small amounts of oxygen and delay the suffocation of the fish, etc.; but when snow and cloudy ice cuts off the light this does not happen.

107

Uranium content variations in thermal waters from the West Rhodope cristalline massif during earthquakes in the Chepino Valley (South Bulgaria)  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The uranium content of the thermal waters in the Chepino valley was determined in a period of increased seismic activity. Significant changes in the uranium concentration, much above the normal background valu...

I. Kuleff; P. Petrov; K. Kostadinov

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Water Content Determination of Rubber Stoppers Utilized for Sealing Lyophilized Pharmaceutical Products: Assessment of Two Karl Fischer Titration Methods  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to factors such as the storage environment and the drug's container/closure system, typically a vial, stopper, and cap. The water present in the rubber stopper may interact with the vial contents, potentially influencing the drug product's stability...

Voth, Laura Marie

2013-08-31T23:59:59.000Z

109

Influence of Liquid Water Content and Temperature on the Form and Growth of Branched Planar Snow Crystals in a Cloud  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

How liquid water content (LWC) and temperature affect the growth of branched planar snow crystals is poorly understood. To address this issue, a vertical supercooled cloud tunnel was used to grow 167 individual snow crystals for 10 min under ...

Tsuneya Takahashi

2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

110

Chemical Characterization and Water Content Determination of Bio-Oils Obtained from Various Biomass Species using 31P NMR Spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect

Pyrolysis is a promising approach to utilize biomass for biofuels. One of the key challenges for this conversion is how to analyze complicated components in the pyrolysis oils. Water contents of pyrolysis oils are normally analyzed by Karl Fischer titration. The use of 2-chloro-4,4,5,5,-tetramethyl-1,3,2-dioxaphospholane followed by {sup 31}P NMR analysis has been used to quantitatively analyze the structure of hydroxyl groups in lignin and whole biomass. Results: {sup 31}P NMR analysis of pyrolysis oils is a novel technique to simultaneously characterize components and analyze water contents in pyrolysis oils produced from various biomasses. The water contents of various pyrolysis oils range from 16 to 40 wt%. The pyrolysis oils obtained from Loblolly pine had higher guaiacyl content, while that from oak had a higher syringyl content. Conclusion: The comparison with Karl Fischer titration shows that {sup 31}P NMR could also reliably be used to measure the water content of pyrolysis oils. Simultaneously with analysis of water content, quantitative characterization of hydroxyl groups, including aliphatic, C-5 substituted/syringyl, guaiacyl, p-hydroxyl phenyl and carboxylic hydroxyl groups, could also be provided by {sup 31}P NMR analysis.

David, K.; Ben, H.; Muzzy, J.; Feik, C.; Iisa, K.; Ragauskas, A.

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Fire and Ice Issue 9  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

£s FIRE AND ICE # 9 IB FIRE ICE #9 A Blake/Avon slash fanzine r Available from: Kathleen Resch POBox 1766 Temple City, CA 91780 Kathleener@aol.com FIRE AND ICE # 9copyright © May, 2005 by Kathleen Resch for the contributors. No reprints... or reproduction without the written permission ofthe author/artist This is an amateur publication and is not p intended to infringe upon the rights ofany holders of"Blake's 7" copyrights. FIRE AND ICE 9 TABLE OF CONTENTS LEAVING ROOM 101 by Nova 2 TOO MANY...

Multiple Contributors

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

A parameterisation of the flux and energy spectrum of single and multiple muons in the deep water or ice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Atmospheric muons play an important role in underwater/ice neutrino detectors. A parameterisation of the flux of single and multiple muon events, of their lateral distribution and energy spectrum is presented. The kinematics parameters were modelled starting from a full Monte Carlo simulation of the interaction of primary cosmic rays with atmospheric nuclei. The parametric formulas are valid for a vertical depth of 1.5–5 km w.e. and up to 85 ? for the zenith angle, and can be used as input for a fast simulation of atmospheric muons in underwater/ice detectors.

M. Spurio

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

113

Calculation of the Cherenkov light yield from low energetic secondary particles accompanying high-energy muons in ice and water with Geant4 simulations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this work we investigate and parameterize the amount and angular distribution of Cherenkov photons, which are generated by low-energy secondary particles (typically ? 500  MeV), which accompany a muon track in water or ice. These secondary particles originate from small energy loss processes. We investigate the contributions of the different energy loss processes as a function of the muon energy and the maximum transferred energy. For the calculation of the angular distribution we have developed a generic transformation method, which allows us to derive the angular distribution of Cherenkov photons for an arbitrary distribution of track directions and their velocities.

Leif Rädel; Christopher Wiebusch

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

114

Aerosol and graphitic carbon content of snow  

SciTech Connect

Snow samples from southern New Mexico, west Texas, Antarctica, and Greenland were analyzed for aerosol and graphitic carbon. Graphitic carbon contents were found to be between 2.2 and 25 ..mu..g L/sup -1/ of snow meltwater; water-insoluble aerosol content varied between 0.62 and 8.5 mg L/sup -1/. For comparison, two samples of Camp Century, Greenland, ice core, having approximate ages of 4,000 and 6,000 years, were also analyzed. Ice core graphitic carbon contents were found to be 2.5 and 1.1 ..mu..g L/sup -1/. copyrightAmerican Geophysical Union 1987

Chy-acute-accentlek, P.; Srivastava, V.; Cahenzli, L.; Pinnick, R.G.; Dod, R.L.; Novakov, T.; Cook, T.L.; Hinds, B.D.

1987-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

115

A GCM Parameterization of Ice Particle Mean Effective Sizes for High Latitude Cirrus Clouds and It's Comparison with Mid-Latitude Parmaterization  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

GCM Parameterization of Ice Particle Mean Effective GCM Parameterization of Ice Particle Mean Effective Sizes for High Latitude Cirrus Clouds and It's Comparison with Mid-Latitude Parameterization F. S. Boudala Department of Oceanography Dalhousie University Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada Q. Fu Department of Atmospheric Sciences University of Washington Seattle, Washington G. A. Issac Meteorological Service of Canada Toronto, Ontario, Canada Introduction Single-scattering properties of ice clouds depend on both ice water content (IWC) and effective size of cloud particles (Fu 1996; Fu et al. 1998). However, only the IWC information is provided in numerical models. Stephens et al. (1990) showed that the ice cloud feedback on a CO 2 warming simulation could be either positive or negative depending on the value of the ice particle size assumed. Parameterizations

116

Spectroscopic measurement of the vapour pressure of ice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...Murphy Meeting Issue Water in the gas phase . We...triple-point state of water and uses frequency-stabilized...temperature-regulated standard humidity generator, which contains ice...within 0.35 per cent. water vapour|ice vapour pressure...technical fields. In atmospheric physics, ice crystals...

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

16/05/12 3:57 PMWATER: Floating robots use GPS-enabled smartphones to track water flow, help water management Page 1 of 4http://www.lakeconews.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article...o-track-water-flow-help-water-management&catid=1:latest&Itemid=1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

management Page 1 of 4http://www.lakeconews.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article...o-track-water-flow-help-water-management management WATER:'Floating'robots'use'GPS8 enabled'smartphones'to'track'water flow,'help'water'management-enabled smartphones to track water flow, help water management Page 2 of 4http://www.lakeconews.com/index.php?option

118

Don't water down: Enhance content learning through the unit organizer routine  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The writer considers a content enhancement routine called the unit organizer routine. This routine focuses on how a teacher introduces, builds, and gains closure on a content area unit's critical ideas and information. In ...

Bouda, Daniel J.; Lenz, B. Keith; Bulgren, Janis A.; Schumaker, Jean B.; Deshler, Donald D.

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

System and method for monitoring water content or other dielectric influences in a medium  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sensor system is provided that measures water content or other detectable properties in a medium along the entire length of the sensor at any point in time. The sensor system includes an electromagnetic signal generator and a transmission line disposed in a medium to be monitored. Alternatively, the transmission line can be configured for movement across a medium to be monitored, or the transmission line can be fixed relative to a moving medium being monitored. A signal is transmitted along the transmission line at predetermined frequencies, and the signal is returned back along the transmission line and/or into an optional receive line in proximity to the transmission line. The returned signal is processed to generate a one-dimensional data output profile that is a function of a detectable property of the medium. The data output profile can be mapped onto a physical system to generate a two-dimensional or three-dimensional profile if desired. The sensor system is useful in a variety of different applications such as agriculture, horticulture, biofiltration systems for industrial offgases, leak detection in landfills or drum storage facilities at buried waste sites, and in many other applications.

Cherry, Robert S. (Idaho Falls, ID); Anderson, Allen A. (Firth, ID)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

GREAT LAKES ICE COVER RaymondA. Asset'  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

hydropower production and cooling water intakes, and damaging shore structures. Ice cover also impactsChapter 6 GREAT LAKES ICE COVER RaymondA. Asset' ABSTRACT: Theformation of ice on the Lallrentian (~rthe Great Lakes anel local weather and climate. The (I1Inllal seasonal and ~'Patialprogression of ice

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water content" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Fire and Ice Issue 2  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. fipl cpn r FLASHPOINT A flame that can't be seen, cloaked in black and silver and disdain, born of anger and of love no longer dared. An ice-encrusted soul, dormant in the aftermath of accusations piled like snow against the heated passions of a man who...^ $$% i&l /P^ \\0 rffej FIRE AND ICE AVAILABLE FROM Kathleen Resch PO Box 1766 Temple City, CA 91780 FIRE AND ICE II TABLE OF CONTENTS COVER by Phoenix FRONTISPIECE by Gayle Feyrer "Flashpoint" by Rachel Duncan 1 PEDESTAL by Thomas 2 "A Damn Fine...

Multiple Contributors

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

122

Fire and Ice Issue 7  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

       ' FIRE and ICE # 7 -p! jP) FIRE AND ICE VII Available from: Kathleen Resch PO Box 1766 Temple City, CA 91780 Kathleener@aol.com © May 2002by Kathleen Reschfor the contributors. No reprints or reproduction without the written... permission of the author/artist. Thisis an amateur publication and is not in tended to infringe upon the rights ofTerryNation, BBC-TV or any others. i - J FIRE AND ICE VI Table of Contents HALF A LOAF by Linda Norman 1 GROUNDHOG LAY by Predatrlx 5 PLAYTIME...

Multiple Contributors

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

/ http://www.sciencemag.org/content/early/recent / 17 April 2014 / Page 1/ 10.1126/science.1249047 A diverse set of geochemical records has been developed from ice re-  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

silty ice. This isotope is contin- uously produced by cosmic rays in the atmosphere, is delivered.1249047 A diverse set of geochemical records has been developed from ice re- covered in the 3054-m Greenland Ice Sheet Project 2 (GISP2) core. These data provide a detailed history of climate and ice

Napp, Nils

124

Water Ice, Silicate, and Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Emission Features in the Infrared Space Observatory Spectrum of the Carbon-Rich Planetary Nebula CPD -56 degree 8032  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combined ISO SWS and LWS spectroscopy is presented of the late WC-type planetary nebula nucleus CPD-56 8032 and its carbon-rich nebula. The extremely broad coverage (2.4-197 microns) enables us to recognize the clear and simultaneous presence of emission features from both oxygen- and carbon- rich circumstellar materials. Removing a smooth continuum highlights bright emission bands characteristic of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (hereafter PAHs) in the 3-14 micron region, bands from crystalline silicates longwards of 18 microns, and the 43- and 62-micron bands of crystalline water ice. We discuss the probable evolutionary state and history of this unusual object in terms of (a) a recent transition from an O-rich to a C-rich outflow following a helium shell flash; or (b) a carbon-rich nebular outflow encountering an O-rich comet cloud.

Cohen, M; Sylvester, R J; Liu, X W; Cox, P; Lim, T; Schmitt, B; Speck, A K; Cohen, Martin

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Water Ice, Silicate and PAH Emission Features in the ISO Spectrum of the Carbon-rich Planetary Nebula CPD-56 8032  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Combined ISO SWS and LWS spectroscopy is presented of the late WC-type planetary nebula nucleus CPD-56 8032 and its carbon-rich nebula. The extremely broad coverage (2.4-197 microns) enables us to recognize the clear and simultaneous presence of emission features from both oxygen- and carbon- rich circumstellar materials. Removing a smooth continuum highlights bright emission bands characteristic of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (hereafter PAHs) in the 3-14 micron region, bands from crystalline silicates longwards of 18 microns, and the 43- and 62-micron bands of crystalline water ice. We discuss the probable evolutionary state and history of this unusual object in terms of (a) a recent transition from an O-rich to a C-rich outflow following a helium shell flash; or (b) a carbon-rich nebular outflow encountering an O-rich comet cloud.

Martin Cohen; M. J. Barlow; R. J. Sylvester; X. -W. Liu; P. Cox; T. Lim; B. Schmitt; A. K. Speck

1999-01-11T23:59:59.000Z

126

Energy Cost Calculator for Commercial Ice Machines | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ice Machines Ice Machines Energy Cost Calculator for Commercial Ice Machines October 8, 2013 - 2:25pm Addthis Vary capacity size, energy cost, hours of operation, and /or efficiency level. INPUT SECTION Input the following data (if any parameter is missing, calculator will set to default value). Defaults Type of Ice Cube Machine Ice Making Head Self-Contained Remote Condensing Unit Ice Making Head Type of Condenser Air Cooled Water Cooled Air Cooled Ice Harvest Rate (lbs. ice per 24 hrs.) lbs. per 24 hrs. 500 lbs. per 24 hrs. Energy Consumption (per 100 lbs. of ice) kWh 5.5 kWh Quantity of ice machines to be purchased 1 Energy Cost $/kWh 0.06 $/kWh Annual Hours of Operation hrs. 3000 hrs. Calculate Reset OUTPUT SECTION Performance per Ice Cube Machine Your

127

An evaluation of hydrologic, geotechnical, and chemical behavior of processed oil shale solid waste 2; The use of time domain reflectometry (TDR) for monitoring in-situ volumetric water content in processed oil shale  

SciTech Connect

This paper describes the use of time domain reflectometry (TDR) for monitoring volumetric water contents in processed oil shale solid waste. TDR measures soil water content via a correlation between the dielectric constant (K) of the 3 phase (soil-water-air) system and the volumetric water content ({theta}{sub v}). An extensive bench top research program has been conducted to evaluate and verify the use of this technique in processed oil shale solid waste. This study utilizes columns of processed oil shale packed to known densities and varying water contents and compares the columetric water content measured via TDR and the volumetric water content measured through gravimetric determination.

Reeves, T.L.; Elgezawi, S.M. (Wyoming Univ., Laramie, WY (USA). Dept. of Civil Engineering); Kaser, T.G. (GIGO Computer and Electronic, Laramie, WY (US))

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

128

The mineral content of water as a variable in the quality control of reconstituted non-fat dry milk products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LibK?ARr '< A 4 M CuLLEftE ?F TEXAf. THE MINERAL CONTENT OF WATER AS A VARIABLE IN THE QUALITY CONTROL OF RECONSTITUTED NONFAT DRY MILK PRODUCTS By JOHN 0. KAPSAUS A Dissertation Submitted to the Graduate School of the Agricultural...). This is the CO2 evolved in the milk, which has been reconstituted with the respective level of bicarbonate water, in the uninoculated tube. (E) CO2 produced from the action of the apparent milk acidity on the bicarbonate. This is the CO2 calculated from...

Kapsalis, John G.

2013-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

129

On the scatteringgreenhouse effect of CO 2 ice clouds  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

that young Mars was warm enough to support flowing water present a continuing enigma (Squyres and Kasting 1994). Kasting (1991) showed that, owing to the effects of CO 2 condensation on temperature lapse rate the optical effects of CO 2 ­ice clouds, but remarked that because CO 2 ­ice (unlike water­ice) has very low

Pierrehumbert, Raymond

130

Hidden force floating ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Because of the segmental specific-heat disparity of the hydrogen bond (O:H-O) and the Coulomb repulsion between oxygen ions, cooling elongates the O:H-O bond at freezing by stretching its containing angle and shortening the H-O bond with an association of larger O:H elongation, which makes ice less dense than water, allowing it to float.

Chang Q. Sun

2015-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

131

E-Print Network 3.0 - additional water content Sample Search...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

supports more than half the world... specified. In addition to water footprinting and LCA, this analysis examines in lesser detail the WBCSD... of production. Understanding...

132

The use of a permanent magnet for water content measurements of wood chips  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the FID Cellulose and Water,” TAPPI Journal, June 1996, Vol.were compared with the TAPPI standard method of measuringmade using the standard TAPPI test employing oven drying.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

133

Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds: sensitivity to ice initiation mechanisms  

SciTech Connect

The importance of Arctic mixed-phase clouds on radiation and the Arctic climate is well known. However, the development of mixed-phase cloud parameterization for use in large scale models is limited by lack of both related observations and numerical studies using multidimensional models with advanced microphysics that provide the basis for understanding the relative importance of different microphysical processes that take place in mixed-phase clouds. To improve the representation of mixed-phase cloud processes in the GISS GCM we use the GISS single-column model coupled to a bin resolved microphysics (BRM) scheme that was specially designed to simulate mixed-phase clouds and aerosol-cloud interactions. Using this model with the microphysical measurements obtained from the DOE ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) campaign in October 2004 at the North Slope of Alaska, we investigate the effect of ice initiation processes and Bergeron-Findeisen process (BFP) on glaciation time and longevity of single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds. We focus on observations taken during 9th-10th October, which indicated the presence of a single-layer mixed-phase clouds. We performed several sets of 12-h simulations to examine model sensitivity to different ice initiation mechanisms and evaluate model output (hydrometeors concentrations, contents, effective radii, precipitation fluxes, and radar reflectivity) against measurements from the MPACE Intensive Observing Period. Overall, the model qualitatively simulates ice crystal concentration and hydrometeors content, but it fails to predict quantitatively the effective radii of ice particles and their vertical profiles. In particular, the ice effective radii are overestimated by at least 50%. However, using the same definition as used for observations, the effective radii simulated and that observed were more comparable. We find that for the single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds simulated, process of ice phase initiation due to freezing of supercooled water in both saturated and undersaturated (w.r.t. water) environments is as important as primary ice crystal origination from water vapor. We also find that the BFP is a process mainly responsible for the rates of glaciation of simulated clouds. These glaciation rates cannot be adequately represented by a water-ice saturation adjustment scheme that only depends on temperature and liquid and solid hydrometeors contents as is widely used in bulk microphysics schemes and are better represented by processes that also account for supersaturation changes as the hydrometeors grow.

Sednev, Igor; Sednev, I.; Menon, S.; McFarquhar, G.

2008-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

134

Simulating mixed-phase Arctic stratus clouds: Sensitivity to ice initiationmechanisms  

SciTech Connect

The importance of Arctic mixed-phase clouds on radiation and the Arctic climate is well known. However, the development of mixed-phase cloud parameterization for use in large scale models is limited by lack of both related observations and numerical studies using multidimensional models with advanced microphysics that provide the basis for understanding the relative importance of different microphysical processes that take place in mixed-phase clouds. To improve the representation of mixed-phase cloud processes in the GISS GCM we use the GISS single-column model coupled to a bin resolved microphysics (BRM) scheme that was specially designed to simulate mixed-phase clouds and aerosol-cloud interactions. Using this model with the microphysical measurements obtained from the DOE ARM Mixed-Phase Arctic Cloud Experiment (MPACE) campaign in October 2004 at the North Slope of Alaska, we investigate the effect of ice initiation processes and Bergeron-Findeisen process (BFP) on glaciation time and longevity of single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds. We focus on observations taken during October 9th-10th, which indicated the presence of a single-layer mixed-phase clouds. We performed several sets of 12-hour simulations to examine model sensitivity to different ice initiation mechanisms and evaluate model output (hydrometeors concentrations, contents, effective radii, precipitation fluxes, and radar reflectivity) against measurements from the MPACE Intensive Observing Period. Overall, the model qualitatively simulates ice crystal concentration and hydrometeors content, but it fails to predict quantitatively the effective radii of ice particles and their vertical profiles. In particular, the ice effective radii are overestimated by at least 50%. However, using the same definition as used for observations, the effective radii simulated and that observed were more comparable. We find that for the single-layer stratiform mixed-phase clouds simulated, process of ice phase initiation due to freezing of supercooled water in both saturated and subsaturated (w.r.t. water) environments is as important as primary ice crystal origination from water vapor. We also find that the BFP is a process mainly responsible for the rates of glaciation of simulated clouds. These glaciation rates cannot be adequately represented by a water-ice saturation adjustment scheme that only depends on temperature and liquid and solid hydrometeors contents as is widely used in bulk microphysics schemes and are better represented by processes that also account for supersaturation changes as the hydrometeors grow.

Sednev, I.; Menon, S.; McFarquhar, G.

2009-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

135

The Behaviour of Electrolytes in Mixed Solvents. Part I. The Free Energies and Heat Contents of Hydrogen Chloride in Water-Ethyl Alcohol Solutions  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

1 November 1929 research-article The Behaviour of Electrolytes in Mixed Solvents. Part I. The Free Energies and Heat Contents of Hydrogen Chloride in Water-Ethyl Alcohol Solutions J. A. V. Butler C. M. Robertson The Royal Society...

1929-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

A parameterisation of the flux and energy spectrum of single and multiple muons in deep water/ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper parametric formulas are presented to evaluate the flux of atmospheric muons in the range of vertical depth between 1.5 to 5 km of water equivalent (km w.e.) and up to 85^o for the zenith angle. We take into account their arrival in bundles with different muon multiplicities. The energy of muons inside bundles is then computed considering the muon distance from the bundle axis. This parameterisation relies on a full Monte Carlo simulation of primary Cosmic Ray (CR) interactions, shower propagation in the atmosphere and muon transport in deep water [1]. The primary CR flux and interaction models, in the range in which they can produce muons which may reach 1.5 km w.e., suffer from large experimental uncertainties. We used a primary CR flux and an interaction model able to correctly reproduce the flux, the multiplicity distribution, the spatial distance between muons as measured by the underground MACRO experiment.

M. Bazzotti; S. Biagi; G. Carminati; S. Cecchini; T. Chiarusi; G. Giacomelli; A. Margiotta; M. Sioli; M. Spurio

2009-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

137

A parameterisation of the flux and energy spectrum of single and multiple muons in deep water/ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper parametric formulas are presented to evaluate the flux of atmospheric muons in the range of vertical depth between 1.5 to 5 km of water equivalent (km w.e.) and up to 85^o for the zenith angle. We take into account their arrival in bundles with different muon multiplicities. The energy of muons inside bundles is then computed considering the muon distance from the bundle axis. This parameterisation relies on a full Monte Carlo simulation of primary Cosmic Ray (CR) interactions, shower propagation in the atmosphere and muon transport in deep water [1]. The primary CR flux and interaction models, in the range in which they can produce muons which may reach 1.5 km w.e., suffer from large experimental uncertainties. We used a primary CR flux and an interaction model able to correctly reproduce the flux, the multiplicity distribution, the spatial distance between muons as measured by the underground MACRO experiment.

Bazzotti, M; Carminati, G; Cecchini, S; Chiarusi, T; Giacomelli, G; Margiotta, A; Sioli, M; Spurio, M

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

138

Fire and Ice Issue 6  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

9#HDIQNV3>IM ".: FIRE AND ICE VI Available from: Kathleen Resch PO Box 1766 Temple City, CA 91780 © October, 2000 by Kathleen Resch for the contributors. No reprints or reproduction without the written permission of the author.../artist. This is an amateur publication and is not intended to infringe upon the rights ofTerry Nation, BBC-TV or any others. FIRE AND ICE VI 1 Table of Contents A DANGEROUS CONCEPT by Nova 1 A FRIEND IN NEED... by Julia Stamford 14 ...IS A FRIEND INDEED by Julia Stamford 19...

Multiple Contributors

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Fire and Ice Issue 3  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

,fpl ^1 FIRE AND ICE Available from: Kathleen Resch PO Box 1766 Temple City,CA 91780 III © May, 1995 by Kathleen Resch for the contributors. No reprints or reproduction without the written permission of the author/artist. This is an amateur... publication and is not intended to infringe upon the rightsof "Blake's 7" copyright holders.. FIRE AND ICE TABLE OF CONTENTS THE GIFT by Pat Terra 1 "innerspace" by Pat Terra 24 WILD, BEAUTIFUL AND DAMNED by Gemini 25 SET THE NIGHT ON FIRE by Riley Cannon 40...

Multiple Contributors

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

The convective desalination of sea ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

containing both liquid brine and solid (pure water) ice. Frad is the flux of penetrating solar radiation. Thus the thermal properties of sea ice are composed of those of the solid and liquid phases that make up sea ice. Fixed-salinity models used in older... components of the physical climate system. Evolving in space and time, sea ice has thermal and mechanical properties that must be updated dynamically for a faithful representation within climate models. Such models are vital tools to help people everywhere...

Rees Jones, David

2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water content" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

The influence of ice nucleation mode and ice vapor growth on simulation of  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The influence of ice nucleation mode and ice vapor growth on simulation of The influence of ice nucleation mode and ice vapor growth on simulation of arctic mixed-phase clouds Avramov, Alexander The Pennsylvania State University Category: Modeling Mixed-phase arctic stratus clouds are the predominant cloud type in the Arctic . Perhaps one of the most intriguing of their features is that they tend to have liquid tops that precipitate ice. Despite the fact that this situation is colloidally unstable, these cloud systems are quite long lived - from a few days to over a couple of weeks. Previous studies have suggested that this longevity may be due to a paucity of ice nucleating aerosols (ice nuclei, or IN) in the Arctic. Such studies have shown that small changes in IN concentrations can cause large changes in the amount of liquid water within a mixed-phase stratus deck. We use the Regional

142

Stresses generated in cooling viscoelastic ice shells: Application to Europa  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Stresses generated in cooling viscoelastic ice shells: Application to Europa F. Nimmo Department to cooling and the expansion of the shell due to the ice-water volume change. The former effect generates Citation: Nimmo, F. (2004), Stresses generated in cooling viscoelastic ice shells: Application to Europa, J

Nimmo, Francis

143

Bonding and Electronic Properties of Ice at High Pressure  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

between the nearest oxygen atoms. All ice structures that we discussed so far are insulators. Militzer 1 Bonding and Electronic Properties of Ice at High Pressure B. Militzer Department of Earth of water ice at megabar pressure are characterized with ab initio computer simulations. The focus lies

Militzer, Burkhard

144

Correspondence Laboratory observations of debris-bearing ice facies frozen  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, others argue that supercooling is not the only mechanism for producing thick basal ice sequencesCorrespondence Laboratory observations of debris-bearing ice facies frozen from supercooled water. Supercooling has been invoked to explain anomalously thick basal ice sequences beneath temperate glaciers

Knight, Peter G.

145

Vadose Zone Transport Field Study: Soil Water Content Distributions by Neutron Moderation  

SciTech Connect

Contaminant transport through the vadose zone is a complex process controlled largely by interactions between subsurface lithologic features, water flow, and fluid properties. Understanding the processes controlling transport is an important prerequisite to the development and implementation of effective soil and ground water remediation programs. However, difficulties in directly observing and sampling the subsurface can complicate attempts to better describe subsurface transport processes and is mostly responsible for the large amount of uncertainty associated with vadose zone processes. The reduction of the uncertainty has been identified as a site need at Hanford by the STCG and the National Research Council (2000a) and is a key aspect of the site?s science and technology effort.

Ward, Anderson L.; Caldwell, Todd G.; Gee, Glendon W.

2000-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Neutron Diffraction of Ice in Hydrogels  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Neutron Diffraction of Ice in Hydrogels ... (14, 15) Neutrons are also especially suited for studying D2O water in hydrogels because hydrogen atoms (H) on the polymer chains are not detectable. ...

Yurina Sekine; Tomoko Ikeda-Fukazawa; Mamoru Aizawa; Riki Kobayashi; Songxue Chi; Jaime A. Fernandez-Baca; Hiroki Yamauchi; Hiroshi Fukazawa

2014-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

147

Weakening of ice by magnesium perchlorate hydrate  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

I show that perchlorate hydrates, which have been indirectly detected at high Martian circumpolar latitudes by the Phoenix Mars Lander, have a dramatic effect upon the rheological behavior of polycrystalline water ice under ...

Lenferink, Hendrik J., 1985-

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Kinetics of electron-induced decomposition of CF{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} coadsorbed with water (ice): A comparison with CCl{sub 4}  

SciTech Connect

The kinetics of decomposition and subsequent chemistry of adsorbed CF{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}, activated by low-energy electron irradiation, have been examined and compared with CCl{sub 4}. These molecules have been adsorbed alone and coadsorbed with water ice films of different thicknesses on metal surfaces (Ru; Au) at low temperatures (25 K; 100 K). The studies have been performed with temperature programmed desorption (TPD), reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS), and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). TPD data reveal the efficient decomposition of both halocarbon molecules under electron bombardment, which proceeds via dissociative electron attachment (DEA) of low-energy secondary electrons. The rates of CF{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and CCl{sub 4} dissociation increase in an H{sub 2}O (D{sub 2}O) environment (2-3x), but the increase is smaller than that reported in recent literature. The highest initial cross sections for halocarbon decomposition coadsorbed with H{sub 2}O, using 180 eV incident electrons, are measured (using TPD) to be 1.0{+-}0.2x10{sup -15} cm{sup 2} for CF{sub 2}Cl{sub 2} and 2.5{+-}0.2x10{sup -15} cm{sup 2} for CCl{sub 4}. RAIRS and XPS studies confirm the decomposition of halocarbon molecules codeposited with water molecules, and provide insights into the irradiation products. Electron-induced generation of Cl{sup -} and F{sup -} anions in the halocarbon/water films and production of H{sub 3}O{sup +}, CO{sub 2}, and intermediate compounds COF{sub 2} (for CF{sub 2}Cl{sub 2}) and COCl{sub 2}, C{sub 2}Cl{sub 4} (for CCl{sub 4}) under electron irradiation have been detected using XPS, TPD, and RAIRS. The products and the decomposition kinetics are similar to those observed in our recent experiments involving x-ray photons as the source of ionizing irradiation.

Faradzhev, N.S.; Perry, C.C.; Kusmierek, D.O.; Fairbrother, D.H.; Madey, T.E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Laboratory for Surface Modification, Rutgers, State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854-8019 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Laboratory for Surface Modification, Rutgers, State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854-8019 (United States); Department of Chemistry, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland 21218 (United States); Department of Physics and Astronomy, and Laboratory for Surface Modification, Rutgers, State University of New Jersey, Piscataway, New Jersey 08854-8019 (United States)

2004-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

The Post-Shock Chemical Lifetimes of Outflow Tracers and a Possible New Mechanism to Produce Water Ice Mantles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We have used a coupled time-dependent chemical and dynamical model to investigate the lifetime of the chemical legacy left in the wake of C-type shocks. We concentrate this study on the chemistry of H2O and O2, two molecules which are predicted to have abundances that are significantly affected in shock-heated gas. Two models are presented: (1) a three-stage model of pre-shock, shocked, and post-shock gas; and (2) a Monte-Carlo cloud simulation where we explore the effects of stochastic shock activity on molecular gas over a cloud lifetime. In agreement with previous studies, we find that shock velocities in excess of 10 km s^-1 are required to convert all of the oxygen not locked in CO into H2O before the gas has an opportunity to cool. For pure gas-phase models the lifetime of the high water abundances, or ``H2O legacy'', in the post-shock gas is 4 - 7 x 10^5 years. Through the Monte Carlo cloud simulation we demonstrate that the time-average abundance of H2O is a sensitive function of the frequency of shoc...

Bergin, E A; Neufeld, D A; Bergin, Edwin A.; Melnick, Gary J.; Neufeld, David A.

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

150

1 Microscopic and environmental controls on the spacing and thickness of segregated 2 ice lenses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

water, and ice conspire with the prevailing environmental conditions 52 to produce macroscopic ice by Henry (2000). The first comprehensive and tractable model 57 for ice lens growth was produced by O1 Microscopic and environmental controls on the spacing and thickness of segregated 2 ice lenses 3

Rempel, Alan W.

151

On the phase diagram of water with density functional theory potentials: the melting temperature of Ice I-h with the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof and Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr functionals  

SciTech Connect

The melting temperature (Tm) of ice Ih was determined from constant enthalphy (NPH) Born-Oppenheimer Molecular Dynamics (BOMD) simulations to be 417±3 K for the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) and 411±4 K for the Becke-Lee-Yang-Parr (BLYP) density functionals using a coexisting ice (Ih)-liquid phase at constant pressures of P = 2,500 and 10,000 bar and a density ? = 1 g/cm3, respectively. This suggests that ambient condition simulations at ? = 1 g/cm3 will rather describe a supercooled state that is overstructured when compared to liquid water. This work was supported by the US Department of Energy Office of Basic Energy Sciences' Chemical Sciences program. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

Yoo, Soohaeng; Zeng, Xiao Cheng; Xantheas, Sotiris S.

2009-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

152

Lithium vanadyl oxalatophosphite: Influence of the water content on the crystal structures and the dehydration scheme  

SciTech Connect

Two new lithium vanadyl oxalatophosphites have been synthesized by hydrothermal treatment. The respective formula are Li{sub 2}(VOHPO{sub 3}){sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4} 6H{sub 2}O (1) and Li{sub 2}(VOHPO{sub 3}){sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4} 4H{sub 2}O (2). The structures of the compounds have been determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound 1 crystallizes in triclinic symmetry in space group P-1, a=6.3592(2) Å, b=8.0789(3) Å, c=9.1692(3) Å, ?=64.390(2), ?=87.277(2)°, ?=67.624(2) and, compound 2 in monoclinic symmetry, space group P2{sub 1}/a, a=6.3555(2) Å b=12.6368(7) Å c=9.0242(4) Å ?=105.167(3)°. The vanadium phosphite framework consists of infinite chains of corner-sharing vanadium octahedra and hydrogenophosphite tetrahedra. The oxalate groups ensure the connection between the chains. The lithium ions and the water molecules are located between the anionic [(VO){sub 2}(HPO{sub 3}){sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}]{sup 2?} layers. Thermal behavior of both compounds was carefully studied by combining thermogravimetric analyses and thermal dependant X-ray diffraction in order to study the thermal stability of the layered oxalatophosphites and to see the influence of the decomposition of the carbon-based anions into the final lithium vanadyl phosphate. Various intermediate phases were evidenced and for both compounds the final product was LiVOPO{sub 4}. -- Graphical abstract: Two new lithium vanadyl oxalatophosphites layered compounds, Li{sub 2} (VOHPO{sub 3}){sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4} 6H{sub 2}O (1) and Li{sub 2} (VOHPO{sub 3}){sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4} 4H{sub 2}O (2) have been hydrothermally synthesized. Lithium ions and water molecules are located between the anionic [(VO){sub 2}(HPO{sub 3}){sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}]{sup 2?} layers. Thermal behaviors were carefully studied by thermogravimetric and thermal dependant X-ray diffraction. Various intermediate phases were evidenced and for both compounds the final product was LiVOPO{sub 4}. Highlights: • The first lithium vanadium oxalatophosphite have been synthesized hydrothermally. • The structure of these compounds is related to vanadium oxalato-phosphates. • Hydrogen bonding in starting material influences the intermediate phase structures. • Thermal decomposition evidences two Li{sub 2}[(VO){sub 2}(HPO{sub 3}){sub 2}C{sub 2}O{sub 4}] anhydrous polymorphs.

Auguste, S.; Alonzo, V. [Sciences Chimiques de Rennes, UMR 6226, Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Rennes, CNRS, 11 Allée de Beaulieu, CS 50837, 35708 Rennes Cedex 7 (France); Université Européenne de Bretagne, 12 avenue Janvier, 35000 Rennes (France); Bataille, T. [Sciences Chimiques de Rennes, UMR 6226, Université de Rennes 1, CNRS, Campus de Beaulieu, 35042 Rennes Cedex (France); Université Européenne de Bretagne, 12 avenue Janvier, 35000 Rennes (France); Le Pollès, L. [Sciences Chimiques de Rennes, UMR 6226, Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Rennes, CNRS, 11 Allée de Beaulieu, CS 50837, 35708 Rennes Cedex 7 (France); Université Européenne de Bretagne, 12 avenue Janvier, 35000 Rennes (France); Cañón-Mancisidor, W.; Venegas-Yazigi, D. [Facultad de Quimia y Biologia, Universitad de Santiago de Chile, USACH, Casilla, 40 Correo 33, Santiago (Chile); Centro para el Desarrollo de Nanociencias y Nanotecnología, CEDENNA (Chile); Le Fur, E., E-mail: eric.le-fur@ensc-rennes.fr [Sciences Chimiques de Rennes, UMR 6226, Ecole Nationale Supérieure de Chimie de Rennes, CNRS, 11 Allée de Beaulieu, CS 50837, 35708 Rennes Cedex 7 (France); Université Européenne de Bretagne, 12 avenue Janvier, 35000 Rennes (France)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

In situ PEM fuel cell water measurements  

SciTech Connect

Efficient PEM fuel cell performance requires effective water management. The materials used, their durability, and the operating conditions under which fuel cells run, make efficient water management within a practical fuel cell system a primary challenge in developing commercially viable systems. We present experimental measurements of water content within operating fuel cells. in response to operational conditions, including transients and freezing conditions. To help understand the effect of components and operations, we examine water transport in operating fuel cells, measure the fuel cell water in situ and model the water transport within the fuel cell. High Frequency Resistance (HFR), AC Impedance and Neutron imaging (using NIST's facilities) were used to measure water content in operating fuel cells with various conditions, including current density, relative humidity, inlet flows, flow orientation and variable GDL properties. Ice formation in freezing cells was also monitored both during operation and shut-down conditions.

Borup, Rodney L [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Mukundan, Rangachary [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Davey, John R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Spendalow, Jacob S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

ICE CORE RECORDS | Greenland Stable Isotopes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract Greenland ice cores contain a wealth of information on past climatic conditions throughout the Northern Hemisphere. A historical perspective on the climatic interpretation of stable isotopes in water and ice is presented in the introduction, while the remainder of the article is devoted to the current interpretation of stable isotope data from Greenland ice cores. The progress in our understanding of stable isotope signals, on timescales from seasons to glacial cycles, is discussed and evaluated through numerous examples from Greenland ice cores. Stable isotope profiles from the Camp Century, Dye-3, GISP2, GRIP, NGRIP, and Renland deep ice cores are emphasized, as they all provide climatic information dating back into the Eemian period.

B.M. Vinther; S.J. Johnsen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

155

Ultrafast photochemistry of methyl hydroperoxide on ice particles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ultrafast photochemistry of methyl hydroperoxide on ice particles M. A. Kambouresa , S. AOOH, on water clusters produces a surprisingly wide range of products on a subpicosecond time scale | photodissociation Photoinduced processes at surfaces of water or ice are of interest in atmospheric chemistry

Nizkorodov, Sergey

156

Chlorine-36 in Water, Snow, and Mid-Latitude Glacial Ice of North America: Meteoric and Weapons-Tests Production in the Vicinity of the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory, Idaho  

SciTech Connect

Measurements of chlorine-36 (36Cl) were made for 64 water, snow, and glacial-ice and -runoff samples to determine the meteoric and weapons-tests-produced concentrations and fluxes of this radionuclide at mid-latitudes in North America. The results will facilitate the use of 36Cl as a hydrogeologic tracer at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL). This information was used to estimate meteoric and weapons-tests contributions of this nuclide to environmental inventories at and near the INEEL. The data presented in this report suggest a meteoric source 36Cl for environmental samples collected in southeastern Idaho and western Wyoming if the concentration is less than 1 x 10 7 atoms/L. Additionally, concentrations in water, snow, or glacial ice between 1 x 10 7 and 1 x 10 8 atoms/L may be indicative of a weapons-tests component from peak 36Cl production in the late 1950s. Chlorine-36 concentrations between 1 x 10 8 and 1 x 10 9 atoms/L may be representative of re-suspension of weapons-tests fallout airborne disposal of 36Cl from the INTEC, or evapotranspiration. It was concluded from the water, snow, and glacial data presented here that concentrations of 36Cl measured in environmental samples at the INEEL larger than 1 x 10 9 atoms/L can be attributed to waste-disposal practices.

L. DeWayne; J. R. Green (USGS); S. Vogt, P. Sharma (Purdue University); S. K. Frape (University of Waterloo); S. N. Davis (University of Arizona); G. L. Cottrell (USGS)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

PET 424304 2013 Exercises 1+2 of 4 17 Jan + 31 Jan 2013 1. 1kg ice at 263 K 1 kg water at 293 K. Heat Q at T = T is supplied by the surroundings.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Heat Q at T = T° is supplied by the surroundings. Specific heat ice : ci = 2,14 kJ/(kgK); water cw = 4,18 kJ/(kgK) melting heat mH = 333,4 kJ/kg 2nd Law: m.sin + Qin/Tin + Sgen = dS/dt + m.sout + Qout)·cw. = 438,4 kJ (per kg) S/m = s = ci·ln(273/263) + melth / 273 + cw·ln(293/273) = 1,6 kJ/(kgK) using

Zevenhoven, Ron

158

Organic Tank Safety Project: development of a method to measure the equilibrium water content of Hanford organic tank wastes and demonstration of method on actual waste  

SciTech Connect

Some of Hanford`s underground waste storage tanks contain Organic- bearing high level wastes that are high priority safety issues because of potentially hazardous chemical reactions of organics with inorganic oxidants in these wastes such as nitrates and nitrites. To ensure continued safe storage of these wastes, Westinghouse Hanford Company has placed affected tanks on the Organic Watch List and manages them under special rules. Because water content has been identified as the most efficient agent for preventing a propagating reaction and is an integral part of the criteria developed to ensure continued safe storage of Hanford`s organic-bearing radioactive tank wastes, as part of the Organic Tank Safety Program the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory developed and demonstrated a simple and easily implemented procedure to determine the equilibrium water content of these potentially reactive wastes exposed to the range of water vapor pressures that might be experienced during the wastes` future storage. This work focused on the equilibrium water content and did not investigate the various factors such as @ ventilation, tank surface area, and waste porosity that control the rate that the waste would come into equilibrium, with either the average Hanford water partial pressure 5.5 torr or other possible water partial pressures.

Scheele, R.D.; Bredt, P.R.; Sell, R.L.

1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

159

Frostbite Theater - Liquid Nitrogen Experiments - Dry Ice vs. Liquid  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Egg + Liquid Nitrogen + Time-lapse! Egg + Liquid Nitrogen + Time-lapse! Previous Video (Egg + Liquid Nitrogen + Time-lapse!) Frostbite Theater Main Index Next Video (Liquid Nitrogen Cooled Dry Ice in Water!) Liquid Nitrogen Cooled Dry Ice in Water! Dry Ice vs. Liquid Nitrogen! Dry ice is cold. Liquid nitrogen is cold, too. What happens when the two are mixed together? [ Show Transcript ] Announcer: Frostbite Theater presents... Cold Cuts! No baloney! Joanna and Steve: Just science! Joanna: Hi! I'm Joanna! Steve: And I'm Steve! Joanna: Have you ever wondered what happens when you mix dry ice and liquid nitrogen? Steve: Well, we just happen to have a chunk of dry ice left over from when we filmed 'How to Make a Cloud Chamber,' and here at Jefferson Lab, liquid nitrogen flows like water, so we're going to find out!

160

Great Lakes Ice Cycle Primary Investigator: Raymond Assel -NOAA GLERL (Emeritus)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and cooling water intakes, and damaging shoreline structures. The ice cover also has an impact on the waterGreat Lakes Ice Cycle Primary Investigator: Raymond Assel - NOAA GLERL (Emeritus) Co Board The formation, duration, and extent of ice cover on the Great Lakes has a major impact

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water content" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


161

Regelation: why does ice melt under pressure?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unlike other unusual materials whose bonds contract under compression, the O:H nonbond undergoes contraction and the H-O bond elongation towards O:H and H-O length symmetry in water and ice. The energy drop of the H-O bond dictates the melting point Tm depression of ice. Once the pressure is relieved, the O:H-O bond fully recovers its initial state, resulting in Regelation.

Sun, Chang Q

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Intercomparison of the Cloud Water Phase among Global Climate Models  

SciTech Connect

Mixed-phase clouds (clouds that consist of both cloud droplets and ice crystals) are frequently present in the Earth’s atmosphere and influence the Earth’s energy budget through their radiative properties, which are highly dependent on the cloud water phase. In this study, the phase partitioning of cloud water is compared among six global climate models (GCMs) and with Cloud and Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization retrievals. It is found that the GCMs predict vastly different distributions of cloud phase for a given temperature, and none of them are capable of reproducing the spatial distribution or magnitude of the observed phase partitioning. While some GCMs produced liquid water paths comparable to satellite observations, they all failed to preserve sufficient liquid water at mixed-phase cloud temperatures. Our results suggest that validating GCMs using only the vertically integrated water contents could lead to amplified differences in cloud radiative feedback. The sensitivity of the simulated cloud phase in GCMs to the choice of heterogeneous ice nucleation parameterization is also investigated. The response to a change in ice nucleation is quite different for each GCM, and the implementation of the same ice nucleation parameterization in all models does not reduce the spread in simulated phase among GCMs. The results suggest that processes subsequent to ice nucleation are at least as important in determining phase and should be the focus of future studies aimed at understanding and reducing differences among the models.

Komurcu, Muge; Storelvmo, Trude; Tan, Ivy; Lohmann, U.; Yun, Yuxing; Penner, Joyce E.; Wang, Yong; Liu, Xiaohong; Takemura, T.

2014-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

163

Ice nanoclusters at hydrophobic metal surfaces  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and characterization of metal-supported water hexamers and a family of hydrated nanoclusters-- heptamers, octamers to nucleate through the presence of an `ice nucleating agent': a microscopic seed particle of salt, sand or such as the formation of new water structures not observed in the gas phase, altered H-bond strengths or different

164

Ising model for melt ponds on Arctic sea ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The albedo of melting Arctic sea ice, a key parameter in climate modeling, is determined by pools of water on the ice surface. Recent observations show an onset of pond complexity at a critical area of about 100 square meters, attended by a transition in pond fractal dimension. To explain this behavior and provide a statistical physics approach to sea ice modeling, we introduce a two dimensional Ising model for pond evolution which incorporates ice-albedo feedback and the underlying thermodynamics. The binary magnetic spin variables in the Ising model correspond to the presence of melt water or ice on the sea ice surface. The model exhibits a second-order phase transition from isolated to clustered melt ponds, with the evolution of pond complexity in the clustered phase consistent with the observations.

Ma, Y -P; Golden, K M

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

The Ability of MM5 to Simulate Ice Clouds: Systematic Comparison between Simulated and Measured Fluxes and Lidar/Radar Profiles at the  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to produce too much solid water (ice and snow) and not enough liquid water. 1. Introduction Ice clouds playThe Ability of MM5 to Simulate Ice Clouds: Systematic Comparison between Simulated and Measured­NCAR Mesoscale Model (MM5) to simulate midlatitude ice clouds is evaluated. Model outputs are compared to long

Protat, Alain

166

Analytical determination of propeller performance degradation due to ice accretion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

trajectory code. Unlike the Bragg code, the effects of compressibility, kinetic heating, and water runback are taken into account in this code, thus making it applicable to both rime and glaze ice conditions. Designed to be applied to helicopter config...- ' urations, the code employs a heat balance analysis to calculate the kinetic heating and runback effects. The authors have reported good agreement between predicted and experimentally obtained ice shapes, tem- perature distributions, and icing threshold...

Miller, Thomas Lloyd

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

New ice rules for nanoconfined monolayer ice from first principles  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Understanding the structural tendencies of nanoconfined water is of great interest for nanoscience and biology, where nano/micro-sized objects may be separated by very few layers of water. Here we investigate the properties of ice confined to a quasi-2D monolayer by a featureless, chemically neutral potential, using density-functional theory simulations with a non-local van der Waals density functional. An ab initio random structure search reveals all the energetically competitive monolayer configurations to belong to only two of the previously-identified families, characterized by a square or honeycomb hydrogen-bonding network, respectively. From an in-depth analysis we show that the well-known ice rules for bulk ice need to be revised for the monolayer, with distinct new rules appearing for the two networks. All identified stable phases for both are found to be non-polar (but with a topologically non-trivial texture for the square) and, hence, non-ferroelectric, in contrast to the predictions of empirical f...

Corsetti, Fabiano; Artacho, Emilio

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

168

STATEMENT OF WORK (SOW) TEMPLATE FOR ICE SUPPORT CONTRACTOR  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

ICE SUPPORT CONTRACTOR ICE SUPPORT CONTRACTOR The template presented below is a Statement of Work (SOW) for services of an ICE Support Contractor for assisting OECM in conducting an ICE. Project and review specific information should be incorporated. Explanatory text appears in italics, while information that should be selected appears in >. The format and contents of this SOW is not compulsory, and the use is at the discretion of the OECM Analysts, tailored as appropriate for the desired contractor support activities. If no contractor support is required, this appendix is not used. Statement of Work for Independent Cost Estimate (ICE) > <ICE (i.e., Alternative Selection and Cost Range (CD-1), Establish

169

Dynamical mechanism of antifreeze proteins to prevent ice growth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The fascinating ability of algae, insects and fishes to survive at temperatures below normal freezing is realized by antifreeze proteins (AFPs). These are surface-active molecules and interact with the diffusive water/ice interface thus preventing complete solidification. We propose a new dynamical mechanism on how these proteins inhibit the freezing of water. We apply a Ginzburg-Landau type approach to describe the phase separation in the two-component system (ice, AFP). The free energy density involves two fields: one for the ice phase with a low AFP concentration, and one for liquid water with a high AFP concentration. The time evolution of the ice reveals microstructures resulting from phase separation in the presence of AFPs. We observed a faster clustering of pre-ice structure connected to a locking of grain size by the action of AFP, which is an essentially dynamical process. The adsorption of additional water molecules is inhibited and the further growth of ice grains stopped. The interfacial energy between ice and water is lowered allowing the AFPs to form smaller critical ice nuclei. Similar to a hysteresis in magnetic materials we observe a thermodynamic hysteresis leading to a nonlinear density dependence of the freezing point depression in agreement with the experiments.

B. Kutschan; K. Morawetz; S. Thoms

2014-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

170

CEDR Content  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

CEDR Content" CEDR Content" "The Consolidated Energy Data Report (CEDR) consists of 27 worksheets that should be completed by each site, as applicable, and included as part each site's SSP in a MS Excel electronic format. The CEDR is due to the SPO no later than December 9th." "Worksheet",,"Overview","Action" 1.1,"Content","Stand-alone overview of the CEDR tabs.","None" 2.1,"Funds, Meters, Training","Collects information on energy and water spending, and metering status.","If applicable, complete cells highlighted in orange. Edited and new data cells should be highlighted in light blue." 3.1,"BTU & Gal Key","Reference tab containing all factors and dropdown menu information for all tabs starting with ""3"". If you need to divide up the CEDR, please keep all tabs starting with ""3"" together to ensure calculation links are not broken. ","None"

171

ARM - Measurement - Total cloud water  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

cloud water cloud water ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Total cloud water The total concentration (mass/vol) of ice and liquid water particles in a cloud; this includes condensed water content (CWC). Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. External Instruments NCEPGFS : National Centers for Environment Prediction Global Forecast System Field Campaign Instruments CSI : Cloud Spectrometer and Impactor PDI : Phase Doppler Interferometer

172

Trigonal ice crystals in Earth’s atmosphere  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

We are all familiar with the hexagonal shape of snow and ice crystals, and it is well established that their six-fold symmetry is derived from the arrangement of water molecules in a hexagonal crystal structure. However, atmospheric ice crystals with only ...

Benjamin J. Murray; Christoph G. Salzmann; Andrew J. Heymsfield; Steven Dobbie; Ryan R. Neely--III; Christopher J. Cox

173

IceCube Project Monthly Report -April 2010 Accomplishments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1 IceCube Project Monthly Report - April 2010 Accomplishments · The IceCube Software Water Drill equipment (http://www.icecube.wisc.edu/disposition/index.php) and the site was circulated at Uppsala University are using Deep Core DOMs as flashers and receivers for low-intensity flasher runs

Saffman, Mark

174

Ice in Clouds Experiment—Layer Clouds. Part I: Ice Growth Rates Derived from Lenticular Wave Cloud Penetrations  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Lenticular wave clouds are used as a natural laboratory to estimate the linear and mass growth rates of ice particles at temperatures from ?20° to ?32°C and to characterize the apparent rate of ice nucleation at water saturation at a nearly ...

Andrew J. Heymsfield; Paul R. Field; Matt Bailey; Dave Rogers; Jeffrey Stith; Cynthia Twohy; Zhien Wang; Samuel Haimov

2011-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Mobile Ice Nucleus Spectrometer  

SciTech Connect

This first year report presents results from a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study to assess the flow and temperature profiles within the mobile ice nucleus spectrometer.

Kulkarni, Gourihar R.; Kok, G. L.

2012-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

176

Antarctic Ice Sheet: Preliminary Results of First Core Hole to Bedrock  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...unconsolidated sediment, such as glacial till, rather than solid rock. Glacial till underlies the Greenland ice sheet at Camp Century (4). Liquid water was encountered at the ice-rock interface, clear evidence that the bottom of the ice sheet is...

Anthony J. Gow; Herbert T. Ueda; Donald E. Garfield

1968-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

177

A Finite Element Model for Ice Ball Evolution in a Multi-probe Cryosurgery  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to intracellular ice injury for fast cooling rates, and solution effects injury for slow cooling rates. BasicallyA Finite Element Model for Ice Ball Evolution in a Multi-probe Cryosurgery RICHARD WANa, *, ZHIHONG October 2002; In final form 8 May 2003) The ice formation in a water body is examined for the computation

Wan, Richard G.

178

Recent Arctic Sea Ice Variability: Connections to the Arctic Oscillation and the ENSO  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

of regional and global climate through the ice albedo feed- back, insulating effect, deep water formationRecent Arctic Sea Ice Variability: Connections to the Arctic Oscillation and the ENSO Jiping Liu; accepted 20 April 2004; published 13 May 2004. [1] Trends in the satellite-derived Arctic sea ice

179

Using radiative transfer models to study the atmospheric water vapor content and to eliminate telluric lines from high-resolution optical spectra  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Radiative Transfer Model (RTM) and the retrieval algorithm, incorporated in the SCIATRAN 2.2 software package developed at the Institute of Remote Sensing/Institute of Enviromental Physics of Bremen University (Germany), allows to simulate, among other things, radiance/irradiance spectra in the 2400-24 000 {\\AA} range. In this work we present applications of RTM to two case studies. In the first case the RTM was used to simulate direct solar irradiance spectra, with different water vapor amounts, for the study of the water vapor content in the atmosphere above Sierra Nevada Observatory. Simulated spectra were compared with those measured with a spectrometer operating in the 8000-10 000 {\\AA} range. In the second case the RTM was used to generate telluric model spectra to subtract the atmospheric contribution and correct high-resolution stellar spectra from atmospheric water vapor and oxygen lines. The results of both studies are discussed.

Gardini, A; Pérez, E; Quesada, J A; Funke, B

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

180

FDR for non destructive evaluation: inspection of external post-tensioned ducts and measurement of water content in concrete  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

are involved in research programs dedicated to concrete Thermo-Hydro- Mechanical (THM) modeling and to in situ content in concrete (nuclear structures and nuclear waste repositories) is a major topic to understand to Structure Safety for Nuclear and Pressurized Components, France (2013)" #12;The height of each material hn

Boyer, Edmond

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water content" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

ARM - Lesson Plans: When Floating Ice Melts in the Sea  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Questions Does the water overflow when ice melts? Do you think that melting icebergs will make the sea level rise? Do you have any reason to support your answer in question (2)...

182

High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Challenges for Climate Research Mark A. Bourassa1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, the Wilkins Ice Shelf collapsed equally quickly (Scambos et al. 2009). Ocean heat content is rising rapidlyHigh-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Challenges for Climate Research Mark A. Bourassa1 conditions for the measurement and estimation of air­sea and ice fluxes, limiting understanding of related

Gille, Sarah T.

183

High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Challenges for Climate Research1 Mark A. Bourassa1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

), and in 2008, the Wilkins Ice Shelf51 collapsed equally quickly (Scambos et al. 2009). Ocean heat content1 High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Challenges for Climate Research1 2 Mark A conditions for the measurement and estimation of air­27 sea and ice fluxes, limiting understanding of related

Gille, Sarah T.

184

High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Challenges for Climate Research1 Mark A. Bourassa1  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

), and in 2008, the Wilkins Ice Shelf51 collapsed equally quickly (Scambos et al. 2009). Ocean heat content1 High-Latitude Ocean and Sea Ice Surface Fluxes: Challenges for Climate Research1 2 Mark A-latitude surface fluxes will require close collaboration among meteorologists,33 oceanographers, ice physicists

Gille, Sarah T.

185

Ice Concentration Retrieval in Stratiform Mixed-phase Clouds Using Cloud Radar Reflectivity Measurements and 1D Ice Growth Model Simulations  

SciTech Connect

Measurement of ice number concentration in clouds is important but still challenging. Stratiform mixed-phase clouds (SMCs) provide a simple scenario for retrieving ice number concentration from remote sensing measurements. The simple ice generation and growth pattern in SMCs offers opportunities to use cloud radar reflectivity (Ze) measurements and other cloud properties to infer ice number concentration quantitatively. To understand the strong temperature dependency of ice habit and growth rate quantitatively, we develop a 1-D ice growth model to calculate the ice diffusional growth along its falling trajectory in SMCs. The radar reflectivity and fall velocity profiles of ice crystals calculated from the 1-D ice growth model are evaluated with the Atmospheric Radiation Measurements (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) ground-based high vertical resolution radar measurements. Combining Ze measurements and 1-D ice growth model simulations, we develop a method to retrieve the ice number concentrations in SMCs at given cloud top temperature (CTT) and liquid water path (LWP). The retrieved ice concentrations in SMCs are evaluated with in situ measurements and with a three-dimensional cloud-resolving model simulation with a bin microphysical scheme. These comparisons show that the retrieved ice number concentrations are within an uncertainty of a factor of 2, statistically.

Zhang, Damao; Wang, Zhien; Heymsfield, Andrew J.; Fan, Jiwen; Luo, Tao

2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

Effect of Water Content on Conversion of d-Cellobiose into 5-Hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde in a Dimethyl Sulfoxide–Water Mixture  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Noncatalytic conversion of d-cellobiose (at 0.5 M) into 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furaldehyde (5-HMF), a platform chemical for fuels and synthetic materials, was analyzed at 120–200 °C over a wide range of water mole fraction, xw = 0.007–1 in a binary dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO)–water mixture by means of the in situ 13C NMR spectroscopy. ... Biomass has attracted attention as a promising source of sustainable fuels and valuable platform chemicals. ... For developing the conversion of cellulosic biomass into 5-HMF, we should move forward to examine model oligosaccharides closer to cellulosic biomass from the viewpoint of green chemistry. ...

Hiroshi Kimura; Ken Yoshida; Yasuhiro Uosaki; Masaru Nakahara

2013-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

187

Fluid Migration During Ice/Rock Planetesimal Differentiation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

/water reaction, which will depend on the rate at which water can be segregated from a melting ice/rock core. For the liquid water phase to migrate toward the surface, the denser rock phase must compact. The primary question that this thesis will answer is how...

Raney, Robert 1987-

2012-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

188

ICE Cleaning Test Report.PDF  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

16 16 FIELD DEMONSTRATION OF THE ICE 250 TM CLEANING SYSTEM AT THE ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER CASPER, WYOMING August 18-19, 1999 Date Published: October 5, 1999 J.L. Johnston L.M. Jackson PREPARED FOR THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY/ROCKY MOUNTAIN OILFIELD TESTING CENTER Work Performed Under Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) CRADA No. 99-009 TABLE OF CONTENTS Abstract.............................................................................................................................................1 Introduction.......................................................................................................................................1 Product Description ...........................................................................................................................1

189

Methodology for Predicting Water Content in Supercritical Gas Vapor and Gas Solubility in Aqueous Phase for Natural Gas Process  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

The streams in the natural gas process contain light hydrocarbons, mainly methane and ethane, associated with non-hydrocarbon supercritical gases (nitrogen, hydrogen, argon, etc.). ... For system that contains supercritical gases, the gas solubility in water can be related to the Henry's law constant. ...

Chorng H. Twu; Suphat Watanasiri; Vince Tassone

2007-09-22T23:59:59.000Z

190

DIFFRACTION STUDIES OF ICE Alexe BOSAK  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Ic 28o halo observed at least 7 times since 1629 octahedral particles of ice Ic! #12;Cooling downDIFFRACTION STUDIES OF ICE Alexeï BOSAK European Synchrotron Radiation Facility #12;Ice as the mild threat ice Ih the only ice in the crust #12;Ice as the absolute weapon Ice IX : melting point 45.8°C

Titov, Anatoly

191

The Viscosity of Ice  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

11 September 1908 research-article The Viscosity of Ice R. M. Deeley The Royal Society is collaborating with JSTOR to digitize, preserve, and extend access to Proceedings of...

1908-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Physiological changes in cultured Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench cells in response to induced water stress: osmotic potential, relative water content, carbohydrates, organic acids, potassium, and amino acids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

, Table 1). At week 2 the weight of absorbed PEG in DT-s was 50% of its DW and 1. 8 times more than that of DS-s. It is obvious then that calculations could be misleading if the added weight of PEG is not subtracted 28 v 9 / III 9 S00 450 400 2S0... differences, and Duncan's test of pEG content of DT and DS calli in control and stressed conditions. (a). Cultivar-treatment WEEK 0 1 2 4 7 DT-c DT-s S S S S DT-c DS-c DT-s DS-s S S DS-c DS-s S S S S 29 TABLE 1. Continued. (h) WEEK 0...

Diquez, Ricardo

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

193

ICE Raids: Compounding Production, Contradiction, and Capitalism  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

America: Factories and ICE Raids Produce Citizens Americansubjects. ICE raids (re)produce workers’ contradictoryfactories and ICE raids have come to produce immigrant

Reas, Elizabeth I

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

194

The Wonders of Water for Families CMU Childrens School  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

or from the teapot, ice in the freezer or icicles on the roof, etc.). · Reinforce water concepts while

195

ARTICLE IN PRESS Southern Ocean sea ice and radiocarbon ages of  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ARTICLE IN PRESS Southern Ocean sea ice and radiocarbon ages of glacial bottom waters A. Schmittner of glacial ocean circulation and radiocarbon distribution I show that increased sea ice cover over-day and one glacial, tuned to have similar rates of North Atlantic Deep Water formation are used. Insulation

Schmittner, Andreas

196

Effect of dynamic bending of level ice on ship's continuous-mode icebreaking  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract This paper focuses on the influences of the dynamic effects of ship–ice–water interaction on ship performance, ship motions, and ice resistance. The effects of the dynamic bending of ice wedges and ship speeds are especially investigated. The study is carried out using a numerical procedure simulating ship operations in level ice with ship motions in six degrees of freedom (DOFs). A case study is conducted with the Swedish icebreaker Tor Viking II. The 3-D hull geometry of the ship is modeled based on the lines drawing. The predicted performance of the ship is compared with data from full-scale ice trials.

Xiang Tan; Kaj Riska; Torgeir Moan

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

A New Approach for Exploring Ice Sheets and Sub-Ice Geology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

-velocity gradient in the surface layer. The boreholes are drilled by different techniques, requiring considerable in controlling ice dynam- ics and is largely determined by the pres- ence of water and/or sediments underneath Geological Drilling (ANDRILL)). Nev- ertheless, the available literature demon- strates that seismic studies

Kristoffersen, Yngve

198

Metastable hydronium ions in UV-irradiated ice  

SciTech Connect

We show that the irradiation of UV light (10-11 eV) onto an ice film produces metastable hydronium (H{sub 3}O{sup +}) ions in the ice at low temperatures (53-140 K). Evidence of the presence of metastable hydronium ions was obtained by experiments involving adsorption of methylamine onto UV-irradiated ice films and hydrogen-deuterium (H/D) isotopic exchange reaction. The methylamine adsorption experiments showed that photogenerated H{sub 3}O{sup +} species transferred a proton to the methylamine arriving at the ice surface, thus producing the methyl ammonium ion, which was detected by low energy sputtering method. The H{sub 3}O{sup +} species induced the H/D exchange of water, which was monitored through the detection of water isotopomers on the surface by using the Cs{sup +} reactive ion scattering method. Thermal and temporal stabilities of H{sub 3}O{sup +} and its proton migration activity were examined. The lifetime of the hydronium ions in the amorphized ice was greater than 1 h at {approx}53 K and decreased to {approx}5 min at 140 K. Interestingly, a small portion of hydronium ions survived for an extraordinarily long time in the ice, even at 140 K. The average migration distance of protons released from H{sub 3}O{sup +} in the ice was estimated to be about two water molecules at {approx}54 K and about six molecules at 100 K. These results indicate that UV-generated hydronium ions can be efficiently stabilized in low-temperature ice. Such metastable hydronium ions may play a significant role in the acid-base chemistry of ice particles in interstellar clouds.

Moon, Eui-Seong; Kang, Heon [Department of Chemistry, Seoul National University, 1 Gwanak-ro, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

2012-11-28T23:59:59.000Z

199

7-46E The COP and the refrigeration rate of an ice machine are given. The power consumption is to be determined.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

25°F Analysis The cooling load of this ice machine is #12; #12; Btu/h4732Btu/lbm169lbm/h28LL qm7-15 7-46E The COP and the refrigeration rate of an ice machine are given. The power consumption is to be determined. Assumptions The ice machine operates steadily. Ice Machine Outdoors R COP = 2.4 QL water 55°F ice

Bahrami, Majid

200

In Shock Compression of Condensed Matter-2003, Ed. M. Furnish, Portland, OR, 2003. A NEW H2O ICE HUGONIOT  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. Collisions on icy planetary bodies produce impact melt water, redistribute ground ice, and deposit thermalIn Shock Compression of Condensed Matter-2003, Ed. M. Furnish, Portland, OR, 2003. 1 A NEW H2O ICE the onset of phase transformations on the ice Hugoniot, and consequently, the criteria for shock melting

Stewart, Sarah T.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water content" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


201

Polynyas, Leads in the Southern Ocean -Encyclopedia of the Antarctic The sea ice surrounding Antarctica and covering much of the Southern Ocean is far from  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Polynyas, Leads in the Southern Ocean - Encyclopedia of the Antarctic The sea ice surrounding with patches of open water and cracks. Larger, persistent areas of open water within the sea ice pack are called polynyas (a word of Russian origin); while linear cracks in the sea ice are called leads

Renfrew, Ian

202

Ice cream headache  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ice cream headache Ice cream headache Name: fath Status: N/A Age: N/A Location: N/A Country: N/A Date: Around 1993 Question: What causes an "ice cream headache"? Are they dangerous? What would happen if I induced an ice cream headache when I had a regular headache? Replies: This is really a neat question. I am certainly no expert on headaches, but it has a lot to do blood circulation in the sinuses and around and within the brain. Why do some people get them easily and other seem resistant? The cold might restrict blood flow which is the basis for the problem. An Ice cream headache can be turned "on" or "off" by adjusting the rate of consumption, Slurpees work best, so really cold stuff enhances the effect. Are there stages: cold sensation, lingering headache, subsiding headache, warming, etc? Does the cold actually create similar headache "conditions" or does the brain confused cause it cannot directly feel pain? The difference in people is probably due to differences in arteriole branching and general circulation. In my experience smokers get worse headaches than nonsmokers of the same age. Do you find a similar trend? I am trying to stimulate discussion!

203

Designing for effective stationkeeping in ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and intervention vessels for Arctic oil and gas. #12;2. An effective Ice Management system · Ice Management for the CIVArctic vessel. - Comparison with the ice model tests carried out in the Aker Arctic ice tank in May 2011

Nørvåg, Kjetil

204

Lampton & Valasek-1 Aerospace Engineering Prediction of Icing Effects on the Stability and  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lampton & Valasek- 1 Aerospace Engineering Prediction of Icing Effects on the Stability and Control content Median volumetric diameter #12;Lampton & Valasek- 5 Aerospace Engineering Separation Bubble Schematic of Upper Surface Separation Bubble Aft of Leading-Edge Ice Accretion #12;Lampton & Valasek- 6

Valasek, John

205

Surface science investigations of photoprocesses in model interstellar ices  

SciTech Connect

The kinetic energy of benzene and water molecules photodesorbed from astrophysically relevant ices on a sapphire substrate under irradiation by a UV laser tuned to the S{sub 1}(leftarrow)S{sub 0} {pi}{yields}{pi}* transition of benzene has been measured using time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Three distinct photodesorption mechanisms have been identified--a direct adsorbate-mediated desorption of benzene, an indirect adsorbate-mediated desorption of water, and a substrate-mediated desorption of both benzene and water. The translational temperature of each desorbing population was well in excess of the ambient temperature of the ice matrix.

Thrower, J. D.; Collings, M. P.; McCoustra, M. R. S.; Burke, D. J.; Brown, W. A.; Dawes, A.; Holtom, P. D.; Kendall, P.; Mason, N. J.; Jamme, F.; Fraser, H. J.; Clark, I. P.; Parker, A. W. [School of Engineering and Physical Sciences, Heriot-Watt University, Edinburgh EH14 4AS (United Kingdom); Department of Chemistry, University College London, 20 Gordon Street, London WC1H 0AJ (United Kingdom); Department of Physics and Astronomy, The Open University, Walton Hall, Milton Keynes MK7 6AA (United Kingdom); SOLEIL Synchrotron, BP 48, L'Orme des Merisiers, F-91192 Gif sur Yvette Cedex (France); Department of Physics, Scottish Universities Physics Alliance (SUPA), University of Strathclyde, John Anderson Building, 107 Rottenrow East, Glasgow G4 0NG (United Kingdom); Central Laser Facility, Science and Technology Facilities Council, Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, Didcot, Oxon OX11 0QX (United Kingdom)

2008-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

206

IceCube Project Monthly Report -December 2008 Accomplishments  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IceCube Project Monthly Report - December 2008 Accomplishments · Drilling and string installation of December 2008 and a total of 16 strings were deployed by January 15th . The deep core prototype string are filled with water, and the controlled freeze of the water in the tanks is underway. · Additional

Saffman, Mark

207

Impact of Solvent on Photocatalytic Mechanisms: Reactions of Photodesorption Products with Ice Overlayers on the TiO2(110) Surface  

SciTech Connect

The effects of water and methanol ice overlayers on the photodecomposition of acetone on rutile TiO2(110) were evaluated in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) using photon stimulated desorption (PSD) and temperature programmed desorption (TPD). In the absence of ice overlayers, acetone photodecomposed on TiO2(110) at 95 K by ejection of a methyl radical into the gas phase and formation of acetate on the surface. With ice overlayers, the methyl radicals are trapped at the interface between TiO2(110) and the ice. When water ice was present, these trapped methyl radicals reacted either with each other to form ethane or with other molecules in the ice (e.g., water or displaced acetone) to form methane (CH4), ethane (CH3CH3) and other products (e.g., methanol), with all of these products trapped in the ice. The new products were free to revisit the surface or depart during desorption of the ice. When methanol ice was present, methane formation came about only from reaction of trapped methyl radicals with the methanol ice. Methane and ethane slowly leaked through methanol ice overlayers into vacuum at 95 K, but not through water ice overlayers. Different degrees of site competition between water and acetone, and between methanol and acetone led to different hydrogen abstraction pathways in the two ices. These results provide new insights into product formation routes and solution-phase radical formation mechanisms that are important in heterogeneous photocatalysis.

Shen, Mingmin; Henderson, Michael A.

2011-04-07T23:59:59.000Z

208

Molecules, ices and astronomy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

......research-article Features Molecules, ices and astronomy David A Williams, Wendy A Brown, Stephen...brown@ucl.ac.uk Dept of Physics and Astronomy, University College London, Gower Street...of Chemistry, UCL Dept of Physics and Astronomy, UCL Over the past 40 years, about......

D A Williams; W A Brown; S D Price; J M C Rawlings; S Viti

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

ice | proceedings Forensic Engineering  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ice | proceedings Forensic Engineering Volume 165 Issue FE4 November 2012 Forensic Engineering or economic damage. Research and practice papers are sought on traditional or modern forensic engineering, design and construction. Topics covered also include research and education best practice in forensic

Mottram, Toby

210

State of Equilibrium of the West Antarctic Inland Ice Sheet  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...ADVANCES OF GLACIERS, NATURE 202 : 77 ( 1964 ). RAYNAUD, D, CLIMATIC IMPLICATIONS OF TOTAL GAS CONTENT IN ICE AT CAMP CENTURY, NATURE 243 : 283 ( 1973 ). ROBIN, GDQ, 86 INT ASS SCI HYDR 104 ( 1970 ). ROBIN, GDQ, 86 INT ASS SCI HYDR 141...

Ian M. Whillans

1973-11-02T23:59:59.000Z

211

Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Designated Product: Water-Cooled  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

FEMP Designated FEMP Designated Product: Water-Cooled Ice Machines to someone by E-mail Share Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Designated Product: Water-Cooled Ice Machines on Facebook Tweet about Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Designated Product: Water-Cooled Ice Machines on Twitter Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Designated Product: Water-Cooled Ice Machines on Google Bookmark Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Designated Product: Water-Cooled Ice Machines on Delicious Rank Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Designated Product: Water-Cooled Ice Machines on Digg Find More places to share Federal Energy Management Program: FEMP Designated Product: Water-Cooled Ice Machines on AddThis.com... Energy-Efficient Products Federal Requirements

212

The effect of selective desorption mechanisms during interstellar ice formation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Major components of ices on interstellar grains in molecular clouds - water and carbon oxides - occur at various optical depths. This implies that selective desorption mechanisms are at work. An astrochemical model of a contracting low-mass molecular cloud core is presented. Ice was treated as consisting of the surface and three subsurface layers (sublayers). Photodesorption, reactive desorption, and indirect reactive desorption were investigated. The latter manifests itself through desorption from H+H reaction on grains. Desorption of shallow subsurface species was included. Modeling results suggest the existence of a "photon-dominated ice" during the early phases of core contraction. Subsurface ice is chemically processed by interstellar photons, which produces complex organic molecules. Desorption from the subsurface layer results in high COM gas-phase abundances at Av = 2.4...10mag. This may contribute towards an explanation for COM observations in dark cores. It was found that photodesorption mostly gove...

Kalvans, Juris

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

ARM - Measurement - Liquid water content  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

MicrowaveImager (SSMI): Satellite 14 SSMI15 : Special Sensor MicrowaveImager (SSMI): Satellite 15 Datastreams ECMWFDIAG : European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts...

214

No Confinement Needed: Observation of a Metastable Hydrophobic Wetting Two-Layer Ice on Graphene  

SciTech Connect

The structure of water at interfaces is crucial for processes ranging from photocatalysis to protein folding. Here, we investigate the structure and lattice dynamics of two-layer crystalline ice films grown on a hydrophobic substrate - graphene on Pt(111) - with low energy electron diffraction, reflection-absorption infrared spectroscopy, rare-gas adsorption/desorption, and ab-initio molecular dynamics. Unlike hexagonal ice, which consists of stacks of puckered hexagonal "bilayers", this new ice polymorph consists of two flat hexagonal sheets of water molecules in which the hexagons in each sheet are stacked directly on top of each other. Such two-layer ices have been predicted for water confined between hydrophobic slits, but not previously observed. Our results show that the two-layer ice forms even at zero pressure at a single hydrophobic interface by maximizing the number of hydrogen bonds at the expense of adopting a non-tetrahedral geometry with weakened bonds.

Kimmel, Gregory A.; Matthiesen, Jesper; Baer, Marcel; Mundy, Christopher J.; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Smith, R. Scott; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Kay, Bruce D.

2009-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

215

E-Print Network 3.0 - adjacent shelf waters Sample Search Results  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

the cavity beneath an ice... ); freezing occurs because warm waters in contact with the ice-shelf base undergo cooling and freshening... of the fluxes of heat and fresh water...

216

Methanesulfonate in the Greenland Ice Sheet Project 2 Ice Core  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sulfate in the Dye 3 and Camp Century Greenland ice cores infor SO4 2- in the Dye 3, Camp Century, MSA to non-sea salt

Saltzman, E. S; Whung, P.-Y.; Mayewski, P. A

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

An icing physics study by using lifetime-based molecular tagging thermometry technique  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

- ing the wind turbine to shut off (Dalili et al., 2009). Icing can also affect the tower structures of water droplets Solidification process Micro scale heat transfer Wind turbine icing a b s t r a c- ming, Minnesota, and Iowa, where wind turbines are subjected to the problems caused by cold climate

Hu, Hui

218

Theoretical approach of freeze seawater desalination on flake ice maker utilizing LNG cold energy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract In this work, a novel concept in freeze desalination (FD) was introduced. Nowadays the total liquefied natural gas (LNG) production capacity has reached 290 Mt/year. Its enormous cold energy released from re-gasification can be used in the freeze desalination process to minimize the overall energy consumption. A process of FD on flake ice maker utilizing LNG cold energy was designed and simulated by HYSYS software. An ice bucket on flake ice maker was chosen as seawater crystallizer mainly due to its continuous ice making and removing ice without heat source. A dynamic model of the freezing section has been developed and simulated through gPROMS software. The results show that the consumption of 1 kg equivalent LNG cold energy can obtain about 2 kg of ice melt water. In addition, it is shown that the power consumption of this LNG/FD hybrid process is negligible.

Wensheng Cao; Clive Beggs; Iqbal M. Mujtaba

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

219

ARM - Lesson Plans: When Land Ice Melts  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ice melts? Do you think melting glaciers and other land-based ice masses will make sea level rise? Will it submerge the continents on which the ice used to be? Most of the...

220

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Name","Description"," Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","New York Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water content" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

energy content  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

energy content, (weight) strength ? Arbeitsvermögen n (im ballistischen Mörser gemessen), Sprengenergie f (im ballistischen Mörser gemessen) [Mit 10 g Sprengstoff ermittelt

2014-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Heat Content of Natural Gas Deliveries to Consumers (BTU per Cubic Foot)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description"," Of...

223

Effect of differing mineral contents in process water on the quantity and nitrogen concentration of protein isolates from defatted soy and cottonseed flours  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

solids and nitrogen in the whey fractions. Positive effects of using deionized process waters in the cotton- seed protein isolation process were shown only with non-storage protein (NSP) curds, the minor isolates. Deionized process waters increased... of deionization of process water on curd 25 28 Effect of deionization of process water on whey . . . . . 35 Results from cottonseed protein isolation process . . . . . . . 36 Effect of deionization of process water on residue . 42 Effect of deionization...

Kim, Heikyung

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

224

Drilling deep in South Pole Ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

To detect the tiny flux of ultra-high energy neutrinos from active galactic nuclei or from interactions of highest energy cosmic rays with the microwave background photons needs target masses of the order of several hundred cubic kilometers. Clear Antarctic ice has been discussed as a favorable material for hybrid detection of optical, radio and acoustic signals from ultra-high energy neutrino interactions. To apply these technologies at the adequate scale hundreds of holes have to be drilled in the ice down to depths of about 2500 m to deploy the corresponding sensors. To do this on a reasonable time scale is impossible with presently available tools. Remote drilling and deployment schemes have to be developed to make such a detector design reality. After a short discussion of the status of modern hot water drilling we present here a design of an autonomous melting probe, tested 50 years ago to reach a depth of about 1000 m in Greenland ice. A scenario how to build such a probe today with modern technologies...

Karg, Timo

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

225

Therapeutic Hypothermia: Protective Cooling Using Medical Ice...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Therapeutic Hypothermia: Protective Cooling Using Medical Ice Slurry Technology available for licensing: Proprietary method and equipment for making an ice slurry coolant to induce...

226

State estimation of the Labrador Sea with a coupled sea ice-ocean adjoint model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sea ice (SI) and ocean variability in marginal polar and subpolar seas are closely coupled. SI variability in the Labrador Sea is of climatic interest because of its relationship to deep convection/mode water formation, ...

Fenty, Ian Gouverneur

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

227

Coupled Sea Ice–Ocean-State Estimation in the Labrador Sea and Baffin Bay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Sea ice variability in the Labrador Sea is of climatic interest because of its relationship to deep convection, mode-water formation, and the North Atlantic atmospheric circulation. Historically, quantifying the relationship ...

Fenty, Ian

228

Nature Bulletin Table of Contents  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Table of Contents: Table of Contents: Here is our table of contents for the Forset Preserve District of Cook Country Nature Bulletins. To search, go to the Natuere Bulletin's Search Engine and type in your topic. You can also use your browser's "FIND" command to search the 750+ article titles here for a specific subject! Fish Smother Under Ice Coyotes in Cook County Tough Times for the Muskrats Wild Geese and Ducks Fly North Squirrels Spring Frogs Snapping Turtles A Phenomenal Spring Good People Do Not Pick Wildflowers Fire is the Enemy of Field and Forest Crows Earthworms Bees Crayfish Floods Handaxes and Knives in the Forest Preserves Ant Sanctuary Conservation Mosquitoes More About Mosquitoes Fishing in the Forest Preserve Our River Grasshoppers Chiggers Ticks Poison Ivy Fireflies

229

ARM - Measurement - Cloud ice particle  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

ice particle ice particle ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Measurement : Cloud ice particle Particles made of ice found in clouds. Categories Cloud Properties Instruments The above measurement is considered scientifically relevant for the following instruments. Refer to the datastream (netcdf) file headers of each instrument for a list of all available measurements, including those recorded for diagnostic or quality assurance purposes. ARM Instruments MET : Surface Meteorological Instrumentation Field Campaign Instruments REPLICATOR : Balloon-borne Ice Crystal Replicator CPI : Cloud Particle Imager CVI-AIR : Counterflow Virtual Impactor LEARJET : Lear Jet PARTIMG : Particle imager UAV-PROTEUS-MICRO : Proteus Cloud Microphysics Instruments

230

Energy content: 43 to 47 KJ/gram not much different from candlewax or candybars (physical density of gasoline is about .73 times that of water (.73 g/cc...it floats!).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GASOLINE: Energy content: 43 to 47 KJ/gram not much different from candlewax or candybars (physical density of gasoline is about .73 times that of water (.73 g/cc...it floats!). Coal...15 to 19 KJ/gram H H-C-C-C-C-C-C-C-C-H Decane | | | | | | | | | | H H H H H H H H H H Typical molecules found in gasoline Rough Values of Power

231

Hydrological and water quality characteristics of three rock glaciers: Blanca Massif, Colorado, USA  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

interstitially or as discrete lenses. The geometry of a rock glacier is conducive not only to the formation and growth of ice, but also to the entrapment of water in the fluid state. It is the ice and the trapped water that are important in providing a source... sediments, and ice. The ice occurs in rock glaciers either interstitially or as discrete lenses. The geometry of a rock glacier is conducive not only to the formation and growth of ice, but also to the entrapment of water in the fluid state. It is the ice...

DeMorett, Joseph Lawrence

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

232

An investigation of ice shape prediction methodologies and comparison with experimental data  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AN INVESTIGATION OF ICE SHAPE PREDICTION METHODOLOGIES AND COMPARISON WITH EXPERIMENTAL DATA A Thesis by RANDALL KEITH BRITTON Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE August 1989 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering AN INVESTIGATION OF ICE SHAPE PREDICTION METHODOLOGIES AND COMPARISON WITH EXPERIMENTAL DATA A Thesis by RANDALL KEITH BRITTON Approved as to style and content by: K. D...

Britton, Randall Keith

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

233

Genetic icing effects on forward flight performance of a model helicopter rotor  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

GENERIC ICING EFFECTS ON FORWARD FLIGHT PERFORMANCE OF A MODEL HELICOPTER ROTOR A Thesis ANA FIORELLA TINETTI-SANCHEZ Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree... of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1987 Major Subject: Aerospace Engineering GENERIC ICING EFFECTS ON FORWARD FLIGHT PERFORMANCE OF A MODEL HELICOPTER ROTOR A Thesis by ANA FIORELLA TINETTI-SANCHEZ Approved as to style and content by: Kenneth D. Korkan...

Tinetti-Sanchez, Ana Fiorella

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

234

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

222014 5:11:47 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Gasoline and Diesel Retail Prices" "Sourcekey","EMMEPM0PTENUSDPG","EMMEPM0UPTENUSDPG","EMMEPM0RPTENUS...

235

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:08:27 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Missouri Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9012MO2" "Date","Missouri...

236

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"9262014 3:44:37 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Pipeline & Distribution Use " "Sourcekey","N9170US2","NA1480SAL2","NA1480SAK2","NA1480SAZ...

237

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Price of Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Re-Exports to Russia (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","NGMEPG0ERENUS-NRSDMCF"...

238

Workbook Contents  

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,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:04:55 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural...

239

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,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:23:03 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Texas...

240

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,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:04:41 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water content" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

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,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:11:23 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1:...

242

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,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:32:23 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1:...

243

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,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:23:04 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Virginia...

244

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,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:26:30 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alabama...

245

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,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:23:01 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Rhode...

246

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,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:04:58 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural...

247

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,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:04:23 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Vermont...

248

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,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:01:10 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1:...

249

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,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:23:00 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Oregon...

250

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U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:01:53 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Utah...

251

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,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:06:23 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Michigan...

252

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,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:01:30 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New...

253

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,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:04:52 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural...

254

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,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:24:23 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kansas...

255

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,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:23:07 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S....

256

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,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:23:02 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: South...

257

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,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:23:03 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Tennessee...

258

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,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:01:23 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Montana...

259

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,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:01:32 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New...

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,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:04:54 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water content" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
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to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

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,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:23:04 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Utah...

262

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,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:04:31 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural...

263

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,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:23:00 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Oklahoma...

264

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,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:08:23 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Illinois...

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,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:06:23 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Maryland...

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,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:01:23 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Percent...

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268

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269

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271

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272

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273

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,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:23:07 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Wyoming...

274

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,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:23:05 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Vermont...

275

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276

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277

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,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"1162014 3:00:57 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Iowa...

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279

Ice deformation near SHEBA R. W. Lindsay  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

in the vicinity of the Surface Heat Budget of the Arctic Ocean (SHEBA) ice camp that is suitable for forcing factor for regional heat fluxes, ice growth and melt rates, and ice strength [Maykut, 1982Ice deformation near SHEBA R. W. Lindsay Polar Science Center, University of Washington, Seattle

Lindsay, Ron

280

Comment on ``A quantitative framework for interpretation of basal ice facies formed by ice  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

heave would be expected to produce were revealed beneath the Kamb Ice Stream by the pioneering boreholeComment on ``A quantitative framework for interpretation of basal ice facies formed by ice quantitative framework for interpretation of basal ice facies formed by ice accretion over subglacial sediment

Worster, M. Grae

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water content" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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281

Ice coring on Vestfonna Ice Cap Contact person: John Moore (jmoore@ulapland.fi).  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

reach bedrock about 4 tons of ice will need to be flown out to Longyearbyen in insulated boxesIce coring on Vestfonna Ice Cap Contact person: John Moore (jmoore@ulapland.fi). Participants, Polish Academy of Science glowacki@igf.edu.pl Science: Ice cores from the glaciers outside the main ice

Moore, John

282

ORIGINAL PAPER A bacterial ice-binding protein from the Vostok ice core  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

to produce a 54 kDa ice-binding protein (GenBank EU694412) that is similar to ice-binding proteins previously- vival at sub-zero temperatures by producing proteins that bind to and inhibit the growth of ice crystalsORIGINAL PAPER A bacterial ice-binding protein from the Vostok ice core James A. Raymond Ã? Brent C

Christner, Brent C.

283

IceCube Collaboration Governance Document IceCube Collaboration Governance Document  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

IceCube Collaboration Governance Document IceCube Collaboration Governance Document Revision 8.1, November 21, 2014 Page 1 of 20 #12;IceCube Collaboration Governance Document IceCube Collaboration Governance Document Revision 8.1, November 21, 2014 Collaboration Objectives The IceCube Collaboration (the

Saffman, Mark

284

Climatic Ice Core Records from the Tropical Quelccaya Ice Cap  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...DANSGAARD, W, LATE CENOZOIC GLACIA 37 ( 1971 ). DANSGAARD, W, ONE THOUSAND CENTURIES OF CLIMATIC RECORD FROM CAMP CENTURY ON GREENLAND ICE SHEET, SCIENCE 166 : 377 ( 1969 ). DANSGAARD, W, STABLE ISOTOPES IN PRECIPITATION, TELLUS 16...

LONNIE G. THOMPSON; STEFAN HASTENRATH; BENJAMÍN MORALES ARNAO

1979-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

285

Decadal to seasonal variability of Arctic sea ice albedo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A controlling factor in the seasonal and climatological evolution of the sea ice cover is its albedo $\\alpha$. Here we analyze Arctic data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Polar Pathfinder and assess the seasonality and variability of broadband albedo from a 23 year daily record. We produce a histogram of daily albedo over ice covered regions in which the principal albedo transitions are seen; high albedo in late winter and spring, the onset of snow melt and melt pond formation in the summer, and fall freeze up. The bimodal late summer distribution demonstrates the combination of the poleward progression of the onset of melt with the coexistence of perennial bare ice with melt ponds and open water, which then merge to a broad peak at $\\alpha \\gtrsim $ 0.5. We find the interannual variability to be dominated by the low end of the $\\alpha$ distribution, highlighting the controlling influence of the ice thickness distribution and large-scale ice edge dynamics. The statistics obtained pro...

Agarwal, S; Wettlaufer, J S

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

An experimental and theoretical study of the ice accretion process during artificial and natural icing conditions  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Real-time measurements of ice growth during artificial and natural icing conditions were conducted using an ultrasonic pulse-echo technique. This technique allows ice thickness to be measured with an accuracy of ?0.5 mm; ...

Kirby, Mark Samuel

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Workbook Contents" Workbook Contents" ,"U.S. State-to-State capacity" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","Units of Measurement","Frequency","Updated Date" ,"Pipeline State-to-State Capacity","State-to-State capacity","Million cubic feet per day (MMcf/d)","Quarterly","application/vnd.ms-excel" ,"State Inflow Capacity","Inflow capacity from other States","Million cubic feet per day (MMcf/d)","Quarterly","application/vnd.ms-excel" ,"State Outflow Capacity","Outflow capacity to other States","Million cubic feet per day (MMcf/d)","Quarterly","application/vnd.ms-excel"

288

Fire in the Ice, Summer 2004  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

R R Vol. 4, Iss. 3 â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ CONTENTS Gulf of Mexico Remote Observatory Update ............... 1 Hydrate Decomposition Studies at USGS .................... 5 NETL's HP View Cell Operational .......................... 10 Announcements .................. 13 * AAPG Hedberg Conference * JIP Drilling Delayed * TOUGH-Fx/HYDRATE v1.0 * Advisory Committee Meeting * Anaximander project Spotlight on Research ........ 16 Dr. Keith Kvenvolden CONTACT POINT Ray Boswell National Energy Technology Laboratory (304) 285-4541 (304) 285-4469 fax Ray.Boswell@netl.doe.gov The Fire in the Ice Newsletter is

289

Fire in the Ice, Fall 2004  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

4 4 â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ â—‹ CONTENTS AAPG Hedberg Research Conference ............................ 1 Oak Ridge Facilities .............. 4 Relic Gas Hydrates of Northwestern Siberia ............. 8 Announcements .................. 11 * JIP Tests in the Gulf of Mexico * Planning Workshop Slated for Early Next Year Spotlight on Research ........ 12 Ingo Pecher CONTACT POINT Ray Boswell National Energy Technology Laboratory (304) 285-4541 (304) 285-4216 fax Ray.Boswell@netl.doe.gov The Fire in the Ice Newsletter is also available online at our website (http://www.netl.doe.gov/ scngo/Natural%20Gas/hydrates/)

290

The shallow shelf approximation as a "sliding law" in a thermomechanically coupled ice sheet model  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The shallow shelf approximation is a better ``sliding law'' for ice sheet modeling than those sliding laws in which basal velocity is a function of driving stress. The shallow shelf approximation as formulated by \\emph{Schoof} [2006a] is well-suited to this use. Our new thermomechanically coupled sliding scheme is based on a plasticity assumption about the strength of the saturated till underlying the ice sheet in which the till yield stress is given by a Mohr-Coulomb formula using a modeled pore water pressure. Using this scheme, our prognostic whole ice sheet model has convincing ice streams. Driving stress is balanced in part by membrane stresses, the model is computable at high spatial resolution in parallel, it is stable with respect to parameter changes, and it produces surface velocities seen in actual ice streams.

Bueler, Ed

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

291

Arctic sea-ice decline archived by multicentury annual-resolution record from crustose coralline algal proxy  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...stratification, and deep water mass formation, among other...winter sea ice via wind-driven anomalies of sea-ice velocity, surface vertical...anomalously high due to wind-driven equatorward...are indicated on the map (Methods). Black circle...three accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS...

Jochen Halfar; Walter H. Adey; Andreas Kronz; Steffen Hetzinger; Evan Edinger; William W. Fitzhugh

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

RELATIONS BETWEEN THE DETECTION OF METHYL TERT-BUTYL ETHER (MTBE) IN SURFACE AND GROUND WATER AND ITS CONTENT IN GASOLINE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

AND ITS CONTENT IN GASOLINE By Michael J. Moran, Mike J. Halde, Rick M. Clawges and John S. Zogorski U in the United States as an octane enhancer and oxygenate in gasoline. Octane enhancement began in the late 1970's with the phase-out of tetraethyl lead from gasoline. The use of oxygenates was expanded

293

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 39, NO. 1, JANUARY 2001 173 Impact of Variable Atmospheric Water Vapor Content  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Canada during the 1996 growing season, together with reanalyzed IWV content data, were employed operating in the optical part of the electromagnetic spectrum. The scattering and absorption of solar are with the Canada Centre for Remote Sensing, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1A 0Y7 (e-mail: josef.cihlar@ccrs. nrcan.gc.ca). I

Li, Zhanqing

294

Water Content and Buildup of Poly(diallyldimethylammonium chloride)/ Poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) and Poly(allylamine hydrochloride)/ Poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) Polyelectrolyte Multilayers Studied by an in Situ Combination of a Quartz Crystal Micr  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ABSTRACT: The buildup of polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs), fabricated by the layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly, was followed in situ by the combination of a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D) and spectroscopic ellipsometry in a single device. PEMs composed of poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and poly(sodium 4-styrenesulfonate) (PSS) polyelectrolyte pairs and of poly-(diallyldimethyl ammonium chloride) (PDADMAC) and PSS were built up to 17 layers. The combination of ellipsometry andQCM-D allowed simultaneous determination of the acousticmass, which comprises both the mass of the polymer and solvent, and the optical mass which corresponds to the polymer mass alone. From these parameters, the hydration of the PEMwas calculated layer by layer. The linearly growing PAH/ PSS PEMs showed a constant absolute content of water throughout the assembly, while the relative contribution of water to the PEM mass content approached zero, when grown in 0.5 M NaCl. Rinses with water between polyelectrolyte deposition steps resulted in a hydration of approximately 40%. The supralinearly growing PDADMAC/PSS PEMs exhibited a remarkable dependence of the hydration on the polyelectrolyte that was deposited last. Implications for the mechanism of assembly of the PEMs are discussed.

Jagoba J. Iturri Ramos; Stefan Stahl; Ralf P. Richter; Sergio E. Moya

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

Ab initio study of ice catalyzation of HOCl + HCl reaction  

SciTech Connect

The observations by Farman et al. revealed remarkable depletions in the total atmospheric ozone content in Antarctica. The observed total ozone decreased smoothing during the spring season from about 1975. Satellite observations have proved Antarctic ozone depletions over a very extended region, in general agreement with the local ground-based data of Farman et al. It was suggested that heterogeneous reactions occurring on particles in polar stratospheric clouds (PSCs) play a central role in the depletion of stratospheric ozone. Experiments proved that the reaction of HOCl + HCl was very slow in the gas phase, but on ice surface it was rapid. In this work the ice catalysis of HOCl + HCl reaction was investigated by using ab initio molecular orbital theory. The authors applied the Hartree-Fock self-consistent field and the second-order Moeller-Plesset perturbation theory with the basis sets of 6-31G* to the model system. The complexes and transition state were obtained along the reaction with and without the presence of ice surface. By comparing the results, a possible catalyzation mechanism of ice on the reaction is proposed.

Zhou, Y.F.; Liu, C.B.

2000-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

296

A preliminary evaluation of the impact of assimilating AVHRR data on sea ice concentration analyses  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

In this paper a method to assimilate data from a visual/infrared (VIS/IR) sensor for the purpose of estimating sea ice concentration is investigated. A novel forward model is presented which allows the reflectances and brightness temperatures from the VIS/IR sensor to be assimilated. The VIS/IR data are assimilated in combination with ice concentration retrievals from a passive microwave sensor using 3D variational data assimilation into a 5 km × 5 km grid of sea ice concentrations. Results are compared with those from an experiment which assimilates only the ice concentration retrievals. It is found that the VIS/IR data have a positive impact as ice on the sea ice state through comparison with independent data. The proportion of points correctly identified asice or open water increased in each region studied by including the AVHRR data, with the largest increase being from 0.921 to 0.935. This positive impact is due to the higher resolution of the VIS/IR data as compared with the passive microwave data, that improves the representation of open water in bays and coastal polynyas. There is however, a degradation in the accuracy of the sea ice state in some regions of the analysis from assimilating the VIS/IR data. Possible ways of improving the impact from VIS/IR data are discussed.

K. Andrea Scott; Mark Buehner; Alain Caya; Tom Carrieres

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

297

Mantle viscosity and ice-age ice sheet topography  

SciTech Connect

Ice-age paleotopography and mantle viscosity can both be inferred from observations of Earth`s response to the most recent deglaciation event of the current ice age. This procedure requires iterative application of a theoretical model of the global process of glacial isostatic adjustment. Results demonstrate that the iterative inversion procedure converges to a paleotopography that is extremely close to that from the ICE-4G model. The accompanying mantle viscosity profile is furthermore shown to reconcile the requirements of aspherical geoid anomalies related to the mantle convection process, thus resolving a fundamental issue concerning mantle rheology. The combined model also explains postglacial sea level histories for the east cost of the United States. 28 refs., 9 figs.

Peltier, W.R. [Univ. of Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

1996-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

298

Ice Energy | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Ice Energy Ice Energy Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Ice Energy Name Ice Energy Address 9351 Eastman Park Drive Place Windsor, Colorado Zip 80550 Sector Renewable energy Product Energy Storage Year founded 2003 Number of employees 51-200 Phone number 970-545-3630 Website http://www.ice-energy.com/ Coordinates 40.4651775°, -104.882° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":40.4651775,"lon":-104.882,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

299

Physical Controls on Ice Variability in the Bering Sea /  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

region. The model also produces less ice near much of thewinds (Figure 3.13c,d) produce more ice growth and more iceThe model produces variations in total ice area anomalies

Li, Linghan

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

300

ICE Solar | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

ICE Solar ICE Solar Jump to: navigation, search Name ICE Solar Place Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India Sector Solar Product India-based company focused on solar PV engineering, procurement and construction opportunities. Coordinates 17.6726°, 77.5971° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":17.6726,"lon":77.5971,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water content" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Thermal Storage with Ice Harvesting Systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Application of Harvesting Ice Storage Systems. Thermal storage systems are becoming widely accepted techniques for utility load management. This paper discusses the principles of ice harvesting equipment and their application to the multi...

Knebel, D. E.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

302

LABORATORY INDENTATION TESTS SIMULATING ICE-STRUCTURE INTERACTIONS USING CONE-SHAPED ICE  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

sample protruding from a steel retaining ring (Figure 1). The closing speed and penetration rate test scenario were ice sample type, ice temperature, interaction rate, penetration depth, cone angle cone angle, indentation rate, ice type and temperature, and indenter roughness were varied. All ice

Bruneau, Steve

303

New study details glacier ice loss following ice shelf July 25, 2011  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Ted #12;Scambos of the NSIDC produced detailed ice loss maps from 2001 to 2009 for the main tributaryNew study details glacier ice loss following ice shelf collapse July 25, 2011 Contact: Anthony Lane UMBC (410) 455-5793 alane@umbc.edu Katherine Leitzell National Snow and Ice Data Center University

Cambridge, University of

304

Numerical Age Computation of the Antarctic Ice Sheet for Dating Deep Ice Cores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Numerical Age Computation of the Antarctic Ice Sheet for Dating Deep Ice Cores Bernd M¨ugge1 for the computation of the age of ice is discussed within the frame of numerical ice sheet modelling. The first method of a numerical diffusion term to stabilize the solution and therefore produces arbitrary results in a near

Calov, Reinhard

305

Gas isotopes in ice reveal a vegetated central Greenland during ice sheet invasion  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

= ) in the silty ice, reaching values as high as 22 mM [Tison et al., 1998]. Ammonium oxalate is produced duringGas isotopes in ice reveal a vegetated central Greenland during ice sheet invasion R. Souchez,1 J prevailing during build-up of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GIS) are not yet established. Here we use results from

Chappellaz, Jérôme

306

AMSR-E Algorithm Theoretical Basis Document: Sea Ice Products  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the Arctic perennial ice regions, and the ice temperature is produced from an algorithm similar to the Nimbus1 AMSR-E Algorithm Theoretical Basis Document: Sea Ice Products Thorsten Markus and Donald J 20771 1. Overview The AMSR-E sea ice standard level 3 products include sea ice concentration, sea ice

Waliser, Duane E.

307

An ecological study examining the correlation of end-stage renal disease and ground water heavy metal content in Texas counties  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An ecological study was conducted to examine the correlation of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) and the ground water heavy metal level of lead, arsenic, cadmium, mercury and the cumulative level of all four metals in Texas counties. The heavy meal...

Bishop, Scott Alan

2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

308

Paleotopography of glacial-age ice sheets  

SciTech Connect

This is technical comment and response to the subject of paleotophography of glacial age ice sheets. The model presented by Peltier reconstructing the paleotopography of glacial age ice sheets has implications for atmospheric general circulation models of ice age climate. In addition, the model suggests that the glacial-age Antarctic Ice Sheet was significantly larger than today`s. The commentor, Edwards, suggests there is a discrepancy between data from Papua New Guinea and the model results.

Edwards, R.L. [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

1995-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

309

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm_epg0_fgc_sky_mmcfa.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/ngm_epg0_fgc_sky_mmcfa.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:59:11 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (MMcf) " "Sourcekey","NGM_EPG0_FGC_SKY_MMCF" "Date","Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (MMcf) "

310

Coherent radar ice thickness measurements over the Greenland ice sheet  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

systems are designed to use pulse compression techniques and coherent integration to obtain the high sensitivity required to measure the thickness of more than 4 km of cold ice. We used these systems to collect radar data over the interior and margins...

Gogineni, S. Prasad; Tammana, Dilip; Braaten, David A.; Leuschen, C.; Legarsky, J.; Kanagaratnam, P.; Stiles, J.; Allen, C.; Jezek, K.; Akins, T.

2001-12-27T23:59:59.000Z

311

Love wave surface acoustic wave sensor for ice detection on aircraft  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

This paper presents the design fabrication experimental results and theoretical validation of a Love wave surface acoustic wave sensor for detecting the phase change from liquid water to solid ice. The sensing of this phase transition is due to the shear horizontal nature of Love waves which couple to a solid (ice) but not to a liquid (water). An SiO2 film of thickness 3.2 ?m deposited on an ST cut quartz wafer via plasma?enhanced chemical?vapor deposition acts as the guiding layer for Love waves. Testing is carried out with the water or ice placed directly in the propagation path of Love waves. An oscillation frequency shift of 2 MHz is observed when water on the sensor is frozen and melted cyclically. The contribution to the frequency shift is explained in terms of the acousto?electric effect (high permittivity and conductivity of water relative to ice) mass loading and elastic film formation (solid ice). An arrangement for wireless interrogation of the sensor is proposed which is particularly attractive for aircraft and rotorcraft applications obviating the need for complex wiring and local power sources. t

Vasundara V. Varadan; Sunil Gangadharan; Vijay K. Varadan

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

312

Phylogenetic and Physiological Diversity of Microorganisms Isolated from a Deep Greenland Glacier Ice Core  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...size reduction, condensation of the cytoplasm...microorganisms from the atmospheric airflow into...enhanced the recovery of the high-GC...the presence of water channels and...2003. Bacterial recovery from ancient...Reeve. 2000. Recovery and identification...glacial ice and water in Canadas High...

V. I. Miteva; P. P. Sheridan; J. E. Brenchley

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

313

The generation of martian floods by the melting of ground ice above dykes  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

... formed by extension. The surface has also been modified by enormous floods, probably of water, which often flowed out of valleys formed by the largest of these faults. By ... can provide a heat source to melt ground ice, and so provide a source of water for the floods that have been inferred to originate in some of the large valleys ...

Dan McKenzie; Francis Nimmo

1999-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

314

Ice-Sheet Response to Oceanic Forcing  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...regional-scale ice-ocean simulations suggests that the state-of-Texas...ice shelf’s rapid demise, which would...providing accurate simulation and projection of...observation and modeling indicate that increases...day (38, 39). Rapid melting of ice cliffs...with an emphasis on automated and smart-sensing...

Ian Joughin; Richard B. Alley; David M. Holland

2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

315

Experimental constraints on the kinetics of ice lens initiation and growth  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Ice lenses are formed by the migration and solidification of unfrozen water during soil freezing, which can lead to the upwards displacement of the ground surface known as frost heave. The complicated interplay between heat and mass transport that causes ice lens formation has been addressed by several theoretical models, but uncertainties remain that require further experimental constraints. In particular, the initiation of ice lenses has long posed theoretical difficulties. We performed a series of stepwise freezing experiments in fine granular materials to observe the initiation and growth of ice lenses. Our experiments demonstrate clear and systematic relationships between the behavior of ice lenses, and the particle size and cooling temperature. Ice lenses are thicker when formed in sediments with smaller particle sizes and the initial formation position is further from the cooled boundary when it is set to lower temperatures. Our temperature measurements and photographic documentation demonstrate that ice lenses are formed below the nominal melting temperature, at a location that is sufficiently distant for the freezing velocity to have slowed below a threshold. We compared our experimental results to numerical predictions of ice lens formation that were applied to our experimental conditions. Our experimental trends are consistent with predictions of our simple, initial model. However, important quantitative differences motivate a refined treatment that emphasizes the kinetics of liquid supply from the pore space through the thin films that separate ice lenses from particle surfaces. We obtained good quantitative agreement between our experimental measurements and the refined model predictions, emphasizing the importance of kinetic effects as a control in ice lens initiation and growth.

Tomotaka Saruya; Kei Kurita; Alan W. Rempel

2013-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

316

An Unprecedented Constraint on Water Content in the Sunlit Lunar Exosphere Seen by Lunar-Based Ultraviolet Telescope of Chang'e-3 Mission  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The content of $\\mathrm{OH/H_2O}$ molecules in the tenuous exosphere of the Moon is still an open issue at present. We here report an unprecedented upper limit of the content of the OH radicals, which is obtained from the in-situ measurements carried out \\rm by the Lunar-based Ultraviolet Telescope, a payload of Chinese Chang'e-3 mission. By analyzing the diffuse background in the images taken by the telescope, the column density and surface concentration of the OH radicals are inferred to be $<10^{11}\\ \\mathrm{cm^{-2}}$ and $<10^{4}\\ \\mathrm{cm^{-3}}$ (by assuming a hydrostatic equilibrium with a scale height of 100km), respectively, by assuming that the recorded background is fully contributed by their resonance fluorescence emission. The resulted concentration is lower than the previously reported value by about two orders of magnitude, and is close to the prediction of the sputtering model. In addition, the same measurements and method allow us to derive a surface concentration of $<10^{2}\\ \\math...

Wang, J; Qiu, Y L; Meng, X M; Cai, H B; Cao, L; Deng, J S; Han, X H; Wei, J Y

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

317

Influence of surface passivation and water content on mineral reactions in unsaturated porous media: Implications for brucite carbonation and CO2 sequestration  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

Abstract The evolution of mineral reactive surface area is an important control on the progress of carbon mineralization reactions that sequester anthropogenic CO2. Dry conditions in unsaturated porous media and the passivation of reactive surface area by secondary phase precipitation complicate predictions of reactive surface during carbon mineralization reactions. Unsaturated brucite [Mg(OH)2] bearing column experiments were used to evaluate the effects of water saturation and hydrous Mg-carbonate precipitation on reaction of brucite with 10% CO2 gas streams at ambient conditions. We demonstrate that a lack of available water severely limits reaction progress largely due to the requirement of water as a reactant to form hydrated Mg-carbonates. The precipitation of a poorly crystalline carbonate phase in the early stages of the reaction does not significantly hinder brucite dissolution, as the carbonate coating remains sufficiently permeable. It is postulated that the conversion of this phase to substantially less porous, crystalline nesquehonite [MgCO3·3H2O] results in passivation of the brucite surface. Although a mechanistic model describing the passivating effect of nesquehonite remains elusive, reactive transport modeling using MIN3P-DUSTY confirms that conventional geometric surface area update models do not adequately reproduce observed reaction progress during brucite carbonation, while an empirically based model accounting for surface passivation is able to capture the transient evolution of CO2 uptake. Both water limits and surface passivation effects may limit the efficiency of CO2 sequestration efforts that rely on the conversion of mafic and ultramafic rock to carbonate minerals.

Anna L. Harrison; Gregory M. Dipple; Ian M. Power; K. Ulrich Mayer

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

318

Lab 10: Contaminated water and remediation Water on and in the Earth  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Lab 10: Contaminated water and remediation Water on and in the Earth Where is Earth's water located that the vast majority of the fresh water available for our uses is stored in the ground (the large grey slice in ice and glaciers. Another 30 percent of freshwater is in the ground. Thus, surface-water sources (such

Li, X. Rong

319

Medical ice slurry production device  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention relates to an apparatus for producing sterile ice slurries for medical cooling applications. The apparatus is capable of producing highly loaded slurries suitable for delivery to targeted internal organs of a patient, such as the brain, heart, lungs, stomach, kidneys, pancreas, and others, through medical size diameter tubing. The ice slurry production apparatus includes a slurry production reservoir adapted to contain a volume of a saline solution. A flexible membrane crystallization surface is provided within the slurry production reservoir. The crystallization surface is chilled to a temperature below a freezing point of the saline solution within the reservoir such that ice particles form on the crystallization surface. A deflector in the form of a reciprocating member is provided for periodically distorting the crystallization surface and dislodging the ice particles which form on the crystallization surface. Using reservoir mixing the slurry is conditioned for easy pumping directly out of the production reservoir via medical tubing or delivery through other means such as squeeze bottles, squeeze bags, hypodermic syringes, manual hand delivery, and the like.

Kasza, Kenneth E. (Palos Park, IL); Oras, John (Des Plaines, IL); Son, HyunJin (Naperville, IL)

2008-06-24T23:59:59.000Z

320

Subglacial floods beneath ice sheets  

Science Journals Connector (OSTI)

...depth 100m subject to a geothermal heat flux of 50m2 gives...crude estimate). As well as the present theoretical...Atlantic or to the Gulf of Mexico. One reason for supposing...do not know this very well for a palaeo-ice sheet...and P Gogineni2001High geothermal flow, basal melt, and...

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water content" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010pa2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010pa2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:52 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Pennsylvania Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010PA2" "Date","Pennsylvania Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,279817 25019,285978 25384,295027 25749,297022 26114,304327

322

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Bcf)" Bcf)" ,"Click worksheet name or tab at bottom for data" ,"Worksheet Name","Description","# Of Series","Frequency","Latest Data for" ,"Data 1","U.S. Dry Natural Gas Production (Bcf)",1,"Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9070us1m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9070us1m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:33:14 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Dry Natural Gas Production (Bcf)"

323

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1504_nus_4m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1504_nus_4m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:46:14 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (%)" "Sourcekey","NA1504_NUS_4" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (%)" 37271,98.3 37302,98.5 37330,98.4 37361,98.1

324

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n5050us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n5050us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:29:09 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Total Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N5050US2" "Date","U.S. Total Natural Gas Injections into Underground Storage (MMcf)" 26679 26710 26738 26769 26799

325

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010hi2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010hi2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:19 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Hawaii Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010HI2" "Date","Hawaii Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 29402,1416 29767,1289 30132,1197 30497,1121 30863,1048 31228,625 31593,579 31958,591

326

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010tx2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010tx2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:59 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Texas Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010TX2" "Date","Texas Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,201407 25019,211763 25384,220728 25749,232189 26114,237387 26480,240662

327

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040nd2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040nd2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:40 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: North Dakota Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040ND2" "Date","North Dakota Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 35079,232 35110,193 35139,232 35170,176 35200,230 35231,258 35261,269

328

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010de3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010de3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:15 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Delaware Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010DE3" "Date","Delaware Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

329

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020fl2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020fl2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:29 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Florida (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3020FL2" "Date","Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Florida (MMcf)"

330

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020ct2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020ct2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:23 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Connecticut (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3020CT2" "Date","Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Connecticut (MMcf)"

331

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020az2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020az2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:17 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Arizona (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3020AZ2" "Date","Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Arizona (MMcf)"

332

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020ca2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020ca2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:19 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in California (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3020CA2" "Date","Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in California (MMcf)"

333

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020dc2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020dc2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:24 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in the District of Columbia (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3020DC2" "Date","Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in the District of Columbia (MMcf)"

334

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020co2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020co2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:21 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Colorado (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3020CO2" "Date","Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Colorado (MMcf)"

335

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010md2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010md2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:30 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Maryland Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010MD2" "Date","Maryland Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,77130 25019,79015 25384,84406 25749,86811 26114,87617 26480,89042

336

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040or2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040or2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:43 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Oregon Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040OR2" "Date","Oregon Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 35079 35110 35139 35170 35200 35231 35261 35292 35323 35353 35384 35414 35445,0

337

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010wv3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010wv3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:07 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: West Virginia Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010WV3" "Date","West Virginia Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

338

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010la2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010la2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:28 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Louisiana Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010LA2" "Date","Louisiana Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,74386 25019,77762 25384,82965 25749,86148 26114,79893 26480,82847

339

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010al3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010al3m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:07 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alabama Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010AL3" "Date","Alabama Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

340

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010nm3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010nm3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:45 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010NM3" "Date","New Mexico Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water content" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010id2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010id2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:22 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Idaho Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010ID2" "Date","Idaho Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,6179 25019,6545 25384,6980 25749,7711 26114,8455 26480,10887 26845,9947 27210,9652

342

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010wa2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010wa2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:05 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Washington Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010WA2" "Date","Washington Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,23160 25019,26342 25384,30479 25749,31929 26114,33934 26480,38631

343

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040ok2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040ok2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:42 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Oklahoma Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040OK2" "Date","Oklahoma Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 35079 35110 35139 35170 35200 35231 35261 35292 35323 35353 35384 35414 35445,0

344

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9132us3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9132us3m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/13/2013 2:23:27 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Price of U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Exports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N9132US3" "Date","Price of U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Exports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" 35445,4.08

345

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040nm2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040nm2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:40 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040NM2" "Date","New Mexico Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 24653,5992 25019,5987 25384,4058 25749,2909 26114,2823 26480,5696 26845,3791 27210,1227

346

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040sd2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040sd2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:43 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: South Dakota Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040SD2" "Date","South Dakota Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 24653,0 25019,0 25384,0 25749,0 26114,0 26480,0 26845,0 27210,0 27575,4 27941,5

347

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040co2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040co2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:33 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Colorado Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040CO2" "Date","Colorado Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 24653,2656 25019,1514 25384,1326 25749,7126 26114,2843 26480,4758 26845,3008 27210,2957

348

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3035us4a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3035us4a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:25:09 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in U.S. Total Represented by the Price (%)" "Sourcekey","N3035US4" "Date","Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in U.S. Total Represented by the Price (%)"

349

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040ny2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040ny2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:41 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040NY2" "Date","New York Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 33253,0 33284,0 33312,1 33343,0 33373,0 33404,0 33434,0 33465,0 33496,0

350

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ma2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ma2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:29 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Massachusetts Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010MA2" "Date","Massachusetts Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,73471 25019,74919 25384,78451 25749,82646 26114,83434 26480,86171

351

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040mt2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040mt2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:39 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Montana Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040MT2" "Date","Montana Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 35079,32 35110,38 35139,34 35170,40 35200,43 35231,27 35261,63 35292,59 35323,60

352

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040us2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040us2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:45 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 13331,392528 13696,526159 14061,649106 14426,677311 14792,655967 15157,630212 15522,626782 15887,684115

353

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040mi2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040mi2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:38 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Michigan Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040MI2" "Date","Michigan Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 35079,277 35110,277 35139,277 35170,277 35200,277 35231,277 35261,277

354

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1997" Annual",2012,"6/30/1997" ,"Data 2","Futures Prices",4,"Annual",2012,"6/30/1993" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_pri_fut_s1_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_pri_fut_s1_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:13 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Spot Price" "Sourcekey","RNGWHHD","NGM_EPG0_PLC_NUS_DMMBTU" "Date","Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)","U.S. Natural Gas Liquid Composite Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"

355

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9012us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9012us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:55:55 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9012US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Oil Wells (MMcf)" 33253,475614 33526,500196 33984,513068 34015,462218

356

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040ne2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040ne2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:40 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Nebraska Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040NE2" "Date","Nebraska Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 33253,0 33284,0 33312,0 33343,0 33373,0 33404,0 33434,0 33465,0 33496,0

357

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040pa2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040pa2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:43 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Pennsylvania Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040PA2" "Date","Pennsylvania Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 33253,0 33284,0 33312,0 33343,0 33373,0 33404,0 33434,0 33465,0

358

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9050us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9050us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:57:04 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Marketed Production (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9050US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Marketed Production (MMcf)" 26679,1948000 26710,1962000 26738,1907000 26769,1814000 26799,1898000 26830,1839000

359

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

mbbl_a.xls" mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_crd_crpdn_adc_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/27/2013 9:07:23 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Crude Oil Production" "Sourcekey","MCRFPUS1","MCRFPP11","MCRFPFL1","MCRFPNY1","MCRFPPA1","MCRFPVA1","MCRFPWV1","MCRFPP21","MCRFPIL1","MCRFPIN1","MCRFPKS1","MCRFPKY1","MCRFP_SMI_1","MCRFPMO1","MCRFPNE1","MCRFPND1","MCRFPOH1","MCRFPOK1","MCRFPSD1","MCRFPTN1","MCRFPP31","MCRFPAL1","MCRFPAR1","MCRFPLA1","MCRFPMS1","MCRFPNM1","MCRFPTX1","MCRFP3FM1","MCRFPP41","MCRFPCO1","MCRFPMT1","MCRFPUT1","MCRFPWY1","MCRFPP51","MCRFPAK1","MCRFPAKS1","MANFPAK1","MCRFPAZ1","MCRFPCA1","MCRFPNV1","MCRFP5F1"

360

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020al2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020al2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:11 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Alabama (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3020AL2" "Date","Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Alabama (MMcf)"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water content" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9100us3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9100us3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/13/2013 3:53:51 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Price of U.S. Natural Gas Imports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N9100US3" "Date","Price of U.S. Natural Gas Imports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" 31228,3.21 31593,2.43 31958,1.95 32324,1.84

362

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","rngc1a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngc1a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:41 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","RNGC1" "Date","Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars per Million Btu)" 34515,1.934 34880,1.692 35246,2.502 35611,2.475 35976,2.156 36341,2.319

363

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9130us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9130us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/13/2013 2:23:23 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Exports (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9130US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Exports (MMcf)" 26679,5808 26710,6079 26738,4021 26769,8017 26799,8741 26830,4131 26860,5744 26891,8726 26922,6403 26952,5473

364

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ks3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ks3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:26 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kansas Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010KS3" "Date","Kansas Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

365

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040ca2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040ca2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:33 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: California Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040CA2" "Date","California Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 35079,97 35110,103 35139,109 35170,107 35200,107 35231,104 35261,108

366

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9103us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9103us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/13/2013 3:54:17 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9103US2" "Date","U.S. Liquefied Natural Gas Imports (MMcf)" 35445,9977 35476,7667 35504,2530 35535,2557 35565,5007 35596,5059 35626,5026 35657,7535

367

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040mt2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040mt2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:39 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Montana Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040MT2" "Date","Montana Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 24653,5022 25019,12551 25384,26458 25749,5203 26114,4917 26480,4222 26845,3691 27210,3901

368

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040tx2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040tx2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:44 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Texas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040TX2" "Date","Texas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 33253,2478 33284,2147 33312,2113 33343,2353 33373,3203 33404,2833 33434,3175

369

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9130us3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9130us3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/13/2013 2:23:24 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Price of U.S. Natural Gas Exports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N9130US3" "Date","Price of U.S. Natural Gas Exports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" 31228,4.77 31593,2.81 31958,3.07 32324,2.74

370

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040ny2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040ny2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:41 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040NY2" "Date","New York Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 24653,0 25019,0 25384,0 25749,0 26114,0 26480,0 26845,0 27210,0 27575,0 27941,0 28306,0 28671,0

371

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040ks2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040ks2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:35 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kansas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040KS2" "Date","Kansas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 24653,2630 25019,2529 25384,2666 25749,2713 26114,2669 26480,2681 26845,2377 27210,889 27575,846

372

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040ar2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040ar2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:32 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arkansas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040AR2" "Date","Arkansas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 33253,23 33284,13 33312,12 33343,7 33373,13 33404,28 33434,28 33465,30

373

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010de2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010de2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:15 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Delaware Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010DE2" "Date","Delaware Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,6844 25019,7068 25384,7475 25749,7843 26114,8172 26480,8358 26845,7514

374

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

mbblpd_a.xls" mbblpd_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_crd_crpdn_adc_mbblpd_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/27/2013 9:07:25 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Crude Oil Production" "Sourcekey","MCRFPUS2","MCRFPP12","MCRFPFL2","MCRFPNY2","MCRFPPA2","MCRFPVA2","MCRFPWV2","MCRFPP22","MCRFPIL2","MCRFPIN2","MCRFPKS2","MCRFPKY2","MCRFP_SMI_2","MCRFPMO2","MCRFPNE2","MCRFPND2","MCRFPOH2","MCRFPOK2","MCRFPSD2","MCRFPTN2","MCRFPP32","MCRFPAL2","MCRFPAR2","MCRFPLA2","MCRFPMS2","MCRFPNM2","MCRFPTX2","MCRFP3FM2","MCRFPP42","MCRFPCO2","MCRFPMT2","MCRFPUT2","MCRFPWY2","MCRFPP52","MCRFPAK2","MCRFPAKS2","MANFPAK2","MCRFPAZ2","MCRFPCA2","MCRFPNV2","MCRFP5F2"

375

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","ngm_epg0_fgc_sky_mmcfm.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/ngm_epg0_fgc_sky_mmcfm.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:59:11 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (MMcf) " "Sourcekey","NGM_EPG0_FGC_SKY_MMCF" "Date","Kentucky Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Coalbed Wells (MMcf) "

376

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020hi3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020hi3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:34 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Hawaii Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3020HI3" "Date","Hawaii Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

377

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

poe2_dcu_nus-z00_a.xls" poe2_dcu_nus-z00_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_move_poe2_dcu_nus-z00_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 6:58:44 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Total Exports " "Sourcekey","N9132US2","N9132US3","N9133US2","N9133US3" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Exports (MMcf)","Price of U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Exports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)","Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports (MMcf)","Price of Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

378

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040ms2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040ms2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:38 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Mississippi Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040MS2" "Date","Mississippi Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 24653,7098 25019,5910 25384,8097 25749,7233 26114,5090 26480,3672 26845,10767 27210,10787

379

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ok3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ok3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:50 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Oklahoma Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010OK3" "Date","Oklahoma Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

380

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010nd3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010nd3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:40 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: North Dakota Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010ND3" "Date","North Dakota Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water content" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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381

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040or2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040or2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:42 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Oregon Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040OR2" "Date","Oregon Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 35246 35611,0 35976,0 36341,0 36707,0 37072,0 37437,0 37802,0 38168,0 38533,0 38898,0 39263,0

382

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ky2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ky2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:27 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kentucky Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010KY2" "Date","Kentucky Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,69542 25019,75824 25384,83815 25749,86473 26114,84197 26480,85881

383

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9160us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9160us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:33:48 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9160US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Lease and Plant Fuel Consumption (MMcf)" 29235,93000 29266,87000 29295,93000 29326,85000

384

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9030us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9030us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:28 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9030US2" "Date","U.S. Nonhydrocarbon Gases Removed from Natural Gas (MMcf)" 26679 26710 26738 26769 26799 26830 26860 26891

385

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010mi3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010mi3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:33 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Michigan Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010MI3" "Date","Michigan Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

386

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9070us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9070us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:57:08 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Dry Natural Gas Production (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9070US2" "Date","U.S. Dry Natural Gas Production (MMcf)" 35445,1617923 35476,1465907 35504,1627602 35535,1551268 35565,1610527 35596,1525325

387

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9102us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9102us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/13/2013 3:53:55 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Imports (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9102US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Imports (MMcf)" 35445,268310 35476,232878 35504,254455 35535,235621 35565,236725 35596,227059 35626,230567

388

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010wy2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010wy2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:08 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Wyoming Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010WY2" "Date","Wyoming Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,11939 25019,12592 25384,16592 25749,17984 26114,19463 26480,22242 26845,13868

389

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020ak2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020ak2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:09 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Alaska (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3020AK2" "Date","Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Alaska (MMcf)"

390

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:00 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 26679,843900 26710,747331 26738,648504 26769,465867 26799,326313

391

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010mt2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010mt2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:38 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Montana Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010MT2" "Date","Montana Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,19756 25019,19711 25384,21463 25749,24794 26114,25379 26480,23787 26845,24923

392

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9103us3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9103us3m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/13/2013 3:54:18 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Price of U.S. Natural Gas LNG Imports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N9103US3" "Date","Price of U.S. Natural Gas LNG Imports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" 35445,3 35476,3

393

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9132us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9132us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/13/2013 2:23:27 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Exports (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9132US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Exports (MMcf)" 35445,6424 35476,6846 35504,10601 35535,8211 35565,6284 35596,5741 35626,6380 35657,10101

394

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3035us4m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3035us4m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:25:10 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in U.S. Total Represented by the Price (%)" "Sourcekey","N3035US4" "Date","Percent of Industrial Natural Gas Deliveries in U.S. Total Represented by the Price (%)"

395

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010wi3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010wi3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:06 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Wisconsin Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010WI3" "Date","Wisconsin Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

396

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040al2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040al2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:31 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alabama Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040AL2" "Date","Alabama Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 35079,194 35110,200 35139,140 35170,132 35200,106 35231,82 35261,205 35292,152

397

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040wv2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040wv2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:46 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: West Virginia Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040WV2" "Date","West Virginia Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 33253,0 33284,0 33312,0 33343,0 33373,0 33404,0 33434,0 33465,0

398

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1993" Monthly","9/2013","1/15/1993" ,"Release Date:","11/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","Last Week of December 2013" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_pnp_pct_dc_nus_pct_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_pnp_pct_dc_nus_pct_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:23:48 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Refinery Yield" "Sourcekey","MLRRYUS3","MGFRYUS3","MGARYUS3","MKJRYUS3","MKERYUS3","MDIRYUS3","MRERYUS3","MNFRYUS3","MOTRYUS3","MNSRYUS3","MLURYUS3","MWXRYUS3","MCKRYUS3","MAPRYUS3","MSGRYUS3","MMSRYUS3","MPGRYUS3"

399

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:23:36 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in the U.S. (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3020US2" "Date","Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in the U.S. (MMcf)"

400

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:45 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 26679 26710 26738 26769 26799 26830 26860 26891 26922 26952 26983 27013 27044 27075 27103

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water content" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","11/2013","1/15/1997" Monthly","11/2013","1/15/1997" ,"Data 2","Futures Prices",4,"Monthly","11/2013","12/15/1993" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_pri_fut_s1_m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_pri_fut_s1_m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:17 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Spot Price" "Sourcekey","RNGWHHD","NGM_EPG0_PLC_NUS_DMMBTU"

402

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010pa3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010pa3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:52 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Pennsylvania Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010PA3" "Date","Pennsylvania Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

403

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ut3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ut3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:02 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Utah Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010UT3" "Date","Utah Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

404

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010dc2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010dc2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:13 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: District of Columbia Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010DC2" "Date","District of Columbia Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 29402,13730 29767,13686 30132,13041 30497,13007

405

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010tx3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010tx3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:00 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Texas Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010TX3" "Date","Texas Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

406

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012,"6/30/1993" Annual",2012,"6/30/1993" ,"Release Date:","9/27/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","9/26/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","pet_stoc_typ_d_nus_skn_mbbl_a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/pet_stoc_typ_d_nus_skn_mbbl_a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"11/25/2013 11:41:29 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Processing Plant " "Sourcekey","MAOSNUS1","MPPSNUS1","MLPSNUS1","METSNUS1","MPRSNUS1","MBNSNUS1","MBISNUS1"

407

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040az2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040az2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:32 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arizona Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040AZ2" "Date","Arizona Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 26114,347 26480,367 26845,277 27210,26 27575,47 27941,32 29036,101 29402,143 29767,106 30132,162

408

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020ca3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020ca3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:20 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: California Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3020CA3" "Date","California Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

409

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010oh3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010oh3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:49 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Ohio Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010OH3" "Date","Ohio Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

410

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020fl3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020fl3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:30 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Florida Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3020FL3" "Date","Florida Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

411

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040ks2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040ks2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:36 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kansas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040KS2" "Date","Kansas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 35079,63 35110,63 35139,63 35170,61 35200,62 35231,57 35261,57 35292,55 35323,56

412

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040nv2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040nv2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:41 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Nevada Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040NV2" "Date","Nevada Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 33253,0 33284,0 33312,0 33343,0 33373,0 33404,0 33434,0 33465,0 33496,0 33526,0

413

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040ms2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040ms2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:38 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Mississippi Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040MS2" "Date","Mississippi Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 35079,217 35110,199 35139,223 35170,219 35200,237 35231,234 35261,239

414

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9103us3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9103us3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/13/2013 3:54:18 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Price of U.S. Natural Gas LNG Imports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N9103US3" "Date","Price of U.S. Natural Gas LNG Imports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" 31228,4.6 31593,4.62 32324,2.71

415

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9130us3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9130us3m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/13/2013 2:23:24 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Price of U.S. Natural Gas Exports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N9130US3" "Date","Price of U.S. Natural Gas Exports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" 32523,2.69 32554,2.4

416

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040tx2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040tx2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:44 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Texas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040TX2" "Date","Texas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 24653,129403 25019,124584 25384,111499 25749,100305 26114,70222 26480,59821 26845,36133 27210,34431

417

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010al2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010al2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:07 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alabama Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010AL2" "Date","Alabama Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,45543 25019,51708 25384,54804 25749,55779 26114,54867 26480,53397 26845,55685

418

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010mi2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010mi2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:33 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Michigan Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010MI2" "Date","Michigan Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,302472 25019,315694 25384,333264 25749,340033 26114,343773 26480,355266

419

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010co3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010co3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:12 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Colorado Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010CO3" "Date","Colorado Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

420

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010wa3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010wa3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:05 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Washington Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010WA3" "Date","Washington Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water content" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ak2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ak2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:05 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alaska Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010AK2" "Date","Alaska Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,1958 25019,2293 25384,4573 25749,6211 26114,6893 26480,8394 26845,5024

422

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ar2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ar2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:08 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arkansas Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010AR2" "Date","Arkansas Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,52777 25019,56346 25384,58322 25749,59792 26114,48737 26480,47387

423

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2010 Annual",2010 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040ok2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040ok2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:42 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Oklahoma Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040OK2" "Date","Oklahoma Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 24653,126629 25019,129408 25384,130766 25749,129629 26114,39799 26480,38797 26845,36411

424

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020us4m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020us4m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:23:38 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in U.S. Total Represented by the Price (%)" "Sourcekey","N3020US4" "Date","Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in U.S. Total Represented by the Price (%)"

425

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ak3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ak3m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:06 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alaska Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010AK3" "Date","Alaska Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

426

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ca3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ca3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:11 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: California Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010CA3" "Date","California Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

427

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040la2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040la2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:37 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Louisiana Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040LA2" "Date","Louisiana Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 33253,1788 33284,1684 33312,1571 33343,1593 33373,1807 33404,1690 33434,2042

428

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040tn2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040tn2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:44 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Tennessee Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040TN2" "Date","Tennessee Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 33253,0 33284,0 33312,0 33343,0 33373,0 33404,0 33434,0 33465,0 33496,0

429

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010wi2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010wi2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:06 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Wisconsin Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010WI2" "Date","Wisconsin Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,90994 25019,93425 25384,101124 25749,105208 26114,109758 26480,104648

430

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020us4a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020us4a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:23:38 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in U.S. Total Represented by the Price (%)" "Sourcekey","N3020US4" "Date","Percent of Commercial Natural Gas Deliveries in U.S. Total Represented by the Price (%)"

431

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010nh3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010nh3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:43 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Hampshire Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010NH3" "Date","New Hampshire Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

432

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010in2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010in2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:24 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Indiana Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010IN2" "Date","Indiana Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,139519 25019,145955 25384,156699 25749,158699 26114,162747 26480,169267

433

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020ct3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020ct3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:23 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Connecticut Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3020CT3" "Date","Connecticut Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

434

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010mo3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010mo3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:36 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Missouri Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010MO3" "Date","Missouri Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

435

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040la2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040la2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:36 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Louisiana Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040LA2" "Date","Louisiana Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 24653,161849 25019,166439 25384,158852 25749,154089 26114,103564 26480,63667 26845,102091

436

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040ut2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040ut2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:46 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Utah Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040UT2" "Date","Utah Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 34592,646 34834,696 34865,4590 34895,4767 34926,4382 34957,4389 34987,4603 35018,4932

437

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010az2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010az2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:09 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arizona Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010AZ2" "Date","Arizona Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,25376 25019,26681 25384,28426 25749,29679 26114,32619 26480,34259 26845,36280

438

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ak3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ak3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:06 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alaska Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010AK3" "Date","Alaska Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

439

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9132us3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9132us3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/13/2013 2:23:27 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Price of U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Exports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N9132US3" "Date","Price of U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline Exports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" 31228,3.92 31593,2.35

440

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010id3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010id3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:23 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Idaho Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010ID3" "Date","Idaho Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water content" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010me2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010me2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:32 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Maine Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010ME2" "Date","Maine Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,3967 25019,3571 25384,4910 25749,5247 26114,5591 26480,6036 26845,6027 27210,6174

442

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ne3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ne3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:42 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Nebraska Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010NE3" "Date","Nebraska Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

443

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040wy2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040wy2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:47 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Wyoming Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040WY2" "Date","Wyoming Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 24653,1498 25019,13038 25384,17632 25749,18419 26114,3860 26480,8376 26845,6618 27210,6102

444

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010mn3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010mn3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:34 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Minnesota Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010MN3" "Date","Minnesota Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

445

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ca2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ca2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:10 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: California Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010CA2" "Date","California Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,522122 25019,517636 25384,562127 25749,552544 26114,630998 26480,637289

446

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040sd2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040sd2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:43 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: South Dakota Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040SD2" "Date","South Dakota Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 33253,384 33284,350 33312,382 33343,380 33373,382 33404,376 33434,405

447

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040nm2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040nm2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:41 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New Mexico Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040NM2" "Date","New Mexico Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 35079,236 35110,220 35139,240 35170,230 35200,241 35231,229 35261,217

448

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010co2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010co2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:11 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Colorado Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010CO2" "Date","Colorado Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,75351 25019,78371 25384,81068 25749,82595 26114,84864 26480,89187

449

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Daily","12/17/2013" Daily","12/17/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","rngc2d.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngc2d.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:40 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Futures Contract 2 (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","RNGC2" "Date","Natural Gas Futures Contract 2 (Dollars per Million Btu)" 34346,2.13 34347,2.072 34348,2.139 34351,2.196 34352,2.131

450

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ar3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ar3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:08 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arkansas Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010AR3" "Date","Arkansas Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

451

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040mo2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040mo2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:38 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Missouri Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040MO2" "Date","Missouri Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 33253,0 33284,0 33312,0 33343,0 33373,0 33404,0 33434,0 33465,0 33496,0

452

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Daily","12/17/2013" Daily","12/17/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","rngc4d.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngc4d.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:29 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Futures Contract 4 (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","RNGC4" "Date","Natural Gas Futures Contract 4 (Dollars per Million Btu)" 34323,1.894 34324,1.83 34325,1.859 34326,1.895 34330,1.965

453

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9010us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9010us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:55:17 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9010US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals (MMcf)" 26679 26710 26738 26769 26799 26830 26860 26891 26922 26952 26983 27013 27044 27075 27103

454

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040ut2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040ut2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:45 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Utah Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040UT2" "Date","Utah Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 24653,3000 25019,2906 25384,2802 25749,2852 26114,2926 26480,5506 26845,7664 27210,5259 27575,1806

455

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ak2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ak2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:06 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alaska Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010AK2" "Date","Alaska Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 32523,1793 32554,2148 32582,1566 32613,1223 32643,858 32674,638

456

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040nd2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040nd2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:39 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: North Dakota Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040ND2" "Date","North Dakota Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 24653,25795 25019,22050 25384,22955 25749,19862 26114,2686 26480,20786 26845,22533

457

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010al3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010al3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:07 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Alabama Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010AL3" "Date","Alabama Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

458

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ar3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ar3m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:09 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arkansas Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010AR3" "Date","Arkansas Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

459

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010va2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010va2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:02 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Virginia Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010VA2" "Date","Virginia Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,41495 25019,43582 25384,46663 25749,49554 26114,49488 26480,55427

460

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040co2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040co2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:33 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Colorado Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040CO2" "Date","Colorado Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 35079,112 35110,77 35139,78 35170,91 35200,100 35231,89 35261,100 35292,106

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water content" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ga2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ga2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:17 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Georgia Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010GA2" "Date","Georgia Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,80322 25019,84072 25384,87878 25749,87359 26114,88319 26480,85256 26845,86191

462

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020hi2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020hi2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:33 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Hawaii (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3020HI2" "Date","Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Hawaii (MMcf)"

463

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020ga2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020ga2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:31 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Georgia (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3020GA2" "Date","Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Georgia (MMcf)"

464

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020ar2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020ar2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:14 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Arkansas (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3020AR2" "Date","Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Arkansas (MMcf)"

465

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ct2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ct2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:12 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Connecticut Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010CT2" "Date","Connecticut Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,26177 25019,26437 25384,29048 25749,31187 26114,31878 26480,32879

466

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010dc3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010dc3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:14 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: District of Columbia Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010DC3" "Date","District of Columbia Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

467

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ri3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ri3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:54 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Rhode Island Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010RI3" "Date","Rhode Island Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

468

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010sd3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010sd3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:56 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: South Dakota Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010SD3" "Date","South Dakota Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

469

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020de2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020de2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:26 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Delaware (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3020DE2" "Date","Natural Gas Deliveries to Commercial Consumers (Including Vehicle Fuel through 1996) in Delaware (MMcf)"

470

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010tn3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010tn3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:58 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Tennessee Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010TN3" "Date","Tennessee Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

471

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ny3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ny3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:48 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: New York Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010NY3" "Date","New York Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

472

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010or2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010or2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:51 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Oregon Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010OR2" "Date","Oregon Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,13427 25019,15126 25384,20507 25749,19742 26114,21217 26480,23331 26845,22271

473

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9140us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9140us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:33:47 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9140US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Total Consumption (MMcf)" 36906,2676998 36937,2309464 36965,2246633 36996,1807170 37026,1522382 37057,1444378

474

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Daily","12/17/2013" Daily","12/17/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","rngc1d.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/rngc1d.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:45 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars per Million Btu)" "Sourcekey","RNGC1" "Date","Natural Gas Futures Contract 1 (Dollars per Million Btu)" 34347,2.194 34348,2.268 34351,2.36 34352,2.318 34353,2.252

475

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010fl3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010fl3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:16 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Florida Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010FL3" "Date","Florida Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

476

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3035us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3035us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:25:08 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3035US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Industrial Consumption (MMcf)" 36906,686540 36937,640026 36965,664918 36996,622054 37026,576532 37057,536820

477

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040fl2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040fl2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:34 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Florida Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040FL2" "Date","Florida Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 26114,355 26480,284 27941,837 28306,607 29402,677 29767,428 30132,435 30497,198 30863,34

478

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ok2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ok2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:50 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Oklahoma Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010OK2" "Date","Oklahoma Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,67395 25019,74782 25384,75310 25749,77460 26114,75238 26480,77608

479

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040ar2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040ar2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:31 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Arkansas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9040AR2" "Date","Arkansas Natural Gas Vented and Flared (MMcf)" 24653,997 25019,895 25384,1326 25749,226 26114,1734 26480,2649 26845,1947 27210,1716 27575,1318

480

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010me3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010me3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:32 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Maine Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010ME3" "Date","Maine Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "ice water content" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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481

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3060us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3060us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:27:25 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in the U.S. (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3060US2" "Date","Natural Gas Delivered to Consumers in the U.S. (MMcf)" 36906,2505011 36937,2156873 36965,2086568 36996,1663832

482

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010us2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010us2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:00 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 11139,295700 11504,294406 11870,298520 12235,283197 12600,288236 12965,313498 13331,343346

483

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010in3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010in3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:25 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Indiana Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010IN3" "Date","Indiana Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

484

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9011us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9011us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:55:36 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9011US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Gross Withdrawals from Gas Wells (MMcf)" 33253,1482053 33526,1363737 33984,1452098 34015,1305490

485

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020us3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020us3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:23:37 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3020US3" "Date","U.S. Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

486

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010nv3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010nv3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:46 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Nevada Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010NV3" "Date","Nevada Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

487

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9133us3m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9133us3m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/13/2013 2:23:31 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Price of Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N9133US3" "Date","Price of Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

488

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010sc3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010sc3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:55 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: South Carolina Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010SC3" "Date","South Carolina Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

489

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010vt2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010vt2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:03 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Vermont Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010VT2" "Date","Vermont Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 29402,1301 29767,1290 30132,1278 30497,1252 30863,1352 31228,1456 31593,1595

490

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Weekly","12/13/2013","1/10/1997" Weekly","12/13/2013","1/10/1997" ,"Data 2","Futures Prices",4,"Weekly","12/13/2013","12/24/1993" ,"Release Date:","12/18/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","12/27/2013" ,"Excel File Name:","ng_pri_fut_s1_w.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://www.eia.gov/dnav/ng/ng_pri_fut_s1_w.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/18/2013 12:22:18 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Spot Price" "Sourcekey","RNGWHHD" "Date","Weekly Henry Hub Natural Gas Spot Price (Dollars per Million Btu)"

491

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9040in2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9040in2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/19/2013 6:56:35 AM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Indiana Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N9040IN2" "Date","Indiana Natural Gas Vented and Flared (Million Cubic Feet)" 33253,0 33284,0 33312,0 33343,0 33373,0

492

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3020ga3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3020ga3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:22:32 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Georgia Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3020GA3" "Date","Georgia Price of Natural Gas Sold to Commercial Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

493

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010hi3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010hi3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:20 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Hawaii Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010HI3" "Date","Hawaii Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

494

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ks2a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ks2a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:26 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Kansas Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N3010KS2" "Date","Kansas Natural Gas Residential Consumption (MMcf)" 24653,84912 25019,89372 25384,94320 25749,97317 26114,98644 26480,100720 26845,96468

495

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9100us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9100us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/13/2013 3:53:50 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Imports (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9100US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Imports (MMcf)" 26679,92694 26710,83870 26738,91581 26769,88407 26799,85844 26830,79121 26860,79428 26891,84400 26922,81157

496

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ga3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ga3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:18 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Georgia Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010GA3" "Date","Georgia Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"

497

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9133us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9133us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/13/2013 2:23:31 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9133US2" "Date","Liquefied U.S. Natural Gas Exports (MMcf)" 35445,5604 35476,5596 35504,5675 35535,5660 35565,3812 35596,3786 35626,3756 35657,7532

498

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Monthly","9/2013" Monthly","9/2013" ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n9170us2m.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n9170us2m.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:33:48 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline & Distribution Use (MMcf)" "Sourcekey","N9170US2" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas Pipeline & Distribution Use (MMcf)" 36906,76386 36937,65770 36965,63626 36996,50736

499

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","na1504_nus_4a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/na1504_nus_4a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:46:13 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: U.S. Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (%)" "Sourcekey","NA1504_NUS_4" "Date","U.S. Natural Gas % of Total Residential - Sales (%)" 32689,99.9 33054,99.2 33419,99.2 33785,99.1 34150,99.1 34515,99.1

500

Workbook Contents  

U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA) Indexed Site

Annual",2012 Annual",2012 ,"Release Date:","12/12/2013" ,"Next Release Date:","1/7/2014" ,"Excel File Name:","n3010ct3a.xls" ,"Available from Web Page:","http://tonto.eia.gov/dnav/ng/hist/n3010ct3a.htm" ,"Source:","Energy Information Administration" ,"For Help, Contact:","infoctr@eia.doe.gov" ,,"(202) 586-8800",,,"12/12/2013 5:21:13 PM" "Back to Contents","Data 1: Connecticut Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)" "Sourcekey","N3010CT3" "Date","Connecticut Price of Natural Gas Delivered to Residential Consumers (Dollars per Thousand Cubic Feet)"