Sample records for ibm websphere sensor

  1. V-054: IBM WebSphere Application Server for z/OS Arbitrary Command...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    4: IBM WebSphere Application Server for zOS Arbitrary Command Execution Vulnerability V-054: IBM WebSphere Application Server for zOS Arbitrary Command Execution Vulnerability...

  2. V-054: IBM WebSphere Application Server for z/OS Arbitrary Command Execution Vulnerability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A vulnerability was reported in the IBM HTTP Server component 5.3 in IBM WebSphere Application Server (WAS) for z/OS

  3. T-722: IBM WebSphere Commerce Edition Input Validation Holes...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    the IBM WebSphere software, access data recently submitted by the target user via web form to the site, or take actions on the site acting as the target user. reference...

  4. IBM Software Services for WebSphere GetStarted with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in modeling concepts and methods, as well as offer hands- on experience modeling business processes with WebSphere Business Modeler. We are highly proficient in translating process models into executable business processes and installing WebSphere Process Server and WebSphere Business Modeler in a sandbox environment. Additionally

  5. Static and dynamic relationships in WebSphere Process Server and WebSphere ESB V7

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Static and dynamic relationships in WebSphere Process Server and WebSphere ESB V7 Using@uk.ibm.com) z/OS SVT Team Lead IBM 15 Sep 2010 Learn how to build mediation flows containing static and dynamic. Example scenario Static and dynamic relationships in WebSphere Process Server and WebSphere ESB V7

  6. IBM Software Services for WebSphere IBMGetStarted with Service Oriented

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and best practices expertise for accessing resources on an on-demand business. Engage the experts - teamSeries project. In addition to the benefits of having subject matter experts at your team's side, the following your requirements #12;© IBM Corporation 2006, All rights reserved. IBM Corporation Route 100, Building

  7. U-186: IBM WebSphere Sensor Events Multiple Vulnerabilities | Department of

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from theDepartment of EnergyTheDepartment of

  8. U-181: IBM WebSphere Application Server Information Disclosure...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    this vulnerability using unspecified attack vectors to inject script in a victim's web browser within the security context of the hosting Web site. Impact: Exposure of...

  9. U-181: IBM WebSphere Application Server Information Disclosure

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of Inspector GeneralDepartment of EnergyofProject is on Track | Department ofLLCU-023: Debian||Vulnerability |

  10. IBM Research Zurich 2010 IBM Corporation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    &D Budget>6 B $ #12;ETH PolyVortrag 2010 Jana Koehler5 IBM Research ­ Zurich © 2010 IBM Corporation IBM - Zurich #12;ETH PolyVortrag 2010 Jana Koehler8 IBM Research ­ Zurich © 2010 IBM Corporation Math;ETH PolyVortrag 2010 Jana Koehler9 IBM Research ­ Zurich © 2010 IBM Corporation Selected Projects #12

  11. T-722: IBM WebSphere Commerce Edition Input Validation Holes Permit

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:YearRound-Up from the GridwiseSiteDepartmentChallengeCompliance7/109 TORNADO46: Debianupdate

  12. IBM Research -Haifa 2012 IBM Corporation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shapiro, Benjamin

    and Optimization Michael Masin IBM Research - Haifa Henry Broodney, Lev Greenberg, Nir Mashkif, Lior Limonad, Aviad

  13. 2012 IBM Corporation IBM operates in 170

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Raja, Anita

    Smart traffic systems Smart water management Smart energy grids Smart healthcare Smart food systems cities Smart retail Making the worlds systems smarter depends on data and analytics #12; 2012 IBM Intelligent oil field technologies Smart regions Smart weather Smart countries Smart supply chains Smart

  14. IBM and Johnson Controls Integrated

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IBM and Johnson Controls Integrated Smarter Building Solution IBM and Johnson Controls make it simpler to reduce energy and operational costs while reducing greenhouse emissions. IBM and Johnson and more. IBM and Johnson Controls work with you to identify high-priority energy consumption areas

  15. IBM Podcast MATHENY: Welcome to this IBM podcast, product and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and industry marketing, and Pierre Coyne, market manager for integrated service management solutions. They'll discuss how IBM is helping our clients #12;-2- develop, build and manage intelligent instrumented-1- [ MUSIC ] IBM Podcast MATHENY: Welcome to this IBM podcast, product and service innovation. I

  16. IBM Research Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-03-02T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 20, 2009 ... An Efficient Decomposition Algorithm for Static, Stochastic, ... Business Analytics & Mathematical Sciences, IBM Research. 1101 ... such as resource planning, capacity allocation, portfolio analysis, etc. ... bound imposed upon the risk measure for modeling the maximum acceptable risk that one is willing.

  17. IBM RESEARCH ZURICH IBM Research Zurich is one of nine IBM research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of a strategic part- nership in nanotechnology with ETH Zurich, one of Europe's premier technical universitiesIBM RESEARCH ­ ZURICH IBM Research ­ Zurich is one of nine IBM research laboratories around the globe. The Zurich laboratory was established in 1956. Cutting-edge research and outstanding scientific

  18. IBM Systems and Technology Electronics IBM CMOS 7HV for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    companies can significantly improve these metrics today by using IBM technology in smart solar- panel to improve effi- ciency, cost per kilowatt and reliability of solar modules IBM CMOS 7HV is the industry, cost per kilowatt and reliability of solar modules. While this research is critical, photovoltaics

  19. IBM's pragmatic embrace of open source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Samuelson, P

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    as a consequence of changed business models in the softwareMicrosoft in OS markets. BUSINESS MODELS STORY Software wasof IBMs initial business model. IBM initially developed

  20. IBM Software Design and development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Balmelli, Laurent

    IBM Software Design and development Thought Leadership White Paper Disciplined Agile Delivery software development paradigm. This trend is also echoed in other industry studies, including one con expensive and risky. It is time for a new genera- tion of agile process framework. #12;3IBM Software Here

  1. V-132: IBM Tivoli System Automation Application Manager Multiple...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    IBM has acknowledged multiple vulnerabilities in IBM Tivoli System Automation Application Manager PLATFORM: The vulnerabilities are reported in IBM Tivoli System Automation...

  2. ibm.com/redbooks Front cover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Westall, James M.

    ibm.com/redbooks Front cover IBM XIV Storage System: Architecture, Implementation, and Usage Organization IBM XIV Storage System: Architecture, Implementation, and Usage September 2009 SG24-7659-01 #12 Storage System software. Note: Before using this information and the product it supports, read

  3. E-Print Network 3.0 - assist global training Sample Search Results

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Robert G.- Department of Mechanical Engineering, Ohio State University Collection: Engineering 3 IBM Software Services for WebSphere IBM Globalization Software Services...

  4. How to port from IBM AIX to IBM z/OS Skill Level: Intermediate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    How to port from IBM AIX to IBM z/OS Skill Level: Intermediate Rajan Bhakta (rbhakta This article discusses possible issues that you may encounter when you port XL C/C++ applications from the IBM performance for the application on the z/OS platform after the porting is completed. Porting applications from

  5. Defend your data with broader, deeper server protection IBM ISS Threat Mitigation Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    protection delivers multilayered intrusion preven- tion and detection to help protect your servers from of attacks, including those tunneling through encrypted Web transactions Combines multiple inspection® Server Intrusion Prevention System (IPS) and IBM RealSecure® Server Sensor. Each supports a broad range

  6. IBM Software Solution Brief Safeguarding the cloud

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IBM Software Solution Brief Safeguarding the cloud with IBM Security solutions Maintain visibility and control with proven security solutions for public, private and hybrid clouds Highlights Address cloud internal and external users, data, applications and workloads as they move to and from the cloud Regain

  7. New ALS Technique Guides IBM in Next-Generation Semiconductor...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    New ALS Technique Guides IBM in Next-Generation Semiconductor Development New ALS Technique Guides IBM in Next-Generation Semiconductor Development Print Wednesday, 21 January 2015...

  8. V-122: IBM Tivoli Application Dependency Discovery Manager Java...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Tivoli Application Dependency Discovery Manager Java Multiple Vulnerabilities March 29, 2013 - 6:00am Addthis PROBLEM: IBM has acknowledged multiple vulnerabilities in IBM Tivoli...

  9. V-205: IBM Tivoli System Automation for Multiplatforms Java Multiple...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    5: IBM Tivoli System Automation for Multiplatforms Java Multiple Vulnerabilities V-205: IBM Tivoli System Automation for Multiplatforms Java Multiple Vulnerabilities July 29, 2013...

  10. Integrated Building Management System (IBMS)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anita Lewis

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project provides a combination of software and services that more easily and cost-effectively help to achieve optimized building performance and energy efficiency. Featuring an open-platform, cloud- hosted application suite and an intuitive user experience, this solution simplifies a traditionally very complex process by collecting data from disparate building systems and creating a single, integrated view of building and system performance. The Fault Detection and Diagnostics algorithms developed within the IBMS have been designed and tested as an integrated component of the control algorithms running the equipment being monitored. The algorithms identify the normal control behaviors of the equipment without interfering with the equipment control sequences. The algorithms also work without interfering with any cooperative control sequences operating between different pieces of equipment or building systems. In this manner the FDD algorithms create an integrated building management system.

  11. IBM Systems Director VMControl Installation and User's Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IBM Systems Director VMControl Installation and User's Guide Version 2 Release 2 #12;#12;IBM Systems Director VMControl Installation and User's Guide Version 2 Release 2 #12;ii IBM Systems Director read this book . . . . . . . . . 1 Conventions and terminology . . . . . . . . 1 Chapter 2. IBM Systems

  12. IBM and Energy Efficiency: Energy Managemnt Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Veilleux, Y.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    IBM and Energy Efficiency Energy management systems IBM has a long standing commitment for the Environment and energy efficiency. An environmental policy has been in place for over 40 years and the corporation is certified to both the ISO... 14001 and ISO 50001 standards. The outcome of these commitments has been outstanding results in various spheres of activity related to environmental management and energy efficiency. At the root of our success is the corporate commitment to Energy...

  13. E-Print Network 3.0 - architecture team project Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    with IBM WebSphere lab services Our skilled consultants... will propel your Service Oriented Architecture project into full swing. Highlight Services Solution Our... deployment...

  14. IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager Installation and User's Guide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager Installation and User's Guide Version 4.3 #12;#12;IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager Installation and User's Guide Version 4.3 #12;ii IBM Systems Director Active Energy Manager: Installation and User's Guide #12;About this book This book provides

  15. IBM Research -Ireland Polynomial Optimisation in Power Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    energy production: 17314000 MWh in 2009 · Production costs at $30 per MWh: $519B/year · Now: 80.9 %, fromIBM Research - Ireland Polynomial Optimisation in Power Systems at IBM Research Jakub Marecek Relaxations 4 Extensions #12;IBM Research - Ireland Optimisation in Power Systems: Motivation · World gross

  16. Norwich Union Life Case Study IBM Global Business Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ,ProfessionalDevelopmentand Practices - InfusedIBMpractitionerstodrive sustainability - SupportedbyatransformationalchangeNorwich Union Life Case Study IBM Global Business Services Aviva is the world's sixth approach to the problem and was one that appealed to NUL. Overview Leveraging the IBM Practice Model IBM

  17. IBM Global Technology Services January 2008

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IBM Global Technology Services January 2008 How service-oriented architecture (SOA) impacts your IT infrastructure Satisfying the demands of dynamic business processes #12;How service-oriented architecture (SOA service-oriented architecture (SOA) and how it holds the promises of quicker response to market trends

  18. IBM Global Business Services Executive Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -based strategic insights for senior executives around critical public and private sector issues. This executive perspectives Creating new business models for a changing world of energy Energy and Utilities #12;IBM Institute to facilitate not only traditional energy generation and delivery, but also emerging products and services

  19. Petascale Debugging via Allinea DDT for IBM Blue Gene /P

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kemner, Ken

    Petascale Debugging via Allinea DDT for IBM Blue Gene /P and IBM Blue Gene /Q Ian Lumb petascaling Allinea DDT Petascaling Allinea DDT for IBM Blue Gene /x Getting Started with Allinea DDT #12;0 50,000 100,000 150,000 200,000 0 0.02 0.04 0.06 0.08 0.1 0.12 DDT 3.0 Performance Figures Jaguar Cray

  20. V-047: IBM Lotus Foundation Multiple Cross Site Scripting | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    the malicious data is being viewed. 2) An error exists within the bundled version of PHP. IMPACT: Two vulnerabilities have been reported in IBM Lotus Foundations Start, which...

  1. IBM Research -ChinaIBM Research China Internet-of-Things for Sustainability of Mega Cities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ge, Zigang

    people, physical objects and IT systems, supported by scalable and affordable technologies, to better Corporation Process efficiency, automation and control #12;Case: System Coordination of Traffic, Water Pipe and LogisticsCase: System Coordination of Traffic, Water Pipe and Logistics © 2010 IBM Corporation #12;

  2. IBM Probes Material Capabilities at the ALS

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuidedCH2MLLCBasics HydropowerI/O LibraryIACTDirectionsIBM

  3. IBM References | Argonne Leadership Computing Facility

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickr FlickrGuidedCH2MLLCBasics HydropowerI/O LibraryIACTDirectionsIBM

  4. GUIDO BARTELS General Manager Global Energy & Utilities Industry, IBM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy Inc., a U.S. based publicly-traded, green energy technology company. Bartels is a frequent speakerGUIDO BARTELS General Manager Global Energy & Utilities Industry, IBM Chairman, Global Smart Grid Federation Board Member and Former Chairman, GridWise Alliance Guido Bartels heads up IBM's energy

  5. IBM Global Services A Strategic Approach to Protecting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IBM Global Services July 2007 A Strategic Approach to Protecting SCADA and Process Control Systems 2007 IBM Internet Security Systems, Inc. #12;A Strategic Approach to Protecting SCADA and Process Control Systems Page No.2 Abstract This document provides an overview of the security weaknesses present

  6. IBM Web Security -Overview Animation With more instrumentation, interconnections

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , IBM enables you to not only protect your existing web applications and backend databases, but also, there is the IBM Proventia family of network and host solutions, for real-time ahead of the threat protection at risk, which can lead to identity theft and fraud. #12;Our changing technological landscape demands new

  7. Energy Usage Attitudes of Urban India IBM Research India

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toronto, University of

    Energy Usage Attitudes of Urban India Mohit Jain IBM Research India mohitjain@in.ibm.com Deepika@cs.cmu.edu Amarjeet Singh IIIT Delhi, India amarjeet@iiitd.ac.in Abstract-- Though rapid increase in energy factors affecting energy consumption in urban India. However, the small numbers of participants in those

  8. Apprenticeship at the IBM Almaden Research Center A. V. Joura

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Freericks, Jim

    gained by researchers in creating new products and in improving existing IBM products is what" business. Starting with tabulators in 1911 (that time they were sold by a company called CTR, T. J. Watson in this new computer business. IBM was also a leader in many computer-related areas like storage devices

  9. V-011: IBM Tivoli Monitoring Web Server HTTP TRACE/TRACK Support...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    1: IBM Tivoli Monitoring Web Server HTTP TRACETRACK Support Lets Remote Users Obtain Potentially Sensitive Information V-011: IBM Tivoli Monitoring Web Server HTTP TRACETRACK...

  10. IBM/VAX Gateway user's guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rosenthal, E.

    1989-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ''Gateway User Guide'' describes the facility available for transferring files from the Data Processing Services IBM mainframe to the Computer Services VAX/VMS cluster. This guide will benefit both Data Processing Operations Staff and programmers who would like to know more about how the ''Gateway'' operates and how to take advantage of its capabilities. The main focus of discussion will be on ''how to'' after a brief overview of the hardware and software components. A special section concerning the IBMRJE login shows how to use the VAX/VMS system to advantage. Source codes for all the procedures and DCL programs is provided at the end, as well as references made in this document to other sources. This first section of document will present a hardware and software overview of the current configuration.

  11. IBM: Building the IT Function for a Global Business

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Woerner, Stephanie L.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In 1993, CEO Louis Gerstner initiated a transformation at IBM that Sam Palmisano continued when he took the reins in 2003. The transformation involved a change from a hardware and software business to a solutions and ...

  12. V-145: IBM Tivoli Federated Identity Manager Products Java Multiple...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Secunia Advisory SA53233 CVE-2013-0169 CVE-2013-0440 CVE-2013-0443 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: CVE-2013-0440 - Unspecified vulnerability in IBM Java Runtime...

  13. IBM Lecture Series on Service Quality May 19, 2010

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Glushko, Robert J.

    IBM Lecture Series on Service Quality May 19, 2010 Two New Perspectives for Service System Design at design time or run time, whether it is coarse-grained or fine-grained, and whether it is partial or total

  14. Page 1 of 11 The Value of IBM's DB2 Utilities and Tools in 2011 The Value of IBM's DB2 Utilities and Tools in 2011

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Page 1 of 11 The Value of IBM's DB2 Utilities and Tools in 2011 The Value of IBM's DB2 Utilities The Value of IBM's DB2 Utilities and Tools in 2011 Table of Contents I. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY.................................................................................... 5 IV. UTILITY PERFORMANCE AND TOTAL COST OF OWNERSHIP

  15. IBM Software Group Whitepaper The Social Business

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to people themselves. Instrumentation, in the form of smartphones, has put unprecedented power literally) everything is becoming instrumented with sensors and computational power; 2) the world is becoming systems that people rely on cities, energy grids, food distribution chains, healthcare networks, banking

  16. Generalized Information Architecture for Managing Requirements in IBM?s Rational DOORS(r) Application.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Aragon, Kathryn M.; Eaton, Shelley M.; McCornack, Marjorie T.; Shannon, Sharon A.

    2014-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    When a requirements engineering effort fails to meet expectations, often times the requirements management tool is blamed. Working with numerous project teams at Sandia National Laboratories over the last fifteen years has shown us that the tool is rarely the culprit; usually it is the lack of a viable information architecture with well- designed processes to support requirements engineering. This document illustrates design concepts with rationale, as well as a proven information architecture to structure and manage information in support of requirements engineering activities for any size or type of project. This generalized information architecture is specific to IBM's Rational DOORS (Dynamic Object Oriented Requirements System) software application, which is the requirements management tool in Sandia's CEE (Common Engineering Environment). This generalized information architecture can be used as presented or as a foundation for designing a tailored information architecture for project-specific needs. It may also be tailored for another software tool. Version 1.0 4 November 201

  17. IBM NJE protocol emulator for VAX/VMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Engert, D.E.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Communications software has been written at Argonne National Laboratory to enable a VAX/VMS system to participate as an end-node in a standard IBM network by emulating the Network Job Entry (NJE) protocol. NJE is actually a collection of programs that support job networking for the operating systems used on most large IBM-compatible computers (e.g., VM/370, MVS with JES2 or JES3, SVS, MVT with ASP or HASP). Files received by the VAX can be printed or saved in user-selected disk files. Files sent to the network can be routed to any node in the network for printing, punching, or job submission, as well as to a VM/370 user's virtual reader. Files sent from the VAX are queued and transmitted asynchronously to allow users to perform other work while files are awaiting transmission. No changes are required to the IBM software.

  18. V-229: IBM Lotus iNotes Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross-Site...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    9: IBM Lotus iNotes Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross-Site Scripting Attacks V-229: IBM Lotus iNotes Input Validation Flaws Permit Cross-Site Scripting Attacks August 28, 2013 -...

  19. BPM Voices: Get social with IBM and BPM Skill Level: Introductory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    BPM Voices: Get social with IBM and BPM Skill Level: Introductory Wilfred Jamison, Ph.D. Senior Technical Lead, Business Process Management technologies IBM 08 Sep 2010 What exactly is social BPM, what does it mean to you, and how can it help you? Wil Jamison gives you the scoop on IBM's social BPM

  20. IBM asset and service management solutions White paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; facilities such as parks, schools, or water/wastewater treatment plants; and linear assets like electrical Summary 14 Formoreinformation 15 AboutTivolisoftwarefromIBM Executive summary Municipal government. Page 2 #12;Introduction In today's economic and regulatory climate, municipal government agencies

  1. Copyright 2009 IBM Global Business Services Turning Green into Gold

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . In a recent IBM survey of more than 400 Supply Chain Executives, 89 percent reported that cost reduction credentials. And consumers are also taking notice. In a recent survey, 12 percent of U.S. adults reported: In a market characterized by volatile energy costs and other rising supply chain costs, cost containment

  2. IBM Case Study Australian Open takes tennis to

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    % reduction in cost per visit since 2004; 23% reduction in energy consumption since 2004; 25% reduction-to-end solution that reduces the complexities for our team and enables us to achieve flawless delivery." -- Dr. Chris Yates, Chief Information Officer, Tennis Australia #12;" IBM enables us to deliver a fresh

  3. The IBM Health Integration Framework: Accelerating solutions for smarter healthcare

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in improving health- care access, cost, quality of care and patient satisfaction. But progress can take many Integration Framework is a unified software platform for implementing comprehensive solutions for health- careThe IBM Health Integration Framework: Accelerating solutions for smarter healthcare Healthcare

  4. IBM Business Continuity and Resiliency Services January 2009

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IBM Business Continuity and Resiliency Services January 2009 Business resilience: The best defense is a good offense Develop a best practices strategy using a tiered approach #12;Business resilience: The best defense is a good offense Page 2 Contents 2 Introduction 3 What is business resilience? 4 5

  5. ANJE5.40. VAX VMS IBM NJE Protocol Emulator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raffenetti, R.C.; Osudar, J. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1990-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Argonne NJE (Network Job Entry) communications software allows VAX/VMS systems to participate in a standard IBM peer-to-peer network and communicate with IBM computers with the VM/RSCS, MVS/JES2, MVS/JES3, or VSE/POWER operating systems or with CDC computers having the NJEF product by emulating the NJE protocol. The emulator has limited routing capability and forwards received files and messages to other nodes connected to it via DECnet. DECnet client nodes implementing the NJE system receive full NJE user services via the routing node including access to BITnet. All member nodes of VAX clusters involved in the NJE domain receive full NJE services as well. The emulator`s capabilities include immediate transfer of commands and messages and queued transfer of standard print and punch files. Jobs can be sent from VMS for execution at any node with batch services. The emulator receives files into user designated subdirectories. Two applications are distributed with ANJE. One is an RFC822-conforming interface that enables users of the VMS Mail Utility and either VM/SP NOTE or the IBM PROFS mail to exchange electronic mail. VMS Mail Utility users can also exchange electronic mail with users of BITnet. The other application is an emulator for the IBM Bulk Data Transfer product and IBM NETDATA protocol that enables transmission and reception of arbitrary sequential files with or without character translation. Data conversion subroutines are provided to aid users in converting their data from the binary format of one machine to that of the other.

  6. International Border Management Systems (IBMS) Program : visions and strategies.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McDaniel, Michael; Mohagheghi, Amir Hossein

    2011-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), International Border Management Systems (IBMS) Program is working to establish a long-term border security strategy with United States Central Command (CENTCOM). Efforts are being made to synthesize border security capabilities and technologies maintained at the Laboratories, and coordinate with subject matter expertise from both the New Mexico and California offices. The vision for SNL is to provide science and technology support for international projects and engagements on border security.

  7. A Distributed Facilities Automation System For IBM Buildings

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Houle, W. D. Sr.

    to the host would be via an IBM-supplied local communications network protocol. Remote appli cations would include process control, security, energy manage ment, facilities automation or any other automation application. The remote systems... of these areas which are affected are: - HVAC - Chemical Processes Control - Utilities Generation - Tank Farm Monitoring Resource Management - Solvent Supply and Recovery Systems - DI Water Distribution - Sewage and Waste Treatment Plant Control...

  8. T-594: IBM solidDB Password Hash Authentication Bypass Vulnerability

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This vulnerability could allow remote attackers to execute arbitrary code on vulnerable installations of IBM solidDB. Authentication is not required to exploit this vulnerability.

  9. V-094: IBM Multiple Products Multiple Vulnerabilities | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) "of EnergyEnergyENERGYWomen Owned SmallOf The 2012Nuclear Guide Remote Access08:Energy 94: IBM Multiple

  10. David J. Hathaway, IBM EDAInverter Minimization 1 Inverter Minimization -OverviewInverter Minimization -Overview

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ellis-Monaghan, Joanna

    David J. Hathaway, IBM EDAInverter Minimization 1 Inverter Minimization - OverviewInverter network a polarity graph 9 Initially consider only equal cost AND, NAND, OR, and NOR gates 9 Inverters for covering fundamental cycles 9 Considering electrically useful inverters #12;David J. Hathaway, IBM

  11. NANOTECHNOLOGY CENTER Eine Partnerschaft in Nanotechnologie von IBM Research und ETH Zrich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cachin, Christian

    NANOTECHNOLOGY CENTER Eine Partnerschaft in Nanotechnologie von IBM Research und ETH Zürich and Rohrer Nanotechnology Center is part of a strategic partnership in nanosciences with ETH Zurich, one FACT SHEET Above: The campus of IBM Research - Zurich Right: The Binnig and Rohrer Nanotechnology

  12. n commenting on the recent chess match between Garry Kasparov and Deep Blue, IBM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Munakata, Toshinori

    OnSite Viewpoint n commenting on the recent chess match between Garry Kasparov and Deep Blue, IBM literature even proclaimed, "The power behind Deep Blue is an IBM RS/6000 SP sys- tem finely tuned a somewhat different view of Deep Blue's prowess and its implica- tions for computing in general and AI

  13. V-147: IBM Lotus Notes Mail Client Lets Remote Users Execute...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    ID 1028504 IBM Security Bulletin 1633819 CVE-2013-0127 CVE-2013-0538 IMPACT ASSESSMENT: Medium DISCUSSION: The mail client does not filter 'applet' and 'javascript' tags in...

  14. U-116: IBM Tivoli Provisioning Manager Express for Software Distribution Multiple Vulnerabilities

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Multiple vulnerabilities have been reported in IBM Tivoli Provisioning Manager Express for Software Distribution, which can be exploited by malicious people to conduct SQL injection attacks and compromise a user's system

  15. IBMS BoneKEy. 2009 April;6(4):132-149 http://www.bonekey-ibms.org/cgi/content/full/ibmske;6/4/132

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and osteoporosis, yet uniquely without targeting the resident fat or bone cell. IBMS BoneKEy. 2009 April;6(4):132-149. 2009 International Bone & Mineral Society Introduction Osteoporosis and obesity, two of the most billion dollars in annual health service costs. (1) Osteoporosis, a disease characterized by diminished

  16. U-007: IBM Rational AppScan Import/Load Function Flaws Let Remote Users Execute Arbitrary Code

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Two vulnerabilities were reported in IBM Rational AppScan. A remote user can cause arbitrary code to be executed on the target user's system.

  17. ServicePac Maintenance Service Agreement NOTICE: PLEASE CAREFULLY READ THE FOLLOWING TERMS UNDER WHICH IBM WILL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , engineering change activity, preventive maintenance, microcode/firmware activity, or features and partsServicePac ServicePac Maintenance Service Agreement NOTICE: PLEASE CAREFULLY READ THE FOLLOWING TERMS UNDER WHICH IBM WILL PROVIDE SERVICEPAC MAINTENANCE SERVICE TO YOU. IBM WILL PROVIDE THIS SERVICE

  18. Fast Poisson Solvers for Thermal Analysis HAIFENG QIAN, IBM T. J. Watson Research Center

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sapatnekar, Sachin

    not only determine the maximum performance envelope of an integrated circuit in the form of thermal designFast Poisson Solvers for Thermal Analysis HAIFENG QIAN, IBM T. J. Watson Research Center SACHIN S thermal analysis for a VLSI chip is crucial, both for sign-off reliability verification and for design

  19. IBM, the IBM logo, ibm.com, Smarter Planet and the planet icon are trademarks of International Business Machines Corp., registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Other product and service names might be trademarks of IBM or other companies. A current li

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .ibm.com/legal/copytrade.shtml. International Business Machines Corporation 2010. Welcome to the decade of smart. Building a Smarter Planet: 1, roadways, power grids, clothes, even natural systems such as agriculture and waterways. Trillions companies to cities. A year into this new era, the signs of a smarter planet are all around us. Smarter

  20. IBM Research Every day we learn that the systems on our planet are

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IBM Research #12;Every day we learn that the systems on our planet are more interrelated than THE DIRECTOR research goal. From studying solar energy and water desalinization in the deserts of the Middle tomorrow's computing sys tems may solve complex problems in real time while requiring less energy than

  1. Accelerating SSL using the Vector processors in IBM's Cell Broadband Engine

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Accelerating SSL using the Vector processors in IBM's Cell Broadband Engine for Sony's Playstation and performance gains when using the vector processing capabilities for SSL and shows that big improve- ments are still possible with the hardware designed primarily for other purposes. 1 Why SSL? Despite huge gains

  2. IBM Center for Applied Insights Energy and Utilities The value of smarter energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IBM Center for Applied Insights Energy and Utilities The value of smarter energy Making the case. Utilities are increasingly challenged to make better, smarter use of existing assets to generate financial return. The transformation from conventional utility networks to much more efficient, smarter grids has

  3. Copyright 2009 IBM Global Business Services A Smarter Approach to Water Management

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Copyright 2009 IBM Global Business Services 1 A Smarter Approach to Water Management Introduction In the early 21st century, there are 3 main global challenges related to the management of water resources' approach to water management is needed. Challenges facing the UK water industry In England and Wales

  4. Copyright 2009 IBM Global Business Services Making the Case for Sustainable `Green' Procurement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ·Tactical focused e.g. energy efficiency ·No measurement and metrics of Sustainability `Green' effortsCopyright 2009 IBM Global Business Services 1 Making the Case for Sustainable `Green' Procurement to repeat unless fundamental change occurs. The energy crisis of the 1970's seems to be manifesting again

  5. Reducing Energy Costs for IBM Blue Gene/P via Power-Aware Job Scheduling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feitelson, Dror

    Reducing Energy Costs for IBM Blue Gene/P via Power-Aware Job Scheduling Zhou Zhou1 , Zhiling Lan1 scheduling approach for HPC systems based on variable energy prices and job power profiles. In particular, we from produc- tion systems show that our power-aware job scheduling approach can reduce the energy cost

  6. Automate and accelerate build and release processes IBM Rational Build Forge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    n n n n n n n Automate and accelerate build and release processes IBM Rational Build Forge in place today Accelerate build and release cycles through iterative develop- ment, parallel processes and efficient use of hardware Improve product quality through consistent, repeatable processes and early

  7. Sensor Relocation with Mobile Sensors:Sensor Relocation with Mobile Sensors: Design,Design,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schindelhauer, Christian

    Sensor Relocation with Mobile Sensors:Sensor Relocation with Mobile Sensors: Design of Freiburg #12;OverviewOverview · Sensor networks · mobile sensor · mobile robot · Mote · sensor relocation #12;Sensor networks · A wirless network . · Set of sensors. · Static Mote #12;Mobile sensor networks

  8. Solar energy system performance evaluation: seasonal report for IBM System 3, Glendo, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The IBM System 3 Solar Energy System was designed by the Federal Systems Division of IBM in Huntsville, Alabama to provide 46% of the space heating and 80% of the domestic hot water (DHW) for a 1078 square foot retrofit of an existing building used as a residence at the Glendo Reservoir State Park Ranger Station. The system consists of fourteen Sunworks Model LA1001A flat plate liquid collectors (294 square feet), a 1000 gallon hot water storage tank, a 65 gallon electric domestic hot water tank, pumps, heat exchangers, controls, and associated plumbing. Water is the heat transfer medium for this closed volume, passive drain down system. A gas furnace is used for auxiliary space heating energy. The system which became operational in October 1978 has five modes of operation. Performance data for the year of 1979 are presented and assessed.

  9. Copyright 1995 by Coherence LTD., all rights reserved (Revised: Oct 97 by Rafi Lohev, Oct 99 by Yair Wiseman)IBM 8 Implementation of Gates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wiseman, Yair

    reserved (Revised: Oct 97 by Rafi Lohev, Oct 99 by Yair Wiseman)IBM 8-5 PN Junction - A diode P N #12 by Coherence LTD., all rights reserved (Revised: Oct 97 by Rafi Lohev, Oct 99 by Yair Wiseman)IBM 8-8 R +5V 0 reserved (Revised: Oct 97 by Rafi Lohev, Oct 99 by Yair Wiseman)IBM 8-15 Output Input +5V 0V ~0V5V ~5V0V

  10. Interfacing a coordinate digitizer to a VAX with an IBM PC-based interactive system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hopwood, J.E.; Affeldt, B.

    1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An IBM personal computer (PC), a Gerber coordinate digitizer, and a collection of other instruments make up a system known as the Coordinate Digitizer Interactive Processor (CDIP). The PC extracts coordinate data from the digitizer through a special interface, and then, after reformatting, transmits the data to a remote VAX computer, a floppy disk, and a display terminal. This system has improved the efficiency of producing printed circuit-board artwork and extended the useful life of the Gerber GCD-1 Digitizer. 1 ref., 12 figs.

  11. 2010 IBM Corporation IBM Research

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    in Practice - Model-driven optimization enables substantial electricity (>20%) generated through renewable energy 3 Country-Wide Measurements Every 12 secs Active & Reactive Power Voltage & Connectivity Centers Spain's Electrical Grid Incorporates >20% of Intermittent Energy Predictable Generators Results

  12. IBM recently unveiled MobileFirst, a major initiative to develop mobile-related technologies and products that include security, analytics, mobile app development, and cloud-based backend services. MobileFirst

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Plotkin, Joshua B.

    IBM recently unveiled MobileFirst, a major initiative to develop mobile-related technologies and products that include security, analytics, mobile app development, and cloud-based backend services. Mobile lab has been asked to lead key portions of IBM's mobile research agenda. IBM Research-Austin has

  13. IBM Information Management Software Services FileNet P8 3.x to 4.x Upgrade/Transition Services

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    IBM Information Management Software Services FileNet P8 3.x to 4.x Upgrade/Transition Services adviser who understands your business needs and can successfully manage the transition. Information Management (IM) Lab Services is the experienced leader through which a successful ECM transition can

  14. Friendly Neighborhood Computer Project. Extension of the IBM NJE network to DEC VAX computers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raffenetti, R.C.; Bertoncini, P.J.; Engert, D.E.

    1984-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This manual is divided into six chapters. The first is an overview of the VAX NJE emulator system and describes what can be done with the VAX NJE emulator software. The second chapter describes the commands that users of the VAX systems will use. Each command description includes the format of the command, a list of valid options and parameters and their meanings, and several short examples of command use. The third chapter describes the commands and capabilities for sending general, sequential files from and to VAX VMS nodes. The fourth chapter describes how to transmit data to a VAX from other computer systems on the network. The fifth chapter explains how to exchange electronic mail with IBM CMS users and with users of other VAX VMS systems connected by NJE communications. The sixth chapter describes operator procedures and the additional commands operators may use.

  15. Solar energy system performance evaluation: seasonal report for IBM System 4 at Clinton, Mississippi

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    1980-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The IBM System 4 Solar Energy System was designed to provide 35 percent of the space heating and 62 percent of the domestic hot water (DHW) preheating for a single-family residence located within the United States. The system is a prepackaged unit called the Remote Solar Assembly which has been integrated into the heating and DHW system in a dormitory in Clinton, Mississippi. The system consists of 259 square feet of Solaron 2001 Series flat-plate-air collectors, a rock thermal storage containing 5 1/2 ton of rock, heat exchangers, blowers, a 52 gallon preheat tank, controls, and associated plumbing, two 30 gallon electric water heaters draw water from the preheat tank. A 20 kilowatt, duct mounted, electric heater supplies auxiliary energy. This system which has three modes of system operation was activated September, 1978. A system performance assessment is presented.

  16. PRAAGE-1988: An interactive IBM-PC code for aging analysis of NUREG-1150 systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fullwood, R.R.; Shier, W.G.

    1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Probabilistic Risk Assessments (PRA) contain a great deal of information for estimating the risk of a nuclear power plant but do not consider aging. PRAAGE (PRA+AGE) is an interactive, IBM-PC code for processing PRA-developed system models using non-aged failure rate data in conjunction with user-supplied time-dependent nuclear plant experience component failure rate data to determine the effects of component aging on a system's reliability as well as providing the age-dependent importances of various generic components. This paper describes the structure, use and application of PRAAGE to the aging analysis of the Peach Bottom 2 RHR system in the LPCI and SDC modes of operation. 4 refs., 15 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Gas sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schmid, Andreas K.; Mascaraque, Arantzazu; Santos, Benito; de la Figuera, Juan

    2014-09-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A gas sensor is described which incorporates a sensor stack comprising a first film layer of a ferromagnetic material, a spacer layer, and a second film layer of the ferromagnetic material. The first film layer is fabricated so that it exhibits a dependence of its magnetic anisotropy direction on the presence of a gas, That is, the orientation of the easy axis of magnetization will flip from out-of-plane to in-plane when the gas to be detected is present in sufficient concentration. By monitoring the change in resistance of the sensor stack when the orientation of the first layer's magnetization changes, and correlating that change with temperature one can determine both the identity and relative concentration of the detected gas. In one embodiment the stack sensor comprises a top ferromagnetic layer two mono layers thick of cobalt deposited upon a spacer layer of ruthenium, which in turn has a second layer of cobalt disposed on its other side, this second cobalt layer in contact with a programmable heater chip.

  18. Sensor apparatus

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Deason, Vance A. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID; Telschow, Kenneth L. (Idaho Falls, ID) [Idaho Falls, ID

    2009-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensor apparatus and method for detecting an environmental factor is shown that includes an acoustic device that has a characteristic resonant vibrational frequency and mode pattern when exposed to a source of acoustic energy and, futher, when exposed to an environmental factor, produces a different resonant vibrational frequency and/or mode pattern when exposed to the same source of acoustic energy.

  19. Virtual Sensors: Abstracting Data from Physical Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Christine

    Virtual Sensors: Abstracting Data from Physical Sensors TR-UTEDGE-2006-001 Sanem Kabadayi Adam Pridgen Christine Julien © Copyright 2006 The University of Texas at Austin #12;Virtual Sensors: Abstracting Data from Physical Sensors Sanem Kabadayi, Adam Pridgen, and Christine Julien The Center

  20. Corrosion sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glass, Robert S. (Livermore, CA); Clarke, Jr., Willis L. (San Ramon, CA); Ciarlo, Dino R. (Livermore, CA)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A corrosion sensor array incorporating individual elements for measuring various elements and ions, such as chloride, sulfide, copper, hydrogen (pH), etc. and elements for evaluating the instantaneous corrosion properties of structural materials. The exact combination and number of elements measured or monitored would depend upon the environmental conditions and materials used which are subject to corrosive effects. Such a corrosion monitoring system embedded in or mounted on a structure exposed to the environment would serve as an early warning system for the onset of severe corrosion problems for the structure, thus providing a safety factor as well as economic factors. The sensor array is accessed to an electronics/computational system, which provides a means for data collection and analysis.

  1. Corrosion sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glass, R.S.; Clarke, W.L. Jr.; Ciarlo, D.R.

    1994-04-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A corrosion sensor array is described incorporating individual elements for measuring various elements and ions, such as chloride, sulfide, copper, hydrogen (pH), etc. and elements for evaluating the instantaneous corrosion properties of structural materials. The exact combination and number of elements measured or monitored would depend upon the environmental conditions and materials used which are subject to corrosive effects. Such a corrosion monitoring system embedded in or mounted on a structure exposed to the environment would serve as an early warning system for the onset of severe corrosion problems for the structure, thus providing a safety factor as well as economic factors. The sensor array is accessed to an electronics/computational system, which provides a means for data collection and analysis. 7 figures.

  2. Study of Even-Even/Odd-Even/Odd-Odd Nuclei in Zn-Ga-Ge Region in the Proton-Neutron IBM/IBFM/IBFFM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoshida, N. [Faculty of Informatics, Kansai University, Takatsuki 569-1095 (Japan); Brant, S. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Zagreb, 10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Zuffi, L. [Dipartimento di Fisica dell'Universita di Milano and Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Milano, Via Celoria 16, Milano 20133 (Italy)

    2009-08-26T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the even-even, odd-even and odd-odd nuclei in the region including Zn-Ga-Ge in the proton-neutron IBM and the models derived from it: IBM2, IBFM2, IBFFM2. We describe {sup 67}Ga, {sup 65}Zn, and {sup 68}Ga by coupling odd particles to a boson core {sup 66}Zn. We also calculate the beta{sup +}-decay rates among {sup 68}Ge, {sup 68}Ga and {sup 68}Zn.

  3. Hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duan, Yixiang (Los Alamos, NM); Jia, Quanxi (Los Alamos, NM); Cao, Wenqing (Katy, TX)

    2010-11-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A hydrogen sensor for detecting/quantitating hydrogen and hydrogen isotopes includes a sampling line and a microplasma generator that excites hydrogen from a gas sample and produces light emission from excited hydrogen. A power supply provides power to the microplasma generator, and a spectrometer generates an emission spectrum from the light emission. A programmable computer is adapted for determining whether or not the gas sample includes hydrogen, and for quantitating the amount of hydrogen and/or hydrogen isotopes are present in the gas sample.

  4. Geometrical model for DBMS: an experimental DBMS using IBM solid modeling

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ali, D.E.D.L.

    1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This research presents a new model for data base management systems (DBMS). The new model, Geometrical DBMS, is based on using solid modelling technology in designing and implementing DBMS. The Geometrical DBMS is implemented using the IBM solid modelling Geometric Design Processor (GDP). Built basically on computer-graphics concepts, Geometrical DBMS is indeed a unique model. Traditionally, researchers start with one of the existent DBMS models and then put a graphical front end on it. In Geometrical DBMS, the graphical aspect of the model is not an alien concept tailored to the model but is, as a matter of fact, the atom around which the model is designed. The main idea in Geometrical DBMS is to allow the user and the system to refer to and manipulate data items as a solid object in 3D space, and representing a record as a group of logically related solid objects. In Geometical DBMS, hierarchical structure is used to present the data relations and the user sees the data as a group of arrays; yet, for the user and the system together, the data structure is a multidimensional tree.

  5. Solar energy system performance evaluation: seasonal report for IBM System IA, Huntsville, Alabama

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1980-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The analysis used is based on instrumented system data monitored and collected for at least one full season of operation. The long-term field performance of the installed system is reported. The Solar Energy System, Sims Prototype System 1A, was designed by IBM to provide 50 to 60% of the space heating and domestic hot water (DHW) preheating load to a 2000 square foot floor space single faily residence in the Huntsville area. The load design temperature inside the building was to be maintained at 70 degrees fahrenheit with auxiliary energy for heating supplied by an electric heat pump assisted by an electric resistance strip heater. Auxiliary energy for domestic hot water is from a conventional 20-gallon DHW storage tank. The solar energy system, uses air as the heat transport medium, has a 720 square foot Solar Energy Products Collector Array, a 22-ton rock storage located within the office building, a pump, heat exchanger, air handler, pre-heat tank, fan and associated plumbing. The system has five different modes of operation.

  6. WRF Test on IBM BG/L:Toward High Performance Application to Regional Climate Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chin, H S

    2008-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of climate change will mostly be felt on local to regional scales (Solomon et al., 2007). To develop better forecast skill in regional climate change, an integrated multi-scale modeling capability (i.e., a pair of global and regional climate models) becomes crucially important in understanding and preparing for the impacts of climate change on the temporal and spatial scales that are critical to California's and nation's future environmental quality and economical prosperity. Accurate knowledge of detailed local impact on the water management system from climate change requires a resolution of 1km or so. To this end, a high performance computing platform at the petascale appears to be an essential tool in providing such local scale information to formulate high quality adaptation strategies for local and regional climate change. As a key component of this modeling system at LLNL, the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model is implemented and tested on the IBM BG/L machine. The objective of this study is to examine the scaling feature of WRF on BG/L for the optimal performance, and to assess the numerical accuracy of WRF solution on BG/L.

  7. ISTUM PC: industrial sector technology use model for the IBM-PC

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roop, J.M.; Kaplan, D.T.

    1984-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A project to improve and enhance the Industrial Sector Technology Use Model (ISTUM) was originated in the summer of 1983. The project had dix identifiable objectives: update the data base; improve run-time efficiency; revise the reference base case; conduct case studies; provide technical and promotional seminars; and organize a service bureau. This interim report describes which of these objectives have been met and which tasks remain to be completed. The most dramatic achievement has been in the area of run-time efficiency. From a model that required a large proportion of the total resources of a mainframe computer and a great deal of effort to operate, the current version of the model (ISTUM-PC) runs on an IBM Personal Computer. The reorganization required for the model to run on a PC has additional advantages: the modular programs are somewhat easier to understand and the data base is more accessible and easier to use. A simple description of the logic of the model is given in this report. To generate the necessary funds for completion of the model, a multiclient project is proposed. This project will extend the industry coverage to all the industrial sectors, including the construction of process flow models for chemicals and petroleum refining. The project will also calibrate this model to historical data and construct a base case and alternative scenarios. The model will be delivered to clients and training provided. 2 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  8. Intelligent Bioreactor Management Information System (IBM-IS) for Mitigation of Greenhouse Gas Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Paul Imhoff; Ramin Yazdani; Don Augenstein; Harold Bentley; Pei Chiu

    2010-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Methane is an important contributor to global warming with a total climate forcing estimated to be close to 20% that of carbon dioxide (CO2) over the past two decades. The largest anthropogenic source of methane in the US is 'conventional' landfills, which account for over 30% of anthropogenic emissions. While controlling greenhouse gas emissions must necessarily focus on large CO2 sources, attention to reducing CH4 emissions from landfills can result in significant reductions in greenhouse gas emissions at low cost. For example, the use of 'controlled' or bioreactor landfilling has been estimated to reduce annual US greenhouse emissions by about 15-30 million tons of CO2 carbon (equivalent) at costs between $3-13/ton carbon. In this project we developed or advanced new management approaches, landfill designs, and landfill operating procedures for bioreactor landfills. These advances are needed to address lingering concerns about bioreactor landfills (e.g., efficient collection of increased CH4 generation) in the waste management industry, concerns that hamper bioreactor implementation and the consequent reductions in CH4 emissions. Collectively, the advances described in this report should result in better control of bioreactor landfills and reductions in CH4 emissions. Several advances are important components of an Intelligent Bioreactor Management Information System (IBM-IS).

  9. Sensor response rate accelerator

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vogt, Michael C. (Westmont, IL)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for sensor signal prediction and for improving sensor signal response time, is disclosed. An adaptive filter or an artificial neural network is utilized to provide predictive sensor signal output and is further used to reduce sensor response time delay.

  10. Remotely Deployed Virtual Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Julien, Christine

    Remotely Deployed Virtual Sensors TR-UTEDGE-2007-010 Sanem Kabadayi Christine Julien © Copyright 2007 The University of Texas at Austin #12;Remotely Deployed Virtual Sensors Sanem Kabadayi that run on mobile client devices connect to the sensors of a multihop sensor network. For emerging

  11. Building Adaptable Sensor Networks with Sensor Cubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roussos, George

    of layers allows easy experiments, upgrades and extensions Small-scale sensor network Example sensor module- world network algorithm and power management behavior · Results from small scale tests can be compared (short packets and high bit rate reduce collision probability); Transmitter's MAC table logic: Small

  12. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Homuth, Emil F. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects.

  13. Digital Sensor Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ted Quinn; Jerry Mauck; Richard Bockhorst; Ken Thomas

    2013-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The nuclear industry has been slow to incorporate digital sensor technology into nuclear plant designs due to concerns with digital qualification issues. However, the benefits of digital sensor technology for nuclear plant instrumentation are substantial in terms of accuracy, reliability, availability, and maintainability. This report demonstrates these benefits in direct comparisons of digital and analog sensor applications. It also addresses the qualification issues that must be addressed in the application of digital sensor technology.

  14. Giant magnetoresistive sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stearns, Daniel G. (Los Altos, CA); Vernon, Stephen P. (Pleasanton, CA); Ceglio, Natale M. (Livermore, CA); Hawryluk, Andrew M. (Modesto, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A magnetoresistive sensor element with a three-dimensional micro-architecture is capable of significantly improved sensitivity and highly localized measurement of magnetic fields. The sensor is formed of a multilayer film of alternately magnetic and nonmagnetic materials. The sensor is optimally operated in a current perpendicular to plane mode. The sensor is useful in magnetic read/write heads, for high density magnetic information storage and retrieval.

  15. Sensor readout detector circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chu, D.D.; Thelen, D.C. Jr.

    1998-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensor readout detector circuit is disclosed that is capable of detecting sensor signals down to a few nanoamperes or less in a high (microampere) background noise level. The circuit operates at a very low standby power level and is triggerable by a sensor event signal that is above a predetermined threshold level. A plurality of sensor readout detector circuits can be formed on a substrate as an integrated circuit (IC). These circuits can operate to process data from an array of sensors in parallel, with only data from active sensors being processed for digitization and analysis. This allows the IC to operate at a low power level with a high data throughput for the active sensors. The circuit may be used with many different types of sensors, including photodetectors, capacitance sensors, chemically-sensitive sensors or combinations thereof to provide a capability for recording transient events or for recording data for a predetermined period of time following an event trigger. The sensor readout detector circuit has applications for portable or satellite-based sensor systems. 6 figs.

  16. Sensor readout detector circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Chu, Dahlon D. (Albuquerque, NM); Thelen, Jr., Donald C. (Bozeman, MT)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensor readout detector circuit is disclosed that is capable of detecting sensor signals down to a few nanoamperes or less in a high (microampere) background noise level. The circuit operates at a very low standby power level and is triggerable by a sensor event signal that is above a predetermined threshold level. A plurality of sensor readout detector circuits can be formed on a substrate as an integrated circuit (IC). These circuits can operate to process data from an array of sensors in parallel, with only data from active sensors being processed for digitization and analysis. This allows the IC to operate at a low power level with a high data throughput for the active sensors. The circuit may be used with many different types of sensors, including photodetectors, capacitance sensors, chemically-sensitive sensors or combinations thereof to provide a capability for recording transient events or for recording data for a predetermined period of time following an event trigger. The sensor readout detector circuit has applications for portable or satellite-based sensor systems.

  17. Sensor system scaling issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canavan, G.H.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A model for IR sensor performance is used to compare estimates of sensor cost effectiveness. Although data from aircraft sensors indicate a weaker scaling, their agreement is adequate to support the assessment of the benefits of operating up to the maximum altitude of most current UAVs.

  18. Sensors for Environmental Observatories

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Michael P.

    Sensors for Environmental Observatories Report of the NSF-Sponsored Workshop December 2004 #12 States of America. 2005. #12;Sensors for Environmental Observatories Report of the NSF Sponsored Workshop sensor technology and the networks that collect data from them. Present work clearly demonstrates

  19. Automotive vehicle sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sheen, S.H.; Raptis, A.C.; Moscynski, M.J.

    1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report is an introduction to the field of automotive vehicle sensors. It contains a prototype data base for companies working in automotive vehicle sensors, as well as a prototype data base for automotive vehicle sensors. A market analysis is also included.

  20. Oracle Spatial Data Option Spatial Cartridge Oracle8i SpatialIBM ESRI DB2 Spatial ExtenderInformix Informix Spatial

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Xiang

    ; ---- Oracle Spatial Data Option Spatial Cartridge Oracle8i SpatialIBM ESRI DB2 Spatial ExtenderInformix Informix Spatial Datablade Oracle Oracle8i Spatial Oracle Spatial ----SDO_GEOMETRY SDO_GEOMETRY OracleWeb-Based Three-Dimensional Geo-Referenced Visualization, in Proceedings of International Conference of Spatial

  1. 15APR91 DDT results on a Sun IPC, a Sun Sparcstation 2, a IBM RS/6000 Model 550, and a

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    15APR91 DDT results on a Sun IPC, a Sun Sparcstation 2, a IBM RS/6000 Model 550, and a Convex C1. Brian Glendenning & Gareth Hunt November 13, 1991 1 Introduction The Large DDT has been run on a Sun IPC

  2. Dear IBM Investor: As I write to you, the global economy is experiencing profound disruption. There is a great deal of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Dear IBM Investor: As I write to you, the global economy is experiencing profound disruption in a global economy? And how will we capture the new growth opportunities that are emerging around the world for the global economy and society. We are now living in a world that is: instrumented: Computational power

  3. Working Group Report: Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Artuso, M.; et al.,

    2013-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Sensors play a key role in detecting both charged particles and photons for all three frontiers in Particle Physics. The signals from an individual sensor that can be used include ionization deposited, phonons created, or light emitted from excitations of the material. The individual sensors are then typically arrayed for detection of individual particles or groups of particles. Mounting of new, ever higher performance experiments, often depend on advances in sensors in a range of performance characteristics. These performance metrics can include position resolution for passing particles, time resolution on particles impacting the sensor, and overall rate capabilities. In addition the feasible detector area and cost frequently provides a limit to what can be built and therefore is often another area where improvements are important. Finally, radiation tolerance is becoming a requirement in a broad array of devices. We present a status report on a broad category of sensors, including challenges for the future and work in progress to solve those challenges.

  4. Capacitive chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manginell, Ronald P; Moorman, Matthew W; Wheeler, David R

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A microfabricated capacitive chemical sensor can be used as an autonomous chemical sensor or as an analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator in a larger microanalytical system. The capacitive chemical sensor detects changes in sensing film dielectric properties, such as the dielectric constant, conductivity, or dimensionality. These changes result from the interaction of a target analyte with the sensing film. This capability provides a low-power, self-heating chemical sensor suitable for remote and unattended sensing applications. The capacitive chemical sensor also enables a smart, analyte-sensitive chemical preconcentrator. After sorption of the sample by the sensing film, the film can be rapidly heated to release the sample for further analysis. Therefore, the capacitive chemical sensor can optimize the sample collection time prior to release to enable the rapid and accurate analysis of analytes by a microanalytical system.

  5. Contact stress sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kotovsky, Jack

    2014-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for producing a contact stress sensor that includes one or more MEMS fabricated sensor elements, where each sensor element of includes a thin non-recessed portion, a recessed portion and a pressure sensitive element adjacent to the recessed portion. An electric circuit is connected to the pressure sensitive element. The circuit includes a pressure signal circuit element configured to provide a signal upon movement of the pressure sensitive element.

  6. Remote electrochemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Joseph (Las Cruces, NM); Olsen, Khris (Richland, WA); Larson, David (Las Cruces, NM)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochemical sensor for remote detection, particularly useful for metal contaminants and organic or other compounds. The sensor circumvents technical difficulties that previously prevented in-situ remote operations. The microelectrode, connected to a long communications cable, allows convenient measurements of the element or compound at timed and frequent intervals and instrument/sample distances of ten feet to more than 100 feet. The sensor is useful for both downhole groundwater monitoring and in-situ water (e.g., shipboard seawater) analysis.

  7. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Homuth, E.F.

    1991-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor is described in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects. 2 figures.

  8. Energy Conservation in Sensor and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stojmenovic, Ivan

    Chapter 4 Energy Conservation in Sensor and Sensor-Actuator Networks Ivan Stojmenovic 4 wireless network, and must work unattended. The limited energy budget at the individual sensor level

  9. Sensors and actuators 1990

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book contains the proceedings on sensors and actuators 1990. Topics covered include: Hot wire air flow meter for engine control systems, A technique for the real-time estimation of air-fuel ratio using molecular weight ratios, combustion knock sensing: Sensor selection and application issues, and An indirect sensing technique for closed-loop diesel fuel quantity control.

  10. 2009 IBM Corporation IBM Academic Initiative

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -sensitive, adaptive information seeking tools. Green and Beyond: Optimizing data center infrastructures for energy, organization, city, nation, natural system and man-made system is becoming interconnected, instrumented Academic Initiative: Building skills for a smarter planet Global market forces are impacting us all Access

  11. Electrocatalytic cermet sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoemaker, Erika L. (Westmont, IL); Vogt, Michael C. (Westmont, IL)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensor for O.sub.2 and CO.sub.2 gases. The gas sensor includes a plurality of layers driven by a cyclic voltage to generate a unique plot characteristic of the gas in contact with the sensor. The plurality of layers includes an alumina substrate, a reference electrode source of anions, a lower electrical reference electrode of Pt coupled to the reference source of anions, a solid electrolyte containing tungsten and coupled to the lower reference electrode, a buffer layer for preventing flow of Pt ions into the solid electrolyte and an upper catalytically active Pt electrode coupled to the buffer layer.

  12. Electrocatalytic cermet sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shoemaker, E.L.; Vogt, M.C.

    1998-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensor is described for O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} gases. The gas sensor includes a plurality of layers driven by a cyclic voltage to generate a unique plot characteristic of the gas in contact with the sensor. The plurality of layers includes an alumina substrate, a reference electrode source of anions, a lower electrical reference electrode of Pt coupled to the reference source of anions, a solid electrolyte containing tungsten and coupled to the lower reference electrode, a buffer layer for preventing flow of Pt ions into the solid electrolyte and an upper catalytically active Pt electrode coupled to the buffer layer. 16 figs.

  13. Remote electrochemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, J.; Olsen, K.; Larson, D.

    1997-10-14T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochemical sensor is described for remote detection, particularly useful for metal contaminants and organic or other compounds. The sensor circumvents technical difficulties that previously prevented in-situ remote operations. The microelectrode, connected to a long communications cable, allows convenient measurements of the element or compound at timed and frequent intervals and instrument/sample distances of ten feet to more than 100 feet. The sensor is useful for both downhole groundwater monitoring and in-situ water (e.g., shipboard seawater) analysis. 21 figs.

  14. Electrochemical micro sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Setter, Joseph R. (Naperville, IL); Maclay, G. Jordan (Maywood, IL)

    1989-09-12T23:59:59.000Z

    A micro-amperometric electrochemical sensor for detecting the presence of a pre-determined species in a fluid material is disclosed. The sensor includes a smooth substrate having a thin coating of solid electrolytic material deposited thereon. The working and counter electrodes are deposited on the surface of the solid electrolytic material and adhere thereto. Electrical leads connect the working and counter electrodes to a potential source and an apparatus for measuring the change in an electrical signal caused by the electrochemical oxidation or reduction of the species. Alternatively, the sensor may be fabricated in a sandwich structure and also may be cylindrical, spherical or other shapes.

  15. Wireless passive radiation sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pfeifer, Kent B; Rumpf, Arthur N; Yelton, William G; Limmer, Steven J

    2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel measurement technique is employed using surface acoustic wave (SAW) devices, passive RF, and radiation-sensitive films to provide a wireless passive radiation sensor that requires no batteries, outside wiring, or regular maintenance. The sensor is small (<1 cm.sup.2), physically robust, and will operate unattended for decades. In addition, the sensor can be insensitive to measurement position and read distance due to a novel self-referencing technique eliminating the need to measure absolute responses that are dependent on RF transmitter location and power.

  16. Aircraft as a meteorological sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Haak, Hein

    Meteorological Institute 2 | The aircraft as a meteorological sensor Photo cover: A KLM Airbus A330-200 landsAircraft as a meteorological sensor Using Mode-S Enhanced Surveillance data to derive upper air Meteorological Institute 3 | The aircraft as a meteorological sensor Aircraft as a meteorological sensor Using

  17. Geographically distributed environmental sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    French, Patrick; Veatch, Brad; O'Connor, Mike

    2006-10-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is directed to a sensor network that includes a number of sensor units and a base unit. The base station operates in a network discovery mode (in which network topology information is collected) in a data polling mode (in which sensed information is collected from selected sensory units). Each of the sensor units can include a number of features, including an anemometer, a rain gauge, a compass, a GPS receiver, a barometric pressure sensor, an air temperature sensor, a humidity sensor, a level, and a radiant temperature sensor.

  18. Complex pendulum biomass sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoskinson, Reed L. (Rigby, ID); Kenney, Kevin L. (Idaho Falls, ID); Perrenoud, Ben C. (Rigby, ID)

    2007-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A complex pendulum system biomass sensor having a plurality of pendulums. The plurality of pendulums allow the system to detect a biomass height and density. Each pendulum has an angular deflection sensor and a deflector at a unique height. The pendulums are passed through the biomass and readings from the angular deflection sensors are fed into a control system. The control system determines whether adjustment of machine settings is appropriate and either displays an output to the operator, or adjusts automatically adjusts the machine settings, such as the speed, at which the pendulums are passed through the biomass. In an alternate embodiment, an entanglement sensor is also passed through the biomass to determine the amount of biomass entanglement. This measure of entanglement is also fed into the control system.

  19. Remote Sensor Placement

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    developed to place the sensor nodes in the field. Contact Institute Director Charles Farrar (505) 663-5330 Email UCSD EI Director Michael Todd (858) 534-5951 Professional Staff...

  20. Integrated optical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watkins, A.D.; Smartt, H.B.; Taylor, P.L.

    1994-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated optical sensor for arc welding having multifunction feedback control is described. The sensor, comprising generally a CCD camera and diode laser, is positioned behind the arc torch for measuring weld pool position and width, standoff distance, and post-weld centerline cooling rate. Computer process information from this sensor is passed to a controlling computer for use in feedback control loops to aid in the control of the welding process. Weld pool position and width are used in a feedback loop, by the weld controller, to track the weld pool relative to the weld joint. Sensor standoff distance is used in a feedback loop to control the contact tip to base metal distance during the welding process. Cooling rate information is used to determine the final metallurgical state of the weld bead and heat affected zone, thereby controlling post-weld mechanical properties. 6 figures.

  1. Integrated optical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watkins, Arthur D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Smartt, Herschel B. (Idaho Falls, ID); Taylor, Paul L. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An integrated optical sensor for arc welding having multifunction feedback control. The sensor, comprising generally a CCD camera and diode laser, is positioned behind the arc torch for measuring weld pool position and width, standoff distance, and post-weld centerline cooling rate. Computer process information from this sensor is passed to a controlling computer for use in feedback control loops to aid in the control of the welding process. Weld pool position and width are used in a feedback loop, by the weld controller, to track the weld pool relative to the weld joint. Sensor standoff distance is used in a feedback loop to control the contact tip to base metal distance during the welding process. Cooling rate information is used to determine the final metallurgical state of the weld bead and heat affected zone, thereby controlling post-weld mechanical properties.

  2. Capacitance pressure sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Eaton, William P. (Tijeras, NM); Staple, Bevan D. (Albuquerque, NM); Smith, James H. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microelectromechanical (MEM) capacitance pressure sensor integrated with electronic circuitry on a common substrate and a method for forming such a device are disclosed. The MEM capacitance pressure sensor includes a capacitance pressure sensor formed at least partially in a cavity etched below the surface of a silicon substrate and adjacent circuitry (CMOS, BiCMOS, or bipolar circuitry) formed on the substrate. By forming the capacitance pressure sensor in the cavity, the substrate can be planarized (e.g. by chemical-mechanical polishing) so that a standard set of integrated circuit processing steps can be used to form the electronic circuitry (e.g. using an aluminum or aluminum-alloy interconnect metallization).

  3. Modular sensor network node

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davis, Jesse Harper Zehring (Berkeley, CA); Stark, Jr., Douglas Paul (Tracy, CA); Kershaw, Christopher Patrick (Hayward, CA); Kyker, Ronald Dean (Livermore, CA)

    2008-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A distributed wireless sensor network node is disclosed. The wireless sensor network node includes a plurality of sensor modules coupled to a system bus and configured to sense a parameter. The parameter may be an object, an event or any other parameter. The node collects data representative of the parameter. The node also includes a communication module coupled to the system bus and configured to allow the node to communicate with other nodes. The node also includes a processing module coupled to the system bus and adapted to receive the data from the sensor module and operable to analyze the data. The node also includes a power module connected to the system bus and operable to generate a regulated voltage.

  4. Magnetic infrasound sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mueller, Fred M. (Los Alamos, NM); Bronisz, Lawrence (Los Alamos, NM); Grube, Holger (Los Alamos, NM); Nelson, David C. (Santa Fe, NM); Mace, Jonathan L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A magnetic infrasound sensor is produced by constraining a permanent magnet inside a magnetic potential well above the surface of superconducting material. The magnetic infrasound sensor measures the position or movement of the permanent magnet within the magnetic potential well, and interprets the measurements. Infrasound sources can be located and characterized by combining the measurements from one or more infrasound sensors. The magnetic infrasound sensor can be tuned to match infrasound source types, resulting in better signal-to-noise ratio. The present invention can operate in frequency modulation mode to improve sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio. In an alternate construction, the superconductor can be levitated over a magnet or magnets. The system can also be driven, so that time resolved perturbations are sensed, resulting in a frequency modulation version with improved sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio.

  5. NOx Sensor Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    needed to meet emission targets and enable widespread use of diesel vehicles with better fuel economies: We are developing a novel sensor with the potential to meet OEM cost and...

  6. Sensor Network Lifetime Maximization Via Sensor Energy Balancing: Construction and Optimal Scheduling of Sensor Trees

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Johansson, Karl Henrik

    in such a way that the total energy usage of the active sensor nodes in the tree is minimized. However whenSensor Network Lifetime Maximization Via Sensor Energy Balancing: Construction and Optimal Scheduling of Sensor Trees Ling Shi , Agostino Capponi , Karl H. Johansson and Richard M. Murray Abstract

  7. Thermal microphotonic sensor and sensor array

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Watts, Michael R. (Albuquerque, NM); Shaw, Michael J. (Tijeras, NM); Nielson, Gregory N. (Albuquerque, NM); Lentine, Anthony L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-02-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal microphotonic sensor is disclosed for detecting infrared radiation using heat generated by the infrared radiation to shift the resonant frequency of an optical resonator (e.g. a ring resonator) to which the heat is coupled. The shift in the resonant frequency can be determined from light in an optical waveguide which is evanescently coupled to the optical resonator. An infrared absorber can be provided on the optical waveguide either as a coating or as a plate to aid in absorption of the infrared radiation. In some cases, a vertical resonant cavity can be formed about the infrared absorber to further increase the absorption of the infrared radiation. The sensor can be formed as a single device, or as an array for imaging the infrared radiation.

  8. Sensor Characteristics Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cree, Johnathan V.; Dansu, A.; Fuhr, P.; Lanzisera, Steven M.; McIntyre, T.; Muehleisen, Ralph T.; Starke, M.; Banerjee, Pranab; Kuruganti, T.; Castello, C.

    2013-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Buildings Technologies Office (BTO), within the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE), is initiating a new program in Sensor and Controls. The vision of this program is: Buildings operating automatically and continuously at peak energy efficiency over their lifetimes and interoperating effectively with the electric power grid. Buildings that are self-configuring, self-commissioning, self-learning, self-diagnosing, self-healing, and self-transacting to enable continuous peak performance. Lower overall building operating costs and higher asset valuation. The overarching goal is to capture 30% energy savings by enhanced management of energy consuming assets and systems through development of cost-effective sensors and controls. One step in achieving this vision is the publication of this Sensor Characteristics Reference Guide. The purpose of the guide is to inform building owners and operators of the current status, capabilities, and limitations of sensor technologies. It is hoped that this guide will aid in the design and procurement process and result in successful implementation of building sensor and control systems. DOE will also use this guide to identify research priorities, develop future specifications for potential market adoption, and provide market clarity through unbiased information

  9. Active Control Strategies for Chemical Sensors and Sensor Arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gosangi, Rakesh

    2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    validated on metal-oxide (MOX) sensors. Our results show that the active sensing method obtains better classification performance than passive sensing methods, and also is more robust to additive Gaussian noise in sensor measurements. Second, we consider...

  10. Optical displacement sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Carr, Dustin W. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2008-04-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical displacement sensor is disclosed which uses a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL) coupled to an optical cavity formed by a moveable membrane and an output mirror of the VCSEL. This arrangement renders the lasing characteristics of the VCSEL sensitive to any movement of the membrane produced by sound, vibrations, pressure changes, acceleration, etc. Some embodiments of the optical displacement sensor can further include a light-reflective diffractive lens located on the membrane or adjacent to the VCSEL to control the amount of lasing light coupled back into the VCSEL. A photodetector detects a portion of the lasing light from the VCSEL to provide an electrical output signal for the optical displacement sensor which varies with the movement of the membrane.

  11. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dooley, Joseph B. (Harriman, TN); Muhs, Jeffrey D. (Lenoir City, TN); Tobin, Kenneth W. (Harriman, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity.

  12. Capacitive proximity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, James W. (Aiken, SC)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A proximity sensor based on a closed field circuit. The circuit comprises a ring oscillator using a symmetrical array of plates that creates an oscillating displacement current. The displacement current varies as a function of the proximity of objects to the plate array. Preferably the plates are in the form of a group of three pair of symmetric plates having a common center, arranged in a hexagonal pattern with opposing plates linked as a pair. The sensor produces logic level pulses suitable for interfacing with a computer or process controller. The proximity sensor can be incorporated into a load cell, a differential pressure gauge, or a device for measuring the consistency of a characteristic of a material where a variation in the consistency causes the dielectric constant of the material to change.

  13. Chemiresistor urea sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Glass, Robert S. (Livermore, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensor to detect and quantify urea in fluids resulting from hemodialysis procedures, and in blood and other body fluids. The sensor is based upon a chemiresistor, which consists of an interdigitated array of metal fingers between which a resistance measured. The interdigitated array is fabricated on a suitable substrate. The surface of the array of fingers is covered with a coating containing the enzyme urease which catalyzes the hydrolysis of urea to form the ammonium ion, the bicarbonate ion, and hydroxide-chemical products which provide the basis for the measured signal. In a typical application, the sensor could be used at bedside, in conjunction with an appropriate electronics/computer system, in order to determine the hemodialysis endpoint. Also, the chemiresistor used to detect urea, can be utilized with a reference chemiresistor which does not contain urease, and connected in a differential measurement arrangement, such that the reference chemiresistor would cancel out any fluctuations due to background effects.

  14. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dooley, J.B.; Muhs, J.D.; Tobin, K.W.

    1995-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity. 2 figures.

  15. Capacitive proximity sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A proximity sensor based on a closed field circuit is disclosed. The circuit comprises a ring oscillator using a symmetrical array of plates that creates an oscillating displacement current. The displacement current varies as a function of the proximity of objects to the plate array. Preferably the plates are in the form of a group of three pair of symmetric plates having a common center, arranged in a hexagonal pattern with opposing plates linked as a pair. The sensor produces logic level pulses suitable for interfacing with a computer or process controller. The proximity sensor can be incorporated into a load cell, a differential pressure gauge, or a device for measuring the consistency of a characteristic of a material where a variation in the consistency causes the dielectric constant of the material to change. 14 figs.

  16. Fluorescent temperature sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Baker, Gary A [Los Alamos, NM; Baker, Sheila N [Los Alamos, NM; McCleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos, NM

    2009-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention is a fluorescent temperature sensor or optical thermometer. The sensor includes a solution of 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane within a 1-butyl-1-1-methylpyrrolidinium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ionic liquid solvent. The 1,3-bis(1-pyrenyl)propane remains unassociated when in the ground state while in solution. When subjected to UV light, an excited state is produced that exists in equilibrium with an excimer. The position of the equilibrium between the two excited states is temperature dependent.

  17. Sensors as Information Transducers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. David zook; Norbert Schroeder

    2008-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

    This chapter reviews the mechanisms by which sensors gather information from the physical world and transform it into the electronic signals that are used in today's information and control systems. It introduces a new methodology for describing sensing mechanisms based on the process of information flow and applies it to the broad spectrum of sensors, instruments and data input devices in current use. We identify four distinct elemental transduction processes: energy conversion, energy dispersion, energy modulation and modulation of a material property. We posit that these four mechanisms form a complete set for describing information transduction in sensing systems.

  18. Magnetic differential torque sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lemarquand, V.; Lemarquand, G. [Univ. de Savoie, Annecy-le-Vieux (France)] [Univ. de Savoie, Annecy-le-Vieux (France)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new torque sensor structure is presented. The basic idea is a simple torque sensor with a variable magnetic circuit excited by an axially magnetized permanent magnet ring. The circuit is constituted by iron toothed rings, whose teeth relative position changes whenever an applied torque twists the rotating shaft. A Hall probe measures the induction in an airgap where the induction is uniform. The new structure is an association of two previous ones, thus creating a differential system with the related advantages: diminution of thermal drifts, zero mean value for the signal. The new magnetic circuit is studied by calculating equivalent reluctances through energy calculations and by using electrical analogies.

  19. Thin film hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Hoffheins, Barbara S. (Knoxville, TN); Fleming, Pamela H. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A hydrogen sensor element comprises an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having a thin-film metallization deposited thereon which forms at least two resistors on the substrate. The metallization comprises a layer of Pd or a Pd alloy for sensing hydrogen and an underlying intermediate metal layer for providing enhanced adhesion of the metallization to the substrate. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors, and at least one of the resistors is left uncovered. The difference in electrical resistances of the covered resistor and the uncovered resistor is related to hydrogen concentration in a gas to which the sensor element is exposed.

  20. Controlled mobility in sensor networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sugihara, Ryo

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    K. Gupta. Optimizing energy-latency trade- o? in sensoras Optimizing Energy-Latency Trade-o? in Sensor NetworksK. Gupta, Optimizing Energy-Latency Trade-o? in Sensor

  1. Nanotechnology-Based Electrochemical Sensors for Biomonitoring...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanotechnology-Based Electrochemical Sensors for Biomonitoring Chemical Exposures . Nanotechnology-Based Electrochemical Sensors for Biomonitoring Chemical Exposures . Abstract:...

  2. Sensors & Measurement | Clean Energy | ORNL

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Systems Research Sustainable Electricity Systems Biology Transportation Clean Energy Home | Science & Discovery | Clean Energy | Research Areas | Sensors & Measurement...

  3. Open Standards for Sensor Information Processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pouchard, Line Catherine [ORNL; Poole, Stephen W [ORNL; Lothian, Josh [ORNL

    2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document explores sensor standards, sensor data models, and computer sensor software in order to determine the specifications and data representation best suited for analyzing and monitoring computer system health using embedded sensor data. We review IEEE 1451, OGC Sensor Model Language and Transducer Model Language (TML), lm-sensors and Intelligent Platform Management Inititative (IPMI).

  4. Future Directions for Magnetic Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and Engineering Laboratory Magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) sensors are rapidly becoming the technology of choiceFuture Directions for Magnetic Sensors: HYBRIDMATERIALS Our goal is to develop the scientific expertise needed to allow modeling and simulation to become the driving force in improving magnetic sensors

  5. Sensor system for web inspection

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sleefe, Gerard E. (1 Snowcap Ct., Cedar Crest, NM 87008); Rudnick, Thomas J. (626 E. Jackson Rd., St. Louis, MO 63119); Novak, James L. (11048 Malaguena La. NE., Albuquerque, NM 87111)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for electrically measuring variations over a flexible web has a capacitive sensor including spaced electrically conductive, transmit and receive electrodes mounted on a flexible substrate. The sensor is held against a flexible web with sufficient force to deflect the path of the web, which moves relative to the sensor.

  6. Carbon dioxide sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dutta, Prabir K. (Worthington, OH); Lee, Inhee (Columbus, OH); Akbar, Sheikh A. (Hilliard, OH)

    2011-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention generally relates to carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors. In one embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor that incorporates lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3). In another embodiment, the present invention relates to a carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensor has a reduced sensitivity to humidity due to a sensing electrode with a layered structure of lithium carbonate and barium carbonate. In still another embodiment, the present invention relates to a method of producing carbon dioxide (CO.sub.2) sensors having lithium phosphate (Li.sub.3PO.sub.4) as an electrolyte and sensing electrode comprising a combination of lithium carbonate (Li.sub.2CO.sub.3) and barium carbonate (BaCO.sub.3).

  7. Thick film hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hoffheins, Barbara S. (Knoxville, TN); Lauf, Robert J. (Oak Ridge, TN)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thick film hydrogen sensor element includes an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having deposited thereon a thick film metallization forming at least two resistors. The metallization is a sintered composition of Pd and a sinterable binder such as glass frit. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors.

  8. Lean blowoff detection sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Thornton, Jimmy (Morgantown, WV); Straub, Douglas L. (Morgantown, WV); Chorpening, Benjamin T. (Morgantown, WV); Huckaby, David (Morgantown, WV)

    2007-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and method for detecting incipient lean blowoff conditions in a lean premixed combustion nozzle of a gas turbine. A sensor near the flame detects the concentration of hydrocarbon ions and/or electrons produced by combustion and the concentration monitored as a function of time are used to indicate incipient lean blowoff conditions.

  9. Intelligent Sensor Validation and Fusion with distributed "MEMS Dust" Sensors Shijun Qiu*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Agogino, Alice M.

    Intelligent Sensor Validation and Fusion with distributed "MEMS Dust" Sensors (Abstract) Shijun Qiu, Berkeley aagogino@euler.berkeley.edu Key Words : sensor networks, sensor fusion, sensor validation, micro-electromechanical systems, MEMS MEMS sensors make a rich design space of networked sensors viable. They can be deeply

  10. IBM Software Solution Brief

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    costs, energy costs alone can rep- resent as much as 30 percent of an office building's total operating for opportunities to consolidate space and improve space planning. At the same time, energy costs are rising. Commercial buildings consume 40 percent of all electricity1--more than any other type of physical asset

  11. IBM Research Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2005-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Apr 15, 2005 ... Abstract. Working with an integer bilinear programming formulation of a ... We work harder to generate new columns, but we are guaranteed...

  12. IBM Research Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Aug 15, 2008 ... Abstract This paper addresses the problem of generating strong .... the disjunction is derived from the so-called p-efficient frontier [26,25].

  13. IBM Blue Gene Architecture

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinementEtching. | EMSL Bubblesstructure the ParkerTH/P8-43IBEX

  14. Sandia National Laboratories: IBM

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administration the1 -theErik Spoerke SSLS Exhibit atVehicle Technologies On NovemberSafety,IAEAIBM

  15. IBM Software Providesacomprehensivesolutionfor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , companies must make sure that they're delivering products that meet their customers' requirements while companies address the challenges of embedded software development and delivery-- from initial product products, services and best practices to help companies define and manage their product development

  16. IBM Certification White Paper

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    surrounding IT certification vary depending on geography, company strategy and the product it supports by individuals and the companies that employ them as a differentiator in the IT Industry. As competition, certification offers several other advantages for both individuals and companies including: Increased income

  17. Emissive sensors and devices incorporating these sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swager, Timothy M; Zhang, Shi-Wei

    2013-02-05T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention generally relates to luminescent and/or optically absorbing compositions and/or precursors to those compositions, including solid films incorporating these compositions/precursors, exhibiting increased luminescent lifetimes, quantum yields, enhanced stabilities and/or amplified emissions. The present invention also relates to sensors and methods for sensing analytes through luminescent and/or optically absorbing properties of these compositions and/or precursors. Examples of analytes detectable by the invention include electrophiles, alkylating agents, thionyl halides, and phosphate ester groups including phosphoryl halides, cyanides and thioates such as those found in certain chemical warfare agents. The present invention additionally relates to devices and methods for amplifying emissions, such as those produced using the above-described compositions and/or precursors, by incorporating the composition and/or precursor within a polymer having an energy migration pathway. In some cases, the compositions and/or precursors thereof include a compound capable of undergoing a cyclization reaction.

  18. The Impact of IBM Cell Technology on the Programming Paradigm in the Context of Computer Systems for Climate and Weather Models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhou, Shujia; Duffy, Daniel; Clune, Thomas; Suarez, Max; Williams, Samuel; Halem, Milton

    2009-01-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The call for ever-increasing model resolutions and physical processes in climate and weather models demands a continual increase in computing power. The IBM Cell processor's order-of-magnitude peak performance increase over conventional processors makes it very attractive to fulfill this requirement. However, the Cell's characteristics, 256KB local memory per SPE and the new low-level communication mechanism, make it very challenging to port an application. As a trial, we selected the solar radiation component of the NASA GEOS-5 climate model, which: (1) is representative of column physics components (half the total computational time), (2) has an extremely high computational intensity: the ratio of computational load to main memory transfers, and (3) exhibits embarrassingly parallel column computations. In this paper, we converted the baseline code (single-precision Fortran) to C and ported it to an IBM BladeCenter QS20. For performance, we manually SIMDize four independent columns and include several unrolling optimizations. Our results show that when compared with the baseline implementation running on one core of Intel's Xeon Woodcrest, Dempsey, and Itanium2, the Cell is approximately 8.8x, 11.6x, and 12.8x faster, respectively. Our preliminary analysis shows that the Cell can also accelerate the dynamics component (~;;25percent total computational time). We believe these dramatic performance improvements make the Cell processor very competitive as an accelerator.

  19. Hydrocarbon sensors and materials therefor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Pham, Ai Quoc (San Jose, CA); Glass, Robert S. (Livermore, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An electrochemical hydrocarbon sensor and materials for use in sensors. A suitable proton conducting electrolyte and catalytic materials have been found for specific application in the detection and measurement of non-methane hydrocarbons. The sensor comprises a proton conducting electrolyte sandwiched between two electrodes. At least one of the electrodes is covered with a hydrocarbon decomposition catalyst. Two different modes of operation for the hydrocarbon sensors can be used: equilibrium versus non-equilibrium measurements and differential catalytic. The sensor has particular application for on-board monitoring of automobile exhaust gases to evaluate the performance of catalytic converters. In addition, the sensor can be utilized in monitoring any process where hydrocarbons are exhausted, for instance, industrial power plants. The sensor is low cost, rugged, sensitive, simple to fabricate, miniature, and does not suffer cross sensitivities.

  20. Two terminal micropower radar sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1995-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple, low power ultra-wideband radar motion sensor/switch configuration connects a power source and load to ground. The switch is connected to and controlled by the signal output of a radar motion sensor. The power input of the motion sensor is connected to the load through a diode which conducts power to the motion sensor when the switch is open. A storage capacitor or rechargeable battery is connected to the power input of the motion sensor. The storage capacitor or battery is charged when the switch is open and powers the motion sensor when the switch is closed. The motion sensor and switch are connected between the same two terminals between the source/load and ground. 3 figs.

  1. Two terminal micropower radar sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple, low power ultra-wideband radar motion sensor/switch configuration connects a power source and load to ground. The switch is connected to and controlled by the signal output of a radar motion sensor. The power input of the motion sensor is connected to the load through a diode which conducts power to the motion sensor when the switch is open. A storage capacitor or rechargeable battery is connected to the power input of the motion sensor. The storage capacitor or battery is charged when the switch is open and powers the motion sensor when the switch is closed. The motion sensor and switch are connected between the same two terminals between the source/load and ground.

  2. Nuclear sensor signal processing circuit

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kallenbach, Gene A. (Bosque Farms, NM); Noda, Frank T. (Albuquerque, NM); Mitchell, Dean J. (Tijeras, NM); Etzkin, Joshua L. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for a compact and temperature-insensitive nuclear sensor that can be calibrated with a non-hazardous radioactive sample. The nuclear sensor includes a gamma ray sensor that generates tail pulses from radioactive samples. An analog conditioning circuit conditions the tail-pulse signals from the gamma ray sensor, and a tail-pulse simulator circuit generates a plurality of simulated tail-pulse signals. A computer system processes the tail pulses from the gamma ray sensor and the simulated tail pulses from the tail-pulse simulator circuit. The nuclear sensor is calibrated under the control of the computer. The offset is adjusted using the simulated tail pulses. Since the offset is set to zero or near zero, the sensor gain can be adjusted with a non-hazardous radioactive source such as, for example, naturally occurring radiation and potassium chloride.

  3. INSENS sensor system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Myers, D.W.; Baker, J.; Benzel, D.M.; Fuess, D.A.

    1993-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper describes an unattended ground sensor system that has been developed for the immigration and Naturalization Service (INS). The system, known as INSENS, was developed at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for use by the United States Border Patrol. This system assists in the detection of illegal entry of aliens and contraband (illegal drugs, etc.) into the United States along its land borders. Key to the system is its flexible modular design which allows future software and hardware enhancements to the system without altering the fundamental architecture of the system. Elements of the system include a sensor system capable of processing signals from multiple directional probes, a repeater system, and a handheld monitor system. Seismic, passive infrared (PIR), and magnetic probes are currently supported. The design of the INSENS system elements and their performance are described.

  4. Thin film hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Lauf, R.J.; Hoffheins, B.S.; Fleming, P.H.

    1994-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A hydrogen sensor element comprises an essentially inert, electrically-insulating substrate having a thin-film metallization deposited thereon which forms at least two resistors on the substrate. The metallization comprises a layer of Pd or a Pd alloy for sensing hydrogen and an underlying intermediate metal layer for providing enhanced adhesion of the metallization to the substrate. An essentially inert, electrically insulating, hydrogen impermeable passivation layer covers at least one of the resistors, and at least one of the resistors is left uncovered. The difference in electrical resistances of the covered resistor and the uncovered resistor is related to hydrogen concentration in a gas to which the sensor element is exposed. 6 figs.

  5. NOx Sensor Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woo, L Y; Glass, R S

    2009-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this report are: (1) Develop an inexpensive, rapid-response, high-sensitivity and selective electrochemical sensor for oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) for compression-ignition, direct-injection (CIDI) exhaust gas monitoring; (2) Explore and characterize novel, effective sensing methodologies based on impedance measurements; (3) Explore designs and manufacturing methods that could be compatible with mass fabrication; and (4) Collaborate with industry in order to (ultimately) transfer the technology to a supplier for commercialization.

  6. Small, Inexpensive Combined NOx Sensor and O2 Sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. N. Lawless; C. F. Clark, Jr.

    2008-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

    It has been successfully demonstrated in this program that a zirconia multilayer structure with rhodium-based porous electrodes performs well as an amperometric NOx sensor. The sensitivity of the sensor bodies operating at 650 to 700 C is large, with demonstrated current outputs of 14 mA at 500 ppm NOx from sensors with 30 layers. The sensor bodies are small (4.5 x 4.2 x 3.1 mm), rugged, and inexpensive. It is projected the sensor bodies will cost $5 - $10 in production. This program has built on another successful development program for an oxygen sensor based on the same principles and sponsored by DOE. This oxygen sensor is not sensitive to NOx. A significant technical hurdle has been identified and solved. It was found that the 100% Rh electrodes oxidize rapidly at the preferred operating temperatures of 650 - 700 C, and this oxidation is accompanied by a volume change which delaminates the sensors. The problem was solved by using alloys of Rh and Pt. It was found that a 10%/90% Rh/Pt alloy dropped the oxidation rate of the electrodes by orders of magnitude without degrading the NOx sensitivity of the sensors, allowing long-term stable operation at the preferred operating temperatures. Degradation in the sensor output caused by temperature cycling was identified as a change in resistance at the junction between the sensor body and the external leads attached to the sensor body. The degradation was eliminated by providing strong mechanical anchors for the wire and processing the junctions to obtain good electrical bonds. The NOx sensors also detect oxygen and therefore the fully-packaged sensor needs to be enclosed with an oxygen sensor in a small, heated zirconia chamber exposed to test gas through a diffusion plug which limits the flow of gas from the outside. Oxygen is pumped from the interior of the chamber to lower the oxygen content and the combination of measurements from the NOx and oxygen sensors yields the NOx content of the gas. Two types of electronic control units were designed and built. One control unit provides independent constant voltages to the NOx and oxygen sensors and reads the current from them (that is, detects the amount of test gas present). The second controller holds the fully-assembled sensor at the desired operating temperature and controllably pumps excess oxygen from the test chamber. While the development of the sensor body was a complete success, the development of the packaging was only partially successful. All of the basic principles were demonstrated, but the packaging was too complex to optimize the operation within the resources of the program. Thus, no fully-assembled sensors were sent to outside labs for testing of cross-sensitivities, response times, etc. Near the end of the program, Sensata Technologies of Attleboro, MA tested the sensor bodies and confirmed the CeramPhysics measurements as indicated in the following attached letter. Sensata was in the process of designing their own packaging for the sensor and performing cross-sensitivity tests when they stopped all sensor development work due to the automotive industry downturn. Recently Ceramatec Inc. of Salt Lake City has expressed an interest in testing the sensor, and other licensing opportunities are being pursued.

  7. Ultra-wideband impedance sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The ultra-wideband impedance sensor (UWBZ sensor, or Z-sensor) is implemented in differential and single-ended configurations. The differential UWBZ sensor employs a sub-nanosecond impulse to determine the balance of an impedance bridge. The bridge is configured as a differential sample-and-hold circuit that has a reference impedance side and an unknown impedance side. The unknown impedance side includes a short transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The single-ended UWBZ sensor eliminates the reference side of the bridge and is formed of a sample and hold circuit having a transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The sensing range of the transmission line is bounded by the two-way travel time of the impulse, thereby eliminating spurious Doppler modes from large distant objects that would occur in a microwave CW impedance bridge. Thus, the UWBZ sensor is a range-gated proximity sensor. The Z-sensor senses the near proximity of various materials such as metal, plastic, wood, petroleum products, and living tissue. It is much like a capacitance sensor, yet it is impervious to moisture. One broad application area is the general replacement of magnetic sensors, particularly where nonferrous materials need to be sensed. Another broad application area is sensing full/empty levels in tanks, vats and silos, e.g., a full/empty switch in water or petroleum tanks.

  8. Ultra-wideband impedance sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1999-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    The ultra-wideband impedance sensor (UWBZ sensor, or Z-sensor) is implemented in differential and single-ended configurations. The differential UWBZ sensor employs a sub-nanosecond impulse to determine the balance of an impedance bridge. The bridge is configured as a differential sample-and-hold circuit that has a reference impedance side and an unknown impedance side. The unknown impedance side includes a short transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The single-ended UWBZ sensor eliminates the reference side of the bridge and is formed of a sample and hold circuit having a transmission line whose impedance is a function of the near proximity of objects. The sensing range of the transmission line is bounded by the two-way travel time of the impulse, thereby eliminating spurious Doppler modes from large distant objects that would occur in a microwave CW impedance bridge. Thus, the UWBZ sensor is a range-gated proximity sensor. The Z-sensor senses the near proximity of various materials such as metal, plastic, wood, petroleum products, and living tissue. It is much like a capacitance sensor, yet it is impervious to moisture. One broad application area is the general replacement of magnetic sensors, particularly where nonferrous materials need to be sensed. Another broad application area is sensing full/empty levels in tanks, vats and silos, e.g., a full/empty switch in water or petroleum tanks. 2 figs.

  9. Intrusion detection sensor testing tools

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hayward, D.R.

    1994-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Intrusion detection sensors must be frequently tested to verify that they are operational, and they must be periodically tested to verify that they are functioning at required performance levels. Concerns involving this testing can include: The significant amount of manpower required, inconsistent results due to variability in methods and personnel, exposure of personnel to hazardous environments, and difficulty in obtaining access to the areas containing some of the intrusion sensors. To address these concerns, the Department of Energy directed Sandia National Labs. to develop intrusion detection sensor testing tools. Over the past two years Sandia has developed several sensor testing tool prototypes. This paper describes the evolution of an exterior intrusion detection sensor tester and automatic data logger, and also describes various interior intrusion detection sensor test fixtures that can be remotely activated to simulate an intruder.

  10. a Wireless Sensor Network for Environmental Monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gburzynski, Pawel

    transmitters #12;Sample sensors: #12;Sample sensors: PAR: Photosynthetically Active (solar) Radiation sensora Wireless Sensor Network for Environmental Monitoring a Wireless Sensor Network for Environmental technology: a truly self configurable, low-cost, maintenance-free, ad-hoc sensor network (not based on Zig

  11. Platforms: Where the sensors are mounted.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilbes, Fernando

    over the Sahara On September 18, 1994. #12;14 The sensor detects solar radiation that has been absorbed1 Platforms: Where the sensors are mounted. Sensors: Instruments on the platforms. ETM+ AVIRIS GER 1500 #12;2 Passive Sensors · Aerial Cameras · Visible or Thermal Active Sensors · Microwave (Radar

  12. HOMOLOGICAL SENSOR Vin de Silva 1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ghrist, Robert W.

    HOMOLOGICAL SENSOR NETWORKS Vin de Silva 1 and Robert Ghrist 2 Sensors and sense-ability A sensor) as well as vast networks of local sensors (for touch). 1Department of Mathematics, Pomona College. 2 possibilities lie in the domain of the small. Swarms of local sensors at micro- or nano- scale have

  13. Special Issue "Underwater Sensor Nodes and Underwater Sensor Networks" A special issue of Sensors (ISSN 1424-8220)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Min

    aquatic environments. Marine surveillance, pollution detection and monitoring, and oceanographic data (salinity, conductivity, turbidity, pH, oxygen, temperature, depth, etc.) - Sediments and pollution sensor nodes - Acoustic sensors - Underwater sensor network architectures - Wired and wireless protocols

  14. Survivability enhancement study for C/sup 3/I/BM (communications, command, control and intelligence/battle management) ground segments: Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1986-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This study involves a concept developed by the Fairchild Space Company which is directly applicable to the Strategic Defense Initiative (SDI) Program as well as other national security programs requiring reliable, secure and survivable telecommunications systems. The overall objective of this study program was to determine the feasibility of combining and integrating long-lived, compact, autonomous isotope power sources with fiber optic and other types of ground segments of the SDI communications, command, control and intelligence/battle management (C/sup 3/I/BM) system in order to significantly enhance the survivability of those critical systems, especially against the potential threats of electromagnetic pulse(s) (EMP) resulting from high altitude nuclear weapon explosion(s). 28 figs., 2 tabs.

  15. Microfabricated AC impedance sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Krulevitch, Peter (Pleasanton, CA); Ackler, Harold D. (Sunnyvale, CA); Becker, Frederick (Houston, TX); Boser, Bernhard E. (Berkeley, CA); Eldredge, Adam B. (Austin, TX); Fuller, Christopher K. (Livermore, CA); Gascoyne, Peter R. C. (Bellaire, TX); Hamilton, Julie K. (Tracy, CA); Swierkowski, Stefan P. (Livermore, CA); Wang, Xiao-Bo (San Diego, CA)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microfabricated instrument for detecting and identifying cells and other particles based on alternating current (AC) impedance measurements. The microfabricated AC impedance sensor includes two critical elements: 1) a microfluidic chip, preferably of glass substrates, having at least one microchannel therein and with electrodes patterned on both substrates, and 2) electrical circuits that connect to the electrodes on the microfluidic chip and detect signals associated with particles traveling down the microchannels. These circuits enable multiple AC impedance measurements of individual particles at high throughput rates with sufficient resolution to identify different particle and cell types as appropriate for environmental detection and clinical diagnostic applications.

  16. Fluorescent sensor for mercury

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Zidong (Urbana, IL); Lee, Jung Heon (Evanston, IL); Lu, Yi (Champaign, IL)

    2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention provides a sensor for detecting mercury, comprising: a first polynucleotide, comprising a first region, and a second region, a second polynucleotide, a third polynucleotide, a fluorophore, and a quencher, wherein the third polynucleotide is optionally linked to the second region; the fluorophore is linked to the first polynucleotide and the quencher is linked to the second polynucleotide, or the fluorophore is linked to the second polynucleotide and the quencher is linked to the first polynucleotide; the first region and the second region hybridize to the second polynucleotide; and the second region binds to the third polynucleotide in the presence of Hg.sup.2+ ions.

  17. Solid state oxygen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Garzon, Fernando H. (Sante Fe, NM); Chung, Brandon W. (Los Alamos, NM); Raistrick, Ian D. (Los Alamos, NM); Brosha, Eric L. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solid state oxygen sensors are provided with a yttria-doped zirconia as an electrolyte and use the electrochemical oxygen pumping of the zirconia electrolyte. A linear relationship between oxygen concentration and the voltage arising at a current plateau occurs when oxygen accessing the electrolyte is limited by a diffusion barrier. A diffusion barrier is formed herein with a mixed electronic and oxygen ion-conducting membrane of lanthanum-containing perovskite or zirconia-containing fluorite. A heater may be used to maintain an adequate oxygen diffusion coefficient in the mixed conducting layer.

  18. Thin film hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cheng, Y.T.; Poli, A.A.; Meltser, M.A.

    1999-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A thin film hydrogen sensor includes a substantially flat ceramic substrate with first and second planar sides and a first substrate end opposite a second substrate end; a thin film temperature responsive resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the first substrate end; a thin film hydrogen responsive metal resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the fist substrate end and proximate to the temperature responsive resistor; and a heater on the second planar side of the substrate proximate to the first end. 5 figs.

  19. Thin film hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cheng, Yang-Tse (Rochester Hills, MI); Poli, Andrea A. (Livonia, MI); Meltser, Mark Alexander (Pittsford, NY)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A thin film hydrogen sensor, includes: a substantially flat ceramic substrate with first and second planar sides and a first substrate end opposite a second substrate end; a thin film temperature responsive resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the first substrate end; a thin film hydrogen responsive metal resistor on the first planar side of the substrate proximate to the fist substrate end and proximate to the temperature responsive resistor; and a heater on the second planar side of the substrate proximate to the first end.

  20. Use of sensors in monitoring civil structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daher, Bassam William, 1979-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis surveys the use of sensors and sensor networks in monitoring civil structures, with particular emphasis on the monitoring of bridges and highways using fiber optic sensors. Following a brief review of the most ...

  1. On the robustness of clustered sensor networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cho, Jung Jin

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    or fault tolerance capability of a sensor system. The redundancy degree of sensors plays two important roles pertaining to the robustness of a sensor network. First, the redundancy degree provides proper parameter values for robust estimator; second, we can...

  2. Massively Deployed Sensors Final Project Report

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massively Deployed Sensors Final Project Report Power Systems Engineering Research Center Systems Engineering Research Center Massively Deployed Sensors Final Project Report Editors Jonathan project titled "Massively Deployed Sensors," PSERC project T-31. We express our appreciation

  3. CHEMICAL SENSORS School of Chemistry and Biochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sherrill, David

    CHEMICAL SENSORS CHEM 6282 School of Chemistry and Biochemistry Chemical sensors physics and electronics or a chemical instrumentation course. The topics covered will include general theory of chemical recognition, electrochemical, optical, mass sensors and data reduction. Text: J

  4. Passive blast pressure sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    King, Michael J.; Sanchez, Roberto J.; Moss, William C.

    2013-03-19T23:59:59.000Z

    A passive blast pressure sensor for detecting blast overpressures of at least a predetermined minimum threshold pressure. The blast pressure sensor includes a piston-cylinder arrangement with one end of the piston having a detection surface exposed to a blast event monitored medium through one end of the cylinder and the other end of the piston having a striker surface positioned to impact a contact stress sensitive film that is positioned against a strike surface of a rigid body, such as a backing plate. The contact stress sensitive film is of a type which changes color in response to at least a predetermined minimum contact stress which is defined as a product of the predetermined minimum threshold pressure and an amplification factor of the piston. In this manner, a color change in the film arising from impact of the piston accelerated by a blast event provides visual indication that a blast overpressure encountered from the blast event was not less than the predetermined minimum threshold pressure.

  5. Fiber optic temperature sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rabold, D.

    1995-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Our fiber optic temperature measurement sensor and system is a major improvement over methods currently in use in most industrial processes, and it delivers all of the attributes required simplicity, accuracy, and cost efficiency-to help improve all of these processes. Because temperature is a basic physical attribute of nearly every industrial and commercial process, our system can eventually result in significant improvements in nearly every industrial and commercial process. Many finished goods, and the materials that go into them, are critically dependent on the temperature. The better the temperature measurement, the better quality the goods will be and the more economically they can be produced. The production and transmission of energy requires the monitoring of temperature in motors, circuit breakers, power generating plants, and transmission line equipment. The more reliable and robust the methods for measuring these temperature, the more available, stable, and affordable the supply of energy will become. The world is increasingly realizing the threats to health and safety of toxic or otherwise undesirable by products of the industrial economy in the environment. Cleanup of such contamination often depends on techniques that require the constant monitoring of temperature in extremely hazardous environments, which can damage most conventional temperature sensors and which are dangerous for operating personnel. Our system makes such monitoring safer and more economical.

  6. Wireless Magnetic Sensor Applications in Transportation Infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez, Rene Omar

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and fourth vehicle downstream signature (five vehicleof Figures Upstream and downstream middle sensor raw signals2.2 Upstream and downstream middle sensor signature

  7. Flexible Pressure Sensors: Modeling and Experimental Characterization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Viana, J.C.

    Flexible capacitive pressure sensors fabricated with nanocomposites were experimentally characterized and results compared with simulations from analytical modeling. Unlike traditional diaphragm silicon pressure sensors, ...

  8. Detectors and Sensors | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Detectors and Sensors SHARE Detectors and Sensors 201303163 Extreme Filter for Low-Output Thermocouples in High EMI Environments 201303179 Internal Tube Inspection System...

  9. A MECHANICAL STRAIN SENSOR FOR POLYMERIC MATERIALS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A MECHANICAL STRAIN SENSOR FOR POLYMERIC MATERIALS AND PHOTOPHYSICAL INVESTIGATIONS OF LARGE ...................................................................................................... 17 A MECHANICAL STRAIN SENSOR FOR POLYMERIC MATERIALS ....... 21 3.1 Introduction

  10. Gas sensor incorporating a porous framework

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Yaghi, Omar M; Czaja, Alexander U; Wang, Bo; Galatsis, Kosmas; Wang, Kang L; Furukawa, Hiroyasu

    2014-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure provides sensor for gas sensing including CO.sub.2 gas sensors comprising a porous framework sensing area for binding an analyte gas.

  11. Gas sensor incorporating a porous framework

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yaghi, Omar M.; Czaja, Alexander U.; Wang, Bo; Furukawa, Hiroyasu; Galatsis, Kosmas; Wang, Kang L.

    2013-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure provides sensor for gas sensing including CO.sub.2 gas sensors comprising a porous framework sensing area for binding an analyte gas.

  12. Nanostructured Electrochemical Sensors Based on Functionalized...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sensors Based on Functionalized Nanoporous Silica for Voltammetric Analysis of Lead, Mercury and Nanostructured Electrochemical Sensors Based on Functionalized Nanoporous Silica...

  13. Enabling Long-Lived Sensor Networks Through Solar Energy Harvesting

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jason Hsu; Sadaf Zahedi; Jonathan Friedman; Aman Kansal; Vijay Raghunathan; Mani Srivastava

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Long - Lived Sensor Networks through Solar Energy Harvestingsolar energy harvesting and storage device for sensor

  14. Energy efficient sensor network implementations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frigo, Janette R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Raby, Eric Y [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Brennan, Sean M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Kulathumani, Vinod [WEST VIRGINIA UNIV.; Rosten, Ed [CAMBRIDGE UNIV.; Wolinski, Christophe [IRISA; Wagner, Charles [IRISA; Charot, Francois [IRISA

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper, we discuss a low power embedded sensor node architecture we are developing for distributed sensor network systems deployed in a natural environment. In particular, we examine the sensor node for energy efficient processing-at-the-sensor. We analyze the following modes of operation; event detection, sleep(wake-up), data acquisition, data processing modes using low power, high performance embedded technology such as specialized embedded DSP processors and a low power FPGAs at the sensing node. We use compute intensive sensor node applications: an acoustic vehicle classifier (frequency domain analysis) and a video license plate identification application (learning algorithm) as a case study. We report performance and total energy usage for our system implementations and discuss the system architecture design trade offs.

  15. Oxygen partial pressure sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Dees, D.W.

    1994-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for detecting oxygen partial pressure and an oxygen partial pressure sensor are provided. The method for measuring oxygen partial pressure includes contacting oxygen to a solid oxide electrolyte and measuring the subsequent change in electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte. A solid oxide electrolyte is utilized that contacts both a porous electrode and a nonporous electrode. The electrical conductivity of the solid oxide electrolyte is affected when oxygen from an exhaust stream permeates through the porous electrode to establish an equilibrium of oxygen anions in the electrolyte, thereby displacing electrons throughout the electrolyte to form an electron gradient. By adapting the two electrodes to sense a voltage potential between them, the change in electrolyte conductivity due to oxygen presence can be measured. 1 fig.

  16. Ion mobility sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xu, Jun; Watson, David B.; Whitten, William B.

    2013-01-22T23:59:59.000Z

    An ion mobility sensor system including an ion mobility spectrometer and a differential mobility spectrometer coupled to the ion mobility spectrometer. The ion mobility spectrometer has a first chamber having first end and a second end extending along a first direction, and a first electrode system that generates a constant electric field parallel to the first direction. The differential mobility spectrometer includes a second chamber having a third end and a fourth end configured such that a fluid may flow in a second direction from the third end to the fourth end, and a second electrode system that generates an asymmetric electric field within an interior of the second chamber. Additionally, the ion mobility spectrometer and the differential mobility spectrometer form an interface region. Also, the first end and the third end are positioned facing one another so that the constant electric field enters the third end and overlaps the fluid flowing in the second direction.

  17. Fuel cell CO sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Grot, Stephen Andreas (Rochester, NY); Meltser, Mark Alexander (Pittsford, NY); Gutowski, Stanley (Pittsford, NY); Neutzler, Jay Kevin (Rochester, NY); Borup, Rodney Lynn (East Rochester, NY); Weisbrod, Kirk (Los Alamos, NM)

    1999-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The CO concentration in the H.sub.2 feed stream to a PEM fuel cell stack is monitored by measuring current and/or voltage behavior patterns from a PEM-probe communicating with the reformate feed stream. Pattern recognition software may be used to compare the current and voltage patterns from the PEM-probe to current and voltage telltale outputs determined from a reference cell similar to the PEM-probe and operated under controlled conditions over a wide range of CO concentrations in the H.sub.2 fuel stream. A CO sensor includes the PEM-probe, an electrical discharge circuit for discharging the PEM-probe to monitor the CO concentration, and an electrical purging circuit to intermittently raise the anode potential of the PEM-probe's anode to at least about 0.8 V (RHE) to electrochemically oxidize any CO adsorbed on the probe's anode catalyst.

  18. RealTime SpatioTemporal Query Processing in Mobile AdHoc Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that has multiple sensors (e.g., mo tion sensors, acoustic sensors, infrared light emitting diodes,

  19. NSTX High Temperature Sensor Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    B.McCormack; H.W. Kugel; P. Goranson; R. Kaita; et al

    1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The design of the more than 300 in-vessel sensor systems for the National Spherical Torus Experiment (NSTX) has encountered several challenging fusion reactor diagnostic issues involving high temperatures and space constraints. This has resulted in unique miniature, high temperature in-vessel sensor systems mounted in small spaces behind plasma facing armor tiles, and they are prototypical of possible high power reactor first-wall applications. In the Center Stack, Divertor, Passive Plate, and vessel wall regions, the small magnetic sensors, large magnetic sensors, flux loops, Rogowski Coils, thermocouples, and Langmuir Probes are qualified for 600 degrees C operation. This rating will accommodate both peak rear-face graphite tile temperatures during operations and the 350 degrees C bake-out conditions. Similar sensor systems including flux loops, on other vacuum vessel regions are qualified for 350 degrees C operation. Cabling from the sensors embedded in the graphite tiles follows narrow routes to exit the vessel. The detailed sensor design and installation methods of these diagnostic systems developed for high-powered ST operation are discussed.

  20. UAV sensor and survivability issues

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Canavan, G.H.

    1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report discusses the most significant tradeoffs between the operating altitude and the complexity and cost of UAVs and sensors. Low altitudes allow less complex, smaller sensors and platforms, but are vulnerable to ground fire. High altitudes require more numerous and capable sensors, but provide wider swaths for more rapid coverage and reduced vulnerability to ground fire. It is shown that for mission requirements and air defenses that higher is not necessarily better and that optimal flight altitudes exist that can be determined analytically.

  1. Sensors for Safety & Performance Stationary Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    for PEM Fuel Cell Vehicles · Interfacial Stability of Thin Film H2 Sensors · Sensors for Automotive Fuel Cell Systems · Micro-Machined Thin Film H2 Gas Sensors · Sensor Development for PEM Fuel Cell Systems for Fuel Cell Monitoring #12;Discussion Points Barriers ·Cost ·Application ·Lifetime ·Flexibility ·Public

  2. MINIMIZATION OF SENSOR USAGE FOR TARGET TRACKING IN A NETWORK OF IRREGULARLY SPACED SENSORS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Morrell, Darryl

    MINIMIZATION OF SENSOR USAGE FOR TARGET TRACKING IN A NETWORK OF IRREGULARLY SPACED SENSORS Thomas address the following scenario: a single target moves through a field of stationary sensors with known locations. At each time epoch, each sensor is either active or not; each active sensor outputs either target

  3. IEEE SENSORS JOURNAL, VOL. 4, NO. 4, AUGUST 2004 395 Sensor Technologies for Monitoring Metabolic

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilson, Denise

    IEEE SENSORS JOURNAL, VOL. 4, NO. 4, AUGUST 2004 395 Sensor Technologies for Monitoring Metabolic Michelle Wilson, Member, IEEE Abstract--A review of optical, chemical, and biological sensors to detect-on-a-chip research instrumentation. The sensors reviewed include optical sensors, at both research and commercial

  4. Multiple frequency method for operating electrochemical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, Louis P. (San Ramon, CA)

    2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A multiple frequency method for the operation of a sensor to measure a parameter of interest using calibration information including the steps of exciting the sensor at a first frequency providing a first sensor response, exciting the sensor at a second frequency providing a second sensor response, using the second sensor response at the second frequency and the calibration information to produce a calculated concentration of the interfering parameters, using the first sensor response at the first frequency, the calculated concentration of the interfering parameters, and the calibration information to measure the parameter of interest.

  5. Compact orthogonal NMR field sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Gerald, II, Rex E. (Brookfield, IL); Rathke, Jerome W. (Homer Glen, IL)

    2009-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    A Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor for emitting two orthogonal electro-magnetic fields in a common space. More particularly, a replacement inductor for existing NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) sensors to allow for NMR imaging. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor has a conductive coil and a central conductor electrically connected in series. The central conductor is at least partially surrounded by the coil. The coil and central conductor are electrically or electro-magnetically connected to a device having a means for producing or inducing a current through the coil and central conductor. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor can be used in NMR imaging applications to determine the position and the associated NMR spectrum of a sample within the electro-magnetic field of the central conductor.

  6. Sensor applications of carbon nanotubes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rushfeldt, Scott I

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A search of published research on sensing mechanisms of carbon nanotubes was performed to identify applications in which carbon nanotubes might improve on current sensor technologies, in either offering improved performance, ...

  7. Nuclear magnetic resonance readable sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ling, Yibo

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The monitoring of physiological biomarkers is fundamental to the diagnosis and treatment of disease. We describe here the development of molecular sensors which can be read by magnetic resonance (MR) relaxometry. MR is an ...

  8. Battery system with temperature sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, Steven J; Trester, Dale B

    2014-02-04T23:59:59.000Z

    A battery system includes a platform having an aperture formed therethrough, a flexible member having a generally planar configuration and extending across the aperture, wherein a portion of the flexible member is coextensive with the aperture, a cell provided adjacent the platform, and a sensor coupled to the flexible member and positioned proximate the cell. The sensor is configured to detect a temperature of the cell.

  9. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buchanan, Bruce R. (1985 Willis, Batesburg, SC 29006); Prather, William S. (2419 Dickey Rd., Augusta, GA 30906)

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for detecting a chemical substance by exposing an optic fiber having a core and a cladding to the chemical substance so that the chemical substance can be adsorbed onto the surface of the cladding. The optic fiber is coiled inside a container having a pair of valves for controlling the entrance and exit of the substance. Light from a light source is received by one end of the optic fiber, preferably external to the container, and carried by the core of the fiber. Adsorbed substance changes the transmissivity of the fiber as measured by a spectrophotometer at the other end, also preferably external to the container. Hydrogen is detected by the absorption of infrared light carried by an optic fiber with a silica cladding. Since the adsorption is reversible, a sensor according to the present invention can be used repeatedly. Multiple positions in a process system can be monitored using a single container that can be connected to each location to be monitored so that a sample can be obtained for measurement, or, alternatively, containers can be placed near each position and the optic fibers carrying the partially-absorbed light can be multiplexed for rapid sequential reading by a single spectrophotometer.

  10. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buchanan, B.R.; Prather, W.S.

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Apparatus and method for detecting a chemical substance by exposing an optic fiber having a core and a cladding to the chemical substance so that the chemical substance can be adsorbed onto the surface of the cladding. The optic fiber is coiled inside a container having a pair of valves for controlling the entrance and exit of the substance. Light from a light source is received by one end of the optic fiber, preferably external to the container, and carried by the core of the fiber. Adsorbed substance changes the transmissivity of the fiber as measured by a spectrophotometer at the other end, also preferably external to the container. Hydrogen is detected by the absorption of infrared light carried by an optic fiber with a silica cladding. Since the adsorption is reversible, a sensor according to the present invention can be used repeatedly. Multiple positions in a process system can be monitored using a single container that can be connected to each location to be monitored so that a sample can be obtained for measurement, or, alternatively, containers can be placed near each position and the optic fibers carrying the partially-absorbed light can be multiplexed for rapid sequential reading, by a single spectrophotometer.

  11. Micromechanical potentiometric sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat, Thomas G. (Knoxville, TN)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microcantilever potentiometric sensor utilized for detecting and measuring physical and chemical parameters in a sample of media is described. The microcantilevered spring element includes at least one chemical coating on a coated region, that accumulates a surface charge in response to hydrogen ions, redox potential, or ion concentrations in a sample of the media being monitored. The accumulation of surface charge on one surface of the microcantilever, with a differing surface charge on an opposing surface, creates a mechanical stress and a deflection of the spring element. One of a multitude of deflection detection methods may include the use of a laser light source focused on the microcantilever, with a photo-sensitive detector receiving reflected laser impulses. The microcantilevered spring element is approximately 1 to 100 .mu.m long, approximately 1 to 50 .mu.m wide, and approximately 0.3 to 3.0 .mu.m thick. An accuracy of detection of deflections of the cantilever is provided in the range of 0.01 nanometers of deflection. The microcantilever apparatus and a method of detection of parameters require only microliters of a sample to be placed on, or near the spring element surface. The method is extremely sensitive to the detection of the parameters to be measured.

  12. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Buchanan, B.R.; Prather, W.S.

    1992-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method are described for detecting a chemical substance by exposing an optic fiber having a core and a cladding to the chemical substance so that the chemical substance can be adsorbed onto the surface of the cladding. The optic fiber is coiled inside a container having a pair of valves for controlling the entrance and exit of the substance. Light from a light source is received by one end of the optic fiber, preferably external to the container, and carried by the core of the fiber. Adsorbed substance changes the transmissivity of the fiber as measured by a spectrophotometer at the other end, also preferably external to the container. Hydrogen is detected by the absorption of infrared light carried by an optic fiber with a silica cladding. Since the adsorption is reversible, a sensor according to the present invention can be used repeatedly. Multiple positions in a process system can be monitored using a single container that can be connected to each location to be monitored so that a sample can be obtained for measurement, or, alternatively, containers can be placed near each position and the optic fibers carrying the partially-absorbed light can be multiplexed for rapid sequential reading by a single spectrophotometer. 4 figs.

  13. Beam current sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuchnir, M.; Mills, F.E.

    1984-09-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A current sensor for measuring the dc component of a beam of charged particles employs a superconducting pick-up loop probe, with twisted superconducting leads in combination with a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) detector. The pick-up probe is in the form of a single-turn loop, or a cylindrical toroid, through which the beam is directed and within which a first magnetic flux is excluded by the Meisner effect. The SQUID detector acts as a flux-to-voltage converter in providing a current to the pick-up loop so as to establish a second magnetic flux within the electrode which nulls out the first magnetic flux. A feedback voltage within the SQUID detector represents the beam current of the particles which transit the pick-up loop. Meisner effect currents prevent changes in the magnetic field within the toroidal pick-up loop and produce a current signal independent of the beam's cross-section and its position within the toroid, while the combination of superconducting elements provides current measurement sensitivities in the nano-ampere range.

  14. Beam current sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kuchnir, Moyses (Elmhurst, IL); Mills, Frederick E. (Elburn, IL)

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A current sensor for measuring the DC component of a beam of charged particles employs a superconducting pick-up loop probe, with twisted superconducting leads in combination with a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID) detector. The pick-up probe is in the form of a single-turn loop, or a cylindrical toroid, through which the beam is directed and within which a first magnetic flux is excluded by the Meisner effect. The SQUID detector acts as a flux-to-voltage converter in providing a current to the pick-up loop so as to establish a second magnetic flux within the electrode which nulls out the first magnetic flux. A feedback voltage within the SQUID detector represents the beam current of the particles which transit the pick-up loop. Meisner effect currents prevent changes in the magnetic field within the toroidal pick-up loop and produce a current signal independent of the beam's cross-section and its position within the toroid, while the combination of superconducting elements provides current measurement sensitivites in the nano-ampere range.

  15. Micromechanical calorimetric sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Thundat, Thomas G. (Knoxville, TN); Doktycz, Mitchel J. (Knoxville, TN)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A calorimeter sensor apparatus is developed utilizing microcantilevered spring elements for detecting thermal changes within a sample containing biomolecules which undergo chemical and biochemical reactions. The spring element includes a bimaterial layer of chemicals on a coated region on at least one surface of the microcantilever. The chemicals generate a differential thermal stress across the surface upon reaction of the chemicals with an analyte or biomolecules within the sample due to the heat of chemical reactions in the sample placed on the coated region. The thermal stress across the spring element surface creates mechanical bending of the microcantilever. The spring element has a low thermal mass to allow detection and measuring of heat transfers associated with chemical and biochemical reactions within a sample placed on or near the coated region. A second surface may have a different material, or the second surface and body of microcantilever may be of an inert composition. The differential thermal stress between the surfaces of the microcantilever create bending of the cantilever. Deflections of the cantilever are detected by a variety of detection techniques. The microcantilever may be approximately 1 to 200 .mu.m long, approximately 1 to 50 .mu.m wide, and approximately 0.3 to 3.0 .mu.m thick. A sensitivity for detection of deflections is in the range of 0.01 nanometers. The microcantilever is extremely sensitive to thermal changes in samples as small as 30 microliters.

  16. Virtual Oxygen Sensor for Innovative NOx and PM Emission Control...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Virtual Oxygen Sensor for Innovative NOx and PM Emission Control Technologies Virtual Oxygen Sensor for Innovative NOx and PM Emission Control Technologies A virtual O2 sensor for...

  17. Information-based self-organization of sensor nodes of a sensor network

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ko, Teresa H. (Castro Valley, CA); Berry, Nina M. (Tracy, CA)

    2011-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensor node detects a plurality of information-based events. The sensor node determines whether at least one other sensor node is an information neighbor of the sensor node based on at least a portion of the plurality of information-based events. The information neighbor has an overlapping field of view with the sensor node. The sensor node sends at least one communication to the at least one other sensor node that is an information neighbor of the sensor node in response to at least one information-based event of the plurality of information-based events.

  18. Radionuclide Sensors for Water Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grate, Jay W.; Egorov, Oleg B.; DeVol, Timothy A.

    2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Radionuclide contamination in the soil and groundwater at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites is a severe problem that requires monitoring and remediation. Radionuclide measurement techniques are needed to monitor surface waters, groundwater, and process waters. Typically, water samples are collected and transported to an analytical laboratory, where costly radiochemical analyses are performed. To date, there has been very little development of selective radionuclide sensors for alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides such as 90Sr, 99Tc, and various actinides of interest. The objective of this project is to investigate novel sensor concepts and materials for sensitive and selective determination of beta- and alpha-emitting radionuclide contaminants in water. To meet the requirements for low-level, isotope-specific detection, the proposed sensors are based on radiometric detection. As a means to address the fundamental challenge of the short ranges of beta and alpha particles in water, our overall approach is based on localization of preconcentration/separation chemistries directly on or within the active area of a radioactivity detector. Automated microfluidics is used for sample manipulation and sensor regeneration or renewal. The outcome of these investigations will be the knowledge necessary to choose appropriate chemistries for selective preconcentration of radionuclides from environmental samples, new materials that combine chemical selectivity with scintillating properties, new materials that add chemical selectivity to solid-state diode detectors, new preconcentrating column sensors, and improved instrumentation and signal processing for selective radionuclide sensors. New knowledge will provide the basis for designing effective probes and instrumentation for field and in situ measurements.

  19. Radionuclide Sensors for Water Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grate, Jay W.; Egorov, Oleg B.; DeVol, Timothy A.

    2004-06-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Radionuclide contamination in the soil and groundwater at U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) sites is a severe problem that requires monitoring and remediation. Radionuclide measurement techniques are needed to monitor surface waters, groundwater, and process waters. Typically, water samples are collected and transported to an analytical laboratory, where costly radiochemical analyses are performed. To date, there has been very little development of selective radionuclide sensors for alpha- and beta-emitting radionuclides such as 90Sr, 99Tc, and various actinides of interest. The objective of this project is to investigate novel sensor concepts and materials for sensitive and selective determination of beta- and alpha-emitting radionuclide contaminants in water. To meet the requirements for low-level, isotope-specific detection, the proposed sensors are based on radiometric detection. As a means to address the fundamental challenge of the short ranges of beta and alpha particle s in water, our overall approach is based on localization of preconcentration/separation chemistries directly on or within the active area of a radioactivity detector. Automated microfluidics is used for sample manipulation and sensor regeneration or renewal. The outcome of these investigations will be the knowledge necessary to choose appropriate chemistries for selective preconcentration of radionuclides from environmental samples, new materials that combine chemical selectivity with scintillating properties, new materials that add chemical selectivity to solid-state diode detectors, new preconcentrating column sensors, and improved instrumentation and signal processing for selective radionuclide sensors. New knowledge will provide the basis for designing effective probes and instrumentation for field and in situ measurements.

  20. Low noise optical position sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spear, Jonathan David (Berkeley, CA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel optical position sensor is described that uses two component photodiodes electrically connected in parallel, with opposing polarities. A lens provides optical gain and restricts the acceptance angle of the detector. The response of the device to displacements of an optical spot is similar to that of a conventional bi-cell type position sensitive detector. However, the component photodiode design enables simpler electronic amplification with inherently less electrical noise than the bi-cell. Measurements by the sensor of the pointing noise of a focused helium-neon laser as a function of frequency demonstrate high sensitivity and suitability for optical probe beam deflection experiments.

  1. Low noise optical position sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spear, J.D.

    1999-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel optical position sensor is described that uses two component photodiodes electrically connected in parallel, with opposing polarities. A lens provides optical gain and restricts the acceptance angle of the detector. The response of the device to displacements of an optical spot is similar to that of a conventional bi-cell type position sensitive detector. However, the component photodiode design enables simpler electronic amplification with inherently less electrical noise than the bi-cell. Measurements by the sensor of the pointing noise of a focused helium-neon laser as a function of frequency demonstrate high sensitivity and suitability for optical probe beam deflection experiments. 14 figs.

  2. Pressure sensor for sealed containers

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Hodges, Franklin R. (Loudon, TN)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A magnetic pressure sensor for sensing a pressure change inside a sealed container. The sensor includes a sealed deformable vessel having a first end attachable to an interior surface of the sealed container, and a second end. A magnet mounted to the vessel second end defining a distance away from the container surface provides an externally detectable magnetic field. A pressure change inside the sealed container causes deformation of the vessel changing the distance of the magnet away from the container surface, and thus the detectable intensity of the magnetic field.

  3. Underwater Data Collection Using Robotic Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hollinger, Geoffrey A.

    We examine the problem of utilizing an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) to collect data from an underwater sensor network. The sensors in the network are equipped with acoustic modems that provide noisy, range-limited ...

  4. Sensor network localization based on natural phenomena

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Daniel Sang

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Autonomous localization is crucial for many sensor network applications. The goal of this thesis is to develop a distributed localization algorithm for the PLUG indoor sensor network by analyzing sound and light sensory ...

  5. Obtaining accurate measurement using redundant sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burnett, Michael Scott

    2012-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Conventional wisdom suggests to accomplish accurate measurement, the sensors used must have high precision and excellent dynamic range. This generally results in sensor systems that are complex, costly, and often sensitive to environmental factors...

  6. Design guidelines for optical resonator biochemical sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kimerling, Lionel C.

    In this paper, we propose a design tool for dielectric optical resonator-based biochemical refractometry sensors. Analogous to the widely accepted photodetector figure of merit, the detectivity D*, we introduce a new sensor ...

  7. Automatic Calibration of Multiple Coplanar Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brookshire, Jonathan

    This paper describes an algorithm for recovering the rigid 3-DOF transformation (offset and rotation) between pairs of sensors mounted rigidly in a common plane on a mobile robot. The algorithm requires only a set of sensor ...

  8. A standalone capacitively coupled occupancy sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, William H., M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the design and implementation of a standalone, capacitively coupled, occupancy sensor. Unlike previous iterations, the new sensor is decoupled from the fluorescent lamp. A well controlled, high voltage ...

  9. Adaptive sampling in autonomous marine sensor networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Eickstedt, Donald Patrick

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis, an innovative architecture for real-time adaptive and cooperative control of autonomous sensor platforms in a marine sensor network is described in the context of the autonomous oceanographic network scenario. ...

  10. IEEE SENSORS JOURNAL, VOL. 13, NO. 9, SEPTEMBER 2013 3405 A Soft Strain Sensor Based on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Park, Yong-Lae

    IEEE SENSORS JOURNAL, VOL. 13, NO. 9, SEPTEMBER 2013 3405 A Soft Strain Sensor Based on Ionic and Vincent Duchaine Abstract--A novel soft strain sensor capable of withstand- ing strains of up to 100% is described. The sensor is made of a hyperelastic silicone elastomer that contains embedded microchannels

  11. Abstract--A low noise optical sensor and biocompatible microscale optical filters for integrated fluorescence sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maryland at College Park, University of

    Abstract--A low noise optical sensor and biocompatible microscale optical filters for integrated fluorescence sensors were developed and tested. The sensor was fabricated in a 0.5 µm CMOS process. The measured reset noise of the sensor is reduced by a factor of 10 compared to conventional active pixel

  12. Sensors and Actuators A xxx (2004) xxxxxx Micromachined silicon force sensor based on diffractive optical

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Quake, Stephen R.

    Sensors and Actuators A xxx (2004) xxx­xxx Micromachined silicon force sensor based on diffractive-based force sensor integrated with a surface micromachined silicon-nitride probe for penetration and injection that is designed to only be sensitive to axial deflections of the probe. The optical-encoder force sensor exhibits

  13. CCEC Seminar Wireless Sensors for SemiconductorWireless Sensors for Semiconductor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Akhmedov, Azer

    CCEC Seminar Wireless Sensors for SemiconductorWireless Sensors for Semiconductor Manufacturing perhaps. In this talk, we describe our efforts in developing a new class of wireless sensors for use in semiconductor manufacturing. These sensors are fully self-contained with on board power, communications

  14. High pressure fiber optic sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Guida, Renato; Xia, Hua; Lee, Boon K; Dekate, Sachin N

    2013-11-26T23:59:59.000Z

    The present application provides a fiber optic sensor system. The fiber optic sensor system may include a small diameter bellows, a large diameter bellows, and a fiber optic pressure sensor attached to the small diameter bellows. Contraction of the large diameter bellows under an applied pressure may cause the small diameter bellows to expand such that the fiber optic pressure sensor may measure the applied pressure.

  15. Sensors 2002, 2, 244-257 ISSN 1424-8220

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mason, Andrew

    Sensors 2002, 2, 244-257 sensors ISSN 1424-8220 © 2002 by MDPI http://www.mdpi.net/sensors Invited Paper Communication Buses and Protocols for Sensor Networks Junwei Zhou and Andrew Mason* Department communication buses which are commonly used in sensor networks, discusses sensor network architectures

  16. Fiber-optic liquid level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber-optic liquid level sensor measures the height of a column of liquid through the hydrostatic pressure it produces. The sensor employs a fiber-optic displacement sensor to detect the pressure-induced displacement of the center of a corrugated diaphragm.

  17. Fiber optic sensor and method for making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vartuli, James Scott; Bousman, Kenneth Sherwood; Deng, Kung-Li; McEvoy, Kevin Paul; Xia, Hua

    2010-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A fiber optic sensor including a fiber having a modified surface integral with the fiber wherein the modified surface includes an open pore network with optical agents dispersed within the open pores of the open pore network. Methods for preparing the fiber optic sensor are also provided. The fiber optic sensors can withstand high temperatures and harsh environments.

  18. Compressive Computation in Analog VLSI Motion Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deutschmann, Rainer

    Compressive Computation in Analog VLSI Motion Sensors Rainer A. Deutschmann1 and Oliver G. Wenisch2 analog VLSI mo- tion sensors developed in the past. We show how their pixel-parallel architecture can is best suited to perform the algorithm even at high noise levels. 1 Analog VLSI Motion Sensors Inthe past

  19. 700:20131001.1211 Fine Sun Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mojzsis, Stephen J.

    700:20131001.1211 Fine Sun Sensor The Laboratory for Atmospheric and Space Physics (LASP) at the University of Colorado, Boulder is a world leader in space-based research including measurements of the Sun with respect to sun center. LASP has built sun position sensors for decades beginning with sensors for sub

  20. Fiber optic coupled optical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fleming, Kevin J. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A displacement sensor includes a first optical fiber for radiating light to a target, and a second optical fiber for receiving light from the target. The end of the first fiber is adjacent and not axially aligned with the second fiber end. A lens focuses light from the first fiber onto the target and light from the target onto the second fiber.

  1. Network Embedded Systems Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amir, Yair

    Battery Energy Reserve Manager = Bank Each task requests an account with conditions W fraction Tracking 9 #12;Virtual Battery: An Energy Reserve Abstraction for Embedded Sensor Networks Qing Cao of real battery allocated N number of energy installments L expected lifetime of the task C

  2. Battery system with temperature sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wood, Steven J.; Trester, Dale B.

    2012-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A battery system to monitor temperature includes at least one cell with a temperature sensing device proximate the at least one cell. The battery system also includes a flexible member that holds the temperature sensor proximate to the at least one cell.

  3. Buried fiber optic intrusion sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maier, Eric William

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    to the buried sensor induces a phase shift in light propagating along the fiber which allows for the detection and localization of intrusions. Through the use of an ultra-stable erbium-doped fiber laser and phase sensitive optical time domain reflectometry...

  4. Microelectromechanical systems contact stress sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotovsky, Jack (Oakland, CA)

    2007-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A microelectromechanical systems stress sensor comprising a microelectromechanical systems silicon body. A recess is formed in the silicon body. A silicon element extends into the recess. The silicon element has limited freedom of movement within the recess. An electrical circuit in the silicon element includes a piezoresistor material that allows for sensing changes in resistance that is proportional to bending of the silicon element.

  5. Microscale autonomous sensor and communications module

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Okandan, Murat; Nielson, Gregory N

    2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    Various technologies pertaining to a microscale autonomous sensor and communications module are described herein. Such a module includes a sensor that generates a sensor signal that is indicative of an environmental parameter. An integrated circuit receives the sensor signal and generates an output signal based at least in part upon the sensor signal. An optical emitter receives the output signal and generates an optical signal as a function of the output signal. An energy storage device is configured to provide power to at least the integrated circuit and the optical emitter, and wherein the module has a relatively small diameter and thickness.

  6. Fabrication of thermal microphotonic sensors and sensor arrays

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Shaw, Michael J. (Tijeras, NM); Watts, Michael R. (Albuquerque, NM); Nielson, Gregory N. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2010-10-26T23:59:59.000Z

    A thermal microphotonic sensor is fabricated on a silicon substrate by etching an opening and a trench into the substrate, and then filling in the opening and trench with silicon oxide which can be deposited or formed by thermally oxidizing a portion of the silicon substrate surrounding the opening and trench. The silicon oxide forms a support post for an optical resonator which is subsequently formed from a layer of silicon nitride, and also forms a base for an optical waveguide formed from the silicon nitride layer. Part of the silicon substrate can be selectively etched away to elevate the waveguide and resonator. The thermal microphotonic sensor, which is useful to detect infrared radiation via a change in the evanescent coupling of light between the waveguide and resonator, can be formed as a single device or as an array.

  7. IBM System Storage Product Guide IBM Systems and Technology Group

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    .2 Disk System with new options for drive-level disk encryption, Solid State storage, and 1 TB SATA drives Repeaters Cache (min, max) 256 MB battery backup 512 MB, 2 GB battery backup 512 MB, 2 GB battery backup 512 MB, 2 GB battery backup N/A RAID support 0, 1, 3, 5, 6,10

  8. IBM Systems and Technology IBM System x3850 X5

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -to-own, simplified power and sys- tems management with an energy-smart design and remote access Tailored to your availability or your peace of mind. OnForeverTM features such as redundant power and cooling help minimize and money needed to run your sys- tem. Advanced light path diagnostics and around-the-clock remote access

  9. IBM Global Business Services IBM Institute for Business Value

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    challenges The spare parts marketplace presents significant opportunity for automotive OEMs, but also electronics. The IT systems deployed by automakers are typically further frustrating the ability of 2 throughout the automotive value chain, even though they comprise a relatively small proportion of automotive

  10. IBM Global Business Services IBM Institute for Business Value

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    and sustainability Building a new financial order The global financial markets industry has been experiencing

  11. IDEAS from IBM 23 July 2007 IDEAS from IBM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Care in Australia The Children's Hospital at Westmead (PDF, 397K) Melbourne Health (PDF, 34.8K of health in Australia · Total health expenditure in 2004/05 (latest figures) was $87.3 billion or $4,319 per person and 9.8% of GDP 2 · 11th highest health expenditure to GDP percentage for OECD countries2

  12. IBM Podcast MATHENY: Welcome to this IBM podcast, Proactively

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . This transformation is driven by healthcare reform, aging populations, compliance mandates and the business challenges States, not only are initiatives to reduce costs and improve or extend access to quality patient care and healthcare reform. One example of this is ICD 10, which stands for International Statistical Classification

  13. IBM Podcast MATHENY: Welcome to this IBM podcast, Achieving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    , the engineering activities such as the execution of a hazard and risk analysis method like FMEA, which is Failure

  14. Real-Time Spatio-Temporal Query Processing in Mobile Ad-Hoc Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    that has multiple sensors (e.g., mo- tion sensors, acoustic sensors, infrared light emitting diodes, and pa

  15. Six degree of freedom sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vann, C.S.

    1999-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

    This small, non-contact optical sensor increases the capability and flexibility of computer controlled machines by detecting its relative position to a workpiece in all six degrees of freedom (DOF). At a fraction of the cost, it is over 200 times faster and up to 25 times more accurate than competing 3-DOF sensors. Applications range from flexible manufacturing to a 6-DOF mouse for computers. Until now, highly agile and accurate machines have been limited by their inability to adjust to changes in their tasks. By enabling them to sense all six degrees of position, these machines can now adapt to new and complicated tasks without human intervention or delay--simplifying production, reducing costs, and enhancing the value and capability of flexible manufacturing. 3 figs.

  16. ION 2006, Fort Worth TX, 26-29 September 2006 1 GPS/INS/G Sensors/Yaw Rate Sensor/Wheel

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Calgary, University of

    of four integration strategies, namely a GPS/INS integrated system, a GPS/INS/G sensors/Yaw rate sensor/Wheel speed sensor system with two non- holonomic constraints, a GPS/INS/G sensors/Yaw rate sensor/Wheel speed/INS/G sensors/Yaw rate sensor/Wheel speed sensor system with the removal of the lateral constraint

  17. IBM Software Lincoln Trust Company

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    into account several "lessons learned" from the company's past pre-divestiture past. A process improve- ment team had existed several years prior, but was decommissioned due to lack of meaningful automation, there were also lessons from the past that needed to be integrated into the new program. Prior attempts

  18. IBM Presentation Template Full Version

    Annual Energy Outlook 2013 [U.S. Energy Information Administration (EIA)]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul(Summary) " ,"ClickPipelines AboutDecember 2005 (Thousand9,0, 1997Environment >7,992000 Short-TermSeptember» ;

  19. IBM's New Flat Panel Displays

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation ProposedUsingFun withconfinementEtching. | EMSL Bubblesstructure theby J. Stöhr (SSRL),

  20. Amorphous Diamond MEMS and Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    SULLIVAN, JOHN P.; FRIEDMANN, THOMAS A.; ASHBY, CAROL I.; DE BOER, MAARTEN P.; SCHUBERT, W. KENT; SHUL, RANDY J.; HOHLFELDER, ROBERT J.; LAVAN, D.A.

    2002-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes a new microsystems technology for the creation of microsensors and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) using stress-free amorphous diamond (aD) films. Stress-free aD is a new material that has mechanical properties close to that of crystalline diamond, and the material is particularly promising for the development of high sensitivity microsensors and rugged and reliable MEMS. Some of the unique properties of aD include the ability to easily tailor film stress from compressive to slightly tensile, hardness and stiffness 80-90% that of crystalline diamond, very high wear resistance, a hydrophobic surface, extreme chemical inertness, chemical compatibility with silicon, controllable electrical conductivity from insulating to conducting, and biocompatibility. A variety of MEMS structures were fabricated from this material and evaluated. These structures included electrostatically-actuated comb drives, micro-tensile test structures, singly- and doubly-clamped beams, and friction and wear test structures. It was found that surface micromachined MEMS could be fabricated in this material easily and that the hydrophobic surface of the film enabled the release of structures without the need for special drying procedures or the use of applied hydrophobic coatings. Measurements using these structures revealed that aD has a Young's modulus of {approx}650 GPa, a tensile fracture strength of 8 GPa, and a fracture toughness of 8 MPa{center_dot}m {sup 1/2}. These results suggest that this material may be suitable in applications where stiction or wear is an issue. Flexural plate wave (FPW) microsensors were also fabricated from aD. These devices use membranes of aD as thin as {approx}100 nm. The performance of the aD FPW sensors was evaluated for the detection of volatile organic compounds using ethyl cellulose as the sensor coating. For comparable membrane thicknesses, the aD sensors showed better performance than silicon nitride based sensors. Greater than one order of magnitude increase in chemical sensitivity is expected through the use of ultra-thin aD membranes in the FPW sensor. The discoveries and development of the aD microsystems technology that were made in this project have led to new research projects in the areas of aD bioMEMS and aD radio frequency MEMS.

  1. A simulation model for the lifetime of wireless sensor networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elleithy, Abdelrahman

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we present a model for the lifetime of wireless sensor networks. The model takes into consideration several parameters such as the total number of sensors, network size, percentage of sink nodes, location of sensors, the mobility of sensors, and power consumption. A definition of the life time of the network based on three different criteria is introduced; percentage of available power to total power, percentage of alive sensors to total sensors, and percentage of alive sink sensors to total sink sensors. A Matlab based simulator is developed for the introduced model. A number of wireless sensor networks scenarios are presented and discussed.

  2. Micromachined pressure sensors: Review and recent developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eaton, W.P.; Smith, J.H. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States). Intelligent Micromachines Dept.

    1997-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Since the discovery of piezoresistivity in silicon in the mid 1950s, silicon-based pressure sensors have been widely produced. Micromachining technology has greatly benefited from the success of the integrated circuits industry, burrowing materials, processes, and toolsets. Because of this, microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) are now poised to capture large segments of existing sensor markets and to catalyze the development of new markets. Given the emerging importance of MEMS, it is instructive to review the history of micromachined pressure sensors, and to examine new developments in the field. Pressure sensors will be the focus of this paper, starting from metal diaphragm sensors with bonded silicon strain gauges, and moving to present developments of surface-micromachined, optical, resonant, and smart pressure sensors. Considerations for diaphragm design will be discussed in detail, as well as additional considerations for capacitive and piezoresistive devices.

  3. Polymers for Chemical Sensors Using Hydrosilylation Chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grate, Jay W.; Kaganove, Steven N.; Nelson, David A.

    2001-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Sorbent and functionalized polymers play a key role in a diverse set of fields, including chemical sensors, separation membranes, solid phase extraction techniques, and chromatography. Sorbent polymers are critical to a number of sensor array or "electronic nose" systems. The responses of the sensors in the array give rise to patterns that can be used to distinguish one compound from another, provided that a sufficiently diverse set of sensing materials is present in the array. Figure 1 illustrates the concept of several sensors, each with a different sensor coating, giving rise to variable responses to an analyte that appear as a pattern in bar graph format. Using hydrosilylation as the bond-forming reaction, we have developed a versatile and efficient approach to developing sorbent polymers with diverse interactive properties for sensor applications. Both the chemical and physical properties of these polymers are predictable and tunable by design.

  4. Frustrated total internal reflection acoustic field sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kallman, Jeffrey S. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A frustrated total internal reflection acoustic field sensor which allows the acquisition of the acoustic field over an entire plane, all at once. The sensor finds use in acoustic holography and acoustic diffraction tomography. For example, the sensor may be produced by a transparent plate with transparent support members tall enough to support one or more flexible membranes at an appropriate height for frustrated total internal reflection to occur. An acoustic wave causes the membrane to deflect away from its quiescent position and thus changes the amount of light that tunnels through the gap formed by the support members and into the membrane, and so changes the amount of light reflected by the membrane. The sensor(s) is illuminated by a uniform tight field, and the reflection from the sensor yields acoustic wave amplitude and phase information which can be picked up electronically or otherwise.

  5. Nonlinear filtering in target tracking using cooperative mobile sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiangping Hu; Xiaoming Hu

    2011-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

    Collaborative signal processing and sensor deployment have been among the most important research tasks in target tracking using networked sensors. In this paper, the mathematical model is formulated for single target tracking using mobile nonlinear scalar range sensors. Then a sensor deployment strategy is proposed for the mobile sensors and a nonlinear convergent filter is built to estimate the trajectory of the target.

  6. Sensors 2007, 7, 3428-3441 ISSN 1424-8220

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Zhongping

    Sensors 2007, 7, 3428-3441 sensors ISSN 1424-8220 © 2007 by MDPI www.mdpi.org/sensors Full Research-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS, 7 bands), the Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MODIS, 8 bands), and the Medium sensors. Recently, Lee and Carder (2002) demonstrated that for adequate derivation of major properties

  7. Query Processing in Mobile Sensor Networks Wang-Chien Lee

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giles, C. Lee

    , a sensor network for air pollution test, where all sensors are scattered in the air and transported to collect the data from the sensors about air pollution and traffic conditions. In comparison, vehicles, animals, air, and water). With self-propelling sensor nodes, a mobile sensor network is self

  8. Low-Cost Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheem, Sang K. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2003-07-22T23:59:59.000Z

    The size and cost of fabricating fiber optic pressure sensors is reduced by fabricating the membrane of the sensor in a non-planar shape. The design of the sensors may be made in such a way that the non-planar membrane becomes a part of an air-tight cavity, so as to make the membrane resilient due to the air-cushion effect of the air-tight cavity. Such non-planar membranes are easier to make and attach.

  9. Low-Cost Fiber Optic Pressure Sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Sheem, Sang K. (Pleasanton, CA)

    2004-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

    The size and cost of fabricating fiber optic pressure sensors is reduced by fabricating the membrane of the sensor in a non-planar shape. The design of the sensors may be made in such a way that the non-planar membrane becomes a part of an air-tight cavity, so as to make the membrane resilient due to the air-cushion effect of the air-tight cavity. Such non-planar membranes are easier to make and attach.

  10. Sensor Development for PEM Fuel Cell Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steve Magee; Richard Gehman

    2005-07-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This document reports on the work done by Honeywell Sensing and Control to investigate the feasibility of modifying low cost Commercial Sensors for use inside a PEM Fuel Cell environment. Both stationary and automotive systems were considered. The target environment is hotter (100 C) than the typical commercial sensor maximum of 70 C. It is also far more humid (100% RH condensing) than the more typical 95% RH non-condensing at 40 C (4% RH maximum at 100 C). The work focused on four types of sensors, Temperature, Pressure, Air Flow and Relative Humidity. Initial design goals were established using a market research technique called Market Driven Product Definition (MDPD). A series of interviews were conducted with various users and system designers in their facilities. The interviewing team was trained in data taking and analysis per the MDPD process. The final result was a prioritized and weighted list of both requirements and desires for each sensor. Work proceeded on concept development for the 4 types of sensors. At the same time, users were developing the actual fuel cell systems and gaining knowledge and experience in the use of sensors and controls systems. This resulted in changes to requirements and desires that were not anticipated during the MDPD process. The concepts developed met all the predicted requirements. At the completion of concept development for the Pressure Sensor, it was determined that the Fuel Cell developers were happy with off-the-shelf automotive pressure sensors. Thus, there was no incentive to bring a new Fuel Cell Specific Pressure Sensor into production. Work was therefore suspended. After the experience with the Pressure Sensor, the requirements for a Temperature Sensor were reviewed and a similar situation applied. Commercially available temperature sensors were adequate and cost effective and so the program was not continued from the Concept into the Design Phase.

  11. Carbon nanotube temperature and pressure sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ivanov, Ilia N; Geohegan, David Bruce

    2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The present invention, in one embodiment, provides a method of measuring pressure or temperature using a sensor including a sensor element composed of a plurality of carbon nanotubes. In one example, the resistance of the plurality of carbon nanotubes is measured in response to the application of temperature or pressure. The changes in resistance are then recorded and correlated to temperature or pressure. In one embodiment, the present invention provides for independent measurement of pressure or temperature using the sensors disclosed herein.

  12. Radionuclide Sensors for Environmental Monitoring: From Flow...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to Equilibration-Based Radionuclide Sensors for Environmental Monitoring: From Flow Injection Solid-Phase Absorptiometry to Equilibration-Based Abstract: The development...

  13. Chemical preconcentrator with integral thermal flow sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Manginell, Ronald P. (Albuquerque, NM); Frye-Mason, Gregory C. (Cedar Crest, NM)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A chemical preconcentrator with integral thermal flow sensor can be used to accurately measure fluid flow rate in a microanalytical system. The thermal flow sensor can be operated in either constant temperature or constant power mode and variants thereof. The chemical preconcentrator with integral thermal flow sensor can be fabricated with the same MEMS technology as the rest of the microanlaytical system. Because of its low heat capacity, low-loss, and small size, the chemical preconcentrator with integral thermal flow sensor is fast and efficient enough to be used in battery-powered, portable microanalytical systems.

  14. MB3a Infrasound Sensor Evaluation.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Merchant, Bion J.; McDowell, Kyle D.

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories has tested and evaluated a new infrasound sensor, the MB3a, manufactured by Seismo Wave. These infrasound sensors measure pressure output by a methodology developed by researchers at the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) and the technology was recently licensed to Seismo Wave for production and sales. The purpose of the infrasound sensor evaluation was to determine a measured sensitivity, transfer function, power, self-noise, dynamic range, seismic sensitivity, and self- calibration ability. The MB3a infrasound sensors are being evaluated for potential use in the International Monitoring System (IMS) of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban-Treaty Organization (CTBTO).

  15. Robust Semidefinite Programming Approaches for Sensor Network ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2006-05-21T23:59:59.000Z

    May 21, 2006 ... Sample random problem with 20 sensors, 12 anchors . ... Section 2 with background and notation, including information on the linear...

  16. Electrochemical NOx Sensors for Monitoring Diesel Emissions

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    x Sensors for Monitoring Diesel Emissions This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract...

  17. Uncertainty Quantification Techniques for Sensor Calibration...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Uncertainty Quantification Techniques for Sensor Calibration Monitoring in Nuclear Power Plants Re-direct Destination: This report describes research towards the development of...

  18. Sensors, Controls, and Transactive Energy Research | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Energy Research Sensors, Controls, and Transactive Energy Research Lead Performer: Oak Ridge National Laboratory - Oak Ridge, TN DOE Funding: 2,700,000 Cost Share: NA...

  19. An Inexpensive Brazable Material for Magnetostrictive Sensors...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    More Like This Return to Search An Inexpensive Brazable Material for Magnetostrictive Sensors and Other Applications Based on Ferrite Materials Ames Laboratory Contact AMES About...

  20. Advanced Sensors, Control, Platforms, and Modeling

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    112 productivity and safety, and boost the U.S. sensor and automation industry. 113 2. Technology Assessment and Potential 114 2.1 Performance advances 115 DRAFT -...

  1. Uncertainty Quantification Techniques for Sensor Calibration...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Uncertainty Quantification Techniques for Sensor Calibration Monitoring in Nuclear Power Plants Re-direct Destination: Temp Data Fields Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Lin, Guang; Crawford,...

  2. Electrochemical NOx Sensor for Monitoring Diesel Emissions

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    advanced prototype built on an alumina substrate, provided by Ford, with an integrated heating element * Substrate packaged by U.S. automotive supplier into a commercial sensor...

  3. Structure and yarn sensor for fabric

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mee, David K. (Knoxville, TN); Allgood, Glenn O. (Powell, TN); Mooney, Larry R. (Knoxville, TN); Duncan, Michael G. (Clinton, TN); Turner, John C. (Clinton, TN); Treece, Dale A. (Knoxville, TN)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A structure and yarn sensor for fabric directly determines pick density in a fabric thereby allowing fabric length and velocity to be calculated from a count of the picks made by the sensor over known time intervals. The structure and yarn sensor is also capable of detecting full length woven defects and fabric. As a result, an inexpensive on-line pick (or course) density measurement can be performed which allows a loom or knitting machine to be adjusted by either manual or automatic means to maintain closer fiber density tolerances. Such a sensor apparatus dramatically reduces fabric production costs and significantly improves fabric consistency and quality for woven or knitted fabric.

  4. Sensors and Actuators B 107 (2005) 121125 Two photon fluorescence sensors based on resonant grating

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Friesem, Asher A.

    Sensors and Actuators B 107 (2005) 121­125 Two photon fluorescence sensors based on resonant the excitation and emission radia- tion reduces the background noise, the static photobleaching.07.040 #12;122 T. Katchalski et al. / Sensors and Actuators B 107 (2005) 121­125 lar, they are compact

  5. SET/RESET PULSE CIRCUITS FOR MAGNETIC SENSORS AN-201 Honeywell's line of magnetoresistive permalloy sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kleinfeld, David

    SET/RESET PULSE CIRCUITS FOR MAGNETIC SENSORS AN-201 Honeywell's line of magnetoresistive permalloy sensors are sensitive to magnetic fields less than 100 µgauss in a ±2 gauss range. In order to achieve, or flip, the polarity of film magnetization, thus changing the sensor characteristics. Following

  6. Adaptive Sensor Activity Scheduling in Distributed Sensor Networks: A Statistical Mechanics Approach

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Asok

    of spatial-temporal events. The sensor network is modeled as a Markov random field on a graph, where concepts and wireless communications have enabled usage of inexpensive and miniaturized sensor nodes [1­3] that can #12;Effective use of sensor networks requires resource-aware operation; once deployed, energy sources

  7. Variable Radii Connected Sensor Cover in Sensor ZONGHENG ZHOU, SAMIR R. DAS, HIMANSHU GUPTA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Himanshu

    is to maintain the fidelity of the gathered data while minimizing energy usage in the network. Energy is spent to be monitored. The set of active sensors should also form a connected communication graph, so that they can of selecting a minimum energy-cost connected sensor cover, when each sensor node can vary its sensing

  8. Variable Radii Connected Sensor Cover in Sensor Networks Zongheng Zhou, Samir Das, Himanshu Gupta

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Das, Samir R.

    of the gathered data while minimizing energy usage in the network. Energy is spent due to message transmissions of active sensors should also form a connected communication graph, so that they can autonomously respond energy-cost connected sensor cover, when each sensor node can vary its sensing and transmission radius

  9. Sensors and Actuators B 118 (2006) 135141 Low temperature indium oxide gas sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sensors and Actuators B 118 (2006) 135­141 Low temperature indium oxide gas sensors M. Sucheaa rights reserved. Keywords: Metal oxide thin films; InOx; Gas sensors; Ozone 1. Introduction The interest's attractive for many areas such as transparent electrodes for solar cells and flat panel displays

  10. Power Sources for Wireless Sensor Abstract. Wireless sensor networks are poised to become a very significant

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frechette, Luc G.

    Power Sources for Wireless Sensor Networks Abstract. Wireless sensor networks are poised to become a very significant enabling technology in many sectors. Already a few very low power wireless sensor environment, alternative power sources must be employed. This paper reviews many potential power sources

  11. Volatile organic compound sensor system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Schabron, John F. (Laramie, WY); Rovani, Jr., Joseph F. (Laramie, WY); Bomstad, Theresa M. (Waxahachie, TX); Sorini-Wong, Susan S. (Laramie, WY); Wong, Gregory K. (Laramie, WY)

    2011-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Generally, this invention relates to the development of field monitoring methodology for new substances and sensing chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and terrorist substances. It also relates to a portable test kit which may be utilized to measure concentrations of halogenated volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the field. Specifically it relates to systems for reliably field sensing the potential presence of such items while also distinguishing them from other elements potentially present. It also relates to overall systems and processes for sensing, reacting, and responding to an indicated presence of such substance, including modifications of existing halogenated sensors and arrayed sensing systems and methods.

  12. sensors | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLasDelivered energy consumption byAbout SRNLBuildingsScattering at JLab and LeadSensors &

  13. Active Sensors | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectric Coop,SaveWhiskeyEnergy InformationAclara JumpLogsEnergySensors Jump

  14. Renewable-reagent electrochemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, J.; Olsen, K.B.

    1999-08-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A new electrochemical probe(s) design allowing for continuous (renewable) reagent delivery is described. The probe comprises an integrated membrane sampling/electrochemical sensor that prevents interferences from surface-active materials and greatly extends the linear range. The probe(s) is useful for remote or laboratory-based monitoring in connection with microdialysis sampling and electrochemical measurements of metals and organic compounds that are not readily detected in the absence of reacting with the compound. Also disclosed is a method of using the probe(s). 19 figs.

  15. Renewable-reagent electrochemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wang, Joseph (Las Cruces, NM); Olsen, Khris B. (Richland, WA)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A new electrochemical probe(s) design allowing for continuous (renewable) reagent delivery. The probe comprises an integrated membrane-sampling/electrochemical sensor that prevents interferences from surface-active materials and greatly extends the linear range. The probe(s) is useful for remote or laboratory-based monitoring in connection with microdialysis sampling and electrochemical measurements of metals and organic compounds that are not readily detected in the absence of reacting with the compound. Also disclosed is a method of using the probe(s).

  16. Oscillator-Based Touch Sensor with Adaptive Resolution

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Du, Li

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Die photo of the touch sensor circuit.223.9 Fig.3.9 Die photo of the touch sensor circuit Chapter 4.photo . 20 Chapter 4. Test of the touch sensor

  17. Vibration detection in turbomachinery using non-contacting sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cohen, Eric D., M. Eng. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Recent developments have seen the introduction of multiple Eddy Current Sensors (ECS) into turbomachinery. These sensors employ an active magnetic field to monitor each blade as it passes the sensor. They generate an ...

  18. Precise Time Synchronization for Wireless Sensor Networks using the

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of Information Technology and Electrical Engineering January 2010 #12;#12;Abstract For sensor networks a wide to the needs of data gathering, the main applica- tion of sensor networks. Sensor data is often useless

  19. Monitor and control of cockroach locomotion with piezoelectric sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cooper, Rodrigo Alejandro

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    sensors; laboratory in vitro testing of sensors and cockroaches; and methodology to control them. This research successfully built an experimental foundation for sensor and roach testing and developed a methodology for roach locomotion control...

  20. Vision and Inertial Sensor Based Drive Trains Control

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Haifei

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Inertial Sensor Based Drive Trains Control by Haifei Cheng AInertial Sensor Based Drive Trains Control c 2010 by HaifeiInertial Sensor Based Drive Trains Control by Haifei Cheng

  1. Leak Detection and H2 Sensor Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brosha, Eric L. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2012-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Low-cost, durable, and reliable Hydrogen safety sensor for vehicle, stationary, and infrastructure applications. A new zirconia, electrochemical-based sensor technology is being transitioned out of the laboratory and into an advanced testing phase for vehicular and stationary H{sub 2} safety applications. Mixed potential sensors are a class of electrochemical devices that develop an open-circuit electromotive force due to the difference in the kinetics of the redox reactions of various gaseous species at each electrode/electrolyte/gas interface, referred to as the triple phase boundary (TPB). Therefore, these sensors have been considered for the sensing of various reducible or oxidizable gas species in the presence of oxygen. Based on this principle, a unique sensor design was developed by LANL and LLNL. The uniqueness of this sensor derives from minimizing heterogeneous catalysis (detrimental to sensor response) by avoiding gas diffusion through a catalytically active material and minimizing diffusion path to the TPB. Unlike the conventional design of these devices that use a dense solid electrolyte and porous thin film electrodes (similar to the current state-of-the-art zirconia-based sensors and fuel cells), the design of this sensor uses dense electrodes and porous electrolytes. Such a sensor design facilitates a stable and reproducible device response, since dense electrode morphologies are easy to reproduce and are significantly more stable than the conventional porous morphologies. Moreover, these sensors develop higher mixed potentials since the gas diffusion is through the less catalytically active electrolyte than the electrode. Lastly, the choice of electrodes is primarily based on their O2 reduction kinetics and catalytic properties vis-a-vis the target gas of interest.

  2. IEEE SENSORS JOURNAL, SELECTED PAPER FROM IEEE SENSORS 2012 CONFERENCE SPECIAL ISSUE, JULY 2013 1 Ambient-RF-Energy-Harvesting Sensor Device with

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tentzeris, Manos

    , Wireless Sensor Networks I. INTRODUCTION Energy harvesting devices such as solar panels, piezoelectricIEEE SENSORS JOURNAL, SELECTED PAPER FROM IEEE SENSORS 2012 CONFERENCE SPECIAL ISSUE, JULY 2013 1 Ambient-RF-Energy-Harvesting Sensor Device with Capacitor-Leakage-Aware Duty Cycle Control Ryo Shigeta

  3. Photogrammetry & Machine Vision 1. Image sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giger, Christine

    Photogrammetry & Machine Vision 1. Image sensors (a) Fundamentals of image sensors (b) CCD image'Apuzzo Photogrammetry and Machine Vision - 3 Point cloud processing, surface generation, texturing (b) Camera, noise) 2N. D'Apuzzo Photogrammetry and Machine Vision - 3 Point cloud processing, surface generation

  4. Photogrammetry & Machine Vision 1. Image sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giger, Christine

    Photogrammetry & Machine Vision 1. Image sensors (a) Fundamentals of image sensors (b) CCD image. Remondino, N. D'Apuzzo Photogrammetry and Machine Vision ­ 1. Measurement in images (b) Camera calibration of Photogrammetry and Machine Vision Fully understand: 1. Image based 3D and 4D measurement 2. Image based 3D

  5. Photogrammetry & Machine Vision 1. Image sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Giger, Christine

    Photogrammetry & Machine Vision 1. Image sensors (a) Fundamentals of image sensors (b) CCD image. Remondino, N. D'Apuzzo Photogrammetry and Machine Vision ­ 2. Camera calibration and orientation (b) Camera and Machine Vision ­ 2. Camera calibration and orientation (b) Calibration methods (reference object, point

  6. WIRELESS SENSORS EMBEDDED IN CONCRETE Amal Abbadi

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    WIRELESS SENSORS EMBEDDED IN CONCRETE Amal Abbadi 1 Phd Student, IRCICA, IEMN, Université Lille1 antennas with concrete are investigated at 860MHz. Simulations for different cases (different concrete are presented. KEYWORDS : Wireless sensor networks, concrete attenuation, embedded antenna, concrete

  7. Modeling Spatially Correlated Data in Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling Spatially Correlated Data in Sensor Networks APOORVA JINDAL and KONSTANTINOS PSOUNIS of spatially correlated sensor network data. The proposed model is Markovian in nature and can capture on the degree of spatial correlation in data, under real and synthetic traces. The real traces are obtained from

  8. Characterization monitoring & sensor technology crosscutting program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of the Characterization, Monitoring, and Sensor Technology Crosscutting Program (CMST-CP) is to deliver appropriate characterization, monitoring, and sensor technology (CMST) to the OFfice of Waste Management (EM-30), the Office of Environmental Restoration (EM-40), and the Office of Facility Transition and Management (EM-60).

  9. Monitoring Energy Consumption In Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turau, Volker

    Monitoring Energy Consumption In Wireless Sensor Networks Matthias Witt, Christoph Weyer, it may impair the ability of the sensor network to function. Therefore, minimizing energy consumption energy consumption in both standby and active modes is the basis of wireless networks. Energy preserving

  10. Optimize Storage Placement in Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Qun

    of limited storage, communication capacity, and battery power is ameliorated. Placing storage nodesOptimize Storage Placement in Sensor Networks Bo Sheng, Member, IEEE, Qun Li, Member, IEEE, and Weizhen Mao Abstract--Data storage has become an important issue in sensor networks as a large amount

  11. Ultra-wideband radar sensors and networks

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Leach, Jr., Richard R; Nekoogar, Faranak; Haugen, Peter C

    2013-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Ultra wideband radar motion sensors strategically placed in an area of interest communicate with a wireless ad hoc network to provide remote area surveillance. Swept range impulse radar and a heart and respiration monitor combined with the motion sensor further improves discrimination.

  12. Carbon Nanotube DNA Sensor and Sensing Mechanism

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Le Roy, Robert J.

    Carbon Nanotube DNA Sensor and Sensing Mechanism Xiaowu Tang,*,, Sarunya Bansaruntip, Nozomi; Revised Manuscript Received June 7, 2006 ABSTRACT We report the fabrication of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) DNA sensors and the sensing mechanism. The simple and generic protocol for label

  13. CARBON NANOTUBE TRANSISTORS, SENSORS, AND A Dissertation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McEuen, Paul L.

    CARBON NANOTUBE TRANSISTORS, SENSORS, AND BEYOND A Dissertation Presented to the Faculty of Philosophy by Xinjian Zhou January 2008 #12;#12;CARBON NANOTUBE TRANSISTORS, SENSORS, AND BEYOND Xinjian Zhou, Ph. D. Cornell University 2008 Carbon nanotubes are tiny hollow cylinders, made from a single

  14. Information Capacity of Energy Harvesting Sensor Nodes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharma, Vinod

    Information Capacity of Energy Harvesting Sensor Nodes R Rajesh CABS, DRDO Bangalore, India Email: rajesh81r@gmail.com Vinod Sharma Dept. of ECE Indian Institute of Science Bangalore, India Email: vinod Email: pramodv@uiuc.edu Abstract--Sensor nodes with energy harvesting sources are gaining popularity due

  15. Sensor device and methods for using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Rothgeb, Timothy Michael; Gansle, Kristina Marie; Joyce, Jonathan Livingsto; Jordan, James Madison; Rohwer, Tedd Addison; Lockhart, Randal Ray; Smith, Christopher Lawrence; Trinh, Toan; Cipollone, Mark Gary

    2005-10-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensor device and method of employment is provided. More specifically, a sensor device adapted to detect, identify and/or measure a chemical and/or physical characteristic upon placement of the device into an environment, especially a liquid medium for which monitoring is sought is provided.

  16. AIAA-98-0401 BROADBAND INFRARED SENSOR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seitzman, Jerry M.

    uniformity in the exit plane of a high pressure gas turbine combustor is presented. The sensor, intended with a relatively broadband light source. Performance of the sensor was simulated using a computer model based For improved efficiency, aircraft turbine engine designs call for progressively higher compressor pressure

  17. Integrated Lateral Flow Test Strip with Electrochemical Sensor...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Lateral Flow Test Strip with Electrochemical Sensor for Quantification of Phosphorylated Cholinesterase: Biomarker of Integrated Lateral Flow Test Strip with Electrochemical Sensor...

  18. A graphene-based electrochemical sensor for sensitive detection...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    A graphene-based electrochemical sensor for sensitive detection of paracetamol . A graphene-based electrochemical sensor for sensitive detection of paracetamol . Abstract: An...

  19. acoustic wave sensors: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    acoustic wave devices can be used as wireless sensor elements (SAW transponders Zachmann, Gabriel 30 Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks: Research Challenges CiteSeer...

  20. acoustic wave sensor: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    acoustic wave devices can be used as wireless sensor elements (SAW transponders Zachmann, Gabriel 30 Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks: Research Challenges CiteSeer...

  1. Self-corrected Sensors Based On Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    corrected Sensors Based On Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy For Atom Flux Measurements In Molecular Beam Epitaxy. Self-corrected Sensors Based On Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy For...

  2. Development of Compact Gaseous Sensors with Internal Reference...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Compact Gaseous Sensors with Internal Reference for Monitoring O2 and NOx in Combustion Environments Development of Compact Gaseous Sensors with Internal Reference for Monitoring...

  3. Nuclear Detection and Sensor Testing Center | Y-12 National Security...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Detection and ... Nuclear Detection and Sensor Testing Center As part of our increased global nuclear nonproliferation efforts, Y-12 commissioned the Nuclear Detection and Sensor...

  4. Electrochemical Sensors for the Detection of Lead and Other Toxic...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Sensors for the Detection of Lead and Other Toxic Heavy Metals: The Next Generation of Personal Exposure Electrochemical Sensors for the Detection of Lead and Other Toxic Heavy...

  5. Glow Plug Integrated Piezo-Ceramic Combustion Sensor for Diesel...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Glow Plug Integrated Piezo-Ceramic Combustion Sensor for Diesel Engines Glow Plug Integrated Piezo-Ceramic Combustion Sensor for Diesel Engines 2005 Diesel Engine Emissions...

  6. A graphene-based electrochemical sensor for sensitive detection...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    graphene-based electrochemical sensor for sensitive detection of paracetamol . A graphene-based electrochemical sensor for sensitive detection of paracetamol . Abstract: An...

  7. Energy Systems Sensor Laboratory (Fact Sheet), NREL (National...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from fundamental research to applications engineering. Partners at the ESIF's Energy Systems Sensor Laboratory may include: * Hydrogen sensor manufacturers * Codes and standards...

  8. Carbon Nanotube-Based Electrochemical Sensor for Assay of Salivary...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nanotube-Based Electrochemical Sensor for Assay of Salivary Cholinesterase Enzyme Activity: An Exposure Biomarker of Carbon Nanotube-Based Electrochemical Sensor for Assay of...

  9. Digital Sensors Digital ports range from dgtl1 to dgtl12.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Beer, Randall D.

    Digital Sensors Digital ports range from dgtl1 to dgtl12. Bumper or limit switch: (to be placed at the top of the program) #pragma config(Sensor, dgtl1, touchSensor, sensorTouch) (in the body of the program) int sensor_value; sensor_value = SensorValue(touchSensor); Bumper and Limit Switch

  10. E-Print Network 3.0 - amperometric glucose sensors Sample Search...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    sensors Search Powered by Explorit Topic List Advanced Search Sample search results for: amperometric glucose sensors...

  11. Vibration welding system with thin film sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Cai, Wayne W; Abell, Jeffrey A; Li, Xiaochun; Choi, Hongseok; Zhao, Jingzhou

    2014-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A vibration welding system includes an anvil, a welding horn, a thin film sensor, and a process controller. The anvil and horn include working surfaces that contact a work piece during the welding process. The sensor measures a control value at the working surface. The measured control value is transmitted to the controller, which controls the system in part using the measured control value. The thin film sensor may include a plurality of thermopiles and thermocouples which collectively measure temperature and heat flux at the working surface. A method includes providing a welder device with a slot adjacent to a working surface of the welder device, inserting the thin film sensor into the slot, and using the sensor to measure a control value at the working surface. A process controller then controls the vibration welding system in part using the measured control value.

  12. Electro-chemical sensors, sensor arrays and circuits

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Katz, Howard E.; Kong, Hoyoul

    2014-07-08T23:59:59.000Z

    An electro-chemical sensor includes a first electrode, a second electrode spaced apart from the first electrode, and a semiconductor channel in electrical contact with the first and second electrodes. The semiconductor channel includes a trapping material. The trapping material reduces an ability of the semiconductor channel to conduct a current of charge carriers by trapping at least some of the charge carriers to localized regions within the semiconductor channel. The semiconductor channel includes at least a portion configured to be exposed to an analyte to be detected, and the trapping material, when exposed to the analyte, interacts with the analyte so as to at least partially restore the ability of the semiconductor channel to conduct the current of charge carriers.

  13. Application Hosting and Management for Top Technology and Expertise Keep Your WebSphere Commerce Solution in Peak Shape

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fisher, Kathleen

    integrations, and service availability · Proactive response to resolve and triage failure or error alerts · Ongoing data management and retention · Patch management and maintenance of WebSphere® Commerce including, availability and scalability of your site · Easily adjust to traffic fluctuations and peak demands · Resolve

  14. Circular chemiresistors for microchemical sensors

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Ho, Clifford K. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2007-03-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A circular chemiresistor for use in microchemical sensors. A pair of electrodes is fabricated on an electrically insulating substrate. The pattern of electrodes is arranged in a circle-filling geometry, such as a concentric, dual-track spiral design, or a circular interdigitated design. A drop of a chemically sensitive polymer (i.e., chemiresistive ink) is deposited on the insulating substrate on the electrodes, which spreads out into a thin, circular disk contacting the pair of electrodes. This circularly-shaped electrode geometry maximizes the contact area between the pair of electrodes and the polymer deposit, which provides a lower and more stable baseline resistance than with linear-trace designs. The circularly-shaped electrode pattern also serves to minimize batch-to-batch variations in the baseline resistance due to non-uniform distributions of conductive particles in the chemiresistive polymer film.

  15. Thin Silicon MEMS Contact-Stress Sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kotovsky, J; Tooker, A; Horsley, D A

    2009-12-07T23:59:59.000Z

    This work offers the first, thin, MEMS contact-stress (CS) sensor capable of accurate in situ measruement of time-varying, contact-stress between two solid interfaces (e.g. in vivo cartilage contact-stress and body armor dynamic loading). This CS sensor is a silicon-based device with a load sensitive diaphragm. The diaphragm is doped to create piezoresistors arranged in a full Wheatstone bridge. The sensor is similar in performance to established silicon pressure sensors, but it is reliably produced to a thickness of 65 {micro}m. Unlike commercial devices or other research efforts, this CS sensor, including packaging, is extremely thin (< 150 {micro}m fully packaged) so that it can be unobtrusively placed between contacting structures. It is built from elastic, well-characterized materials, providing accurate and high-speed (50+ kHz) measurements over a potential embedded lifetime of decades. This work explored sensor designs for an interface load range of 0-2 MPa; however, the CS sensor has a flexible design architecture to measure a wide variety of interface load ranges.

  16. Sensorpedia: Information Sharing Across Autonomous Sensor Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorman, Bryan L [ORNL; Resseguie, David R [ORNL; Tomkins-Tinch, Christopher H [ORNL

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The concept of adapting social media technologies is introduced as a means of achieving information sharing across autonomous sensor systems. Historical examples of interoperability as an underlying principle in loosely-coupled systems is compared and contrasted with corresponding tightly-coupled, integrated systems. Examples of ad hoc information sharing solutions based on Web 2.0 social networks, mashups, blogs, wikis, and data tags are presented and discussed. The underlying technologies of these solutions are isolated and defined, and Sensorpedia is presented as a formalized application for implementing sensor information sharing across large-scale enterprises with incompatible autonomous sensor systems.

  17. Wireless Sensor Networks for Structural Health Monitoring by Sukun Kim

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN). The project is targeting a deployment on the Golden Gate Bridge. Ambient

  18. On Optimization of Sensor Selection for Aircraft Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Simon, Dan

    #12;2 Overview of presentation · Background · Sensor selection optimization · Probabilistic approach Parameters · 11 Sensors #12;6 Background ­ Engine sensors 1. Core rotor speed 2. Percent low pressure spool;9 Background - Riccati Equation · Kalman filter estimation · K is the Kalman gain for the given sensor set

  19. Mobile Robotics I: Lab 3 Obstacle Avoidance with IR Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farritor, Shane

    Sensors Background IR SENSORS INTERFACE The CEENBoT comes equipped with a Left and Right non-contact bumpMobile Robotics I: Lab 3 Obstacle Avoidance with IR Sensors CEENBoTTM Mobile Robotics Platform 1.01 #12;. ( Blank ) #12;Mobile Robotics I ­ Obstacle Avoidance with IR Sensors Purpose

  20. Adaptive coherent interferometric imaging for sensor networks Gregoire Derveauxa)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Papanicolaou, George C.

    with distributed sensor networks is presented. The sensors record the impulse response of the unknown background imaging when the background is known is considered in Ref.8. The sensors record an approximate impulseAdaptive coherent interferometric imaging for sensor networks Gr´egoire Derveauxa) INRIA Domaine de

  1. Development of Sensors for Automotive PEM-based Fuel Cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    organization #12;4 Sensors for Automotive PEM Fuel Cells - Motivation Sensor Performance and Cost ImprovementsDevelopment of Sensors for Automotive PEM-based Fuel Cells DOE Agreement DE-FC04-02AL67616 Brian FC Series 200 - 50 kW PEM #12;2 Development of Sensors for Automotive PEM-based Fuel Cells ­ Program

  2. "Whiskbrooms" and"Pushbrooms" Remote Sensing Platforms and Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frank, Thomas D.

    "Whiskbrooms" and"Pushbrooms" Remote Sensing Platforms and Sensors Remote sensing requires that a sensor be constructed and then attached to a platform that provides an aerial view of the landscape. "Whiskbrooms" and"Pushbrooms" Remote Sensing Platforms and Sensors Remote sensing requires that a sensor

  3. Use of autoassociative neural networks for sensor diagnostics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Najafi, Massieh

    2005-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    faulty sensors. E-AANN uses a secondary optimization process to identify and reconstruct sensor faults. Two common types of sensor faults are investigated, drift error and shift or offset error. In the case of drift error, the sensor error occurs...

  4. Electrostatic Modeling of CMOS sensor array 1 Computing Security

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cukic, Bojan

    to Hades. #12;Electrostatic Modeling of CMOS sensor array 3 7 Kerberos Tickets Used for authentication

  5. The development and construction of an inductive tactile sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanchez-Vanzzini, Juan Alfonso Luis

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . M. Chairman of Advisory Committee: Dr. Oren Masory The objective of this research project was to design and construct a discrete tactile sensor. The sensor has the ability to detect a distributed force applied over the working area of the sensor... information, it is possible to use different types of sensors. These sensors can be grouped into three categories [1&2]: V&sion Sensor s. These sensors are used to detect the general state of the environment; this means existence, distance, moving...

  6. Carbon monoxide sensor and method of use thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McDaniel; Anthony H. (Livermore, CA), Medlin; J. Will (Boulder, CO), Bastasz; Robert J. (Livermore, CA)

    2007-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Carbon monoxide sensors suitable for use in hydrogen feed streams and methods of use thereof are disclosed. The sensors are palladium metal/insulator/semiconductor (Pd-MIS) sensors which may possess a gate metal layer having uniform, Type 1, or non-uniform, Type 2, film morphology. Type 1 sensors display an increased sensor response in the presence of carbon monoxide while Type 2 sensors display a decreased response to carbon monoxide. The methods and sensors disclosed herein are particularly suitable for use in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs).

  7. Problem Description:Problem Description: How can Researchers Monitor Ecosystems via Embedded Sensors?How can Researchers Monitor Ecosystems via Embedded Sensors? Proposed Solution:Proposed Solution: Wireless Sensors to Monitor and Record Biodiversity and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hamilton, Michael P.

    Sensors?How can Researchers Monitor Ecosystems via Embedded Sensors? Proposed Solution:Proposed Solution: Wireless Sensors to Monitor and Record Biodiversity and Ecological ChangesWireless Sensors to Monitor.jamesreserve.edu Introduction:Introduction: Embedded Sensors, a Model for Monitoring Wildlife in Their Habitat.Embedded Sensors

  8. Rank Extraction in Tin-Oxide Sensor Arrays Page 1 of 23 Rank Extraction in Tin-Oxide Sensor Arrays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roppel, Thaddeus A.

    Rank Extraction in Tin-Oxide Sensor Arrays Page 1 of 23 Rank Extraction in Tin-Oxide Sensor Arrays the amount of data to be processed. This work is a first example in feature extraction from tin-oxide sensors element array of tin-oxide sensors is presented. Results are extrapolated to other arrays of chemical

  9. Dynamic temperature measurements with embedded optical sensors.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dolan, Daniel H.,; Seagle, Christopher T; Ao, Tommy

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes LDRD project number 151365, %5CDynamic Temperature Measurements with Embedded Optical Sensors%22. The purpose of this project was to develop an optical sensor capable of detecting modest temperature states (<1000 K) with nanosecond time resolution, a recurring diagnostic need in dynamic compression experiments at the Sandia Z machine. Gold sensors were selected because the visible re ectance spectrum of gold varies strongly with temperature. A variety of static and dynamic measurements were performed to assess re ectance changes at di erent temperatures and pressures. Using a minimal optical model for gold, a plausible connection between static calibrations and dynamic measurements was found. With re nements to the model and diagnostic upgrades, embedded gold sensors seem capable of detecting minor (<50 K) temperature changes under dynamic compression.

  10. Temperature Sensor Data Michael W. Bigrigg

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sadeh, Norman M.

    in the room. Sensor networks can be used to identify larger trends in temperature which could be used to report energy usage, HVAC problems, computer failures based on high temperatures, and fire evacuation

  11. Configurable dynamic privacy for pervasive sensor networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gong, Nan-Wei

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ubiquitous computing sensor networks have greatly augmented the functionality of interactive media systems by adding the ability to capture and store activity-related information. Analyzing the information recorded from ...

  12. Reactive Grasping Using Optical Proximity Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nangeroni, Paul

    We propose a system for improving grasping using fingertip optical proximity sensors that allows us to perform online grasp adjustments to an initial grasp point without requiring premature object contact or regrasping ...

  13. Frugal Sensor Assignment Matthew P. Johnson1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Preece, Alun

    Frugal Sensor Assignment Matthew P. Johnson1 Hosam Rowaihy2 Diego Pizzocaro3 Amotz Bar-Noy1 Stuart many simultaneous missions. While the current user #12;2 Johnson, Rowaihy, Pizzocaro, Bar-Noy, Chalmers

  14. Structure and yarn sensor for fabric

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mee, D.K.; Allgood, G.O.; Mooney, L.R.; Duncan, M.G.; Turner, J.C.; Treece, D.A.

    1998-10-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A structure and yarn sensor for fabric directly determines pick density in a fabric thereby allowing fabric length and velocity to be calculated from a count of the picks made by the sensor over known time intervals. The structure and yarn sensor is also capable of detecting full length woven defects and fabric. As a result, an inexpensive on-line pick (or course) density measurement can be performed which allows a loom or knitting machine to be adjusted by either manual or automatic means to maintain closer fiber density tolerances. Such a sensor apparatus dramatically reduces fabric production costs and significantly improves fabric consistency and quality for woven or knitted fabric. 13 figs.

  15. Autonomous Robot System for Sensor Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David Bruemmer; Douglas Few; Frank Carney; Miles Walton; Heather Hunting; Ron Lujan

    2004-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper discusses an innovative application of new Markov localization techniques that combat the problem of odometry drift, allowing a novel control architecture developed at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) to be utilized within a sensor characterization facility developed at the Remote Sensing Laboratory (RSL) in Nevada. The new robotic capability provided by the INEEL will allow RSL to test and evaluate a wide variety of sensors including radiation detection systems, machine vision systems, and sensors that can detect and track heat sources (e.g. human bodies, machines, chemical plumes). By accurately moving a target at varying speeds along designated paths, the robotic solution allows the detection abilities of a wide variety of sensors to be recorded and analyzed.

  16. Sensor-guided threat countermeasure system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Stuart, Brent C.; Hackel, Lloyd A.; Hermann, Mark R.; Armstrong, James P.

    2012-12-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A countermeasure system for use by a target to protect against an incoming sensor-guided threat. The system includes a laser system for producing a broadband beam and means for directing the broadband beam from the target to the threat. The countermeasure system comprises the steps of producing a broadband beam and directing the broad band beam from the target to blind or confuse the incoming sensor-guided threat.

  17. Thermal sensor with an improved coating

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    LaDelfe, Peter C. (Los Alamos, NM); Stotlar, Suzanne C. (Los Alamos, NM)

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The disclosure is directed to an apparatus for detecting radiation having wavelengths from about 0.4 .mu.m to about 5.6 .mu.m. An optical coating is applied to a thermal sensor that is normally transparent to radiation with such wavelengths. The optical coating is thin and light and includes a modifier and an absorber. The thermal sensor can be a pyroelectric detector such as strontium barium niobate.

  18. Handbook of actuators and edge alignment sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Krulewich, D A

    1992-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This actuator and sensor handbook was developed during a cooperative project between the NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center, the SDI-Directed Energy Program and LLNL. The common purpose of the joint effort was to develop precision actuators and sensors for the NASA initiated SpacE Laser ENE-rgy Program (SELENE). The purpose of the SELENE Program is to develop a highly cost effective segmented adaptive optics system for beaming laser power directly to spacecraft in earth orbit.

  19. Wireless sensor for detecting explosive material

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lamberti, Vincent E; Howell, Jr., Layton N; Mee, David K; Sepaniak, Michael J

    2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Disclosed is a sensor for detecting explosive devices. The sensor includes a ferromagnetic metal and a molecular recognition reagent coupled to the ferromagnetic metal. The molecular recognition reagent is operable to expand upon absorption of vapor from an explosive material such that the molecular recognition reagent changes a tensile stress upon the ferromagnetic metal. The explosive device is detected based on changes in the magnetic switching characteristics of the ferromagnetic metal caused by the tensile stress.

  20. Electro-optic voltage sensor head

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crawford, Thomas M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Davidson, James R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Woods, Gregory K. (Cornelius, OR)

    1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is an electro-optic voltage sensor head designed for integration with existing types of high voltage transmission and distribution apparatus. The sensor head contains a transducer, which comprises a transducing material in which the Pockels electro-optic effect is observed. In the practice of the invention at least one beam of electromagnetic radiation is routed into the transducing material of the transducer in the sensor head. The beam undergoes an electro-optic effect in the sensor head when the transducing material is subjected to an E-field. The electro-optic effect is observed as a differential phase a shift, also called differential phase modulation, of the beam components in orthogonal planes of the electromagnetic radiation. In the preferred embodiment the beam is routed through the transducer along an initial axis and then reflected by a retro-reflector back substantially parallel to the initial axis, making a double pass through the transducer for increased measurement sensitivity. The preferred embodiment of the sensor head also includes a polarization state rotator and at least one beam splitter for orienting the beam along major and minor axes and for splitting the beam components into two signals which are independent converse amplitude-modulated signals carrying E-field magnitude and hence voltage information from the sensor head by way of optic fibers.

  1. Unattended ground sensor situation assessment workstation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jeppesen, D.; Trellue, R.

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Effective utilization of unattended ground sensors (UGSs) in a theater reconnaissance, surveillance, target acquisition, and kill assessment environment requires that a human operator be able to interpret, and collectively assess, the significance of real time data obtained from UGS emplacements over large geographical regions of interest. The products of this UGS data interpretation and assessment activity can then be used in the decision support process for command level evaluation of appropriate courses of action. Advancements in both sensor hardware technology and in software systems and processing technology have enabled the development of practical real time situation assessment capabilities based upon information from unattended ground sensors. A decision support workstation that employs rule-based expert system processing of reports from unattended ground sensors is described. The primary goal of this development activity is to produce a suite of software to track vehicles using data from unattended ground sensors. The situational assessment products from this system have stand-alone utility, but are also intended to provide cueing support for overhead sensors and supplementary feeds to all-source fusion centers. The conceptual framework, developmental architecture, and demonstration field tests of the system are described.

  2. Development of a prototype lignin concentration sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malito, M.L.; Jeffers, L.A.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies, is sponsoring a research and development program for the development of a real-time, in-situ sensor to measure the concentration of lignin in wood pulp. The program is composed of phase I showing feasibility which is now complete, phase II for development and testing of a Field Prototype, in progress, Phase III commercialization. Phase I work (funded entirely by B W) demonstrated a correlation between the fluorescence intensity and lignin concentration (as measured by TAPPI procedure, T 236 hm-85 Kappa Number of Pulp) for undiluted wood pulp samples. In Phase II, a laboratory test program directed at characterizing the fluorescence of wood pulp has been conducted as a prelude to the design of a prototype sensor. The current report summarizes the testing completed in Phase I and documents the Phase II laboratory testing completed through December 1991. Future Phase II efforts include additional laboratory testing, design and fabrication of a prototype sensor, and field testing of the prototype sensor. Phase III of the program will concentrate on the incorporation of the sensor into a control system and commercialization of the sensor.

  3. Development of a prototype lignin concentration sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Malito, M.L.; Jeffers, L.A.

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The US Department of Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies, is sponsoring a research and development program for the development of a real-time, in-situ sensor to measure the concentration of lignin in wood pulp. The program is composed of phase I showing feasibility which is now complete, phase II for development and testing of a Field Prototype, in progress, Phase III commercialization. Phase I work (funded entirely by B&W) demonstrated a correlation between the fluorescence intensity and lignin concentration (as measured by TAPPI procedure, T 236 hm-85 Kappa Number of Pulp) for undiluted wood pulp samples. In Phase II, a laboratory test program directed at characterizing the fluorescence of wood pulp has been conducted as a prelude to the design of a prototype sensor. The current report summarizes the testing completed in Phase I and documents the Phase II laboratory testing completed through December 1991. Future Phase II efforts include additional laboratory testing, design and fabrication of a prototype sensor, and field testing of the prototype sensor. Phase III of the program will concentrate on the incorporation of the sensor into a control system and commercialization of the sensor.

  4. Electro-optic voltage sensor head

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Crawford, T.M.; Davidson, J.R.; Woods, G.K.

    1999-08-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention is an electro-optic voltage sensor head designed for integration with existing types of high voltage transmission and distribution apparatus. The sensor head contains a transducer, which comprises a transducing material in which the Pockels electro-optic effect is observed. In the practice of the invention at least one beam of electromagnetic radiation is routed into the transducing material of the transducer in the sensor head. The beam undergoes an electro-optic effect in the sensor head when the transducing material is subjected to an E-field. The electro-optic effect is observed as a differential phase a shift, also called differential phase modulation, of the beam components in orthogonal planes of the electromagnetic radiation. In the preferred embodiment the beam is routed through the transducer along an initial axis and then reflected by a retro-reflector back substantially parallel to the initial axis, making a double pass through the transducer for increased measurement sensitivity. The preferred embodiment of the sensor head also includes a polarization state rotator and at least one beam splitter for orienting the beam along major and minor axes and for splitting the beam components into two signals which are independent converse amplitude-modulated signals carrying E-field magnitude and hence voltage information from the sensor head by way of optic fibers. 6 figs.

  5. Online Sensor Calibration Assessment in Nuclear Power Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Coble, Jamie B.; Ramuhalli, Pradeep; Meyer, Ryan M.; Hashemian, Hash

    2013-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Safe, efficient, and economic operation of nuclear systems (nuclear power plants, fuel fabrication and storage, used fuel processing, etc.) relies on transmission of accurate and reliable measurements. During operation, sensors degrade due to age, environmental exposure, and maintenance interventions. Sensor degradation can affect the measured and transmitted signals, including sensor failure, signal drift, sensor response time, etc. Currently, periodic sensor recalibration is performed to avoid these problems. Sensor recalibration activities include both calibration assessment and adjustment (if necessary). In nuclear power plants, periodic recalibration of safety-related sensors is required by the plant technical specifications. Recalibration typically occurs during refueling outages (about every 18 to 24 months). Non-safety-related sensors also undergo recalibration, though not as frequently. However, this approach to maintaining sensor calibration and performance is time-consuming and expensive, leading to unnecessary maintenance, increased radiation exposure to maintenance personnel, and potential damage to sensors. Online monitoring (OLM) of sensor performance is a non-invasive approach to assess instrument calibration. OLM can mitigate many of the limitations of the current periodic recalibration practice by providing more frequent assessment of calibration and identifying those sensors that are operating outside of calibration tolerance limits without removing sensors or interrupting operation. This can support extended operating intervals for unfaulted sensors and target recalibration efforts to only degraded sensors.

  6. Optical sensor of magnetic fields

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Butler, M.A.; Martin, S.J.

    1986-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    An optical magnetic field strength sensor for measuring the field strength of a magnetic field comprising a dilute magnetic semi-conductor probe having first and second ends, longitudinally positioned in the magnetic field for providing Faraday polarization rotation of light passing therethrough relative to the strength of the magnetic field. Light provided by a remote light source is propagated through an optical fiber coupler and a single optical fiber strand between the probe and the light source for providing a light path therebetween. A polarizer and an apparatus for rotating the polarization of the light is provided in the light path and a reflector is carried by the second end of the probe for reflecting the light back through the probe and thence through the polarizer to the optical coupler. A photo detector apparatus is operably connected to the optical coupler for detecting and measuring the intensity of the reflected light and comparing same to the light source intensity whereby the magnetic field strength may be calculated.

  7. Electrochemical NOx Sensor for Monitoring Diesel Emissions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woo, L Y; Glass, R S

    2008-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Increasingly stringent emissions regulations will require the development of advanced gas sensors for a variety of applications. For example, compact, inexpensive sensors are needed for detection of regulated pollutants, including hydrocarbons (HCs), CO, and NO{sub x}, in automotive exhaust. Of particular importance will be a sensor for NO{sub x} to ensure the proper operation of the catalyst system in the next generation of diesel (CIDI) automobiles. Because many emerging applications, particularly monitoring of automotive exhaust, involve operation in harsh, high-temperature environments, robust ceramic-oxide-based electrochemical sensors are a promising technology. Sensors using yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as an oxygen-ion-conducting electrolyte have been widely reported for both amperometric and potentiometric modes of operation. These include the well-known exhaust gas oxygen (EGO) sensor. More recently, ac impedance-based (i.e., impedance-metric) sensing techniques using YSZ have been reported for sensing water vapor, hydrocarbons, CO, and NO{sub x}. Typically small-amplitude alternating signal is applied, and the sensor response is measured at a specified frequency. Most impedance-metric techniques have used the modulus (or magnitude) at low frequencies (< 1 Hz) as the sensing signal and attribute the measured response to interfacial phenomena. Work by our group has also investigated using phase angle as the sensing signal at somewhat higher frequencies (10 Hz). The higher frequency measurements would potentially allow for reduced sampling times during sensor operation. Another potential advantage of impedance-metric NO{sub x} sensing is the similarity in response to NO and NO{sub 2} (i.e., total-NO{sub x} sensing). Potentiometric NO{sub x} sensors typically show higher sensitivity to NO2 than NO, and responses that are opposite in sign. However, NO is more stable than NO{sub 2} at temperatures > 600 C, and thermodynamic calculations predict {approx}90% NO, balance NO{sub 2}. Since automotive exhaust sensors will probably be required to operate at temperatures > 600 C, NO is the dominant component in thermodynamic equilibrium and the target NOx species. Also, the use of upstream catalysts could further promote the conversion of NO{sub x} species to NO. Therefore, the focus of current work is to investigate the response to NO. Nevertheless, minimizing the sensitivity to a variety of competing species is important in order to obtain the accuracy necessary for achieving the emission limits. Mitigating the effect of interfering gases (e.g., O{sub 2}, water vapor, HCs, etc.) is an area of current study. For impedance metric NO{sub x} sensors, our previous work has demonstrated that the cross-sensitivity to O{sub 2} may be accounted for by comparing measurements at multiple frequencies. Other strategies for compensation are also being explored, including calibration using data from existing sensors located nearby. Our current work has made significant advances in terms of developing prototype sensors more suitable for commercialization. Also, dynamometer testing has provided real-world sensor performance data that will be useful in approaching potential suppliers to whom we can transfer the technology for commercialization. The advances are a direct result of understanding the sensing mechanisms responsible for impedance-based NO{sub x} sensing and the effect of materials choice and sensor design/geometry.

  8. Robust Nitrogen Oxide/Ammonia Sensors for Vehicle On-board Emissions...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    * 53% NO x sensors that meet stringent vehicle requirements are not available: a) Cost (Complex sensors compared to the automotive sensor) b) Sensitivity (Need 5ppm or...

  9. Robust Nitrogen Oxide/Ammonia Sensors for Vehicle On-board Emissions...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    complete NO x sensors that meet stringent vehicle requirements are not available: a) Cost (Complex sensors compared to the automotive sensor) b) Sensitivity (Need 5ppm or...

  10. Micro- and Mini-nitrate Sensors for Monitoring of Soils, Groundwater and Aquatic Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Nitrate Mini-Sensor with PVC membrane containing liquidmin) Mini-sensors with PVC maintain their sensitivity duringfabricated mini- sensors with PVC membranes showed better

  11. Solid State Electrochemical Sensors for Nitrogen Oxide (NOx) Detection in Lean Exhaust Gases

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rheaume, Jonathan Michael

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cell that is derived from oxygen sensor technology.are derived from oxygen sensor technology. This sectionoverview of the technology underpinning oxygen sensors and

  12. Sensores CMOS para robotica e industria: Sensor ret nico espacio variante y vision activa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Valencia, Universidad de

    Sensores CMOS para robotica e industria: Sensor ret nico espacio variante y vision activa Fernando Pardo, Francisco Vegara, Jose A. Boluda, Santiago Felici Instituto de Robotica Universidad de Valencia C venido estudiando especialmente en el terreno de aplicaciones en robotica 2]. Sin em- bargo, en el

  13. Guaranteed delivery for geographical anycasting in wireless multi-sink sensor and sensor-actor networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stojmenovic, Ivan

    of sinks may receive the report from sensors, and meet application demands. However, the cost of anycasting and providing service may depend on the distance of the receiving sinks/actors to the re- porting sensor. Energy consumption and scalability are two challenging issues since wireless networks operate on limited

  14. SENSOR ARRAY FOR FOETAL ECG. PART 2: SENSOR SELECTION. V. VIGNERON1,2,3

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    SENSOR ARRAY FOR FOETAL ECG. PART 2: SENSOR SELECTION. V. VIGNERON1,2,3 , A. AZANCOT4 , C. H´ERAIL2^opital R. Debr´e, France ABSTRACT Non invasive foetal electrocardiogram (ECG) extraction involve measurements from electrodes located on different points of the mother's skin. As a result, foetal ECG (fECG

  15. Infrared sensors and sensor fusion; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, May 19-21, 1987

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Buser, R.G.; Warren, F.B.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present conference discusses topics in the fields of IR sensor multifunctional design; image modeling, simulation, and detection; IR sensor configurations and components; thermal sensor arrays; silicide-based IR sensors; and IR focal plane array utilization. Attention is given to the fusion of lidar and FLIR for target segmentation and enhancement, the synergetic integration of thermal and visual images for computer vision, the 'Falcon Eye' FLIR system, multifunctional electrooptics and multiaperture sensors for precision-guided munitions, and AI approaches to data integration. Also discussed are the comparative performance of Ir silicide and Pt silicide photodiodes, high fill-factor silicide monolithic arrays, and the characterization of noise in staring IR focal plane arrays.

  16. Distributed Sensor Coordination for Advanced Energy Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tumer, Kagan

    2013-07-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The ability to collect key system level information is critical to the safe, efficient and reli- able operation of advanced energy systems. With recent advances in sensor development, it is now possible to push some level of decision making directly to computationally sophisticated sensors, rather than wait for data to arrive to a massive centralized location before a decision is made. This type of approach relies on networked sensors (called agents from here on) to actively collect and process data, and provide key control deci- sions to significantly improve both the quality/relevance of the collected data and the as- sociating decision making. The technological bottlenecks for such sensor networks stem from a lack of mathematics and algorithms to manage the systems, rather than difficulties associated with building and deploying them. Indeed, traditional sensor coordination strategies do not provide adequate solutions for this problem. Passive data collection methods (e.g., large sensor webs) can scale to large systems, but are generally not suited to highly dynamic environments, such as ad- vanced energy systems, where crucial decisions may need to be reached quickly and lo- cally. Approaches based on local decisions on the other hand cannot guarantee that each agent performing its task (maximize an agent objective) will lead to good network wide solution (maximize a network objective) without invoking cumbersome coordination rou- tines. There is currently a lack of algorithms that will enable self-organization and blend the efficiency of local decision making with the system level guarantees of global decision making, particularly when the systems operate in dynamic and stochastic environments. In this work we addressed this critical gap and provided a comprehensive solution to the problem of sensor coordination to ensure the safe, reliable, and robust operation of advanced energy systems. The differentiating aspect of the proposed work is in shift- ing the focus towards what to observe rather than how to observe in large sensor networks, allowing the agents to actively determine both the structure of the network and the relevance of the information they are seeking to collect. In addition to providing an implicit coordination mechanism, this approach allows the system to be reconfigured in response to changing needs (e.g., sudden external events requiring new responses) or changing sensor network characteristics (e.g., sudden changes to plant condition). Outcome Summary: All milestones associated with this project have been completed. In particular, private sensor objective functions were developed which are aligned with the global objective function, sensor effectiveness has been improved by using sensor teams, system efficiency has been improved by 30% using difference evaluation func- tions, we have demonstrated system reconfigurability for 20% changes in system con- ditions, we have demonstrated extreme scalability of our proposed algorithm, we have demonstrated that sensor networks can overcome disruptions of up to 20% in network conditions, and have demonstrated system reconfigurability to 20% changes in system conditions in hardware-based simulations. This final report summarizes how each of these milestones was achieved, and gives insight into future research possibilities past the work which has been completed. The following publications support these milestones [6, 8, 9, 10, 16, 18, 19].

  17. Internal Reflection Sensor for the Cone Penetrometer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Job Bello

    1998-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project are to design, assemble, test, and demonstrate a prototype Internal Reflection Sensor (IRS) for the cone penetrometer. The sensor will ultimately be deployed during site characterization with the goal of providing real-time, in situ detection of NonAqueous Phase Liquids (NAPLs) in the subsurface. In the first phase of this program, we have designed and assembled an IRS module that interfaces directly to a standard cone penetrometer system. Laboratory tests demonstrated that the sensor responds in real-time to a wide variety of free phase NAPLs without interference from natural materials such as water and soil of various types or dissolved contaminants. In a preliminary field test, the sensor was able to locate NAPLs at thin, discrete depths in a soil test pit when deployed with a cone penetrometer. Ruggedness of the device was tested with a series of penetrometer pushes to the depth of refusal at a clean location. There was no visible damage to the sensor and its performance did not change in the course of these experiments. Based on the successes of the Phase I program, it is recommended that the project proceed to full-scale demonstration in Phase II.

  18. Electro-Mechanical Resonant Magnetic Field Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Temnykh, A B; Temnykh, Alexander B.; Lovelace, Richard V. E.

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a new type of magnetic field sensor which is termed an Electro-Mechanical Resonant Sensor (EMRS). The key part of this sensor is a small conductive elastic element with low damping rate and therefore a high Q fundamental mode of frequency $f_1$. An AC current is driven through the elastic element which, in the presence of a magnetic field, causes an AC force on the element. When the frequency of the AC current matches the resonant frequency of the element, maximum vibration of the element occurs and this can be measured precisely by optical means. We have built and tested a model sensor of this type using for the elastic element a length of copper wire of diameter 0.030 mm formed into a loop shape. The wire motion was measured using a light emitting diode photo-transistor assembly. This sensor demonstrated a sensitivity better than 0.001G for an applied magnetic field of $ \\sim 1$G and a good selectivity for the magnetic field direction. The sensitivity can be easily improved by a factor of $\\sim ...

  19. Sensor system for buried waste containment sites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Smith, Ann Marie (Pocatello, ID); Gardner, Bradley M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Kostelnik, Kevin M. (Idaho Falls, ID); Partin, Judy K. (Idaho Falls, ID); Lancaster, Gregory D. (Idaho Falls, ID); Pfeifer, May Catherine (Idaho Falls, ID)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A sensor system is disclosed for a buried waste containment site having a bottom wall barrier and/or sidewall barriers, for containing hazardous waste. The sensor system includes one or more sensor devices disposed in one or more of the barriers for detecting a physical parameter either of the barrier itself or of the physical condition of the surrounding soils and buried waste, and for producing a signal representing the physical parameter detected. Also included is a signal processor for receiving signals produced by the sensor device and for developing information identifying the physical parameter detected, either for sounding an alarm, displaying a graphic representation of a physical parameter detected on a viewing screen and/or a hard copy printout. The sensor devices may be deployed in or adjacent the barriers at the same time the barriers are deployed and may be adapted to detect strain or cracking in the barriers, leakage of radiation through the barriers, the presence and leaking through the barriers of volatile organic compounds, or similar physical conditions.

  20. Narrow field electromagnetic sensor system and method

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A narrow field electromagnetic sensor system and method of sensing a characteristic of an object provide the capability to realize a characteristic of an object such as density, thickness, or presence, for any desired coordinate position on the object. One application is imaging. The sensor can also be used as an obstruction detector or an electronic trip wire with a narrow field without the disadvantages of impaired performance when exposed to dirt, snow, rain, or sunlight. The sensor employs a transmitter for transmitting a sequence of electromagnetic signals in response to a transmit timing signal, a receiver for sampling only the initial direct RF path of the electromagnetic signal while excluding all other electromagnetic signals in response to a receive timing signal, and a signal processor for processing the sampled direct RF path electromagnetic signal and providing an indication of the characteristic of an object. Usually, the electromagnetic signal is a short RF burst and the obstruction must provide a substantially complete eclipse of the direct RF path. By employing time-of-flight techniques, a timing circuit controls the receiver to sample only the initial direct RF path of the electromagnetic signal while not sampling indirect path electromagnetic signals. The sensor system also incorporates circuitry for ultra-wideband spread spectrum operation that reduces interference to and from other RF services while allowing co-location of multiple electronic sensors without the need for frequency assignments.

  1. Electronic Position Sensor for Power Operated Accessory

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Haag, Ronald H.; Chia, Michael I.

    2005-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

    An electronic position sensor for use with a power operated vehicle accessory, such as a power liftgate. The position sensor includes an elongated resistive circuit that is mounted such that it is stationary and extends along the path of a track portion of the power operated accessory. The position sensor further includes a contact nub mounted to a link member that moves within the track portion such that the contact nub is slidingly biased against the elongated circuit. As the link member moves under the force of a motor-driven output gear, the contact nub slides along the surface of the resistive circuit, thereby affecting the overall resistance of the circuit. The position sensor uses the overall resistance to provide an electronic position signal to an ECU, wherein the signal is indicative of the absolute position of the power operated accessory. Accordingly, the electronic position sensor is capable of providing an electronic signal that enables the ECU to track the absolute position of the power operated accessory.

  2. Lensless magneto-optic speed sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veeser, L.R.; Forman, P.R.; Rodriguez, P.J.

    1998-02-17T23:59:59.000Z

    Lensless magneto-optic speed sensor is disclosed. The construction of a viable Faraday sensor has been achieved. Multimode fiber bundles are used to collect the light. If coupled directly into a 100 or 200 {micro}m core fiber, light from a light emitting diode (LED) is sufficient to operate the sensor. In addition, LEDs ensure that no birefringence effects in the input fiber are possible, as the output from such light sources have random polarization. No lens is required since the large diameter optical fibers and thin crystals of materials having high Verdet constants (such as iron garnets) employed permit the collection of a substantial quantity of light. No coupler is required. The maximum amount of light which could reach a detector using a coupler is 25%, while the measured throughput of the fiber-optic bundle without a coupler is about 42%. All of the elements employed in the present sensor are planar, and no particular orientation of these elements is required. The present sensor operates over a wide range of distances from magnetic field sources, and observed signals are large. When a tone wheel is utilized, the signals are independent of wheel speed, and the modulation is observed to be about 75%. No sensitivity to bends in the input or output optical fiber leads was observed. Reliable operation was achieved down to zero frequency, or no wheel rotation. 5 figs.

  3. Lensless Magneto-optic speed sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Veeser, Lynn R. (Los Alamos, NM); Forman, Peter R. (Los Alamos, NM); Rodriguez, Patrick J. (Santa Fe, NM)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Lensless magneto-optic speed sensor. The construction of a viable Faraday sensor has been achieved. Multimode fiber bundles are used to collect the light. If coupled directly into a 100 or 200 .mu.m core fiber, light from a light emitting diode (LED) is sufficient to operate the sensor. In addition, LEDs ensure that no birefringence effects in the input fiber are possible, as the output from such light sources have random polarization. No lens is required since the large diameter optical fibers and thin crystals of materials having high Verdet constants (such as iron garnets) employed permit the collection of a substantial quantity of light. No coupler is required. The maximum amount of light which could reach a detector using a coupler is 25%, while the measured throughput of the fiber-optic bundle without a coupler is about 42%. All of the elements employed in the present sensor are planar, and no particular orientation of these elements is required. The present sensor operates over a wide range of distances from magnetic field sources, and observed signals are large. When a tone wheel is utilized, the signals are independent of wheel speed, and the modulation is observed to be about 75%. No sensitivity to bends in the input or output optical fiber leads was observed. Reliable operation was achieved down to zero frequency, or no wheel rotation.

  4. Non-contact current and voltage sensor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carpenter, Gary D; El-Essawy, Wael; Ferreira, Alexandre Peixoto; Keller, Thomas Walter; Rubio, Juan C; Schappert, Michael A

    2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

    A detachable current and voltage sensor provides an isolated and convenient device to measure current passing through a conductor such as an AC branch circuit wire, as well as providing an indication of an electrostatic potential on the wire, which can be used to indicate the phase of the voltage on the wire, and optionally a magnitude of the voltage. The device includes a housing that contains the current and voltage sensors, which may be a ferrite cylinder with a hall effect sensor disposed in a gap along the circumference to measure current, or alternative a winding provided through the cylinder along its axis and a capacitive plate or wire disposed adjacent to, or within, the ferrite cylinder to provide the indication of the voltage.

  5. Fabrication of 3D Silicon Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kok, A.; Hansen, T.E.; Hansen, T.A.; Lietaer, N.; Summanwar, A.; /SINTEF, Oslo; Kenney, C.; Hasi, J.; /SLAC; Da Via, C.; /Manchester U.; Parker, S.I.; /Hawaii U.

    2012-06-06T23:59:59.000Z

    Silicon sensors with a three-dimensional (3-D) architecture, in which the n and p electrodes penetrate through the entire substrate, have many advantages over planar silicon sensors including radiation hardness, fast time response, active edge and dual readout capabilities. The fabrication of 3D sensors is however rather complex. In recent years, there have been worldwide activities on 3D fabrication. SINTEF in collaboration with Stanford Nanofabrication Facility have successfully fabricated the original (single sided double column type) 3D detectors in two prototype runs and the third run is now on-going. This paper reports the status of this fabrication work and the resulted yield. The work of other groups such as the development of double sided 3D detectors is also briefly reported.

  6. Platform Based Design for Automotive Sensor Conditioning

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fanucci, L; Iozzi, F; Marino, C; Rocchi, A

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper a general architecture suitable to interface several kinds of sensors for automotive applications is presented. A platform based design approach is pursued to improve system performance while minimizing time-to-market.. The platform is composed by an analog front-end and a digital section. The latter is based on a microcontroller core (8051 IP by Oregano) plus a set of dedicated hardware dedicated to the complex signal processing required for sensor conditioning. The microcontroller handles also the communication with external devices (as a PC) for data output and fast prototyping. A case study is presented concerning the conditioning of a Gyro yaw rate sensor for automotive applications. Measured performance results outperform current state-of-the-art commercial devices.

  7. Sensors and Automated Analyzers for Radionuclides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Grate, Jay W.; Egorov, Oleg B.

    2003-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The production of nuclear weapons materials has generated large quantities of nuclear waste and significant environmental contamination. We have developed new, rapid, automated methods for determination of radionuclides using sequential injection methodologies to automate extraction chromatographic separations, with on-line flow-through scintillation counting for real time detection. This work has progressed in two main areas: radionuclide sensors for water monitoring and automated radiochemical analyzers for monitoring nuclear waste processing operations. Radionuclide sensors have been developed that collect and concentrate radionuclides in preconcentrating minicolumns with dual functionality: chemical selectivity for radionuclide capture and scintillation for signal output. These sensors can detect pertechnetate to below regulatory levels and have been engineered into a prototype for field testing. A fully automated process monitor has been developed for total technetium in nuclear waste streams. This instrument performs sample acidification, speciation adjustment, separation and detection in fifteen minutes or less.

  8. Automated Intruder Tracking using Particle Filtering and a Network of Binary Motion Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Goldberg, Ken

    infrared (PIR) motion sensors that suggest that our estimator is effective and degrades gracefully with increasing sensor refractory periods. Index Terms - Security, Sensor Networks, Particle Filter, Tracking, Sensor Fusion. I. INTRODUCTION Many new technologies for automated security, wireless networks

  9. Microbend fiber-optic chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Weiss, Jonathan D. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A microbend fiber-optic chemical sensor for detecting chemicals in a sample, and a method for its use, is disclosed. The sensor comprises at least one optical fiber having a microbend section (a section of small undulations in its axis), for transmitting and receiving light. In transmission, light guided through the microbend section scatters out of the fiber core and interacts, either directly or indirectly, with the chemical in the sample, inducing fluorescence radiation. Fluorescence radiation is scattered back into the microbend section and returned to an optical detector for determining characteristics of the fluorescence radiation quantifying the presence of a specific chemical.

  10. Passive in-situ chemical sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Morrell, Jonathan S. (Farragut, TN); Ripley, Edward B. (Knoxville, TN)

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    A chemical sensor for assessing a chemical of interest. In typical embodiments the chemical sensor includes a first thermocouple and second thermocouple. A reactive component is typically disposed proximal to the second thermal couple, and is selected to react with the chemical of interest and generate a temperature variation that may be detected by a comparison of a temperature sensed by the second thermocouple compared with a concurrent temperature detected by the first thermocouple. Further disclosed is a method for assessing a chemical of interest and a method for identifying a reaction temperature for a chemical of interest in a system.

  11. Sensor devices comprising field-structured composites

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Martin, James E. (Tijeras, NM); Hughes, Robert C. (Albuquerque, NM); Anderson, Robert A. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2001-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    A new class of sensor devices comprising field-structured conducting composites comprising a textured distribution of conducting magnetic particles is disclosed. The conducting properties of such field-structured materials can be precisely controlled during fabrication so as to exhibit a large change in electrical conductivity when subject to any environmental influence which changes the relative volume fraction. Influences which can be so detected include stress, strain, shear, temperature change, humidity, magnetic field, electromagnetic radiation, and the presence or absence of certain chemicals. This behavior can be made the basis for a wide variety of sensor devices.

  12. Sensors and Controls Workshop Summary Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Susan Maley; Robert R. Romanosky

    2001-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Higher operating efficiencies, emission reductions, improved reliability, and lower operating costs are benefits that the power industry can realize with the utilization of sensors and controls. However, for the power industry to derive the maximum benefit from sensors and controls, improvements in existing technologies and novel approaches to challenging measurements are needed. Recognizing the importance of sensors and controls, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) sponsored a sensors and controls workshop on April 17 to 18, 2001, in Washington, DC. The workshop focused on identifying technology needs in sensors and controls for existing fossil-energy power plants as well as future facilities conceived under the Vision 21 Program. Forty-six experts from 29 organizations, including private industry, research laboratories, academia, and government agencies, attended the workshop. The meeting opened with keynote speakers from NETL and the private sector. NETL officials spoke of the Vision 21 and advanced research programs. Speakers from the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) and Delphi Automotive Systems Research Laboratory discussed the improvements realized with their respective operation through the use of sensors and controls. NETL keynote speakers Robert Romanosky and Carl Bauer emphasized that developing sensor and control systems plays a critical role in DOE Office of Fossil Energy Vision 21 Program, clean coal activities under the Power Plant Improvement Initiative, and the proposed Clean Coal Power Initiative. The Vision 21 Program is aimed at providing technologies for ultra-clean fossil-fuel-based energy production with 60- to 75-percent efficiencies and near zero emissions. The program also uses a modular approach to present opportunities to not only generate power, but also co-produce clean fuels, chemicals, steam, and other useful products. The ultra-high efficiency and environmental performance goals of the Vision 21 Program mean that facilities must operate at optimum conditions, while adapting in real-time to changes in load and feedstock. These are challenging performance goals. They will require advanced control and sensing systems that can be adapted and optimized in real time. To improve the overall plant performance of existing power plants, one of the most cost-effective methods is to update the sensor and control systems.

  13. Ultra-wideband radar motion sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A motion sensor is based on ultra-wideband (UWB) radar. UWB radar range is determined by a pulse-echo interval. For motion detection, the sensors operate by staring at a fixed range and then sensing any change in the averaged radar reflectivity at that range. A sampling gate is opened at a fixed delay after the emission of a transmit pulse. The resultant sampling gate output is averaged over repeated pulses. Changes in the averaged sampling gate output represent changes in the radar reflectivity at a particular range, and thus motion. 15 figs.

  14. Sensors and Detectors | Argonne National Laboratory

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmosphericNuclear Security Administrationcontroller systemsBi (2) SrEvaluating theDepartmentSensitivity ofSensors andSensors

  15. Implementing a wireless base station for a sensor network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Heewon, 1977-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Using wireless sensor networks for monitoring infrastructure is a new trend in civil engineering. Compared with traditional ways to monitor infrastructure, wireless sensor networks are cheap, safe, and compact. However, ...

  16. Defending against Search-based Physical Attacks in Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xuan, Dong

    and destroy sensors with stealth by moving across the sensor network. In any case, the end result of physical or recommendations expressed in this material are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the views

  17. On Perimeter Coverage in Wireless Sensor Networks with Minimum Cost

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tam, Vincent W. L.

    , and asset tracking [1], [2]. In monitoring applications, small battery-powered sensor nodes are deployed of the white house so as to ensure its security. Each sensor is associated with a cost. To reduce the total

  18. A microelectronic design for low-cost disposable chemical sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laval, Stuart S. (Stuart Sean), 1980-

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis demonstrates the novel concept and design of integrated microelectronics for a low-cost disposable chemical sensor. The critical aspects of this chemical sensor are the performance of the microelectronic chip ...

  19. Design & implementation of a wireless sensor prototyping kit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hope, Jamison Roger

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, wireless sensor networks (WSN) has become an active area of research among computer scientists. In this work, JONA, a prototyping kit for wireless sensors, will be described. The intention of this kit is ...

  20. Key Distribution Mechanisms for Wireless Sensor Networks: a Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bystroff, Chris

    of physical attacks to unattended sensors. Moreover, in some deployment sce- narios sensor nodes need, Computer Science Department, Lally 310, 110 8th Street, Troy, NY 12180-3590. Technical Report TR-05

  1. Key Distribution Mechanisms for Wireless Sensor Networks: a Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bystroff, Chris

    of physical attacks to unattended sensors. Moreover, in some deployment sce­ narios sensor nodes need, Computer Science Department, Lally 310, 110 8th Street, Troy, NY 12180­3590. Technical Report TR­05

  2. Chemical and biological sensors based on organic semiconductors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bora, Mihail

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In this thesis I designed, fabricated and characterized two types of sensors: chemical sensors based on organic thin film transistors, and a miniaturized surface plasmon resonance biosensors for biotechnology and medical ...

  3. Harsh Environment Silicon Carbide Sensor Technology for Geothermal Instrumentation

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: Develop advanced sensor technology for the direct monitoring of geothermal reservoirs. Engineer sensors to survive and operate in H2O pressures up to 220 bar and temperatures as high as 374o C.

  4. Integration of wireless sensor networks in environmental monitoring cyber infrastructure

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huang, Yan

    Integration of wireless sensor networks in environmental monitoring cyber infrastructure Jue Yang ? to revolutionize many science and engineering domains. We present a novel environmental monitoring system collection, management, visualization, dissemination, and exchange, conforming to the new Sensor Web

  5. National Renewable Energy Laboratory Hydrogen Safety Sensor Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to electromagnetic interference. · Can be fabricated in high volumes at low- cost (one control, many sensor heads

  6. Polymer-Ceramic MEMS Bimorphs as Thermal Infrared Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Clinton Gregory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and performance. Microelectromechanical Systems, Journal of,Sensor. Microelectromechanical Systems, Journal of, 2005.Nanostructures. Microelectromechanical Systems, Journal of,

  7. Ris-PhD-19(EN) Self Calibrating Interferometric Sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Interferometric Sensor Department: Optics and Plasma Research Department Risø-PhD-19(EN) January 2006 This thesis

  8. Fiber-Optic Long-Line Position Sensor

    Energy Innovation Portal (Marketing Summaries) [EERE]

    2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a side-emitting fiber optic position sensor and method of determining an unknown position of an object by using the sensor. Non-electrical position sensors like the one developed by Sandia are desirable for use in hazardous environment, e.g., for measuring the liquid level in gasoline or jet fuel tanks. This sensor is an attractive option because it does notintroduce electrical energy, is insensitive to electromagnetic interference,...

  9. Polymer-Ceramic MEMS Bimorphs as Thermal Infrared Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warren, Clinton Gregory

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    sensors and actuators. Smart Material Structure, 2000. 9: p.beam microactuators. Smart Materials and Structures, 2000(

  10. Sensors year, vol, 1-x manuscripts; DOI: 10.3390/--OPEN ACCESS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cai, Jianfei

    Sensors year, vol, 1-x manuscripts; DOI: 10.3390/-- OPEN ACCESS sensors ISSN 1424-8220 www.mdpi.com/journal/sensors Article On the Selection of Transmission Range in Underwater Acoustic Sensor Networks Mingsheng Gao 1 of a practical un- derwater acoustic sensor network (UWSN), where sensor nodes equipping with only basic

  11. Security Schemes for Wireless Sensor Networks with Mobile Sink

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rasheed, Amar Adnan

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    ........................ 35 10 Wireless sensor network with mobile sinks and sensor nodes using two separate key pools for key pre-distribution ......................................... 39 11 (a) Direct key discovery, (b) Indirect key discovery through interrmedi... Protocol parameter values .......................................................................... 108 1 CHAPTER I INTRODUCTION Mobility is exploited in the field of wireless sensor network [1], [2], [3], [4] to circum- vent multi...

  12. Platform Based Design for Automotive Sensor Conditioning L. Fanucci1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Platform Based Design for Automotive Sensor Conditioning L. Fanucci1 , A. Giambastiani2 , F. Iozzi3 kinds of sensors for automotive applications is presented. A platform based design approach is pursued prototyping. A case study is presented concerning the conditioning of a Gyro yaw rate sensor for automotive

  13. Approximate Solutions and Performance Bounds for the Sensor Placement Problem

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kavcic, Aleksandar

    to place environmental sensors for an area where there are large amounts of distributed solar PV and whereApproximate Solutions and Performance Bounds for the Sensor Placement Problem Muhammad Uddin@cc.tuat.ac.jp Abstract--This paper considers the placement of m sensors at n > m possible locations. Given noisy

  14. Everlast: Long-life, Supercapacitor-operated Wireless Sensor Node

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chou, Pai H.

    Everlast: Long-life, Supercapacitor-operated Wireless Sensor Node Farhan Simjee and Pai H. Chou,phchou}@uci.edu ABSTRACT This paper describes a supercapacitor-operated, solar-powered wire- less sensor node called, Design Keywords Maximum power point tracking, supercapacitor, solar power, wire- less sensors 1

  15. Autonomous Data Collection from Underwater Sensor Networks using Acoustic Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sukhatme, Gaurav S.

    for an autonomous underwater vehicle (AUV) to collect data from an underwater sensor network. The sensors. A potential solution is the use of a mobile autonomous under- water vehicle (AUV) equipped with an acousticAutonomous Data Collection from Underwater Sensor Networks using Acoustic Communication Geoffrey A

  16. Power Management for Wireless Sensor Networks Based on Energy Budgets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Turau, Volker

    Power Management for Wireless Sensor Networks Based on Energy Budgets Christian Renner Institute with wireless sensor networks powered by energy-harvesting supplies. We introduce the concept of an energy budget, the amount of energy available to a sensor node for a given period of time. The presented tools

  17. ESC: Energy Synchronized Communication in Sustainable Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Massachusetts at Amherst, University of

    ESC: Energy Synchronized Communication in Sustainable Sensor Networks Yu Gu, Ting Zhu and Tian He Abstract--With advances in energy harvesting techniques, it is now feasible to build sustainable sensor of sustainable sensor networks is to effectively utilize a continuous stream of ambient energy. Instead

  18. Simulating Microstructural Evolution and Electrical Transport in Ceramic Gas Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ciobanu, Cristian

    . In this paper, using the example of the thermal processing of ceramic gas sensors, an integrated compu- tationalSimulating Microstructural Evolution and Electrical Transport in Ceramic Gas Sensors Yunzhi Wang in ceramic gas sensors has been proposed. First, the particle-flow model and the continuum-phase-field method

  19. 3.5 Nanowire Sensors 3.5.1 Background

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    117 3.5 Nanowire Sensors 3.5.1 Background Nanowires are solid, rod-like materials with diameters that similar commercial products will eventually be available. 3.5.2 Description Nanowire sensors have et al. 2003). A comprehensive review of current research activities on chemical sensors based

  20. MTDC Safety Sensor Technology Beyond the standard duty cycle data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MTDC Safety Sensor Technology Background Beyond the standard duty cycle data collection system used in the Department of Energy's Medium Truck Duty Cycle program, additional sensors were installed on three test Administration. The real-time brake stroke, tire pressure, and weight information obtained from these sensors

  1. Applicability of CS616 Soil Water Sensors for South

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Migliaccio, Kati White

    site water balance Image from: (Migliaccio 2007) #12;Background ­ Soil Water Sensors Time DomainApplicability of CS616 Soil Water Sensors for South Florida Urban Soils Kevin Koryto Water: Determine if CS616 soil water sensors are functioning adequately at field site. Hypothesis: Presence of air

  2. Hybrid Sensor Networks: A Small World Gaurav Sharma

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazumdar, Ravi R.

    wires to a wireless sensor network can not only reduce the average energy expenditure per sensor node, but also the non-uniformity in the energy expenditure across the sensor nodes. Categories and Subject the average hop count of the network, resulting in a reduced energy dissipa- tion per node. We also show

  3. Signal Compression in Wireless Sensor By Marco F. Duarte1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sensor networks (WSNs) has been motivated by important applications such as climate change tracking is an important tool for reducing the communication costs and increasing the lifetime of wireless sensor network communication rate could be achieved. This, however, would require communication between the sensors or prior

  4. Fluorescent Sensors for Zn2+ Based on a Fluorescein Platform

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tsien, Roger Y.

    Fluorescent Sensors for Zn2+ Based on a Fluorescein Platform: Synthesis, Properties fluorescent sensors for Zn2+ that utilize fluorescein as a reporting group, Zinpyr-1 and Zinpyr-2, have been. Both Zinpyr sensors have excitation and emission wavelengths in the visible range (500 nm

  5. Recent Advances of Sensors for Pacemakers Wei Vivien Shi1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Mingshen

    - 1 - Recent Advances of Sensors for Pacemakers Wei Vivien Shi1 , Student Member, IEEE, and Meng University, Shanghai 201804, China Abstract--In this paper, the recent advances of sensors incorporated in pacemakers are presented. Based on the functions and operations of modern pacemakers, a variety of sensors

  6. INTRODUCTION Optical sensors have long been used in the Great

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTRODUCTION Optical sensors have long been used in the Great Lakes to track changes and Haw- ley 1998, Hawley and Lee 1999, for example), but the use of acoustic sensors for this purpose Concentrations Measured by Acoustic and Optical Sensors Nathan Hawley* Great Lakes Environmental Research

  7. Sun Sensor Model Nikolas Trawny and Stergios Roumeliotis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roumeliotis, Stergios I.

    Sun Sensor Model Nikolas Trawny and Stergios Roumeliotis Department of Computer Science://www.cs.umn.edu/~trawny #12;Sun Sensor Model Nikolas Trawny and Stergios Roumeliotis Department of Computer Science-hole Camera Model The Sun Sensor is represented mathematically by the simple pin-hole camera model, depicted

  8. Distributed Dynamic Clustering Algorithm in Uneven Distributed Wireless Sensor Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the sensor networks energy efficient [3][4][5]. This helps to increase the lifetime of the sensor nodes and energy efficient routing has been presented in recent research literature [1]-[16]. In [1] an intelligent energy efficient de- ployment algorithm for cluster based WSNs is described, in which the sensor node

  9. ENERGY EFFICIENT ROUTING IN WIRELESS SENSOR NETWORKS Curt Schurgers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shihada, Basem

    the integration of communications, sensors and signal processing all together in one low-cost package. It is now feasible to fabricate ultra-small sensor nodes that can be scattered on the battlefield to gather strategic towards localized algorithms [1][2]. Due to the large number of sensors, network-scale interaction

  10. Insider Attacker Detection in Wireless Sensor Fang Liu & Xiuzhen Cheng

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cheng, Xiuzhen "Susan"

    to be low-cost and lack of tamper resistance. The compromise or capture of a sensor releases all the intrusion detection techniques developed for a fixed wired network. A typical low-cost sensor has limited working towards securing sensor networks in the fields of pairwise key establishment [13

  11. Invited Paper: Wireless Sensor Networks for Ecosystem Monitoring & Port Surveillance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Invited Paper: Wireless Sensor Networks for Ecosystem Monitoring & Port Surveillance A. Mansour*1 of the most up-to-date innovations in sensor technology and sensor networks, our current project should as well as the second phase of the project which consists in analyzing living underwater micro

  12. Dual port temperature sensor tag for passive UHF RFID systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elsherbeni, Atef Z.

    Dual port temperature sensor tag for passive UHF RFID systems J. Virtanen Rauma Research Unit and to simplify the measurement procedure. Design/methodology/approach ­ The sensor tag is based on a dual port sensing concept in which two ports are used to obtain sensor readings. By utilizing two ports instead

  13. Design and characterization of a low cost dual differential proving ring force sensor utilizing Hall-effect sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rivest, Christopher W. (Christopher Warren)

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A novel dual differential hall-effect based proving ring force sensor has been designed, manufactured, and tested. Strain gauge based force sensors are among the most common methods of measuring static and dynamic forces, ...

  14. Silicon micromachined sensors and sensor arrays for shear-stress measurements in aerodynamic flows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Padmanabhan, Aravind

    In this thesis we report on a new micromachined floating-element shear-stress sensor for turbulent boundary layer research. Applications in low shear-stress environments such as turbulent boundary layers require extremely ...

  15. Electrical Metering Equipment and Sensors Appendix D -Electrical Metering Equipment and Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Appendix D ­ Electrical Metering Equipment and Sensors #12;D.1 Appendix D - Electrical Metering schedules, and view system status from the convenience of a standard web-browser. D.2 Metering Data Logger

  16. Mechanical and optical behavior of a novel optical fiber crack sensor and an interferometric strain sensor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Olson, Noah Gale, 1969-

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The proper interpretation of measurements from an optical fiber sensor requires a full understanding of its mechanical response to external action and the corresponding change in optical output. To quantify the mechanical ...

  17. Applications of Industrial Wireless Sensor Milan Erdelj

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    ...................................... 10 1.3.2.2 Hazard ........................................ 10 1.3.2.3 Security manuscript, published in "Industrial Wireless Sensor Networks: Applications, Protocols, and Standards CRC the problems of air, water (together with waste water) pollution, but covers the production material pollution

  18. Electro-optical voltage sensor head

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woods, Gregory K. (Idaho Falls, ID)

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A miniature electro-optic voltage sensor system capable of accurate operation at high voltages. The system employs a transmitter, a sensor disposed adjacent to but out of direct electrical contact with a conductor on which the voltage is to be measured, a detector, and a signal processor. The transmitter produces a beam of electromagnetic radiation which is routed into the sensor where the beam undergoes the Pockels electro-optic effect. The electro-optic effect causes phase shifting in the beam, which is in turn converted to a pair of independent beams, from which the voltage of a system based on its E-field is determined when the two beams are normalized by the signal processor. The sensor converts the beam by splitting the beam in accordance with the axes of the beam's polarization state (an ellipse whose ellipticity varies between -1 and +1 in proportion to voltage) into at least two AM signals. These AM signals are fed into a signal processor and processed to determine the voltage between a ground conductor and the conductor on which voltage is being measured.

  19. Software Update Recovery for Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sreenan, Cormac J.

    mechanism that uses loss-of- control to provide high-reliability, low energy, software updates, includingSoftware Update Recovery for Wireless Sensor Networks Stephen Brown1 and Cormac J. Sreenan2 1 Laboratory, University College Cork, Ireland Abstract. Updating software over the network is important

  20. Applications of the Sensor Fish Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng, Zhiqun; Carlson, Thomas J.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Richmond, Marshall C.

    2007-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    The Sensor Fish is an autonomous device developed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and Army Corps of Engineers (COE) to better understand the physical conditions fish experience during passage through hydro-turbines and other dam bypass alternatives. Since its initial development in 1997, the Sensor Fish has undergone several design changes to improve its function and extend the range of its use. The most recent Sensor Fish design, the six-degree-of-freedom (6DOF) device, has been deployed successfully to characterize the environment fish experience when they pass through several hydroelectric projects along main stem Columbia and Snake Rivers in the Pacific Northwest. Just as information gathered from crash test dummies can affect automobile design with the installation of protective designs to lessen or prevent human injury, having sensor fish data to quantify accelerations, rotations, and pressure changes, helps identify fish injury mechanisms such as strike, turbulent shear, pressure, and inertial effects, including non-lethal ones such as stunning or signs of vestibular disruption that expose fish to a higher risk of predation by birds and piscivorous fish downstream following passage.

  1. Lateral displacement and rotational displacement sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Duden, Thomas

    2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

    A position measuring sensor formed from opposing sets of capacitor plates measures both rotational displacement and lateral displacement from the changes in capacitances as overlapping areas of capacitors change. Capacitances are measured by a measuring circuit. The measured capacitances are provided to a calculating circuit that performs calculations to obtain angular and lateral displacement from the capacitances measured by the measuring circuit.

  2. Low-Cost Spectral Sensor Development Description.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Armijo, Kenneth Miguel; Yellowhair, Julius

    2014-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Solar spectral data for all parts of the US is limited due in part to the high cost of commercial spectrometers. Solar spectral information is necessary for accurate photovoltaic (PV) performance forecasting, especially for large utility-scale PV installations. A low-cost solar spectral sensor would address the obstacles and needs. In this report, a novel low-cost, discrete- band sensor device, comprised of five narrow-band sensors, is described. The hardware is comprised of commercial-off-the-shelf components to keep the cost low. Data processing algorithms were developed and are being refined for robustness. PV module short-circuit current ( I sc ) prediction methods were developed based on interaction-terms regression methodology and spectrum reconstruction methodology for computing I sc . The results suggest the computed spectrum using the reconstruction method agreed well with the measured spectrum from the wide-band spectrometer (RMS error of 38.2 W/m 2 -nm). Further analysis of computed I sc found a close correspondence of 0.05 A RMS error. The goal is for ubiquitous adoption of the low-cost spectral sensor in solar PV and other applications such as weather forecasting.

  3. Remotely deployable aerial inspection using tactile sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    MacLeod, C. N.; Cao, J.; Pierce, S. G.; Dobie, G.; Summan, R. [Centre for Ultrasonic Engineering, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, G1 1XW (United Kingdom); Sullivan, J. C.; Pipe, A. G. [Bristol Robotics Laboratory, University of the West of England, Bristol, BS16 1QY (United Kingdom)

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    For structural monitoring applications, the use of remotely deployable Non-Destructive Evaluation (NDE) inspection platforms offer many advantages, including improved accessibility, greater safety and reduced cost, when compared to traditional manual inspection techniques. The use of such platforms, previously reported by researchers at the University Strathclyde facilitates the potential for rapid scanning of large areas and volumes in hazardous locations. A common problem for both manual and remote deployment approaches lies in the intrinsic stand-off and surface coupling issues of typical NDE probes. The associated complications of these requirements are obviously significantly exacerbated when considering aerial based remote inspection and deployment, resulting in simple visual techniques being the preferred sensor payload. Researchers at Bristol Robotics Laboratory have developed biomimetic tactile sensors modelled on the facial whiskers (vibrissae) of animals such as rats and mice, with the latest sensors actively sweeping their tips across the surface in a back and forth motion. The current work reports on the design and performance of an aerial inspection platform and the suitability of tactile whisking sensors to aerial based surface monitoring applications.

  4. Microwave Sensors Active and David G. Long

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Long, David G.

    waves up through high energy gamma waves. Microwaves extend over an important part of the elec be classified as either passive (radiometers) or active (radars). Each sensor class provides unique insight instruments can be divided into two broad classes: pas- sive, known as radiometers, and active, known

  5. PVT-NG sensor final report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mitchell, Dean James; Brusseau, Charles A.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This document is a final report for the polyvinyl toluene (PVT) neutron-gamma (PVT-NG) project, which was sponsored by the Domestic Nuclear Detection Office (DNDO). The PVT-NG sensor uses PVT detectors for both gamma and neutron detection. The sensor exhibits excellent spectral resolution and gain stabilization, which are features that are beneficial for detection of both gamma-ray and neutron sources. In fact, the ability to perform isotope identification based on spectra that were measured by the PVT-NG sensor was demonstrated. As described in a previous report, the neutron sensitivity of the first version of the prototype was about 25% less than the DNDO requirement of 2.5 cps/ng for bare Cf-252. This document describes design modifications that were expected to improve the neutron sensitivity by about 50% relative to the PVT-NG prototype. However, the project was terminated before execution of the design modifications after portal vendors demonstrated other technologies that enable neutron detection without the use of He-3. Nevertheless, the PVT-NG sensor development demonstrated several performance goals that may be useful in future portal designs.

  6. Radioactive Target Detection Using Wireless Sensor Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Tonglin

    . By using the physical law for nuclear radiation isotopes, this chapter proposes a statistical method for wireless sensor network data to detect and locate a hidden nuclear target in a large study area. The method shown that the proposed method is effective and efficient in detection and location of the nuclear

  7. Energy Balanced Chain in Distributed Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Howitt, Ivan

    Energy Balanced Chain in Distributed Sensor Networks Ivan Howitt Electrical & Computer Engineering because of their higher traffic. This paper suggests an energy balanced chain (EBC) which can efficiently the energy balance optimization problem in terms of the segmentation space. By adjusting the transmission

  8. Intrusion Detection Techniques in Sensor Aikaterini Mitrokotsa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    to the network administrator because communication between the access point and the clients is broadcastPDF PROOF Intrusion Detection Techniques in Sensor Networks Aikaterini Mitrokotsa Department Research has been conducted in wired network Intrusion Detection Systems (IDS) for over 25 years. Although

  9. Sensor Fault Diagnosis Using Principal Component Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sharifi, Mahmoudreza

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this research is to address the problem of fault diagnosis of sensors which measure a set of direct redundant variables. This study proposes: 1. A method for linear senor fault diagnosis 2. An analysis of isolability and detectability...

  10. Bragg Experimental SensorNet Testbed (BEST)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gorman, Bryan

    2010-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

    The principal causative objectives of BEST were to consolidate the 9-1-1 and emergency response services into an Integrated Incident Management Center (I2MC) and to establish an 'Interoperability framework' based on SensorNet protocols to allow additional components to be added to the I2MC over time.

  11. Explicit Sensor Network Localization using Semidefinite ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2010-01-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Key Words: Sensor Network Localization, Euclidean Distance Matrix ... Cliques in the graph of the SNL problem give rise to this degeneracy in the ..... cone (S) denote the convex cone generated by the set S. We use the Matlab notation 1 : n =.

  12. Wireless sensor networks and environmental monitoring applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Le Borgne, Yann-Aël

    by the Human Resources and Mobility program of the European community (MEST-CT-2004-505079) #12;ULB Machine Radio: 4kbps, 180m Sensors: Light and accelerometer Energy: Solar powered Golem and deputy dust 16mm3 ­ Remote or non invasive monitoring ·... #12;Solbosch greenhouses ·Greenhouses used by different research

  13. Embedded sensor having an identifiable orientation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Bennett, Thomas E. (31 Portola Ct., Danville, CA 94506); Nelson, Drew V. (840 Cabot Ct., San Carlos, CA 94070)

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method is described wherein a sensor, such as a mechanical strain sensor, embedded in a fiber core, is "flagged" to identify a preferred orientation of the sensor. The identifying "flag" is a composite material, comprising a plurality of non-woven filaments distributed in a resin matrix, forming a small planar tab. The fiber is first subjected to a stimulus to identify the orientation providing the desired signal response, and then sandwiched between first and second layers of the composite material. The fiber, and therefore, the sensor orientation is thereby captured and fixed in place. The process for achieving the oriented fiber includes, after identifying the fiber orientation, carefully laying the oriented fiber onto the first layer of composite, moderately heating the assembled layer for a short period in order to bring the composite resin to a "tacky" state, heating the second composite layer as the first, and assembling the two layers together such that they merge to form a single consolidated block. The consolidated block achieving a roughly uniform distribution of composite filaments near the embedded fiber such that excess resin is prevented from "pooling" around the periphery of the fiber.

  14. FUTURE POWER GRID INITIATIVE Scalable Sensor Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of sensors and a large number of applications in future smart grids Provide a uniformed API to allow applications to access real time power grid data Facilitate the integration of a large number of diverse management systems Allow easy integration of a large number of diverse power grid applications

  15. Hierarchical Nanoceramics for Industrial Process Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ruud, James, A.; Brosnan, Kristen, H.; Striker, Todd; Ramaswamy, Vidya; Aceto, Steven, C.; Gao, Yan; Willson, Patrick, D.; Manoharan, Mohan; Armstrong, Eric, N., Wachsman, Eric, D.; Kao, Chi-Chang

    2011-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

    This project developed a robust, tunable, hierarchical nanoceramics materials platform for industrial process sensors in harsh-environments. Control of material structure at multiple length scales from nano to macro increased the sensing response of the materials to combustion gases. These materials operated at relatively high temperatures, enabling detection close to the source of combustion. It is anticipated that these materials can form the basis for a new class of sensors enabling widespread use of efficient combustion processes with closed loop feedback control in the energy-intensive industries. The first phase of the project focused on materials selection and process development, leading to hierarchical nanoceramics that were evaluated for sensing performance. The second phase focused on optimizing the materials processes and microstructures, followed by validation of performance of a prototype sensor in a laboratory combustion environment. The objectives of this project were achieved by: (1) synthesizing and optimizing hierarchical nanostructures; (2) synthesizing and optimizing sensing nanomaterials; (3) integrating sensing functionality into hierarchical nanostructures; (4) demonstrating material performance in a sensing element; and (5) validating material performance in a simulated service environment. The project developed hierarchical nanoceramic electrodes for mixed potential zirconia gas sensors with increased surface area and demonstrated tailored electrocatalytic activity operable at high temperatures enabling detection of products of combustion such as NOx close to the source of combustion. Methods were developed for synthesis of hierarchical nanostructures with high, stable surface area, integrated catalytic functionality within the structures for gas sensing, and demonstrated materials performance in harsh lab and combustion gas environments.

  16. Partially Controlled Deployment Strategies for Wireless Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Santi, Paolo

    be formed and used in several application scenarios: smart home environ- ments, intrusion detection a certain set of grid-like strategies that reflect the (one- or two-dimensional) symmetry of the region years. By con- necting tiny, smart sensor nodes by means of wireless transceivers, large WSNs Part

  17. MIS-based sensors with hydrogen selectivity

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Li; ,Dongmei (Boulder, CO); Medlin, J. William (Boulder, CO); McDaniel, Anthony H. (Livermore, CA); Bastasz, Robert J. (Livermore, CA)

    2008-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The invention provides hydrogen selective metal-insulator-semiconductor sensors which include a layer of hydrogen selective material. The hydrogen selective material can be polyimide layer having a thickness between 200 and 800 nm. Suitable polyimide materials include reaction products of benzophenone tetracarboxylic dianhydride 4,4-oxydianiline m-phenylene diamine and other structurally similar materials.

  18. Designing Self-Sustainable Photovoltaic Sensor Network

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    , 2006 #12;2 Target Environment · Outdoor application ­ Wired power and battery has limitations. ­ Solar for power saving. ­ Power saving for single-hop is trivial. #12;3 Related Work on Solar Powered Sensor #12;4 Goals · Power saving for multi-hop networks under solar energy source. ­ Solar Energy: time

  19. Primary Cilia: Cellular Sensors for the Skeleton

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stearns, Tim

    Primary Cilia: Cellular Sensors for the Skeleton CHARLES T. ANDERSON,1 * ALESHA B. CASTILLO,2 of microtubules and are thus called 910 cilia. The pri- mary cilium is enclosed in a specialized membrane (Vieira. Anderson, Department of Biological Sciences, Stanford University, Stanford, California. E-mail: ctanders

  20. Reducing Uncertainty in Wireless Sensor Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    network. OSDI '06. [4] O.V. K. Langendoen et. al. Murphy loves potatoes: Experiences from a pilot sensor Island [1] Redwood Tree (Wikipedia) Redwoods [2] Agriculture [4] Potato Field (Kevin Temple) Volcano, Memento2 ­ "Heisenbugs" ­ Waste of resources ­ Monitoring suffers from network problems, too. [1] N

  1. Tracking Dynamic Boundary Fronts using Range Sensors

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ramamritham, Krithi

    are being deployed for real-time monitoring applica- tions, such as detecting leakage of hazardous material location whereas in the latter approach a sensor finds approximate distance to a remote location where degrees and gather reflec- tivity and wind velocity information. Lidars (LIght Detection and Ranging

  2. A 16 mm3 autonomous solar-powered sensor node with bi-directional optical communication for distributed sensor net-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kahn, Joseph M.

    Abstract A 16 mm3 autonomous solar-powered sensor node with bi- directional optical communication for distributed sensor net- works has been demonstrated. The device digitizes inte- grated sensor signals, a 2.6 mm2 SOI solar cell array, and a micromachined four-quadrant corner-cube retroreflector (CCR

  3. Tape-cast sensors and method of making

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Mukundan, Rangachary (Santa Fe, NM); Brosha, Eric L. (Los Alamos, NM); Garzon, Fernando H. (Santa Fe, NM)

    2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

    A method of making electrochemical sensors in which an electrolyte material is cast into a tape. Prefabricated electrodes are then partially embedded between two wet layers of the electrolyte tape to form a green sensor, and the green sensor is then heated to sinter the electrolyte tape around the electrodes. The resulting sensors can be used in applications such as, but not limited to, combustion control, environmental monitoring, and explosive detection. A electrochemical sensor formed by the tape-casting method is also disclosed.

  4. Cooperative UAV-Based Communications Backbone for Sensor Networks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Roberts, R S

    2001-10-07T23:59:59.000Z

    The objective of this project is to investigate the use of unmanned air vehicles (UAVs) as mobile, adaptive communications backbones for ground-based sensor networks. In this type of network, the UAVs provide communication connectivity to sensors that cannot communicate with each other because of terrain, distance, or other geographical constraints. In these situations, UAVs provide a vertical communication path for the sensors, thereby mitigating geographic obstacles often imposed on networks. With the proper use of UAVs, connectivity to a widely disbursed sensor network in rugged terrain is readily achieved. Our investigation has focused on networks where multiple cooperating UAVs are used to form a network backbone. The advantage of using multiple UAVs to form the network backbone is parallelization of sensor connectivity. Many widely spaced or isolated sensors can be connected to the network at once using this approach. In these networks, the UAVs logically partition the sensor network into sub-networks (subnets), with one UAV assigned per subnet. Partitioning the network into subnets allows the UAVs to service sensors in parallel thereby decreasing the sensor-to-network connectivity. A UAV services sensors in its subnet by flying a route (path) through the subnet, uplinking data collected by the sensors, and forwarding the data to a ground station. An additional advantage of using multiple UAVs in the network is that they provide redundancy in the communications backbone, so that the failure of a single UAV does not necessarily imply the loss of the network.

  5. Wireless sensor systems and methods, and methods of monitoring structures

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kunerth, Dennis C.; Svoboda, John M.; Johnson, James T.; Harding, L. Dean; Klingler, Kerry M.

    2007-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    A wireless sensor system includes a passive sensor apparatus configured to be embedded within a concrete structure to monitor infiltration of contaminants into the structure. The sensor apparatus includes charging circuitry and a plurality of sensors respectively configured to measure environmental parameters of the structure which include information related to the infiltration of contaminants into the structure. A reader apparatus is communicatively coupled to the sensor apparatus, the reader apparatus being configured to provide power to the charging circuitry during measurements of the environmental parameters by the sensors. The reader apparatus is configured to independently interrogate individual ones of the sensors to obtain information measured by the individual sensors. The reader apparatus is configured to generate an induction field to energize the sensor apparatus. Information measured by the sensor apparatus is transmitted to the reader apparatus via a response signal that is superimposed on a return induction field generated by the sensor apparatus. Methods of monitoring structural integrity of the structure are also provided.

  6. Intelligent Software Agents: Sensor Integration and Response

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kulesz, James J [ORNL; Lee, Ronald W [ORNL

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Abstract In a post Macondo world the buzzwords are Integrity Management and Incident Response Management. The twin processes are not new but the opportunity to link the two is novel. Intelligent software agents can be used with sensor networks in distributed and centralized computing systems to enhance real-time monitoring of system integrity as well as manage the follow-on incident response to changing, and potentially hazardous, environmental conditions. The software components are embedded at the sensor network nodes in surveillance systems used for monitoring unusual events. When an event occurs, the software agents establish a new concept of operation at the sensing node, post the event status to a blackboard for software agents at other nodes to see , and then react quickly and efficiently to monitor the scale of the event. The technology addresses a current challenge in sensor networks that prevents a rapid and efficient response when a sensor measurement indicates that an event has occurred. By using intelligent software agents - which can be stationary or mobile, interact socially, and adapt to changing situations - the technology offers features that are particularly important when systems need to adapt to active circumstances. For example, when a release is detected, the local software agent collaborates with other agents at the node to exercise the appropriate operation, such as: targeted detection, increased detection frequency, decreased detection frequency for other non-alarming sensors, and determination of environmental conditions so that adjacent nodes can be informed that an event is occurring and when it will arrive. The software agents at the nodes can also post the data in a targeted manner, so that agents at other nodes and the command center can exercise appropriate operations to recalibrate the overall sensor network and associated intelligence systems. The paper describes the concepts and provides examples of real-world implementations including the Threat Detection and Analysis System (TDAS) at the International Port of Memphis and the Biological Warning and Incident Characterization System (BWIC) Environmental Monitoring (EM) Component. Technologies developed for these 24/7 operational systems have applications for improved real-time system integrity awareness as well as provide incident response (as needed) for production and field applications.

  7. High payload six-axis load sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Jansen, John F. (Knoxville, TN); Lind, Randall F. (Knoxville, TN)

    2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A repairable high-payload six-axis load sensor includes a table, a base, and at least three shear-pin load transducers removably mounted between the table and the base. Removable mounting permits easy replacement of damaged shear pins. Preferably, the shear-pin load transducers are responsive to shear forces imparted along the two axes perpendicular to an axis of minimum sensitivity characteristic of the transducer. Responsive to an applied shear force, each shear-pin load transducer can produce an electrical signal proportional to the reaction force. The load sensor can further include a structure for receiving the proportional electrical signals and computing the applied load corresponding to the proportional electrical signals. The computed load can be expressed in terms of a three-dimensional XYZ Cartesian coordinate system.

  8. Optical fiber sensors for harsh environments

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Xu, Juncheng; Wang, Anbo

    2007-02-06T23:59:59.000Z

    A diaphragm optic sensor comprises a ferrule including a bore having an optical fiber disposed therein and a diaphragm attached to the ferrule, the diaphragm being spaced apart from the ferrule to form a Fabry-Perot cavity. The cavity is formed by creating a pit in the ferrule or in the diaphragm. The components of the sensor are preferably welded together, preferably by laser welding. In some embodiments, the entire ferrule is bonded to the fiber along the entire length of the fiber within the ferrule; in other embodiments, only a portion of the ferrule is welded to the fiber. A partial vacuum is preferably formed in the pit. A small piece of optical fiber with a coefficient of thermal expansion chosen to compensate for mismatches between the main fiber and ferrule may be spliced to the end of the fiber.

  9. Electro-optic high voltage sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Davidson, James R.; Seifert, Gary D.

    2003-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A small sized electro-optic voltage sensor capable of accurate measurement of high voltages without contact with a conductor or voltage source is provided. When placed in the presence of an electric field, the sensor receives an input beam of electromagnetic radiation. A polarization beam displacer separates the input beam into two beams with orthogonal linear polarizations and causes one linearly polarized beam to impinge a crystal at a desired angle independent of temperature. The Pockels effect elliptically polarizes the beam as it travels through the crystal. A reflector redirects the beam back through the crystal and the beam displacer. On the return path, the polarization beam displacer separates the elliptically polarized beam into two output beams of orthogonal linear polarization. The system may include a detector for converting the output beams into electrical signals and a signal processor for determining the voltage based on an analysis of the output beams.

  10. Phase sensor for solar adaptive-optics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kellerer, Aglae

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Wavefront sensing in solar adaptive-optics is currently done with correlating Shack-Hartmann sensors, although the spatial- and temporal-resolutions of the phase measurements are then limited by the extremely fast computing required to correlate the sensor signals at the frequencies of daytime atmospheric-fluctuations. To avoid this limitation, a new wavefront-sensing technique is presented, that makes use of the solar brightness and is applicable to extended sources. The wavefront is sent through a modified Mach-Zehnder interferometer. A small, central part of the wavefront is used as reference and is made to interfere with the rest of the wavefront. The contrast of two simultaneously measured interference-patterns provides a direct estimate of the wavefront phase, no additional computation being required. The proposed optical layout shows precise initial alignment to be the critical point in implementing the new wavefront-sensing scheme.

  11. Continuous, real time microwave plasma element sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Woskov, P.P.; Smatlak, D.L.; Cohn, D.R.; Wittle, J.K.; Titus, C.H.; Surma, J.E.

    1995-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Microwave-induced plasma is described for continuous, real time trace element monitoring under harsh and variable conditions. The sensor includes a source of high power microwave energy and a shorted waveguide made of a microwave conductive, refractory material communicating with the source of the microwave energy to generate a plasma. The high power waveguide is constructed to be robust in a hot, hostile environment. It includes an aperture for the passage of gases to be analyzed and a spectrometer is connected to receive light from the plasma. Provision is made for real time in situ calibration. The spectrometer disperses the light, which is then analyzed by a computer. The sensor is capable of making continuous, real time quantitative measurements of desired elements, such as the heavy metals lead and mercury. 3 figs.

  12. Electronic multi-purpose material level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, T.E.

    1997-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    The present electronic multi-purpose material level sensor is based on time domain reflectometry (TDR) of very short electrical pulses. Pulses are propagated along a transmission line that is partially immersed in a liquid, powder, or other substance such as grain in a silo. The time difference of the reflections at the start of the transmission line and the air/liquid interface are used to determine levels to better than 0.01 inch. The sensor is essentially independent of circuit element and temperature variations, and can be mass produced at an extremely low price. The transmission line may be a Goubau line, microstrip, coaxial cable, twin lead, CPS or CPW, and may typically be a strip placed along the inside wall of a tank. The reflected pulses also contain information about strata within the liquid such as sludge-build-up at the bottom of an oil tank. 9 figs.

  13. Electronic multi-purpose material level sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    McEwan, Thomas E. (Livermore, CA)

    1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The present electronic multi-purpose material level sensor is based on time domain reflectometry (TDR) of very short electrical pulses. Pulses are propagated along a transmission line that is partially immersed in a liquid, powder, or other substance such as grain in a silo. The time difference of the reflections at the start of the transmission line and the air/liquid interface are used to determine levels to better than 0.01 inch. The sensor is essentially independent of circuit element and temperature variations, and can be mass produced at an extremely low price. The transmission line may be a Goubau line, microstrip, coaxial cable, twin lead, CPS or CPW, and may typically be a strip placed along the inside wall of a tank. The reflected pulses also contain information about strata within the liquid such as sludge-build-up at the bottom of an oil tank.

  14. Radionuclide Sensors for Subsurface Water Monitoring

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Timothy DeVol

    2006-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Contamination of the subsurface by radionuclides is a persistent and vexing problem for the Department of Energy. These radionuclides must be measured in field studies and monitoed in the long term when they cannot be removed. However, no radionuclide sensors existed for groundwater monitoring prior to this team's research under the EMSP program Detection of a and b decays from radionuclides in water is difficult due to their short ranges in condensed media.

  15. Sensor for viscosity and shear strength measurement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ebadian, M.A.; Dillion, J.; Moore, J.; Jones, K.

    1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Measurement of the physical properties (viscosity and density) of waste slurries is critical in evaluating transport parameters to ensure turbulent flow through transport pipes. The environment for measurement and sensor exposure is extremely harsh; therefore, reliability and ruggedness are critical in the sensor design. Two different viscometer techniques are being investigated in this study, based on: magnetostrictive pulse generated acoustic waves; and an oscillating cylinder. Prototype sensors have been built and tested which are based on both techniques. A base capability instrumentation system has been designed, constructed, and tested which incorporates both of these sensors. It requires manual data acquisition and off-line calculation. A broad range of viscous media has been tested using this system. Extensive test results appear in this report. The concept for each technique has been validated by these test results. This base capability system will need to be refined further before it is appropriate for field tests. The mass of the oscillating system structure will need to be reduced. A robust acoustic probe assembly will need to be developed. In addition, in March 1997 it was made known for the first time that the requirement was for a deliverable automated viscosity instrumentation system. Since then such a system has been designed, and the hardware has been constructed so that the automated concept can be proved. The rest of the hardware, which interfaced to a computer, has also been constructed and tested as far as possible. However, for both techniques the computer software for automated data acquisition, calculation, and logging had not been completed before funding and time ran out.

  16. Energy Management in Wireless Sensor Network Operations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohapatra, Arupa Kumar

    2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

    ) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 9 Comparison of long-run average costs of policies in 4-node line network (ct = 1 and T = 1) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 10 Fluid- ow model of an energy harvesting sensor . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 11 Sample path of X(t...) under threshold-based node activation policy . . 69 12 Sample path of X(t) in an exponential on-o environment . . . . . . 76 13 Limiting availability for di erent values of threshold (L) . . . . . . . 78 14 Energy ow model of an energy harvesting...

  17. Issues in autonomous mobile sensor networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dharne, Avinash Gopal

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    moni- toring, surveillance, search and rescue, and emergency management [9]-[15]. For example, one application for mobile sensor networks is in offshore oil and gas ex- ploration and condition monitoring. It is envisaged that a team of autonomous... another example of a network would be the ?Dominator? UAV network being envisaged by the USAF for surveillance, monitor- ing and engagement of targets on a cluttered battlefield [16]. A human in the loop provides initial directives to a group of agents...

  18. Adaptive and mobile ground sensor array.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Holzrichter, Michael Warren; O'Rourke, William T.; Zenner, Jennifer; Maish, Alexander B.

    2003-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The goal of this LDRD was to demonstrate the use of robotic vehicles for deploying and autonomously reconfiguring seismic and acoustic sensor arrays with high (centimeter) accuracy to obtain enhancement of our capability to locate and characterize remote targets. The capability to accurately place sensors and then retrieve and reconfigure them allows sensors to be placed in phased arrays in an initial monitoring configuration and then to be reconfigured in an array tuned to the specific frequencies and directions of the selected target. This report reviews the findings and accomplishments achieved during this three-year project. This project successfully demonstrated autonomous deployment and retrieval of a payload package with an accuracy of a few centimeters using differential global positioning system (GPS) signals. It developed an autonomous, multisensor, temporally aligned, radio-frequency communication and signal processing capability, and an array optimization algorithm, which was implemented on a digital signal processor (DSP). Additionally, the project converted the existing single-threaded, monolithic robotic vehicle control code into a multi-threaded, modular control architecture that enhances the reuse of control code in future projects.

  19. Final report on the PNL program to develop an alumina sensor. Sensors Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Windisch, C.F. Jr.; Brenden, B.B.; Koski, O.H.; Williford, R.E.

    1992-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An alumina concentration sensor was required to ensure safe operating conditions for cermet inert anodes that were under development at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL)(a) for the electrolytic production of aluminum metal. The Sensors Development Program at PNL was conducted in response to this need for an alumina sensor. In all, eight different approaches to developing an alumina sensor were evaluated as part of this program. Each approach sought to correlate alumina concentration either to some spectral, physical, or electrical property of the molten electrolytic, or alternatively, to some operational characteristic of the reduction cell such as the integrity of the cermet anodes or the electrical noise generated by them during cell operation. The studies on electrical noise were performed using a large number of digital signal analysis (DSA) methods. There were two primary requirements for success for an alumina sensor to be used in conjunction with cermet anodes: (1) adequate sensitivity to alumina concentration at concentrations close to saturation, and (2) ease of use in an industrial setting. After numerous laboratory experiments as well as field studies in some cases, it was concluded that none of the approaches sufficiently satisfied the two criteria to serve as the basis for an alumina sensor. If further work is to continue in this area, it is recommended that the research focus on altemative DSA approaches, primarily because DSA methods would be so easy to use in an industrial environment. Due to the lack of correlation using DSA in the present work, however, it is recommended that altemative strategies for data collection and analysis be used in any further development activities.

  20. Electron beam diagnostic system using computed tomography and an annular sensor

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elmer, John W.; Teruya, Alan T.

    2014-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

    A system for analyzing an electron beam including a circular electron beam diagnostic sensor adapted to receive the electron beam, the circular electron beam diagnostic sensor having a central axis; an annular sensor structure operatively connected to the circular electron beam diagnostic sensor, wherein the sensor structure receives the electron beam; a system for sweeping the electron beam radially outward from the central axis of the circular electron beam diagnostic sensor to the annular sensor structure wherein the electron beam is intercepted by the annular sensor structure; and a device for measuring the electron beam that is intercepted by the annular sensor structure.