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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hyperspectral imaging magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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1

Hyperspectral Imaging: Training Algorithms & Data Generation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hyperspectral Imaging: Training Algorithms & Data Generation REU Students: Ping Fung and Carl +exp[-2(( + s))1/2 D / 3]} 1-rlSI +(rl - SI )exp[-2(( + s))1/2 D / 3] Data Generation To apply our possible parameters is impractical, so we generate approximate spectra using a physical model based

Mountziaris, T. J.

2

Hyperspectral Imaging At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Calvin...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Hyperspectral Imaging At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Calvin, Et Al., 2010) Exploration Activity Details Location...

3

Hyperspectral Imaging At Fish Lake Valley Area (Littlefield ...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Fish Lake Valley Area (Littlefield & Calvin, 2010) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Hyperspectral Imaging At Fish Lake Valley Area...

4

Hyperspectral Imaging | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating Solar Power BasicsGermany: EnergyPowerInformationHomerHydrogen CompaniesImaging

5

Methods for gas detection using stationary hyperspectral imaging sensors  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

According to one embodiment, a method comprises producing a first hyperspectral imaging (HSI) data cube of a location at a first time using data from a HSI sensor; producing a second HSI data cube of the same location at a second time using data from the HSI sensor; subtracting on a pixel-by-pixel basis the second HSI data cube from the first HSI data cube to produce a raw difference cube; calibrating the raw difference cube to produce a calibrated raw difference cube; selecting at least one desired spectral band based on a gas of interest; producing a detection image based on the at least one selected spectral band and the calibrated raw difference cube; examining the detection image to determine presence of the gas of interest; and outputting a result of the examination. Other methods, systems, and computer program products for detecting the presence of a gas are also described.

Conger, James L. (San Ramon, CA); Henderson, John R. (Castro Valley, CA)

2012-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

6

Digital Compressive Quantitation and Hyperspectral Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Jun 20, 2013 ... produced using multivariate curve resolution (MCR) to pre-process mixture training spectra, thus facilitating the quantitation of mixtures even when no pure chemical component .... simulated annealing to ?nd the rotation matrix elements that ... the image registration was also performed in Matlab R2012a.

2013-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

7

The Robust Classification of Hyperspectral Images Using Adaptive Wavelet Kernel Support Vector Data Description  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Detection of targets in hyperspectral images is a specific case of one-class classification. It is particularly relevant in the area of remote sensing and has received considerable interest in the past few years. The thesis proposes the use...

Kollegala, Revathi

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

8

Hyperspectral Imaging At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

aircraft and much in the same way more familiar geophysics are flown. The hyperspectral data records a continuous spatial record of the earth's surface, as well as measuring a...

9

Erratum to "Nonlinear Unmixing of Hyperspectral Images Using a Generalized Bilinear Model"  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1 Erratum to "Nonlinear Unmixing of Hyperspectral Images Using a Generalized Bilinear Model for the four images. TABLE I UNMIXING ALGORITHM PERFORMANCES WITH ACTUAL AND ESTIMATED ENDMEMBERS (1ST AND 2ND SCENARIOS): RE AND SAM. 1st scenario 2nd scenario RE (×10-2 ) SAM (×10-2 ) RE (×10-2 ) SAM (×10-2 ) LMM FM

Dobigeon, Nicolas

10

3D optical sectioning with a new hyperspectral confocal fluorescence imaging system.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A novel hyperspectral fluorescence microscope for high-resolution 3D optical sectioning of cells and other structures has been designed, constructed, and used to investigate a number of different problems. We have significantly extended new multivariate curve resolution (MCR) data analysis methods to deconvolve the hyperspectral image data and to rapidly extract quantitative 3D concentration distribution maps of all emitting species. The imaging system has many advantages over current confocal imaging systems including simultaneous monitoring of numerous highly overlapped fluorophores, immunity to autofluorescence or impurity fluorescence, enhanced sensitivity, and dramatically improved accuracy, reliability, and dynamic range. Efficient data compression in the spectral dimension has allowed personal computers to perform quantitative analysis of hyperspectral images of large size without loss of image quality. We have also developed and tested software to perform analysis of time resolved hyperspectral images using trilinear multivariate analysis methods. The new imaging system is an enabling technology for numerous applications including (1) 3D composition mapping analysis of multicomponent processes occurring during host-pathogen interactions, (2) monitoring microfluidic processes, (3) imaging of molecular motors and (4) understanding photosynthetic processes in wild type and mutant Synechocystis cyanobacteria.

Nieman, Linda T.; Sinclair, Michael B.; Davidson, George S.; Van Benthem, Mark Hilary; Haaland, David Michael; Timlin, Jerilyn Ann; Sasaki, Darryl Yoshio; Bachand, George David; Jones, Howland D. T.

2007-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Magnetic Imaging Wolfgang Kuch  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic Imaging Wolfgang Kuch Freie Universit¨at Berlin, Institut f¨ur Experimentalphysik, Arnimallee 14, 14195 Berlin, Germany kuch@physik.fu-berlin.de Abstract. Imaging of magnetic domains has- ern techniques is used nowadays routinely for magnetic imaging of magnetic ma- terials

Kuch, Wolfgang

12

2008 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON IMAGE PROCESSING, VOL. 21, NO. 4, APRIL 2012 SpectralSpatial Classification of Hyperspectral  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

­Spatial Classification of Hyperspectral Data Based on a Stochastic Minimum Spanning Forest Approach Kévin Bernard, Yuliya is proposed. In particular, the notion of sto- chastic minimum spanning forest (MSF) is introduced spanning forest (MSF), multiple classifiers, stochastic. I. INTRODUCTION HYPERSPECTRAL imaging can

Boyer, Edmond

13

Advanced Processing of Hyperspectral Images A. Plaza, J. A. Benediktsson, J. Boardman, J. Brazile, L. Bruzzone, G. Camps-Valls ,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from the interaction of solar energy with the molecular structure of the material. In this paper, we on recent, consolidated advances in technologies for efficient processing of hyperspectral imagery. First, we discuss hyperspectral image classification using support vector machines (SVMs), which are one

Plaza, Antonio J.

14

Programmable matched filter and Hadamard transform hyperspectral imagers based on micro-mirror arrays  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Hyperspectral imaging (HSI), in which each pixel contains a high-resolution spectrum, is a powerful technique that can remotely detect, identify, and quantify a multitude of materials and chemicals. The advent of addressable micro-mirror arrays (MMAs) makes possible a new class of programmable hyperspectral imagers that can perform key spectral processing functions directly in the optical hardware, thus alleviating some of HSI's high computational overhead, as well as offering improved signal-to-noise in certain important regimes (e.g. when using uncooled infrared detectors). We have built and demonstrated a prototype UV-Visible micro-mirror hyperspectral imager that is capable not only of matched-filter imaging, but also of full hyperspectral imagery via the Hadamard transform technique. With this instrument, one can upload a chemical-specific spectral matched filter directly to the MMA, producing an image showing the location of that chemical without further processing. Target chemicals are changeable nearly instantaneously simply by uploading new matched-filter patterns to the MMA. Alternatively, the MMA can implement Hadamard mask functions, yielding a full-spectrum hyperspectral image upon inverting the transform. In either case, the instrument can produce the 2D spatial image either by an internal scan, using the MMA itself, or with a traditional external push-broom scan. The various modes of operation are selectable simply by varying the software driving the MMA. Here the design and performance of the prototype is discussed, along with experimental results confirming the signal-to-noise improvement produced by the Hadamard technique in the noisy-detector regime.

Love, Steven P [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Mapping oil spills on sea water using spectral mixture analysis of hyperspectral image data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Mapping oil spills on sea water using spectral mixture analysis of hyperspectral image data Javier large spill oil events threatening coastal habitats and species. Some recent examples include the 2002 Prestige tanker oil spill in Galicia, Northern Spain, as well as repeated oil spill leaks evidenced

Plaza, Antonio J.

16

Automation of waste recycling using hyperspectral image analysis Artzai Picon1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Automation of waste recycling using hyperspectral image analysis Artzai Picon1 Ovidiu Ghita2 Pedro. In this paper we present a novel methodology to automate the recycling process of non-ferrous metal Waste from that the proposed solution can be used to replace the manual procedure that is currently used in WEEE recycling

Whelan, Paul F.

17

Hyperspectral microscope for in vivo imaging of microstructures and cells in tissues  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical hyperspectral/multimodal imaging method and apparatus is utilized to provide high signal sensitivity for implementation of various optical imaging approaches. Such a system utilizes long working distance microscope objectives so as to enable off-axis illumination of predetermined tissue thereby allowing for excitation at any optical wavelength, simplifies design, reduces required optical elements, significantly reduces spectral noise from the optical elements and allows for fast image acquisition enabling high quality imaging in-vivo. Such a technology provides a means of detecting disease at the single cell level such as cancer, precancer, ischemic, traumatic or other type of injury, infection, or other diseases or conditions causing alterations in cells and tissue micro structures.

Demos; Stavros G. (Livermore, CA)

2011-05-17T23:59:59.000Z

18

Extended data analysis strategies for high resolution imaging MS: New methods to deal with extremely large image hyperspectral datasets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The large size of the hyperspectral datasets that are produced with modern mass spectrometric imaging techniques makes it difficult to analyze the results. Unsupervised statistical techniques are needed to extract relevant information from these datasets and reduce the data into a surveyable overview. Multivariate statistics are commonly used for this purpose. Computational power and computer memory limit the resolution at which the datasets can be analyzed with these techniques. We introduce the use of a data format capable of efficiently storing sparse datasets for multivariate analysis. This format is more memory-efficient and therefore it increases the possible resolution together with a decrease of computation time. Three multivariate techniques are compared for both sparse-type data and non-sparse data acquired in two different imaging ToF-SIMS experiments and one LDI-ToF imaging experiment. There is no significant qualitative difference in the use of different data formats for the same multivariate algorithms. All evaluated multivariate techniques could be applied on both SIMS and the LDI imaging datasets. Principal component analysis is shown to be the fastest choice; however a small increase of computation time using a VARIMAX optimization increases the decomposition quality significantly. PARAFAC analysis is shown to be very effective in separating different chemical components but the calculations take a significant amount of time, limiting its use as a routine technique. An effective visualization of the results of the multivariate analysis is as important for the analyst as the computational issues. For this reason, a new technique for visualization is presented, combining both spectral loadings and spatial

Leendert A. Klerk A; Er Broersen B; Ian W. Fletcher C

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

19

Mapping microphytobenthos biomass by non-linear inversion of visible-infrared hyperspectral images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

- 1 - Mapping microphytobenthos biomass by non-linear inversion of visible-infrared hyperspectral-Philippe.Combe@chimie.univ-nantes.fr Abstract This study presents an innovative approach to map microphytobenthos biomass and fractional cover to microscale intimate mixtures. This prevents the use of classical linear unmixing models to retrieve biomass

Combe, Jean-Philippe

20

Chapter 20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging Magnetic Resonance Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, and software training from Siemens Medical Solutions; research funding through the Siemens-MIT Alliance and Technology (HST). 2 Siemens Medical Solutions, Erlangen, Germany. #12;Chapter 20. Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Siemens Medical Solutions, Siemens-MIT Alliance, HST Martinos Catalyst Fund. Project Staff: Audrey P. Fan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hyperspectral imaging magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

VIMS images of the Huygens landing site on Titan: S. Rodriguez et al. Cassini/VIMS hyperspectral observations of the HUYGENS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

VIMS images of the Huygens landing site on Titan: S. Rodriguez et al. 1 Cassini/VIMS hyperspectral.N. Clark2 , B. Buratti3 , R.H. Brown4 , T.B. McCord5 , P.D. Nicholson6 , K.H. Baines3 and the VIMS science Number of Table(s): 1 Number of figure(s): 11 Running Head: VIMS images of the Huygens probe landing site

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

22

Development of Research Infrastructure in Nevada for the Exploitation of Hyperspectral Image Data to Address Proliferation and Detection of Chemical and Biological Materials.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research was to exploit hyperspectral reflectance imaging technology for the detection and mapping variability (clutter) of the natural background against which gases in the atmosphere are imaged. The natural background consists of landscape surface cover composed of consolidated rocks, unconsolidated rock weathering products, soils, coatings on rock materials, vegetation, water, materials constructed by humans, and mixtures of the above. Human made gases in the atmosphere may indicate industrial processes important to detecting non-nuclear chemical and biological proliferation. Our research was to exploit the Visible and Near-Infrared (NIR) and the Short-wave Infrared (SWIR) portions of the electromagnetic spectrum to determine the properties of solid materials on the earth’s surface that could influence the detection of gases in the Long-Wave Infrared (LWIR). We used some new experimental hyperspectral imaging technologies to collect data over the Non-Proliferation Test and Evaluation Center (NPTEC) located on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The SpecTIR HyperSpecTIR (HST) and Specim Dual hyperspectral sensors were used to understand the variability in the imaged background (clutter), that detected, measured, identified and mapped with operational commercial hyperspectral techniques. The HST sensors were determined to be more experimental than operational because of problems with radiometric and atmospheric data correction. However the SpecTIR Dual system, developed by Specim in Finland, eventually was found to provide cost-effective hyperspectral image data collection and it was possible to correct the Dual system’s data for specific areas. Batch processing of long flightlines was still complex, and if comparison to laboratory spectra was desired, the Dual system data still had to be processed using the empirical line method. This research determined that 5-meter spatial resolution was adequate for mapping natural background variations. Furthermore, this research determined that spectral resolution of 10um was adequate, but a signal to noise above 300:1 was desirable for hyperspectral sensors with this spectral resolution. Finally, we acquired a hyperspectral thermal dataset (SEBASS) at 3m spatial resolution over our study area in Beatty, Nevada that can be co-registered with the hyperspectral reflectance, LIDAR and digital Orthophoto data sets. This data set will enable us to quantify how measurements in the reflected infrared can be used to make inferences about the response of materials in the thermal infrared, the topic of our follow-on NA-22 investigation ending in 2008. These data provide the basis for our investigations proposed for the NA-22 2008 Broad Area Announcement. Beginning in June 2008, SpecTIR Corporation and Aerospace Corporation plan to fly the SpecTIR Dual and SEBASS in a stabilized mount in a twin Otter aircraft. This research provides the foundation for using reflected and emitted hyperspectral measurements together for mapping geologic and soil materials in arid to semi-arid regions.

James V. Taranik

2007-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

23

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LawrenceE C H N ILensless Imaging of Magnetic

24

Classification of hyperspectral images by tensor modeling and additive morphological decomposition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. AMD defines a scale-space decomposition for multivariate images without any loss of information. AMD`emes, MINES Paristech, France Abstract Pixel-wise classification in high-dimensional multivariate images is modeled as a tensor structure and tensor principal components analysis is compared as dimensional

Boyer, Edmond

25

Single echo acquisition magnetic resonance imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The dramatic improvement in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan time over the past fifteen years through gradient-based methods that sample k-space more efficiently and quickly cannot be sustained, as thresholds regarding hardware and safety...

McDougall, Mary Preston

2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

26

Magnetic particle imaging of blood coagulation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigated the feasibility of visualizing blood coagulation using a system for magnetic particle imaging (MPI). A magnetic field-free line is generated using two opposing neodymium magnets and transverse images are reconstructed from the third-harmonic signals received by a gradiometer coil, using the maximum likelihood-expectation maximization algorithm. Our MPI system was used to image the blood coagulation induced by adding CaCl{sub 2} to whole sheep blood mixed with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). The “MPI value” was defined as the pixel value of the transverse image reconstructed from the third-harmonic signals. MPI values were significantly smaller for coagulated blood samples than those without coagulation. We confirmed the rationale of these results by calculating the third-harmonic signals for the measured viscosities of samples, with an assumption that the magnetization and particle size distribution of MNPs obey the Langevin equation and log-normal distribution, respectively. We concluded that MPI can be useful for visualizing blood coagulation.

Murase, Kenya, E-mail: murase@sahs.med.osaka-u.ac.jp; Song, Ruixiao; Hiratsuka, Samu [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Division of Medical Technology and Science, Faculty of Health Science, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

27

Hyperspectral Data Classification Using Spectral-Spatial Approaches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hyperspectral Data Classification Using Spectral-Spatial Approaches Yuliya Tarabalka1 , Jón Atli classification problem AVIRIS image Spatial resolution: 20m/pix Spectral resolution: 200 bands Ground-truth data.tarabalka@nasa.gov) Spectral-Spatial Classification of Hyperspectral Data 6 #12;Introduction Classification using segmentation

Dobigeon, Nicolas

28

Hyperspectral imaging spectroscopy of a Mars analogue environment at the North Pole Dome, Pilbara Craton, Western Australia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A visible and near infrared (VNIR) to shortwave infrared (SWIR) hyperspectral dataset of the Early Archaean North Pole Dome, Pilbara Craton, Western Australia, has been analysed for indications of hydrothermal alteration. Occurrence maps of hydrothermal alteration minerals were produced. It was found that using a spatial resolution on the ground of approximately 5 m and spectral coverage from 0.4 to 2.5 mm was sufficient to delineate several hydrothermal alteration zones and associated veins, including phyllic, serpentinitic and chloritic alteration. These results suggest this level of spectral and spatial resolution would be ideal for localising shallow epithermal activity, should such activity have existed, on the surface of Mars.

Brown, Adrian J; Cudahy, Thomas

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Instrumentation for parallel magnetic resonance imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the art of parallel MR imaging. First, a low-cost desktop MR scanner was developed (2.54 cm fields-of view) at low magnetic field strengths (25 T). The performance of the prototype was verified through bench...

Brown, David Gerald

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

30

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of PEM Dehydration and Gas Manifold...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Resonance Imaging (MRI) of PEM Dehydration and Gas Manifold Flooding During Continuous Fuel Cell Operation. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of PEM Dehydration and Gas Manifold...

31

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LawrenceE C H N ILensless Imaging of

32

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LawrenceE C H N ILensless Imaging ofLensless

33

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LawrenceE C H N ILensless Imaging

34

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and Interfaces Sample6, 2011 LawrenceE C H N ILensless ImagingLensless

35

E-Print Network 3.0 - airborne hyperspectral sensors Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

imaging activities in Europe, ranging from sensor design and flight operation to data collection... directed towards the improvement of hyperspectral sensor and mission...

36

Hyperspectral Imaging or Imaging Spectroscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DIFFERENTIATION Every sensor is limited in respect to the size of the smallest area that can be separately V / NIR / SWIR / MWIR / LWIR Optical Region 400 14000 400 0.4 14000 14.0 1500 1.5 3000 3.0 5000 5;Sampling the Spectrum NIR SWIR MWIR LWIR 400 nm 700 1500 3000 RB 5000 14000 nm G Panchromatic: one very

Gilbes, Fernando

37

Magnetic resonance imaging of self-assembled biomaterial scaffolds  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Compositions and/or mixtures comprising peptide amphiphile compounds comprising one or more contrast agents, as can be used in a range of magnetic resonance imaging applications.

Bull, Steve R; Meade, Thomas J; Stupp, Samuel I

2014-09-16T23:59:59.000Z

38

Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging using parallel transmission at 7T  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Conventional magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI), also known as phase-encoded (PE) chemical shift imaging (CSI), suffers from both low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the brain metabolites, as well as inflexible ...

Gagoski, Borjan Aleksandar

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

39

Hyperspectral stimulated emission depletion microscopy and methods of use thereof  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hyperspectral stimulated emission depletion ("STED") microscope system for high-resolution imaging of samples labeled with multiple fluorophores (e.g., two to ten fluorophores). The hyperspectral STED microscope includes a light source, optical systems configured for generating an excitation light beam and a depletion light beam, optical systems configured for focusing the excitation and depletion light beams on a sample, and systems for collecting and processing data generated by interaction of the excitation and depletion light beams with the sample. Hyperspectral STED data may be analyzed using multivariate curve resolution analysis techniques to deconvolute emission from the multiple fluorophores. The hyperspectral STED microscope described herein can be used for multi-color, subdiffraction imaging of samples (e.g., materials and biological materials) and for analyzing a tissue by Forster Resonance Energy Transfer ("FRET").

Timlin, Jerilyn A; Aaron, Jesse S

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

40

On the dynamics of magnetic fluids in magnetic resonance imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The hydrodynamics of magnetic fluids, often termed ferrofluids, has been an active area of research since the mid 1960s. However, it is only in the past twenty years that these fluids have begun to be used in magnetic ...

Cantillon-Murphy, Pádraig J

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hyperspectral imaging magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

International Journal of Mass Spectrometry 260 (2007) 222–236 Extended data analysis strategies for high resolution imaging MS: New methods to deal with extremely large image hyperspectral datasets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The large size of the hyperspectral datasets that are produced with modern mass spectrometric imaging techniques makes it difficult to analyze the results. Unsupervised statistical techniques are needed to extract relevant information from these datasets and reduce the data into a surveyable overview. Multivariate statistics are commonly used for this purpose. Computational power and computer memory limit the resolution at which the datasets can be analyzed with these techniques. We introduce the use of a data format capable of efficiently storing sparse datasets for multivariate analysis. This format is more memory-efficient and therefore it increases the possible resolution together with a decrease of computation time. Three multivariate techniques are compared for both sparse-type data and non-sparse data acquired in two different imaging ToF-SIMS experiments and one LDI-ToF imaging experiment. There is no significant qualitative difference in the use of different data formats for the same multivariate algorithms. All evaluated multivariate techniques could be applied on both SIMS and the LDI imaging datasets. Principal component analysis is shown to be the fastest choice; however a small increase of computation time using a VARIMAX optimization increases the decomposition quality significantly. PARAFAC analysis is shown to be very effective in separating different chemical components but the calculations take a significant amount of time, limiting its use as a routine technique. An effective visualization of the results of the multivariate analysis is as important for the analyst as the computational issues. For this reason, a new technique for visualization is presented, combining both spectral loadings and spatial

Leendert A. Klerk A; Er Broersen B; Ian W. Fletcher C

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Microfluidically Cryo-Cooled Planar Coils for Magnetic Resonance Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

High signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is typically required for higher resolution and faster speed in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Planar microcoils as receiver probes in MRI systems offer the potential to be configured into array elements for fast...

Koo, Chiwan

2013-08-09T23:59:59.000Z

43

RF Pulse Design for Parallel Excitation in Magnetic Resonance Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Parallel excitation is an emerging technique to improve or accelerate multi-dimensional spatially selective excitations in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) using multi-channel transmit arrays. The technique has potential in many applications...

Liu, Yinan

2012-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

44

Modeling Left Ventricle Wall Motion Using Tagged Magnetic Resonance Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A two-parameter computational model is proposed for the study of the regional motion of the left ventricle (LV) wall using tagged magnetic resonance imaging (tMRI) data. In this model, the LV wall motion is mathematically ...

Alenezy, Mohammed D.

2009-04-17T23:59:59.000Z

45

Improvements in magnetic resonance imaging excitation pulse design  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis focuses on the design of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) radio-frequency (RF) excitation pulses, and its primary contributions are made through connections with the novel multiple-system single-output (MSSO) ...

Zelinski, Adam Charles

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

46

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print Wednesday, 25 November 2009 00:00 Magnetic...

47

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation Print Magnetic thin-film nanostructures can exhibit a magnetic vortex state in which the magnetization vectors lie in...

48

Method for nuclear magnetic resonance imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for in vivo NMR imaging of the blood vessels and organs of a patient characterized by using a dark dye-like imaging substance consisting essentially of a stable, high-purity concentration of D/sub 2/O in a solution with water.

Kehayias, J.J.; Joel, D.D.; Adams, W.H.; Stein, H.L.

1988-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

49

Application of Parallel Imaging to Murine Magnetic Resonance Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. This dissertation describes foundational level work to enable parallel imaging of mice on a 4.7 Tesla/40 cm bore research scanner. Reducing the size of the hardware setup associated with typical parallel imaging was an integral part of achieving the work, as animal...

Chang, Chieh-Wei 1980-

2012-09-21T23:59:59.000Z

50

Directed evolution of a magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent for noninvasive imaging of dopamine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The development of molecular probes that allow in vivo imaging of neural signaling processes with high temporal and spatial resolution remains challenging. Here we applied directed evolution techniques to create magnetic ...

Shapiro, Mikhail G.

51

Portable low-cost magnetic resonance imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Purpose: As the premiere modality for brain imaging, MRI could find wider applicability if lightweight, portable systems were available for siting in unconventional locations such as intensive care units (ICUs), physician ...

Cooley, Clarissa Zimmerman

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

52

Parallel magnetic resonance imaging: characterization and comparison  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

[Sodickson, 1997], GRAPPA [Griswold, 2002] and SPACE RIP [Kyriakos, 2000]; developed in the past decade have been studied, simulated and compared in this research. Because of the dependence of the parallel imaging methods on numerous factors such as receiver...

Rane, Swati Dnyandeo

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

53

White matter microstructure on diffusion tensor imaging is associated with conventional magnetic resonance imaging findings and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

White matter microstructure on diffusion tensor imaging is associated with conventional magnetic to evaluate white matter architecture after preterm birth. The goals were (1) to compare white matter if sex, gestational age, birth- weight, white matter injury score from conventional magnetic resonance

Grill-Spector, Kalanit

54

Original Research In Vivo Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Human  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Original Research In Vivo Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Human Cervical Spinal Cord at 3 Tesla is feasible at 3 T. Key Words: MRI; 3 Tesla; cervical spinal cord; gradient echo; gray matter; white matter J, and pulsatile flow (9,10). Deficits in motor and sensory function from damage to the spinal cord are mainly due

Gorassini, Monica

55

Original Research Magnetic Resonance Image-Guided Trans-Septal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

vasculature. Key Words: interventional; magnetic resonance imaging; trans-septal catheterization; cardiac; MR with a pigtail catheter in the aorta and the use of His bundle/coronary sinus catheters (1), and, more recently from a percutaneous femoral vein ap- proach. MATERIALS AND METHODS Animal Model The Institutional

Atalar, Ergin

56

Direct Imaging of Asymmetric Magnetization Reversal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData FilesShape,PhysicsDileepDiracNanotubesDirect Imaging of

57

Direct Imaging of Asymmetric Magnetization Reversal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData FilesShape,PhysicsDileepDiracNanotubesDirect Imaging

58

Direct Imaging of Asymmetric Magnetization Reversal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData FilesShape,PhysicsDileepDiracNanotubesDirect ImagingDirect

59

Ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance and magnetic resonance imaging to discriminate and identify materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An ultra-low magnetic field NMR system can non-invasively examine containers. Database matching techniques can then identify hazardous materials within the containers. Ultra-low field NMR systems are ideal for this purpose because they do not require large powerful magnets and because they can examine materials enclosed in conductive shells such as lead shells. The NMR examination technique can be combined with ultra-low field NMR imaging, where an NMR image is obtained and analyzed to identify target volumes. Spatial sensitivity encoding can also be used to identify target volumes. After the target volumes are identified the NMR measurement technique can be used to identify their contents.

Kraus, Robert H. (Los Alamos, NM); Matlashov, Andrei N. (Los Alamos, NM); Espy, Michelle A. (Los Alamos, NM); Volegov, Petr L. (Los Alamos, NM)

2010-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

60

Magnetic Resonance Imaging 1 A new global optimization algorithm and its application to a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic Resonance Imaging 1 A new global optimization algorithm and its application to a Magnetic-cost, low-field multipolar magnet for Magnetic Resonance Imaging with a high field uniformity, the proposed method em- ploys, as local search engine, a derivative free procedure. Under reasonable

Neumaier, Arnold

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hyperspectral imaging magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


61

Soft x-ray microscopy - a powerful analytical tool to image magnetism down to fundamental length and times scales  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analytical tool to image magnetism down to fundamentalmicroscopies Research of magnetism in low dimensions has notnanoscience [3]. Solid state magnetism is also a showcase in

Fischer, Peter

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

62

Respiratory Amplitude Guided 4-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of prospectively guiding 4-dimensional (4D) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) image acquisition using triggers at preselected respiratory amplitudes to achieve T{sub 2} weighting for abdominal motion tracking. Methods and Materials: A respiratory amplitude-based triggering system was developed and integrated into a commercial turbo spin echo MRI sequence. Initial feasibility tests were performed on healthy human study participants. Four respiratory states, the middle and the end of inhalation and exhalation, were used to trigger 4D MRI image acquisition of the liver. To achieve T{sub 2} weighting, the echo time and repetition time were set to 75 milliseconds and 4108 milliseconds, respectively. Single-shot acquisition, together with parallel imaging and partial k-space imaging techniques, was used to improve image acquisition efficiency. 4D MRI image sets composed of axial or sagittal slices were acquired. Results: Respiratory data measured and logged by the MRI scanner showed that the triggers occurred at the appropriate respiratory levels. Liver motion could be easily observed on both 4D MRI image datasets by sensing either the change of liver in size and shape (axial) or diaphragm motion (sagittal). Both 4D MRI image datasets were T{sub 2}-weighted as expected. Conclusions: This study demonstrated the feasibility of achieving T{sub 2}-weighted 4D MRI images using amplitude-based respiratory triggers. With the aid of the respiratory amplitude-based triggering system, the proposed method is compatible with most MRI sequences and therefore has the potential to improve tumor-tissue contrast in abdominal tumor motion imaging.

Hu, Yanle, E-mail: yhu@radonc.wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Caruthers, Shelton D. [Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)] [Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Low, Daniel A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California (United States); Parikh, Parag J.; Mutic, Sasa [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States)

2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

63

Slew-rate dependence of tracer magnetization response in magnetic particle imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a new biomedical imaging technique that produces real-time, high-resolution tomographic images of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle tracers. Currently, 25?kHz and 20?mT/?{sub 0} excitation fields are common in MPI, but lower field amplitudes may be necessary for patient safety in future designs. Here, we address fundamental questions about MPI tracer magnetization dynamics and predict tracer performance in future scanners that employ new combinations of excitation field amplitude (H{sub o}) and frequency (?). Using an optimized, monodisperse MPI tracer, we studied how several combinations of drive field frequencies and amplitudes affect the tracer's response, using Magnetic Particle Spectrometry and AC hysteresis, for drive field conditions at 15.5, 26, and 40.2?kHz, with field amplitudes ranging from 7 to 52?mT/?{sub 0}. For both fluid and immobilized nanoparticle samples, we determined that magnetic response was dominated by Néel reversal. Furthermore, we observed that the peak slew-rate (?H{sub o}) determined the tracer magnetic response. Smaller amplitudes provided correspondingly smaller field of view, sometimes resulting in excitation of minor hysteresis loops. Changing the drive field conditions but keeping the peak slew-rate constant kept the tracer response almost the same. Higher peak slew-rates led to reduced maximum signal intensity and greater coercivity in the tracer response. Our experimental results were in reasonable agreement with Stoner-Wohlfarth model based theories.

Shah, Saqlain A.; Krishnan, K. M., E-mail: kannanmk@uw.edu [Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington 98195 (United States); Ferguson, R. M. [LodeSpin Labs, P.O. Box 95632, Seattle, Washington 98145 (United States)

2014-10-28T23:59:59.000Z

64

Self-consistent magnetic properties of magnetite tracers optimized for magnetic particle imaging measured by ac susceptometry,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Self-consistent magnetic properties of magnetite tracers optimized for magnetic particle imaging measured by ac susceptometry, magnetorelaxometry and magnetic particle spectroscopy Frank Ludwig a , Hilke. Krishnan b,n a Institute of Electrical Measurement and Fundamental Electrical Engineering, TU Braunschweig

Krishnan, Kannan M.

65

Identification of breast calcification using magnetic resonance imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

MRI phase and magnitude images provide information about local magnetic field variation ({Delta}B{sub 0}), which can consequently be used to understand tissue properties. Often, phase information is discarded. However, corrected phase images are able to produce contrast as a result of magnetic susceptibility differences and local field inhomogeneities due to the presence of diamagnetic and paramagnetic substances. Three-dimensional (3D) susceptibility weighted imaging (SWI) can be used to probe changes in MRI phase evolution and, subsequently, result in an alternate form of contrast between tissues. For example, SWI has been useful in the assessment of negative phase induced {Delta}B{sub 0} modulation due to the presence of paramagnetic substances such as iron. Very little, however, has been done to assess positive phase induced contrast changes resulting from the presence of diamagnetic substances such as precipitated calcium. As ductal carcinoma in situ, which is the precursor of invasive ductal cancer, is often associated with breast microcalcification, the authors proposed using SWI as a possible visualization technique. In this study, breast phantoms containing calcifications (0.4-1.5 mm) were imaged using mammography, computed tomography (CT), and SWI. Corrected phase and magnitude images acquired using SWI allowed identification and correlation of all calcifications seen on CT. As the approach is a 3D technique, it could potentially allow for more accurate localization and biopsy and maybe even reduce the use of gadolinium contrast. Furthermore, the approach may be beneficial to women with dense breast tissue where the ability to detect microcalcification with mammography is reduced.

Fatemi-Ardekani, Ali; Boylan, Colm; Noseworthy, Michael D. [Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4K1 (Canada) and Imaging Research Centre, Brain-Body Institute, St. Joseph's Healthcare, Hamilton, Ontario L8N 4A6 (Canada); Diagnostic Imaging, St. Joseph's Healthcare, Hamilton, Ontario L8N 4A6 (Canada) and Department of Radiology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8N 3Z5 (Canada); Department of Medical Physics and Applied Radiation Sciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4K1 (Canada); Imaging Research Centre, Brain-Body Institute, St. Joseph's Healthcare, Hamilton, Ontario L8N 4A6 (Canada); Diagnostic Imaging, St. Joseph's Healthcare, Hamilton, Ontario L8N 4A6 (Canada); Department of Radiology, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8N 3Z5 (Canada) and Electrical and Computer Engineering, and School of Biomedical Engineering, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario L8S 4K1 (Canada)

2009-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

66

THERMAL IMAGING OF ACTIVE MAGNETIC REGERNERATOR MCE MATERIALS DURING OPERATION  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

An active magnetic regenerator (AMR) prototype was constructed that incorporates a Gd sheet into the regenerator wall to enable visualization of the system s thermal transients. In this experiment, the thermal conditions inside the AMR are observed under a variety of operating conditions. An infrared (IR) camera is employed to visualize the thermal transients within the AMR. The IR camera is used to visually and quantitatively evaluate the temperature difference and thus giving means to calculate the performance of the system under the various operating conditions. Thermal imaging results are presented for two differing experimental test runs. Real time imaging of the thermal state of the AMR has been conducted while operating the system over a range of conditions. A 1 Tesla twin-coil electromagnet (situated on a C frame base) is used for this experiment such that all components are stationary during testing. A modular, linear reciprocating system has been realized in which the effects of regenerator porosity and utilization factor can be investigated. To evaluate the performance variation in porosity and utilization factor the AMR housing was constructed such that the plate spacing of the Gd sheets may be varied. Each Gd sheet has dimensions of 38 mm wide and 66 mm long with a thickness of 1 mm and the regenerator can hold a maximum of 29 plates with a spacing of 0.25 mm. Quantitative and thermal imaging results are presented for several regenerator configurations.

Shassere, Benjamin [ORNL] [ORNL; West, David L [ORNL] [ORNL; Abdelaziz, Omar [ORNL] [ORNL; Evans III, Boyd Mccutchen [ORNL] [ORNL

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

67

Hyperspectral Microscopy of Explosives Particles Using an External Cavity Quantum Cascade Laser  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Using infrared hyperspectral imaging, we demonstrate microscopy of small particles of the explosives compounds RDX, tetryl, and PETN with near diffraction-limited performance. The custom microscope apparatus includes an external cavity quantum cascade laser illuminator scanned over its tuning range of 9.13-10.53 µm in four seconds, coupled with a microbolometer focal plane array to record infrared transmission images. We use the hyperspectral microscopy technique to study the infrared absorption spectra of individual explosives particles, and demonstrate sub-nanogram detection limits.

Phillips, Mark C.; Bernacki, Bruce E.

2012-12-26T23:59:59.000Z

68

A REAL TIME 3D VISUALIZATION PROTOTYPE FOR INTERVENTIONAL MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A REAL TIME 3D VISUALIZATION PROTOTYPE FOR INTERVENTIONAL MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING JENS FISCHER.weiss@pfh.research.philips.com HEIDRUN SCHUMANN University of Rostock, Computer Science Department, D­18051 Rostock,Germany schumann radiologists during invasive and non­invasive magnetic resonance imaging. We use pre­acquired and real time

Schumann, Heidrun

69

Development of imaging bolometers for magnetic fusion reactors (invited)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Imaging bolometers utilize an infrared (IR) video camera to measure the change in temperature of a thin foil exposed to the plasma radiation, thereby avoiding the risks of conventional resistive bolometers related to electric cabling and vacuum feedthroughs in a reactor environment. A prototype of the IR imaging video bolometer (IRVB) has been installed and operated on the JT-60U tokamak demonstrating its applicability to a reactor environment and its ability to provide two-dimensional measurements of the radiation emissivity in a poloidal cross section. In this paper we review this development and present the first results of an upgraded version of this IRVB on JT-60U. This upgrade utilizes a state-of-the-art IR camera (FLIR/Indigo Phoenix-InSb) (3-5 {mu}m, 256x360 pixels, 345 Hz, 11 mK) mounted in a neutron/gamma/magnetic shield behind a 3.6 m IR periscope consisting of CaF{sub 2} optics and an aluminum mirror. The IRVB foil is 7 cmx9 cmx5 {mu}m tantalum. A noise equivalent power density of 300 {mu}W/cm{sup 2} is achieved with 40x24 channels and a time response of 10 ms or 23 {mu}W/cm{sup 2} for 16x12 channels and a time response of 33 ms, which is 30 times better than the previous version of the IRVB on JT-60U.

Peterson, Byron J.; Parchamy, Homaira; Ashikawa, Naoko [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan); Kawashima, Hisato; Konoshima, Shigeru [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Naka 311-0193 (Japan); Kostryukov, Artem Yu.; Miroshnikov, Igor V. [St. Petersburg State Technical University, St. Petersburg 195251 (Russian Federation); Seo, Dongcheol [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Omori, T. [Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

70

Characterization of forest crops with a range of nutrient and water treatments using AISA Hyperspectral Imagery.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This research examined the utility of Airborne Imaging Spectrometer for Applications (AISA) hyperspectral imagery for estimating the biomass of three forest crops---sycamore, sweetgum and loblolly pine--planted in experimental plots with a range of fertilization and irrigation treatments on the Savannah River Site near Aiken, South Carolina.

Gong, Binglei; Im, Jungho; Jensen, John, R.; Coleman, Mark; Rhee, Jinyoung; Nelson, Eric

2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

WEAK SIGNAL DETECTION IN HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGERY USING SPARSE MATRIX TRANSFORM (SMT) COVARIANCE ESTIMATION  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Sciences Los Alamos, NM 87544 ABSTRACT Many detection algorithms in hyperspectral image analysis, from well Laboratory. 1. INTRODUCTION The covariance matrix is the cornerstone of multivariate sta- tistical analysis and Computer Engineering West Lafayette, IN 47907 Los Alamos National Laboratory Space and Remote Sensing

72

Abstract-In this study, imaging of electrical current density in conducting objects, which contain nuclear magnetic resonance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) active nuclei is planned using 0.15T Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI at each cycle within the object. The applied current pulse creates a measurable magnetic flux density. The component of magnetic flux density parallel to the main magnetic field accumulates an additional phase

Eyüboðlu, Murat

73

Accelerating magnetic resonance imaging by unifying sparse models and multiple receivers  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an increasingly versatile diagnostic tool for a variety of medical purposes. During a conventional MRI scan, samples are acquired along a trajectory in the spatial Fourier transform ...

Weller, Daniel (Daniel Stuart)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

74

Highly Parallel Magnetic Resonance Imaging with a Fourth Gradient Channel for Compensation of RF Phase Patterns  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A fourth gradient channel was implemented to provide slice dependent RF coil phase compensation for arrays in dual-sided or "sandwich" configurations. The use of highly parallel arrays for single echo acquisition magnetic resonance imaging allows...

Bosshard, John 1983-

2012-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

75

An iterative technique for refinement of selective excitations for magnetic resonance imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Selective RF pulses are needed or many application in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The desired excitation profile is omen used as the spectrum of the applied RF pulse; the modulation waveform of the RF pulse which approximately excites...

Lebsack, Eliot Todd

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

76

T2*-weighted magnetic resonance imaging used to detect coagulative necrosis in tissue  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to prevent unnecessary collateral damage to surrounding healthy tissue. This research focuses on using T2*-weighted FLASH magnetic resonance imaging to detect irreversible changes in i . n vitro bovine liver tissue and tissuesimulating polyacrylamide gel...

Van Hyfte, John Bruce

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

77

Eight-Channel Head Array and Control System for Parallel Transmit/Receive Magnetic Resonance Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Interest in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) at high fields strengths (3 Tesla and above) is driven by the associated improvements in signal-to-noise ratio and spectral resolution. In practice, however, technical challenges prevent these benefits...

Moody, Katherine

2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

78

A 16-Channel Receive Array Insert for Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Breast at 7T  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death among females in the United States. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has emerged as a powerful tool for detecting and evaluating the disease, with notable advantages over other modalities...

By, Samantha

2014-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

79

HST.583 Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Data Acquisition and Analysis, Fall 2006  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This team taught, multidisciplinary course covers the fundamentals of magnetic resonance imaging relevant to the conduct and interpretation of human brain mapping studies. The challenges inherent in advancing our knowledge ...

Gollub, Randy L.

80

Multimodal neuroimaging with simultaneous electroencephalogram and high-field functional magnetic resonance imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Simultaneous recording of electroencephalogram (EEG) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (tMRI) is an important emerging tool in functional neuroimaging with the potential to reveal new mechanisms for brain function ...

Purdon, Patrick L. (Patrick Lee), 1974-

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hyperspectral imaging magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging with 2D spectroscopy for the detection of brain metabolites  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

While magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) derives its signal from protons in water, additional biochemical compounds are detectable in vivo within the proton spectrum. The detection and mapping of these much weaker signals ...

Kok, Trina

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

The development of magnetic resonance imaging for the determination of porosity in reservoir core samples  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

THE DEVELOPMENT OF MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING FOR THE DETERMINATION OF POROSITY IN RESERVOIR CORE SAMPLES A Thesis by BYRON BLAKE SHERMAN Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment... of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1991 Major Subject: Petroleum Engineering THE DEVELOPMENT OF MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING FOR THE DETERMINATION OF POROSITY IN RESERVOIR CORE SAMPLES A Thesis by BYRON BLAKE SHERMAN Approved...

Sherman, Byron Blake

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

83

Application of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy to fluids in porous media  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

APPLICATION OF NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPY TO FLUIDS IN POROUS MEDIA A Thesis by SHANTHI SREE MANDAVA Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1991 Major Subject: Chemical Engineering APPLICATION OF NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING AND SPECTROSCOPY TO FLUIDS IN POROUS MEDIA A Thesis by SHANTHI SREE MANDAVA Approved as to style and content by: A. Ted...

Mandava, Shanthi Sree

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Category:Hyperspectral Imaging | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Office of InspectorConcentrating SolarElectricEnergyCTBarreis aCallahanWind FarmAdd a new

85

Simultaneous Electroencephalography and Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging of General Anesthesia  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

It has been long appreciated that anesthetic drugs induce stereotyped changes in electroencephalogram (EEG), but the relationships between the EEG and underlying brain function remain poorly understood. Functional imaging ...

Purdon, Patrick Lee

86

3D and 4D magnetic susceptibility tomography based on complex MR images  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Magnetic susceptibility is the physical property for T2*-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (T2*MRI). The invention relates to methods for reconstructing an internal distribution (3D map) of magnetic susceptibility values, .chi. (x,y,z), of an object, from 3D T2*MRI phase images, by using Computed Inverse Magnetic Resonance Imaging (CIMRI) tomography. The CIMRI technique solves the inverse problem of the 3D convolution by executing a 3D Total Variation (TV) regularized iterative convolution scheme, using a split Bregman iteration algorithm. The reconstruction of .chi. (x,y,z) can be designed for low-pass, band-pass, and high-pass features by using a convolution kernel that is modified from the standard dipole kernel. Multiple reconstructions can be implemented in parallel, and averaging the reconstructions can suppress noise. 4D dynamic magnetic susceptibility tomography can be implemented by reconstructing a 3D susceptibility volume from a 3D phase volume by performing 3D CIMRI magnetic susceptibility tomography at each snapshot time.

Chen, Zikuan; Calhoun, Vince D

2014-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

87

1380 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON GEOSCIENCE AND REMOTE SENSING, VOL. 39, NO. 7, JULY 2001 Unsupervised Target Detection in Hyperspectral  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Tukey [1], [2] to be used as a technique for exploratory analysis of multivariate data and has been is reduced to a well-known technique, principal components analysis (PCA). Using PP for hyperspectral image set into a low dimensional data space while retaining desired informa- tion of interest. It utilizes

Chang, Chein-I

88

Potential Applications of Microtesla Magnetic Resonance ImagingDetected Using a Superconducting Quantum Interference Device  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This dissertation describes magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of protons performed in a precession field of 132 {micro}T. In order to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), a pulsed 40-300 mT magnetic field prepolarizes the sample spins and an untuned second-order superconducting gradiometer coupled to a low transition temperature superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) detects the subsequent 5.6-kHz spin precession. Imaging sequences including multiple echoes and partial Fourier reconstruction are developed. Calculating the SNR of prepolarized SQUID-detected MRI shows that three-dimensional Fourier imaging yields higher SNR than slice-selection imaging. An experimentally demonstrated field-cycling pulse sequence and post-processing algorithm mitigate image artifacts caused by concomitant gradients in low-field MRI. The magnetic field noise of SQUID untuned detection is compared to the noise of SQUID tuned detection, conventional Faraday detection, and the Nyquist noise generated by conducting biological samples. A second-generation microtesla MRI system employing a low-noise SQUID is constructed to increase SNR. A 2.4-m cubic, eddy-current shield with 6-mm thick aluminum walls encloses the experiment to attenuate external noise. The measured noise is 0.75 fT Hz{sup -1/2} referred to the bottom gradiometer loop. Solenoids wound from 30-strand braided wire to decrease Nyquist noise and cooled by either liquid nitrogen or water polarize the spins. Copper wire coils wound on wooden supports produce the imaging magnetic fields and field gradients. Water phantom images with 0.8 x 0.8 x 10 mm{sup 3} resolution have a SNR of 6. Three-dimensional 1.6 x 1.9 x 14 mm{sup 3} images of bell peppers and 3 x 3 x 26 mm{sup 3} in vivo images of the human arm are presented. Since contrast based on the transverse spin relaxation rate (T{sub 1}) is enhanced at low magnetic fields, microtesla MRI could potentially be used for tumor imaging. The measured T{sub 1} of ex vivo normal and cancerous prostate tissue differ significantly at 132 {micro}T. A single-sided MRI system designed for prostate imaging could achieve 3 x 3 x 5 mm{sup 3} resolution in 8 minutes. Existing SQUID-based magnetoencephalography (MEG) systems could be used as microtesla MRI detectors. A commercial 275-channel MEG system could acquire 6-minute brain images with (4 mm){sup 3} resolution and SNR 16.

Myers, Whittier R.

2006-05-18T23:59:59.000Z

89

X-ray imaging of extended magnetic domain walls in Ni80Fe20 wires  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have used magnetic transmission X-ray microscopy to image magnetization configurations in 700 nm wide Ni{sub 80}Fe{sub 20} planar wires attached to 'nucleation' pads Domain walls were observed to inject only across half of the wire width but extend to several micrometers in length. Magnetostatic interactions with adjacent wires caused further unusual domain wall behavior. Micromagnetic modeling suggests the extended walls have Neel-like structure along their length and indicates weaker exchange coupling than is often assumed. These observations explain previous measurements of domain wall injection and demonstrate that magnetic domain walls in larger nanowires cannot always be considered as localized entities.

Basu, S.; Fry, P. W.; Allwood, D. A.; Bryan, M. T.; Gibbs, M. R. J.; Schrefl, T.; Im, M.-Y.; Fischer, P.

2009-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

90

X-ray imaging of vortex cores in confined magnetic structures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Cores of magnetic vortices in micron-sized NiFe disk structures, with thicknesses between 150 and 50 nm, were imaged and analysed by high resolution magnetic soft X-ray microscopy. A decrease of the vortex core radius was observed, from #24; ~38 to 18 nm with decreasing disk thickness. By comparing with full 3D micromagnetic simulations showing the well-known barrel structure, we obtained excellent agreement taking into account instrumental broadening and a small perpendicular anisotropy. The proven magnetic spatial resolution of better than 25 nm was sufficient to identify a negative dip close to the vortex core, originating from stray fields of the core. Magnetic vortex structures can serve as test objects for evaluating sensitivity and spatial resolution of advanced magnetic microscopy techniques.

Fischer, P.; Im, M.-Y.; Kasai, S.; Yamada, K.; Ono, T.; Thiaville, A.

2011-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

91

Design of a scanning Josephson junction microscope for submicron-resolution magnetic imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We describe a magnetic field scanning instrument designed to extend the spatial resolution of scanning superconducting quantum interference device microscopy into the submicron regime. This instrument, the scanning Josephson junction microscope, scans a single Josephson junction across the surface of a sample, detecting the local magnetic field by the modulation of the junction critical current. By using a submicron junction and a scanning tunneling microscope feedback system to maintain close proximity to the surface, magnetic field sensitivity of 10 {mu}G with a spatial resolution of 0.3 {mu}m should be attainable, opening up new opportunities for imaging vortex configurations and core structure in superconductors and magnetic domains in magnetic materials. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

Plourde, B.L.; Van Harlingen, D.J. [Department of Physics, Science and Technology Center for Superconductivity, and Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)] [Department of Physics, Science and Technology Center for Superconductivity, and Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois 61801 (United States)

1999-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) Vector Magnetic Field Pipeline: Magnetohydrodynamics Simulation Module for the Global Solar Corona  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Time-dependent three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) simulation modules are implemented at the Joint Science Operation Center (JSOC) of Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). The modules regularly produce three-dimensional data of the time-relaxed minimum-energy state of the solar corona using global solar-surface magnetic-field maps created from Helioseismic Magnetic Imager (HMI) full-disk magnetogram data. With the assumption of polytropic gas with specific heat ratio of 1.05, three types of simulation products are currently generated: i) simulation data with medium spatial resolution using the definitive calibrated synoptic map of the magnetic field with a cadence of one Carrington rotation, ii) data with low spatial resolution using the definitive version of the synchronic frame format of the magnetic field, with a cadence of one day, and iii) low-resolution data using near-real-time (NRT) synchronic format of the magnetic field on daily basis. The MHD data available in the JSOC database are three-dimen...

Hayashi, Keiji; Liu, Yang; Bobra, Monica G; Sun, Xudong D; Norton, Aimee A

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

93

GPU-accelerated denoising of 3D magnetic resonance images  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The raw computational power of GPU accelerators enables fast denoising of 3D MR images using bilateral filtering, anisotropic diffusion, and non-local means. In practice, applying these filtering operations requires setting multiple parameters. This study was designed to provide better guidance to practitioners for choosing the most appropriate parameters by answering two questions: what parameters yield the best denoising results in practice? And what tuning is necessary to achieve optimal performance on a modern GPU? To answer the first question, we use two different metrics, mean squared error (MSE) and mean structural similarity (MSSIM), to compare denoising quality against a reference image. Surprisingly, the best improvement in structural similarity with the bilateral filter is achieved with a small stencil size that lies within the range of real-time execution on an NVIDIA Tesla M2050 GPU. Moreover, inappropriate choices for parameters, especially scaling parameters, can yield very poor denoising performance. To answer the second question, we perform an autotuning study to empirically determine optimal memory tiling on the GPU. The variation in these results suggests that such tuning is an essential step in achieving real-time performance. These results have important implications for the real-time application of denoising to MR images in clinical settings that require fast turn-around times.

Howison, Mark; Wes Bethel, E.

2014-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

94

Direct imaging of neural currents using ultra-low field magnetic resonance techniques  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Using resonant interactions to directly and tomographically image neural activity in the human brain using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques at ultra-low field (ULF), the present inventors have established an approach that is sensitive to magnetic field distributions local to the spin population in cortex at the Larmor frequency of the measurement field. Because the Larmor frequency can be readily manipulated (through varying B.sub.m), one can also envision using ULF-DNI to image the frequency distribution of the local fields in cortex. Such information, taken together with simultaneous acquisition of MEG and ULF-NMR signals, enables non-invasive exploration of the correlation between local fields induced by neural activity in cortex and more `distant` measures of brain activity such as MEG and EEG.

Volegov, Petr L. (Los Alamos, NM); Matlashov, Andrei N. (Los Alamos, NM); Mosher, John C. (Los Alamos, NM); Espy, Michelle A. (Los Alamos, NM); Kraus, Jr., Robert H. (Los Alamos, NM)

2009-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

95

Rotating-frame gradient fields for magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance in low fields  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A system and method for Fourier encoding a nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) signal is disclosed. A static magnetic field B.sub.0 is provided along a first direction. An NMR signal from the sample is Fourier encoded by applying a rotating-frame gradient field B.sub.G superimposed on the B.sub.0, where the B.sub.G comprises a vector component rotating in a plane perpendicular to the first direction at an angular frequency .omega.in a laboratory frame. The Fourier-encoded NMR signal is detected.

Bouchard, Louis-Serge; Pines, Alexander; Demas, Vasiliki

2014-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

96

Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction for high-resolution bioimepedance imaging through vector source reconstruction under the static field of MRI magnet  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Magnetoacoustic tomography with magnetic induction (MAT-MI) is an imaging modality to reconstruct the electrical conductivity of biological tissue based on the acoustic measurements of Lorentz force induced tissue vibration. This study presents the feasibility of the authors' new MAT-MI system and vector source imaging algorithm to perform a complete reconstruction of the conductivity distribution of real biological tissues with ultrasound spatial resolution. Methods: In the present study, using ultrasound beamformation, imaging point spread functions are designed to reconstruct the induced vector source in the object which is used to estimate the object conductivity distribution. Both numerical studies and phantom experiments are performed to demonstrate the merits of the proposed method. Also, through the numerical simulations, the full width half maximum of the imaging point spread function is calculated to estimate of the spatial resolution. The tissue phantom experiments are performed with a MAT-MI imaging system in the static field of a 9.4 T magnetic resonance imaging magnet. Results: The image reconstruction through vector beamformation in the numerical and experimental studies gives a reliable estimate of the conductivity distribution in the object with a ?1.5 mm spatial resolution corresponding to the imaging system frequency of 500 kHz ultrasound. In addition, the experiment results suggest that MAT-MI under high static magnetic field environment is able to reconstruct images of tissue-mimicking gel phantoms and real tissue samples with reliable conductivity contrast. Conclusions: The results demonstrate that MAT-MI is able to image the electrical conductivity properties of biological tissues with better than 2 mm spatial resolution at 500 kHz, and the imaging with MAT-MI under a high static magnetic field environment is able to provide improved imaging contrast for biological tissue conductivity reconstruction.

Mariappan, Leo; Hu, Gang [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minnesota 55455 (United States)] [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minnesota 55455 (United States); He, Bin, E-mail: binhe@umn.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minnesota 55455 and Institute of Engineering in Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minnesota 55455 (United States)] [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Minnesota, Minnesota 55455 and Institute of Engineering in Medicine, University of Minnesota, Minnesota 55455 (United States)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

97

Nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of water content in the subsurface  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Previous theoretical and experimental studies indicated that surface nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has the potential to provide cost-effective water content measurements in the subsurface and is a technology ripe for exploitation in practice. The objectives of this investigation are (a) to test the technique under a wide range of hydrogeological conditions and (b) to generalize existing NMR theories in order to correctly model NMR response from conductive ground and to assess properties of the inverse problem. Twenty-four sites with different hydrogeologic settings were selected in New Mexico and Colorado for testing. The greatest limitation of surface NMR technology appears to be the lack of understanding in which manner the NMR signal is influenced by soil-water factors such as pore size distribution, surface-to-volume ratio, paramagnetic ions dissolved in the ground water, and the presence of ferromagnetic minerals. Although the theoretical basis is found to be sound, several advances need to be made to make surface NMR a viable technology for hydrological investigations. There is a research need to investigate, under controlled laboratory conditions, how the complex factors of soil-water systems affect NMR relaxation times.

J. Hendricks; T. Yao; A. Kearns

1999-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

98

Radiometric and Geometric Analysis of Hyperspectral Imagery Acquired from an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the summer of 2010, an Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) hyperspectral in-flight calibration and characterization experiment of the Resonon PIKA II imaging spectrometer was conducted at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Idaho National Laboratory (INL) UAV Research Park. The purpose of the experiment was to validate the radiometric calibration of the spectrometer and determine the georegistration accuracy achievable from the on-board global positioning system (GPS) and inertial navigation sensors (INS) under operational conditions. In order for low-cost hyperspectral systems to compete with larger systems flown on manned aircraft, they must be able to collect data suitable for quantitative scientific analysis. The results of the in-flight calibration experiment indicate an absolute average agreement of 96.3%, 93.7% and 85.7% for calibration tarps of 56%, 24%, and 2.5% reflectivity, respectively. The achieved planimetric accuracy was 4.6 meters (based on RMSE).

Ryan C. Hruska; Jessica J. Mitchell; Matthew O. Anderson; Nancy F. Glenn

2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Three-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance imaging of green-state ceramics  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Objective is the development of nuclear magnetic resonance imaging techniques and technology applicable to the nondestructive characterization of green-state ceramics. To this end, a three-dimensional (3-D) NMR imaging technique has been developed, based on a back-projection acquisition protocol in combination with image reconstruction techniques that are based on 3-D Radon transform inversion. The method incorporates the experimental flexibility to overcome many of the difficulties associated with imaging of solid and semisolid broad-line materials, and also provides contiguously sampled data in three dimensions. This technique has been evaluated as a nondestructive characterizauon method for determining the spatial distribution of organic additves in green-state injection-molded cylindrical Si{sub 3}N{sup 4} tensile specimens. The technique has been evaluated on the basis of providing moderate image resolution over large sample volumes, high resolution over smaller specimen volumes, and sensitivity to variations in the concentration of organics. Resolution of 200{mu}m has been obtained with excellent sensitivity to concentration. A detailed account of the 3-D imaging results obtained from the study, a discussion of the difficulties and limitations of the imaging technique, and suggestions for technique and system improvements are included.

Dieckman, S.L.; Gopalsami, N.; Ford, J.M.; Raptis, A.C.; Ellingson, W.A. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Rizo, P. (CEA Centre d'Etudes Nucleaires de Grenoble, 38 (France). Lab. d'Electronique et de Technologie de l'Informatique); Tracey, D.M.; Pujari, V.K. (Norton Co., Northboro, MA (United States))

1991-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

100

Evaluation of Hydatid Disease of the Heart with Magnetic Resonance Imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Two patients with cardiac involvement of hydatid disease are presented: one with hydatid cyst of the interventricular septum and pulmonary arteries and the other with multiple pulmonary cysts associated with intracardiac and pericardial cysts. The ability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to provide a global view of cardiac anatomy in any plane with high contrast between flowing blood and soft tissue ensures it an important role in the diagnosis and preoperative assessment of hydatid disease of the heart.

Kotoulas, Grigoris K.; Magoufis, George L.; Gouliamos, Athanasios D.; Athanassopoulou, Alexandra K.; Roussakis, Arcadios C.; Koulocheri, Dimitra P.; Kalovidouris, Angelos; Vlahos, Labros [Department of Radiology, CT-MRI Unit, Areteion Hospital, University of Athens, 76 Vas. Sophias Ave., GR-115 28 Athens (Greece)

1996-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hyperspectral imaging magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Three dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging of sodium ions using stochastic excitation and oscillating gradients  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopic imaging of {sup 23}Na holds promise as a non-invasive method of mapping Na{sup +} distributions, and for differentiating pools of Na{sup +} ions in biological tissues. However, due to NMR relaxation properties of {sup 23}Na in vivo, a large fraction of Na{sup +} is not visible with conventional NMR imaging methods. An alternate imaging method, based on stochastic excitation and oscillating gradients, has been developed which is well adapted to measuring nuclei with short T{sub 2}. Contemporary NMR imaging techniques have dead times of up to several hundred microseconds between excitation and sampling, comparable to the shortest in vivo {sup 23}Na T{sub 2} values, causing significant signal loss. An imaging strategy based on stochastic excitation has been developed which greatly reduces experiment dead time by reducing peak radiofrequency (RF) excitation power and using a novel RF circuit to speed probe recovery. Continuously oscillating gradients are used to eliminate transient eddy currents. Stochastic {sup 1}H and {sup 23}Na spectroscopic imaging experiments have been performed on a small animal system with dead times as low as 25{mu}s, permitting spectroscopic imaging with 100% visibility in vivo. As an additional benefit, the encoding time for a 32x32x32 spectroscopic image is under 30 seconds. The development and analysis of stochastic NMR imaging has been hampered by limitations of the existing phase demodulation reconstruction technique. Three dimensional imaging was impractical due to reconstruction time, and design and analysis of proposed experiments was limited by the mathematical intractability of the reconstruction method. A new reconstruction method for stochastic NMR based on Fourier interpolation has been formulated combining the advantage of a several hundredfold reduction in reconstruction time with a straightforward mathematical form.

Frederick, B.deB. [California Univ., Berkeley, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA (United States)

1994-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

102

Construction of a two-parameter empirical model of left ventricle wall motion using cardiac tagged magnetic resonance imaging data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

visualized using cardiac tagged magnetic resonance imaging (tMRI) covering the contraction and relaxation phases. Based on the characteristics of the overall dynamics of the LV wall, its motion was represented by a combination of two components - radial...

Shi, Jack J; Alenezy, Mohammed D.; Smirnova, Irina V.; Bilgen, Mehmet

2012-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

103

K-space reconstruction of magnetic resonance inverse imaging (K-InI) of human visuomotor systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

MRI InI Visual MRI Neuroimaging K-InI Inverse solution MEG EEG Electroencephalography channels of a radio-frequency coil array, magnetic resonance inverse imaging (InI) can achieve ultra. Mathematically, the InI reconstruction is a generalization of parallel MRI (pMRI), which includes image space

104

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of solid materials entails numerous problems from short longitudinal relaxation (T2) times to  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Solid-State STRAFI NMR Probe for Material Imaging of Quadrupolar Nuclei, J. Magn. Reson. httpMagnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of solid materials entails numerous problems from short for broadband tuning, sample translation along z-axis, and electrodes for in situ battery studies. An Alderman

Weston, Ken

105

Noise-Produced Patterns in Images Constructed from Magnetic Flux Leakage Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic flux leakage measurements help identify the position, size and shape of corrosion-related defects in steel casings used to protect boreholes drilled into oil and gas reservoirs. Images constructed from magnetic flux leakage data contain patterns related to noise inherent in the method. We investigate the patterns and their scaling properties for the case of delta-correlated input noise, and consider the implications for the method's ability to resolve defects. The analytical evaluation of the noise-produced patterns is made possible by model reduction facilitated by large-scale approximation. With appropriate modification, the approach can be employed to analyze noise-produced patterns in other situations where the data of interest are not measured directly, but are related to the measured data by a complex linear transform involving integrations with respect to spatial coordinates.

Pimenova, Anastasiya V; Levesley, Jeremy; Elkington, Peter; Bacciarelli, Mark

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

106

Development of Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging/spectroscopy for improved petroleum recovery. Final report  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The overall objectives of this program are to develop and apply Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging (NMRI) and CT X-Ray Scanning methods for determining rock, fluid, and petrophysical properties and for fundamental studies of multiphase flow behavior in porous media. Specific objectives are divided into four subtasks: (1) development of NMRI and CT scanning for the determination of rock-fluid and petrophysical properties; (2) development of NMRI and CT scanning for characterizing conventional multiphase displacement processes; (3) development of NMR and CT scanning for characterizing dispersed phase processes; and (4) miscible displacement studies.

Barrufet, M.A.; Flumerfelt, F.W.; Walsh, M.P.; Watson, A.T.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

107

Preliminary tests using magnetic resonance imaging of two-phase flow patterns and transitions  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This paper presents the results of preliminary tests used to establish the feasibility of using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to examine and quantitatively characterize two-phase flow patterns and flow transitions. These tests were performed at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) School of Medicine MRI Center as a collaborative research effort with Oregon State University (OSU). Special scanning sequences designed by UCSF for flow imaging were implemented in the tests. UCSF operated the MRI facility, and OSU constructed and operated a cocurrent air-water flow loop consisting of a 1-in.-diam test section capable of producing air superficial velocities j[sub g] ranging from 0.3 to 14 m/s, and water superficial velocities j[sub l] ranging from 0.08 to 1.3 m/s.

Reyes, J.N. Jr.; Lafi, A.Y. (Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)); Saloner, D. (Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States))

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Hyperspectral Mineral Mapping in Support of Geothermal Exploration: Examples from Long Valley Caldera, CA and Dixie Valley, NV, USA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Growing interest and exploration dollars within the geothermal sector have paved the way for increasingly sophisticated suites of geophysical and geochemical tools and methodologies. The efforts to characterize and assess known geothermal fields and find new, previously unknown resources has been aided by the advent of higher spatial resolution airborne geophysics (e.g. aeromagnetics), development of new seismic processing techniques, and the genesis of modern multi-dimensional fluid flow and structural modeling algorithms, just to name a few. One of the newest techniques on the scene, is hyperspectral imaging. Really an optical analytical geochemical tool, hyperspectral imagers (or imaging spectrometers as they are also called), are generally flown at medium to high altitudes aboard mid-sized aircraft and much in the same way more familiar geophysics are flown. The hyperspectral data records a continuous spatial record of the earth's surface, as well as measuring a continuous spectral record of reflected sunlight or emitted thermal radiation. This high fidelity, uninterrupted spatial and spectral record allows for accurate material distribution mapping and quantitative identification at the pixel to sub-pixel level. In volcanic/geothermal regions, this capability translates to synoptic, high spatial resolution, large-area mineral maps generated at time scales conducive to both the faster pace of the exploration and drilling managers, as well as to the slower pace of geologists and other researchers trying to understand the geothermal system over the long run.

Martini, B; Silver, E; Pickles, W; Cocks, P

2004-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

109

Hyperspectral Mineral Mapping in Support of Geothermal Exploration: Examples from Long Valley Caldera, CA and Dixie Valley, NV, USA  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Growing interest and exploration dollars within the geothermal sector have paved the way for increasingly sophisticated suites of geophysical and geochemical tools and methodologies. The efforts to characterize and assess known geothermal fields and find new, previously unknown resources has been aided by the advent of higher spatial resolution airborne geophysics (e.g. aeromagnetics), development of new seismic processing techniques, and the genesis of modern multi-dimensional fluid flow and structural modeling algorithms, just to name a few. One of the newest techniques on the scene, is hyperspectral imaging. Really an optical analytical geochemical tool, hyperspectral imagers (or imaging spectrometers as they are also called), are generally flown at medium to high altitudes aboard mid-sized aircraft and much in the same way more familiar geophysics are flown. The hyperspectral data records a continuous spatial record of the earth's surface, as well as measuring a continuous spectral record of reflected sunlight or emitted thermal radiation. This high fidelity, uninterrupted spatial and spectral record allows for accurate material distribution mapping and quantitative identification at the pixel to sub-pixel level. In volcanic/geothermal regions, this capability translates to synoptic, high spatial resolution, large-area mineral maps generated at time scales conducive to both the faster pace of the exploration and drilling managers, as well as to the slower pace of geologists and other researchers trying to understand the geothermal system over the long run.

Pickles, W L; Martini, B A; Silver, E A; Cocks, P A

2004-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

110

Imaging and spectroscopic observations of magnetic reconnection and chromospheric evaporation in a solar flare  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic reconnection is believed to be the dominant energy release mechanism in solar flares. The standard flare model predicts both downward and upward outflow plasmas with speeds close to the coronal Alfv\\'{e}n speed. Yet, spectroscopic observations of such outflows, especially the downflows, are extremely rare. With observations of the newly launched Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS), we report the detection of greatly redshifted ($\\sim$125 km s$^{-1}$ along line of sight) Fe {\\sc{xxi}} 1354.08\\AA{} emission line with a $\\sim$100 km s$^{-1}$ nonthermal width at the reconnection site of a flare. The redshifted Fe {\\sc{xxi}} feature coincides spatially with the loop-top X-Ray source observed by the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI). We interpret this large redshift as the signature of downward-moving reconnection outflow/hot retracting loops. Imaging observations from both IRIS and the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA) onboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) also...

Tian, Hui; Reeves, Katharine K; Raymond, John C; Guo, Fan; Liu, Wei; Chen, Bin; Murphy, Nicholas A

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

111

Understanding the Fe I Line Measurements Returned by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager (HMI) aboard the Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) observes the Sun at the Fe I 6173 {\\AA} line and returns full-disk maps of line-of-sight (LOS) observables including the magnetic flux density, velocities, Fe I line width, line depth, and continuum intensity. These data are estimated through an algorithm (the MDI-like algorithm, hereafter), which combines observables obtained at six wavelength positions within the Fe I 6173 {\\AA} line. To properly interpret such data it is important to understand any effects of the instrument and the pipeline that generates these data products. We tested the accuracy of the line width, line depth, and continuum intensity returned by the MDI-like algorithm using various one-dimensional (1D) atmosphere models. It was found that HMI estimates of these quantities are highly dependent on the shape of the line, therefore on the LOS angle and the magnetic flux density associated with the model, and less to line shifts with respect to the central ...

Cohen, Daniel P; Farris, Laurel; Tritschler, Alexandra

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Hyperspectral Aerosol Optical Depths from TCAP Flights  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

4STAR (Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research), the world’s first hyperspectral airborne tracking sunphotometer, acquired aerosol optical depths (AOD) at 1 Hz during all July 2012 flights of the Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP). Root-mean square differences from AERONET ground-based observations were 0.01 at wavelengths between 500-1020 nm, 0.02 at 380 and 1640 nm and 0.03 at 440 nm in four clear-sky fly-over events, and similar in ground side-by-side comparisons. Changes in the above-aircraft AOD across 3-km-deep spirals were typically consistent with integrals of coincident in situ (on DOE Gulfstream 1 with 4STAR) and lidar (on NASA B200) extinction measurements within 0.01, 0.03, 0.01, 0.02, 0.02, 0.02 at 355, 450, 532, 550, 700, 1064 nm, respectively, despite atmospheric variations and combined measurement uncertainties. Finer vertical differentials of the 4STAR measurements matched the in situ ambient extinction profile within 14% for one homogeneous column. For the AOD observed between 350-1660 nm, excluding strong water vapor and oxygen absorption bands, estimated uncertainties were ~0.01 and dominated by (then) unpredictable throughput changes, up to +/-0.8%, of the fiber optic rotary joint. The favorable intercomparisons herald 4STAR’s spatially-resolved high-frequency hyperspectral products as a reliable tool for climate studies and satellite validation.

Shinozuka, Yohei; Johnson, Roy R.; Flynn, Connor J.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Redemann, Jens; Dunagan, Stephen; Kluzek, Celine D.; Hubbe, John M.; Segal-Rosenheimer, Michal; Livingston, J. M.; Eck, T.; Wagener, Richard; Gregory, L.; Chand, Duli; Berg, Larry K.; Rogers, Ray; Ferrare, R. A.; Hair, John; Hostetler, Chris A.; Burton, S. P.

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

113

Hyperspectral Mineral Mapping In Support Of Geothermal Exploration...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

aircraft and much in the same way more familiar geophysics are flown. The hyperspectral data records a continuous spatial record of the earth's surface, as well as measuring a...

114

A 200-MHz fully-differential CMOS front-end with an on-chip inductor for magnetic resonance imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A 200-MHZ FULLY-DIFFERENTIAL CMOS FRONT-END WITH AN ON-CHIP INDUCTOR FOR MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING A Thesis by JULIO ENRIQUE AYALA II Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements... for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 2005 Major Subject: Electrical Engineering A 200-MHZ FULLY-DIFFERENTIAL CMOS FRONT-END WITH AN ON-CHIP INDUCTOR FOR MAGNETIC RESONANCE IMAGING A Thesis by JULIO ENRIQUE AYALA II Submitted to the Office of Graduate...

Ayala, Julio Enqrique, II

2007-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

115

UNMANNED AERIAL VEHICLE (UAV) HYPERSPECTRAL REMOTE SENSING FOR DRYLAND VEGETATION MONITORING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

UAV-based hyperspectral remote sensing capabilities developed by the Idaho National Lab and Idaho State University, Boise Center Aerospace Lab, were recently tested via demonstration flights that explored the influence of altitude on geometric error, image mosaicking, and dryland vegetation classification. The test flights successfully acquired usable flightline data capable of supporting classifiable composite images. Unsupervised classification results support vegetation management objectives that rely on mapping shrub cover and distribution patterns. Overall, supervised classifications performed poorly despite spectral separability in the image-derived endmember pixels. Future mapping efforts that leverage ground reference data, ultra-high spatial resolution photos and time series analysis should be able to effectively distinguish native grasses such as Sandberg bluegrass (Poa secunda), from invasives such as burr buttercup (Ranunculus testiculatus) and cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum).

Nancy F. Glenn; Jessica J. Mitchell; Matthew O. Anderson; Ryan C. Hruska

2012-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

A 64-channel personal computer based image reconstruction system and applications in single echo acquisition magnetic resonance elastography and ultra-fast magnetic resonance imaging.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, this value is 2? x 42.5759 MHz/Tesla. This translates to a Larmor frequency of 200.238 MHz for the 4.7T magnet situated in the Magnetic Resonance Systems Lab (MRSL). In the presence of the static ????the proton population aligns itself according...

Yallapragada, Naresh

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

117

Pulmonary Hemorrhage: Imaging with a New Magnetic Resonance Blood Pool Agent in Conjunction with Breathheld Three-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Angiography  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To describe the three-dimensional magnetic resonance angiography (3D MRA) imaging appearance of the pulmonary arteries following administration of a superparamagnetic iron oxide blood pool agent to human volunteers, and to demonstrate in an animal model (pigs) how this technique can be used to detect pulmonary parenchymal hemorrhage. Methods: Two volunteers were examined following the intravenous administration of a superparamagnetic iron oxide blood pool agent (NC100150 Injection, Nycomed Amersham Imaging, Wayne, PA, USA). T1-weighted 3D gradient recalled echo (GRE) image sets (TR/TE 5.1/1.4 msec, flip angle 30 deg.) were acquired breathheld over 24 sec. To assess the detectability of pulmonary bleeding with intravascular MR contrast, pulmonary parenchymal injuries were created in two animals under general anesthesia, and fast T1-weighted 3D GRE image sets collected before and after the injury. Results: Administration of the intravascular contrast in the two volunteers resulted in selective enhancement of the pulmonary vasculature permitting complete visualization and excellent delineation of central, segmental, and subsegmental arteries. Following iatrogenic injury in the two animals, pulmonary hemorrhage was readily detected on the 3D image sets. Conclusion: The data presented illustrate that ultrafast 3D GRE MR imaging in conjunction with an intravenously administered intravascular blood pool agent can be used to perform high-quality pulmonary MRA as well as to detect pulmonary hemorrhage.

Weishaupt, Dominik; Hilfiker, Paul R.; Schmidt, Michaela; Debatin, Joerg F. [Institute of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital Zurich, Raemistrasse 100, CH-8091 Zurich (Switzerland)

1999-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

118

FPGA based image processing with R-fuctions and the curvelet transform  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

previously not feasible to develop. By using the concepts presented in this thesis, ideas have come about for the development of a large scale Boltzman equation solver, and a satellite hyperspectral imaging system. The Boltzman equation solver has been...

Wisinger, John L.

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

119

Automatic Landmarking of Magnetic Resonance brain Images Camille Izard*a,b, Bruno M. Jedynaka,b and Craig E.L. Starkc  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Automatic Landmarking of Magnetic Resonance brain Images Camille Izard*a,b, Bruno M. JedynakaDepartment of Psychological and Brain Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD ABSTRACT Landmarking MR images is crucial in registering brain structures from different images. It consists in locating the voxel

Jedynak, Bruno M.

120

13Moving Magnetic Filaments Near Sunspots These two images were taken by the Hinode (Solar-B) solar observatory on October 30, 2006.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

13Moving Magnetic Filaments Near Sunspots These two images were taken by the Hinode (Solar-B) solar://spacemath.gsfc.nasa.gov These two images were taken by the Hinode (Solar-B) solar observatory on October 30, 2006. The size of each also use transparent paper or film, overlay the paper on each image, and mark the locations carefully

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hyperspectral imaging magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Effect of Background Emissivity on Gas Detection in Thermal Hyperspectral Imagery  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Detecting and identifying weak gaseous plumes using thermal imaging data is complicated by many factors. These include variability due to atmosphere, ground and plume temper- ature, and background clutter. This paper presents an analysis of one formulation of the physics-based radiance model, which describes at-sensor observed radiance. The background emissivity and plume/ground temperatures are isolated, and their effects on net chemical signal are described. This analysis shows that the plume’s physical state, emission or absorption, is directly dependent on the background emissivity. It then describes what conditions on the background emissivity have inhibiting effects on the net chemical signal. These claims are illustrated by analyzing synthetic hyperspectral imaging data with the Adaptive Matched Filter using four chemicals and three distinct background emissivities. Two chemicals (Carbontetrachloride and Tetraflourosilane) in the analysis had a very strong relationship with the background emissivities: they exhibited absorbance over a small range of wavenumbers and the background emissivities showed a consistent ordering at these wavenumbers. Analysis of simulated hyperspectral images containing these chemicals showed complete agreement with the analysis of the physics-based model that described when the background emissivities would have inhibiting effects on gas detection. The other chemicals considered (Ammonia and Tributylphosphate) exhibited very complex absorbance structure across the longwave infrared spectrum. Analysis of images containing these chemicals revealed that the the analysis of the physics-based model did not hold completely for these complex chemicals but did suggest that gas detection was dominated by their dominant absorbance features. These results provide some explanation of the effect of the background emissivity on gas detection and a more general exploration of gas absorbance/background emissivity variability and their effects on gas detection is warranted. i

Walsh, Stephen J.; Tardiff, Mark F.; Chilton, Lawrence K.; Metoyer, Candace N.

2008-10-02T23:59:59.000Z

122

PREDICTION METRICS FOR CHEMICAL DETECTION IN LONG-WAVE INFRARED HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGERY  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Natural and man-made chemical processes generate gaseous plumes that may be detected by hyperspectral imaging, which produces a matrix of spectra affected by the chemical constituents of the plume, the atmosphere, the bounding background surface and instrument noise. A physics-based model of observed radiance shows that high chemical absorbance and low background emissivity result in a larger chemical signature. Using simulated hyperspectral imagery, this study investigated two metrics which exploited this relationship. The objective was to explore how well the chosen metrics predicted when a chemical would be more easily detected when comparing one background type to another. The two predictor metrics correctly rank ordered the backgrounds for about 94% of the chemicals tested as compared to the background rank orders from Whitened Matched Filtering (a detection algorithm) of the simulated spectra. These results suggest that the metrics provide a reasonable summary of how the background emissivity and chemical absorbance interact to produce the at-sensor chemical signal. This study suggests that similarly effective predictors that account for more general physical conditions may be derived.

Chilton, M.; Walsh, S.J.; Daly, D.S.

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Prediction of Liver Function by Using Magnetic Resonance-based Portal Venous Perfusion Imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate whether liver function can be assessed globally and spatially by using volumetric dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging MRI (DCE-MRI) to potentially aid in adaptive treatment planning. Methods and Materials: Seventeen patients with intrahepatic cancer undergoing focal radiation therapy (RT) were enrolled in institution review board-approved prospective studies to obtain DCE-MRI (to measure regional perfusion) and indocyanine green (ICG) clearance rates (to measure overall liver function) prior to, during, and at 1 and 2 months after treatment. The volumetric distribution of portal venous perfusion in the whole liver was estimated for each scan. We assessed the correlation between mean portal venous perfusion in the nontumor volume of the liver and overall liver function measured by ICG before, during, and after RT. The dose response for regional portal venous perfusion to RT was determined using a linear mixed effects model. Results: There was a significant correlation between the ICG clearance rate and mean portal venous perfusion in the functioning liver parenchyma, suggesting that portal venous perfusion could be used as a surrogate for function. Reduction in regional venous perfusion 1 month after RT was predicted by the locally accumulated biologically corrected dose at the end of RT (P<.0007). Regional portal venous perfusion measured during RT was a significant predictor for regional venous perfusion assessed 1 month after RT (P<.00001). Global hypovenous perfusion pre-RT was observed in 4 patients (3 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and cirrhosis), 3 of whom had recovered from hypoperfusion, except in the highest dose regions, post-RT. In addition, 3 patients who had normal perfusion pre-RT had marked hypervenous perfusion or reperfusion in low-dose regions post-RT. Conclusions: This study suggests that MR-based volumetric hepatic perfusion imaging may be a biomarker for spatial distribution of liver function, which could aid in individualizing therapy, particularly for patients at risk for liver injury after RT.

Cao Yue, E-mail: yuecao@umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Wang Hesheng [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Johnson, Timothy D. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Pan, Charlie [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Hussain, Hero [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Balter, James M.; Normolle, Daniel; Ben-Josef, Edgar; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Feng, Mary [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Findings in 20-year Survivors of Mediastinal Radiotherapy for Hodgkin's Disease  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The recognition of the true prevalence of cardiac toxicity after mediastinal radiotherapy requires very long follow-up and a precise diagnostic procedure. Cardiac magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) permits excellent quantification of cardiac function and identification of localized myocardial defects and has now been applied to a group of 20-year Hodgkin's disease survivors. Methods and materials: Of 143 patients treated with anterior mediastinal radiotherapy (cobalt-60, median prescribed dose 40 Gy) for Hodgkin's disease between 1978 and 1985, all 53 survivors were invited for cardiac MRI. Of those, 36 patients (68%) presented for MRI, and in 31 patients (58%) MRI could be performed 20-28 years (median, 24) after radiotherapy. The following sequences were acquired on a 1.5-T MRI: transversal T1-weighted TSE and T2-weighted half-fourier acquisition single-shot turbo-spin-echo sequences, a steady-state free precession (SSFP) cine sequence in the short heart axis and in the four-chamber view, SSFP perfusion sequences under rest and adenosine stress, and a SSFP inversion recovery sequence for late enhancement. The MRI findings were correlated with previously reconstructed doses to cardiac structures. Results: Clinical characteristics and reconstructed doses were not significantly different between survivors undergoing and not undergoing MRI. Pathologic findings were reduced left ventricular function (ejection fraction <55%) in 7 (23%) patients, hemodynamically relevant valvular dysfunction in 13 (42%), late myocardial enhancement in 9 (29%), and any perfusion deficit in 21 (68%). An association of regional pathologic changes and reconstructed dose to cardiac structures could not be established. Conclusions: In 20-year survivors of Hodgkin's disease, cardiac MRI detects pathologic findings in approximately 70% of patients. Cardiac MRI has a potential role in cardiac imaging of Hodgkin's disease patients after mediastinal radiotherapy.

Machann, Wolfram; Beer, Meinrad [Department of Radiology, University of Wuerzburg (Germany); Breunig, Margret; Stoerk, Stefan; Angermann, Christiane [Department of Cardiology, University of Wuerzburg (Germany); Seufert, Ines; Schwab, Franz; Koelbl, Oliver; Flentje, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Wuerzburg (Germany); Vordermark, Dirk, E-mail: dirk.vordermark@medizin.uni-halle.d [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Wuerzburg (Germany); Department of Radiation Oncology, Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (Germany)

2011-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

125

Radiation-Induced Alterations in Mouse Brain Development Characterized by Magnetic Resonance Imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to identify regions of altered development in the mouse brain after cranial irradiation using longitudinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Methods and Materials: Female C57Bl/6 mice received a whole-brain radiation dose of 7 Gy at an infant-equivalent age of 2.5 weeks. MRI was performed before irradiation and at 3 time points following irradiation. Deformation-based morphometry was used to quantify volume and growth rate changes following irradiation. Results: Widespread developmental deficits were observed in both white and gray matter regions following irradiation. Most of the affected brain regions suffered an initial volume deficit followed by growth at a normal rate, remaining smaller in irradiated brains compared with controls at all time points examined. The one exception was the olfactory bulb, which in addition to an early volume deficit, grew at a slower rate thereafter, resulting in a progressive volume deficit relative to controls. Immunohistochemical assessment revealed demyelination in white matter and loss of neural progenitor cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus and subventricular zone. Conclusions: MRI can detect regional differences in neuroanatomy and brain growth after whole-brain irradiation in the developing mouse. Developmental deficits in neuroanatomy persist, or even progress, and may serve as useful markers of late effects in mouse models. The high-throughput evaluation of brain development enabled by these methods may allow testing of strategies to mitigate late effects after pediatric cranial irradiation.

Gazdzinski, Lisa M.; Cormier, Kyle [Mouse Imaging Centre, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada)] [Mouse Imaging Centre, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Lu, Fred G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto (Canada)] [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto (Canada); Lerch, Jason P. [Mouse Imaging Centre, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada) [Mouse Imaging Centre, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Wong, C. Shun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto (Canada) [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Nieman, Brian J., E-mail: bjnieman@phenogenomics.ca [Mouse Imaging Centre, Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto (Canada); Department of Medical Biophysics, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

2012-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

126

Discrete magic angle turning system, apparatus, and process for in situ magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Described are a "Discrete Magic Angle Turning" (DMAT) system, devices, and processes that combine advantages of both magic angle turning (MAT) and magic angle hopping (MAH) suitable, e.g., for in situ magnetic resonance spectroscopy and/or imaging. In an exemplary system, device, and process, samples are rotated in a clockwise direction followed by an anticlockwise direction of exactly the same amount. Rotation proceeds through an angle that is typically greater than about 240 degrees but less than or equal to about 360 degrees at constant speed for a time applicable to the evolution dimension. Back and forth rotation can be synchronized and repeated with a special radio frequency (RF) pulse sequence to produce an isotropic-anisotropic shift 2D correlation spectrum. The design permits tubes to be inserted into the sample container without introducing plumbing interferences, further allowing control over such conditions as temperature, pressure, flow conditions, and feed compositions, thus permitting true in-situ investigations to be carried out.

Hu, Jian Zhi (Richland, WA); Sears, Jr., Jesse A. (Kennewick, WA); Hoyt, David W. (Richland, WA); Wind, Robert A. (Kennewick, WA)

2009-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

127

Advanced slow-magic angle spinning probe for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention relates to a probe and processes useful for magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy instruments. More particularly, the invention relates to a MR probe and processes for obtaining resolution enhancements of fluid objects, including live specimens, using an ultra-slow (magic angle) spinning (MAS) of the specimen combined with a modified phase-corrected magic angle turning (PHORMAT) pulse sequence. Proton NMR spectra were measured of the torso and the top part of the belly of a female BALBc mouse in a 2T field, while spinning the animal at a speed of 1.5 Hz. Results show that even in this relatively low field with PHORMAT, an isotropic spectrum is obtained with line widths that are a factor 4.6 smaller than those obtained in a stationary mouse. Resolution of 1H NMR metabolite spectra are thus significantly enhanced. Results indicate that PHORMAT has the potential to significantly increase the utility of 1H NMR spectroscopy for in vivo biochemical, biomedical and/or medical applications involving large-sized biological objects such as mice, rats and even humans within a hospital setting. For small-sized objects, including biological objects, such as excised tissues, organs, live bacterial cells, and biofilms, use of PASS at a spinning rate of 30 Hz and above is preferred.

Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi; Minard, Kevin R.; Rommereim, Donald N.

2006-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

128

Application of topological sensitivity toward tissue elasticity imaging using magnetic resonance data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) and brain degeneration imaging (Green et al., 2008) with promising results. Specifically, the MRE estimates

Guzina, Bojan

129

Magnetic force microscopy method and apparatus to detect and image currents in integrated circuits  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A magnetic force microscopy method and improved magnetic tip for detecting and quantifying internal magnetic fields resulting from current of integrated circuits. Detection of the current is used for failure analysis, design verification, and model validation. The interaction of the current on the integrated chip with a magnetic field can be detected using a cantilevered magnetic tip. Enhanced sensitivity for both ac and dc current and voltage detection is achieved with voltage by an ac coupling or a heterodyne technique. The techniques can be used to extract information from analog circuits.

Campbell, Ann. N. (13170-B Central SE #188, Albuquerque, NM 87123); Anderson, Richard E. (2800 Tennessee NE, Albuquerque, NM 87110); Cole, Jr., Edward I. (2116 White Cloud NE, Albuquerque, NM 87112)

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

130

Magnetic force microscopy method and apparatus to detect and image currents in integrated circuits  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A magnetic force microscopy method and improved magnetic tip for detecting and quantifying internal magnetic fields resulting from current of integrated circuits are disclosed. Detection of the current is used for failure analysis, design verification, and model validation. The interaction of the current on the integrated chip with a magnetic field can be detected using a cantilevered magnetic tip. Enhanced sensitivity for both ac and dc current and voltage detection is achieved with voltage by an ac coupling or a heterodyne technique. The techniques can be used to extract information from analog circuits. 17 figs.

Campbell, A.N.; Anderson, R.E.; Cole, E.I. Jr.

1995-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

131

Correction to “Hyperspectral Aerosol Optical Depths from TCAP Flights”  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the paper “Hyperspectral aerosol optical depths from TCAP flights” by Y. Shinozuka et al. (Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres, 118, doi:10.1002/2013JD020596, 2013), Tables 1 and 2 were published with the column heads out of order. Tables 1 and 2 are published correctly here. The publisher regrets the error.

Shinozuka, Yohei; Johnson, Roy R.; Flynn, Connor J.; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Redemann, Jens; Dunagan, Stephen; Kluzek, Celine D.; Hubbe, John M.; Segal-Rosenheimer, Michal; Livingston, J. M.; Eck, T.; Wagener, Richard; Gregory, L.; Chand, Duli; Berg, Larry K.; Rogers, Ray; Ferrare, R. A.; Hair, John; Hostetler, Chris A.; Burton, S. P.

2014-02-16T23:59:59.000Z

132

Joint Linear/Nonlinear Spectral Unmixing of Hyperspectral Image Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

of the mixing process, several naturally occurring situations exist where nonlinear models may provide the most and flexibility in different applications, there are many naturally occuring situations where nonlinear mixture mixed spectra from the reflected surface radiation of various subpixel constituent materials

Plaza, Antonio J.

133

Estimation of Atmospheric PSF Parameters for Hyperspectral Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

from the online tutorial: http://personalpages.manchester.ac.uk/staff/ david.foster/Tutorial_HSI2RGB

Plemmons, Robert J.

134

Hyperspectral Imaging At Dixie Valley Geothermal Field Area (Laney, 2005) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:GreerHiCalifornia: Energythe Second Workshop onDepositedHyperionOpen

135

Hyperspectral Imaging At Yellowstone Region (Hellman & Ramsey, 2004) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:GreerHiCalifornia: Energythe Second Workshop

136

Hyperspectral Imaging At Blue Mountain Geothermal Area (Calvin, Et Al.,  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat Jump to:PhotonHolyName HousingIIIDrive Ltd Jump to:

137

Hyperspectral Imaging At Long Valley Caldera Geothermal Area (Martini, Et  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat Jump to:PhotonHolyName HousingIIIDrive Ltd Jump to:Al., 2003) |

138

Spectro-polarimetric Imaging Reveals Helical Magnetic Fields in Solar Prominence Feet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Solar prominences are clouds of cool plasma levitating above the solar surface and insulated from the million-degree corona by magnetic fields. They form in regions of complex magnetic topology, characterized by non-potential fields, which can evolve abruptly, disintegrating the prominence and ejecting magnetized material into the heliosphere. However, their physics is not yet fully understood because mapping such complex magnetic configurations and their evolution is extremely challenging, and must often be guessed by proxy from photometric observations.Using state-of-the-art spectro-polarimetric data, we reconstruct the structure of the magnetic field in a prominence. We find that prominence feet harbor helical magnetic fields connecting the prominence to the solar surface below.

Gonzalez, M J Martinez; Ramos, A Asensio; Beck, C; Rodriguez, J de la Cruz; Diaz, A J

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

139

Nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus having semitoroidal rf coil for use in topical NMR and NMR imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) apparatus for use in topical magnetic resonance (TMR) spectroscopy and other remote sensing NMR applications includes a semitoroidal radio-frequency (rf) coil. The semitoroidal rf coil produces an effective alternating magnetic field at a distance from the poles of the coil, so as to enable NMR measurements to be taken from selected regions inside an object, particularly including human and other living subjects. The semitoroidal rf coil is relatively insensitive to magnetic interference from metallic objects located behind the coil, thereby rendering the coil particularly suited for use in both conventional and superconducting NMR magnets. The semitoroidal NMR coil can be constructed so that it emits little or no excess rf electric field associated with the rf magnetic field, thus avoiding adverse effects due to dielectric heating of the sample or to any other interaction of the electric field with the sample.

Fukushima, Eiichi (Los Alamos, NM); Roeder, Stephen B. W. (La Mesa, CA); Assink, Roger A. (Albuquerque, NM); Gibson, Atholl A. V. (Bryan, TX)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

140

HST.583 Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Data Acquisition and Analysis, Fall 2004  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Provides information relevant to the conduct and interpretation of human brain mapping studies. Provides in-depth coverage of the physics of image formation, mechanisms of image contrast, and the physiological basis for ...

Gollub, Randy L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hyperspectral imaging magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

HST.583 Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Data Acquisition and Analysis, Fall 2002  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Provides information relevant to the conduct and interpretation of human brain mapping studies. Provides in-depth coverage of the physics of image formation, mechanisms of image contrast, and the physiological basis for ...

Gollub, Randy L.

142

Imaging and Spectroscopic Diagnostics on the Formation of Two Magnetic Flux Ropes Revealed by SDO/AIA and IRIS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Helical magnetic flux rope (MFR) is a fundamental structure of corona mass ejections (CMEs) and has been discovered recently to exist as a sigmoidal channel structure prior to its eruption in the extreme ultraviolet (EUV) high temperature passbands of the Atmospheric Imaging Assembly (AIA). However, when and where the MFR is built up are still elusive. In this paper, we investigate two MFRs (MFR1 and MFR2) in detail, whose eruptions produced two energetic solar flares and CMEs on 2014 April 18 and 2014 September 10, respectively. The AIA EUV images reveal that for a long time prior to their eruption, both MFR1 and MFR2 are under formation, which is probably through magnetic reconnection between two groups of sheared arcades driven by the shearing and converging flows in the photosphere near the polarity inversion line. At the footpoints of the MFR1, the \\textit{Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph} Si IV, C II, and Mg II lines exhibit weak to moderate redshifts and a non-thermal broadening in the pre-flare p...

Cheng, X; Fang, C

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

E-Print Network 3.0 - airborne hyperspectral imagery Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

for Fusion of Hyperspectral and Multispectral Imagery with the Objective of Improving Spatial Resolution While Retaining Spectral Data Summary: Development of Algorithm for...

144

Evaluating Swallowing Muscles Essential for Hyolaryngeal Elevation by Using Muscle Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Reduced hyolaryngeal elevation, a critical event in swallowing, is associated with radiation therapy. Two muscle groups that suspend the hyoid, larynx, and pharynx have been proposed to elevate the hyolaryngeal complex: the suprahyoid and longitudinal pharyngeal muscles. Thought to assist both groups is the thyrohyoid, a muscle intrinsic to the hyolaryngeal complex. Intensity modulated radiation therapy guidelines designed to preserve structures important to swallowing currently exclude the suprahyoid and thyrohyoid muscles. This study used muscle functional magnetic resonance imaging (mfMRI) in normal healthy adults to determine whether both muscle groups are active in swallowing and to test therapeutic exercises thought to be specific to hyolaryngeal elevation. Methods and Materials: mfMRI data were acquired from 11 healthy subjects before and after normal swallowing and after swallowing exercise regimens (the Mendelsohn maneuver and effortful pitch glide). Whole-muscle transverse relaxation time (T2 signal, measured in milliseconds) profiles of 7 test muscles were used to evaluate the physiologic response of each muscle to each condition. Changes in effect size (using the Cohen d measure) of whole-muscle T2 profiles were used to determine which muscles underlie swallowing and swallowing exercises. Results: Post-swallowing effect size changes (where a d value of >0.20 indicates significant activity during swallowing) for the T2 signal profile of the thyrohyoid was a d value of 0.09; a d value of 0.40 for the mylohyoid, 0.80 for the geniohyoid, 0.04 for the anterior digastric, and 0.25 for the posterior digastric-stylohyoid in the suprahyoid muscle group; and d values of 0.47 for the palatopharyngeus and 0.28 for the stylopharyngeus muscles in the longitudinal pharyngeal muscle group. The Mendelsohn maneuver and effortful pitch glide swallowing exercises showed significant effect size changes for all muscles tested, except for the thyrohyoid. Conclusions: Muscles of both the suprahyoid and the longitudinal pharyngeal muscle groups are active in swallowing, and both swallowing exercises effectively target muscles elevating the hyolaryngeal complex. mfMRI is useful in testing swallowing muscle function.

Pearson, William G., E-mail: bp1@bu.edu [Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hindson, David F. [Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Radiology, Boston Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Langmore, Susan E. [Department of Otolaryngology, Boston Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States) [Department of Otolaryngology, Boston Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Speech and Hearing Sciences, Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Zumwalt, Ann C. [Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)] [Department of Anatomy and Neurobiology, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

145

Developing novel polymer architectures for applications In magnetic resonance imaging and self-assembly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Macromolecular scaffolds for drug delivery, self-assembly, and imaging applications have attracted significant attention over the last several decades. As polymerization techniques become more sophisticated, it becomes ...

McCombs, Jessica R. (Jessica Rose)

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Method for nuclear magnetic resonance imaging using deuterum as a contrast agent  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for in vivo NMR imaging of the blood vessels and organs of a patient characterized by using a dark dye-like imaging substance consisting essentially of a stable, high-purity concentration of D.sub.2 O in a solution with water.

Kehayias, Joseph J. (Chestnut Hill, MA); Joel, Darrel D. (Setauket, NY); Adams, William H. (Eastport, NY); Stein, Harry L. (Glen Head, NY)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

147

Cassini/VIMS hyperspectral observations of the HUYGENS landing site on Titan  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Titan is one of the primary scientific objectives of the NASA ESA ASI Cassini Huygens mission. Scattering by haze particles in Titan's atmosphere and numerous methane absorptions dramatically veil Titan's surface in the visible range, though it can be studied more easily in some narrow infrared windows. The Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (VIMS) instrument onboard the Cassini spacecraft successfully imaged its surface in the atmospheric windows, taking hyperspectral images in the range 0.4 5.2 ?m. On 26 October (TA flyby) and 13 December 2004 (TB flyby), the Cassini Huygens mission flew over Titan at an altitude lower than 1200 km at closest approach. We report here on the analysis of VIMS images of the Huygens landing site acquired at TA and TB, with a spatial resolution ranging from 16 to14.4 km/pixel. The pure atmospheric backscattering component is corrected by using both an empirical method and a first-order theoretical model. Both approaches provide consistent results. After the removal of scat...

Rodríguez, S; Sotin, C; Clénet, H; Clark, R N; Buratti, B; Brown, R H; Mccord, T B; Nicholson, P D; Baines, K H; 10.1016/J.PSS.2006.06.016

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Evaluating the Effects of Spatial Resolution on Hyperspectral Fire Detection and Temperature Retrieval  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and background land cover. Previous work has used hyperspectral data acquired from airborne platforms, limiting (Riaño et al., 2002). Hyperspectral sensors utilize a large number of contiguous bands, each, like all airborne sensors, faces issues of varying spatial resolutions and has limited spatial

149

Gas Plume Species Identification in LWIR Hyperspectral Imagery by Regression Analyses  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Gas Plume Species Identification in LWIR Hyperspectral Imagery by Regression Analyses by David Title of Thesis: Gas Plume Species Identification in LWIR Hyperspectral Imagery by Regression Analyses I in whole or in part. Any reproduction will not be for commercial use or profit. Signature Date ii #12;Gas

Salvaggio, Carl

150

Transmit field pattern control for high field magnetic resonance imaging with integrated RF current sources  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in units of radians/tesla and B is the magnetic flux density of the applied field, expressed in units of tesla. The hydrogen nucleus, which consists of a single proton, is the most abundantly present in tissue and is most widely used for MRI...

Kurpad, Krishna Nagaraj

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

An analysis of the PERL Magnetic Resonance Imaging theory and implementation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The goal of PERL MRI in its most basic form is single shot imaging without the need to rapidly switch gradients to encode spatial information into the signal. PERL MRI incorporates the application of the PERL field into the standard spin echo...

Kremkus, Mark Christian

2013-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

152

Fast and contrast-enhanced phase-sensitive magnetic resonance imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

two signals if the resonance frequencies are close. For example, in MR mammography, it is difficult to separate silicone breast implants signals (4.0 ppm) from fat signals (3.5 ppm); (2) the signal dynamic range of images acquired using Dixon...

Son, Jong Bum

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

153

Assessment of Wall Shear Stress Changes in Arteries and Veins of Arteriovenous Polytetrafluoroethylene Grafts Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The purpose of the study was to determine simultaneously the temporal changes in luminal vessel area, blood flow, and wall shear stress (WSS) in both the anastomosed artery (AA) and vein (AV) of arteriovenous polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) grafts. PTFE grafts were placed from the iliac artery to the ipsilateral iliac vein in 12 castrated juvenile male pigs. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance angiograpgy with cine phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging was performed. Luminal vessel area, blood flow, and WSS in the aorta, AA, AV, and inferior vena cava were determined at 3 days (D3), 7 days (D7), and 14 days (D14) after graft placement. Elastin von Gieson staining of the AV was performed. The average WSS of the AA was highest at D3 and then decreased by D7 and D14. In contrast, the average WSS and intima-to-media ratio of the AV increased from D3 to D7 and peaked by D14. Similarly, the average area of the AA was highest by D7 and began to approximate the control artery by D14. The average area of the AV had decreased to its lowest by D7. High blood flows through the AA causes a decrease in average WSS and increase in the average luminal vessel area, whereas at the AV, the average WSS and intima-to-media ratio both increase while the average luminal vessel area decreases.

Misra, Sanjay, E-mail: Misra.sanjay@mayo.edu; Woodrum, David A. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology (United States); Homburger, Jay [Medical College of Georgia, Department of Vascular Surgery (United States); Elkouri, Stephane [Centre Hospitalier de I'Universite de Montreal, Department of Vascular Surgery (Canada); Mandrekar, Jayawant N. [Mayo Clinic, Division of Biostatistics (United States); Barocas, Victor [University of Minnesota, Department of Biomedical Engineering (United States); Glockner, James F. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology (United States); Rajan, Dheeraj K. [Toronto General Hospital, University Health Network, Department of Medical Imaging, Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (Canada); Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata [Mayo Clinic, Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (United States)

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

154

Prediction of the reversibility of the ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening using passive cavitation detection with magnetic resonance imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

cavitation detection with magnetic resonance imaging validation Tao Sun1 , Gesthimani Samiotaki1 and Elisa E (diameters: 1-2, 4-5, or 6-8 m). A 10-MHz passive cavitation detector was used to acquire cavitation signals that the stable cavitation dose increased with the number of days required for closing while it reached a plateau

Konofagou, Elisa E.

155

Intensity inhomogeneity correction for magnetic resonance imaging of human brain at 7T  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the performance and efficacy for intensity inhomogeneity correction of various sequences of the human brain in 7T MRI using the extended version of the unified segmentation algorithm. Materials: Ten healthy volunteers were scanned with four different sequences (2D spin echo [SE], 3D fast SE, 2D fast spoiled gradient echo, and 3D time-of-flight) by using a 7T MRI system. Intensity inhomogeneity correction was performed using the “New Segment” module in SPM8 with four different values (120, 90, 60, and 30 mm) of full width at half maximum (FWHM) in Gaussian smoothness. The uniformity in signals in the entire white matter was evaluated using the coefficient of variation (CV); mean signal intensities between the subcortical and deep white matter were compared, and contrast between subcortical white matter and gray matter was measured. The length of the lenticulostriate (LSA) was measured on maximum intensity projection (MIP) images in the original and corrected images. Results: In all sequences, the CV decreased as the FWHM value decreased. The differences of mean signal intensities between subcortical and deep white matter also decreased with smaller FWHM values. The contrast between white and gray matter was maintained at all FWHM values. LSA length was significantly greater in corrected MIP than in the original MIP images. Conclusions: Intensity inhomogeneity in 7T MRI can be successfully corrected using SPM8 for various scan sequences.

Uwano, Ikuko; Yamashita, Fumio; Higuchi, Satomi; Ito, Kenji; Sasaki, Makoto [Division of Ultrahigh Field MRI, Institute for Biomedical Sciences, Iwate Medical University, Yahaba, Iwate 028-3694 (Japan)] [Division of Ultrahigh Field MRI, Institute for Biomedical Sciences, Iwate Medical University, Yahaba, Iwate 028-3694 (Japan); Kudo, Kohsuke, E-mail: kkudo@huhp.hokudai.ac.jp; Goodwin, Jonathan; Harada, Taisuke [Division of Ultrahigh Field MRI, Institute for Biomedical Sciences, Iwate Medical University, Yahaba, Iwate 028-3694, Japan and Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8648 (Japan)] [Division of Ultrahigh Field MRI, Institute for Biomedical Sciences, Iwate Medical University, Yahaba, Iwate 028-3694, Japan and Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Hokkaido University Hospital, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-8648 (Japan); Ogawa, Akira [Department of Neurosurgery, Iwate Medical University, Morioka, Iwate 020-8505 (Japan)] [Department of Neurosurgery, Iwate Medical University, Morioka, Iwate 020-8505 (Japan)

2014-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

156

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures by X-ray Spectro-Holography  

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157

X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires  

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158

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

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159

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

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160

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

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161

X-Ray Imaging Current-Driven Magnetic Domain-Wall Motion in Nanowires  

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162

X-Ray Imaging of the Dynamic Magnetic Vortex Core Deformation  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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163

Classification of brain compartments and head injury lesions by neural networks applied to magnetic resonance images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the limitation that they carry no infor- mation regarding the relative position of pixels with respect to each other [14] . The gray-level co-occurrence matrices (GLCM) method is a "direct approach" to texture analysis using low-level features of the image... by matrices [20]. The transformation matrices are based on the training samples and then applied to the testing samples. Given an original feature vector, x, and an f x f transformation matrix, A, the transformed vector, y, is given by [20]: ~A. E, (13...

Kischell, Eric Robert

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

A Prospective Study of the Utility of Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Determining Candidacy for Partial Breast Irradiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: Retrospective data have demonstrated that breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may change a patient's eligibility for partial breast irradiation (PBI) by identifying multicentric, multifocal, or contralateral disease. The objective of the current study was to prospectively determine the frequency with which MRI identifies occult disease and to establish clinical factors associated with a higher likelihood of MRI prompting changes in PBI eligibility. Methods and Materials: At The University of Chicago, women with breast cancer uniformly undergo MRI in addition to mammography and ultrasonography. From June 2009 through May 2011, all patients were screened prospectively in a multidisciplinary conference for PBI eligibility based on standard imaging, and the impact of MRI on PBI eligibility according to National Surgical Adjuvant Breast and Bowel Project protocol B-39/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 0413 entry criteria was recorded. Univariable analysis was performed using clinical characteristics in both the prospective cohort and in a separate cohort of retrospectively identified patients. Pooled analysis was used to derive a scoring index predictive of the risk that MRI would identify additional disease. Results: A total of 521 patients were screened for PBI eligibility, and 124 (23.8%) patients were deemed eligible for PBI based on standard imaging. MRI findings changed PBI eligibility in 12.9% of patients. In the pooled univariable analysis, tumor size ?2 cm on mammography or ultrasonography (P=.02), age <50 years (P=.01), invasive lobular histology (P=.01), and HER-2/neu amplification (P=.01) were associated with a higher likelihood of MRI changing PBI eligibility. A predictive score was generated by summing the number of significant risk factors. Patients with a score of 0, 1, 2, and 3 had changes to eligibility based on MRI findings in 2.8%, 13.2%, 38.1%, and 100%, respectively (P<.0001). Conclusions: MRI identified additional disease in a significant number of patients eligible for PBI, based on standard imaging. Clinical characteristics may be useful in directing implementation of MRI in the staging of PBI candidates.

Dorn, Paige L.; Al-Hallaq, Hania A.; Haq, Farah; Goldberg, Mira [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Abe, Hiroyuki [Department of Radiology, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Department of Radiology, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Hasan, Yasmin [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)] [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Chmura, Steven J., E-mail: schmura@radonc.uchicago.edu [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Minimally Invasive Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Free-Hand Aspiration of Symptomatic Nerve Route Compressing Lumbosacral Cysts Using a 1.0-Tesla Open Magnetic Resonance Imaging System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of minimally invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided free-hand aspiration of symptomatic nerve route compressing lumbosacral cysts in a 1.0-Tesla (T) open MRI system using a tailored interactive sequence. Materials and Methods: Eleven patients with MRI-evident symptomatic cysts in the lumbosacral region and possible nerve route compressing character were referred to a 1.0-T open MRI system. For MRI interventional cyst aspiration, an interactive sequence was used, allowing for near real-time position validation of the needle in any desired three-dimensional plane. Results: Seven of 11 cysts in the lumbosacral region were successfully aspirated (average 10.1 mm [SD {+-} 1.9]). After successful cyst aspiration, each patient reported speedy relief of initial symptoms. Average cyst size was 9.6 mm ({+-}2.6 mm). Four cysts (8.8 {+-} 3.8 mm) could not be aspirated. Conclusion: Open MRI systems with tailored interactive sequences have great potential for cyst aspiration in the lumbosacral region. The authors perceive major advantages of the MR-guided cyst aspiration in its minimally invasive character compared to direct and open surgical options along with consecutive less trauma, less stress, and also less side-effects for the patient.

Bucourt, Maximilian de, E-mail: mdb@charite.de; Streitparth, Florian, E-mail: florian.streitparth@charite.de; Collettini, Federico [Charite-University Medicine, Department of Radiology (Germany); Guettler, Felix [Jena University, Department of Radiology (Germany); Rathke, Hendrik; Lorenz, Britta; Rump, Jens; Hamm, Bernd [Charite-University Medicine, Department of Radiology (Germany); Teichgraeber, U. K. [Jena University, Department of Radiology (Germany)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

166

A Signal-Inducing Bone Cement for Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Spinal Surgery Based on Hydroxyapatite and Polymethylmethacrylate  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The aim of this study was to develop a signal-inducing bone cement for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided cementoplasty of the spine. This MRI cement would allow precise and controlled injection of cement into pathologic lesions of the bone. We mixed conventional polymethylmethacrylate bone cement (PMMA; 5 ml methylmethacrylate and 12 g polymethylmethacrylate) with hydroxyapatite (HA) bone substitute (2-4 ml) and a gadolinium-based contrast agent (CA; 0-60 {mu}l). The contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of different CA doses was measured in an open 1.0-Tesla scanner for fast T1W Turbo-Spin-Echo (TSE) and T1W TSE pulse sequences to determine the highest signal. We simulated MRI-guided cementoplasty in cadaveric spines. Compressive strength of the cements was tested. The highest CNR was (1) 87.3 (SD 2.9) in fast T1W TSE for cements with 4 {mu}l CA/ml HA (4 ml) and (2) 60.8 (SD 2.4) in T1W TSE for cements with 1 {mu}l CA/ml HA (4 ml). MRI-guided cementoplasty in cadaveric spine was feasible. Compressive strength decreased with increasing amounts of HA from 46.7 MPa (2 ml HA) to 28.0 MPa (4 ml HA). An MRI-compatible cement based on PMMA, HA, and CA is feasible and clearly visible on MRI images. MRI-guided spinal cementoplasty using this cement would permit direct visualization of the cement, the pathologic process, and the anatomical surroundings.

Wichlas, Florian, E-mail: florian.wichlas@charite.de; Seebauer, Christian J.; Schilling, Rene [University Charite, Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery (Germany); Rump, Jens [University Charite, Department of Radiology (Germany); Chopra, Sascha S. [University Charite, Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery (Germany); Walter, Thula; Teichgraeber, Ulf K. M. [University Charite, Department of Radiology (Germany); Bail, Hermann J. [University Charite, Center for Musculoskeletal Surgery (Germany)

2012-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

167

Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Osseous Biopsy in Children With Chronic Recurrent Multifocal Osteomyelitis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To report the safety and diagnostic performance of magnetic resonance (MRI)-guided core biopsy of osseous lesions in children with chronic recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis (CRMO) that were visible on MRI but were occult on radiography and computed tomography (CT). Materials and Methods: A retrospective analysis of MRI-guided osseous biopsy performed in seven children (four girls and three boys; mean age 13 years (range 11 to 14) with CRMO was performed. Indication for using MRI guidance was visibility of lesions by MRI only. MRI-guided procedures were performed with 0.2-Tesla (Magnetom Concerto; Siemens, Erlangen, Germany; n = 5) or 1.5-T (Magnetom Espree; Siemens; n = 2) open MRI systems. Core needle biopsy was obtained using an MRI-compatible 4-mm drill system. Conscious sedation or general anesthesia was used. Parameters evaluated were lesion visibility, technical success, procedure time, complications and microbiology, cytology, and histopathology findings. Results: Seven of seven (100%) targeted lesions were successfully visualized and sampled. All obtained specimens were sufficient for histopathological analysis. Length of time of the procedures was 77 min (range 64 to 107). No complications occurred. Histopathology showed no evidence of malignancy, which was confirmed at mean follow-up of 50 months (range 28 to 78). Chronic nonspecific inflammation characteristic for CRMO was present in four of seven (58%) patients, and edema with no inflammatory cells was found in three of seven (42%) patients. There was no evidence of infection in any patient. Conclusion: MRI-guided osseous biopsy is a safe and accurate technique for the diagnosis of pediatric CRMO lesions that are visible on MRI only.

Fritz, Jan, E-mail: jfritz9@jhmi.edu [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science (United States); Tzaribachev, Nikolay [University Children's Hospital, Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Division of Pediatric Rheumatology (Germany); Thomas, Christoph [Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Wehrmann, Manfred [Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Department of Pathology (Germany); Horger, Marius S. [Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Carrino, John A. [Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science (United States); Koenig, Claudius W.; Pereira, Philippe L. [Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany)

2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

168

Imaging  

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169

Imaging  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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170

Imaging  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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171

" Rotating, In Plane Magnetization and Magneto-Optic Imaging of Cracks in Thick-Section Steel Under Stainless-Steel Cladding".  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The nondestructive inspection (NDI) of thick-section steel nuclear reactor pressure vessels (RPV'S) is rendered difficult by rough stainless steel cladding. Because the cladding condition is poorly known in most RPV's, an NDI technique that is unaffected by cladding roughness would be a major advance. Magneto-optic imaging is one such technique. The purpose of this project was to develop a novel method to induce rotating, in-plane magnetization, and to combine this capability with magneto-optic imaging to produce a self-contained inspection system. Imaging of cracks under thick cladding (0.250 inches) was demonstrated using a system capable, in principle, of performing robotic inspections, both inside & outside a typical boiling water reactor (BWR) RPV. This report, together publications listed, constitutes a comprehensive account of this work.

Gerald Fitzpatrick & Richard Skaugset

2000-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

172

Estimating biodiversity of dry forests and coral reefs with hyperspectral data: a NASA EPSCOR project at UPRM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Estimating biodiversity of dry forests and coral reefs with hyperspectral data: a NASA EPSCOR and modelsensing and field data to assess and model components of ecosystem biodiversity · Utilize hyperspectral service in PR and PR department ofp Natural Resources #12;What is ecosystem biodiversity ?biodiversity ? D

Gilbes, Fernando

173

Improved nuclear magnetic resonance apparatus having semitoroidal rf coil for use in topical NMR and NMR imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) apparatus for use in topical magnetic resonance (TMR) spectroscopy and other remote sensing NMR applications includes a semitoroidal radio frequency (rf) coil. The semitoroidal rf coil produces an effective alternating magnetic field at a distance from the poles of the coil, so as to enable NMR measurements to be taken from selected regions inside an object, particularly including human and other living subjects. The semitoroidal rf coil is relatively insensitive to magnetic interference from metallic objects located behind the coil, thereby rendering the coil particularly suited for use in both conventional and superconducting NMR magnets. The semitoroidal NMR coil can be constructed so that it emits little or no excess rf electric field associated with the rf magnetic field, thus avoiding adverse effects due to dielectric heating of the sample or to any other interaction of the electric field with the sample.

Fukushima, E.; Roeder, S.B.W.; Assink, R.A.; Gibson, A.A.V.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Near-electrode imager  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus, near-electrode imager, for employing nuclear magnetic resonance imaging to provide in situ measurements of electrochemical properties of a sample as a function of distance from a working electrode. The near-electrode imager uses the radio frequency field gradient within a cylindrical toroid cavity resonator to provide high-resolution nuclear magnetic resonance spectral information on electrolyte materials.

Rathke, Jerome W. (Lockport, IL); Klingler, Robert J. (Westmont, IL); Woelk, Klaus (Wachtberg, DE); Gerald, II, Rex E. (Brookfield, IL)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

175

Hyperspectral monitoring of chemically sensitive plant Danielle A. Simmons, John P. Kerekes and Nina G. Raqueno  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. Harnessing plants as bio-sensors allows for distributed sensing without a power supply. Monitoring the bioHyperspectral monitoring of chemically sensitive plant sentinels Danielle A. Simmons, John P ABSTRACT Automated detection of chemical threats is essential for an early warning of a potential attack

Kerekes, John

176

Magnetic Stereoscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The space mission STEREO will provide images from two viewpoints. An important aim of the STEREO mission is to get a 3D view of the solar corona. We develop a program for the stereoscopic reconstruction of 3D coronal loops from images taken with the two STEREO spacecraft. A pure geometric triangulation of coronal features leads to ambiguities because the dilute plasma emissions complicates the association of features in image 1 with features in image 2. As a consequence of these problems the stereoscopic reconstruction is not unique and multiple solutions occur. We demonstrate how these ambiguities can be resolved with the help of different coronal magnetic field models (potential, linear and non-linear force-free fields). The idea is that, due to the high conductivity in the coronal plasma, the emitting plasma outlines the magnetic field lines. Consequently the 3D coronal magnetic field provides a proxy for the stereoscopy which allows to eliminate inconsistent configurations. The combination of stereoscopy and magnetic modelling is more powerful than one of these tools alone. We test our method with the help of a model active region and plan to apply it to the solar case as soon as STEREO data become available.

Thomas Wiegelmann; Bernd Inhester

2006-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

177

USING HYPERSPECTRAL IMAGERY TO ASSIST FEDERAL FOREST MONITORING AND RESTORATION PROJECTS IN THE SOUTHERN ROCKY MOUNTAINS, COLORADO  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Hyperspectral imagery and the corresponding ability to conduct analysis below the pixel level have tremendous potential to aid in landcover monitoring. During large ecosystem restoration projects, being able to monitor ...

Wamser, William Kyle

2012-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

178

Neuroimaging at 1.5 T and 3.0 T: Comparison of Oxygenation-Sensitive Magnetic Resonance Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and becomes a larger fraction of the total noise at 3.0 T. Activation of the primary motor and visual cortex a magnetic field strength of 1.5 Tesla (T) seems to represent a good compromise. Functional MRI (f

Glover, Gary H.

179

Real-Time Color-Flow Magnetic ResonanceImaging of Congenital Heart Disease E. De La Pena-Almaguer, K. S. Nayak, M. Terashima, P.C. Yang,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Real-Time Color-Flow Magnetic ResonanceImaging of Congenital Heart Disease E. De La Pena used for the diagnosis of congenital heart disease (CHD), although it has limitations. Conventional MRI flow pulse sequence.A low flip- angle water selective spectral-spatial excitation is followed

Southern California, University of

180

Change detection for hyperspectral sensing in a transformed low-dimensional space  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present an approach to the problem of change in hyperspectral imagery that operates in a two-dimensional space. The coordinates in the space are related to Mahalanobis distances for the combined ('stacked') data and the individual hyperspectral scenes. Although it is only two-dimensional, this space is rich enough to include several well-known change detection algorithms, including the hyperbolic anomalous change detector, based on Gaussian scene clutter, and the EC-uncorrelated detector based on heavy-tailed (elliptically contoured) clutter. Because this space is only two-dimensional, adaptive machine learning methods can produce new change detectors without being stymied by the curse of dimensionality. We investigate, in particular, the utility of the support vector machine for learning boundaries in this 2-D space, and compare the performance of the resulting nonlinearly adaptjve detector to change detectors that have themselves shown good performance.

Foy, Bernard R [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Theiler, James [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hyperspectral imaging magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Use of T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging of the optic nerve sheath to detect raised intracranial pressure  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

is accurate at measuring ONSD [27,28] and has been proposed to detect raised ICP in idiopathic hydrocephalus and to diagnose shunt malfunction [12,14,29,30]. On T2-weighted sequences, water (and CSF) exhibits a high signal (white). Fat and grey matter appear... as light grey, and white matter as dark grey. The perioptic CSF is surrounded by orbital fat. Contrast between CSF and orbital fat can be improved with fat suppression, increasing the image resolution for the ONSD measurement [12,13]. We have con- firmed...

Geeraerts, Thomas; Newcombe, Virginia F J; Coles, Jonathan P; Abate, Maria Giulia; Perkes, Iain E; Hutchinson, Peter J A; Outtrim, Jo G; Chatfield, Dot A; Menon, David K

2008-09-11T23:59:59.000Z

182

Image 2006 DESY A Beamline Simulation  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

precise #12;Image © 2006 DESY A Zero Schematic BPM BPM BPM BPM BPM Yellow Magnet Kicker Corrector Magnet Spectrometer Magnet 1 2 3 4 5 BPM: Beam Position Monitor Yellow Magnet: Not part of experiment, suppose · BPM resolution · Time step · Yellow Magnet field strength · Kicker field strength · Corrector Magnet

Gollin, George

183

Correlated Biofilm Imaging, Transport and Metabolism Measurements...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Biofilm Imaging, Transport and Metabolism Measurements via Combined Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Confocal Correlated Biofilm Imaging, Transport and Metabolism Measurements via...

184

Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials 286 (2005) 324328 Light-free magnetic resonance force microscopy for studies of  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials 286 (2005) 324­328 Light-free magnetic resonance force for Physical Sciences, College Park, MD, USA Available online 4 November 2004 Abstract Magnetic resonance force microscopy is a scanned probe technique capable of three-dimensional magnetic resonance imaging. Its

185

Cerebral edema induced in mice by a convulsive dose of soman. Evaluation through diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging and histology  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: In the present study, diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) and histology were used to assess cerebral edema and lesions in mice intoxicated by a convulsive dose of soman, an organophosphate compound acting as an irreversible cholinesterase inhibitor. Methods: Three hours and 24 h after the intoxication with soman (172 {mu}g/kg), the mice were anesthetized with an isoflurane/N{sub 2}O mixture and their brain examined with DW-MRI. After the imaging sessions, the mice were sacrificed for histological analysis of their brain. Results: A decrease in the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was detected as soon as 3 h after the intoxication and was found strongly enhanced at 24 h. A correlation was obtained between the ADC change and the severity of the overall brain damage (edema and cellular degeneration): the more severe the damage, the stronger the ADC drop. Anesthesia was shown to interrupt soman-induced seizures and to attenuate edema and cell change in certain sensitive brain areas. Finally, brain water content was assessed using the traditional dry/wet weight method. A significant increase of brain water was observed following the intoxication. Conclusions: The ADC decrease observed in the present study suggests that brain edema in soman poisoning is mainly intracellular and cytotoxic. Since entry of water into Brain was also evidenced, this type of edema is certainly mixed with others (vasogenic, hydrostatic, osmotic). The present study confirms the potential of DW-MRI as a non-invasive tool for monitoring the acute neuropathological consequences (edema and neurodegeneration) of soman-induced seizures.

Testylier, Guy [Centre de Recherches du Service Sante des Armees, Departement de Toxicologie, BP87, F-38702 La Tronche cedex (France)]. E-mail: guytestylier@crssa.net; Lahrech, Hana [Inserm, UMR-S 836-Grenoble Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble, F-38043 (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble, F-38043 (France); Montigon, Olivier [Inserm, UMR-S 836-Grenoble Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble, F-38043 (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble, F-38043 (France); Foquin, Annie [Centre de Recherches du Service Sante des Armees, Departement de Toxicologie, BP87, F-38702 La Tronche cedex (France); Delacour, Claire [Centre de Recherches du Service Sante des Armees, Departement de Toxicologie, BP87, F-38702 La Tronche cedex (France); Bernabe, Denis [Centre de Recherches du Service Sante des Armees, Departement de Toxicologie, BP87, F-38702 La Tronche cedex (France); Segebarth, Christoph [Inserm, UMR-S 836-Grenoble Institut des Neurosciences, Grenoble, F-38043 (France); Universite Joseph Fourier, Grenoble, F-38043 (France); Dorandeu, Frederic [Centre de Recherches du Service Sante des Armees, Departement de Toxicologie, BP87, F-38702 La Tronche cedex (France); Carpentier, Pierre [Centre de Recherches du Service Sante des Armees, Departement de Toxicologie, BP87, F-38702 La Tronche cedex (France)

2007-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

186

Design and Implementation of a Parallel Heterogeneous Algorithm for Hyperspectral Image Analysis Using HeteroMPI  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-based networks such as ATMs, as well as distributed service and support, especially for large file systems and objects in the air, land and water on the basis of the unique reflectance patterns that result from of this technology require timely responses for swift decisions which depend upon high computing performance

Plaza, Antonio J.

187

Active hyperspectral imaging using a quantum cascade laser (QCL) array and digital-pixel focal  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, D. L. Sivco, and A. Y. Cho, "Quantum cascade lasers," Phys. Today 55(5), 34 (2002). 13. Daylight Solutions, Inc., www.daylightsolutions.com; Block Engineering LLC, www.blockeng.com. 14. B. G. Lee, M. A

Capasso, Federico

188

Project 1640: the world's first ExAO coronagraphic hyperspectral imager for comparative planetary science  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Zimmermang a American Museum of Natural History, Dept. of Astrophysics, Central Park West at 79th Street, New of inquiry. Exoplanetary science (the study of planets exterior to the solar system), which is nearly two These measurements and associated survey work have transformed our view of the solar neighborhood. It is full

189

Hyperspectral Imaging At Fish Lake Valley Area (Littlefield & Calvin, 2010)  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFranconia, Virginia: Energy Resources Jump to: navigation,Ohio:GreerHiCalifornia: Energythe Second Workshop onDepositedHyperionOpen|

190

Hyperspectral Imaging At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Kennedy-Bowdoin, Et  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat Jump to:PhotonHolyName HousingIIIDrive Ltd Jump to:Al., 2003) | Open

191

Hyperspectral Imaging At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Nash & D., 1997) |  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat Jump to:PhotonHolyName HousingIIIDrive Ltd Jump to:Al., 2003) | OpenOpen

192

Hyperspectral Imaging At Salton Sea Area (Reath, Et Al., 2010) | Open  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home5b9fcbce19 No revision hasInformation Earth's Heat Jump to:PhotonHolyName HousingIIIDrive Ltd Jump to:Al., 2003) |Energy

193

Environmental Monitoring with Airborne Hyperspectral Imagery (HAB Prediction)  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) in the western basin of Lake Erie. Blooms form, spread and disappear within a four to eight week time period of the cause. MODIS satellite image of Lake Erie algal bloom. August 13, 2009. #12;Proposed Work This project of the infrequent overpasses and the blooms quick spread. Blooms recent reoccurred in the Great Lakes

194

Automated Identification of Endmembers from Hyperspectral Data Using Mathematical Morphology  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

analysis and pattern recognition technique that has proved to be especially well suited to segment images Informática, Universidad de Extremadura, Spain. b Global Science and Technology. NASA/Goddard Space Flight with irregular and complex shapes, but has rarely been applied to the classification/segmentation of multivariate

Plaza, Antonio J.

195

Use of Non-Invasive Phase Contrast Magnetic Resonance Imaging for Estimation of Atrial Septal Defect Size and Morphology: A Comparison with Transesophageal Echo  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Background: Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE) is a trusted method of sizing atrial septal defect (ASD) prior to percutaneous closure but is invasive, uncomfortable, and may carry a small risk of morbidity and mortality. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may be useful non-invasive alternative in such patients who refuse or are unable to tolerate TEE and may provide additional information on the shape of the A0SD. Purpose: To validate the accuracy of ASD sizing by MRI compared with TEE.Method: Twelve patients (mean age 30 years; range 11-60 years) scheduled for ASD closure underwent TEE, cine balanced fast field echo MRI (bFFE-MRI) in four-chamber and sagittal views and phase-contrast MRI (PC-MRI) with reconstruction using the two orthogonal planes of T2-weighted images as planning. The average of the three longest measurements for all imaging modalities was calculated for each patient. Results: Mean maximum ASD length on TEE was 18.8 {+-} 4.6 mm, mean length by bFFE-MRI was 20.0 {+-} 5.0 mm, and mean length by PC-MRI was 18.3 {+-} 3.6 mm. The TEE measurement was significantly correlated with the bFFE-MRI and PC-MRI measurements (Pearson r = 0.69, p = 0.02 and r = 0.59, p = 0.04, respectively). The mean difference between TEE and bFFE-MRI measurements was -1.2mm (95% CI: -3.7, 1.3) and between TEE and PC-MRI was 0.5 mm (95% CI: -1.9, 2.9). Bland-Altman analysis also determined general agreement between both MRI methods and TEE. The ASDs were egg-shaped in two cases, circular in 1 patient and oval in the remaining patients. Conclusion: ASD sizing by MRI using bFFE and phase-contrast protocols correlated well with TEE estimations. PC-MRI provided additional information on ASD shapes and proximity to adjacent structures.

Piaw, Chin Sze; Kiam, Ong Tiong [Sarawak General Hospital, Department of Cardiology (Malaysia); Rapaee, Annuar [University of Malaysia Sarawak (Malaysia)], E-mail: rannuar@fmhs.unimas.myp; Khoon, Liew Chee; Bang, Liew Houng; Ling, Chan Wei [Sarawak General Hospital, Department of Cardiology (Malaysia); Samion, Hasri [National Heart Institute, Pediatric of Cardiology (Malaysia); Hian, Sim Kui [Sarawak General Hospital, Department of Cardiology (Malaysia)

2006-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

196

VEGETATION COVER ANALYSIS OF HAZARDOUS WASTE SITES IN UTAH AND ARIZONA USING HYPERSPECTRAL REMOTE SENSING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Remote sensing technology can provide a cost-effective tool for monitoring hazardous waste sites. This study investigated the usability of HyMap airborne hyperspectral remote sensing data (126 bands at 2.3 x 2.3 m spatial resolution) to characterize the vegetation at U.S. Department of Energy uranium processing sites near Monticello, Utah and Monument Valley, Arizona. Grass and shrub species were mixed on an engineered disposal cell cover at the Monticello site while shrub species were dominant in the phytoremediation plantings at the Monument Valley site. The specific objectives of this study were to: (1) estimate leaf-area-index (LAI) of the vegetation using three different methods (i.e., vegetation indices, red-edge positioning (REP), and machine learning regression trees), and (2) map the vegetation cover using machine learning decision trees based on either the scaled reflectance data or mixture tuned matched filtering (MTMF)-derived metrics and vegetation indices. Regression trees resulted in the best calibration performance of LAI estimation (R{sup 2} > 0.80). The use of REPs failed to accurately predict LAI (R{sup 2} < 0.2). The use of the MTMF-derived metrics (matched filter scores and infeasibility) and a range of vegetation indices in decision trees improved the vegetation mapping when compared to the decision tree classification using just the scaled reflectance. Results suggest that hyperspectral imagery are useful for characterizing biophysical characteristics (LAI) and vegetation cover on capped hazardous waste sites. However, it is believed that the vegetation mapping would benefit from the use of 1 higher spatial resolution hyperspectral data due to the small size of many of the vegetation patches (< 1m) found on the sites.

Serrato, M.; Jungho, I.; Jensen, J.; Jensen, R.; Gladden, J.; Waugh, J.

2012-01-17T23:59:59.000Z

197

Fiber-Optic Stethoscope: A Cardiac Monitoring and Gating System for Magnetic Resonance Microscopy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the distortion of the ECG due to electromagnetic interference

198

Multi- and Hyper-Spectral Sensing for Autonomous Ground Vehicle Navigation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Robotic vehicles that navigate autonomously are hindered by unnecessary avoidance of soft obstacles, and entrapment by potentially avoidable obstacles. Existing sensing technologies fail to reliably distinguish hard obstacles from soft obstacles, as well as impassable thickets and other sources of entrapment. Automated materials classification through advanced sensing methods may provide a means to identify such obstacles, and from their identity, to determine whether they must be avoided. Multi- and hyper-spectral electro-optic sensors are used in remote sensing applications to classify both man-made and naturally occurring materials on the earth's surface by their reflectance spectra. The applicability of this sensing technology to obstacle identification for autonomous ground vehicle navigation is the focus of this report. The analysis is restricted to system concepts in which the multi- or hyper-spectral sensor is on-board the ground vehicle, facing forward to detect and classify obstacles ahead of the vehicle. Obstacles of interest include various types of vegetation, rocks, soils, minerals, and selected man-made materials such as paving asphalt and concrete.

FOGLER, ROBERT J.

2003-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Magnetic Resonance Imaging of concrete  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

velocity · Relates Elastic modulus to speed of sound Assumes Concrete heterogeneous Can be affected by steel Modulus related to speed of sound Strength of concrete related to modulus Location of flaws structure · In both cases procedure is destructive Systems to monitor concrete modulus · Ultra-sonic pulse

Burgoyne, Chris

200

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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201

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocs spaceLaser The SRSSPECIAL SEMINARImaging of

202

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocs spaceLaser The SRSSPECIAL SEMINARImaging

203

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocs spaceLaser The SRSSPECIAL SEMINARImagingLensless

204

Lensless Imaging of Magnetic Nanostructures  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-SeriesFlickrinformationPostdocs spaceLaser The SRSSPECIAL

205

On the Dynamics of Magnetic Fluids in Magnetic Resonance Padraig J. Cantillon-Murphy  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in Magnetic Resonance Imaging by Padraig J. Cantillon-Murphy B.E., Electrical and Electronic EngineeringOn the Dynamics of Magnetic Fluids in Magnetic Resonance Imaging by Padraig J. Cantillon-Murphy Submitted to the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in partial fulfillment

206

Near infrared spectral imaging of explosives using a tunable laser source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Diffuse reflectance near infrared hyperspectral imaging is an important analytical tool for a wide variety of industries, including agriculture consumer products, chemical and pharmaceutical development and production. Using this technique as a method for the standoff detection of explosive particles is presented and discussed. The detection of the particles is based on the diffuse reflectance of light from the particle in the near infrared wavelength range where CH, NH, OH vibrational overtones and combination bands are prominent. The imaging system is a NIR focal plane array camera with a tunable OPO/laser system as the illumination source. The OPO is programmed to scan over a wide spectral range in the NIR and the camera is synchronized to record the light reflected from the target for each wavelength. The spectral resolution of this system is significantly higher than that of hyperspectral systems that incorporate filters or dispersive elements. The data acquisition is very fast and the entire hyperspectral cube can be collected in seconds. A comparison of data collected with the OPO system to data obtained with a broadband light source with LCTF filters is presented.

Klunder, G L; Margalith, E; Nguyen, L K

2010-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

207

A Small Scale Magnetic Particle Relaxometer  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic Particle Imaging (MPI) is a newly found imaging modality. It utilizes superparamagnetic materials as tracers in the blood stream to obtain very high resolutions. MPI promises to have high sensitivity, high spatial resolution...

El Ghamrawy, Ahmed

2013-12-09T23:59:59.000Z

208

Hyperspectral Aquatic Radiative Transfer Modeling Using a High-Performance Cluster Computing-Based Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Abstract For aquatic studies, radiative transfer (RT) modeling can be used to compute hyperspectral above-surface remote sensing reflectance that can be utilized for inverse model development. Inverse models can provide bathymetry and inherent-and bottom-optical property estimation. Because measured oceanic field/organic datasets are often spatio-temporally sparse, synthetic data generation is useful in yielding sufficiently large datasets for inversion model development; however, these forward-modeled data are computationally expensive and time-consuming to generate. This study establishes the magnitude of wall-clock-time savings achieved for performing large, aquatic RT batch-runs using parallel computing versus a sequential approach. Given 2,600 simulations and identical compute-node characteristics, sequential architecture required ~100 hours until termination, whereas a parallel approach required only ~2.5 hours (42 compute nodes) a 40x speed-up. Tools developed for this parallel execution are discussed.

Filippi, Anthony M [ORNL; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL; Naughton, III, Thomas J [ORNL; King, Amy L [ORNL; Scott, Stephen L [ORNL; Guneralp, Inci [Texas A& M University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Hyperspectral Aquatic Radiative Transfer Modeling Using a High-Performance Cluster Computing Based Approach  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

For aquatic studies, radiative transfer (RT) modeling can be used to compute hyperspectral above-surface remote sensing reflectance that can be utilized for inverse model development. Inverse models can provide bathymetry and inherent- and bottom-optical property estimation. Because measured oceanic field/organic datasets are often spatio-temporally sparse, synthetic data generation is useful in yielding sufficiently large datasets for inversion model development; however, these forward-modeled data are computationally expensive and time-consuming to generate. This study establishes the magnitude of wall-clock-time savings achieved for performing large, aquatic RT batch-runs using parallel computing versus a sequential approach. Given 2,600 simulations and identical compute-node characteristics, sequential architecture required {approx}100 hours until termination, whereas a parallel approach required only {approx}2.5 hours (42 compute nodes) - a 40x speed-up. Tools developed for this parallel execution are discussed.

Fillippi, Anthony [Texas A& M University; Bhaduri, Budhendra L [ORNL; Naughton, III, Thomas J [ORNL; King, Amy L [ORNL; Scott, Stephen L [ORNL; Guneralp, Inci [Texas A& M University

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

210

Efficient MR image reconstruction for compressed MR imaging Junzhou Huang  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

to be very powerful for the MR image reconstruction. First, we decompose the original problem into L1 and TV.V. All rights reserved. 1. Introduction Magnetic Resonance (MR) imaging has been widely used in medical. Computation became the bottleneck that prevented this good model (1) from being used in practical MR image

Huang, Junzhou

211

Efficient MR Image Reconstruction for Compressed MR Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

demonstrate the superior performance of the proposed algorithm for com- pressed MR image reconstruction. 1 [1][2] show that it is possi- ble to accurately reconstruct the Magnetic Resonance (MR) images from for real MR images. Computation became the bottleneck that prevented this good model (1) from being used

Huang, Junzhou

212

Tumor Metabolism and Perfusion in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Pretreatment Multimodality Imaging With {sup 1}H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy, Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI, and [{sup 18}F]FDG-PET  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To correlate proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ({sup 1}H-MRS), dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), and {sup 18}F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ([{sup 18}F]FDG PET) of nodal metastases in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) for assessment of tumor biology. Additionally, pretreatment multimodality imaging was evaluated for its efficacy in predicting short-term response to treatment. Methods and Materials: Metastatic neck nodes were imaged with {sup 1}H-MRS, DCE-MRI, and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET in 16 patients with newly diagnosed HNSCC, before treatment. Short-term patient radiological response was evaluated at 3 to 4 months. Correlations among {sup 1}H-MRS (choline concentration relative to water [Cho/W]), DCE-MRI (volume transfer constant [K{sup trans}]; volume fraction of the extravascular extracellular space [v{sub e}]; and redistribution rate constant [k{sub ep}]), and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET (standard uptake value [SUV] and total lesion glycolysis [TLG]) were calculated using nonparametric Spearman rank correlation. To predict short-term responses, logistic regression analysis was performed. Results: A significant positive correlation was found between Cho/W and TLG ({rho} = 0.599; p = 0.031). Cho/W correlated negatively with heterogeneity measures of standard deviation std(v{sub e}) ({rho} = -0.691; p = 0.004) and std(k{sub ep}) ({rho} = -0.704; p = 0.003). Maximum SUV (SUVmax) values correlated strongly with MRI tumor volume ({rho} = 0.643; p = 0.007). Logistic regression indicated that std(K{sup trans}) and SUVmean were significant predictors of short-term response (p < 0.07). Conclusion: Pretreatment multimodality imaging using {sup 1}H-MRS, DCE-MRI, and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET is feasible in HNSCC patients with nodal metastases. Additionally, combined DCE-MRI and [{sup 18}F]FDG PET parameters were predictive of short-term response to treatment.

Jansen, Jacobus F.A. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Radiology, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Schoeder, Heiko [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Lee, Nancy Y. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Stambuk, Hilda E. [Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Wang Ya [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Fury, Matthew G. [Department of Medical Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Patel, Senehal G. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Pfister, David G. [Department of Medical Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Shah, Jatin P. [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Koutcher, Jason A. [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Medical Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Shukla-Dave, Amita, E-mail: davea@mskcc.org [Department of Medical Physics, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Department of Radiology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

213

Methods for functional brain imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has demonstrated the potential for non-invasive mapping of structure and function (fMRI) in the human brain. In this thesis, we propose a series of methodological developments towards ...

Witzel, Thomas, Ph. D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Video Toroid Cavity Imager  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A video toroid cavity imager for in situ measurement of electrochemical properties of an electrolytic material sample includes a cylindrical toroid cavity resonator containing the sample and employs NMR and video imaging for providing high-resolution spectral and visual information of molecular characteristics of the sample on a real-time basis. A large magnetic field is applied to the sample under controlled temperature and pressure conditions to simultaneously provide NMR spectroscopy and video imaging capabilities for investigating electrochemical transformations of materials or the evolution of long-range molecular aggregation during cooling of hydrocarbon melts. The video toroid cavity imager includes a miniature commercial video camera with an adjustable lens, a modified compression coin cell imager with a fiat circular principal detector element, and a sample mounted on a transparent circular glass disk, and provides NMR information as well as a video image of a sample, such as a polymer film, with micrometer resolution.

Gerald, Rex E. II; Sanchez, Jairo; Rathke, Jerome W.

2004-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

215

The MARTE VNIR Imaging Spectrometer Experiment: Design and Analysis  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We report on the design, operation, and data analysis methods employed on the VNIR imaging spectrometer instrument that was part of the Mars Astrobiology Research and Technology Experiment (MARTE). The imaging spectrometer is a hyperspectral scanning pushbroom device sensitive to VNIR wavelengths from 400-1000 nm. During the MARTE project, the spectrometer was deployed to the Rio Tinto region of Spain. We analyzed subsets of 3 cores from Rio Tinto using a new band modeling technique. We found most of the MARTE drill cores to contain predominantly goethite, though spatially coherent areas of hematite were identified in Core 23. We also distinguished non Fe-bearing minerals that were subsequently analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and found to be primarily muscovite. We present drill core maps that include spectra of goethite, hematite, and non Fe-bearing minerals.

Brown, Adrian J; Dunagan, Stephen

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Nonuniform radiation damage in permanent magnet quadrupoles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present data that indicate nonuniform magnetization loss due to radiation damage in neodymium-iron-boron Halbach-style permanent magnet quadrupoles. The proton radiography (pRad) facility at Los Alamos uses permanent-magnet quadrupoles for magnifying lenses, and a system recently commissioned at GSI-Darmsdadt uses permanent magnets for its primary lenses. Large fluences of spallation neutrons can be produced in close proximity to these magnets when the proton beam is, intentionally or unintentionally, directed into the tungsten beam collimators; imaging experiments at LANL’s pRad have shown image degradation with these magnetic lenses at proton beam doses lower than those expected to cause damage through radiation-induced reduction of the quadrupole strength alone. We have observed preferential degradation in portions of the permanent magnet quadrupole where the field intensity is highest, resulting in increased high-order multipole components.

Danly, C. R.; Merrill, F. E.; Barlow, D.; Mariam, F. G. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87544 (United States)

2014-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

217

Argonne scientists discover new magnetic phase in iron-based...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

neutron diffraction image giving evidence for the new magnetic phase in iron-based superconductors discovered by Argonne scientists. It shows the scattering results from a sample...

218

arthritis magnetic resonance: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the distortion of the ECG due to electromagnetic interference cardiac activity that, unlike the ECG, is immune to electromagnetic...

219

Infrared near-field imaging and spectroscopy based on thermal or synchrotron radiation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We demonstrate the coupling of a scattering near-field scanning optical microscope combined with a Fourier transform infrared spectrometer. The set-up operates using either the near-field thermal emission from the sample itself, which is proportional to the electromagnetic local density of states, or with an external infrared synchrotron source, which is broadband and highly brilliant. We perform imaging and spectroscopy measurements with sub-wavelength spatial resolution in the mid-infrared range on surfaces made of silicon carbide and gold and demonstrate the capabilities of the two configurations for super-resolved near-field mid-infrared hyperspectral imaging and that the simple use of a properly chosen bandpass filter on the detector allows one to image the spatial distribution of materials with sub-wavelength resolution by studying the contrast in the near-field images.

Peragut, Florian; De Wilde, Yannick, E-mail: yannick.dewilde@espci.fr [ESPCI ParisTech, PSL Research University, CNRS, Institut Langevin, 1 rue Jussieu, F-75005, Paris (France); Brubach, Jean-Blaise; Roy, Pascale [Société Civile Synchrotron SOLEIL, L'Orme des Merisiers, St-Aubin BP48, 91192 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France)

2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

220

Image Charge Differential  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Image Charge Differential Amplifier FT 0 Crude Oil Time (s) 543210 Frequency (kHz) m/z m q B f Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) uses the frequency of cyclotron motion of the ions in a static magnetic field to determine the mass-to-charge ratio, which is then used

Weston, Ken

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hyperspectral imaging magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based Target Volume Delineation in Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning for Brain Tumors Using Localized Region-Based Active Contour  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Purpose: To evaluate the clinical application of a robust semiautomatic image segmentation method to determine the brain target volumes in radiation therapy treatment planning. Methods and Materials: A local robust region-based algorithm was used on MRI brain images to study the clinical target volume (CTV) of several patients. First, 3 oncologists delineated CTVs of 10 patients manually, and the process time for each patient was calculated. The averages of the oncologists’ contours were evaluated and considered as reference contours. Then, to determine the CTV through the semiautomatic method, a fourth oncologist who was blind to all manual contours selected 4-8 points around the edema and defined the initial contour. The time to obtain the final contour was calculated again for each patient. Manual and semiautomatic segmentation were compared using 3 different metric criteria: Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and mean absolute distance. A comparison also was performed between volumes obtained from semiautomatic and manual methods. Results: Manual delineation processing time of tumors for each patient was dependent on its size and complexity and had a mean (±SD) of 12.33 ± 2.47 minutes, whereas it was 3.254 ± 1.7507 minutes for the semiautomatic method. Means of Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and mean absolute distance between manual contours were 0.84 ± 0.02, 2.05 ± 0.66 cm, and 0.78 ± 0.15 cm, and they were 0.82 ± 0.03, 1.91 ± 0.65 cm, and 0.7 ± 0.22 cm between manual and semiautomatic contours, respectively. Moreover, the mean volume ratio (=semiautomatic/manual) calculated for all samples was 0.87. Conclusions: Given the deformability of this method, the results showed reasonable accuracy and similarity to the results of manual contouring by the oncologists. This study shows that the localized region-based algorithms can have great ability in determining the CTV and can be appropriate alternatives for manual approaches in brain cancer.

Aslian, Hossein [Department of Medical Radiation, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadeghi, Mahdi [Agricultural, Medical and Industrial Research School, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahdavi, Seied Rabie [Department of Medical Physics, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Babapour Mofrad, Farshid [Department of Medical Radiation, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Astarakee, Mahdi, E-mail: M-Astarakee@Engineer.com [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khaledi, Navid [Department of Medical Radiation, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fadavi, Pedram [Department of Radiation Oncology, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Magnetic investigations  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Air and ground magnetic anomalies in the Climax stock area of the NTS help define the gross configuration of the stock and detailed configuration of magnetized rocks at the Boundary and Tippinip faults that border the stock. Magnetizations of geologic units were evaluated by measurements of magnetic properties of drill core, minimum estimates of magnetizations from ground magnetic anomalies for near surface rocks, and comparisons of measured anomalies with anomalies computed by a three-dimensional forward program. Alluvial deposits and most sedimentary rocks are nonmagnetic, but drill core measurements reveal large and irregular changes in magnetization for some quartzites and marbles. The magnetizations of quartz monzonite and granodiorite near the stock surface are weak, about 0.15 A/m, and increase at a rate of 0.00196 A/m/m to 1.55 A/m, at depths greater than 700 m (2300 ft). The volcanic rocks of the area are weakly magnetized. Aeromagnetic anomalies 850 m (2800 ft) above the stock are explained by a model consisting of five vertical prisms. Prisms 1, 2, and 3 represent the near surface outline of the stock, prism 4 is one of the models developed by Whitehill (1973), and prism 5 is modified from the model developed by Allingham and Zietz (1962). Most of the anomaly comes from unsampled and strongly-magnetized deep sources that could be either granite or metamorphosed sedimentary rocks. 48 refs., 23 figs., 3 tabs.

Bath, G.D.; Jahren, C.E.; Rosenbaum, J.G. [Geological Survey, Denver, CO (USA); Baldwin, M.J. [Fenix and Scisson, Inc., Mercury, NV (USA)

1983-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

223

Magnetic Barcoded Hydrogel Microparticles for Multiplexed Detection  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic polymer particles have been used in a wide variety of applications ranging from targeting and separation to diagnostics and imaging. Current synthesis methods have limited these particles to spherical or deformations ...

Bong, Ki Wan

224

Platinum dendritic nanoparticles with magnetic behavior  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magnetic nanoparticles have attracted increasing attention for biomedical applications in magnetic resonance imaging, high frequency magnetic field hyperthermia therapies, and magnetic-field-gradient-targeted drug delivery. In this study, three-dimensional (3D) platinum nanostructures with large surface area that features magnetic behavior have been demonstrated. The well-developed 3D nanodendrites consist of plentiful interconnected nano-arms ?4?nm in size. The magnetic behavior of the 3D dendritic Pt nanoparticles is contributed by the localization of surface electrons due to strongly bonded oxygen/Pluronic F127 and the local magnetic moment induced by oxygen vacancies on the neighboring Pt and O atoms. The magnetization of the nanoparticles exhibits a mixed paramagnetic and ferromagnetic state, originating from the core and surface, respectively. The 3D nanodendrite structure is suitable for surface modification and high amounts of drug loading if the transition temperature was enhanced to room temperature properly.

Li, Wenxian, E-mail: wl240@uowmail.edu.au [Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Solar Energy Technologies, School of Computing, Engineering, and Mathematics, University of Western Sydney, Penrith NSW 2751 (Australia); Sun, Ziqi; Nevirkovets, Ivan P.; Dou, Shi-Xue [Institute for Superconducting and Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, NSW 2522 (Australia); Tian, Dongliang [Key Laboratory of Bio-Inspired Smart Interfacial Science and Technology of the Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and the Environment, Beihang University, Beijing 100191 (China)

2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

225

Strange Magnetism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We present an analytic and parameter-free expression for the momentum dependence of the strange magnetic form factor of the nucleon and its corresponding radius which has been derived in Heavy Baryon Chiral Perturbation Theory. We also discuss a model-independent relation between the isoscalar magnetic and the strange magnetic form factors of the nucleon based on chiral symmetry and SU(3) only. These limites are used to derive bounds on the strange magnetic moment of the proton from the recent measurement by the SAMPLE collaboration.

Thomas R. Hemmert; Ulf-G. Meissner; Sven Steininger

1998-11-09T23:59:59.000Z

226

Magnetic Field Safety Magnetic Field Safety  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic Field Safety Training #12;Magnetic Field Safety Strong Magnetic Fields exist around energized magnets. High magnetic fields alone are a recognized hazard only for personnel with certain medical conditions such as pacemakers, magnetic implants, or embedded shrapnel. In addition, high magnetic

McQuade, D. Tyler

227

Magnetic shielding  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines.

Kerns, J.A.; Stone, R.R.; Fabyan, J.

1985-02-12T23:59:59.000Z

228

Superconductive imaging surface magnetometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved pick-up coil system for use with Superconducting Quantum Interference Device gradiometers and magnetometers involving the use of superconducting plates near conventional pick-up coil arrangements to provide imaging of nearby dipole sources and to deflect environmental magnetic noise away from the pick-up coils. This allows the practice of gradiometry and magnetometry in magnetically unshielded environments. One embodiment uses a hemispherically shaped superconducting plate with interior pick-up coils, allowing brain wave measurements to be made on human patients. another embodiment using flat superconducting plates could be used in non-destructive evaluation of materials.

Overton, Jr., William C. (Los Alamos, NM); van Hulsteyn, David B. (Santa Fe, NM); Flynn, Edward R. (Los Alamos, NM)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Magnetic nanotubes  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A magnetic nanotube includes bacterial magnetic nanocrystals contacted onto a nanotube which absorbs the nanocrystals. The nanocrystals are contacted on at least one surface of the nanotube. A method of fabricating a magnetic nanotube includes synthesizing the bacterial magnetic nanocrystals, which have an outer layer of proteins. A nanotube provided is capable of absorbing the nanocrystals and contacting the nanotube with the nanocrystals. The nanotube is preferably a peptide bolaamphiphile. A nanotube solution and a nanocrystal solution including a buffer and a concentration of nanocrystals are mixed. The concentration of nanocrystals is optimized, resulting in a nanocrystal to nanotube ratio for which bacterial magnetic nanocrystals are immobilized on at least one surface of the nanotubes. The ratio controls whether the nanocrystals bind only to the interior or to the exterior surfaces of the nanotubes. Uses include cell manipulation and separation, biological assay, enzyme recovery, and biosensors.

Matsui, Hiroshi (Glen Rock, NJ); Matsunaga, Tadashi (Tokyo, JP)

2010-11-16T23:59:59.000Z

230

Estimating radiological background using imaging spectroscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Optical imaging spectroscopy is investigated as a method to estimate radiological background by spectral identification of soils, sediments, rocks, minerals and building materials derived from natural materials and assigning tabulated radiological emission values to these materials. Radiological airborne surveys are undertaken by local, state and federal agencies to identify the presence of radiological materials out of regulatory compliance. Detection performance in such surveys is determined by (among other factors) the uncertainty in the radiation background; increased knowledge of the expected radiation background will improve the ability to detect low-activity radiological materials. Radiological background due to naturally occurring radiological materials (NORM) can be estimated by reference to previous survey results, use of global 40K, 238U, and 232Th (KUT) values, reference to existing USGS radiation background maps, or by a moving average of the data as it is acquired. Each of these methods has its drawbacks: previous survey results may not include recent changes, the global average provides only a zero-order estimate, the USGS background radiation map resolutions are coarse and are accurate only to 1 km – 25 km sampling intervals depending on locale, and a moving average may essentially low pass filter the data to obscure small changes in radiation counts. Imaging spectroscopy from airborne or spaceborne platforms can offer higher resolution identification of materials and background, as well as provide imaging context information. AVIRIS hyperspectral image data is analyzed using commercial exploitation software to determine the usefulness of imaging spectroscopy to identify qualitative radiological background emissions when compared to airborne radiological survey data.

Bernacki, Bruce E.; Schweppe, John E.; Stave, Sean C.; Jordan, David V.; Kulisek, Jonathan A.; Stewart, Trevor N.; Seifert, Carolyn E.

2014-06-13T23:59:59.000Z

231

Real-time high-resolution X-ray imaging and nuclear magnetic resonance study of the hydration of pure and Na-doped C3A in the presence of sulfates  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This study details the differences in real-time hydration between pure tricalcium aluminate (cubic C{sub 3}A or 3CaO {center_dot} Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) and Na-doped tricalcium aluminate (orthorhombic C{sub 3}A or Na{sub 2}Ca{sub 8}Al{sub 6}O{sub 18}), in aqueous solutions containing sulfate ions. Pure phases were synthesized in the laboratory to develop an independent benchmark for the reactions, meaning that their reactions during hydration in a simulated early age cement pore solution (saturated with respect to gypsum and lime) were able to be isolated. Because the rate of this reaction is extremely rapid, most microscopy methods are not adequate to study the early phases of the reactions in the early stages. Here, a high-resolution full-field soft X-ray imaging technique operating in the X-ray water window, combined with solution analysis by {sup 27}Al nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, was used to capture information regarding the mechanism of C{sub 3}A hydration during the early stages. There are differences in the hydration mechanism between the two types of C{sub 3}A, which are also dependent on the concentration of sulfate ions in the solution. The reactions with cubic C{sub 3}A (pure) seem to be more influenced by higher concentrations of sulfate ions, forming smaller ettringite needles at a slower pace than the orthorhombic C{sub 3}A (Na-doped) sample. The rate of release of aluminate species into the solution phase is also accelerated by Na doping.

Kirchheim,, A. P.; Dal Molin, D.C.; Emwas, Abdul-Hamid; Provis, J.L.; Fischer, P.; Monteiro, P.J.M.

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

232

Microporous Magnets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Combining porosity and magnetic ordering in a single material presents a significant challenge since magnetic exchange generally requires short bridges between the spin carriers, whereas porosity usually relies on the use of long diamagnetic connecting ligands. Despite this apparent incompatibility, notable successes have been achieved of late in generating truly microporous solids with high magnetic ordering temperatures. In this critical review, we give an overview of this emerging class of multifunctional materials, with particular emphasis on synthetic strategies and possible routes to new materials with improved properties (149 references).

Dechambenoit, Pierre; Long, Jeffrey R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

233

Low dimensional magnetism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetism in Ultracold Gases 4 Magnetic phase diagram of aMagnetism . . . . . . . . . . . .1.3 Magnetism in condensedIntroduction 1 Brief introduction to magnetism 1.1 Classic

Kjall, Jonas Alexander

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

234

128 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MEDICAL IMAGING, VOL. 25, NO. 1, JANUARY 2006 Unwrapping of MR Phase Images Using a  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

128 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MEDICAL IMAGING, VOL. 25, NO. 1, JANUARY 2006 Unwrapping of MR Phase of blood flow [1], [2]. Extracting the phase image from its measured complex MR image is nontrivial because, phase unwrapping. I. INTRODUCTION A. Background Magnetic resonance (MR) phase images often contain

Koetter, Ralf

235

106 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MEDICAL IMAGING, VOL. 29, NO. 1, JANUARY 2010 Feature Based Nonrigid Brain MR Image Registration  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

106 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MEDICAL IMAGING, VOL. 29, NO. 1, JANUARY 2010 Feature Based Nonrigid Brain MR Image Registration With Symmetric Alpha Stable Filters Shu Liao* and Albert C. S. Chung Abstract--A new feature based nonrigid image registration method for magnetic resonance (MR) brain images

Chung, Albert C. S.

236

Polarization transfer NMR imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) image is obtained with spatial information modulated by chemical information. The modulation is obtained through polarization transfer from a first element representing the desired chemical, or functional, information, which is covalently bonded and spin-spin coupled with a second element effective to provide the imaging data. First and second rf pulses are provided at first and second frequencies for exciting the imaging and functional elements, with imaging gradients applied therebetween to spatially separate the nuclei response for imaging. The second rf pulse is applied at a time after the first pulse which is the inverse of the spin coupling constant to select the transfer element nuclei which are spin coupled to the functional element nuclei for imaging. In a particular application, compounds such as glucose, lactate, or lactose, can be labeled with .sup.13 C and metabolic processes involving the compounds can be imaged with the sensitivity of .sup.1 H and the selectivity of .sup.13 C.

Sillerud, Laurel O. (Los Alamos, NM); van Hulsteyn, David B. (Santa Fe, NM)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

237

Test Images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Test Images. I hope to have a set of test images for the course soon. Some images are available now; some will have to wait until I can find another 100-200

238

Controlling Magnetism at the Nanoscale  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Manipulation of Magnetism - External148 Conclusion A The Magnetism Cheat Sheet A.1 Magnetic157 A.2 Magnetism Unit Conversion

Wong, Jared

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Adjustable permanent magnet assembly for NMR and MRI  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

System and methods for designing and using single-sided magnet assemblies for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are disclosed. The single-sided magnet assemblies can include an array of permanent magnets disposed at selected positions. At least one of the permanent magnets can be configured to rotate about an axis of rotation in the range of at least +/-10 degrees and can include a magnetization having a vector component perpendicular to the axis of rotation. The single-sided magnet assemblies can further include a magnet frame that is configured to hold the permanent magnets in place while allowing the at least one of the permanent magnets to rotate about the axis of rotation.

Pines, Alexander; Paulsen, Jeffrey; Bouchard, Louis S; Blumich, Bernhard

2013-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

240

Image Analysis  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Recognition Image Analysis and Recognition Snapshot1498121slicesqResedison Fibers permeating imaged material (Courtesy: Bale, Loring, Perciano and Ushizima) Imagery coming from...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hyperspectral imaging magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Next Generation Magnetic Resonance Imaging Contrast Agents  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

E. A. ; MacRenaris, K. W. ; Parigi, G. ; Luchinat, C. ; Ho,R. ; Eckermann, A. L. ; Parigi, G. ; Luchinat, C. ; Meade,E. A. ; MacRenaris, K. W. ; Parigi, G. ; Luchinat, C. ; Ho,

Klemm, Piper Julia

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

242

Direct Imaging of Asymmetric Magnetization Reversal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData FilesShape,PhysicsDileepDiracNanotubes

243

Direct Imaging of Asymmetric Magnetization Reversal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed Newcatalyst phasesData FilesShape,PhysicsDileepDiracNanotubesDirect

244

Direct Imaging of Asymmetric Magnetization Reversal  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to UserProduct: CrudeOfficeNERSCDiesel prices top

245

Neutrino magnetic moment in a magnetized plasma  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The contribution of a magnetized plasma to the neutrino magnetic moment is calculated. It is shown that only part of the additional neutrino energy in magnetized plasma connecting with its spin and magnetic field strength defines the neutrino magnetic moment. It is found that the presence of magnetized plasma does not lead to the considerable increase of the neutrino magnetic moment in contrast to the results presented in literature previously.

N. V. Mikheev; E. N. Narynskaya

2010-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

246

Array combination for parallel imaging in Magnetic Resonance Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

......................................103 Figure 51. Diagram of geometry used...........................................................................104 Figure 52. 64 element 8x8 grid array SNR map using 64 receivers. ............................105 Figure 53. 64 element 8x8 grid...-factor maps for point combined array......................................................117 Figure 63. SENSE reconstructions using point combined array...................................118 Figure 64. Grid array geometry used for simulation...

Spence, Dan Kenrick

2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

247

Patterned Magnetic Nanostructures and Quantized Magnetic Disks  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, opens up new opportunities for engineering innovative magnetic materials and devices, developing ultra of magnetic nanostructures as small as 10 nm; 2) engineering of unique magnetic properties (such as domainPatterned Magnetic Nanostructures and Quantized Magnetic Disks STEPHEN Y. CHOU Invited Paper

248

Petroglyphs, Lighting, and Magnetism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1950 Electricity and Magnetism: Theory and Applications.I Petroglyphs, Lightning, and Magnetism | Walker Figure 8.I Petroglyphs, Lightning, and Magnetism | Walker Figure IL

Walker, Merle F

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Magnetic Catalysis vs Magnetic Inhibition  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We discuss the fate of chiral symmetry in an extremely strong magnetic field B. We investigate not only quark fluctuations but also neutral meson effects. The former would enhance the chiral-symmetry breaking at finite B according to the Magnetic Catalysis, while the latter would suppress the chiral condensate once B exceeds the scale of the hadron structure. Using a chiral model we demonstrate how neutral mesons are subject to the dimensional reduction and the low dimensionality favors the chiral-symmetric phase. We point out that this effect, the Magnetic Inhibition, can be a feasible explanation for recent lattice-QCD data indicating the decreasing behavior of the chiral-restoration temperature with increasing B.

Kenji Fukushima; Yoshimasa Hidaka

2012-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

250

Seeing the magnetic monopole through the mirror of topological surface states  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Existence of the magnetic monopole is compatible with the fundamental laws of nature, however, this illusive particle has yet to be detected experimentally. In this work, we show that an electric charge near the topological surface state induces an image magnetic monopole charge due to the topological magneto-electric effect. The magnetic field generated by the image magnetic monopole can be experimentally measured, and the inverse square law of the field dependence can be determined quantitatively. We propose that this effect can be used to experimentally realize a gas of quantum particles carrying fractional statistics, consisting of the bound states of the electric charge and the image magnetic monopole charge.

Qi, Xiao-Liang; Li, Rundong; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.; Zang, Jiadong; /Fudan U.; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /Fudan U.

2010-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

251

Simulations of magnetic nanoparticle Brownian motion  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic nanoparticles are useful in many medical applications because they interact with biology on a cellular level thus allowing microenvironmental investigation. An enhanced understanding of the dynamics of magnetic particles may lead to advances in imaging directly in magnetic particle imaging (MPI) or through enhanced MRI contrast and is essential for nanoparticle sensing as in magnetic spectroscopy of Brownian motion (MSB). Moreover, therapeutic techniques like hyperthermia require information about particle dynamics for effective, safe, and reliable use in the clinic. To that end, we have developed and validated a stochastic dynamical model of rotating Brownian nanoparticles from a Langevin equation approach. With no field, the relaxation time toward equilibrium matches Einstein's model of Brownian motion. In a static field, the equilibrium magnetization agrees with the Langevin function. For high frequency or low amplitude driving fields, behavior characteristic of the linearized Debye approximation is reproduced. In a higher field regime where magnetic saturation occurs, the magnetization and its harmonics compare well with the effective field model. On another level, the model has been benchmarked against experimental results, successfully demonstrating that harmonics of the magnetization carry enough information to infer environmental parameters like viscosity and temperature.

Daniel B Reeves; John B Weaver

2014-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

252

Superconducting Magnet Division  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Superconducting Magnet Division DOE NP Program Review - July 06 1 Brookhaven Magnet Division - Nuclear Physics Program Support Activities Superconducting Magnet Program RHIC Operations Support Spin Summary Peter Wanderer, DOE review, July 25, 2006 Acting Head, Superconducting Magnet Division #12

253

E-Print Network 3.0 - abdominal magnetic resonance Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

between men and women at rest and during lower Summary: resonance-compatible exercise bicycle, magnetic resonance imaging techniques, and custom data processing... at all. We have...

254

People Images  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

People Images People Images Several hundred of the 1700 U.S. scientists contributing to the LHC accelerator and experiments gathered in June 2008 in CERN's building 40 CE0252 Joel...

255

Image alignment  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Disclosed is a method and device for aligning at least two digital images. An embodiment may use frequency-domain transforms of small tiles created from each image to identify substantially similar, "distinguishing" features within each of the images, and then align the images together based on the location of the distinguishing features. To accomplish this, an embodiment may create equal sized tile sub-images for each image. A "key" for each tile may be created by performing a frequency-domain transform calculation on each tile. A information-distance difference between each possible pair of tiles on each image may be calculated to identify distinguishing features. From analysis of the information-distance differences of the pairs of tiles, a subset of tiles with high discrimination metrics in relation to other tiles may be located for each image. The subset of distinguishing tiles for each image may then be compared to locate tiles with substantially similar keys and/or information-distance metrics to other tiles of other images. Once similar tiles are located for each image, the images may be aligned in relation to the identified similar tiles.

Dowell, Larry Jonathan

2014-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

256

Magnetic Reconnection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We review the fundamental physics of magnetic reconnection in laboratory and space plasmas, by discussing results from theory, numerical simulations, observations from space satellites, and the recent results from laboratory plasma experiments. After a brief review of the well-known early work, we discuss representative recent experimental and theoretical work and attempt to interpret the essence of significant modern findings. In the area of local reconnection physics, many significant findings have been made with regard to two- uid physics and are related to the cause of fast reconnection. Profiles of the neutral sheet, Hall currents, and the effects of guide field, collisions, and micro-turbulence are discussed to understand the fundamental processes in a local reconnection layer both in space and laboratory plasmas. While the understanding of the global reconnection dynamics is less developed, notable findings have been made on this issue through detailed documentation of magnetic self-organization phenomena in fusion plasmas. Application of magnetic reconnection physics to astrophysical plasmas is also brie y discussed.

Masaaki Yamada, Russell Kulsrud and Hantao Ji

2009-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

257

artery magnetic resonance: Topics by E-print Network  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 Next Page Last Page Topic Index 1 Whole Brain Isotropic Arterial Spin Labeling Magnetic Resonance Imaging in a transgenic mouse...

258

Exploring the magnetic topologies of cool stars  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic fields of cool stars can be directly investigated through the study of the Zeeman effect on photospheric spectral lines using several approaches. With spectroscopic measurement in unpolarised light, the total magnetic flux averaged over the stellar disc can be derived but very little information on the field geometry is available. Spectropolarimetry provides a complementary information on the large-scale component of the magnetic topology. With Zeeman-Doppler Imaging (ZDI), this information can be retrieved to produce a map of the vector magnetic field at the surface of the star, and in particular to assess the relative importance of the poloidal and toroidal components as well as the degree of axisymmetry of the field distribution. The development of high-performance spectropolarimeters associated with multi-lines techniques and ZDI allows us to explore magnetic topologies throughout the Hertzsprung-Russel diagram, on stars spanning a wide range of mass, age and rotation period. These observations b...

Morin, J; Petit, P; Albert, L; Auriere, M; Cabanac, R; Catala, C; Delfosse, X; Dintrans, B; Fares, R; Forveille, T; Gastine, T; Jardine, M; Konstantinova-Antova, R; Lanoux, J; Lignieres, F; Morgenthaler, A; Paletou, F; Velez, J C Ramirez; Solanki, S K; Theado, S; Van Grootel, V

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

259

In Vivo Imaging with a Cell-Permeable Porphyrin-Based MRI Contrast  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with molecular probes offers the potential to monitor physiological parameters with comparatively high spatial and temporal resolution in living subjects. For detection of intracellular ...

Lee, Taekwan

260

In vivo imaging with a cell-permeable porphyrin-based MRI contrast agent  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with molecular probes offers the potential to monitor physiological parameters with comparatively high spatial and temporal resolution in living subjects. For detection of intracellular ...

Lee, Taekwan

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hyperspectral imaging magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

E-Print Network 3.0 - alternative imaging modality Sample Search...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Summary: traditional imaging modalities such as magnetic resonance (MR), computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound (US... detection and characterization of breast cancer pathology...

262

Knowledge discovery using data mined from Nuclear Magnetic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Knowledge discovery using data mined from Nuclear Magnetic Resonance spectral images William J cyberinfrastructure · Method ­ Solid State ab initio calculations ­ Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) ­ Support Vector refined (and/or relaxed) structure, perform Self-Consistent Field calculation for electronic structure

Narasayya, Vivek

263

Superconducting magnet  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A superconducting magnet designed to produce magnetic flux densities of the order of 4 to 5 Webers per square meter is constructed by first forming a cable of a plurality of matrixed superconductor wires with each wire of the plurality insulated from each other one. The cable is shaped into a rectangular cross-section and is wound with tape in an open spiral to create cooling channels. Coils are wound in a calculated pattern in saddle shapes to produce desired fields, such as dipoles, quadrupoles, and the like. Wedges are inserted between adjacent cables as needed to maintain substantially radial placement of the long dimensions of cross sections of the cables. After winding, individual strands in each of the cables are brought out to terminals and are interconnected to place all of the strands in series and to maximize the propagation of a quench by alternating conduction from an inner layer to an outer layer and from top half to bottom half as often as possible. Individual layers are separated from others by spiraled aluminum spacers to facilitate cooling. The wound coil is wrapped with an epoxy tape that is cured by heat and then machined to an interference fit with an outer aluminum pipe which is then affixed securely to the assembled coil by heating it to make a shrink fit. In an alternate embodiment, one wire of the cable is made of copper or the like to be heated externally to propagate a quench.

Satti, John A. (Naperville, IL)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

One dimensional electron spin imaging for single spin detection and manipulation using a gradient field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

magnetic field gradients. These fabricated devices are used to demonstrate this subwavelength imaging technique by imaging single electron spins of the nitrogen-vacancy (NV) defect in diamond. In this demonstration, multiple NV defects, unresolved in a...

Shin, Chang-Seok

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

265

Computing Images  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Computing Images The interior of an automated tape library in Brookhaven's RHIC and ATLAS Computing Facility. Brookhaven engineers in the RHIC and ATLAS Computing Facility....

266

Interface Magnetism in Multiferroics  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

1.2.1 Magnetism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1.2.2domain walls . . . . . 3 Magnetism of domain walls in BiFeOof electrical control of magnetism in mixed phase BiFeO 3

He, Qing

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

267

Nanostructured magnetic materials  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetism and Magnetic Materials Conference, Atlanta, GA (Nanostructured Magnetic Materials by Keith T. Chan Doctor ofinduced by a Si-based material occurs at a Si/Ni interface

Chan, Keith T.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Superconducting 30-MJ Energy Storage Coil", Proc. 19 80 ASC,Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Plant", IEEE Trans.SlIperconducting Magnetic Energy Storage Unit", in Advances

Hassenzahl, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETIC ENERGY STORAGE  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Design of the BPA Superconducting 30-MJ Energy Storagefor a Utility Scale Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storagefor a Lnrge Scale Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage

Hassenzahl, W.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Magnetite-Loaded Polymeric Micelles as Ultrasensitive Magnetic-Resonance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetite-Loaded Polymeric Micelles as Ultrasensitive Magnetic-Resonance Probes** By Hua Ai* Polymeric micelles offer a powerful multifunctional plat- form for drug delivery and diagnostic imaging- tions, polymeric micelles have also received increasing atten- tion in diagnostic imaging applications

Gao, Jinming

271

Methods for characterizing magnetic footprints of perpendicular magnetic recording writer heads  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In this work, the magnetic footprints, along with some of its dynamic features in recording process, of perpendicular magnetic recording writer heads have been characterized by using three different techniques. Those techniques are the spin-stand stationary footprint technique, the spin-stand dynamic footprint technique, and the coherent writing technique combined with magnetic force microscope imaging method. The characteristics of those techniques have been compared to one another. It was found experimentally that the spin-stand stationary method could not precisely catch some peculiar recording dynamics of the write heads in certain conditions. The advantages and disadvantages among all those techniques are also examined and discussed in detail.

Li, Shaoping, E-mail: shaoping.li@wdc.com; Lin, Ed; George, Zach; Terrill, Dave; Mendez, H.; Santucci, J.; Yie, Derek [Western Digital Corp., 44100 Osgood Road, Fremont, California 94539 (United States)

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

272

Simultaneous multislice spiral and EPI chemical shift imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The current prominent excitation methods of 3D slabs used for MR Spectroscopy Imaging (MRSI) include long dead times in each TR. This dead time is necessary for magnetization moments' longitudinal relaxation, and so a good ...

Abuhashem, Obaidah Anees

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

273

A practical acceleration algorithm for real-time imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A practical acceleration algorithm for real-time magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is presented. Neither separate training scans nor embedded training samples are used. The Kalman filter based algorithm provides a fast and ...

Sumbul, Uygar

274

Superconducting Magnet Division  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Superconducting Magnet Division Ramesh Gupta 20T Target Solenoid with HTS Insert Solenoid Capture Laboratory New York, USA http://www.bnl.gov/magnets/staff/gupta #12;Superconducting Magnet Division Ramesh of HTS may significantly reduce the amount of Tungsten shielding · Summary #12;Superconducting Magnet

McDonald, Kirk

275

Evaluation of magnetic flux distribution from magnetic domains in [Co/Pd] nanowires by magnetic domain scope method using contact-scanning of tunneling magnetoresistive sensor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Current-driven magnetic domain wall motions in magnetic nanowires have attracted great interests for physical studies and engineering applications. The magnetic force microscope (MFM) is widely used for indirect verification of domain locations in nanowires, where relative magnetic force between the local domains and the MFM probe is used for detection. However, there is an occasional problem that the magnetic moments of MFM probe influenced and/or rotated the magnetic states in the low-moment nanowires. To solve this issue, the “magnetic domain scope for wide area with nano-order resolution (nano-MDS)” method has been proposed recently that could detect the magnetic flux distribution from the specimen directly by scanning of tunneling magnetoresistive field sensor. In this study, magnetic domain structure in nanowires was investigated by both MFM and nano-MDS, and the leakage magnetic flux density from the nanowires was measured quantitatively by nano-MDS. Specimen nanowires consisted from [Co (0.3)/Pd (1.2)]{sub 21}/Ru(3) films (units in nm) with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy were fabricated onto Si substrates by dual ion beam sputtering and e-beam lithography. The length and the width of the fabricated nanowires are 20??m and 150?nm. We have succeeded to obtain not only the remanent domain images with the detection of up and down magnetizations as similar as those by MFM but also magnetic flux density distribution from nanowires directly by nano-MDS. The obtained value of maximum leakage magnetic flux by nano-MDS is in good agreement with that of coercivity by magneto-optical Kerr effect microscopy. By changing the protective diamond-like-carbon film thickness on tunneling magnetoresistive sensor, the three-dimensional spatial distribution of leakage magnetic flux could be evaluated.

Okuda, Mitsunobu, E-mail: okuda.m-ky@nhk.or.jp; Miyamoto, Yasuyoshi; Miyashita, Eiichi; Hayashi, Naoto [NHK Science and Technology Research Laboratories, 1-10-11 Kinuta Setagaya, Tokyo 157-8510 (Japan)

2014-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

276

Microscopy image segmentation tool: Robust image data analysis  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We present a software package called Microscopy Image Segmentation Tool (MIST). MIST is designed for analysis of microscopy images which contain large collections of small regions of interest (ROIs). Originally developed for analysis of porous anodic alumina scanning electron images, MIST capabilities have been expanded to allow use in a large variety of problems including analysis of biological tissue, inorganic and organic film grain structure, as well as nano- and meso-scopic structures. MIST provides a robust segmentation algorithm for the ROIs, includes many useful analysis capabilities, and is highly flexible allowing incorporation of specialized user developed analysis. We describe the unique advantages MIST has over existing analysis software. In addition, we present a number of diverse applications to scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, magnetic force microscopy, scanning tunneling microscopy, and fluorescent confocal laser scanning microscopy.

Valmianski, Ilya, E-mail: ivalmian@ucsd.edu; Monton, Carlos; Schuller, Ivan K. [Department of Physics and Center for Advanced Nanoscience, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)] [Department of Physics and Center for Advanced Nanoscience, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, California 92093 (United States)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

277

Image Fusion for MR Bias Stochastic Systems Group  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We can target T1 and T2 through appropriate selection of TE and TR. #12;Image Reconstruction The MRImage Fusion for MR Bias Correction Ayres Fan Stochastic Systems Group Joint work with W. Wells, J. Fisher, M. Cetin, S. Haker, A. Willsky, B. Mulkern #12;Magnetic Resonance The magnetic resonance (MR

Willsky, Alan S.

278

Magnetic infrasound sensor  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A magnetic infrasound sensor is produced by constraining a permanent magnet inside a magnetic potential well above the surface of superconducting material. The magnetic infrasound sensor measures the position or movement of the permanent magnet within the magnetic potential well, and interprets the measurements. Infrasound sources can be located and characterized by combining the measurements from one or more infrasound sensors. The magnetic infrasound sensor can be tuned to match infrasound source types, resulting in better signal-to-noise ratio. The present invention can operate in frequency modulation mode to improve sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio. In an alternate construction, the superconductor can be levitated over a magnet or magnets. The system can also be driven, so that time resolved perturbations are sensed, resulting in a frequency modulation version with improved sensitivity and signal-to-noise ratio.

Mueller, Fred M. (Los Alamos, NM); Bronisz, Lawrence (Los Alamos, NM); Grube, Holger (Los Alamos, NM); Nelson, David C. (Santa Fe, NM); Mace, Jonathan L. (Los Alamos, NM)

2006-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

279

Bioinspired synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The synthesis of magnetic nanoparticles has long been an area of active research. Magnetic nanoparticles can be used in a wide variety of applications such as magnetic inks, magnetic memory devices, drug delivery, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents, and pathogen detection in foods. In applications such as MRI, particle uniformity is particularly crucial, as is the magnetic response of the particles. Uniform magnetic particles with good magnetic properties are therefore required. One particularly effective technique for synthesizing nanoparticles involves biomineralization, which is a naturally occurring process that can produce highly complex nanostructures. Also, the technique involves mild conditions (ambient temperature and close to neutral pH) that make this approach suitable for a wide variety of materials. The term 'bioinspired' is important because biomineralization research is inspired by the naturally occurring process, which occurs in certain microorganisms called 'magnetotactic bacteria'. Magnetotactic bacteria use biomineralization proteins to produce magnetite crystals having very good uniformity in size and morphology. The bacteria use these magnetic particles to navigate according to external magnetic fields. Because these bacteria synthesize high quality crystals, research has focused on imitating aspects of this biomineralization in vitro. In particular, a biomineralization iron-binding protein found in a certain species of magnetotactic bacteria, magnetospirillum magneticum, AMB-1, has been extracted and used for in vitro magnetite synthesis; Pluronic F127 gel was used to increase the viscosity of the reaction medium to better mimic the conditions in the bacteria. It was shown that the biomineralization protein mms6 was able to facilitate uniform magnetite synthesis. In addition, a similar biomineralization process using mms6 and a shorter version of this protein, C25, has been used to synthesize cobalt ferrite particles. The overall goal of this project is to understand the mechanism of magnetite particle synthesis in the presence of the biomineralization proteins, mms6 and C25. Previous work has hypothesized that the mms6 protein helps to template magnetite and cobalt ferrite particle synthesis and that the C25 protein templates cobalt ferrite formation. However, the effect of parameters such as the protein concentration on the particle formation is still unknown. It is expected that the protein concentration significantly affects the nucleation and growth of magnetite. Since the protein provides iron-binding sites, it is expected that magnetite crystals would nucleate at those sites. In addition, in the previous work, the reaction medium after completion of the reaction was in the solution phase, and magnetic particles had a tendency to fall to the bottom of the medium and aggregate. The research presented in this thesis involves solid Pluronic gel phase reactions, which can be studied readily using small-angle x-ray scattering, which is not possible for the solution phase experiments. In addition, the concentration effect of both of the proteins on magnetite crystal formation was studied.

David, Anand

2009-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

280

Ultrasensitive Magnetometry and Imaging with NV Diamond  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-size wire structure to sit directly on the surface of millimeter-scale diamond plate. In contrast to conventional magnetic resonance imaging pulsed ESR was used to measure the Rabi oscillations. From the beating of Rabi oscillations from a "double NV...

Kim, Changdong

2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hyperspectral imaging magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Prediction-Based Compression Ratio Boundaries for Medical Images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Prediction-Based Compression Ratio Boundaries for Medical Images Xiaojun Qi Computer Science present prediction-based image compression techniques take advantage of either intra- or inter function. The prediction-based compression technique has been applied on some magnetic resonance (MR) brain

Qi, Xiaojun

282

Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials ] (  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

magnetic properties were measured with a vibrating sample magnetometer. The mass-specific power loss.40.Rs Keywords: Nanocrystalline alloys; Amorphous alloys; Field annealing; Power loss; Soft magnets the hysteretic power loss while maintaining high-temperature operability [4]. Other goals have included studies

McHenry, Michael E.

283

Recent lunar magnetism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The magnetization of young lunar samples (magnetic fields (e.g. core dynamo and long-lived impact plasma fields) have not been present within the last 1.5 Ga. To better ...

Buz, Jennifer

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

Magnetic assisted statistical assembly  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The objective of this thesis is to develop a process using magnetic forces to assemble micro-components into recesses on silicon based integrated circuits. Patterned SmCo magnetic thin films at the bottom of recesses are ...

Cheng, Diana I

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

Magnetic susceptibility in QCD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic susceptibility in the deconfined phase of QCD is calculated in a closed form using a recent general expression for the quark gas pressure in magnetic field. Quark selfenergies are entering the result via Polyakov line factors and ensure the total paramagnetic effect, increasing with temperature. A generalized form of magnetic susceptibility in nonzero magnetic field suitable for experimental and lattice measurements is derived, showing a good agreement with available lattice data.

V. D. Orlovsky; Yu. A. Simonov

2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

286

Magnetism Theory Group / POSTECH Magnetism Theory Group / POSTECH  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetism Theory Group / POSTECH #12;Magnetism Theory Group / POSTECH #12;Magnetism Theory Group / POSTECH #12;Magnetism Theory Group / POSTECH #12;Magnetism Theory Group / POSTECH J.H . Park et al. #12;'s of FeinCsm e tal The chargeandorbitalordering geom etryin YB a C o 2 O 5 S. K. Kwon etal .Magnetism Theory

Min, Byung Il

287

Magnetic nanohole superlattices  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A magnetic material is disclosed including a two-dimensional array of carbon atoms and a two-dimensional array of nanoholes patterned in the two-dimensional array of carbon atoms. The magnetic material has long-range magnetic ordering at a temperature below a critical temperature Tc.

Liu, Feng

2013-05-14T23:59:59.000Z

288

Noble gas magnetic resonator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Precise measurements of a precessional rate of noble gas in a magnetic field is obtained by constraining the time averaged direction of the spins of a stimulating alkali gas to lie in a plane transverse to the magnetic field. In this way, the magnetic field of the alkali gas does not provide a net contribution to the precessional rate of the noble gas.

Walker, Thad Gilbert; Lancor, Brian Robert; Wyllie, Robert

2014-04-15T23:59:59.000Z

289

Permanent magnet with MgB{sub 2} bulk superconductor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Superconductors with persistent zero-resistance currents serve as permanent magnets for high-field applications requiring a strong and stable magnetic field, such as magnetic resonance imaging. The recent global helium shortage has quickened research into high-temperature superconductors (HTSs)—materials that can be used without conventional liquid-helium cooling to 4.2?K. Herein, we demonstrate that 40-K-class metallic HTS magnesium diboride (MgB{sub 2}) makes an excellent permanent bulk magnet, maintaining 3?T at 20?K for 1 week with an extremely high stability (<0.1 ppm/h). The magnetic field trapped in this magnet is uniformly distributed, as for single-crystalline neodymium-iron-boron. Magnetic hysteresis loop of the MgB{sub 2} permanent bulk magnet was determined. Because MgB{sub 2} is a simple-binary-line compound that does not contain rare-earth metals, polycrystalline bulk material can be industrially fabricated at low cost and with high yield to serve as strong magnets that are compatible with conventional compact cryocoolers, making MgB{sub 2} bulks promising for the next generation of Tesla-class permanent-magnet applications.

Yamamoto, Akiyasu, E-mail: yamamoto@appchem.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp [The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan); JST-PRESTO, 4-1-8 Honcho, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Ishihara, Atsushi; Tomita, Masaru [Railway Technical Research Institute, 2-8-38 Hikari, Kokubunji, Tokyo 185-8540 (Japan); Kishio, Kohji [The University of Tokyo, 7-3-1 Hongo, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-8656 (Japan)

2014-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

290

National High Magnetic Field Laboratory  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

ANNUAL REPORT RESEARCH HIGHLIGHTS: CONDENSED MATTER SCIENCE Technique development, graphene, magnetism & magnetic materials, topological insulators, quantum fl uids & solids,...

291

Imaging bolometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Radiation-hard, steady-state imaging bolometer. A bolometer employing infrared (IR) imaging of a segmented-matrix absorber of plasma radiation in a cooled-pinhole camera geometry is described. The bolometer design parameters are determined by modeling the temperature of the foils from which the absorbing matrix is fabricated by using a two-dimensional time-dependent solution of the heat conduction equation. The resulting design will give a steady-state bolometry capability, with approximately 100 Hz time resolution, while simultaneously providing hundreds of channels of spatial information. No wiring harnesses will be required, as the temperature-rise data will be measured via an IR camera. The resulting spatial data may be used to tomographically investigate the profile of plasmas.

Wurden, Glen A. (Los Alamos, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

292

Imaging bolometer  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Radiation-hard, steady-state imaging bolometer is disclosed. A bolometer employing infrared (IR) imaging of a segmented-matrix absorber of plasma radiation in a cooled-pinhole camera geometry is described. The bolometer design parameters are determined by modeling the temperature of the foils from which the absorbing matrix is fabricated by using a two-dimensional time-dependent solution of the heat conduction equation. The resulting design will give a steady-state bolometry capability, with approximately 100 Hz time resolution, while simultaneously providing hundreds of channels of spatial information. No wiring harnesses will be required, as the temperature-rise data will be measured via an IR camera. The resulting spatial data may be used to tomographically investigate the profile of plasmas. 2 figs.

Wurden, G.A.

1999-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

293

Magnetically attached sputter targets  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved method and assembly for attaching sputtering targets to cathode assemblies of sputtering systems which includes a magnetically permeable material is described. The magnetically permeable material is imbedded in a target base that is brazed, welded, or soldered to the sputter target, or is mechanically retained in the target material. Target attachment to the cathode is achieved by virtue of the permanent magnets and/or the pole pieces in the cathode assembly that create magnetic flux lines adjacent to the backing plate, which strongly attract the magnetically permeable material in the target assembly. 11 figures.

Makowiecki, D.M.; McKernan, M.A.

1994-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

294

Integrating an automatic classification method into the medical image retrieval process  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the performance of the University at Buffalo Medical Text and Images Retrieval System (UBMedTIRS). This paper classification process was performed using the Image Retrieval for Medical Application (IRMA) codes3 employed to acquire the image such as x-ray, ultrasound, magnetic resonance measurement, nuclear medicine

Ruiz, Miguel E.

295

Dynamic Surface Reconstruction from 4D-MR Images Matthias Fenchel1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Dynamic Surface Reconstruction from 4D-MR Images Matthias Fenchel1 , Stefan Gumhold2 , Hans approach is applied to 4D-MR images of a human heart in motion. 1 Introduction Image segmentation-Peter Seidel3 1 Siemens AG Medical Solutions, Magnetic Resonance, Karl-Schall-Str. 4, 91052 Erlangen 2 TU

Gumhold, Stefan

296

An Integrated Method of Adaptive Enhancement for Unsupervised Segmentation of MRI Brain Images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An Integrated Method of Adaptive Enhancement for Unsupervised Segmentation of MRI Brain Images of the adaptive enhancement for an unsupervised global-to-local segmentation of brain tissues in three-dimensional (3-D) MRI (Magnetic Resonance Imaging) images. Three brain tissues are of interest: CSF (Cerebro

Pizurica, Aleksandra

297

TRACKING TONGUE MOTION IN THREE DIMENSIONS USING TAGGED MR IMAGES Xiaofeng Liu1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

TRACKING TONGUE MOTION IN THREE DIMENSIONS USING TAGGED MR IMAGES Xiaofeng Liu1 , Maureen Stone3 and strain analysis of tagged magnetic res- onance (MR) imaging [1]. It was originally applied to car- diac This research was supported by NIH grants R01 HL047405 and R01 DC001758 (a) (b) Fig. 1. (a) A tagged MR image

Prince, Jerry L.

298

Development of novel high-performance six-axis magnetically levitated instruments for nanoscale applications  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and the sample. While working in noncontact mode the AFM tip does not touch the sample but gets the topographic image of sample from attractive force [13]. The AFM have resolution up to 10 pm. The basic working principle of AFM is very much like a record...-earth permanent-magnet-biased magnetic-bearing suspension [48]. The permanent magnet provides bias flux and the electromagnet can increase or reduce flux of the permanent magnet. The flux path of the electromagnet does not pass through the permanent magnet so...

Verma, Shobhit

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

299

Permanent magnet steam generator  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This patent describes a system for magnetic heating of a fluid by motor rotation of a permanent magnet rotor adjacent an assembly of ferro-magnetic condensing plate and of copper heat absorber plate with protrusions through the ferro-magnetic condensing plate into an enclosure with the fluid therein and having fluid inlet and fluid outlet. The assembly has a first shaft and a second shaft coaxially spaced therefrom, a respective the motor connected to the outer end of each shaft, and a respective the permanent magnet rotor connected to the inner end of each shaft, adjacent a the heat absorber plate. The improvement described here comprises: the enclosure including a steel boiler with a first the ferro-magnetic condensing plate closing off a first end thereof and a second the ferro-magnetic condensing plate closing off a second end thereof, a the copper heat absorbing plate affixed on each ferro-magnetic plate; means, free of pockets, for promoting turbulent flow of the fluid with uniformly good heat transfer including the protrusion being a plurality of heat sinks, each heat sink of the plurality of heat sinks comprising an integral elongate member with an alternately large diameter and smaller diameter portions regularly spaced therealong. The elongate members through the first the ferro-magnetic condensing plate are coaxially aligned with the elongate members through the second the ferro-magnetic condensing plate.

Gerard, F.; Gerard, F.J.

1986-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

300

Performing temperature feedback controlled tissue photo-coagulation using magnetic resonance thermometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

controlled photo-coagulation using magnetic resonance imaging as the non-invasive means of temperature feedback. The desired coagulation depth was controlled at a constant temperature of 40 degrees for different amounts of time and the actual coagulation...

Sampath, Smita

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hyperspectral imaging magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Brass plasmoid in external magnetic field at different air pressures  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The behavior of expanding brass plasmoid generated by 266 nm wavelength of Nd:YAG laser in nonuniform magnetic field at different air pressures has been examined using optical emission spectroscopy and fast imaging of plasma plumes. The splitting of the plasma plumes and enhancement of intensity of Cu I at 510.5 nm in the presence of magnetic field at lower pressures are discussed. The threading and expulsion of the magnetic field lines through the plasmoid are correlated with the ambient pressure. The stoichiometry of the plasma plume is not significantly influenced by the magnetic field; however, the abundance of neutral to ionic species of Cu and Zn is greatly influenced by the magnetic field.

Patel, D. N.; Thareja, Raj K. [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur, UP 208016 (India)] [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur, UP 208016 (India); Pandey, Pramod K. [WCI-Center for Quantum-Beam Based Radiation Research, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daojeon (Korea, Republic of)] [WCI-Center for Quantum-Beam Based Radiation Research, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daojeon (Korea, Republic of)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

302

Core-Shell Structured Magnetic Ternary Nanocubes  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

While transition metal-doped ferrite nanoparticles constitute an important class of soft magnetic nanomaterials with spinel structures, the ability to control the shape and composition would enable a wide range of applications in homogeneous or heterogeneous reactions such as catalysis and magnetic separation of biomolecules. This report describes novel findings of an investigation of core-shell structured MnZn ferrite nanocubes synthesized in organic solvents by manipulating the reaction temperature and capping agent composition in the absence of the conventionally-used reducing agents. The core-shell structure of the highly-monodispersed nanocubes (~20 nm) are shown to consist of an Fe3O4 core and an (Mn0.5Zn0.5)(Fe0.9, Mn1.1)O4 shell. In comparison with Fe3O4 and other binary ferrite nanoparticles, the core-shell structured nanocubes were shown to display magnetic properties regulated by a combination of the core-shell composition, leading to a higher coercivity (~350 Oe) and field-cool/zero-field-cool characteristics drastically different from many regular MnZn ferrite nanoparticles. The findings are discussed in terms of the unique core-shell composition, the understanding of which has important implication to the exploration of this class of soft magnetic nanomaterials in many potential applications such as magnetic resonance imaging, fuel cells, and batteries.

Wang, Lingyan; Wang, Xin; Luo, Jin; Wanjala, Bridgid N.; Wang, Chong M.; Chernova, Natalya; Engelhard, Mark H.; Liu, Yao; Bae, In-Tae; Zhong, Chuan-Jian

2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Nanometric Optical Imaging Frontiers in Chemical Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Nanometric Optical Imaging Frontiers in Chemical Imaging Seminar Series Presented by... Professor growing field which has provided for nanometric optical imaging in the near-field. Even though a variety of techniques are being developed with nanometric optical imaging potential, near-field optics remains the most

304

Magnetic spectroscopy and microscopy of functional materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Heusler intermetallics Mn{sub 2}Y Ga and X{sub 2}MnGa (X; Y =Fe, Co, Ni) undergo tetragonal magnetostructural transitions that can result in half metallicity, magnetic shape memory, or the magnetocaloric effect. Understanding the magnetism and magnetic behavior in functional materials is often the most direct route to being able to optimize current materials for todays applications and to design novel ones for tomorrow. Synchrotron soft x-ray magnetic spectromicroscopy techniques are well suited to explore the the competing effects from the magnetization and the lattice parameters in these materials as they provide detailed element-, valence-, and site-specifc information on the coupling of crystallographic ordering and electronic structure as well as external parameters like temperature and pressure on the bonding and exchange. Fundamental work preparing the model systems of spintronic, multiferroic, and energy-related compositions is presented for context. The methodology of synchrotron spectroscopy is presented and applied to not only magnetic characterization but also of developing a systematic screening method for future examples of materials exhibiting any of the above effects. The chapter progression is as follows: an introduction to the concepts and materials under consideration (Chapter 1); an overview of sample preparation techniques and results, and the kinds of characterization methods employed (Chapter 2); spectro- and microscopic explorations of X{sub 2}MnGa/Ge (Chapter 3); spectroscopic investigations of the composition series Mn{sub 2}Y Ga to the logical Mn{sub 3}Ga endpoint (Chapter 4); and a summary and overview of upcoming work (Chapter 5). Appendices include the results of a Think Tank for the Graduate School of Excellence MAINZ (Appendix A) and details of an imaging project now in progress on magnetic reversal and domain wall observation in the classical Heusler material Co{sub 2}FeSi (Appendix B).

Jenkins, C.A.

2011-01-28T23:59:59.000Z

305

Passive magnetic bearing system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An axial stabilizer for the rotor of a magnetic bearing provides external control of stiffness through switching in external inductances. External control also allows the stabilizer to become a part of a passive/active magnetic bearing system that requires no external source of power and no position sensor. Stabilizers for displacements transverse to the axis of rotation are provided that require only a single cylindrical Halbach array in its operation, and thus are especially suited for use in high rotation speed applications, such as flywheel energy storage systems. The elimination of the need of an inner cylindrical array solves the difficult mechanical problem of supplying support against centrifugal forces for the magnets of that array. Compensation is provided for the temperature variation of the strength of the magnetic fields of the permanent magnets in the levitating magnet arrays.

Post, Richard F.

2014-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

306

Pulse magnetic welder  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A welder is described for automated closure of fuel pins by a pulsed magnetic process in which the open end of a length of cladding is positioned within a complementary tube surrounded by a pulsed magnetic welder. Seals are provided at each end of the tube, which can be evacuated or can receive tag gas for direct introduction to the cladding interior. Loading of magnetic rings and end caps is accomplished automatically in conjunction with the welding steps carried out within the tube.

Christiansen, D.W.; Brown, W.F.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Effect of recording condition on the diffraction efficiency of magnetic hologram with magnetic garnet films  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A holographic memory has been attracting attention as recording media with high recording density and high data transfer rate. We have studied the magnetic garnets as a rewritable and long life media for magnetic holography. However, since the signal intensity of reconstructed image was relatively low, the effects of recording conditions on the diffraction efficiency of magnetic hologram were investigated with experiments and the numerical simulation using COMSOL multi-physics. The diffraction efficiency tends to decrease as increasing the spatial frequency, and the use of short pulse laser with the pulse width of 50 ps was found to be effective to achieve high diffraction efficiency. This suggests that the formation of clear magnetic fringe similar to interference pattern can be obtained by the use of short pulse laser since undesirable heat diffusion during radiation does not occur. On the other hand, the diffraction efficiency increased as increasing the film thickness up to 3.1??m but was saturated in the garnet film thicker than 3.1??m in the case of spatial frequency of 1500 line pair/mm. The numerical simulation showed that the effective depth of magnetic fringe was limited about 1.8??m irrespective of the garnet film thickness because the fringes were connected by thermal diffusion near the surface of the film, and the effective depth is limited due to this connection of the magnetic fringe. Avoiding this fringe connection, much higher diffraction efficiency will be achieved.

Nakamura, Yuichi, E-mail: nakamura@ee.tut.ac.jp; Takagi, Hiroyuki; Lim, Pang Boey; Inoue, Mitsuteru [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi, Aichi 441-8580 (Japan)

2014-09-14T23:59:59.000Z

308

Magnetic Braids Anthony Yeates  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

flux function Main result Conclusion 2. Thermonuclear confinement devices. ITER (Internat'l Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor). Inside the KSTAR tokamak. Correspond to periodic magnetic braids. 4 / 22

Dundee, University of

309

Magnetic differential torque sensor  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A new torque sensor structure is presented. The basic idea is a simple torque sensor with a variable magnetic circuit excited by an axially magnetized permanent magnet ring. The circuit is constituted by iron toothed rings, whose teeth relative position changes whenever an applied torque twists the rotating shaft. A Hall probe measures the induction in an airgap where the induction is uniform. The new structure is an association of two previous ones, thus creating a differential system with the related advantages: diminution of thermal drifts, zero mean value for the signal. The new magnetic circuit is studied by calculating equivalent reluctances through energy calculations and by using electrical analogies.

Lemarquand, V.; Lemarquand, G. [Univ. de Savoie, Annecy-le-Vieux (France)] [Univ. de Savoie, Annecy-le-Vieux (France)

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

310

Magnetic nanoparticles for medical applications: Progress and challenges  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magnetic nanoparticles present unique properties that make them suitable for applications in biomedical field such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), hyperthermia and drug delivery systems. Magnetic hyperthermia involves heating the cancer cells by using magnetic particles exposed to an alternating magnetic field. The cell temperature increases due to the thermal propagation of the heat induced by the nanoparticles into the affected region. In order to increase the effectiveness of the treatment hyperthermia can be combined with drug delivery techniques. As a spectroscopic technique MRI is used in medicine for the imaging of tissues especially the soft ones and diagnosing malignant or benign tumors. For this purpose Zn{sub x}Co{sub 1?x}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} ferrite nanoparticles with x between 0 and 1 have been prepared by co-precipitation method. The cristallite size was determined by X-ray diffraction, while the transmission electron microscopy illustrates the spherical shape of the nanoparticles. Magnetic characterizations of the nanoparticles were carried out at room temperature by using a vibrating sample magnetometer. The specific absorption rate (SAR) was measured by calorimetric method at different frequencies and it has been observed that this value depends on the chemical formula, the applied magnetic fields and the frequency. The study consists of evaluating the images, obtained from an MRI facility, when the nanoparticles are dispersed in agar phantoms compared with the enhanced ones when Omniscan was used as contrast agent. Layer-by-layer technique was used to achieve the necessary requirement of biocompatibility. The surface of the magnetic nanoparticles was modified by coating it with oppositely charged polyelectrolites, making it possible for the binding of a specific drug.

Doaga, A.; Cojocariu, A. M.; Constantin, C. P.; Caltun, O. F. [Faculty of Physics, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, Bd. Carol I. Nr. 11, Iasi, 700506 (Romania); Hempelmann, R. [Physical Chemistry Department, Saarland University, 66123 Saarbrücken (Germany)

2013-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

311

Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials 252 (2002) 159161 Magnetically induced alignment of FNS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials 252 (2002) 159­161 Magnetically induced alignment the observation of magnetically controlled anchoring of ferro-nematic suspensions. We found that application of a weak magnetic field to a cell with the ferro-suspension induces an easy orientation axis with weak

Reznikov, Yuri

312

Split image optical display  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A video image is displayed from an optical panel by splitting the image into a plurality of image components, and then projecting the image components through corresponding portions of the panel to collectively form the image. Depth of the display is correspondingly reduced.

Veligdan, James T. (Manorville, NY)

2007-05-29T23:59:59.000Z

313

The magnetic resonance force microscope: A new microscopic probe of magnetic materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The magnetic resonance force microscope (MRFM) marries the techniques of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), to produce a three-dimensional imaging instrument with high, potentially atomic-scale, resolution. The principle of the MRFM has been successfully demonstrated in numerous experiments. By virtue of its unique capabilities the MRFM shows promise to make important contributions in fields ranging from three-dimensional materials characterization to bio-molecular structure determination. Here the authors focus on its application to the characterization and study of layered magnetic materials; the ability to illuminate the properties of buried interfaces in such materials is a particularly important goal. While sensitivity and spatial resolution are currently still far from their theoretical limits, they are nonetheless comparable to or superior to that achievable in conventional MRI. Further improvement of the MRFM will involve operation at lower temperature, application of larger field gradients, introduction of advanced mechanical resonators and improved reduction of the spurious coupling when the magnet is on the resonator.

Hammel, P.C.; Zhang, Z. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Midzor, M.; Roukes, M.L. [California Inst. of Tech., Pasadena, CA (United States); Wigen, P.E. [Ohio State Univ., Columbus, OH (United States); Childress, J.R. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)

1997-08-06T23:59:59.000Z

314

Electronic Structure and Magnetism in Diluted Magnetic Semiconductors  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Electronic Structure and Magnetism in Diluted Magnetic Semiconductors Print The possibility of using electrons' spins in addition to their charge in information technology has...

315

Superconducting Magnet Division  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Superconducting Magnet Division MAGNETIC DESIGN OF E-LENS SOLENOID AND CORRECTOR SYSTEM FOR RHIC* R Slotted Dipole Corrector Design · Slots are machined in an Al tube where superconducting wires are placed between superconducting and copper solenoid with superconducting solenoid at 6T · The desired field (>0

Ohta, Shigemi

316

Design and construction of a magnetic force microscope  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) ............................................. 11 II. USES OF MFM....................................................................................... 16 A. Overview...................................................................................... 16 B. MFM on superconductors... the sample and the tip is useful to ensure the dominance of magnetic force term. The other popular method to ensure that this is the case is called ?Plane Scan?. One of the first uses of this technique was to image vortices in YBCO superconductors.11...

Khandekar, Sameer Sudhakar

2005-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

317

NANOSCALE STRUCTURALAND MAGNETIC CHARACTERIZATION USING  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

by magnetic materials as their dimensions are reduced towards the nanoscale. Important examples include coupling between magnetic thin films, which depends on the thickness of the non-magnetic spacer layer [2

Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

318

Magnet pole tips  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An improved magnet more easily provides a radially increasing magnetic field, as well as reduced fringe field and requires less power for a given field intensity. The subject invention comprises a pair of spaced, opposed magnetic poles which further comprise a pair of pole roots, each having a pole tip attached to its center. The pole tips define the gap between the magnetic poles and at least a portion of each pole tip is separated from its associated pole root. The separation begins at a predetermined distance from the center of the pole root and increases with increasing radial distance while being constant with azimuth within that portion. Magnets in accordance with the subject invention have been found to be particularly advantageous for use in large isochronous cyclotrons.

Thorn, C.E.; Chasman, C.; Baltz, A.J.

1981-11-19T23:59:59.000Z

319

Methods for magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Methods of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object are disclosed that include placing the object in a main magnetic field (that has a static field direction) and in a radio frequency field; rotating the object at a frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a phase-corrected magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. In particular embodiments the method includes pulsing the radio frequency to provide at least two of a spatially selective read pulse, a spatially selective phase pulse, and a spatially selective storage pulse. Further disclosed methods provide pulse sequences that provide extended imaging capabilities, such as chemical shift imaging or multiple-voxel data acquisition.

Hu, Jian Zhi (Richland, WA); Wind, Robert A. (Kennewick, WA); Minard, Kevin R. (Kennewick, WA); Majors, Paul D. (Kennewick, WA)

2011-11-22T23:59:59.000Z

320

IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON MAGNETICS, VOL. 46, NO. 6, JUNE 2010 2187 Novel Solder-Magnetic Particle Composites and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Terms--Electromagnetic induction heating, infrared imaging, magnetic nanoparticles, solder reflow. I University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 USA Intel Corporation, Chandler, AZ 85226 USA Localized heating of solder reflow process, where the package is subjected to high temperatures. Localized heating is possible

McHenry, Michael E.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hyperspectral imaging magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Observation of Dirac Monopoles in a Synthetic Magnetic Field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic monopoles --- particles that behave as isolated north or south magnetic poles --- have been the subject of speculation since the first detailed observations of magnetism several hundred years ago. Numerous theoretical investigations and hitherto unsuccessful experimental searches have followed Dirac's 1931 development of a theory of monopoles consistent with both quantum mechanics and the gauge invariance of the electromagnetic field. The existence of even a single Dirac magnetic monopole would have far-reaching physical consequences, most famously explaining the quantization of electric charge. Although analogues of magnetic monopoles have been found in exotic spin-ices and other systems, there has been no direct experimental observation of Dirac monopoles within a medium described by a quantum field, such as superfluid helium-3. Here we demonstrate the controlled creation of Dirac monopoles in the synthetic magnetic field produced by a spinor Bose-Einstein condensate. Monopoles are identified, in both experiments and matching numerical simulations, at the termini of vortex lines within the condensate. By directly imaging such a vortex line, the presence of a monopole may be discerned from the experimental data alone. These real-space images provide conclusive and long-awaited experimental evidence of the existence of Dirac monopoles. Our result provides an unprecedented opportunity to observe and manipulate these quantum-mechanical entities in a controlled environment.

M. W. Ray; E. Ruokokoski; S. Kandel; M. Möttönen; D. S. Hall

2014-08-13T23:59:59.000Z

322

QUENCHES IN LARGE SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETS  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

QUENCHES IN LARGE SUPERCONDUCTING MAGNETS. P. H. Eberhard,Study of an Unprotected Superconducting Coil Going Normal,"Method for Testing Superconducting Magnets," LBL Physics

Eberhard, P.H.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

323

Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces Large Magnetization at Carbon Surfaces Print Wednesday, 31 August 2011 00:00 From organic matter to pencil lead, carbon is a versatile...

324

Femtosecond Transient Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis proposes a novel framework called transient imaging for image formation and scene understanding through impulse illumination and time images. Using time-of-flight cameras and multi-path analysis of global light ...

Kirmani, Ahmed (Ghulam Ahmed)

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Toward magnetic field dissipation during the 23 July 2002 solar flare measured with Solar  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Heliospheric Observatory/Michelson Doppler Imager (SOHO/MDI) and Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic and Heliospheric Observatory/Michelson Doppler Imager (SOHO/MDI) and Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic] It is widely accepted that the source of primary energy release in solar flares is associated with magnetic

Zharkova, Valentina V.

326

Tracking Elevated Pollution Layers with a Newly Developed Hyperspectral Sun/Sky Spectrometer (4STAR): Results from the TCAP 2012 and 2013 Campaigns  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Total columnar amounts of water vapor, nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3) are derived from a newly developed, hyperspectral airborne sun-sky spectrometer (4STAR) for the first time during the two intensive phases of the Two Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) in summer 2012 and winter 2013 aboard the DOE G-1 aircraft. We compare results with coincident measurements. We find 0.045 g/cm2 (4.2%) negative bias and 0.28 g/cm2 (26.3%) root-mean-square (RMS) difference in water vapor layer comparison with in-situ hygrometer, and an overall RMS difference of 1.28 g/m3 (38%) water vapor amount in profile by profile comparisons, with differences distributed evenly around zero in most cases. The RMS differences for O3 values average to 3%, with a 1% negative bias for 4STAR compared with the spaceborne Ozone Measuring Instrument (OMI) along the aircraft flight-track for 14 flights during both TCAP phases. Ground-based comparisons with the Pandora spectrometer system at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), Greenbelt, Maryland showed excellent agreement between the instruments for both O3 and NO2, further emphasizing 4STAR’s new capabilities. During the summer phase, we have succeeded in identifying variations in elevated pollution layers corresponding to urban pollution outflow and transported biomass burning. This was done using clustering analysis of the retrieved products (e.g. Ångstrom exponent, NO2 and columnar water vapor), and was confirmed by aerosol type identification by HSRL2 aboard the NASA B-200 aircraft. These newly demonstrated 4STAR capabilities are expected to be instrumental in improving our understanding of atmospheric composition variability and aerosol-trace-gas interactions; they open new horizons and opportunities in airborne sunphotometry.

Segal Rozenhaimer, Michal; Russell, P. B.; Schmid, Beat; Redemann, Jens; Livingston, J. M.; Flynn, Connor J.; Johnson, Roy R.; Dunagan, Stephen; Shinozuka, Yohei; Herman, J. R.; Cede, A.; Abuhassan, N.; Comstock, Jennifer M.; Hubbe, John M.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Wilson, Jacqueline M.

2014-03-16T23:59:59.000Z

327

Tailoring Magnetic Properties in Bulk Nanostructured Solids  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

permanent magnets). Under specific temperature and applied magnetic field conditions, exchange coupling

Morales, Jason R.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

328

Plant root system analysis from MRI images Hannes Schulz1, Johannes A. Postma2, Dagmar van Dusschoten2,  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

voxel to the base of the plant root, weighing the Euclidean distance measure by a multi-scale vesselness test this method using both virtually generated MRI images of Maize and real MRI images of Barley roots (Ferreira et al., 2010; Nakanishi et al., 2003; Pierret et al., 2003) and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Behnke, Sven

329

Moment free toroidal magnet  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A toroidal magnet for confining a high magnetic field for use in fusion reactor research and nuclear particle detection. The magnet includes a series of conductor elements arranged about and fixed at its small major radius portion to the outer surface of a central cylindrical support each conductor element having a geometry such as to maintain the conductor elements in pure tension when a high current flows therein, and a support assembly which redistributes all or part of the tension which would otherwise arise in the small major radius portion of each coil element to the large major radius portion thereof.

Bonanos, Peter (East Brunswick, NJ)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

330

Permanent magnet energy conversion machine with magnet mounting arrangement  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A hybrid permanent magnet dc motor includes three sets of permanent magnets supported by the rotor and three sets of corresponding stators fastened to the surrounding frame. One set of magnets operates across a radial gap with a surrounding radial gap stator, and the other two sets of magnets operate off the respective ends of the rotor across respective axial gaps.

Hsu, John S. (Oak Ridge, TN); Adams, Donald J. (Knoxville, TN)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

331

Imaging Sciences Workshop Proceedings  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This report contains the proceedings of the Imaging Sciences Workshop sponsored by C.A.S.LS., the Center for Advanced Signal & Image Sciences. The Center, established primarily to provide a forum where researchers can freely exchange ideas on the signal and image sciences in a comfortable intellectual environment, has grown over the last two years with the opening of a Reference Library (located in Building 272). The Technical Program for the 1996 Workshop include a variety of efforts in the Imaging Sciences including applications in the Microwave Imaging, highlighted by the Micro-Impulse Radar (MIR) system invented at LLNL, as well as other applications in this area. Special sessions organized by various individuals in Speech, Acoustic Ocean Imaging, Radar Ocean Imaging, Ultrasonic Imaging, and Optical Imaging discuss various applica- tions of real world problems. For the more theoretical, sessions on Imaging Algorithms and Computed Tomography were organized as well as for the more pragmatic featuring a session on Imaging Systems.

Candy, J.V.

1996-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

332

Magnetic susceptibility, magnetization, magnetic moment and characterization of Carancas meteorite  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

On September, 15th, 2007, in the community of Carancas (Puno, Peru) a stony meteorite formed a crater explosive type with a mean diameter of 13.5 m. some samples meteorite fragments were collected. The petrologic analysis performed corresponds to a meteorite ordinary chondrite H 4-5. In this paper we have analyzed the magnetic properties of a meteorite fragment with a proton magnetometer. Also in order to have a complete characterization of the Carancas meteorite and its crater, from several papers, articles and reports, we have made a compilation of the most important characteristics and properties of this meteorite.

Rosales, Domingo

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

333

Magnetic gripper device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A climbing apparatus is provided for climbing ferromagnetic surfaces, such as storage tanks and steel frame structures. A magnet assembly is rotatably mounted in a frame assembly. The frame assembly provides a pair of cam surfaces having different dimensions so that, when the frame is rotated, the cam surfaces contact the ferromagnetic surface to separate the magnet assembly from the surface. The different cam dimensions enable one side of the magnet at a time to be detached from the surface to reduce the effort needed to disengage the climbing apparatus. The cam surface also provides for smoothly attaching the apparatus. A hardened dowel pin is also attached to the frame and the pointed end of the dowel engages the surface when the magnet is attached to the surface to prevent downward sliding movement of the assembly under the weight of the user.

Meyer, R.E.

1993-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

334

Magnetic gripper device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A climbing apparatus is provided for climbing ferromagnetic surfaces, such as storage tanks and steel frame structures. A magnet assembly is rotatably mounted in a frame assembly. The frame assembly provides a pair of cam surfaces having different dimensions so that, when the frame is rotated, the cam surfaces contact the ferromagnetic surface to separate the magnet assembly from the surface. The different cam dimensions enable one side of the magnet at a time to be detached from the surface to reduce the effort needed to disengage the climbing apparatus. The cam surface also provides for smoothly attaching the apparatus. A hardened dowel pin is also attached to the frame and the pointed end of the dowel engages the surface when the magnet is attached to the surface to prevent downward sliding movement of the assembly under the weight of the user.

Meyer, Ross E. (Los Alamos, NM)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Geometrically frustrated quantum magnets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

(cont.) more general lessons on frustrated quantum magnetism. At the end, we demonstrate some new mathematical tools on two other frustrated two-dimensional systems, and summarize our conclusions, with an outlook to remaining ...

Nikolić , Predrag, 1974-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

336

Large Superconducting Magnet Systems  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The increase of energy in accelerators over the past decades has led to the design of superconducting magnets for both accelerators and the associated detectors. The use of Nb?Ti superconducting materials allows an increase in the dipole field by up to 10 T compared with the maximum field of 2 T in a conventional magnet. The field bending of the particles in the detectors and generated by the magnets can also be increased. New materials, such as Nb3Sn and high temperature superconductor (HTS) conductors, can open the way to higher fields, in the range 13–20 T. The latest generations of fusion machines producing hot plasma also use large superconducting magnet systems.

Védrine, P

2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

337

Instabilities and transport in magnetized plasmas  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The ensuing flows and tem- perature profiles are anisotropic with respect to the direction of the magnetic field, and lead to highly filamentary structures. Left Panel: X-ray emission im- age of solar coronal loops taken by the Transition Region and Coronal... Explorer (TRACE) (Reale & Peres, 2000; Reale et al., 2000; TRACE, 2000). Right Panel: D? emission images (visible light) from Edge Localised Modes (ELMS) on the Mega Ampere Spherical Tokomak (MAST) (Kirk et al., 2005; Dudson et al., 2008). in an asymptotic...

Rosin, Mark

2011-02-08T23:59:59.000Z

338

Magnetic fluorescent lamp  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The radiant emission of a mercury-argon discharge in a fluorescent lamp assembly is enhanced by providing means for establishing a magnetic field with lines of force along the path of electron flow through the bulb of the lamp assembly, to provide Zeeman splitting of the ultraviolet spectral line. Optimum results are obtained when the magnetic field strength causes a Zeeman splitting of approximately 1.7 times the thermal line width.

Berman, S.M.; Richardson R.W.

1983-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

339

Magnetic coupling device  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A quick connect/disconnect coupling apparatus is provided in which a base member is engaged by a locking housing through a series of interengagement pins. The pins maintain the shaft in a locked position. Upon exposure to an appropriately positioned magnetic field, pins are removed a sufficient distance such that the shaft may be withdrawn from the locking housing. The ability to lock and unlock the connector assembly requires no additional tools or parts apart from a magnetic key.

Nance, Thomas A. (Aiken, SC)

2009-08-18T23:59:59.000Z

340

Permanent Magnet Ecr Plasma Source With Magnetic Field Optimization  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

In a plasma-producing device, an optimized magnet field for electron cyclotron resonance plasma generation is provided by a shaped pole piece. The shaped pole piece adjusts spacing between the magnet and the resonance zone, creates a convex or concave resonance zone, and decreases stray fields between the resonance zone and the workpiece. For a cylindrical permanent magnet, the pole piece includes a disk adjacent the magnet together with an annular cylindrical sidewall structure axially aligned with the magnet and extending from the base around the permanent magnet. The pole piece directs magnetic field lines into the resonance zone, moving the resonance zone further from the face of the magnet. Additional permanent magnets or magnet arrays may be utilized to control field contours on a local scale. Rather than a permeable material, the sidewall structure may be composed of an annular cylindrical magnetic material having a polarity opposite that of the permanent magnet, creating convex regions in the resonance zone. An annular disk-shaped recurve section at the end of the sidewall structure forms magnetic mirrors keeping the plasma off the pole piece. A recurve section composed of magnetic material having a radial polarity forms convex regions and/or magnetic mirrors within the resonance zone.

Doughty, Frank C. (Plano, TX); Spencer, John E. (Plano, TX)

2000-12-19T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hyperspectral imaging magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

Bioengineering 278: Magnetic Resonance Imaging Laboratory Winter 2013  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

the provided piece of pyrolytic carbon (diamagnetic) on the surface of the pink oil phantom so that the carbon and the collection of the center of K-space (the gradient echo). In spin echo mode, the CV tau sets the offset by applying a shim offset in the X direction. The shim offset should perturb the phase of the gradient echoes

California at San Diego, University of

342

SQUID-Detected Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Microtesla Fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

quantization (30). In a Josephson junction, Cooper pairs ofconsists of two Josephson junctions connected in parallel onis the array of 20 Josephson junctions in series with the

Moessle, Michael; Hatridge, Michael; Clarke, John

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

343

Postinfectious Encephalitis A Coregistered SPECT and Magnetic Resonance Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-mail: eitti@humc.edu From the Departments of Radiology,* Pediatric Neurology, and Pathology, Harbor

Itti, Laurent

344

Compressed Sensing accelerated radial acquisitions for dynamic Magnetic Resonance Imaging.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

??We present a flexible method dubbed Accelerated Radial Compressed Sensing (ARCS) which uses Compressed Sensing to reconstruct 2D and 3D radial data. Our tests on… (more)

Zwaan, I.N.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

345

Wavelet smoothing of functional magnetic resonance images: A ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and these choices, among other things, concern us in this paper. ... shows the active pixels in white (with a pixel value of 1) and the inactive pixels in black (with a value of 0). ... We dealt with the boundaries in the final (time) dimension.

1910-30-72T23:59:59.000Z

346

ischemic (at-risk) Current Research in Magnetic Resonance Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

killer in the United States, and is responsible for half million deaths and medical costs on the order of $165 billion per year. There are many different types of heart disease (ischemic, valvular, con Department of Electrical Engineering, Viterbi School of EngineeringMing Hsieh Department of Electrical

Southern California, University of

347

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of PEM Dehydration and Gas Manifold  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and InterfacesAdministration -Lowell L.FallU . SChromatography

348

Magnetic charge crystals imaged in artificial spin ice  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsrucLas Conchas recovery challenge fund Las ConchasTrail

349

Application of Magnetic Resonance (MR) Imaging for the Development and  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to someone by E-mailRadioimmunotherapy of Cancers.Appendix

350

Magnetic metallic multilayers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Utilizing self-consistent Hartree-Fock calculations, several aspects of multilayers and interfaces are explored: enhancement and reduction of the local magnetic moments, magnetic coupling at the interfaces, magnetic arrangements within each film and among non-neighboring films, global symmetry of the systems, frustration, orientation of the various moments with respect to an outside applied field, and magnetic-field induced transitions. Magnetoresistance of ferromagnetic-normal-metal multilayers is found by solving the Boltzmann equation. Results explain the giant negative magnetoresistance encountered in these systems when an initial antiparallel arrangement is changed into a parallel configuration by an external magnetic field. The calculation depends on (1) geometric parameters (thicknesses of layers), (2) intrinsic metal parameters (number of conduction electrons, magnetization, and effective masses in layers), (3) bulk sample properties (conductivity relaxation times), (4) interface scattering properties (diffuse scattering versus potential scattering at the interfaces, and (5) outer surface scattering properties (specular versus diffuse surface scattering). It is found that a large negative magnetoresistance requires considerable asymmetry in interface scattering for the two spin orientations. Features of the interfaces that may produce an asymmetrical spin-dependent scattering are studied: varying interfacial geometric random roughness with no lateral coherence, correlated (quasi-periodic) roughness, and varying chemical composition of the interfaces. The interplay between these aspects of the interfaces may enhance or suppress the magnetoresistance, depending on whether it increases or decreases the asymmetry in the spin-dependent scattering of the conduction electrons.

Hood, R.Q.

1994-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

351

Freely oriented portable superconducting magnet  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A freely oriented portable superconducting magnet is disclosed. Coolant is supplied to the superconducting magnet from a repository separate from the magnet, enabling portability of the magnet. A plurality of support assemblies structurally anchor and thermally isolate the magnet within a thermal shield. A plurality of support assemblies structurally anchor and thermally isolate the thermal shield within a vacuum vessel. The support assemblies restrain movement of the magnet resulting from energizing and cooldown, as well as from changes in orientation, enabling the magnet to be freely orientable.

Schmierer, Eric N. (Los Alamos, NM); Prenger, F. Coyne (Los Alamos, NM); Hill, Dallas D. (Los Alamos, NM)

2010-01-12T23:59:59.000Z

352

NMR imaging of materials  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Interest in the area of NMR imaging has been driven by the widespread success of medical imaging. John M. Listerud of the Pendergrass Diagnostic Research Laboratories, Steven W. Sinton of Lockheed, and Gary P. Drobny of the University of Washington describe the principal image reconstruction methods, factors limiting spatial resolution, and applications of imaging to the study of materials.

Listerud, J.M.; Sinton, S.W.; Drobny, G.P.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

353

Scaling of EPR spectral-spatial images with size of sample: Images of a sample greater than 5 cm in linear dimension  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The authors have obtained spectral-spatial EPR images of a phantom significantly larger than those previously obtained. Images of a homogeneous phantom 4.2 cm in diameter and 6.5 cm in length with B{sub 1} equivalent to that used for smaller samples give a similar linewidth resolution both with linewidth population distributions of width 0.1 {mu}T. Spatial resolution appeared to have modest degradation. Images of the large homogeneous phantom provide maps of the magnetic field of a partially shimmed magnet.

Ahn, Kang-Hyun; Subramanian, V. S.; Halpern, Howard J. [Department of Radiation and Cellular Oncology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 and Center for EPR Imaging in Vivo Physiology, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637 (United States)

2007-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

354

MAGNETIC NEUTRON SCATTERING  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Much of our understanding of the atomic-scale magnetic structure and the dynamical properties of solids and liquids was gained from neutron-scattering studies. Elastic and inelastic neutron spectroscopy provided physicists with an unprecedented, detailed access to spin structures, magnetic-excitation spectra, soft-modes and critical dynamics at magnetic-phase transitions, which is unrivaled by other experimental techniques. Because the neutron has no electric charge, it is an ideal weakly interacting and highly penetrating probe of matter's inner structure and dynamics. Unlike techniques using photon electric fields or charged particles (e.g., electrons, muons) that significantly modify the local electronic environment, neutron spectroscopy allows determination of a material's intrinsic, unperturbed physical properties. The method is not sensitive to extraneous charges, electric fields, and the imperfection of surface layers. Because the neutron is a highly penetrating and non-destructive probe, neutron spectroscopy can probe the microscopic properties of bulk materials (not just their surface layers) and study samples embedded in complex environments, such as cryostats, magnets, and pressure cells, which are essential for understanding the physical origins of magnetic phenomena. Neutron scattering is arguably the most powerful and versatile experimental tool for studying the microscopic properties of the magnetic materials. The magnitude of the cross-section of the neutron magnetic scattering is similar to the cross-section of nuclear scattering by short-range nuclear forces, and is large enough to provide measurable scattering by the ordered magnetic structures and electron spin fluctuations. In the half-a-century or so that has passed since neutron beams with sufficient intensity for scattering applications became available with the advent of the nuclear reactors, they have became indispensable tools for studying a variety of important areas of modern science, ranging from large-scale structures and dynamics of polymers and biological systems, to electronic properties of today's technological materials. Neutron scattering developed into a vast field, encompassing many different experimental techniques aimed at exploring different aspects of matter's atomic structure and dynamics. Modern magnetic neutron scattering includes several specialized techniques designed for specific studies and/or particular classes of materials. Among these are magnetic reflectometry aimed at investigating surfaces, interfaces, and multilayers, small-angle scattering for the large-scale structures, such as a vortex lattice in a superconductor, and neutron spin-echo spectroscopy for glasses and polymers. Each of these techniques and many others offer exciting opportunities for examining magnetism and warrant extensive reviews, but the aim of this chapter is not to survey how different neutron-scattering methods are used to examine magnetic properties of different materials. Here, we concentrate on reviewing the basics of the magnetic neutron scattering, and on the recent developments in applying one of the oldest methods, the triple axis spectroscopy, that still is among the most extensively used ones. The developments discussed here are new and have not been coherently reviewed. Chapter 2 of this book reviews magnetic small-angle scattering, and modern techniques of neutron magnetic reflectometry are discussed in Chapter 3.

ZALIZNYAK,I.A.; LEE,S.H.

2004-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

355

Seismic Imaging and Monitoring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

I give an overview of LANL's capability in seismic imaging and monitoring. I present some seismic imaging and monitoring results, including imaging of complex structures, subsalt imaging of Gulf of Mexico, fault/fracture zone imaging for geothermal exploration at the Jemez pueblo, time-lapse imaging of a walkway vertical seismic profiling data for monitoring CO{sub 2} inject at SACROC, and microseismic event locations for monitoring CO{sub 2} injection at Aneth. These examples demonstrate LANL's high-resolution and high-fidelity seismic imaging and monitoring capabilities.

Huang, Lianjie [Los Alamos National Laboratory

2012-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

356

Ground-based Technologies for Cotton Root Rot Control  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. The effects of multiple plant stressors on the accuracy of this technique are unknown. A similar classification process was done using hyperspectral images by Yang et al. (2010). Their study showed that both hyperspectral and multispectral methods could...

Cribben, Curtis D

2013-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

357

Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials 290291 (2005) 836838 Dynamic response limits of an elastic magnet  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

on the elastomagnetic coupling but also on the interaction among the microparticles magnetic moments depending as for possible applications [1,2]. When the magnetic particles are permanently magnetized and the matrix material. Bar shaped samples have been produced with the permanent magnetic moments preferentially oriented

Franzese, Giancarlo

358

Magnetic monopole and the nature of the static magnetic field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the factuality of the hypothetical magnetic monopole and the nature of the static magnetic field. It is shown from many aspects that the concept of the massive magnetic monopoles clearly is physically untrue. We argue that the static magnetic field of a bar magnet, in fact, is the static electric field of the periodically quasi-one-dimensional electric-dipole superlattice, which can be well established in some transition metals with the localized d-electron. This research may shed light on the perfect unification of magnetic and electrical phenomena.

Xiuqing Huang

2008-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

359

New Frontiers in Solar Physics: Broadband Imaging Spectroscopy with the  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, the solar panel of the AASC recommended an integrated suite of instrumentation designed to meetNew Frontiers in Solar Physics: Broadband Imaging Spectroscopy with the Frequency Agile Solar and other astrophysical objects and processes. Outstanding problems in solar physics include the magnetic

360

Artificial neural network prediction of ischemic tissue fate in acute stroke imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Artificial neural network prediction of ischemic tissue fate in acute stroke imaging Shiliang Huang Multimodal magnetic resonance imaging of acute stroke provides predictive value that can be used to guide stroke therapy. A flexible artificial neural network (ANN) algorithm was developed and applied to predict

Duong, Timothy Q.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hyperspectral imaging magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Spectroscopic imaging from spatially-encoded single-scan multidimensional MRI data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Spectroscopic imaging from spatially-encoded single-scan multidimensional MRI data Assaf Tal, Lucio multidimensional magnetic resonance images within a single scan, based on a spatial encoding of the spin in its magnitude the spatial distribution of spins throughout the sample. It is hereby shown that whereas

Frydman, Lucio

362

3D Harmonic Mapping and Tetrahedral Meshing of Brain Imaging Data  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

3D Harmonic Mapping and Tetrahedral Meshing of Brain Imaging Data Yalin Wang1 , Xianfeng Gu2 , Paul algorithm finds a harmonic map from a 3-manifold to a 3D solid sphere and the second is a novel sphere of magnetic resonance images (MRI). A heat flow method is used to solve the volumetric harmonic mapping

Thompson, Paul

363

Active magnetic regenerator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for refrigeration are disclosed which provides efficient refrigeration over temperature ranges in excess of 20/sup 0/C and which requires no maintenance and is, therefore, usable on an unmanned satellite. The apparatus comprises a superconducting magnet which may be solenoidal. A piston comprising a substance such as a rare earth substance which is maintained near its Curie temperature reciprocates through the bore of the solenoidal magnet. A magnetic drive rod is connected to the piston and appropriate heat sinks are connected thereto. The piston is driven by a suitable mechanical drive such as an electric motor and cam. In practicing the invention, the body of the piston is magnetized and demagnetized as it moves through the magnetic field of the solenoid to approximate any of the following cycles or a condition thereof as well as, potentially, other cycles: Brayton, Carnot, Ericsson, and Stirling. Advantages of the present invention include: that refrigeration can be accomplished over at least a 20/sup 0/C scale at superconducting temperatures as well as at more conventional temperatures; very high efficiency, high reliability, and small size. (LCL)

Barclay, J.A.; Steyert, W.A.

1981-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

364

Reversible collisionless magnetic reconnection  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Reversible magnetic reconnection is demonstrated for the first time by means of gyrokinetic numerical simulations of a collisionless magnetized plasma. Growth of a current-driven instability in a sheared magnetic field is accompanied by magnetic reconnection due to electron inertia effects. Following the instability growth, the collisionless reconnection is accelerated with development of a cross-shaped structure of current density, and then all field lines are reconnected. The fully reconnected state is followed by the secondary reconnection resulting in a weakly turbulent state. A time-reversed simulation starting from the turbulent state manifests that the collisionless reconnection process proceeds inversely leading to the initial state. During the reversed reconnection, the kinetic energy is reconverted into the original magnetic field energy. In order to understand the stability of reversed process, an external perturbation is added to the fully reconnected state, and it is found that the accelerated reconnection is reversible when the deviation of the E × B streamlines due to the perturbation is comparable with or smaller than a current layer width.

Ishizawa, A.; Watanabe, T.-H. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)] [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)

2013-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

365

Superconducting magnetic coil  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A superconducting magnetic coil includes a plurality of sections positioned axially along the longitudinal axis of the coil, each section being formed of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor material wound about a longitudinal axis of the coil and having an associated critical current value that is dependent on the orientation of the magnetic field of the coil. The cross section of the superconductor, or the type of superconductor material, at sections along the axial and radial axes of the coil are changed to provide an increased critical current at those regions where the magnetic field is oriented more perpendicularly to the conductor plane, to thereby increase the critical current at these regions and to maintain an overall higher critical current of the coil. 15 figs.

Aized, D.; Schwall, R.E.

1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

366

Superconducting magnetic coil  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A superconducting magnetic coil includes a plurality of sections positioned axially along the longitudinal axis of the coil, each section being formed of an anisotropic high temperature superconductor material wound about a longitudinal axis of the coil and having an associated critical current value that is dependent on the orientation of the magnetic field of the coil. The cross section of the superconductor, or the type of superconductor material, at sections along the axial and radial axes of the coil are changed to provide an increased critical current at those regions where the magnetic field is oriented more perpendicularly to the conductor plane, to thereby increase the critical current at these regions and to maintain an overall higher critical current of the coil.

Aized, Dawood (Marlboro, MA); Schwall, Robert E. (Northborough, MA)

1999-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

367

Ultra-high-resolution Observations of MHD Waves in Photospheric Magnetic Structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Here we review the recent progress made in the detection, examination, characterisation and interpretation of oscillations manifesting in small-scale magnetic elements in the solar photosphere. This region of the Sun's atmosphere is especially dynamic, and importantly, permeated with an abundance of magnetic field concentrations. Such magnetic features can span diameters of hundreds to many tens of thousands of km, and are thus commonly referred to as the `building blocks' of the magnetic solar atmosphere. However, it is the smallest magnetic elements that have risen to the forefront of solar physics research in recent years. Structures, which include magnetic bright points, are often at the diffraction limit of even the largest of solar telescopes. Importantly, it is the improvements in facilities, instrumentation, imaging techniques and processing algorithms during recent years that have allowed researchers to examine the motions, dynamics and evolution of such features on the smallest spatial and temporal ...

Jess, David B

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

368

Frustrated Magnetism in Low-Dimensional Lattices  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and C. Baines. Quantum magnetism in the paratacamite family:14] Stephen Blundell. Magnetism in Condensed Matter. OxfordElectrons and Quantum Magnetism. Graduate Texts in Con-

Tovar, Mayra

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Superconducting Magnet Technology for Future Hadron Colliders  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

I. Superconducting Magnet Technology for Future Hadl"On1994. M.N. Wilson, Superconducting Magnets (Clarendon Press,The application of superconducting magnets to large-scale

Scanlan, R.M.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

370

26 Tesla DC Magnet for Neutron Scattering  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Previously, DC Magnets located at Neutron-Scattering Beamlines were commercially-manufactured superconducting magnets and limited to 17 T. A few pulsed magnet systems have been...

371

Magnetic catalysis and inverse magnetic catalysis in QCD  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We investigate the effects of strong magnetic fields on the QCD phase structure at vanishing density by solving the gluon and quark gap equations, and by studying the dynamics of the quark scattering with the four-fermi coupling. The chiral crossover temperature as well as the chiral condensate are computed. For asymptotically large magnetic fields we find magnetic catalysis, while we find inverse magnetic catalysis for intermediate magnetic fields. Moreover, for large magnetic fields the chiral phase transition for massless quarks turns into a crossover. The underlying mechanisms are then investigated analytically within a few simplifications of the full numerical analysis. We find that a combination of gluon screening effects and the weakening of the strong coupling is responsible for the phenomenon of inverse catalysis. In turn, the magnetic catalysis at large magnetic field is already indicated by simple arguments based on dimensionality.

Niklas Mueller; Jan M. Pawlowski

2015-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

372

Magnetic fluid flow phenomena in DC and rotating magnetic fields  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

An investigation of magnetic fluid experiments and analysis is presented in three parts: a study of magnetic field induced torques in magnetorheological fluids, a characterization and quantitative measurement of properties ...

Rhodes, Scott E. (Scott Edward), 1981-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Magnetic nanowire based high resolution magnetic force microscope probes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-resolution magnetic force microscope probes using preformed magnetic nanowires. Nickel and cobalt nanowires produced by electrodeposition were directly assembled onto the tip of a commercial atomic force microscope cantilever

Qin, Lu-Chang

374

Magnetic Field Measurement System  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

A magnetic field measurement system was designed, built and installed at MAX Lab, Sweden for the purpose of characterizing the magnetic field produced by Insertion Devices (see Figure 1). The measurement system consists of a large granite beam roughly 2 feet square and 14 feet long that has been polished beyond laboratory grade for flatness and straightness. The granite precision coupled with the design of the carriage yielded minimum position deviations as measured at the probe tip. The Hall probe data collection and compensation technique allows exceptional resolution and range while taking data on the fly to programmable sample spacing. Additional flip coil provides field integral data.

Kulesza, Joe; Johnson, Eric; Lyndaker, Aaron; Deyhim, Alex; Waterman, Dave; Blomqvist, K. Ingvar [Advanced Design Consulting USA, 126 Ridge Road, P.O. Box 187, Lansing, NY 14882 (United States); Dunn, Jonathan Hunter [MAX-lab, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden)

2007-01-19T23:59:59.000Z

375

Cool Magnetic Molecules  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationCleanCommunity2Workshops01ControllingControlsCool MagneticCool Magnetic

376

SKA Deep Polarization and Cosmic Magnetism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Deep surveys with the SKA1-MID array offer for the first time the opportunity to systematically explore the polarization properties of the microJy source population. Our knowledge of the polarized sky approaching these levels is still very limited. In total intensity the population will be dominated by star-forming and normal galaxies to intermediate redshifts ($z \\sim1-2$), and low-luminosity AGN to high redshift. The polarized emission from these objects is a powerful probe of their intrinsic magnetic fields and of their magnetic environments. For redshift of order 1 and above the broad bandwidth of the mid-bands span the Faraday thick and thin regimes allowing study of the intrinsic polarization properties of these objects as well as depolarization from embedded and foreground plasmas. The deep field polarization images will provide Rotation Measures data with very high solid angle density allowing a sensitive statistical analysis of the angular variation of RM on critical arc-minute scales from a magnetic...

Taylor, A R; Akahori, Takuya; Beck, Rainer; Gaensler, Bryan; Heald, George; Johnston-Hollitt, Melanie; Langer, Mathieu; Rudnick, Lawrence; Ryu, Dongsu; Scaife, Anna; Schleicher, Dominik; Stil, Jeroen

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

377

Magnetic resonance studies of cement based materials in inhomogeneous magnetic fields  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Single-sided magnets give hope that Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) might in future be used for in situ characterisation of hydration and water transport in the surface layers of concrete slabs. Towards that end, a portable NMR-MOUSE (MObile Universal Surface Explorer) has been used to follow the hydration of gypsum based plaster, a Portland cement paste and concrete mortar. The results compare favourably to those obtained using a standard laboratory bench-top spectrometer. Further, stray field imaging (STRAFI) based methods have been used with embedded NMR detector coils to study water transport across a mortar/topping interface. The measured signal amplitudes are found to correlate with varying sample conditions.

Boguszynska, Joanna [Institute of Molecular Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Smoluchowskiego 17, Poznan (Poland); Brown, Marc C.A. [School of Physical Sciences, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent, CT2 7NR (United Kingdom); McDonald, Peter J. [School of Electronics and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Surrey, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: p.mcdonald@surrey.ac.uk; Mitchell, Jonathan [School of Electronics and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Surrey, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Mulheron, Mike [School of Engineering, University of Surrey, Surrey, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Tritt-Goc, Jadwiga [Institute of Molecular Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, Smoluchowskiego 17, Poznan (Poland); Verganelakis, Dimitris A. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, CB2 3RA (United Kingdom)

2005-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

378

MagLab - Meet the Magnets: 45 Tesla Hybrid  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Features > Meet the Magnets Meet the Magnets Choose a Magnet 45 Tesla Hybrid 900 MHz NMR Magnet 25 Tesla Split Magnet 14.5 Tesla ICR Magnet 100 Tesla Multi-shot Magnet 600 MHz...

379

Magnetic nanoworms Systematic Surface Engineering of Magnetic Nanoworms  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic nanoworms Systematic Surface Engineering of Magnetic Nanoworms for in vivo Tumor Targeting and Engineering Program Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry University of California, San Diego 9500 Gilman magnetic materials nanoworms peptides tumor targeting 694 ß 2009 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGa

Bhatia, Sangeeta

380

Magnetic Coordinates for Systems with Imperfect Magnetic Surfaces  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic Coordinates for Systems with Imperfect Magnetic Surfaces R. L. Dewar and S. R. Hudson & Engineering, The Australian National University, Canberra, A.C.T. 0200, Australia e-mail: robert-orbits, and the surfaces are formed from a continuous one-parameter family of such orbits. Magnetic field-line flow

Dewar, Robert L.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hyperspectral imaging magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

Imaging in radiotherapy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The text contains details of recording media, image quality, sensitometry, processing and equipment used in radiotherapy for imaging. It reflects part of the syllabus for the College of Radiographers.

Taylor, J.

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

User Science Images  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Image: OBrianImageBig.png | png | 5 MB SlavaFull.png FES: Small Scale Experimental Plasma Research October 21, 2010 | Author(s): Vyacheslav Lukin (NRL) | Category: Fusion Energy |...

383

Ultra-low field nuclear magnetic resonance and magnetic resonance imaging to discriminate and identify materials  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Method comprising obtaining an NMR measurement from a sample wherein an ultra-low field NMR system probes the sample and produces the NMR measurement and wherein a sampling temperature, prepolarizing field, and measurement field are known; detecting the NMR measurement by means of inductive coils; analyzing the NMR measurement to obtain at least one measurement feature wherein the measurement feature comprises T1, T2, T1.rho., or the frequency dependence thereof; and, searching for the at least one measurement feature within a database comprising NMR reference data for at least one material to determine if the sample comprises a material of interest.

Matlashov, Andrei Nikolaevich; Urbaitis, Algis V.; Savukov, Igor Mykhaylovich; Espy, Michelle A.; Volegov, Petr Lvovich; Kraus, Jr., Robert Henry

2013-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

384

Dual Plane Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We outline a technique called Dual Plane Imaging which should significantly improve images which would otherwise be blurred due to atmospheric turbulence. The technique involves capturing all the spatial, directional and temporal information about the arriving photons and processing the data afterwards to produce the sharpened images. The technique has particular relevance for imaging at around 400-1000nm on extremely large telescopes (ELTs).

Parry, Ian

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Consumers' Image of Broilers.  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

which they feel the product possesses. This research was designed to determine consumers' favorable and unfavorable images as to broilers, both in making purchases in stores and in serving them as a meat dish. These images, summarized briefly here... count. The Preparation and Cooking Image: The h0u.l wife's image of broilers focuses on one metliotl- frying. The major deterrent to preparing othci dishes was that these are either too difficult or canno* be prepared satisfactorily...

Courtenay, Henry V.; Branson, Robert E.

1962-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

386

Imaging with Scattered Neutrons  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We describe a novel experimental technique for neutron imaging with scattered neutrons. These scattered neutrons are of interest for condensed matter physics, because they permit to reveal the local distribution of incoherent and coherent scattering within a sample. In contrast to standard attenuation based imaging, scattered neutron imaging distinguishes between the scattering cross section and the total attenuation cross section including absorption. First successful low-noise millimeter-resolution images by scattered neutron radiography and tomography are presented.

H. Ballhausen; H. Abele; R. Gaehler; M. Trapp; A. Van Overberghe

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

387

Solar Magnetic Flux Ropes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The most probable initial magnetic configuration of a CME is a flux rope consisting of twisted field lines which fill the whole volume of a dark coronal cavity. The flux ropes can be in stable equilibrium in the coronal magnetic field for weeks and even months, but suddenly they loose their stability and erupt with high speed. Their transition to the unstable phase depends on the parameters of the flux rope (i.e., total electric current, twist, mass loading etc.), as well as on the properties of the ambient coronal magnetic field. One of the major governing factors is the vertical gradient of the coronal magnetic field which is estimated as decay index (n). Cold dense prominence material can be collected in the lower parts of the helical flux tubes. Filaments are therefore good tracers of the flux ropes in the corona, which become visible long before the beginning of the eruption. The perspectives of the filament eruptions and following CMEs can be estimated by the comparison of observed filament heights with...

Filippov, Boris; Srivastava, Abhishek K; Uddin, Wahab

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

388

Rotary magnetic heat pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A rotary magnetic heat pump constructed without flow seals or segmented rotor accomplishes recuperation and regeneration by using split flow paths. Heat exchange fluid pumped through heat exchangers and returned to the heat pump splits into two flow components: one flowing counter to the rotor rotation and one flowing with the rotation. 5 figs.

Kirol, L.D.

1987-02-11T23:59:59.000Z

389

Superconducting Magnet Division  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the 400 kW end of RIA's Fragment Separator are subjected to several orders of magnitude more radiation an order of magnitude as compared to that for present superconducting accelerator magnets. An OPERA3d model://www.phy.anl.gov/ria/ http://www.orau.org/ria/ Figure: On this chart of the nuclides, black squares represent stable nuclei

Gupta, Ramesh

390

Magnetic Monopole Searches  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

In these lecture notes we discuss the status of the searches for classical Dirac Magnetic Monopoles (MMs) at accelerators, for GUT superheavy MMs in the penetrating cosmic radiation and for Intermediate Mass MMs. Also the searches for nuclearites and Q-balls are considered.

G. Giacomelli; L. Patrizii

2005-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

391

Optically Enhanced Magnetic Resonance  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

, like spatial structures or molecular dynamics. While the direct excitation of nuclear spin transitions.1 Motivation The physical mechanism of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, the excitation of transitions light for polarizing the spin system or for observing its dynamics. This possibility arises from

Suter, Dieter

392

Magnetic resonance apparatus  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Means for producing a region of homogeneous magnetic field remote from the source of the field, wherein two equal field sources are arranged axially so their fields oppose, producing a region near the plane perpendicular to the axis midway between the sources where the radial component of the field goes through a maximum. Near the maximum, the field is homogeneous over prescribed regions.

Jackson, Jasper A. (Los Alamos, NM); Cooper, Richard K. (Los Alamos, NM)

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Rotary magnetic heat pump  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A rotary magnetic heat pump constructed without flow seals or segmented rotor accomplishes recuperation and regeneration by using split flow paths. Heat exchange fluid pumped through heat exchangers and returned to the heat pump splits into two flow components: one flowing counter to the rotor rotation and one flowing with the rotation.

Kirol, Lance D. (Shelly, ID)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

394

Medical imaging systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and diagnostic or functional images. The system may be portable, and may include adapters for connecting various light sources and cameras in open surgical environments or laparascopic or endoscopic environments. A user interface provides control over the functionality of the integrated imaging system. In one embodiment, the system provides a tool for surgical pathology.

Frangioni, John V

2013-06-25T23:59:59.000Z

395

Human Functional Brain Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human Functional Brain Imaging 1990­2009 September 2011 Portfolio Review Summary Brain Imaging #12 Dale ­ one of our first Trustees. Understanding the brain remains one of our key strategic aims today three-fold: · to identify the key landmarks and influences on the human functional brain imaging

Rambaut, Andrew

396

Human Functional Brain Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Human Functional Brain Imaging 1990­2009 September 2011 Portfolio Review #12;2 | Portfolio Review: Human Functional Brain ImagingThe Wellcome Trust is a charity registered in England and Wales, no's role in supporting human functional brain imaging and have informed `our' speculations for the future

Rambaut, Andrew

397

Ames Lab 101: Magnetic Refrigeration  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Vitalij Pecharsky, distinguished professor of materials science and engineering, discusses his research in magnetic refrigeration at Ames Lab.

Pecharsky, Vitalij

2013-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

398

Zoomed Functional Imaging in the Human Brain at 7 Tesla with Simultaneous High Spatial and High Temporal Resolution  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Zoomed Functional Imaging in the Human Brain at 7 Tesla with Simultaneous High Spatial and High and is mainly limited by sensitivity. Here, signal-to-noise gains at high magnetic fields (7 Tesla

399

JOURNAL OF MICROELECTROMECHANICAL SYSTEMS, VOL. 19, NO. 6, DECEMBER 2010 1341 Encapsulation of Capacitive Micromachined  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

-time imaging conditions. Index Terms--Fourier spectrometer, hyperspectral imaging, microelectromechanical-systems]­[6]. Espe- cially the progress in optical microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) technology has initiated

Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T. "Pierre"

400

MO. REV. MO. MAGNETIC CLEANLINESS GUIDELINES  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

in the ALSEP Systems Engineering Magnetic Cleanliness File. #12;NO. REV. NO. ATM-865 MAGNETIC CLEANLINESS Engineering Magnetic Cleanliness File. #12;MO. REV. MO. ATM-865 MAGNETIC CLEANLINESS GUIDELINES PAGE 1 Of 3 DATE 4/6/70 The purpose

Rathbun, Julie A.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hyperspectral imaging magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

Magnetic reconnection launcher  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An electromagnetic launcher includes a plurality of electrical stages which are energized sequentially in the launcher with the passage of a projectiles. Each stage of the launcher includes two or more coils which are arranged coaxially on either closed-loop or straight lines to form gaps between their ends. The projectile has an electrically conductive gap-portion that passes through all the gaps of all the stages in a direction transverse to the axes of the coils. The coils receive an electric current, store magnetic energy, and convert a significant portion of the stored magnetic energy into kinetic energy of the projectile moves through the gap. The magnetic polarity of the opposing coils is in the same direction, e.g. N-S-N-S. A gap portion of the projectile may be made from aluminum and is propelled by the reconnection of magnetic flux stored in the coils which causes accelerating forces to act upon the projectile and at the horizontal surfaces of the projectile near its rear. The gap portion of the projectile may be flat, rectangular and longer than the length of the opposing coils. The gap portion of the projectile permits substantially unrestricted distribution of the induced currents so that current densities are only high where the useful magnetic force is high. This allows designs which permit ohmic oblation from the rear surfaces of the gap portion of the projectile allowing much high velocities to be achieved. An electric power apparatus controls the electric power supplied to the opposing coils until the gap portion of the projectile substantially occupies the gap between the coils, at which time the coils are supplied with peak current quickly. 8 figs.

Cowan, M.

1987-04-06T23:59:59.000Z

402

Low-temperature magnetic refrigerator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The invention relates to magnetic refrigeration and more particularly to low temperature refrigeration between about 4 and about 20 K, with an apparatus and method utilizing a belt of magnetic material passed in and out of a magnetic field with heat exchangers within and outside the field operably disposed to accomplish refrigeration.

Barclay, J.A.

1983-05-26T23:59:59.000Z

403

Superconducting pipes and levitating magnets  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Motivated by a beautiful demonstration of the Faraday's and Lenz's law in which a small neodymium magnet falls slowly through a conducting non-ferromagnetic tube, we consider the dynamics of a magnet falling through a superconducting pipe. Unlike the case of normal conducting pipes, in which the magnet quickly reaches the terminal velocity, inside a superconducting tube the magnet falls freely. On the other hand, to enter the pipe the magnet must overcome a large electromagnetic energy barrier. For sufficiently strong magnets, the barrier is so large that the magnet will not be able to penetrate it and will be suspended over the front edge. We calculate the work that must done to force the magnet to enter a superconducting tube. The calculations show that superconducting pipes are very efficient at screening magnetic fields. For example, the magnetic field of a dipole at the center of a short pipe of radius $a$ and length $L \\approx a$ decays, in the axial direction, with a characteristic length $\\xi \\approx 0.26 a$. The efficient screening of the magnetic field might be useful for shielding highly sensitive superconducting quantum interference devices, SQUIDs. Finally, the motion of the magnet through a superconducting pipe is compared and contrasted to the flow of ions through a trans-membrane channel.

Yan Levin; Felipe B. Rizzato

2006-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

404

LABORATORY VI ELECTRICITY FROM MAGNETISM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LABORATORY VI ELECTRICITY FROM MAGNETISM Lab VI - 1 In the previous problems you explored the magnetic field and its effect on moving charges. You also saw how electric currents could create magnetic can give rise to electric currents. This is the effect that allows the generation of electricity

Minnesota, University of

405

Future Directions for Magnetic Sensors  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

and Engineering Laboratory Magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) sensors are rapidly becoming the technology of choiceFuture Directions for Magnetic Sensors: HYBRIDMATERIALS Our goal is to develop the scientific expertise needed to allow modeling and simulation to become the driving force in improving magnetic sensors

406

Automation in image cytometry : continuous HCS and kinetic image cytometry  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO Automation in Image Cytometry:xiv Abstract of Dissertation Automation in Image Cytometry:

Charlot, David J.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Magnetic Edge States in Graphene  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Magnetic confinement in graphene has been of recent and growing interest because its potential applications in nanotechnology. In particular, the observation of the so called magnetic edge states in graphene has opened the possibility to deepen into the generation of spin currents and its applications in spintronics. We study the magnetic edge states of quasi-particles arising in graphene monolayers due to an inhomogeneous magnetic field of a magnetic barrier in the formalism of the two-dimensional massless Dirac equation. We also show how the solutions of such states in each of both triangular sublattices of the graphene are related through a supersymmetric transformation in the quantum mechanical sense.

Gabriela Murguia

2010-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

408

Fast superconducting magnetic field switch  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The superconducting magnetic switch or fast kicker magnet is employed with electron stream or a bunch of electrons to rapidly change the direction of flow of the electron stream or bunch of electrons. The apparatus employs a beam tube which is coated with a film of superconducting material. The tube is cooled to a temperature below the superconducting transition temperature and is subjected to a constant magnetic field which is produced by an external dc magnet. The magnetic field produced by the dc magnet is less than the critical field for the superconducting material, thus, creating a Meissner Effect condition. A controllable fast electromagnet is used to provide a magnetic field which supplements that of the dc magnet so that when the fast magnet is energized the combined magnetic field is now greater that the critical field and the superconducting material returns to its normal state allowing the magnetic field to penetrate the tube. This produces an internal field which effects the direction of motion and of the electron stream or electron bunch. The switch can also operate as a switching mechanism for charged particles.

Goren, Yehuda (Mountain View, CA); Mahale, Narayan K. (The Woodlands, TX)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

409

Image compression technique  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An image is compressed by identifying edge pixels of the image; creating a filled edge array of pixels each of the pixels in the filled edge array which corresponds to an edge pixel having a value equal to the value of a pixel of the image array selected in response to the edge pixel, and each of the pixels in the filled edge array which does not correspond to an edge pixel having a value which is a weighted average of the values of surrounding pixels in the filled edge array which do correspond to edge pixels; and subtracting the filled edge array from the image array to create a difference array. The edge file and the difference array are then separately compressed and transmitted or stored. The original image is later reconstructed by creating a preliminary array in response to the received edge file, and adding the preliminary array to the received difference array. Filling is accomplished by solving Laplace`s equation using a multi-grid technique. Contour and difference file coding techniques also are described. The techniques can be used in a method for processing a plurality of images by selecting a respective compression approach for each image, compressing each of the images according to the compression approach selected, and transmitting each of the images as compressed, in correspondence with an indication of the approach selected for the image. 16 figs.

Fu, C.Y.; Petrich, L.I.

1997-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

410

Apparatus and method for continuous separation of magnetic particles from non-magnetic fluids  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An apparatus and method for continuous separation of magnetic particles from non-magnetic fluids including particular rods, magnetic fields and flow arrangements.

Oder, Robin R. (Export, PA); Jamison, Russell E. (Burrell, PA)

2011-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

411

Method for high resolution magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object that includes placing the object in a main magnetic field (that has a static field direction) and in a radio frequency field; rotating the object at a frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a phase-corrected magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. The object may be reoriented about the magic angle axis between three predetermined positions that are related to each other by 120.degree.. The main magnetic field may be rotated mechanically or electronically. Methods for magnetic resonance imaging of the object are also described.

Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

2003-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

412

Method for high resolution magnetic resonance analysis using magic angle technique  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method of performing a magnetic resonance analysis of a biological object that includes placing the object in a main magnetic field (that has a static field direction) and in a radio frequency field; rotating the object at a frequency of less than about 100 Hz around an axis positioned at an angle of about 54.degree.44' relative to the main magnetic static field direction; pulsing the radio frequency to provide a sequence that includes a phase-corrected magic angle turning pulse segment; and collecting data generated by the pulsed radio frequency. The object may be reoriented about the magic angle axis between three predetermined positions that are related to each other by 120.degree.. The main magnetic field may be rotated mechanically or electronically. Methods for magnetic resonance imaging of the object are also described.

Wind, Robert A.; Hu, Jian Zhi

2004-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

413

Quantitative luminescence imaging system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The QLIS images and quantifies low-level chemiluminescent reactions in an electromagnetic field. It is capable of real time nonperturbing measurement and simultaneous recording of many biochemical and chemical reactions such as luminescent immunoassays or enzyme assays. The system comprises image transfer optics, a low-light level digitizing camera with image intensifying microchannel plates, an image process or, and a control computer. The image transfer optics may be a fiber image guide with a bend, or a microscope, to take the light outside of the RF field. Output of the camera is transformed into a localized rate of cumulative digitalized data or enhanced video display or hard-copy images. The system may be used as a luminescent microdosimetry device for radiofrequency or microwave radiation, as a thermal dosimeter, or in the dosimetry of ultra-sound (sonoluminescence) or ionizing radiation. It provides a near-real-time system capable of measuring the extremely low light levels from luminescent reactions in electromagnetic fields in the areas of chemiluminescence assays and thermal microdosimetry, and is capable of near-real-time imaging of the sample to allow spatial distribution analysis of the reaction. It can be used to instrument three distinctly different irradiation configurations, comprising (1) RF waveguide irradiation of a small Petri-dish-shaped sample cell, (2) RF irradiation of samples in a microscope for the microscopie imaging and measurement, and (3) RF irradiation of small to human body-sized samples in an anechoic chamber.

Erwin, David N. (San Antonio, TX); Kiel, Johnathan L. (San Antonio, TX); Batishko, Charles R. (West Richland, WA); Stahl, Kurt A. (Richland, WA)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

414

Quantitative luminescence imaging system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The QLIS images and quantifies low-level chemiluminescent reactions in an electromagnetic field. It is capable of real time nonperturbing measurement and simultaneous recording of many biochemical and chemical reactions such as luminescent immunoassays or enzyme assays. The system comprises image transfer optics, a low-light level digitizing camera with image intensifying microchannel plates, an image process or, and a control computer. The image transfer optics may be a fiber image guide with a bend, or a microscope, to take the light outside of the RF field. Output of the camera is transformed into a localized rate of cumulative digitalized data or enhanced video display or hard-copy images. The system may be used as a luminescent microdosimetry device for radiofrequency or microwave radiation, as a thermal dosimeter, or in the dosimetry of ultra-sound (sonoluminescence) or ionizing radiation. It provides a near-real-time system capable of measuring the extremely low light levels from luminescent reactions in electromagnetic fields in the areas of chemiluminescence assays and thermal microdosimetry, and is capable of near-real-time imaging of the sample to allow spatial distribution analysis of the reaction. It can be used to instrument three distinctly different irradiation configurations, comprising (1) RF waveguide irradiation of a small Petri-dish-shaped sample cell, (2) RF irradiation of samples in a microscope for the microscopic imaging and measurement, and (3) RF irradiation of small to human body-sized samples in an anechoic chamber. 22 figs.

Erwin, D.N.; Kiel, J.L.; Batishko, C.R.; Stahl, K.A.

1990-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

415

Ferroelectric optical image comparator  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A ferroelectric optical image comparator has a lead lanthanum zirconate titanate thin-film device which is constructed with a semi-transparent or transparent conductive first electrode on one side of the thin film, a conductive metal second electrode on the other side of the thin film, and the second electrode is in contact with a nonconducting substrate. A photoinduced current in the device represents the dot product between a stored image and an image projected onto the first electrode. One-dimensional autocorrelations are performed by measuring this current while displacing the projected image. 7 figures.

Butler, M.A.; Land, C.E.; Martin, S.J.; Pfeifer, K.B.

1993-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

416

EMSL - image superimposition  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

image-superimposition en Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. http:www.emsl.pnl.govemslwebpublicationsmagnesium-behavior-and-structu...

417

image superimposition | EMSL  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

superimposition image superimposition Leads No leads are available at this time. Magnesium behavior and structural defects in Mg+ ion implanted silicon carbide. Abstract: As a...

418

Energy of magnetic moment of superconducting current in magnetic field  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The energy of magnetic moment of the persistent current circulating in superconducting loop in an externally produced magnetic field is not taken into account in the theory of quantization effects because of identification of the Hamiltonian with the energy. This identification misleads if, in accordance with the conservation law, the energy of a state is the energy expended for its creation. The energy of magnetic moment is deduced from a creation history of the current state in magnetic field both in the classical and quantum case. But taking this energy into account demolishes the agreement between theory and experiment. Impartial consideration of this problem discovers the contradiction both in theory and experiment.

V. L. Gurtovoi; A. V. Nikulov

2014-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

419

Continuous magnetic separator and process  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A continuous magnetic separator and process for separating a slurry comprising magnetic particles into a clarified stream and a thickened stream. The separator has a container with a slurry inlet, an overflow outlet for the discharge of the clarified slurry stream, and an underflow outlet for the discharge of a thickened slurry stream. Magnetic particles in the slurry are attracted to, and slide down, magnetic rods within the container. The slurry is thus separated into magnetic concentrate and clarified slurry. Flow control means can be used to control the ratio of the rate of magnetic concentrate to the rate of clarified slurry. Feed control means can be used to control the rate of slurry feed to the slurry inlet.

Oder, Robin R. (Export, PA); Jamison, Russell E. (Lower Burrell, PA)

2008-04-22T23:59:59.000Z

420

Restoring functional PET Images using Anatomical MR Images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Restoring functional PET Images using Anatomical MR Images Peter Philipsen, Ulrik Kjems, Peter Toft signal to noise ratio and the low spa­ tial resolution in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) images ? And Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Images? ffl Segmentation of MR Images ­ Extraction of important edges

Mosegaard, Klaus

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hyperspectral imaging magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

Compression of Computer Graphics Images with Image-Based Rendering  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Compression of Computer Graphics Images with Image-Based Rendering Ilmi Yoon and Ulrich Neumann information from previously rendered images. Images predicted from prior images are combined with a residual-based rendering tech- nique provides accurate motion prediction and accelerates rendering at the same time

Shahabi, Cyrus

422

Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials 281 (2004) 272275 Effects of high magnetic field annealing on texture and  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials 281 (2004) 272­275 Effects of high magnetic field annealing on texture and magnetic properties of FePd D.S. Lia, *, H. Garmestania , Shi-shen Yanb , M China c National High Magnetic Field Laboratory, Florida State University, 1800 East Paul Dirac Drive

Garmestani, Hamid

423

Cool Magnetic Molecules  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr May JunDatastreamsmmcrcalgovInstrumentsruc DocumentationP-Series to User GroupInformationE-Gov ContactsContractOfficeCool Magnetic

424

Magnetic Materials (MM)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and InterfacesAdministration -Lowell L.FallU . S .ofFieldMagnetic Materials

425

Magnetic Materials Group  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and InterfacesAdministration -Lowell L.FallU . S .ofFieldMagnetic

426

Magnetic Materials Group - Staff  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: VegetationEquipment Surfaces and InterfacesAdministration -Lowell L.FallU . S .ofFieldMagneticFormer

427

Cool Magnetic Molecules  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationCleanCommunity2Workshops01ControllingControlsCool Magnetic Molecules

428

Cool Magnetic Molecules  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE:1 First Use of Energy for All Purposes (Fuel and Nonfuel),Feet) Year Jan Feb Mar Apr MayAtmospheric Optical Depth7-1D: Vegetation Proposed New SubstationCleanCommunity2Workshops01ControllingControlsCool Magnetic

429

Measurements of magnetic field alignment  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The procedure for installing Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) dipoles in their respective cryostats involves aligning the average direction of their field with the vertical to an accuracy of 0.5 mrad. The equipment developed for carrying on these measurements is described and the measurements performed on the first few prototypes SSC magnets are presented. The field angle as a function of position in these 16.6 m long magnets is a characteristic of the individual magnet with possible feedback information to its manufacturing procedure. A comparison of this vertical alignment characteristic with a magnetic field intensity (by NMR) characteristic for one of the prototypes is also presented. 5 refs., 7 figs.

Kuchnir, M.; Schmidt, E.E.

1987-11-06T23:59:59.000Z

430

$?^{-}$, $?^{* -}$, $?^{* -}$ and $?^{-}$ decuplet baryon magnetic moments  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The properties of the ground state $U$-Spin $={3/2}$ baryon decuplet magnetic moments $\\Delta^{-}$, $\\Xi^{* -}$, $\\Sigma^{* -}$ and $\\Omega^{-}$ and their ground state spin 1/2 cousins $p$, $n$, $\\Lambda$, $\\Sigma^{+}$, $\\Sigma^{0}$, $\\Sigma^{-}$, $\\Xi^{+}$, and $\\Xi^{-}$ have been studied for many years with a modicum of success. The magnetic moments of many are yet to be determined. Of the decuplet baryons, only the magnetic moment of the $\\Omega^{-}$ has been accurately determined. We calculate the magnetic moments of the \\emph{physical} decuplet $U$-Spin $={3/2}$ quartet members without ascribing any specific form to their quark structure or intra-quark interactions.

Milton Dean Slaughter

2011-04-04T23:59:59.000Z

431

Active Magnetic Regenerator Experimental Optimization  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Active Magnetic Regenerator Experimental Optimization by Armando Tura Bachelor in Engineering Regenerator Experimental Optimization by Armando Tura Bachelor in Engineering, University of Victoria, 2002

Victoria, University of

432

DOUBLE MAJORS Imaging Science + ...  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

DOUBLE MAJORS Imaging Science + ... Applied Mathematics Biomedical Sciences Computer Science Undergraduate Research Internships and Cooperative Education (Co-op) (optional) Study Abroad WHY IMAGING SCIENCE Science: BS, MS, PhD Color Science: MS, PhD BS + MS/PhD Combos HUMAN VISION BIO- MEDICAL ASTRO- PHYSICS

Zanibbi, Richard

433

Directional Multiresolution Image Representations  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

) are not necessarily best suited for images. Thus, there is a strong motivation to search for more powerful schemes consid´er´ees comme de bonnes repr´esentations des images na- turelles. Le lien entre les courbelettes et

Do, Minh N.

434

Medical imaging systems  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A medical imaging system provides simultaneous rendering of visible light and fluorescent images. The system may employ dyes in a small-molecule form that remains in a subject's blood stream for several minutes, allowing real-time imaging of the subject's circulatory system superimposed upon a conventional, visible light image of the subject. The system may also employ dyes or other fluorescent substances associated with antibodies, antibody fragments, or ligands that accumulate within a region of diagnostic significance. In one embodiment, the system provides an excitation light source to excite the fluorescent substance and a visible light source for general illumination within the same optical guide that is used to capture images. In another embodiment, the system is configured for use in open surgical procedures by providing an operating area that is closed to ambient light. More broadly, the systems described herein may be used in imaging applications where a visible light image may be usefully supplemented by an image formed from fluorescent emissions from a fluorescent substance that marks areas of functional interest.

Frangioni, John V. (Wayland, MA)

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

435

Heart imaging method  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method for providing an image of the human heart's electrical system derives time-of-flight data from an array of EKG electrodes and this data is transformed into phase information. The phase information, treated as a hologram, is reconstructed to provide an image in one or two dimensions of the electrical system of the functioning heart.

Collins, H. Dale (Richland, WA); Gribble, R. Parks (Richland, WA); Busse, Lawrence J. (Littleton, CO)

1991-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Fluorescent image tracking velocimeter  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A multiple-exposure fluorescent image tracking velocimeter (FITV) detects and measures the motion (trajectory, direction and velocity) of small particles close to light scattering surfaces. The small particles may follow the motion of a carrier medium such as a liquid, gas or multi-phase mixture, allowing the motion of the carrier medium to be observed, measured and recorded. The main components of the FITV include: (1) fluorescent particles; (2) a pulsed fluorescent excitation laser source; (3) an imaging camera; and (4) an image analyzer. FITV uses fluorescing particles excited by visible laser light to enhance particle image detectability near light scattering surfaces. The excitation laser light is filtered out before reaching the imaging camera allowing the fluoresced wavelengths emitted by the particles to be detected and recorded by the camera. FITV employs multiple exposures of a single camera image by pulsing the excitation laser light for producing a series of images of each particle along its trajectory. The time-lapsed image may be used to determine trajectory and velocity and the exposures may be coded to derive directional information.

Shaffer, Franklin D. (Library, PA)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

National High Magnetic Field Laboratory Audio Dictionary: Hybrid...  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hybrid Magnet? Now Playing: What's a Hybrid Magnet? Enable Javascript and Flash to stream the Magnet Minute Scott Hannahs Associated Links The World's Strongest Magnet (audio...

438

MagLab: 45 Tesla Hybrid Magnet - Publications  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Magnets & Facilities > Hybrid Magnet Arrow Publications Featuring Data from the 45 Tesla Hybrid Magnet The hybrid magnet was commissioned in December 1999. Nature, Nature Physics,...

439

MagLab - MagLab Dictionary: Hybrid Magnet (Transcript)  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Hybrid Magnet As explained by Scott Hannahs, DC Facilities & Instrumentation director. Hybrid magnet The lab's world-record 45 tesla hybrid magnet. The premier magnet system at the...

440

Adaptive wiener image restoration kernel  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A method and device for restoration of electro-optical image data using an adaptive Wiener filter begins with constructing imaging system Optical Transfer Function, and the Fourier Transformations of the noise and the image. A spatial representation of the imaged object is restored by spatial convolution of the image using a Wiener restoration kernel.

Yuan, Ding (Henderson, NV)

2007-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hyperspectral imaging magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Rotational and magnetic shunt permanent magnet quadrupoles with variable magnetic strength  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Next Linear Collider (NLC) and Very Large Hadron Collider (VLHC) projects suppose to use permanent magnets as bending, focusing and correcting elements. Prototypes of two permanent magnet quadrupoles with variable strength were built and successfully tested in Fermilab. Quadrupoles have 12.7 mm aperture diameter, 100 T/m gradient with an adjustment range of 0 to -20%. Special designs provide high precision magnetic center stability during strength change. SmCo5 permanent magnet bricks were used in these prototypes. Rotational quadrupole consists of four sections. Two central sections are rotated in counter directions to adjust the strength. Magnetic shunt quadrupole design provides variable shunting of the magnetic flux. The numerical simulation, designs, measuring results are described.

Vladimir Kashikhin et al.

2002-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

442

Background Material Important Questions about Magnetism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Background Material Important Questions about Magnetism: 1) What is Magnetism?Magnetism is a force or repulsion due to charge is called the electric force. But what about magnetism, is there a fundamental property of some matter that makes things magnetic? The answer is: "sort of." Electric current

Mojzsis, Stephen J.

443

Correction magnets for the Fermilab Recycler Ring  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In the commissioning of the Fermilab Recycler ring the need for higher order corrector magnets in the regions near beam transfers was discovered. Three types of permanent magnet skew quadrupoles, and two types of permanent magnet sextupoles were designed and built. This paper describes the need for these magnets, the design, assembly, and magnetic measurements.

James T Volk et al.

2003-05-27T23:59:59.000Z

444

Time encoded radiation imaging  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The various technologies presented herein relate to detecting nuclear material at a large stand-off distance. An imaging system is presented which can detect nuclear material by utilizing time encoded imaging relating to maximum and minimum radiation particle counts rates. The imaging system is integrated with a data acquisition system that can utilize variations in photon pulse shape to discriminate between neutron and gamma-ray interactions. Modulation in the detected neutron count rates as a function of the angular orientation of the detector due to attenuation of neighboring detectors is utilized to reconstruct the neutron source distribution over 360 degrees around the imaging system. Neutrons (e.g., fast neutrons) and/or gamma-rays are incident upon scintillation material in the imager, the photons generated by the scintillation material are converted to electrical energy from which the respective neutrons/gamma rays can be determined and, accordingly, a direction to, and the location of, a radiation source identified.

Marleau, Peter; Brubaker, Erik; Kiff, Scott

2014-10-21T23:59:59.000Z

445

High temperature, permanent magnet biased, homopolar magnetic bearing actuator  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

current resistance and improves the system efficiency because the magnetic field of the HTPM can suspend the major portion of the static load on bearing. A high temperature radial magnetic bearing was designed via an iterative search employing 3D finite...

Hossain, Mohammad Ahsan

2006-10-30T23:59:59.000Z

446

Magnetism and chemisorption  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Spin polarized photoemission studies of different adsorbates on an Fe (001) substrate show the interaction between the adsorbate and the substrate d bands. Studies of the adsorption of oxygen reveal exchange split adsorbate bands indicative of both a magnetic moment on the adsorbate atom and also a strong adsorbate p{sub z} substrate d{sub z}{sup 2} bond. The oxygen p{sub z} bands show a large variation in exchange splitting across the surface zone, an observation that is not predicted in first principles calculations of this system. Spin Polarized Auger Electron Spectroscopy studies of sulfur adsorbed on the same surface provide some indication of the magnetic moment on the adsorbate. It is found to be of the order of 0.1 {mu}B. Studies of carbon monoxide adsorption in two different configurations, vertical and tilted, reveal little or no exchange splitting in the molecular 5{sigma} orbital suggesting that the interaction of this orbital with the substrate d bands is much weaker. 38 refs., 11 figs.

Johnson, P.D.

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Tunable exchange bias-like effect in patterned hard-soft two-dimensional lateral composites with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Patterned hard-soft 2D magnetic lateral composites have been fabricated by e-beam lithography plus dry etching techniques on sputter-deposited NdCo{sub 5} thin films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy. Their magnetic behavior is strongly thickness dependent due to the interplay between out-of-plane anisotropy and magnetostatic energy. Thus, the spatial modulation of thicknesses leads to an exchange coupled system with hard/soft magnetic regions in which rotatable anisotropy of the thicker elements provides an extra tool to design the global magnetic behavior of the patterned lateral composite. Kerr microscopy studies (domain imaging and magneto-optical Kerr effect magnetometry) reveal that the resulting hysteresis loops exhibit a tunable exchange bias-like shift that can be switched on/off by the applied magnetic field.

Hierro-Rodriguez, A., E-mail: ahierro@fc.up.pt; Alvarez-Prado, L. M.; Martín, J. I.; Alameda, J. M. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Oviedo, C/Calvo Sotelo S/N, 33007 Oviedo (Spain); Centro de Investigación en Nanomateriales y Nanotecnología—CINN (CSIC—Universidad de Oviedo—Principado de Asturias), Parque Tecnológico de Asturias, 33428 Llanera (Spain); Teixeira, J. M. [IN-IFIMUP, Departamento de Física e Astronomia, Faculdade de Ciências, Universidade do Porto, Rua Campo Alegre 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Vélez, M. [Departamento de Física, Universidad de Oviedo, C/Calvo Sotelo S/N, 33007 Oviedo (Spain)

2014-09-08T23:59:59.000Z

448

SOLAR MAGNETIC TRACKING. IV. THE DEATH OF MAGNETIC FEATURES  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The removal of magnetic flux from the quiet-Sun photosphere is important for maintaining the statistical steady state of the magnetic field there, for determining the magnetic flux budget of the Sun, and for estimating the rate of energy injected into the upper solar atmosphere. Magnetic feature death is a measurable proxy for the removal of detectable flux, either by cancellation (submerging or rising loops, or reconnection in the photosphere) or by dispersal of flux. We used the SWAMIS feature tracking code to understand how nearly 2 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 4} magnetic features die in an hour-long sequence of Hinode/SOT/NFI magnetograms of a region of the quiet Sun. Of the feature deaths that remove visible magnetic flux from the photosphere, the vast majority do so by a process that merely disperses the previously detected flux so that it is too small and too weak to be detected, rather than completely eliminating it. The behavior of the ensemble average of these dispersals is not consistent with a model of simple planar diffusion, suggesting that the dispersal is constrained by the evolving photospheric velocity field. We introduce the concept of the partial lifetime of magnetic features, and show that the partial lifetime due to Cancellation of magnetic flux, 22 hr, is three times slower than previous measurements of the flux turnover time. This indicates that prior feature-based estimates of the flux replacement time may be too short, in contrast with the tendency for this quantity to decrease as resolution and instrumentation have improved. This suggests that dispersal of flux to smaller scales is more important for the replacement of magnetic fields in the quiet Sun than observed bipolar cancellation. We conclude that processes on spatial scales smaller than those visible to Hinode dominate the processes of flux emergence and cancellation, and therefore also the quantity of magnetic flux that threads the photosphere.

Lamb, D. A.; Howard, T. A.; DeForest, C. E. [Southwest Research Institute, 1050 Walnut Street, Suite 300, Boulder, CO 80302 (United States); Parnell, C. E. [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St. Andrews, St. Andrews, KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Welsch, B. T., E-mail: derek@boulder.swri.edu [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California-Berkeley, 7 Gauss Way, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States)

2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

449

Magnetic-field-dosimetry system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

A device is provided for measuring the magnetic field dose and peak field exposure. The device includes three Hall-effect sensors all perpendicular to each other, sensing the three dimensional magnetic field and associated electronics for data storage, calculating, retrieving and display.

Lemon, D.K.; Skorpik, J.R.; Eick, J.L.

1981-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

450

Reversal modes in magnetic nanotubes  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The magnetic switching of ferromagnetic nanotubes is investigated as a function of their geometry. Two independent methods are used: Numerical simulations and analytical calculations. It is found that for long tubes the reversal of magnetization is achieved by two mechanism: The propagation of a transverse or a vortex domain wall depending on the internal and external radii of the tube.

P. Landeros; S. Allende; J. Escrig; E. Salcedo; D. Altbir; E. E. Vogel

2006-11-08T23:59:59.000Z

451

Magnetic Resonance Facility (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

This fact sheet provides information about Magnetic Resonance Facility capabilities and applications at NREL's National Bioenergy Center. Liquid and solid-state analysis capability for a variety of biomass, photovoltaic, and materials characterization applications across NREL. NREL scientists analyze solid and liquid samples on three nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometers as well as an electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectrometer.

Not Available

2012-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

452

Magnetic bags in hyperbolic space  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A magnetic bag is an abelian approximation to a large number of coincident SU(2) BPS monopoles. In this paper we consider magnetic bags in hyperbolic space and derive their Nahm transform from the large charge limit of the discrete Nahm equation for hyperbolic monopoles. An advantage of studying magnetic bags in hyperbolic space, rather than Euclidean space, is that a range of exact charge N hyperbolic monopoles can be constructed, for arbitrarily large values of N, and compared with the magnetic bag approximation. We show that a particular magnetic bag (the magnetic disc) provides a good description of the axially symmetric N-monopole. However, an abelian magnetic bag is not a good approximation to a roughly spherical N-monopole that has more than N zeros of the Higgs field. We introduce an extension of the magnetic bag that does provide a good approximation to such monopoles and involves a spherical non-abelian interior for the bag, in addition to the conventional abelian exterior.

Bolognesi, Stefano; Sutcliffe, Paul

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

453

Superconductivity and Magnetism: Materials Properties  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

.g. within high-Tc superconductivity, magnetic superconductors, MgB2, CMR materials, nanomagnetism and spin#12;#12;Superconductivity and Magnetism: Materials Properties and Developments #12;Copyright 2003 Risø National Laboratory Roskilde, Denmark ISBN 87-550-3244-3 ISSN 0907-0079 #12;Superconductivity

454

LABORATORY VI ELECTRICITY FROM MAGNETISM  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

LABORATORY VI ELECTRICITY FROM MAGNETISM Lab VI - 1 In the previous problems you explored by electric currents. This lab will carry that investigation one step further, determining how changing magnetic fields can give rise to electric currents. This is the effect that allows the generation

Minnesota, University of

455

Superconducting Magnet Division Mike Harrison  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Superconducting Magnet Division Mike Harrison The LARP Dipole R&D Program - D1 only Design (high beta lattice location) · Beam heating (first active element from the IP) #12;Superconducting aperture Field quality Issues not (well ?) understood #12;Superconducting Magnet Division Mike Harrison

Large Hadron Collider Program

456

NONTHERMAL HARD X-RAY EMISSIONS FROM MAGNETIC RECONNECTION IN THE SUN'S LOWER  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

. R. China, jihs@bbso.njit.edu 2. Big Bear Solar Observatory, New Jersey Institute of Technology from magnetic reconnection in the solar lower atmosphere by analyzing an M1.0 class solar flare, as observed by full disk H images of Big Bear Solar Observatory (BBSO). HXR maps constructed from the Reuven

457

Direct torsional actuation of microcantilevers using magnetic excitation  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Torsional mode dynamic force microscopy can be used for a wide range of studies including mapping lateral contact stiffness, torsional frequency or amplitude modulation imaging, and dynamic friction measurements of various materials. Piezo-actuation of the cantilever is commonly used, but it introduces spurious resonances, limiting the frequency range that can be sampled, and rendering the technique particularly difficult to apply in liquid medium where the cantilever oscillations are significantly damped. Here, we demonstrate a method that enables direct torsional actuation of cantilevers with high uniformity over wide frequency ranges by attaching a micrometer-scale magnetic bead on the back side of the cantilever. We show that when beads are magnetized along the width of the cantilever, efficient torsional actuation of the cantilevers can be achieved using a magnetic field produced from a solenoid placed underneath the sample. We demonstrate the capability of this technique by imaging atomic steps on graphite surfaces in tapping mode near the first torsional resonance of the cantilever in dodecane. The technique is also applied to map the variations in the lateral contact stiffness on the surface of graphite and polydiacetylene monolayers.

Gosvami, Nitya Nand; Nalam, Prathima C.; Tam, Qizhan; Carpick, Robert W., E-mail: carpick@seas.upenn.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Exarhos, Annemarie L.; Kikkawa, James M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

2014-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

458

Permanent magnet multipole with adjustable strength  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Two or more magnetically soft pole pieces are symmetrically positioned along a longitudinal axis to provide a magnetic field within a space defined by the pole pieces. Two or more permanent magnets are mounted to an external magnetically-soft cylindrical sleeve which rotates to bring the permanent magnets into closer coupling with the pole pieces and thereby adjustably control the field strength of the magnetic field produced in the space defined by the pole pieces. The permanent magnets are preferably formed of rare earth cobalt (REC) material which has a high remanent magnetic field and a strong coercive force. The pole pieces and the permanent magnets have corresponding cylindrical surfaces which are positionable with respect to each other to vary the coupling therebetween. Auxiliary permanent magnets are provided between the pole pieces to provide additional magnetic flux to the magnetic field without saturating the pole pieces.

Halbach, Klaus (Berkeley, CA)

1985-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Permanent-magnet multipole with adjustable strength  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Two or more magnetically soft pole pieces are symmetrically positioned along a longitudinal axis to provide a magnetic field within a space defined by the pole pieces. Two or more permanent magnets are mounted to an external magnetically-soft cylindrical sleeve which rotates to bring the permanent magnets into closer coupling with the pole pieces and thereby adjustably control the field strength of the magnetic field produced in the space defined by the pole pieces. The permanent magnets are preferably formed of rare earth cobalt (REC) material which has a high remanent magnetic field and a strong coercive force. The pole pieces and the permanent magnets have corresponding cylindrical surfaces which are positionable with respect to each other to vary the coupling there between. Auxiliary permanent magnets are provided between the pole pieces to provide additional magnetic flux to the magnetic field without saturating the pole pieces.

Halbach, K.

1982-09-20T23:59:59.000Z

460

Purification of recombinant proteins with magnetic nanoclusters  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

This thesis focused on the development and analysis of a new class of magnetic fluids for recovery of recombinant proteins from fermentation broth. Magnetic fluids are colloidally stable dispersions of magnetic nanoclusters ...

Ditsch, Andre (Andre Paul)

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hyperspectral imaging magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


461

Magnetic nanostructures patterned by block copolymer lithography  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The aim of this research was twofold: understanding the methods of patterning magnetic films using self-assembled block copolymer masks and examining the magnetic reversal mechanisms of as deposited and patterned magnetic ...

Ilievski, Filip, 1980-

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

462

Performance Analysis between Two Sparsity Constrained MRI Methods: Highly Constrained Backprojection(HYPR) and Compressed Sensing(CS) for Dynamic Imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

One of the most important challenges in dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is to achieve high spatial and temporal resolution when it is limited by system performance. It is desirable to acquire data fast enough to capture the dynamics...

Arzouni, Nibal

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

463

Nuclear medicine imaging system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

It is an object of this invention to provide a nuclear imaging system having the versatility to do positron annihilation studies, rotating single or opposed camera gamma emission studies, and orthogonal gamma emission studies. It is a further object of this invention to provide an imaging system having the capability for orthogonal dual multipinhole tomography. It is another object of this invention to provide a nuclear imaging system in which all available energy data, as well as patient physiological data, are acquired simultaneously in list mode.

Bennett, G.W.; Brill, A.B.; Bizais, Y.J.C.; Rowe, R.W.; Zubal, I.G.

1983-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

464

Superconducting magnetic energy storage  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Recent programmatic developments in Superconducting Magnetic Energy Storage (SMES) have prompted renewed and widespread interest in this field. In mid 1987 the Defense Nuclear Agency, acting for the Strategic Defense Initiative Office, issued a request for proposals for the design and construction of SMES Engineering Test Model (ETM). Two teams, one led by Bechtel and the other by Ebasco, are now engaged in the first phase of the development of a 10 to 20 MWhr ETM. This report presents the rationale for energy storage on utility systems, describes the general technology of SMES, and explains the chronological development of the technology. The present ETM program is outlined; details of the two projects for ETM development are described in other papers in these proceedings. The impact of high T/sub c/ materials on SMES is discussed. 69 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Hassenzahl, W.

1988-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

465

Power-Invariant Magnetic System Modeling  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

properties and characteristics. Progress in magnetism was made after Oersted discovered in 1820 that a magnetic field could be generated with an electric current. Famous scientists, including Gauss, Maxwell and Faraday, tackled the phenomenon of magnetism... flows in the material. Meanwhile, in magnetic circuits, the reluctance is a measure of magnetic energy storage rather than being a measure of magnetic energy dissipation. 2. The Permeance-Capacitor Model In 1969, Dr. R.W. Buntenbach from...

Gonzalez Dominguez, Guadalupe Giselle

2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

466

2D electron temperature diagnostic using soft x-ray imaging technique  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We have developed a two-dimensional (2D) electron temperature (T{sub e}) diagnostic system for thermal structure studies in a low-aspect-ratio reversed field pinch (RFP). The system consists of a soft x-ray (SXR) camera with two pin holes for two-kinds of absorber foils, combined with a high-speed camera. Two SXR images with almost the same viewing area are formed through different absorber foils on a single micro-channel plate (MCP). A 2D T{sub e} image can then be obtained by calculating the intensity ratio for each element of the images. We have succeeded in distinguishing T{sub e} image in quasi-single helicity (QSH) from that in multi-helicity (MH) RFP states, where the former is characterized by concentrated magnetic fluctuation spectrum and the latter, by broad spectrum of edge magnetic fluctuations.

Nishimura, K., E-mail: nishim11@nuclear.es.kit.ac.jp; Sanpei, A., E-mail: sanpei@kit.ac.jp; Tanaka, H.; Ishii, G.; Kodera, R.; Ueba, R.; Himura, H.; Masamune, S. [Department of Electronics, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan)] [Department of Electronics, Kyoto Institute of Technology, Kyoto 606-8585 (Japan); Ohdachi, S.; Mizuguchi, N. [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)] [National Institute for Fusion Science, 322-6 Oroshi-cho, Toki 509-5292 (Japan)

2014-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

467

THE STORAGE AND DISSIPATION OF MAGNETIC ENERGY IN THE QUIET SUN CORONA DETERMINED FROM SDO/HMI MAGNETOGRAMS  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

In recent years, higher cadence, higher resolution observations have revealed the quiet-Sun photosphere to be complex and rapidly evolving. Since magnetic fields anchored in the photosphere extend up into the solar corona, it is expected that the small-scale coronal magnetic field exhibits similar complexity. For the first time, the quiet-Sun coronal magnetic field is continuously evolved through a series of non-potential, quasi-static equilibria, deduced from magnetograms observed by the Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager on board the Solar Dynamics Observatory, where the photospheric boundary condition which drives the coronal evolution exactly reproduces the observed magnetograms. The build-up, storage, and dissipation of magnetic energy within the simulations is studied. We find that the free magnetic energy built up and stored within the field is sufficient to explain small-scale, impulsive events such as nanoflares. On comparing with coronal images of the same region, the energy storage and dissipation visually reproduces many of the observed features. The results indicate that the complex small-scale magnetic evolution of a large number of magnetic features is a key element in explaining the nature of the solar corona.

Meyer, K. A.; Sabol, J.; Mackay, D. H. [School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of St Andrews, North Haugh, St Andrews KY16 9SS (United Kingdom); Van Ballegooijen, A. A., E-mail: karen@mcs.st-and.ac.uk [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

2013-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

468

Magnetism in metal-organic capsules  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Quantum Spin Chains in Magnetism: Molecules to Materials, J.Magnetism in metal-organic capsules Jerry L. Atwood,* a Euan

Atwood, Jerry L.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

469

A Brief Note on Jupiter's Magnetism  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

A recent model which gives the contribution of the earth's solid core to geo magnetism is seen to explain Jupiter's magnetism also.

B. G. Sidharth

1999-05-06T23:59:59.000Z

470

Chemical Magnetism Shouheng Sun, Chairman Semiconductivity,  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

Chemical Magnetism Shouheng Sun, Chairman Semiconductivity, spin delocalization, and excited states of the single molecule magnets Fe 8 Br 8 and Mn 12 -acetate "invited... D....

471

Journal of Magnetism and Magnetic Materials 293 (2005) 578583 Theoretical comparison of magnetic and hydrodynamic  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ã?, Mikkel Fougt Hansen, Henrik Bruus MIC--Department of Micro and Nanotechnology, Technical University). #12;inhomogeneous magnetic field created by micro- structures that are magnetized by either electro wish to highlight the importance of hydro- dynamic interactions in connection with bead capturing

472

Results of magnetic field measurements of SPring-8 magnets  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Magnetic measurements have been performed for all dipoles, quadrupoles and sextupoles of the SPring-8 storage ring. The long flip coil and the rotating coil system were used for the measurements and they were good enough in measurement accuracy. Dispersion of the magnetic length and strength of the multipole fields were found to be within tolerable range for the three types of the magnets. The position of the fiducial points for alignment was measured in the accuracy of better than 20 {micro}m for all the quadrupoles and the sextupoles.

Ohnishi, J.; Kawakami, M.; Fujii, K.; Matsui, S.; Kumagai, N. [SPring-8, Hyogo (Japan)] [SPring-8, Hyogo (Japan)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

473

Imaging of lateral spin valves with soft x-ray microscopy  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigated Co/Cu lateral spin valves by means of high-resolution transmission soft x-ray microscopy with magnetic contrast that utilizes x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD). No magnetic XMCD contrast was observed at the Cu L{sub 3} absorption edge, which should directly image the spin accumulation in Cu. Although electrical transport measurements in a non-local geometry clearly detected the spin accumulation in Cu, which remained unchanged during illumination with circular polarized x-rays at the Co and Cu L{sub 3} absorption edges.

Mosendz, O.; Mihajlovic, G.; Pearson, J. E.; Fischer, P.; Im, M.-Y.; Bader, S. D.; Hoffmann, A.

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

474

Imaging of lateral spin valves with soft x-ray microscopy.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

We investigated Co/Cu lateral spin valves by means of high-resolution transmission soft x-ray microscopy with magnetic contrast that utilizes x-ray magnetic circular dichroism (XMCD). No magnetic XMCD contrast was observed at the Cu L{sub 3} absorption edge, which should directly image the spin accumulation in Cu, although electrical transport measurements in a nonlocal geometry clearly detected the spin accumulation in Cu, which remained unchanged during illumination with circular polarized x rays at the Co and Cu L{sub 3} absorption edges.

Mosendz, O.; Mihajlovic, G.; Pearson, J. E.; Fischer, P.; Im, M.-Y.; Bader, S. D.; Hoffmann, A.; LBNL

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

475

Image portion identification methods, image parsing methods, image parsing systems, and articles of manufacture  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Image portion identification methods, image parsing methods, image parsing systems, and articles of manufacture are described. According to one embodiment, an image portion identification method includes accessing data regarding an image depicting a plurality of biological substrates corresponding to at least one biological sample and indicating presence of at least one biological indicator within the biological sample and, using processing circuitry, automatically identifying a portion of the image depicting one of the biological substrates but not others of the biological substrates.

Lassahn, Gordon D.; Lancaster, Gregory D.; Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki S.

2013-01-08T23:59:59.000Z

476

Photothermal imaging scanning microscopy  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

Photothermal Imaging Scanning Microscopy produces a rapid, thermal-based, non-destructive characterization apparatus. Also, a photothermal characterization method of surface and subsurface features includes micron and nanoscale spatial resolution of meter-sized optical materials.

Chinn, Diane (Pleasanton, CA); Stolz, Christopher J. (Lathrop, CA); Wu, Zhouling (Pleasanton, CA); Huber, Robert (Discovery Bay, CA); Weinzapfel, Carolyn (Tracy, CA)

2006-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

477

JOB OPPORTUNITIES Breast imaging  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Genitourinary Radiology Head and Neck Radiology Musculoskeletal Radiology Neuroradiology Pediatric RadiologyJOB OPPORTUNITIES Breast imaging Chest Radiology Emergency Radiology Gastrointestinal Radiology Interventional Radiology Nuclear Radiology Radiation Oncology What Can I Do With a Major in... Radiological

Jiang, Huiqiang

478

THERMAL NEUTRON BACKSCATTER IMAGING.  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Objects of various shapes, with some appreciable hydrogen content, were exposed to fast neutrons from a pulsed D-T generator, resulting in a partially-moderated spectrum of backscattered neutrons. The thermal component of the backscatter was used to form images of the objects by means of a coded aperture thermal neutron imaging system. Timing signals from the neutron generator were used to gate the detection system so as to record only events consistent with thermal neutrons traveling the distance between the target and the detector. It was shown that this time-of-flight method provided a significant improvement in image contrast compared to counting all events detected by the position-sensitive {sup 3}He proportional chamber used in the imager. The technique may have application in the detection and shape-determination of land mines, particularly non-metallic types.

VANIER,P.; FORMAN,L.; HUNTER,S.; HARRIS,E.; SMITH,G.

2004-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

479

Overview of Image Reconstruction  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Image reconstruction (or computerized tomography, etc.) is any process whereby a function, f, on Rn is estimated from empirical data pertaining to its integrals, ∫f(x) dx, for some collection of hyperplanes of dimension k < n. The paper begins with background information on how image reconstruction problems have arisen in practice, and describes some of the application areas of past or current interest; these include radioastronomy, optics, radiology and nuclear medicine, electron microscopy, acoustical imaging, geophysical tomography, nondestructive testing, and NMR zeugmatography. Then the various reconstruction algorithms are discussed in five classes: summation, or simple back-projection; convolution, or filtered back-projection; Fourier and other functional transforms; orthogonal function series expansion; and iterative methods. Certain more technical mathematical aspects of image reconstruction are considered from the standpoint of uniqueness, consistency, and stability of solution. The paper concludes by presenting certain open problems. 73 references. (RWR)

Marr, R.B.

1980-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

480

Magnetic filtration process, magnetic filtering material, and methods of forming magnetic filtering material  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

The present invention provides magnetically responsive activated carbon, and a method of forming magnetically responsive activated carbon. The method of forming magnetically responsive activated carbon typically includes providing activated carbon in a solution containing ions of ferrite forming elements, wherein at least one of the ferrite forming elements has an oxidation state of +3 and at least a second of the ferrite forming elements has an oxidation state of +2, and increasing pH of the solution to precipitate particles of ferrite that bond to the activated carbon, wherein the activated carbon having the ferrite particles bonded thereto have a positive magnetic susceptibility. The present invention also provides a method of filtering waste water using magnetic activated carbon.

Taboada-Serrano, Patricia; Tsouris, Constantino; Contescu, Cristian I; McFarlane, Joanna

2013-10-08T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hyperspectral imaging magnetic" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


481

Imaging of ferromagnetic domains using photoelectrons: Photoelectron emission microscopy of neodymium-iron-boron (Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B)  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Ferromagnetic domains of a single crystal of neodymium-iron-boron, Nd{sub 2}Fe{sub 14}B (one of the strongest permanent magnetic materials known) are imaged by focusing a beam of photoelectrons with electrostatic optics in a photoelectron emission microscope. Photoelectrons emitted from the surface are deflected laterally into two opposite directions by stray magnetic fields that exist above the domains. The photoelectron beam is partially split into two. Magnetic contrast is produced by blocking part of the beam and imaging with an edge of the beam. The magnetic contrast mechanism appears to be similar to the type I magnetic contrast mechanism known from scanning electron microscopy, in which stray magnetic fields above the ferromagnetic domains deflect secondary electrons either towards or away from the electron detector. Upon heating the sample above the Curie temperature, the ferromagnetic domains gradually disappear, as expected for a second order phase transition. They reappear upon cooling. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Vacuum Society}

Mundschau, M.; Romanowicz, J. [Center for Materials Science, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, Ohio 43403-0213 (United States)] [Center for Materials Science, Bowling Green State University, Bowling Green, Ohio 43403-0213 (United States); Wang, J.Y.; Sun, D.L.; Chen, H.C. [Institute of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan 250100, People`s Republic of (China)] [Institute of Crystal Materials, Shandong University, Jinan 250100, People`s Republic of (China)

1996-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

482

Reflective optical imaging system  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

An optical system compatible with short wavelength (extreme ultraviolet) radiation comprising four reflective elements for projecting a mask image onto a substrate. The four optical elements are characterized in order from object to image as convex, concave, convex and concave mirrors. The optical system is particularly suited for step and scan lithography methods. The invention increases the slit dimensions associated with ringfield scanning optics, improves wafer throughput and allows higher semiconductor device density.

Shafer, David R. (Fairfield, CT)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

483

Restoring functional PET Images using Anatomical MR Images  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Restoring functional PET Images using Anatomical MR Images Peter Alshede Philipsen, Ulrik Kjems,uk,pto,lkh@imm.dtu.dk Abstract In this paper we present a Bayesian method to enhance functional 3D PET images using apriori as a true PET­MR result, and further more show how to obtain the desired information from the MR images. 1

Mosegaard, Klaus

484

Ch 20. Magnetism Liu UCD Phy1B 2012 1  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Ch 20. Magnetism Liu UCD Phy1B 2012 1 #12;I. MagnetI. Magnet Poles of a magnet: magnetic effect is strongest When the magnet is freely suspended North pole: pointing to north South pole: pointing to south Poles always come in pairs Liu UCD Phy1B 2012 2 #12;Magnetic MaterialsMagnetic Materials Magnetite Fe3O4

Yoo, S. J. Ben

485

Measurement of dielectric and magnetic properties of soil  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

The possibility of subsurface imaging using SAR technology has generated a considerable amount of interest in recent years. One requirement for the successful development of a subsurface imagin system is an understanding of how the soil affects the signal. In response to a need for an electromagnetic characterization of the soil properties, the Radar/Antenna department has developed a measurement system which determines the soils complex electric permittivity and magnetic permeability at UHF frequencies. The one way loss in dB is also calculated using the measured values. There are many reports of measurements of the electric properties of soil in the literature. However, most of these are primarily concerned with measuring only a real dielectric constant. Because some soils have ferromagnetic constituents it is desirable to measure both the electric and magnetic properties of the soil.

Patitz, W.E.; Brock, B.C.; Powell, E.G.

1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

486

Flows and Waves in Braided Solar Coronal Magnetic Structures  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We study the high frequency dynamics in the braided magnetic structure of an active region (AR 11520) moss as observed by High-Resolution Coronal Imager (Hi-C). We detect quasi periodic flows and waves in these structures. We search for high frequency dynamics while looking at power maps of the observed region. We find that shorter periodicites (30 - 60 s) are associated with small spatial scales which can be resolved by Hi-C only. We detect quasi periodic flows with wide range of velocities from 13 - 185 km/s associated with braided regions. This can be interpreted as plasma outflows from reconnection sites. We also find presence of short period and large amplitude transverse oscillations associated with braided magnetic region. Such oscillations could be triggered by reconnection or such oscillation may trigger reconnection.

Pant, V; Banerjee, Dipankar

2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

487

National High Magnetic Field Laboratory: Magnetic Thin Films  

Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

recorded work with magnetic thin films took place in the 1880s and was carried out by German physicist August Kundt. Well known for his research on sound and optics, Kundts...

488

Associated Particle Tagging (APT) in Magnetic Spectrometers  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Summary In Brief The Associated Particle Tagging (APT) project, a collaboration of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Idaho National Laboratory (INL) and the Idaho State University (ISU)/Idaho Accelerator Center (IAC), has completed an exploratory study to assess the role of magnetic spectrometers as the linchpin technology in next-generation tagged-neutron and tagged-photon active interrogation (AI). The computational study considered two principle concepts: (1) the application of a solenoidal alpha-particle spectrometer to a next-generation, large-emittance neutron generator for use in the associated particle imaging technique, and (2) the application of tagged photon beams to the detection of fissile material via active interrogation. In both cases, a magnetic spectrometer momentum-analyzes charged particles (in the neutron case, alpha particles accompanying neutron generation in the D-T reaction; in the tagged photon case, post-bremsstrahlung electrons) to define kinematic properties of the relevant neutral interrogation probe particle (i.e. neutron or photon). The main conclusions of the study can be briefly summarized as follows: Neutron generator: • For the solenoidal spectrometer concept, magnetic field strengths of order 1 Tesla or greater are required to keep the transverse size of the spectrometer smaller than 1 meter. The notional magnetic spectrometer design evaluated in this feasibility study uses a 5-T magnetic field and a borehole radius of 18 cm. • The design shows a potential for 4.5 Sr tagged neutron solid angle, a factor of 4.5 larger than achievable with current API neutron-generator designs. • The potential angular resolution for such a tagged neutron beam can be less than 0.5o for modest Si-detector position resolution (3 mm). Further improvement in angular resolution can be made by using Si-detectors with better position resolution. • The report documents several features of a notional generator design incorporating the alpha-particle spectrometer concept, and outlines challenges involved in the magnetic field design. Tagged photon interrogation: • We investigated a method for discriminating fissile from benign cargo-material response to an energy-tagged photon beam. The method relies upon coincident detection of the tagged photon and a photoneutron or photofission neutron produced in the target material. The method exploits differences in the shape of the neutron production cross section as a function of incident photon energy in order to discriminate photofission yield from photoneutrons emitted by non-fissile materials. Computational tests of the interrogation method as applied to material composition assay of a simple, multi-layer target suggest that the tagged-photon information facilitates precise (order 1% thickness uncertainty) reconstruction of the constituent thicknesses of fissile (uranium) and high-Z (Pb) constituents of the test targets in a few minutes of photon-beam exposure. We assumed an 18-MeV endpoint tagged photon beam for these simulations. • The report addresses several candidate design and data analysis issues for beamline infrastructure required to produce a tagged photon beam in a notional AI-dedicated facility, including the accelerator and tagging spectrometer.

Jordan, David V.; Baciak, James E.; Stave, Sean C.; Chichester, David; Dale, Daniel; Kim, Yujong; Harmon, Frank

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

489

The Magnetism of Neutron States  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

The recent measurement by Bignami and co-workers of the magnetic field of a neutron star for the first time gives a value that differs by about two orders of magnitude from the expected value. The speculation has been that the nuclear matter in the neutron stars exhibits some exotic behaviour. In this note we argue that this exotic behaviour is an anomalous statistics obeyed by the neutrons, and moreover these considerations lead to a value of the magnetic field that agrees with the observation. The same considerations also correctly give the magnetic fields of the earth and Jupiter.

B. G. Sidharth

2003-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

490

Magnetic moment versus tensor charge  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We express the baryon magnetic moments in terms of the baryon tensor charges, considering the quarks as relativistic interacting objects. Once tensor charges get measured accurately, the formula for the baryon magnetic moment will serve to extract precise information on the quark anomalous magnetic moment, the quark effective mass and the ratio of the quark constituent mass to the quark effective mass. The analogous formula for the baryon electric dipole moment is of no great use as it gets eventually sizable contributions from various CP- violating sources not necessary associated to the quark electric dipole moment.

M. Mekhfi

2005-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

491

Magnetically driven quantum heat engine  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

We studied the efficiency of two different schemes for a magnetically driven quantum heat engine, by considering as the working substance a single nonrelativistic particle trapped in a cylindrical potential well, in the presence of an external magnetic field. The first scheme is a cycle, composed of two adiabatic and two isoenergetic reversible trajectories in configuration space. The trajectories are driven by a quasistatic modulation of the external magnetic-field intensity. The second scheme is a variant of the former, where the isoenergetic trajectories are replaced by isothermal ones, along which the system is in contact with macroscopic thermostats. This second scheme constitutes a quantum analog of the classical Carnot cycle.

Enrique Muñoz; Francisco J. Peña

2014-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

492

Magnetic nanoparticles for applications in oscillating magnetic field  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Enzymatic and thermochemical catalysis are both important industrial processes. However, the thermal requirements for each process often render them mutually exclusive: thermochemical catalysis requires high temperature that denatures enzymes. One of the long-term goals of this project is to design a thermocatalytic system that could be used with enzymatic systems in situ to catalyze reaction sequences in one pot; this system would be useful for numerous applications e.g. conversion of biomass to biofuel and other commodity products. The desired thermocatalytic system would need to supply enough thermal energy to catalyze thermochemical reactions, while keeping the enzymes from high temperature denaturation. Magnetic nanoparticles are known to generate heat in an oscillating magnetic field through mechanisms including hysteresis and relaxational losses. We envisioned using these magnetic nanoparticles as the local heat source embedded in sub-micron size mesoporous support to spatially separate the particles from the enzymes. In this study, we set out to find the magnetic materials and instrumental conditions that are sufficient for this purpose. Magnetite was chosen as the first model magnetic material in this study because of its high magnetization values, synthetic control over particle size, shape, functionalization and proven biocompatibility. Our experimental designs were guided by a series of theoretical calculations, which provided clues to the effects of particle size, size distribution, magnetic field, frequency and reaction medium. Materials of theoretically optimal size were synthesized, functionalized, and their effects in the oscillating magnetic field were subsequently investigated. Under our conditions, the materials that clustered e.g. silica-coated and PNIPAM-coated iron oxides exhibited the highest heat generation, while iron oxides embedded in MSNs and mesoporous iron oxides exhibited the least bulk heating. It is worth noting that the specific loss power of PNIPAM-coated Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} was peculiarly high, and the heat loss mechanism of this material remains to be elucidated. Since thermocatalysis is a long-term goal of this project, we also investigated the effects of the oscillating magnetic field system for the synthesis of 7-hydroxycoumarin-3-carboxylic acid. Application of an oscillating magnetic field in the presence of magnetic particles with high thermal response was found to effectively increase the reaction rate of the uncatalyzed synthesis of the coumarin derivative compared to the room temperature control.

Peeraphatdit, Chorthip

2010-12-15T23:59:59.000Z

493

On the jets, kinks, and spheromaks formed by a planar magnetized coaxial gun  

E-Print Network [OSTI]

Measurements of the various plasma configurations produced by a planar magnetized coaxial gun provide insight into the magnetic topology evolution resulting from magnetic helicity injection. Important features of the experiments are a very simple coaxial gun design so that all observed geometrical complexity is due to the intrinsic physical dynamics rather than the source shape and use of a fast multiple-frame digital camera which provides direct imaging of topologically complex shapes and dynamics. Three key experimental findings were obtained: (1) formation of an axial collimated jet [Hsu and Bellan, Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 334, 257 (2002)] that is consistent with a magnetohydrodynamic description of astrophysical jets, (2) identification of the kink instability when this jet satisfies the Kruskal-Shafranov limit, and (3) the nonlinear properties of the kink instability providing a conversion of toroidal to poloidal flux as required for spheromak formation by a coaxial magnetized source [Hsu and Bellan, P...

Hsu, S C

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

494

Magnetic-compression/magnetized-target fusion (MAGO/MTF): A marriage of inertial and magnetic confinement  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Intermediate between magnetic confinement (MFE) and inertial confinement (ICF) in time and density scales is an area of research now known in the US as magnetized target fusion (MTF) and in Russian as MAGO (MAGnitnoye Obzhatiye--magnetic compression). MAGO/MTF uses a magnetic field and preheated, wall-confined plasma fusion fuel within an implodable fusion target. The magnetic field suppresses thermal conduction losses in the fuel during the target implosion and hydrodynamic compression heating process. In contrast to direct, hydrodynamic compression of initially ambient-temperature fuel (i.e., ICF), MAGO/MTF involves two steps: (a) formation of a warm (e.g., 100 eV or higher), magnetized (e.g., 100 kG) plasma within a fusion target prior to implosion; (b) subsequent quasi-adiabatic compression by an imploding pusher, of which a magnetically driven imploding liner is one example. In this paper, the authors present ongoing activities and potential future activities in this relatively unexplored area of controlled thermonuclear fusion.

Lindemuth, I.R.; Ekdahl, C.A.; Kirkpatrick, R.C. [and others

1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

495

Imaging spectroscopic analysis at the Advanced Light Source  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

One of the major advances at the high brightness third generation synchrotrons is the dramatic improvement of imaging capability. There is a large multi-disciplinary effort underway at the ALS to develop imaging X-ray, UV and Infra-red spectroscopic analysis on a spatial scale from. a few microns to 10nm. These developments make use of light that varies in energy from 6meV to 15KeV. Imaging and spectroscopy are finding applications in surface science, bulk materials analysis, semiconductor structures, particulate contaminants, magnetic thin films, biology and environmental science. This article is an overview and status report from the developers of some of these techniques at the ALS. The following table lists all the currently available microscopes at the. ALS. This article will describe some of the microscopes and some of the early applications.

MacDowell, A. A.; Warwick, T.; Anders, S.; Lamble, G.M.; Martin, M.C.; McKinney, W.R.; Padmore, H.A.

1999-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

496

Improved superconducting magnet wire  

DOE Patents [OSTI]

This invention is directed to a superconducting tape or wire composed of alternating layers of copper and a niobium-containing superconductor such as niobium of NbTi, Nb/sub 3/Sn or Nb/sub 3/Ge. In general, each layer of the niobium-containing superconductor has a thickness in the range of about 0.05 to 1.5 times its coherence length (which for Nb/sub 3/Si is 41 A) with each copper layer having a thickness in the range of about 170 to 600 A. With the use of very thin layers of the niobium composition having a thickness within the desired range, the critical field (H/sub c/) may be increased by factors of 2 to 4. Also, the thin layers of the superconductor permit the resulting tape or wire to exhibit suitable ductility for winding on a magnet core. These compositions are also characterized by relatively high values of critical temperature and therefore will exhibit a combination of useful properties as superconductors.

Schuller, I.K.; Ketterson, J.B.

1983-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

497

THE GALACTIC MAGNETIC FIELD  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

With this Letter, we complete our model of the Galactic magnetic field (GMF), by using the WMAP7 22 GHz total synchrotron intensity map and our earlier results to obtain a 13-parameter model of the Galactic random field, and to determine the strength of the striated random field. In combination with our 22-parameter description of the regular GMF, we obtain a very good fit to more than 40,000 extragalactic Faraday rotation measures and the WMAP7 22 GHz polarized and total intensity synchrotron emission maps. The data call for a striated component to the random field whose orientation is aligned with the regular field, having zero mean and rms strength Almost-Equal-To 20% larger than the regular field. A noteworthy feature of the new model is that the regular field has a significant out-of-plane component, which had not been considered earlier. The new GMF model gives a much better description of the totality of data than previous models in the literature.

Jansson, Ronnie; Farrar, Glennys R. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, New York, NY 10003 (United States)

2012-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

498

Absorption Mode FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry Imaging  

SciTech Connect (OSTI)

Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry offers the highest mass resolving power for molecular imaging experiments. This high mass resolving power ensures that closely spaced peaks at the same nominal mass are resolved for proper image generation. Typically higher magnetic fields are used to increase mass resolving power. However, a gain in mass resolving power can also be realized by phase correction of the data for absorption mode display. In addition to mass resolving power, absorption mode offers higher mass accuracy and signal-to-noise ratio over the conventional magnitude mode. Here we present the first use of absorption mode for Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry imaging. The Autophaser algorithm is used to phase correct each spectrum (pixel) in the image and then these parameters are used by the Chameleon work-flow based data processing software to generate absorption mode ?Datacubes? for image and spectral viewing. Absorption mode reveals new mass and spatial features that are not resolved in magnitude mode and results in improved selected ion image contrast.

Smith, Donald F.; Kilgour, David P.; Konijnenburg, Marco; O'Connor, Peter B.; Heeren, Ronald M.

2013-12-03T23:59:59.000Z

499

Magnet Girder Assembly and Installation  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

It takes teamwork to assemble and install magnet girders for the storage ring of the National Synchrotron Light Source II. NSLS-II is now under construction at Brookhaven Lab.

None

2013-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

500

Magnetically stimulated fluid flow patterns  

ScienceCinema (OSTI)

Sandia National Laboratories' Jim Martin and Kyle Solis explain research on the effects of magnetic fields on fluid flows and how they stimulate vigorous flows. Fluid flow is a necessary phenomenon in everything from reactors to cooling engines in cars.

Martin, Jim; Solis, Kyle

2014-08-06T23:59:59.000Z