National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for hydroxyl group ch

  1. Electrostatic Cooperativity of Hydroxyl Groups at Metal Oxide Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Boily, Jean F.; Lins, Roberto D.

    2009-09-24

    The O-H bond distribution of hydroxyl groups at the {110} goethite (R-FeOOH) surface was investigated by molecular dynamics. This distribution was strongly affected by electrostatic interactions with neighboring oxo and hydroxo groups. The effects of proton surface loading, simulated by emplacing two protons at different distances of separation, were diverse and generated several sets of O-H bond distributions. DFT calculations of a representative molecular cluster were also carried out to demonstrate the impact of these effects on the orientation of oxygen lone pairs in neighboring oxo groups. These effects should have strong repercussions on O-H stretching vibrations of metal oxide surfaces.h

  2. Tuning magnetic splitting of zigzag graphene nanoribbons by edge functionalization with hydroxyl groups

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, Huizhen; Yang, Haifang; Li, Lin; Fu, Huixia; Ma, Wei; Niu, Chunyao; Sun, Jiatao; Meng, Sheng; Gu, Changzhi

    2015-03-21

    The electronic properties and relative stability of zigzag graphene nanoribbons are studied by varying the percentage of hydroxyl radicals for edge saturation using first principle calculations. The passivated structures of zigzag graphene nanoribbon have spin-polarized ground state with antiferromagnetic exchange coupling across the edge and ferromagnetic coupling along the edges. When the edges are specially passivated by hydroxyl, the potentials of spin exchange interaction across the two edges shift accordingly, resulting into a spin-semiconductor. Varying the concentration of hydroxyl groups can alter the maximum magnetization splitting. When the percentage of asymmetrically adsorbed hydroxyl reaches 50%, the magnetization splitting can reach a value as high as 275 meV due to the asymmetrical potential across the nanoribbon edges. These results would favor spintronic device applications based on zigzag graphene nanoribbons.

  3. Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M-Washington Group Idaho...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    M-Washington Group Idaho, LLC - EA-2007-03 Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M-Washington Group Idaho, LLC - EA-2007-03 June 14, 2007 Issued to CH2M-Washington Group Idaho, LLC,...

  4. Enforcement Letter, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc - July 8, 2005...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Inc - July 8, 2005 Enforcement Letter, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc - July 8, 2005 July 8, 2005 Issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., related to Neutron Exposure at the Hanford...

  5. Enforcement Letter, CH2M Hill Hanford Group Inc,- September 6, 2007

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., related to Quality Improvement Deficiencies at the Hanford Tank Farms

  6. Mechanistic Insights of Ethanol Steam Reforming over NiCeO x (111): The Importance of Hydroxyl Groups for Suppressing Coke Formation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Zongyuan; Ducho?, Tom; Wang, Huanru; Peterson, Erik W.; Zhou, Yinghui; Luo, Si; Zhou, Jing; Matoln, Vladimir; Stacchiola, Dario J.; Rodriguez, Jos A.; Senanayake, Sanjaya D.

    2015-07-30

    We have studied the reaction of ethanol and water over NiCeO2-x(111) model surfaces to elucidate the mechanistic steps associated with the ethanol steam reforming (ESR) reaction. Our results provide insights about the importance of hydroxyl groups to the ESR reaction over Ni-based catalysts. Systematically, we have investigated the reaction of ethanol on NiCeO2-x(111) at varying Ce? concentrations (CeO1.82.0) with absence/presence of water using a combination of soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (sXPS) and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD). Consistent with previous reports, upon annealing, metallic Ni formed on reduced ceria while NiO was the main component on fully oxidized ceria. Ni? is the active phase leading to both the CC and CH cleavage of ethanol but is also responsible for carbon accumulation or coking. We have identified a Ni?C phase that formed prior to the formation of coke. At temperatures above 600K, the lattice oxygen from ceria and the hydroxyl groups from water interact cooperatively in the removal of coke, likely through a strong metalsupport interaction between nickel and ceria that facilitates oxygen transfer.

  7. Mechanistic insights of ethanol steam reforming over Ni-CeOx(111): The importance of hydroxyl groups for suppressing coke formation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Zongyuan; Senanayake, Sanjaya D.; Duchon, Tomas; Wang, Huanru; Peterson, Erik W.; Zhou, Yinghui; Luo, Si; Zhou, Jing; Matolin, Vladimir; Stacchiola, Dario J.; et al

    2015-07-10

    We have studied the reaction of ethanol and water over NiCeO2-x(111) model surfaces to elucidate the mechanistic steps associated with the ethanol steam reforming (ESR) reaction. Our results provide insights about the importance of hydroxyl groups to the ESR reaction over Ni-based catalysts. Systematically, we have investigated the reaction of ethanol on NiCeO2-x(111) at varying Ce? concentrations (CeO1.82.0) with absence/presence of water using a combination of soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (sXPS) and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD). Consistent with previous reports, upon annealing, metallic Ni formed on reduced ceria while NiO was the main component on fully oxidized ceria. Ni? is themoreactive phase leading to both the CC and CH cleavage of ethanol but is also responsible for carbon accumulation or coking. We have identified a Ni?C phase that formed prior to the formation of coke. At temperatures above 600K, the lattice oxygen from ceria and the hydroxyl groups from water interact cooperatively in the removal of coke, likely through a strong metalsupport interaction between nickel and ceria that facilitates oxygen transfer.less

  8. Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M HILL Hanford Group, Inc.- NEA-2008-02

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., related to a Radioactive Waste Spill at the Hanford Site Tank Farms

  9. Consent Order, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - EA-2000-09 | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - EA-2000-09 Consent Order, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - EA-2000-09 July 25, 2000 Issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., related to Quality Problems at the Hanford Site Tank Farms, (EA-2000-09) On July 25, 2000, the U.S. Department of Energy issued a Consent Order to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. relating to quality problems with the procurement of safety class piping for the W-314 Project at the Tank Farm Waste Remediation System at DOE's Hanford

  10. Enforcement Letter, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - April 24, 2001 |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - April 24, 2001 Enforcement Letter, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - April 24, 2001 April 24, 2001 Issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., related to Nuclear Safety Management at the Hanford Site Tank Farms. On April 24, 2001, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) issued a nuclear safety Enforcement Letter to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. for failures to perform technical safety requirements for gas monitoring and failure to enter a Limiting

  11. Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - EA-2003-06

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    | Department of Energy 3-06 Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - EA-2003-06 August 29, 2003 Issued to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc., related to Quality Assurance Issues at the Hanford Site Tank Farms On August 29, 2003, the U.S. Department of Energy issued a Preliminary Notice of Violation (EA-2003-06) to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. for violations of 10 C.F.R. 830 related to numerous nuclear safety quality assurance issues at the Hanford Tank Farms that occurred

  12. Enforcement Letter, CH2M-Washington Group Idaho LLC , - May 20...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    , - May 20, 2009 May 20, 2009 Issued to CH2M-Washington Group Idaho, LLC, for Electrical Safety Deficiencies at the Idaho National Laboratory On May 20, 2009, the U.S. Department...

  13. Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M-Washington Group Idaho, LLC- EA-2007-03

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Issued to CH2M-Washington Group Idaho, LLC, related to Radiation Protection Program Deficiencies at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex - Accelerated Retrieval Project at the Idaho National Laboratory

  14. DOE Cites CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. for Price-Anderson Violations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) today issued a Preliminary Notice of Violation (PNOV) to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. (CHG) for nuclear safety violations.  CHG is the tank...

  15. DOE Cites CH2M Hill Hanford Group for Price-Anderson Violations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    WASHINGTON, DC - The Department of Energy (DOE) today notified CH2M Hill Hanford Group (CHG) that it will fine the company $82,500 for violations of the Department's nuclear safety requirements. ...

  16. Special Report Order, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. - October...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Site On October 22, 2001, the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Price-Anderson Enforcement issued a Special Report Order to CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc. related to...

  17. The relationship between hydroxyl groups on oxide surfaces and the properties of supported metals. Progress report, June 1, 1992--January 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwarz, J.A.

    1994-05-01

    Supported metal catalysts are commonly prepared by depositing catalytic precursors from aqueous solutions of electrolytes onto high surface area oxides. A general conclusion of our previous studies was that the performance of the finished catalyst depends on the characteristic properties of the hydroxyl inventory on the surface of the oxide support, both in wet and in (pseudo)-dry conditions. Hydroxyl groups serve as adsorption or exchange sites during catalyst preparation. On the other hand, the configuration of hydroxyl groups still remaining on oxides after dehydration determines the acid-base characteristics of the catalyst, which is an important catalytic property. The purpose of the investigation is to characterize the relationship between the complex inventory of hydroxyl groups at oxide surfaces, the acid-base properties of oxides (both in aqueous solution and in the pseudo-dry state) and the resultant effects on the properties of catalytic materials formed by adsorption/impregnation onto these hydroxylated supports during catalyst preparation. We use a common crystallographic model to describe the local configuration of hydroxyl groups on both the pseudo-dry surface and -the oxide/aqueous solution interface. This allows us to extend the concept of structurally determined intrinsic heterogeneity of pseudo-dry surfaces (as already known from the IR spectra of isolated surface hydroxyls) to the oxide/solution interface. We examine the consequences of that heterogeneity upon the impregnation step during catalyst preparation.

  18. DOE Cites CH2M-Washington Group Idaho for Price-Anderson Violations |

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Department of Energy M-Washington Group Idaho for Price-Anderson Violations DOE Cites CH2M-Washington Group Idaho for Price-Anderson Violations June 14, 2007 - 1:40pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today notified CH2M-Washington Group Idaho (CWI) that it will fine the company $55,000 for violations of the Department's nuclear safety requirements. CWI is the prime contractor responsible for managing the Idaho Cleanup Project at the Idaho National Laboratory site.

  19. Heterogeneity of hydroxyl and deuteroxyl groups on the surface of TiO{sub 2} polymorphs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Contescu, C.; Popa, V.T.; Schwarz, J.A.

    1996-06-01

    Potentiometric titration data from pure rutile, anatase, and a commercial fumed titania (Degussa P25) were analyzed in terms of proton binding isotherms from which proton affinity distributions (PADs) of surface sites were obtained. As-received samples, whose thermal and storage history were not systematically controlled, as well as samples subjected to controlled calcination-rehydration-drying treatments were studied. The results indicated the occurrence of a limited number of surface groups on the two polymorphs. The behavior of pure rutile and anatase could be admixed to simulate the acid-base behavior of the commercial sample; on this basis the surface of fumed titania consists largely of anatase-like structures with a small contribution (7%) of rutile-like groups. The region of {nu}{sub OD} stretching vibrations of isolated -OD groups on extensively dehydroxylated samples was found to correlate with the pK`s determined from PADs. A qualitative assignment of measured pK values based on either the original MUSIC model (Hiemstra, T., de Wit, J.C.M., and Van Riemsdijk, W.H., J. Colloid Interface Sci. 133, 105 (1989)) or a refined version of it is presented.

  20. Synthesis of MOF having hydroxyl functional side groups and optimization of activation process for the maximization of its BET surface area

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Jongsik; Kim, Dong Ok; Kim, Dong Wook; Sagong, Kil

    2013-01-15

    To accomplish the postsynthetic modification of MOF with organic-metal precursors (OMPs) described in our previous researches more efficiently, synthesis of MOF (HCC-2) possessing relatively larger pore size as well as higher number of hydroxyl functional side groups per its base unit than those of HCC-1 has been successfully conducted via adopting 1,4-di-(4-carboxy-2,6-dihydroxyphenyl)benzene as an organic ligand and Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O as a metal source, respectively. Also, optimization about the Activation process of HCC-2 was performed to maximize its BET (Brunauer-Emmett-Teller) surface area which was proved to be proportional to the number of exposed active sites on which its postsynthetic modification occurred. However, Activation process having been validated to be so effective with the acquirement of highly-purified HCC-1 (CO{sub 2} supercritical drying step followed by vacuum drying step) was less satisfactory with the case of HCC-2. This might be attributed to relatively higher hydrophilicity and bulkier molecular structure of organic ligand of HCC-2. However, it was readily settled by simple modification of above Activation process. Moreover, indispensable residues composed of both DMF and its thermally degraded derivatives which were chemically attached via coordination bond with hydroxyl functionalities even after Activation process III might enable their H{sub 2} adsorption properties to be seriously debased compared to that of IRMOF-16 having no hydroxyl functionalities. - Graphical abstract: Synthesis of new-structured MOF (HCC-2) simultaneously possessing relatively larger pore size as well as higher number of hydroxyl functional side groups per its base unit at the same time than those of HCC-1 has been performed via adopting 1,4-di-(4-carboxy-2,6-dihydroxyphenyl)benzene as an organic ligand and Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O as a metal source, respectively. Also, the optimization of activation process for HCC-2 was conducted to maximize its BET surface area while the suitability of this activation process was proved via SEM, TGA, EA, XRF, and PSD. Being compared with the crystal structures of IRMOF-16 and HCC-1 via XRD and FT-IR analysis, the crystal structure of HCC-2 having an identical chemical structure except the introduction of four hydroxyl functional side groups on the backbone of its organic ligand showed no noticeable change. Specifically, HCC-2 was established as a cubic structure with each axis of about 21.5 A. Moreover, H{sub 2} adsorption isotherms for these HCCs were attained to ultimately examine that hydroxyl functionalities inside their pores have any influence on their H{sub 2} adsorption properties. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HCC-2 having higher number of hydroxyl groups than that of HCC-1 was prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The optimization of activation process for HCC-2 was studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The crystal structure of HCC-2 was a cubic-shaped structure with each axis of 21.5 A. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer -OH functionalities on HCCs had negative influence on their H{sub 2} adsorption abilities. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This might be due to impurities rigidly attached to their functional side groups.

  1. Mechanistic Insights of Ethanol Steam Reforming over Ni–CeO x (111): The Importance of Hydroxyl Groups for Suppressing Coke Formation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Liu, Zongyuan; Duchoň, Tomáš; Wang, Huanru; Peterson, Erik W.; Zhou, Yinghui; Luo, Si; Zhou, Jing; Matolín, Vladimir; Stacchiola, Dario J.; Rodriguez, José A.; et al

    2015-07-30

    We have studied the reaction of ethanol and water over Ni–CeO2-x(111) model surfaces to elucidate the mechanistic steps associated with the ethanol steam reforming (ESR) reaction. Our results provide insights about the importance of hydroxyl groups to the ESR reaction over Ni-based catalysts. Systematically, we have investigated the reaction of ethanol on Ni–CeO2-x(111) at varying Ce³⁺ concentrations (CeO1.8–2.0) with absence/presence of water using a combination of soft X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (sXPS) and temperature-programmed desorption (TPD). Consistent with previous reports, upon annealing, metallic Ni formed on reduced ceria while NiO was the main component on fully oxidized ceria. Ni⁰ is themore » active phase leading to both the C–C and C–H cleavage of ethanol but is also responsible for carbon accumulation or coking. We have identified a Ni₃C phase that formed prior to the formation of coke. At temperatures above 600K, the lattice oxygen from ceria and the hydroxyl groups from water interact cooperatively in the removal of coke, likely through a strong metal–support interaction between nickel and ceria that facilitates oxygen transfer.« less

  2. Structure-activity relationship of Au-ZrO2 catalyst on formation of hydroxyl groups and its influence on CO oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karwacki, Christopher J; Ganesh, Panchapakesan; Kent, P. R. C.; Gordon, Wesley O; Peterson, Gregory W; Niu, Jun Jie; Gogotsi, Yury G.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of changes in morphology and surface hydroxyl species upon thermal treatment of zirconia on the oxidation activity of Au/ZrO2 catalyst was studied. We observed using transmission Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy progressive changes in the presence of monodentate (type I), bidentate (type II) and hydrogen bridged species (type III) for each of the thermally treated (85 to 500 C) supports consisting of bare zirconia and Au/ZrO2 catalysts. Furthermore, structural changes in zirconia were accompanied by an increase in crystal size (7 to 58 nm) and contraction of the supports porosity (SSA 532 to 7 m2 g 1) with increasing thermal treatment. Deposition of gold nanoparticles under similar preparation conditions on different thermally treated zirconia resulted in changes in the mean gold cluster size, ranging from 3.7 to 5.6 nm. Changes in the surface hydroxyl species, support structure and size of the gold centers are important parameters responsible for the observed decrease (>90%) in CO conversion activity for the Au/ZrO2 catalysts. Density functional theory calculations provide evidence of increased CO binding to Au nanoclusters in the presence of surface hydroxyls on zirconia, which increases charge transfer at the perimeter of the gold nanocluster on zirconia support. This further helps in reducing a model CO-oxidation reaction barrier in the presence of surface hydroxyls. This work demonstrates the need to understand the structure activity relationship of both the support and active particles for the design of catalytic materials.

  3. Structure-Activity Relationship of Au/ZrO2 Catalyst on Formation of Hydroxyl Groups and Its Influence on CO Oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Karwacki, Christopher J; Ganesh, Panchapakesan; Gordon, Wesley O; Peterson, Gregory W; Niu, Jun Jie; Gogotsi, Yury G.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of changes in morphology and surface hydroxyl species upon thermal treatment of zirconia on the oxidation activity of Au/ZrO2 catalyst was studied. We observed using transmission fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy progressive changes in the presence of monodentate (type I), bidentate (type II) and hydrogen bridged species (type III) for each of the thermally treated (85 to 500 C) supports consisting of bare zirconia and Au/ZrO2 catalysts. Furthermore, structural changes in zirconia were accompanied by an increase in crystal size (7 to 58 nm) and contraction of the supports porosity (SSA 532 to 7 m2/g) with increasing thermal treatment. Deposition of gold nanoparticles under similar preparation conditions on different thermally treated zirconia resulted in changes in the mean gold cluster size, ranging from 3.7 to 5.6 nm. Changes in the surface hydroxyl species, support structure and size of the gold centers are important parameters responsible for the observed decrease (> 90 %) in CO conversion activity for the Au/ZrO2 catalysts. Density functional theory calculations provide evidence of increased CO binding to Au nanoclusters in the presence of surface hydroxyls on zirconia, which increases charge transfer at the perimeter of the gold nanocluster on zirconia support. This further helps in reducing a model CO-oxidation reaction barrier in the presence of surface hydroxyls. This work demonstrates the need to understand the structure-activity relationship of both the support and active particles for the design of catalytic materials.

  4. A Pyrrolyl-based Triazolophane: A Macrocyclic Receptor With CH and NH Donor Groups That Exhibits a Preference for Pyrophosphate Anions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sessler, Jonathan L.; Cia, Jiajia; Gong, Han-Yuan; Yang, Xiauping; Arambula, Jonathan F.; Hay, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    A pyrrolyl-based triazolophane, incorporating CH and NH donor groups, acts as a receptor for the pyrophosphate anion in chloroform solution. It shows selectivity for this trianion, followed by HSO{sub 4}{sup -} > H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}{sup -} > Cl{sup -} > Br{sup -} (all as the corresponding tetrabutylammonium salts), with NH-anion interactions being more important than CH-anion interactions. In the solid state, the receptor binds the pyrophosphate anion in a clip-like slot via NH and CH hydrogen bonds.

  5. Department of Justice: CH2M Hill Hanford Group Inc. Admits Criminal Conduct, Parent Company Agrees to Cooperate in Ongoing Investigation and Pay $18.5 Million to Resolve Civil and Criminal Allegations

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Justice Department, in conjunction with the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Eastern District of Washington, announced today that Colorado-based CH2M Hill Hanford Group Inc. (CHG) and its parent company, CH2M Hill Companies Ltd. (CH2M Hill) have agreed that CHG committed federal criminal violations, defrauding the public by engaging in years of widespread time card fraud.

  6. Separation of niobium and tantalum using a chelating ion exchange resin with N-benzoyl phenyl hydroxyl amine as functional group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pobi, M.; Das, J. )

    1993-04-01

    Niobium is separated from Ta and V by elution with 0.5 M HF in a column of chelating resin containing N-benzoyl-N-phenyl-hydroxylamine (NBPHA) as a function group. Niobium and tantalum can also be separated using their differential distribution coefficient and elution behavior, monitored by radiometric and also be spectrophotometric methods. 15 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  7. Ammonia formation from NO reaction with surface hydroxyls on...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    insight about the interactions of NO with hydroxyl groups on TiO2(110) . Authors: Kim, Boseong ; Kay, Bruce D. ; Dohnalek, Zdenek ; Kim, Yu Kwon Publication Date:...

  8. ch_5

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    45 DOEEIS-0287 Idaho HLW & FD EIS 5.3.4.2 Existing Facilities Associated with High-Level Waste Management The facilities in this group are those that have historically been used...

  9. ch_12

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    .0 12.0 Distribution Distribution List List - New Information - 12-1 DOE/EIS-0287 The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) pro- vided copies of this Final Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) to Federal, state, and local elected and appointed officials and agencies of government; Native American groups; national, state, and local environmental and public interest groups; and other organizations and individuals list- ed below. In addition, DOE sent copies of the Final EIS to all persons who comment-

  10. ch_3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    47 DOE/EIS-0287 Idaho HLW & FD EIS has been provided to the public, committed DOE to restoring the existing contaminated groundwater plume outside the INTEC security fence to meet the current drinking water stan- dard of 4 millirem per year. A performance assessment would be developed for each facility or group of facilities under consideration for disposition, to determine which of the three disposition alternatives would be implemented. The performance assessment results would be used to

  11. Structure, electronic properties, and aggregation behavior of hydroxylated carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lpez-Oyama, A. B.; Silva-Molina, R. A.; Ruz-Garca, J.; Guirado-Lpez, R. A.; Gmez-Corrales, R.

    2014-11-07

    We present a combined experimental and theoretical study to analyze the structure, electronic properties, and aggregation behavior of hydroxylated multiwalled carbon nanotubes (OHMWCNT). Our MWCNTs have average diameters of ?2 nm, lengths of approximately 100300 nm, and a hydroxyl surface coverage ??0.1. When deposited on the air/water interface the OHMWCNTs are partially soluble and the floating units interact and link with each other forming extended foam-like carbon networks. Surface pressure-area isotherms of the nanotube films are performed using the Langmuir balance method at different equilibration times. The films are transferred into a mica substrate and atomic force microscopy images show that the foam like structure is preserved and reveals fine details of their microstructure. Density functional theory calculations performed on model hydroxylated carbon nanotubes show that low energy atomic configurations are found when the OH groups form molecular islands on the nanotube's surface. This patchy behavior for the OH species is expected to produce nanotubes having reduced wettabilities, in line with experimental observations. OH doping yields nanotubes having small HOMOLUMO energy gaps and generates a nanotube ? OH direction for the charge transfer leading to the existence of more hole carriers in the structures. Our synthesized OHMWCNTs might have promising applications.

  12. CH Packaging Operations Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2003-06-26

    Introduction - This procedure provides instructions for assembling the following CH packaging payload: -Drum payload assembly -Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly -Ten-Drum Overpack (TDOP).

  13. DISCOVERY OF 6.035 GHz HYDROXYL MASER FLARES IN IRAS 18566+0408

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Al-Marzouk, A. A.; Araya, E. D.; Hofner, P.; Kurtz, S.; Linz, H.; Olmi, L.

    2012-05-10

    We report the discovery of 6.035 GHz hydroxyl (OH) maser flares toward the massive star-forming region IRAS 18566+0408 (G37.55+0.20), which is the only region known to show periodic formaldehyde (4.8 GHz H{sub 2}CO) and methanol (6.7 GHz CH{sub 3}OH) maser flares. The observations were conducted between 2008 October and 2010 January with the 305 m Arecibo Telescope in Puerto Rico. We detected two flare events, one in 2009 March and one in 2009 September to November. The OH maser flares are not simultaneous with the H{sub 2}CO flares, but may be correlated with CH{sub 3}OH flares from a component at corresponding velocities. A possible correlated variability of OH and CH{sub 3}OH masers in IRAS 18566+0408 is consistent with a common excitation mechanism (IR pumping) as predicted by theory.

  14. Graphene Oxide Catalyzed C-H Bond Activation: The Importance...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Graphene Oxide Catalyzed C-H Bond Activation: The Importance Oxygen Functional Groups for Biaryl Construction Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Graphene Oxide Catalyzed ...

  15. Poly(hydroxyl urethane) compositions and methods of making and...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Poly(hydroxyl urethane) compositions and methods of making and using the same Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Poly(hydroxyl urethane) compositions and methods of making...

  16. CH Packaging Operations Manual

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-06-13

    This procedure provides instructions for assembling the CH Packaging Drum payload assembly, Standard Waste Box (SWB) assembly, Abnormal Operations and ICV and OCV Preshipment Leakage Rate Tests on the packaging seals, using a nondestructive Helium (He) Leak Test.

  17. Aromatic-Hydroxyl Interaction of a Lignin Model Compound on SBA-15, Present at Pyrolysis Temperatures

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kandziolka, III, Michael V.; Kidder, Michelle; Gill, Lance W.; Wu, Zili; Savara, Aditya Ashi

    2014-07-14

    An aromatic alpha-aryl ether compound (a benzyl phenyl ether analogue) was covalently grafted to mesoporous silica SBA-15, to create BPEa-SBA-15. The BPEa-SBA-15 was subjected to successive heating cycles up to 600 °C, with in situ monitoring by DRIFTS. It was found that the toluene moiety coordinates to SBA-15 surface silanol hydroxyl groups via an aromatic–hydroxyl interaction. This interaction is evidenced by a red-shift of the aromatic C–H stretches, as well as a red-shift and broadening of the surface hydroxyl O–H stretches, which are features characteristic of a hydrogen bond. These features remain present during heating until ~400 °C whereupon themore » ether linkage of BPEa-SBA-15 is cleaved, accompanied by loss of the toluene moiety.« less

  18. Plutonium Uptake By Brucite And Hydroxylated Periclase

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Farr, J.D.; Neu, M.P.; Schulze, R.K.; Honeyman, B.D.

    2009-06-02

    Batch adsorption experiments and spectroscopic investigations consistently show that aqueous Pu(IV) is quickly removed from solution and becomes incorporated in a brucite or hydroxylated MgO surface to a depth of at least 50 nm, primarily as Pu(IV) within a pH range of 8.5--12.5, and is unaffected by the presence of the organic ligand, citrate. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) were used to estimate Pu penetration depth and provide information about its chemical state.

  19. Schulthess Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Schulthess Group Place: Wolfhausen, Switzerland Zip: CH-8633 Product: A company with activities in regenerative energy production,...

  20. TRITEC Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    TRITEC Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: TRITEC Group Place: Basel, Switzerland Zip: CH-4123 Product: Basel-based installer and distributor for PV products. Coordinates:...

  1. Poly(hydroxyl urethane) compositions and methods of making and using the same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Luebke, David; Nulwala, Hunaid; Tang, Chau

    2014-12-16

    Methods and compositions relating to poly(hydroxyl urethane) compounds are described herein that are useful as, among other things, binders and adhesives. The cross-linked composition is achieved through the reaction of a cyclic carbonate, a compound having two or more thiol groups, and a compound having two or more amine functional groups. In addition, a method of adhesively binding two or more substrates using the cross-linked composition is provided.

  2. Preindustrial to present-day changes in tropospheric hydroxyl...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Room, GFDL Preindustrial to present-day changes in tropospheric hydroxyl radical and methane lifetime from the ACCMIP Vaishali Naik GFDL Preindustrial to present-day changes in...

  3. NOPR CH2M | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    CH2M NOPR CH2M PDF icon NOPR CH2M More Documents & Publications NOPR NEI NEI Statement DOE Workshop 02 20 FINAL NOPR CIGNL

  4. Nucleosides with 5'-O-photolabile protecting groups

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Foote, Robert S. (105 Elliot Cir., Oak Ridge, TN 37830); Sachleben, Richard A. (1105 Hickory Trail, Knoxville, TN 37932)

    1996-09-17

    Nucleosides with photolabile protecting groups on the 5'-hydroxyl. These nucleosides are useful in the sythesis of nucleic acids on solid-state arrays.

  5. Hydroxylation of p-substituted phenols by tyrosinase: Further insight into the mechanism of tyrosinase activity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Munoz-Munoz, Jose Luis; Berna, Jose; Garcia-Molina, Maria del Mar; Garcia-Molina, Francisco; Garcia-Ruiz, Pedro Antonio; Varon, Ramon [Departamento de Quimica-Fisica, Escuela de Ingenieros Industriales de Albacete, Universidad de Castilla la Mancha, Avda. Espana s and others

    2012-07-27

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The action the copper complexes and tyrosinase on phenols is equivalent. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Isotope effect showed that nucleophilic attack to copper atom may be the slower step. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The value of {rho} (Hammett constant) supports an electrophilic aromatic substitution. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Data obtained in steady state pH 7 conditions support the mechanism of Scheme 1SM. -- Abstract: A study of the monophenolase activity of tyrosinase by measuring the steady state rate with a group of p-substituted monophenols provides the following kinetic information: k{sub cat}{sup m} and the Michaelis constant, K{sub M}{sup m}. Analysis of these data taking into account chemical shifts of the carbon atom supporting the hydroxyl group ({delta}) and {sigma}{sub p}{sup +}, enables a mechanism to be proposed for the transformation of monophenols into o-diphenols, in which the first step is a nucleophilic attack on the copper atom on the form E{sub ox} (attack of the oxygen of the hydroxyl group of C-1 on the copper atom) followed by an electrophilic attack (attack of the hydroperoxide group on the ortho position with respect to the hydroxyl group of the benzene ring, electrophilic aromatic substitution with a reaction constant {rho} of -1.75). These steps show the same dependency on the electronic effect of the substituent groups in C-4. Furthermore, a study of a solvent deuterium isotope effect on the oxidation of monophenols by tyrosinase points to an appreciable isotopic effect. In a proton inventory study with a series of p-substituted phenols, the representation of k{sub cat}{sup f{sub n}}/k{sub cat}{sup f{sub 0}} against n (atom fractions of deuterium), where k{sub cat}{sup f{sub n}} is the catalytic constant for a molar fraction of deuterium (n) and k{sub cat}{sup f{sub 0}} is the corresponding kinetic parameter in a water solution, was linear for all substrates. These results indicate that only one of the proton transfer processes from the hydroxyl groups involved the catalytic cycle is responsible for the isotope effects. We suggest that this step is the proton transfer from the hydroxyl group of C-1 to the peroxide of the oxytyrosinase form (E{sub ox}). After the nucleophilic attack, the incorporation of the oxygen in the benzene ring occurs by means of an electrophilic aromatic substitution mechanism in which there is no isotopic effect.

  6. Regioselective alkane hydroxylation with a mutant AlkB enzyme

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koch, Daniel J.; Arnold, Frances H.

    2012-11-13

    AlkB from Pseudomonas putida was engineered using in-vivo directed evolution to hydroxylate small chain alkanes. Mutant AlkB-BMO1 hydroxylates propane and butane at the terminal carbon at a rate greater than the wild-type to form 1-propanol and 1-butanol, respectively. Mutant AlkB-BMO2 similarly hydroxylates propane and butane at the terminal carbon at a rate greater than the wild-type to form 1-propanol and 1-butanol, respectively. These biocatalysts are highly active for small chain alkane substrates and their regioselectivity is retained in whole-cell biotransformations.

  7. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2004-10-01

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  8. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2007-08-15

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  9. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2007-06-15

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  10. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2007-09-20

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  11. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2007-02-15

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  12. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2006-06-20

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  13. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-08-15

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  14. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2004-12-01

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  15. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2006-08-15

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  16. CH-TRU Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-10-15

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  17. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-01-30

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  18. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2006-12-20

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  19. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2006-09-15

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  20. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-11-20

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  1. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-03-15

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  2. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2006-01-18

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  3. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-01-15

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codesand corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  4. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-12-15

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  5. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-06-20

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  6. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2005-05-01

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  7. Graphene Oxide Catalyzed C-H Bond Activation: The Importance Oxygen

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Functional Groups for Biaryl Construction (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Graphene Oxide Catalyzed C-H Bond Activation: The Importance Oxygen Functional Groups for Biaryl Construction Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Graphene Oxide Catalyzed C-H Bond Activation: The Importance Oxygen Functional Groups for Biaryl Construction A heterogeneous, inexpensive and environment-friendly carbon catalytic system was developed for the C-H bond arylation of benzene resulting in the

  8. Production of hydroxylated fatty acids in genetically modified plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Somerville, Chris (Portola Valley, CA); Broun, Pierre (Burlingame, CA); van de Loo, Frank (Lexington, KY)

    2001-01-01

    This invention relates to plant fatty acyl hydroxylases. Methods to use conserved amino acid or nucleotide sequences to obtain plant fatty acyl hydroxylases are described. Also described is the use of cDNA clones encoding a plant hydroxylase to produce a family of hydroxylated fatty acids in transgenic plants.

  9. Iron(IV)hydroxide pKa and the Role of Thiolate Ligation in C-H Bond

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Activation by Cytochrome P450 | Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource Iron(IV)hydroxide pKa and the Role of Thiolate Ligation in C-H Bond Activation by Cytochrome P450 Saturday, May 31, 2014 Cytochrome P450s (P450s) are a family of monooxygenase enzymes that are nearly ubiquitous in nature. P450s are often described as biological blowtorches due to their incredible oxidizing power:1 They can hydroxylate C-H bonds of about 98-100 kcal/mol. P450s are responsible for the phase I metabolism

  10. Ability of TiO2(110) Surface to Be Fully Hydroxylated and Fully Reduced

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Zhitao; Garcia, Juan C.; Deskins, N. A.; Lyubinetsky, Igor

    2015-08-06

    Many TiO2 applications (e.g., in heterogeneous catalysis) involve contact with ambient atmosphere and/or water. The resulting hydroxylation can significantly alter its surface properties. While behavior of single, isolated OH species on the model metal oxide surface of rutile TiO2(110) is relatively well understood, much less is known regarding highly-hydroxylated surfaces and/or whether TiO2(110) could be fully-hydroxylated under ultra-high vacuum conditions. Here we report in situ formation of a well-ordered, fully-hydroxylated TiO2(110)-(1 x 1) surface using an enhanced photochemical approach, key parts of which are pre-dosing of water and multi-step dissociative adsorption and subsequent photolysis of the carboxylic (trimethyl acetic) acid. Combining scanning tunneling microscopy, ultra-violet photoelectron spectroscopy and density functional theory results, we show that the attained super OH surface is also fully-reduced, as a result of the photochemical trapping of electrons at the OH groups.

  11. CH-TRAMPAC Rev. 4

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    This page intentionally left blank to facilitate duplex printing. CH-TRAMPAC Document Rev. 4, December 2012 i TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................... 1.1-1 1.1 Scope ...................................................................................................................... 1.1-1 1.2 Purpose

  12. Room temperature atomic layerlike deposition of ZnS on organic thin films: Role of substrate functional groups and precursors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shi, Zhiwei; Walker, Amy V.

    2015-09-15

    The room temperature atomic layerlike deposition (ALLD) of ZnS on functionalized self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) was investigated, using diethyl zinc (DEZ) and in situ generated H{sub 2}S as reactants. Depositions on SAMs with three different terminal groups, –CH{sub 3,} –OH, and –COOH, were studied. It was found that the reaction of DEZ with the SAM terminal group is critical in determining the film growth rate. Little or no deposition is observed on –CH{sub 3} terminated SAMs because DEZ does not react with the methyl terminal group. ZnS does deposit on both –OH and –COOH terminated SAMs, but the grow rate on –COOH terminated SAMs is ∼10% lower per cycle than on –OH terminated SAMs. DEZ reacts with the hydroxyl group on –OH terminated SAMs, while on –COOH terminated SAMs it reacts with both the hydroxyl and carbonyl bonds of the terminal groups. The carbonyl reaction is found to lead to the formation of ketones rather than deposition of ZnS, lowering the growth rate on –COOH terminated SAMs. SIMS spectra show that both –OH and –COOH terminated SAMs are covered by the deposited ZnS layer after five ALLD cycles. In contrast to ZnO ALLD where the composition of the film differs for the first few layers on –COOH and –OH terminated SAMs, the deposited film composition is the same for both –COOH and –OH terminated SAMs. The deposited film is found to be Zn-rich, suggesting that the reaction of H{sub 2}S with the Zn-surface adduct may be incomplete.

  13. Production of hydroxylated fatty acids in genetically modified plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Somerville, Chris (Portola Valley, CA); Broun, Pierre (Burlingame, CA); van de Loo, Frank (Weston, AU); Boddupalli, Sekhar S. (Manchester, MI)

    2011-08-23

    This invention relates to plant fatty acyl hydroxylases. Methods to use conserved amino acid or nucleotide sequences to obtain plant fatty acyl hydroxylases are described. Also described is the use of cDNA clones encoding a plant hydroxylase to produce a family of hydroxylated fatty acids in transgenic plants. In addition, the use of genes encoding fatty acid hydroxylases or desaturases to alter the level of lipid fatty acid unsaturation in transgenic plants is described.

  14. Production of hydroxylated fatty acids in genetically modified plants

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Somerville, Chris; Broun, Pierre; van de Loo, Frank; Boddupalli, Sekhar S.

    2005-08-30

    This invention relates to plant fatty acyl hydroxylases. Methods to use conserved amino acid or nucleotide sequences to obtain plant fatty acyl hydroxylases are described. Also described is the use of cDNA clones encoding a plant hydroxylase to produce a family of hydroxylated fatty acids in transgenic plants. In addition, the use of genes encoding fatty acid hydroxylases or desaturases to alter the level of lipid fatty acid unsaturation in transgenic plants is described.

  15. CH-TRUCON Rev. 21, January 2008

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    DOE/WIPP 01-3194 Rev. 21 CH-TRU WASTE CONTENT CODES (CH-TRUCON) Revision 21 January 2008 This document supercedes DOE/WIPP 01-3194, Revision 20 CH-TRUCON, Rev. 21, January 2008 DOE/WIPP 01-3194 2 DOE/WIPP 01-3194 Rev. 21 CH-TRU WASTE CONTENT CODES (CH-TRUCON) Revision 21 January 2008 Approved by: [Signature on File] Date:____________ D. Casey Gadbury, National TRU Program Director CH-TRUCON, Rev. 21, January 2008 DOE/WIPP 01-3194 3 This document has been submitted as required to: Office of

  16. CH

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The presence of single-layer graphene between an aqueous or organic fluid phase and the solid phase has little or no influence on adsorption free energy, electrostatics, or other ...

  17. Predicting tropospheric ozone and hydroxyl radical in a global, three-dimensional, chemistry, transport, and deposition model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atherton, C.S.

    1995-01-05

    Two of the most important chemically reactive tropospheric gases are ozone (O{sub 3}) and the hydroxyl radical (OH). Although ozone in the stratosphere is a necessary protector against the sun`s radiation, tropospheric ozone is actually a pollutant which damages materials and vegetation, acts as a respiratory irritant, and is a greenhouse gas. One of the two main sources of ozone in the troposphere is photochemical production. The photochemistry is initiated when hydrocarbons and carbon monoxide (CO) react with nitrogen oxides (NO{sub x} = NO + NO{sub 2}) in the presence of sunlight. Reaction with the hydroxyl radical, OH, is the main sink for many tropospheric gases. The hydroxyl radical is highly reactive and has a lifetime on the order of seconds. Its formation is initiated by the photolysis of tropospheric ozone. Tropospheric chemistry involves a complex, non-linear set of chemical reactions between atmospheric species that vary substantially in time and space. To model these and other species on a global scale requires the use of a global, three-dimensional chemistry, transport, and deposition (CTD) model. In this work, I developed two such three dimensional CTD models. The first model incorporated the chemistry necessary to model tropospheric ozone production from the reactions of nitrogen oxides with carbon monoxide (CO) and methane (CH{sub 4}). The second also included longer-lived alkane species and the biogenic hydrocarbon isoprene, which is emitted by growing plants and trees. The models` ability to predict a number of key variables (including the concentration of O{sub 3}, OH, and other species) were evaluated. Then, several scenarios were simulated to understand the change in the chemistry of the troposphere since preindustrial times and the role of anthropogenic NO{sub x} on present day conditions.

  18. Future Directions of Structural Mass Spectrometry using Hydroxyl Radical Footprinting

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    J Kiselar; M Chance

    2011-12-31

    Hydroxyl radical protein footprinting coupled to mass spectrometry has been developed over the last decade and has matured to a powerful method for analyzing protein structure and dynamics. It has been successfully applied in the analysis of protein structure, protein folding, protein dynamics, and protein-protein and protein-DNA interactions. Using synchrotron radiolysis, exposure of proteins to a 'white' X-ray beam for milliseconds provides sufficient oxidative modification to surface amino acid side chains, which can be easily detected and quantified by mass spectrometry. Thus, conformational changes in proteins or protein complexes can be examined using a time-resolved approach, which would be a valuable method for the study of macromolecular dynamics. In this review, we describe a new application of hydroxyl radical protein footprinting to probe the time evolution of the calcium-dependent conformational changes of gelsolin on the millisecond timescale. The data suggest a cooperative transition as multiple sites in different molecular subdomains have similar rates of conformational change. These findings demonstrate that time-resolved protein footprinting is suitable for studies of protein dynamics that occur over periods ranging from milliseconds to seconds. In this review, we also show how the structural resolution and sensitivity of the technology can be improved as well. The hydroxyl radical varies in its reactivity to different side chains by over two orders of magnitude, thus oxidation of amino acid side chains of lower reactivity are more rarely observed in such experiments. Here we demonstrate that the selected reaction monitoring (SRM)-based method can be utilized for quantification of oxidized species, improving the signal-to-noise ratio. This expansion of the set of oxidized residues of lower reactivity will improve the overall structural resolution of the technique. This approach is also suggested as a basis for developing hypothesis-driven structural mass spectrometry experiments.

  19. Ammonia formation from NO reaction with surface hydroxyls on rutile TiO2 (110) - 11

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kim, Boseong; Kay, Bruce D.; Dohnalek, Zdenek; Kim, Yu Kwon

    2015-01-15

    The reaction of NO with hydroxylated rutile TiO2(110)-11 surface (h-TiO2) was investigated as a function of NO coverage using temperature-programmed desorption. Our results show that NO reaction with h-TiO2 leads to formation of NH3 which is observed to desorb at ~ 400 K. Interestingly, the amount of NH3 produced depends nonlinearly on the coverage of NO. The yield increases up to a saturation value of ~1.31013 NH3/cm2 at a NO dose of 51013 NO/cm2, but subsequently decreases at higher NO doses. Preadsorbed H2O is found to have a negligible effect on the NH3 desorption yield. Additionally, no NH3 is formed in the absence of surface hydroxyls (HObs) upon coadsorption of NO and H2O on a stoichiometric TiO2(110) (s-TiO2(110)). Based on these observations, we conclude that nitrogen from NO has a strong preference to react with HObs on the bridge-bonded oxygen rows (but not with H2O) to form NH3. The absolute NH3 yield is limited by competing reactions of HOb species with titanium-bound oxygen adatoms to form H2O. Our results provide new mechanistic insight about the interactions of NO with hydroxyl groups on TiO2(110) .

  20. CO2/CH4, CH4/H2 and CO2/CH4/H2 separations at high pressures using

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mg2(dobdc) | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies | Blandine Jerome /CH4, CH4/H2 and CO2/CH4/H2 separations at high pressures using Mg2(dobdc) Previous Next List Zoey R. Herm, Rajamani Krishna, Jeffrey R. Long, Microporous Mesoporous Mater., 151, 481-487 (2012) DOI: 10.1016/j.micromeso.2011.09.004 Full-size image (38 K) Abstract: High-pressure separations of binary and ternary mixtures of CO2, CH4, and H2 are relevant to carbon dioxide capture as well as hydrogen

  1. Poly(hydroxyl urethane) compositions and methods of making and using the

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    same (Patent) | SciTech Connect Poly(hydroxyl urethane) compositions and methods of making and using the same Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Poly(hydroxyl urethane) compositions and methods of making and using the same Methods and compositions relating to poly(hydroxyl urethane) compounds are described herein that are useful as, among other things, binders and adhesives. The cross-linked composition is achieved through the reaction of a cyclic carbonate, a compound having two or

  2. ARM - Datastreams - aeri01ch1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ch1 Documentation Data Quality Plots Citation DOI: 10.5439/1025138 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : AERI01CH1 Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) 01: ch. 1 data Active Dates 1995.07.22 - 2014.03.12 Measurement Categories Radiometric Originating Instrument Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) Measurements Only measurements

  3. ARM - Datastreams - aeri01ch2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ch2 Documentation Data Quality Plots Citation DOI: 10.5439/1025139 [ What is this? ] Generate Citation ARM Data Discovery Browse Data Comments? We would love to hear from you! Send us a note below or call us at 1-888-ARM-DATA. Send Datastream : AERI01CH2 Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) 01: ch. 2 data Active Dates 1995.07.22 - 2014.03.12 Measurement Categories Radiometric Originating Instrument Atmospheric Emitted Radiance Interferometer (AERI) Measurements Only measurements

  4. Spectroscopy and reaction dynamics of collision complexes containing hydroxyl radicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lester, M.I.

    1993-12-01

    The DOE supported work in this laboratory has focused on the spectroscopic characterization of the interaction potential between an argon atom and a hydroxyl radical in the ground X{sup 2}II and excited A {sup 2}{summation}{sup +} electronic states. The OH-Ar system has proven to be a test case for examining the interaction potential in an open-shell system since it is amenable to experimental investigation and theoretically tractable from first principles. Experimental identification of the bound states supported by the Ar + OH (X {sup 2}II) and Ar + OH(A {sup 2}{summation}{sup +}) potentials makes it feasible to derive realistic potential energy surfaces for these systems. The experimentally derived intermolecular potentials provide a rigorous test of ab initio theory and a basis for understanding the dramatically different collision dynamics taking place on the ground and excited electronic state surfaces.

  5. Bobst Group SA | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bobst Group SA Jump to: navigation, search Name: Bobst Group SA Place: Susanne, Switzerland Zip: CH-1001 Sector: Services Product: A Swiss-based company that supplies equipment and...

  6. CH-TRU Waste Content Codes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Washington TRU Solutions LLC

    2008-01-16

    The CH-TRU Waste Content Codes (CH-TRUCON) document describes the inventory of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) CH-TRU waste within the transportation parameters specified by the Contact-Handled Transuranic Waste Authorized Methods for Payload Control (CH-TRAMPAC). The CH-TRAMPAC defines the allowable payload for the Transuranic Package Transporter-II (TRUPACT-II) and HalfPACT packagings. This document is a catalog of TRUPACT-II and HalfPACT authorized contents and a description of the methods utilized to demonstrate compliance with the CH-TRAMPAC. A summary of currently approved content codes by site is presented in Table 1. The CH-TRAMPAC describes "shipping categories" that are assigned to each payload container. Multiple shipping categories may be assigned to a single content code. A summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories is provided in Table 2, which consists of Tables 2A, 2B, and 2C. Table 2A provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for the "General Case," which reflects the assumption of a 60-day shipping period as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.4 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to be completed within an approximately 1,000-mile radius, a shorter shipping period of 20 days is applicable as described in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.5 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices. For shipments to WIPP from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Nevada Test Site, and Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site, a 20-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2B provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Close-Proximity Shipments" (20-day shipping period). For shipments implementing the controls specified in the CH-TRAMPAC and Appendix 3.6 of the CH-TRU Payload Appendices, a 10-day shipping period is applicable. Table 2C provides a summary of approved content codes and corresponding shipping categories for "Controlled Shipments" (10-day shipping period).

  7. Enforcement Letter, CH2M-WG Idaho - September 28, 2011 | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

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  16. Newport News in Review, ch. 47, segment includes TEDF groundbreaking...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

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  17. Central Characterization Program (CCP) Contact-Handled (CH) TRU...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Contact-Handled (CH) TRU Waste Certification and Waste Information SystemWaste Data System (WWISWDS) Data Entry Central Characterization Program (CCP) Contact-Handled (CH) TRU...

  18. Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Site CH2M Hill Plateau...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company - November 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Site CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company - November 2012 November 2012 Review of the...

  19. Ability of TiO2(110) Surface to Be Fully Hydroxylated and Fully...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    The resulting hydroxylation can significantly alter its surface properties. While behavior of single, isolated OH species on the model metal oxide surface of rutile TiO2(110) is ...

  20. In-situ infrared spectroscopic studies of hydroxyl in amphiboles at high

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    pressure (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect SciTech Connect Search Results Journal Article: In-situ infrared spectroscopic studies of hydroxyl in amphiboles at high pressure Citation Details In-Document Search Title: In-situ infrared spectroscopic studies of hydroxyl in amphiboles at high pressure Authors: Thompson, Elizabeth C. ; Campbell, Andrew J. ; Liu, Zhenxian [1] ; CIW) [2] + Show Author Affiliations (UC) ( Publication Date: 2016-03-08 OSTI Identifier: 1241067 Resource Type: Journal

  1. Preindustrial to present-day changes in tropospheric hydroxyl radical and

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    methane lifetime from the ACCMIP | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab July 17, 2013, 12:00pm to 1:00pm Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Smagorinsky Seminar Room, GFDL Preindustrial to present-day changes in tropospheric hydroxyl radical and methane lifetime from the ACCMIP Vaishali Naik GFDL Preindustrial to present-day changes in tropospheric hydroxyl radical and methane lifetime from the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP) Contact Information Website:

  2. HASQARD Focus Group - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contracting Wastren Advantage, Inc. HASQARD Focus Group Contracting ORP Contracts and Procurements RL Contracts and Procurements CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company Mission Support Alliance Washington Closure Hanford HPM Corporation (HPMC) Wastren Advantage, Inc. Analytical Services HASQARD Focus Group Bechtel National, Inc. Washington River Protection Solutions HASQARD Focus Group Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size HASQARD Document HASQARD

  3. CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company - Hanford Site

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Contracting CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company Contracting ORP Contracts and Procurements RL Contracts and Procurements CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company Mission Support Alliance Washington Closure Hanford HPM Corporation (HPMC) Wastren Advantage, Inc. Bechtel National, Inc. Washington River Protection Solutions CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company Email Email Page | Print Print Page |Text Increase Font Size Decrease Font Size CH2M CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company is the prime

  4. Class I methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) maser conditions near supernova remnants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McEwen, Bridget C.; Pihlstrm, Ylva M.; Sjouwerman, Lornt O.

    2014-10-01

    We present results from calculations of the physical conditions necessary for the occurrence of 36.169 (4{sub 1}-3{sub 0} E), 44.070 (7{sub 0}-6{sub 1} A {sup +}), 84.521 (5{sub 1}-4{sub 0} E), and 95.169 (8{sub 0}-7{sub 1} A {sup +}) GHz methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) maser emission lines near supernova remnants (SNRs), using the MOLPOP-CEP program. The calculations show that given a sufficient methanol abundance, methanol maser emission arises over a wide range of densities and temperatures, with optimal conditions at n ? 10{sup 4}-10{sup 6} cm{sup 3} and T > 60 K. The 36 GHz and 44 GHz transitions display more significant maser optical depths compared to the 84 GHz and 95 GHz transitions over the majority of physical conditions. It is also shown that line ratios are an important and applicable probe of the gas conditions. The line ratio changes are largely a result of the E-type transitions becoming quenched faster at increasing densities. The modeling results are discussed using recent observations of CH{sub 3}OH and hydroxyl (OH) masers near the SNRs G1.40.1, W28, and Sgr A East.

  5. Computational observation of enhanced solvation of the hydroxyl radical with increased NaCl concentration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wick, Collin D.; Dang, Liem X.

    2006-05-11

    Classical molecular dynamics simulations with many-body potentials were carried out to quantitatively determine the effect of NaCl salt concentration on the aqueous solvation and surface concentration of hydroxyl radicals. The potential of mean force technique was used to track the incremental free energy of the hydroxyl radical from the vapor, crossing the air-water interface into the aqueous bulk. Results showed increased NaCl salt concentration significantly enhanced hydroxyl radical solvation, which should significantly increase its accommodation on water droplets. This has been experimentally observed for ozone aqueous accommodation with increased NaI concentration, but to our knowledge, no experimental study has probed this for hydroxyl radicals. The origin for this effect was found to be very favorable hydroxyl radical-chloride ion interactions, being stronger than for water-chloride. This work was performed at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) under the auspices of the Division of Chemical Sciences, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, U.S. Department of Energy. Battelle operates PNNL for the Department of Energy.

  6. Influence of hydroxyl contents on photocatalytic activities of polymorphic titania nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    kaewguna, Sujaree; Nolpha, Christopher A.; Lee, Burtrand I.; Wang, Li Q.

    2009-03-15

    Polymorphic titania nanoparticles, prepared by a Water-based Ambient Condition Sol (WACS) process, were post-treated by a Solvent-based Ambient Condition Sol (SACS) process in sec-butanol. All samples were characterized for phase composition, surface area, lattice hydroxyl contamination, and particle morphology by X-ray diffraction, N2 physisorption, FT-IR, solid state Magic Angle Spinning (MAS) 1H NMR and scanning electron microscopy. The resultswerecompared to acommercial titania, Degussa P25. Evaluation of methyl orange degradation under UV irradiation results showed that the lower lattice hydroxyl content in SACS titania nanoparticles enhances photocatalytic activity. As-prepared titania and post-treated SACS samples, which have similar surface areas and crystallinity, were compared in order to prove that the superior photocatalytic activity came from a reduction in lattice hydroxyl content.

  7. Kinetic deuterium isotope effects on deamination and N-hydroxylation of cyclohexylamine by rabbit liver microsomes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kurebayashi, H.

    1989-04-01

    Deuterium isotope effects on the kinetic parameters for deamination and N-hydroxylation of cyclohexylamine (CHA) catalyzed by rabbit liver microsomes with NADPH are investigated. Both reactions are inhibited by carbon monoxide and have the characteristics of typical cytochrome P450-dependent monooxygenase reactions. A small and significant deuterium isotope effect operates in the oxidative deamination of CHA. The apparent isotope effects, i.e., VH/VD and (V/K)H/(V/K)D ratios for deamination, are 1.75 and 1.8-2.3, respectively. On the basis of N-hydroxylation, the VH/VD and (V/K)H/(V/K)D ratios are 0.8-0.9. The N-hydroxylation rate of alpha-deuterated CHA (D-CHA) is somewhat higher than that of CHA. The increased increment of hydroxylamine formation seems to coincide with the decreased amount of deamination. Substitution of deuterium in the alpha-position of CHA results in metabolic switching of cytochrome P450 from deamination to N-hydroxylation with low deuterium isotope effects. The data are interpreted in terms of an initial one-electron abstraction from the nitrogen to form an aminium cation radical followed by recombination with iron-bound hydroxyl radical leading to N-hydroxylamine, or followed by alpha-carbon deprotonation to form a neutral carbon radical. The latter can lead to a carbinolamine intermediate for deamination by way of amine or recombination with nascent iron-bound hydroxyl radical. The relative rates of the reactions depend on the alpha-carbon deprotonation rates of amines.

  8. Effect of antisymmetric CH stretching excitation on the dynamics of O({sup 1}D) + CH{sub 4} ? OH + CH{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pan, Huilin; Yang, Jiayue; Zhang, Dong; Shuai, Quan; Jiang, Bo [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian, Liaoning 116023 (China)] [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian, Liaoning 116023 (China); Dai, Dongxu; Wu, Guorong, E-mail: wugr@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: xmyang@dicp.ac.cn; Yang, Xueming, E-mail: wugr@dicp.ac.cn, E-mail: xmyang@dicp.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian, Liaoning 116023 (China) [State Key Laboratory of Molecular Reaction Dynamics, Dalian Institute of Chemical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Dalian, Liaoning 116023 (China); Synergetic Innovation Center of Quantum Information and Quantum Physics, University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui 230026 (China)

    2014-04-21

    The effect of antisymmetric CH stretching excitation of CH{sub 4} on the dynamics and reactivity of the O({sup 1}D) + CH{sub 4} ? OH + CD{sub 3} reaction at the collision energy of 6.10 kcal/mol has been investigated using the crossed-beam and time-sliced velocity map imaging techniques. The antisymmetric CH stretching mode excited CH{sub 4} molecule was prepared by direct infrared excitation. From the measured images of the CH{sub 3} products with the infrared laser on and off, the product translational energy and angular distributions were derived for both the ground and vibrationally excited reactions. Experimental results show that the vibrational energy of the antisymmetric stretching excited CH{sub 4} reagent is channeled exclusively into the vibrational energy of the OH co-products and, hence, the OH products from the excited-state reaction are about one vibrational quantum hotter than those from the ground-state reaction, and the product angular distributions are barely affected by the vibrational excitation of the CH{sub 4} reagent. The reactivity was found to be suppressed by the antisymmetric stretching excitation of CH{sub 4} for all observed CH{sub 3} vibrational states. The degree of suppression is different for different CH{sub 3} vibrational states: the suppression is about 40%60% for the ground state and the umbrella mode excited CH{sub 3} products, while for the CH{sub 3} products with one quantum symmetric stretching mode excitation, the suppression is much less pronounced. In consequence, the vibrational state distribution of the CH{sub 3} product from the excited-state reaction is considerably different from that of the ground-state reaction.

  9. Regioselective alkane hydroxylation with a mutant CYP153A6 enzyme

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Koch, Daniel J.; Arnold, Frances H.

    2013-01-29

    Cytochrome P450 CYP153A6 from Myobacterium sp. strain HXN1500 was engineered using in-vivo directed evolution to hydroxylate small-chain alkanes regioselectively. Mutant CYP153A6-BMO1 selectively hydroxylates butane and pentane at the terminal carbon to form 1-butanol and 1-pentanol, respectively, at rates greater than wild-type CYP153A6 enzymes. This biocatalyst is highly active for small-chain alkane substrates and the regioselectivity is retained in whole-cell biotransformations.

  10. Enforcement Letter, CH2M Hill- October 4, 2004

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Issued to CH2M Hill related to at a Lapse in Dosimetry Accreditation at the Separations Process Research Unit

  11. Time-Resolved Quantitative Measurement of OH HO2 and CH2O in Fuel Oxidation Reactions by High Resolution IR Absorption Spectroscopy.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Haifeng; Rotavera, Brandon; Taatjes, Craig A.

    2014-08-01

    Combined with a Herriott-type multi-pass slow flow reactor, high-resolution differential direct absorption spectroscopy has been used to probe, in situ and quantitatively, hydroxyl (OH), hydroperoxy (HO 2 ) and formaldehyde (CH 2 O) molecules in fuel oxidation reactions in the reactor, with a time resolution of about 1 micro-second. While OH and CH 2 O are probed in the mid-infrared (MIR) region near 2870nm and 3574nm respectively, HO 2 can be probed in both regions: near-infrared (NIR) at 1509nm and MIR at 2870nm. Typical sensitivities are on the order of 10 10 - 10 11 molecule cm -3 for OH at 2870nm, 10 11 molecule cm -3 for HO 2 at 1509nm, and 10 11 molecule cm -3 for CH 2 O at 3574nm. Measurements of multiple important intermediates (OH and HO 2 ) and product (CH 2 O) facilitate to understand and further validate chemical mechanisms of fuel oxidation chemistry.

  12. Iron hydroxyl phosphate microspheres: Microwave-solvothermal ionic liquid synthesis, morphology control, and photoluminescent properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao Shaowen; Zhu Yingjie; Cui Jingbiao

    2010-07-15

    A variety of iron hydroxyl phosphate (NH{sub 4}Fe{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}OH.2H{sub 2}O) nanostructures such as solid microspheres, microspheres with the core in the hollow shell, and double-shelled hollow microspheres were synthesized by a simple one-step microwave-solvothermal ionic liquid method. The effects of the experimental parameters on the morphology and crystal phase of the resultant materials were investigated. Structural dependent photoluminescence was observed from the double-shelled hollow microspheres and the underlying mechanisms were discussed. - Graphical abstract: A variety of iron hydroxyl phosphate (NH{sub 4}Fe{sub 2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}OH.2H{sub 2}O) nanostructures were synthesized by a simple one-step microwave-solvothermal ionic liquid method. Structural dependent photoluminescence was observed from the double-shelled hollow microspheres.

  13. Reactivity of perovskites with water: Role of hydroxylation in wetting and implications for oxygen electrocatalysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stoerzinger, Kelsey A.; Hong, Wesley T.; Azimi, Gisele; Crumlin, Ethan J.; Biegalski, Michael D.; Bluhm, Hendrik; Varanasi, Kripa K.; Shao-Horn, Yang; Giordano, Livia; Lee, Yueh -Lin

    2015-07-15

    Oxide materials play an important role in technical applications such as gas sensing and catalysis, where they can react notably with water in vapor or liquid form. We find that the coverage of (*OH) measured at fixed relative humidity trends with the electron donor (basic) character of wetted perovskite oxide surfaces, corresponding to low contact angles when removing a droplet of water. We report for the first time that the affinity toward hydroxylation, coincident with strong adsorption energies calculated for dissociative and molecular adsorption of water, leads to strong H-bonding detrimental to catalysis of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Furthermore, this suggests that hydrophobic oxides with low tendency to hydroxylate may demonstrate improved catalytic activity for the ORR.

  14. Reactivity of perovskites with water: Role of hydroxylation in wetting and implications for oxygen electrocatalysis

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Stoerzinger, Kelsey A.; Hong, Wesley T.; Azimi, Gisele; Crumlin, Ethan J.; Biegalski, Michael D.; Bluhm, Hendrik; Varanasi, Kripa K.; Shao-Horn, Yang; Giordano, Livia; Lee, Yueh -Lin

    2015-07-15

    Oxide materials play an important role in technical applications such as gas sensing and catalysis, where they can react notably with water in vapor or liquid form. We find that the coverage of (*OH) measured at fixed relative humidity trends with the electron donor (basic) character of wetted perovskite oxide surfaces, corresponding to low contact angles when removing a droplet of water. We report for the first time that the affinity toward hydroxylation, coincident with strong adsorption energies calculated for dissociative and molecular adsorption of water, leads to strong H-bonding detrimental to catalysis of the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Furthermore,more » this suggests that hydrophobic oxides with low tendency to hydroxylate may demonstrate improved catalytic activity for the ORR.« less

  15. NIF User Group Executive Board

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NIF User Group Executive Board Professor Don Lamb (Chair) University of Chicago Dr. Riccardo Betti University of Rochester Dr. Alexis Casner Centre d'Études de Bruyère Le Châtel Professor Paul Drake Co-Chair Committee Elections University of Michigan Dr. Hans Hermann Los Alamos National Laboratory Dr. Paul Neumayer GSI Darmstadt Dr. Hye-Sook Park Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Dr. Mingsheng Wei General Atomics Jena Meineche Young Researcher: Oxford University Gianluca Gregori Oxford

  16. Chemical characterization of SOA formed from aqueous-phase reactions of phenols with the triplet excited state of carbonyl and hydroxyl radical

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yu, Lu; Smith, Jeremy; Laskin, Alexander; Anastasio, Cort N.; Laskin, Julia; Zhang, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Phenolic compounds, which are emitted in significant amounts from biomass burning, can undergo fast reactions in atmospheric aqueous phases to form secondary organic aerosol (aqSOA). In this study, we investigate the reactions of phenol and two methoxy-phenols (syringol and guaiacol) with two major aqueous phase oxidants the triplet excited states of an aromatic carbonyl (3C*) and hydroxyl radical (OH). We thoroughly characterize the low-volatility species produced from these reactions and interpret their formation mechanisms using aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS), desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESIMS), and ion chromatography (IC). A large number of oxygenated molecules are identified, including oligomers containing up to six monomer units, functionalized monomer and oligomers with carbonyl, carboxyl, and hydroxyl groups, and small organic acid anions (e.g., formate, acetate, oxalate, and malate). The average atomic oxygen-to-carbon (O/C) ratios of phenolic aqSOA are in the range of 0.85-1.23, similar to those of low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA) observed in ambient air. The aqSOA compositions are overall similar for the same precursor, but the reactions mediated by 3C* are faster than OH-mediated reactions and produce more oligomers and hydroxylated species at the point when 50% of the phenol had reacted. Profiles determined using a thermodenuder indicate that the volatility of phenolic aqSOA is influenced by both oligomer content and O/C ratio. In addition, the aqSOA shows enhanced light absorption in the UV-vis region, suggesting that aqueous-phase reactions of phenols are likely an important source of brown carbon in the atmosphere, especially in regions influenced by biomass burning.

  17. Chemical characterization of SOA formed from aqueous-phase reactions of phenols with the triplet excited state of carbonyl and hydroxyl radical

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yu, L.; Smith, J.; Laskin, A.; Anastasio, C.; Laskin, J.; Zhang, Q.

    2014-08-19

    Phenolic compounds, which are emitted in significant amounts from biomass burning, can undergo fast reactions in atmospheric aqueous phases to form secondary organic aerosol (aqSOA). In this study, we investigate the reactions of phenol and two methoxy-phenols (syringol and guaiacol) with two major aqueous phase oxidants – the triplet excited states of an aromatic carbonyl (3C*) and hydroxyl radical (·OH). We thoroughly characterize the low-volatility species produced from these reactions and interpret their formation mechanisms using aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS), nanospray desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (nano-DESI MS), and ion chromatography (IC). A large number of oxygenated molecules are identified,more » including oligomers containing up to six monomer units, functionalized monomer and oligomers with carbonyl, carboxyl, and hydroxyl groups, and small organic acid anions (e.g., formate, acetate, oxalate, and malate). The average atomic oxygen-to-carbon (O / C) ratios of phenolic aqSOA are in the range of 0.85–1.23, similar to those of low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA) observed in ambient air. The aqSOA compositions are overall similar for the same precursor, but the reactions mediated by 3C* are faster than ·OH-mediated reactions and produce more oligomers and hydroxylated species at the point when 50% of the phenol had reacted. Profiles determined using a thermodenuder indicate that the volatility of phenolic aqSOA is influenced by both oligomer content and O / C ratio. In addition, the aqSOA shows enhanced light absorption in the UV-vis region, suggesting that aqueous-phase reactions of phenols are likely an important source of brown carbon in the atmosphere, especially in regions influenced by biomass burning.« less

  18. Chemical characterization of SOA formed from aqueous-phase reactions of phenols with the triplet excited state of carbonyl and hydroxyl radical

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Yu, L.; Smith, J.; Laskin, A.; Anastasio, C.; Laskin, J.; Zhang, Q.

    2014-12-23

    Phenolic compounds, which are emitted in significant amounts from biomass burning, can undergo fast reactions in atmospheric aqueous phases to form secondary organic aerosol (aqSOA). In this study, we investigate the reactions of phenol (compound with formula C6H5OH)), guaiacol (2-methoxyphenol), and syringol (2,6-dimethoxyphenol) with two major aqueous-phase oxidants – the triplet excited states of an aromatic carbonyl (3C*) and hydroxyl radical (· OH). We thoroughly characterize the low-volatility species produced from these reactions and interpret their formation mechanisms using aerosol mass spectrometry (AMS), nanospray desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (nano-DESI MS), and ion chromatography (IC). A large number of oxygenatedmore » molecules are identified, including oligomers containing up to six monomer units, functionalized monomer and oligomers with carbonyl, carboxyl, and hydroxyl groups, and small organic acid anions (e.g., formate, acetate, oxalate, and malate). The average atomic oxygen-to-carbon (O / C) ratios of phenolic aqSOA are in the range of 0.85–1.23, similar to those of low-volatility oxygenated organic aerosol (LV-OOA) observed in ambient air. The aqSOA compositions are overall similar for the same precursor, but the reactions mediated by 3C* are faster than · OH-mediated reactions and produce more oligomers and hydroxylated species at the point when 50% of the phenolic compound has reacted. Profiles determined using a thermodenuder indicate that the volatility of phenolic aqSOA is influenced by both oligomer content and O / C ratio. In addition, the aqSOA shows enhanced light absorption in the UV–visible region, suggesting that aqueous-phase reactions of phenols may contribute to formation of secondary brown carbon in the atmosphere, especially in regions influenced by biomass burning.« less

  19. Modelling On Photogeneration Of Hydroxyl Radical In Surface Waters And Its Reactivity Towards Pharmaceutical Wastes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Das, Radha; Vione, Davide; Rubertelli, Francesca; Maurino, Valter; Minero, Claudio; Barbati, Stephane; Chiron, Serge

    2010-10-26

    This paper reports a simple model to describe the formation and reactivity of hydroxyl radicals in the whole column of freshwater lakes. It is based on empirical irradiation data and is a function of the water chemical composition (the photochemically significant parameters NPOC, nitrate, nitrite, carbonate and bicarbonate), the lake conformation best expressed as the average depth, and the water absorption spectrum in a simplified Lambert-Beer approach. The purpose is to derive the lifetime of dissolved molecules, due to reaction with OH, on the basis of their second-order rate constants with the hydroxyl radical. The model was applied to two compounds of pharmaceutical wastes ibuprofen and carbamazepine, for which the second-order rate constants for reaction with the hydroxyl radical were measured by means of the competition kinetics with 2-propanol. The measured values of the rate constants are 1.0x10{sup 10} and 1.6x10{sup 10} M{sup -1} s{sup -1} for ibuprofen and carbamazepine, respectively. The model suggests that the lifetime of a given compound can be very variable in different lakes, even more than the lifetime of different compounds in the same lake. It can be concluded that as far as the reaction with OH, is concerned the concepts of photolability and photostability, traditionally attached to definite compounds, are ecosystem-dependent at least as much as they depend on the molecule under consideration.

  20. The hydroxyl-water megamaser connection. I. Water emission toward OH megamaser hosts

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Wiggins, Brandon K.; Migenes, Victor; Smidt, Joseph M.

    2016-02-05

    Questions surround the connection of luminous extragalactic masers to galactic processes. The observation that water and hydroxyl megamasers rarely coexist in the same galaxy has given rise to a hypothesis that the two species appear in different phases of nuclear activity. The detection of simultaneous hydroxyl and water megamaser emission toward IC694 has called this hypothesis into question, but, because many megamasers have not been surveyed for emission in the other molecule, it remains unclear whether IC694 occupies a narrow phase of galaxy evolution or whether the relationship between megamaser species and galactic processes is more complicated than previously believed. In this paper, we present results of a systematic search for 22 GHz water maser emission among OH megamaser hosts to identify additional objects hosting both megamasers. Our work roughly doubles the number of galaxies searched for emission in both molecules, which host at least one confirmed maser. We confirm with a high degree of confidence (more » $$\\gt 8\\sigma $$) the detection of water emission toward IIZw96, firmly establishing it as the second object to cohost both water and hydroxyl megamasers after IC694. We find high luminosity, narrow features in the water feature in IIZw96. All dual megamaser candidates appear in merging galaxy systems suggestive that megamasers that coexistance may signal a brief phase along the merger sequence. In conclusion, a statistical analysis of the results of our observations provide possible evidence for an exclusion of H2O kilomasers among OH megamaser hosts.« less

  1. Ch. I, Report on Waunita Hot Springs Project, Gunnison County...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Report: Ch. I, Report on Waunita Hot Springs Project, Gunnison County, Colorado Author K. W. Nickerson and Associates Editor T. G. Zacharakis Published Colorado Geological...

  2. Ch. VII, Temperature, heat flow maps and temperature gradient...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Report: Ch. VII, Temperature, heat flow maps and temperature gradient holes Author T. G. Zacharakis Editor T. G. Zacharakis Published Colorado Geological Survey in Cooperation...

  3. 2011 Annual Planning Summary for Chicago Operations Office (CH)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The ongoing and projected Environmental Assessments and Environmental Impact Statements for 2011 and 2012 within the Chicago Operations Office (CH) (See Science APS).

  4. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, CH2M HILL Plateau...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Programs Participants' Association (VPPPA) Presentation: Conducting your Annual VPP Self Assessment Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, CH2M HILL Analytical Technical...

  5. Ch P cage Operations and Regional Office 9800 South Cass Avenue

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    artment of Energy Ch P cage Operations and Regional Office 9800 South Cass Avenue Argonne, Illinois 60439 OCT 2 1 1980 Ki.lliam E. Mott, Director Environmental Cinttol Technology Division, KC! SUBJECT I PREHIER MANUFACTURING - SPRINGDALE, PEhVSYLVA?UA A visit to Premier Manufacturing, 644 Garfield, Springdalc, Pennsylvania, was made en October 6, 1980, by Edward J. Jascewsky and Art Whitman, Department of Energy, and Walter R. Smith, Argonne National Laboratory. The group met with Edward

  6. Group X

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fields, Susannah

    2007-08-16

    This project is currently under contract for research through the Department of Homeland Security until 2011. The group I was responsible for studying has to remain confidential so as not to affect the current project. All dates, reference links and authors, and other distinguishing characteristics of the original group have been removed from this report. All references to the name of this group or the individual splinter groups has been changed to 'Group X'. I have been collecting texts from a variety of sources intended for the use of recruiting and radicalizing members for Group X splinter groups for the purpose of researching the motivation and intent of leaders of those groups and their influence over the likelihood of group radicalization. This work included visiting many Group X websites to find information on splinter group leaders and finding their statements to new and old members. This proved difficult because the splinter groups of Group X are united in beliefs, but differ in public opinion. They are eager to tear each other down, prove their superiority, and yet remain anonymous. After a few weeks of intense searching, a list of eight recruiting texts and eight radicalizing texts from a variety of Group X leaders were compiled.

  7. Galaxy groups

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brent Tully, R.

    2015-02-01

    Galaxy groups can be characterized by the radius of decoupling from cosmic expansion, the radius of the caustic of second turnaround, and the velocity dispersion of galaxies within this latter radius. These parameters can be a challenge to measure, especially for small groups with few members. In this study, results are gathered pertaining to particularly well-studied groups over four decades in group mass. Scaling relations anticipated from theory are demonstrated and coefficients of the relationships are specified. There is an update of the relationship between light and mass for groups, confirming that groups with mass of a few times 10{sup 12}M{sub ?} are the most lit up while groups with more and less mass are darker. It is demonstrated that there is an interesting one-to-one correlation between the number of dwarf satellites in a group and the group mass. There is the suggestion that small variations in the slope of the luminosity function in groups are caused by the degree of depletion of intermediate luminosity systems rather than variations in the number per unit mass of dwarfs. Finally, returning to the characteristic radii of groups, the ratio of first to second turnaround depends on the dark matter and dark energy content of the universe and a crude estimate can be made from the current observations of ?{sub matter}?0.15 in a flat topology, with a 68% probability of being less than 0.44.

  8. CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company The Office of Hea1th, Safety and Security's Office of Enforcement and Oversight has evaluated the facts and circumstances of a series of radiological work deficiencies at the Plutonium Finishing Plant (PFP) and the 105 K-East Reactor Facility (105KE Reactor) by CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC). The radiological work deficiencies at PFP are documented in the April 29, 2011, Department of Energy Richland

  9. Hydrogen Reactivity on Highly-hydroxylated TiO2(110) Surfaces Prepared via Carboxylic Acid Adsorption and Photolysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Du, Yingge; Petrik, Nikolay G.; Deskins, N. Aaron; Wang, Zhitao; Henderson, Michael A.; Kimmel, Gregory A.; Lyubinetsky, Igor

    2012-02-27

    Combined scanning tunneling microscopy, temperature-programmed desorption, photo stimulated desorption, and density functional theory studies have probed the formation and reactivity of highly-hydroxylated rutile TiO2(110) surfaces, which were prepared via a novel, photochemical route using trimethyl acetic acid (TMAA) dissociative adsorption and subsequent photolysis at 300 K. Deprotonation of TMAA molecules upon adsorption produces both surface bridging hydroxyls (OHb) and bidentate trimethyl acetate (TMA) species with a saturation coverage of near 0.5 monolayer (ML). Ultra-violet light irradiation selectively removes TMA species, producing a highly-hydroxylated surface with up to ~0.5 ML OHb coverage. At high coverages, the OHb species typically occupy second-nearest neighbor sites along the bridging oxygen row locally forming linear (21) structures of different lengths, although the surface is less ordered on a long scale. The annealing of the highly-hydroxylated surface leads to hydroxyl recombination and H2O desorption with ~100% yield, thus ruling out the diffusion of H into the bulk that has been suggested in the literature. In agreement with experimental data, theoretical results show that the recombinative H2O desorption is preferred over both H bulk diffusion and H2 desorption processes.

  10. Molecular Simulation Studies of Separation of CO2/N2, CO2/CH4, and CH4/N2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    by ZIFs | Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies | Blandine Jerome Molecular Simulation Studies of Separation of CO2/N2, CO2/CH4, and CH4/N2 by ZIFs Previous Next List Bei Liu and Berend Smit, J. Phys. Chem. C, 2010, 114 (18), pp 8515-8522 DOI: 10.1021/jp101531m Abstract Image Abstract In this work, molecular simulations were performed to evaluate the separation performance of two typical zeolitic imidazolate frameworks (ZIFs), ZIF-68 and ZIF-69, for CO2/N2, CO2/CH4,

  11. CH2M Hill Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in consulting, design, engineering, procurement, construction, and operations and maintenance. References: CH2M Hill Ltd1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by...

  12. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, CH2M HILL Analytical...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Evaluation to determine whether CH2M HILL Analytical Technical Services is continuing to perform at a level deserving DOE-VPP Star recognition. The Team conducted its review during...

  13. Experimental Confirmation of CH Mandrel Removal from Be Shells (Technical

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Report) | SciTech Connect Experimental Confirmation of CH Mandrel Removal from Be Shells Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Experimental Confirmation of CH Mandrel Removal from Be Shells Sputtered Be shells are made by sputter deposition of Be, with a radially graded Cu dopant as necessary, onto plastic mandrels supplied by General Atomics. Although the plastic mandrel may not be a design issue, it is a fielding issue because at cryo temperatures the plastic shrinks more than the Be

  14. Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    violation during a cross-site waste transfer; (3) the November 2003 valve positioning error during S-112 waste retrieval operations; and (4) the July 2004 extremity...

  15. Preliminary Notice of Violation, CH2M Hill Hanford Group, Inc...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Tank C-202 Mobile Retrieval System multi-personnel contamination event; a March 2006 ER-311 catch tank camera removal radiological event; and additional radiological ...

  16. Office of Enforcement Special Report Order, Office of River Protection, CH2M Hill Hanford Group

    Energy Savers [EERE]

  17. Method of dehydroxylating a hydroxylated material and method of making a mesoporous film

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Domansky, Karel [Richland, WA; Fryxell, Glen E [Kennewick, WA; Liu, Jun [West Richland, WA; Kohler, Nathan J [Richland, WA; Baskaran, Suresh [Kennewick, WA

    2002-05-07

    The present invention is a method of dehydroxylating a silica surface that is hydroxylated having the steps of exposing the silica surface separately to a silicon organic compound and a dehydroxylating gas. Exposure to the silicon organic compound can be in liquid, gas or solution phase, and exposure to a dehydroxylating gas is typically at elevated temperatures. In one embodiment, the improvement of the dehydroxylation procedure is the repetition of the soaking and dehydroxylating gas exposure. In another embodiment, the improvement is the use of an inert gas that is substantially free of hydrogen. In yet another embodiment, the present invention is the combination of the two-step dehydroxylation method with a surfactant templating method of making a mesoporous film.

  18. Communication: Ultraviolet photodissociation dynamics of the simplest Criegee intermediate CH{sub 2}OO

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lehman, Julia H.; Li, Hongwei; Beames, Joseph M.; Lester, Marsha I.

    2013-10-14

    The velocity and angular distributions of O {sup 1}D photofragments arising from UV excitation of the CH{sub 2}OO intermediate on the B {sup 1}A??X {sup 1}A? transition are characterized using velocity map ion imaging. The anisotropic angular distribution yields the orientation of the transition dipole moment, which reflects the ?*?? character of the electronic transition associated with the COO group. The total kinetic energy release distributions obtained at several photolysis wavelengths provide detail on the internal energy distribution of the formaldehyde cofragments and the dissociation energy of CH{sub 2}OO X {sup 1}A? to O {sup 1}D + H{sub 2}CO X {sup 1}A{sub 1}. A common termination of the total kinetic energy distributions, after accounting for the different excitation energies, gives an upper limit for the CH{sub 2}OO X {sup 1}A? dissociation energy of D{sub 0}? 54 kcal mol{sup ?1}, which is compared with theoretical predictions including high level multi-reference ab initio calculations.

  19. Rhodium-Catalyzed C-C Bond Formation via Heteroatom-Directed C-H Bond Activation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Colby, Denise; Bergman, Robert; Ellman, Jonathan

    2010-05-13

    Once considered the 'holy grail' of organometallic chemistry, synthetically useful reactions employing C-H bond activation have increasingly been developed and applied to natural product and drug synthesis over the past decade. The ubiquity and relative low cost of hydrocarbons makes C-H bond functionalization an attractive alternative to classical C-C bond forming reactions such as cross-coupling, which require organohalides and organometallic reagents. In addition to providing an atom economical alternative to standard cross - coupling strategies, C-H bond functionalization also reduces the production of toxic by-products, thereby contributing to the growing field of reactions with decreased environmental impact. In the area of C-C bond forming reactions that proceed via a C-H activation mechanism, rhodium catalysts stand out for their functional group tolerance and wide range of synthetic utility. Over the course of the last decade, many Rh-catalyzed methods for heteroatom-directed C-H bond functionalization have been reported and will be the focus of this review. Material appearing in the literature prior to 2001 has been reviewed previously and will only be introduced as background when necessary. The synthesis of complex molecules from relatively simple precursors has long been a goal for many organic chemists. The ability to selectively functionalize a molecule with minimal pre-activation can streamline syntheses and expand the opportunities to explore the utility of complex molecules in areas ranging from the pharmaceutical industry to materials science. Indeed, the issue of selectivity is paramount in the development of all C-H bond functionalization methods. Several groups have developed elegant approaches towards achieving selectivity in molecules that possess many sterically and electronically similar C-H bonds. Many of these approaches are discussed in detail in the accompanying articles in this special issue of Chemical Reviews. One approach that has seen widespread success involves the use of a proximal heteroatom that serves as a directing group for the selective functionalization of a specific C-H bond. In a survey of examples of heteroatom-directed Rh catalysis, two mechanistically distinct reaction pathways are revealed. In one case, the heteroatom acts as a chelator to bind the Rh catalyst, facilitating reactivity at a proximal site. In this case, the formation of a five-membered metallacycle provides a favorable driving force in inducing reactivity at the desired location. In the other case, the heteroatom initially coordinates the Rh catalyst and then acts to stabilize the formation of a metal-carbon bond at a proximal site. A true test of the utility of a synthetic method is in its application to the synthesis of natural products or complex molecules. Several groups have demonstrated the applicability of C-H bond functionalization reactions towards complex molecule synthesis. Target-oriented synthesis provides a platform to test the effectiveness of a method in unique chemical and steric environments. In this respect, Rh-catalyzed methods for C-H bond functionalization stand out, with several syntheses being described in the literature that utilize C-H bond functionalization in a key step. These syntheses are highlighted following the discussion of the method they employ.

  20. Ed Jascevsky Safety Division ChIcago Operations Office MIT CONTFACT INFCE"ATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ;/:4,4 (; . 1.; e octo: ' J : 18, 1976 Ed Jascevsky Safety Division ChIcago Operations Office MIT CONTFACT INFCE"ATION During the discussions on October 8, 1976, you iquired about information relative to work done by MIT as background infomation for survey planning. The enclosed information is parephrased frorc an unpublished history of program work carried out by the Process Eevclopncnt Group of the Dl.ti,si.on of Raw Katerids, I believe this work was done under contract nuder AT(30-1)956.

  1. Procedures For Making Precision CH Bumps On Capsules (Technical Report) |

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    SciTech Connect Procedures For Making Precision CH Bumps On Capsules Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Procedures For Making Precision CH Bumps On Capsules Recently we were asked to produce target capsules with bumps on the surface. The bumps were to test the effects of fill tubes in future targets. The bumps desired were to be Gaussian in shape and from 60 to 40 {micro}m in diameter and from 1 to 6 {micro}m high. The capsules had a nominal diameter of 500 {micro}m. The approach we

  2. Notices Chamorro Standard Time (ChST)]. This

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    616 Federal Register / Vol. 80, No. 161 / Thursday, August 20, 2015 / Notices Chamorro Standard Time (ChST)]. This extension is made in recognition of damage on Saipan from Typhoon Soudelor and the ongoing recovery effort. DATES: The public comment period for the Draft EIS began on April 03, 2015, EDT [April 04, 2015, ChST] with the publication of the Notice of Availability in the Federal Register by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and with this extension, will end on October 1, 2015,

  3. Molecular dynamics simulations of shock waves in hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene melts: Mechanical and structural responses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frhlich, Markus G. E-mail: ThompsonDon@missouri.edu; Sewell, Thomas D. Thompson, Donald L. E-mail: ThompsonDon@missouri.edu

    2014-01-14

    The mechanical and structural responses of hydroxyl-terminated cis-1,4-polybutadiene melts to shock waves were investigated by means of all-atom non-reactive molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations were performed using the OPLS-AA force field but with the standard 12-6 Lennard-Jones potential replaced by the Buckingham exponential-6 potential to better represent the interactions at high compression. Monodisperse systems containing 64, 128, and 256 backbone carbon atoms were studied. Supported shock waves were generated by impacting the samples onto stationary pistons at impact velocities of 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 km s{sup ?1}, yielding shock pressures between approximately 2.8 GPa and 12.5 GPa. Single-molecule structural properties (squared radii of gyration, asphericity parameters, and orientational order parameters) and mechanical properties (density, shock pressure, shock temperature, and shear stress) were analyzed using a geometric binning scheme to obtain spatio-temporal resolution in the reference frame centered on the shock front. Our results indicate that while shear stress behind the shock front is relieved on a ?0.5 ps time scale, a shock-induced transition to a glass-like state occurs with a concomitant increase of structural relaxation times by several orders of magnitude.

  4. Research Groups - Cyclotron Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Groups Research Group Homepages: Nuclear Theory Group Dr. Sherry Yennello's Research Group Dr. Dan Melconian's Research Group Dr. Cody Folden's Group...

  5. Cp* Iridium Precatalysts for Selective C-H Oxidation via Direct...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    C-H Oxidation via Direct Insertion. A Joint ExperimentalComputational Study Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Cp* Iridium Precatalysts for Selective C-H Oxidation ...

  6. DOE Selects CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company for Plateau...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company for Plateau Remediation Contract at its Hanford Site DOE Selects CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company for Plateau Remediation Contract at its ...

  7. Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Print Wednesday, 28 June 2006 00:00 Two of...

  8. Cooperative, Multicentered CH/ Interaction-Controlled Supramolecular Self-Assembly Processes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Qing; Han, Chengbo; Horton, Scott R; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel A; Sumpter, Bobby G; Lu, Wenchang; Bernholc, J.; Maksymovych, Petro; Pan, Minghu

    2012-01-01

    Supramolecular self-assembly on well-defined surfaces provides access to a multitude of nanoscale architectures, including clusters of distinct symmetry and size. The driving forces underlying supramolecular structures generally involve both graphoepitaxy and weak directional nonconvalent interactions. Here we show that functionalizing a benzene molecule with an ethyne group introduces attractive interactions in a 2D geometry, which would otherwise be dominated by intermolecular repulsion. Furthermore, the attractive interactions enable supramolecular self-assembly, wherein a subtle balance between very weak CH/{pi} bonding and molecule-surface interactions produces a well-defined 'magic' dimension and chirality of supramolecular clusters. The nature of the process is corroborated by extensive scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/S) measurements and ab initio calculations, which emphasize the cooperative, multicenter characters of the CH/{pi} interaction. This work points out new possibilities for chemical functionalization of {pi}-conjugated hydrocarbon molecules that may allow for the rational design of supramolecular clusters with a desired shape and size.

  9. Independent Activity Report, CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company- January 2011

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Review of the CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company Unreviewed Safety Question Procedure [ARPT-RL-2011-003

  10. Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Site CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Company - November 2012 | Department of Energy CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company - November 2012 Independent Oversight Review, Hanford Site CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company - November 2012 November 2012 Review of the Hanford Site CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company Implementation Verification Review Processes This report documents the results of an independent review of the implementation verification review (IVR) processes employed by CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company at the

  11. Decomposition and vibrational relaxation in CH{sub 3}I and self-reaction of CH{sub 3} radicals.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, X.; Goldsmith, C. F.; Tranter, R. S.

    2009-07-01

    Vibrational relaxation and dissociation of CH{sub 3}I, 2-20% in krypton, have been investigated behind incident shock waves in a diaphragmless shock tube at 20, 66, 148, and 280 Torr and 630-2200 K by laser schlieren densitometry. The effective collision energy obtained from the vibrational relaxation experiments has a small, positive temperature dependence, {Delta}E{sub down} = 63 x (T/298){sup 0.56} cm{sup -1}. First-order rate coefficients for dissociation of CH{sub 3}I show a strong pressure dependence and are close to the low-pressure limit. Restricted-rotor Gorin model RRKM calculations fit the experimental results very well with {Delta}E{sub down} = 378 x (T/298){sup 0.457} cm{sup -1}. The secondary chemistry of this reaction system is dominated by reactions of methyl radicals and the reaction of the H atom with CH{sub 3}I. The results of the decomposition experiments are very well simulated with a model that incorporates methyl recombination and reactions of methylene. Second-order rate coefficients for ethane dissociation to two methyl radicals were derived from the experiments and yield k = (4.50 {+-} 0.50) x 10{sup 17} exp(-32709/T) cm{sup 3} mol{sup -1} s{sup -1}, in good agreement with previous measurements. Rate coefficients for H + CH{sub 3}I were also obtained and give k = (7.50 {+-} 1.0) x 10{sup 13} exp(-601/T) cm{sup 3} mol{sup -1} s{sup -1}, in reasonable agreement with a previous experimental value.

  12. Alkyl group substitution by oxime-bound palladium(II) (the Shaw reaction): Alkly group selectivity and deuterium isotope effects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wells, A.P.; Kitching, W.

    1992-08-01

    This report provides information regarding the selectivity of alkyl groups and the nature of the transition state for C-H palladation by oxime-bound palladium(II) (the Shaw reaction). The kinetic deuterium isotope effects are also presented. 21 refs.

  13. ChEAS Data: The Chequamegon Ecosystem Atmosphere Study

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Davis, Kenneth J. [Penn State

    The Chequamegon Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (ChEAS) is a multi-organizational research effort studying biosphere/atmosphere interactions within a northern mixed forest in Northern Wisconsin. A primary goal is to understand the processes controlling forest-atmosphere exchange of carbon dioxide and the response of these processes to climate change. Another primary goal is to bridge the gap between canopy-scale flux measurements and the global CO2 flask sampling network. The ChEAS flux towers participate in AmeriFlux, and the region is an EOS-validation site. The WLEF tower is a NOAA-CMDL CO2 sampling site. ChEAS sites are primarily located within or near the Chequamegon-Nicolet National Forest in northern Wisconsin, with one site in the Ottawa National Forest in the upper peninsula of Michigan. Current studies observe forest/atmosphere exchange of carbon dioxide at canopy and regional scales, forest floor respiration, photosynthesis and transpiration at the leaf level and use models to scale to canopy and regional levels. EOS-validation studies quantitatively assess the land cover of the area using remote sensing and conduct extensive ground truthing of new remote sensing data (i.e. ASTER and MODIS). Atmospheric remote sensing work is aimed at understanding atmospheric boundary layer dynamics, the role of entrainment in regulating the carbon dioxide mixing ratio profiles through the lower troposphere, and feedback between boundary layer dynamics and vegetation (especially via the hydrologic cycle). Airborne studies have included include balloon, kite and aircraft observations of the CO2 profile in the troposphere.

  14. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Consolidated Grant Topic Group |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Consolidated Grant Topic Group TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Consolidated Grant Topic Group The Consolidated Grant Topic Group arose from recommendations provided by the TEC and other external parties to the DOE Senior Executive Transportation Forum in July 1998. It was proposed that the consolidation of multiple funding streams from numerous DOE sources into a single grant would provide a more equitable and efficient means of assistance to States and Tribes

  15. Experimental verification of the method for detection of water microleakages in plasma vacuum chambers by using the hydroxyl spectrum

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Antipenkov, A. B.; Afonin, O. N.; Ochkin, V. N.; Savinov, S. Yu.; Tskhai, S. N.

    2012-03-15

    Experimental determination of the sensitivity of the method for detection of water microleakages in the cooling systems of the plasma vacuum chambers of complex electrophysical devices (such as tokamaks, fuel elements of nuclear reactors, and plasmachemical reactors) is considered. It was shown that the spectroscopic method for detection of water microleakages by using the hydroxyl radiation spectrum makes it possible to detect leakages at a level of 10{sup -5} Pa m{sup 3} s{sup -1}. The spatial resolution of the method allows one to localize defects with an accuracy of several centimeters.

  16. Methanogenic Conversion of CO2 Into CH4

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stevens, S.H., Ferry, J.G., Schoell, M.

    2012-05-06

    This SBIR project evaluated the potential to remediate geologic CO2 sequestration sites into useful methane gas fields by application of methanogenic bacteria. Such methanogens are present in a wide variety of natural environments, converting CO2 into CH4 under natural conditions. We conclude that the process is generally feasible to apply within many of the proposed CO2 storage reservoir settings. However, extensive further basic R&D still is needed to define the precise species, environments, nutrient growth accelerants, and economics of the methanogenic process. Consequently, the study team does not recommend Phase III commercial application of the technology at this early phase.

  17. Effects of Oxygen-Containing Functional Groups on Supercapacitor Performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Schwenzer, Birgit; Vijayakumar, M.

    2014-07-03

    Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the interface between graphene and the ionic liquid 1-butyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethanesulfonate (BMIM OTf) were carried out to gain molecular-level insights into the performance of graphene-based supercapacitors and, in particular, determine the effects of the presence of oxygen-containing defects at the graphene surface on their integral capacitance. The MD simulations predict that increasing the surface coverage of hydroxyl groups negatively affects the integral capacitance, whereas the effect of the presence of epoxy groups is much less significant. The calculated variations in capacitance are found to be directly correlated to the interfacial structure. Indeed, hydrogen bonding between hydroxyl groups and SO3 anion moieties prevents BMIM+ and OTf- molecules from interacting favorably in the dense interfacial layer and restrains the orientation and mobility of OTf- ions, thereby reducing the permittivity of the ionic liquid at the interface. The results of the molecular simulations can facilitate the rational design of electrode materials for supercapacitors.

  18. Test Plan: WIPP bin-scale CH TRU waste tests

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Molecke, M.A.

    1990-08-01

    This WIPP Bin-Scale CH TRU Waste Test program described herein will provide relevant composition and kinetic rate data on gas generation and consumption resulting from TRU waste degradation, as impacted by synergistic interactions due to multiple degradation modes, waste form preparation, long-term repository environmental effects, engineered barrier materials, and, possibly, engineered modifications to be developed. Similar data on waste-brine leachate compositions and potentially hazardous volatile organic compounds released by the wastes will also be provided. The quantitative data output from these tests and associated technical expertise are required by the WIPP Performance Assessment (PA) program studies, and for the scientific benefit of the overall WIPP project. This Test Plan describes the necessary scientific and technical aspects, justifications, and rational for successfully initiating and conducting the WIPP Bin-Scale CH TRU Waste Test program. This Test Plan is the controlling scientific design definition and overall requirements document for this WIPP in situ test, as defined by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), scientific advisor to the US Department of Energy, WIPP Project Office (DOE/WPO). 55 refs., 16 figs., 19 tabs.

  19. Synthesis and crystal structure of (NH{sub 4}){sub 3}[UO{sub 2}(CH{sub 3}COO){sub 3}]{sub 2}[UO{sub 2}(CH{sub 3}COO)(NCS){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Serezhkina, L. B.; Peresypkina, E. V.; Virovets, A. V.; Karasev, M. O.

    2010-01-15

    Single crystals of the compound (NH{sub 4}){sub 3}[UO{sub 2}(CH{sub 3}COO){sub 3}]{sub 2}[UO{sub 2}(CH{sub 3}COO)(NCS){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)] (I) are synthesized, and their structure is investigated using X-ray diffraction. Compound I crystallizes in the monoclinic system with the unit cell parameters a = 18.3414(6) A, b = 16.3858(7) A, c = 12.4183(5) A, {beta} = 92.992(1){sup o}, space group C2/c, Z = 4, V = 3727.1(3) A{sup 3}, and R = 0.0253. The uranium-containing structural units of crystals I are mononuclear complexes of two types with an island structure, i.e., the [UO{sub 2}(CH{sub 3}COO){sub 3}]{sup -} anionic complexes belonging to the crystal-chemical group (AB{sub 3}{sup 01} = UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, B{sup 01} = CH{sub 3}COO{sup -}) of the uranyl complexes and the [UO{sub 2}(CH{sub 3}COO)(NCS){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)]{sup -} anionic complexes belonging to the crystal-chemical group AB{sup 01}M{sub 3}{sup 1} (A = UO{sub 2}{sup 2+}, B{sup 01} = CH{sub 3}COO{sup -}, M{sup 1} = NCS{sup -} or H{sub 2}O).

  20. Direct Functionalization of Nitrogen Heterocycles via Rh-Catalyzed C-H Bond Activation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lewis, Jared; Bergman, Robert; Ellman, Jonathan

    2008-02-04

    Nitrogen heterocycles are present in many compounds of enormous practical importance, ranging from pharmaceutical agents and biological probes to electroactive materials. Direct funtionalization of nitrogen heterocycles through C-H bond activation constitutes a powerful means of regioselectively introducing a variety of substituents with diverse functional groups onto the heterocycle scaffold. Working together, our two groups have developed a family of Rh-catalyzed heterocycle alkylation and arylation reactions that are notable for their high level of functional-group compatibility. This Account describes their work in this area, emphasizing the relevant mechanistic insights that enabled synthetic advances and distinguished the resulting transformations from other methods. They initially discovered an intramolecular Rh-catalyzed C-2-alkylation of azoles by alkenyl groups. That reaction provided access to a number of di-, tri-, and tetracyclic azole derivatives. They then developed conditions that exploited microwave heating to expedite these reactions. While investigating the mechanism of this transformation, they discovered that a novel substrate-derived Rh-N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) complex was involved as an intermediate. They then synthesized analogous Rh-NHC complexes directly by treating precursors to the intermediate [RhCl(PCy{sub 3}){sub 2}] with N-methylbenzimidazole, 3-methyl-3,4-dihydroquinazolein, and 1-methyl-1,4-benzodiazepine-2-one. Extensive kinetic analysis and DFT calculations supported a mechanism for carbene formation in which the catalytically active RhCl(PCy{sub 3}){sub 2} fragment coordinates to the heterocycle before intramolecular activation of the C-H bond occurs. The resulting Rh-H intermediate ultimately tautomerizes to the observed carbene complex. With this mechanistic information and the discovery that acid co-catalysts accelerate the alkylation, they developed conditions that efficiently and intermolecularly alkylate a variety of heterocycles, including azoles, azolines, dihydroquinazolines, pyridines, and quinolines, with a wide range of functionalized olefins. They demonstrated the utility of this methodology in the synthesis of natural products, drug candidates, and other biologically active molecules. In addition, they developed conditions to directly arylate these heterocycles with aryl halides. The initial conditions that used PCy{sub 3} as a ligand were successful only for aryl iodides. However, efforts designed to avoid catalyst decomposition led to the development of ligands based on 9-phosphabicyclo[4.2.1]nonane (Phoban) that also facilitated the coupling of aryl bromides. They then replicated the unique coordination environment, stability, and catalytic activity of this complex using the much simpler tetrahydrophosphepine ligands and developed conditions that coupled aryl bromides bearing diverse functional groups without the use of a glovebox or purified reagents. With further mechanistic inquiry, they anticipate that researchers will better understand the details of the aforementioned Rh-catalyzed C-H bond functionalization reactions, resulting in the design of more efficient and robust catalysts, expanded substrate scope, and new transformations.

  1. Hydrated goethite ([alpha]-FeOOH) (1 0 0 ) interface structure: Ordered water and surface functional groups

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ghose, Sanjit K.; Waychunas, Glenn A.; Trainor, Thomas P.; Eng, Peter J.

    2010-03-16

    Goethite({alpha}-FeOOH), an abundant and highly reactive iron oxyhydroxide mineral, has been the subject of numerous studies of environmental interface reactivity. However, such studies have been hampered by the lack of experimental constraints on aqueous interface structure, and especially of the surface water molecular arrangements. Structural information of this type is crucial because reactivity is dictated by the nature of the surface functional groups and the structure or distribution of water and electrolyte at the solid-solution interface. In this study we have investigated the goethite (1 0 0) surface using surface diffraction techniques, and have determined the relaxed surface structure, the surface functional groups, and the three dimensional nature of two distinct sorbed water layers. The crystal truncation rod (CTR) results show that the interface structure consists of a double hydroxyl, double water terminated interface with significant atom relaxations. Further, the double hydroxyl terminated surface dominates with an 89% contribution having a chiral subdomain structure on the (1 0 0) cleavage faces. The proposed interface stoichiometry is ((H{sub 2}O)-(H{sub 2}O)-OH{sub 2}-OH-Fe-O-O-Fe-R) with two types of terminal hydroxyls; a bidentate (B-type) hydroxo group and a monodentate (A-type) aquo group. Using the bond-valence approach the protonation states of the terminal hydroxyls are predicted to be OH type (bidentate hydroxyl with oxygen coupled to two Fe{sup 3+} ions) and OH{sub 2} type (monodentate hydroxyl with oxygen tied to only one Fe{sup 3+}). A double layer three dimensional ordered water structure at the interface was determined from refinement of fits to the experimental data. Application of bond-valence constraints to the terminal hydroxyls with appropriate rotation of the water dipole moments allowed a plausible dipole orientation model as predicted. The structural results are discussed in terms of protonation and H-bonding at the interface, and the results provide an ideal basis for testing theoretical predictions of characteristic surface properties such as pK{sub a}, sorption equilibria, and surface water permittivity.

  2. U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office And CH2M HILL Plateau

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Remediation Company Partnering Charter For Partnering Performance Agreement | Department of Energy CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company Partnering Charter For Partnering Performance Agreement U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office And CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company Partnering Charter For Partnering Performance Agreement The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Richland Operations Office (DOE-RL) and CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CHPRC) are committed to continuous

  3. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, CH2M HILL Analytical Technical Services- January 2008

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Evaluation to determine whether CH2M HILL Analytical Technical Services is continuing to perform at a level deserving DOE-VPP Star recognition.

  4. Enforcement Letter, CH2M Hill Mound, Inc- December 22, 2004

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Issued to CH2M Hill Mound, Inc. related to a Radioactive Contamination Event during Remediation Activities at the Miamisburg Closure Project

  5. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, CH2M WG LLC, Idaho Cleanup Project March 2014

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Evaluation to determine whether CH2M WG LLC, Idaho Cleanup Project is performing at a level deserving DOE-VPP Star recognition.

  6. Joint DOE-CH2M HILL News Release Media Contact: For Immediate Release:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Geoff Tyree, DOE June 3, 2014 (509) 376-4171, Geoffrey.Tyree@rl.doe.gov Sonya Johnson, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (509) 376-5611, Sonya_E_Johnson@rl.gov CH2M HILL Graduates Protégé Company on Department of Energy Project Participation in Program Yields Substantial Sales Growth for Small Business RICHLAND, Wash. - CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company (CH2M HILL), a federal prime contractor doing environmental remediation work at the Department of Energy's (DOE) Hanford Site in

  7. Testing of the method for water microleakage detection from OH hydroxyl spectral lines at the L-2M stellarator

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Voronov, G. S. Berezhetskii, M. S.; Bondar', Yu. F.; Vafin, I. Yu.; Vasil'kov, D. G.; Voronova, E. V.; Grebenshchikov, S. E.; Grishina, I. A.; Larionova, N. F.; Letunov, A. A.; Logvinenko, V. P.; Meshcheryakov, A. I.; Pleshkov, E. I.; Khol'nov, Yu. V.; Fedyanin, O. I.; Tsygankov, V. A.; Shchepetov, S. V.; Kurnaev, V. A.; Vizgalov, I. V.; Urusov, V. A.; and others

    2013-04-15

    Results are presented from L-2M stellarator experiments on testing a possible method for detection of water microleakages in the cooling system of the first wall and vacuum chamber of ITER. The method consists in the spectroscopic detection of spectral lines of the OH hydroxyl, which forms via the dissociation of water molecules in plasma. Emission in the spectral band of 305-310 nm can be detected even at water leakage rates less than 10{sup -4} Pa m{sup 3}/s. Chemical reactions between water and boron compounds on the vacuum chamber wall delay the detection of leakages up to {approx}2000 s. A similar phenomenon can be expected when a leakage will occur in ITER, where the materials suggested for the first wall (Be, Li) can also chemically react with water.

  8. Intermolecular interactions involving C-H bonds, 3, Structure and energetics of the interaction between CH{sub 4} and CN{sup {minus}}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Novoa, J.J.; Whangbo, Myung-Hwan; Williams, J.M.

    1991-12-31

    On the basis of SCF and single reference MP2 calculations, the full potential energy surface of the interaction between CH{sub 4} and CN{sup {minus}} was studied using extended basis sets of up to near Hartree-Fock limit quality. Colinear arrangements C-N{sup {minus}}{hor_ellipsis}H-CH{sub 3} and N-C{sup {minus}}{hor_ellipsis}H-CH{sub 3} are found to be the only two energy minima. The binding energies of these two structures are calculated to be 2.5 and 2.1 kcal/mol, respectively, at the MP2 level. The full vibrational analyses of two structures show a red shift of about 30 cm{sup {minus}1} for the v{sub s} C-H stretching.

  9. Translational and internal energy distributions of methyl and hydroxyl radicals produced by 157 nm photodissociation of amorphous solid methanol

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hama, Tetsuya; Yokoyama, Masaaki; Yabushita, Akihiro; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Wickramasinghe, Piyumie; Guo Wei; Loock, Hans-Peter; Ashfold, Michael N. R.; Western, Colin M.

    2009-12-14

    Methanol is typically observed within water-rich interstellar ices and is a source of interstellar organic species. Following the 157 nm photoexcitation of solid methanol at 90 K, desorbed CH{sub 3}(v=0) and OH(v=0,1) radicals have been observed in situ, near the solid surface, using resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) detection methods. Time-of-flight and rotationally resolved REMPI spectra of the desorbed species were measured, and the respective fragment internal energy and kinetic energy distributions were obtained. Photoproduction mechanisms for CH{sub 3} and OH radicals from solid methanol are discussed. The formation of O({sup 1}D and {sup 3}P) atoms and H{sub 2}O was investigated, but the yield of these species was found to be negligible. CH{sub 3} products arising following the photoexcitation of water-methanol mixed ice showed similar kinetic and internal energy distributions to those from neat methanol ice.

  10. A microbial functional group-based module for simulating methane production and consumption: Application to an incubated permafrost soil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Xiaofeng; Elias, Dwayne A.; Graham, David E.; Phelps, Tommy J.; Carroll, Sue L.; Wullschleger, Stan D.; Thornton, Peter E.

    2015-07-23

    In this study, accurately estimating methane (CH4) flux is critically important for investigating and predicting the biogeochemistry-climate feedback. Better simulating CH4 flux requires explicit representations of microbial processes on CH4 dynamics because all processes for CH4 production and consumption are actually carried out by microbes. A microbial functional group based module was developed and tested against an incubation experiment. The module considers four key mechanisms for CH4 production and consumption: methanogenesis from acetate or single-carbon compounds and CH4 oxidation using molecular oxygen or other inorganic electron acceptors. These four processes were carried out by four microbial functional groups: acetoclastic methanogens, hydrogenotrophic methanogens, aerobic methanotrophs, and anaerobic methanotrophs. This module was then linked with the decomposition subroutine of the Community Land Model, and was further used to simulate dynamics of carbon dioxide (CO2) and CH4 concentrations from an incubation experiment with permafrost soils. The results show that the model could capture the dynamics of CO2 and CH4 concentrations in microcosms with top soils, mineral layer soils and permafrost soils under natural and saturated moisture conditions and a temperature gradient of -2C, 3C, and 5C. Sensitivity analysis confirmed the importance of acetic acid's direct contribution as substrate and indirect effects through pH feedback on CO2 and CH4 production and consumption. This study suggests that representing the microbial mechanisms is critical for modeling CH4 production and consumption; it is urgent to incorporate microbial mechanisms into Earth system models for better predicting the behavior of the climate system.

  11. A microbial functional group-based module for simulating methane production and consumption: Application to an incubated permafrost soil

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Xu, Xiaofeng; Elias, Dwayne A.; Graham, David E.; Phelps, Tommy J.; Carroll, Sue L.; Wullschleger, Stan D.; Thornton, Peter E.

    2015-07-23

    In this study, accurately estimating methane (CH4) flux is critically important for investigating and predicting the biogeochemistry-climate feedback. Better simulating CH4 flux requires explicit representations of microbial processes on CH4 dynamics because all processes for CH4 production and consumption are actually carried out by microbes. A microbial functional group based module was developed and tested against an incubation experiment. The module considers four key mechanisms for CH4 production and consumption: methanogenesis from acetate or single-carbon compounds and CH4 oxidation using molecular oxygen or other inorganic electron acceptors. These four processes were carried out by four microbial functional groups: acetoclastic methanogens,more » hydrogenotrophic methanogens, aerobic methanotrophs, and anaerobic methanotrophs. This module was then linked with the decomposition subroutine of the Community Land Model, and was further used to simulate dynamics of carbon dioxide (CO2) and CH4 concentrations from an incubation experiment with permafrost soils. The results show that the model could capture the dynamics of CO2 and CH4 concentrations in microcosms with top soils, mineral layer soils and permafrost soils under natural and saturated moisture conditions and a temperature gradient of -2°C, 3°C, and 5°C. Sensitivity analysis confirmed the importance of acetic acid's direct contribution as substrate and indirect effects through pH feedback on CO2 and CH4 production and consumption. This study suggests that representing the microbial mechanisms is critical for modeling CH4 production and consumption; it is urgent to incorporate microbial mechanisms into Earth system models for better predicting the behavior of the climate system.« less

  12. Method of preparing (CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiNSO and byproducts thereof

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Spicer, Leonard D.; Bennett, Dennis W.; Davis, Jon F.

    1984-01-01

    (CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiNSO is produced by the reaction of ((CH.sub.3).sub.3 Si).sub.2 NH with SO.sub.2. Also produced in the reaction are ((CH.sub.3).sub.3 Si).sub.2 O and a new solid compound [NH.sub.4 ][(CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiOSO.sub.2 ]. Both (CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiNSO and [NH.sub.4 ][(CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiOSO.sub.2 ] have fluorescent properties. The reaction of the subject invention is used in a method of measuring the concentration of SO.sub.2 pollutants in gases. By the method, a sample of gas is bubbled through a solution of ((CH.sub.3).sub.3 Si).sub.2 NH, whereby any SO.sub.2 present in the gas will react to produce the two fluorescent products. The measured fluorescence of these products can then be used to calculate the concentration of SO.sub.2 in the original gas sample. The solid product [NH.sub.4 ][(CH.sub.3).sub.3 SiOSO.sub.2 ] may be used as a standard in solid state NMR spectroscopy.

  13. Critical interpretation of CH and OH stretching regions for infrared spectra of methanol clusters (CH{sub 3}OH){sub n} (n = 25) using self-consistent-charge density functional tight-binding molecular dynamics simulations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nishimura, Yoshifumi; Lee, Yuan-Pern; Irle, Stephan; Witek, Henryk A.

    2014-09-07

    Vibrational infrared (IR) spectra of gas-phase OH???O methanol clusters up to pentamer are simulated using self-consistent-charge density functional tight-binding method using two distinct methodologies: standard normal mode analysis and Fourier transform of the dipole time-correlation function. The twofold simulations aim at the direct critical assignment of the CH stretching region of the recently recorded experimental spectra [H.-L. Han, C. Camacho, H. A. Witek, and Y.-P. Lee, J. Chem. Phys. 134, 144309 (2011)]. Both approaches confirm the previous assignment (ibid.) of the CH stretching bands based on the B3LYP/ANO1 harmonic frequencies, showing that ?{sub 3}, ?{sub 9}, and ?{sub 2} CH stretching modes of the proton-accepting (PA) and proton-donating (PD) methanol monomers experience only small splittings upon the cluster formation. This finding is in sharp discord with the assignment based on anharmonic B3LYP/VPT2/ANO1 vibrational frequencies (ibid.), suggesting that some procedural faults, likely related to the breakdown of the perturbational vibrational treatment, led the anharmonic calculations astray. The IR spectra based on the Fourier transform of the dipole time-correlation function include new, previously unaccounted for physical factors such as non-zero temperature of the system and large amplitude motions of the clusters. The elevation of temperature results in a considerable non-homogeneous broadening of the observed IR signals, while the presence of large-amplitude motions (methyl group rotations and PA-PD flipping), somewhat surprisingly, does not introduce any new features in the spectrum.

  14. JLF User Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JLF User Group NIF and Jupiter User Group Meeting 2016 The 2016 NIF User Group Meeting will take place the first week of February. The exact dates are Sunday evening, January 31th,...

  15. Photolysis of CH{sub 3}CHO at 248 nm: Evidence of triple fragmentation from primary quantum yield of CH{sub 3} and HCO radicals and H atoms

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morajkar, Pranay; Schoemaecker, Coralie; Fittschen, Christa; Bossolasco, Adriana

    2014-06-07

    Radical quantum yields have been measured following the 248 nm photolysis of acetaldehyde, CH{sub 3}CHO. HCO radical and H atom yields have been quantified by time resolved continuous wave Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy in the near infrared following their conversion to HO{sub 2} radicals by reaction with O{sub 2}. The CH{sub 3} radical yield has been determined using the same technique following their conversion into CH{sub 3}O{sub 2}. Absolute yields have been deduced for HCO radicals and H atoms through fitting of time resolved HO{sub 2} profiles, obtained under various O{sub 2} concentrations, to a complex model, while the CH{sub 3} yield has been determined relative to the CH{sub 3} yield from 248 nm photolysis of CH{sub 3}I. Time resolved HO{sub 2} profiles under very low O{sub 2} concentrations suggest that another unknown HO{sub 2} forming reaction path exists in this reaction system besides the conversion of HCO radicals and H atoms by reaction with O{sub 2}. HO{sub 2} profiles can be well reproduced under a large range of experimental conditions with the following quantum yields: CH{sub 3}CHO?+?h?{sub 248nm} ? CH{sub 3}CHO{sup *}, CH{sub 3}CHO{sup *} ? CH{sub 3}?+?HCO??{sub 1a} = 0.125??0.03, CH{sub 3}CHO{sup *} ? CH{sub 3}?+?H?+?CO??{sub 1e} = 0.205??0.04, CH{sub 3}CHO{sup *}?{sup o{sub 2}}CH{sub 3}CO?+?HO{sub 2}??{sub 1f} = 0.07??0.01. The CH{sub 3}O{sub 2} quantum yield has been determined in separate experiments as ?{sub CH{sub 3}} = 0.33 0.03 and is in excellent agreement with the CH{sub 3} yields derived from the HO{sub 2} measurements considering that the triple fragmentation (R1e) is an important reaction path in the 248 nm photolysis of CH{sub 3}CHO. From arithmetic considerations taking into account the HO{sub 2} and CH{sub 3} measurements we deduce a remaining quantum yield for the molecular pathway: CH{sub 3}CHO{sup *} ? CH{sub 4}?+?CO??{sub 1b} = 0.6. All experiments can be consistently explained with absence of the formerly considered pathway: CH{sub 3}CHO{sup *} ? CH{sub 3}CO?+?H??{sub 1c} = 0.

  16. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Manual Review

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This group is responsible for the update of DOE Manual 460.2-1, Radioactive Material Transportation Practices Manual.  This manual was issued on September 23, 2002, and establishes a set of...

  17. Women's Employee Resource Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Group Women's Employee Resource Group The Women's Employee Resource Group encourages women's contributions, professional development opportunities, and shared support across the Laboratory. Contact Us Office of Diversity and Strategic Staffing (505) 667-2602 Email Computational scientist Hai Ah Nam, a member of the Women's Employee Resource Group Computational scientist Hai Ah Nam, a member of the Women's Employee Resource Group, works on the Laboratory's new Trinity supercomputing system.

  18. JLab Users Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    JLab Users Group Please upgrade your browser. This site's design is only visible in a graphical browser that supports web standards, but its content is accessible to any browser. Concerns? JLab Users Group User Liaison Home Users Group Program Advisory Committee User/Researcher Information print version UG Resources Background & Purpose Users Group Wiki By Laws Board of Directors Board of Directors Minutes Directory of Members Events At-A-Glance Member Institutions News Users Group Mailing

  19. Oxidation of alpha-tocopherol in micelles and liposomes by the hydroxyl, perhydroxyl, and superoxide free radicals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fukuzawa, K.; Gebicki, J.M.

    1983-10-01

    Rates of oxidation of alpha-tocopherol by the hydroxyl- and superoxide free radicals were measured. The radicals were produced in known yields by radiolysis of aqueous solutions with gamma rays. Two main systems were used to dissolve the tocopherol; micelles, made up from charged and uncharged amphiphiles, and membranes made from dimyristyl phosphatidylcholine which could be charged by addition of stearyl amine or dicetyl phosphate. The HO. radicals were efficient oxidants of alpha-tocopherol in all systems, with up to 83% of radicals generated in micelle and 32% in membrane suspensions initiating the oxidation. The HO/sub 2/ radical was an even more effective oxidant, but when most of it was in the O/sub 2/ form at neutral or alkaline pH, the oxidation rates became low. Tocopherol held in positively charged micelles or membranes was oxidized at a higher rate by the O/sub 2/ than in uncharged or negative particles. Possible biological significance of these results is discussed.

  20. Moltech Power Systems Group MPS Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Moltech Power Systems Group MPS Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Moltech Power Systems Group (MPS Group) Place: China Product: China-based subsidiary of Shanghai Huayi Group...

  1. Hanergy Holdings Group Company Ltd formerly Farsighted Group...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hanergy Holdings Group Company Ltd formerly Farsighted Group aka Huarui Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Hanergy Holdings Group Company Ltd (formerly Farsighted Group, aka...

  2. MiniBooNE Pion Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pion Group

  3. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, CH2M HILL B&W West Valley LLC,

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    West Valley Demonstration Project - October 2013 | Department of Energy CH2M HILL B&W West Valley LLC, West Valley Demonstration Project - October 2013 Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, CH2M HILL B&W West Valley LLC, West Valley Demonstration Project - October 2013 Octover 24, 2013 Evaluation to determine whether CH2M HILL B&W West Valley LLC, West Valley Demonstration Project is performing at a level deserving DOE-VPP Star recognition. PDF icon Voluntary Protection

  4. DOE Selects CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company for Plateau Remediation

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Contract at its Hanford Site | Department of Energy CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company for Plateau Remediation Contract at its Hanford Site DOE Selects CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company for Plateau Remediation Contract at its Hanford Site June 19, 2008 - 1:29pm Addthis WASHINGTON, DC - The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced that CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company has been selected as the plateau remediation contractor for DOE's Hanford Site in southeastern Washington

  5. Consent Order, CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC - WCO-2011-01 | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    M-WG Idaho, LLC - WCO-2011-01 Consent Order, CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC - WCO-2011-01 October 6, 2011 Issued to CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC related to a Hoisting Incident that occurred at the Sodium Bearing Waste Treatment Project at the Idaho National Laboratory On October 6, 2011, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Health Safety and Security's Office of Enforcement and Oversight issued a Consent Order to CH2M-WG Idaho, LLC (CWI) for deficiencies in CWI's oversight of its construction subcontractor

  6. ChIMES: "Limited only by our imaginations" | Y-12 National Security

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Complex ChIMES: "Limited only by ... ChIMES: "Limited only by our imaginations" Posted: March 26, 2015 - 4:18pm The ChIMES team's investigators each brought unique expertise to the project. A three-year collaboration of scientists from Y-12 National Security Complex and The University of Tennessee, Knoxville, resulted in the innovation of a patented chemical sensor that is unique in several aspects: it's inexpensive, tiny and portable; it promises virtually limitless

  7. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, URS | CH2M Oak Ridge LLC -

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    April 2015 | Department of Energy URS | CH2M Oak Ridge LLC - April 2015 Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, URS | CH2M Oak Ridge LLC - April 2015 April 2015 UCOR is admitted to the Department of Energy Voluntary Protection Program as a Star Participant. This report summarizes the results from the evaluation of URS | CH2M OAK RIDGE LLC (UCOR) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee during the period of April 14-23 2015, and provides the Associate Under Secretary for AU with the necessary information

  8. Enforcement Letter, CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC - SEL-2012-01 | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Oak Ridge, LLC - SEL-2012-01 Enforcement Letter, CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC - SEL-2012-01 May 4, 2012 Issued to URS CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC, related to a Security Incident involving the Protection and Control of Classified Information at the East Tennessee Technology Park On May 4, 2012, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Health, Safety and Security's Office of Enforcement and Oversight issued an Enforcement Letter (SEL-2012-01) to URS CH2M Oak Ridge, LLC relating to concerns

  9. Letter from DOE to URS | CH2M Oak Ridge LLC on Award Fee Determination for

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    April to September 2015 | Department of Energy DOE to URS | CH2M Oak Ridge LLC on Award Fee Determination for April to September 2015 Letter from DOE to URS | CH2M Oak Ridge LLC on Award Fee Determination for April to September 2015 DOE's Oak Ridge Environmental Management Office told URS | CH2M Oak Ridge LLC (UCOR) in a letter that it had completed its evaluation of the company's performance for the award fee period of April to September 2015 and determined that UCOR earned a fee of more

  10. Independent Oversight Review, Richland Operations Office and CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company and Mission Support Alliance- April 2012

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Review of Richland Operations Office and CH2M Hill Plateau Remediation Company and Mission Support Alliance Conduct of Operations

  11. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, CH2M HILL B&W West...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    B&W West Valley LLC, West Valley Demonstration Project - October 2013 Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, CH2M HILL B&W West Valley LLC, West Valley Demonstration Project -...

  12. Fundamental Understanding of Methane-Carbon Dioxide-Water (CH4...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fundamental Understanding of Methane-Carbon Dioxide-Water (CH4-CO2-H2O) Interactions in Shale Nanopores under Reservoir Conditions. Citation Details In-Document Search Title:...

  13. Park, Y.J.; Hofmayer, C.H. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton,...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Understanding seismic design criteria for Japanese nuclear power plants Park, Y.J.; Hofmayer, C.H. Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Costello, J.F. US Nuclear...

  14. DOE Cites CH2M Hill Hanford for Violating Nuclear Safety Rules...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    for Violating Nuclear Safety Rules DOE Cites CH2M Hill Hanford for Violating Nuclear Safety Rules March 10, 2005 - 10:44am Addthis Hanford Tank Farm Contractor Faces Fine of more ...

  15. Fundamental Understanding of Methane-Carbon Dioxide-Water (CH4...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    ...Water (CH4-CO2-H2O) Interactions in Shale Nanopores under Reservoir Conditions. Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Fundamental Understanding of Methane-Carbon Dioxide-Water ...

  16. Contract DE-AC02-07CH11358 Modifications Language Changes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AC02-07CH11358 Modifications Language Changes Modification 183 October 23, 2015 Part I, Section H - Special Contract Requirements (replace Mod 171) Part II, Section I - Contract...

  17. Quantitative Visualization of ChIP-chip Data by Using Linked...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Data by Using Linked Views Most analyses of ChIP-chip in vivo DNA binding have focused on qualitative descriptions of whether genomic regions are bound or not. There is increasing...

  18. Quantitative Visualization of ChIP-chip Data by Using Linked...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    VA at www.ntis.gov. Most analyses of ChIP-chip in vivo DNA binding have focused on qualitative descriptions of whether genomic regions are bound or not. There is increasing...

  19. Running Jobs by Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Running Jobs by Group Running Jobs by Group Daily Graph: Weekly Graph: Monthly Graph: Yearly Graph: 2 Year Graph: Last edited: 2016-02-01 08:06:40

  20. Pending Jobs by Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pending Jobs by Group Pending Jobs by Group Daily Graph: Weekly Graph: Monthly Graph: Yearly Graph: 2 Year Graph: Last edited: 2016-02-01 08:07:15

  1. Running Jobs by Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Running Jobs by Group Running Jobs by Group Daily Graph: Weekly Graph: Monthly Graph: Yearly Graph: 2 Year Graph: Last edited: 2011-04-05 13:59:48...

  2. Pending Jobs by Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Pending Jobs by Group Pending Jobs by Group Daily Graph: Weekly Graph: Monthly Graph: Yearly Graph: 2 Year Graph: Last edited: 2011-04-05 14:00:14...

  3. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at the August meeting, the Focus Group Secretary continues to work on deleting the language proposed by the QA Sub-group that would have divided the section on methods into one...

  4. TEC Communications Topic Group

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    procurement - Routing criteriaemergency preparedness Tribal Issues Topic Group * TEPP Navajo Nation (Tom Clawson) - 1404 - Needs Assessment * Identified strengths and...

  5. Interagency Sustainability Working Group

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Interagency Sustainability Working Group (ISWG) is the coordinating body for sustainable buildings in the federal government.

  6. Newport News in Review, ch. 47, segment includes TEDF groundbreaking event

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    | Jefferson Lab https://www.jlab.org/news/articles/newport-news-review-ch-47-segment-includes-tedf-groundbreaking-event Newport News in Review, ch. 47, segment includes TEDF groundbreaking event The September 2010 "Newport News in Review" program includes a segment on JLab's Sept. 1 Technology and Engineering Development Facility Groundbreaking event. The program may be viewed at NNGOV.COM:

  7. Spectroscopic characterization of rovibrational temperatures in atmospheric pressure He/CH{sub 4} plasmas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moon, Se Youn; Kim, D. B.; Gweon, B.; Choe, W.

    2008-10-15

    Atmospheric pressure of helium (He) and methane (CH{sub 4}) mixture discharge characteristics are investigated using emission spectroscopic methods. Plasmas are produced in a radio frequency capacitively coupled device at atmospheric pressure in the ambient air. Without the CH{sub 4} gas introduced in the plasma, the emission spectrum exhibits typical helium discharge characteristics showing helium atomic lines with nitrogen molecular bands and oxygen atomic lines resulting from air impurities. Addition of a small amount (<1%) of CH{sub 4} to the supplied He results in the emission of CN (B{sup 2}{sigma}{sup +}-X{sup 2}{sigma}{sup +}: violet system) and CH (A{sup 2}{delta}-X{sup 2} product : 430 nm system) molecular bands. Analyzing the CN and CH diatomic molecular emission spectra, the vibrational temperature (T{sub vib}) and rotational temperature (T{sub rot}) are simultaneously obtained. As input power levels are raised from 20 W to 200 W, T{sub vib} and T{sub rot} are increased from 4230 K to 6310 K and from 340 K to 500 K, respectively. On the contrary, increasing the CH{sub 4} amount brings about the decrease of both temperatures because CH{sub 4} is harder to ionize than He. The emission intensities of CN and CH radicals, which are important in plasma processing, are also changed along with the temperature variation. From the results, the atmospheric pressure plasma shows strong nonequilibrium discharge properties, which may be effectively utilized for thermal damage free material treatments.

  8. SSRL ETS Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    STANFORD SYNCHROTRON RADIATION LABORATORY Stanford Linear Accelerator Center Engineering & Technical Services Groups: Mechanical Services Group Mechanical Services Group Sharepoint ASD: Schedule Priorites Accelerator tech support - Call List Documentation: Engineering Notes, Drawings, and Accelerator Safety Documents Mechanical Systems: Accelerator Drawings Accelerator Pictures Accelerator Vacuum Systems (SSRL) LCW Vacuum Projects: Last Updated: February 8, 2007 Ben Scott

  9. Nilsson Group Members

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    stanford top slac line home group research line Welcome to the Nilsson group. Primary research interests in the Nilsson group includes using x-ray spectroscopies to understand: The Structure of water Bond breakage and formation during catalytic reactions on surfaces The fundamental studies of electrochemistry for energy conversion

  10. Process for alkane group dehydrogenation with organometallic catalyst

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaska, William C.; Jensen, Craig M.

    1998-01-01

    An improved process is described for the catalytic dehydrogenation of organic molecules having a ##STR1## group to produce a ##STR2## group. The organic molecules are: ##STR3## wherein: A.sup.1, A.sup.2, A.sup.3, and A.sup.4 are each independently P, As or N: E.sup.2 is independently C or N; E.sup.3 is independently C, Si or Ge; E.sup.4 is independently C, Si, or Ge; and E.sup.5 is independently C, Si or Ge; M.sup.1, M.sup.2, M.sup.3, and M.sup.4 each is a metal atom independently selected from the group consisting of ruthenium, rhodium, palladium, osmium, iridium and platinum; Q.sup.1, Q.sup.2, Q.sup.3, and Q.sup.4 are each independently a direct bond, --CH.sub.2 --, --CH.sub.2 CH.sub.2 --, or CH.dbd.CH--; in structure I, structure II or structure IV, R.sup.1, R.sup.2, R.sup.3, and R.sup.4 are each independently selected from alkyl, alkenyl, cycloalkyl, and aryl, or R.sup.1 and R.sup.2 together and R.sup.3 and R.sup.4 together form a ring structure having from 4 to 10 carbon atoms, or in structure III, R.sup.5, R.sup.6, R.sup.7, and R.sup.8 are each independently selected from alkyl, alkenyl, cycloalkyl, and aryl, or R.sup.5 and R.sup.6 together and R.sup.7 and R.sup.8 together form a ring structure having from 4 to 10 carbon atoms, at a temperature of between about 100.degree. and 250.degree. C. for between about 1 hr and 300 days in the absence of N.sub.2. The surprisingly stable catalyst is a complex of an organic ligand comprising H, C, Si, N, P atoms, and a platinum group metal. The dehydrogenation is performed between about 100 to 200.degree. C., and has increased turnover.

  11. Process for alkane group dehydrogenation with organometallic catalyst

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kaska, W.C.; Jensen, C.M.

    1998-07-14

    An improved process is described for the catalytic dehydrogenation of organic molecules having a ##STR1## group to produce a ##STR2## group. The organic molecules are: ##STR3## wherein: A.sup.1, A.sup.2, A.sup.3, and A.sup.4 are each independently P, As or N: E.sup.2 is independently C or N; E.sup.3 is independently C, Si or Ge; E.sup.4 is independently C, Si, or Ge; and E.sup.5 is independently C, Si or Ge; M.sup.1, M.sup.2, M.sup.3, and M.sup.4 each is a metal atom independently selected from the group consisting of ruthenium, rhodium, palladium, osmium, iridium and platinum; Q.sup.1, Q.sup.2, Q.sup.3, and Q.sup.4 are each independently a direct bond, --CH.sub.2 --, --CH.sub.2 CH.sub.2 --, or CH.dbd.CH--; in structure I, structure II or structure IV, R.sup.1, R.sup.2, R.sup.3, and R.sup.4 are each independently selected from alkyl, alkenyl, cycloalkyl, and aryl, or R.sup.1 and R.sup.2 together and R.sup.3 and R.sup.4 together form a ring structure having from 4 to 10 carbon atoms, or in structure III, R.sup.5, R.sup.6, R.sup.7, and R.sup.8 are each independently selected from alkyl, alkenyl, cycloalkyl, and aryl, or R.sup.5 and R.sup.6 together and R.sup.7 and R.sup.8 together form a ring structure having from 4 to 10 carbon atoms, at a temperature of between about 100.degree. and 250.degree. C. for between about 1 hr and 300 days in the absence of N.sub.2. The surprisingly stable catalyst is a complex of an organic ligand comprising H, C, Si, N, P atoms, and a platinum group metal. The dehydrogenation is performed between about 100 to 200.degree. C., and has increased turnover.

  12. An Unprecedented NADPH Domain Conformation in Lysine Monooxygenase NbtG Provides Insights into Uncoupling of Oxygen Consumption from Substrate Hydroxylation

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Binda, Claudia; Robinson, Reeder M.; Martin del Campo, Julia S.; Keul, Nicholas D.; Rodriguez, Pedro J.; Robinson, Howard H.; Mattevi, Andrea; Sobrado, Pablo

    2015-03-23

    N-hydroxylating monooxygenases (NMOs) are involved in the biosynthesis of iron-chelating hydroxamate-containing siderophores that play a role in microbial virulence. These flavoenzymes catalyze the NADPH- and oxygen-dependent hydroxylation of amines, such as those found on the side chains of lysine and ornithine. In this work we report the biochemical and structural characterization of Nocardia farcinica Lys monooxygenase (NbtG), which has similar biochemical properties to mycobacterial homologs. NbtG is also active on D-Lys although it binds L-Lys with a higher affinity. Differently from the ornithine monooxygenases PvdA, SidA and KtzI, NbtG can use both NADH and NADPH and is highly uncoupled, producingmore » more superoxide and hydrogen peroxide than hydroxylated Lys. The crystal structure of NbtG solved at 2.4 Å resolution revealed an unexpected protein conformation with a 30° rotation of the NAD(P)H domain with respect to the FAD domain that precludes binding of the nicotinamide cofactor. This “occluded” structure may explain the biochemical properties of NbtG, specifically with regard to the substantial uncoupling and limited stabilization of the C4a-hydroperoxyflavin intermediate. We discuss the biological implications of these findings.« less

  13. Kinetics of the Hydrogen Atom Abstraction Reactions from 1?Butanol by Hydroxyl Radical: Theory Matches Experiment and More

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Seal, Prasenjit; Oyedepo, Gbenga; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2013-01-17

    In the present work, we study the H atom abstraction reactions by hydroxyl radical at all five sites of 1-butanol. Multistructural variational transition state theory (MS-VTST) was employed to estimate the five thermal rate constants. MS-VTST utilizes a multifaceted dividing surface that accounts for the multiple conformational structures of the transition state, and we also include all the structures of the reactant molecule. The vibrational frequencies and minimum energy paths (MEPs) were computed using the M08-HX/MG3S electronic structure method. The required potential energy surfaces were obtained implicitly by direct dynamics employing interpolated variational transition state theory with mapping (IVTST-M) using a variational reaction path algorithm. The M08-HX/MG3S electronic model chemistry was then used to calculate multistructural torsional anharmonicity factors to complete the MS-VTST rate constant calculations. The results indicate that torsional anharmonicity is very important at higher temperatures, and neglecting it would lead to errors of 26 and 32 at 1000 and 1500 K, respectively. Our results for the sums of the site-specific rate constants agree very well with the experimental values of Hanson and co-workers at 896?1269 K and with the experimental results of Campbell et al. at 292 K, but slightly less well with the experiments of Wallington et al., Nelson et al., and Yujing and Mellouki at 253?372 K; nevertheless, the calculated rates are within a factor of 1.61 of all experimental values at all temperatures. This gives us confidence in the site-specific values, which are currently inaccessible to experiment.

  14. Grouped exposed metal heaters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Coit, William George (Bellaire, TX); Griffin, Peter Terry (Brixham, GB); Hamilton, Paul Taylor (Houston, TX); Hsu, Chia-Fu (Granada Hills, CA); Mason, Stanley Leroy (Allen, TX); Samuel, Allan James (Kular Lumpar, MY); Watkins, Ronnie Wade (Cypress, TX)

    2010-11-09

    A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation is described. The system includes two or more groups of elongated heaters. The group includes two or more heaters placed in two or more openings in the formation. The heaters in the group are electrically coupled below the surface of the formation. The openings include at least partially uncased wellbores in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The groups are electrically configured such that current flow through the formation between at least two groups is inhibited. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the formation.

  15. Grouped exposed metal heaters

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Vinegar, Harold J. (Bellaire, TX); Coit, William George (Bellaire, TX); Griffin, Peter Terry (Brixham, GB); Hamilton, Paul Taylor (Houston, TX); Hsu, Chia-Fu (Granada Hills, CA); Mason, Stanley Leroy (Allen, TX); Samuel, Allan James (Kular Lumpar, ML); Watkins, Ronnie Wade (Cypress, TX)

    2012-07-31

    A system for treating a hydrocarbon containing formation is described. The system includes two or more groups of elongated heaters. The group includes two or more heaters placed in two or more openings in the formation. The heaters in the group are electrically coupled below the surface of the formation. The openings include at least partially uncased wellbores in a hydrocarbon layer of the formation. The groups are electrically configured such that current flow through the formation between at least two groups is inhibited. The heaters are configured to provide heat to the formation.

  16. Synthetic route to meso-tetra hydrocarbyl or substituted hydrocarbyl porphyrins and derivatives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wijesekera, T.P.; Wagner, R.W.

    1993-08-31

    The hydroxyl group in a pyrrolic compound having in the 2-position thereof a group having the formula R(OH)CH-R is hydrocarbyl or substituted hydrocarbyl, is replaced by a group, for example a p-nitrobenzoate group, having better leaving properties than those of hydroxyl for a subsequent self-condensation and cyclization of the pyrrolic compound to form a meso-hydrocarbyl or meso-substituted hydrocarbyl porphyrin.

  17. Synthetic route to meso-tetra hydrocarbyl or substituted hydrocarbyl porphyrins and derivatives

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wijesekera, Tilak P.; Wagner, Richard W.

    1993-01-01

    The hydroxyl group in a pyrrolic compound having in the 2-position thereof a group having the formula R(OH)CH--R is hydrocarbyl or substituted hydrocarbyl, is replaced by a group, for example a p-nitrobenzoate group, having better leaving properties than those of hydroxyl for a subsequent self-condensation and cyclization of the pyrrolic compound to form a meso-hydrocarbyl or meso-substituted hydrocarbyl porphyrin.

  18. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Routing Key Documents | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Key Documents TEC Working Group Topic Groups Routing Key Documents KEY DOCUMENTS PDF icon Proposed Task Plan - Routing Topic Group More Documents & Publications TEC Working Group...

  19. Alternative current conduction mechanisms of organic-inorganic compound [N(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}H]{sub 2}ZnCl{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ben Bechir, M. Karoui, K.; Guidara, K.; Ben Rhaiem, A.; Tabellout, M.

    2014-04-21

    [N(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}H]{sub 2}ZnCl{sub 4} has been studied by X-ray powder diffraction patterns, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and impedance spectroscopy. The [N(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}H]{sub 2}ZnCl{sub 4} hybrid compound is crystallized at room temperature (T ? 300?K) in the orthorhombic system with Pnma space group. Five phase transitions (T{sub 1}?=?255?K, T{sub 2}?=?282?K, T{sub 3}?=?302?K, T{sub 4}?=?320?K, and T{sub 5}?=?346?K) have been proved by DSC measurements. The electrical technique was measured in the 10{sup ?1}-10{sup 7}?Hz frequency range and 233363?K temperature interval. The frequency dependence of alternative current (AC) conductivity is interpreted in terms of Jonscher's law. The AC electrical conduction in [N(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}H]{sub 2}ZnCl{sub 4} is analyzed by different processes, which can be attributed to several models: the correlated barrier hopping model in phase I, the overlapping large polaron tunneling model in phase II, the quantum mechanical tunneling model in phase IV, and the non-overlapping small polaron tunneling model in phases III, V, and VI. The conduction mechanism is studied with the help of Elliot's theory, and the Elliot's parameters are determined.

  20. Alternative current conduction mechanisms of organic-inorganic compound [N(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}H]{sub 2}CuCl{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ben Bechir, M. Karoui, K.; Guidara, K.; Ben Rhaiem, A.; Tabellout, M.

    2014-05-28

    The [N(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}H]{sub 2}CuCl{sub 4} single crystal has been analyzed by X-ray powder diffraction patterns, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and electrical impedance spectroscopy. [N(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}H]{sub 2}CuCl{sub 4} crystallizes at room temperature in the monoclinic system with P2{sub 1}/{sub C} space group. Three phase transitions at T{sub 1}?=?226?K, T{sub 2}?=?264?K, and T{sub 3}?=?297?K have been evidenced by DSC measurements. The electrical technique was measured in the 10{sup ?1}10{sup 7}?Hz frequency range and 203313?K temperature intervals. The frequency dependence of alternative current (AC) conductivity is interpreted in terms of Jonscher's law (developed). The AC electrical conduction in [N(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}H]{sub 2}CuCl{sub 4} compound is studied by two processes which can be attributed to a hopping transport mechanism: the correlated barrier hopping model in phases I, II, and III, the non-overlapping small polaron tunneling model in phase IV. The conduction mechanism is interpreted with the help of Elliot's theory, and the Elliot's parameters are found.

  1. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7, 2013 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:09 PM on December 17, 2013 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Taffy Almeida, Joe Archuleta, Jeff Cheadle, Glen Clark, Robert Elkins, Scot Fitzgerald, Joan Kessner, Karl Pool, Chris Sutton, Amanda Tuttle, Rich Weiss and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich asked if there were any comments on the minutes from the

  2. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6, 2015 The meeting was called to order by Cliff Watkins, HASQARD Focus Group Secretary at 2:07 PM on May 26, 2015 in Conference Room 328 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Jonathan Sanwald (Mission Support Alliance (MSA), Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Corporate Allocation Services, DOE-RL Support Contractor, Focus Group Secretary), Taffy Almeida (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)), Glen Clark (Washington River Protection Solution (WRPS)), Fred Dunhour (DOE-ORP), Scot

  3. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    22, 2015 The meeting was called to order by Cliff Watkins, HASQARD Focus Group Secretary at 2:05 PM on October 22, 2015 in Conference Room 328 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Jonathan Sanwald (Mission Support Alliance (MSA), Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Corporate Allocation Services, DOE-RL Support Contractor, Focus Group Secretary), Glen Clark (Washington River Protection Solution (WRPS)), Fred Dunhour (DOE-ORP), Joan Kessner (Washington Closure Hanford (WCH)), Karl Pool (Pacific

  4. TEC Communications Topic Group

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Tribal Issues Topic Group Judith Holm, Chair April 21, 2004 Albuquerque, NM Tribal Issues Topic Group * February Tribal Summit with Secretary of Energy (Kristen Ellis, CI) - Held in conjunction with NCAI mid-year conference - First Summit held in response to DOE Indian Policy - Addressed barriers to communication and developing framework for interaction Tribal Issues Topic Group * Summit (continued) - Federal Register Notice published in March soliciting input on how to improve summit process

  5. NIF User Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    users NIF User Group The National Ignition Facility User Group provides an organized framework and independent vehicle for interaction between the scientists who use NIF for "Science Use of NIF" experiments and NIF management. Responsibility for NIF and the research programs carried out at NIF resides with the NIF Director. The NIF User Group advises the NIF Director on matters of concern to users, as well as providing a channel for communication for NIF users with funding agencies and

  6. Photodissociation and photoisomerization dynamics of CH{sub 2}=CHCHO in solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu Weiqiang; Yang Chunfan; Zhao Hongmei; Liu Kunhui; Su Hongmei

    2010-03-28

    By means of time-resolved Fourier transform infrared absorption spectroscopy, we have investigated the 193 nm photodissociation and photoisomerization dynamics of the prototype molecule of {alpha},{beta}-enones, acrolein (CH{sub 2}=CHCHO) in CH{sub 3}CN solution. The primary photolysis channels and absolute branching ratios are determined. The most probable reaction mechanisms are clarified by control experiments monitoring the product yields varied with the triplet quencher addition. The predominant channel is the 1,3-H migration yielding the rearrangement product CH{sub 3}CH=C=O with a branching ratio of 0.78 and the less important channel is the {alpha} cleavage of C-H bond yielding radical fragments CH{sub 2}=CHCO+H with a branching ratio of only 0.12. The 1,3-H migration is strongly suggested to correlate with the triplet {sup 3}({pi}{pi}{sup *}) state rather than the ground S{sub 0} state and the {alpha} cleavage of C-H bond is more likely to proceed in the singlet S{sub 1} {sup 1}(n{pi}{sup *}) state. From the solution experiments we have not only acquired clues clarifying the previous controversial mechanisms, but also explored different photochemistry in solution. Compared to the gas phase photolysis which is dominated by photodissociation channels, the most important channel in solution is the photoisomerization of 1,3-H migration. The reason leading to the different photochemistry in solution is further ascribed to the solvent cage effect.

  7. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6, 2012 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:04 PM on October 16, 2012 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Jeff Cheadle, Glen Clark, Robert Elkins, Larry Markel, Mary McCormick-Barger, Karl Pool, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Chris Sutton, Steve Trent, Amanda Tuttle, Sam Vega, Rich Weiss and Eric Wyse. New personnel have joined the Focus Group since the last

  8. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    27, 2012 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:09 PM on November 27, 2012 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Glen Clark, Robert Elkins, Joan Kessner, Larry Markel, Mary McCormick-Barger, Steve Trent, and Rich Weiss. I. Huei Meznarich requested comments on the minutes from the October 16, 2012 meeting. No HASQARD Focus Group members present stated any

  9. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0, 2013 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:05 PM on August 20, 2013 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Taffy Almeida, Glen Clark, Robert Elkins, Scot Fitzgerald, Joan Kessner, Steve Smith, Rich Weiss and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich asked if there were any comments on the minutes from the July 23, 2013 meeting. No Focus Group members stated they had

  10. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5, 2014 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:10 PM on April 15, 2014 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Glen Clark, Robert Elkins, Scot Fitzgerald, Mary McCormick-Barger, Karl Pool, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich asked if there were any comments on the minutes from the March 18, 2014 meeting. No Focus Group members stated they

  11. ALS Communications Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Communications Group Print From left: Ashley White, Lori Tamura, Keri Troutman, and Carina Braun. The ALS Communications staff maintain the ALS Web site; write and edit all print...

  12. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    deviations from a procedure or deviations from a published analytical method. Also, the language in this section of HASQARD uses the term "modification" and the Focus Group was...

  13. Photoelectrochemical Working Group

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Photoelectrochemical Working Group meets regularly to review technical progress, develop synergies, and collaboratively develop common tools and processes for photoelectrochemical (PEC) water...

  14. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    a. The action item related to organizing a working group to address the HASQARD language regarding independent assessments to ensure the language addresses all organizations...

  15. Insights into the structure of mixed CO2/CH4 in gas hydrates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Everett, Susan M; Rawn, Claudia J; Chakoumakos, Bryan C; Keffer, David J.; Huq, Ashfia; Phelps, Tommy Joe

    2015-01-01

    The exchange of CO2 for CH4 in natural gas hydrates is an attractive approach to methane for energy production while simultaneously sequestering CO2. In addition to the energy and environmental implications, the solid solution of clathrate hydrate (CH4)1-x(CO2)x 5.75H2O provides a model system to study how the distinct bonding and shapes of CH4 and CO2 influence the structure and properties of the compound. High-resolution neutron diffraction was used to examine mixed CO2/CH4 gas hydrates. CO2-rich hydrates had smaller lattice parameters, which were attributed to the higher affinity of the CO2 molecule interacting with H2O molecules that form the surrounding cages, and resulted in a reduction in the unit cell volume. Experimental nuclear scattering densities illustrate how the cage occupants and energy landscape change with composition. These results provide important insights on the impact and mechanisms for exchanging CH4 and CO2.

  16. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Summaries Rail Topic Group TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Rail Topic Group Rail Topic Group PDF icon May 17, 2007 PDF icon January 16, 2007 PDF icon...

  17. Electronic properties of binary and mixed [RMNH]{sub n} (R=H,CH{sub 3}, M=Al,Ga,In) oligomers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Oranskaya, A. A. Pomogaeva, A. V. Timoshkin, A. Y.

    2015-03-30

    Theoretical investigation of structural and electronic properties is presented for the rod-like oligomers R{sub 3}-[MRNH]{sub 3n}-H{sub 3} and [RMNH]{sub n+1} (M=Ga,Al,In R=H,CH{sub 3}) of different lengths. Electronic structures of the oligomers with and without substitutions of Ga atoms with Al or In were studied at DFT level of theory. Clusters up to 8?nm of length were considered. A type of terminal groups of the oligomers is found to have a dominant influence on their electronic properties.

  18. Trails Working Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Trails » Trails Working Group Trails Working Group Our mission is to inventory, map, and prepare historical reports on the many trails used at LANL. Contact Environmental Communication & Public Involvement P.O. Box 1663 MS M996 Los Alamos, NM 87545 (505) 667-0216 Email The LANL Trails Working Group inventories, maps, and prepares historical reports on the many trails used at LANL. Some of these trails are ancient pueblo footpaths that continue to be used for recreational hiking today. Some

  19. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:06 PM on June 12, 2012 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Jeff Cheadle, Glen Clark, Shannan Johnson, Joan Kessner, Larry Markel, Karl Pool, Steve Smith, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Chris Sutton, Cindy Taylor, Chris Thomson, Amanda Tuttle, Sam Vega, Rick Warriner and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich requested comments on the

  20. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    6, 2013 The beginning of the meeting was delayed due to an unannounced loss of the conference room scheduled for the meeting. After securing another meeting location, the meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:18 PM on April 16, 2013 in Conference Room 156 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Jeff Cheadle, Glen Clark, Joan Kessner, Larry Markel, Mary McCormick-Barger, Karl Pool,

  1. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    January 28, 2014 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:04 PM on January 28, 2014 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Joe Archuleta, Glen Clark, Robert Elkins, Scot Fitzgerald, Joan Kessner, Mary McCormick-Barger, Karl Pool, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Chris Sutton, Chris Thompson, Rich Weiss and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich asked if there were any comments on

  2. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    5, 2014 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:07 PM on February 25, 2014 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Lynn Albin, Taffy Almeida, Joe Archuleta, Glen Clark, Robert Elkins, Scot Fitzgerald, Joan Kessner, Mary McCormick-Barger, Karl Pool, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Chris Sutton, Chris Thompson, and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich asked if there were any

  3. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0, 2014 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:05 PM on May 20, 2014 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Lynn Albin, Taffy Almeida, Joe Archuleta, Glen Clark, Robert Elkins, Scot Fitzgerald, Shannan Johnson, Joan Kessner, Mary McCormick-Barger, Craig Perkins, Karl Pool, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Chris Sutton, Chris Thompson and Eric Wyse. I. Acknowledging the

  4. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:07 PM on June 12, 2014 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Joe Archuleta, Sara Champoux, Glen Clark, Jim Douglas, Robert Elkins, Scot Fitzgerald, Joan Kessner, Jan McCallum, Mary McCormick-Barger, Karl Pool, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Rich Weiss and Eric Wyse. I. Acknowledging the presence of new and/or infrequent

  5. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7, 2014 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:10 PM on June 17, 2014 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Focus Group Chair), Cliff Watkins (Focus Group Secretary), Robert Elkins, Shannan Johnson, Joan Kessner, Jan McCallum, Craig Perkins, Karl Pool, Chris Sutton and Rich Weiss. I. Because of the short time since the last meeting, Huei Meznarich stated that the minutes from the June 12, 2014 meeting have not yet

  6. NERSC Users Group (NUG)

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    NUGEX Elections Charter User Announcements Help Staff Blogs Request Repository Mailing List Operations for: Passwords & Off-Hours Status 1-800-66-NERSC, option 1 or 510-486-6821 Account Support https://nim.nersc.gov accounts@nersc.gov 1-800-66-NERSC, option 2 or 510-486-8612 Consulting http://help.nersc.gov consult@nersc.gov 1-800-66-NERSC, option 3 or 510-486-8611 Home » For Users » NERSC Users Group NERSC Users Group (NUG) The NERSC Users' Group, NUG, welcomes participation from all

  7. InterGroup Protocols

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (OSTI)

    2003-04-02

    Existing reliable ordered group communication protocols have been developed for local-area networks and do not in general scale well to a large number of nodes and wide-area networks. The InterGroup suite of protocols is a scalable group communication system that introduces an unusual approach to handling group membership, and supports a receiver-oriented selection of service. The protocols are intended for a wide-area network, with a large number of nodes, that has highly variable delays andmore »a high message loss rate, such as the Internet. The levels of the message delivery service range from unreliable unordered to reliable timestamp ordered.« less

  8. Date Times Group Speakers

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Meetings - Spring 2014 Date Times Group Speakers Tues, 1-13 2:30-3:30pm Faculty Meeting Fri, 1-24 12:30-1:30pm Group Research Meeting Emmanuel Giannelis Fri, 1-31 12:30-1:30pm Student & Postdoc Mtg Apostolos Enotiadis; Nikki Ritzert & Megan Holtz Fri, 2-7 12:30-1:30pm Group Research Meeting CHESS Mon, 2-10 2:30-3:30pm Faculty Meeting Will Dichtel Fri, 2-14 12:30-1:30pm Student & Postdoc Mtg Frank DiSalvo Fri, 2-21 12:30-1:30pm Group Research Meeting Lynden Archer Fri, 2-28

  9. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at the September 21 meeting of the Focus Group, the concerns related to the current language in HASQARD Volume 1, Section 10.4, "Quality Systems" were discussed at the...

  10. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    been distributed to the Focus Group prior to the meeting. The comments that required editorial changes to the document were made in the working electronic version. b. At the June...

  11. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Markel, Mary McCormick-Barger, Dave St. John, Steve Smith, Steve Trent and Eric Wyse. ... On January 31, the Secretary received a call from the QA Sub-Group Chair, Steve Smith. ...

  12. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Elkins, Mary McCormick-Barger, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Chris Sutton, Amanda Tuttle, Rick ... Noe'l Smith-Jackson stated that the HASQARD document is the work of the Focus Group not ...

  13. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Markel, Huei Meznarich, Karl Pool, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Andrew Stevens, Genesis Thomas, ... the radar of the DOE- HQ QA group. Noe'l Smith-Jackson commented that Ecology was always ...

  14. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Group to review. Rich began his presentation by stating that he does not believe the language in Revision 3 works nor is it necessary anymore. The purpose of the Revision 3...

  15. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at the last Focus Group meeting to get together and see if an agreement on proposed language could be achieved that would satisfy CHPRC sampling personnel and WSCF laboratory...

  16. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the May 15 meeting, Rich Weiss sent an e-mail to the Focus Group to propose revised language for the last paragraph in Section 5.3 containing the sentence about measured...

  17. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    change. This distribution was to allow the Focus Group time to review the proposed language and be prepared for the matter to come to a vote at the next meeting of the Focus...

  18. Tritium Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    matters related to tritium. Contacts Mike Rogers (505) 665-2513 Email Chandra Savage Marsden (505) 664-0183 Email The Tritium Focus Group consists of participants from member...

  19. Specific Group Hardware

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Specific Group Hardware Specific Group Hardware ALICE palicevo1 The Virtual Organization (VO) server. Serves as gatekeeper for ALICE jobs. It's duties include getting assignments from ALICE file catalog (at CERN), submitting jobs to pdsfgrid (via condor) which submits jobs to the compute nodes, monitoring the cluster work load, and uploading job information to ALICE file catalog. It is monitored with MonALISA (the monitoring page is here). It's made up of 2 Intel Xeon E5520 processors each with

  20. Macro Industrial Working Group

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    September 29, 2014 | Washington, DC WORKING GROUP PRESENTATION FOR DISCUSSION PURPOSES DO NOT QUOTE OR CITE AS RESULTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE Industrial team preliminary results for AEO2015 Overview AEO2015 2 Industrial Team Washington DC, September 29, 2014 WORKING GROUP PRESENTATION FOR DISCUSSION PURPOSES DO NOT QUOTE OR CITE AS RESULTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE * AEO2015 is a "Lite" year - New ethane/propane pricing model only major update - Major side cases released with Reference case

  1. DOE STGWG Group

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    STGWG Group The State and Tribal Government Working Group (STGWG) is one of the intergovernmental organizations with which the DOE EM office works with. They meet twice yearly for updates to the EM projects. They were formed in 1989. It is comprised of several state legislators and tribal staff and leadership from states in proximity to DOE's environmental cleanup sites of the following states: New York, South Carolina, Ohio, Washington, New Mexico, Idaho, California, Colorado, Georgia,

  2. ALS Communications Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Communications Group Print From left: Ashley White, Lori Tamura, Keri Troutman, and Carina Braun. The ALS Communications staff maintain the ALS Web site; write and edit all print and electronic publications for the ALS, including Science Highlights, Science Briefs, brochures, handouts, and the monthly newsletter ALSNews; and create educational and scientific outreach materials. In addition, members of the group organize bi-monthly Science Cafés, create conference and workshop Web sites and

  3. ALS Communications Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALS Communications Group Print From left: Ashley White, Lori Tamura, Keri Troutman, and Carina Braun. The ALS Communications staff maintain the ALS Web site; write and edit all print and electronic publications for the ALS, including Science Highlights, Science Briefs, brochures, handouts, and the monthly newsletter ALSNews; and create educational and scientific outreach materials. In addition, members of the group organize bi-monthly Science Cafés, create conference and workshop Web sites and

  4. ALS Communications Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ALS Communications Group Print From left: Ashley White, Lori Tamura, Keri Troutman, and Carina Braun. The ALS Communications staff maintain the ALS Web site; write and edit all print and electronic publications for the ALS, including Science Highlights, Science Briefs, brochures, handouts, and the monthly newsletter ALSNews; and create educational and scientific outreach materials. In addition, members of the group organize bi-monthly Science Cafés, create conference and workshop Web sites and

  5. Observation of CH4 and other Non-CO2 Green House Gas Emissions from California

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fischer, Marc L.; Zhao, Chuanfeng; Riley, William J.; Andrews, Arlyn C.

    2009-01-09

    In 2006, California passed the landmark assembly bill AB-32 to reduce California's emissions of greenhouse gases (GHGs) that contribute to global climate change. AB-32 commits California to reduce total GHG emissions to 1990 levels by 2020, a reduction of 25 percent from current levels. To verify that GHG emission reductions are actually taking place, it will be necessary to measure emissions. We describe atmospheric inverse model estimates of GHG emissions obtained from the California Greenhouse Gas Emissions Measurement (CALGEM) project. In collaboration with NOAA, we are measuring the dominant long-lived GHGs at two tall-towers in central California. Here, we present estimates of CH{sub 4} emissions obtained by statistical comparison of measured and predicted atmospheric mixing ratios. The predicted mixing ratios are calculated using spatially resolved a priori CH{sub 4} emissions and surface footprints, that provide a proportional relationship between the surface emissions and the mixing ratio signal at tower locations. The footprints are computed using the Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) coupled to the Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport (STILT) model. Integral to the inverse estimates, we perform a quantitative analysis of errors in atmospheric transport and other factors to provide quantitative uncertainties in estimated emissions. Regressions of modeled and measured mixing ratios suggest that total CH{sub 4} emissions are within 25% of the inventory estimates. A Bayesian source sector analysis obtains posterior scaling factors for CH{sub 4} emissions, indicating that emissions from several of the sources (e.g., landfills, natural gas use, petroleum production, crops, and wetlands) are roughly consistent with inventory estimates, but livestock emissions are significantly higher than the inventory. A Bayesian 'region' analysis is used to identify spatial variations in CH{sub 4} emissions from 13 sub-regions within California. Although, only regions near the tower are significantly constrained by the tower measurements, CH{sub 4} emissions from the south Central Valley appear to be underestimated in a manner consistent with the under-prediction of livestock emissions. Finally, we describe a pseudo-experiment using predicted CH{sub 4} signals to explore the uncertainty reductions that might be obtained if additional measurements were made by a future network of tall-tower stations spread over California. These results show that it should be possible to provide high-accuracy estimates of surface CH{sub 4} emissions for multiple regions as a means to verify future emissions reductions.

  6. Contract No.: DE-AC02-07CH11358 Contract Modification No. 0159

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    : DE-AC02-07CH11358 Contract Modification No. 0159 Section J, Appendix C ATTACHMENT J.3 APPENDIX C SPECIAL FINANCIAL INSTITUTION ACCOUNT AGREEMENT Applicable to the Operation of AMES Laboratory Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358 AMENDMENT 8 TO SPECIAL FINANCIAL INSTITUTION ACCOUNT Page 1 of 2 AGREEMENT FOR USE WITH THE PAYMENTS CLEARED FINANCING ARRANGEMENT between BANKERS TRUST COMPANY, N.A. (hereinafter referred to as the "Financial Institution"), and IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY of Science and

  7. Cyclic Versus Linear Isomers Produced by Reaction of the Methylidyne Radical (CH) with Small Unsaturated Hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goulay, Fabien; Trevitt, Adam J.; Meloni, Giovanni; Selby, Talitha M.; Osborn, David L.; Taatjes, Craig A.; Vereecken, Luc; Leone, Stephen R.

    2008-12-05

    The reactions of the methylidyne radical (CH) with ethylene, acetylene, allene, and methylacetylene are studied at room temperature using tunable vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) photoionization and time-resolved mass spectrometry. The CH radicals are prepared by 248 nm multiphoton photolysis of CHBr3 at 298 K and react with the selected hydrocarbon in a helium gas flow. Analysis of photoionization efficiency versus VUV photon wavelength permits isomer-specific detection of the reaction products and allows estimation of the reaction product branching ratios. The reactions proceed by either CH insertion or addition followed by H atom elimination from the intermediate adduct. In the CH + C2H4 reaction the C3H5 intermediate decays by H atom loss to yield 70(+-8)percent allene, 30(+-8)percent methylacetylene and less than 10percent cyclopropene, in agreement with previous RRKM results. In the CH + acetylene reaction, detection of mainly the cyclic C3H2 isomer is contrary to a previous RRKM calculation that predicted linear triplet propargylene to be 90percent of the total H-atom co-products. High-level CBS-APNO quantum calculations and RRKM calculation for the CH + C2H2 reaction presented in this manuscript predict a higher contribution of the cyclic C3H2 (27.0percent) versus triplet propargylene (63.5percent) than these earlier predictions. Extensive calculations on the C3H3 and C3H2D system combined with experimental isotope ratios for the CD + C2H2 reaction indicate that H-atom assisted isomerization in the present experiments is responsible for the discrepancy between the RRKM calculations and the experimental results. Cyclic isomers are also found to represent 30(+-6)percent of the detected products in the case of CH + methylacetylene, together with 33(+-6)percent 1,2,3-butatriene and 37(+-6)percent vinylacetylene. The CH + allene reaction gives 23(+-5)percent 1,2,3-butatriene and 77(+-5)percent vinylacetylene, whereas cyclic isomers are produced below the detection limit in this reaction. The reaction exit channels deduced by comparing the product distributions for the aforementioned reactions are discussed in detail.

  8. Joint DOE-CH2M News Release Media Contact: For Immediate Release:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Joint DOE-CH2M News Release Media Contact: For Immediate Release: Destry Henderson, CH2M, (509) 376-8644, April 20, 2015 destry_j_henderson@rl.gov Mark Heeter, DOE, (509)373-1970, mark.heeter@rl.doe.gov WORKERS REMOVE LAST PENCIL TANK FROM KEY AREA OF HANFORD'S PLUTONIUM FINISHING PLANT Removal of contaminated pencil tanks brings facility one step closer toward demolition RICHLAND, Wash. - More than 50 pencil tank assemblies - some two stories tall - contaminated with chemical and radiological

  9. Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Print Wednesday, 28 June 2006 00:00 Two of the major challenges for humanity in the next 20 years are the shrinking availability of fossil fuels and the global warming and potential climate changes that result from their ever-increasing use. One possible solution to these problems is to use an energy carrier such as hydrogen, and ways to produce and store

  10. Sub-picosecond IR study of the reactive intermediate in an alkane C-H bond

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    activation reaction by CpRh(CO)2 (Journal Article) | SciTech Connect Journal Article: Sub-picosecond IR study of the reactive intermediate in an alkane C-H bond activation reaction by CpRh(CO)2 Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Sub-picosecond IR study of the reactive intermediate in an alkane C-H bond activation reaction by CpRh(CO)2 No abstract prepared. Authors: Asbury, John B. ; Ghosh, Hirendra N. ; Yeston, Jake S. ; Bergman, Robert G. ; Lian, Tianquan Publication Date:

  11. Voluntary Protection Program Onsite Review, CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Co., Inc., Hanford – Jan 2014

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Evaluation to determine whether CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Co., Inc., Hanford is performing at a level deserving DOE-VPP Star recognition.

  12. Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 Section J - Appendix F J-F-1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    52 Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 Section J - Appendix F J-F-1 Attachment J.6 APPENDIX F Contractor Resources, Commitments, and Agreements Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 Modification No. 0152 Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 Section J - Appendix F J-F-2 This page intentionally blank Modification No. 0152 Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 Section J - Appendix F J-F-3 RESOURCES, SERVICES, AND SUPPORT PROVIDED TO PPPL Princeton University has committed substantial resources and services over the first

  13. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Section 180(c) Meeting Summaries...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Section 180(c) Meeting Summaries Meeting Summaries PDF icon Washington, DC TEC Meeting - 180(c) Group Summary - March 15, 2006 More...

  14. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Routing Meeting Summaries | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Routing Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Routing Meeting Summaries MEETING SUMMARIES PDF icon Atlanta TEC Meeting, Routing Topic Group Summary More Documents &...

  15. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Rail Conference Call Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries CONFERENCE CALL SUMMARIES Rail Topic Group Inspections Subgroup Planning Subgroup...

  16. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Protocols Meeting Summaries...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Protocols Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Protocols Meeting Summaries Meeting Summaries PDF icon Philadelphia TEC Meeting, Protocols Topic Group Summary -...

  17. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Meeting Summaries | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Meeting Summaries MEETING SUMMARIES PDF icon Kansas City TEC Meeting, Rail Topic Group Summary - July 25, 2007 PDF icon Atlanta TEC...

  18. Good Energy Group Plc previously Monkton Group Plc | Open Energy...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Plc previously Monkton Group Plc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Good Energy Group Plc (previously Monkton Group Plc) Place: Chippenham, Wiltshire, United Kingdom Zip: SN15 1EE...

  19. Illinois Wind Workers Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    David G. Loomis

    2012-05-28

    The Illinois Wind Working Group (IWWG) was founded in 2006 with about 15 members. It has grown to over 200 members today representing all aspects of the wind industry across the State of Illinois. In 2008, the IWWG developed a strategic plan to give direction to the group and its activities. The strategic plan identifies ways to address critical market barriers to the further penetration of wind. The key to addressing these market barriers is public education and outreach. Since Illinois has a restructured electricity market, utilities no longer have a strong control over the addition of new capacity within the state. Instead, market acceptance depends on willing landowners to lease land and willing county officials to site wind farms. Many times these groups are uninformed about the benefits of wind energy and unfamiliar with the process. Therefore, many of the project objectives focus on conferences, forum, databases and research that will allow these stakeholders to make well-educated decisions.

  20. Quasiclassical trajectory study of the effect of antisymmetric stretch mode excitation on the O({sup 3}P) + CH{sub 4}(ν{sub 3} = 1) → OH + CH{sub 3} reaction on an analytical potential energy surface. Comparison with experiment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Monge-Palacios, M.; González-Lavado, E.; Espinosa-Garcia, J.

    2014-09-07

    Motivated by a recent crossed-beam experiment on the title reaction reported by Pan and Liu [J. Chem. Phys. 140, 191101 (2014)], a detailed dynamics study was performed at three collision energies using quasiclassical trajectory (QCT) calculations based on a full-dimensional potential energy surface recently developed by our group (PES-2014). Although theory/experiment agreement is not yet quantitative, in general the theoretical results reproduce the experimental evidence: the vibrational branching ratio of OH(v = 1)/OH(v = 0) is ∼0.8/0.2, excitation of the antisymmetric CH stretching mode in methane increases reactivity by factor 2.28–1.50, although an equivalent amount as translational energy is more efficient in promoting the reaction and, finally, product angular distribution shifts from backward in the CH{sub 4}(ν = 0) ground-state to sideways when the antisymmetric CH stretching mode is excited. These results give confidence to the PES-2014 surface, depend on the quantization procedure used, are comparable with recent QCT calculations or improve previous theoretical studies using a different surface, and demonstrate the utility of the theory/experiment collaboration.

  1. ENN Group aka XinAo Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ENN Group aka XinAo Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: ENN Group (aka XinAo Group) Place: Langfang, Hebei Province, China Zip: 65001 Product: Chinese private industrial...

  2. Bell, group and tangle

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Solomon, A. I.

    2010-03-15

    The 'Bell' of the title refers to bipartite Bell states, and their extensions to, for example, tripartite systems. The 'Group' of the title is the Braid Group in its various representations; while 'Tangle' refers to the property of entanglement which is present in both of these scenarios. The objective of this note is to explore the relation between Quantum Entanglement and Topological Links, and to show that the use of the language of entanglement in both cases is more than one of linguistic analogy.

  3. Upgraded Coal Interest Group

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evan Hughes

    2009-01-08

    The Upgraded Coal Interest Group (UCIG) is an EPRI 'users group' that focuses on clean, low-cost options for coal-based power generation. The UCIG covers topics that involve (1) pre-combustion processes, (2) co-firing systems and fuels, and (3) reburn using coal-derived or biomass-derived fuels. The UCIG mission is to preserve and expand the economic use of coal for energy. By reducing the fuel costs and environmental impacts of coal-fired power generation, existing units become more cost effective and thus new units utilizing advanced combustion technologies are more likely to be coal-fired.

  4. The Chaninik Wind Group

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Chaninik Wind Group It started as a small, simple idea..., now we are headed to become," the heartbeat of the region." William Igkurak, President USDoE Tribal Energy Program, Annual Program Review, November 13-16, 2012, Denver, Colorado Department of Energy Tribal Energy Chaninik Wind Group Villages Kongiganak pop.359 Kwigillingok pop. 388 Kipnuk pop.644 Tuntutuliak pop. 370 On average, 24% of families are below the poverty line. Chaninik's Goal is to become "The

  5. Greenko Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Greenko Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Greenko Group Place: Hyderabad, India Zip: 500 033 Product: Focused on clean energy projects in Asia. References: Greenko Group1...

  6. Sinocome Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Sinocome Group Place: Beijing Municipality, China Sector: Solar Product: A Chinese high tech group with business in solar PV sector...

  7. Valesul Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Valesul Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Valesul Group Place: Brazil Product: Brazilian ethanol producer. References: Valesul Group1 This article is a stub. You can help...

  8. Angeleno Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Angeleno Group Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Angeleno Group Name: Angeleno Group Address: 2029 Century Park East, Suite 2980 Place: Los Angeles, California Zip: 90067 Region:...

  9. MTorres Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: MTorres Group Place: Murcia, Spain Zip: 30320 Sector: Wind energy Product: Wind turbine manufacturer References: MTorres Group1 This...

  10. Ferrari Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ferrari Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ferrari Group Place: Sao Paulo, Brazil Product: Sao Paulo-based ethanol producer. References: Ferrari Group1 This article is a...

  11. X-ray Thomson scattering measurements of temperature and density from multi-shocked CH capsules

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Fletcher, L. B.; Glenzer, S. H.; Kritcher, A.; Pak, A.; Ma, T.; Doppner, T.; Fortmann, C.; Divol, L.; Landen, O. L.; Vorberger, J.; et al

    2013-05-24

    Proof-of-principle measurements of the electron densities, temperatures, and ionization states of spherically compressed multi-shocked CH (polystyrene) capsules have been achieved using spectrally resolved x-ray Thomson scattering. A total energy of 13.5 kJ incident on target is used to compress a 70 μm thick CH shell above solid-mass density using three coalescing shocks. Separately, a laser-produced zinc He-α x-ray source at 9 keV delayed 200 ps-800 ps after maximum compression is used to probe the plasma in the non-collective scattering regime. The data show that x-ray Thomson scattering enables a complete description of the time-dependent hydrodynamic evolution of shock-compressed CH capsules,more » with a maximum measured density of ρ > 6 g cm–3. Additionally, the results demonstrate that accurate measurements of x-ray scattering from bound-free transitions in the CH plasma demonstrate strong evidence that continuum lowering is the primary ionization mechanism of carbon L-shell electrons.« less

  12. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Communications Meeting Summaries |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Archives Communications Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Communications Meeting Summaries Meeting Summaries PDF icon Milwaukee TEC Meeting, Communications Topic Group Summary - July 1998 PDF icon Inaugural Group Meeting - April 1998 More Documents & Publications TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Communications Conference Call Summaries TEC Meeting Summaries - January 1997 TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal Conference Call Summa

  13. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Inspections

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Subgroup | Department of Energy Summaries Inspections Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Inspections Subgroup Inspections Subgroup PDF icon April 6, 2006 PDF icon February 23, 2006 Draft PDF icon January 24, 2006 More Documents & Publications TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Planning Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Tracking Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call

  14. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Radiation Monitoring

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Subgroup | Department of Energy Radiation Monitoring Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Radiation Monitoring Subgroup Radiation Monitoring Subgroup PDF icon Draft Work Plan - February 4, 2008 More Documents & Publications TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Radiation Monitoring Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Intermodal Subgroup

  15. Helms Research Group - Home

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Helms Group Home Research Members Publications Collaborations Connect Physical Organic Materials Chemistry Our research is devoted to understanding transport phenomena in mesostructured systems assembled from organic, organometallic, polymeric and nanocrystalline components. Enhanced capabilities relevant to energy, health, water, and food quality are enabled by our unique approaches to the modular design of their architectures and interfaces.

  16. Durability Working Group

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Description, technical targets, meeting archives, and contacts for the DOE Durability Working Group, which meets twice per year to exchange information, create synergies, and collaboratively develop both an understanding of and tools for studying degradation mechanisms of polymer electrolyte fuel cell stacks.

  17. Focus Group | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Outreach Forums » Focus Group and Work Group Activities » Focus Group Focus Group The Focus Group was formed in March 2007 to initiate dialogue and interface with labor unions, DOE Program Secretarial Offices, and stakeholders in areas of mutual interest and concern related to health, safety, security, and the environment. Meeting Documents Available for Download November 13, 2012 Work Group Leadership Meetings: Transition Elements This Focus Group Work Group telecom was held with the Work

  18. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal Meeting Summaries | Department of

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal Meeting Summaries Meeting Summaries PDF icon Kansas City TEC Meeting - Tribal Group Summary - July 25, 2007 PDF icon Atlanta TEC Meeting - Tribal Group Summary - March 6, 2007 PDF icon Green Bay TEC Meeting -- Tribal Group Summary - October 26, 2006 PDF icon Washington TEC Meeting - Tribal Topic Group Summary - March 14, 2006 PDF icon Pueblo TEC Meeting - Tribal Topic Group Summary, September 22, 2005 PDF icon Phoenix TEC Meeting

  19. TEC Working Group Topic Groups | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Topic Groups TEC Working Group Topic Groups TEC Topic Groups were formed in 1991 following an evaluation of the TEC program. Interested members, DOE and other federal agency staff meet to examine specific issues related to radioactive materials transportation. TEC Topic Groups enable a small number of participants to focus intensively on key issues at a level of detail that is unattainable during the TEC semiannual meetings due to time and group size constraints. Topic Groups meet individually

  20. Working Group Reports

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Working Group Reports Special Working Session on the Role of Buoy Observations in the Tropical Western Pacific Measurement Scheme J. Downing Marine Sciences Laboratory Sequim, Washington R. M. Reynolds Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York Attending W. Clements (TWPPO) F. Barnes (TWPPO) T. Ackerman (TWP Site Scientist) M. Ivey (ARCS Manager) H. Church J. Curry J. del Corral B. DeRoos S. Kinne J. Mather J. Michalsky M. Miller P. Minnett B. Porch J. Sheaffer P. Webster M. Wesely K.

  1. Schuck Group - Home

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    News Archive Research Members Publications Contacts The Schuck Research Group Home News Archive Research Members Publications Contacts Tweet We focus on investigating and controlling light-matter interactions at the nanoscale, and using light to probe local environments. We are particularly interested in understanding the nano- and meso-scale interactions between localized states in materials, and relating these properties with material and device functionality. We do this by correlating

  2. ORGANIZATION/GROUP

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HANFORD ADVISORY BOARD MEMBERSHIP Page 1 January 22, 2016 ORGANIZATION/GROUP PRIMARY MEMBER ALTERNATE LOCAL GOVERNMENT INTERESTS (7) Benton County Bob Suyama Larry Lockrem Benton-Franklin Council of Governments Dawn Wellman Tony Benegas City of Kennewick Bob Parks Dick Smith City of Pasco Rob Davis Vacant City of Richland Pam Larsen Vince Panesko City of West Richland Jerry Peltier Richard Bloom Grant & Franklin Counties Gary Garnant Mike Korenko LOCAL BUSINESS INTERESTS (1) Tri-Cities

  3. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7, 2012 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:04 PM on January 17, 2012 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Chair), Cliff Watkins (Secretary), Mike Barnes, Jeff Cheadle, Glen Clark, Scot Fitzgerald, Shannan Johnson, Joan Kessner, Larry Markel, Cindy Taylor, Chris Thompson, Amanda Tuttle, Sam Vega, Rich Weiss and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich requested comments on the minutes from the December 13, 2011 meeting.

  4. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1, 2012 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:02 PM on February 21, 2012 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Chair), Cliff Watkins (Secretary), Lynn Albin, Taffy Almeida, Courtney Blanchard, Glen Clark, Scot Fitzgerald, Shannan Johnson, Kris Kuhl-Klinger, Larry Markel, Karl Pool, Steve Smith, Cindy Taylor, Amanda Tuttle, Sam Vega, Rick Warriner, Rich Weiss and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich requested comments on

  5. Buildings Sector Working Group

    Gasoline and Diesel Fuel Update (EIA)

    July 22, 2013 AEO2014 Model Development For discussion purposes only Not for citation Overview Builldings Working Group Forrestal 2E-069 / July 22, 2013 2 * Residential projects - RECS update - Lighting model - Equipment, shell subsidies - ENERGY STAR benchmarking - Housing stock formation and decay * Commercial projects - Major end-use capacity factors - Hurdle rates - ENERGY STAR buildings * Both sectors - Consumer behavior workshop - Comparisons to STEO - AER  MER - Usual annual updates -

  6. Tritium Focus Group Meeting:

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    32 nd Tritium Focus Group Meeting: Tritium research activities in Safety and Tritium Applied Research (STAR) facility, Idaho National Laboratory Masashi Shimada Fusion Safety Program, Idaho National Laboratory April 25 th 2013, Germantown, MD STI #: INL/MIS-13-28975 Outlines 1. Motivation of tritium research activity in STAR facility 2. Unique capabilities in STAR facility 3. Research highlights from tritium retention in HFIR neutron- irradiated tungsten April 25th 2013 Germantown, MD STAR

  7. Detector Support Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    search Nuclear Physics Program Please upgrade your browser. This site's design is only visible in a graphical browser that supports web standards, but its content is accessible to any browser. Concerns? Hall B Navigation DSG Home Staff Presentations Notes print version Detector Support Group Spotlight Archive Index Rotation test for the SVT detector EPICS Interlock Testing Bundling HV DC cables Hall D N2 tank level check Parameter check of Hall D solenoid Testing of SVT Hybrid Flex Circuit

  8. Environmental/Interest Groups

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    Environmental/Interest Groups Miamisburg Mound Community Improvement Corporation (MMCIC) Mike J. Grauwelman President P.O. Box 232 Miamisburg, OH 45343-0232 (937) 865-4462 Email: mikeg@mound.com Mound Reuse Committee See MMCIC Mound Environmental Safety and Health Sharon Cowdrey President 5491 Weidner Road Springboro, OH 45066 (937) 748-4757 No email address available Mound Museum Association Dr. Don Sullenger President Mound Advanced Technology Center 720 Mound Road Miamisburg, OH 45342-6714

  9. Turbulence and combustion interaction: High resolution local flame front structure visualization using simultaneous single-shot PLIF imaging of CH, OH, and CH{sub 2}O in a piloted premixed jet flame

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, Z.S.; Li, B.; Sun, Z.W.; Alden, M. [Division of Combustion Physics, Lund University, P.O. Box 118, S-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Bai, X.S. [Division of Fluid Mechanics, Lund University, P.O. Box 118, S-221 00 Lund (Sweden)

    2010-06-15

    High resolution planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) was applied to investigate the local flame front structures of turbulent premixed methane/air jet flames in order to reveal details about turbulence and flame interaction. The targeted turbulent flames were generated on a specially designed coaxial jet burner, in which low speed stoichiometric gas mixture was fed through the outer large tube to provide a laminar pilot flame for stabilization of the high speed jet flame issued through the small inner tube. By varying the inner tube flow speed and keeping the mixture composition as that of the outer tube, different flames were obtained covering both the laminar and turbulent flame regimes with different turbulent intensities. Simultaneous CH/CH{sub 2}O, and also OH PLIF images were recorded to characterize the influence of turbulence eddies on the reaction zone structure, with a spatial resolution of about 40 {mu}m and temporal resolution of around 10 ns. Under all experimental conditions, the CH radicals were found to exist only in a thin layer; the CH{sub 2}O were found in the inner flame whereas the OH radicals were seen in the outer flame with the thin CH layer separating the OH and CH{sub 2}O layers. The outer OH layer is thick and it corresponds to the oxidation zone and post-flame zone; the CH{sub 2}O layer is thin in laminar flows; it becomes broad at high speed turbulent flow conditions. This phenomenon was analyzed using chemical kinetic calculations and eddy/flame interaction theory. It appears that under high turbulence intensity conditions, the small eddies in the preheat zone can transport species such as CH{sub 2}O from the reaction zones to the preheat zone. The CH{sub 2}O species are not consumed in the preheat zone due to the absence of H, O, and OH radicals by which CH{sub 2}O is to be oxidized. The CH radicals cannot exist in the preheat zone due to the rapid reactions of this species with O{sub 2} and CO{sub 2} in the inner-layer of the reaction zones. The local PLIF intensities were evaluated using an area integrated PLIF signal. Substantial increase of the CH{sub 2}O signal and decrease of CH signal was observed as the jet velocity increases. These observations raise new challenges to the current flamelet type models. (author)

  10. ch_4

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... The Big Lost River flows south- east from Mackay Dam, past Arco and onto the Snake River Plain. On INEEL, near the south- western boundary, a diversion dam prevents flooding of ...

  11. ch_13

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    .0 13.0 Index Index 13-1 DOE/EIS-0287 DOE/EIS-0287 13-2 Index A aesthetics - 3-54, 4-18, 4-35, 5-17, 5-18, 5-214, 5-232, 5-233, 9-9, 10-3, 10-7, C.2-4, C.8-13, C.8-32, C.8-46 airborne releases - 4-32, 4-71, 4-72, 5-48, 5-74, 5-87, 5-184, 5-225, C.2-13, C.2-17, C.8-16, C.8-36 aquifer - 2-30, 2-32, 2-33, 4-40, 4-47, 4-48, 4-49, 4-50, 4-51, 4-53, 4-54, 4-55, 4-56, 4-57, 4-72, 4-79, 5-2, 5-20, 5-44, 5-45, 5-107, 5-121, 5-122, 5-161, 5-165, 5-180, 5-212, 5-221, 5-222, 5-225, 5-227, 5-233, 5-234,

  12. ch_2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    0 2.0 B B ackgr ackgr ound ound The Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) cur- rently manages waste associated with the processing of spent nuclear reactor fuel, including high-level waste (HLW). This waste is being managed to reduce the risk to human health and the environment. This Environmental Impact Statement (often referred to as the Idaho HLW & FD EIS or simply "this EIS") describes tech- nologies and methods the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) is

  13. ch_2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    4 Background 2.1.3 CURRENT MISSION The current INEEL mission is to develop, demonstrate, and deploy advanced engineering technology and systems to improve national competitiveness and security, to make the pro- duction and use of energy more efficient, and to improve the quality of the environment. Areas of primary emphasis at INEEL include waste management and waste minimization, environ- mental engineering and restoration, energy effi- ciency, renewable energy, national security and defense,

  14. ch_3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    3-34 Alternatives transuranic waste/SBW. The EIS also presents the impacts for a grout facility (see Project P2001 in Appendix C.6) that could be used to treat the waste generated after 2005. For pur- poses of assessing transportation impacts, DOE assumed the grouted waste would be character- ized as remote-handled transuranic waste and transported to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for disposal (see Appendix C.5). 3.2 Facility Disposition Alternatives The waste processing alternatives described

  15. ch_4

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    47 DOE/EIS-0287 Idaho HLW & FD EIS 4.8.2 SUBSURFACE WATER Subsurface water at INEEL occurs in the under- lying Snake River Plain Aquifer and the vadose zone (area of unsaturated soil and material above the aquifer). This section describes the regional and local hydrogeology, vadose zone hydrology, perched water, and subsurface water quality. 4.8.2.1 Regional Hydrogeology INEEL overlies the Snake River Plain Aquifer as shown in Figure 4-12. This aquifer is the major source of drinking water

  16. ch_5

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    44 Environmental Consequences 5.2.7 WATER RESOURCES This section presents potential water resource impacts from implement- ing the proposed waste processing alternatives described in Chapter 3. Section 5.2.14 dis- cusses potential impacts to INEEL water resources from accidents or unusual natural phe- nomena such as earth- quakes. Appendix C.9 discusses potential long- term impacts to INEEL water resources from facility closure. Because the Minimum INEEL Processing Alternative would involve

  17. ch_5

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    160 Environmental Consequences Under Clean Closure, radioactive and hazardous constituents would be removed from the site or treated so that residual contamination is no higher than background levels. This could require removal of all buildings, vaults, tanks, transfer piping, and contaminated soil. No post- closure monitoring would be required because potential sources of contamination would no longer be present. Unrestricted industrial use of clean-closed facilities and sites will be permissi-

  18. ch_8

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    .0 8.0 Contents of Contents of Appendices Appendices 8-1 DOE/EIS-0287 This chapter provides the contents of the appendices supporting this EIS. The appendices contain technical information supporting the analysis in this EIS, and scanned comment response documents received by DOE during the public com- ment period. The appendices are pub- lished separately and are available on request. - New Information - DOE/EIS-0287 8-2 Contents of Appendices TABLE OF CONTENTS Section Appendix A Site

  19. ch_9

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

  20. ch_3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    at the Tank Farm would be calcined by the end of 2014 and added to the blended HLW cal- cine presently stored in the bin sets. The calcine then would be mixed with amorphous silica...

  1. ch_2

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the liquid mixed HLW derived from first cycle uranium extraction was converted to cal- cine. Calcining of the mixed transuranic wasteSBW and newly generated liquid waste...

  2. ch_3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and treatment technologies to both the mixed transuranic wasteSBW and mixed HLW cal- cine. The products resulting from these differ- ent technologies would be managed as...

  3. ch_3

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the project is successful, the facilities could be modified to treat the INEEL HLW cal- cine. DOE will be in a better position to analyze the technical feasibility and cost...

  4. ch_5

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    are no longer operational. Once waste processing operations are com- pleted, treatment and storage facilities at INTEC would be deactivated. DOE (1997) discusses the...

  5. ch_5

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    the Minimum INEEL Processing Alternative. The incremental Hanford Site impacts for treatment of the INEEL mixed HLW were obtained by scaling impacts for similar activities...

  6. ch_4

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Antelope Buttes are visible to the northeast. Smaller volcanic buttes dot the natural landscape of INEEL, providing a striking contrast to the relatively flat ground surface. The...

  7. ch_1

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    activities, and mixed HLW treatment activities produced additional liquid waste, gen- erally less radioactive than mixed HLW, that may be characterized as mixed transuranic...

  8. ch_4

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    and Game in reducing crop damage on adjacent private agri- cultural lands caused by wild game. INEEL is a designated National Environmental Research Park, functioning as a field...

  9. ch_4

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ladies tresses (Spiranthes diluvialis) LT INPS-GP2 Found near, but not on, INEEL Speal-tooth dodder (Cuscuta denticulata) INPS-1 Found near, but not on, INEEL Spreading gilia...

  10. ch_4

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    II, when the U.S. Navy used what is now the Central Facilities Area to test-fire naval guns. INEEL lands were also used as a bombing range by the U.S. Army Air Corps during the...

  11. ch_9

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Grout at the Hanford Site ...... 3-42 3.3.5 Vitrification at the West ... 4-54 4.9.1 Plant Communities and ...

  12. ch_11

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Safety Board (Board) (avail- able at http:www.deprep.org). ... from processing at Hanford are covered in more ... Guyman, R. H., 2001, Bechtel BWXT Idaho, LLC, Idaho ...

  13. ch_10

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    experience in environmental compliance, environmental impact assessment, ecological risk assessment, and remedial investigationsfeasibility studies at DOE and DOD facilities...

  14. ch_7

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... that can be fissioned by fast neutrons. frit Finely ... mixed transuranic wastesodium-bearing waste in the ... and can be used in nuclear reactors to make energy. ...

  15. ch_9

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... and Management of Sodium-Bonded Spent Nuclear Fuel, ... Including the Role of the Fast Flux Test Facility, DOE... the Navy, Office of Naval Reactors, letter to W. R. Dixon, ...

  16. ch_5

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HLW & FD EIS 5-73 DOEEIS-0287 tion dose to the nonin- volved worker and maximally exposed offsite individual and the collective dose to the population residing within 50 miles of...

  17. ch_5

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... As specified by Sections 650 and 651 of Rules for the Control of Air Pollution in Idaho (IDEQ 2001), all reasonable precautions would be taken to prevent the generation of fugitive ...

  18. ch_4

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Air quality regulations have been established to protect the public from potential harmful effects of air pollution. These regulations (a) designate acceptable levels of pollution ...

  19. ch_4

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    ... Low-income populations are identified using statistical poverty thresholds from the Bureau of Census Current Population Reports, Series P-60 on Income and Poverty. In identifying ...

  20. ch_6

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    to comply with Federal, state, interstate, and local requirements. Under the Clean Water Act, states generally set water quality standards, and EPA or states regu- late and issue...

  1. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Archives TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives The following Topic Groups are no longer active; however, related documents and notes for these archived Topic Groups are available through the following links: Communicatons Consolidated Grant Topic Group Training - Medical Training Protocols Route Identificaiton Process Mechanics of Funding and Technical Assistance

  2. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    1 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:04 PM on December 13, 2011 in Conference Room 126 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Chair), Cliff Watkins (Secretary), Lynn Albin, Heather Anastos, Jeff Cheadle, Glen Clark, Scot Fitzgerald, Shannan Johnson, Kris Kuhl-Klinger, Joan Kessner, Karl Pool, Dave St. John, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Chris Sutton, Cindy Taylor, Amanda Tuttle, Rich Weiss and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich requested comments

  3. HASQARD Focus Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    7, 2012 The meeting was called to order by Huei Meznarich, HASQARD Focus Group Chair at 2:06 PM on April 17, 2012 in Conference Room 308 at 2420 Stevens. Those attending were: Huei Meznarich (Chair), Cliff Watkins (Secretary), Lynn Albin, Taffy Almeida, Jeff Cheadle, Glen Clark, Scot Fitzgerald, Kris Kuhl-Klinger, Joan Kessner, Larry Markel, Noe'l Smith-Jackson, Cindy Taylor, Amanda Tuttle, Rich Weiss and Eric Wyse. I. Huei Meznarich requested comments on the minutes from the March 20, 2012

  4. # Energy Measuremenfs Group

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    ri EECE # Energy Measuremenfs Group SUMMARY REPORT . AiRIAL R4DIOLOGICAL SURVEY - NIAGARA FALLS AREA NIAGARA FALLS, NEh' YORK DATE OF SURVEY: SEPTEMBER 1979 APPROVED FOR DISTRIBUTION: P Stuart, EC&G, Inc. . . Herbirt F. Hahn, Department of Energy PERFDRflED BY EGtf, INC. UNDER CONTRACT NO. DE-AHO&76NV01163 WITH THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY II'AFID 010 November 30, 1979 - The Aerial Measurements System (A%), operated by EC&t, Inc< for the Un i ted States Department of

  5. High-resolution spectroscopy of jet-cooled CH{sub 5}{sup +}: Progress

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Savage, C.; Dong, F.; Nesbitt, D. J.

    2015-01-22

    Protonated methane (CH{sub 5}{sup +}) is thought to be a highly abundant molecular ion in interstellar medium, as well as a potentially bright ?wave- mm wave emitter that could serve as a tracer for methane. This paper describes progress and first successful efforts to obtain a high resolution, supersonically cooled spectrum of CH{sub 5}{sup +} in the 2900-3100 cm{sup ?1} region, formed in a slit supersonic discharge at low jet temperatures and with sub-Doppler resolution. Short term precision in frequency measurement (< 5 MHz on an hour time scale) is obtained from a thermally controlled optical transfer cavity servoloop locked onto a frequency stabilized HeNe laser. Long term precision (< 20 MHz day-to-day) due to pressure, temperature and humidity dependent index of refraction effects in the optical transfer cavity is also present and discussed.

  6. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Communications Conference Call

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Summaries | Department of Energy Communications Conference Call Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Communications Conference Call Summaries Conference Call Summaries PDF icon Conference Call Summary April 2000 PDF icon Conference Call Summary February 1999 PDF icon Conference Call Summary November 1998 More Documents & Publications TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Communications Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal Conference Call Summaries TEC

  7. The U.S. Department of Energy and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    . The U.S. Department of Energy and contractor CH2M HILL Plateau Remediation Company manage the Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility at the Hanford Site in southeast Washington state. Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility Background The Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF) provides safe and compliant underwater storage for 1,936 highly radioactive capsules containing the elements cesium and strontium. In the 1970s, radioactive isotopes of the chemical elements cesium and

  8. 10 CFR Ch. III (1-1-11 Edition) Pt. 851, App. B

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    2 10 CFR Ch. III (1-1-11 Edition) Pt. 851, App. B must meet the applicable electrical safety codes and standards referenced in § 851.23. 11. NANOTECHNOLOGY SAFETY-RESERVED The Department has chosen to reserve this section since policy and procedures for nano- technology safety are currently being devel- oped. Once these policies and procedures have been approved, the rule will be amended to include them through a rulemaking con- sistent with the Administrative Procedure Act. 12. WORKPLACE

  9. CORRELATION BETWEEN GROUP LOCAL DENSITY AND GROUP LUMINOSITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Deng Xinfa; Yu Guisheng

    2012-11-10

    In this study, we investigate the correlation between group local number density and total luminosity of groups. In four volume-limited group catalogs, we can conclude that groups with high luminosity exist preferentially in high-density regions, while groups with low luminosity are located preferentially in low-density regions, and that in a volume-limited group sample with absolute magnitude limit M{sub r} = -18, the correlation between group local number density and total luminosity of groups is the weakest. These results basically are consistent with the environmental dependence of galaxy luminosity.

  10. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Summaries Inspections Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Conference Call Summaries Inspections Subgroup Inspections Subgroup PDF icon April 6, 2006 PDF icon February 23,...

  11. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Routing Conference Call Summaries...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Routing Conference Call Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Routing Conference Call Summaries CONFERENCE CALL SUMMARIES PDF icon January 31, 2008 PDF icon December 6, 2007 PDF...

  12. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Security Meeting Summaries | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Security Meeting Summaries Meeting Summaries PDF icon Green Bay STG Meeting Summary- September 14, 2006 PDF icon Washington STG...

  13. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Mechanics of Funding...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Mechanics of Funding and Techical Assistance TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Mechanics of Funding and Techical Assistance Mechanics of Funding and Techical Assistance Items...

  14. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Archived Documents | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Archived Documents TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Archived Documents ARCHIVED DOCUMENTS PDF icon Inspections Summary Matrix PDF icon TEC Transportation Safety WIPP-PIG Rail...

  15. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal Conference Call Summaries...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Conference Call Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal Conference Call Summaries Conference Call Summaries PDF icon March 12, 2008 PDF icon October 3, 2007 PDF icon...

  16. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Communications Conference...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Communications Conference Call Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Communications Conference Call Summaries Conference Call Summaries PDF icon Conference Call Summary...

  17. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Communications Meeting...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Archives Communications Meeting Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Communications Meeting Summaries Meeting Summaries PDF icon Milwaukee TEC Meeting, Communications...

  18. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Section 180(c) Key Documents ...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Key Documents TEC Working Group Topic Groups Section 180(c) Key Documents Key Documents Briefing Package for Section 180(c) Implementation - July 2005 PDF icon Executive Summary...

  19. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Security Conference Call Summaries...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Security Conference Call Summaries TEC Working Group Topic Groups Security Conference Call Summaries Conference Call Summaries PDF icon August 17, 2006 (Draft) PDF icon July 18,...

  20. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Rail Key Documents TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents KEY DOCUMENTS Radiation Monitoring Subgroup Intermodal Subgroup Planning Subgroup PDF icon Current FRA State...

  1. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Intermodal...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Intermodal Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Intermodal Subgroup Intermodal Subgroup PDF icon Draft Work Plan More Documents & Publications TEC Working...

  2. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Radiation Monitoring...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Radiation Monitoring Subgroup TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail Key Documents Radiation Monitoring Subgroup Radiation Monitoring Subgroup PDF icon Draft Work Plan - February 4,...

  3. Fall 2012 Working Groups

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    2 C STEC W orking G roup S chedule Thrust I --- s elected Thursdays; M SE C onference R oom ( 3062 H H D ow) October 1 1 Dylan B ayerl ( Kioupakis g roup) 3:00---4:00pm November 1 Andy M artin ( Millunchick g roup) 2:00---3:00pm December 1 3 Brian R oberts ( Ku g roup) 2:00---3:00pm Thrust II --- s elected T hursdays, 3 :30---4:30pm; M SE C onference R oom ( 3062 H H D ow) September 2 7 Hang C hi ( Uher g roup) October 1 8 Reddy g roup November 2 9 Gunho Kim (Pipe group) Thrust III --- s elected

  4. Working Group Report: Sensors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Artuso, M.; et al.,

    2013-10-18

    Sensors play a key role in detecting both charged particles and photons for all three frontiers in Particle Physics. The signals from an individual sensor that can be used include ionization deposited, phonons created, or light emitted from excitations of the material. The individual sensors are then typically arrayed for detection of individual particles or groups of particles. Mounting of new, ever higher performance experiments, often depend on advances in sensors in a range of performance characteristics. These performance metrics can include position resolution for passing particles, time resolution on particles impacting the sensor, and overall rate capabilities. In addition the feasible detector area and cost frequently provides a limit to what can be built and therefore is often another area where improvements are important. Finally, radiation tolerance is becoming a requirement in a broad array of devices. We present a status report on a broad category of sensors, including challenges for the future and work in progress to solve those challenges.

  5. Rowan Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rowan Group Place: United Kingdom Product: ( Private family-controlled ) References: Rowan Group1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding it. Rowan Group is a...

  6. Tecate Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Tecate Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Tecate Group Place: San Diego, California Zip: 92108-4400 Product: The Tecate Group is a global supplier of electronic components and...

  7. USJ Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    USJ Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: USJ Group Place: So Paulo, Sao Paulo, Brazil Zip: 04534 000 Product: Sao Paulo based ethanol producer. References: USJ Group1 This...

  8. ERIC Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ERIC Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: ERIC Group Place: Italy Product: Italian project developer of PV power plants. References: ERIC Group1 This article is a stub. You...

  9. CO2 CH4 flux Air temperature Soil temperature and Soil moisture, Barrow, Alaska 2013 ver. 1

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Margaret Torn

    2015-01-14

    This dataset consists of field measurements of CO2 and CH4 flux, as well as soil properties made during 2013 in Areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Included are i) measurements of CO2 and CH4 flux made from June to September (ii) Calculation of corresponding Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) and CH4 exchange (transparent minus opaque) between atmosphere and the ecosystem (ii) Measurements of Los Gatos Research (LGR) chamber air temperature made from June to September (ii) measurements of surface layer depth, type of surface layer, soil temperature and soil moisture from June to September.

  10. CO2 CH4 flux Air temperature Soil temperature and Soil moisture, Barrow, Alaska 2013 ver. 1

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Margaret Torn

    This dataset consists of field measurements of CO2 and CH4 flux, as well as soil properties made during 2013 in Areas A-D of Intensive Site 1 at the Next-Generation Ecosystem Experiments (NGEE) Arctic site near Barrow, Alaska. Included are i) measurements of CO2 and CH4 flux made from June to September (ii) Calculation of corresponding Gross Primary Productivity (GPP) and CH4 exchange (transparent minus opaque) between atmosphere and the ecosystem (ii) Measurements of Los Gatos Research (LGR) chamber air temperature made from June to September (ii) measurements of surface layer depth, type of surface layer, soil temperature and soil moisture from June to September.

  11. Rioglass Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Rioglass Group Place: Spain Product: A Spanish glass company supplying the automotive sector, who has recently announced to launch...

  12. Humus Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Humus Group Place: Brazil Product: Stakeholder in the Vertente ethanol mill in Brazil. References: Humus Group1 This article is a stub. You can help...

  13. Bumlai Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: Bumlai Group Place: Brazil Product: Investor in ethanol plant So Fernando Acar e lcool. References: Bumlai Group1 This...

  14. Paro group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Paro group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Paro group Place: Brazil Product: Ethanol producer that plans to jointly own an ethanol plant in Minas Gerais. References: Paro...

  15. Mouratoglou Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mouratoglou Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Mouratoglou Group Place: France Sector: Renewable Energy Product: Investment parent-company of EDF Energies Nouvelles, involved...

  16. Electrocell Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Electrocell Group Place: Sao Paolo, Brazil Zip: 05508-000 Product: Producer of fuel cells, accessories and controls. The company...

  17. Copisa Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Copisa Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Copisa Group Place: Barcelona, Spain Zip: 8029 Product: Barcelona-based, construction company. Copisa is involved in building three...

  18. Emte Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Emte Group Place: Spain Sector: Renewable Energy, Services Product: String representation "EMTE is the ben ... ctor companies." is too long....

  19. Poyry Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Poyry Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Poyry Group Place: Vantaa, Finland Zip: 1621 Product: Vantaa-based consulting and engineering firm, specialising in issues regarding...

  20. Anel Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Anel Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Anel Group Place: ISTANBUL, Turkey Zip: 34768 Sector: Solar, Wind energy Product: Istanbul-based technological and engineering...

  1. Aksa Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Aksa Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Aksa Group Place: Istanbul, Turkey Zip: 34212 Sector: Wind energy Product: Turkey-based international company recently involved in the...

  2. GEA Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jump to: navigation, search Name: GEA Group Place: Bochum, Germany Zip: 44809 Sector: Biofuels, Solar Product: Bochum-based, engineering group specialising in process engineering...

  3. Daesung Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Daesung Group Place: Jongno-Gu Seoul, Korea (Republic) Zip: 110-300 Sector: Hydro, Hydrogen Product: Daesung Group, a Korea-based energy provider and electric machinary...

  4. Westly Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Westly Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Westly Group Place: Menlo Park, California Zip: 94025 Product: Clean technology-oriented venture capital firm. References: Westly...

  5. Enerbio Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Enerbio Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Enerbio Group Place: Porto Alegre, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil Zip: 90480-003 Sector: Renewable Energy, Services Product: Brazilian...

  6. BOC Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: BOC Group Place: United Kingdom Zip: GU20 6HJ Sector: Services Product: UK-based industrial gases, vacuum technologies and distribution...

  7. Jinglong Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Jinglong Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Jinglong Group Place: Ningjin, Hebei Province, China Product: Chinese manufacturer and supplier of monocrystalline silicon and...

  8. Verdeo Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Verdeo Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Verdeo Group Place: Washington, DC Zip: 20006 Sector: Carbon Product: Washington based integrated carbon solutions company....

  9. Bazan Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bazan Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Bazan Group Place: Pontal, Brazil Zip: 14180-000 Product: Bioethanol production company Coordinates: -21.023149, -48.037099 Show...

  10. Delaney Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Delaney Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Delaney Group Place: Gloversville, New York Zip: 12078 Sector: Services, Wind energy Product: Services company focused on...

  11. Ramky Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ramky Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ramky Group Place: Andhra Pradesh, India Zip: 500082 Product: Focussed on construction, infrastructure development and waste...

  12. Samaras Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Samaras Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Samaras Group Place: Greece Sector: Renewable Energy, Services Product: Greek consultancy services provider with specialization in...

  13. Altira Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Altira Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Altira Group Address: 1675 Broadway, Suite 2400 Place: Denver, Colorado Zip: 80202 Region: Rockies Area Product: Venture Capital...

  14. Sunvim Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Sunvim Group Place: Gaomi, Shandong Province, China Zip: 261500 Product: Sunvim, a Chinese home textile maker, is also engaged in the...

  15. Balta Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Balta Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Balta Group Place: Sint Baafs Vijve, Belgium Zip: 8710 Product: Belgium-based manufacturer of broadloom carpets, rugs and laminate...

  16. Noribachi Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Noribachi Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Noribachi Group Place: Albuquerque, New Mexico Zip: 87104 Product: New Mexico-based private equity firm focused on investing in...

  17. Lucas Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Lucas Group Place: Chicago, Illinois Sector: Services Product: Renewable Energy Recruiters Year Founded: 1970 Coordinates: 41.850033,...

  18. Pohlen Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Pohlen Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Pohlen Group Place: Geilenkirchen, Germany Product: Specialises in roof engineering, including installing and maintaining PV systems...

  19. Vaillant Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Vaillant Group Place: Remscheid, Germany Zip: 42859 Product: For nearly 130 years Vaillant has been at the forefront of heating technology....

  20. Ostwind Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ostwind Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ostwind Group Place: Regensburg, Germany Zip: D-93047 Sector: Biomass, Hydro, Wind energy Product: Develops wind projects, and also...

  1. Schaffner Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Schaffner Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Schaffner Group Place: Switzerland Zip: 4542 Product: Switzerland-based company supplier of components that support the efficient...

  2. Swatch Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Swatch Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Swatch Group Place: Switzerland Product: String representation "The Swatch Grou ... ther industries" is too long. References: Swatch...

  3. Shenergy Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Shenergy Group Place: Shanghai Municipality, China Product: Gas and power project investor and developer based in Shanghai. References: Shenergy Group1 This article is a stub....

  4. Ralos Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ralos Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ralos Group Place: Michelstadt, Germany Zip: D-64720 Sector: Solar Product: Germany-based solar project developer that specialises in...

  5. Enovos Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Enovos Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Enovos Group Place: Germany Sector: Solar Product: Germany-based utility. The utility has interests in solar energy. References:...

  6. Richway Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    by expanding it. Richway Group is a company based in Richmond, British Columbia. FROM WASTE TO ENERGY, YOUR WISE CHOICE Vision and Objectives Richway Group (Richway) is located...

  7. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Protocols | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Protocols TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Protocols The Transportation Protocols Topic Group serves as an important vehicle for DOE senior managers to assess and incorporate stakeholder input into the protocols process. The Topic Group was formed to review a series of transportation protocols developed in response to a request for DOE to be more consistent in its approach to transportation.

  8. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Tribal TEC Working Group Topic Groups Tribal The Tribal Topic Group was established in January 1998 to address government-to-government consultation between DOE and Indian Tribes affected by its transportation activities. The group focuses on transportation planning, funding, and training. Members convene at the semiannual TEC meetings and hold frequent conference calls between TEC sessions. The group has addressed issues such as a consolidated transportation funding grant, DOE's revised Indian

  9. Focus Group Training Work Group Meeting | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Date: September 13, 2012 In conjunction with the HAMMER Steering Committee meeting the HSS Focus Group Training Working Group Meeting was conducted from 2:00 PM to 4:30 PM at the HAMMER Training Facility in Richland, WA. Documents Available for Download PDF icon Meeting Agenda PDF icon Meeting Summary More Documents & Publications Focus Group Training Work Group Meeting DOE Training Reciprocity Program Training Work Group Charter

  10. Distributions of methyl group rotational barriers in polycrystalline organic solids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beckmann, Peter A. E-mail: wangxianlong@uestc.edu.cn; Conn, Kathleen G.; Division of Education and Human Services, Neumann University, One Neumann Drive, Aston, Pennsylvania 19014-1298 ; Mallory, Clelia W.; Department of Chemistry, Bryn Mawr College, 101 North Merion Ave., Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania 19010-2899 ; Mallory, Frank B.; Rheingold, Arnold L.; Rotkina, Lolita; Wang, Xianlong E-mail: wangxianlong@uestc.edu.cn

    2013-11-28

    We bring together solid state {sup 1}H spin-lattice relaxation rate measurements, scanning electron microscopy, single crystal X-ray diffraction, and electronic structure calculations for two methyl substituted organic compounds to investigate methyl group (CH{sub 3}) rotational dynamics in the solid state. Methyl group rotational barrier heights are computed using electronic structure calculations, both in isolated molecules and in molecular clusters mimicking a perfect single crystal environment. The calculations are performed on suitable clusters built from the X-ray diffraction studies. These calculations allow for an estimate of the intramolecular and the intermolecular contributions to the barrier heights. The {sup 1}H relaxation measurements, on the other hand, are performed with polycrystalline samples which have been investigated with scanning electron microscopy. The {sup 1}H relaxation measurements are best fitted with a distribution of activation energies for methyl group rotation and we propose, based on the scanning electron microscopy images, that this distribution arises from molecules near crystallite surfaces or near other crystal imperfections (vacancies, dislocations, etc.). An activation energy characterizing this distribution is compared with a barrier height determined from the electronic structure calculations and a consistent model for methyl group rotation is developed. The compounds are 1,6-dimethylphenanthrene and 1,8-dimethylphenanthrene and the methyl group barriers being discussed and compared are in the 212 kJ?mol{sup ?1} range.

  11. September 8, 2011, HSS/Union Focus Group Work Group Telecom - Work Group Charter

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    TEMPLATE Office of Health, Safety and Security Focus Group [Name of Work Group] Work Group Charter (Date) I. PURPOSE The HSS Focus Group [Name of Work Group] is one of several HSS Work Groups, established to address worker health, safety and security programs improvements across the U.S. Department of Energy Complex. The [Name of Work Group] has been established to (state specific purpose). II. OBJECTIVES (State the desired impact(s) and major outcome(s) for, the Work Group) 1. Establish

  12. Aerobic C-H Acetoxylation of 8-Methylquinoline in PdII-Pyridinecarboxylic Acid Systems: Some Structure-Reactivity Relationships

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Daoyong; Zavalij, Peter Y.; Vedernikov, Andrei N.

    2013-09-09

    Catalytic oxidative CH acetoxylation of 8-methylquinoline as a model substrate with O2 as oxidant was performed using palladium(II) carboxylate catalysts derived from four different pyridinecarboxylic acids able to form palladium(II) chelates of different size. A comparison of the rates of the substrate CH activation and the O2 activation steps shows that the CH activation step is rate-limiting, whereas the O2 activation occurs at a much faster rate already at 20 C. The chelate ring size and the chelate ring strain of the catalytically active species are proposed to be the key factors affecting the rate of the CH activation.

  13. High Temperature Membrane Working Group

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This presentation provides an overview of the High Temperature Membrane Working Group Meeting in May 2007.

  14. Science Education Group | Princeton Plasma Physics Lab

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Science Education Group View larger image Sci Ed Group 15 View larger image Group 21

  15. The Radiative Transfer Of CH{sub 4}-N{sub 2} Plasma Arc

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Benallal, R.; Liani, B.

    2008-09-23

    Any physical modelling of a circuit-breaker arc therefore requires an understanding of the radiated energy which is taken into account in the form of a net coefficient. The evaluation of the net emission coefficient is performed by the knowledge of the chemical plasma composition and the resolution of the radiative transfer equation. In this paper, the total radiation which escapes from a CH{sub 4}-N{sub 2} plasma is calculated in the temperature range between 5000 and 30000K on the assumption of a local thermodynamic equilibrium and we have studied the nitrogen effect in the hydrocarbon plasmas.

  16. Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Print Two of the major challenges for humanity in the next 20 years are the shrinking availability of fossil fuels and the global warming and potential climate changes that result from their ever-increasing use. One possible solution to these problems is to use an energy carrier such as hydrogen, and ways to produce and store hydrogen in electric power plants and vehicles is a major research focus for materials scientists and

  17. Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Print Two of the major challenges for humanity in the next 20 years are the shrinking availability of fossil fuels and the global warming and potential climate changes that result from their ever-increasing use. One possible solution to these problems is to use an energy carrier such as hydrogen, and ways to produce and store hydrogen in electric power plants and vehicles is a major research focus for materials scientists and

  18. Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Print Two of the major challenges for humanity in the next 20 years are the shrinking availability of fossil fuels and the global warming and potential climate changes that result from their ever-increasing use. One possible solution to these problems is to use an energy carrier such as hydrogen, and ways to produce and store hydrogen in electric power plants and vehicles is a major research focus for materials scientists and

  19. Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358 Section E Contract Modification No. 133

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    E Contract Modification No. 133 i PART I SECTION E INSPECTION AND ACCEPTANCE PAGE NO. E.1 - FAR 52.246-9 - INSPECTION OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT (SHORT FORM) (APR 1984) E-1 E.2 - CERTIFICATION E-1 Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358 Section E Contract Modification No.133 E-1 PART I SECTION E - INSPECTION AND ACCEPTANCE E.1 - FAR 52.246-9 - INSPECTION OF RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT (SHORT FORM) (APR 1984) The Government has the right to inspect and evaluate the work performed or being performed under

  20. Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358 Section F Contract Modification No. 0139

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    F Contract Modification No. 0139 i PART I SECTION F DELIVERIES OR PERFORMANCE TABLE OF CONTENTS PAGE NO. F.1 - PERIOD OF PERFORMANCE F-1 F.2 - AWARD TERM INCENTIVE (SPECIAL) F-1 F.3 - FAR 52.242-15 - STOP WORK ORDER (AUG 1989) - ALTERNATE I (APR 1984) F-4 F.4 - STOP WORK AND SHUTDOWN AUTHORITY F-5 F.5 - PRINCIPAL PLACE OF PERFORMANCE F-5 Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358 Section F Contract Modification No. 0139 F-1 PART I SECTION F - DELIVERIES OR PERFORMANCE F.1 - PERIOD OF PERFORMANCE (a) This

  1. Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358 Section J Appendix H

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Section J Appendix H Modification 0171 ATTACHMENT J.8 APPENDIX H SMALL BUSINESS SUBCONTRACTING PLAN Applicable to the Operation of AMES Laboratory Contract No. DE-AC02-07CH11358 A mAmes Laboratory Croltfng Motlr/6/o A E*orpy Sofulfono U.B . DEPAR'fld.£NT OF BNKD.OY This subcontracting plan was submitted by: Signature: Typed Name: Andrea Spiker Title: Purchasing Manag r Date Signed: IO(;J. }~ OJ'f I I Phone No.: 515-294-6738 Approval: Agency: Signature: Typed Name: Title: Contracting Officer ,

  2. THE CHANDRA ACIS SURVEY OF M33 (ChASeM33): THE FINAL SOURCE CATALOG

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tuellmann, R.; Gaetz, T. J.; Plucinsky, P. P.; Challis, P.; Edgar, R. J.; Kirshner, R. P.; Kuntz, K. D.; Blair, W. P.; Williams, B. F.; Pietsch, W.; Haberl, F.; Long, K. S.; Sasaki, M.; Winkler, P. F.; Pannuti, T. G.; Helfand, D. J.; Hughes, J. P.; Mazeh, T.; Shporer, A.

    2011-04-01

    This study presents the final source catalog of the Chandra ACIS Survey of M33 (ChASeM33). With a total exposure time of 1.4 Ms, ChASeM33 covers {approx}70% of the D{sub 25} isophote (R {approx} 4.0 kpc) of M33 and provides the deepest, most complete, and detailed look at a spiral galaxy in X-rays. The source catalog includes 662 sources, reaches a limiting unabsorbed luminosity of {approx}2.4x10{sup 34} erg s{sup -1} in the 0.35-8.0 keV energy band, and contains source positions, source net counts, fluxes and significances in several energy bands, and information on source variability. The analysis challenges posed by ChASeM33 and the techniques adopted to address these challenges are discussed. To constrain the nature of the detected X-ray source, hardness ratios were constructed and spectra were fit for 254 sources, follow-up MMT spectra of 116 sources were acquired, and cross-correlations with previous X-ray catalogs and other multi-wavelength data were generated. Based on this effort, 183 of the 662 ChASeM33 sources could be identified. Finally, the luminosity function (LF) for the detected point sources as well as the one for the X-ray binaries (XRBs) in M33 is presented. The LFs in the soft band (0.5-2.0 keV) and the hard band (2.0-8.0 keV) have a limiting luminosity at the 90% completeness limit of 4.0 x 10{sup 34} erg s{sup -1} and 1.6 x 10{sup 35} erg s{sup -1}(for D = 817 kpc), respectively, which is significantly lower than what was reported by previous XRB population studies in galaxies more distant than M33. The resulting distribution is consistent with a dominant population of high-mass XRBs as would be expected for M33.

  3. Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 Section F

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Modification No. 0164 Contract No. DE-AC02-09CH11466 Section F i PART I SECTION F DELIVERIES OR PERFORMANCE TABLE OF CONTENTS CLAUSE NO. TITLE OF CLAUSE F.1 PERIOD OF PERFORMANCE (Revised by Prime Contract Modification 041 - 07/13/2010; 0137 - 10/28/2013; 0164 - 08/07/2014) F.2 AWARD TERM INCENTIVE (SPECIAL) F.3 FAR 52.242-15 - STOP WORK ORDER (AUG 1989) ALTERNATE I (APR 1984) F.4 STOP WORK AND SHUTDOWN AUTHORITY F.5 PRINCIPAL PLACE OF PERFORMANCE Modification No. 0164 Contract No.

  4. Hindering effects in diffusion of CO2/CH4 mixtures in ZIF-8 crystals |

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Center for Gas SeparationsRelevant to Clean Energy Technologies | Blandine Jerome Hindering effects in diffusion of CO2/CH4 mixtures in ZIF-8 crystals Previous Next List C. Chmelik, J. van Baten, and R. Krishna, J. Membr. Sci. 397, 87 (2012) DOI: 10.1016/j.memsci.2012.01.013 Full-size image (22 K) Abstract Cage-type micro-porous materials such as LTA, CHA, SAPO-34, DDR, ERI, ZIF-7, and ZIF-8 have significant potential for use in membrane technologies for CO2 capture. The permeation

  5. Joint DOE-CH2M HILL News Release For Immediate Release:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    For Immediate Release: Media Contact: August 12, 2014 Destry Henderson, CH2M HILL, (509) 376-8644, destry_j_henderson@rl.gov Geoff Tyree, DOE, (509) 308-4287, geoffrey.tyree@rl.doe.gov Contractor removes more than 650 pounds of contamination from Hanford groundwater Energy Department annual goal met 4 months ahead of schedule Note: Photos are available on the Hanford Site website: http://go.usa.gov/PARP RICHLAND, Wash. - For a second year in a row and four months ahead of schedule, the U.S.

  6. Joint DOE-CH2M HILL News Release For Immediate Release:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    For Immediate Release: Media Contact: July 2, 2014 Destry Henderson, CH2M HILL, (509) 376-8644, destry_j_henderson@rl.gov Geoff Tyree, DOE, (509)376-4171, geoffrey.tyree@rl.doe.gov Watch a video that explains the history of the McCluskey Room and demonstrates new equipment employees will use when they enter that hazardous and historic area: http://youtu.be/K-6bTvzBVA4 WORKERS PREPARE TO ENTER ONE OF HANFORD'S MOST HAZARDOUS ROOMS Employee-driven tools and training will help ensure safety inside

  7. Joint DOE-CH2M HILL News Release Media Contact: For Immediate Release:

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Destry Henderson, CH2M HILL, (509) 376-8644, September 10, 2014 destry_j_henderson@rl.gov Geoff Tyree, DOE, (509)376-4171, geoffrey.tyree@rl.doe.gov WORKERS BEGIN CLEANING OUT HANFORD'S HISTORIC MCCLUSKEY ROOM Safely cleaning out room is key step toward Plutonium Finishing Plant demolition RICHLAND, Wash. - Workers have entered one of the most hazardous rooms at the Hanford Site in Washington state to begin final cleanup of a room that became known to workers over the years by the name of a

  8. Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Print Two of the major challenges for humanity in the next 20 years are the shrinking availability of fossil fuels and the global warming and potential climate changes that result from their ever-increasing use. One possible solution to these problems is to use an energy carrier such as hydrogen, and ways to produce and store hydrogen in electric power plants and vehicles is a major research focus for materials scientists and

  9. Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Hydrogen Storage in Carbon Nanotubes Through Formation of C-H Bonds Print Two of the major challenges for humanity in the next 20 years are the shrinking availability of fossil fuels and the global warming and potential climate changes that result from their ever-increasing use. One possible solution to these problems is to use an energy carrier such as hydrogen, and ways to produce and store hydrogen in electric power plants and vehicles is a major research focus for materials scientists and

  10. HA' R$,kAW CH EM I CAL CO,M i=ANY A

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    TH Ii ' HA' R$,kAW CH EM I CAL CO,M i=ANY A December 30, 1955 U. S. Atomic Energy Commission Oak Ridge OperationwOfflce Post Office Box "E" Oak Ridge, Tennessee Attention: Mr. T. Carberry Dear Mr. Carberry: ' ..> In the process of removing 'classified documents from the safes at the Main Office for des$ruction we discovered two sample cylinders of hexafluorlde. If memory serves us right these sample6 were prepared at the request of the Commission and shipped to the Unl- versity of

  11. MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE ChMBRIDGE'39, MASSACHUSETTS TELEPHONE UNrvn.,,r,

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    2, .* -' .l-.; . . *' ,. .:, ,-i&CLEAR METALS, INC. MA ,y 155 MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE ChMBRIDGE'39, MASSACHUSETTS TELEPHONE UNrvn.,,r, 4-5200 blr. Saul Strauch Technical Liason Division United States Atomic Energy Commission New York Operations Office 70 Columbus Avenue New York 23, New York SUBJECT:- Program for Uranium Recovery (Ref: S. Strauch to A. R. Kaufmnnn, B/30/55) Dear Mr. Strauch: With reference to Mr. K. E. Field's confidential memorandum of August 22, 1956, this is to advise tha.t

  12. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Security Key Documents | Department...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Key Documents TEC Working Group Topic Groups Security Key Documents Key Documents PDF icon Security TG Work Plan August 7, 2006 PDF icon Security Lessons Learned Document August 2,...

  13. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Rail TEC Working Group Topic Groups Rail The Rail Topic Group has the responsibility to identify and discuss current issues and concerns regarding rail transportation of radioactive materials by the Department of Energy (DOE). The group's current task is to examine different aspects of rail transportation including inspections, tracking and radiation monitoring, planning and process, and review of lessons learned. Ultimately, the main goal for members will be to assist in the identification of

  14. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Routing | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Routing TEC Working Group Topic Groups Routing ROUTING The Routing Topic Group has been established to examine topics of interest and relevance concerning routing of shipments of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high-level radioactive waste (HLW) to a national repository at Yucca Mountain, Nevada by highway, rail, and intermodal operations that could involve use of barges. Ultimately, the main goal for the topic group members will be to provide stakeholder perspectives and input to the Office of

  15. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Communications | Department of

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Energy Communications TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Communications The Communications Topic Group was convened in April 1998 to improve internal and external strategic level communications regarding DOE shipments of radioactive and other hazardous materials. Major issues under consideration by this Topic Group include: - Examination of DOE external and internal communications processes; - Roles and responsibilities when communicating with a diverse range of stakeholders; and -

  16. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Training - Medical Training |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Training - Medical Training TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Training - Medical Training The TEC Training and Medical Training Issues Topic Group was formed to address the training issues for emergency responders in the event of a radioactive material transportation incident. The Topic Group first met in 1996 to assist DOE in developing an approach to address radiological emergency response training needs and to avoid redundancy of existing training materials. The

  17. Research Group Websites - Links - Cyclotron Institute

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Research Group Websites Dr. Sherry J. Yennello's Research Group Nuclear Theory Group Dr. Dan Melconian's Research Group Dr. Cody Folden's Research Group...

  18. Weighted Running Jobs by Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Weighted Running Jobs by Group Weighted Running Jobs by Group Daily Graph: Weekly Graph: Monthly Graph: Yearly Graph: 2 Year Graph: Last edited: 2016-02-01 08:06:59

  19. Klebl Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Zip: 6388 Product: Construction and engineering group with some experience building PV plants. References: Klebl Group1 This article is a stub. You can help OpenEI by expanding...

  20. Sova Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sova Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Sova Group Place: Kolkata, West Bengal, India Zip: 700012 Product: Kolkatta-based iron and steel major. The firm plans to foray into PV...

  1. Minoan Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Minoan Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Minoan Group Place: Kent, England, United Kingdom Zip: BR5 1XB Sector: Solar Product: UK-based developer of resorts in Greece that...

  2. ESV Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    ESV Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: ESV Group Place: London, England, United Kingdom Zip: W1K 4QH Sector: Biofuels Product: UK-based investment agri-business involved in...

  3. Ensus Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ensus Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Ensus Group Place: Stockton-on-Tees, England, United Kingdom Zip: TS15 9BW Product: North Yorkshire-based developer & operator of...

  4. Camco Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Group Jump to: navigation, search Name: Camco Group Place: Jersey, United Kingdom Zip: JE2 4UH Sector: Carbon, Renewable Energy, Services Product: UK-based firm that provides...

  5. Expanded Pending Jobs by Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Expanded Pending Jobs by Group Expanded Pending Jobs by Group Daily Graph: Weekly Graph: Monthly Graph: Yearly Graph: 2 Year Graph: Last edited: 2016-02-01 08:07:29

  6. Barrierless proton transfer across weak CH?O hydrogen bonds in dimethyl ether dimer

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yoder, Bruce L. West, Adam H. C.; Signorell, Ruth; Bravaya, Ksenia B.; Bodi, Andras; Sztray, Blint

    2015-03-21

    We present a combined computational and threshold photoelectron photoion coincidence study of two isotopologues of dimethyl ether, (DME ? h{sub 6}){sub n} and (DME ? d{sub 6}){sub n}n = 1 and 2, in the 914 eV photon energy range. Multiple isomers of neutral dimethyl ether dimer were considered, all of which may be present, and exhibited varying CH?O interactions. Results from electronic structure calculations predict that all of them undergo barrierless proton transfer upon photoionization to the ground electronic state of the cation. In fact, all neutral isomers were found to relax to the same radical cation structure. The lowest energy dissociative photoionization channel of the dimer leads to CH{sub 3}OHCH{sub 3}{sup +} by the loss of CH{sub 2}OCH{sub 3} with a 0 K appearance energy of 9.71 0.03 eV and 9.73 0.03 eV for (DME ? h{sub 6}){sub 2} and deuterated (DME ? d{sub 6}){sub 2}, respectively. The ground state threshold photoelectron spectrum band of the dimethyl ether dimer is broad and exhibits no vibrational structure. Dimerization results in a 350 meV decrease of the valence band appearance energy, a 140 meV decrease of the band maximum, thus an almost twofold increase in the ground state band width, compared with DME ? d{sub 6} monomer.

  7. CO2 and CH4 Fluxes across Polygon Geomorphic Types, Barrow, Alaska, 2006-2010

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Tweedie,Craig; Lara, Mark

    2014-09-17

    Carbon flux data are reported as Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE), Gross Ecosystem Exchange (GEE), Ecosystem Respiration (ER), and Methane (CH4) flux. Measurements were made at 82 plots across various polygon geomorphic classes at research sites on the Barrow Environmental Observatory (BEO), the Biocomplexity Experiment site on the BEO, and the International Biological Program (IBP) site a little west of the BEO. This product is a compilation of data from 27 plots as presented in Lara et al. (2012), data from six plots presented in Olivas et al. (2010); and from 49 plots described in (Lara et al. 2014). Measurements were made during the peak of the growing seasons during 2006 to 2010. At each of the measurement plots (except Olivas et al., 2010) four different thicknesses of shade cloth were used to generate CO2 light response curves. Light response curves were used to normalize photosynthetically active radiation that is diurnally variable to a peak growing season average ~400 umolm-2sec-1. At the Olivas et al. (2010) plots, diurnal patterns were characterized by repeated sampling. CO2 measurements were made using a closed-chamber photosynthesis system and CH4 measurements were made using a photo-acoustic multi-gas analyzer. In addition, plot-level measurements for thaw depth (TD), water table depth (WTD), leaf area index (LAI), and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) are summarized by geomorphic polygon type.

  8. CO2 and CH4 Fluxes across Polygon Geomorphic Types, Barrow, Alaska, 2006-2010

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Tweedie,Craig; Lara, Mark

    Carbon flux data are reported as Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE), Gross Ecosystem Exchange (GEE), Ecosystem Respiration (ER), and Methane (CH4) flux. Measurements were made at 82 plots across various polygon geomorphic classes at research sites on the Barrow Environmental Observatory (BEO), the Biocomplexity Experiment site on the BEO, and the International Biological Program (IBP) site a little west of the BEO. This product is a compilation of data from 27 plots as presented in Lara et al. (2012), data from six plots presented in Olivas et al. (2010); and from 49 plots described in (Lara et al. 2014). Measurements were made during the peak of the growing seasons during 2006 to 2010. At each of the measurement plots (except Olivas et al., 2010) four different thicknesses of shade cloth were used to generate CO2 light response curves. Light response curves were used to normalize photosynthetically active radiation that is diurnally variable to a peak growing season average ~400 umolm-2sec-1. At the Olivas et al. (2010) plots, diurnal patterns were characterized by repeated sampling. CO2 measurements were made using a closed-chamber photosynthesis system and CH4 measurements were made using a photo-acoustic multi-gas analyzer. In addition, plot-level measurements for thaw depth (TD), water table depth (WTD), leaf area index (LAI), and normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) are summarized by geomorphic polygon type.

  9. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Security | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Security TEC Working Group Topic Groups Security The Security Topic group is comprised of regulators, law enforcement officials, labor and industry representatives and other subject matter experts concerned with secure transport of spent nuclear fuel (SNF) and high level waste (HLW) to Yucca Mountain. Current activities include updating the security portion of DOE's Transportation Practices Manual, identifying key State, Tribal and local security officials and organizations, and examining

  10. Effects of reactant rotation on the dynamics of the OH + CH{sub 4} ? H{sub 2}O + CH{sub 3} reaction: A six-dimensional study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Song, Hongwei; Li, Jun; Jiang, Bin; Guo, Hua E-mail: hguo@unm.edu; Yang, Minghui; Lu, Yunpeng E-mail: hguo@unm.edu

    2014-02-28

    The dynamics of the hydrogen abstraction reaction between methane and hydroxyl radical is investigated using an initial state selected time-dependent wave packet method within a six-dimensional model. The ab initio calibrated global potential energy surface of Espinosa-Garca and Corchado was used. Integral cross sections from several low-lying rotational states of both reactants have been obtained using the centrifugal sudden and J-shifting approximations. On the empirical potential energy surface, the rotational excitation of methane has little effect on the reaction cross section, but excited rotational states of OH inhibit the reactivity slightly. These results are rationalized with the newly proposed sudden vector projection model.

  11. Groups

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    groupbig-clean-data" target"blank">read more

    Big Data Concentrated Solar Power DataAnalysis energy efficiency energy storage expert systems machine learning...

  12. TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Route Identification Process |

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Department of Energy Route Identification Process TEC Working Group Topic Groups Archives Route Identification Process Route Identification Process Items Available for Download PDF icon Routing Discussion Paper (April 1998) More Documents & Publications TEC Meeting Summaries - January 1997 TEC Meeting Summaries - July 1997 TEC Meeting Summaries - January 1998

  13. Detection of class I methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) maser candidates in supernova remnants

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pihlstrm, Y. M.; Mesler, R. A.; McEwen, B. C.; Sjouwerman, L. O.; Frail, D. A.; Claussen, M. J.

    2014-04-01

    We have used the Karl G. Jansky Very Large Array to search for 36 GHz and 44 GHz methanol (CH{sub 3}OH) lines in a sample of 21 Galactic supernova remnants (SNRs). Mainly the regions of the SNRs with 1720 MHz OH masers were observed. Despite the limited spatial extent covered in our search, methanol masers were detected in both G1.40.1 and W28. Additional masers were found in Sgr A East. More than 40 masers were found in G1.40.1, which we deduce are due to interactions between the SNR and at least two separate molecular clouds. The six masers in W28 are associated with the molecular cloud that is also associated with the OH maser excitation. We discuss the possibility that the methanol maser may be more numerous in SNRs than the OH maser, but harder to detect due to observational constraints.

  14. Final Report for DOE Project DE-FC07-99CH11010

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jed Randall; Robert Kean

    2003-10-22

    Department of Energy award number DE-FC07-99CH11010, Enhanced Utilization of Corn Based Biomaterials, supported a technology development program sponsored by Cargill Dow LLC from September 30, 1999 through June 30, 2003. The work involved fundamental scientific studies on poly lactic acid (PLA), a new environmentally benign plastic material from renewable resources. DOE funds supported academic research at the Colorado School of Mines and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), and industry cost share was directed towards applied research into new product development utilizing the fundamental information generated by the academic partners. Under the arrangement of the grant, the fundamental information is published so that other companies can utilize it in evaluating the applicability of PLA in their own products. The overall project objective is to increase the utilization of PLA, a renewable resource based plastic, currently produced from fermented corn sugar.

  15. Creating Los Alamos Women's Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Raeanna Sharp-Geiger-Creating a cleaner, greener environment March 28, 2014 Creating Los Alamos Women's Group Inspired by their informal dinner discussions, Raeanna Sharp-Geiger and a few of her female colleagues decided to create a new resource a few years ago, the Los Alamos Women's Group. They wanted to create a comfortable environment where women from all across the diverse Lab could network, collaborate, share ideas and gain a broader perspective of the Lab's mission. The Women's Group has

  16. Near-infrared spectroscopy of CH{sub 2} by frequency modulated diode laser absorption

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Marr, A.J.; Sears, T.J.; Chang, B.

    1998-09-01

    A diode laser spectrometer incorporating a multi-pass Herriott type cell and frequency modulation detection was used to record a previously unaccessed region of the near-infrared singlet{l_arrow}singlet absorption spectrum of methylene between 10thinsp000 cm{sup {minus}1} and 10thinsp600 cm{sup {minus}1}. With this spectrometer, signal-to-noise ratios close to the quantum noise limit have been attained. Identification of rovibronic transitions to five previously unobserved levels, K=1 {tilde a}(0,9,0), K=2thinsp{tilde b}(0,1,0), K=2thinsp{tilde a}(1,6,0), K=3thinsp{tilde b}(0,1,0) and K=3thinsp{tilde a}(0,10,0), was made. Despite the fact that the present spectra access levels within approximately 1300 cm{sup {minus}1} of the barrier to linearity, the spectrum is dense and perturbed, characteristics in common with spectra recorded in many previous studies at shorter wavelengths. Recent spectroscopic observations of halomethylenes [J. Mol. Spectrosc. {bold 188}, 68 (1998)] had suggested that the CH{sub 2} spectrum might become simpler at longer wavelengths, but this was not evident in the observed spectra. The mixed nature of the singlet states is evidenced by the assignment of rovibronic transitions to levels containing primarily {tilde a}thinsp{sup 1}A{sub 1} state character. The new measurements provide a stringent test for modern theoretical models for CH{sub 2} and will enable refinement of the electronic potential surfaces. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  17. Copelouzos Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    navigation, search Name: Copelouzos Group Place: Athens, Greece Product: Fully integrated business development organisation, servicing key industrial and technological sectors such...

  18. XSD Groups | Advanced Photon Source

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Imaging (IMG) Primary Contact: Francesco De Carlo Research Disciplines: Materials Science, Biology, Physics, Life Sciences The IMG group designs, supports, and operates...

  19. Arakaki Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: Arakaki Group Place: Fernandopolis, Sao Paulo, Brazil Product: Brazil based agriculture company, which owns 50% of an ethanol plant. Coordinates: -20.284244,...

  20. Royalstar Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Royalstar Group Place: Hefei, Anhui Province, China Sector: Solar Product: Chinese manufacturer of washing machines, solar water heaters, and as of June 2006,...

  1. Groupe Valeco | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Name: Groupe Valeco Place: Montpellier, France Zip: 34070 Sector: Biomass, Solar, Wind energy Product: Develops wind, solar, biomass and cogeneration projects in France....

  2. Airvoice Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Airvoice Group Place: Gurgaon, Haryana, India Zip: 122001 Sector: Services, Solar, Wind energy Product: Holding company with interest in tele-solutions, petrochemicals and...

  3. Kedco Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Co. Cork, Ireland Product: Cork-based project developer of biogas and gasification plants; also active in the residential heating sector. References: Kedco Group1 This...

  4. High Temperature Membrane Working Group

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The High Temperature Membrane Working Group consists of government, industry, and university researchers interested in developing high temperature membranes for fuel cells.

  5. Martifer Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    search Name: Martifer Group Place: Oliveira de Frades, Portugal Zip: 3684-001 Sector: Biofuels, Solar, Wind energy Product: Portugal-based company divided across four core business...

  6. Traction Drive Systems Breakout Group

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    TRACTION DRIVE SYSTEM BREAKOUT GROUP EV Everywhere Workshop July 24, 2012 Breakout Session 1 - Discussion of Performance Targets and Barriers Comments on the Achievability of the...

  7. Groups | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    technologies. Groups Home Title Posts Members Subgroups Description Created sort icon Big Clean Data 2 We aim to bring together professionals who want to share ideas, knowledge...

  8. DAQO Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    An enterprise group whose industry field involves electric, environmental protection, science and technology and hotels, and is also setting up a polysilicon factory. References:...

  9. Tim Kuneli, Electronics Maintenance Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Tim Kuneli, Electronics Maintenance Group Print The recent ALS power supply failure was one of the most challenging projects that Electronics Engineer Technical Superintendent Tim...

  10. Acterra Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Product: Acterra Group provides consulting, project financing, services and support to energy, natural resource, and sustainability companies. Coordinates: 44.671312,...

  11. Marseglia Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    diversified infrastructure developer. The firm is active in the fields of energy, tourism and hotels and real estate. References: Marseglia Group1 This article is a stub....

  12. TUNL Nuclear Data Evaluation Group

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    TUNL Nuclear Data Evaluation Group As a part of the United States Nuclear Data Network and the international Nuclear Structure and Decay Data Evaluators' Network, the Nuclear Data...

  13. Unix File Groups at NERSC

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    disk and tape. At NERSC, groups are also used to control access to certain computational resources (e.g., batch queues, testbed systems, licensed software). Overview of Unix...

  14. Schaeffler Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    rolling bearings and linear products worldwide as well as a renowned supplier to the automotive industry. References: Schaeffler Group1 This article is a stub. You can help...

  15. Interagency Sustainability Working Group | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Facilities Sustainable Buildings & Campuses Interagency Sustainability Working Group Interagency Sustainability Working Group The Interagency Sustainability Working Group ...

  16. Extension of structure-reactivity correlations for the hydrogen abstraction reaction by bromine atom and comparison to chlorine atom and hydroxyl radical

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Poutsma, Marvin L.

    2015-12-14

    Recently we presented structure-reactivity correlations for the gas-phase ambient-temperature rate constants for hydrogen abstraction from sp3-hybridized carbon by chlorine atom and hydroxyl radical (Cl•/HO• + HCR3 → HCl/HOH + •CR3); the reaction enthalpy effect was represented by the independent variable ΔrH and the polar effect by the independent variables F and R, the Hammett constants for field/inductive and resonance effects. Both these reactions are predominantly exothermic and have early transition states. Here we present a parallel treatment for Br• whose reaction is significantly endothermic with a correspondingly late transition state. In spite of lower expectations because the available data basemore » is less extensive and much more scattered and because long temperature extrapolations are often required, the resulting least-squares fit (log k298,Br = –0.147 ΔrH –4.32 ΣF –4.28 ΣR –12.38 with r2 = 0.92) was modestly successful and useful for initial predictions. The coefficient of ΔrH was ~4-fold greater, indicative of the change from an early to a late transition state; meanwhile the sizable coefficients of ΣF and ΣR indicate the persistence of the polar effect. Although the mean unsigned deviation of 0.79 log k298 units is rather large, it must be considered in the context of a total span of over 15 log units in the data set. Lastly, the major outliers are briefly discussed.« less

  17. CO2 and CH4 Surface Flux, Soil Profile Concentrations, and Stable Isotope Composition, Barrow, Alaska, 2012-2013

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Curtis, J.B.; Vaughn, L.S.; Torn, M.S.; Conrad, M.S.; Chafe, O.; Bill, M.

    2015-12-31

    In August-October 2012 and June-October 2013, co-located measurements were made of surface CH4 and CO2 flux, soil pore space concentrations and stable isotope compositions of CH4 and CO2, and subsurface temperature and soil moisture. Measurements were made in intensive study site 1 areas A, B, and C, and from the site 0 and AB transects, from high-centered, flat-centered, and low-centered polygons, from the center, edge, and trough of each polygon.

  18. Site Office Contracting Officer E-mail address Ames Site Office Jackie York Jacquelyn.york@ch.doe.gov

    National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)

    Site Office Contracting Officer E-mail address Ames Site Office Jackie York Jacquelyn.york@ch.doe.gov Argonne Site Office Jacquelyn York Jacquelyn.york@ch.doe.gov Brookhaven Site Office Evelyn Landini Jennifer Hartmann elandini@bnl.gov jhartmann@bnl.gov Idaho Site Office Paul Allen allenph@id.doe.gov Kansas City Site Office Ralph Tennant rtennant@kcp.gov Lawrence Livermore Site Office Homer Williamson homer.williamson@nnsa.doe.gov Los Alamos Site Office Barbara Romero Robert M. Poole

  19. Federal Utility Partnership Working Group

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Federal Utility Partnership Working Group (FUPWG) establishes partnerships and facilitates communications among Federal agencies, utilities, and energy service companies. The group develops strategies to implement cost-effective energy efficiency and water conservation projects through utility incentive programs at Federal sites.

  20. Focus Group Training Work Group Meeting | Department of Energy

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Dates: July 10 - 11 The Focus Group Training Work Group met at the DOE National Training Center (NTC) inAlbuquerque, NM on Tuesday, July 10 and Wednesday, July 11, 2012. The meeting was chaired by the Work Group co-chairs, Karen Boardman,Pete Stafford (AFL-CIO BCTD/CPWR), and Julie Johnston (EFCOG). Attachment 1 is the Meeting Agenda; Attachment 2 is a list of meeting attendees; and Attachment3 is the proposed Radworker Training Reciprocity Program. Documents Available for Download PDF icon