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Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydroxide exchange membranes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
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1

Anion exchange membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An anion exchange membrane and fuel cell incorporating the anion exchange membrane are detailed in which proazaphosphatrane and azaphosphatrane cations are covalently bonded to a sulfonated fluoropolymer support along with anionic counterions. A positive charge is dispersed in the aforementioned cations which are buried in the support to reduce the cation-anion interactions and increase the mobility of hydroxide ions, for example, across the membrane. The anion exchange membrane has the ability to operate at high temperatures and in highly alkaline environments with high conductivity and low resistance.

Verkade, John G; Wadhwa, Kuldeep; Kong, Xueqian; Schmidt-Rohr, Klaus

2013-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

2

Affordable Hydrogen Fuel Cell Vehicles: Quaternary Phosphonium Based Hydroxide Exchange Membranes  

SciTech Connect

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: The University of Delaware is developing a new fuel cell membrane for vehicles that relies on cheaper and more abundant materials than those used in current fuel cells. Conventional fuel cells are very acidic, so they require acid-resistant metals like platinum to generate electricity. The University of Delaware is developing an alkaline fuel cell membrane that can operate in a non-acidic environment where cheaper materials like nickel and silver, instead of platinum, can be used. In addition to enabling the use of cheaper metals, the University of Delaware’s membrane is 500 times less expensive than other polymer membranes used in conventional fuel cells.

None

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

3

Anion Exchange Membranes for Fuel Cells  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Anion Exchange Membranes for Fuel Cells Andrew M. Herring CSM Bryan Pivovar NREL 1 Anion Exchange Membranes (Presented to Parallel Breakout Sessions) * Stability Challenges -...

4

Proton Exchange Membranes for Fuel Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proton exchange membrane, also known as polymer electrolyte membrane, fuel cells (PEMFCs) offer the promise of efficient conversion of chemical energy of fuel, such as hydrogen or methanol, into electricity with minimal pollution. Their widespread use to power zero-emission automobiles as part of a hydrogen economy can contribute to enhanced energy security and reduction in greenhouse gas emissions. However, the commercial viability of PEMFC technology is hindered by high cost associated with the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) and poor membrane durability under prolonged operation at elevated temperature. Membranes for automotive fuel cell applications need to perform well over a period comparable to the life of an automotive engine and under heavy load cycling including start-stop cycling under sub-freezing conditions. The combination of elevated temperature, changes in humidity levels, physical stresses and harsh chemical environment contribute to membrane degradation. Perfluorinated sulfonic acid (PFSA)-based membranes, such as Nafion®, have been the mainstay of PEMFC technology. Their limitations, in terms of cost and poor conductivity at low hydration, have led to continuing research into membranes that have good proton conductivity at elevated temperatures above 120 °C and under low humidity conditions. Such membranes have the potential to avoid catalyst poisoning, simplify fuel cell design and reduce the cost of fuel cells. Hydrocarbon-based membranes are being developed as alternatives to PFSA membranes, but concerns about chemical and mechanical stability and durability remain. Novel anhydrous membranes based on polymer gels infused with protic ionic liquids have also been recently proposed, but considerable fundamental research is needed to understand proton transport in novel membranes and evaluate durability under fuel cell operating conditions. In order to advance this promising technology, it is essential to rationally design the next generation of PEMs based on an understanding of chemistry, membrane morphology and proton transport obtained from experiment, theory and computer simulation.

Devanathan, Ramaswami

2010-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

5

Anion Exchange Membranes - Transport/Conductivity  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Fundamental understanding Fundamental understanding * Driving membranes towards applications Anion Exchange Membranes - Transport/Conductivity High Priority * A need for a standard/available AEM (similar to Nafion in PEMs) * Define standard experimental conditions and protocols * A need for much more fundamental studies in transport mechanisms and mechanical properties * A need to develop much more new AEMs with alternative chemistries (new cation and backbone chemistries) Fundamental Studies * TRANSPORT * Conductivity (pure OH - hard to measure) * Water content, λ * Diffusion coefficients, NMR * Drag coefficients * Transference * Solubility * Fundamental transport mechanisms for anion and water transport * Computational Modeling * MORPHOLOGY/CHEMISTRY * Vibrational Spectroscopy: FTIR, Raman

6

Polymeric Electrolytes and Catalysts for Anion-Exchange-Membrane ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Alternatively, our newly developed solid anion-exchange-membrane fuel cells ( AEMFCs) have several intrinsic advantages to PEMFCs including: 1) more ...

7

DOE Hydrogen Analysis Repository: Cost Analysis of Proton Exchange Membrane  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Cost Analysis of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Systems for Cost Analysis of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Project Summary Full Title: Cost Analysis of Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell Systems for Transportation Project ID: 196 Principal Investigator: Eric Carlson Keywords: Fuel cells, fuel cell vehicles (FCV), transportation, costs Purpose Assess the cost of an 80 kW direct hydrogen fuel cell system relative to the DOE 2005 target of $125/kW. The system includes the fuel cell stack and balance-of-plant (BOP) components for water, thermal, and fuel management, but not hydrogen storage. Performer Principal Investigator: Eric Carlson Organization: TIAX, LLC Address: 15 Acorn Park Cambridge, MA 02140-2328 Telephone: 617-498-5903 Email: carlson.e@tiaxllc.com Additional Performers: P. Kopf, TIAX, LLC; J. Sinha, TIAX, LLC; S. Sriramulu, TIAX, LLC

8

RADIATION STABILITY OF NAFION MEMBRANES USED FOR ISOTOPE SEPARATION BY PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE ELECTROLYSIS  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proton Exchange Membrane Electrolyzers have potential interest for use for hydrogen isotope separation from water. In order for PEME to be fully utilized, more information is needed on the stability of Nafion when exposed to radiation. This work examines Nafion 117 under varying exposure conditions, including dose rate, total dosage and atmospheric condition. Analytical tools, such as FT-IR, ion exchange capacity, DMA and TIC-TOC were used to characterize the exposed membranes. Analysis of the water from saturated membranes can provide important data on the stability of the membranes during radiation exposure. It was found that the dose rate of exposure plays an important role in membrane degradation. Potential mechanisms for membrane degradation include peroxide formation by free radicals.

Fox, E

2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

9

Membrane permeation process for dehydration of organic liquid mixtures using sulfonated ion-exchange polyalkene membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A membrane permeation process for dehydrating a mixture of organic liquids, such as alcohols or close boiling, heat sensitive mixtures. The process comprises causing a component of the mixture to selectively sorb into one side of sulfonated ion-exchange polyalkene (e.g., polyethylene) membranes and selectively diffuse or flow therethrough, and then desorbing the component into a gas or liquid phase on the other side of the membranes.

Cabasso, Israel (131 Buckingham Ave., Syracuse, NY 13210); Korngold, Emmanuel (P.O. Box 1025, Beer-Sheva 84110, IL)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

10

Model-based diagnosis for proton exchange membrane fuel cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) systems are more and more presented as a good alternative to current energy converters such as internal combustion engines. They suffer however from insufficient reliability and durability for stationary and ... Keywords: Diagnosis, Elman neural network, Flooding, PEM fuel cell, Water management

N. Yousfi Steiner; D. Candusso; D. Hissel; P. Moçoteguy

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

11

Macroscopic Modeling of the Proton-Exchange-Membrane Fuel-Cell...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Macroscopic Modeling of the Proton-Exchange-Membrane Fuel-Cell Catalyst Layer Title Macroscopic Modeling of the Proton-Exchange-Membrane Fuel-Cell Catalyst Layer Publication Type...

12

HYDROGEN ISOTOPE RECOVERY USING PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE ELECTROLYSIS OF WATER  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A critical component of tritium glovebox operations is the recovery of high value tritium from the water vapor in the glove box atmosphere. One proposed method to improve existing tritium recovery systems is to replace the disposable hot magnesium beds used to separate the hydrogen and oxygen in water with continuous use Proton Exchange Membrane Electrolyzers (PEMEs). This study examines radiation exposure to the membrane of a PEME and examines the sizing difference that would be needed if the electrolyzer were operated with a cathode water vapor feed instead of an anode liquid water feed.

Fox, E; Scott Greenway, S; Amy Ekechukwu, A

2007-08-27T23:59:59.000Z

13

Proton exchange membrane fuel cells with chromium nitride nanocrystals as electrocatalysts  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

S. Srinivasan, V. Antonucci, Fuel Cells 1, 133 (2001). 15 Y.Proton exchange membrane fuel cells with chromium nitridePolymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are energy

Zhong, Hexiang; Chen, Xiaobo; Zhang, Huamin; Wang, Meiri; Mao, Samuel S.

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

14

Analysis and modelling of membrane heat exchanger in HVAC energy recovery systems.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The performance of membrane heat exchangers for HVAC total energy recovery systems was evaluated through experimentation and detailed system modelling. The operating principle of the… (more)

Nasif, Mohammad Shakir

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

15

Theory of proton exchange membranes fuel cells and the testing of performance characteristics of polymer electrolyte membranes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells hold great promise as source of power. A hydrogen and oxygen PEM fuel is a simple fuel cell that can be theoretically characterized. The performance of a PEM fuel cell can be ...

Cruz-Gonzalez, Tizoc, 1982-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

16

Application of Neural Network approach for Proton Exchange Membrane fuel cell systems  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Artificial Intelligence (AI) techniques, particularly the Neural Networks (NNs), are recently having significant impact on power electronics. In a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell system, there is a strong relationship between the available ... Keywords: NNC, PEM fuel cells, dynamic modelling, neural network controllers, neural networks, output variables, performance modelling, power electronics, proton exchange membrane

Mustapha Hatti; Mustapha Tioursi

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

17

DEVELOPMENT OF NOVEL ELECTROCATALYSTS FOR PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE FUEL CELLS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Fuel cells are electrochemical devices that convert the available chemical free energy directly into electrical energy, without going through heat exchange process. Of all different types of fuel cells, the Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) is one of the most promising power sources for stand-alone utility and electric vehicle applications. Platinum (Pt) Catalyst is used for both fuel and air electrodes in PEMFCs. However, carbon monoxide (CO) contamination of H{sub 2} greatly affects electro catalysts used at the anode of PEMFCs and decreases cell performance. The irreversible poisoning of the anode can occur even in CO concentrations as low as few parts per million (ppm). In this work, we have synthesized several novel elctrocatalysts (Pt/C, Pt/Ru/C, Pt/Mo/C, Pt/Ir and Pt/Ru/Mo) for PEMFCs. These catalysts have been tested for CO tolerance in the H{sub 2}/air fuel cell, using CO concentrations in the H{sub 2} fuel that varies from 10 to 100 ppm. The performance of the electrodes was evaluated by determining the cell potential against current density. The effects of catalyst composition and electrode film preparation method on the performance of PEM fuel cell were also studied. It was found that at 70 C and 3.5 atm pressure at the cathode, Pt-alloy catalyst (10 wt% Pt/Ru/C, 20 wt% Pt/Mo/C) were more CO tolerant than the 20 wt% Pt/C catalyst alone. It was also observed that spraying method was better than the brushing technique for the preparation of electrode film.

Shamsuddin Ilias

2003-04-24T23:59:59.000Z

18

DEVELOPMENT OF NOVEL ELECTROCATALYSTS FOR PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE FUEL CELLS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) is one of the most promising power sources for stand-alone utility and electric vehicle applications. Platinum (Pt) Catalyst is used for both fuel and air electrodes in PEMFCs. However, carbon monoxide (CO) contamination of H{sub 2} greatly affects electro catalysts used at the anode of PEMFCs and decreases cell performance. The irreversible poisoning of the anode can occur even in CO concentrations as low as few parts per million (ppm). In this work, we have synthesized several novel elctrocatalysts (Pt/C, Pt/Ru/C, Pt/Mo/C, Pt/Ir and Pt/Ru/Mo) for PEMFCs. These catalysts have been tested for CO tolerance in the H{sub 2}/air fuel cell, using CO concentrations in the H{sub 2} fuel that varies from 10 to 100 ppm. The performance of the electrodes was evaluated by determining the cell potential against current density. The effects of catalyst composition and electrode film preparation method on the performance of PEM fuel cell were also studied. It was found that at 70 C and 3.5 atm pressure at the cathode, Pt-alloy catalyst (10 wt% Pt/Ru/C, 20 wt% Pt/Mo/C) were more CO tolerant than the 20 wt% Pt/C catalyst alone. It was also observed that spraying method was better than the brushing technique for the preparation of electrode film.

Shamsuddin Ilias

2002-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

19

DEVELOPMENT OF NOVEL ELECTROCATALYSTS FOR PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE FUEL CELLS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) is one of the most promising power sources for space and electric vehicle applications. Platinum (Pt) catalyst is used for both fuel and air electrodes in PEMFCs. The carbon monoxide (CO) contamination of H{sub 2} greatly affects electrocatalysts used at the anode of PEMFCs and decrease the cell performance. This irreversible poisoning of the anode can happen even in CO concentrations as low as few ppm, and therefore, require expensive scrubbing of the H{sub 2}-fuel to reduce the contaminant concentration to acceptable level. In order to commercialize this environmentally sound source of energy/power system, development of suitable CO-tolerant catalyst is needed. In this work, we have synthesized several novel electrocatalysts (Pt/C, Pt/Ru/C Pt/Mo/C, Pt/Ir and Pt/Ru/Mo) for PEMFCs. These catalysts have been tested for CO tolerance in the H{sub 2}/air fuel cell. The concentration of CO in the H{sub 2} fuel varied from 10 ppm to 100 ppm. The performance of the electrodes was evaluated by determining the cell potential against current density. The effect of temperature, catalyst compositions, and electrode film preparation methods on the performance of PEM fuel cell has also been studied. It was found that at 70 C and 3.5 atm pressure at the cathode, Pt-alloy catalysts (10 wt % Pt/Ru/C, 20 wt % Pt/Mo/C) were more CO-tolerant than 20 wt % Pt catalyst alone. It was also observed that spraying method is better for the preparation of electrode film than the brushing technique. Some of these results are summarized in this report.

Shamsuddin Ilias

2001-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

20

Influence of electrode stress on proton exchange membrane fuel cell performance : experimental characterization and power optimization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Compressive stress applied to the electrode area of a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell is known to significantly affect power output. In practice, electrode stress arises during operation due to the clamping force ...

Gallant, Betar M. (Betar Maurkah)

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydroxide exchange membranes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


21

Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells for Electrical Power Generation On-Board Commercial Airplanes  

Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

Deployed on a commercial airplane, proton exchange membrane fuel cells may offer emissions reductions, thermal efficiency gains, and enable locating the power near the point of use. This work seeks to

22

Comparison of platinum deposit methods on carbon aerogels used in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFC)  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Comparison of platinum deposit methods on carbon aerogels used in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel: carbon aerogel, platinum, Strong Electrostatic Adsorption, chemical reduction, UV With the rarefaction the diffusive phenomena limiting electrochemical performances. By contrast, carbon aerogels present

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

23

Low platinum loading electrospun electrodes for proton exchange membrane fuel cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An experimental study was performed to evaluate the utility of electrospun carbon nanofiber supports for sputtered platinum catalyst in proton exchange membrane fuel cells. The performance of the sputtered nanofiber supports ...

Singer, Simcha Lev

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

24

Interfacial Water-Transport Effects in Proton-Exchange Membranes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

1993, "The Contact Angle  between Water and the Surface of Desorption, and Transport of Water in  Polymer Electrolyte Vaporization?Exchange Model  for Water Sorption and Flux in 

Kienitz, Brian

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

25

NICKEL HYDROXIDES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Nickel hydroxides have been used as the active material in the positive electrodes of several alkaline batteries for over a century. These materials continue to attract a lot of attention because of the commercial importance of nickel-cadmium and nickel-metal hydride batteries. This review gives a brief overview of the structure of nickel hydroxide battery electrodes and a more detailed review of the solid state chemistry and electrochemistry of the electrode materials. Emphasis is on work done since 1989.

MCBREEN,J.

1997-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

26

Membrane-supported nonvolatile acidic electrolytes allow higher temperature operation of proton-exchange membrane fuel cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The feasibility of using nonvolatile molten and solid acidic electrolyte impregnated ion-exchange membranes in higher temperature proton-exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) to alleviate their water dependence is investigated. Higher temperature PEMFC operation reduces CO poisoning as well as passivation of the Pt electrocatalyst by other condensable species. Further, higher temperature operation could eventually allow direct use of low-temperature reformable fuels such as methanol in the PEMFC. The methodology proposed here involves supporting an appropriate acidic solid, melt, or solution of low volatility within the pores of Nafion{reg_sign} so as to enhance its protonic conductivity at higher temperatures and lower humidity levels. Preliminary experimental results reported here for a PEM fuel cell operating at temperatures of 110 to 120 C based on Nafion supported solutions of heteropolyacid indicate the feasibility of the technique.

Malhotra, S.; Datta, R. [Univ. of Iowa, Iowa City, IA (United States). Dept. of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

27

160 C PROTON EXCHANGE MEMBRANE (PEM) FUEL CELL SYSTEM DEVELOPMENT  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives of this program were: (a) to develop and demonstrate a new polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) system that operates up to 160 C temperatures and at ambient pressures for stationary power applications, and (b) to determine if the GTI-molded composite graphite bipolar separator plate could provide long term operational stability at 160 C or higher. There are many reasons that fuel cell research has been receiving much attention. Fuel cells represent environmentally friendly and efficient sources of electrical power generation that could use a variety of fuel sources. The Gas Technology Institute (GTI), formerly Institute of Gas Technology (IGT), is focused on distributed energy stationary power generation systems. Currently the preferred method for hydrogen production for stationary power systems is conversion of natural gas, which has a vast distribution system in place. However, in the conversion of natural gas into a hydrogen-rich fuel, traces of carbon monoxide are produced. Carbon monoxide present in the fuel gas will in time cumulatively poison, or passivate the active platinum catalysts used in the anodes of PEMFC's operating at temperatures of 60 to 80 C. Various fuel processors have incorporated systems to reduce the carbon monoxide to levels below 10 ppm, but these require additional catalytic section(s) with sensors and controls for effective carbon monoxide control. These CO cleanup systems must also function especially well during transient load operation where CO can spike 300% or more. One way to circumvent the carbon monoxide problem is to operate the fuel cell at a higher temperature where carbon monoxide cannot easily adsorb onto the catalyst and poison it. Commercially available polymer membranes such as Nafion{trademark} are not capable of operation at temperatures sufficiently high to prevent this. Hence this project investigated a new polymer membrane alternative to Nafion{trademark} that is capable of operation at temperatures up to 160 C.

L.G. Marianowski

2001-12-21T23:59:59.000Z

28

Proton exchange membrane fuel cells with chromium nitridenanocrystals as electrocatalysts  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are energy conversion devices that produce electricity from a supply of fuel, such as hydrogen. One of the major challenges in achieving efficient energy conversion is the development of cost-effective materials that can act as electrocatalysts for PEMFCs. In this letter, we demonstrate that, instead of conventional noble metals, such as platinum, chromium nitride nanocrystals of fcc structure exhibit attractive catalytic activity for PEMFCs. Device testing indicates good stability of nitride nanocrystals in low temperature fuel cell operational environment.

Zhong, Hexiang; Chen, Xiaobo; Zhang, Huamin; Wang, Meiri; Mao,Samuel S.

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

29

Efficient Numerical Methods for an Anisotropic, Nonisothermal, Two-Phase Transport Model of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We carry out model and numerical studies for a three-dimensional, anisotropic, nonisothermal, two-phase steady state transport model of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) in this paper. Besides fully addressing the conservation equations of mass, ... Keywords: Anisotropy, Combined finite element-upwind finite volume, Kirchhoff transformation, Newton's linearization, Nonisothermality, Proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC), Two-phase transport

Pengtao Sun

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

30

Through-the-electrode model of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell with independently measured parameters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A one dimensional model for a proton exchange membrane fuel cell was developed which makes use of independently measured parameters for predicting single cell performance. Optimization of catalyst layer formulation and properties are explored. Impact of temperature and cathode pressure upon system performance was investigated.

Weisbrod, K.R.; Grot, S.A.; Vanderborgh, N.E.

1995-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

31

Computational Modeling of Electrolyte/Cathode Interfaces in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

interface is simulated by a MD approach. Initial results show the interfacial water dipole orientation the contributions of acidic groups on the proton exchange membrane, further perturbs interfacial water structure developed C++ MD code. Related Publications K.-Y. Yeh, S. A. Wasileski, M. J. Janik. "Electronic structure

Bjørnstad, Ottar Nordal

32

Through-the-electrode model of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell with independently measured parameters  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A one dimensional model for a proton exchange membrane fuel cell was developed which makes use of independently measured parameters for predicting single cell performance. Optimization of catalyst layer formulation and properties are explored. Impact of temperature and cathode pressure upon system performance is investigated.

Weisbrod, K.R.; Grot, S.A.; Vandergborgh, N.E.

1995-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

33

Develpment of Higher Temperature Membrane and Electrode Assembly (MEA) for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Devices  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Our work will fucus on developing higher temperature MEAs based on SPEKK polymer blends. Thse MEAs will be designed to operatre at 120 degrees C Higher temperatures, up to 200 degrees C will also be explored. This project will develop Nafion-free MEAs using only SPEKK blends in both membrane and catalytic layers.

Susan Agro, Anthony DeCarmine, Shari Williams

2005-12-30T23:59:59.000Z

34

The use of fuel cell ion exchange membranes in electrolytic cells les membranes echangeuses d'ions des piles a combustibles  

SciTech Connect

Ion exchange membranes, previously used in fuel cells, were studied in order to examine their application to water electrolysis. State-of-the-art is reviewed from the bibliography, comparing this process with a classic one. Results show that only the cationic membranes are adequate for electrolytic cell use, being sufficiently resistant to heat and oxidation.

Damien, A.; Sohm, J.C.

1977-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

35

Mechanics of proton exchange membranes : time, temperature, and hydration dependence of the stress-strain behavior of persulfonated polytetrafluorethylene  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel cells are an important part of the future strategy for reducing dependence on fossil fuels as the world's supplies become more limited and greenhouse gasses become more of a concern. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells ...

Silberstein, Meredith N

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

36

SEPARATION OF PROTEINS BY ION EXCHANGE AND MEMBRANE CHROMATOGRAPHY: BUFFER COMPOSITION, INTERFERING IMPURITIES AND FOULING CONSIDERATIONS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Efficient separation of target protein from impurities is crucial in bioseparation for large scale production and purity of the target protein. Two separation process approaches were considered in this study. The first approach focused on identifying major impurity and optimization of solution properties for target protein purification. The second approach consisted of designing an adsorbent that interacted specifically with the target molecule. The first study included modification of protein solution properties (pH, ionic strength, buffer ions) in order to maximize lysozyme purification by a strong cation exchange resin. The interaction of phytic acid, a major impurity, present in transgenic rice extracts, that contributes to decreased lysozyme adsorption capacity on SP Sepharose was evaluated. The target protein was lysozyme, which is used in a purified form as a baby formula additive to reduce gastrointestinal tract infections. At constant ionic strength, lysozyme in pH 4.5 acetate buffer had a higher binding capacity and stronger binding strength than at pH 6.0. Lysozyme in sodium phosphate buffer of pH 6.0 exhibited lower adsorption capacity than in pH 6 Tris buffer. Binding capacity and strength were significantly affected by phytic acid in all studies buffers. The second study consisted of surface modification of microfiltration membranes for protein purification and separation and reduces fouling. This study describes adsorption and fouling of chemically modified microfiltration membranes with bovine serum albumin (BSA) and immunoglobulin G (IgG). Least fouling resulted with polyethylene glycol (PEG) membranes when BSA protein was used. Amine-functionalized membranes showed specific interaction with BSA. There was multi-layer deposition of IgG on amine-functionalized membrane. G3 membrane synthesized to selectively bind IgG seemed a noble option to separate IgG from a protein mixture.

Imam, Tahmina

2009-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

37

A Dynamic Two-Phase Flow Model of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A dynamic two phase flow model for proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells is presented. The two dimensional along-the-channel model includes the two phase flow of water (gaseous and liquid) in the porous diffusion layers and in the catalyst layers, as well as the transport of the species in the gas phase. Moreover, proton and water transport in the membrane and the oxygen reduction reaction in the cathodic catalyst layer is accounted for. The discretisation of the resulting flow equations is done by a mixed finite element approach. Based on this the transport equations for the species in each phase are discretised by a finite volume scheme. The coupled mixed finite element/finite volume approach gives the spatially resolved water and gas saturation and the species concentrations. In order to describe the charge transport in the fuel cell the Poisson equations for the electrons and protons are solved by using Galerkin finite element schemes.

Karsten Kühn; K. Kühn; Mario Ohlberger; Jürgen O. Schumacher; C. Ziegler; R. Klöfkorn; Karsten Kühn Ab; Mario Ohlberger Cd; Jürgen O. Schumacher A; Christoph Ziegler; Robert Klöfkorn C

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

38

Determining the quality and quantity of heat produced by proton exchange membrane fuel cells with application to air-cooled stacks for combined heat and power  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Determining the quality and quantity of heat produced by proton exchange membrane fuel cells Determining the quality and quantity of heat produced by proton exchange membrane fuel cells with application, the coolant is pumped to a heat recovery system. A water-to-air heat exchange system or water-to-water heat

Victoria, University of

39

SEPARATION OF PLUTONIUM HYDROXIDE FROM BISMUTH HYDROXIDE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An tmproved method is described for separating plutonium hydroxide from bismuth hydroxide. The end product of the bismuth phosphate processes for the separation amd concentration of plutonium is a inixture of bismuth hydroxide amd plutonium hydroxide. It has been found that these compounds can be advantageously separated by treatment with a reducing agent having a potential sufficient to reduce bismuth hydroxide to metalltc bisinuth but not sufficient to reduce the plutonium present. The resulting mixture of metallic bismuth and plutonium hydroxide can then be separated by treatment with a material which will dissolve plutonium hydroxide but not metallic bismuth. Sodiunn stannite is mentioned as a preferred reducing agent, and dilute nitric acid may be used as the separatory solvent.

Watt, G.W.

1958-08-19T23:59:59.000Z

40

Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells for Electrical Power Generation On-Board Commercial Airplanes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

SAND2011-3119 SAND2011-3119 Unlimited Release Printed May 2011 Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells for Electrical Power Generation On-Board Commercial Airplanes Joseph W. Pratt, Leonard E. Klebanoff, Karina Munoz-Ramos, Abbas A. Akhil, Dita B. Curgus, and Benjamin L. Schenkman Prepared by Sandia National Laboratories Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 and Livermore, California 94550 Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE -AC04-94AL85000. Approved for public release; further dissemination unlimited. Issued by Sandia National Laboratories, operated for the United States Department of Energy

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydroxide exchange membranes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


41

Short communication Electronic circuit model for proton exchange membrane fuel cells ?  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell is being investigated as an alternate power source for various applications like transportation and emergency power supplies. The paper presents a novel circuit model for a PEM fuel cell that can be used to design and analyze fuel cell power systems. The PSPICE-based model uses bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) and LC elements available in the PSPICE library with some modification. The model includes the phenomena like activation polarization, ohmic polarization, and mass transport effect present in a PEM fuel cell. The static and dynamic characteristics obtained through simulation are compared with experimental results obtained on a commercial fuel cell module. © 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Dachuan Yu; S. Yuvarajan

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

42

Proton exchange membrane fuel cells for electrical power generation on-board commercial airplanes.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Deployed on a commercial airplane, proton exchange membrane fuel cells may offer emissions reductions, thermal efficiency gains, and enable locating the power near the point of use. This work seeks to understand whether on-board fuel cell systems are technically feasible, and, if so, if they offer a performance advantage for the airplane as a whole. Through hardware analysis and thermodynamic and electrical simulation, we found that while adding a fuel cell system using today's technology for the PEM fuel cell and hydrogen storage is technically feasible, it will not likely give the airplane a performance benefit. However, when we re-did the analysis using DOE-target technology for the PEM fuel cell and hydrogen storage, we found that the fuel cell system would provide a performance benefit to the airplane (i.e., it can save the airplane some fuel), depending on the way it is configured.

Curgus, Dita Brigitte; Munoz-Ramos, Karina (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Pratt, Joseph William; Akhil, Abbas Ali (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Klebanoff, Leonard E.; Schenkman, Benjamin L. (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM)

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

43

Two-phase flow and transport in the air cathode of proton exchange membrane fuel cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Two-phase flow and transport of reactants and products in the air cathode of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells is studied analytically and numerically. Four regimes of water distribution and transport are classified by defining three threshold current densities and a maximum current density. They correspond to first appearance of liquid water at the membrane/cathode interface, extension of the gas-liquid two-phase zone to the cathode/channel interface, saturated moist air exiting the gas channel, and complete consumption of oxygen by the electrochemical reaction. When the cell operates above the first threshold current density, liquid water appears and a two-phase zone forms within the porous cathode. A two-phase, multi-component mixture model in conjunction with a finite-volume-based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique is applied to simulate the cathode operation in this regime. The model is able to handle the situation where a single-phase region co-exists with a two-phase zone in the air cathode. For the first time, the polarization curve as well as water and oxygen concentration distributions encompassing both single- and two-phase regimes of the air cathode are presented. Capillary action is found to be the dominant mechanism for water transport inside the two-phase zone. The liquid water saturation within the cathode is predicted to reach 6.3% at 1.4 A/cm{sup 2}.

WANG,Z.H.; WANG,C.Y.; CHEN,KEN S.

2000-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

44

A feasibility study of internal evaporative cooling for proton exchange membrane fuel cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An investigation was conducted to determine the feasibility of using the technique of ultrasonic nebulization of water into the anode gas stream for evaporative cooling of a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell. The basic concept of this form of internal evaporative cooling of the PEM fuel cell is to introduce finely atomized liquid water into the anode gas stream, so that the finely atomized liquid water adsorbs onto the anode and then moves to the cathode via electro-osmotic drag, where this water then evaporates into the relatively dry cathode gas stream, carrying with it the waste thermal energy generated within the fuel cell. The thermal and electrical performance of a 50 cm2 PEM fuel cell utilizing this technique was compared to the performance obtained with conventional water management. Both techniques were compared over a range of humidification chamber temperatures for both the anode and cathode gas streams so as to determine the robustness of the proposed method. The proposed method produced only meager levels of evaporative cooling (at best 2 watts, for which a minimum of 30 watts was required for adequate cooling), but the average cell voltage increased considerably (as much as a 10% gain), and the technique increased the fault tolerance of the fuel cell (the Nafion� membrane did not dry out even if cell temperature went well in excess of 70° C despite both anode and cathode humidification temperatures of 55° C). An interesting phenomena was also observed wherein the fuel cell voltage oscillated regularly with a period of tens of seconds, and that the amplitude of this oscillation corresponded inversely with the level of humidification received by the fuel cell.

Snyder, Loren E

2004-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

45

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Novel Regenerative Fuel Cells based on Anion Exchange Membranes - Katherine Ayers, Proton Onsite  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

l l R ti F l C ll b d A i E h M b f Novel Regenerative Fuel Cells based on Anion Exchange Membranes for Novel Regenerative Fuel Cells based on Anion Exchange Membranes for g g Affordable Renewable Energy Storage Affordable Renewable Energy Storage Affordable Renewable Energy Storage PI: Dr Katherine Ayers Proton Energy Systems kayers@protononsite com PI: Dr. Katherine Ayers, Proton Energy Systems, kayers@protononsite.com y , gy y , y @p A h Key Challenges and Progress Approach Key Challenges and Progress Approach Key Challenges and Progress pp N PGM t l t ( l t l ) Fuel Cell Durability: Non-PGM catalysts (electrolyzer) * Leverage Proton experience in large scale Fuel Cell Durability: o G cata ysts (e ect o y e ) * Leverage Proton experience in large scale Anode flooding and cathode * Translation from RDE to cell results electrolysis and regenerative fuel

46

Conceptual design report for a Direct Hydrogen Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell for transportation application  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This report presents the conceptual design for a Direct-Hydrogen-Fueled Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell System for transportation applications. The design is based on the initial selection of the Chrysler LH sedan as the target vehicle with a 50 kW (gross) PEM Fuel Cell Stack (FCS) as the primary power source, a battery-powered Load Leveling Unit (LLU) for surge power requirements, an on-board hydrogen storage subsystem containing high pressure gaseous storage, a Gas Management Subsystem (GMS) to manage the hydrogen and air supplies for the FCS, and electronic controllers to control the electrical system. The design process has been dedicated to the use of Design-to-Cost (DTC) principles. The Direct Hydrogen-Powered PEM Fuel Cell Stack Hybrid Vehicle (DPHV) system is designed to operate on the Federal Urban Driving Schedule (FUDS) and Hiway Cycles. These cycles have been used to evaluate the vehicle performance with regard to range and hydrogen usage. The major constraints for the DPHV vehicle are vehicle and battery weight, transparency of the power system and drive train to the user, equivalence of fuel and life cycle costs to conventional vehicles, and vehicle range. The energy and power requirements are derived by the capability of the DPHV system to achieve an acceleration from 0 to 60 MPH within 12 seconds, and the capability to achieve and maintain a speed of 55 MPH on a grade of seven percent. The conceptual design for the DPHV vehicle is shown in a figure. A detailed description of the Hydrogen Storage Subsystem is given in section 4. A detailed description of the FCS Subsystem and GMS is given in section 3. A detailed description of the LLU, selection of the LLU energy source, and the power controller designs is given in section 5.

NONE

1995-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

47

Electronically conducting proton exchange polymers as catalyst supports for proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Electrocatalysis of oxygen reduction, hydrogen oxidation, and methanol oxidation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A variety of supported catalysts were prepared by the chemical deposition of Pt and Pt-Ru particles on chemically prepared poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/poly(styrene-4-sulfonate) (PEDOT/PSS) and PEDOT/polyvinylsulfate (PVS) composites. The polymer particles were designed to provide a porous, proton-conducting and electron-conducting catalyst support for use in fuel cells. These polymer-supported catalysts were characterized by electron microscopy, impedance spectroscopy, cyclic voltammetry, and conductivity measurements. Their catalytic activities toward hydrogen and methanol oxidation and oxygen reduction were evaluated in proton exchange membrane fuel-cell-type gas diffusion electrodes. Activities for oxygen reduction comparable to that obtained with a commercial carbon-supported catalyst were observed, whereas those for hydrogen and methanol oxidation were significantly inferior, although still high for prototype catalysts.

Lefebvre, M.C.; Qi, Z.; Pickup, P.G. [Memorial Univ. of Newfoundland, St. John`s, Newfoundland (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry

1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

48

Investigating the effects of proton exchange membrane fuel cell conditions on carbon supported platinum electrocatalyst composition and performance  

SciTech Connect

Changes that carbon-supported platinum electrocatalysts undergo in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell environment were simulated by ex situ heat treatment of catalyst powder samples at 150 #2;C and 100% relative humidity. In order to study modifications that are introduced to chemistry, morphology, and performance of electrocatalysts, XPS, HREELS and three-electrode rotating disk electrode experiments were performed. Before heat treatment, graphitic content varied by 20% among samples with different types of carbon supports, with distinct differences between bulk and surface compositions within each sample. Following the aging protocol, the bulk and surface chemistry of the samples were similar, with graphite content increasing or remaining constant and Pt-carbide decreasing for all samples. From the correlation of changes in chemical composition and losses in performance of the electrocatalysts, we conclude that relative distribution of Pt particles on graphitic and amorphous carbon is as important for electrocatalytic activity as the absolute amount of graphitic carbon present

Patel, Anant; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Atanassov, Plamen; Colbow, Vesna; Dutta, Monica; Harvey, Davie; Wessel, Silvia

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

49

Investigating the effects of proton exchange membrane fuel cell conditions on carbon supported platinum electrocatalyst composition and performance  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Changes that carbon-supported platinum electrocatalysts undergo in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell environment were simulated by ex situ heat treatment of catalyst powder samples at 150 C and 100% relative humidity. In order to study modifications that are introduced to chemistry, morphology, and performance of electrocatalysts, XPS, HREELS and three-electrode rotating disk electrode experiments were performed. Before heat treatment, graphitic content varied by 20% among samples with different types of carbon supports, with distinct differences between bulk and surface compositions within each sample. Following the aging protocol, the bulk and surface chemistry of the samples were similar, with graphite content increasing or remaining constant and Pt-carbide decreasing for all samples. From the correlation of changes in chemical composition and losses in performance of the electrocatalysts, we conclude that relative distribution of Pt particles on graphitic and amorphous carbon is as important for electrocatalytic activity as the absolute amount of graphitic carbon present

A. Patel; K. Artyushkova; P. Atanassov; V. Colbow; M. Dutta; D. Harvey; S. Wessel

2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

50

Characterization of proton exchange membrane materials for fuel cells by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been used to explore the nanometer-scale structure of Nafion, the widely used fuel cell membrane, and its composites. We have shown that solid-state NMR can characterize chemical structure and composition, domain size and morphology, internuclear distances, molecular dynamics, etc. The newly-developed water channel model of Nafion has been confirmed, and important characteristic length-scales established. Nafion-based organic and inorganic composites with special properties have also been characterized and their structures elucidated. The morphology of Nafion varies with hydration level, and is reflected in the changes in surface-to-volume (S/V) ratio of the polymer obtained by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The S/V ratios of different Nafion models have been evaluated numerically. It has been found that only the water channel model gives the measured S/V ratios in the normal hydration range of a working fuel cell, while dispersed water molecules and polymer ribbons account for the structures at low and high hydration levels, respectively.

Kong, Zueqian

2010-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

51

Acid/base equilibria in clusters and their role in proton exchange membranes: Computational insight  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

We describe molecular orbital theory and ab initio molecular dynamics studies of acid/base equilibria of clusters AH:(H2O)n ? A-:H+(H2O)n in low hydration regime (n=1-4), where AH is a model of perfluorinated sulfonic acids, RSO3H, encountered in polymeric electrolyte membranes of fuel cells. Free energy calculations on the neutral and ion pair structures for n=3 indicate that the two configurations are close in energy and are accessible in the fluctuation dynamics of proton transport. For n=1,2 the only relevant configuration is the neutral form. This was verified through ab initio metadynamics simulations. These findings suggest that bases are directly involved in the proton transport at low hydration levels. In addition, the gas phase proton affinity of the model sulfonic acid RSO3H was found to be comparable to the proton affinity of water. Thus, protonated acids can also play a role in proton transport under low hydration conditions and under high concentration of protons. This work was supported by the Division of Chemical Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, US Department of Energy (DOE under Contract DE-AC05-76RL)1830. Computations were performed on computers of the Molecular Interactions and Transformations (MI&T) group and MSCF facility of EMSL, sponsored by US DOE and OBER located at PNNL. This work was benefited from resource of the National Energy Research Scientific Computing Centre, supported by the Office of Science of the US DOE, under Contract No. DE-AC03-76SF00098.

Glezakou, Vanda A.; Dupuis, Michel; Mundy, Christopher J.

2007-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

52

Isothermal Ice-Crystallization Kinetics in the Gas-Diffusion Layer of a Proton-Exchange-Membrane Fuel Cell  

SciTech Connect

Nucleation and growth of ice in the fibrous gas-diffusion layer (GDL) of a proton-exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) are investigated using isothermal differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Isothermal crystallization rates and pseudo-steady-state nucleation rates are obtained as a function of subcooling from heat-flow and induction-time measurements. Kinetics of ice nucleation and growth are studied at two polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) loadings (0 and 10 wt %) in a commercial GDL for temperatures between 240 and 273 K. A nonlinear icecrystallization rate expression is developed using Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) theory, in which the heat-transfer-limited growth rate is determined from the moving-boundary Stefan problem. Induction times follow a Poisson distribution and increase upon addition of PTFE, indicating that nucleation occurs more slowly on a hydrophobic fiber than on a hydrophilic fiber. The determined nucleation rates and induction times follow expected trends from classical nucleation theory. A validated rate expression is now available for predicting icecrystallization kinetics in GDLs.

Dursch, Thomas J.; Ciontea, Monica A.; Radke, Clayton J.; Weber, Adam Z.

2011-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

53

The design and evaluation of a water delivery system for evaporative cooling of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

An investigation was performed to demonstrate system design for the delivery of water required for evaporative cooling of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The water delivery system uses spray nozzles capable of injecting water directly and uniformly to the nickel metal foam flow-field (element for distributing the reactant gases over the surface of the electrodes) on the anode side from which water can migrate to the cathode side of the cell via electroosmotic drag. For an effective overall cooling, water distribution over the surface of the nickel foam has to be uniform to avoid creation of hotspots within the cell. A prototype PEMFC structure was constructed modeled after a 35 kW electrical output PEMFC stack. Water was sprayed on the nickel metal foam flow-field using two types of nozzle spray, giving conical fog type flow and flat fan type flow. A detailed investigation of the distribution pattern of water over the surface of the nickel metal flow field was conducted. The motive behind the investigation was to determine if design parameters such as type of water flow from nozzles, vertical location of the water nozzles above the flowfield, area of the nozzles, or operating variables such as reactant gas flow had any effect on water distribution over the surface of the Ni-metal foam flow field. It was found that the design parameters (types of flow, area and location of the nozzle) had a direct impact on the distribution of water in the nickel metal foam. However, the operating variable, reactant gas flow, showed no effect on the water distribution pattern in the Ni-foam.

Al-Asad, Dawood Khaled Abdullah

2006-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

54

Membrane Based Heat Exchanger.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? Reduction of the energy used to acclimatise buildings is a huge challenge simultaneously with the implementation of air tight low energy buildings. In residential… (more)

Aarnes, Sofie Marie

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

55

Method of fabricating electrode catalyst layers with directionally oriented carbon support for proton exchange membrane fuel cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A membrane electrode assembly (MEA) of the invention comprises an anode and a cathode and a proton conductive membrane therebetween, the anode and the cathode each comprising a patterned sheet of longitudinally aligned transition metal-containing carbon nanotubes, wherein the carbon nanotubes are in contact with and are aligned generally perpendicular to the membrane, wherein a catalytically active transition metal is incorporated throughout the nanotubes.

Liu, Di-Jia (Naperville, IL); Yang, Junbing (Bolingbrook, IL)

2012-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

56

Platinum-Alloy Cathode Catalyst Degradation in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells: Nanometer-Scale Compositional and Morphological Changes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrochemical measurements showed an ?75% Pt surface area loss and an ?40% specific activity loss for a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) cathode with acid-treated “Pt[subscript 3]Co ” catalyst particles in a H[subscript ...

Chen, Shuo

57

Method of fabricating electrode catalyst layers with directionally oriented carbon support for proton exchange membrane fuel cell  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of making a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) having an anode and a cathode and a proton conductive membrane there between. A bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated in the nanotubes forms at least one portion of the MEA and is in contact with the membrane. A combination selected from one or more of a hydrocarbon and an organometallic compound containing an catalytically active transition metal and a nitrogen containing compound and an inert gas and a reducing gas is introduced into a first reaction zone maintained at a first reaction temperature for a time sufficient to vaporize material therein. The vaporized material is transmitted to a second reaction zone maintained at a second reaction temperature for a time sufficient to grow longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes. The nanotubes are in contact with a portion of the MEA at production or being positioned in contact thereafter. Methods of forming a PEMFC are also disclosed.

Liu, Di-Jia (Naperville, IL); Yang, Junbing (Willow brook, IL)

2010-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

58

Final report on LDRD project : elucidating performance of proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells via computational modeling with experimental discovery and validation.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

In this report, we document the accomplishments in our Laboratory Directed Research and Development project in which we employed a technical approach of combining experiments with computational modeling and analyses to elucidate the performance of hydrogen-fed proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). In the first part of this report, we document our focused efforts on understanding water transport in and removal from a hydrogen-fed PEMFC. Using a transparent cell, we directly visualized the evolution and growth of liquid-water droplets at the gas diffusion layer (GDL)/gas flow channel (GFC) interface. We further carried out a detailed experimental study to observe, via direct visualization, the formation, growth, and instability of water droplets at the GDL/GFC interface using a specially-designed apparatus, which simulates the cathode operation of a PEMFC. We developed a simplified model, based on our experimental observation and data, for predicting the onset of water-droplet instability at the GDL/GFC interface. Using a state-of-the-art neutron imaging instrument available at NIST (National Institute of Standard and Technology), we probed liquid-water distribution inside an operating PEMFC under a variety of operating conditions and investigated effects of evaporation due to local heating by waste heat on water removal. Moreover, we developed computational models for analyzing the effects of micro-porous layer on net water transport across the membrane and GDL anisotropy on the temperature and water distributions in the cathode of a PEMFC. We further developed a two-phase model based on the multiphase mixture formulation for predicting the liquid saturation, pressure drop, and flow maldistribution across the PEMFC cathode channels. In the second part of this report, we document our efforts on modeling the electrochemical performance of PEMFCs. We developed a constitutive model for predicting proton conductivity in polymer electrolyte membranes and compared model prediction with experimental data obtained in our laboratory and from literature. Moreover, we developed a one-dimensional analytical model for predicting electrochemical performance of an idealized PEMFC with small surface over-potentials. Furthermore, we developed a multi-dimensional computer model, which is based on the finite-element method and a fully-coupled implicit solution scheme via Newton's technique, for simulating the performance of PEMFCs. We demonstrated utility of our finite-element model by comparing the computed current density distribution and overall polarization with those measured using a segmented cell. In the last part of this report, we document an exploratory experimental study on MEA (membrane electrode assembly) degradation.

Wang, Chao Yang (Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA); Pasaogullari, Ugur (Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA); Noble, David R.; Siegel, Nathan P.; Hickner, Michael A.; Chen, Ken Shuang

2006-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

59

Research and development of proton-exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell system for transportation applications. Phase I final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Objective during Phase I was to develop a methanol-fueled 10-kW fuel cell power source and evaluate its feasibility for transportation applications. This report documents research on component (fuel cell stack, fuel processor, power source ancillaries and system sensors) development and the 10-kW power source system integration and test. The conceptual design study for a PEM fuel cell powered vehicle was documented in an earlier report (DOE/CH/10435-01) and is summarized herein. Major achievements in the program include development of advanced membrane and thin-film low Pt-loaded electrode assemblies that in reference cell testing with reformate-air reactants yielded performance exceeding the program target (0.7 V at 1000 amps/ft{sup 2}); identification of oxidation catalysts and operating conditions that routinely result in very low CO levels ({le} 10 ppm) in the fuel processor reformate, thus avoiding degradation of the fuel cell stack performance; and successful integrated operation of a 10-kW fuel cell stack on reformate from the fuel processor.

NONE

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

60

Unveiling N-Protonation and Anion-Binding Effects on Fe/N/C Catalysts for O2 Reduction in Proton-Exchange-Membrane Fuel Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The high cost of proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells would be considerably reduced if platinum-based catalysts were replaced by iron-based substitutes, which have recently demonstrated comparable activity for oxygen reduction but whose cause of activity decay in acidic medium has been elusive. Here, we reveal that the activity of Fe/N/C catalysts prepared through a pyrolysis in NH{sub 3} is mostly imparted by acid-resistant FeN{sub 4} sites whose turnover frequency for the O{sub 2} reduction can be regulated by fine chemical changes of the catalyst surface. We show that surface N-groups protonate at pH 1 and subsequently bind anions. This results in decreased activity for the O{sub 2} reduction. The anions can be removed chemically or thermally, which restores the activity of acid-resistant FeN{sub 4} sites. These results are interpreted as an increased turnover frequency of FeN{sub 4} sites when specific surface N-groups protonate. These unprecedented findings provide a new perspective for stabilizing the most active Fe/N/C catalysts known to date.

J Herranz; F Jaouen; M Lefevre; U Kramm; E Proietti; J Dodelet; P Bogdanoff; S Fiechter; I Abs-Wurbach; et al.

2011-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydroxide exchange membranes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
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61

Direct-hydrogen-fueled proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) fuel cell system for transportation applications. Quarterly technical progress report Number 1, July 1--September 30, 1994  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This is the first Technical Progress Report for DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-94CE50389 awarded to Ford Motor Company on July 1, 1994. The overall objective of this contract is to advance the Proton-Exchange-Membrane (PEM) fuel cell technology for automotive applications. Specifically, the objectives resulting from this contract are to: (1) develop and demonstrate on a laboratory propulsion system within 2-1/2 years a fully functional PEM Fuel Cell Power System (including fuel cell peripherals, peak power augmentation and controls), this propulsion system will achieve, or will be shown to have the growth potential to achieve, the weights, volumes, and production costs which are competitive with those same attributes of equivalently performing internal combustion engine propulsion systems; (2) select and demonstrate a baseline onboard hydrogen storage method with acceptable weight, volume, cost, and safety features and analyze future alternatives; (3) analyze the hydrogen infrastructure components to ensure that hydrogen can be safely supplied to vehicles at geographically widespread convenient sites and at prices which are less than current gasoline prices per vehicle-mile; (4) identify any future R and D needs for a fully integrated vehicle and for achieving the system cost and performance goals.

Oei, G.

1994-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

62

Direct-hydrogen-fueled proton-exchange-membrane (PEM) fuel cell system for transportation applications. Quarterly technical progress report No. 4, April 1, 1995--June 30, 1995  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This is the fourth Technical Progress Report for DOE Contract No. DE-AC02-94CE50389 awarded to Ford Motor Company on July 1, 1994. The overall objective of this contract is to advance the Proton-Exchange-Membrane (PEM) fuel cell technology for automotive applications. Specifically, the objectives resulting from this contract are to: (1) Develop and demonstrate on a laboratory propulsion system within 2-1/2 years a fully functional PEM Fuel Cell Power System (including fuel cell peripherals, peak power augmentation and controls). This propulsion system will achieve, or will be shown to have the growth potential to achieve, the weights, volumes, and production costs which are competitive with those same attributes of equivalently performing internal combustion engine propulsion systems; (2) Select and demonstrate a baseline onboard hydrogen storage method with acceptable weight, volume, cost, and safety features and analyze future alternatives; and (3) Analyze the hydrogen infrastructure components to ensure that hydrogen can be safely supplied to vehicles at geographically widespread convenient sites and at prices which are less than current gasoline prices per vehicle-mile; (4) Identify any future R&D needs for a fully integrated vehicle and for achieving the system cost and performance goals.

Oei, D.

1995-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

63

Composite fuel cell membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A bilayer or trilayer composite ion exchange membrane is described suitable for use in a fuel cell. The composite membrane has a high equivalent weight thick layer in order to provide sufficient strength and low equivalent weight surface layers for improved electrical performance in a fuel cell. In use, the composite membrane is provided with electrode surface layers. The composite membrane can be composed of a sulfonic fluoropolymer in both core and surface layers.

Plowman, K.R.; Rehg, T.J.; Davis, L.W.; Carl, W.P.; Cisar, A.J.; Eastland, C.S.

1997-08-05T23:59:59.000Z

64

Direct-hydrogen-fueled proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell system for transportation applications: Conceptual vehicle design report pure fuel cell powertrain vehicle  

SciTech Connect

In partial fulfillment of the Department of Energy (DOE) Contract No. DE-AC02-94CE50389, {open_quotes}Direct-Hydrogen-Fueled Proton-Exchange-Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell for Transportation Applications{close_quotes}, this preliminary report addresses the conceptual design and packaging of a fuel cell-only powered vehicle. Three classes of vehicles are considered in this design and packaging exercise, the Aspire representing the small vehicle class, the Taurus or Aluminum Intensive Vehicle (AIV) Sable representing the mid-size vehicle and the E-150 Econoline representing the van-size class. A fuel cell system spreadsheet model and Ford`s Corporate Vehicle Simulation Program (CVSP) were utilized to determine the size and the weight of the fuel cell required to power a particular size vehicle. The fuel cell power system must meet the required performance criteria for each vehicle. In this vehicle design and packaging exercise, the following assumptions were made: fuel cell power system density of 0.33 kW/kg and 0.33 kg/liter, platinum catalyst loading less than or equal to 0.25 mg/cm{sup 2} total and hydrogen tanks containing gaseous hydrogen under 340 atm (5000 psia) pressure. The fuel cell power system includes gas conditioning, thermal management, humidity control, and blowers or compressors, where appropriate. This conceptual design of a fuel cell-only powered vehicle will help in the determination of the propulsion system requirements for a vehicle powered by a PEMFC engine in lieu of the internal combustion (IC) engine. Only basic performance level requirements are considered for the three classes of vehicles in this report. Each vehicle will contain one or more hydrogen storage tanks and hydrogen fuel for 560 km (350 mi) driving range. Under these circumstances, the packaging of a fuel cell-only powered vehicle is increasingly difficult as the vehicle size diminishes.

Oei, D.; Kinnelly, A.; Sims, R.; Sulek, M.; Wernette, D.

1997-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

65

Associative detachment of rubidium hydroxide  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We performed calculations of the optimized structure, harmonic vibrational frequencies and dissociation energies of RbOH and its anion, and investigate the interactions between Rb and OH$^-$ leading to possible associative detachment pathways. The electron affinity of RbOH was computed to be 0.2890 eV, with a bond energy of Rb+OH$^-$ half that of Rb+OH. To determine other possible charge loss pathways, the Rb+OH and Rb+OH$^-$ dissociation curves were computed using couple cluster methods along all possible collisional angles. An adiabatic curve crossing between the neutral and charged molecule was found at the inner wall of the molecular potential curve for linear geometries. Associative detachment rates were estimated using the Langevin ion capture cross-section for hydroxide. We find for $v\\ge 2$ an associative detachment rate of $>2\\times 10^{-9}$ cm$^3$s$^{-1}$, while for $v=0$ and 1 no appreciable rate exists. This strong dependence on vibrational level suggests the ability to control the associative det...

Byrd, Jason N; Montgomery, John A; Côté, Robin

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

66

Membrane module assembly  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A membrane module assembly is described which is adapted to provide a flow path for the incoming feed stream that forces it into prolonged heat-exchanging contact with a heating or cooling mechanism. Membrane separation processes employing the module assembly are also disclosed. The assembly is particularly useful for gas separation or pervaporation. 2 figures.

Kaschemekat, J.

1994-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

67

Method of manufacturing positive nickel hydroxide electrodes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of manufacturing a positive nickel hydroxide electrode is discussed. A highly porous core structure of organic material having a fibrous or reticular texture is uniformly coated with nickel powder and then subjected to a thermal treatment which provides sintering of the powder coating and removal of the organic core material. A consolidated, porous nickel support structure is thus produced which has substantially the same texture and porosity as the initial core structure. To provide the positive electrode including the active mass, nickel hydroxide is deposited in the pores of the nickel support structure.

Gutjahr, M.A.; Schmid, R.; Beccu, K.D.

1975-12-16T23:59:59.000Z

68

Structural transformation of nickel hydroxide films during anodic oxidation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The transformation of anodically formed nickel hydroxide/oxy-hydroxide electrodes has been investigated. A mechanism is proposed for the anodic oxidation reaction, in which the reaction interface between the reduced and oxidized phases of the electrode evolves in a nodular topography that leads to inefficient utilization of the active electrode material. In the proposed nodular transformation model for the anodic oxidation reaction, nickel hydroxide is oxidized to nickel oxy-hydroxide in the region near the metal substrate. Since the nickel oxy-hydroxide is considerably more conductive than the surrounding nickel hydroxide, as further oxidation occurs, nodular features grow rapidly to the film/electrolyte interface. Upon emerging at the electrolyte interface, the reaction boundary between the nickel hydroxide and oxy-hydroxide phases spreads laterally across the film/electrolyte interface, creating an overlayer of nickel oxy-hydroxide and trapping uncharged regions of nickel hydroxide within the film. The nickel oxy-hydroxide overlayer surface facilitates the oxygen evolution side reaction. Scanning tunneling microscopy of the electrode in its charged state revealed evidence of 80 {endash} 100 Angstrom nickel oxy-hydroxide nodules in the nickel hydroxide film. In situ spectroscopic ellipsometer measurements of films held at various constant potentials agree quantitatively with optical models appropriate to the nodular growth and subsequent overgrowth of the nickel oxy-hydroxide phase. A two-dimensional, numerical finite difference model was developed to simulate the current distribution along the phase boundary between the charged and uncharged material. The model was used to explore the effects of the physical parameters that govern the electrode behavior. The ratio of the conductivities of the nickel hydroxide and oxy-hydroxide phases was found to be the dominant parameter in the system.

Crocker, R.W.; Muller, R.H.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

69

Secondary Transport Phenomena in Ceramic Membranes under ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, Dense ceramic membranes are used at high temperatures as ... Stability and Oxygen Exchange Kinetics of Oxide Hetero-Junction Electrodes.

70

Effect of scale up, stacking, self humidification and use of lightweight components on the performance of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The effects of various design and operating variables on the performances of a PEM fuel cell were investigated. Performance was evaluated in terms of the polarization curves (cell potential versus current density plots). The specific effects that were investigated were : (i) effects of scale up from 5 cm 2 to 50 cm2 single cells and stacking 50 cm2- single to multicell (quad cells) stack; (ii) the performance of self humidified single and multicell stack PEMFCs with various electrode structures, platinum loadings and membranes; and (iii) light weight bipolar plates in PEMFCs. Several types and two sizes of PEMFCs were constructed and evaluated. Most membrane and electrodes assemblies (MEAs) were fabricated in-house but some specialized MEAs were provided by an outside source. Polarization plots were made for each PEMFC and the data was correlated using the five parameter empirical equation.

Tran, Doanh Thuc

1995-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

71

Manufacturing and Performance Assessment of Stamped, Laser Welded, and Nitrided FeCrV Stainless Steel Bipolar Plates for Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells  

SciTech Connect

A manufacturing and single-cell fuel cell performance study of stamped, laser welded, and gas nitrided ferritic stainless steel foils in an advanced automotive bipolar plate assembly design was performed. Two developmental foil compositions were studied: Fee20Cre4V and Fee23Cre4V wt.%. Foils 0.1 mm thick were stamped and then laser welded together to create single bipolar plate assemblies with cooling channels. The plates were then surface treated by pre-oxidation and nitridation in N2e4H2 based gas mixtures using either a conventional furnace or a short-cycle quartz lamp infrared heating system. Single-cell fuel cell testing was performed at 80 C for 500 h at 0.3 A/cm2 using 100% humidification and a 100%/40% humidification cycle that stresses the membrane and enhances release of the fluoride ion and promotes a more corrosive environment for the bipolar plates. Periodic high frequency resistance potential-current scans during the 500 h fuel cell test and posttest analysis of the membrane indicated no resistance increase of the plates and only trace levels of metal ion contamination.

Brady, Michael P [ORNL; Abdelhamid, Mahmoud [General Motors Technical Center; Dadheech, G [General Motors Technical Center; Bradley, J [General Motors Technical Center; Toops, Todd J [ORNL; Meyer III, Harry M [ORNL; Tortorelli, Peter F [ORNL

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

72

Effects of Tungsten Oxide Addition on the Electrochemical Performance of Nanoscale Tantalum Oxide-Based Electrocatalysts for Proton Exchange Membrane PEM Fuel Cells  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present study, the properties of a series of non-platinum based nanoscale tantalum oxide/tungsten oxide-carbon composite catalysts was investigated for potential use in catalyzing the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) on the cathode side of a PEM fuel cell membrane electrode assembly. Electrochemical performance was measured using a half-cell test set up with a rotating disc electrode and compared with a commercial platinum-on-carbon (Pt/C) catalyst. Overall, all of the oxide-based composite catalysts exhibit high ORR on-set potentials, comparable to that of the baseline Pt/C catalyst. The addition of tungsten oxide as a dopant to tantalum oxide greatly improved mass specific current density. Maximum performance was achieved with a catalyst containing 32 mol% of tungsten oxide, which exhibited a mass specific current density ~8% that of the Pt/C catalyst at 0.6 V vs. the normal hydrogen electrode (NHE) and ~35% that of the Pt/C catalyst at 0.2 V vs. NHE. Results from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis indicated that the tungsten cations in the composite catalysts exist in the +6 oxidation state, while the tantalum displays an average valence of +5, suggesting that the addition of tungsten likely creates an oxygen excess in the tantalum oxide structure that influences its oxygen absorption kinetics. When the 32mol% tungsten doped catalyst loading on the working electrode was increased to five times that of the original loading (which was equivalent to that of the baseline Pt/C catalyst), the area specific current density improved four fold, achieving an area specific current density ~35% that of the Pt/C catalyst at 0.6 V vs. NHE.

Oh, Tak Keun; Kim, Jin Yong; Shin, Yongsoon; Engelhard, Mark H.; Weil, K. Scott

2011-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

73

Association Exchange  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The AOCS Association Exchange program goal is to create collaborative partnerships and long term business relations with related organizations. Association Exchange Membership Information achievement application award Awards distinguished division

74

Information Exchange  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

To encourage the exchange of information, NIST holds many workshops, seminars, tours and other events available to the public. ...

2012-08-29T23:59:59.000Z

75

Homogeneous Precipitation of Nickel Hydroxide Powders  

SciTech Connect

Precipitation and characterization of nickel hydroxide powders were investigated. A comprehensive precipitation model incorporating the metal ion hydrolysis, complexation and precipitation reactions was developed for the production of the powders with urea precipitation method. Model predictions on Ni{sup 2+} precipitation rate were confirmed with precipitation experiments carried out at 90 C. Experimental data and model predictions were in remarkable agreement. Uncertainty in the solubility product data of nickel hydroxides was found to be the large contributor to the error. There were demonstrable compositional variations across the particle cross-sections and the growth mechanism was determined to be the aggregation of primary crystallites. This implied that there is a change in the intercalate chemistry of the primary crystallites with digestion time. Predicted changes in the concentrations of simple and complex ions in the solution support the proposed mechanism. The comprehensive set of hydrolysis reactions used in the model described above allows the investigation of other systems provided that accurate reaction constants are available. the fact that transition metal ions like Ni{sup 2+} form strong complexes with ammonia presents a challenge in the full recovery of the Ni{sup 2+}. On the other hand, presence of Al{sup 3+} facilitates the complete precipitation of Ni{sup 2+} in about 3 hours of digestion. A challenge in their predictive modeling studies had been the fact that simultaneous incorporation of more than one metal ion necessitates a different approach than just using the equilibrium constants of hydrolysis, complexation and precipitation reactions. Another limitation of using equilibrium constants is that the nucleation stage of digestion, which is controlled mainly by kinetics, is not fully justified. A new program released by IBM Almaden Research Center (Chemical Kinetics Simulator{trademark}, Version 1.01) lets the user change the order of kinetic components of a reaction which was set to stoichiometric constant with which the species appear in the reaction in KINSIM by default. For instance, in the case of LDH precipitation, the new program allows to change the order of species in the reactions associated with Al{sup 3+} and let the Ni{sup 2+} reactions take over. This could be carried on iteratively until a good fit between the experimental data and the predictions were observed. However for such studies availability of accurate equilibrium constants (especially for the solubility products for the solid phase) is a prerequisite.

Bora Mavis

2003-12-12T23:59:59.000Z

76

Hysteresis During Cycling of Nickel Hydroxide Active Material  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hysteresis During Cycling of Nickel Hydroxide Active Material Hysteresis During Cycling of Nickel Hydroxide Active Material Title Hysteresis During Cycling of Nickel Hydroxide Active Material Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2001 Authors Srinivasan, Venkat, John W. Weidner, and John S. Newman Journal Electrochemical Society Volume 148 Start Page A969 Issue 9 Pagination A969-A980 Date Published 04/2001 Abstract The nickel hydroxide electrode is known to exhibit a stable hysteresis loop, with the potential on charge being higher than that on discharge at every state-of-charge ~SOC!.What we show here is that this loop created during a complete charge and discharge ~i.e., boundary curves! is not sufficient to define the state of the system. Rather, internal paths within the boundary curves ~i.e., scanning

77

Membrane stabilizer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A device is provided for stabilizing a flexible membrane secured within a frame, wherein a plurality of elongated arms are disposed radially from a central hub which penetrates the membrane, said arms imposing alternately against opposite sides of the membrane, thus warping and tensioning the membrane into a condition of improved stability. The membrane may be an opaque or translucent sheet or other material. 10 figs.

Mingenbach, W.A.

1988-02-09T23:59:59.000Z

78

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: Alkaline Membrane Fuel Cell Workshop  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Renewable Energy Laboratory Anion Exchange Membranes for Fuel Cells, Prof. Andrew Herring, Colorado School of Mines Electrocatalysis in Alkaline Electrolytes, Prof. Sanjeev...

79

Poly(phenylene)-based Anion Exchange Membranes  

subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration. SAND # 2011-6932P TECHNOLOGY SUMMARY

80

Acidic Ion Exchange Membrane - Energy Innovation Portal  

Technology Marketing Summary In this invention we report the synthesis of a copolymer of vinyl phosphonic acid (VPA) and vinyl zirconium phosphorous (VZP) acid has ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydroxide exchange membranes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


81

Exchangeable equilibria  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The main contribution of this thesis is a new solution concept for symmetric games (of complete information in strategic form), the exchangeable equilibrium. This is an intermediate notion between symmetric Nash and symmetric ...

Stein, Noah D. (Noah Daniel)

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

82

HEAT EXCHANGER  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat exchanger is designed for use in the transfer of heat between a radioactive fiuid and a non-radioactive fiuid. The exchanger employs a removable section containing the non-hazardous fluid extending into the section designed to contain the radioactive fluid. The removable section is provided with a construction to cancel out thermal stresses. The stationary section is pressurized to prevent leakage of the radioactive fiuid and to maintain a safe, desirable level for this fiuid. (AEC)

Fox, T.H. III; Richey, T. Jr.; Winders, G.R.

1962-10-23T23:59:59.000Z

83

Membrane Extraction for Detoxification of Biomass Hydrolysates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Membrane extraction was used for the removal of sulfuric acid, acetic acid, 5-hydroxymethyl furfural and furfural from corn stover hydrolyzed with dilute sulfuric acid. Microporous polypropylene hollow fiber membranes were used. The organic extractant consisted of 15% Alamine 336 in: octanol, a 50:50 mixture of oleyl alcohol:octanol or oleyl alcohol. Rapid removal of sulfuric acid, 5-hydroxymethyl and furfural was observed. The rate of acetic acid removal decreased as the pH of the hydrolysate increased. Regeneration of the organic extractant was achieved by back extraction into an aqueous phase containing NaOH and ethanol. A cleaning protocol consisting of flushing the hydrolysate compartment with NaOH and the organic phase compartment with pure organic phase enabled regeneration and reuse of the module. Ethanol yields from hydrolysates detoxified by membrane extraction using 15% Alamine 336 in oleyl alcohol were about 10% higher than those from hydrolysates detoxified using ammonium hydroxide treatment.

Grzenia, D. L.; Schell, D. J.; Wickramasinghe, S. R.

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

84

Heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat exchanger is provided having first and second fluid chambers for passing primary and secondary fluids. The chambers are spaced apart and have heat pipes extending from inside one chamber to inside the other chamber. A third chamber is provided for passing a purge fluid, and the heat pipe portion between the first and second chambers lies within the third chamber.

Daman, Ernest L. (Westfield, NJ); McCallister, Robert A. (Mountain Lakes, NJ)

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

85

Heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat exchanger of the straight tube type in which different rates of thermal expansion between the straight tubes and the supply pipes furnishing fluid to those tubes do not result in tube failures. The supply pipes each contain a section which is of helical configuration.

Wolowodiuk, Walter (New Providence, NJ)

1976-01-06T23:59:59.000Z

86

Membranes – Phosphazene  

INL’s new phosphazene membrane technology provides a method for making polydichlorophosphazene using solid state reactants that simplifies previous processes with a “single pot” two-step process. The process eliminates use of chlorinated hydrocarbon ...

87

Heat Exchangers  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Table 16   Ceramic heat exchanger systems...Soaking pit 870â??1230 1600â??2250 Fe, Si, alkalis Solar Turbines â?¦ 4â??8 OD Ã? 180 long (440 tubes) Aluminum melt furnaces 1010 1850 Alkali salts Plate fin GTE 0.6, 1.6 25â??46 Multiple 870â??1370 1600â??2250 Clean (good), alkalis (poor) Coors 0.25, 1.0 30 Ã? 30 Ã? 46 Multiple Clean (good), alkalis (poor) Radiant...

88

Alternate Fuel Cell Membranes for Energy Independence  

SciTech Connect

The overall objective of this project was the development and evaluation of novel hydrocarbon fuel cell (FC) membranes that possess high temperature performance and long term chemical/mechanical durability in proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells (FC). The major research theme was synthesis of aromatic hydrocarbon polymers of the poly(arylene ether sulfone) (PAES) type containing sulfonic acid groups tethered to the backbone via perfluorinated alkylene linkages and in some cases also directly attached to the phenylene groups along the backbone. Other research themes were the use of nitrogen-based heterocyclics instead of acid groups for proton conduction, which provides high temperature, low relative humidity membranes with high mechanical/thermal/chemical stability and pendant moieties that exhibit high proton conductivities in the absence of water, and synthesis of block copolymers consisting of a proton conducting block coupled to poly(perfluorinated propylene oxide) (PFPO) blocks. Accomplishments of the project were as follows: 1) establishment of a vertically integrated program of synthesis, characterization, and evaluation of FC membranes, 2) establishment of benchmark membrane performance data based on Nafion for comparison to experimental membrane performance, 3) development of a new perfluoroalkyl sulfonate monomer, N,N-diisopropylethylammonium 2,2-bis(p-hydroxyphenyl) pentafluoropropanesulfonate (HPPS), 4) synthesis of random and block copolymer membranes from HPPS, 5) synthesis of block copolymer membranes containing high-acid-concentration hydrophilic blocks consisting of HPPS and 3,3'-disulfonate-4,4'-dichlorodiphenylsulfone (sDCDPS), 6) development of synthetic routes to aromatic polymer backbones containing pendent 1H-1,2,3-triazole moieties, 7) development of coupling strategies to create phase-separated block copolymers between hydrophilic sulfonated prepolymers and commodity polymers such as PFPO, 8) establishment of basic performance properties of experimental membranes, 9) fabrication and FC performance testing of membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) from experimental membranes, and 10) measurement of ex situ and in situ membrane durability of experimental membranes. Although none of the experimental hydrocarbon membranes that issued from the project displayed proton conductivities that met DOE requirements, the project contributed to our basic understanding of membrane structure-property relationships in a number of key respects. An important finding of the benchmark studies is that physical degradation associated with humidity and temperature variations in the FC tend to open new fuel crossover pathways and act synergistically with chemical degradation to accelerate overall membrane degradation. Thus, for long term membrane survival and efficient fuel utilization, membranes must withstand internal stresses due to humidity and temperature changes. In this respect, rigid aromatic hydrocarbon fuel cell membranes, e.g. PAES, offer an advantage over un-modified Nafion membranes. The benchmark studies also showed that broadband dielectric spectroscopy is a potentially powerful tool in assessing shifts in the fundamental macromolecular dynamics caused by Nafion chemical degradation, and thus, this technique is of relevance in interrogating proton exchange membrane durability in fuel cells and macromolecular dynamics as coupled to proton migration, which is of fundamental relevance in proton exchange membranes in fuel cells. A key finding from the hydrocarbon membrane synthesis effort was that rigid aromatic polymers containing isolated ion exchange groups tethered tightly to the backbone (short tether), such as HPPS, provide excellent mechanical and durability properties but do not provide sufficient conductivity, in either random or block configuration, when used as the sole ion exchange monomer. However, we continue to hypothesize that longer tethers, and tethered groups spaced more closely within the hydrophilic chain elements of the polymer, will yield highly conductive materials with excellent mech

Storey, Robson, F.; Mauritz, Kenneth, A.; Patton, Derek, L.; Savin, Daniel, A.

2012-12-18T23:59:59.000Z

89

Heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat exchanger comparising a shell attached at its open end to one side of a tube sheet and a detachable head connected to the other side of said tube sheet. The head is divided into a first and second chamber in fluid communication with a nozzle inlet and nozzle outlet, respectively, formed in said tube sheet. A tube bundle is mounted within said shell and is provided with inlets and outlets formed in said tube sheet in communication with said first and second chambers, respectively.

Brackenbury, Phillip J. (Richland, WA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

90

Method of treating inflammatory diseases using a radiolabeled ferric hydroxide calloid  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A ferric hydroxide colloid having an alpha-emitting radionuclide essentially on the outer surfaces and a method of forming same. The method includes oxidizing a ferrous hydroxide to ferric hydroxide in the presence of a preselected radionuclide to form a colloid having the radionuclide on the outer surface thereof, and thereafter washing the colloid, and suspending the washed colloid in a suitable solution. The labelled colloid is useful in cancer therapy and for the treatment of inflamed joints.

Atcher, Robert W. (Chicago, IL); Hines, John J. (Glen Ellyn, IL)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

91

Development, Kinetic Analysis and Applications of 2-D Nanostructured Layered Metal Hydroxides.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Nanodimensional layered metal hydroxides which include layered hydroxy salts (LHSs) and hydroxy double salts (HDSs) have the ability to accommodate species between the layers. The… (more)

Majoni, Stephen

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

92

Segmented heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A segmented heat exchanger system for transferring heat energy from an exhaust fluid to a working fluid. The heat exchanger system may include a first heat exchanger for receiving incoming working fluid and the exhaust fluid. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the first heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration. In addition, the heat exchanger system may include a second heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the first heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from a third heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the second heat exchanger in a counter flow configuration. Furthermore, the heat exchanger system may include a third heat exchanger for receiving working fluid from the second heat exchanger and exhaust fluid from the first heat exchanger. The working fluid and exhaust fluid may travel through at least a portion of the third heat exchanger in a parallel flow configuration.

Baldwin, Darryl Dean (Lafayette, IN); Willi, Martin Leo (Dunlap, IL); Fiveland, Scott Byron (Metamara, IL); Timmons, Kristine Ann (Chillicothe, IL)

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

93

Layered double hydroxides as supports for intercalation and sustained release of antihypertensive drugs  

SciTech Connect

Zn/Al layered double hydroxides (LDHs) were intercalated with the anionic antihypertensive drugs Enalpril, Lisinopril, Captopril and Ramipril by using coprecipitation or ion-exchange technique. TG-MS analyses suggested that the thermal stability of Ena{sup -}, Lis{sup -} (arranged with monolayer, resulted from X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectra (FT-IR) analysis was enhanced much more than Cap{sup -} and Ram{sup -} (arranged with bilayer). The release studies show that the release rate of all samples markedly decreased in both pH 4.25 and 7.45. However, the release time of Ena{sup -}, Lis{sup -} were much longer compared with Cap{sup -}, Ram{sup -} in both pH 4.25 and 7.45, it is possible that the intercalated guests, arranged with monolayer in the interlayer, show lesser repulsive force and strong affinity with the LDH layers. And the release data followed both the Higuchi-square-root law and the first-order equation well. Based on the analysis of batch release, intercalated structural models as well as the TG-DTA results, we conclude that for drug-LDH, stronger the affinity between intercalated anions and the layers is, better the thermal property and the stability to the acid attack of drug-LDH, and the intercalated anions are easier apt to monolayer arrangement within the interlayer, were presented. - Graphical abstract: A series of antihypertensive drugs including Enalpril, Lisinopril, Captopril and Ramipril were intercalated into Zn/Al-NO{sub 3}-LDHs successfully by coprecipitation or ion-exchange technique. We focus on the structure, thermal property and low/controlled release property of as-synthesized drug-LDH composite intended for the possibility of applying these LDH-antihypertensive nanohybrids in drug delivery and controlled release systems.

Xia Shengjie [College of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310032 (China); Ni Zheming [College of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310032 (China)], E-mail: jchx@zjut.edu.cn; Xu Qian; Hu Baoxiang; Hu Jun [College of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310032 (China)

2008-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

94

Biodiesel synthesis using calcined layered double hydroxide catalysts  

SciTech Connect

The catalytic properties of calcined Li-Al, Mg-Al and Mg-Fe layered double hydroxides (LDHs) were examined in two transesterification reactions, namely, the reaction of glyceryl tributyrate with methanol, and the reaction of soybean oil with methanol. While the Li-Al catalysts showed high activity in these reactions at the reflux temperature of methanol, the Mg-Fe and Mg-Al catalysts exhibited much lower methyl ester yields. CO2 TPD measurements revealed the presence of sites of weak, medium and strong basicity on both Mg-Al and Li-Al catalysts, the latter showing higher concentrations of medium and strong base sites; by implication, these are the main sites active in transesterification catalyzed by calcined Li-Al LDHs. Maximum activity was observed for the Li-Al catalysts when a calcination temperature of 450-500 aC was applied, corresponding to decomposition of the layered double hydroxide to the mixed oxide without formation of crystalline lithium aluminate phases.

Schumaker, J. Link [University of Kentucky; Crofcheck, Czarena [University of Kentucky; TAckett, S. Adam [University of Kentucky; Santillan-Jimenez, Eduardo [University of Kentucky; Morgan, Tonya [University of Kentucky; Ji, Yaying [University of Kentucky; Crocker, Mark [University of Kentucky; Toops, Todd J [ORNL

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

95

Effect of Lithium Hydroxide on Zircaloy Corrosion in the Ringhals-3 PWR Plant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A predictive model for Zircaloy corrosion has been compared to Zircaloy oxide thickness measurements made after operation with elevated lithium hydroxide concentrations and pH at the Ringhals-3 PWR plant. Within the accuracy of the measurements and predictions, there was no significant effect of lithium hydroxide on Zircaloy corrosion.

1992-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

96

SMALL PARTICLE HEAT EXCHANGERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

ON ~m Small Particle Heat Exchangers Arion J. Hunt June 1978d. LBL 7841 Small Particle Heat Exchangers by Arlon J. Huntgenerally to non-solar heat exchangers. These may be of the

Hunt, A.J.

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

97

Corrosive resistant heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A corrosive and errosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is conveyed through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium.

Richlen, Scott L. (Annandale, VA)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

98

Woven heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

In a woven ceramic heat exchanger using the basic tube-in-shell design, each heat exchanger consisting of tube sheets and tube, is woven separately. Individual heat exchangers are assembled in cross-flow configuration. Each heat exchanger is woven from high temperature ceramic fiber, the warp is continuous from tube to tube sheet providing a smooth transition and unitized construction.

Piscitella, Roger R. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

99

Woven heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention relates to a heat exchanger for waste heat recovery from high temperature industrial exhaust streams. In a woven ceramic heat exchanger using the basic tube-in-shell design, each heat exchanger consisting of tube sheets and tube, is woven separately. Individual heat exchangers are assembled in cross-flow configuration. Each heat exchanger is woven from high temperature ceramic fiber, the warp is continuous from tube to tube sheet providing a smooth transition and unitized construction.

Piscitella, R.R.

1984-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

100

Microsoft Word - 25A5311 Continued  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

By switching fuel cell electrochemical reactions from an acidic medium to a basic one and utilizing highly conductive hydroxide exchange By switching fuel cell electrochemical reactions from an acidic medium to a basic one and utilizing highly conductive hydroxide exchange membranes, the high-performance hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cells (HEMFCs) are a truly innovative technology and radically different from the proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) that have been intensively researched and developed in the past two decades. The most exciting ability of HEMFCs is to solve fundamentally the PEMFCs' serious problems of catalysts cost and durability, while achieving PEMFCs' high power and energy density simultaneously. What has been critically missing for HEMFCs is a polymeric hydroxide exchange membrane (HEM) with high hydroxide conductivity and stability. With the totally revolutionarily design of hydroxide conducting functional

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydroxide exchange membranes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


101

Microsoft Word - 25A5311 Continued  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

By switching fuel cell electrochemical reactions from an acidic medium to a basic one and utilizing highly conductive hydroxide exchange By switching fuel cell electrochemical reactions from an acidic medium to a basic one and utilizing highly conductive hydroxide exchange membranes, the high-performance hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cells (HEMFCs) are a truly innovative technology and radically different from the proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) that have been intensively researched and developed in the past two decades. The most exciting ability of HEMFCs is to solve fundamentally the PEMFCs' serious problems of catalysts cost and durability, while achieving PEMFCs' high power and energy density simultaneously. What has been critically missing for HEMFCs is a polymeric hydroxide exchange membrane (HEM) with high hydroxide conductivity and stability. With the totally revolutionarily design of hydroxide conducting functional

102

Fabrication and corrosion resistance of superhydrophobic hydroxide zinc carbonate film on aluminum substrates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Superhydrophobic hydroxide zinc carbonate (HZC) films were fabricated on aluminum substrate through a convenient in situ deposition process. Firstly, HZC films with different morphologies were deposited on aluminum substrates through immersing the aluminum ...

Jin Liang, Yunchu Hu, Yiqiang Wu, Hong Chen

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

103

A Ni-Fe Layered Double Hydroxide-Carbon Nanotube Complex for Water Oxidation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Highly active, durable and cost-effective electrocatalysts for water oxidation to evolve oxygen gas hold a key to a range of renewable energy solutions including water splitting and rechargeable metal-air batteries. Here, we report the synthesis of ultrathin nickel iron layered double hydroxide nanoplates on mildly oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes. Incorporation of Fe into the nickel hydroxide induced the formation of NiFe-layered double hydroxide. The nanoplates were covalently attached to a network of nanotubes, affording excellent electrical wiring to the nanoplates. The ultra-thin Ni-Fe layered double hydroxide nanoplates/carbon nanotube complex was found to exhibit unusually high electro-catalytic activity and stability for oxygen evolution and outperformed commercial precious metal Ir catalysts.

Gong, Ming; Wang, Hailiang; Liang, Yongye; Wu, Justin Zachary; Zhou, Jigang; Wang, Jian; Regier, Tom; Wei, Fei; Dai, Hongjie

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

104

METHOD FOR RECOVERING PLUTONIUM VALUES FROM SOLUTION USING A BISMUTH HYDROXIDE CARRIER PRECIPITATE  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Carrier precipitation processes for separating plutonium values from aqueous solutions are described. In accordance with the invention a bismuth hydroxide precipitate is formed in the plutonium-containing solution, thereby carrying plutonium values from the solution.

Faris, B.F.

1961-04-25T23:59:59.000Z

105

Electrolyte membrane, methods of manufacture thereof and articles comprising the same  

SciTech Connect

Disclosed herein is a method of forming an electrolyte membrane comprising forming a mixture; the mixture comprising a polyhydroxy compound, an aromatic polyhalide compound and an alkali metal hydroxide; disposing the mixture on a porous substrate; reacting the mixture to form a proton conductor; and crosslinking the proton conductor to form a cross-linked proton-conducting network. Disclosed herein too is an article comprising a porous substrate; and a crosslinked proton conductor disposed on the porous substrate.

Tamaki, Ryo (Santa Clarita, CA); Rice, Steven Thomas (Scotia, NY); Yeager, Gary William (Rexford, NY)

2012-06-12T23:59:59.000Z

106

NCSL International Technical Exchange  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

NCSL International Technical Exchange. Purpose: The NCSL International ... Charleston, SC 29418. Technical Contact: Val Miller (301) 975-3602.

2013-02-19T23:59:59.000Z

107

Exchange Rates, Information, and Crises  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

3 Intervention and Exchange Rate Misalignment 4 Conclusion 5explain the exchange rate determination puzzle? Americanrisk to defend the exchange rate. Universit¨at Trier Working

Fernholz, Ricardo Turrin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

108

Composite sensor membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A sensor may include a membrane to deflect in response to a change in surface stress, where a layer on the membrane is to couple one or more probe molecules with the membrane. The membrane may deflect when a target molecule reacts with one or more probe molecules.

Majumdar, Arun (Orinda, CA); Satyanarayana, Srinath (Berkeley, CA); Yue, Min (Albany, CA)

2008-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

109

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: High Temperature Membrane Working Group  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

High Temperature Membrane Working Group High Temperature Membrane Working Group The High Temperature Membrane Working Group consists of government, industry, and university researchers interested in developing high temperature membranes for fuel cells. Description Technical Targets Meetings Contacts Description Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells typically operate at temperatures no higher than 60°C-80°C due to structural limitations of the membrane. Operating PEM fuel cell stacks at higher temperatures (120°C for transportation and 150°C for stationary applications), however, would yield significant energy benefits. For example, heat rejection is easier at higher temperatures, which would allow use of smaller heat exchangers in fuel cell power systems. In addition, for reformate fuel cell systems, carbon monoxide (CO) tolerance of the stack is less problematic at higher temperatures, which would reduce the size requirements or possibly eliminate the need for some CO clean-up beds in the fuel processor.

110

Separation and Fixation of Carbon Dioxide Using Polymeric Membrane Contactor  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

National Natural Science Foundation of China. National Natural Science Foundation of China. Separation and Fixation of Carbon Dioxide Using Polymeric Membrane Contactor Zhikang XU, Jianli WANG, Wei CHEN, Youyi XU Institute of Polymer Science, Zhejiang University, 310027, Hangzhou, P. R. China Tel: +86-571-7951342-8218, E-mail: xuzk@ipsm.zju.edu.cn ABSTRACT: Polypropylene hollow fiber membrane (PPHFM) contactor, with aqueous solution absorbent such as sodium hydroxide (NaOH), monoethanolamine (MEA) and diethanolamine (DEA), was designed and used to separate and fix CO 2 from CO 2 /N 2 gas mixtures. The factors that influence the separation properties of CO 2 /N 2 were investigated. It was found that the CO 2 removal efficiency is the best by using MEA solution as absorbent. The overall mass transfer coefficient (K) increases

111

The influence of zeta potential and yield stress on the filtration characteristics of a magnesium hydroxide simulant  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the UK, irradiated fuels from Magnox reactors are often stored in water-filled ponds under alkaline conditions, so as to minimise corrosion of fuel cladding. This is important to prevent or reduce leakage of soluble fission products and actinides to the pond water. A variety of intermediate level wastes derived from Magnox materials are stored at power stations. Under these alkaline conditions, various species of magnesium are formed, of which magnesium hydroxide is the dominant material. The particle-fluid interactions are significant for the design and operation of facilities for hydraulic retrieval, filtration, dewatering and ion exchange treatment of fuel storage pond water and stored wet Magnox wastes. Here we describe a study of particulate properties and filtration characteristics of oxide particle simulants under laboratory conditions. Cake and medium resistance data were correlated across a range of pH conditions with electro-acoustic zeta potential and shear yield stress measurements, as a function of particle volume fractions. The influence of zeta potential on filtration properties arises directly from the interaction of particles within the sediment cake. (authors)

Biggs, Simon; Nabi, Rafiq; Poole, Colin [Leeds University/Nexia Solutions URA in Particle Science and Technology, Institute of Particle Science and Engineering, School of Process, Environmental and Materials Engineering, The University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Patel, Ashok [British Nuclear Group, Reactor Sites, Berkeley Centre, Berkeley, Gloucestershire, GL13 9PB (United Kingdom)

2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

112

Anion exchange polymer electrolytes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Solid anion exchange polymer electrolytes and compositions comprising chemical compounds comprising a polymeric core, a spacer A, and a guanidine base, wherein said chemical compound is uniformly dispersed in a suitable solvent and has the structure: ##STR00001## wherein: i) A is a spacer having the structure O, S, SO.sub.2, --NH--, --N(CH.sub.2).sub.n, wherein n=1-10, --(CH.sub.2).sub.n--CH.sub.3--, wherein n=1-10, SO.sub.2-Ph, CO-Ph, ##STR00002## wherein R.sub.5, R.sub.6, R.sub.7 and R.sub.8 each are independently --H, --NH.sub.2, F, Cl, Br, CN, or a C.sub.1-C.sub.6 alkyl group, or any combination of thereof; ii) R.sub.9, R.sub.10, R.sub.11, R.sub.12, or R.sub.13 each independently are --H, --CH.sub.3, --NH.sub.2, --NO, --CH.sub.nCH.sub.3 where n=1-6, HC.dbd.O--, NH.sub.2C.dbd.O--, --CH.sub.nCOOH where n=1-6, --(CH.sub.2).sub.n--C(NH.sub.2)--COOH where n=1-6, --CH--(COOH)--CH.sub.2--COOH, --CH.sub.2--CH(O--CH.sub.2CH.sub.3).sub.2, --(C.dbd.S)--NH.sub.2, --(C.dbd.NH)--N--(CH.sub.2).sub.nCH.sub.3, where n=0-6, --NH--(C.dbd.S)--SH, --CH.sub.2--(C.dbd.O)--O--C(CH.sub.3).sub.3, --O--(CH.sub.2).sub.n--CH--(NH.sub.2)--COOH, where n=1-6, --(CH.sub.2).sub.n--CH.dbd.CH wherein n=1-6, --(CH.sub.2).sub.n--CH--CN wherein n=1-6, an aromatic group such as a phenyl, benzyl, phenoxy, methylbenzyl, nitrogen-substituted benzyl or phenyl groups, a halide, or halide-substituted methyl groups; and iii) wherein the composition is suitable for use in a membrane electrode assembly.

Kim, Yu Seung; Kim, Dae Sik; Lee, Kwan-Soo

2013-07-23T23:59:59.000Z

113

Investigation of Transient Phenomena of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and Electric Vehicles · Photovoltaics ­ thin film solar cells, deployment and testing · Fuel Cells­ · Novel System with Fuel Cell #12;Hydrogen Power Park Overview · Test bed for integration and validationHNEI Overview and Fuel Cell Programs SOEST Dean's Advance by HNEI Faculty and Staff Hawaii Natural

Victoria, University of

114

Computational Modeling and Optimization of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

power density (HPD) solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) is a geometry based on a tubular type SOFC increased power density, but still maintains the beneficial feature of secure sealing for a tubular SOFC. In this paper, the electric performance of a flat-tube HPD SOFC is studied. This paper also investigates

Victoria, University of

115

Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Characterization for Electric Vehicle Applications  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Characterization for Electric Vehicle Applications D.H. SwanHybridSystemfor Electric Vehicle Applications", SAEPaperFuel Cells for Electric Vehicles, Knowledge Gaps and

Swan, D.H.; Dickinson, B.E.; Arikara, M.P.

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

116

Composite zeolite membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A new class of composite zeolite membranes and synthesis techniques therefor has been invented. These membranes are essentially defect-free, and exhibit large levels of transmembrane flux and of chemical and isotopic selectivity.

Nenoff, Tina M. (Albuquerque, NM); Thoma, Steven G. (Albuquerque, NM); Ashley, Carol S. (Albuquerque, NM); Reed, Scott T. (Albuquerque, NM)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

117

Supported inorganic membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Supported inorganic membranes capable of molecular sieving, and methods for their production, are provided. The subject membranes exhibit high flux and high selectivity. The subject membranes are substantially defect free and less than about 100 nm thick. The pores of the subject membranes have an average critical pore radius of less than about 5 .ANG., and have a narrow pore size distribution. The subject membranes are prepared by coating a porous substrate with a polymeric sol, preferably under conditions of low relative pressure of the liquid constituents of the sol. The coated substrate is dried and calcined to produce the subject supported membrane. Also provided are methods of derivatizing the surface of supported inorganic membranes with metal alkoxides. The subject membranes find use in a variety of applications, such as the separation of constituents of gaseous streams, as catalysts and catalyst supports, and the like.

Sehgal, Rakesh (Albuquerque, NM); Brinker, Charles Jeffrey (Albuquerque, NM)

1998-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

118

Technology Performance Exchange  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Technology Performance Exchange TDM - Jason Koman (BTO) TDM - Dave Catarious (FEMP) William Livingood National Renewable Energy Laboratory William.Livingood@nrel.gov 303-384-7490...

119

Mechanics and multi-physics deformation behavior of polymer electrolyte membranes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Fuel cells are a developing technology within the energy sector that offer both efficiency and environmental advantages over traditional combustion processes. In particular, proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) are ...

Silberstein, Meredith N

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

120

Cadmium sulfide membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for the creation of novel q-effect cadmium sulfide membranes. The membranes are made by first creating a dilute cadmium sulfide colloid in aqueous suspension and then removing the water and excess salts therefrom. The cadmium sulfide membrane thus produced is luminescent at room temperature and may have application in laser fabrication.

Spanhel, Lubomir (Madison, WI); Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI)

1992-07-07T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydroxide exchange membranes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


121

Cadmium sulfide membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method is described for the creation of novel q-effect cadmium sulfide membranes. The membranes are made by first creating a dilute cadmium sulfide colloid in aqueous suspension and then removing the water and excess salts therefrom. The cadmium sulfide membrane thus produced is luminescent at room temperature and may have application in laser fabrication.

Spanhel, Lubomir (Madison, WI); Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI)

1991-10-22T23:59:59.000Z

122

Polyphosphazene semipermeable membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A semipermeable, inorganic membrane is disclosed; the membrane is prepared from a phosphazene polymer and, by the selective substitution of the constituent groups bound to the phosphorous in the polymer structure, the selective passage of fluid from a feedstream can be controlled. Resistance to high temperatures and harsh chemical environments is observed in the use of the phosphazene polymers as semipermeable membranes.

Allen, Charles A. (Idaho Falls, ID); McCaffrey, Robert R. (Idaho Falls, ID); Cummings, Daniel G. (Idaho Falls, ID); Grey, Alan E. (Idaho Falls, ID); Jessup, Janine S. (Darlington, ID); McAtee, Richard E. (Idaho Falls, ID)

1988-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

123

Exchanging intensional XML data  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

XML is becoming the universal format for data exchange between applications. Recently, the emergence of Web services as standard means of publishing and accessing data on the Web introduced a new class of XML documents, which we call intensional ... Keywords: Data exchange, Web services, XML, intensional information, typing

Tova Milo; Serge Abiteboul; Bernd Amann; Omar Benjelloun; Fred Dang Ngoc

2005-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

124

Direct fired heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas-to-liquid heat exchanger system which transfers heat from a gas, generally the combustion gas of a direct-fired generator of an absorption machine, to a liquid, generally an absorbent solution. The heat exchanger system is in a counterflow fluid arrangement which creates a more efficient heat transfer.

Reimann, Robert C. (Lafayette, NY); Root, Richard A. (Spokane, WA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

125

Ion Recognition Approach to Volume Reduction of Alkaline Tank Waste by Separation and Recycle of Sodium Hydroxide and Sodium Nitrate  

SciTech Connect

This research was intended to provide the scientific foundation upon which the feasibility of liquid-liquid extraction chemistry for bulk reduction of the volume of high-activity tank waste can be evaluated. Primary focus has been on sodium hydroxide separation, with potential Hanford application. Value in sodium hydroxide separation can potentially be found in alternative flowsheets for treatment and disposal of low-activity salt waste. Additional value can be expected in recycle of sodium hydroxide for use in waste retrieval and sludge washing, whereupon additions of fresh sodium hydroxide to the waste can be avoided. Potential savings are large both because of the huge cost of vitrification of the low-activity waste stream and because volume reduction of high-activity wastes could obviate construction of costly new tanks. Toward these ends, the conceptual development begun in the original proposal was extended with the formulation of eight fundamental approaches that could be undertaken for extraction of sodium hydroxide.

Bruce A. Moyer; Alan P. Marchand; Peter V. Bonnesen; Jeffrey C. Bryan; Tamara J. Haverlock

2004-06-08T23:59:59.000Z

126

Wound tube heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

What is disclosed is a wound tube heat exchanger in which a plurality of tubes having flattened areas are held contiguous adjacent flattened areas of tubes by a plurality of windings to give a double walled heat exchanger. The plurality of windings serve as a plurality of effective force vectors holding the conduits contiguous heat conducting walls of another conduit and result in highly efficient heat transfer. The resulting heat exchange bundle is economical and can be coiled into the desired shape. Also disclosed are specific embodiments such as the one in which the tubes are expanded against their windings after being coiled to insure highly efficient heat transfer.

Ecker, Amir L. (Duncanville, TX)

1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

127

Heat and mass exchanger  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A mass and heat exchanger includes at least one first substrate with a surface for supporting a continuous flow of a liquid thereon that either absorbs, desorbs, evaporates or condenses one or more gaseous species from or to a surrounding gas; and at least one second substrate operatively associated with the first substrate. The second substrate includes a surface for supporting the continuous flow of the liquid thereon and is adapted to carry a heat exchange fluid therethrough, wherein heat transfer occurs between the liquid and the heat exchange fluid.

Lowenstein, Andrew (Princeton, NJ); Sibilia, Marc J. (Princeton, NJ); Miller, Jeffrey A. (Hopewell, NJ); Tonon, Thomas (Princeton, NJ)

2011-06-28T23:59:59.000Z

128

NETL: Novel Polymer Membrane Process for Pre-Combustions CO2 Capture from  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Polymer Membrane Process for Pre-Combustions CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Syngas Polymer Membrane Process for Pre-Combustions CO2 Capture from Coal-Fired Syngas Project No.: DE-FE0001124 Membrane Technology Research (MTR) is developing a high-temperature stable polymer membrane to separate hydrogen from carbon dioxide (H2/CO2). MTR will investigate novel high-temperature-stable polymers identified by Tetramer for use in H2/CO2 selective membranes. They will also conduct bench-scale testing of optimized membranes and membrane modules with simulated syngas to evaluate the membrane performance and lifetime under expected operating conditions. The advantages of this technology are that the process can be done warm/hot to reduce the need for heat exchange and nitrogen sweep can be used to maintain permeate fuel gas at turbine pressure.

129

"Building Energy Data Exchange Specification"  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Building Energy Data Exchange Specification" "Version 2.3" "applicationvnd.ms-excel" "Overview:" "This document describes the DOE Building Energy Data Exchange Specification...

130

Green Exchange | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Green Exchange Jump to: navigation, search Name Green Exchange Place New York, New York Zip NY 10282 Product String representation "The Green Excha ... es marketplace." is too...

131

Trade, Interdependence and Exchange Rates  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

period is 1971-2000. All inflation rates and predictions areof Goods and Real Exchange Rate Fluc- tuations,” mimeo [5]Between Trade and Exchange Rate Volatility,” mimeo [6

Fitzgerald, Doireann

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

132

Supported liquid membrane system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A cell apparatus for a supported liquid membrane including opposing faceplates, each having a spirally configured groove, an inlet groove at a first end of the spirally configured groove, and an outlet groove at the other end of the spirally configured groove, within the opposing faces of the faceplates, a microporous membrane situated between the grooved faces of the faceplates, said microporous membrane containing an extractant mixture selective for a predetermined chemical species within the pores of said membrane, means for aligning the grooves of the faceplates in an directly opposing configuration with the porous membrane being situated therebetween, such that the aligned grooves form a pair of directly opposing channels, separate feed solution and stripping solution compartments connected to respective channels between the faceplates and the membrane, separate pumping means for passing feed solution and stripping solution through the channels is provided.

Takigawa, D.Y.; Bush, H. Jr.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

133

Substituted polyacetylene separation membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A separation membrane is described which is useful for gas separation, particularly separation of C{sub 2+} hydrocarbons from natural gas. The invention encompasses the membrane itself, methods of making it and processes for using it. The membrane comprises a polymer having repeating units of a hydrocarbon-based, disubstituted polyacetylene, having the general formula shown in the accompanying diagram, wherein R{sub 1} is chosen from the group consisting of C{sub 1}-C{sub 4} alkyl and phenyl, and wherein R{sub 2} is chosen from the group consisting of hydrogen and phenyl. In the most preferred embodiment, the membrane comprises poly(4-methyl-2-pentyne) [PMP]. The membrane exhibits good chemical resistance and has super-glassy properties with regard to separating certain large, condensable permeant species from smaller, less-condensable permeant species. The membranes may also be useful in other fluid separations. 4 figs.

Pinnau, I.; Morisato, Atsushi

1998-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

134

Substituted polyacetylene separation membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A separation membrane useful for gas separation, particularly separation of C.sub.2+ hydrocarbons from natural gas. The invention encompasses the membrane itself, methods of making it and processes for using it. The membrane comprises a polymer having repeating units of a hydrocarbon-based, disubstituted polyacetylene, having the general formula: ##STR1## wherein R.sub.1 is chosen from the group consisting of C.sub.1 -C.sub.4 alkyl and phenyl, and wherein R.sub.2 is chosen from the group consisting of hydrogen and phenyl. In the most preferred embodiment, the membrane comprises poly(4-methyl-2-pentyne) ›PMP!. The membrane exhibits good chemical resistance and has super-glassy properties with regard to separating certain large, condensable permeant species from smaller, less-condensable permeant species. The membranes may also be useful in other fluid separations.

Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA); Morisato, Atsushi (Tokyo, JP)

1998-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

135

Exchange Rates and Fundamentals  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We show analytically that in a rational expectations present-value model, an asset price manifests near–random walk behavior if fundamentals are I(1) and the factor for discounting future fundamentals is near one. We argue that this result helps explain the well-known puzzle that fundamental variables such as relative money supplies, outputs, inflation, and interest rates provide little help in predicting changes in floating exchange rates. As well, we show that the data do exhibit a related link suggested by standard models—that the exchange rate helps predict these fundamentals. The implication is that exchange rates and fundamentals are linked in a way that is broadly consistent with asset-pricing models of the exchange rate. I.

Charles Engel; Kenneth D. West

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

136

Active microchannel heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

The present invention is an active microchannel heat exchanger with an active heat source and with microchannel architecture. The active microchannel heat exchanger has (a) an exothermic reaction chamber; (b) an exhaust chamber; and (c) a heat exchanger chamber in thermal contact with the exhaust chamber, wherein (d) heat from the exothermic reaction chamber is convected by an exothermic reaction exhaust through the exhaust chamber and by conduction through a containment wall to the working fluid in the heat exchanger chamber thereby raising a temperature of the working fluid. The invention is particularly useful as a liquid fuel vaporizer and/or a steam generator for fuel cell power systems, and as a heat source for sustaining endothermic chemical reactions and initiating exothermic reactions.

Tonkovich, Anna Lee Y. (Pasco, WA); Roberts, Gary L. (West Richland, WA); Call, Charles J. (Pasco, WA); Wegeng, Robert S. (Richland, WA); Wang, Yong (Richland, WA)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

137

Greywater heat exchanger  

SciTech Connect

A kilowatt meter and water meter were installed to monitor pregreywater usage. The design considerations, the heat exchanger construction and installation, and the monitoring of usage levels are described.

Holmberg, D.

1983-11-21T23:59:59.000Z

138

Siloxane-grafted membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Composite cellulosic semipermeable membranes are disclosed which are the covalently bonded reaction product of an asymmetric cellulosic semipermeable membrane and a polysiloxane containing reactive functional group. The two reactants chemically bond by ether, ester, amide or acrylate linkages to form a siloxane-grafted cellulosic membrane having superior selectivity and flux stability. Selectivity may be enhanced by wetting the surface with a swelling agent such as water.

Friesen, D.T.; Obligin, A.S.

1989-10-31T23:59:59.000Z

139

Technology Performance Exchange  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Technology Performance Exchange Technology Performance Exchange TDM - Jason Koman (BTO) TDM - Dave Catarious (FEMP) William Livingood National Renewable Energy Laboratory William.Livingood@nrel.gov 303-384-7490 April 2, 2013 2 | Building Technologies Office eere.energy.gov Purpose & Objectives Problem: Perceived fiscal risk associated with the installation of unfamiliar technologies impedes adoption rates for cost-effective, energy-saving products. Impact of Project: Enable end users to quickly and

140

Classical Heat Exchanger Analysis  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The industry methodology for heat exchanger performance and uncertainty analysis has been successful in dealing with the requirements of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued in 1989 for safety-related service water systems, but has been found to have several significant limitations. The general objective of this report is to improve the industry performance and uncertainty analysis methodology and guidelines for implementation and analysis of heat exchanger performance. ...

2013-05-31T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydroxide exchange membranes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


141

Membranes for Clean Water  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Membranes for Clean Water. Summary: ... Description: Impact. Access to affordable, clean water is vital to the nation's economic growth and security. ...

2013-02-02T23:59:59.000Z

142

Radial flow heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A radial flow heat exchanger (20) having a plurality of first passages (24) for transporting a first fluid (25) and a plurality of second passages (26) for transporting a second fluid (27). The first and second passages are arranged in stacked, alternating relationship, are separated from one another by relatively thin plates (30) and (32), and surround a central axis (22). The thickness of the first and second passages are selected so that the first and second fluids, respectively, are transported with laminar flow through the passages. To enhance thermal energy transfer between first and second passages, the latter are arranged so each first passage is in thermal communication with an associated second passage along substantially its entire length, and vice versa with respect to the second passages. The heat exchangers may be stacked to achieve a modular heat exchange assembly (300). Certain heat exchangers in the assembly may be designed slightly differently than other heat exchangers to address changes in fluid properties during transport through the heat exchanger, so as to enhance overall thermal effectiveness of the assembly.

Valenzuela, Javier (Hanover, NH)

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

143

Influence of electrolytes and membranes on cell operation for syn-gas production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The impact of membrane type and electrolyte composition for the electrochemical generation of synthesis gas (CO + H2) using a Ag gas diffusion electrode are presented. Changing from a cation exchange membrane to an anion exchange membrane (AEM) extended the cell operational time at low Ecell values (up to 4x) without impacting product composition. The use of KOH as the catholyte decreased the Ecell and resulted in a minimum electrolyte cost reduction of 39%. The prime factor in determining operational time at low Ecell values was the ability to maintain a sufficiently high anolyte pH.

Eric J. Dufek; Tedd E. Lister; Michael E. McIlwain

2012-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

144

Electrolytic process to produce sodium hypochlorite using sodium ion conductive ceramic membranes  

SciTech Connect

An electrochemical process for the production of sodium hypochlorite is disclosed. The process may potentially be used to produce sodium hypochlorite from seawater or low purity un-softened or NaCl-based salt solutions. The process utilizes a sodium ion conductive ceramic membrane, such as membranes based on NASICON-type materials, in an electrolytic cell. In the process, water is reduced at a cathode to form hydroxyl ions and hydrogen gas. Chloride ions from a sodium chloride solution are oxidized in the anolyte compartment to produce chlorine gas which reacts with water to produce hypochlorous and hydrochloric acid. Sodium ions are transported from the anolyte compartment to the catholyte compartment across the sodium ion conductive ceramic membrane. Sodium hydroxide is transported from the catholyte compartment to the anolyte compartment to produce sodium hypochlorite within the anolyte compartment.

Balagopal, Shekar; Malhotra, Vinod; Pendleton, Justin; Reid, Kathy Jo

2012-09-18T23:59:59.000Z

145

Microporous alumina ceramic membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Several methods are disclosed for the preparation microporous alumina ceramic membranes. For the first time, porous alumina membranes are made which have mean pore sizes less than 100 Angstroms and substantially no pores larger than that size. The methods are based on improved sol-gel techniques.

Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI); Sheng, Guangyao (Madison, WI)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

146

Microporous alumina ceramic membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Several methods are disclosed for the preparation microporous alumina ceramic membranes. For the first time, porous alumina membranes are made which have mean pore sizes less than 100 Angstroms and substantially no pores larger than that size. The methods are based on improved sol-gel techniques.

Anderson, M.A.; Guangyao Sheng.

1993-05-04T23:59:59.000Z

147

OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES  

SciTech Connect

This report covers the following tasks: Task 1--Design, fabricate and evaluate ceramic to metal seals based on graded ceramic powder/metal braze joints; Task 2--Evaluate the effect of defect configuration on ceramic membrane conductivity and long term chemical and structural stability; Task 3--Determine materials mechanical properties under conditions of high temperatures and reactive atmospheres; Task 4--Evaluate phase stability and thermal expansion of candidate perovskite membranes and develop techniques to support these materials on porous metal structures; Task 5--Assess the microstructure of membrane materials to evaluate the effects of vacancy-impurity association, defect clusters, and vacancy-dopant association on the membrane performance and stability; and Task 6--Measure kinetics of oxygen uptake and transport in ceramic membrane materials under commercially relevant conditions using isotope labeling techniques.

Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

148

Membranes with a boundary  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We investigate the recently developed theory of multiple membranes. In particular, we consider open membranes, i.e. the theory defined on a membrane world volume with a boundary. We first restrict our attention to the gauge sector of the theory. We obtain a boundary action from the Chern-Simons terms. Secondly, we consider the addition of certain boundary terms to various Chern-Simons theories coupled to matter. These terms ensure the full bulk plus boundary action has the correct amount of supersymmetry. For the ABJM model, this construction motivates the inclusion of a boundary quartic scalar potential. The boundary dynamics obtained from our modified theory produce Basu-Harvey type equations describing membranes ending on a fivebrane. The ultimate goal of this work is to throw light on the theory of fivebranes using the theory of open membranes.

David S Berman; Daniel C Thompson

2009-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

149

A NEW PROCESS DEVELOPED FOR SEPARATION OF LIGNIN FROM AMMONIUM HYDROXIDE PRETREATMENT SOLUTIONS  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A method is described for separating lignin from liquid solutions resulting from the pretreatment of lignocellulosic materials such as switchgrass with ammonium hydroxide. The method involves a sequence of steps including acidification, evaporation, and precipitation or centrifugation that are performed under defined conditions, and results in a relatively pure, solid lignin product. The method is tested on ammonium hydroxide solutions containing lignin extracted from switchgrass. Experimental results show that the method is capable of recovering between 66-95% of dissolved lignin as a precipitated solid. Cost estimates of pilot-scale and industrial-scale expressions of the process indicate that breakeven lignin prices of $2.36/kg and $0.78/kg, respectively, may be obtainable with this recovery method.

Sherman, S.; Gorensek, M.; Milliken, C.

2010-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

150

Ion exchange phenomena  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ion exchange phenomena involve the population of readily exchangeable ions, the subset of adsorbed solutes that balance the intrinsic surface charge and can be readily replaced by major background electrolyte ions (Sposito, 2008). These phenomena have occupied a central place in soil chemistry research since Way (1850) first showed that potassium uptake by soils resulted in the release of an equal quantity of moles of charge of calcium and magnesium. Ion exchange phenomena are now routinely modeled in studies of soil formation (White et al., 2005), soil reclamation (Kopittke et al., 2006), soil fertilitization (Agbenin and Yakubu, 2006), colloidal dispersion/flocculation (Charlet and Tournassat, 2005), the mechanics of argillaceous media (Gajo and Loret, 2007), aquitard pore water chemistry (Tournassat et al., 2008), and groundwater (Timms and Hendry, 2007; McNab et al., 2009) and contaminant hydrology (Chatterjee et al., 2008; van Oploo et al., 2008; Serrano et al., 2009).

Bourg, I.C.; Sposito, G.

2011-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

151

Laser Assisted Emittance Exchange  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We describe here the laser assisted emittance exchange (LAEE) technique. A laser operating in the transverse mode (TEM10 or TEM01) is used to interact with the electron beam in a dispersive region and to initiate the transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchange. It is shown that with the LAEE one can generate an electron beam with ultralow transverse emittance, which allows one to significantly bring down the size of an X-ray free electron laser (FEL) and greatly extend the availability of these light sources. The technique can also be used to enhance the performances of X-ray FELs in storage rings. The timing and energy jitter problems for the standard emittance exchange and LAEE techniques are also discussed.

Xiang, Dao; /SLAC

2012-06-11T23:59:59.000Z

152

Modular heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat exchanger for use in nuclear reactors includes a heat exchange tube bundle formed from similar modules each having a hexagonal shroud containing a large number of thermally conductive tubes which are connected with inlet and outlet headers at opposite ends of each module, the respective headers being adapted for interconnection with suitable inlet and outlet manifold means. In order to adapt the heat exchanger for operation in a high temperature and high pressure environment and to provide access to all tube ports at opposite ends of the tube bundle, a spherical tube sheet is arranged in sealed relation across the chamber with an elongated duct extending outwardly therefrom to provide manifold means for interconnection with the opposite end of the tube bundle.

Culver, Donald W. (Poway, CA)

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

153

The Neural Heat Exchanger  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The "Neural Heat Exchanger" is an alternative, supervised learning method for multi-layer neural nets. It is inspired by the physical heat exchanger. Unlike backprop, it is entirely local. This makes its parallel implementation trivial. It was first presented during occasional talks since 1990, and is closely related to Hinton et. al.'s recent Helmholtz Machine (1995). For the first time, this paper presents the basic ideas in written form. To fully understand the Neural Heat Exchanger's advantages and limitations, however, much theoretical and empirical work remains to be done. 1 Introduction Most conventional supervised algorithms for multi-layer neural nets are not local in space and time. Backprop, for instance, requires a global control mechanism that first propagates activation signals through all successive layers, then waits until the error signals come back, then changes the weights. Many suspect, however, that the brain does use an entirely local algorithm. One advantage of...

Jürgen Schmidhuber

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

154

Formation and Stability of Ni-Al Hydroxide Phases in Soils  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Formation and Stability of Ni-Al Hydroxide Phases in Soils E D W A R D P E L T I E R , § , * , D A N I E L V A N D E R L E L I E , A N D D O N A L D L . S P A R K S Environmental Soil Chemistry Research Group, Department of Plant and Soil Sciences and Delaware Environmental Institute, 152 Townsend

Sparks, Donald L.

155

Electrochemical formation of hydroxide for enhancing carbon dioxide and acid gas uptake by a solution  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A system is described for forming metal hydroxide from a metal carbonate utilizing a water electrolysis cell having an acid-producing anode and a hydroxyl-producing cathode immersed in a water solution of sufficient ionic content to allow an electric current to pass between the hydroxyl-producing cathode and the acid-producing anode. A metal carbonate, in particular water-insoluble calcium carbonate or magnesium carbonate, is placed in close proximity to the acid-producing anode. A direct current electrical voltage is provided across the acid-producing anode and the hydroxyl-producing cathode sufficient to generate acid at the acid-producing anode and hydroxyl ions at the hydroxyl-producing cathode. The acid dissolves at least part of the metal carbonate into metal and carbonate ions allowing the metal ions to travel toward the hydroxyl-producing cathode and to combine with the hydroxyl ions to form the metal hydroxide. The carbonate ions travel toward the acid-producing anode and form carbonic acid and/or water and carbon dioxide. Among other uses, the metal hydroxide formed can be employed to absorb acid gases such as carbon dioxide from a gas mixture. The invention can also generate hydrogen and oxidative gases such as oxygen or chlorine.

Rau, Gregory Hudson (Castro Valley, CA)

2012-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

156

Spectral induced polarization signatures of hydroxide adsorption and mineral precipitation in porous media  

SciTech Connect

The spectral induced polarization (SIP) technique is a promising approach for delineating subsurface physical and chemical property changes in a minimally invasive manner. We investigated spatiotemporal variations in complex conductivity during evolution of urea hydrolysis and calcite precipitation reaction fronts within a silica gel column. The real and imaginary parts of complex conductivity were shown to be sensitive to changes in both solution chemistry and calcium carbonate precipitation. Distinct changes in imaginary conductivity coincided with increased hydroxide ion concentration during urea hydrolysis. In a separate experiment focused on the effect of hydroxide concentration on interfacial polarization of silica gel and well-sorted sand, we found a strong dependence of the polarization response on pH changes of the solution. We propose a conceptual model describing hydroxide ion adsorption behavior in silica gel and its control on interfacial polarizability. Our results demonstrate the utility of SIP for non-invasive monitoring of reaction fronts, and indicate its potential for quantifying geochemical processes that control the polarization responses of porous media at larger spatial scales in the natural environment.

Chi Zhang; Lee Slater; George Redden; Yoshiko Fujita; Timothy Johnson; Don Fox

2012-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

157

Chemical exchange program analysis.  

SciTech Connect

As part of its EMS, Sandia performs an annual environmental aspects/impacts analysis. The purpose of this analysis is to identify the environmental aspects associated with Sandia's activities, products, and services and the potential environmental impacts associated with those aspects. Division and environmental programs established objectives and targets based on the environmental aspects associated with their operations. In 2007 the most significant aspect identified was Hazardous Materials (Use and Storage). The objective for Hazardous Materials (Use and Storage) was to improve chemical handling, storage, and on-site movement of hazardous materials. One of the targets supporting this objective was to develop an effective chemical exchange program, making a business case for it in FY07, and fully implementing a comprehensive chemical exchange program in FY08. A Chemical Exchange Program (CEP) team was formed to implement this target. The team consists of representatives from the Chemical Information System (CIS), Pollution Prevention (P2), the HWMF, Procurement and the Environmental Management System (EMS). The CEP Team performed benchmarking and conducted a life-cycle analysis of the current management of chemicals at SNL/NM and compared it to Chemical Exchange alternatives. Those alternatives are as follows: (1) Revive the 'Virtual' Chemical Exchange Program; (2) Re-implement a 'Physical' Chemical Exchange Program using a Chemical Information System; and (3) Transition to a Chemical Management Services System. The analysis and benchmarking study shows that the present management of chemicals at SNL/NM is significantly disjointed and a life-cycle or 'Cradle-to-Grave' approach to chemical management is needed. This approach must consider the purchasing and maintenance costs as well as the cost of ultimate disposal of the chemicals and materials. A chemical exchange is needed as a mechanism to re-apply chemicals on site. This will not only reduce the quantity of unneeded chemicals and the amount spent on new purchases, but will also avoid disposal costs. If SNL/NM were to realize a 5 percent reduction in chemical inventory and a 10 percent reduction in disposal of unused chemicals the total savings would be $189, 200 per year.

Waffelaert, Pascale

2007-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

158

A corrosive resistant heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A corrosive and erosive resistant heat exchanger which recovers heat from a contaminated heat stream. The heat exchanger utilizes a boundary layer of innocuous gas, which is continuously replenished, to protect the heat exchanger surface from the hot contaminated gas. The innocuous gas is pumped through ducts or perforations in the heat exchanger wall. Heat from the heat stream is transferred by radiation to the heat exchanger wall. Heat is removed from the outer heat exchanger wall by a heat recovery medium. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

Richlen, S.L.

1987-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

159

Ion Exchange Filter Transition Plan for BWRs and PWRs  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report includes an interim review of plant experiences with various cation exchange membranes to determine if new filters are comparable and suitable for nuclear power plant chemistry applications. Gaps in performance and impacts to recommendations in EPRI reports BWRVIP-190: BWR Vessel and Internals Project, BWR Water Chemistry Guidelines - 2008 Revision (1016579), Pressurized Water Reactor Primary Water Chemistry Guidelines (1014986) and Pressurized Water Reactor Secondary ...

2013-03-28T23:59:59.000Z

160

Fuel cell membrane humidification  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell assembly has an anode side and a cathode side separated by the membrane and generating electrical current by electrochemical reactions between a fuel gas and an oxidant. The anode side comprises a hydrophobic gas diffusion backing contacting one side of the membrane and having hydrophilic areas therein for providing liquid water directly to the one side of the membrane through the hydrophilic areas of the gas diffusion backing. In a preferred embodiment, the hydrophilic areas of the gas diffusion backing are formed by sewing a hydrophilic thread through the backing. Liquid water is distributed over the gas diffusion backing in distribution channels that are separate from the fuel distribution channels.

Wilson, Mahlon S. (Los Alamos, NM)

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydroxide exchange membranes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
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161

Membranes Improve Insulation Efficiency  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It has been determined from extensive tests involving test models and home attics that loose fill and fiber batt insulation does not function as expected by the industry. The reason for this deficiency is current test methods do not accurately predict the magnitude of air infiltration into fiber insulation as used in home attics, radiant heat infiltration into the insulation during summer, or radiant heat loss through the insulation during winter conditions. The use of (1) moisture permeable membranes over the insulation, and (2) layered membranes between fiber batts to form closed cells in the insulation both dramatically improve the efficiency of the fiber insulation. The efficiency of this insulation will be improved to an even greater degree if these membranes reflect radiant heat as well as reduce convection air currents. Extensive tests have also been conducted which show that if moisture permeable membranes are used over fiber insulation, the moisture content of the insulation will be reduced.

Bullock, C. A.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

162

Microprobes aluminosilicate ceramic membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods have been developed to make mixed alumina-silicate and aluminosilicate particulate microporous ceramic membranes. One method involves the making of separate alumina and silica sols which are then mixed. Another method involves the creation of a combined sol with aluminosilicate particles. The resulting combined alumina and silica membranes have high surface area, a very small pore size, and a very good temperature stability.

Anderson, Marc A. (2114 Chadbourne Ave., Madison, WI 53705); Sheng, Guangyao (45 N. Orchard St., Madison, WI 53715)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

163

Battery utilizing ceramic membranes  

SciTech Connect

A thin film battery is disclosed based on the use of ceramic membrane technology. The battery includes a pair of conductive collectors on which the materials for the anode and the cathode may be spin coated. The separator is formed of a porous metal oxide ceramic membrane impregnated with electrolyte so that electrical separation is maintained while ion mobility is also maintained. The entire battery can be made less than 10 microns thick while generating a potential in the 1 volt range.

Yahnke, Mark S. (Berkeley, CA); Shlomo, Golan (Haifa, IL); Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

164

Adsorptive Membranes vs. Resins for Acetic Acid Removal from Biomass Hydrolysates  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Acetic acid is a compound commonly found in hemicellulosic hydrolysates. This weak acid strongly influences the bioconversion of sugar containing hydrolysates. Previous investigators have used anion exchange resins for acetic acid removal from different hemicellulosic hydrolysates. In this study, the efficiency of an anion exchange membrane was compared to that of an anion exchange resin, for acetic acid removal from a DI water solution and an acidic hemicellulose hydrolysate pretreated using two different methods. Ion exchange membranes and resins have very different geometries. Here the performance of membranes and resins is compared using two dimensionless parameters, the relative mass throughput and chromatographic bed number. The relative mass throughput arises naturally from the Thomas solution for ion exchange. The results show that the membrane exhibit better performance in terms of capacity, and loss of the desired sugars. In addition acetic acid may be eluted at a higher concentration from the membrane thus leading to the possibility of recovery and re-use of the acetic acid.

Han, B.; Carvalho, W.; Canilha, L.; da Silva, S. S.; e Silva, J. B. A.; McMillan, J. D.; Wickramasinghe, S. R.

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

165

Predicting particle deposition on HVAC heat exchangers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

gas-side of finned tube heat- exchangers. Journal of Heatsurface interactions in heat exchanger fouling. Journal ofParticle Deposition on Heat Exchangers Epstein, N. , 1988.

Siegel, J A; Nazaroff, William W

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

166

THERMOSIPHON WATER HEATERS WITH HEAT EXCHANGERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

the collector and heat exchanger (Uc and Uhel · ~Constant tNational Standard, "Solar Heat Exchangers," ANSI/ASME SES 1,connecting pipes header heat exchanger insulation maximum

Mertol, Atila

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

167

Chicago Climate Exchange CCX | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Chicago Climate Exchange CCX Jump to: navigation, search Name Chicago Climate Exchange (CCX) Place Chicago, Illinois Zip 60604 Product Chicago Climate Exchange (CCX) is aiming at...

168

Heat exchanger tube mounts  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat exchanger in which tubes are secured to a tube sheet by internal bore welding is described. The tubes may be moved into place in preparation for welding with comparatively little trouble. A number of segmented tube support plates are provided which allow a considerable portion of each of the tubes to be moved laterally after the end thereof has been positioned in preparation for internal bore welding to the tube sheet. (auth)

Wolowodiuk, W.; Anelli, J.; Dawson, B.E.

1974-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

169

R&D on an Ultra-Thin Composite Membrane for High-Temperature Operation in PEMFC. Final Report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

FuelCell Energy developed a novel high-temperature proton exchange membrane for PEM fuel cells for building applications. The laboratory PEM fuel cell successfully operated at 100-400{supdegree}C and low relative humidity to improve CO tolerance, mitigate water and thermal management challenges, and reduce membrane cost. The developed high-temperature membrane has successfully completed 500h 120C endurance testing.

Yuh, C.-Y.

2003-10-06T23:59:59.000Z

170

Accurate measurement of the through-plane water content of proton-exchange  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Accurate measurement of the through-plane water content of proton-exchange Accurate measurement of the through-plane water content of proton-exchange membranes using neutron radiography Title Accurate measurement of the through-plane water content of proton-exchange membranes using neutron radiography Publication Type Journal Article Year of Publication 2012 Authors Hussey, Daniel S., Dusan Spernjak, Adam Z. Weber, Rangachary Mukundan, Joseph Fairweather, Eric L. Brosha, John Davey, Jacob S. Spendelow, David L. Jacobson, and Rodney L. Borup Journal Journal of Applied Physics Volume 112 Issue 10 Pagination 104906 Date Published 2012 ISSN 00218979 Keywords electrolyte fuel-cells, in-situ, liquid water, microchannel plate detectors, model, nafion, polymer electrolytes, schroeders-paradox, transport, x-ray-scattering Abstract The water sorption of proton-exchange membranes (PEMs) was measured in situ using high-resolution neutron imaging in small-scale fuel cell test sections. A detailed characterization of the measurement uncertainties and corrections associated with the technique is presented. An image-processing procedure resolved a previously reported discrepancy between the measured and predicted membrane water content. With high-resolution neutron-imaging detectors, the water distributions across N1140 and N117 Nafion membranes are resolved in vapor-sorption experiments and during fuel cell and hydrogen-pump operation. The measured in situ water content of a restricted membrane at 80 degrees C is shown to agree with ex situ gravimetric measurements of free-swelling membranes over a water activity range of 0.5 to 1.0 including at liquid equilibration. Schroeder's paradox was verified by in situ water-content measurements which go from a high value at supersaturated or liquid conditions to a lower one with fully saturated vapor. At open circuit and during fuel cell operation, the measured water content indicates that the membrane is operating between the vapor-and liquid-equilibrated states.

171

Membrane-Based Absorption Refrigeration Systems: Nanoengineered Membrane-Based Absorption Cooling for Buildings Using Unconcentrated Solar & Waste Heat  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

BEETIT Project: UFL is improving a refrigeration system that uses low quality heat to provide the energy needed to drive cooling. This system, known as absorption refrigeration system (ARS), typically consists of large coils that transfer heat. Unfortunately, these large heat exchanger coils are responsible for bulkiness and high cost of ARS. UFL is using new materials as well as system design innovations to develop nanoengineered membranes to allow for enhanced heat exchange that reduces bulkiness. UFL’s design allows for compact, cheaper and more reliable use of ARS that use solar or waste heat.

None

2010-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

172

NETL: Hydrogen Selective Exfoliated Zeolite Membranes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Designing and Validating Ternay Pd Alloys for Optimum Sulfur/Carbon Resistance Designing and Validating Ternay Pd Alloys for Optimum Sulfur/Carbon Resistance Project No.: DE-FE0001181 Gas Permeation Cell and Test Stand Pall Corporation is developing an economically-viable hydrogen/carbon dioxide (H2/CO2) separation membrane system that would allow efficient capture of CO2 at high temperature and pressure from gasified coal in the presence of typical contaminants. Goals for the project include creating an advanced palladium alloy for optimum hydrogen separation performance using combinatorial material methods for high-throughput screening, testing, and characterization and demonstrating durability by long term testing of a pilot membrane module at a commercial coal gasification facility. The advantages of this technology are reduction of CO2 compression costs, lack of need for both upstream and downstream heat exchange and complex heat integration, and the potential for integration with water gas shift in a single compact membrane reactor system.

173

Ab initio studies of ionization potentials of hydrated hydroxide and hydronium  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The ionization potential distributions of hydrated hydroxide and hydronium are computed with many-body approach for electron excitations with configurations generated by {\\it ab initio} molecular dynamics. The experimental features are well reproduced and found to be closely related to the molecular excitations. In the stable configurations, the ionization potential is mainly perturbed by water molecules within the first solvation shell. On the other hand, electron excitation is delocalized on both proton receiving and donating complex during proton transfer, which shifts the excitation energies and broadens the spectra for both hydrated ions.

Swartz, Charles W

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

174

Membranes Obtained from PA6/HDPE Blends Via Precipitation by ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The results showed the characteristic pores for microfiltration process. .... of Transparent Conductive Films of Magnesium Hydroxide Based Compounds.

175

Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this quarter a systematic analysis on the decomposition behavior of the OTM membranes at air and nitrogen were initiated to understand the structural and stoichiometric changes associated with elevated temperatures. Evaluation of the flexural strengths using 4-point bend test was also started for the dual phase membranes. Initial results on the synthesis of dual phase composite materials have been obtained. The measurements have focused on the compatibility of mixed conductors with the pure ionic conductors yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and gadolinium doped ceria (GDC). The initial results obtained for three different mixed conductors suggest that (GDC) is the better choice. A new membrane permeation system has been designed and tested and sintering studies of biphasic systems are in progress.

S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

2006-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

176

The Automorphic Membrane  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We present a 1-loop toroidal membrane winding sum reproducing the conjectured $M$-theory, four-graviton, eight derivative, $R^4$ amplitude. The $U$-duality and toroidal membrane world-volume modular groups appear as a Howe dual pair in a larger, exceptional, group. A detailed analysis is carried out for $M$-theory compactified on a 3-torus, where the target-space $Sl(3,\\Zint)\\times Sl(2,\\Zint)$ $U$-duality and $Sl(3,\\Zint)$ world-volume modular groups are embedded in $E_{6(6)}(\\Zint)$. Unlike previous semi-classical expansions, $U$-duality is built in manifestly and realized at the quantum level thanks to Fourier invariance of cubic characters. In addition to winding modes, a pair of new discrete, flux-like, quantum numbers are necessary to ensure invariance under the larger group. The action for these modes is of Born-Infeld type, interpolating between standard Polyakov and Nambu-Goto membrane actions. After integration over the membrane moduli, we recover the known $R^4$ amplitude, including membrane instantons. Divergences are disposed of by trading the non-compact volume integration for a compact integral over the two variables conjugate to the fluxes -- a constant term computation in mathematical parlance. As byproducts, we suggest that, in line with membrane/fivebrane duality, the $E_6$ theta series also describes five-branes wrapped on $T^6$ in a manifestly U-duality invariant way. In addition we uncover a new action of $E_6$ on ten dimensional pure spinors, which may have implications for ten dimensional super Yang--Mills theory. An extensive review of $Sl(3)$ automorphic forms is included in an Appendix.

Boris Pioline; Andrew Waldron

2004-04-02T23:59:59.000Z

177

Supported microporous ceramic membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for permformation of microporous ceramic membranes onto a porous support includes placing a colloidal suspension of metal or metal oxide particles on one side of the porous support and exposing the other side of the porous support to a drying stream of gas or a reactive gas stream so that the particles are deposited on the drying side of the support as a gel. The gel so deposited can be sintered to form a supported ceramic membrane useful for ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, or molecular sieving having mean pore sizes less than 100 Angstroms.

Webster, Elizabeth (Madison, WI); Anderson, Marc (Madison, WI)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

178

Supported microporous ceramic membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the formation of microporous ceramic membranes onto a porous support includes placing a colloidal suspension of metal or metal oxide particles on one side of the porous support and exposing the other side of the porous support to a drying stream of gas or a reactive gas stream so that the particles are deposited on the drying side of the support as a gel. The gel so deposited can be sintered to form a supported ceramic membrane useful for ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis, or molecular sieving having mean pore sizes less than 100 Angstroms. 4 figures.

Webster, E.; Anderson, M.

1993-12-14T23:59:59.000Z

179

Battery utilizing ceramic membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A thin film battery is disclosed based on the use of ceramic membrane technology. The battery includes a pair of conductive collectors on which the materials for the anode and the cathode may be spin coated. The separator is formed of a porous metal oxide ceramic membrane impregnated with electrolyte so that electrical separation is maintained while ion mobility is also maintained. The entire battery can be made less than 10 microns thick while generating a potential in the 1 volt range. 2 figs.

Yahnke, M.S.; Shlomo, G.; Anderson, M.A.

1994-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

180

Final Report - Membranes and MEA's for Dry, Hot Operating Conditions  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The focus of this program was to develop a new Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) which can operate under hotter, dryer conditions than the state of the art membranes today and integrate it into a Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA). These MEA's should meet the performance and durability requirements outlined in the solicitation, operating under low humidification conditions and at temperatures ranging from -20���ºC to 120���ºC, to meet 2010 DOE technical targets for membranes. This membrane should operate under low humidification conditions and at temperatures ranging from -20���ºC to 120���ºC in order to meet DOE HFCIT 2010 commercialization targets for automotive fuel cells. Membranes developed in this program may also have improved durability and performance characteristics making them useful in stationary fuel cell applications. The new membranes, and the MEA�¢����s comprising them, should be manufacturable at high volumes and at costs which can meet industry and DOE targets. This work included: A) Studies to better understand factors controlling proton transport within the electrolyte membrane, mechanisms of polymer degradation (in situ and ex situ) and membrane durability in an MEA; B) Development of new polymers with increased proton conductivity over the range of temperatures from -20���ºC to 120���ºC and at lower levels of humidification and with improved chemical and mechanical stability; C) Development of new membrane additives for increased durability and conductivity under these dry conditions; D) Integration of these new materials into membranes and membranes into MEA�¢����s, including catalyst and gas diffusion layer selection and integration; E) Verification that these materials can be made using processes which are scalable to commercial volumes using cost effective methods; F) MEA testing in single cells using realistic automotive testing protocols. This project addresses technical barriers A (Durability) and C (Performance) from the Fuel Cells section of the 2005 Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Multi-Year R&D Plan. In the course of this four-year program we developed a new PEM with improved proton conductivity, chemical stability and mechanical stability. We incorporated this new membrane into MEAs and evaluated performance and durability.

Hamrock, Steven J.

2011-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydroxide exchange membranes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


181

Synthesis and release behavior of composites of camptothecin and layered double hydroxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A simple method, reconstruction of calcinated layered double hydroxides (CLDH) in an organic (ethanol)-water mixed solvent medium containing drug, was developed to intercalate partially a non-ionic and poorly water-soluble drug (camptothecin) into the gallery of layered double hydroxides (LDHs) to form the drug-LDH composites. The purpose of choosing organic-water mixed solvent is to increase remarkably the solubility of camptothecin (CPT) in the reconstruction medium. A probable morphology of CPT molecules in the gallery of LDHs is that CPT molecules arrange as monolayer with the long axis parallel to the LDH layers. The in vitro drug release from the composites was remarkably lower than that from the corresponding physical mixture, which shows these drug-inorganic composites can be used as a potential drug delivery system. - Graphical abstract: A simple method, reconstruction of calcinated LDHs in an organic-water medium containing drug, was developed to intercalate non-ionic and poorly water-soluble camptothecin into the gallery of LDHs.

Dong Lun [School of Medicine, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Yan Li [Key Laboratory for Colloid and Interface Chemistry of Education Ministry, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Hou Wanguo, E-mail: wghou@sdu.edu.c [Key Laboratory for Colloid and Interface Chemistry of Education Ministry, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266042 (China); Liu Shaojie [Key Laboratory for Colloid and Interface Chemistry of Education Ministry, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)

2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

182

The Reorientation Mechanism of Hydroxide Ions in Water: A Molecular Dynamics Study  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

simulations with polarizable potential models. Two major solvation structures of OH- were suggested by our study. One of which has four accepted hydrogen bonds from water and the other has five accepted hydrogen bonds. A weak hydrogen bond donated by the hydroxide ion was observed in our simulations. The simulated reorientation relaxation times of OH- are in qualitative agreement with CTTS experiments. We propose a two-step mechanism for the reorientation of hydroxide ions in water. First, the reorientation of OH- is initiated by the coupled translation with water molecules in its first solvation shell. Second, the OH- hydrogen relaxes to the minimum energy state. The rate-limiting step in this mechanism is the first step, translation diffusion of the first solvation shell water molecules. The activation energies of reorientation of OH- and translation of H2O determined from our simulations are 22.5 and 18.5 kJ/mol, respectively. These values fall in the range of the measured data. This work was supported by the US Department of energy's Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences program. Pacific Northwest national Laboratory is operated by Battelle for the US Department of Energy.

Sun, Xiuquan; Yoo, Soohaeng; Xantheas, Sotiris S.; Dang, Liem X.

2009-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

183

Hydrogen-selective membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrogen-selective membrane comprises a tubular porous ceramic support having a palladium metal layer deposited on an inside surface of the ceramic support. The thickness of the palladium layer is greater than about 10 {micro}m but typically less than about 20 {micro}m. The hydrogen permeation rate of the membrane is greater than about 1.0 moles/m{sup 2} s at a temperature of greater than about 500 C and a transmembrane pressure difference of about 1,500 kPa. Moreover, the hydrogen-to-nitrogen selectivity is greater than about 600 at a temperature of greater than about 500 C and a transmembrane pressure of about 700 kPa. Hydrogen can be separated from a mixture of gases using the membrane. The method may include the step of heating the mixture of gases to a temperature of greater than about 400 C and less than about 1000 C before the step of flowing the mixture of gases past the membrane. The mixture of gases may include ammonia. The ammonia typically is decomposed to provide nitrogen and hydrogen using a catalyst such as nickel. The catalyst may be placed inside the tubular ceramic support. The mixture of gases may be supplied by an industrial process such as the mixture of exhaust gases from the IGCC process. 9 figs.

Collins, J.P.; Way, J.D.

1997-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

184

Hydrogen-Selective Membrane  

SciTech Connect

A hydrogen-selective membrane comprises a tubular porous ceramic support having a palladium metal layer deposited on an inside surface of the ceramic support. The thickness of the palladium layer is greater than about 10 .mu.m but typically less than about 20 .mu.m. The hydrogen permeation rate of the membrane is greater than about 1.0 moles/m.sup.2.s at a temperature of greater than about 500.degree. C. and a transmembrane pressure difference of about 1,500 kPa. Moreover, the hydrogen-to-nitrogen selectivity is greater than about 600 at a temperature of greater than about 500.degree. C. and a transmembrane pressure of about 700 kPa. Hydrogen can be separated from a mixture of gases using the membrane. The method may include the step of heating the mixture of gases to a temperature of greater than about 400.degree. C. and less than about 1000.degree. C. before the step of flowing the mixture of gases past the membrane. The mixture of gases may include ammonia. The ammonia typically is decomposed to provide nitrogen and hydrogen using a catalyst such as nickel. The catalyst may be placed inside the tubular ceramic support. The mixture of gases may be supplied by an industrial process such as the mixture of exhaust gases from the IGCC process.

Collins, John P. (Boulder, CO); Way, J. Douglas (Boulder, CO)

1995-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

185

Hydrogen-selective membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrogen-selective membrane comprises a tubular porous ceramic support having a palladium metal layer deposited on an inside surface of the ceramic support. The thickness of the palladium layer is greater than about 10 .mu.m but typically less than about 20 .mu.m. The hydrogen permeation rate of the membrane is greater than about 1.0 moles/m.sup.2. s at a temperature of greater than about 500.degree. C. and a transmembrane pressure difference of about 1,500 kPa. Moreover, the hydrogen-to-nitrogen selectivity is greater than about 600 at a temperature of greater than about 500.degree. C. and a transmembrane pressure of about 700 kPa. Hydrogen can be separated from a mixture of gases using the membrane. The method may include the step of heating the mixture of gases to a temperature of greater than about 400.degree. C. and less than about 1000.degree. C. before the step of flowing the mixture of gases past the membrane. The mixture of gases may include ammonia. The ammonia typically is decomposed to provide nitrogen and hydrogen using a catalyst such as nickel. The catalyst may be placed inside the tubular ceramic support. The mixture of gases may be supplied by an industrial process such as the mixture of exhaust gases from the IGCC process.

Collins, John P. (Boulder, CO); Way, J. Douglas (Boulder, CO)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

186

OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES  

SciTech Connect

In the present quarter, the possibility of using a more complex interfacial engineering approach to the development of reliable and stable oxygen transport perovskite ceramic membranes/metal seals is discussed. Experiments are presented and ceramic/metal interactions are characterized. Crack growth and fracture toughness of the membrane in the reducing conditions are also discussed. Future work regarding this approach is proposed are evaluated for strength and fracture in oxygen gradient conditions. Oxygen gradients are created in tubular membranes by insulating the inner surface from the reducing environment by platinum foils. Fracture in these test conditions is observed to have a gradient in trans and inter-granular fracture as opposed to pure trans-granular fracture observed in homogeneous conditions. Fracture gradients are reasoned to be due to oxygen gradient set up in the membrane, variation in stoichiometry across the thickness and due to varying decomposition of the parent perovskite. The studies are useful in predicting fracture criterion in actual reactor conditions and in understanding the initial evolution of fracture processes.

Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

187

Hydrogen-selective membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrogen-selective membrane comprises a tubular porous ceramic support having a palladium metal layer deposited on an inside surface of the ceramic support. The thickness of the palladium layer is greater than about 10 {micro}m but typically less than about 20 {micro}m. The hydrogen permeation rate of the membrane is greater than about 1.0 moles/m{sup 2}s at a temperature of greater than about 500 C and a transmembrane pressure difference of about 1,500 kPa. Moreover, the hydrogen-to-nitrogen selectivity is greater than about 600 at a temperature of greater than about 500 C and a transmembrane pressure of about 700 kPa. Hydrogen can be separated from a mixture of gases using the membrane. The method may include the step of heating the mixture of gases to a temperature of greater than about 400 C and less than about 1000 C before the step of flowing the mixture of gases past the membrane. The mixture of gases may include ammonia. The ammonia typically is decomposed to provide nitrogen and hydrogen using a catalyst such as nickel. The catalyst may be placed inside the tubular ceramic support. The mixture of gases may be supplied by an industrial process such as the mixture of exhaust gases from the IGCC process. 9 figs.

Collins, J.P.; Way, J.D.

1995-09-19T23:59:59.000Z

188

Heat exchanger-accumulator  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

What is disclosed is a heat exchanger-accumulator for vaporizing a refrigerant or the like, characterized by an upright pressure vessel having a top, bottom and side walls; an inlet conduit eccentrically and sealingly penetrating through the top; a tubular overflow chamber disposed within the vessel and sealingly connected with the bottom so as to define an annular outer volumetric chamber for receiving refrigerant; a heat transfer coil disposed in the outer volumetric chamber for vaporizing the liquid refrigerant that accumulates there; the heat transfer coil defining a passageway for circulating an externally supplied heat exchange fluid; transferring heat efficiently from the fluid; and freely allowing vaporized refrigerant to escape upwardly from the liquid refrigerant; and a refrigerant discharge conduit penetrating sealingly through the top and traversing substantially the length of the pressurized vessel downwardly and upwardly such that its inlet is near the top of the pressurized vessel so as to provide a means for transporting refrigerant vapor from the vessel. The refrigerant discharge conduit has metering orifices, or passageways, penetrating laterally through its walls near the bottom, communicating respectively interiorly and exteriorly of the overflow chamber for controllably carrying small amounts of liquid refrigerant and oil to the effluent stream of refrigerant gas.

Ecker, Amir L. (Dallas, TX)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

189

HYDROGEN SEPARATION MEMBRANES  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A likely membrane for future testing of high-temperature hydrogen separation from a gasification product stream was targeted as an inorganic analog of a dense-metal membrane, where the hydrogen would dissolve into and diffuse through the membrane structure. An amorphous membrane such as zinc sulfide appeared to be promising. Previously, ZnS film coating tests had been performed using an electron-beam vacuum coating instrument, with zinc films successfully applied to glass substrates. The coatings appeared relatively stable in air and in a simple simulated gasification atmosphere at elevated temperature. Because the electron-beam coating instrument suffered irreparable breakdown, several alternative methods were tested in an effort to produce a nitrogen-impermeable, hydrogen-permeable membrane on porous sintered steel substrates. None of the preparation methods proved successful in sealing the porous substrate against nitrogen gas. To provide a nitrogen-impermeable ZnS material to test for hydrogen permeability, two ZnS infrared sample windows were purchased. These relatively thick ''membranes'' did not show measurable permeation of hydrogen, either due to lack of absorption or a negligible permeation rate due to their thickness. To determine if hydrogen was indeed adsorbed, thermogravimetric and differential thermal analyses tests were performed on samples of ZnS powder. A significant uptake of hydrogen gas occurred, corresponding to a maximum of 1 mole H{sub 2} per 1 mole ZnS at a temperature of 175 C. The hydrogen remained in the material at ambient temperature in a hydrogen atmosphere, but approximately 50% would be removed in argon. Reheating in a hydrogen atmosphere resulted in no additional hydrogen uptake. Differential scanning calorimetry indicated that the hydrogen uptake was probably due to the formation of a zinc-sulfur-hydrogen species resulting in the formation of hydrogen sulfide. The zinc sulfide was found to be unstable above approximately 200 C, probably with the reduction to metallic zinc with the evolution of hydrogen sulfide. The work has shown that ZnS is not a viable candidate for a high-temperature hydrogen separation membrane.

Donald P. McCollor; John P. Kay

1999-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

190

Chemically and compositionally modified solid solution disordered multiphase nickel hydroxide positive electrode for alkaline rechargeable electrochemical cells  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A high capacity, long cycle life positive electrode for use in an alkaline rechargeable electrochemical cell comprising: a solid solution nickel hydroxide material having a multiphase structure that comprises at least one polycrystalline .gamma.-phase including a polycrystalline .gamma.-phase unit cell comprising spacedly disposed plates with at least one chemical modifier incorporated around the plates, the plates having a range of stable intersheet distances corresponding to a 2.sup.+ oxidation state and a 3.5.sup.+, or greater, oxidation state; and at least one compositional modifier incorporated into the solid solution nickel hydroxide material to promote the multiphase structure.

Ovshinsky, Stanford R. (Bloomfield Hills, MI); Corrigan, Dennis (Troy, MI); Venkatesan, Srini (Southfield, MI); Young, Rosa (Troy, MI); Fierro, Christian (Troy, MI); Fetcenko, Michael A. (Rochester Hills, MI)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

191

Ceramic membranes having macroscopic channels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods have been developed to make porous ceramic membranes having macroscopic channels therethrough. The novel membranes are formed by temporarily supporting the sol-gel membrane precursor on an organic support which is ultimately removed from the interior of the membrane, preferably by pyrolysis or by chemical destruction. The organic support may also include an inorganic metal portion that remains on destruction of the organic portion, providing structural support and/or chemical reactivity to the membrane. The channels formed when the organic support is destroyed provide the ability to withdraw small catalytic products or size-separated molecules from the metal oxide membrane. In addition, the channel-containing membranes retain all of the advantages of existing porous ceramic membranes.

Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI); Peterson, Reid A. (Madison, WI)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

192

Ceramic membranes having macroscopic channels  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Methods have been developed to make porous ceramic membranes having macroscopic channels therethrough. The novel membranes are formed by temporarily supporting the sol-gel membrane precursor on an organic support which is ultimately removed from the interior of the membrane, preferably by pyrolysis or by chemical destruction. The organic support may also include an inorganic metal portion that remains on destruction of the organic portion, providing structural support and/or chemical reactivity to the membrane. The channels formed when the organic support is destroyed provide the ability to withdraw small catalytic products or size-separated molecules from the metal oxide membrane. In addition, the channel-containing membranes retain all of the advantages of existing porous ceramic membranes. 1 fig.

Anderson, M.A.; Peterson, R.A.

1996-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

193

Copper Palladium Hydrogen Separation Membranes  

This patent-pending technology, “Cu-Pd Hydrogen Separation Membranes with Reduced Palladium Content and Improved Performance,” consists of copper-palladium alloy compositions for hydrogen separation membranes that use less palladium and have a ...

194

Ion exchange technology assessment report  

SciTech Connect

In the execution of its charter, the SRS Ion Exchange Technology Assessment Team has determined that ion exchange (IX) technology has evolved to the point where it should now be considered as a viable alternative to the SRS reference ITP/LW/PH process. The ion exchange media available today offer the ability to design ion exchange processing systems tailored to the unique physical and chemical properties of SRS soluble HLW`s. The technical assessment of IX technology and its applicability to the processing of SRS soluble HLW has demonstrated that IX is unquestionably a viable technology. A task team was chartered to evaluate the technology of ion exchange and its potential for replacing the present In-Tank Precipitation and proposed Late Wash processes to remove Cs, Sr, and Pu from soluble salt solutions at the Savannah River Site. This report documents the ion exchange technology assessment and conclusions of the task team.

Duhn, E.F.

1992-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

195

Lead Research and Development Activity for DOE's High Temperature, Low Relative Humidity Membrane Program (Topic 2)  

SciTech Connect

The Department of Energy’s High Temperature, Low Relative Humidity Membrane Program was begun in 2006 with the Florida Solar Energy Center (FSEC) as the lead organization. During the first three years of the program, FSEC was tasked with developing non-Nafion® proton exchange membranes with improved conductivity for fuel cells. Additionally, FSEC was responsible for developing protocols for the measurement of in-plane conductivity, providing conductivity measurements for the other funded teams, developing a method for through-plane conductivity and organizing and holding semiannual meetings of the High Temperature Membrane Working Group (HTMWG). The FSEC membrane research focused on the development of supported poly[perfluorosulfonic acid] (PFSA) – Teflon membranes and a hydrocarbon membrane, sulfonated poly(ether ether ketone). The fourth generation of the PFSA membrane (designated FSEC-4) came close to, but did not meet, the Go/No-Go milestone of 0.1 S/cm at 50% relative humidity at 120 °C. In-plane conductivity of membranes provided by the funded teams was measured and reported to the teams and DOE. Late in the third year of the program, DOE used this data and other factors to decide upon the teams to continue in the program. The teams that continued provided promising membranes to FSEC for development of membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) that could be tested in an operating fuel cell. FSEC worked closely with each team to provide customized support. A logic flow chart was developed and discussed before MEA fabrication or any testing began. Of the five teams supported, by the end of the project, membranes from two of the teams were easily manufactured into MEAs and successfully characterized for performance. One of these teams exceeded performance targets, while the other requires further optimization. An additional team developed a membrane that shows great promise for significantly reducing membrane costs and increasing membrane lifetime.

James Fenton, PhD; Darlene Slattery, PhD; Nahid Mohajeri, PhD

2012-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

196

Oxygen-permeable ceramic membranes for gas separation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Mixed-conducting oxides have a wide range of applications, including fuel cells, gas separation systems, sensors, and electrocatalytic equipment. Dense ceramic membranes made of mixed-conducting oxides are particularly attractive for gas separation and methane conversion processes. Membranes made of Sr-Fe-Co oxide, which exhibits high combined electronic and oxygen ionic conductivities, can be used to selectively transport oxygen during the partial oxidation of methane to synthesis gas (syngas, i.e., CO + H{sub 2}). The authors have fabricated tubular Sr{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}CoO{sub 6+{delta}} membranes and tested them (some for more than 1,000 h) in a methane conversion reactor that was operating at 850--950 C. An oxygen permeation flux of {approx} 10 scc/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} min was obtained at 900 C in a tubular membrane with a wall thickness of 0.75 mm. Using a gas-tight electrochemical cell, the authors have also measured the steady-state oxygen permeability of flat Sr{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}CoO{sub 6+{delta}} membranes as a function of temperature and oxygen partial pressure(pO{sub 2}). Steady-state oxygen permeability increases with increasing temperature and with the difference in pO{sub 2} on the two sides of the membrane. At 900 C, an oxygen permeability of {approx} 2.5 scc/cm{sup 2} {center_dot} min was obtained in a 2.9-mm-thick membrane. This value agrees with that obtained in methane conversion reactor experiments. Current-voltage (I-V) characteristics determined in the gas-tight cell indicate that bulk effect, rather than surface exchange effect, is the main limiting factor for oxygen permeation of {approx} 1-mm-thick Sr{sub 2}Fe{sub 2}CoO{sub 6+{delta}} membranes at elevated temperatures (> 650 C).

Balachandran, U.; Ma, B.; Maiya, P.S.; Dusek, J.T.; Mieville, R.L.; Picciolo, J.J.

1998-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

197

Hydrogen separation using silica membranes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Silica membranes were synthesized on tubular supports of alumina by dipping in silica colloidal solutions. The quality and the performance of the silica membranes were tested by experiments on single gas permeation and gas separation of mixed N2, ... Keywords: Knudsen diffusion, colloidal solution, gas permeation, hydrogen separation, silica membranes

Salvador Alfaroa; Miguel A. Valenzuelaa; Pedro Bosch

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

198

Exchange rate determination in Indonesia.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This thesis examines the options for adopting normative and prescriptive models of exchange rate determination suitable for developed and developing countries. It also develops a… (more)

Rusydi, Mohammad

2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

199

Flat plate heat exchangers  

SciTech Connect

A lightweight flat plate heat exchanger comprised of two or more essentially parallel flat plates which are formed and arranged to provide fluid flow passages between the plates. New combinations of plastic plates include the usage of transparent plastic foam and honeycomb structures. Improved shapes of flow passages include the usage of flow nozzles, flow diffusers, and jet pumps to increase fluid flow and heat transfer. The invention includes the usage of transparent plastic foam plates which are shaped to concentrate solar energy onto plastic tubes. Clear plastic tubes containing black heat transfer fluid are included. The invention includes the usage of spiral flow channels within plastic foam plates. Six different embodiments of the invention are included. Five of the embodiments could be used as efficient lightweight solar collectors.

Berringer, R.T.

1981-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

200

Highly Selective H2 Separation Zeolite Membranes for Coal Gasification Membrane Reactor Applications  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Zeolite membranes are thermally, chemically, and mechanically stable. They also have tunable molecular sieving and catalytic ability. These unique properties make zeolite membrane an excellent candidate for use in catalytic membrane reactor applications related to coal conversion and gasification, which need high temperature and high pressure range separation in chemically challenging environment where existing technologies are inefficient or unable to operate. Small pore, good quality, and thin zeolite membranes are needed for highly selective H2 separation from other light gases (CO2, CH4, CO). However, current zeolite membranes have either too big zeolite pores or a large number of defects and have not been successful for H2 separation from light gases. The objective of this study is to develop zeolite membranes that are more suitable for H2 separation. In an effort to tune the size of zeolite pores and/or to decrease the number of defects, medium-pore zeolite B-ZSM-5 (MFI) membranes were synthesized and silylated. Silylation on B-ZSM-5 crystals reduced MFI-zeolite pore volume, but had little effect on CO2 and CH4 adsorption. Silylation on B-ZSM-5 membranes increased H2 selectivity both in single component and in mixtures with CO2, CH4, or N2. Single gas and binary mixtures of H2/CO2 and H2/CH4 were permeated through silylated B-ZSM-5 membranes at feed pressures up to 1.7 MPa and temperatures up to 773 K. For one B-ZSM-5 membrane after silylation, the H2/CO2 separation selectivity at 473 K increased from 1.4 to 37, whereas the H2/CH4 separation selectivity increased from 1.6 to 33. Hydrogen permeance through a silylated BZSM-5 membrane was activated with activation energy of {approx}10 kJ/mol, but the CO2 and CH4 permeances decreased slightly with temperature in both single gas and in mixtures. Therefore, the H2 permeance and H2/CO2 and H2/CH4 separation selectivities increased with temperature. At 673 K, the H2 permeance was 1.0x10-7 mol{center_dot}m-2{center_dot}s-1{center_dot}Pa-1, and the H2/CO2 separation selectivity was 47. Above 673 K, the silylated membrane catalyzed reverse water gas shift reaction and still separated H2 with high selectivity; and it was thermally stable. However, silylation decreased H2 permeance more than one order of magnitude. Increasing the membrane feed pressure increased the H2 flux and the H2 mole fraction in the permeate stream for both H2/CO2 and H2/CH4 mixtures. The H2 separation performance of the silylated B-ZSM-5 membranes depended on the initial membrane quality and acidity, as well as the silane precursors. Another approach used in this study is optimizing the synthesis of small-pore SAPO-34 (CHA) membranes and/or modifying SAPO-34 membranes by silylation or ion exchange. For SAPO-34 membranes, strong CO2 adsorption inhibited H2 adsorption and decreased H2 permeances, especially at low temperatures. At 253 K, CO2/H2 separation selectivities of a SAPO-34 membrane were greater than 100 with CO2 permeances of about 3 x 10-8 mol{center_dot}m-2{center_dot}s-1{center_dot}Pa-1. The high reverse-selectivity of the SAPO-34 membranes can minimize H2 recompression because H2 remained in the retentate stream at a higher pressure. The CO2/H2 separation selectivity exhibited a maximum with CO2 feed concentration possibly caused by a maximum in the CO2/H2 sorption selectivity with increased CO2 partial pressure. The SAPO-34 membrane separated H2 from CH4 because CH4 is close to the SAPO-34 pore size so its diffusivity (ABSTRACT TRUNCATED)

Mei Hong; Richard Noble; John Falconer

2007-09-24T23:59:59.000Z

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201

OXYGEN TRANSPORT CERAMIC MEMBRANES  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the present quarter, experiments are presented on ceramic/metal interactions of Zirconia/Ni-B-Si system and with a thin Ti coating deposited on zirconia surface. Processing of perovskites of LSC, LSF and LSCF composition for evaluation of mechanical properties as a function of environment are begun. The studies are to be in parallel with LSFCO composition to characterize the segregation of cations and slow crack growth in environmental conditions. La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-d} has also been characterized for paramagnetic ordering at room temperature and the evolution of magnetic moments as a function of temperature are investigated. Investigation on the thermodynamic properties of the membrane materials are continued to develop a complete model for the membrane transport.

Dr. Sukumar Bandopadhyay; Dr. Nagendra Nagabhushana

2003-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

202

Membrane Stability Testing  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Electrosynthesis Co. Inc. (ESC) was contracted by the Westinghouse Savannah River Company to investigate the long term performance and durability of cell components (anode, membrane, cathode) in an electrochemical caustic recovery process using a simulated SRC liquid waste as anolyte solution. This report details the results of two long-term studies conducted using an ICI FM01 flow cell. This cell is designed and has previously been demonstrated to scale up directly into the commercial scale ICI FM21 cell.

Hobbs, D.T. [Westinghouse Savannah River Company, AIKEN, SC (United States)

1997-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

203

Novel Catalytic Membrane Reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

There are many industrial catalytic organic reversible reactions with amines or alcohols that have water as one of the products. Many of these reactions are homogeneously catalyzed. In all cases removal of water facilitates the reaction and produces more of the desired chemical product. By shifting the reaction to right we produce more chemical product with little or no additional capital investment. Many of these reactions can also relate to bioprocesses. Given the large number of water-organic compound separations achievable and the ability of the Compact Membrane Systems, Inc. (CMS) perfluoro membranes to withstand these harsh operating conditions, this is an ideal demonstration system for the water-of-reaction removal using a membrane reactor. Enhanced reaction synthesis is consistent with the DOE objective to lower the energy intensity of U.S. industry 25% by 2017 in accord with the Energy Policy Act of 2005 and to improve the United States manufacturing competitiveness. The objective of this program is to develop the platform technology for enhancing homogeneous catalytic chemical syntheses.

Stuart Nemser, PhD

2010-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

204

Entropic Tension in Crowded Membranes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Unlike their model membrane counterparts, biological membranes are richly decorated with a heterogeneous assembly of membrane proteins. These proteins are so tightly packed that their excluded area interactions can alter the free energy landscape controlling the conformational transitions suffered by such proteins. For membrane channels, this effect can alter the critical membrane tension at which they undergo a transition from a closed to an open state, and therefore influence protein function in vivo. Despite their obvious importance, crowding phenomena in membranes are much less well studied than in the cytoplasm. Using statistical mechanics results for hard disk liquids, we show that crowding induces an entropic tension in the membrane, which influences transitions that alter the projected area and circumference of a membrane protein. As a specific case study in this effect, we consider the impact of crowding on the gating properties of bacterial mechanosensitive membrane channels, which are thought to confer osmoprotection when these cells are subjected to osmotic shock. We find that crowding can alter the gating energies by more than 2 kBT in physiological conditions, a substantial fraction of the total gating energies in some cases. Given the ubiquity of membrane crowding, the nonspecific nature of excluded volume interactions, and the fact that the function of many membrane proteins involve significant

Martin Lindén; Pierre Sens; Rob Phillips

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

205

APPLICATIONS OF LAYERED DOUBLE HYDROXIDES IN REMOVING OXYANIONS FROM OIL REFINING AND COAL MINING WASTEWATER  

SciTech Connect

Western Research Institute (WRI), in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), conducted a study of using the layered double hydroxides (LDH) as filter material to remove microorganisms, large biological molecules, certain anions and toxic oxyanions from various waste streams, including wastewater from refineries. Results demonstrate that LDH has a high adsorbing capability to those compounds with negative surface charge. Constituents studied include model bacteria, viruses, arsenic, selenium, vanadium, diesel range hydrocarbons, methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), mixed petroleum constituents, humic materials and anions. This project also attempted to modify the physical structure of LDH for the application as a filtration material. Flow characterizations of the modified LDH materials were also investigated. Results to date indicate that LDH is a cost-effective new material to be used for wastewater treatment, especially for the treatment of anions and oxyanions.

Song Jin; Paul Fallgren

2006-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

206

Hydration, Swelling, Interlayer Structure, and Hydrogen Bonding in Organolayered Double Hydroxides: Insights from Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Citrate-Intercalated  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

citrate, C6H5O7 3- , as the charge balancing interlayer anion provides new molecular scale insight hydration levels, in contrast to the preferred low hydration states of most LDHs intercalated with small. Introduction Layered double hydroxides (LDHs), also known as hydro- talcite-like compounds, form an important

Kalinichev, Andrey G.

207

Partnership in key exchange protocols  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, we investigate the notion of partnership as found in security models for key exchange protocols. Several different approaches have been pursued to define partnership, with varying degrees of success. We aim to provide an overview and criticism ... Keywords: key exchange, partnership, session identifier

Kazukuni Kobara; Seonghan Shin; Mario Strefler

2009-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

208

Technology Performance Exchange (Fact Sheet)  

SciTech Connect

This fact sheet, 'The Technology Performance Exchange' will be presented at the ET Summit, held at the Pasadena Convention Center on October 15-17, 2012. The Technology Performance Exchange will be a centralized, Web-based portal for finding and sharing energy performance data for commercial building technologies.

Not Available

2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

209

Synthesis and characterization of 5-fluorocytosine intercalated Zn-Al layered double hydroxide  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In this paper, the intercalation of 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) into a layered inorganic host, Zn-Al layered double hydroxide (LDH), has been carried out using coprecipitation method to obtain 5-FC/LDH nanohybrids. The intercalated amount (A{sub In}) of 5-FC into the LDH is remarkably dependent on the molar ratio (R{sub F/M}) of 5-FC to metal ions and the pH of coprecipitation system. The morphology of 5-FC molecules in 5-FC/LDH nanohybrids is dependent on the A{sub In}. It is interestingly found that the morphology of the nanohybrid particles may be changed with the increase of R{sub F/M} from hexagonal plate particles to threadlike particles. The in vitro drug release from the nanohybrids is remarkably lower than that from the corresponding physical mixture and pristine 5-FC at either pH 4.8 or pH 7.5. In addition, the release rate of 5-FC from the nanohybrid at pH 7.5 is remarkably lower than that at pH 4.8, this is due to a possible difference in the release mechanism. The obtained results show these drug-inorganic nanohybrids can be used as a potential drug delivery system. - Graphical abstract: The 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC) has been intercalated into layered double hydroxide using coprecipitation method. The morphology of 5-FC molecules in obtained nanohybrids was dependent on the intercalated amount of 5-FC. The in vitro drug release from the nanohybrids was remarkably lower than that from the corresponding physical mixture, which shows these drug-inorganic nanohybrids can be used as a potential drug delivery system.

Liu Chunxia [Key Laboratory for Colloid and Interface Chemistry of Education Ministry, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Hou Wanguo [Key Laboratory for Colloid and Interface Chemistry of Education Ministry, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Qingdao University of Science and Technology, Qingdao 266042 (China)], E-mail: wghou@sdu.edu.cn; Li Lifang [College of Chemistry and Material Science, Shandong Agriculture University, Taian 271018 (China); Li Yan; Liu Shaojie [Key Laboratory for Colloid and Interface Chemistry of Education Ministry, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)

2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

210

High Temperature Heat Exchanger Project  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The UNLV Research Foundation assembled a research consortium for high temperature heat exchanger design and materials compatibility and performance comprised of university and private industry partners under the auspices of the US DOE-NE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative in October 2003. The objectives of the consortium were to conduct investigations of candidate materials for high temperature heat exchanger componets in hydrogen production processes and design and perform prototypical testing of heat exchangers. The initial research of the consortium focused on the intermediate heat exchanger (located between the nuclear reactor and hydrogen production plan) and the components for the hydrogen iodine decomposition process and sulfuric acid decomposition process. These heat exchanger components were deemed the most challenging from a materials performance and compatibility perspective

Anthony E. Hechanova, Ph.D.

2008-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

211

Oxygen Transport Membranes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The focus of this research was to develop new membrane materials by synthesizing different compounds and determining their defect structures, crystallographic structures and electrical properties. In addition to measuring electrical conductivity, oxygen vacancy concentration was also evaluated using thermogravimetry, Neutron diffraction and Moessbauer Spectroscopy. The reducing conditions (CO{sub 2}/CO/H{sub 2} gas mixtures with steam) as encountered in a reactor environment can be expected to have significant influence on the mechanical properties of the oxides membranes. Various La based materials with and without Ti were selected as candidate membrane materials for OTM. The maximum electrical conductivity of LSF in air as a function of temperature was achieved at Oxygen occupancy in LSF was estimated using Neutron diffractometry and Moessbauer Spectroscopy by measuring magnetic moment changes depending on the Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 4+} ratio. After extensive studies of candidate materials, lanthanum ferrites (LSF and LSFT) were selected as the favored materials for the oxygen transport membrane (OTM). LSF is a very good material for an OTM because of its high electronic and oxygen ionic conductivity if long term stability and mechanical strength are improved. LSFT not only exhibits p-type behavior in the high oxygen activity regime, but also has n-type conduction in reducing atmospheres. Higher concentrations of oxygen vacancies in the low oxygen activity regime may improve the performance of LSFT as an OTM. The hole concentration is related to the difference in the acceptor and donor concentration by the relation p = [Sr'{sub La}]-[Ti{sm_bullet}{sub Fe}]. The chemical formulation predicts that the hole concentration is, p = 0.8-0.45 or 0.35. Experimental measurements indicated that p is about {approx} 0.35. The activation energy of conduction is 0.2 eV which implies that LSCF conducts via the small polaron conduction mechanism. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) were used to develop strategies to detect and characterize vacancy creation, dopant segregations and defect association in the oxygen conducting membrane material. The pO{sub 2} and temperature dependence of the conductivity, non-stoichiometry and thermal-expansion behavior of compositions with increasing complexity of substitution on the perovskite A and B sites were studied. Studies with the perovskite structure show anomalous behavior at low oxygen partial pressures (oxygen equilibration kinetics arises from two different mechanisms. In the first, a two phase region occurs between an oxygen vacancy ordered phase such as brownmillerite SrFeO{sub 2.5} and perovskite SrFeO{sub 3-x}. The slow kinetics is associated with crossing the two phase region. The width of the miscibility gap decreases with increasing temperature and consequently the effect is less pronounced at higher temperature. The preferred kinetic pathway to reduction of perovskite ferrites when the vacancy concentration corresponds to the formation of significant concentrations of Fe{sup 2+} is via the formation of a Ruddlesden-Popper (RP) phases as clearly observed in the case of La{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}FeO{sub 3-x} where LaSrFeO{sub 4} is found together with Fe. In more complex compositions, such as LSFTO, iron or iron rich phases are observed locally with no evidence for the presence of discrete RP phase. Fracture strength of tubular perovskite membranes was determined in air and in reducing atmospheric conditions. The strength of the membrane decreased with temperature and severity of reducing conditions although the strength distribution (Weibull parameter, m) was relatively unaltered. Surface and volume dominated the fracture origins and the overall fracture was purely transgranular. The dual phas

S. Bandopadhyay

2008-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

212

Modular heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A shell and tube heat exchanger is described having a plurality of individually removable tube bundle modules. A lattice of structural steel forming rectangular openings therein is placed at each end of a cylindrical shell. Longitudinal structural members are placed in the shell between corners of the rectangular openings situated on opposite ends of the shell. Intermediate support members interconnect the longitudinal supports so as to increase the longitudinal supports rigidity. Rectangular parallelepiped tube bundle modules occupy the space defined by the longitudinal supports and end supports and each include a rectangular tube sheet situated on each end of a plurality of tubes extending there through, a plurality of rectangular tube supports located between the tube sheets, and a tube bundle module stiffening structure disposed about the bundle's periphery and being attached to the tube sheets and tube supports. The corners of each tube bundle module have longitudinal framework members which are mateable with and supported by the longitudinal support members. Intermediate support members constitute several lattices, each of which is situated in a plane between the end support members. The intermediate support members constituting the several lattices extend horizontally and vertically between longitudinal supports of adjacent tube module voids. An alternative embodiment for intermediate support members constitute a series of structural plates situated at the corners of the module voids and having recesses therein for receiving the respective longitudinal support members adjacent thereto, protrusions separating the recesses, and a plurality of struts situated between protrusions of adjacent structural plates. 12 figs.

Giardina, A.R.

1981-03-03T23:59:59.000Z

213

Modular heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A shell and tube heat exchanger having a plurality of individually removable tube bundle modules. A lattice of structural steel forming rectangular openings therein is placed at each end of a cylindrical shell. Longitudinal structural members are placed in the shell between corners of the rectangular openings situated on opposite ends of the shell. Intermediate support members interconnect the longitudinal supports so as to increase the longitudinal supports rigidity. Rectangular parallelpiped tube bundle moldules occupy the space defined by the longitudinal supports and end supports and each include a rectangular tube sheet situated on each end of a plurality of tubes extending therethrough, a plurality of rectangular tube supports located between the tube sheets, and a tube bundle module stiffening structure disposed about the bundle's periphery and being attached to the tube sheets and tube supports. The corners of each tube bundle module have longitudinal framework members which are mateable with and supported by the longitudinal support members. Intermediate support members constitute several lattice, each of which is situate d in a plane between the end support members. The intermediate support members constituting the several lattice extend horizontally and vertically between longitudinal supports of adjacent tube module voids. An alternative embodiment for intermediate support members constitute a series of structural plates situated at the corners of the module voids and having recesses therein for receiving the respective longitudinal support members adjacent thereto, protrusions separating the recesses, and a plurality of struts situated between protrusions of adjacent structural plates.

Giardina, Angelo R. (Marple Township, Delaware County, PA)

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

214

Computational and experimental study of nanoporous membranes for water desalination and decontamination.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fundamentals of ion transport in nanopores were studied through a joint experimental and computational effort. The study evaluated both nanoporous polymer membranes and track-etched nanoporous polycarbonate membranes. The track-etched membranes provide a geometrically well characterized platform, while the polymer membranes are more closely related to ion exchange systems currently deployed in RO and ED applications. The experimental effort explored transport properties of the different membrane materials. Poly(aniline) membranes showed that flux could be controlled by templating with molecules of defined size. Track-etched polycarbonate membranes were modified using oxygen plasma treatments, UV-ozone exposure, and UV-ozone with thermal grafting, providing an avenue to functionalized membranes, increased wettability, and improved surface characteristic lifetimes. The modeling effort resulted in a novel multiphysics multiscale simulation model for field-driven transport in nanopores. This model was applied to a parametric study of the effects of pore charge and field strength on ion transport and charge exclusion in a nanopore representative of a track-etched polycarbonate membrane. The goal of this research was to uncover the factors that control the flux of ions through a nanoporous material and to develop tools and capabilities for further studies. Continuation studies will build toward more specific applications, such as polymers with attached sulfonate groups, and complex modeling methods and geometries.

Hickner, Michael A. (Penn State University, University Park, PA); Chinn, Douglas Alan (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Adalsteinsson, Helgi; Long, Kevin R. (Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX); Kent, Michael Stuart (Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM); Debusschere, Bert J.; Zendejas, Frank J.; Tran, Huu M.; Najm, Habib N.; Simmons, Blake Alexander

2008-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

215

Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. The in situ electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient measurements were made on LSFT at 1000 and 1200 C over the oxygen activity range from air to 10{sup -15} atm. The electrical conductivity measurements exhibited a p to n type transition at an oxygen activity of 1 x 10{sup -10} at 1000 C and 1 x 10{sup -6} at 1200 C. Thermogravimetric studies were also carried out over the same oxygen activities and temperatures. Based on the results of these measurements, the chemical and mechanical stability range of LSFT were determined and defect structure was established. The studies on the fracture toughness of the LSFT and dual phase membranes exposed to air and N{sub 2} at 1000 C was done and the XRD and SEM analysis of the specimens were carried out to understand the structural and microstructural changes. The membranes that are exposed to high temperatures at an inert and a reactive atmosphere undergo many structural and chemical changes which affect the mechanical properties. A complete transformation of fracture behavior was observed in the N{sub 2} treated LSFT samples. Further results to investigate the origin of the slow kinetics on reduction of ferrites have been obtained. The slow kinetics appear to be related to a non-equilibrium reduction pathway that initially results in the formation of iron particles. At long times, equilibrium can be reestablished with recovery of the perovskite phase. Recent results on transient kinetic data are presented. The 2-D modeling of oxygen movement has been undertaken in order to fit isotope data. The model is used to study ''frozen'' profiles in patterned or composite membranes.

S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

2005-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

216

Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The present quarterly report describes some of the investigations on the structural properties of dense OTM bars provided by Praxair and studies on newer composition of Ti doped LSF. In the previous research, the reference point of oxygen occupancy was determined and verified. In the current research, the oxygen occupancy was investigated at 1200 C as a function of oxygen activity and compared with that at 1000 C. The cause of bumps at about 200 C was also investigated by using different heating and cooling rates during TGA. The fracture toughness of LSFT and dual phase membranes at room temperature is an important mechanical property. Vicker's indentation method was used to evaluate this toughness. Through this technique, a K{sub Ic} (Mode-I Fracture Toughness) value is attained by means of semi-empirical correlations between the indentation load and the length of the cracks emanating from the corresponding Vickers indentation impression. In the present investigation, crack propagation behavior was extensively analyzed in order to understand the strengthening mechanisms involved in the non-transforming La based ceramic composites. Cracks were generated using Vicker's indenter and used to identify and evaluate the toughening mechanisms involved. Preliminary results of an electron microscopy study of the origin of the slow kinetics on reduction of ferrites have been obtained. The slow kinetics appear to be related to a non-equilibrium reduction pathway that initially results in the formation of iron particles. At long times, equilibrium can be reestablished with recovery of the perovskite phase. Modeling of the isotopic transients on operating membranes (LSCrF-2828 at 900 C) and a ''frozen'' isotope profile have been analyzed in conjunction with a 1-D model to reveal the gradient in oxygen diffusivity through the membrane under conditions of high chemical gradients.

S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham; X.-D Zhou; Y-W. Sin; H.U. Anderson; Alan Jacobson; C.A. Mims

2005-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

217

Modeling particle deposition on HVAC heat exchangers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

DEPOSITION ON HVAC HEAT EXCHANGERS JA Siegel 1,3 * and WWof fin-and-tube heat exchangers by particle deposition leadsparticle deposition on heat exchanger surfaces. We present a

Siegel, J.A.; Nazaroff, W.W.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

218

Entanglement Exchange and Bohmian Mechanics  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This paper analyses the phenomenon of entanglement exchange in Bohm's pilot wave interpretation of quantum mechanics. The interesting feature of the phenomenon is that systems become entangled without causal interaction; hence it is a useful situation for investigating the unique nature of interaction in Bohmian mechanics. The first two sections introduce, respectively, entanglement exchange in the standard interpretation of quantum mechanics, and the basic principles of Bohmian mechanics. The next section shows that the Bohmian interpretation makes the same experimental predictions about entanglement exchange as the standard one. The final section draws some conclusions about interactions and entanglement in Bohmian mechanics.

Nick Huggett; Tiziana Vistarini

2009-05-25T23:59:59.000Z

219

Heat exchanger using graphite foam  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat exchanger is disclosed. The heat exchanger may have an inlet configured to receive a first fluid and an outlet configured to discharge the first fluid. The heat exchanger may further have at least one passageway configured to conduct the first fluid from the inlet to the outlet. The at least one passageway may be composed of a graphite foam and a layer of graphite material on the exterior of the graphite foam. The layer of graphite material may form at least a partial barrier between the first fluid and a second fluid external to the at least one passageway.

Campagna, Michael Joseph; Callas, James John

2012-09-25T23:59:59.000Z

220

Optimization of Heat Exchanger Cleaning  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The performance of heat integration systems is quantified in terms of the amount of heat that is recovered. This decreases with time due to increased fouling of the heat exchange surface. Using the "Total Fouling Related Expenses (TFRE)" approach, economic incentives for heat exchanger cleaning are evaluated using linear, exponential, and exponential finite decrease models of the heat recovery decay. A mathematical comparison of mechanical and chemical cleaning of heat exchangers has identified the most significant parameters which affect the choice between the two methods.

Siegell, J. H.

1986-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydroxide exchange membranes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


221

Heat exchanger with ceramic elements  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An annular heat exchanger assembly includes a plurality of low thermal growth ceramic heat exchange members with inlet and exit flow ports on distinct faces. A mounting member locates each ceramic member in a near-annular array and seals the flow ports on the distinct faces into the separate flow paths of the heat exchanger. The mounting member adjusts for the temperature gradient in the assembly and the different coefficients of thermal expansion of the members of the assembly during all operating temperatures.

Corey, John A. (North Troy, NY)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

222

Supported liquid membrane electrochemical separators  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Supported liquid membrane separators improve the flexibility, efficiency and service life of electrochemical cells for a variety of applications. In the field of electrochemical storage, an alkaline secondary battery with improved service life is described in which a supported liquid membrane is interposed between the positive and negative electrodes. The supported liquid membranes of this invention can be used in energy production and storage systems, electrosynthesis systems, and in systems for the electrowinning and electrorefining of metals.

Pemsler, J. Paul (Lexington, MA); Dempsey, Michael D. (Revere, MA)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

223

Durable, Low-cost, Improved Fuel Cell Membranes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The development of low cost, durable membranes and membranes electrode assemblies (MEAs) that operate under reduced relative humidity (RH) conditions remain a critical challenge for the successful introduction of fuel cells into mass markets. It was the goal of the team lead by Arkema, Inc. to address these shortages. Thus, this project addresses the following technical barriers from the fuel cells section of the Hydrogen Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Program Multi-Year Research, Development and Demonstration Plan: (A) Durability (B) Cost Arkema’s approach consisted of using blends of polyvinylidenefluoride (PVDF) and proprietary sulfonated polyelectrolytes. In the traditional approach to polyelectrolytes for proton exchange membranes (PEM), all the required properties are “packaged” in one macromolecule. The properties of interest include proton conductivity, mechanical properties, durability, and water/gas transport. This is the case, for example, for perfluorosulfonic acid-containing (PFSA) membranes. However, the cost of these materials is high, largely due to the complexity and the number of steps involved in their synthesis. In addition, they suffer other shortcomings such as mediocre mechanical properties and insufficient durability for some applications. The strength and originality of Arkema’s approach lies in the decoupling of ion conductivity from the other requirements. Kynar® PVDF provides an exceptional combination of properties that make it ideally suited for a membrane matrix (Kynar® is a registered trademark of Arkema Inc.). It exhibits outstanding chemical resistance in highly oxidative and acidic environments. In work with a prior grant, a membrane known as M41 was developed by Arkema. M41 had many of the properties needed for a high performance PEM, but had a significant deficiency in conductivity at low RH. In the first phase of this work, the processing parameters of M41 were explored as a means to increase its proton conductivity. Optimizing the processing of M41 was found to increase its proton conductivity by almost an order of magnitude at 50% RH. Characterization of the membrane morphology with Karren More at Oak Ridge National Laboratory showed that the membrane morphology was complex. This technology platform was dubbed M43 and was used as a baseline in the majority of the work on the project. Although its performance was superior to M41, M43 still showed proton conductivity an order of magnitude lower than that of a PFSA membrane at 50% RH. The MEA performance of M43 could be increased by reducing the thickness from 1 to 0.6 mils. However, the performance of the thinner M43 still did not match that of a PFSA membrane.

Chris Roger; David Mountz; Wensheng He; Tao Zhang

2011-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

224

EVALUATION OF PROTON-CONDUCTING MEMBRANES FOR USE IN A SULFUR-DIOXIDE DEPOLARIZED ELECTROLYZER  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The chemical stability, sulfur dioxide transport, ionic conductivity, and electrolyzer performance have been measured for several commercially available and experimental proton exchange membranes (PEMs) for use in a sulfur dioxide depolarized electrolyzer (SDE). The SDE's function is to produce hydrogen by using the Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) Process, a sulfur based electrochemical/thermochemical hybrid cycle. Membrane stability was evaluated using a screening process where each candidate PEM was heated at 80 C in 60 wt. % H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} for 24 hours. Following acid exposure, chemical stability for each membrane was evaluated by FTIR using the ATR sampling technique. Membrane SO{sub 2} transport was evaluated using a two-chamber permeation cell. SO{sub 2} was introduced into one chamber whereupon SO{sub 2} transported across the membrane into the other chamber and oxidized to H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} at an anode positioned immediately adjacent to the membrane. The resulting current was used to determine the SO{sub 2} flux and SO{sub 2} transport. Additionally, membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) were prepared from candidate membranes to evaluate ionic conductivity and selectivity (ionic conductivity vs. SO{sub 2} transport) which can serve as a tool for selecting membranes. MEAs were also performance tested in a HyS electrolyzer measuring current density versus a constant cell voltage (1V, 80 C in SO{sub 2} saturated 30 wt% H2SO{sub 4}). Finally, candidate membranes were evaluated considering all measured parameters including SO{sub 2} flux, SO{sub 2} transport, ionic conductivity, HyS electrolyzer performance, and membrane stability. Candidate membranes included both PFSA and non-PFSA polymers and polymer blends of which the non-PFSA polymers, BPVE-6F and PBI, showed the best selectivity.

Hobbs, D.; Elvington, M.; Colon-Mercado, H.

2009-11-11T23:59:59.000Z

225

XML for CIM Model Exchange  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Abstract: Organizations responsible for secure power system operations need to model their systems and portions of neighboring systems in support of control and security functions. In the USA, the restructuring of the electric utility industry emphasizes the need to exchange operational system models for Independent System Operators (ISO) and Regional Transmission Organizations (RTO). These models need to be node/breaker oriented in order to meet the needs of control center applications. Unfortunately, the existing model exchange formats derive from planning models that are bus/branch oriented and lack detail required for control center operations. To support these data modeling exchange needs, NERC has adopted an approach that uses the semantic data definitions from the EPRI CIM with the syntax of XML to create XML files containing operational power system models. This paper presents the key aspects of XML and the CIM that make them excellent choices for addressing the operational model exchange needs of our industry.

A. Devos; Member Ieee; S. E. Widergren; Sr. Member; Ieee J. Zhu; Member Ieee

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

226

Heat pipe array heat exchanger  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat pipe arrangement for exchanging heat between two different temperature fluids. The heat pipe arrangement is in a ounterflow relationship to increase the efficiency of the coupling of the heat from a heat source to a heat sink.

Reimann, Robert C. (Lafayette, NY)

1987-08-25T23:59:59.000Z

227

Exchange Rates, Information, and Crises  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

equation (5.4). Standard Bayesian inference implies that theAs before, standard Bayesian inference implies that Var 1 [f˜ so that standard Bayesian inference both exchange rate is

Fernholz, Ricardo Turrin

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

228

Regeneration of strong-base anion-exchange resins by sequential chemical displacement  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for regenerating strong-base anion exchange resins utilizing a sequential chemical displacement technique with new regenerant formulation. The new first regenerant solution is composed of a mixture of ferric chloride, a water-miscible organic solvent, hydrochloric acid, and water in which tetrachloroferrate anion is formed and used to displace the target anions on the resin. The second regenerant is composed of a dilute hydrochloric acid and is used to decompose tetrachloroferrate and elute ferric ions, thereby regenerating the resin. Alternative chemical displacement methods include: (1) displacement of target anions with fluoroborate followed by nitrate or salicylate and (2) displacement of target anions with salicylate followed by dilute hydrochloric acid. The methodology offers an improved regeneration efficiency, recovery, and waste minimization over the conventional displacement technique using sodium chloride (or a brine) or alkali metal hydroxide.

Brown, Gilbert M. (Knoxville, TN); Gu, Baohua (Oak Ridge, TN); Moyer, Bruce A. (Oak Ridge, TN); Bonnesen, Peter V. (Knoxville, TN)

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

229

Oxygen Transport Membranes  

SciTech Connect

The focus of this research was to develop new membrane materials by synthesizing different compounds and determining their defect structures, crystallographic structures and electrical properties. In addition to measuring electrical conductivity, oxygen vacancy concentration was also evaluated using thermogravimetry, Neutron diffraction and Moessbauer Spectroscopy. The reducing conditions (CO{sub 2}/CO/H{sub 2} gas mixtures with steam) as encountered in a reactor environment can be expected to have significant influence on the mechanical properties of the oxides membranes. Various La based materials with and without Ti were selected as candidate membrane materials for OTM. The maximum electrical conductivity of LSF in air as a function of temperature was achieved at < 600 C and depends on the concentration of Sr (acceptor dopant). Oxygen occupancy in LSF was estimated using Neutron diffractometry and Moessbauer Spectroscopy by measuring magnetic moment changes depending on the Fe{sup 3+} and Fe{sup 4+} ratio. After extensive studies of candidate materials, lanthanum ferrites (LSF and LSFT) were selected as the favored materials for the oxygen transport membrane (OTM). LSF is a very good material for an OTM because of its high electronic and oxygen ionic conductivity if long term stability and mechanical strength are improved. LSFT not only exhibits p-type behavior in the high oxygen activity regime, but also has n-type conduction in reducing atmospheres. Higher concentrations of oxygen vacancies in the low oxygen activity regime may improve the performance of LSFT as an OTM. The hole concentration is related to the difference in the acceptor and donor concentration by the relation p = [Sr'{sub La}]-[Ti{sm_bullet}{sub Fe}]. The chemical formulation predicts that the hole concentration is, p = 0.8-0.45 or 0.35. Experimental measurements indicated that p is about {approx} 0.35. The activation energy of conduction is 0.2 eV which implies that LSCF conducts via the small polaron conduction mechanism. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) were used to develop strategies to detect and characterize vacancy creation, dopant segregations and defect association in the oxygen conducting membrane material. The pO{sub 2} and temperature dependence of the conductivity, non-stoichiometry and thermal-expansion behavior of compositions with increasing complexity of substitution on the perovskite A and B sites were studied. Studies with the perovskite structure show anomalous behavior at low oxygen partial pressures (<10{sup -5} atm). The anomalies are due to non-equilibrium effects and can be avoided by using very strict criteria for the attainment of equilibrium. The slowness of the oxygen equilibration kinetics arises from two different mechanisms. In the first, a two phase region occurs between an oxygen vacancy ordered phase such as brownmillerite SrFeO{sub 2.5} and perovskite SrFeO{sub 3-x}. The slow kinetics is associated with crossing the two phase region. The width of the miscibility gap decreases with increasing temperature and consequently the effect is less pronounced at higher temperature. The preferred kinetic pathway to reduction of perovskite ferrites when the vacancy concentration corresponds to the formation of significant concentrations of Fe{sup 2+} is via the formation of a Ruddlesden-Popper (RP) phases as clearly observed in the case of La{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 0.5}FeO{sub 3-x} where LaSrFeO{sub 4} is found together with Fe. In more complex compositions, such as LSFTO, iron or iron rich phases are observed locally with no evidence for the presence of discrete RP phase. Fracture strength of tubular perovskite membranes was determined in air and in reducing atmospheric conditions. The strength of the membrane decreased with temperature and severity of reducing conditions although the strength distribution (Weibull parameter, m) was relatively unaltered. Surface and volume dominated the fracture origins and the overall fracture was purely transgranular. The dual phas

S. Bandopadhyay

2008-08-30T23:59:59.000Z

230

Operation of staged membrane oxidation reactor systems  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of operating a multi-stage ion transport membrane oxidation system. The method comprises providing a multi-stage ion transport membrane oxidation system with at least a first membrane oxidation stage and a second membrane oxidation stage, operating the ion transport membrane oxidation system at operating conditions including a characteristic temperature of the first membrane oxidation stage and a characteristic temperature of the second membrane oxidation stage; and controlling the production capacity and/or the product quality by changing the characteristic temperature of the first membrane oxidation stage and/or changing the characteristic temperature of the second membrane oxidation stage.

Repasky, John Michael

2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

231

Chicago Climate Exchange, Inc. 2010 Chicago Climate Exchange 1 The Role of Exchanges and Standardization  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Premium Standard Farms Smithfield Foods, Inc. Forest Products Abitibi-Consolidated Aracruz Celulose S Incorporated NewPage Plum Creek Suzano Papel E Celulose SA Tembec Industries Inc. #12;Chicago Climate Exchange

232

Oxygen Transport Ceramic Membranes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ti doping on La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}FeO{sub 3-{delta}} (LSF) tends to increase the oxygen equilibration kinetics of LSF in lower oxygen activity environment because of the high valence state of Ti. However, the addition of Ti decreases the total conductivity because the acceptor ([Sr{prime}{sub La}]) is compensated by the donor ([Ti{sub Fe}{sup {sm_bullet}}]) which decreases the carrier concentration. The properties of La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 1-x}Ti{sub x}O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSFT, x = 0.45) have been experimentally and theoretically investigated to elucidate (1) the dependence of oxygen occupancy and electrochemical properties on temperature and oxygen activity by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and (2) the electrical conductivity and carrier concentration by Seebeck coefficient and electrical measurements. In the present study, dual phase (La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Fe{sub 0.6}Ti{sub 0.4}O{sub 3-{delta}}/Ce{sub 0.9}Gd{sub 0.1}O{sub 2-{delta}}) membranes have been evaluated for structural properties such as hardness, fracture toughness and flexural strength. The effect of high temperature and slightly reducing atmosphere on the structural properties of the membranes was studied. The flexural strength of the membrane decreases upon exposure to slightly reducing conditions at 1000 C. The as-received and post-fractured membranes were characterized using XRD, SEM and TG-DTA to understand the fracture mechanisms. Changes in structural properties of the composite were sought to be correlated with the physiochemical features of the two-phases. We have reviewed the electrical conductivity data and stoichiometry data for La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Cr{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3-{delta}} some of which was reported previously. Electrical conductivity data for La{sub 0.2}Sr{sub 0.8}Cr{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3-{delta}} (LSCrF) were obtained in the temperature range, 752 {approx} 1055 C and in the pO{sub 2} range, 10{sup -18} {approx} 0.5 atm. The slope of the plot of log {sigma} vs. log pO{sub 2} is {approx} 1/5 in the p-type region, pO{sub 2} = 10{sup -5} {approx} 10{sup -1} atm. The pO{sub 2} at which the p-n transition is observed increases with increasing temperature. The activation energy for ionic conduction was estimated to be 0.86 eV from an Arrhenius plot of the minimum conductivity vs. reciprocal temperature. At temperatures below 940 C, a plateau in the conductivity isotherm suggests the presence of a two-phase region. Most likely, phase separation occurs to form a mixture of a perovskite phase and an oxygen vacancy ordered phase related to brownmillerite. Additional data for the oxygen non stoichiometry are presented.

S. Bandopadhyay; T. Nithyanantham

2006-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

233

Developing a Mechanistic Understanding of Lamellar Hydroxide Mineral Carbonation Reaction Processes to Reduce CO2 Mineral Sequestration Process Cost  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Mechanistic Understanding of Lamellar Hydroxide Mechanistic Understanding of Lamellar Hydroxide Mineral Carbonation Reaction Processes to Reduce CO 2 Mineral Sequestration Process Cost Michael J. McKelvy (mckelvy@asu.edu; 480-965-4535), Andrew V. G. Chizmeshya (chizmesh@asu.edu; 480-965-6072), Hamdallah Bearat (Hamdallah.Bearat@asu.edu; 480-965-2624), Renu Sharma (Renu.Sharma@asu.edu; 480-965-4541), and Ray W. Carpenter (carpenter@asu.edu; 480-965-4549) Center for Solid State Science and Science and Engineering of Materials PhD Program, P.O. Box 871704, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287 USA ABSTRACT The potential environmental effects of increasing atmospheric CO 2 levels are of major worldwide concern. One alternative for managing CO 2 emissions is carbon sequestration: the capture and secure confinement of CO

234

EM Waste Processing Technical Exchange Thermodynamic Modeling of ...  

Sodium Fluoride 0.26 0.15 0.138 Sodium Chloride 0.064 0.062 Sodium Hydroxide 49.30 27.93 29.59 Potassium Hydroxide 0.12 0.34 Sodium Oxalate 0.23 0.51 0.46

235

Mesoporous mixed metal oxides derived from P123-templated Mg-Al layered double hydroxides  

SciTech Connect

We report the preparation of mesoporous mixed metal oxides (MMOs) through a soft template method. Different amounts of P123 were used as structure directing agent to synthesize P123-templated Mg-Al layered double hydroxides (LDHs). After calcination of as-synthesized LDHs at 500 {sup o}C, the ordered mesopores were obtained by removal of P123. The mesoporous Mg-Al MMOs fabricated by using 2 wt% P123 exhibited a high specific surface area of 108.1 m{sup 2}/g, and wide distribution of pore size (2-18 nm). An investigation of the 'memory effect' of the mesoporous MMOs revealed that they were successfully reconstructed to ibuprofen intercalated LDHs having different gallery heights, which indicated different intercalation capacities. Due to their mesoporosity these unique MMOs have particular potential as drug or catalyst carriers. - Graphical abstract: Ordered mesoporous Mg-Al MMOs can be obtained through the calcination of P123-templated Mg-Al-CO{sub 3} LDHs. The pore diameter is 2.2 nm. At the presence of ibuprofen, the Mg-Al MMOs can recover to Mg-Al-IBU LDHs, based on its 'remember effect'. Display Omitted

Wang Jun, E-mail: zhqw1888@sohu.co [College of Material Science and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China); College of Chemical Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China); Key Laboratory of Superlight Materials and Surface Technology, Ministry of Education, 150001 (China); Zhou Jideng; Li Zhanshuang; He Yang; Lin Shuangshuang; Liu Qi [College of Material Science and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China); Zhang Milin [College of Material Science and Chemical Engineering, Harbin Engineering University, Harbin 150001 (China); Key Laboratory of Superlight Materials and Surface Technology, Ministry of Education, 150001 (China); Jiang Zhaohua [College of Chemical Engineering, Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin 150001 (China)

2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

236

Ordered Layered Organic-Inorganic of 4-Chlorophenoxyacetate-Zinc Layered Hydroxide Nanohybrid  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ordered layered organic-inorganic nanostructure composed of zinc layered hydroxide-4-chlorophenoxy acetate (ZLH-4CPA) was prepared by reaction of an organic anion, 4-chlorophenoxy acetate (4CPA) with ZnO under aqueous environment. The concentration of 4CPA was found to be a controlling factor in determining the formation of phase pure, well ordered nanolayered hybrid material. At lower concentration of 4CPA (0.05 M), a mixed phase was observed in which ZnO co-existed with the nanohybrid. At 0.01 M, a pure phase is obtained with high crystallinity but a well ordered nanolayered structure is lacking. A pure phase, well ordered nanolayered hybrid can be clearly observed at 0.2 M 4CPA. ZnO shows well defined grain structure of various sizes at nanometer scale range. Direct reaction between ZnO and 4CPA under aqueous environment resulted in the formation of 4CPA-ZLH nanohybrid with flake-like fibrous structure. On heating at 500 deg. C for 5 h under atmospheric condition, the nanohybrid was transformed back to well defined grain structure, as previously observed for the starting materials, ZnO. This shows that the nanohybrid has ''memory effect'' property. Well ordered nanolayered hybrid with up to 5 harmonics, from which the average basal spacing of 19.03 A of the material was deduced, showing long range order of the layer packing.

Hussein, Mohd Zobir [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Advanced Materials and Nanotechnology Laboratory, Institute of Advanced Technology (ITMA), Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Nazarudin, Nor Farhana binti [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Sarijo, Siti Halimah [Faculty of Applied Science, Universiti Teknologi Mara (UiTM), 40450 Shah Alam, Selangor (Malaysia); Yarmo, Mohd Ambar [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Technology, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

2011-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

237

STABILITY OF DOW CORNING Q2-3183A ANTIFOAM IN IRRADIATED HYDROXIDE SOLUTION  

SciTech Connect

Researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) examined the stability of Dow Corning Q2-3183A antifoam to radiation and aqueous hydroxide solutions. Initial foam control studies with Hanford tank waste showed the antifoam reduced foaming. The antifoam was further tested using simulated Hanford tank waste spiked with antifoam that was heated and irradiated (2.1 x 10{sup 4} rad/h) at conditions (90 C, 3 M NaOH, 8 h) expected in the processing of radioactive waste through the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) at Hanford. After irradiation, the concentration of the major polymer components polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and polypropylene glycol (PPG) in the antifoam was determined by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). No loss of the major polymer components was observed after 24 h and only 15 wt% loss of PDMS was reported after 48 h. The presence of degradation products were not observed by gas chromatography (GC), gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) or high performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS). G values were calculated from the GPC analysis and tabulated. The findings indicate the antifoam is stable for 24 h after exposure to gamma radiation, heat, and alkaline simulated waste.

White, T; Crawford, C; Burket, P; Calloway, B

2009-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

238

Deconstruction of Lignin Model Compounds and Biomass-Derived Lignin using Layered Double Hydroxide Catalysts  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Lignin is an underutilized value stream in current biomass conversion technologies because there exist no economic and technically feasible routes for lignin depolymerization and upgrading. Base-catalyzed deconstruction (BCD) has been applied for lignin depolymerization (e.g., the Kraft process) in the pulp and paper industry for more than a century using aqueous-phase media. However, these efforts require treatment to neutralize the resulting streams, which adds significantly to the cost of lignin deconstruction. To circumvent the need for downstream treatment, here we report recent advances in the synthesis of layered double hydroxide and metal oxide catalysts to be applied to the BCD of lignin. These catalysts may prove more cost-effective than liquid-phase, non-recyclable base, and their use obviates downstream processing steps such as neutralization. Synthetic procedures for various transition-metal containing catalysts, detailed kinetics measurements using lignin model compounds, and results of the application of these catalysts to biomass-derived lignin will be presented.

Chmely, S. C.; McKinney, K. A.; Lawrence, K. R.; Sturgeon, M.; Katahira, R.; Beckham, G. T.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

239

Incorporation of oxidized uranium into Fe (hydr)oxides during Fe(II) catalyzed remineralization  

SciTech Connect

The form of solid phase U after Fe(II) induced anaerobic remineralization of ferrihydrite in the presence of aqueous and absorbed U(VI) was investigated under both abiotic batch and biotic flow conditions. Experiments were conducted with synthetic ground waters containing 0.168 mM U(VI), 3.8 mM carbonate, and 3.0 mM Ca{sup 2+}. In spite of the high solubility of U(VI) under these conditions, appreciable removal of U(VI) from solution was observed in both the abiotic and biotic systems. The majority of the removed U was determined to be substituted as oxidized U (U(VI) or U(V)) into the octahedral position of the goethite and magnetite formed during ferrihydrite remineralization. It is estimated that between 3% and 6% of octahedral Fe(III) centers in the new Fe minerals were occupied by U(VI). This site specific substitution is distinct from the non-specific U co-precipitation processes in which uranyl compounds, e.g. uranyl hydroxide or carbonate, are entrapped with newly formed Fe oxides. The prevalence of site specific U incorporation under both abiotic and biotic conditions and the fact that the produced solids were shown to be resistant to both extraction (30 mM KHCO{sub 3}) and oxidation (air for 5 days) suggest the potential importance of sequestration in Fe oxides as a stable and immobile form of U in the environment.

Nico, Peter S.; Stewart, Brandy D.; Fendorf, Scott

2009-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

240

ZnSe nanorods prepared in hydroxide-melts and their application as a humidity sensor  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have synthesized the crystalline ZnSe nanorods for the first time using the molten hydroxides as reaction solvent in the absence of organic dispersant or capping agents. The products are characterized by X-ray diffraction, field emission scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The diameters of ZnSe nanorods are about 200-300 nm, and the lengths are about 1-2 {mu}m. Humidity sensors based on ZnSe nanorods are fabricated and their responsiveness to humidity on static and dynamic testing are investigated. The change of resistance is about three orders of magnitude as the relative humidity increases from 20% to 85%. The response time and recovery time is 50 s and 81 s versus the changes of relative humidity from 20% to 85% and from 85% to 20%, respectively. Our sensor offers higher sensitivity, as well as much better stability and reproducibility than the humidity sensor of ZnSe nanostructure reported before.

Yan Wei [Department of Applied Physics, Chongqing University, 174 Shapingba Street, Chongqing 400044 (China); Hu Chenguo, E-mail: hucg@cqu.edu.cn [Department of Applied Physics, Chongqing University, 174 Shapingba Street, Chongqing 400044 (China); Xi Yi; Wan Buyong; He Xiaoshan; Zhang Michao; Zhang Yan [Department of Applied Physics, Chongqing University, 174 Shapingba Street, Chongqing 400044 (China)

2009-06-03T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydroxide exchange membranes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


241

Olefin separation membrane and process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A membrane and process are disclosed for separating unsaturated hydrocarbons from fluid mixtures. The membrane and process differ from previously known membranes and processes, in that the feed and permeate streams can both be dry, the membrane need not be water or solvent swollen, and the membrane is characterized by a selectivity for an unsaturated hydrocarbon over a saturated hydrocarbon having the same number of carbon atoms of at least about 20, and a pressure-normalized flux of said unsaturated hydrocarbon of at least about 5{times}10{sup {minus}6}cm{sup 3}(STP)/cm{sup 2}{center_dot}s{center_dot}cmHg, said flux and selectivity being measured with a gas mixture containing said unsaturated and saturated hydrocarbons, and in a substantially dry environment. 4 figs.

Pinnau, I.; Toy, L.G.; Casillas, C.

1997-09-23T23:59:59.000Z

242

Gas separation with glass membranes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is seeking to develop high temperature, high pressure inorganic membrane technology to perform a variety of gas separation processes to improve the efficiency and economics of advanced power generation systems such as direct coal-fueled turbines (DCFT) and the integrated gasification combined cycle process (IGCC). The temperatures encountered in these power generation systems are far above the temperature range for organic membrane materials. Inorganic materials such as ceramics are therefore the most likely membrane materials for use at high temperatures. This project focussed on silica glass fiber membranes made by PPG Industries (Pittsburgh, PA). The goals were both experimental and theoretical. The first objective was to develop a rational theory for the performance of these membranes. With existing theories as a starting point, a new theory was devised to explain the unusual molecular sieving'' behavior exhibited by these glass membranes. An apparatus was then devised for making permeation performance measurements at conditions of interest to DOE (temperatures to 2000[degrees]F; pressures to 1000 psia). With this apparatus, gas mixtures could be made typical of coal combustion or coal gasification processes, these gases could be passed into a membrane test cell, and the separation performance determined. Data were obtained for H[sub 2]/CO,N[sub 2]/CO[sub 2], 0[sub 2]/N[sub 2], and NH[sub 3]/N[sub 2] mixtures and for a variety of pure component gases (He, H[sub 2], CO[sub 2], N[sub 2], CO, NH[sub 3]). The most challenging part of the project turned out to be the sealing of the membrane at high temperatures and pressures. The report concludes with an overview of the practical potential of these membranes and of inorganic membranes in general of DOE and other applications.

Roberts, D.L.; Abraham, L.C.; Blum, Y.; Way, J.D.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

243

CX-000598: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

598: Categorical Exclusion Determination 598: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-000598: Categorical Exclusion Determination 25A5311 - Quaternary Phosphonium Based Hydroxide Exchange Membranes CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 12/15/2009 Location(s): California Office(s): Advanced Research Projects Agency - Energy The technical objective of this project is to develop and master a series of technologies to prepare/produce the commercialization-ready high-performance quarternary phosphorium (QP)-based hydroxide exchange membranes (HEMs) that have high hydroxide conductivity, outstanding alkaline-stability, suitable dimension-stability, and high hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cell (HEMFC) performance. This project will help the United States maintain, unquestionably, the technological lead in developing and deploying advanced energy technologies. If successful, the

244

Carbon molecular sieve (CMS) membranes are microporous carbon membranes formed by pyrolysis of polymers. CMS membranes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Carbon molecular sieve (CMS) membranes are microporous carbon membranes formed by pyrolysis mixtures such as carbon dioxide / methane and ethane / ethylene separations. While there are many reports including carbon dioxide, methane, ethane and ethylene and also with selected two-component mixtures

McQuade, D. Tyler

245

Sweeping Gas Membrane Desalination Using Commercial Hydrophobic Hollow Fiber Membranes  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Water shortages affect 88 developing countries that are home to half of the world's population. In these places, 80-90% of all diseases and 30% of all deaths result from poor water quality. Furthermore, over the next 25 years, the number of people affected by severe water shortages is expected to increase fourfold. Low cost methods of purifying freshwater, and desalting seawater are required to contend with this destabilizing trend. Membrane distillation (MD) is an emerging technology for separations that are traditionally accomplished via conventional distillation or reverse osmosis. As applied to desalination, MD involves the transport of water vapor from a saline solution through the pores of a hydrophobic membrane. In sweeping gas MD, a flowing gas stream is used to flush the water vapor from the permeate side of the membrane, thereby maintaining the vapor pressure gradient necessary for mass transfer. Since liquid does not penetrate the hydrophobic membrane, dissolved ions are completely rejected by the membrane. MD has a number of potential advantages over conventional desalination including low temperature and pressure operation, reduced membrane strength requirements, compact size, and 100% rejection of non-volatiles. The present work evaluated the suitability of commercially available technology for sweeping gas membrane desalination. Evaluations were conducted with Celgard Liqui-Cel{reg_sign} Extra-Flow 2.5X8 membrane contactors with X-30 and X-40 hydrophobic hollow fiber membranes. Our results show that sweeping gas membrane desalination systems are capable of producing low total dissolved solids (TDS) water, typically 10 ppm or less, from seawater, using low grade heat. However, there are several barriers that currently prevent sweeping gas MD from being a viable desalination technology. The primary problem is that large air flows are required to achieve significant water yields, and the costs associated with transporting this air are prohibitive. To overcome this barrier, at least two improvements are required. First, new and different contactor geometries are necessary to achieve efficient contact with an extremely low pressure drop. Second, the temperature limits of the membranes must be increased. In the absence of these improvements, sweeping gas MD will not be economically competitive. However, the membranes may still find use in hybrid desalination systems.

EVANS, LINDSEY; MILLER, JAMES E.

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

246

Apparatus for tensioning a heliostat membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An apparatus for pneumatically or hydraulically tensioning a membrane, which stretched membrane can support a reflective surface for use as a heliostat in a solar energy collection system.

Sallis, Daniel V. (P.O. Box 554, Littleton, CO 80120)

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

247

NETL: Gasification Systems - Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membranes...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membranes for Coal Gasification Project No.: DE-FE0004908 Membranes shown (from top to bottom): ceramic support, activated and coated with palladium...

248

Role Of Calcium In Membrane Fusion.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This project is focused on understanding the role of calcium in membrane fusion at the atomic level. Membrane fusion is an intense area of experimental… (more)

Issa, Zeena Kas

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

249

Theoretical and experimental investigation of membrane distillation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Invented in the 1960s, membrane distillation is an emerging technology for water treatment attracting more attention since 1980s. There are four configurations of membrane distillations… (more)

Zhang, Jianhua

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

250

Water Transport and Sorption in Nafion Membrane  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Transport and Sorption in Nafion Membrane Title Water Transport and Sorption in Nafion Membrane Publication Type Book Chapter Year of Publication 2012 Authors Kusoglu, Ahmet, and...

251

Lyotropic Liquid Crystal (LLC) Nanofiltration Membranes - Energy ...  

Vehicles and Fuels; Wind Energy; Partners (27) Visual Patent Search; ... Description Control of membrane pore structure is a major challenge for membrane manufacturers.

252

Gas Separations using Ceramic Membranes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This project has been oriented toward the development of a commercially viable ceramic membrane for high temperature gas separations. A technically and commercially viable high temperature gas separation membrane and process has been developed under this project. The lab and field tests have demonstrated the operational stability, both performance and material, of the gas separation thin film, deposited upon the ceramic membrane developed. This performance reliability is built upon the ceramic membrane developed under this project as a substrate for elevated temperature operation. A comprehensive product development approach has been taken to produce an economically viable ceramic substrate, gas selective thin film and the module required to house the innovative membranes for the elevated temperature operation. Field tests have been performed to demonstrate the technical and commercial viability for (i) energy and water recovery from boiler flue gases, and (ii) hydrogen recovery from refinery waste streams using the membrane/module product developed under this project. Active commercializations effort teaming with key industrial OEMs and end users is currently underway for these applications. In addition, the gas separation membrane developed under this project has demonstrated its economical viability for the CO2 removal from subquality natural gas and landfill gas, although performance stability at the elevated temperature remains to be confirmed in the field.

Paul KT Liu

2005-01-13T23:59:59.000Z

253

ROTARY FILTER FINES TESTING FOR SMALL COLUMN ION EXCHANGE  

SciTech Connect

SRNL was requested to quantify the amount of 'fines passage' through the 0.5 micron membranes currently used for the rotary microfilter (RMF). Testing was also completed to determine if there is any additional benefit to utilizing a 0.1 micron filter to reduce the amount of fines that could pass through the filter. Quantifying of the amount of fines that passed through the two sets of membranes that were tested was accomplished by analyzing the filtrate by Inductively Coupled Plasma Atomic Emission Spectrometry (ICP-AES) for titanium. Even with preparations to isolate the titanium, all samples returned results of less than the instrument's detection limit of 0.184 mg/L. Test results show that the 0.5 micron filters produced a significantly higher flux while showing a negligible difference in filtrate clarity measured by turbidity. The first targeted deployment of the RMF is with the Small Column Ion Exchange (SCIX) at the Savannah River Site (SRS). SCIX uses crystalline silicotitanate (CST) to sorb cesium to decontaminate a clarified salt solution. The passage of fine particles through the filter membranes in sufficient quantities has the potential to impact the downstream facilities. To determine the amount of fines passage, a contract was established with SpinTek Filtration to operate a 3-disk pilot scale unit with prototypic filter disk and various feeds and two different filter disk membranes. SpinTek evaluated a set of the baseline 0.5 micron filter disks as well as a set of 0.1 micron filter disks to determine the amount of fine particles that would pass the membrane and to determine the flux each set produced. The membrane on both disk sets is manufactured by the Pall Corporation (PMM 050). Each set of disks was run with three feed combinations: prototypically ground CST, CST plus monosodium titanate (MST), and CST, MST, plus Sludge Batch 6 (SB6) simulant. Throughout the testing, samples of the filtrate were collected, measured for turbidity, and sent back to SRNL for analysis to quantify the amount of fines that passed through the membrane. It should be noted that even though ground CST was tested, it will be transferred to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed tank and is not expected to require filtration.

Herman, D.

2011-08-03T23:59:59.000Z

254

CO2 SELECTIVE CERAMIC MEMBRANE FOR WATER-GAS-SHIFT REACTION WITH CONCOMITANT RECOVERY OF CO2  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

A high temperature membrane reactor (MR) has been developed to enhance the water-gas-shift (WGS) reaction efficiency with concomitant CO{sub 2} removal for sequestration. This improved WGS-MR with CO{sub 2} recovery capability is ideally suitable for integration into the Integrated Gasification Combined-Cycle (IGCC) power generation system. Two different CO{sub 2}-affinity materials were selected in this study. The Mg-Al-CO{sub 3}-layered double hydroxide (LDH) was investigated as an adsorbent or a membrane for CO{sub 2} separation. The adsorption isotherm and intraparticle diffusivity for the LDH-based adsorbent were experimentally determined, and suitable for low temperature shift (LTS) of WGS. The LDH-based membranes were synthesized using our commercial ceramic membranes as substrate. These experimental membranes were characterized comprehensively in terms of their morphology, and CO{sub 2} permeance and selectivity to demonstrate the technical feasibility. In parallel, an alternative material-base membrane, carbonaceous membrane developed by us, was characterized, which also demonstrated enhanced CO{sub 2} selectivity at the LTS-WGS condition. With optimization on membrane defect reduction, these two types of membrane could be used commercially as CO{sub 2}-affinity membranes for the proposed application. Based upon the unique CO{sub 2} affinity of the LDHs at the LTS/WGS environment, we developed an innovative membrane reactor, Hybrid Adsorption and Membrane Reactor (HAMR), to achieve {approx}100% CO conversion, produce a high purity hydrogen product and deliver a concentrated CO{sub 2} stream for disposal. A mathematical model was developed to simulate this unique one -step process. Finally a benchtop reactor was employed to generate experimental data, which were consistent with the prediction from the HAMR mathematical model. In summary, the project objective, enhancing WGS efficiency for hydrogen production with concomitant CO{sub 2} removal for sequestration, has been theoretically and experimentally demonstrated via the developed one-step reactor, HAMR. Future development on reactor scale up and field testing is recommended.

Paul K.T. Liu

2005-07-15T23:59:59.000Z

255

Corrugated Membrane Fuel Cell Structures  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

By corrugating the fuel cell membrane electrode structure, Ion Power?s goal is to realize both the Pt utilization targets as well as the power density targets of the DOE. This will be achieved by demonstrating a fuel cell single cell (50 cm2) with a twofold increase in the membrane active area over the geometric area of the cell by corrugating the MEA structure. The corrugating structure must be able to demonstrate the target properties of < 10 mOhm-cm2 electrical resistance at > 20 psi compressive strength over the active area, in combination with offering at least 80% of power density that can be achieved by using the same MEA in a flat plate structure. Corrugated membrane fuel cell structures also have the potential to meet DOE power density targets by essentially packaging more membrane area into the same fuel cell volume as compared to conventional stack constructions.

Grot, Stephen [President, Ion Power Inc.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

256

Layered plasma polymer composite membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Layered plasma polymer composite fluid separation membranes are disclosed, which comprise alternating selective and permeable layers for a total of at least 2n layers, where n is [>=]2 and is the number of selective layers. 2 figs.

Babcock, W.C.

1994-10-11T23:59:59.000Z

257

Gas separation membrane module assembly  

SciTech Connect

A gas-separation membrane module assembly and a gas-separation process using the assembly. The assembly includes a set of tubes, each containing gas-separation membranes, arranged within a housing. The housing contains a tube sheet that divides the space within the housing into two gas-tight spaces. A permeate collection system within the housing gathers permeate gas from the tubes for discharge from the housing.

Wynn, Nicholas P (Palo Alto, CA); Fulton, Donald A. (Fairfield, CA)

2009-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

258

Ninth International Workshop on Plant Membrane Biology  

SciTech Connect

This report is a compilation of abstracts from papers which were discussed at a workshop on plant membrane biology. Topics include: plasma membrane ATP-ases; plant-environment interactions, membrane receptors; signal transduction; ion channel physiology; biophysics and molecular biology; vaculor H+ pumps; sugar carriers; membrane transport; and cellular structure and function.

Not Available

1993-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

259

Hydrogen purifier module with membrane support  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A hydrogen purifier utilizing a hydrogen-permeable membrane to purify hydrogen from mixed gases containing hydrogen is disclosed. Improved mechanical support for the permeable membrane is described, enabling forward or reverse differential pressurization of the membrane, which further stabilizes the membrane from wrinkling upon hydrogen uptake.

A hydrogen purifier utilizing a hydrogen-permeable membrane to purify hydrogen from mixed gases containing hydrogen is disclosed. Improved mechanical support for the permeable membrane is described, enabling forward or reverse differential pressurization of the membrane, which further stabilizes the membrane from wrinkling upon hydrogen uptake.

2012-07-24T23:59:59.000Z

260

Membrane Purification Cell for Aluminum Recycling  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Recycling mixed aluminum scrap usually requires adding primary aluminum to the scrap stream as a diluent to reduce the concentration of non-aluminum constituents used in aluminum alloys. Since primary aluminum production requires approximately 10 times more energy than melting scrap, the bulk of the energy and carbon dioxide emissions for recycling are associated with using primary aluminum as a diluent. Eliminating the need for using primary aluminum as a diluent would dramatically reduce energy requirements, decrease carbon dioxide emissions, and increase scrap utilization in recycling. Electrorefining can be used to extract pure aluminum from mixed scrap. Some example applications include producing primary grade aluminum from specific scrap streams such as consumer packaging and mixed alloy saw chips, and recycling multi-alloy products such as brazing sheet. Electrorefining can also be used to extract valuable alloying elements such as Li from Al-Li mixed scrap. This project was aimed at developing an electrorefining process for purifying aluminum to reduce energy consumption and emissions by 75% compared to conventional technology. An electrolytic molten aluminum purification process, utilizing a horizontal membrane cell anode, was designed, constructed, operated and validated. The electrorefining technology could also be used to produce ultra-high purity aluminum for advanced materials applications. The technical objectives for this project were to: - Validate the membrane cell concept with a lab-scale electrorefining cell; - Determine if previously identified voltage increase issue for chloride electrolytes holds for a fluoride-based electrolyte system; - Assess the probability that voltage change issues can be solved; and - Conduct a market and economic analysis to assess commercial feasibility. The process was tested using three different binary alloy compositions (Al-2.0 wt.% Cu, Al-4.7 wt.% Si, Al-0.6 wt.% Fe) and a brazing sheet scrap composition (Al-2.8 wt.% Si-0.7 wt.% Fe-0.8 wt.% Mn),. Purification factors (defined as the initial impurity concentration divided by the final impurity concentration) of greater than 20 were achieved for silicon, iron, copper, and manganese. Cell performance was measured using its current and voltage characteristics and composition analysis of the anode, cathode, and electrolytes. The various cells were autopsied as part of the study. Three electrolyte systems tested were: LiCl-10 wt. % AlCl3, LiCl-10 wt. % AlCl3-5 wt.% AlF3 and LiF-10 wt.% AlF3. An extended four-day run with the LiCl-10 wt.% AlCl3-5 wt.% AlF3 electrolyte system was stable for the entire duration of the experiment, running at energy requirements about one third of the Hoopes and the conventional Hall-Heroult process. Three different anode membranes were investigated with respect to their purification performance and survivability: a woven graphite cloth with 0.05 cm nominal thickness & > 90 % porosity, a drilled rigid membrane with nominal porosity of 33%, and another drilled rigid graphite membrane with increased thickness. The latter rigid drilled graphite was selected as the most promising membrane design. The economic viability of the membrane cell to purify scrap is sensitive to primary & scrap aluminum prices, and the cost of electricity. In particular, it is sensitive to the differential between scrap and primary aluminum price which is highly variable and dependent on the scrap source. In order to be economically viable, any scrap post-processing technology in the U.S. market must have a total operating cost well below the scrap price differential of $0.20-$0.40 per lb to the London Metal Exchange (LME), a margin of 65%-85% of the LME price. The cost to operate the membrane cell is estimated to be aluminum. The energy cost is estimated to be $0.05/lb of purified aluminum with the remaining costs being repair and maintenance, electrolyte, labor, taxes and depreciation. The bench-scale work on membrane purification cell process has demonstrated technological advantages and subs

David DeYoung; James Wiswall; Cong Wang

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydroxide exchange membranes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


261

Membrane Purification Cell for Aluminum Recycling  

SciTech Connect

Recycling mixed aluminum scrap usually requires adding primary aluminum to the scrap stream as a diluent to reduce the concentration of non-aluminum constituents used in aluminum alloys. Since primary aluminum production requires approximately 10 times more energy than melting scrap, the bulk of the energy and carbon dioxide emissions for recycling are associated with using primary aluminum as a diluent. Eliminating the need for using primary aluminum as a diluent would dramatically reduce energy requirements, decrease carbon dioxide emissions, and increase scrap utilization in recycling. Electrorefining can be used to extract pure aluminum from mixed scrap. Some example applications include producing primary grade aluminum from specific scrap streams such as consumer packaging and mixed alloy saw chips, and recycling multi-alloy products such as brazing sheet. Electrorefining can also be used to extract valuable alloying elements such as Li from Al-Li mixed scrap. This project was aimed at developing an electrorefining process for purifying aluminum to reduce energy consumption and emissions by 75% compared to conventional technology. An electrolytic molten aluminum purification process, utilizing a horizontal membrane cell anode, was designed, constructed, operated and validated. The electrorefining technology could also be used to produce ultra-high purity aluminum for advanced materials applications. The technical objectives for this project were to: - Validate the membrane cell concept with a lab-scale electrorefining cell; - Determine if previously identified voltage increase issue for chloride electrolytes holds for a fluoride-based electrolyte system; - Assess the probability that voltage change issues can be solved; and - Conduct a market and economic analysis to assess commercial feasibility. The process was tested using three different binary alloy compositions (Al-2.0 wt.% Cu, Al-4.7 wt.% Si, Al-0.6 wt.% Fe) and a brazing sheet scrap composition (Al-2.8 wt.% Si-0.7 wt.% Fe-0.8 wt.% Mn),. Purification factors (defined as the initial impurity concentration divided by the final impurity concentration) of greater than 20 were achieved for silicon, iron, copper, and manganese. Cell performance was measured using its current and voltage characteristics and composition analysis of the anode, cathode, and electrolytes. The various cells were autopsied as part of the study. Three electrolyte systems tested were: LiCl-10 wt. % AlCl3, LiCl-10 wt. % AlCl3-5 wt.% AlF3 and LiF-10 wt.% AlF3. An extended four-day run with the LiCl-10 wt.% AlCl3-5 wt.% AlF3 electrolyte system was stable for the entire duration of the experiment, running at energy requirements about one third of the Hoopes and the conventional Hall-Heroult process. Three different anode membranes were investigated with respect to their purification performance and survivability: a woven graphite cloth with 0.05 cm nominal thickness & > 90 % porosity, a drilled rigid membrane with nominal porosity of 33%, and another drilled rigid graphite membrane with increased thickness. The latter rigid drilled graphite was selected as the most promising membrane design. The economic viability of the membrane cell to purify scrap is sensitive to primary & scrap aluminum prices, and the cost of electricity. In particular, it is sensitive to the differential between scrap and primary aluminum price which is highly variable and dependent on the scrap source. In order to be economically viable, any scrap post-processing technology in the U.S. market must have a total operating cost well below the scrap price differential of $0.20-$0.40 per lb to the London Metal Exchange (LME), a margin of 65%-85% of the LME price. The cost to operate the membrane cell is estimated to be < $0.24/lb of purified aluminum. The energy cost is estimated to be $0.05/lb of purified aluminum with the remaining costs being repair and maintenance, electrolyte, labor, taxes and depreciation. The bench-scale work on membrane purification cell process has demonstrated technological advantages and subs

David DeYoung; James Wiswall; Cong Wang

2011-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

262

Tensioning device for a stretched membrane collector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a solar concentrating collector comprising an elastic membrane member for concentrating sunlight, a frame for holding the membrane member in plane and in tension, and a tensioning means for varying the tension of the membrane member. The tensioning means is disposed at the frame and is adapted to releasably attach the membrane member thereto. The tensioning means is also adapted to uniformly and symmetrically subject the membrane member to stretching forces such that membrane stresses produced thereby are distributed uniformly over a thickness of the membrane member and reciprocal twisting moments are substantially prevented from acting about said frame.

Murphy, Lawrence M. (Lakewood, CO)

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

263

Tensioning device for a stretched membrane collector  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed is a solar concentrating collector comprising an elestic membrane member for concentrating sunlight, a frame for holding the membrane member in plane and in tension, and a tensioning means for varying the tension of the membrane member. The tensioning means is disposed at the frame and is adapted to releasably attach the membrane member thereto. The tensioning means is also adapted to uniformly and symmetrically subject the membrane member to stretching forces such that membrane stresses produced thereby are distributed uniformly over a thickness of the membrane member and reciprocal twisting moments are substantially prevented from acting about said frame.

Murphy, L.M.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

264

Liquid membrane purification of biogas  

SciTech Connect

Conventional gas purification technologies are highly energy intensive. They are not suitable for economic removal of CO{sub 2} from methane obtained in biogas due to the small scale of gas production. Membrane separation techniques on the other hand are ideally suited for low gas production rate applications due to their modular nature. Although liquid membranes possess a high species permeability and selectivity, they have not been used for industrial applications due to the problems of membrane stability, membrane flooding and poor operational flexibility, etc. A new hollow-fiber-contained liquid membrane (HFCLM) technique has been developed recently. This technique overcomes the shortcomings of the traditional immobilized liquid membrane technology. A new technique uses two sets of hydrophobic, microporous hollow fine fibers, packed tightly in a permeator shell. The inter-fiber space is filled with an aqueous liquid acting as the membrane. The feed gas mixture is separated by selective permeation of a species through the liquid from one fiber set to the other. The second fiber set carries a sweep stream, gas or liquid, or simply the permeated gas stream. The objectives (which were met) of the present investigation were as follows. To study the selective removal of CO{sub 2} from a model biogas mixture containing 40% CO{sub 2} (the rest being N{sub 2} or CH{sub 4}) using a HFCLM permeator under various operating modes that include sweep gas, sweep liquid, vacuum and conventional permeation; to develop a mathematical model for each mode of operation; to build a large-scale purification loop and large-scale permeators for model biogas separation and to show stable performance over a period of one month.

Majumdar, S.; Guha, A.K.; Lee, Y.T.; Papadopoulos, T.; Khare, S. (Stevens Inst. of Tech., Hoboken, NJ (United States). Dept. of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering)

1991-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

265

Phosphonic acid based ion exchange resins  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion exchange resin is described for extracting metal ions from a liquid waste stream. An ion exchange resin is prepared by copolymerizing a vinylidene diphosphonic acid with styrene, acrylonitrile and divinylbenzene. 9 figures.

Horwitz, E.P.; Alexandratos, S.D.; Gatrone, R.C.; Chiarizia, R.

1994-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

266

New Challenges in Multihospital Kidney Exchange  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The growth of kidney exchange presents new challenges for the design of kidney exchange clearinghouses. The players now include directors of transplant centers, who see sets of patient-donor pairs, and can choose to reveal ...

Ashlagi, Itai

267

Exchange Server 2010 Unleashed, 1st edition  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Microsoft Exchange Server 2010 Unleashed is the ultimate guide to designing, deploying, managing, troubleshooting, and supporting any Exchange Server 2010 environment, no matter how large or complex. Drawing on their extensive experience with hundreds ...

Rand Morimoto; Michael Noel; Chris Amaris; Andrew Abbate; Mark Weinhardt

2009-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

268

Intelligent predictive control of micro heat exchanger  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

An intelligent predictive control to temperature control of a micro heat exchanger is addressed. First, the dynamics of the micro heat exchanger is identified using a locally linear model. Then, the predictive control strategy based on this model of ...

Mehdi Galily; Farzad Habibipour Roudsari; Masoum Fardis; Ali Yazdian

2005-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

269

Synergistic diffuser/heat-exchanger design  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The theoretical and numerical evaluation of synergistic diffusing heat-exchanger design is presented. Motivation for this development is based on current diffuser and heat-exchange technologies in cogeneration plants, which ...

Lazzara, David S. (David Sergio), 1980-

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

270

Utilization of by-products from alkaline hydroxide preservation of whole broiler carcasses  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Alkaline hydroxides can be used as a preservation method for on-farm storage of broiler mortalities. This method creates two by-products: alkaline preserved whole broiler carcasses, which can be rendered into an Alkaline Poultry By-Product Meal (APBPM) and residual alkaline effluent, which can be used as a soil amendment. In experiment 1 APBPM was added to a broiler diet and evaluated for apparent metabolizable energy (AME). In experiment 2 AME was used to formulate balanced diets with 0 to 5% APBPM. Effects on broiler performance, organ morphology, tibia sheer strength and moisture content were evaluated in both experiments. Experiment 1 determined that the optimum additive concentration for the APBPM was 5%. The AME trials showed no significant difference between the control group and treatment group (5% APBPM) when comparing body weight and feed consumption, however a significant difference was observed when comparing excreta moisture. Experiment 2 evaluated the parameters of feed consumption, feed conversion, and body weight when fed an APBPM. The feed conversion for the 5% treatment in trial 1 was significantly lower compared to control, 1%, and 3% treatment groups. Feed consumption per bird for trial 1 was significantly higher in the control, 1%, and 3% treatment groups compared to the 5% treatment group. The percentage of organ weight was larger in treatment groups compared to control groups indicating an enlargement of organ weight as a percentage of body weight. The residual alkaline effluent was applied to coastal bermudagrass plots in amounts of 0 to 9354 L/ha with four replications per treatment each year for 1999 and 2000. Dry matter yield, nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P), and potassium (K) uptakes were evaluated. In 1999 maximum yields were at the 5612 L/ha rate but there was no yield response to effluent rate in 2000. Effluent rate had only small effects on N and P uptake since all treatments were balanced for these nutrients. The potassium uptakes showed a significant increase as the effluent rate increased. The residual KOH effluent can be applied to Coastal bermudagrasses as a source of K as well as N and P.

Niemeyer, Truitt Preston

2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

271

J. Plasma Fusion Res. SERIES, Vol. 8 (2009) Influence of Calcium Hydroxide Solution in RF Plasma on Sterilization of Bacterial Spores  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A low-pressure RF plasma powered by a 13.56 MHz RF power supply was generated with oxygen or calcium hydroxide solution vapor. The plasma was divided into three phases during one sterilization cycle. In the 1 st phase, CCP plasma is generated in the chamber and the pressure of pure oxygen varies from 3 Pa to 100 Pa. Electron density and electron temperature are approximately 10 9 cm-3 and 2 eV respectively. Calcium hydroxide solution vapor injection varies the pressure from 3 Pa to 100 Pa twice during the 2 nd phase of sterilization cycle. The 3 rd phase operating with oxygen gas supply is as same as the 1 st phase. This kind of three phase characteristic plasma with additive calcium hydroxide solution had been applied to investigate the different resistance of two commercial biological indicators i.e. the spores of B. atrophaeus and G. stearothermophilus. The survival curve obtained from experiment indicates that the former shows stronger resistance than the latter in the initial oxygen plasma sterilization phase. On the other hand, the latter shows stronger resistance to calcium hydroxide solution vapor plasma. A comparison analysis of the survival curves and optical emission spectral data from the plasma demonstrates that hydroxyl radicals play a significant role in inactivation of B. atrophaeus spores and eventually lead successful sterilization after the 80 minute cycle. The results observed under a scanning electron microscope show apparent desorption of B. atrophaeus spores after calcium hydroxide solution vapor plasma treatment.

Weimin Guan; Hiroharu Kawasaki; Tamiko Ohshima; Yoshihito Yagyu; Toshinobu Shi; Nobuya Hayashi

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

272

Thermal Response Testing for Geothermal Heat Exchangers ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Thermal Response Testing for Geothermal Heat Exchangers Begins. The Net-Zero house features a geothermal heat pump ...

2013-03-12T23:59:59.000Z

273

THERMOSIPHON WATER HEATERS WITH HEAT EXCHANGERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

11 ector connecting pipes header heat exchanger insulationLt total connecting pipe length, m (ft) total number of heat

Mertol, Atila

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

274

SPR - Historical Oil Sales and Exchanges | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

- Historical Oil Sales and Exchanges SPR - Historical Oil Sales and Exchanges SPR - Historical Oil Sales and Exchanges More Documents & Publications Before the Senate Energy and...

275

Deposition of biological aerosols on HVAC heat exchangers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methods to Maintain Heat Exchanger Coil Cleanliness. ASHRAEEngineering Foundation on Heat Exchanger Fouling, UnitedAerosols on HVAC Heat Exchangers Jeffrey Siegel and Iain

Siegel, Jeffrey; Walker, Iain

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

276

EA-179 California Power Exchange Corporation | Department of...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

9 California Power Exchange Corporation EA-179 California Power Exchange Corporation Order authorizing Power Exchange Corporation to export electric energy to Mexico. EA-179...

277

Deposition of biological aerosols on HVAC heat exchangers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methods to Maintain Heat Exchanger Coil Cleanliness. ASHRAEEngineering Foundation on Heat Exchanger Fouling, Unitedof HVAC Fin and Tube Heat Exchangers, To be published in the

Siegel, Jeffrey; Walker, Iain

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

278

Freely Floating Exchange Rates Do Not Systematically Overshoot  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Canadian-U.S. exchange rate, Review of Financial Economics,economy under flexible exchange rates, Journal of Monetary1976, Expectations and Exchange Rate Dynamics, Journal of

Pippenger, John

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

279

Globalization, Macroeconomic Performance, and the Exchange Rates of Emerging Economies  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Impact of Exchange Rate Movements on U.S. Foreign Debt."Performance, and the Exchange Rates of Emerging Economies*volatility, exchange-rate regimes, institutions,

Obstfeld, Maurice

2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

280

After the Fall: East Asian Exchange Rates Since the Crisis  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Case for Floating Exchange Rates in Asia. ” In Monetary and2005. “Classifying Exchange Rate Regimes: Deeds vs. Words. ”Ronald I. 2005. Exchange Rates under the East Asian Dollar

Cohen, Benjamin J

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydroxide exchange membranes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


281

Preconceptual design of a salt splitting process using ceramic membranes  

SciTech Connect

Inorganic ceramic membranes for salt splitting of radioactively contaminated sodium salt solutions are being developed for treating U. S. Department of Energy tank wastes. The process consists of electrochemical separation of sodium ions from the salt solution using sodium (Na) Super Ion Conductors (NaSICON) membranes. The primary NaSICON compositions being investigated are based on rare- earth ions (RE-NaSICON). Potential applications include: caustic recycling for sludge leaching, regenerating ion exchange resins, inhibiting corrosion in carbon-steel tanks, or retrieving tank wastes; reducing the volume of low-level wastes volume to be disposed of; adjusting pH and reducing competing cations to enhance cesium ion exchange processes; reducing sodium in high-level-waste sludges; and removing sodium from acidic wastes to facilitate calcining. These applications encompass wastes stored at the Hanford, Savannah River, and Idaho National Engineering Laboratory sites. The overall project objective is to supply a salt splitting process unit that impacts the waste treatment and disposal flowsheets and meets user requirements. The potential flowsheet impacts include improving the efficiency of the waste pretreatment processes, reducing volume, and increasing the quality of the final waste disposal forms. Meeting user requirements implies developing the technology to the point where it is available as standard equipment with predictable and reliable performance. This report presents two preconceptual designs for a full-scale salt splitting process based on the RE-NaSICON membranes to distinguish critical items for testing and to provide a vision that site users can evaluate.

Kurath, D.E.; Brooks, K.P.; Hollenberg, G.W.; Clemmer, R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Balagopal, S.; Landro, T.; Sutija, D.P. [Ceramatec, Inc., Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

282

Integrated Approach to Revamping Heat Exchangers Networks  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A heat exchanger network constitutes the core of the plant energy systems interlinking the core process operation and the utility systems. This paper will illustrate an integrated approach for the revamp of a heat exchanger network by bringing together process simulation, pinch analysis and detailed heat exchanger design tools. The paper will illustrate the methodology using a refinery example.

Glass, K. E.; Dhole, V.; Wang, Y.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

283

Verifiable auctions for online ad exchanges  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This paper treats a critical component of the Web ecosystem that has so far received little attention in our community: ad exchanges. Ad exchanges run auctions to sell publishers' inventory-space on Web pages-to advertisers who want to display ads in ... Keywords: ad exchanges, online advertising, verifiable auctions

Sebastian Angel; Michael Walfish

2013-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

284

High temperature size selective membranes  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objective of this research is to develop a high temperature size selective membrane capable of separating gas mixture components from each other based on molecular size, using a molecular sieving mechanism. The authors are evaluating two concepts: a composite of a carbon molecular sieve (CMS) with a tightly defined pore size distribution between 3 and 4 {angstrom}, and a microporous supporting matrix which provides mechanical strength and resistance to thermal degradation, and a sandwich of a CMS film between the porous supports. The high temperature membranes the authors are developing can be used to replace the current low-temperature unit operations for separating gaseous mixtures, especially hydrogen, from the products of the water gas shift reaction at high temperatures. Membranes that have a high selectivity and have both thermal and chemical stability would improve substantially the economics of the coal gasification process. These membranes can also improve other industrial processes such as the ammonia production and oil reform processes where hydrogen separation is crucial. Results of tests on a supported membrane and an unsupported carbon film are presented.

Yates, S.F.; Zhou, S.J.; Anderson, D.J.; Til, A.E. van

1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

285

High temperature catalytic membrane reactors  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Current state-of-the-art inorganic oxide membranes offer the potential of being modified to yield catalytic properties. The resulting modules may be configured to simultaneously induce catalytic reactions with product concentration and separation in a single processing step. Processes utilizing such catalytically active membrane reactors have the potential for dramatically increasing yield reactions which are currently limited by either thermodynamic equilibria, product inhibition, or kinetic selectivity. Examples of commercial interest include hydrogenation, dehydrogenation, partial and selective oxidation, hydrations, hydrocarbon cracking, olefin metathesis, hydroformylation, and olefin polymerization. A large portion of the most significant reactions fall into the category of high temperature, gas phase chemical and petrochemical processes. Microporous oxide membranes are well suited for these applications. A program is proposed to investigate selected model reactions of commercial interest (i.e. dehydrogenation of ethylbenzene to styrene and dehydrogenation of butane to butadiene) using a high temperature catalytic membrane reactor. Membranes will be developed, reaction dynamics characterized, and production processes developed, culminating in laboratory-scale demonstration of technical and economic feasibility. As a result, the anticipated increased yield per reactor pass economic incentives are envisioned. First, a large decrease in the temperature required to obtain high yield should be possible because of the reduced driving force requirement. Significantly higher conversion per pass implies a reduced recycle ratio, as well as reduced reactor size. Both factors result in reduced capital costs, as well as savings in cost of reactants and energy.

Not Available

1990-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

286

EXCHANGE  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report discusses the following topics on computer environments: Releasing computer software outside EG G Idaho; Ilford digital photo imager; mandatory upgrade of PC ORPS software; ORPS host computer upgrade; EROB computer users see network change; password expiration notice; big iron still has place in HPC market; handy scripts to copy and move files; more on workstation password expiration; training center course schedule for April 1993; Microsoft Word Version 5.1a- button bar; file attributes can provide you greater flexibility; constructing a personal WordPerfect dictionary; and Windows shortcuts.

Boltz, J.C. (ed.)

1993-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

287

Science Policy Exchange September 21, 2009 Columbia River Estuary Science-Policy Exchange  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Science Policy Exchange September 21, 2009 Summary 1 Columbia River Estuary Science-Policy Exchange and Conservation Council hosted a science-policy exchange in Astoria, Oregon. The Council supports strategies Science Advisory Board (ISAB) and the Independent Scientific Review Panel (ISRP) attended the exchange

288

Nanoengineered membranes for controlled transport  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A nanoengineered membrane for controlling material transport (e.g., molecular transport) is disclosed. The membrane includes a substrate, a cover defining a material transport channel between the substrate and the cover, and a plurality of fibers positioned in the channel and connected to and extending away from a surface of the substrate. The fibers are aligned perpendicular to the surface of the substrate, and have a width of 100 nanometers or less. The diffusion limits for material transport are controlled by the separation of the fibers. In one embodiment, chemical derivatization of carbon fibers may be undertaken to further affect the diffusion limits or affect selective permeability or facilitated transport. For example, a coating can be applied to at least a portion of the fibers. In another embodiment, individually addressable carbon nanofibers can be integrated with the membrane to provide an electrical driving force for material transport.

Doktycz, Mitchel J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Simpson, Michael L. (Knoxville, TN); McKnight, Timothy E. (Greenback, TN); Melechko, Anatoli V. (Oak Ridge, TN); Lowndes, Douglas H. (Knoxville, TN); Guillorn, Michael A. (Knoxville, TN); Merkulov, Vladimir I. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2010-01-05T23:59:59.000Z

289

Durable, Low Cost, Improved Fuel Cell Membranes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Durable, Low-cost, Improved Durable, Low-cost, Improved Fuel Cell Membranes US Department of Energy Office of Hydrogen, Fuel Cells and Infrastructure Technologies Kickoff Meeting, Washington DC, February 13, 2007 Michel Fouré Project Objectives z To develop a low cost (vs. perfluorosulfonated ionomers), durable membrane. z To develop a membrane capable at 80°C at low relative humidity (25-50%). z To develop a membrane capable of operating at 120°C for brief periods of time. z To elucidate membrane degradation and failure mechanisms. U:jen/slides/pres.07/FC kickoff Washington DC 2-13-07 2 Technical Barriers Addressed z Membrane Cost z Membrane Durability z Membrane capability to operate at low relative humidity. z Membrane capability to operate at 120ºC for brief period of times.

290

High Temperature Membrane & Advanced Cathode Catalyst Development  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Current project consisted of three main phases and eighteen milestones. Short description of each phase is given below. Table 1 lists program milestones. Phase 1--High Temperature Membrane and Advanced Catalyst Development. New polymers and advanced cathode catalysts were synthesized. The membranes and the catalysts were characterized and compared against specifications that are based on DOE program requirements. The best-in-class membranes and catalysts were downselected for phase 2. Phase 2--Catalyst Coated Membrane (CCM) Fabrication and Testing. Laboratory scale catalyst coated membranes (CCMs) were fabricated and tested using the down-selected membranes and catalysts. The catalysts and high temperature membrane CCMs were tested and optimized. Phase 3--Multi-cell stack fabrication. Full-size CCMs with the down-selected and optimized high temperature membrane and catalyst were fabricated. The catalyst membrane assemblies were tested in full size cells and multi-cell stack.

Protsailo, Lesia

2006-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

291

Continuous production of polymethylpentene membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Gas separation membranes may be prepared in a continuous manner by passing a porous support which may, if so desired, be backed by a fabric through a solution of polymethylpentene dissolved in an organic solvent such as hexane. The support member is passed through the solution while one side thereof is in contact with a roller, thereby permitting only one side of the support member to be coated with the polymer. After continuously withdrawing the support member from the bath, the solvent is allowed to evaporate and the resulting membrane is recovered.

Epperson, B.J.; Burnett, L.J.; Helm, V.D.

1983-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

292

Fluidized bed heat exchanger utilizing angularly extending heat exchange tubes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A fluidized bed heat exchanger in which air is passed through a bed of particulate material containing fuel disposed in a housing. A steam/water natural circulation system is provided and includes a steam drum disposed adjacent the fluidized bed and a series of tubes connected at one end to the steam drum. A portion of the tubes are connected to a water drum and in the path of the air and the gaseous products of combustion exiting from the bed. Another portion of the tubes pass through the bed and extend at an angle to the upper surface of the bed.

Talmud, Fred M. (Berkeley Heights, NJ); Garcia-Mallol, Juan-Antonio (Morristown, NJ)

1980-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

293

Production of permeable cellulose triacetate membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A phase inversion process for the preparation of cellulose triacetate (CTA) and regenerated cellulose membranes is disclosed. Such membranes are useful as supports for liquid membranes in facilitated transport processes, as microfiltration membranes, as dialysis or ultrafiltration membranes, and for the preparation of ion-selective electrodes. The process comprises the steps of preparing a casting solution of CTA in a solvent comprising a mixture of cyclohexanone and methylene chloride, casting a film from the casting solution, and immersing the cast film in a methanol bath. The resulting CTA membrane may then be hydrolyzed to regenerated cellulose using conventional techniques.

Johnson, B.M.

1986-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

294

Advanced proton-exchange materials for energy efficient fuel cells.  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The ''Advanced Proton-Exchange Materials for Energy Efficient Fuel Cells'' Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project began in October 2002 and ended in September 2005. This LDRD was funded by the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy strategic business unit. The purpose of this LDRD was to initiate the fundamental research necessary for the development of a novel proton-exchange membranes (PEM) to overcome the material and performance limitations of the ''state of the art'' Nafion that is used in both hydrogen and methanol fuel cells. An atomistic modeling effort was added to this LDRD in order to establish a frame work between predicted morphology and observed PEM morphology in order to relate it to fuel cell performance. Significant progress was made in the area of PEM material design, development, and demonstration during this LDRD. A fundamental understanding involving the role of the structure of the PEM material as a function of sulfonic acid content, polymer topology, chemical composition, molecular weight, and electrode electrolyte ink development was demonstrated during this LDRD. PEM materials based upon random and block polyimides, polybenzimidazoles, and polyphenylenes were created and evaluated for improvements in proton conductivity, reduced swelling, reduced O{sub 2} and H{sub 2} permeability, and increased thermal stability. Results from this work reveal that the family of polyphenylenes potentially solves several technical challenges associated with obtaining a high temperature PEM membrane. Fuel cell relevant properties such as high proton conductivity (>120 mS/cm), good thermal stability, and mechanical robustness were demonstrated during this LDRD. This report summarizes the technical accomplishments and results of this LDRD.

Fujimoto, Cy H.; Grest, Gary Stephen; Hickner, Michael A.; Cornelius, Christopher James; Staiger, Chad Lynn; Hibbs, Michael R.

2005-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

295

The Roles of Outer Membrane Cytochromes of Shewanella and Geobacter in Extracellular Electron Transfer  

SciTech Connect

As key components of the electron transfer (ET) pathways used for dissimilatory reduction of solid iron [Fe(III)] and manganese [Mn(IV)] (hydr)oxides, outer membrane cytochromes MtrC and OmcA of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and OmcE and OmcS of Geobacter sulfurreducens mediate ET reactions extracellularly. Cell surface-exposed MtrC and OmcA can transfer electrons directly to the metal oxides. S. oneidensis MR-1 cells also secrete flavins that can facilitate ET to the oxides. The secreted flavins are thought to serve either as chelators that form soluble Fe(III)/Mn(IV)-flavin complexes or as electron shuttles that ferry the electrons from cell-associated ET proteins to the metal oxides. Cell-surface localization may also permit MtrC and OmcA to transfer electrons extracellularly to either flavin-chelated Fe(III)/Mn(IV) or oxidized flavins. OmcE and OmcS are proposed to be located on the Geobacter cell surface where they are believed to function as the intermediates to relay electrons to type IV pili, which are then hypothesized to transfer electrons directly to the metal oxides. Thus, cell surface-localization positions these outer membrane cytochromes to transfer electrons to Fe(III)/Mn(IV) oxides external to the bacterial cells either directly, indirectly, or both, demonstrating a common strategy shared by Shewanella and Geobacter for extracellular reduction of the oxides.

Shi, Liang; Richardson, David; Wang, Zheming; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Zachara, John M.; Fredrickson, Jim K.

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

296

Argonne CNM News: Ultrananocrystalline Diamond-Coated Membranes...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Ultrananocrystalline Diamond-Coated Membranes Show Promise for Medical Implant Applications SEM image of UNCD coated AAO membrane SEM image of AAO membrane coated with tungsten...

297

Protein Flips Lipids Across Membranes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Protein Flips Lipids Across Membranes Print Protein Flips Lipids Across Membranes Print Found ubiquitously in both bacteria and humans, membrane proteins of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family have been implicated in both antibiotic and cancer-drug resistance. The mechanisms used by these proteins to expel toxins from cells therefore represent key targets for the development of drugs designed to combat the growing problem of multidrug resistance. Toward this end, researchers from The Scripps Research Institute have succeeded in crystallizing MsbA-an ABC transporter protein-together with a substrate (the molecule to be transported) and a hydrolyzed (spent) form of the nucleotide ATP, the transporter's source of chemical energy. The resulting molecular complex is caught at a moment following the transporter's "power stroke," the force-generating part of the transport cycle. This snapshot suggests a mechanism by which the substrate molecule gets flipped head-over-tail from one side of the membrane to the other, on its way out of the cell.

298

Preparation of gas selective membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Gas separation membranes which possess improved characteristics as exemplified by selectivity and flux may be prepared by coating a porous organic polymer support with a solution or emulsion of a plasticizer and an organic polymer, said coating being effected at subatmospheric pressures in order to increase the penetration depth of the coating material.

Kulprathipanja, S.; Kulkarni, S.S.; Funk, E.W.

1988-06-14T23:59:59.000Z

299

Protein Flips Lipids Across Membranes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Protein Flips Lipids Across Membranes Print Protein Flips Lipids Across Membranes Print Found ubiquitously in both bacteria and humans, membrane proteins of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family have been implicated in both antibiotic and cancer-drug resistance. The mechanisms used by these proteins to expel toxins from cells therefore represent key targets for the development of drugs designed to combat the growing problem of multidrug resistance. Toward this end, researchers from The Scripps Research Institute have succeeded in crystallizing MsbA-an ABC transporter protein-together with a substrate (the molecule to be transported) and a hydrolyzed (spent) form of the nucleotide ATP, the transporter's source of chemical energy. The resulting molecular complex is caught at a moment following the transporter's "power stroke," the force-generating part of the transport cycle. This snapshot suggests a mechanism by which the substrate molecule gets flipped head-over-tail from one side of the membrane to the other, on its way out of the cell.

300

Protein Flips Lipids Across Membranes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Protein Flips Lipids Across Protein Flips Lipids Across Membranes Protein Flips Lipids Across Membranes Print Wednesday, 26 October 2005 00:00 Found ubiquitously in both bacteria and humans, membrane proteins of the adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family have been implicated in both antibiotic and cancer-drug resistance. The mechanisms used by these proteins to expel toxins from cells therefore represent key targets for the development of drugs designed to combat the growing problem of multidrug resistance. Toward this end, researchers from The Scripps Research Institute have succeeded in crystallizing MsbA-an ABC transporter protein-together with a substrate (the molecule to be transported) and a hydrolyzed (spent) form of the nucleotide ATP, the transporter's source of chemical energy. The resulting molecular complex is caught at a moment following the transporter's "power stroke," the force-generating part of the transport cycle. This snapshot suggests a mechanism by which the substrate molecule gets flipped head-over-tail from one side of the membrane to the other, on its way out of the cell.

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydroxide exchange membranes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


301

Corrugated Membrane Fuel Cell Structures  

SciTech Connect

One of the most challenging aspects of traditional PEM fuel cell stacks is the difficulty achieving the platinum catalyst utilization target of 0.2 gPt/kWe set forth by the DOE. Good catalyst utilization can be achieved with state-of-the-art catalyst coated membranes (CCM) when low catalyst loadings (<0.3 mg/cm2) are used at a low current. However, when low platinum loadings are used, the peak power density is lower than conventional loadings, requiring a larger total active area and a larger bipolar plate. This results in a lower overall stack power density not meeting the DOE target. By corrugating the fuel cell membrane electrode structure, Ion Power?s goal is to realize both the Pt utilization targets as well as the power density targets of the DOE. This will be achieved by demonstrating a fuel cell single cell (50 cm2) with a twofold increase in the membrane active area over the geometric area of the cell by corrugating the MEA structure. The corrugating structure must be able to demonstrate the target properties of < 10 mOhm-cm2 electrical resistance at > 20 psi compressive strength over the active area, in combination with offering at least 80% of power density that can be achieved by using the same MEA in a flat plate structure. Corrugated membrane fuel cell structures also have the potential to meet DOE power density targets by essentially packaging more membrane area into the same fuel cell volume as compared to conventional stack constructions.

Grot, Stephen [President, Ion Power Inc.] President, Ion Power Inc.

2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

302

Testing and analysis of immersed heat exchangers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The objectives were to determine the performance of four immersed, ''supply-side'' heat exchangers used in solar domestic-hot-water systems; to examine the effects of flow rate, temperature difference, and coil configuration on performance; and to develop a simple model to predict the performance of immersed heat exchangers. We tested four immersed heat exchangers: a smooth coil, a finned spiral, a single-wall bayonet, and a double-wall bayonet. We developed two analyticl models and a simple finite difference model. We experimentally verified that the performance of these heat exchangers depends on the flow rate through them; we also showed that the temperature difference between the heat exchanger's inlet and the storage tank can strongly affect a heat exchanger's performance. We also compared the effects of the heat exchanger's configuration and correlated Nusselt and Rayleigh numbers for each heat exchanger tested. The smooth coil had a higher effectiveness than the others, while the double-wall bayonet had a very low effectiveness. We still do not know the long-term effectiveness of heat exchangers regarding scale accumulation, nor do we know the effects of very low flow rates on a heat exchanger's performance.

Farrington, R.B.; Bingham, C.E.

1986-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

303

Microporous Inorganic Membranes for Hydrogen Purification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Microporous Microporous Inorganic Membranes for Hydrogen Purification Brian L. Bischoff, Roddie R. Judkins, and Timothy R. Armstrong Oak Ridge National Laboratory Presented at: DOE Workshop on Hydrogen Separations and Purification Technologies Arlington, Virginia September 8, 2004 2 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Hydrogen Separation Membranes * Non-Porous - Palladium based films - Ion transport membranes * Porous - Ordered microporous membranes (IUPAC Recommendations 2001), e.g. zeolite membranes - Microporous membranes 3 OAK RIDGE NATIONAL LABORATORY U. S. DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Microporous Membranes * IUPAC defines micropores as pores smaller than 2nm in diameter * Generally a microporous membrane is made by applying 1 to 3 thin layers to a porous support * Porous support can be ceramic or metallic

304

Development of energy efficient membrane distillation systems  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Membrane distillation (MD) has shown potential as a means of desalination and water purification. As a thermally driven membrane technology which runs at relatively low pressure, which can withstand high salinity feed ...

Summers, Edward K

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

305

Anion permselective membrane. [For redox fuel cells  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Experimental anion permeselective membranes were improved and characterized for use as separators in a chemical redox, power storage cell being developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The goal of minimal Fe/sup +3/ ion transfer was achieved for each candidate membrane system. Minimal membrane resistivity was demonstrated by reduction of film thickness using synthetic backing materials but usefulness of thin membranes was limited by the scarcity of compatible fabrics. The most durable and useful backing fabrics were modacrylics. One membrane, a copolymer of 4 vinylpyridine and vinyl benzylchloride was outstanding in overall electrochemical and physical properties. Long term (1000 hrs) membrane chemical and thermal durability in redox environment was shown by three candidate polymers and two membranes. The remainder had good durability at ambient temperature. Manufacturing capability was demonstrated for large scale production of membrane sheets 5.5 ft/sup 2/ in area for two candidate systems.

Alexander, S.S.; Hodgdon, R.B.

1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

306

Tetrakis-amido high flux membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Composite RO membranes of a microporous polymeric support and a polyamide reaction product of a tetrakis-aminomethyl compound and a polyacylhalide are disclosed, said membranes exhibiting high flux and good chlorine resistance.

McCray, Scott B. (Bend, OR)

1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

307

Engineering supported membranes for cell biology  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

membranes in structural biology. J Struct Biol 168:1–2 50.supported membranes for cell biology Cheng-han Yu • Jay T.range problems in cell biology. Because lateral mobility of

Yu, Cheng-han; Groves, Jay T.

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

308

Tetrakis-amido high flux membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Composite RO membranes of a microporous polymeric support and a polyamide reaction product of a tetrakis-aminomethyl compound and a polyacylhalide are disclosed, said membranes exhibiting high flux and good chlorine resistance.

McCray, S.B.

1989-10-24T23:59:59.000Z

309

Surface analysis of mixed-conducting ferrite membranes by the conversion-electron Moessbauer spectroscopy  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Conversion-electron Moessbauer spectroscopy analysis of iron surface states in the dense ceramic membranes made of {sup 57}Fe-enriched SrFe{sub 0.7}Al{sub 0.3}O{sub 3-{delta}} perovskite, shows no traces of reductive decomposition or carbide formation in the interfacial layers after operation under air/CH{sub 4} gradient at 1173 K, within the limits of experimental uncertainty. The predominant trivalent state of iron cations at the membrane permeate-side surface exposed to flowing dry methane provides evidence of the kinetic stabilization mechanism, which is only possible due to slow oxygen-exchange kinetics and enables long-term operation of the ferrite-based ceramic reactors for natural gas conversion. At the membrane feed-side surface exposed to air, the fractions of Fe{sup 4+} and Fe{sup 3+} are close to those in the powder equilibrated at atmospheric oxygen pressure, suggesting that the exchange limitations to oxygen transport are essentially localized at the partially reduced surface. - Graphical Abstract: Conversion-electron Moessbauer spectroscopy analysis of dense ceramic membranes made of {sup 57}Fe-enriched SrFe{sub 0.7}Al{sub 0.3}O{sub 3-{delta}} perovskite, shows no reductive decomposition in thin interfacial layers after testing under air/CH{sub 4} gradient, enabling stable operation of the ferrite-based ceramic reactors for partial oxidation of methane. Highlights: > Conversion-electron Moessbauer spectroscopy is used for mixed-conducting membranes. > No decomposition is detected in the membrane surface layers under air/CH{sub 4} gradient. > Due to kinetic stabilization, Fe{sup 3+} states prevail at the surface exposed to methane. > Transmission Moessbauer spectra show perovskite decomposition on equlibration in CH{sub 4}. > Ferrite-based ceramic reactors can stably operate under air/CH{sub 4} gradient.

Waerenborgh, J.C.; Tsipis, E.V. [Chemistry Department, Instituto Tecnologico e Nuclear, CFMC-UL, EN 10, 2686-953 Sacavem (Portugal); Yaremchenko, A.A. [Department of Ceramics and Glass Engineering, CICECO, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Kharton, V.V., E-mail: kharton@ua.pt [Department of Ceramics and Glass Engineering, CICECO, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

310

Identification and Characterization of Near-Term Direct Hydrogen Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Markets  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

This report is a work prepared for the United States Government by Battelle. In no event shall either the United States Government or Battelle have any responsibility or liability for any consequences of any use, misuse, inability to use, or reliance on the information contained herein, nor does either warrant or otherwise represent in any way the accuracy, adequacy, efficacy, or applicability of the contents hereof. ii TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.0 INTRODUCTION ........................................................................................................ 1 1.1 Marketing Research Design.......................................................................................... 2 1.1.1 Phase 1 Research .............................................................................................

311

A Methanol Steam Reforming Micro Reactor for Proton Exchange Membrane Micro Fuel Cell System  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The heat, mass and momentum transfer from a fuel reforming packed bed to a surrounding silicon wafer has been simulated. Modeling showed quantitatively reasonable agreement with experimental data for fuel conversion efficiency, hydrogen production rate, outlet methanol mole fraction and outlet steam mole fraction. The variation in fuel conversion efficiency with the micro reformer thermal isolation can be used to optimize fuel-processing conditions for micro PEM fuel cells.

Park, H G; Piggott, W T; Chung, J; Morse, J D; Havstad, M; Grigoropoulos, C P; Greif, R; Benett, W; Sopchak, D; Upadhye, R

2003-07-28T23:59:59.000Z

312

Bipolar plate/diffuser for a proton exchange membrane fuel cell  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A combination bipolar plate/diffuser fuel cell component includes an electrically conducting solid material having: a porous region having a porous surface; and a hermetic region, the hermetic region defining at least a portion of at least one coolant channel, the porous region defining at least a portion of at least one reactant channel, the porous region defining a flow field medium for diffusing the reactant to the porous surface.

Besmann, T.M.; Burchell, T.D.

2000-03-14T23:59:59.000Z

313

Characterization and modification of electrospun fiber mats for use in composite proton exchange membranes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Electrostatic fiber formation, or electrospinning, offers a particularly simple and robust method to create polymeric nanofibers of various sizes and morphologies. In electrospinning, a viscoelastic fluid is charged so ...

Mannarino, Matthew Marchand

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

314

Topic 04 Mathilde Brigaudet 395 Study of diffusive limitations in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

aerogels may replace advantageously the usual carbon blacks as catalyst support in cathodes. Resulting, which is a strong poison of Pt catalysts. On the contrary, electrocatalysts based on carbon aerogels on the catalytic layer architecture. Moreover, carbon aerogels and xerogels enable a good platinum dispersion

Paris-Sud XI, Université de

315

Correlating Humidity-Dependent Ionically Conductive Surface Area with Transport Phenomena in Proton-Exchange Membranes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Conductive Surface Area with Transport Phenomena in Proton-its bulk and interfacial transport properties as a functioninterfacial mass-transport resistance was established.

He, Qinggang

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

316

Development of a Novel CO Tolerant Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Anode  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

for Materials, School of Nanosciences and Engineering, State University of New York at Albany, Albany, New York Power, Incorporated, Latham, New York 12110, USA c Energy and Environment Applications Center, Institute inherent to storing hydrogen, liquid fuels such as propane, natural gas, and gasoline are used to produce

Weidner, John W.

317

Inorganic dual-layer microporous supported membranes  

SciTech Connect

The present invention provides for a dual-layer inorganic microporous membrane capable of molecular sieving, and methods for production of the membranes. The inorganic microporous supported membrane includes a porous substrate which supports a first inorganic porous membrane having an average pore size of less than about 25 .ANG. and a second inorganic porous membrane coating the first inorganic membrane having an average pore size of less than about 6 .ANG.. The dual-layered membrane is produced by contacting the porous substrate with a surfactant-template polymeric sol, resulting in a surfactant sol coated membrane support. The surfactant sol coated membrane support is dried, producing a surfactant-templated polymer-coated substrate which is calcined to produce an intermediate layer surfactant-templated membrane. The intermediate layer surfactant-templated membrane is then contacted with a second polymeric sol producing a polymeric sol coated substrate which is dried producing an inorganic polymeric coated substrate. The inorganic polymeric coated substrate is then calcined producing an inorganic dual-layered microporous supported membrane in accordance with the present invention.

Brinker, C. Jeffrey (14 Eagle Nest Dr. NE., Albuquerque, NM 87122); Tsai, Chung-Yi (6 Mount Vernon Dr., Apt. C, Vernon, CT 06066); Lu, Yungfeng (1055 N. Capital Ave., #20, San Jose, CA 95133)

2003-03-25T23:59:59.000Z

318

IONICALLY CONDUCTING MEMBRANES FOR HYDROGEN PRODUCTION AND  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

SEQUESTRATION Oxygen Transport Membrane Hydrogen Transport Membrane Natural Gas Coal Biomass Syngas CO/H2 WGS H2 operating experience. #12;ELTRON RESEARCH INC. Syngas Production Rate ­ 60 mL/min cm2 @ 900°C Equivalent O2 Operational Experience Under High Pressure Differential SUMMARY OF ELTRON OXYGEN TRANSPORT MEMBRANE SYNGAS

319

DHE (downhole heat exchangers). [Downhole Heat Exchangers (DHE)  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The use of downhole heat exchangers (DHE) for residential or commercial space and domestic water heating and other applications has several desirable features. Systems are nearly or completely passive -- that is, no or very little geothermal water or steam is produced from the well either reducing or completely eliminating surface environmental concerns and the need for disposal systems or injection wells. Initial cost of pumps and installation are eliminated or reduced along with pumping power costs and maintenance costs associated with pumping often corrosive geothermal fluids. Many residential and small commercial systems do not require circulating pumps because the density difference in the incoming and outgoing sides of the loop are sufficient to overcome circulating friction losses in the entire system. The major disadvantage of DHEs is their dependence on natural heat flow. In areas where geological conditions provide high permeability and a natural hydraulic gradient, DHEs can provide a substantial quantity of heat. A single 500-ft (152 m) well in Klamath Falls, Oregon, supplies over one megawatt thermal and output is apparently limited by the surface area of pipe that can be installed in the well bore. In contrast, DHEs used in conjunction with heat pumps may supply less than 8 KW from a well of similar depth. Here output is limited by conductive heat flow with perhaps a small contribution from convection near the well bore. The highest capacity DHE reported to date, in Turkey, supplies 6 MW thermal from an 820-ft (250 m) well. There were two main goals for this project. The first was to gather, disseminate and exchange internationally information on DHES. The second was to perform experiments that would provide insight into well bore/aquifer interaction and thereby provide more information on which to base DHE designs. 27 refs., 31 figs., 3 tabs.

Culver, G.

1990-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

320

ALUMINUM READINESS EVALUATION FOR ALUMINUM REMOVAL AND SODIUM HYDROXIDE REGENRATION FROM HANFORD TANK WASTE BY LITHIUM HYDROTALCITE PRECIPITATION  

SciTech Connect

A Technology Readiness Evaluation (TRE) performed by AREV A Federal Services, LLC (AFS) for Washington River Protection Solutions, LLC (WRPS) shows the lithium hydrotalcite (LiHT) process invented and patented (pending) by AFS has reached an overall Technology Readiness Level (TRL) of 3. The LiHT process removes aluminum and regenerates sodium hydroxide. The evaluation used test results obtained with a 2-L laboratory-scale system to validate the process and its critical technology elements (CTEs) on Hanford tank waste simulants. The testing included detailed definition and evaluation for parameters of interest and validation by comparison to analytical predictions and data quality objectives for critical subsystems. The results of the TRE would support the development of strategies to further mature the design and implementation of the LiHT process as a supplemental pretreatment option for Hanford tank waste.

SAMS TL; MASSIE HL

2011-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydroxide exchange membranes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


321

Technology Performance Exchange | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Performance Exchange Performance Exchange Technology Performance Exchange A collaboration between the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Federal Energy Management Program Office and the Building Technologies Office, the Technology Performance Exchange will establish a Web-based portal and accompanying database that allows technology suppliers to submit product performance data that private and public sector end users can use to make fact-based procurement decisions. Suppliers will populate the database with technologies that affect building activities, including construction, commissioning, maintenance, monitoring, equipment, and verification. This project will help the U.S. energy efficiency technology market by providing objective product performance data to building engineers and

322

Heat transfer and heat exchangers reference handbook  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The purpose of this handbook is to provide Rocky Flats personnel with an understanding of the basic concepts of heat transfer and the operation of heat exchangers.

Not Available

1991-01-15T23:59:59.000Z

323

Industrial Plate Exchangers Heat Recovery and Fouling  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Plate and Frame Heat Exchangers have special characteristics for both fouling and heat recovery. These are discussed in general then related to two industrial examples.

Cross, P. H.

1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

324

Geothermal shell and tube heat exchanger augmentation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The heat exchangers for a moderate temperature geothermal plant represent a major portion of the plant capital cost. Therefore, reduction in heat exchanger size will significantly improve the electrical power economics. The potential heat exchanger size reduction that could be achieved by reducing any combination heat transfer resistance terms is evaluated. A literature survey of heat transfer augmentation schemes is summarized and equations for evaluating the impact of cleaning frequency on heat exchanger size are presented. Recommendations are made specifically for the Raft River Thermal Loop, however, the techniques are applicable to any other geothermal plant or heat transfer system.

Neill, D.T.

1976-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

325

Innovative heat exchangers for solar water heaters.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??The performance of two innovative collector-loop heat exchangers used in pumped circulation solar water heaters was investigated experimentally and numerically, and TRNSYS simulation models were… (more)

Soo Too, Yen Chean

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

326

Modelling of Multistream LNG Heat Exchangers.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The main goal of this thesis is to find out if a liquefied natural gas multistream heat exchanger numerical model is achievable. This should… (more)

Soler Fossas, Joan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

327

Building Technologies Office: Technology Performance Exchange...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities 179d Tax Calculator Advanced Energy Design Guides Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides Building Energy Data Exchange...

328

Office of Waste Processing Technical Exchange  

... Savannah River/Hanford/Idaho along with others receiving funding from the Environmental Management Office of Waste Processing have met to exchange recent ...

329

Office of Waste Processing Technical Exchange  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Contact Information: For more EM Waste Processing Technical Exchange 2010 information, please contact one of the folowing (click name to email): Bill Wilmarth Rosalind Blocker...

330

Office of Waste Processing Technical Exchange  

... Savannah River/Hanford/Idaho along with others receiving funding from the Environmental Management Office of Waste Processing have met to exchange ...

331

DOE Office of Waste Processing Technical Exchange  

The Department of Energy is hosting a technical exchange in Denver, CO. Over the past seven years, personnel from the three sites, Savannah ...

332

Bio-Membrane Flexibility Studied in the Presence of ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Bio-Membrane Flexibility Studied in the Presence of Cholesterol and Salt. Living cell membranes are made of phospholipids ...

333

Durable Fuel Cell Membrane Electrode Assembly (MEA) - Energy ...  

Technology Marketing Summary The membrane electrode assembly (MEA) is an essential, yet highly expensive component of any polymer electrolyte membrane ...

334

Separation of metals by supported liquid membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A supported liquid membrane system for the separation of a preselected chemical species within a feedstream, preferably an aqueous feedstream, includes a feed compartment containing a feed solution having at least one preselected chemical species therein, a stripping compartment containing a stripping solution therein, and a microporous polybenzimidazole membrane situated between the compartments, the microporous polybenzimidazole membrane containing an extractant mixture selective for the preselected chemical species within the membrane pores is disclosed along with a method of separating preselected chemical species from a feedstream with such a system, and a supported liquid membrane for use in such a system.

Takigawa, Doreen Y. (Los Alamos, NM)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

335

Separation of metals by supported liquid membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A supported liquid membrane system for the separation of a preselected chemical species within a feedstream, preferably an aqueous feedstream, includes a feed compartment containing a feed solution having at least one preselected chemical species therein, a stripping compartment containing a stripping solution therein, and a microporous polybenzimidazole membrane situated between the compartments, the microporous polybenzimidazole membrane containing an extractant mixture selective for the preselected chemical species within the membrane pores is disclosed along with a method of separating preselected chemical species from a feedstream with such a system, and a supported liquid membrane for use in such a system.

Takigawa, D.Y.

1990-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

336

Process for restoring membrane permeation properties  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for restoring the selectivity of high-flee-volume, glassy polymer membranes for condensable components over less-condensable components or non-condensable components of a gas mixture. The process involves exposing the membrane to suitable sorbent vapor, such as propane or butane, thereby reopening the microvoids that make up the free volume. The selectivity of an aged membrane may be restored to 70-100% of its original value. The selectivity of a membrane which is known to age over time can also be maintained by keeping the membrane in a vapor environment when it is not in use.

Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA); Toy, Lora G. (San Francisco, CA); Casillas, Carlos G. (San Jose, CA)

1997-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

337

Process for restoring membrane permeation properties  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for restoring the selectivity of high-free-volume, glassy polymer membranes for condensable components over less-condensable components or non-condensable components of a gas mixture. The process involves exposing the membrane to suitable sorbent vapor, such as propane or butane, thereby reopening the microvoids that make up the free volume. The selectivity of an aged membrane may be restored to 70--100% of its original value. The selectivity of a membrane which is known to age over time can also be maintained by keeping the membrane in a vapor environment when it is not in use. 8 figs.

Pinnau, I.; Toy, L.G.; Casillas, C.G.

1997-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

338

Quality Assurance Exchange August 2012  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

With the help of dedicated quality With the help of dedicated quality professionals across the complex and beyond, I am pleased to announce that this issue of the Quality Assurance Exchange (QAE) newsletter focuses on hard hitting issues, as well as opportunities to explore abatement methods in regards to our quality assurance (QA) challenges. Within, you will find a brief discussion on the Department of Energy (DOE) Federal Quality Council and its Calendar Year 2011 accomplishments; an exploration of Safety Software QA activities including an overview of the annual meeting; an update on the Safety Software Communication Forum; and activities surrounding new and upcoming guides and systems. Also, you will get an inside look on the Differing Professional Opinions Process; read an exclusive interview

339

Hydrogen Selective Exfoliated Zeolite Membranes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Selective Exfoliated Zeolite Hydrogen Selective Exfoliated Zeolite Membranes Background An important component of the Department of Energy (DOE) Carbon Sequestration Program is the development of carbon capture technologies for power systems. Capturing carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) from mixed-gas streams is a first and critical step in carbon sequestration. To be technically and economically viable, a successful separation method must be applicable to industrially relevant gas streams at realistic

340

Microsoft Word - 25A5311 Continued  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

X - B3.6 Siting/construction/operation/decommissioning of facilities for bench-scale research, conventional laboratory operations, small-scale research and development and pilot projects X - B3.6 Siting/construction/operation/decommissioning of facilities for bench-scale research, conventional laboratory operations, small-scale research and development and pilot projects By switching fuel cell electrochemical reactions from an acidic medium to a basic one and utilizing highly conductive hydroxide exchange membranes, the high-performance hydroxide exchange membrane fuel cells (HEMFCs) are a truly innovative technology and radically different from the proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) that have been intensively researched and developed in the past two decades. The most exciting ability of HEMFCs is to solve fundamentally the PEMFCs' serious problems of catalysts cost and durability, while achieving PEMFCs' high power and energy density simultaneously. What has been critically missing for HEMFCs is a polymeric hydroxide

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydroxide exchange membranes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


341

CX-010528: Categorical Exclusion Determination | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

528: Categorical Exclusion Determination 528: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-010528: Categorical Exclusion Determination Durability Investigation for Quarternary Phosphonium-based Polymer Hydroxide Exchange Membranes CX(s) Applied: B3.6 Date: 09/18/2012 Location(s): Delaware Offices(s): Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy Funding will support two efforts: 1) durability testing and analysis of battery cells outfitted with the University of Delaware's novel phosphonium based polymer hydroxide exchange membrane, and 2) creation of a batch of phosphonium based polymer hydroxide exchange membranes for use in another ARPA-E project. CX-010528.pdf More Documents & Publications CX-000598: Categorical Exclusion Determination CX-009898: Categorical Exclusion Determination Energy Storage Systems 2012 Peer Review Presentations - Poster Session 1

342

NETL: Hydrogen Selective Exfoliated Zeolite Membranes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Hydrogen Selective Exfoliated Zeolite Membranes Hydrogen Selective Exfoliated Zeolite Membranes Project No.: DE-FE0001322 The University of Minnesota is developing a technically and economically viable membrane for carbon dioxide (CO2) separation from typical water-gas-shift (WGS) mixture feeds. The goal of this project is to further develop recently developed membrane technology based on exfoliated zeolite coatings as components for carbon capture in integrated gasification combined cycle plants. These membranes have the potential to contribute to carbon capture by high-temperature separation of hydrogen from CO2 and other gases present in shifted synthesis gas. Molecular sieve membrane for the pre-combustion capture of CO2. Molecular sieve membrane for the pre-combustion capture of CO2. Related Papers and Publications:

343

Interaction of arginine oligomer with model membrane  

SciTech Connect

Short oligomers of arginine (R8) have been shown to cross readily a variety of biological barriers. A hypothesis was put forward that inverted micelles form in biological membranes in the presence of arginine oligomer peptides, facilitating their transfer through the membranes. In order to define the role of peptide-lipid interaction in this mechanism, we prepared liposomes as the model membrane to study the ability of R8 inducing calcein release from liposomes, the fusion of liposomes, R8 binding to liposomes and membrane disturbing activity of the bound R8. The results show that R8 binding to liposome membrane depends on lipid compositions, negative surface charge density and interior water phase pH values of liposomes. R8 has no activity to induce the leakage of calcein from liposomes or improve liposome fusion. R8 does not permeabilize through the membrane spontaneously. These peptides delivering drugs through membranes may depend on receptors and energy.

Yi, Dandan [Department of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, No.13, Hangkong Road, Wuhan 430040 (China)]. E-mail: yi_dandan@yahoo.com.cn; Guoming, Li [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, The Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100101 (China); Gao, Li [Department of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, No.13, Hangkong Road, Wuhan 430040 (China); Wei, Liang [National Laboratory of Biomacromolecules, Institute of Biophysics, The Chinese Academy of Science, Beijing 100101 (China)

2007-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

344

Ion transport membrane module and vessel system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel. The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

Stein, VanEric Edward (Allentown, PA); Carolan, Michael Francis (Allentown, PA); Chen, Christopher M. (Allentown, PA); Armstrong, Phillip Andrew (Orefield, PA); Wahle, Harold W. (North Canton, OH); Ohrn, Theodore R. (Alliance, OH); Kneidel, Kurt E. (Alliance, OH); Rackers, Keith Gerard (Louisville, OH); Blake, James Erik (Uniontown, OH); Nataraj, Shankar (Allentown, PA); Van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias (Obersulm-Willsbach, DE); Wilson, Merrill Anderson (West Jordan, UT)

2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

345

Ion transport membrane module and vessel system  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel having an interior, an exterior, an inlet, and an outlet; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein any inlet and any outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; and (c) one or more gas manifolds in flow communication with interior regions of the membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel.The ion transport membrane system may be utilized in a gas separation device to recover oxygen from an oxygen-containing gas or as an oxidation reactor to oxidize compounds in a feed gas stream by oxygen permeated through the mixed metal oxide ceramic material of the membrane modules.

Stein, VanEric Edward (Allentown, PA); Carolan, Michael Francis (Allentown, PA); Chen, Christopher M. (Allentown, PA); Armstrong, Phillip Andrew (Orefield, PA); Wahle, Harold W. (North Canton, OH); Ohrn, Theodore R. (Alliance, OH); Kneidel, Kurt E. (Alliance, OH); Rackers, Keith Gerard (Louisville, OH); Blake, James Erik (Uniontown, OH); Nataraj, Shankar (Allentown, PA); van Doorn, Rene Hendrik Elias (Obersulm-Willsbach, DE); Wilson, Merrill Anderson (West Jordan, UT)

2008-02-26T23:59:59.000Z

346

Efficient autonomous signature exchange on ubiquitous networks  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Fair signature exchange in emerging ubiquitous commerce (u-commerce) poses new security challenges. In particular, its operations are highly distributed and autonomous, and typically run on much open, dynamic and resource-diversified ubiquitous networks. ... Keywords: Communication protocol, Fair exchange, Signature, Ubiquitous computing, Verifiable encryption

Q. Shi; N. Zhang; D. Llewellyn-Jones

2012-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

347

Heat exchanger with a removable tube section  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A heat exchanger is described in which the tube sheet is secured against primary liquid pressure, but which allows for easy removal of the tube section. The tube section is supported by a flange which is secured by a number of shear blocks, each of which extends into a slot which is immovable with respect to the outer shell of the heat exchanger. (auth)

Wolowodiuk, W.; Anelli, J.

1975-07-29T23:59:59.000Z

348

Stability analysis of heat exchanger dynamics  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

In the study of vapor compression cycle, momentum balance equation is often ignored in the heat exchanger model. In this paper, we investigate the effect of the momentum balance through a systematic study of the open loop stability of a heat exchanger. ...

Tiejun Zhang; John T. Wen; Juan Catano; Rongliang Zhou

2009-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

349

Circulation and Exchange in Choked Marginal Seas  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A theory for the exchange between a rotating, buoyancy-forced marginal sea and an ocean is developed and tested numerically. Cooling over the marginal sea leads to sinking and sets up a two-layer exchange flow, with a warm surface layer entering ...

Larry J. Pratt; Michael A. Spall

2008-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

350

Guidance for an Effective Heat Exchanger Program  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Heat exchangers are used extensively in the nuclear power generation industry. Their proper operation is essential for reliable and safe nuclear plant operation. Increased emphasis on heat exchanger reliability at nuclear power plants has resulted in the development of engineering programs or equivalent actions to maintain the required thermal performance and structural integrity.

2011-10-04T23:59:59.000Z

351

Heat Exchanger Thermal Performance Margin Guidelines  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This report provides utility engineers with guidance on how to identify the thermal performance margin that is available in a given heat exchanger by comparing the thermal performance requirement at design limiting conditions to the thermal performance capability of the heat exchanger under those same conditions.

2005-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

352

Korea Power Exchange (KPX) | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exchange (KPX) Exchange (KPX) Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Korea Power Exchange (KPX) Name Korea Power Exchange (KPX) Agency/Company /Organization Argonne National Laboratory Sector Energy Focus Area Energy Efficiency Topics Background analysis Website http://www.dis.anl.gov/news/Ko Country South Korea Eastern Asia References http://www.dis.anl.gov/news/KoreaKpxIit.html Abstract In an agreement signed on March 26, 2007, Argonne National Laboratory and the Illinois Institute of Technology are joining with the Korea Power Exchange to establish a joint training program combining training and research at Argonne with formal academic education at IIT. Argonne-IIT Joint Graduate Program in Electricity Markets: In an agreement signed on March 26, 2007, Argonne National Laboratory and the Illinois

353

Thermodynamic Efficiency of Heat Exchange Devices  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The continued rise in the cost of energy 'has it imperative to augment the usual heat flow analyses for power plants, refineries, chemical plants and other energy intensive industries by adding analyses of available energy flow and device irreversibilities. The reclamation of what was formerly 'waste heat' by using additional, or more efficient, equipment has become not only economically feasible, but sometimes essential. A thermodynamic efficiency based on the second law of thermodynamics is defined for heat exchange devices. The efficiency can be simply written in terms of the mean absolute temperature levels of the two fluids exchanging heat, and an appropriate environment temperature. It is also shown that for a given ratio of hot to cold inlet temperatures, the efficiency and effectiveness for particular heat exchange configurations are related. Conclusions regarding the effect of stream temperatures on the efficiency of various types of exchangers are made. The concept is applied to typical heat exchange cases to demonstrate its applicability and sensitivity.

Witte, L. C.; Shamsundar, N.

1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

354

Final Report: Computer Simulation of Osmosis and Reverse Osmosis in Structured Membranes  

SciTech Connect

Molecular simulation methods were developed as part of this project to increase our fundamental understanding of membrane based separation systems. Our simulations clarified for example that steric (size) effects had a significant impact on the desalination membranes. Previously it was thought the separation was entirely driven by coulombic force (attractive/repulsive forces at the membrane surfaces). Steric effects played an important role, because salt ions in brackish water are never present alone, but are strongly hydrated which effectively increases their size, and makes it impossible to enter a membrane, while the smaller water molecules can enter more readily. Membrane surface effects did play a role in increasing the flux of water, but not in the separation itself. In addition we also developed simulation methods to study ion exchange, gas separations, and pervaporation. The methods developed were used to once again increase our fundamental understanding of these separation processes. For example our studies showed that when the separation factor of gases in membranes can be significantly affected by the presence of another gas, it is generally because the separation mechanism has changed. For example in the case of nitrogen and carbon dioxide, in their pure state the separation factor is determined by diffusion, while in mixtures it is influenced more by adsorption in the membrane (zeolite in our case) Finally we developed a new technique using the NMR chemical shift to determine intermolecular interactions for mixtures. For polar-nonpolar systems such as Xe dissolved in water we were able to significantly improve the accuracy of gas solubilities, which are very sensitive to the cross interaction between water and Xe.

Sohail Murad

2012-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

355

Quantum dynamics of an optical cavity coupled to a thin semitransparent membrane: Effect of membrane absorption  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We study the quantum dynamics of the cavity optomechanical system formed by a Fabry-Perot cavity with a thin vibrating membrane at its center. We determine in particular to what extent optical absorption by the membrane hinders reaching a quantum regime for the cavity-membrane system. We show that even though membrane absorption may significantly lower the cavity finesse and also heat the membrane, one can still simultaneously achieve ground state cooling of a vibrational mode of the membrane and stationary optomechanical entanglement with state-of-the-art apparatuses.

Biancofiore, C.; Karuza, M.; Galassi, M.; Natali, R.; Vitali, D. [School of Science and Technology, Physics Division, University of Camerino, via Madonna delle Carceri, 9, I-62032 Camerino (Italy) and INFN, Sezione di Perugia (Italy); Tombesi, P.; Di Giuseppe, G. [School of Science and Technology, Physics Division, University of Camerino, via Madonna delle Carceri, 9, I-62032 Camerino (Italy) and INFN, Sezione di Perugia (Italy); CriptoCam S.r.l., via Madonna delle Carceri 9, I-62032 Camerino (Italy)

2011-09-15T23:59:59.000Z

356

PERFORMANCE OF RESIDENTIAL AIR-TO-AIR HEAT EXCHANGERS: TEST METHODS AND RESULTS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Presenting Test Results Heat Exchanger Descriptions and Testof Residential Heat Exchangers Conclusions . . . . . . . .ventilation testing heat exchangers. system, a heat

Fisk, William J.

2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

357

Fouling of HVAC fin and tube heat exchangers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Methods to Maintain Heat Exchanger Coil Cleanliness, ASHRAEof HVAC Fin and Tube Heat Exchangers Jeffrey Siegel and VanOF HVAC FIN AND TUBE HEAT EXCHANGERS Jeffrey Siegel 1,2 and

Siegel, Jeffrey; Carey, Van P.

2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

358

Particulate Fouling of HVAC Heat Exchangers Jeffrey Alexander Siegel  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Particulate Fouling of HVAC Heat Exchangers by Jeffrey Alexander Siegel B.S. (Swarthmore College.......................................................................................xv CHAPTER 1: PARTICULATE FOULING OF HVAC HEAT EXCHANGERS ....1 1.1 Introduction.......................................................................11 CHAPTER 2: MODELING PARTICLE DEPOSITION ON HVAC HEAT EXCHANGERS

Siegel, Jeffrey

359

Semipermeable Membranes for Micromachined Silicon Surfaces ...  

Technology Marketing Summary Sandia National Laboratories has developed semipermeable silicon nitride membranes using an etch process to be co-manufactured on a ...

360

Rhodobacter System for the Expression of Membrane  

Cell membranes are the interface between an organism and its environment. These biological structures contain proteins that are extremely important for many cellular ...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydroxide exchange membranes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


361

Composite membranes and methods for making same  

SciTech Connect

Composite membranes that are adapted for separation, purification, filtration, analysis, reaction and sensing. The composite membranes can include a porous support structure having elongate pore channels extending through the support structure. The composite membrane also includes an active layer comprising an active layer material, where the active layer material is completely disposed within the pore channels between the surfaces of the support structure. The active layer is intimately integrated within the support structure, thus enabling great robustness, reliability, resistance to mechanical stress and thermal cycling, and high selectivity. Methods for the fabrication of composite membranes are also provided.

Routkevitch, Dmitri; Polyakov, Oleg G

2012-07-03T23:59:59.000Z

362

Synthesizing Membrane Proteins Using In Vitro Methodology ...  

Scientists at Argonne National Laboratory have created an in vitro , cell-free system and method for producing several types of protein: membrane ...

363

High Permeability Ternary Palladium Alloy Membranes with ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Multiple membranes have been tested under the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) Test Protocol with initial promising results from Au containing  ...

364

NETL: Gasification - Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membranes for...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Syngas Processing Systems Advanced Hydrogen Transport Membranes for Coal Gasification Praxair Inc. Project Number: FE0004908 Project Description Praxair is conducting research to...

365

Natural gas treatment process using PTMSP membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process is described for separating C{sub 3}+ hydrocarbons, particularly propane and butane, from natural gas. The process uses a poly(trimethylsilylpropyne) membrane. 6 figs.

Toy, L.G.; Pinnau, I.

1996-03-26T23:59:59.000Z

366

Natural gas treatment process using PTMSP membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A process for separating C.sub.3 + hydrocarbons, particularly propane and butane, from natural gas. The process uses a poly(trimethylsilylpropyne) membrane.

Toy, Lora G. (San Francisco, CA); Pinnau, Ingo (Palo Alto, CA)

1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

367

EMSL: Science: GC: Membrane Biology - Project Achievements  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Project Achievements EMSL's Membrane Biology Scientific Grand Challenge researchers grew Cyanothece in defined culture conditions and entrained it to a 12-hour light12-hour...

368

Membrane distillation : module design and modeling.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Membrane distillation (MD) is an emerging technology for seawater desalination that is traditionally accomplished by conventional separation processes such as thermal distillation or reverse osmosis.… (more)

Yang, Xing.

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

369

Skew chicane based betatron eigenmode exchange module  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A skewed chicane eigenmode exchange module (SCEEM) that combines in a single beamline segment the separate functionalities of a skew quad eigenmode exchange module and a magnetic chicane. This module allows the exchange of independent betatron eigenmodes, alters electron beam orbit geometry, and provides longitudinal parameter control with dispersion management in a single beamline segment with stable betatron behavior. It thus reduces the spatial requirements for multiple beam dynamic functions, reduces required component counts and thus reduces costs, and allows the use of more compact accelerator configurations than prior art design methods.

Douglas, David (Yorktown, VA)

2010-12-28T23:59:59.000Z

370

Second Law Optimization of Heat Exchangers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A new method for optimizing heat exchangers is developed in this paper. It is based on second law efficiency relationships rather than on the traditional heat exchanger effectiveness concept. The cost of energy is based on its availability level rather than on the simple cost of fuel required to meet the exchanger heat duty. Application of the method to a condensing heater shows that the optimum area based on second law efficiency can be quite different from the optimum area computed by the effectiveness method.

Witte, L. C.

1985-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

371

Heat Exchanger Technologies for Distillation Columns  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper we look at the challenges that improvements in energy efficiency of distillation systems presents the heat exchanger designer. We examine each type of exchanger in turn. Heat exchanger size is minimized if the temperature driving force is maximized. The design should therefore seek to minimize the temperature changes during phase change. So, streams that are being condensed are kept as hot as possible. Streams that are being vaporized are kept as cool as possible. With one noted exception, this also leads to maximization of the thermodynamic efficiency and maximizes the scope for use of these streams in integrated systems.

Polley, G. T.

2002-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

372

International information exchange in fusion research  

SciTech Connect

Formal and informal agreements exist between the US and several other countries, assuring the unrestricted exchange of magnetic fusion information. The Fusion Energy Library at Oak Ridge National Laboratory uses the US Department of Energy standard distribution system and exchange agreements to ensure the receipt of current reports. Selective dissemination of information, computer networks, and exchange programs are additional means for information gathering. The importance of these means as they relate to the fusion program in the US and specifically at ORNL is discussed.

Strickler, C.S.

1979-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

373

Heat Exchanger Design for Solar Gas-Turbine Power Plant.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

?? The aim of this project is to select appropriate heat exchangers out of available gas-gas heat exchangers for used in a proposed power plant.… (more)

Yakah, Noah

2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

374

Event:Technical Workshop & Peer Exchange 'NAMA finance and MRV...  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Technical Workshop & Peer Exchange 'NAMA finance and MRV' Jump to: navigation, search Calendar.png Technical Workshop & Peer Exchange 'NAMA finance and MRV': on 20120911...

375

Membrane degumming of crude vegetable oil  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Crude vegetable oils contain various minor substances like phospholipids, coloring pigments, and free fatty acids (FFA) that may affect quality of the oil. Reduction of energy costs and waste disposal are major concerns for many oil refiners who are looking for alternative methods to improve conventional refining methods. During the last decade, energy efficient membrane separation technology has evolved dramatically. This thesis reports a study on degumming crude vegetable oil using membrane separation. In the bench-scale study, two membranes were evaluated for their flux and rejection properties. Process parameters including pressure, temperature, feed velocity and volumetric concentration factor were examined. A 99.6% rejection of phospholipids and a flux of 22.4 LMH were achieved at pressure 300 psi, temperature 40'C and feed velocity 220 1/hr using DS-7 membrane, and significant reduction of the coloring pigments was observed as well. In the pilot-scale study, the spiral wound DS-7 membrane was found effective for 100% rejection of phospholipids with a permeate flux of 57.6 LMH. The rejection rates of phospholipids, Mg and Ca were 100%, 99.6% and 54.6%, respectively. Resistance-in-series model of the membrane system was also studied. The membrane resistance, the fouling resistance, and the polarization resistance for the pilotscale system were 0.29, 0.043, and 4.49, respectively. Evaluation on membrane fouling and cleaning showed that flux decreased rapidly during the first several hours and membrane cleaning presented no significant problem. The pilot-scale study confirmed results of the bench-scale system and provides useful data for commercializing membrane refining process in the near future. KEY WORDS: Membrane separation, crude vegetable oil, degumming, phospholipids.

Lin, Lan

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

376

ALUMINUM REMOVAL AND SODIUM HYDROXIDE REGENERATION FROM HANFORD TANK WASTE BY LITHIUM HYDROTALCITE PRECIPITATION SUMMARY OF PRIOR LAB-SCALE TESTING  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Scoping laboratory scale tests were performed at the Chemical Engineering Department of the Georgia Institute of Technology (Georgia Tech), and the Hanford 222-S Laboratory, involving double-shell tank (DST) and single-shell tank (SST) Hanford waste simulants. These tests established the viability of the Lithium Hydrotalcite precipitation process as a solution to remove aluminum and recycle sodium hydroxide from the Hanford tank waste, and set the basis of a validation test campaign to demonstrate a Technology Readiness Level of 3.

SAMS TL; GUILLOT S

2011-01-27T23:59:59.000Z

377

Energy Technology Data Exchange | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Exchange Exchange Jump to: navigation, search Logo: Energy Technology Data Exchange Name Energy Technology Data Exchange Address P.O. Box 62 Place Oak Ridge, Tennessee Zip 37831 Year founded 1987 Phone number 865 576 1272 Coordinates 36.0103°, -84.2698° Loading map... {"minzoom":false,"mappingservice":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","zoom":14,"types":["ROADMAP","SATELLITE","HYBRID","TERRAIN"],"geoservice":"google","maxzoom":false,"width":"600px","height":"350px","centre":false,"title":"","label":"","icon":"","visitedicon":"","lines":[],"polygons":[],"circles":[],"rectangles":[],"copycoords":false,"static":false,"wmsoverlay":"","layers":[],"controls":["pan","zoom","type","scale","streetview"],"zoomstyle":"DEFAULT","typestyle":"DEFAULT","autoinfowindows":false,"kml":[],"gkml":[],"fusiontables":[],"resizable":false,"tilt":0,"kmlrezoom":false,"poi":true,"imageoverlays":[],"markercluster":false,"searchmarkers":"","locations":[{"text":"","title":"","link":null,"lat":36.0103,"lon":-84.2698,"alt":0,"address":"","icon":"","group":"","inlineLabel":"","visitedicon":""}]}

378

Office of Waste Processing Technical Exchange  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Agenda Hotel Register Contacts Event Media Speaker Information Home Agenda Hotel Register Contacts Event Media Speaker Information Home Environmental Management Waste Processing Technical Exchange 2010 in Atlanta, GA, November 16 - 18. Over the past eight years, personnel from the three sites, Savannah River/Hanford/Idaho along with others receiving funding from the Environmental Management Office of Waste Processing have met to exchange recent results of on-going field operations and technology development. The purpose of this exchange is to provide a forum for discussion of each Site's efforts to accelerate cleanup operations. Keys to success and lessons learned are openly exchanged in a manner to allow for open discussion between operations, engineering and scientists to accelerate transition of technologies from concepts to field implementation.

379

Cooperative update exchange in the Youtopia system  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Youtopia is a platform for collaborative management and integration of relational data. At the heart of Youtopia is an update exchange abstraction: changes to the data propagate through the system to satisfy user-specified mappings. We present a novel ...

?ucja Kot; Christoph Koch

2009-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

380

Essays on exchange rates and electricity demand  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

This thesis examines two important issues in economic development: exchange rates and electricity demand and addresses methodological issues of using time series and panel data analysis to investigate important policy ...

Li, Xiangming, 1966-

1999-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydroxide exchange membranes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


381

On Modeling Of Heat Exchangers In Modelica  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is demonstrated how Modelica TM is used in an application to develop models that are useful when solving real problems. Modelica is a new unified modeling language being developed in an international effort to promote object-oriented and non-causal modeling, and exchange of model libraries. The application is a heat exchanger where the media are liquids, typically water. This type of heat exchangers can be used for district heating of houses and for production of hot tap water. The model developed illustrates very nicely the power of Modelica. The modularization concepts support flexible model components which are easy to use and to adapt when making a model of a real system with heat exchangers. The concept of class parameters support medium parameterization and arrays of model components support discretization. The expressive power of Modelica allows complete listings of the developed model components to be given. The model produces simulation results that agree very well with measured data.

Sven Erik Mattsson

1997-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

382

Password based key exchange with mutual authentication  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A reasonably efficient password based key exchange (KE) protocol with provable security without random oracle was recently proposed by Katz, et al. [17] and later by Gennaro and Lindell [13]. However, these protocols do not support mutual authentication ...

Shaoquan Jiang; Guang Gong

2004-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

383

Direct Diagnoses of Stratosphere–Troposphere Exchange  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This study discusses the direct diagnosis of stratosphere–troposphere exchange. The method introduced by Wei is applied to the Goddard Earth Observation System assimilated dataset. In many respects, the results generally agree with those of other ...

Andrew Gettelman; Adam H. Sobel

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

384

Experimental Study of Hybrid Cooled Heat Exchanger.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??A test system for a hybrid cooled heat exchanger was designed, and the test facility was constructed based on ASHRAE Standard 41.2-1987. A conventional air-cooled… (more)

Tsao, Han-Chuan

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

385

Office of Waste Processing Technical Exchange  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

this hotel at the government per diem rate of 132.00 per night. Please reference the "DOE EM Waste Processing Technical Exchange 2010" when making your reservation to the get...

386

Catalyst containing oxygen transport membrane  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A composite oxygen transport membrane having a dense layer, a porous support layer and an intermediate porous layer located between the dense layer and the porous support layer. Both the dense layer and the intermediate porous layer are formed from an ionic conductive material to conduct oxygen ions and an electrically conductive material to conduct electrons. The porous support layer has a high permeability, high porosity, and a high average pore diameter and the intermediate porous layer has a lower permeability and lower pore diameter than the porous support layer. Catalyst particles selected to promote oxidation of a combustible substance are located in the intermediate porous layer and in the porous support adjacent to the intermediate porous layer. The catalyst particles can be formed by wicking a solution of catalyst precursors through the porous support toward the intermediate porous layer.

Christie, Gervase Maxwell; Wilson, Jamie Robyn; van Hassel, Bart Antonie

2012-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

387

Geothermal field tests: heat exchanger evaluation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Results of the heat exchanger tests conducted on a scale model of a heat exchanger that has been designed and fabricated for the Geothermal Test Facility show that this exchanger will lose 60% of its heat transfer capability and fall below design requirements after 92 hours of operation. When the test exchanger was clean and operating as close as possible to design conditions, its overall heat transfer coefficient was 426 BTU/hr-ft/sup 2/ - /sup 0/f. when calculating in the fouling factor of .0035 this gave a design coefficient of 171 BTU/hr-ft/sup 2/ - /sup 0/f which was reached after less than four days of steady state operation. Thermal shocking of the test heat exchanger once each hour while the exchanger was operating at design conditions had no effect on scale removal or heat transfer. Results of tube cleaning showed that chemical treatment with 30% hydrochloric acid followed by a high pressure water jet (6000 psig), was effective in removing scale from tubes contacted with geothermal brine. After cleaning, the tubes were examined and some pitting was observed throughout the length of one tube.

Felsinger, D.E.

1973-07-06T23:59:59.000Z

388

DNA sequencing using fluorescence background electroblotting membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the multiplex sequencing on DNA is disclosed which comprises the electroblotting or specific base terminated DNA fragments, which have been resolved by gel electrophoresis, onto the surface of a neutral non-aromatic polymeric microporous membrane exhibiting low background fluorescence which has been surface modified to contain amino groups. Polypropylene membranes are preferably and the introduction of amino groups is accomplished by subjecting the membrane to radio or microwave frequency plasma discharge in the presence of an aminating agent, preferably ammonia. The membrane, containing physically adsorbed DNA fragments on its surface after the electroblotting, is then treated with crosslinking means such as UV radiation or a glutaraldehyde spray to chemically bind the DNA fragments to the membrane through amino groups contained on the surface. The DNA fragments chemically bound to the membrane are subjected to hybridization probing with a tagged probe specific to the sequence of the DNA fragments. The tagging may be by either fluorophores or radioisotopes. The tagged probes hybridized to the target DNA fragments are detected and read by laser induced fluorescence detection or autoradiograms. The use of aminated low fluorescent background membranes allows the use of fluorescent detection and reading even when the available amount of DNA to be sequenced is small. The DNA bound to the membranes may be reprobed numerous times. No Drawings

Caldwell, K.D.; Chu, T.J.; Pitt, W.G.

1992-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

389

Hybrid Membranes for Light Gas Separations  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Membrane separations provide a potentially attractive technology over conventional processes due to their advantages, such as low capital cost and energy consumption. The goal of this thesis is to design hybrid membranes that facilitate specific gas separations, especially olefin/paraffin separations. This thesis focuses on the designing dendrimer-based hybrid membranes on mesoporous alumina for reverse-selective separations, synthesizing Cu(I)-dendrimer hybrid membrane to facilitate olefin/paraffin separations, particularly ethylene/methane separation, and investigating the influence of solvent, stabilizing ligands on facilitated transport membrane. Reverse-selective gas separations have attracted considerable attention in removing the heavier/larger molecules from gas mixtures. In this study, dendrimer-based chemistry was proved to be an effective method by altering dendrimer structures and generations. G6-PIP, G4-AMP and G3-XDA are capable to fill the alumina mesopores and slight selectivity are observed. Facilitated transport membranes were made to increase the olefin/paraffin selectivity based on their chemical interaction with olefin molecules. Two approaches were explored, the first was to combine facilitator Cu(I) with dendrimer hybrid membrane to increase olefin permeance and olefin/paraffin selectivity simultaneously, and second was to facilitate transport membrane functionality by altering solvents and stabilizing ligands. Promising results were found by these two approaches, which were: 1) olefin/paraffin selectivity slightly increased by introducing facilitator Cu(I), 2) the interaction between Cu(I) and dendrimer functional groups are better known.

Liu, Ting

2012-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

390

Colloidal Fouling of Reverse Osmosis Membranes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

. For the tests involving foulant mass measurements and effect of surfactants, a predetermined initial flux to distinguish between two cases. For RO, nanofiltration (NF), and perhaps "tight" ultrafiltration (UF) membranes and, thus, reduces the product water flux (4). For microfiltration (MF) membranes, pore plugging

Elimelech, Menachem

391

Zein Recovery Using Non-Porous Membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A membrane process for treating zein solutions to increase the zein concentration in the solution. The process uses a non-porous membrane that preferentially permeates the solvent and rejects the zein. Optionally, the process can be operated as a diafiltration process to yield a concentrate of high zein purity.

Mairal, Anurag P. (Fremont, CA); Ng, Alvin (Palo Alto, CA); Wijmans, Johannes G. (Menlo Park, CA)

2005-01-25T23:59:59.000Z

392

Defect-free ultrahigh flux asymmetric membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Defect-free, ultrahigh flux integrally-skinned asymmetric membranes having extremely thin surface layers (<0.2 .mu.m) comprised of glassy polymers are disclosed. The membranes are formed by casting an appropriate drope followed by forced convective evaporation of solvent to obtain a dry phase separated asymmetrical structure. The structure is then washed in a precipitation liquid and dried.

Pinnau, Ingo (Austin, TX); Koros, William J. (Austin, TX)

1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

393

Reactor process using metal oxide ceramic membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reaction vessel for use in photoelectrochemical reactions includes as its reactive surface a metal oxide porous ceramic membrane of a catalytic metal such as titanium. The reaction vessel includes a light source and a counter electrode. A provision for applying an electrical bias between the membrane and the counter electrode permits the Fermi levels of potential reaction to be favored so that certain reactions may be favored in the vessel. The electrical biasing is also useful for the cleaning of the catalytic membrane. Also disclosed is a method regenerating a porous metal oxide ceramic membrane used in a photoelectrochemical catalytic process by periodically removing the reactants and regenerating the membrane using a variety of chemical, thermal, and electrical techniques. 2 figures.

Anderson, M.A.

1994-05-03T23:59:59.000Z

394

Reactor process using metal oxide ceramic membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reaction vessel for use in photoelectrochemical reactions includes as its reactive surface a metal oxide porous ceramic membrane of a catalytic metal such as titanium. The reaction vessel includes a light source and a counter electrode. A provision for applying an electrical bias between the membrane and the counter electrode permits the Fermi levels of potential reaction to be favored so that certain reactions may be favored in the vessel. The electrical biasing is also useful for the cleaning of the catalytic membrane. Also disclosed is a method regenerating a porous metal oxide ceramic membrane used in a photoelectrochemical catalytic process by periodically removing the reactants and regenerating the membrane using a variety of chemical, thermal, and electrical techniques.

Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI)

1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

395

Fission of a multiphase membrane tube  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

A common mechanism for intracellular transport is the use of controlled deformations of the membrane to create spherical or tubular buds. While the basic physical properties of homogeneous membranes are relatively well-known, the effects of inhomogeneities within membranes are very much an active field of study. Membrane domains enriched in certain lipids in particular are attracting much attention, and in this Letter we investigate the effect of such domains on the shape and fate of membrane tubes. Recent experiments have demonstrated that forced lipid phase separation can trigger tube fission, and we demonstrate how this can be understood purely from the difference in elastic constants between the domains. Moreover, the proposed model predicts timescales for fission that agree well with experimental findings.

Jean-Marc Allain; Cornelis Storm; Aurelien Roux; Martine Ben Amar; Jean-Francois Joanny

2004-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

396

Liners for ion transport membrane systems  

SciTech Connect

Ion transport membrane system comprising (a) a pressure vessel comprising an interior, an exterior, an inlet, an inlet conduit, an outlet, and an outlet conduit; (b) a plurality of planar ion transport membrane modules disposed in the interior of the pressure vessel and arranged in series, each membrane module comprising mixed metal oxide ceramic material and having an interior region and an exterior region, wherein the inlet and the outlet of the pressure vessel are in flow communication with exterior regions of the membrane modules; (c) a gas manifold having an interior surface wherein the gas manifold is in flow communication with the interior region of each of the planar ion transport membrane modules and with the exterior of the pressure vessel; and (d) a liner disposed within any of the inlet conduit, the outlet conduit, and the interior surface of the gas manifold.

Carolan, Michael Francis (Allentown, PA); Miller, Christopher Francis (Macungie, PA)

2010-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

397

Proton conducting ceramic membranes for hydrogen separation  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A multi-phase proton conducting material comprising a proton-conducting ceramic phase and a stabilizing ceramic phase. Under the presence of a partial pressure gradient of hydrogen across the membrane or under the influence of an electrical potential, a membrane fabricated with this material selectively transports hydrogen ions through the proton conducting phase, which results in ultrahigh purity hydrogen permeation through the membrane. The stabilizing ceramic phase may be substantially structurally and chemically identical to at least one product of a reaction between the proton conducting phase and at least one expected gas under operating conditions of a membrane fabricated using the material. In a barium cerate-based proton conducting membrane, one stabilizing phase is ceria.

Elangovan, S. (South Jordan, UT); Nair, Balakrishnan G. (Sandy, UT); Small, Troy (Midvale, UT); Heck, Brian (Salt Lake City, UT)

2011-09-06T23:59:59.000Z

398

NETL: Novel Inorganic/Polymer Composite Membranes  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Novel Inorganic/Polymer Composite Membranes Novel Inorganic/Polymer Composite Membranes Project No.: DE-FE0007632 Ohio State University is developing a cost-effective design and manufacturing process for new membrane modules that capture carbon dioxide (CO2) from flue gas. The membranes consist of a thin, selective inorganic layer, embedded in a polymer structure so that it can be made in a continuous manufacturing process. They will be incorporated in spiral-wound modules for bench-scale tests using coal-fired flue gas. Preliminary cost calculations show that a single-stage membrane process is economically unfavorable, primarily because of the low concentration of CO2 (~14 percent) in the flue gas stream. A two-stage process is more economical, but requires plant operation with a CO2-enriched recycle stream.

399

Synthesis gas production by mixed conducting membranes with integrated conversion into liquid products  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Natural gas or other methane-containing feed gas is converted to a C.sub.5 -C.sub.19 hydrocarbon liquid in an integrated system comprising an oxygenative synthesis gas generator, a non-oxygenative synthesis gas generator, and a hydrocarbon synthesis process such as the Fischer-Tropsch process. The oxygenative synthesis gas generator is a mixed conducting membrane reactor system and the non-oxygenative synthesis gas generator is preferably a heat exchange reformer wherein heat is provided by hot synthesis gas product from the mixed conducting membrane reactor system. Offgas and water from the Fischer-Tropsch process can be recycled to the synthesis gas generation system individually or in combination.

Nataraj, Shankar (Allentown, PA); Russek, Steven Lee (Allentown, PA); Dyer, Paul Nigel (Allentown, PA)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

400

Caustic Recycle from Hanford Tank Waste Using NaSICON Ceramic Membrane Salt Splitting Process  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

A family of inorganic ceramic materials, called sodium (Na) Super Ion Conductors (NaSICON), has been studied at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to investigate their ability to separate sodium from radioactively contaminated sodium salt solutions for treating U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) tank wastes. Ceramatec Inc. developed and fabricated a membrane containing a proprietary NAS-GY material formulation that was electrochemically tested in a bench-scale apparatus with both a simulant and a radioactive tank-waste solution to determine the membrane performance when removing sodium from DOE tank wastes. Implementing this sodium separation process can result in significant cost savings by reducing the disposal volume of low-activity wastes and by producing a NaOH feedstock product for recycle into waste treatment processes such as sludge leaching, regenerating ion exchange resins, inhibiting corrosion in carbon-steel tanks, or retrieving tank wastes.

Fountain, Matthew S.; Kurath, Dean E.; Sevigny, Gary J.; Poloski, Adam P.; Pendleton, J.; Balagopal, S.; Quist, M.; Clay, D.

2009-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydroxide exchange membranes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


401

ESS 2012 Peer Review - Highly Selective Proton-Conducting Composite Membranes for Redox Flow Batteries - Alan Cisar, Lynntech  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Membrane for Redox Flow Batteries Membrane for Redox Flow Batteries DOE Grant No: DE-SC0004516 Alan Cisar* and Chris Rhodes Lynntech, Inc., 2501 Earl Rudder Freeway South, College Station, TX 77845 *E-mail: alan.cisar@lynntech.com, Phone: 979.764.2311 Introduction * Redox flow batteries (RFBs) are a promising technology to store electrical energy from intermittent renewable sources such as solar and wind power. Although they offer many advantages, RFBs with reduced cost and improved performance (i.e., efficiency and durability) need to be developed to achieve broad market penetration. * Ion exchange membranes in RFBs separate two soluble redox couples should allow rapid proton transport and suppress transport of the reactive species between anode and cathode compartments. Nafion

402

Gas separation with glass membranes. Final report  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The Department of Energy (DOE) is seeking to develop high temperature, high pressure inorganic membrane technology to perform a variety of gas separation processes to improve the efficiency and economics of advanced power generation systems such as direct coal-fueled turbines (DCFT) and the integrated gasification combined cycle process (IGCC). The temperatures encountered in these power generation systems are far above the temperature range for organic membrane materials. Inorganic materials such as ceramics are therefore the most likely membrane materials for use at high temperatures. This project focussed on silica glass fiber membranes made by PPG Industries (Pittsburgh, PA). The goals were both experimental and theoretical. The first objective was to develop a rational theory for the performance of these membranes. With existing theories as a starting point, a new theory was devised to explain the unusual ``molecular sieving`` behavior exhibited by these glass membranes. An apparatus was then devised for making permeation performance measurements at conditions of interest to DOE (temperatures to 2000{degrees}F; pressures to 1000 psia). With this apparatus, gas mixtures could be made typical of coal combustion or coal gasification processes, these gases could be passed into a membrane test cell, and the separation performance determined. Data were obtained for H{sub 2}/CO,N{sub 2}/CO{sub 2}, 0{sub 2}/N{sub 2}, and NH{sub 3}/N{sub 2} mixtures and for a variety of pure component gases (He, H{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, N{sub 2}, CO, NH{sub 3}). The most challenging part of the project turned out to be the sealing of the membrane at high temperatures and pressures. The report concludes with an overview of the practical potential of these membranes and of inorganic membranes in general of DOE and other applications.

Roberts, D.L.; Abraham, L.C.; Blum, Y.; Way, J.D.

1992-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

403

Freezing and sorption/desorption of water confined in a Polymeric Electrolyte Membrane  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Nafion is a perfluorosulfonated polymer, widely used in Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells. This amphiphilic polymer adopts a structural organisation made of channels and cavities formed by the organisation of the sulfonate groups. Upon hydration, the cavities are filled with water in which are released the acidic protons to form a solution of hydronium ions in water, confined in the polymer matrix. Below 0OC, a phenomenon of water sorption/desorption occurs, whose origin is still an open question. Performing neutron diffraction, we monitored the quantity of ice formed during the sorption/desorption as a function of temperature down to 180 K. Upon cooling, we observe that ice forms outside of the membrane and crystallises in the hexagonal Ih form. Simultaneously, the membrane shrinks and dehydrate, leading to an increase of the hydronium ions concentration inside the matrix. Reversibly, the ice melts and the membrane re-hydrate upon heating. A model of solution, whose freezing point varies with the hydronium concentration, is proposed to calculate the quantity of ice formed as a function of temperature. The quantitative agreement between the model and experimental data explains the smooth and reversible behavior observed during the sorption or desorption of water, pointing out the origin of the phenomena. Other examples of water filled electrolyte nano-structures are eventually discussed, in the context of clarifying the conditions for water transport at low temperature.

Marie Plazanet; Renato Torre; Paolo Bartolini; Bruno Deme; Caterina Petrillo; Francesco Sacchetti

2013-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

404

Improved filtration membranes through self-organizing amphiphilic comb copolymers  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The operating cost of a membrane filtration system is generally determined by two major factors: the permeability of the membrane to water, and the lifetime of the membrane. Both of these are strongly affected by the ...

Asatekin Alexiou, Ayse

2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

405

Quantitative analysis of intra-Golgi transport reveals inter-cisternal exchange for all cargo  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The mechanisms controlling the transport of proteins across the Golgi stack of mammalian and plant cells is the subject of intense debate, with two models, cisternal progression and inter-cisternal exchange, emerging as major contenders. A variety of transport experiments have claimed support for each of these models. We reevaluate these experiments using a single quantitative coarse-grained framework of intra-Golgi transport that accounts for both transport models and their many variants. Our analysis makes a definitive case for the existence of inter-cisternal exchange both for small membrane proteins (VSVG) and large protein complexes (procollagen) -- this implies that membrane structures larger than the typical protein-coated vesicles must be involved in transport. Notwithstanding, we find that current observations on protein transport cannot rule out cisternal progression as contributing significantly to the transport process. To discriminate between the different models of intra-Golgi transport, we suggest experiments and an analysis based on our extended theoretical framework that compare the dynamics of transiting and resident proteins.

Serge Dmitrieff; Madan Rao; Pierre Sens

2013-07-26T23:59:59.000Z

406

LDRD final report on imaging self-organization of proteins in membranes by photocatalytic nano-tagging.  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

We have developed a new nanotagging technology for detecting and imaging the self-organization of proteins and other components of membranes at nanometer resolution for the purpose of investigating cell signaling and other membrane-mediated biological processes. We used protein-, lipid-, or drug-bound porphyrin photocatalysts to grow in-situ nanometer-sized metal particles, which reveal the location of the porphyrin-labeled molecules by electron microscopy. We initially used photocatalytic nanotagging to image assembled multi-component proteins and to monitor the distribution of lipids and porphyrin labels in liposomes. For example, by exchanging the heme molecules in hemoproteins with a photocatalytic tin porphyrin, a nanoparticle was grown at each heme site of the protein. The result obtained from electron microscopy for a tagged multi-subunit protein such as hemoglobin is a symmetric constellation of a specific number of nanoparticle tags, four in the case of the hemoglobin tetramer. Methods for covalently linking photocatalytic porphyrin labels to lipids and proteins were also developed to detect and image the self-organization of lipids, protein-protein supercomplexes, and membrane-protein complexes. Procedures for making photocatalytic porphyrin-drug, porphyrin-lipid, and porphyrin-protein hybrids for non-porphyrin-binding proteins and membrane components were pursued and the first porphyrin-labeled lipids was investigated in liposomal membrane models. Our photocatalytic nanotagging technique may ultimately allow membrane self-organization and cell signaling processes to be imaged in living cells. Fluorescence and plasmonic spectra of the tagged proteins might also provide additional information about protein association and membrane organization. In addition, a porphyrin-aspirin or other NSAID hybrid may be used to grow metal nanotags for the pharmacologically important COX enzymes in membranes so that the distribution of the protein can be imaged at the nanometer scale.

Zavadil, Kevin Robert; Shelnutt, John Allen; Sasaki, Darryl Yoshio; Song, Yujiang; Medforth, Craig J.

2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

407

Building Technologies Office: HVAC Optimized Heat Exchangers Research  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Optimized Heat Optimized Heat Exchangers Research Project to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: HVAC Optimized Heat Exchangers Research Project on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: HVAC Optimized Heat Exchangers Research Project on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: HVAC Optimized Heat Exchangers Research Project on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: HVAC Optimized Heat Exchangers Research Project on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: HVAC Optimized Heat Exchangers Research Project on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: HVAC Optimized Heat Exchangers Research Project on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Partner with DOE Activities Appliances Research Building Envelope Research

408

Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Data Exchange Specification  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Building Energy Data Building Energy Data Exchange Specification to someone by E-mail Share Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Data Exchange Specification on Facebook Tweet about Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Data Exchange Specification on Twitter Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Data Exchange Specification on Google Bookmark Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Data Exchange Specification on Delicious Rank Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Data Exchange Specification on Digg Find More places to share Building Technologies Office: Building Energy Data Exchange Specification on AddThis.com... About Take Action to Save Energy Activities 179d Tax Calculator Advanced Energy Design Guides Advanced Energy Retrofit Guides

409

New Membrane Technology Boosts Efficiency in Industrial Gas Processes  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE))

Fact sheet from Membrane Technology and Research, Inc. about its pilot-scale industrial membrane system that was funded by the SBIR program.

410

Fuel Cell Technologies Office: High Temperature Membrane Working...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells typically operate at temperatures no higher than 60C-80C due to structural limitations of the membrane. Operating PEM fuel...

411

Hydrogen Production from Methane Using Oxygen-permeable Ceramic Membranes.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Non-porous ceramic membranes with mixed ionic and electronic conductivity have received significant interest as membrane reactor systems for the conversion of methane and higher hydrocarbons… (more)

Faraji, Sedigheh

2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

412

A bacterial factory for the production of MEMBRANE PROTEINS  

Office of Technology Transfer A bacterial factory for the production of MEMBRANE PROTEINS Cell membranes are important biological structures as they ...

413

Corrosion of Membrane Materials for Hydrogen Separation from ...  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Abstract Scope, To produce high purity hydrogen fuel from coal, hydrogen can be extracted from syngas using gas separation membranes. No membrane ...

414

A membrane reactor process for the production of biodiesel .  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??Bench and pilot scale membrane reactors were designed and assembled to carry out the transesterification of different lipids with methanol. The membrane reactors integrate many… (more)

Cao, Peigang

2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

415

Gradient Porous Composite Membrane for Fuel Cell Applications  

The heart of current polymer electrolyte fuel cells are the membrane electrode assemblies (MEA), which are composed of (i) an ionomer polymer membrane ...

416

Ohio State Develops Breakthrough Membranes for Carbon Capture...  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Ohio State Develops Breakthrough Membranes for Carbon Capture, Utilization and Storage Ohio State Develops Breakthrough Membranes for Carbon Capture, Utilization and Storage...

417

EMSL: Science: EMSL Scientific Grand Challenge: Membrane Biology  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

CHALLENGE: MEMBRANE BIOLOGY Membrane Biology GC Resources Meet the Team Advisory Committee What Are Cyanobacteria? Project Achievements In the News 2005-2007 Progress Report...

418

Graphene as the Ultimate Membrane for Gas Separation Project...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Graphene as the Ultimate Membrane for Gas Separation Graphene as the Ultimate Membrane for Gas Separation GraphenePore.jpg Key Challenges: Investigate the permeability and...

419

The Energy Saving Potential of Membrane-Based Enthalpy Recovery...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Energy Saving Potential of Membrane-Based Enthalpy Recovery in Vav Systems for Commercial Office Buildings Title The Energy Saving Potential of Membrane-Based Enthalpy Recovery...

420

The Energy Saving Potential of Membrane-Based Enthalpy Recovery...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Energy Saving Potential of Membrane-Based Enthalpy Recovery in VAV System for Commercial Office Buildings Title The Energy Saving Potential of Membrane-Based Enthalpy Recovery...

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydroxide exchange membranes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


421

DNA sequencing using fluorescence background electroblotting membrane  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method for the multiplex sequencing on DNA is disclosed which comprises the electroblotting or specific base terminated DNA fragments, which have been resolved by gel electrophoresis, onto the surface of a neutral non-aromatic polymeric microporous membrane exhibiting low background fluorescence which has been surface modified to contain amino groups. Polypropylene membranes are preferably and the introduction of amino groups is accomplished by subjecting the membrane to radio or microwave frequency plasma discharge in the presence of an aminating agent, preferably ammonia. The membrane, containing physically adsorbed DNA fragments on its surface after the electroblotting, is then treated with crosslinking means such as UV radiation or a glutaraldehyde spray to chemically bind the DNA fragments to the membrane through said smino groups contained on the surface thereof. The DNA fragments chemically bound to the membrane are subjected to hybridization probing with a tagged probe specific to the sequence of the DNA fragments. The tagging may be by either fluorophores or radioisotopes. The tagged probes hybridized to said target DNA fragments are detected and read by laser induced fluorescence detection or autoradiograms. The use of aminated low fluorescent background membranes allows the use of fluorescent detection and reading even when the available amount of DNA to be sequenced is small. The DNA bound to the membrances may be reprobed numerous times.

Caldwell, Karin D. (Salt Lake City, UT); Chu, Tun-Jen (Salt Lake City, UT); Pitt, William G. (Orem, UT)

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

422

Development of Inorganic Membranes for Hydrogen Separation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The purpose of this work is to improve the method of fabricating tubular metal supported microporous inorganic membranes. Earlier work focused on the original development of inorganic membranes for the purification of hydrogen. These membranes are now being scaled up for demonstration in a coal gasification plant for the separation of hydrogen from coal-derived synthesis gas for a project funded by the Office of Fossil Energy's Gasification and Coal Fuels programs [1]. This project is part of FutureGen, an initiative to build the world's first integrated sequestration and hydrogen production research power plant. Although previous work in the Advanced Research Materials Program project led to development of a tubular metal supported microporous membrane which was approved by the Department of Energy for testing, the membranes generally have lower than desired selectivities for hydrogen over other gases common in synthesis gas including carbon dioxide. The work on this project over three years will lead to general improvements in fabrication techniques that will result in membranes having higher separation factors and higher fluxes. Scanning electron microscopy and profilometry data will be presented to show qualitatively and quantitatively the surface roughness of the support tubes. We will discuss how the roughness affects membrane quality and methods to improve the quality of the support tube surface.

Bischoff, Brian L [ORNL; Adcock, Kenneth Dale [ORNL; Powell, Lawrence E [ORNL; Sutton, Theodore G [ORNL; Miller, Curtis Jack [ORNL

2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

423

Heat Exchangers for Solar Water Heating Systems | Department of Energy  

Energy.gov (U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)) Indexed Site

Heat Exchangers for Solar Water Heating Systems Heat Exchangers for Solar Water Heating Systems Heat Exchangers for Solar Water Heating Systems May 30, 2012 - 3:40pm Addthis Image of a heat exchanger. | Photo from iStockphoto.com Image of a heat exchanger. | Photo from iStockphoto.com Solar water heating systems use heat exchangers to transfer solar energy absorbed in solar collectors to the liquid or air used to heat water or a space. Heat exchangers can be made of steel, copper, bronze, stainless steel, aluminum, or cast iron. Solar heating systems usually use copper, because it is a good thermal conductor and has greater resistance to corrosion. Types of Heat Exchangers Solar water heating systems use three types of heat exchangers: Liquid-to-liquid A liquid-to-liquid heat exchanger uses a heat-transfer fluid that

424

Performance Assessment Community of Practice Technical Exchange  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

The Department of Energy is hosting a Technical Exchange at the Hanford Site on The Department of Energy is hosting a Technical Exchange at the Hanford Site on April 13-14, 2010. The Performance Assessment Community of Practice has been chartered to advise the Office of Environmental Management Tank Waste Corporate Board regarding performance assessments and performance assessment-like analyses, promote consistency in the preparation of performance assessments across the Department of Energy (DOE) complex, foster exchange of information among performance assessment practitioners, and develop appropriate guidance for performance assessments such that they are based on sound science and are defensible. The purpose of this technical exchange is to provide a venue for performance assessment and risk assessment practitioners, managers and regulators, and contributors to the Cementitious Barriers Partnership and Advanced Simulation Capability for Environmental Management project to share plans and experiences and share ideas for future performance assessment and risk assessment modeling. The technical exchange will include a combination of plenary presentations and discussions with breakout sessions for specific topics. Discussions will emphasize areas for improved consistency and solicit suggestions for future developments related to modeling tools. A breakout discussion session is also planned to address: DOE Order 435.1 Update, regulatory challenges for performance and risk assessment modeling, and other topical areas. Arrangements have also been made for a GoldSim modeling roundtable at the conclusion of the workshop for participants who are interested in sharing experiences related to the use of GoldSim for their simulations.

425

The management of foreign exchange risk, Second edition  

SciTech Connect

This edition of this introductory textbook to foreign exchange risk management considers: how to measure risk and accurately forecast exchange rates and use those forecasts; the principal hedging procedures; management approaches to risk including the use of export finance companies and management control and centralization. It is written by a team of corporate and banking practioners. Contents include: Measuring foreign exchange risk; Forecasting exchange rates; Using foreign exchange markets and forecasts; Hedging procedures; Management approaches to risk.

Ensor, R.; Antl, B.

1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

426

Ceramic membranes with enhanced thermal stability  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A method of creating a ceramic membrane with enhanced thermal stability is disclosed. The method involves combining quantities of a first metal alkoxide with a second metal, the quantities selected to give a preselected metal ratio in the resultant membrane. A limited amount of water and acid is added to the combination and stirred until a colloidal suspension is formed. The colloid is dried to a gel, and the gel is fired at a temperature greater than approximately 400.degree. C. The porosity and surface area of ceramic membranes formed by this method are not adversely affected by this high temperature firing.

Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI); Xu, Qunyin (Plainsboro, NJ); Bischoff, Brian L. (Madison, WI)

1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

427

Reactor vessel using metal oxide ceramic membranes  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A reaction vessel for use in photoelectrochemical reactions includes as its reactive surface a metal oxide porous ceramic membrane of a catalytic metal such as titanium. The reaction vessel includes a light source and a counter electrode. A provision for applying an electrical bias between the membrane and the counter electrode permits the Fermi levels of potential reaction to be favored so that certain reactions may be favored in the vessel. The electrical biasing is also useful for the cleaning of the catalytic membrane.

Anderson, Marc A. (Madison, WI); Zeltner, Walter A. (Oregon, WI)

1992-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

428

Growth of aqueous foam on flexible membranes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

In this paper, I study the coarsening dynamics of two-dimensional dry foam sandwiched by deformable membranes. The time-varying deformation of the confining membranes gives rise to a significant alteration in the evolution of polygonal cells of bubbles when compared to the case of rigid membranes. This alteration is attributed to the correlation between the rate of inter-cell gas transfer and temporal fluctuation in surface curvature within a cell domain. The existing material constants are referred to understand the utility of the correlation effect toward the artificial control of the coarsening dynamics.

Hiroyuki Shima

2009-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

429

Innovative oxygen separation membrane prototype  

SciTech Connect

Improvements are still needed to gas separation processes to gain industry acceptance of coal gasification systems. The Ion Transport Membrane (ITM) technology, being developed by the US Department of Energy and its partners, offers an opportunity to lower overall plant cost and improve efficiency compared to cryogenic distillation and pressure swing adsorption methods. The technology is based on a novel class of perovskite ceramic oxides which can selectively separate oxygen ions from a stream of air at high temperature and pressure. Those ions are transported across the ITM leaving non-permeate air which can be integrated with a fuel-fired gas system, enabling co-production of power and steam along with the concentrated, high-purity oxygen. The project is at the second phase, to scale up the ITM Oxygen ceramic devices to demonstrate the technology at the 1-5 tpd capability in the Subscale Engineering Prototype. A third phase to demonstrate commercial viability extends to the end of the decade. 2 figs.

NONE

2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

430

Anisotropic membranes for gas separation  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

A gas separation membrane has a dense separating layer about 10,000 Angstroms or less thick and a porous support layer 10 to 400 microns thick that is an integral unit with gradually and continuously decreasing pore size from the base of the support layer to the surface of the thin separating layer and is made from a casting solution comprising ethyl cellulose and ethyl cellulose-based blends, typically greater than 47.5 ethoxyl content ethyl cellulose blended with compatible second polymers, such as nitrocellulose. The polymer content of the casting solution is from about 10% to about 35% by weight of the total solution with up to about 50% of this polymer weight a compatible second polymer to the ethyl cellulose in a volatile solvent such as isopropanol, methylacetate, methanol, ethanol, and acetone. Typical nonsolvents for the casting solutions include water and formamide. The casting solution is cast in air from about zero to 10 seconds to allow the volatile solvent to evaporate and then quenched in a coagulation bath, typically water, at a temperature of 7--25 C and then air dried at ambient temperature, typically 10--30 C. 2 figs.

Gollan, A.Z.

1987-07-21T23:59:59.000Z

431

Performance of ceramic membrane filters  

SciTech Connect

CeraMem Corp.`s ceramic-membrane coated, dead-end ceramic filters offer a promising alternative to ceramic candle filters providing long-term operational and reliability issues are resolved: regenerability of filter passages by back pulse cleaning, tolerance to alkali-containing combustion gas and thermal/chemical aging. ANL is responsible for analytical modeling of filtration and pulse cleaning operations, flow-through testing, and prediction of filter response to thermal cycling under realistic service conditions. A test apparatus was built to expose ceramic filter specimens to chemical environments simulating operation of pressurized fluidized bed and integrated gasification combined cycle plants. Four long-duration tests have been conducted in which 100-cpsi channel filters were exposed to ash collected downstream of the cyclone separator at the PFBC plant at Tidd. Results are discussed. Focus has now shifted to exposing the advanced candle filter specimens to reducing gas environments containing NaCl, H{sub 2}S, H{sub 2}O, and gasification ash.

Ahluwalia, R.K.; Im, K.H.; Geyer, H.K. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Shelleman, D.L.; Tressler, R.E. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)

1996-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

432

Definition: Heat exchanger | Open Energy Information  

Open Energy Info (EERE)

Definition Definition Edit with form History Facebook icon Twitter icon » Definition: Heat exchanger Jump to: navigation, search Dictionary.png Heat exchanger A device for transferring thermal energy (heat) from one fluid (liquid or gas) to another, when the two fluids are physically separated; such as a radiator.[1][2] View on Wikipedia Wikipedia Definition A heat exchanger is a piece of equipment built for efficient heat transfer from one medium to another. The media may be separated by a solid wall to prevent mixing or they may be in direct contact. They are widely used in space heating, refrigeration, air conditioning, power plants, chemical plants, petrochemical plants, petroleum refineries [bp, shell, sasol], natural gas processing, and sewage treatment. The classic example

433

Heat exchanger for coal gasification process  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

This invention provides a heat exchanger, particularly useful for systems requiring cooling of hot particulate solids, such as the separated fines from the product gas of a carbonaceous material gasification system. The invention allows effective cooling of a hot particulate in a particle stream (made up of hot particulate and a gas), using gravity as the motive source of the hot particulate. In a preferred form, the invention substitutes a tube structure for the single wall tube of a heat exchanger. The tube structure comprises a tube with a core disposed within, forming a cavity between the tube and the core, and vanes in the cavity which form a flow path through which the hot particulate falls. The outside of the tube is in contact with the cooling fluid of the heat exchanger.

Blasiole, George A. (Greensburg, PA)

1984-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

434

Indentation behavior of ion-exchanged glasses  

SciTech Connect

This paper reports indentation fracture mechanics extended to include the effect of a thin layer of residual stress on the indentation strength of brittle materials. The proposed theory was used to predict the residual stress values for an ion-exchanged glass. For flaws placed before the exchange, considerable strengthening was observed, but the value of the surface stress predicted was considerable underestimated. For flaws placed after the exchange, there was no strengthening and the value of the surface stress was predicted to be zero. The failure of the indentation analysis indicates that it has to be modified for accurate stress determination. Thin layers of residual stress were found to retard the initiation of surface damage, but their influence on the strength after damage initiation was minimal.

Tandon, R.; Green, D.J. (Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering, Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (US))

1990-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

435

Fock exchange in meson theories of nuclei  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

The Fock exchange term in meson field theories of nuclear systems is shown to arise from a two-loop ground-state self-energy diagram. Evaluation of this diagram gives the relativistic or semirelativistic analog of the Fock exchange energy; it differs from the nucleon-nucleon Fock energy in including retardation effects. In finite meson-field theories of nuclear systems, the variational nature of the meson-field analog of the Hartree-Fock energy functional can be further elucidated. 4 refs.

Bolsterli, M.

1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

436

Quantum exchange interaction of spherically symmetric plasmoids  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

We study nano-sized spherically symmetric plasma structures which are radial nonlinear oscillations of electrons in plasma. The effective interaction of these plasmoids via quantum exchange forces between ions is described. We calculate the energy of this interaction for the case of a dense plasma. The conditions when the exchange interaction is attractive are examined and it is shown that separate plasmoids can form a single object. The application of our results to the theoretical description of stable atmospheric plasma structures is considered.

Maxim Dvornikov

2011-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

437

ION EXCHANGE ADSORPTION PROCESS FOR PLUTONIUM SEPARATION  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Ion exchange processes for the separation of plutonium from fission products are described. In accordance with these processes an aqueous solution containing plutonium and fission products is contacted with a cation exchange resin under conditions favoring adsorption of plutonium and fission products on the resin. A portion of the fission product is then eluted with a solution containing 0.05 to 1% by weight of a carboxylic acid. Plutonium is next eluted with a solution containing 2 to 8 per cent by weight of the same carboxylic acid, and the remaining fission products on the resin are eluted with an aqueous solution containing over 10 per cent by weight of sodium bisulfate.

Boyd, G.E.; Russell, E.R.; Taylor, M.D.

1961-07-11T23:59:59.000Z

438

Carbon Nanotube Membranes: Carbon Nanotube Membranes for Energy-Efficient Carbon Sequestration  

SciTech Connect

Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Porifera is developing carbon nanotube membranes that allow more efficient removal of CO2 from coal plant exhaust. Most of today’s carbon capture methods use chemical solvents, but capture methods that use membranes to draw CO2 out of exhaust gas are potentially more efficient and cost effective. Traditionally, membranes are limited by the rate at which they allow gas to flow through them and the amount of CO2 they can attract from the gas. Smooth support pores and the unique structure of Porifera’s carbon nanotube membranes allows them to be more permeable than other polymeric membranes, yet still selective enough for CO2 removal. This approach could overcome the barriers facing membrane-based approaches for capturing CO2 from coal plant exhausts.

None

2010-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

439

Table II: Technical Targets for Membranes: Automotive  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

II: Technical Targets for Membranes: Automotive II: Technical Targets for Membranes: Automotive All targets must be achieved simultaneously Characteristics Units Calendar year 2000 status a 2005 2010 Membrane conductivity, operating temperature Ω-cm -1 0.1 0.1 0.1 Room temperature Ω-cm -1 -20 o C Ω-cm -1 Oxygen cross-over b mA/cm 2 5 5 2 Hydrogen cross-over b mA/cm 2 5 5 2 Cost $/kW 50 5 Operating Temperature o C 80 120 120 Durability Hours 1000 d >4000 e >5000 f Survivability c o C -20 -30 -40 Thermal cyclability in presence of condensed water yes yes yes Notes: a) Status is present day 80 o C unless otherwise noted; targets are for new membranes/CCMs b) Tested in CCM c) Indicates temperature from which bootstrapping stack must be achieved

440

Critical Casimir forces in cellular membranes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

Recent experiments suggest that membranes of living cells are tuned close to a miscibility critical point in the 2D Ising universality class. We propose that one role for this proximity to criticality in live cells is to provide a conduit for relatively long-ranged critical Casimir forces. Using techniques from conformal field theory we calculate potentials of mean force between membrane bound inclusions mediated by their local interactions with the composition order parameter. We verify these calculations using Monte-Carlo where we also compare critical and off-critical results. Our findings suggest that membrane bound proteins experience weak yet long range forces mediated by critical composition fluctuations in the plasma membranes of living cells.

Benjamin B. Machta; Sarah L. Veatch; James P. Sethna

2012-03-09T23:59:59.000Z

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydroxide exchange membranes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.


441

Constant Pressure High Throughput Membrane Permeation Testing...  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

plant flue gas or in natural gas sweetening, and the separation of methane from other biogas components. Membranes can be made from a vast array of organic or inorganic materials...

442

Diffuse charge effects in fuel cell membranes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

It is commonly assumed that electrolyte membranes in fuel cells are electrically neutral, except in unsteady situations, when the double-layer capacitance is heuristically included in equivalent circuit calculations. Indeed, ...

Biesheuvel, P. M.

443

Catalytic carbon membranes for hydrogen production  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

Commercial carbon composite microfiltration membranes may be modified for gas separation applications by providing a gas separation layer with pores in the 1- to 10-nm range. Several organic polymeric precursors and techniques for depositing a suitable layer were investigated in this project. The in situ polymerization technique was found to be the most promising, and pure component permeation tests with membrane samples prepared with this technique indicated Knudsen diffusion behavior. The gas separation factors obtained by mixed-gas permeation tests were found to depend strongly on gas temperature and pressure indicating significant viscous flow at high-pressure conditions. The modified membranes were used to carry out simultaneous water gas shift reaction and product hydrogen separation. These tests indicated increasing CO conversions with increasing hydrogen separation. A simple process model was developed to simulate a catalytic membrane reactor. A number of simulations were carried out to identify operating conditions leading to product hydrogen concentrations over 90 percent. (VC)

Damle, A.S.; Gangwal, S.K.

1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

444

Electrokinetic properties of the mammalian tectorial membrane  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The tectorial membrane (TM) clearly plays a mechanical role in stimulating cochlear sensory receptors, but the presence of fixed charge in TM constituents suggests that electromechanical properties also may be important. ...

Ghaffari, Roozbeh

445

Supported Ionic Liquid Membranes for Gas Separation  

SciTech Connect

Ionic liquids have been rapidly gaining attention for various applications including solvent separation and gas capture. These substances are noted for extremely low vapor pressure and high CO2 solubility making them ideal as transport or capture media for CO2 abatement in power generation applications. Ionic liquids, combined with various supports to form membranes, have been proven selective in CO2 separation. Several ionic liquids and a variety of polymer supports have been studied over a temperature range from 37°C to 300°C and have been optimized for stability. The membranes have demonstrated high permeability and high selectivity since the supported ionic liquid membranes incorporate functionality capable of chemically complexing CO2. A study aimed at improving supported ionic liquid membranes will examine their durability with greater transmembrane pressures and the effects on CO2 permeance, CO2/H2 selectivity and thermal stability.

Myers, C.R.; Ilconich, J.B.; Pennline, H.W.; Luebke, D.R.

2007-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

446

Aging and weathering of cool roofing membranes  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

and L.S. Rose. 2002. “Aging of reflective roofs: sootAging and Weathering of Cool Roofing Membranes HashemNRC), Canada ABSTRACT Aging and weathering can reduce the

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

447

Application of Oak Ridge Inorganic Membrane  

NLE Websites -- All DOE Office Websites (Extended Search)

Oak Ridge Inorganic Membrane Oak Ridge Inorganic Membrane Technology to Cat Cracker Recycle Gas Hydrogen* FINAL REPORT DOE FEW FEAC324 June 2003 L.D. Trowbridge *AKA: Application of Inorganic Membrane Technology to Hydrogen-Hydrocarbon Separations ORNL/TM-2003/139 Application of Inorganic Membrane Technology To Hydrogen-hydrocarbon Separations June 2003 Prepared by L. D. Trowbridge DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY Reports produced after January 1, 1996, are generally available free via the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Information Bridge: Web site: http://www.osti.gov/bridge Reports produced before January 1, 1996, may be purchased by members of the public from the following source: National Technical Information Service 5285 Port Royal Road Springfield, VA 22161 Telephone: 703-605-6000 (1-800-553-6847)

448

Fuel cell electrolyte membrane with acidic polymer  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

An electrolyte membrane is formed by an acidic polymer and a low-volatility acid that is fluorinated, substantially free of basic groups, and is either oligomeric or non-polymeric.

Hamrock, Steven J. (Stillwater, MN); Larson, James M. (Saint Paul, MN); Pham, Phat T. (Little Canada, MN); Frey, Matthew H. (Cottage Grove, MN); Haugen, Gregory M. (Edina, MN); Lamanna, William M. (Stillwater, MN)

2009-04-14T23:59:59.000Z

449

Inorganic Polymer Derived Ceramic Membranes 2  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

Ceramic porous membranes capable of molecular sieving represent a promising alternative to energy-intensive distillation or cryogenic separation technologies used for processes such as purification of natural gas, air separation, and flue gas cleanup. Such membranes, fabricated at laboratory scale as part of this study, are capable of operating at temperatures as high as 200 degrees Celsius and can withstand harsh chemical environments and aggressive cleaning after fouling. Their selectivity factors and ...

2001-11-14T23:59:59.000Z

450

Membrane Research for Water and Wastewater Treatment  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document summarizes two research projects involving the use of membranes in water treatment: o Technologies for Improving Water Desalination -- The objectives of this study were to compare capacitive deionization (CDI) with carbon aerogel and reverse osmosis (RO) for salinity reduction using conventional treatment, conventional treatment with ozone and biologically active filters, and microfiltration as the pretreatment step. o Membrane Pretreatment of Reclaimed Wastewater for Reverse Osmosis Desali...

2001-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

451

Dehydration processes using membranes with hydrophobic coating  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Processes for removing water from organic compounds, especially polar compounds such as alcohols. The processes include a membrane-based dehydration step, using a membrane that has a dioxole-based polymer selective layer or the like and a hydrophilic selective layer, and can operate even when the stream to be treated has a high water content, such as 10 wt % or more. The processes are particularly useful for dehydrating ethanol.

Huang, Yu; Baker, Richard W; Aldajani, Tiem; Ly, Jennifer

2013-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

452

Advanced Membrane Separation Technologies for Energy Recovery from Industrial Process Streams  

SciTech Connect

Recovery of energy from relatively low-temperature waste streams is a goal that has not been achieved on any large scale. Heat exchangers do not operate efficiently with low-temperature streams and thus require such large heat exchanger surface areas that they are not practical. Condensing economizers offer one option for heat recovery from such streams, but they have not been widely implemented by industry. A promising alternative to these heat exchangers and economizers is a prototype ceramic membrane system using transport membrane technology for separation of water vapor and recovery of heat. This system was successfully tested by the Gas Technology Institute (GTI) on a natural gas fired boiler where the flue gas is relatively clean and free of contaminants. However, since the tubes of the prototype system were constructed of aluminum oxide, the brittle nature of the tubes limited the robustness of the system and even limited the length of tubes that could be used. In order to improve the robustness of the membrane tubes and make the system more suitable for industrial applications, this project was initiated with the objective of developing a system with materials that would permit the system to function successfully on a larger scale and in contaminated and potentially corrosive industrial environments. This required identifying likely industrial environments and the hazards associated with those environments. Based on the hazardous components in these environments, candidate metallic materials were identified that are expected to have sufficient strength, thermal conductivity and corrosion resistance to permit production of longer tubes that could function in the industrial environments identified. Tests were conducted to determine the corrosion resistance of these candidate alloys, and the feasibility of forming these materials into porous substrates was assessed. Once the most promising metallic materials were identified, the ability to form an alumina membrane layer on the surface of the metallic tubes was evaluated. Evaluation of this new style of membrane tube involved exposure to SO{sub 2} containing gases as well as to materials with a potential for fouling. Once the choice of substrate and membrane materials and design were confirmed, about 150 tubes were fabricated and assembled into three modules. These modules were mounted on an industrial size boiler and their performance carefully monitored during a limited testing period. The positive results of this performance test confirm the feasibility of utilizing such a system for recovery of heat and water from industrial waste streams. The improved module design along with use of long metallic substrate tubes with a ceramic membrane on the outer surface resulted in the successful, limited scale demonstration of the Transport Membrane Condenser (TMC) technology in the GTI test facility. This test showed this technology can successfully recover a significant amount of heat and water from gaseous waste streams. However, before industry will make the investment to install a full scale TMC, a full scale system will need to be constructed, installed and successfully operated at a few industrial sites. Companies were identified that had an interest in serving as a host site for a demonstration system.

Keiser, J. R.; Wang, D. [Gas Technology Institute; Bischoff, B.; Ciora, [Media and Process Technology; Radhakrishnan, B.; Gorti, S. B.

2013-01-14T23:59:59.000Z

453

Carbon-nanotube-based membranes for water desalination by membrane distillation.  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

??This work investigates ways to fabricate composite macro-structures made of carbon nanotubes in combination with polymers and metals to enhance membrane lifespan and performance. Carbon… (more)

Dumee, Ludovic

2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

454

Development of Inorganic Membranes for Hydrogen Separation  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

This paper presents information and data relative to recent advances in the development at Oak Ridge National Laboratory of porous inorganic membranes for high-temperature hydrogen separation. The Inorganic Membrane Technology Laboratory, which was formerly an organizational element of Bechtel Jacobs Company, LLC, was formally transferred to Oak Ridge National Laboratory on August 1, 2002, as a result of agreements reached between Bechtel Jacobs Company, the management and integration contractor at the East Tennessee Technology Park (formerly the Oak Ridge Gaseous Diffusion Plant or Oak Ridge K-25 Site); UT-Battelle, the management and operating contractor of Oak Ridge National Laboratory; and the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Oak Ridge Operations Office. Research emphasis during the last year has been directed toward the development of high-permeance (high-flux) and high-separation-factor metal-supported membranes. Performance data for these membranes are presented and are compared with performance data for membranes previously produced under this program and for membranes produced by other researchers. New insights into diffusion mechanisms are included in the discussion. Fifteen products, many of which are the results of research sponsored by the DOE Fossil Energy Advanced Research Materials Program, have been declared unclassified and have been approved for commercial production.

Bischoff, B.L.; Judkins, R.R.

2003-04-23T23:59:59.000Z

455

Bifunctional anion-exchange resins with improved selectivity and exchange kinetics  

DOE Patents (OSTI)

Disclosed herein are a class of anion exchange resins containing two different exchange sites with improved selectivity and sorptive capability for chemical species in solution, such as heptavalent technetium (as pertechnetate anion, TcO.sub.4.sup.-). The resins are prepared by first reacting haloalkylated crosslinked copolymer beads with a large tertiary amine in a solvent in which the resin beads can swell, followed by reaction with a second, smaller, tertiary amine to more fully complete the functionalization of the resin. The resins have enhanced selectivity, capacity, and exchange kinetics.

Alexandratos, Spiro D. (Knoxville, TN); Brown, Gilbert M. (Knoxville, TN); Bonnesen, Peter V. (Knoxville, TN); Moyer, Bruce A. (Oak Ridge, TN)

2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

456

Money Exchange Model and a general Outlook  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The Kinetic Gas Theory like two-agent money exchange models, recently introduced in the Econophysics of Wealth distributions, are revisited. The emergence of Boltzmann-Gibbs like distribution of individual money to Pareto's law in the tail of the distribution is examined in terms of 2x2 Transition matrix with a general and simple oulook. Some additional interesting results are also reported.

Gupta, A K

2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

457

Thermal Analysis of LANL Ion Exchange Column  

Science Conference Proceedings (OSTI)

This document reports results from an ion exchange column heat transfer analysis requested by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The object of the analysis is to demonstrate that the decay heat from the Pu-238 will not cause resin bed temperatures to increase to a level where the resin significantly degrades.

Laurinat, J.E.

1999-06-16T23:59:59.000Z

458

Qualification of aluminum for OTEC heat exchangers  

DOE Green Energy (OSTI)

The basis for qualification of aluminum as a material for use as tubing in Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion heat exchangers is reviewed. Reference is made to compendia of data from tests of aluminum alloys in natural sea water and to applicable service records. Data from these sources were found to be inadequate to either qualify or disqualify aluminum. They serve only to identify the 5052 alloy and Alclad 3003 or 3004 as being worthy of additional testing under conditions more directly related to what will be encountered in OTEC heat exchangers. The principal deficiency of data from long-time tests in natural sea water is that in almost all of these tests the specimens were exposed under static conditions that caused the surfaces to be covered by marine fouling organisms that would not be present in heat exchanger tubes. The tests did not take into account possible effects of periodic mechanical or chemical treatments to remove fouling or chemical treatments (chlorination) to prevent fouling. A current testing program sponsored by the Department of Energy through Argonne National Laboratory is designed to provide the needed data. Limited tests in high velocity sea water have indicated that aluminum tubes would tolerate the velocities under 10 ft (3 m) per second likely to be used in OTEC heat exchangers.

LaQue, F.L.

1979-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

459

Heat Exchanger Fouling- Prediction, Measurement and Mitigation  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

The U. S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Industrial Programs (OIP) sponsors the development of innovative heat exchange systems. Fouling is a major and persistent cost associated with most industrial heat exchangers and nationally wastes an estimated 2.9 Quads per year. To predict and control fouling, three OIP projects are currently exploring heat exchanger fouling in specific industrial applications. A fouling probe has been developed to determine empirically the fouling potential of an industrial gas stream and to derive the fouling thermal resistance. The probe is a hollow metal cylinder capable of measuring the average heat flux along the length of the tube. The local heat flux is also measured by a heat flux meter embedded in the probe wall. The fouling probe has been successfully tested in the laboratory at flue gas temperatures up to 2200°F and a local heat flux up to 41,000 BTU/hr-ft2. The probe has been field tested at a coal-fired boiler plant. Future tests at a municipal waste incinerator are planned. Two other projects study enhanced heat exchanger tubes, specifically the effect of enhanced surface geometries on tube bundle performance. Both projects include fouling in a liquid heat transfer fluid. Identifying and quantifying the factors affecting fouling in these enhanced heat transfer tubes will lead to techniques to mitigate fouling.

Peterson, G. R.

1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

460

MODELING PARTICLE DEPOSITION ON HVAC HEAT EXCHANGERS  

E-Print Network (OSTI)

LBNL-49339 MODELING PARTICLE DEPOSITION ON HVAC HEAT EXCHANGERS J.A. Siegel1,3 * and W.W. Nazaroff2 Department of Energy under contract DE-AC03-76SF00098. #12;MODELING PARTICLE DEPOSITION ON HVAC HEAT, such as discontinuities in the fins, are hypothesized to be responsible for the discrepancy. INDEX TERMS HVAC, Fouling

Note: This page contains sample records for the topic "hydroxide exchange membranes" from the National Library of EnergyBeta (NLEBeta).
While these samples are representative of the content of NLEBeta,
they are not comprehensive nor are they the most current set.
We encourage you to perform a real-time search of NLEBeta
to obtain the most current and comprehensive results.