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Sample records for hydrothermal system jump

  1. New Evidence On The Hydrothermal System In Long Valley Caldera...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hydrothermal System In Long Valley Caldera, California, From Wells, Fluid Sampling, Electrical Geophysics, And Age Determinations Of Hot-Spring Deposits Jump to: navigation,...

  2. Hydrothermal System | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View NewGuam:on Openei | Open Energy InformationHydrothermal System

  3. Geothermal reservoirs in hydrothermal convection systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorey, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    Geothermal reservoirs commonly exist in hydrothermal convection systems involving fluid circulation downward in areas of recharge and upwards in areas of discharge. Because such reservoirs are not isolated from their surroundings, the nature of thermal and hydrologic connections with the rest of the system may have significant effects on the natural state of the reservoir and on its response to development. Conditions observed at numerous developed and undeveloped geothermal fields are discussed with respect to a basic model of the discharge portion of an active hydrothermal convection system. Effects of reservoir development on surficial discharge of thermal fluid are also delineated.

  4. Hydrothermal System | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNewTexas: EnergyHunterdonHutto,FuelEnergyGabbsequal to

  5. Hydrothermal System | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNewTexas: EnergyHunterdonHutto,FuelEnergyGabbsequal

  6. Temporal Relations of Volcanism and Hydrothermal Systems in Two...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geology, 1989 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Temporal Relations of Volcanism and Hydrothermal Systems in Two Areas of...

  7. Fluid Inclusion Gas Compositions From An Active Magmatic-Hydrothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fluid Inclusion Gas Compositions From An Active Magmatic-Hydrothermal System- A Case Study Of The Geysers Geothermal Field, Usa Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  8. GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM, IDAHO Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: GEOLOGY...

  9. Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid inclusions from active geothermal systems Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  10. Hydrology of Hydrothermal Systems in the Long Valley Caldera Hydrothermal activity in the Long Valley Caldera has had many different periods in its history of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polly, David

    the temperatures of the hydrothermal fluid. The geothermal systems and hydrothermal systems have been documented that the temperatures would be extremely high, akin to Yellowstone. But what they found were temperatures much lower). Hydrothermal Systems Summary Geothermal systems and the hydrothermal systems are an occurrence that happens

  11. Spatial And Temporal Geochemical Trends In The Hydrothermal System...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    analysis also suggests that it might be more feasible to detect large-scale heating or cooling of the hydrothermal system by tracking changes in gas and steam flux than by...

  12. Interconnected hydro-thermal systems Models, methods, and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Interconnected hydro-thermal systems Models, methods, and applications Magnus Hindsberger Kgs. Lyngby 2003 IMM-PHD-2003-112 Interconnected hydro-thermalsystems #12;Technical University of Denmark 45882673 reception@imm.dtu.dk www.imm.dtu.dk IMM-PHD-2003-112 ISSN 0909-3192 #12;Interconnected hydro

  13. POWER SCHEDULING IN A HYDRO-THERMAL SYSTEM UNDER UNCERTAINTY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Römisch, Werner

    POWER SCHEDULING IN A HYDRO-THERMAL SYSTEM UNDER UNCERTAINTY C.C. Car e1, M.P. Nowak2, W. Romisch2 and pumped-storage hydro units is developed. For its compu- tational solution two di erent decompo- sition-burning) thermal units, pumped-storage hydro plants and delivery con- tracts and describe an optimization model

  14. Instabilities during liquid migration into superheated hydrothermal systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzgerald, Shaun D.; Woods, Andrew W.

    1995-01-26

    Hydrothermal systems typically consist of hot permeable rock which contains either liquid or liquid and saturated steam within the voids. These systems vent fluids at the surface through hot springs, fumaroles, mud pools, steaming ground and geysers. They are simultaneously recharged as meteoric water percolates through the surrounding rock or through the active injection of water at various geothermal reservoirs. In a number of geothermal reservoirs from which significant amounts of hot fluid have been extracted and passed through turbines, superheated regions of vapor have developed. As liquid migrates through a superheated region of a hydrothermal system, some of the liquid vaporizes at a migrating liquid-vapor interface. Using simple physical arguments, and analogue laboratory experiments we show that, under the influence of gravity, the liquid-vapor interface may become unstable and break up into fingers.

  15. Aqueous geochemistry of the Thermopolis hydrothermal system, southern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, U.S.A.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaszuba, John P. [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics; Sims, Kenneth W.W. [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). School of Energy Resources; Pluda, Allison R. [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Wyoming High-Precision Isotope Lab.

    2014-03-01

    The Thermopolis hydrothermal system is located in the southern portion of the Bighorn Basin, in and around the town of Thermopolis, Wyoming. It is the largest hydrothermal system in Wyoming outside of Yellowstone National Park. The system includes hot springs, travertine deposits, and thermal wells; published models for the hydrothermal system propose the Owl Creek Mountains as the recharge zone, simple conductive heating at depth, and resurfacing of thermal waters up the Thermopolis Anticline.

  16. Aqueous geochemistry of the Thermopolis hydrothermal system, southern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, U.S.A.

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kaszuba, John P.; Sims, Kenneth W.W.; Pluda, Allison R.

    2014-06-01

    The Thermopolis hydrothermal system is located in the southern portion of the Bighorn Basin, in and around the town of Thermopolis, Wyoming. It is the largest hydrothermal system in Wyoming outside of Yellowstone National Park. The system includes hot springs, travertine deposits, and thermal wells; published models for the hydrothermal system propose the Owl Creek Mountains as the recharge zone, simple conductive heating at depth, and resurfacing of thermal waters up the Thermopolis Anticline.

  17. Depth determinations of shallow hydrothermal systems by self-potential and multi-scale wavelet tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams-Jones, Glyn

    to significantly enhance our ability to locate geothermal systems and monitor active volcanoes. © 2010 Elsevier BDepth determinations of shallow hydrothermal systems by self-potential and multi-scale wavelet studies, the depth of the hydrothermal system is always required, but rarely known via traditional

  18. Products of an Artificially Induced Hydrothermal System at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Levy

    2000-08-07

    Studies of mineral deposition in the recent geologic past at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, address competing hypotheses of hydrothermal alteration and deposition from percolating groundwater. The secondary minerals being studied are calcite-opal deposits in fractures and lithophysal cavities of ash-flow tuffs exposed in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), a 7.7-km tunnel excavated by the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project within Yucca Mountain. An underground field test in the ESF provided information about the minerals deposited by a short-lived artificial hydrothermal system and an opportunity for comparison of test products with the natural secondary minerals. The heating phase lasted nine months, followed by a nine-month cooling period. Natural pore fluids were the only source of water during the thermal test. Condensation and reflux of water driven away from the heater produced fluid flow in certain fractures and intersecting boreholes. The mineralogic products of the thermal test are calcite-gypsum aggregates of less than 4-micrometer crystals and amorphous silica as glassy scale less than 0.2 mm thick and as mounds of tubules with diameters less than 0.7 micrometers. The minute crystal sizes of calcite and gypsum from the field test are very different from the predominantly coarser calcite crystals (up to cm scale) in natural secondary-mineral deposits at the site. The complex micrometer-scale textures of the amorphous silica differ from the simple forms of opal spherules and coatings in the natural deposits, even though some natural spherules are as small as 1 micrometer. These differences suggest that the natural minerals, especially if they were of hydrothermal origin, may have developed coarser or simpler forms during subsequent episodes of dissolution and redeposition. The presence of gypsum among the test products and its absence from the natural secondary-mineral assemblage may indicate a higher degree of evaporation during the test than during the deposition of natural calcite-opal deposits.

  19. POWER MANAGEMENT IN A HYDRO-THERMAL SYSTEM UNDER UNCERTAINTY BY LAGRANGIAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Römisch, Werner

    POWER MANAGEMENT IN A HYDRO-THERMAL SYSTEM UNDER UNCERTAINTY BY LAGRANGIAN RELAXATION NICOLE GR power in a hydro-thermal system under uncertainty in load, inflow to reservoirs and prices for fuel to successive decom- position into single thermal and hydro unit subproblems that are solved by dynamic

  20. Development of a Hydrothermal Spallation Drilling System for EGS

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objective: Build and demonstrate a working prototype hydrothermal spallation drilling unit that will accelerate commercial deployment of EGS as a domestic energy resource.

  1. Development of a Hydrothermal Spallation Drilling System for EGS Geothermal

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstrumentsArea (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation,SystemMEQ in EGSProject |

  2. Surficial Extent And Conceptual Model Of Hydrothermal System At Mount

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS ReportEuropeEnergy InformationSunrainSampling JumpRainier,

  3. Carbon geochemistry of serpentinites in the Lost City Hydrothermal System (30N, MAR)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Massif (Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 30°N) was exam- ined to characterize carbon sources and speciation in oceanic. The speciation of carbon de- pends on the chemical and physical conditions prevailing in the reservoir, and itsCarbon geochemistry of serpentinites in the Lost City Hydrothermal System (30°N, MAR) Ade

  4. PRIMAL AND DUAL METHODS FOR UNIT COMMITMENT IN A HYDRO-THERMAL POWER SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Römisch, Werner

    PRIMAL AND DUAL METHODS FOR UNIT COMMITMENT IN A HYDRO-THERMAL POWER SYSTEM R. Gollmer1 , A. Moller comprising thermal and pumped-storage hydro units a large-scale mixed-integer optimization model is developed hydro units. The variable ut i 2 f0;1g; i = 1;:::;I;t = 1;:::;T indicates whether the thermal unit i

  5. Hydrothermal Convection Systems with Reservoir Temperatures greater than or

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNewTexas: EnergyHunterdonHutto,FuelEnergyGabbsequal to 90

  6. Relations Of Ammonium Minerals At Several Hydrothermal Systems In The

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-b <Refurbished Projects WindEnergyWestern Us | Open

  7. Spatial And Temporal Geochemical Trends In The Hydrothermal System Of

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS ReportEurope GmbHSoloPage Edit with formYellowstone National Park-

  8. The Hydrothermal System of Long Valley Caldera, California | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJ AutomationTexas/Wind Resources <forGerman WindCombustion

  9. Quantum-jumps and photon-statistic in fluorescent systems coupled to classically fluctuating reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adrian A. Budini

    2010-05-20

    In this paper, we develop a quantum-jump approach for describing the photon-emission process of single fluorophore systems coupled to complex classically fluctuating reservoirs. The formalism relies on an open quantum system approach where the dynamic of the system and the reservoir fluctuations are described through a density matrix whose evolution is defined by a Lindblad rate equation. For each realization of the photon measurement processes it is possible to define a conditional system state (stochastic density matrix) whose evolution depends on both the photon detection events and the fluctuations between the configurational states of the reservoir. In contrast to standard fluorescent systems the photon-to-photon emission process is not a renewal one, being defined by a (stochastic) waiting time distribution that in each recording event parametrically depends on the conditional state. The formalism allows calculating experimental observables such as the full hierarchy of joint probabilities associated to the time intervals between consecutive photon recording events. These results provide a powerful basis for characterizing different situations arising in single-molecule spectroscopy, such as spectral fluctuations, lifetime fluctuations, and light assisted processes.

  10. Development of a Hydrothermal Spallation Drilling System for...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Spallation Drilling System for EGS Project Type Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and DevelopmentAnalysis Project Type Topic 2 Drilling...

  11. Inferences On The Hydrothermal System Beneath The Resurgent Dome...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    more vigorous and energetic fluid circulation beneath the resurgent dome. Although this system apparently died off as a result of mineral deposition and cooling (andor...

  12. POWER SCHEDULING IN A HYDROTHERMAL SYSTEM UNDER UNCERTAINTY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Römisch, Werner

    POWER SCHEDULING IN A HYDRO­THERMAL SYSTEM UNDER UNCERTAINTY C.C. Carøe 1 , M.P. Nowak 2 , W. R: A multi­stage stochastic pro­ gramming model for power scheduling un­ der uncertainty in a generation system comprising thermal and pumped­storage hydro units is developed. For its compu­ tational solution

  13. Hydrothermal Heat Discharge In The Cascade Range, Northwestern...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    United States Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Hydrothermal Heat Discharge In The Cascade Range, Northwestern United States...

  14. An Overview of Hydrothermal Alteration and Vein Mineralization...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Overview of Hydrothermal Alteration and Vein Mineralization in Continental Scientific Drilling Program Core Hole VC-2B, Valles Caldera, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search...

  15. A decomposition approach to the economic dispatch of hydrothermal systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pereira, M.U.F.; Pinto, L.M.

    1982-10-01

    The objective of the predispatch of a hydroelectric system is to produce an hourly generation schedule that does not violate electrical constraints and meets weekly generation targets for each hydro plant. The predispatch can therefore be seen as a link between operation planning and the on-line generation scheduling. This paper presents a decomposition approach to the solution of the predispatch problem, which is modeled as a large-scale linear program and solved by Dantzig-Wolfe decomposition. The subproblems in this decompositon correspond to hourly optimal rescheduling problems and are solved by an efficient version of the Dual Simplex method. Core and CPU requirements are thus greatly reduced. A case study with the Brazilian Southeast network is presented and discussed.

  16. Hydrothermal Processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2011-03-11

    This chapter is a contribution to a book on Thermochemical Conversion of Biomass being edited by Prof. Robert Brown of Iowa State University. It describes both hydrothermal liquefaction and hydrothermal gasification of biomass to fuels.

  17. Faults and gravity anomalies over the East Mesa hydrothermal-geothermal system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldstein, N.E.; Carle, S.

    1986-05-01

    Detailed interpretations of gravity anomalies over geothermal systems may be extremely useful for mapping the fracture or fault systems that control the circulation of the thermal waters. This approach seems to be particularly applicable in areas like the Salton Trough where reactions between the thermal waters and the porous sediments produce authigenic-hydrothermal minerals in sufficient quantity to cause distinct gravity anomalies at the surface. A 3-D inversion of the residual Bouguer gravity anomaly over the East Mesa geothermal field was made to examine the densified volume of rock. We show that the data not only resolve a north-south and an intersecting northwest structure, but that it may be possible to distinguish between the active present-day hydrothermal system and an older and cooler part of the system. The densified region is compared spatially to self-potential, thermal and seismic results and we find a good concordance between the different geophysical data sets. Our results agree with previous studies that have indicated that the main feeder fault recharging the East Mesa reservoir dips steeply to the west.

  18. A genetic algorithm for solving the unit commitment problem of a hydro-thermal power system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudolf, A.; Bayrleithner, R.

    1999-11-01

    The paper presents a two layer approach to solve the unit commitment problem of a hydro-thermal power system. The first layer uses a genetic algorithm (GA) to decide the on/off status of the units. The second layer uses a non-linear programming formulation solved by a Lagrangian relaxation to perform the economic dispatch while meeting all plant and system constraints. In order to deal effectively with the constraints of the problem and prune the search space of the GA in advance, the difficult minimum up/down-time constraints of thermal generation units and the turbine/pump operating constraint of storage power stations are embedded in the binary strings that are coded to represent the on/off-states of the generating units. The other constraints are handled by integrating penalty costs into the fitness function. In order to save execution time, the economic dispatch is only performed if the given unit commitment schedule is able to meet the load balance, energy, and begin/end level constraints. The proposed solution approach was tested on a real scaled hydro-thermal power system over a period of a day in half-hour time-steps for different GA-parameters. The simulation results reveal that the features of easy implementation, convergence within an acceptable execution time, and highly optimal solution in solving the unit commitment problem can be achieved.

  19. The boron isotope systematics of the Yellowstone National Park (Wyoming) hydrothermal system: A reconnaissance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, M.R. (Bristol Univ. (England)); Sturchio, N.C. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Boron concentrations and isotope compositions have been measured in fourteen hot spring waters, two drill hole waters, an unaltered rhyolite flow, and hydrothermally altered rhyolite from the geothermal system in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The samples are representative of the major thermal areas within the park and span the range of fluid types. For the fluids, the B concentrations range from 0.043-2.69 mM/kg, and the {delta}{sup 11}B values range from {minus}9.3 to +4.4{per thousand}. There is no relationship between the dissolved B concentrations or isotope compositions with the concentration of any major element (other than Cl) or physical property. Each basin is characterized by a restricted range in B/Cl ratios and {delta}{sup 11}B values. Hot spring waters from the Norris Basin, Upper Geyser Basin, Calcite Springs, and Clearwater have {delta}{sup 11}B values close to that of unaltered rhyolite ({minus}5.2{per thousand}) and are interpreted to have derived their B from this source. Waters from Mammoth Hot Springs, Sheepeater, and Rainbow Springs have lower {delta}{sup 11}B values close to {minus}8{per thousand}. These lower values may reflect leaching of B from sedimentary rocks outside the Yellowstone caldera, but they are similar to the {delta}{sup 11}B value of hydrothermally altered rhyolite ({minus}9.7{per thousand}). Hence, the light boron isotope compositions recorded in these hot spring waters may reflect leaching of previously deposited hydrothermal minerals. Cooler springs along the Yellowstone River just outside the park boundary have lower B concentrations and higher {delta}{sup 11}B values that may reflect mixing with shallow meteoric water.

  20. Mineral formation and redox-sensitive trace elements in a near-surface hydrothermal alteration system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gehring, A.U.; Schosseler, P.M.; Weidler, P.G.

    1999-07-01

    A recent hydrothermal mudpool at the southwestern slope of the Rincon de la Vieja volcano in Northwest Costa Rica exhibits an argillic alteration system formed by intense interaction of sulfuric acidic fluids with wall rock materials. Detailed mineralogical analysis revealed an assemblage with kaolinite, alunite, and opal-C as the major mineral phases. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) showed 3 different redox-sensitive cations associated with the mineral phases, Cu{sup +} is structure-bound in opal-C, whereas VO{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} are located in the kaolinite structure. The location of the redox-sensitive cations in different minerals of the assemblage is indicative of different chemical conditions. The formation of the alteration products can be described schematically as a 2-step process. In a first step alunite and opal-C were precipitated in a fluid with slightly reducing conditions and a low chloride availability. The second step is characterized by a decrease in K{sup +} activity and subsequent formation of kaolinite under weakly oxidizing to oxidizing redox conditions as indicated by structure-bound VO{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+}. The detection of paramagnetic trace elements structure-bound in mineral phases by EPR provide direct information about the prevailing redox conditions during alteration and can, therefore, be used as additional insight into the genesis of the hydrothermal, near-surface system.

  1. Steel characteristics measurement system using Barkhausen jump sum rate and magnetic field intensity and method of using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kohn, Gabriel (Omer, IL); Hicho, George (Derwood, MD); Swartzendruber, Lydon (New Carrollton, MD)

    1997-01-01

    A steel hardness measurement system and method of using same are provided for measuring at least one mechanical or magnetic characteristic of a ferromagnetic sample as a function of at least one magnetic characteristic of the sample. A magnetic field generator subjects the sample to a variable external magnetic field. The magnetic field intensity of the magnetic field generated by the magnetic field generating means is measured and a signal sensor is provided for measuring Barkhausen signals from the sample when the sample is subjected to the external magnetic field. A signal processing unit calculates a jump sum rate first moment as a function of the Barkhausen signals measured by the signal sensor and the magnetic field intensity, and for determining the at least one mechanical or magnetic characteristic as a function of the jump sum rate first moment.

  2. Steel characteristics measurement system using Barkhausen jump sum rate and magnetic field intensity and method of using same

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Kohn, G.; Hicho, G.; Swartzendruber, L.

    1997-04-08

    A steel hardness measurement system and method of using same are provided for measuring at least one mechanical or magnetic characteristic of a ferromagnetic sample as a function of at least one magnetic characteristic of the sample. A magnetic field generator subjects the sample to a variable external magnetic field. The magnetic field intensity of the magnetic field generated by the magnetic field generating means is measured and a signal sensor is provided for measuring Barkhausen signals from the sample when the sample is subjected to the external magnetic field. A signal processing unit calculates a jump sum rate first moment as a function of the Barkhausen signals measured by the signal sensor and the magnetic field intensity, and for determining the at least one mechanical or magnetic characteristic as a function of the jump sum rate first moment. 7 figs.

  3. A core hole into the hydrothermal system of the Long Valley caldera

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wollenberg, H.; White, A.; Flexser, S.; Sorey, M.; Farrar, C.

    1987-03-01

    To investigate the present-day hydrothermal system, the ''Shady Rest'' hole was continuously cored 715m into the southwestern moat of the Long Valley caldera. The hole intersected 100m of glacial till and 300m of postcaldera rhyolite before entering the welded Bishop Tuff and bottoming in that unit. A sharp temperature rise over the upper 350m, and near-isothermal conditions below reflect the presence of approx.200/sup 0/C water moving through open, calcite-lined fractures in silicified Early Rhyolite and Bishop Tuff. The depth to the Bishop is the shallowest encountered in holes in the caldera, and the temperatures measured are among the hottest observed in wells drilled within the caldera.

  4. Eruptive history and petrochemistry of the Bulusan volcanic complex: Implications for the hydrothermal system and volcanic hazards of Mt. Bulusan, Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delfin, F.G. Jr.; Panem, C.C.; Defant, M.J.

    1993-10-01

    Two contrasting conceptual models of the postcaldera magmatic system of the Bulusan volcanic complex are constructed on the basis of a synthesis of volcanological, petrochemical, and petrologic data. These models predict that hydrothermal convection below the complex will occur either in discrete, structurally-focused zones or over a much broader area. Both models, however, agree that hydrothermal fluids at depth will be highly acidic and volcanic-related. Future ash-fall eruptions and mudflows are likely to affect the area previously chosen for possible drilling. Such risks, combined with the expected acidic character of the hydrothermal system, argue against drilling into this system.

  5. Effects of glacial ice on subsurface temperatures of hydrothermal systems in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming: Fluid-inclusion evidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bargar, K.E.; Fournier, R.O. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA))

    1988-12-01

    Hydrothermal quartz and fluorite crystals containing liquid-rich fluid inclusions (coexisting vapor-rich fluid inclusions were not observed) were found in drill cores from eight relatively shallow research holes drilled by the US Geological Survey in and near major geyser basins of Yellowstone National Park. Homogenization temperatures (T{sub h}) for mostly secondary fluid inclusions show variations in temperature that have occurred at give depths since precipitation of the host minerals. Within major hydrothermal upflow zones, fluid-inclusion T{sub h} values all were found to be equal to or higher (commonly 20-50 C and up to 155 C higher) than present temperatures at the depths sampled. During periods when thick glacial ice covered the Yellowstone National Park region, pore-fluid pressures in the underlying rock were increased in proportion to the weight of the overlying column of ice. Accordingly, theoretical reference boiling-point curves that reflect the maximum temperature attainable in a hot-water geothermal system at a given depth were elevated, and temperatures within zones of major hydrothermal upflow (drill holes Y-2, Y-3, Y-6, Y-11, Y-13, and upper part of Y-5) increased. The thicknesses of ice required to elevate boiling-point curves sufficiently to account for the observed fluid-inclusion T{sub h} values are within the ranges estimated by glacial geologic studies. At the margins of major hydrothermal upflow zones (drill holes Y-4 and Y-9), fluid-inclusion T{sub h} values at given depths range from 57 C lower to about the same as the current temperature measurements because of a previous decrease in the rate of discharge of warm water and/or an increase in the rate of recharge of cold water into the hydrothermal system.

  6. Petrology and geochemistry of Alto Peak, a vapor-cored hydrothermal system, Leyte Province, Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reyes, A.G.; Giggenbach, W.F.; Saleras, J.R.M.; Salonga, N.D.; Vergara, M.C.

    1993-10-01

    Based on detailed petrological information on secondary mineral assemblages and the composition of fluids trapped in inclusions and discharged from five wells, the Alto Peak geothermal field was found to represent a combined vapor and liquid-dominated system. A central core or chimney, with a diameter of about 1 km, a height of some 3 km and occupied by a high gas vapor (1.1 to 5.6 molal CO{sub 2}), is surrounded by an envelope of intermediate salinity water (7,000 mg/kg Cl) with temperatures between 250 and 350 C. The transition from purely vapor-dominated to liquid-dominated zones takes place via two-phase zones occupied by fluid mixtures of highly variable compositions. Much of the lower temperature, mature neutral pH Cl water is likely to have formed during an earlier stage in the evolution of the system. High temperatures of > 300 C, and associated alteration, are limited to wells AP-1D and the lower parts of AP-2D and are ascribed to re-heating by recent magmatic intrusions. The isotopic composition of the well discharges suggests that they contain some 40 to 50% of magmatic water. Alto Peak is considered a typical example of hydrothermal systems associated with many dormant volcanoes.

  7. Laboratory and field-based investigations of subsurface geochemical processes in seafloor hydrothermal systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reeves, Eoghan

    2010-01-01

    This thesis presents the results of four discrete investigations into processes governing the organic and inorganic chemical composition of seafloor hydrothermal fluids in a variety of geologic settings. Though Chapters 2 ...

  8. The role of oxalic acid on the dissolution of granitic sand: an experimental investigation in a hydrothermal flow-through system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Christy Lynn

    1990-01-01

    THE ROLE OF OXALIC ACID ON THE DISSOLUTION OF GRANITIC SAND: AN EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION IN A HYDROTHERMAL FLOW-THROUGH SYSTEM A Thesis by CHRISTY LYNN REED Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1990 Major Subject: Geology THE ROLE OF OXALIC ACID ON THE DISSOLUTION OF GRANITIC SAND: AN EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION IN A HYDROTHERMAL FLOW-THROUGH SYSTEM A Thesis...

  9. Thermodynamics of quantum jump trajectories in systems driven by classical fluctuations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adrian A. Budini

    2010-12-03

    The large-deviation method can be used to study the measurement trajectories of open quantum systems. For optical arrangements this formalism allows to describe the long time properties of the (non-equilibrium) photon counting statistics in the context of a (equilibrium) thermodynamic approach defined in terms of dynamical phases and transitions between them in the trajectory space [J.P. Garrahan and I. Lesanovsky, Phys. Rev. Lett. 104, 160601 (2010)]. In this paper, we study the thermodynamic approach for fluorescent systems coupled to complex reservoirs that induce stochastic fluctuations in their dynamical parameters. In a fast modulation limit the thermodynamics corresponds to that of a Markovian two-level system. In a slow modulation limit, the thermodynamic properties are equivalent to those of a finite system that in an infinite-size limit is characterized by a first-order transition. The dynamical phases correspond to different intensity regimes, while the size of the system is measured by the transition rate of the bath fluctuations. As a function of a dimensionless intensive variable, the first and second derivative of the thermodynamic potential develop an abrupt change and a narrow peak respectively. Their scaling properties are consistent with a double-Gaussian probability distribution of the associated extensive variable.

  10. A model for jumping and bubble waves in the BelousovZhabotinsky-aerosol OT system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Epstein, Irving R.

    of the Oregonator model in order to describe patterns in the BZ-AOT water-in-oil microemulsion system AOT. Vanaga and Irving R. Epsteinb Department of Chemistry, MS 015, Brandeis University, Waltham develop a four-variable model, based on the classic Field­Krös­Noyes mechanism for the oscillatory

  11. Hydrothermal Resources Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

    2012-08-31

    This two-page fact sheet provides an overview of hydrothermal resources and hydrothermal reservoir creation and operation.

  12. A Sr-Isotopic Comparison Between Thermal Waters, Rocks, And Hydrotherm...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Caldera, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A Sr-Isotopic Comparison Between Thermal Waters, Rocks, And Hydrothermal...

  13. Hydrothermal Alteration and Past and Present Thermal Regimes...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Long Valley Caldera Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Hydrothermal Alteration and Past and Present Thermal Regimes in the Western...

  14. Seismic Evidence For A Hydrothermal Layer Above The Solid Roof...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Seismic Evidence For A Hydrothermal Layer Above The Solid Roof Of The Axial Magma Chamber At The Southern East Pacific Rise Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd...

  15. Hydrothermally Deposited Rock | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNewTexas:Hydrothermally Deposited Rock Jump to: navigation,

  16. Structural Settings Of Hydrothermal Outflow- Fracture Permeability...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    long-lived hydrothermal flow despite potential clogging of fractures due to mineral precipitation. As fault systems evolve, propagation, interaction, and linkage of fault segments...

  17. A New Type of Two-Dimensional Metal Coordination Systems: Hydrothermal Synthesis and Properties of the First Oxalate-bpy Mixed-Ligand Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jing

    A New Type of Two-Dimensional Metal Coordination Systems: Hydrothermal Synthesis and Properties, 290 °C; II, 340 °C; III, 350 °C; and IV, 290 °C). Introduction Investigation of novel inorganic-organic hybrid framework assemblies represents one of the most active areas of materials science and chemical

  18. Luminescent nanocrystals in the rare-earth niobate–zirconia system formed via hydrothermal method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirano, Masanori Dozono, Hayato

    2013-08-15

    Luminescent nanocrystals based on the rare-earth niobates (Ln{sub 3}NbO{sub 7}, Ln=Y, Eu) and zirconia (ZrO{sub 2}) that were composed of 50 mol% Ln{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} and 50 mol% ZrO{sub 2}, were hydrothermally formed as cubic phase under weakly basic conditions at 240 °C. The lattice parameter of the as-prepared nanoparticles corresponding to the composition of Y{sub 3?x}Eu{sub x}NbO{sub 7}–4ZrO{sub 2} that was estimated as a single phase of cubic gradually increased as the content of europium x increased. The existence of small absorbance peaks at 395 and 466 nm corresponding to the Eu{sup 3+7}F{sub 0}?{sup 5}L{sub 6}, and {sup 7}F{sub 0}?{sup 5}D{sub 2} excitation transition, respectively, was clearly observed in the diffuse reflectance spectra of the as-prepared samples containing europium. The optical band gap of the as-prepared samples was in the range from 3.5 to 3.7 eV. The photoluminescence spectra of the as-prepared nanocrystals containing europium showed orange and red luminescences with main peaks at 590 and 610 nm, corresponding to {sup 5}D{sub 0}?{sup 7}F{sub 1} and {sup 5}D{sub 0}?{sup 7}F{sub 2} transitions of Eu{sup 3+}, respectively, under excitation at 395 nm Xe lamp. The emission intensity corresponding to {sup 5}D{sub 0}?{sup 7}F{sub 2} transition increased as heat-treatment temperature rose from 800 to 1200 °C. - Graphical abstract: This graphical abstract shows the excitation and emission spectra and a transmission electron microscopy image of nanocrystals (with composition based on the rare-earth niobates (Ln{sub 3}NbO{sub 7}, Ln=Y, Eu) and zirconia (ZrO{sub 2}) that were composed of 50 mol% Ln{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} and 50 mol% ZrO{sub 2}) formed via hydrothermal route. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Nanocrystals composed of 50 mol% Y{sub 3?x}Eu{sub x}NbO{sub 7} and 50 mol% ZrO{sub 2} was directly formed. • The nanocrystals were hydrothermally formed under weakly basic conditions at 240 °C. • The Y{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} showed an UV-blue and broad-band emission under excitation at 240 nm. • The emission is originated from the niobate octahedral group [NbO{sub 6}]{sup 7?}. • The nanocrystals showed orange and red luminescences ({sup 5}D{sub 0}?{sup 7}F{sub 1} and {sup 5}D{sub 0}?{sup 7}F{sub 2} , Eu{sup 3+})

  19. Trace-Element Distribution In An Active Hydrothermal System, Roosevelt Hot

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThin Film SolarTown of Skiatook, OklahomaInformationToyolaUtah

  20. New Evidence On The Hydrothermal System In Long Valley Caldera, California,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII Jump to: navigation,National MarineUSAIDCanaan, Connecticut:NewNewFrom Wells,

  1. Present State of the Hydrothermal System in Long Valley Caldera, California

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly SmartDB-2, BluePoulsen Hybrid,Areas- CovePrescienceGeodetically|

  2. Hydrothermal Liquefaction of Biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2010-12-10

    Hydrothermal liquefaction technology is describes in its relationship to fast pyrolysis of biomass. The scope of work at PNNL is discussed and some intial results are presented. HydroThermal Liquefaction (HTL), called high-pressure liquefaction in earlier years, is an alternative process for conversion of biomass into liquid products. Some experts consider it to be pyrolysis in solvent phase. It is typically performed at about 350 C and 200 atm pressure such that the water carrier for biomass slurry is maintained in a liquid phase, i.e. below super-critical conditions. In some applications catalysts and/or reducing gases have been added to the system with the expectation of producing higher yields of higher quality products. Slurry agents ('carriers') evaluated have included water, various hydrocarbon oils and recycled bio-oil. High-pressure pumping of biomass slurry has been a major limitation in the process development. Process research in this field faded away in the 1990s except for the HydroThermal Upgrading (HTU) effort in the Netherlands, but has new resurgence with other renewable fuels in light of the increased oil prices and climate change concerns. Research restarted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in 2007 with a project, 'HydroThermal Liquefaction of Agricultural and Biorefinery Residues' with partners Archer-Daniels-Midland Company and ConocoPhillips. Through bench-scale experimentation in a continuous-flow system this project investigated the bio-oil yield and quality that could be achieved from a range of biomass feedstocks and derivatives. The project was completed earlier this year with the issuance of the final report. HydroThermal Liquefaction research continues within the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium with the effort focused at PNNL. The bench-scale reactor is being used for conversion of lignocellulosic biomass including pine forest residue and corn stover. A complementary project is an international collaboration with Canada to investigate kelp (seaweed) as a biomass feedstock. The collaborative project includes process testing of the kelp in HydroThermal Liquefaction in the bench-scale unit at PNNL. HydroThermal Liquefaction at PNNL is performed in the hydrothermal processing bench-scale reactor system. Slurries of biomass are prepared in the laboratory from whole ground biomass materials. Both wet processing and dry processing mills can be used, but the wet milling to final slurry is accomplished in a stirred ball mill filled with angle-cut stainless steel shot. The PNNL HTL system, as shown in the figure, is a continuous-flow system including a 1-litre stirred tank preheater/reactor, which can be connected to a 1-litre tubular reactor. The product is filtered at high-pressure to remove mineral precipitate before it is collected in the two high-pressure collectors, which allow the liquid products to be collected batchwise and recovered alternately from the process flow. The filter can be intermittently back-flushed as needed during the run to maintain operation. By-product gas is vented out the wet test meter for volume measurement and samples are collected for gas chromatography compositional analysis. The bio-oil product is analyzed for elemental content in order to calculate mass and elemental balances around the experiments. Detailed chemical analysis is performed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and 13-C nuclear magnetic resonance is used to evaluate functional group types in the bio-oil. Sufficient product is produced to allow subsequent catalytic hydroprocessing to produce liquid hydrocarbon fuels. The product bio-oil from hydrothermal liquefaction is typically a more viscous product compared to fast pyrolysis bio-oil. There are several reasons for this difference. The HTL bio-oil contains a lower level of oxygen because of more extensive secondary reaction of the pyrolysis products. There are less amounts of the many light oxygenates derived from the carbohydrate structures as they have been further reacted to phenolic Aldol condensation products. The bio-oil

  3. Caldera processes and magma-hydrothermal systems continental scientific drilling program: thermal regimes, Valles caldera research, scientific and management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goff, F.; Nielson, D.L. (eds.)

    1986-05-01

    Long-range core-drilling operations and initial scientific investigations are described for four sites in the Valles caldera, New Mexico. The plan concentrates on the period 1986 to 1993 and has six primary objectives: (1) study the origin, evolution, physical/chemical dynamics of the vapor-dominated portion of the Valles geothermal system; (2) investigate the characteristics of caldera fill and mechanisms of caldera collapse and resurgence; (3) determine the physical/chemical conditions in the heat transfer zone between crystallizing plutons and the hydrothermal system; (4) study the mechanism of ore deposition in the caldera environment; (5) develop and test high-temperature drilling techniques and logging tools; and (6) evaluate the geothermal resource within a large silicic caldera. Core holes VC-2a (500 m) and VC-2b (2000 m) are planned in the Sulphur Springs area; these core holes will probe the vapor-dominated zone, the underlying hot-water-dominated zone, the boiling interface and probable ore deposition between the two zones, and the deep structure and stratigraphy along the western part of the Valles caldera fracture zone and resurgent dome. Core hole VC-3 will involve reopening existing well Baca number12 and deepening it from 3.2 km (present total depth) to 5.5 km, this core hole will penetrate the deep-crystallized silicic pluton, investigate conductive heat transfer in that zone, and study the evolution of the central resurgent dome. Core hole VC-4 is designed to penetrate deep into the presumably thick caldera fill in eastern Valles caldera and examine the relationship between caldera formation, sedimentation, tectonics, and volcanism. Core hole VC-5 is to test structure, stratigraphy, and magmatic evolution of pre-Valles caldera rocks, their relations to Valles caldera, and the influences of regional structure on volcanism and caldera formation.

  4. In situ ore formation experiment: Amino acids and amino sugars trapped in artificial chimneys on deep-sea hydrothermal systems at Suiyo Seamount, Izu-Bonin Arc, Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takano,; Marumo,; K.,; Ebashi,; T.,; Gupta,; P., L; Kawahata,; H.,; Kobayashi,; K.,; Yamagishi,; A.,; Kuwabara,; T,

    2013-01-01

    The present study reports on the bio-organic composition of a deep-sea venting hydrothermal system originating from arc volcanism; the origin of the particulates in hydrothermal fluids from the Suiyo Seamount in the southern Izu-Bonin (Ogasawara) Arc is discussed with regard to amino compounds. Chimney samples on deep-sea hydrothermal systems and core samples at Suiyo Seamount were determined for amino acids, and occasionally amino sugars. Two types of chimney samples were obtained from active hydrothermal systems by submersible vehicles: one was natural chimney (NC) on a hydrothermal natural vent; the other was artificial chimneys (AC), mainly formed by the growth and deposition of sulfide-rich particulate components in a Kuwabara-type in situ incubator (KI incubator). Total hydrolyzed amino acids (THAA) and hydrolyzed hexosamines (HA) in AC ranged from 10.7 nmol/g to 64.0 nmol/g and from 0 nmol/g to 8.1 nmol/g, respectively, while THAA in hydrothermally altered core samples ranged from 26.0 nmol/g to 107.4 ...

  5. Hydrothermal spallation drilling and advanced energy conversion technologies for Engineered Geothermal Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Augustine, Chad R

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to study the various factors affecting the economic and technical feasibility of Engineered Geothermal Systems, with a special emphasis on advanced drilling technologies. The first part of ...

  6. Behavior of nuclear waste elements during hydrothermal alteration of glassy rhyolite in an active geothermal system: Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sturchio, N.C.; Seitz, M.G.

    1984-12-31

    The behavior of a group of nuclear waste elements (U, Th, Sr, Zr, Sb, Cs, Ba, and Sm) during hydrothermal alteration of glassy rhyolite is investigated through detailed geochemical analyses of whole rocks, glass and mineral separates, and thermal waters. Significant mobility of U, Sr, Sb, Cs, and Ba is found, and the role of sorption processes in their observed behavior is identified. Th, Zr, and Sm are relatively immobile, except on a microscopic scale. 9 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  7. Quantum jump mechanics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Yu. Samarin

    2015-05-10

    The change with time of the system consisting of the quantum object and the macroscopic measuring instrument is described on the base of the uniform dynamic law, which is suitable both evolution and reduction processes description. It is the integral wave equation with kernel in the form of a path integral. It is shown, that wave function collapse is the specific transformation which is fundamentally differ from Shr\\"odinger's evolution. Specifically, a formal cause of the collapse is a local time derivative (infinite large) of the potential energy. Such transformation can not be described using mathematical apparatus of conventional quantum mechanics.

  8. The BGU/CERN solar hydrothermal reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertolucci, Sergio; Caspers, Fritz; Garb, Yaakov; Gross, Amit; Pauletta, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    We describe a novel solar hydrothermal reactor (SHR) under development by Ben Gurion University (BGU) and the European Organization for Nuclear Research CERN. We describe in broad terms the several novel aspects of the device and, by extension, of the niche it occupies: in particular, enabling direct off-grid conversion of a range of organic feedstocks to sterile useable (solid, liquid) fuels, nutrients, products using only solar energy and water. We then provide a brief description of the high temperature high efficiency panels that provide process heat to the hydrothermal reactor, and review the basics of hydrothermal processes and conversion taking place in this. We conclude with a description of a simulation of the pilot system that will begin operation later this year.

  9. Hydraulic jumps on an incline

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jean-Luc Thiffeault; Andrew Belmonte

    2010-09-01

    When a fluid jet strikes an inclined solid surface at normal incidence, gravity creates a flow pattern with a thick outer rim resembling a parabola and reminiscent of a hydraulic jump. There appears to be little theory or experiments describing simple aspects of this phenomenon, such as the maximum rise height of the fluid above the impact point, and its dependence on jet velocity and inclination angle. We address this with experiments, and present a simple theory based on horizontal hydraulic jumps which accounts for the rise height and its scaling, though without describing the shape of the parabolic envelope.

  10. Hamilton-Jacobi equations with jumps: asymptotic stability

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amir Mahmood; Saima Parveen

    2009-09-05

    The asymptotic stability of a global solution satisfying Hamilton-Jacobi equations with jumps will be analyzed in dependence on the strong dissipativity of the jump control function and using orbits of the differentiable flows to describe the corresponding characteristic system.

  11. Viscous Hydraulic Jumps Submitted by

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bush, John W.M.

    Viscous Hydraulic Jumps Submitted by Jeffrey M. Aristoff, Jeffrey D. Leblanc, Annette E. Hosoi, and John W. M. Bush, Massachusetts Institute of Technology We examine the form of the viscous hydraulic of height 2­10 mm. Elegaard et al.1 first demonstrated that the axial symme- try of the viscous hydraulic

  12. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    order for the hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks. Whole Algae Hydrothermal...

  13. Catalytic Hydrothermal Gasification of Biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2008-05-06

    A recent development in biomass gasification is the use of a pressurized water processing environment in order that drying of the biomass can be avoided. This paper reviews the research undertaken developing this new option for biomass gasification. This review does not cover wet oxidation or near-atmospheric-pressure steam-gasification of biomass. Laboratory research on hydrothermal gasification of biomass focusing on the use of catalysts is reviewed here, and a companion review focuses on non-catalytic processing. Research includes liquid-phase, sub-critical processing as well as super-critical water processing. The use of heterogeneous catalysts in such a system allows effective operation at lower temperatures, and the issues around the use of catalysts are presented. This review attempts to show the potential of this new processing concept by comparing the various options under development and the results of the research.

  14. Park Profiler/Jump Analyzer Practical method for determining terrain park jump performance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . Terrain Park jump safety as a rider/resort partnership II. USTPC criteria: Quantifying best practices in terrain park jump design III. "Park Profiler" - practical tool to measure TP jump IV. "Jump Analyzer of flying ... but, as Icarus leaned the hard way, there are risks. #12;Terrain Park Jump Safety Terrain park

  15. Hydrothermal Exploration Data Gap Analysis Update

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingR Walls -Hydro-PacHydronic Systems:TechnologyHydrothermal

  16. Hydrothermal vents of Yellowstone Lake, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaplinski, M.A.; Morgan, P. (Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff, AZ (United States). Geology Dept.)

    1993-04-01

    Hydrothermal vent systems within Yellowstone Lake are located within the Yellowstone caldera in the northeastern and West Thumb sections of the lake. The vent systems lie within areas of extremely high geothermal gradients (< 1,000 C/km) in the lake sediments and occur as clusters of individual vents that expel both hydrothermal fluids and gas. Regions surrounding the vents are colonized by unique, chemotropic biologic communities and suggest that hydrothermal input plays an important role in the nutrient dynamics of the lake's ecosystem. The main concentration of hydrothermal activity occurs in the northeast region of the main lake body in a number of locations including: (1) along the shoreline from the southern edge of Sedge Bay to the inlet of Pelican Creek; (2) the central portion of the partially submerged Mary Bay phreatic explosion crater, within deep (30--50 m) fissures; (3) along the top of a 3 km long, steep-sided ridge that extends from the southern border of Mary Bay, south-southeast into the main lake basin; and (4) east of Stevenson Island along the lower portion of the slope (50--107 m) into the lake basin, within an anastomosing series of north to northwest trending, narrow troughs or fissures. Hydrothermal vents were also located within, and surrounding the West Thumb of Yellowstone Lake, with the main concentration occurring the offshore of the West Thumb and Potts Geyser Basin. Hydrothermal vents in Yellowstone Lake occur along fractures that have penetrated the lake sediments or along the tops of ridges and near shore areas. Underneath the lake, rising hydrothermal fluids encounter a semi-permeable cap of lake sediments. Upwardly convecting hydrothermal fluid flow may be diverted by the impermeable lake sediments along the buried, pre-existing topography. These fluids may continue to rise along topography until fractures are encountered, or the lake sediment cover is thinned sufficiently to allow egress of the fluids.

  17. Spontaneous azimuthal breakout and instability at the circular hydraulic jump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, Arnab K; Basu, Abhik; Bhattacharjee, Jayanta K

    2015-01-01

    We consider a shallow, two-dimensional flow of a liquid in which the radial and the azimuthal dynamics are coupled to each other. The steady and radial background flow of this system creates an axially symmetric circular hydraulic jump. On this background we apply time-dependent perturbations of the matter flow rate and the azimuthal flow velocity, with the latter strongly localized at the hydraulic jump. The perturbed variables depend spatially on both the radial and azimuthal coordinates. Linearization of the perturbations gives a coupled system of wave equations. The characteristic equations extracted from these wave equations show that under a marginally stable condition a spontaneous breaking of axial symmetry occurs at the position of the hydraulic jump. Departure from the marginal stability shows further that a linear instability develops in the azimuthal direction, resulting in an azimuthal transport of liquid at the hydraulic jump. The time for the growth of azimuthal instability is scaled by viscosi...

  18. Numerical Study of a Turbulent Hydraulic Jump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Qun

    Numerical Study of a Turbulent Hydraulic Jump Qun Zhao, Shubhra Misra, Ib. A. Svendsen and James T of a Turbulent Hydraulic Jump ­ p.1/14 #12;Objective Our ultimate goal is to study the breaking waves. Numerical Study of a Turbulent Hydraulic Jump ­ p.2/14 #12;A moving bore Qiantang Bore China (Courtesy of Dr J

  19. RIDGE JUMP PROCESS IN ICELAND Sebastian GARCIA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 RIDGE JUMP PROCESS IN ICELAND Sebastian GARCIA Freie Universität Berlin ­ Department of Geologie, sgarcia@zedat.fu-berlin.de Abstract Eastward ridge jumps bring the volcanic zones of Iceland back pulses triggers these ridge jumps. One of them is occurring in Southern Iceland, whereas the exact

  20. Hydrothermal Processing of Wet Wastes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 3A—Conversion Technologies III: Energy from Our Waste—Will we Be Rich in Fuel or Knee Deep in Trash by 2025? Hydrothermal Processing of Wet Wastes James R. Oyler, President, Genifuel Corporation

  1. ITN Energy Systems | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNewTexas:HydrothermallyIFB Agro IndustriesISI SolarSystems Jump

  2. Impact-induced hydrothermal activity on early Mars Oleg Abramov and David A. Kring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abramov, Oleg

    Impact-induced hydrothermal activity on early Mars Oleg Abramov and David A. Kring Lunar time for colonization of impact-induced hydrothermal systems by thermophilic organisms, provided they existed on early Mars. The habitable volume reaches a maximum of 6,000 km3 8,500 years after the impact

  3. Non-Markovian Quantum Jump with Generalized Lindblad Master Equation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    X. L. Huang; H. Y. Sun; X. X. Yi

    2008-10-14

    The Monte Carlo wave function method or the quantum trajectory/jump approach is a powerful tool to study dissipative dynamics governed by the Markovian master equation, in particular for high-dimensional systems and when it is difficult to simulate directly. In this paper, we extend this method to the non-Markovian case described by the generalized Lindblad master equation. Two examples to illustrate the method are presented and discussed. The results show that the method can correctly reproduce the dissipative dynamics for the system. The difference between this method and the traditional Markovian jump approach and the computational efficiency of this method are also discussed.

  4. Hydrothermal Liquefaction Treatment Preliminary Hazard Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowry, Peter P.; Wagner, Katie A.

    2015-08-31

    A preliminary hazard assessment was completed during February 2015 to evaluate the conceptual design of the modular hydrothermal liquefaction treatment system. The hazard assessment was performed in 2 stages. An initial assessment utilizing Hazard Identification and Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) techniques identified areas with significant or unique hazards (process safety-related hazards) that fall outside of the normal operating envelope of PNNL and warranted additional analysis. The subsequent assessment was based on a qualitative What-If analysis. This analysis was augmented, as necessary, by additional quantitative analysis for scenarios involving a release of hazardous material or energy with the potential for affecting the public.

  5. Bubble visualization in a simulated hydraulic jump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Witt, Adam; Shen, Lian

    2013-01-01

    This is a fluid dynamics video of two- and three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulations carried out at St. Anthony Falls Laboratory. A transient hydraulic jump is simulated using OpenFOAM, an open source numerical solver. A Volume of Fluid numerical method is employed with a realizable k-epsilon turbulence model. The goal of this research is to model the void fraction and bubble size in a transient hydraulic jump. This fluid dynamics video depicts the air entrainment characteristics and bubble behavior within a hydraulic jump of Froude number 4.82.

  6. JUMP DIFFUSION OPTION WITH TRANSACTION COSTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mocioalca, Oana

    JUMP DIFFUSION OPTION WITH TRANSACTION COSTS "non-systematic" risk, inclusive of transaction costs. We compute the total transac- tion costs and the turnover for different options, transaction costs, and revision intervals

  7. The hydraulic jump as a white hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. E. Volovik

    2005-10-21

    In the geometry of the circular hydraulic jump, the velocity of the liquid in the interior region exceeds the speed of capillary-gravity waves (ripplons), whose spectrum is `relativistic' in the shallow water limit. The velocity flow is radial and outward, and thus the relativistic ripplons cannot propagating into the interior region. In terms of the effective 2+1 dimensional Painleve-Gullstrand metric appropriate for the propagating ripplons, the interior region imitates the white hole. The hydraulic jump represents the physical singularity at the white-hole horizon. The instability of the vacuum in the ergoregion inside the circular hydraulic jump and its observation in recent experiments on superfluid 4He by E. Rolley, C. Guthmann, M.S. Pettersen and C. Chevallier in physics/0508200 are discussed.

  8. The hydraulic jump as a white whole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Volovik, G E

    2005-01-01

    In the geometry of the circular hydraulic jump, the velocity of the liquid in the interior region exceeds the speed of capillary-gravity waves (ripplons), whose spectrum is `relativistic' in the shallow water limit. The velocity flow is radial and outward, and thus the relativistic ripplons cannot propagating into the interior region. In terms of the effective 2+1 dimensional Painleve-Gullstrand metric appropriate for the propagating ripplons, the interior region imitates the `white-hole'. The hydraulic jump represents the physical singularity at the white-hole horizon. The instability of the vacuum in the ergoregion inside the circular hydraulic jump and its observation in recent experiments on superfluid 4He by E. Rolley, C. Guthmann, M.S. Pettersen and C. Chevallier in physics/0508200 are discussed.

  9. A Model For Polygonal Hydraulic Jumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Martens, Erik A; Bohr, Tomas

    2011-01-01

    We propose a phenomenological model for the polygonal hydraulic jumps discovered by Ellegaard et al., based on the known flow structure for the type II hydraulic jumps with a "roller" (separation eddy) near the free surface in the jump region. The model consists of mass conservation and radial force balance between hydrostatic pressure and viscous stresses on the roller surface. In addition, we consider the azimuthal force balance, primarily between pressure and viscosity, but also including non-hydrostatic pressure contributions from surface tension in light of recent observations by Bush et al. The model can be analyzed by linearization around the circular state, resulting in a parameter relationship for nearly circular polygonal states. A truncated, but fully nonlinear version of the model can be solved analytically. This simpler model gives rise to polygonal shapes that are very similar to those observed in experiments, even though surface tension is neglected, and the condition for the existence of a pol...

  10. Hydrothermal Exploration Best Practices and Geothermal Knowledge...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Knowledge Exchange on Openei Abstract Though exploring for hydrothermal resources is not new, advances in exploration technologies and the pursuit of less visible resources have...

  11. Stratigraphy, Structure, Hydrothermal Alteration and Ore Mineralizatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Stratigraphy, Structure, Hydrothermal Alteration and Ore Mineralization Encountered in CSDP (Continental Scientific Drilling Program) Corehole VC-2A, Sulphur Springs Area, Valles...

  12. Fluid-inclusion gas composition from an active magmatic-hydrothermal system: a case study of The Geysers, California geothermal field

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Joseph N.; Norman, David I.; Kennedy, B. Mack.

    2001-01-01

    Ed. . , Active geothermal systems and gold–mercury depositsEd. . , Active Geothermal Systems and Gold– Mercury Depositsassoci- ated geothermal systems, alteration, mineralization,

  13. Heat release by controlled continuous-time Markov jump processes

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paolo Muratore-Ginanneschi; Carlos Mejía-Monasterio; Luca Peliti

    2012-12-17

    We derive the equations governing the protocols minimizing the heat released by a continuous-time Markov jump process on a one-dimensional countable state space during a transition between assigned initial and final probability distributions in a finite time horizon. In particular, we identify the hypotheses on the transition rates under which the optimal control strategy and the probability distribution of the Markov jump problem obey a system of differential equations of Hamilton-Bellman-Jacobi-type. As the state-space mesh tends to zero, these equations converge to those satisfied by the diffusion process minimizing the heat released in the Langevin formulation of the same problem. We also show that in full analogy with the continuum case, heat minimization is equivalent to entropy production minimization. Thus, our results may be interpreted as a refined version of the second law of thermodynamics.

  14. Hydraulic/Shock-Jumps in Protoplanetary Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. C. Boley; R. H. Durisen

    2006-03-10

    In this paper, we describe the nonlinear outcome of spiral shocks in protoplanetary disks. Spiral shocks, for most protoplanetary disk conditions, create a loss of vertical force balance in the post-shock region and result in rapid expansion of the gas perpendicular to the disk midplane. This expansion has characteristics similar to hydraulic jumps, which occur in incompressible fluids. We present a theory to describe the behavior of these hybrids between shocks and hydraulic jumps (shock bores) and then compare the theory to three-dimensional hydrodynamics simulations. We discuss the fully three-dimensional shock structures that shock bores produce and discuss possible consequences for disk mixing, turbulence, and evolution of solids.

  15. Does the side jump effect exist?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sushkov, O P; Mori, M; Maekawa, S

    2012-01-01

    The side-jump effect is a manifestation of the spin orbit interaction in electron scattering from an atom/ion/impurity. The effect has a broad interest because of its conceptual importance for generic spin-orbital physics, in particular the effect is widely discussed in spintronics. We reexamine the effect accounting for the exact nonperturbative electron wave function inside the atomic core. We find that value of the effect is much smaller than estimates accepted in literature. The reduction factor is 1/Z^2, where Z is the nucleus charge of the atom/impurity. This implies that the side-jump effect is practically irrelevant for spintronics, the skew scattering and/or the intrinsic mechanism always dominate the anomalous Hall and spin Hall effects.

  16. Hydrothermal Processing of Macroalgal Feedstocks in Continuous-Flow Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Hart, Todd R.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Rotness, Leslie J.; Roesijadi, Guritno; Zacher, Alan H.; Magnuson, Jon K.

    2014-02-18

    Wet macroalgal slurries can be converted into a biocrude by hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL). High levels of carbon conversion to gravity-separable oil product were accomplished at relatively low temperature (350 ?C) in a pressurized (sub-critical liquid water) environment (20 MPa). As opposed to earlier work in batch reactors reported by others, direct oil recovery was achieved without the use of a solvent and biomass trace mineral components were removed by processing steps so that they did not cause processing difficulties. In addition, catalytic hydrothermal gasification was effectively applied for HTL byproduct water cleanup and fuel gas production from water soluble organics. As a result, high conversion of macroalgae to liquid and gas fuel products was found with low levels of organic contamination in byproduct water. Both process steps were accomplished in continuous-flow reactor systems such that design data for process scale-up was generated.

  17. Biomass reforming processes in hydrothermal media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Andrew A

    2009-01-01

    While hydrothermal technologies offer distinct advantages in being able to process a wide variety of biomass feedstocks, the composition of the feedstock will have a large effect on the processing employed. This thesis ...

  18. Correlation of hydrothermal sericite composition with permeability...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of aqueous species in the geothermal fluids were combined with activity phase diagrams accounting for hydrothermal sericite compositions to determine a pH of 6.1 for the...

  19. Hydrothermal industrialization: direct heat development. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-05-01

    A description of hydrothermal resources suitable for direct applications, their associated temperatures, geographic distribution and developable capacity are given. An overview of the hydrothermal direct-heat development infrastructure is presented. Development activity is highlighted by examining known and planned geothermal direct-use applications. Underlying assumptions and results for three studies conducted to determine direct-use market penetration of geothermal energy are discussed.

  20. Computing the Rates of Measurement-Induced Quantum Jumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Michel Bauer; Denis Bernard; Antoine Tilloy

    2015-06-08

    Small quantum systems can now be continuously monitored experimentally which allows for the reconstruction of quantum trajectories. A peculiar feature of these trajectories is the emergence of jumps between the eigenstates of the observable which is measured. Using the Stochastic Master Equation (SME) formalism for continuous quantum measurements, we show that the density matrix of a system indeed shows a jumpy behavior when it is subjected to a tight measurement (even if the noise in the SME is Gaussian). We are able to compute the jump rates analytically for any system evolution, i.e. any Lindbladian, and we illustrate how our general recipe can be applied to two simple examples. We then discuss the mathematical, foundational and practical applications of our results. The analysis we present is based on a study of the strong noise limit of a class of stochastic differential equations (the SME) and as such the method may be applicable to other physical situations in which a strong noise limit plays a role.

  1. Jump-Diffusion Risk-Sensitive Asset Management II: Jump-Diffusion Factor Model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davis, Mark

    2011-01-01

    In this article we extend earlier work on the jump-diffusion risk-sensitive asset management problem [SIAM J. Fin. Math. (2011) 22-54] by allowing jumps in both the factor process and the asset prices, as well as stochastic volatility and investment constraints. In this case, the HJB equation is a partial integro-differential equation (PIDE). By combining viscosity solutions with a change of notation, a policy improvement argument and classical results on parabolic PDEs we prove that the HJB PIDE admits a unique smooth solution. A verification theorem concludes the resolution of this problem.

  2. Geochemical tracers of processes affecting the formation of seafloor hydrothermal fluids and deposits in the Manus back-arc basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craddock, Paul R

    2009-01-01

    Systematic differences in trace element compositions (rare earth element (REE), heavy metal, metalloid concentrations) of seafloor vent fluids and related deposits from hydrothermal systems in the Manus back-arc basin ...

  3. Chars produced by slow pyrolysis and hydrothermal carbonization vary in carbon sequestration potential and greenhouse gases emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malghani, S; Gleixner, G; Trumbore, SE

    2013-01-01

    of biochar from fast pyrolysis and gasi?cation systems.Effects of slow and fast pyrolysis biochar on soil C and Ncarbonaceous products obtained by pyrolysis and hydrothermal

  4. Electrowetting study of jumping droplets on hydrophobic surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tio, Evelyn

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that jumping-droplet-enhanced condensation has higher heat transfer than state-of-the-art dropwise condensing surfaces by -30-40%. Jumping-droplet condensation occurs due to the conversion of ...

  5. Viscous Undular Hydraulic Jumps of Moderate Reynolds number

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shyamasundar, R.K.

    Viscous Undular Hydraulic Jumps of Moderate Reynolds number Ratul Dasgupta I will present some results on undular hydraulic jumps occurring in a two bores (in rivers), where the interface remains horizontal, the moderate Reynolds hydraulic jump shows a linear increase in height due to viscosity

  6. The solubility of natural quartz sand at 100?C, and 150?C, 345 bars: an experimental investigation in a flow-through hydrothermal system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burns, Gregory Lee

    1989-01-01

    geothermometers and mixing for geothermal systems. Geothermi cs 5, 41-50. Foumier R. O. and Potter R. W. II (1982) An equation correlating the solubility of quartz in water from 25' to 900' C at pressures up to 10, 000 bars, Geochim. Cosrnochim. Acta 46, 1969...

  7. Reconnaissance of the hydrothermal resources of Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rush, F.E.

    1983-01-01

    Geologic factors in the Basin and Range province in Utah are more favorable for the occurrence of geothermal resources than in other areas on the Colorado Plateaus or in the Middle Rocky Mountains. These geologic factors are principally crustal extension and crustal thinning during the last 17 million years. Basalts as young as 10,000 years have been mapped in the area. High-silica volcanic and intrusive rocks of Quaternary age can be used to locate hydrothermal convection systems. Drilling for hot, high-silica, buried rock bodies is most promising in the areas of recent volcanic activity. Southwestern Utah has more geothermal potential than other parts of the Basin and Range province in Utah. The Roosevelt Hot Springs area, the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale area, and the area to the north as far as 60 kilometers from them probably have the best potential for geothermal development for generation of electricity. Other areas with estimated reservoir temperatures greater than 150/sup 0/C are Thermo, Monroe, Red Hill (in the Monroe-Joseph Known Geothermal Resource Area), Joseph Hot Springs, and the Newcastle area. The rates of heat and water discharge are high at Crater, Meadow, and Hatton Hot Springs, but estimated reservoir temperatures there are less than 150/sup 0/C. Additional exploration is needed to define the potential in three additional areas in the Escalante Desert. 28 figs., 18 tabs.

  8. Lift-off dynamics in a simple jumping robot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jeffrey Aguilar; Alex Lesov; Kurt Wiesenfeld; Daniel I. Goldman

    2012-08-30

    We study vertical jumping in a simple robot comprising an actuated mass-spring arrangement. The actuator frequency and phase are systematically varied to find optimal performance. Optimal jumps occur above and below (but not at) the robot's resonant frequency $f_0$. Two distinct jumping modes emerge: a simple jump which is optimal above $f_0$ is achievable with a squat maneuver, and a peculiar stutter jump which is optimal below $f_0$ is generated with a counter-movement. A simple dynamical model reveals how optimal lift-off results from non-resonant transient dynamics.

  9. The Effects of Hydrothermal Agingon a Commercial Cu SCR Catalyst...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrothermal Agingon a Commercial Cu SCR Catalyst Examines the effect of hydrothermal aging on the Nox reduction over a commercial Cu-zeolite SCR catalyst. deer11lee.pdf More...

  10. Calibrated Hydrothermal Parameters, Barrow, Alaska, 2013

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Atchley, Adam; Painter, Scott; Harp, Dylan; Coon, Ethan; Wilson, Cathy; Liljedahl, Anna; Romanovsky, Vladimir

    A model-observation-experiment process (ModEx) is used to generate three 1D models of characteristic micro-topographical land-formations, which are capable of simulating present active thaw layer (ALT) from current climate conditions. Each column was used in a coupled calibration to identify moss, peat and mineral soil hydrothermal properties to be used in up-scaled simulations. Observational soil temperature data from a tundra site located near Barrow, AK (Area C) is used to calibrate thermal properties of moss, peat, and sandy loam soil to be used in the multiphysics Advanced Terrestrial Simulator (ATS) models. Simulation results are a list of calibrated hydrothermal parameters for moss, peat, and mineral soil hydrothermal parameters.

  11. Calibrated Hydrothermal Parameters, Barrow, Alaska, 2013

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Atchley, Adam; Painter, Scott; Harp, Dylan; Coon, Ethan; Wilson, Cathy; Liljedahl, Anna; Romanovsky, Vladimir

    2015-01-29

    A model-observation-experiment process (ModEx) is used to generate three 1D models of characteristic micro-topographical land-formations, which are capable of simulating present active thaw layer (ALT) from current climate conditions. Each column was used in a coupled calibration to identify moss, peat and mineral soil hydrothermal properties to be used in up-scaled simulations. Observational soil temperature data from a tundra site located near Barrow, AK (Area C) is used to calibrate thermal properties of moss, peat, and sandy loam soil to be used in the multiphysics Advanced Terrestrial Simulator (ATS) models. Simulation results are a list of calibrated hydrothermal parameters for moss, peat, and mineral soil hydrothermal parameters.

  12. Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThin FilmUnitedVairexVertVillageVitex Systems Jump to:

  13. Optimal Control of Standing Jump Movements Michael W. Koch, Sigrid Leyendecker

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Leyendecker, Sigrid

    Optimal Control of Standing Jump Movements Michael W. Koch, Sigrid Leyendecker Chair of Applied standing jumping movements, in particular, standing high jumps and standing long jumps are considered. The exemplary investigated jumps are restricted to standing jump movements. Historically, the standing high jump

  14. Hydro unit commitment in hydro-thermal optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, C.; Hsu, E.; Svoboda, A.J.; Tseng, C.; Johnson, R.B. [Pacific Gas and Electric Co., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1997-05-01

    In this paper the authors develop a model and technique for solving the combined hydro and thermal unit commitment problem, taking into full account the hydro unit dynamic constraints in achieving overall economy of power system operation. The combined hydrothermal unit commitment problem is solved by a decomposition and coordination approach. Thermal unit commitment is solved using a conventional Lagrangian relaxation technique. The hydro system is divided into watersheds, which are further broken down into reservoirs. The watersheds are optimized by Network Flow Programming (NFP). Priority-list-based Dynamic Programming is used to solve the Hydro Unit Commitment (HUC) problem at the reservoir level. A successive approximation method is used for updating the marginal water values (Lagrange multipliers) to improve the hydro unit commitment convergence, due to the large size and multiple couplings of water conservation constraints. The integration of the hydro unit commitment into the existing Hydro-Thermal Optimization (HTO) package greatly improves the quality of its solution in the PG and E power system.

  15. Hydrothermal stability of high silica zeolites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, David

    1988-01-01

    This thesis concerns the hydrothermal stability of two zeolite molecular sieves with the MFI structure, ZSM-5 and its 'aluminium free' form silicalite. Silicalite was synthesised from low pH alkali metal free aqueous gels at 95°C and characterised...

  16. ISSN 1745-9648 Gasoline Prices Jump Up on Mondays

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Feigon, Brooke

    ISSN 1745-9648 Gasoline Prices Jump Up on Mondays: an Outcome of Aggressive Competition? by Øystein Research Council is gratefully acknowledged. #12;Gasoline prices jump up on Mondays: An outcome, 2008 Abstract This paper examines Norwegian gasoline pump prices using daily station

  17. Mapping Hydrothermal Upwelling and Outflow Zones: Preliminary...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Results from Two-Meter Temperature Data and Geologic Analysis at Lee Allen Springs and Salt Wells Basin Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  18. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biddy, Mary J.; Davis, Ryan; Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua

    2013-03-31

    In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates the feasibility of using whole wet microalgae as a feedstock for conversion via hydrothermal liquefaction. Technical barriers and key research needs have been assessed in order for the hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range blendstocks.

  19. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing ToolInternationalReport FY2014 -Energy Costs by IncreasingWhole Algae Hydrothermal

  20. Hydrothermal Resources Fact Sheet | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof Energy ServicesContractingManagement »Hydrogen and FuelHydrothermal

  1. Hydrothermal reaction of fly ash. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, P.W.

    1994-12-31

    The reactions which occur when fly ash is treated under hydrothermal conditions were investigated. This was done for the following primary reasons. The first of these is to determine the nature of the phases that form to assess the stabilities of these phases in the ambient environment and, finally, to assess whether these phases are capable of sequestering hazardous species. The second reason for undertaking this study was whether, depending on the composition of the ash and the presence of selected additives, it would be possible under hydrothermal conditions to form compounds which have cementitious properties. Formation of four classes of compounds, which bracket likely fly ash compositional ranges, were selected for study. The classes are calcium silicate hydrates, calcium selenates, and calcium aluminosulfates, and silicate-based glasses. Specific compounds synthesized were determined and their stability regions assessed. As part of stability assessment, the extent to which selected hazardous species are sequestered was determined. Finally, the cementing properties of these compounds were established. The results obtained in this program have demonstrated that mild hydrothermal conditions can be employed to improve the reactivity of fly ash. Such improvements in reactivity can result in the formation of monolithic forms which may exhibit suitable mechanical properties for selected applications as building materials. If the ashes involved are considered hazardous, the mechanical properties exhibited indicated the forms could be handled in a manner which facilitates their disposal.

  2. One Jump Ahead: Interspecies Interations and Distribution of Jumping Spiders on Mo'orea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pena, Danielle L

    2009-01-01

    Unlike continents, an island system such as Mo’orea oftenflora and fauna. In island systems, these relationships can

  3. Jumping-Droplet-Enhanced Condensation on Scalable Superhydrophobic Nanostructured Surfaces

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miljkovic, Nenad

    When droplets coalesce on a superhydrophobic nanostructured surface, the resulting droplet can jump from the surface due to the release of excess surface energy. If designed properly, these superhydrophobic nanostructured ...

  4. The Hydrothermal Outflow Plume of Valles Caldera, New Mexico...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    are parents to mixed fluids flowing in the hydrothermal plume. However, isotopic data, borehole data, basic geology, and inverse relations between temperature and chloride...

  5. Altered Tectonic and Hydrothermal Breccias in Corehole VC-1,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    origin. Hydrothermal breccias and associated crackle zones or stockworks created by hydraulic fracturing can provide significant secondary permeability, as demonstrated by...

  6. Robust optimization based self scheduling of hydro-thermal Genco ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dec 29, 2013 ... Abstract: This paper proposes a robust optimization model for optimal self scheduling of a hydro-thermal generating company. The proposed ...

  7. Gravity-free hydraulic jumps and metal femtocups

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rama Govindarajan; Manikandan Mathur; Ratul DasGupta; N. R. Selvi; Neena Susan John; G. U. Kulkarni

    2006-10-03

    Hydraulic jumps created by gravity are seen every day in the kitchen sink. We show that at small scales a circular hydraulic jump can be created in the absence of gravity, by surface tension. The theory is motivated by our experimental finding of a height discontinuity in spreading submicron molten metal droplets created by pulsed-laser ablation. By careful control of initial conditions, we show that this leads to solid femtolitre cups of gold, silver, copper, niobium and tin.

  8. Chemical Potential Jump during Evaporation of a Quantum Bose Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    E. A. Bedrikova; A. V. Latyshev

    2013-01-07

    The dependence of the chemical potential jump coefficient on the evaporation coefficient is analyzed for the case in which the evaporating component is a Bose gas. The concentration of the evaporating component is assumed to be much lower than the concentration of the carrier gas. The expression for the chemical potential jump is derived from the analytic solution of the problem for the case in which the collision frequency of molecules of the evaporating component is constant.

  9. Construction plans jump; operations skid in 1996

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    True, W.R.

    1997-08-04

    Federally regulated oil and gas pipelines turned in mixed performances in 1996, a review of annual reports filed with the US Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) shows. Plans for new pipeline construction, filed with both the FERC and Canadian regulatory bodies, increased during a 12-month period ending June 30, 1997. Natural-gas pipeline operating companies increased their operating revenues but saw their incomes fall; oil pipelines saw both revenues and incomes fall sharply as deliveries were flat. Major natural-gas pipelines slightly increased the amounts of gas they moved for a fee and decreased gas sold out of their systems. In 1996, liquids pipelines moved fewer barrels than a year earlier and reduced in all categories the miles of line operated. Each year in this exclusive report, Oil and Gas Journal tracks revenues and incomes earned from operations along with volumes moved, as submitted to the FERC by US regulated interstate pipeline companies. Data are presented on the following: pipeline revenues, incomes--1996; North American pipeline-construction costs; US pipeline costs--estimated vs. actual; North American compressor construction costs; US compressor costs--estimated vs. actual; Canadian pipeline-construction costs, actual; US interstate mileage; investment in liquids pipelines; 10 years of land-construction costs; top 10 interstate liquids lines; top 10 interstate gas lines; liquids pipeline companies; and gas pipeline companies.

  10. Hydrothermal changes related to earthquake activity at Mud Volcano, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitt, A.M.; Hutchinson, R.A.

    1982-04-10

    The Mud Volcano hydrothermal area in Yellowstone National Park is near the intersection of a 20-km-long zone of northeast trending normal faults with the eastern resurgent dome within the 600,000-year-odd Yellowstone caldera. Recent crustal uplift along the northeast trending axis of the caldera is at a maximum (700 mm since 1923) near the Mud Volcano area. From 1973 through April 1978, less than 10 earthquakes (largest M 2.4) were located within 3 km of the Mud Volcano area. In May 1978, earthquakes began occurring beneath the hydrothermal area at depths of 1 to 5 km. The seismic activity continued until the end of November with intense swarms (100 events per hour) occurring on October 23 and November 7. The largest event (M 3.1) occured on November 14 and at least 8 events were M 2.5 or larger. In December 1978, heat flux in the Mud Volcano hydrothermal features began increasing along a 2-km-long northeast trending zone. Existing mud cauldrons became more active, new mud cauldrons and fumeroles were formed, and vegetation (primarily lodgepole pine) was killed by increased soil temperature. The increase in heat flux continued through July 1979 then gradually declined, reaching the early 1978 level by June 1980. The spatial and temporal association of earthquakes and increased hydrothermal activity at Mud Volcano suggests that the seismic activity expanded preexisting fracture systems, premitting increased fluid flow from depths of several kilometers.

  11. Automated high pressure cell for pressure jump x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, Nicholas J.; Gauthe, Beatrice L. L. E.; Templer, Richard H.; Ces, Oscar; Seddon, John M.; Terrill, Nick J.; Rogers, Sarah E.

    2010-06-15

    A high pressure cell for small and wide-angle x-ray diffraction measurements of soft condensed matter samples has been developed, incorporating a fully automated pressure generating network. The system allows both static and pressure jump measurements in the range of 0.1-500 MPa. Pressure jumps can be performed as quickly as 5 ms, both with increasing and decreasing pressures. Pressure is generated by a motorized high pressure pump, and the system is controlled remotely via a graphical user interface to allow operation by a broad user base, many of whom may have little previous experience of high pressure technology. Samples are loaded through a dedicated port allowing the x-ray windows to remain in place throughout an experiment; this facilitates accurate subtraction of background scattering. The system has been designed specifically for use at beamline I22 at the Diamond Light Source, United Kingdom, and has been fully integrated with the I22 beamline control systems.

  12. Hydrothermal synthesis of hexagonal magnesium hydroxide nanoflakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Qiang, E-mail: qwchem@gmail.com [Laboratory for Micro-sized Functional Materials and College of Elementary Education, Capital Normal University, Beijing 100048 (China); Li, Chunhong [National Laboratory for Superconductivity, Institute of Physics and Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Guo, Ming [Laboratory for Micro-sized Functional Materials and College of Elementary Education, Capital Normal University, Beijing 100048 (China); Sun, Lingna [ShenZhen Key Laboratory of Functional Polymer, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Hu, Changwen [Key Laboratory of Cluster Science of Ministry of Education of China, The Institute for Chemical Physics and Department of Chemistry, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: Hexagonal Mg(OH){sub 2} nanoflakes were synthesized via hydrothermal method in the presence of PEG-20,000. Results show that PEG-20,000 plays an important role in the formation of this kind of nanostructure. The SAED patterns taken from the different positions on a single hexagonal Mg(OH){sub 2} nanoflake yielded different crystalline structures. The structure of the nanoflakes are polycrystalline and the probable formation mechanism of Mg(OH){sub 2} nanoflakes is discussed. - Highlights: • Hexagonal Mg(OH){sub 2} nanoflakes were synthesized via hydrothermal method. • PEG-20,000 plays an important role in the formation of hexagonal nanostructure. • Mg(OH){sub 2} nanoflakes show different crystalline structures at different positions. • The probable formation mechanism of hexagonal Mg(OH){sub 2} nanoflakes was reported. - Abstract: Hexagonal magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH){sub 2}) nanoflakes were successfully synthesized via hydrothermal method in the presence of the surfactant polyethylene glycol 20,000 (PEG-20,000). Results show that PEG-20,000 plays an important role in the formation of this kind of nanostructure. The composition, morphologies and structure of the Mg(OH){sub 2} nanoflakes were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and selected area electron diffraction (SAED). The SAED patterns taken from the different positions on a single hexagonal Mg(OH){sub 2} nanoflake show different crystalline structures. The structure of the nanoflakes are polycrystalline and the probable formation mechanism of Mg(OH){sub 2} nanoflakes is discussed. Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) analysis were performed to investigate the porous structure and surface area of the as-obtained nanoflakes.

  13. Hydrothermal synthesis, characterization and up/down-conversion luminescence of barium rare earth fluoride nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jia, Li-Ping; Zhang, Qiang [Department of Chemistry, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse (Tongji University) (China); Yan, Bing, E-mail: byan@tongji.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse (Tongji University) (China)

    2014-07-01

    Graphical abstract: Lanthanide ions doped bare earth rare earth fluoride nanocrystals are synthesized by hydrothermal technology and characterized. The down/up-conversion luminescence of them are discussed. - Highlights: • Mixed hydrothermal system H{sub 2}O–OA (EDA)–O-A(LO-A) is used for synthesis. • Barium rare earth fluoride nanocrystals are synthesized comprehensively. • Luminescence for down-conversion and up-conversion are obtained for these systems. - Abstract: Mixed hydrothermal system H{sub 2}O–OA (EDA)–O-A(LO-A) is developed to synthesize barium rare earth fluorides nanocrystals (OA = oleylamine, EDA = ethylenediamine, O-A = oleic acid and LO-A = linoleic acid). They are presented as BaREF{sub 5} (RE = Ce, Pr, Nd, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Y, Tm, Lu) and Ba{sub 2}REF{sub 7} (RE = La, Sm, Ho, Er, Yb). The influence of reaction parameters (rare earth species, hydrothermal system and temperature) is checked on the phase and shape evolution of the fluoride nanocrystals. It is found that reaction time and temperature of these nanocrystals using EDA (180 °C, 6 h) is lower than those of them using OA (220 °C, 10 h). The photoluminescence properties of these fluorides activated by some rare earth ions (Nd{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}) are studied, and especially up-conversion luminescence of the four fluoride nanocrystal systems (Ba{sub 2}LaF{sub 7}:Yb, Tm(Er), Ba{sub 2}REF{sub 7}:Yb, Tm(Er) (RE = Gd, Y, Lu)) is observed.

  14. ILLITE-SMECTITE MIXED-LAYER MINERALS IN HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF VOLCANIC ROCKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    diagenesis, low-grade metamorphism, contact metamorphism and hydrothermal alteration. Despite extensive

  15. SHORT COMMUNICATION Dynamical analysis of winter terrain park jumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    of this work is to show how a dynamical analysis can assess impact injury risks and inform safer terrain park frequently pose a hazard to patrons and may represent a significant liability risk to winter resorts. By performing a simple dynamic analysis of terrain park jumps, the relative risk to impact injuries for any

  16. Peak-Jumping Frequent Itemset Mining Nele Dexters1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Van Gucht, Dirk

    Peak-Jumping Frequent Itemset Mining Algorithms Nele Dexters1 , Paul W. Purdom2 , and Dirk Van Gucht2 1 Departement Wiskunde-Informatica, Universiteit Antwerpen, Belgium, nele.dexters@ua.ac.be, 2. We analyze algorithms that, under the right circumstances, permit efficient mining for frequent

  17. Chemical and isotopic characteristics of the coso east flank hydrothermal

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButte County,Camilla,Thermal GradientChateau Tebeau LLC JumpSystem at Long

  18. Hydrothermally Altered Rock | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNewTexas:

  19. Self-excited hydrothermal waves in evaporating sessile drops 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sefiane K.; Moffat J.R.; Matar O.K.; Craster R.V.

    2008-08-01

    Pattern formation driven by the spontaneous evaporation of sessile drops of methanol, ethanol, and FC-72 using infrared thermography is observed and, in certain cases, interpreted in terms of hydrothermal waves. Both ...

  20. Direct use of hydrothermal energy: a review of environmental aspects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Banion, K.; Layton, D.

    1981-08-28

    The potential environmental impacts of the exploration, development, and production of hydrothermal geothermal energy for direct use applications are reviewed and evaluated. Mitigation strategies and research and development needs are included. (MHR)

  1. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction: 2014 State of Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Anderson, Daniel; Hallen, Richard T.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Elliott, Douglas C.

    2014-07-30

    This report describes the base case yields and operating conditions for converting whole microalgae via hydrothermal liquefaction and upgrading to liquid fuels. This serves as the basis against which future technical improvements will be measured.

  2. Rational control of hydrothermal nanowire synthesis and its applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joo, Jaebum

    2010-01-01

    Hydrothermal nanowire synthesis is a rapidly emerging nanowire discipline that enables low temperature growth and batch process. It has a major impact on the development of novel energy conversion devices, high density ...

  3. Insider Models with Finite Utility in Markets with Jumps

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kohatsu-Higa, Arturo; Yamazato, Makoto

    2011-10-15

    In this article we consider, under a Levy process model for the stock price, the utility optimization problem for an insider agent whose additional information is the final price of the stock blurred with an additional independent noise which vanishes as the final time approaches. Our main interest is establishing conditions under which the utility of the insider is finite. Mathematically, the problem entails the study of a 'progressive' enlargement of filtration with respect to random measures. We study the jump structure of the process which leads to the conclusion that in most cases the utility of the insider is finite and his optimal portfolio is bounded. This can be explained financially by the high risks involved in models with jumps.

  4. Analysis and Improvements of Fringe Jump Corrections by Electronics on the JET Tokamak FIR Interferometer

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Analysis and Improvements of Fringe Jump Corrections by Electronics on the JET Tokamak FIR Interferometer

  5. Fast MCMC sampling for Markov jump processes and extensions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bach, Francis

    Fast MCMC sampling for Markov jump processes and extensions Vinayak Rao and Yee Whye Teh Rao-backward, Baum-Welch. V Rao and Y W Teh (Mar 2013) Fast MCMC for MJPs 2 / 41 #12;Continuous-Time Hidden Markov state i V Rao and Y W Teh (Mar 2013) Fast MCMC for MJPs 3 / 41 #12;Predator-Prey (Lotka-Volterra) Model

  6. Methods to enhance the characteristics of hydrothermally prepared slurry fuels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Chris M. (Shakopee, MN); Musich, Mark A. (Grand Forks, ND); Mann, Michael D. (Thompson, ND); DeWall, Raymond A. (Grand Forks, ND); Richter, John J. (Grand Forks, ND); Potas, Todd A. (Plymouth, MN); Willson, Warrack G. (Fairbanks, AK)

    2000-01-01

    Methods for enhancing the flow behavior and stability of hydrothermally treated slurry fuels. A mechanical high-shear dispersion and homogenization device is used to shear the slurry fuel. Other improvements include blending the carbonaceous material with a form of coal to reduce or eliminate the flocculation of the slurry, and maintaining the temperature of the hydrothermal treatment between approximately 300.degree. to 350.degree. C.

  7. Jumping-Droplet-Enhanced Condensation on Scalable Superhydrophobic Nanostructured Surfaces

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miljkovic, N; Enright, R; Nam, Y; Lopez, K; Dou, N; Sack, J; Wang, E

    2012-01-01

    When droplets coalesce on a superhydrophobic nanostructured surface, the resulting droplet can jump from the surface due to the release of excess surface energy. If designed properly, these superhydrophobic nanostructured surfaces can not only allow for easy droplet removal at micrometric length scales during condensation but also promise to enhance heat transfer performance. However, the rationale for the design of an ideal nanostructured surface as well as heat transfer experiments demonstrating the advantage of this jumping behavior are lacking. Here, we show that silanized copper oxide surfaces created via a simple fabrication method can achieve highly efficient jumping-droplet condensation heat transfer. We experimentally demonstrated a 25% higher overall heat flux and 30% higher condensation heat transfer coefficient compared to state-of-the-art hydrophobic condensing surfaces at low supersaturations (<1.12). This work not only shows significant condensation heat transfer enhancement but also promises a low cost and scalable approach to increase efficiency for applications such as atmospheric water harvesting and dehumidification. Furthermore, the results offer insights and an avenue to achieve high flux superhydrophobic condensation.

  8. Hydrothermally altered and fractured granite as an HDR reservoir in the EPS-1 borehole, Alsace,

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Genter, A.; Traineau, H.

    1992-01-01

    As part of the European Hot Dry Rocks Project, a second exploration borehole, EPS-1, has been cored to a depth of 2227 m at Soultz-sous-Forets (France). The target was a granite beginning at 1417 m depth, overlain by post-Paleozoic sedimentary cover. Structural analysis and petrographic examination of the 800-m porphyritic granite core, have shown that this rock has undergone several periods of hydrothermal alteration and fracturing. More than 3000 natural structures were recorded, whose distribution pattern shows clusters where low-density fracture zones (less than 1 per meter) alternate with zones of high fracture density (more than 20 per meter). Vein alteration, ascribed to paleohydrothermal systems, developed within the hydrothermally altered and highly fractured zones, transforming primary biotite and plagioclase into clay minerals. One of these zones at 2.2 km depth produced a hot-water outflow during coring, indicating the existence of a hydrothermal reservoir. Its permeability is provided by the fracture network and by secondary porosity of the granitic matrix resulting from vein alteration. This dual porosity in the HDR granite reservoir must be taken into account in the design of the heat exchanger, both for modeling the water-rock interactions and for hydraulic testing.

  9. Structural Settings Of Hydrothermal Outflow- Fracture Permeability

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS ReportEurope GmbHSoloPageBeforeCreek WindInsulated Panel

  10. Hydrovolt Energy Systems | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNewTexas:Hydrothermally Deposited Rock Jump to:

  11. Jump Steady Resort Space Heating Low Temperature Geothermal Facility | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy ResourcesOrder atHills,New York: EnergyUnlimitedEnergy Information Jump

  12. Hydrothermal corrosion of SiC in LWR coolant environments in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article: Hydrothermal corrosion of SiC in LWR coolant environments in the absence of irradiation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Hydrothermal corrosion of SiC in LWR...

  13. Distal transport of dissolved hydrothermal iron in the deep South Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzsimmons, Jessica N.

    Until recently, hydrothermal vents were not considered to be an important source to the marine dissolved Fe (dFe) inventory because hydrothermal Fe was believed to precipitate quantitatively near the vent site. Based on ...

  14. Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes Print Wednesday, 29 April 2009 00:00...

  15. Making Things Clearer: Exaggeration, Jumping the Gun, and The Venus Syndrome

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hansen, James E.

    1 Making Things Clearer: Exaggeration, Jumping the Gun, and The Venus Syndrome 15 April 2013 James. Jumping the Gun It has been said that I reach conclusions before the evidence warrants them. Two examples

  16. Hydro-thermal flow in a rough fracture EC Contract SES6-CT-2003-502706

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toussaint, Renaud

    Hydro-thermal flow in a rough fracture EC Contract SES6-CT-2003-502706 PARTICIPANT ORGANIZATION NAME: CNRS Synthetic 2nd year report Related with Work Package............ HYDRO-THERMAL FLOW in the influence of a realistic geometry of the fracture on its hydro-thermal response. Several studies have

  17. Precautionary Measures for Credit Risk Management in Jump Models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Egami, Masahiko

    2011-01-01

    Sustaining efficiency and stability by properly controlling the equity to asset ratio is one of the most important and difficult challenges in bank management. Due to unexpected and abrupt decline of asset values, a bank must closely monitor its net worth as well as market conditions, and one of its important concerns is when to raise more capital so as not to violate capital adequacy requirements. In this paper, we model the tradeoff between avoiding costs of delay and premature capital raising, and solve the corresponding optimal stopping problem. In order to model defaults in a bank's loan/credit business portfolios, we represent its net worth by Levy processes, and solve explicitly for the double exponential jump diffusion process and for a general spectrally negative Levy process.

  18. Markov Jump Processes Approximating a Non-Symmetric Generalized Diffusion

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Limic, Nedzad

    2011-08-15

    Consider a non-symmetric generalized diffusion X( Dot-Operator ) in Double-Struck-Capital-R {sup d} determined by the differential operator A(x) = -{Sigma}{sub ij} {partial_derivative}{sub i}a{sub ij}(x){partial_derivative}{sub j} + {Sigma}{sub i} b{sub i}(x){partial_derivative}{sub i}. In this paper the diffusion process is approximated by Markov jump processes X{sub n}( Dot-Operator ), in homogeneous and isotropic grids G{sub n} Subset-Of Double-Struck-Capital-R {sup d}, which converge in distribution in the Skorokhod space D([0,{infinity}), Double-Struck-Capital-R {sup d}) to the diffusion X( Dot-Operator ). The generators of X{sub n}( Dot-Operator ) are constructed explicitly. Due to the homogeneity and isotropy of grids, the proposed method for d{>=}3 can be applied to processes for which the diffusion tensor {l_brace}a{sub ij}(x){r_brace}{sub 11}{sup dd} fulfills an additional condition. The proposed construction offers a simple method for simulation of sample paths of non-symmetric generalized diffusion. Simulations are carried out in terms of jump processes X{sub n}( Dot-Operator ). For piece-wise constant functions a{sub ij} on Double-Struck-Capital-R {sup d} and piece-wise continuous functions a{sub ij} on Double-Struck-Capital-R {sup 2} the construction and principal algorithm are described enabling an easy implementation into a computer code.

  19. NUMERICAL STUDY OF A TURBULENT HYDRAULIC JUMP Qun Zhao 1 Shubhra K. Misra1

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhao, Qun

    . Hydraulic jumps are commonly used as energy dissipators and they have been studied intensively by hydraulicNUMERICAL STUDY OF A TURBULENT HYDRAULIC JUMP Qun Zhao 1 Shubhra K. Misra1 Ib A. Svendsen 1 (Member of a turbulent hydraulic jump. The numerical model is based on RIPPLE (Kothe et al., 1994) with two turbulence

  20. Jump Flooding in GPU with Applications to Voronoi Diagram and Distance Transform Guodong Rong

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tan, Tiow Seng

    Jump Flooding in GPU with Applications to Voronoi Diagram and Distance Transform Guodong Rong Tiow of the jump flooding algorithm is shown in the other six pictures, with the rightmost being the computed Voronoi diagram. Abstract This paper studies jump flooding as an algorithmic paradigm in the general

  1. Edit: Study -APP Save | Exit | Hide/Show Errors | Print... | Jump To

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Biederman, Irving

    Edit: Study - APP Save | Exit | Hide/Show Errors | Print... | Jump To: 01. Project Guidance Save | Exit | Hide/Show Errors | Print... | Jump To: 01. Project IdentificationStarDev/ResourceAdministration/Project/ProjectEditor?Project=com... 1 #12;Edit: Study - APP- Save | Exit | Hide/Show Errors | Print... | Jump To: 02. Study

  2. Hydrothermal venting of greenhouse gases triggering Early Jurassic global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svensen, Henrik

    Hydrothermal venting of greenhouse gases triggering Early Jurassic global warming Henrik Svensen a carbon cycle. The event lasted for approximately 200,000 years and was manifested by a global warming, and the Toarcian global warming. © 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: climate change; Toarcian

  3. Quantum Jump from Singularity to Outside of Black Hole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dündar, Furkan Semih

    2015-01-01

    Considering the role of black hole singularity in quantum evolution, a resolution to the firewall paradox is presented. It is emphasized that if an observer has the singularity as a part of his spacetime, then the semi-classical evolution would be non-unitary as viewed by him. Specifically, a free-falling observer inside the black hole would have a Hilbert space with non-unitary evolution; a quantum jump for particles encountering the singularity to outside of the horizon as part of late radiations in black hole evaporation. Accordingly, we elaborate the first postulate of black hole complementarity: freely falling observers who pass through the event horizon would have non-unitarity evolutions. The non-unitary evolution is such that it does not have physically measurable effects for them. Besides, no information would be lost in singularity. Taking the modified picture into account, the firewall paradox {can be} resolved, respecting No Drama. A by-product of our modification is that roughly half of the mass ...

  4. Geographic Information System At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    over the Dixie Valley hydrothermal convection system, and if so, are they related with soil geochemical, vegetal-spectral, soil spectral, and biogeochemical anomalies. Other goals...

  5. Register now at career.ucla.edu/JumpStart The JumpStart Series is a fee-based program open to currently registered UCLA students.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ferguson, Thomas S.

    . Blogs Winter 2015 Internship Search Wednesday, January 7, 4-7pm Engineering / Technology / Consulting-7pm Graduate Student JumpStart Engineering and Technology Thursday, Oct 16, 4-7pm #12;

  6. Ionic liquid assisted hydrothermal fabrication of hierarchically organized ?-AlOOH hollow sphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Zhe; Liu, Yunqi; Li, Guangci; Hu, Xiaofu; Liu, Chenguang

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: ? The ?-AlOOH hollow spheres were synthesized via an ionic liquid-assisted hydrothermal treatment. ? Ionic liquid plays an important role in the morphology of the product. ? Ionic liquid can be easily removed from the product and reused in next experiment. ? A “aggregation–solution–recrystallization” formation mechanism may occur in the system. -- Abstract: Hierarchically organized ?-AlOOH hollow spheres with nanoflake-like porous surface texture have been successfully synthesized via an ionic liquid-assisted hydrothermal synthesis method in citric acid monohydrate (CAMs). It was found that ionic liquid [bmim]{sup +}Cl{sup ?} played an important role in the morphology of the product due to its strong interactions with reaction particles. The samples were characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The results show that the product has narrow particle size distribution (500–900 nm particle diameter range), high specific surface area (240.5 m{sup 2}/g) and large pore volume (0.61 cm{sup 3}/g). The corresponding ?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} hollow spheres can be obtained by calcining it at 550 °C for 3 h. The proposed formation mechanism and other influencing factors of the ?-AlOOH hollow sphere material, such as reaction temperature, reaction duration, CAMs and urea, have also been investigated.

  7. Process Development for Hydrothermal Liquefaction of Algae Feedstocks in a Continuous-Flow Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Hart, Todd R.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Rotness, Leslie J.; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Zacher, Alan H.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Hallen, Richard T.; Holladay, Johnathan E.

    2013-10-01

    Wet algae slurries can be converted into an upgradeable biocrude by hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL). High levels of carbon conversion to gravity-separable biocrude product were accomplished at relatively low temperature (350 ?C) in a continuous-flow, pressurized (sub-critical liquid water) environment (20 MPa). As opposed to earlier work in batch reactors reported by others, direct oil recovery was achieved without the use of a solvent and biomass trace components were removed by processing steps so that they did not cause process difficulties. High conversions were obtained even with high slurry concentrations of up to 35 wt% of dry solids. Catalytic hydrotreating was effectively applied for hydrodeoxygenation, hydrodenitrogenation, and hydrodesulfurization of the biocrude to form liquid hydrocarbon fuel. Catalytic hydrothermal gasification was effectively applied for HTL byproduct water cleanup and fuel gas production from water soluble organics, allowing the water to be considered for recycle of nutrients to the algae growth ponds. As a result, high conversion of algae to liquid hydrocarbon and gas products was found with low levels of organic contamination in the byproduct water. All three process steps were accomplished in bench-scale, continuous-flow reactor systems such that design data for process scale-up was generated.

  8. Property:IdentifiedHydrothermalPotential | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo,AltFuelVehicle2 Jump to: navigation, search ThisHeadquartersState Jump

  9. Property:UndiscoveredHydrothermalPotential | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource HistoryPotentialRuralUtilityScalePVGeneration Jump to:SpatialResolution JumpTypes

  10. Hydrothermal synthesis and characterization of zirconia based catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caillot, T. Salama, Z.; Chanut, N.; Cadete Santos Aires, F.J.; Bennici, S.; Auroux, A.

    2013-07-15

    In this work, three equimolar mixed oxides ZrO{sub 2}/CeO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}/La{sub 2}O{sub 3} and a reference ZrO{sub 2} have been synthesized by hydrothermal method. The structural and surface properties of these materials have been fully characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, surface area measurement, chemical analysis, XPS, infrared spectroscopy after adsorption of pyridine and adsorption microcalorimetry of NH{sub 3} and SO{sub 2} probe molecules. All investigated mixed oxides are amphoteric and possess redox centers on their surface. Moreover, hydrothermal synthesis leads to catalysts with higher surface area and with better acid–base properties than classical coprecipitation method. Both Lewis and Brønsted acid sites are present on the surface of the mixed oxides. Compared to the other samples, the ZrO{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2} material appears to be the best candidate for further application in acid–base catalysis. - Graphical abstract: Mesoporous amorphous phase with a high surface area of titania zirconia mixed oxide obtained by hydrothermal preparation. - Highlights: • Three zirconia based catalysts and a reference were prepared by hydrothermal synthesis. • Mixed oxides present larger surface areas than the reference ZrO{sub 2}. • ZrO{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2} catalyst presents a mesoporous structure with high surface area. • ZrO{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2} catalyst presents simultaneously strong acidic and basic properties.

  11. Hydrothermal Exploration Data Gap Analysis Update | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool Fits the Bill FinancingDepartmentDatabase| Department ofHydropowerHydrothermal

  12. The Shallow Hydrothermal System of Long Valley Caldera, California | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013) |InformationThe Needles GeothermalFinance |RuhlinEnergy

  13. Ecological and Geochemical Aspects of Terrestrial Hydrothermal Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forrest, Matthew James

    exploitation of nearby geothermal energy resources. Dixieexploitation of nearby geothermal energy resources. In Napachange (USFWS, 2009), geothermal energy development (BLM,

  14. Ecological and Geochemical Aspects of Terrestrial Hydrothermal Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forrest, Matthew James

    Yellowstone Ecosystem, A. boreas breed predominantly in geothermalYellowstone Ecosystem, A. boreas breed predominantly in geothermalYellowstone Ecosystem, A. boreas breed predominantly in geothermal

  15. Inferences On The Hydrothermal System Beneath The Resurgent Dome...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    around 1980 and has included periods of intense seismicity and ground deformation. Uplift totaling more than 0.7 m has been centered on the caldera's resurgent dome, and is...

  16. Trace-Element Distribution In An Active Hydrothermal System,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    trace-element dispersion patterns. Multielement analyses of surface rock samples, soil samples and drill cuttings from deep exploration wells provide a three-dimensional...

  17. Mapping the Hydrothermal System Beneath the Western Moat of Long...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    under the Magma Energy Program, and by the DOE Office of Energy Research, Division of Engineering and Geosciences (DEG), along with the USGS and NSE, under the Continental...

  18. Hydrothermal systems on Mars:an assessment of present evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farmer, Jack D.

    , and as a possible origin for iron oxide-rich spectralunits on the floorsof somerifted basins (chasmata of methods developed by the mining industry to look for similar deposits on Earth. But Earth

  19. Geochemical Modeling of the Near-Surface Hydrothermal System...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in petrographic studies. Results of this study show that the mineralogy and fluid chemistry observed in the shallow reservoir at Long Valley caldera are formed in an open...

  20. Relations Of Ammonium Minerals At Several Hydrothermal Systems...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    that the ammonium feldspar, buddingtonite, occurs as fine-grained euhedral crystals coating larger sulfide and quartz crystals. Ammonium feldspar seems to precipitate relatively...

  1. Surficial Extent And Conceptual Model Of Hydrothermal System...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    include smectite, halloysite and disordered kaolinite, cristobalite, tridymite, opal, alunite, gibbsite, and calcite.2. (2) A small area (less than 500 m2) of heated ground...

  2. Present State of the Hydrothermal System in Long Valley Caldera...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    California Abstract Results of test drilling to depths of 2 km and data on the chemical and isotopic content of waters from hot springs and fumaroles permit a conceptual...

  3. GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePowerEdistoWhiskeyFootprint VenturesColorado:Georgia:FutureG2FOR EGSIDAHO |

  4. Sulfur geochemistry of hydrothermal waters in Yellowstone National Park. 1: The origin of thiosulfate in hot spring waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Y.; Schoonen, M.A.A. [SUNY, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Dept. of Geosciences] [SUNY, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Dept. of Geosciences; Nordstrom, D.K.; Cunningham, K.M.; Ball, J.W. [Geological Survey, Boulder, CO (United States). Water Resources Div.] [Geological Survey, Boulder, CO (United States). Water Resources Div.

    1998-12-01

    Thiosulfate (S{sub 2}O{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}), polythionate (S{sub x}O{sub 6}{sup 2{minus}}), dissolved sulfide (H{sub 2}S), and sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}) concentrations in thirty-nine alkaline and acidic springs in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) were determined. The analyses were conducted on site, using ion chromatography for thiosulfate, polythionate, and sulfate, and using colorimetry for dissolved sulfide. Thiosulfate was detected at concentrations typically less than 2 {micro}mol/L in neutral and alkaline chloride springs with low sulfate concentrations (Cl{sup {minus}}/SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} > 25). The thiosulfate concentration levels are about one to two orders of magnitude lower than the concentration of dissolved sulfide in these springs. In most acid sulfate and acid sulfate-chloride springs (Cl{sup {minus}}/SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} < 10), thiosulfate concentrations were also typically lower than 2 {micro}mol/L. However, in some chloride springs enriched with sulfate (Cl{sup {minus}}/SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} between 10 and 25), thiosulfate was found at concentrations ranging from 9 to 95 {micro}mol/L, higher than the concentrations of dissolved sulfide in these waters. Polythionate was detected only in Cinder Pool, Norris Geyser basin, at concentrations up to 8 {micro}mol/L, with an average S-chain-length from 4.1 to 4.9 sulfur atoms. The results indicate that no thiosulfate occurs in the deeper parts of the hydrothermal system. Thiosulfate may form, however, from (1) hydrolysis of native sulfur by hydrothermal solutions in the shallower parts (<50 m) of the system, (2) oxidation of dissolved sulfide upon mixing of a deep hydrothermal water with aerated shallow groundwater, and (3) the oxidation of dissolved sulfide by dissolved oxygen upon discharge of the hot spring. Upon discharge of a sulfide-containing hydrothermal water, oxidation proceeds rapidly as atmospheric oxygen enters the water. The transfer of oxygen is particularly effective if the hydrothermal discharge is turbulent and has a large surface area.

  5. K-Ar Dates Of Hydrothermal Clays From Core Hole VC-2B, Valles...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    However, the range of ages obtained from illites in Permian sands and pebbles and from Precambrian crystalline rocks indicates that Valles hydrothermal activity is overwhelming...

  6. Metatranscriptomics reveal differences in in situ energy and nitrogen metabolism among hydrothermal vent snail symbionts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanders, J. G.

    Despite the ubiquity of chemoautotrophic symbioses at hydrothermal vents, our understanding of the influence of environmental chemistry on symbiont metabolism is limited. Transcriptomic analyses are useful for linking ...

  7. Modelling the "Pop" in Winter Terrain Park Jumps J. A. McNeil

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    at ski resorts have found that jumping generally poses a signif- icantly greater risk of spine and head found that jumping generally (whether in a terrain park or not) poses a significantly greater risk of the feature." The authors have since identified experimental errors in this work and an erratum has been

  8. Characterizing Microbial Community and Geochemical Dynamics at Hydrothermal Vents Using Osmotically Driven Continuous Fluid Samplers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robidart, Julie C.; Callister, Stephen J.; Song, Peng F.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Wheat, Charles G.; Girguis, Peter R.

    2013-05-07

    Microbes play a key role in mediating all aquatic biogeochemical cycles, and ongoing efforts are aimed at better understanding the relationships between microbial phylogenetic and physiological diversity, and habitat physical and chemical characteristics. Establishing such relationships is facilitated by sampling and studying microbiology and geochemistry at the appropriate spatial and temporal scales, to access information on the past and current environmental state that contributes to observed microbial abundances and activities. A modest number of sampling systems exist to date, few of which can be used in remote, harsh environments such as hydrothermal vents, where the ephemeral nature of venting underscores the necessity for higher resolution sampling. We have developed a robust, continuous fluid sampling system for co-registered microbial and biogeochemical analyses. The osmosis-powered bio-osmosampling system (BOSS) use no electricity, collects fluids with daily resolution or better, can be deployed in harsh, inaccessible environments and can sample fluids continuously for up to five years. Here we present a series of tests to examine DNA, RNA and protein stability over time, as well as material compatability, via lab experiments. We also conducted two field deployments at deep-sea hydrothermal vents to assess changes in microbial diversity and protein expression as a function of the physico-chemical environment. Our data reveal significant changes in microbial community composition co-occurring with relatively modest changes in the geochemistry. These data additionally provide new insights into the distribution of an enigmatic sulfur oxidizing symbiont in its free-living state. Data from the second deployment reveal differences in the representation of peptides over time, underscoring the utility of the BOSS in meta-proteomic studies. In concert, these data demonstrate the efficacy of this approach, and illustrate the value of using this method to study microbial and geochemical phenomena.

  9. Evaluation of hydrothermal resources of North Dakota. Phase III final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, K.L.; Howell, F.L.; Wartman, B.L.; Anderson, S.B.

    1982-08-01

    The hydrothermal resources of North Dakota were evaluated. This evaluation was based on existing data on file with the North Dakota Geological Survey (NDGS) and other state and federal agencies, and field and laboratory studies conducted. The principal sources of data used during the study were WELLFILE, the computer library of oil and gas well data developed during the Phase I study, and WATERCAT, a computer library system of water well data assembled during the Phase II study. A field survey of the shallow geothermal gradients present in selected groundwater observation holes was conducted. Laboratory determinations of the thermal conductivity of core samples were done to facilitate heat-flow calculations on those holes-of-convenience cased.

  10. An Overview of Hydrothermal Alteration and Vein Mineralization in

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAandAmminex A S Jump to: navigation,In TheExperiments |

  11. Altered Tectonic and Hydrothermal Breccias in Corehole VC-1, Valles

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand DaltonSolarOpen5All HomeAlphakat GmbH JumpAlsoAltamount

  12. Characterization of past hydrothermal fluids in the Humboldt House

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmentalBowerbank,CammackFLIR Jump to:RAPIDCavalloCerionChannahon,7 Jump to:4:geothermal

  13. Hydrothermal alteration mineral mapping using hyperspectral imagery in

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View NewGuam:on Openei | Open Energy InformationHydrothermal

  14. Anaerobic oxidation of short-chain alkanes in hydrothermal sediments: potential influences on sulfur cycling and microbial diversity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, MM; Hoarfrost, AL; Bose, A; Joye, SB; Girguis, PR

    2013-05-14

    Short-chain alkanes play a substantial role in carbon and sulfur cycling at hydrocarbon-rich environments globally, yet few studies have examined the metabolism of ethane (C-2), propane (C-3), and butane (C-4) in anoxic sediments in contrast to methane (C-1). In hydrothermal vent systems, short-chain alkanes are formed over relatively short geological time scales via thermogenic processes and often exist at high concentrations. The sediment-covered hydrothermal vent systems at Middle Valley (MV Juan de Fuca Ridge) are an ideal site for investigating the anaerobic oxidation of C-1-C-4 alkanes, given the elevated temperatures and dissolved hydrocarbon species characteristic of these metalliferous sediments. We examined whether MV microbial communities oxidized C-1-C-4 alkanes under mesophilic to thermophilic sulfate-reducing conditions. Here we present data from discrete temperature (25, 55, and 75 degrees C) anaerobic batch reactor incubations of MV sediments supplemented with individual alkanes. Co-registered alkane consumption and sulfate reduction (SR) measurements provide clear evidence for C-1-C-4 alkane oxidation linked to SR over time and across temperatures. In these anaerobic batch reactor sediments, 16S ribosomal RNA pyrosequencing revealed that Deltaproteobacteria, particularly a novel sulfate-reducing lineage, were the likely phylotypes mediating the oxidation of C-2-C-4 alkanes. Maximum C-1-C-4 alkane oxidation rates occurred at 55 degrees C, which reflects the mid-core sediment temperature profile and corroborates previous studies of rate maxima for the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Of the alkanes investigated, C-3 was oxidized at the highest rate over time, then C-4, C-2, and C-1, respectively. The implications of these results are discussed with respect to the potential competition between the anaerobic oxidation of C-2-C(4)alkanes with AOM for available oxidants and the influence on the fate of C-1 derived from these hydrothermal systems.

  15. Aalborg Universitet Hydrothermal Processing of Lignin for Bio-Crude Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosendahl, Lasse

    Aalborg Universitet Hydrothermal Processing of Lignin for Bio-Crude Production Grigoras, Ionela.aau.dk on: juli 04, 2015 #12;Hydrothermal Processing of Lignin for Bio-crude Production Ionela F. Grigoras) per day, and with an oil production capacity questioned constantly, together with the increasing CO2

  16. A new hydrothermal scenario for the 2006 Lusi eruption, Indonesia. Insights from gas geochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzini, Adriano

    acquired a wide set of data of molecular and isotopic composition of gas sampled in several Lusi vents, in the surrounding mud volcanoes, in the closest natural gas field (Wunut), and in the hydrothermal ventsA new hydrothermal scenario for the 2006 Lusi eruption, Indonesia. Insights from gas geochemistry

  17. Discovery of new hydrothermal vent sites in Branseld Strait, G.P. Klinkhammer aY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Randall A

    ¨ Pierre et Marie Curie, 4 Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris, France Received 24 January 2001; accepted 1 October 2001 Abstract We carried out a search for hydrothermal vents in the Central Basin of Bransfield Strait of dredges. Hydrothermal plumes over Hook Ridge at the eastern end of the basin are confined to the E ridge

  18. Raman spectroscopic investigations of hydrothermal solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, M.M.

    1988-01-01

    There is still very little information about the stoichiometries, structures and stabilities of metal complexes at high temperatures and pressures. Raman spectroscopy is ideally suited to probe and study concentrated electrolyte solutions at the molecular level. This thesis includes the design and construction of a Raman cell operable up to 300C and 15MPa. In order to obtain quantitative thermodynamic information from Raman spectroscopic measurements, a chemically inert internal standard must be used. Perchlorate is commonly used for this purpose at low temperatures, but it may be unstable at high temperatures and its explosive properties make it undesirable. A new preferred internal standard; trifluoromethanesulfonic acid is introduced and its spectra p to 300C discussed. The use of this compound as a high temperature internal standard enabled stepwise stability constants of zinc-bromo complexes to be determined. Although bromide is not an important ligand in geologic systems, its chemical similarity to chloride can provide insights into the study of zinc-chloro species which do not have very informative Raman spectra. The importance of organic ligands in geologic settings such as the Mississippi-Valley Type Pb-Zn sulfide deposits is now being realized. Chapter four presents the first high temperature spectroscopic measurements of lead and zinc acetate aqueous solutions. Not only do these studies verify the stability of lead and zinc acetate complexes up to 250 C but they also show that the type of complex formed is a function of pH, metal-ligand ratio and temperature, thus having important implications for zoning of Pb-Zn sulfide deposits.

  19. Hydrothermal synthesis of hydroxyapatite nanorods using pyridoxal-5?-phosphate as a phosphorus source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Xin-Yu; Zhu, Ying-Jie, E-mail: y.j.zhu@mail.sic.ac.cn; Lu, Bing-Qiang; Chen, Feng; Qi, Chao; Zhao, Jing; Wu, Jin

    2014-07-01

    Graphical abstract: Hydroxyapatite nanorods are synthesized using biocompatible biomolecule pyridoxal-5?-phosphate as a new organic phosphorus source by the hydrothermal method. - Highlights: • Hydrothermal synthesis of hydroxyapatite nanorods is reported. • Biocompatible pyridoxal-5?-phosphate is used as an organic phosphorus source. • This method is simple, surfactant-free and environmentally friendly. - Abstract: Hydroxyapatite nanorods are synthesized by the hydrothermal method using biocompatible biomolecule pyridoxal-5?-phosphate (PLP) as a new organic phosphorus source. In this method, PLP biomolecules are hydrolyzed to produce phosphate ions under hydrothermal conditions, and these phosphate ions react with pre-existing calcium ions to form hydroxyapatite nanorods. The effects of experimental conditions including hydrothermal temperature and time on the morphology and crystal phase of the products are investigated. This method is simple, surfactant-free and environmentally friendly. The products are characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric (TG) analysis.

  20. Information Shocks, Liquidity Shocks, Jumps, and Price Discovery: Evidence from the U.S. Treasury Market

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jiang, George J.

    In this paper, we identify jumps in U.S. Treasury-bond (T-bond) prices and investigate what causes such unexpected large price changes. In particular, we examine the relative importance of macroeconomic news announcements ...

  1. LETTER doi:10.1038/nature13436 Tracking photon jumps with repeated quantum

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Devoret, Michel H.

    LETTER doi:10.1038/nature13436 Tracking photon jumps with repeated quantum non-demolition parity measurements L. Sun1 {, A. Petrenko1 , Z. Leghtas1 , B. Vlastakis1 , G. Kirchmair1 {, K. M. Sliwa1 , A. Narla1

  2. Characterization and catalytic properties of hydrothermally dealuminated MCM-22

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meriaudeau, P.; Tuan, V.A.; Nghiem, V.T.; Ha, V.T. [IRC/NCRS, Villeurbanne (France)] [IRC/NCRS, Villeurbanne (France); Lefevbre, F. [Univ. Claude Bernard, Villeurbanne (France)] [Univ. Claude Bernard, Villeurbanne (France)

    1999-07-25

    Zeolite MCM-22 was recently patented as a useful catalyst for alkylation and isomerization reactions and for conversion of methanol or olefins to hydrocarbons. MCM-22 has been synthesized and dealuminated by hydrothermal treatments. The resulting solids were characterized by different techniques in order to know how the acid properties of the dealuminated solids were modified. It appears that the number of acid sites was decreased by hydrothermal treatments but the acid strength was not modified. Nondealuminated and dealuminated solids were used in the n-octane hydroconversion. Results suggested that for both types of solids the hydroisomerization is mainly occurring in the 10-membered ring (MR) channels whereas the hydrocracking is mainly coming from acid sites located in 12-membered ring channels. According to the observed distribution of monobranched isomers, MCM-22 shows some ``shape-selective`` character typical of the pentasil family, whereas, according to the absolute yield of isopentane in the hydrocracked products at low hydrocracking conversions, MCM-22 behaves more like a 12 MR zeolite.

  3. INI Power Systems | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNewTexas:HydrothermallyIFB Agro Industries Ltd

  4. Bow-wave-like hydraulic jump and horseshoe vortex around an obstacle in a supercritical open channel flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    Bow-wave-like hydraulic jump and horseshoe vortex around an obstacle in a supercritical open the obstacle, two main flow structures are observed: i a hydraulic jump in the near-surface region and ii turbulent regime , the detachment length of the hydraulic jump exceeds the one of the horseshoe vortex

  5. Methods and apparatus for catalytic hydrothermal gasification of biomass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Butner, Robert Scott; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Zacher, Alan H.; Hart, Todd R.

    2012-08-14

    Continuous processing of wet biomass feedstock by catalytic hydrothermal gasification must address catalyst fouling and poisoning. One solution can involve heating the wet biomass with a heating unit to a temperature sufficient for organic constituents in the feedstock to decompose, for precipitates of inorganic wastes to form, for preheating the wet feedstock in preparation for subsequent separation of sulfur contaminants, or combinations thereof. Treatment further includes separating the precipitates out of the wet feedstock, removing sulfur contaminants, or both using a solids separation unit and a sulfur separation unit, respectively. Having removed much of the inorganic wastes and the sulfur that can cause poisoning and fouling, the wet biomass feedstock can be exposed to the heterogeneous catalyst for gasification.

  6. Comparison Of Hydrothermal Alteration Of Carboniferous Carbonate And

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company)| Open EnergyColoradoBiomassPlus JumpQinghai

  7. Revisiting the emission from relativistic blast waves in a density-jump medium

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Geng, J. J.; Huang, Y. F.; Dai, Z. G. [School of Astronomy and Space Science, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Wu, X. F. [Purple Mountain Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China); Li, Liang, E-mail: hyf@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: dzg@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: xfwu@pmo.ac.cn [Department of Physics, Stockholm University, AlbaNova, SE-106 91 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-09-01

    Re-brightening bumps are frequently observed in gamma-ray burst afterglows. Many scenarios have been proposed to interpret the origin of these bumps, of which a blast wave encountering a density-jump in the circumburst environment has been questioned by recent works. We develop a set of differential equations to calculate the relativistic outflow encountering the density-jump by extending the work of Huang et al. This approach is a semi-analytic method and is very convenient. Our results show that late high-amplitude bumps cannot be produced under common conditions, rather only a short plateau may emerge even when the encounter occurs at an early time (<10{sup 4} s). In general, our results disfavor the density-jump origin for those observed bumps, which is consistent with the conclusion drawn from full hydrodynamics studies. The bumps thus should be caused by other scenarios.

  8. Laser-induced temperature jump/time-resolved infrared study of the fast events in protein folding

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woodruff, W.H.; Dyer, R.B.; Williams, S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, NM (United States); Callender, H.; Gilmanshin, R. [CUNY, NY (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Laser-induced temperature jump followed by time-resolved infrared probe of reaction dynamics are used to study the temporal evolution of polypeptide structure during protein folding and unfolding. Reactions are initiated in times of 50 ps or longer by T-jumps of 10`s of degrees, obtained by laser excitation of water overtone absorbances. Observation of the Amide I transient absorbances reveal melting lifetimes of helices unconstrained by tertiary structure to be ca. 160 ns in a model 21-peptide and ca. 30 ns in {open_quotes}molten globule{close_quotes} apomyoglobin. No other processes are observed in these systems over the timescale 50 ps to 2 ms. Equilibrium data suggest the corresponding helix formation lifetimes to be ca. 16 and 1 ns, respectively. In {open_quotes}native{close_quotes} apomyoglobin two helix melting lifetimes are observed and we infer that a third occurs on a timescale inaccessible to our experiment (> 1 ms). The shorter observed lifetime, as in the molten globule, is ca. 30 ns. The longer lifetime is ca. 70 {mu}s. We suggest that the slower process is helix melting that is rate-limited by the unfolding of tertiary structure. Equilibrium data suggest a lifetime of ca. 1 {mu}s for the development of these tertiary folds.

  9. Probing the mechanism of rubredoxin thermal unfolding in the absence of salt bridges by temperature jump experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henriques, Barbara J. [Instituto Tecnologia Quimica e Biologica, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Oeiras (Portugal); Saraiva, Ligia M. [Instituto Tecnologia Quimica e Biologica, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Oeiras (Portugal); Gomes, Claudio M. [Instituto Tecnologia Quimica e Biologica, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Oeiras (Portugal)]. E-mail: gomes@itqb.unl.pt

    2005-08-05

    Rubredoxins are the simplest type of iron-sulphur proteins and in recent years they have been used as model systems in protein folding and stability studies, especially the proteins from thermophilic sources. Here, we report our studies on the rubredoxin from the hyperthermophile Methanococcus jannaschii (T {sub opt} = 85 deg C), which was investigated in respect to its thermal unfolding kinetics by temperature jump experiments. Different spectroscopic probes were used to monitor distinct structural protein features during the thermal transition: the integrity of the iron-sulphur centre was monitored by visible absorption spectroscopy, whereas tertiary structure was followed by intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence and exposure of protein hydrophobic patches was sensed by 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulphonate fluorescence. The studies were performed at acidic pH conditions in which any stabilising contributions from salt bridges are annulled due to protonation of protein side chain groups. In these conditions, M. jannaschii rubredoxin assumes a native-like, albeit more flexible and open conformation, as indicated by a red shift in the tryptophan emission maximum and 1-anilinonaphthalene-8-sulphonate binding. Temperature jumps were monitored by the three distinct techniques and showed that the protein undergoes thermal denaturation via a simple two step mechanism, as loss of tertiary structure, hydrophobic collapse, and disintegration of the iron-sulphur centre are concomitant processes. The proposed mechanism is framed with the multiphasic one proposed for Pyrococcus furiosus rubredoxin, showing that a common thermal unfolding mechanism is not observed between these two closely related thermophilic rubredoxins.

  10. Hydrothermal growth of single crystals of the quantum magnets: Clinoatacamite, paratacamite, and herbertsmithite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Peter

    In this report, we describe crystal growth technology and characterizations of clinoata- camite, paratacamiteHydrothermal growth of single crystals of the quantum magnets: Clinoatacamite, paratacamite and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA 2 Department

  11. Geochemistry of deep-sea hydrothermal vent fluids from the Mid-Cayman Rise, Caribbean Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDermott, Jill Marie

    2015-01-01

    This thesis examines the controls on organic, inorganic, and volatile species distributions in hydrothermal fluids venting at Von Damm and Piccard, two recently discovered vent fields at the ultra slow spreading Mid-Cayman ...

  12. Decoherent time-dependent transport beyond the Landauer-Büttiker formulation: a quantum-drift alternative to quantum jumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lucas J. Fernández-Alcázar; Horacio M. Pastawski

    2015-02-27

    We present a model for decoherence in time-dependent transport. It boils down into a form of wave function that undergoes a smooth stochastic drift of the phase in a local basis, the Quantum Drift (QD) model. This drift is nothing else but a local energy fluctuation. Unlike Quantum Jumps (QJ) models, no jumps are present in the density as the evolution is unitary. As a first application, we address the transport through a resonant state $\\left\\vert 0\\right\\rangle $ that undergoes decoherence. We show the equivalence with the decoherent steady state transport in presence of a B\\"{u}ttiker's voltage probe. In order to test the dynamics, we consider two many-spin systems whith a local energy fluctuation. A two-spin system is reduced to a two level system (TLS) that oscillates among $\\left\\vert 0\\right\\rangle $ $\\equiv $ $ \\left\\vert \\uparrow \\downarrow \\right\\rangle $ and $\\left\\vert 1\\right\\rangle \\equiv $ $\\left\\vert \\downarrow \\uparrow \\right\\rangle $. We show that QD model recovers not only the exponential damping of the oscillations in the low perturbation regime, but also the non-trivial bifurcation of the damping rates at a critical point, i.e. the quantum dynamical phase transition. We also address the spin-wave like dynamics of local polarization in a spin chain. The QD average solution has about half the dispersion respect to the mean dynamics than QJ. By evaluating the Loschmidt Echo (LE), we find that the pure states $\\left\\vert 0\\right\\rangle $ and $\\left\\vert 1\\right \\rangle $ are quite robust against the local decoherence. In contrast, the LE, and hence coherence, decays faster when the system is in a superposition state. Because its simple implementation, the method is well suited to assess decoherent transport problems as well as to include decoherence in both one-body and many-body dynamics.

  13. Dynamics of a drop trapped inside a horizontal circular hydraulic jump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Duchesne, Alexis; Lebon, Luc; Pirat, Christophe; Limat, Laurent

    2013-01-01

    A drop of moderate size deposited inside a horizontal circular hydraulic jump of the same liquid remains trapped at the shock front and does not coalesce. In this situation the drop is moving along the jump and one observes two different motions: a periodic one (it orbitates at constant speed) and an irregular one involving reversals of the orbital motion. Modeling the drop as a rigid sphere exchanging friction with liquid across a thin film of air, we recover the orbital motion and the internal rotation of the drop. This internal rotation is experimentally observed.

  14. Orbits and reversals of a drop rolling inside a horizontal circular hydraulic jump

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alexis Duchesne; Clément Savaro; Luc Lebon; Christophe Pirat; Laurent Limat

    2013-02-14

    We explore the complex dynamics of a non-coalescing drop of moderate size inside a circular hydraulic jump of the same liquid formed on a horizontal disk. In this situation the drop is moving along the jump and one observes two different motions: a periodic one (it orbitates at constant speed) and an irregular one involving reversals of the orbital motion. Modeling the drop as a rigid sphere exchanging friction with liquid across a thin film of air, we recover the orbital motion and the internal rotation of the drop. This internal rotation is experimentally observed.

  15. Mantises exchange angular momentum between three rotating body parts to jump precisely to targets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burrows, M.; Cullen, D. A.; Dorosenko, M.; Sutton, G. P.

    2015-03-05

    muscular control. In the second manipulation, flexibility of the abdomen was reduced by super-gluing the segments together and this resulted in the mantises rotating at an angular velocity of 0.6 ± 0.2 degrees ms -1 (mean of means of 17 jumps by two 5... lens. The images had a resolution of 1024 x 1024 pixels and were fed directly to a computer for later analysis. Jumps were made from a platform made of high density white foam (Plastazote, Watkins and Doncaster, Cranbrook, Kent, UK) 85 mm deep and 150...

  16. Rare earth oxide fluoride nanoparticles and hydrothermal method for forming nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fulton, John L. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; Hoffmann, Markus M. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA

    2001-11-13

    A hydrothermal method for forming nanoparticles of a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine has been discovered. Nanoparticles comprising a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine are also described. These nanoparticles can exhibit excellent refractory properties as well as remarkable stability in hydrothermal conditions. The nanoparticles can exhibit excellent properties for numerous applications including fiber reinforcement of ceramic composites, catalyst supports, and corrosion resistant coatings for high-temperature aqueous solutions.

  17. Rare Earth Oxide Fluoride Nanoparticles And Hydrothermal Method For Forming Nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fulton, John L. (Richland, WA); Hoffmann, Markus M. (Richland, WA)

    2003-12-23

    A hydrothermal method for forming nanoparticles of a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine has been discovered. Nanoparticles comprising a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine are also described. These nanoparticles can exhibit excellent refractory properties as well as remarkable stability in hydrothermal conditions. The nanoparticles can exhibit excellent properties for numerous applications including fiber reinforcement of ceramic composites, catalyst supports, and corrosion resistant coatings for high-temperature aqueous solutions.

  18. Possible Origin of Improved High Temperature Performance of Hydrothermally Aged Cu/Beta Zeolite Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peden, Charles HF; Kwak, Ja Hun; Burton, Sarah D.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Kim, Do Heui; Lee, Jong H.; Jen, H. W.; Cavattaio, Giovanni; Cheng, Yisun; Lambert, Christine

    2012-04-30

    The hydrothermal stability of Cu/beta NH3 SCR catalysts are explored here. In particular, this paper focuses on the interesting ability of this catalyst to maintain and even enhance high-temperature performance for the "standard" SCR reaction after modest (900 °C, 2 hours) hydrothermal aging. Characterization of the fresh and aged catalysts was performed with an aim to identify possible catalytic phases responsible for the enhanced high temperature performance. XRD, TEM and 27Al NMR all showed that the hydrothermally aging conditions used here resulted in almost complete loss of the beta zeolite structure between 1 and 2 hours aging. While the 27Al NMR spectra of 2 and 10 hour hydrothermally-aged catalysts showed significant loss of a peak associated with tetrahedrally-coordinated Al species, no new spectral features were evident. Two model catalysts, suggested by these characterization data as possible mimics of the catalytic phase formed during hydrothermal aging of Cu/beta, were prepared and tested for their performance in the "standard" SCR and NH3 oxidation reactions. The similarity in their reactivity compared to the 2 hour hydrothermally-aged Cu/beta catalyst suggests possible routes for preparing multi-component catalysts that may have wider temperature windows for optimum performance than those provided by current Cu/zeolite catalysts.

  19. Usefulness of the reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo model in regional flood frequency

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ribatet, Mathieu

    Usefulness of the reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo model in regional flood frequency; revised 3 May 2007; accepted 17 May 2007; published 3 August 2007. [1] Regional flood frequency analysis and the index flood approach. Results show that the proposed estimator is absolutely suited to regional

  20. Internal hydraulic jumps and overturning generated by tidal flow over a tall steep ridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klymak, Jody M.

    that tidal energy is both converted into internal waves, which radiate away from the topography, and used of tidal mixing for global climate models, the physical processes governing the transfer of energy fromInternal hydraulic jumps and overturning generated by tidal flow over a tall steep ridge Sonya Legg

  1. Kinetics and Mechanisms of Sulfate Adsorption/Desorption on Goethite Using Pressure-Jump Relaxation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sparks, Donald L.

    Kinetics and Mechanisms of Sulfate Adsorption/Desorption on Goethite Using Pressure-Jump Relaxation Peng Chu Zhang* and Donald L. Sparks ABSTRACT Sulfate adsorption/desorption on goethite (Fe indicated that adsorption decreased with increased pH of the goethite suspension. The triple-layer model fit

  2. Multi-scale Jump and Volatility Analysis for High-Frequency Financial Data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fan, Jianqing

    Multi-scale Jump and Volatility Analysis for High-Frequency Financial Data Jianqing Fan and Yazhen Wang Version of May 2007 Abstract The wide availability of high-frequency data for many financial-diffusion processes observed with market microstructure noise are frequently used to model high-frequency financial

  3. Seismic signals are crucial for male mating success in a visual specialist jumping spider (Araneae: Salticidae)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elias, Damian Octavio

    Seismic signals are crucial for male mating success in a visual specialist jumping spider (Araneae of multicomponent seismic courtship signals in addition to and produced in concert with its multiple visual ornaments and movement displays. Here, we demonstrate the importance of these seismic signals

  4. Hydrothermal Alteration Mineral Studies in Long Valley, In- Proceedings of

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNewTexas: EnergyHunterdonHutto,FuelEnergyGabbs Valley Areathe

  5. Hydrothermal Heat Discharge In The Cascade Range, Northwestern United

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNewTexas: EnergyHunterdonHutto,FuelEnergyGabbsequal to 90States

  6. Property:PotentialGeothermalHydrothermalCapacity | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo,AltFuelVehicle2FlatDemandMonth3 Jump to:PotentialCSPCapacity

  7. Property:PotentialGeothermalHydrothermalGeneration | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo,AltFuelVehicle2FlatDemandMonth3 Jump to:PotentialCSPCapacityInformation

  8. Basement Structure and Implications for Hydrothermal Circulation Patterns

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAandAmminexInformation Bartholomew County,Creek, Texas:BartowCallof:in

  9. Adventive Hydrothermal Circulation On Stromboli Volcano (Aeolian Islands,

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand DaltonSolar Energy LLCAdemaInformation VehicleAdvectiveItaly)

  10. Clay Minerals Related To The Hydrothermal Activity Of The Bouillante

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (Utility Company) Jump to:New York:Clay County,North Carolina:Clay

  11. Fluid Inclusion Gas Compositions From An Active Magmatic-Hydrothermal

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePowerEdistoWhiskey flatsInformationFlintInformation ) JumpOpen

  12. A Helium Isotope Perspective On The Dixie Valley, Nevada, Hydrothermal

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (UtilityMichigan)data bookresult9) Jump

  13. Colorado's Hydrothermal Resource Base - An Assessment | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower Ventures Jump to:Information 4th congressionalInformation

  14. Colorado's hydrothermal resource base---an assessment | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower Ventures Jump to:Information 4th

  15. Correlation of hydrothermal sericite composition with permeability and

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButtePower Ventures JumpCommercialRenewableGlobalTechnologytemperature, Coso Hot

  16. Geographic Information System At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geographic Information System At Lightning Dock Geothermal Area (Getman, 2014) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic...

  17. Radium-thorium disequilibrium and zeolite-water ion exchange in a Yellowstone hydrothermal environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sturchio, N.C.; Bohlke, J.K. (Argonne National Laboratory, IL (USA)); Binz, C.M. (Loras College, Dubuque, IA (USA))

    1989-05-01

    Whole rock samples of hydrothermally altered Biscuit Basin rhyolite from Yellowstone drill cores Y-7 and Y-8 were analyzed for {sup 226}Ra and {sup 230}Th to determine the extent of radioactive disequilibrium and its relation to the rates and mechanisms of element transport in the shallow portion of an active hydrothermal system. The ({sup 226}Ra/{sup 230}Th) activity ratios range from 0.73 to 1.46 and are generally correlated with Th-normalized Ba concentrations (Ba{sub N}). Compositions of clinoptilolite and mordenite in these samples are consistent with ion exchange equilibrium between zeolites and coexisting thermal waters. Average K{sup Ba}{sub d mineral-water} values are 1.0 {center dot} 10{sup 5} mL/g for clinoptilolite and 1.4 {center dot} 10{sup 4} mL/g for mordenite. Apparent diffusivities through matrix porosity estimated for R and Ba range from {approximately}10{sup {minus}12} to {approximately}10{sup {minus}10} cm{sup 2} s{sup {minus}1} in thoroughly zeolitic rhyolite; these rates of diffusion are too low to account for the observed distance scale of ({sup 226}Ra/{sup 230}Th) disequilibrium. The correlated values of ({sup 226}Ra/{sup 230}Th) disequilibrium and Ba{sub N} represent zeolite-water ion exchange equilibrium that is caused by porous flow of water through the rock matrix and by the relatively rapid diffusion of cations within the zeolite lattices. A water flux of at least {approximately}2.5 (cm{sup 3}{sub water}/cm{sup 3}{sub rock}) yr{sup {minus}1} is required to produce measurable ({sup 226}Ra/{sup 230}Th) disequilibrium, whereas at least {approximately}23 (cm{sup 3}{sub water}/cm{sup 3}{sub rock}) yr{sup {minus}1} is required for the sample exhibiting the most extreme ({sup 226}Ra/{sup 230}Th) disequilibrium; these fluxes are much higher than those that can be inferred from net mass transfers of stable species.

  18. Southwest Photovoltaic Systems Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Southwest Photovoltaic Systems Inc Jump to: navigation, search Name: Southwest Photovoltaic Systems Inc Place: Tomball, Texas Zip: 77375 Product: Distributor of small scale PV...

  19. Directional Drilling Systems | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Directional Drilling Systems Jump to: navigation, search Geothermal ARRA Funded Projects for Directional Drilling Systems Loading map... "format":"googlemaps3","type":"ROADMAP","t...

  20. Temperature jump in degenerate quantum gases in the presence of a Bose - Einstein condensate

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. V. Latyshev; A. A. Yushkanov

    2010-01-04

    We construct a kinetic equation modeling the behavior of degenerate quantum Bose gases whose collision rate depends on the momentum of elementary excitations. We consider the case where the phonon component is the decisive factor in the elementary excitations. We analytically solve the half-space boundary value problem of the temperature jump at the boundary of the degenerate Bose gas in the presence of a Bose -- Einstein condensate.

  1. The dynamics of silica deposition in fractures: Oxygen isotope ratios in hydrothermal silica from Yellowstone drill core Y-13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sturchio, N.C.; Keith, T.E.C.; Muehlenbachs, K.

    1988-01-01

    The delta/sup 18/O values of 22 samples of hydrothermal chalcedony and quartz from Y-13 drill core range from /minus/7.5 to /minus/1.3/per thousand/. Most samples could not be in mineral-water isotopic equilibrium under present conditions. Fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures in quartz indicate precipitation at or above temperatures measured during drilling. Most silica appears to have precipitated from water enriched in /sup 18/O relative to present thermal water. Inferred /sup 18/O enrichments are too large in many cases to be explained by boiling and steam separation. The apparent /sup 18/O enrichment in thermal water may represent a transient dynamic effect that occurs when new fractures open, as disequilibrium increases and the local system is temporarily perturbed. This interpretation is consistent with the observed sequence of mineral deposition and delta/sup 18/O within individual fractures. 32 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. A Lagrangian model of Copepod dynamics: clustering by escape jumps in turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ardeshiri, Hamidreza; Schmitt, François G; Souissi, Sami; Toschi, Federico; Calzavarini, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Planktonic copepods are small crustaceans that have the ability to swim by quick powerful jumps. Such an aptness is used to escape from high shear regions, which may be caused either by flow per- turbations, produced by a large predator (i.e. fish larvae), or by the inherent highly turbulent dynamics of the ocean. Through a combined experimental and numerical study, we investigate the impact of jumping behaviour on the small-scale patchiness of copepods in a turbulent environment. Recorded velocity tracks of copepods displaying escape response jumps in still water are here used to define and tune a Lagrangian Copepod (LC) model. The model is further employed to simulate the behaviour of thousands of copepods in a fully developed hydrodynamic turbulent flow obtained by direct numerical simulation of the Navier-Stokes equations. First, we show that the LC velocity statistics is in qualitative agreement with available experimental observations of copepods in tur- bulence. Second, we quantify the clustering of LC...

  3. Testing for jumps in the context of high frequency data Universite P. et M. Curie (Paris-6)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Testing for jumps in the context of high frequency data Jean Jacod Universit´e P. et M. Curie of these discrete observations, in the case of high frequency observations. That is, n is small, and we are in fact Universit´e P. et M. Curie (Paris-6) Testing for Jumps in the Context of High Frequency Data MONDAY, April 2

  4. Preliminary conceptual design for the destruction of organic/ferrocyanide constituents in the Hanford tank waste with low-temperature hydrothermal processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, A.J.; Jones, E.O.; Orth, R.J.; Cox, J.L.; Elmore, M.E.; Neuenschwander, G.G.; Hart, T.R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Meng, C.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-05-01

    Hydrothermal processing (HTP) is a thermal-chemical processing method that can be employed to destroy organic and ferrocyanide constituents in Hanford tank waste by using the abundant existing oxidants in the tank waste such as nitrite and nitrate. Use-temperature HTP effectively destroys organics at temperatures from 250{degree}C to 400{degree}C to eliminate safety hazards and improve further processing. This proposal describes a conceptual design of a low-temperature HTP system (including a preliminary flow diagram and plot plan, equipment descriptions and sizes, utility requirements, and costs); the experimental work supporting this effort at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL); the reaction chemistry and kinetics; the technical maturity of the process; and a preliminary assessment of maintenance, operation, and safety of a system. Nitrate destruction using organic reductants is also described. The low-temperature hydrothermal program at PNL was initiated in January 1993. It is part of an overall program to develop organic destruction technologies, which was originally funded by Hanford`s Tank Waste Remediation System program and then was transferred to the Initial Pretreatment (IPM) project. As described in the document, low-temperature HTP (1) meets or exceeds system requirements in organic, ferrocyanide, and nitrate destruction, and processing rate; (2) is technically mature with little additional technology development required; (3) is a simple process with good operational reliability; (4) is flexible and can be easily integrated in the system; (5) has reasonable costs and utility requirements; and (6) is safe and environmentally-benign.

  5. Benefit-cost analysis of DOE's Current Federal Program to increase hydrothermal resource utilization. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-12-10

    The impact of DOE's Current Federal Program on the commercialization of hydrothermal resources between 1980 and 2000 is analyzed. The hydrothermal resources of the United States and the types of DOE activities used to stimulate the development of these resources for both electric power and direct heat use are described briefly. The No Federal Program and the Current Federal Program are then described in terms of funding levels and the resultant market penetration estimates through 2000. These market penetration estimates are also compared to other geothermal utilization forecasts. The direct benefits of the Current Federal Program are next presented for electric power and direct heat use applications. An analysis of the external impacts associated with the additional hydrothermal resource development resulting from the Current Federal Program is also provided. Included are environmental effects, national security/balance-of-payments improvements, socioeconomic impacts and materials requirements. A summary of the analysis integrating the direct benefits, external impacts and DOE program costs concludes the report.

  6. Physical properties of upper oceanic crust: Ocean Drilling Program Hole 801C and the waning of hydrothermal circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abrams, Lewis J.

    alteration continues, at a decreasing rate, throughout the lifetime of oceanic crust. INDEX TERMS: 3015 Marine Geology and Geophysics: Heat flow (benthic) and hydrothermal processes; 7220 Seismology: Oceanic, decreased porosity and permeability, and oxidation of magnetic minerals [e.g., Jacobson, 1992]. Hydrothermal

  7. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Algal Biomass to Hydrocarbons: Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction and Upgrading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua; Anderson, Daniel B.; Hallen, Richard T.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Hart, Todd R.; Butcher, Mark G.; Drennan, Corinne; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Davis, Ryan; Kinchin, Christopher

    2014-03-20

    This report provides a preliminary analysis of the costs associated with converting whole wet algal biomass into primarily diesel fuel. Hydrothermal liquefaction converts the whole algae into an oil that is then hydrotreated and distilled. The secondary aqueous product containing significant organic material is converted to a medium btu gas via catalytic hydrothermal gasification.

  8. Baseline System Costs for 50.0 MW Enhanced Geothermal System...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Baseline System Costs for 50.0 MW Enhanced Geothermal System -- A Function of: Working Fluid, Technology, and Location Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified...

  9. Hydrothermal formation of Clay-Carbonate alteration assemblages in the Nili Fossae region of Mars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Adrian J; Baldridge, Alice M; Crowley, James K; Bridges, Nathan T; Thomson, Bradley J; Marion, Giles M; Filho, Carlos R de Souza; Bishop, Janice L

    2014-01-01

    The Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) has returned observations of the Nili Fossae region indicating the presence of Mg- carbonate in small (characterize these carbonate-bearing units. We applied absorption band mapping techniques to investigate a range of possible phyllosilicate and carbonate minerals that could be present in the Nili Fossae region. We also describe a clay-carbonate hydrothermal alteration mineral assemblage in the Archean Warrawoona Group of Western Australia that is a potential Earth analog to the Nili Fossae carbonate-bearing rock units. We discuss the geological and biological implications for hydrothermal processes on Noachian Mars.

  10. Enhanced performance of wearable piezoelectric nanogenerator fabricated by two-step hydrothermal process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qiu, Yu; Lei, Jixue; Yin, Bing; Zhang, Heqiu; Ji, Jiuyu; Hu, Lizhong, E-mail: lizhongh@dlut.edu.cn [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); The Key Laboratory for Micro/Nano Technology and System of Liaoning Province, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Yang, Dechao [Department of Electronic Engineering, Dalian Neusoft University of Information, Dalian 116024 (China); Bian, Jiming; Liu, Yanhong; Zhao, Yu; Luo, Yingmin [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2014-03-17

    A simple two-step hydrothermal process was proposed for enhancing the performance of the nanogenerator on flexible and wearable terylene-fabric substrate. With this method, a significant enhancement in output voltage of the nanogenerator from ?10?mV to 7?V was achieved, comparing with the one by conventional one-step process. In addition, another advantage with the devices synthesized by two-step hydrothermal process was that their output voltages are only sensitive to strain rather than strain rate. The devices with a high output voltage have the ability to power common electric devices and will have important applications in flexible electronics and wearable devices.

  11. Low-temperature hydrothermal synthesis of the three-layered sodium cobaltite P3-Na{sub x}CoO{sub 2} (x ? 0.60)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miclau, M.; Bokinala, K.; Miclau, N.

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • We report direct synthesis of the high temperature stable phase, P3-Na{sub 0.6}CoO{sub 2}. • The hydrothermal synthesis of P3-Na{sub 0.6}CoO{sub 2} involves one step and low temperature. • The yield diagram for Na–Co–H{sub 2}O system has been builded up to 250 °C. • We propose a formation mechanism of P3-Na{sub 0.6}CoO{sub 2} phase using the unit cell theory. • The thermal stability of P3-Na{sub 0.6}CoO{sub 2} has been investigated by means of HT-XRD. - Abstract: In order to obtain the layered sodium cobalt oxide materials by hydrothermal synthesis, the yield diagram for Na–Co–H{sub 2}O system has been built and studied. In the same time, the well-known data of Co–H{sub 2}O system have been extended at 250 °C in basic solution. We had first synthesized directly the high temperature stable phase, P3-Na{sub 0.6}CoO{sub 2} by a one-step low-temperature hydrothermal method. The rhombohedral structure of P3-Na{sub 0.6}CoO{sub 2} has been determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the purity of phases has been confirmed by XPS. The thermal stability of P3-Na{sub 0.6}CoO{sub 2} has been investigated by means of high temperature X-ray diffraction in 298–873 K range and when the temperature has reached 723 K, the completely transformation of P3-Na{sub 0.6}CoO{sub 2} in the rhombohedral stable phase ?-NaCoO{sub 2} (space group R-3m) was observed. Also, a formation mechanism of P3-Na{sub 0.6}CoO{sub 2} phase using the unit cell theory in the hydrothermal process was proposed.

  12. Jump Chaotic Behaviour of Ultra Low Loss Bulk Acoustic Wave Cavities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Maxim Goryachev; Warrick G. Farr; Serge Galliou; Michael E. Tobar

    2014-06-16

    We demonstrate a previously unobserved nonlinear phenomenon in an ultra-low loss quartz Bulk Acoustic Wave cavity ($Q>3\\times10^9$), which only occurs below 20 milli-Kelvin in temperature and under relatively weak pumping. The phenomenon reveals the emergence of several stable equilibria (at least two foci and two nodes) and jumps between these quasi states at random times. The degree of this randomness as well as separations between levels can be controlled by the frequency of the incident carrier signal. It is demonstrated that the nature of the effect lays beyond the standard Duffing model.

  13. Jump chaotic behaviour of ultra low loss bulk acoustic wave cavities

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goryachev, Maxim, E-mail: maxim.goryachev@uwa.edu.au; Farr, Warrick G.; Tobar, Michael E. [ARC Centre of Excellence for Engineered Quantum Systems, University of Western Australia, 35 Stirling Highway, Crawley WA 6009 (Australia); Galliou, Serge [Department of Time and Frequency, FEMTO-ST Institute, ENSMM, 26 Chemin de l'Épitaphe 25000 Besançon (France)

    2014-08-11

    We demonstrate a previously unobserved nonlinear phenomenon in an ultra-low loss quartz bulk acoustic wave cavity (Q>3>10{sup 9}), which only occurs below 20 mK in temperature and under relatively weak pumping. The phenomenon reveals the emergence of several stable equilibria (at least two foci and two nodes) and jumps between these quasi states at random times. The degree of this randomness as well as separations between levels can be controlled by the frequency of the incident carrier signal. It is demonstrated that the nature of the effect lies beyond the standard Duffing model.

  14. Rheological study of comingled biomass and coal slurries with hydrothermal pretreatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei He; Chan S. Park; Joseph M. Norbeck [University of California, Riverside, CA (United States). Bourns College of Engineering Center for Environmental Research and Technology

    2009-09-15

    Gasification of comingled biomass and coal feedstock is an effective means of reducing the net life cycle greenhouse gas emissions in the coal gasification process while maintaining its inherent benefits of abundance and high-energy density. However, feeding a comingled biomass and coal feedstock into a pressurized gasification reactor poses a technical problem. Conventional dry feeding systems, such as lock hoppers and pressurized pneumatic transport, are complex and operationally expensive. A slurry formation of comingled biomass and coal feedstock can be easily fed into the gasification reactor but, in normal conditions, only allows for a small portion of biomass in the mixture. This is a consequence of the hydroscopic and hydrophilic nature of the biomass. The College of Engineering Center for Environmental Research and Technology (CE-CERT) at the University of California, Riverside, has developed a process producing high solid content biomass-water slurry using a hydrothermal pretreatment process. In this paper, the systematic investigation of the rheological properties (e.g., shear rate, shear stress, and viscosity) of coal-water slurries, biomass-water slurries, and comingled biomass and coal-water slurries is reported. The solid particle size distribution in the slurry and the initial solid/water ratio were investigated to determine the impact on shear rate and viscosity. This was determined using a rotational rheometer. The experimental results show that larger particle size offers better pumpability. The presence of a high percentage of biomass in solid form significantly decreases slurry pumpability. It is also shown that the solid loading of the biomass-water slurry can be increased to approximately 35 wt % with viscosity of less than 0.7 Pa.s after the pretreatment process. The solid loading increased to approximately 45 wt % when the biomass is comingled with coal. 18 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  15. Improvement of Hydrothermal Stability of Mesoporous Silica Using Salts: Reinvestigation for Time-Dependent Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Ji Man

    compounds with aqueous solutions of hydrogen peroxide.5 However, the structure of the TiMCM-41 is reported and Center for Molecular Science, Korea AdVanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon 305-701, Korea of hydrothermal stability of mesoporous silica using salts solutions (Ryoo, R.; Jun, S. J. Phys. Chem. B 1997, 101

  16. Hydrothermal method of synthesis of rare-earth tantalates and niobates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nyman, May D; Rohwer, Lauren E.S.; Martin, James E

    2012-10-16

    A hydrothermal method of synthesis of a family of rare-earth Group 5 oxides, where the Group 5 oxide is a niobate or tantalate. The rare-earth Group 5 oxides can be doped with suitable emitter ions to form nanophosphors.

  17. Investigation of Lignin Deposition on Cellulose During Hydrothermal Pretreatment, Its Effect on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    Investigation of Lignin Deposition on Cellulose During Hydrothermal Pretreatment, Its Effect on Cellulose Hydrolysis, and Underlying Mechanisms Hongjia Li,1,2,4 Yunqiao Pu,3,4 Rajeev Kumar,1,2,4 Arthur J to form droplets that deposit on the cellulose surface and retard enzymatic digestion of cellulose

  18. Textured catalysts, methods of making textured catalysts, and methods of catalyzing reactions conducted in hydrothermal conditions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Werpy, Todd [West Richland, WA; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA

    2003-12-30

    A textured catalyst having a hydrothermally-stable support, a metal oxide and a catalyst component is described. Methods of conducting aqueous phase reactions that are catalyzed by a textured catalyst are also described. The invention also provides methods of making textured catalysts and methods of making chemical products using a textured catalyst.

  19. Silicic magma petrogenesis in Iceland by remelting of hydrothermally altered crust based on oxygen isotope diversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bindeman, Ilya N.

    Silicic magma petrogenesis in Iceland by remelting of hydrothermally altered crust based on oxygen, University of Iceland, 101 Reykjavik, Iceland; 6 Laboratoire Magmas et Volcans, CNRS-Universite´ Blaise rocks (e.g. Gillis and Coogan, 2002; Jonasson, 2007; Wanless et al., 2010). Iceland represents the only

  20. Synthesis of ZrO{sub 2} nanoparticles by hydrothermal treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Machmudah, Siti Widiyastuti, W. Prastuti, Okky Putri Nurtono, Tantular Winardi, Sugeng; Wahyudiono,; Kanda, Hideki; Goto, Motonobu

    2014-02-24

    Zirconium oxide (zirconia, ZrO{sub 2}) is the most common material used for electrolyte of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Zirconia has attracted attention for applications in optical coatings, buffer layers for growing superconductors, thermal-shield, corrosion resistant coatings, ionic conductors, and oxygen sensors, and for potential applications including transparent optical devices and electrochemical capacitor electrodes, fuel cells, catalysts, and advanced ceramics. In this work, zirconia particles were synthesized from ZrCl{sub 4} precursor with hydrothermal treatment in a batch reactor. Hydrothermal treatment may allow obtaining nanoparticles and sintered materials with controlled chemical and structural characteristics. Hydrothermal treatment was carried out at temperatures of 150 – 200°C with precursor concentration of 0.1 – 0.5 M. Zirconia particles obtained from this treatment were analyzed by using SEM, PSD and XRD to characterize the morphology, particle size distribution, and crystallinity, respectively. Based on the analysis, the size of zirconia particles were around 200 nm and it became smaller with decreasing precursor concentration. The increasing temperature caused the particles formed having uniform size. Zirconia particles formed by hydrothermal treatment were monoclinic, tetragonal and cubic crystal.

  1. Chemical structure and properties of low-rank coals treated by hydrothermal process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohki, A.; Xie, X.F.; Nakajima, Tsunenori; Maeda, Shigeru [Kagoshima Univ., Korimoto, Kagoshima (Japan). Dept. of Applied Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

    1998-12-31

    Several methods for upgrading low-rank coals, in which the hygroscopicity is irreversibly reduced into a level for high-rank coals, have been developed. A hydrothermal treatment of coal, such as hot water drying (HWD), is one of the most promising upgrading methods. The HWD method involves a treatment of low-rank coals under high temperature (300-350 C) and high pressure (80-180 kg/cm{sup 2}). Two low-rank coals, Loy Yang coal and Yallourn coal were hydrothermally treated at 150--350 C. The chemical structure and properties of these treated coals have been examined. The analysis of coal includes hygroscopicity, elemental analysis, the content of oxygenic functional groups measured by chemical analysis, FTIR analysis, CP/MAS {sup 13}C NMR analysis, specific surface area, maceral composition, and vitrinite reflectance. When the low-rank coals are hydrothermally treated, the hygroscopicity of coal remarkably decreases. The content of carboxyl group in coal greatly decreases as heat treatment temperature (HTT) is raised. The difference in carboxyl group content in the 350 C-treated coal between from the chemical analysis and from {sup 13}C NMR and FTIR analyses is explained. From these results, the change in chemical structure and properties of coal during the hydrothermal treatment is discussed.

  2. The evolution of asteroids in the jumping-Jupiter migration model

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roig, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we investigate the evolution of a primordial belt of asteroids, represented by a large number of massless test particles, under the gravitational effect of migrating Jovian planets in the framework of the jumping-Jupiter model. We perform several simulations considering test particles distributed in the Main Belt, as well as in the Hilda and Trojan groups. The simulations start with Jupiter and Saturn locked in the mutual 3:2 mean motion resonance plus 3 Neptune-mass planets in a compact orbital configuration. Mutual planetary interactions during migration led one of the Neptunes to be ejected in less than 10 Myr of evolution, causing Jupiter to jump by about 0.3 au in semi-major axis. This introduces a large scale instability in the studied populations of small bodies. After the migration phase, the simulations are extended over 4 Gyr, and we compare the final orbital structure of the simulated test particles to the current Main Belt of asteroids with absolute magnitude $H<9.7$. The results ...

  3. IDAPA 58.01.07 - Rules Regulating Underground Storage Tank Systems | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNewTexas:Hydrothermally DepositedInformation 6 -

  4. Supply of geothermal power from hydrothermal sources: A study of the cost of power in 20 and 40 years

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petty, S. (Petty (Susan) Consulting, Solano Beach, CA (United States)); Livesay, B.J. (Livesay Consultants, Inc., Encinitas, CA (United States)); Long, W.P. (Carlin Gold Co., Inc., Grass Valley, CA (United States)); Geyer, J. (Geyer (John) and Associates, Vancouver, WA (United States))

    1992-11-01

    This study develops estimates for the amount of hydrothermal geothermal power that could be on line in 20 and 40 years. This study was intended to represent a snapshot'' in 20 and 40 years of the hydrothermal energy available for electric power production should a market exist for this power. This does not represent the total or maximum amount of hydrothermal power, but is instead an attempt to estimate the rate at which power could be on line constrained by the exploration, development and support infrastructure available to the geothermal industry, but not constrained by the potential market for power.

  5. Strong pressure-energy correlations in liquids as a configuration space property: Simulations of temperature down jumps and crystallization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas B. Schroder; Ulf R. Pedersen; Nicoletta Gnan; Jeppe C. Dyre

    2009-03-03

    Computer simulations recently revealed that several liquids exhibit strong correlations between virial and potential energy equilibrium fluctuations in the NVT ensemble [U. R. Pedersen {\\it et al.}, Phys. Rev. Lett. {\\bf 100}, 015701 (2008)]. In order to investigate whether these correlations are present also far from equilibrium constant-volume aging following a temperature down jump from equilibrium was simulated for two strongly correlating liquids, an asymmetric dumbbell model and Lewis-Wahnstr{\\"o}m OTP, as well as for SPC water that is not strongly correlating. For the two strongly correlating liquids virial and potential energy follow each other closely during the aging towards equilibrium. For SPC water, on the other hand, virial and potential energy vary with little correlation as the system ages towards equilibrium. Further proof that strong pressure-energy correlations express a configuration space property comes from monitoring pressure and energy during the crystallization (reported here for the first time) of supercooled Lewis-Wahnstr{\\"o}m OTP at constant temperature.

  6. Structure of The Dixie Valley Geothermal System, a "Typical"...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geothermal System, a "Typical" Basin and Range Geothermal System, From Thermal and Gravity Data Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference...

  7. Applying Innovation System Concept in Agricultural Research for...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Applying Innovation System Concept in Agricultural Research for Development: A learning module Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Applying Innovation System...

  8. Advanced Systems of Efficient Use of Electrical Energy SURE ...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Advanced Systems of Efficient Use of Electrical Energy SURE (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Advanced Systems of Efficient Use of Electrical Energy...

  9. Concept for Management of the Future Electricity System (Smart...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Concept for Management of the Future Electricity System (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Concept for Management of the Future Electricity System...

  10. Electricity storage for short term power system service (Smart...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electricity storage for short term power system service (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Electricity storage for short term power system service...

  11. Multiparameter Fiber Optic Sensing System for Monitoring Enhanced...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Multiparameter Fiber Optic Sensing System for Monitoring Enhanced Geothermal Systems Geothermal Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title...

  12. Smooth Light Curves from a Bumpy Ride: Relativistic Blast Wave Encounters a Density Jump

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakar, Ehud; /Caltech; Granot, Jonathan; /KIPAC, Menlo Park

    2006-06-06

    Some gamma-ray burst (GRB) afterglow light curves show significant variability, which often includes episodes of rebrightening. Such temporal variability had been attributed in several cases to large fluctuations in the external density, or density ''bumps''. Here we carefully examine the effect of a sharp increase in the external density on the afterglow light curve by considering, for the first time, a full treatment of both the hydrodynamic evolution and the radiation in this scenario. To this end we develop a semi-analytic model for the light curve and carry out several elaborate numerical simulations using a one dimensional hydrodynamic code together with a synchrotron radiation code. Two spherically symmetric cases are explored in detail--a density jump in a uniform external medium, and a wind termination shock. The effect of density clumps is also constrained. Contrary to previous works, we find that even a very sharp (modeled as a step function) and large (by a factor of a >> 1) increase in the external density does not produce sharp features in the light curve, and cannot account for significant temporal variability in GRB afterglows. For a wind termination shock, the light curve smoothly transitions between the asymptotic power laws over about one decade in time, and there is no rebrightening in the optical or X-rays that could serve as a clear observational signature. For a sharp jump in a uniform density profile we find that the maximal deviation {Delta}{alpha}{sub max} of the temporal decay index {alpha} from its asymptotic value (at early and late times), is bounded (e.g, {Delta}{alpha}{sub max} < 0.4 for {alpha} = 10); {Delta}{alpha}{sub max} slowly increases with {alpha}, converging to {Delta}{alpha}{sub max} {approx} 1 at very large {alpha} values. Therefore, no optical rebrightening is expected in this case as well. In the X-rays, while the asymptotic flux is unaffected by the density jump, the fluctuations in {alpha} are found to be comparable to those in the optical. Finally, we discuss the implications of our results for the origin of the observed fluctuations in several GRB afterglows.

  13. "You Can't Just Jump Into the Icy Pool of Metacognition": The Value of Networking and Community Building in California Community Colleges' Reading Apprenticeship Project

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harrington, Deborah Lea

    2014-01-01

    You Can't Just Jump Into the Icy Pool of Metacognition": TheYou Can't Just Jump Into the Icy Pool of Metacognition": Thejump  into  the  icy  pool  of  metacognition. ”  This  

  14. Anomalous specific heat jump in a two-component ultracold Fermi gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Armen Sedrakian; Herbert Müther; Artur Polls

    2006-09-20

    The thermodynamic functions of a Fermi gas with spin population imbalance are studied in the temperature-asymmetry plane in the BCS limit. The low temperature domain is characterized by anomalous enhancement of the entropy and the specific heat above their values in the unpaired state, decrease of the gap and eventual unpairing phase transition as the temperature is lowered. The unpairing phase transition induces a second jump in the specific heat, which can be measured in calorimetric experiments. While the superfluid is unstable against a supercurrent carrying state, it may sustain a metastable state if cooled adiabatically down from the stable high-temperature domain. In the latter domain the temperature dependence of the gap and related functions is analogous to the predictions of the BCS theory.

  15. Limiting results for the free energy of directed polymers in random environment with unbounded jumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francis Comets; Ryoki Fukushima; Shuta Nakajima; Nobuo Yoshida

    2015-08-11

    We study asymptotics of the free energy for the directed polymer in random environment. The polymer is allowed to make unbounded jumps and the environment is given by Bernoulli variables. We first establish the existence and continuity of the free energy including the negative infinity value of the coupling constant $\\beta$. Our proof of existence at $\\beta=-\\infty$ differs from existing ones in that it avoids the direct use of subadditivity. Secondly, we identify the asymptotics of the free energy at $\\beta=-\\infty$ in the limit of the success probability of the Bernoulli variables tending to one. It is described by using the so-called time constant of a certain directed first passage percolation. Our proof relies on a certain continuity property of the time constant, which is of independent interest.

  16. Limiting results for the free energy of directed polymers in random environment with unbounded jumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Francis Comets; Ryoki Fukushima; Shuta Nakajima; Nobuo Yoshida

    2015-05-27

    We study asymptotic behaviors of the free energy for the directed polymer in random environment. The polymer is allowed to make unbounded jumps and the environment is given by the Bernoulli variables. We first establish the existence and continuity including the negative infinity value of the coupling constant $\\beta$. Our proof of existence at $\\beta=-\\infty$ differs from existing ones in that it avoids the direct use of subadditivity. Secondly, we identify the asymptotics of the free energy at $\\beta=-\\infty$ in the limit of the success probability of the Bernoulli variables tending to one. It is described by using the so-called time constant of a certain directed first passage percolation. Our proof relies on a certain continuity property of the time constant, which is of independent interest.

  17. EPA - National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System General...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    EPA - National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System General Permit for Discharges from Construction Activities Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  18. Regional Systems Development for Geothermal Energy Resources...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Systems Development for Geothermal Energy Resources Pacific Region (California and Hawaii). Task 3: water resources evaluation. Topical report Jump to: navigation, search...

  19. GROWDERS Demonstration of Grid Connected Electricity Systems...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GROWDERS Demonstration of Grid Connected Electricity Systems (Smart Grid Project) (Spain) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name GROWDERS Demonstration of Grid Connected...

  20. Geographic Information Systems- Tools For Geotherm Exploration...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Information Systems- Tools For Geotherm Exploration, Tracers Data Analysis, And Enhanced Data Distribution, Visualization, And Management Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  1. "Granular jets and hydraulic jumps on an inclined plane", C. G. Johnson, J. M. N. T. Gray ( ), J. Fluid Mech., (Submitted)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sidorov, Nikita

    · "Granular jets and hydraulic jumps on an inclined plane", C. G. Johnson, J. M. N. T. Gray ( ), J material impinging on an inclined plane pro- duces a diverse range of ows, from steady hydraulic jumps-moving radial ow, surrounded by either a teardrop-shaped, or a `blunted' hydraulic jump. A depth

  2. Chars produced by slow pyrolysis and hydrothermal carbonization vary in carbon sequestration potential and greenhouse gases emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malghani, S; Malghani, S; Gleixner, G; Trumbore, SE

    2013-01-01

    of slow and fast pyrolysis biochar on soil C and N turnoverpyrolysis and hydrothermal carbonisation of corn stover. Soilmatter. Slow pyrolysis char is more stable in soil and had

  3. Biotic and abiotic interactions of deep-sea hydrothermal vent-endemic fish on the East Pacific Rise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buckman, Kate Lynn

    2009-01-01

    A study of the ecology of fish endemic to hydrothermal vents on the East Pacific Rise was undertaken utilizing a variety of techniques, focusing on the bythitid Thermichthys hollisi. Stable isotope and gut content analyses ...

  4. Spatial and temporal population genetics at deep-sea hydrothermal vents along the East Pacific Rise and Galápagos Rift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fusaro, Abigail Jean

    2008-01-01

    Ecological processes at deep-sea hydrothermal vents on fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges are punctuated by frequent physical disturbance. Larval dispersal among disjunct vent sites facilitates the persistence of sessile ...

  5. A Helium Isotope Perspective On The Dixie Valley, Nevada, Hydrothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    System. Geothermics. () . Related Geothermal Exploration Activities Activities (4) Direct-Current Resistivity Survey At Dixie Valley Geothermal Area (Laney, 2005) Isotopic...

  6. FTIR study of the photocatalytic degradation of gaseous benzene over UV-irradiated TiO{sub 2} nanoballs synthesized by hydrothermal treatment in alkaline solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Zhengru [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering and State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemical, School of Environmental Sciences and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering and State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemical, School of Environmental Sciences and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Li, Xinyong, E-mail: xyli@dlut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering and State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemical, School of Environmental Sciences and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering and State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemical, School of Environmental Sciences and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhao, Qidong; Qu, Zhenping; Hou, Yang; Zhao, Ling [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering and State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemical, School of Environmental Sciences and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering and State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemical, School of Environmental Sciences and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Liu, Shaomin [Department of Chemical Engineering, Curtin University of Technology, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia)] [Department of Chemical Engineering, Curtin University of Technology, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia); Chen, Guohua [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)] [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2010-12-15

    In this study, photocatalysts of TiO{sub 2} nanoballs were obtained via a hydrothermal treating of commercial P25 in alkaline solution, and then characterized with SEM, XRD, BET and surface photovoltage spectroscopy techniques. The UV-assisted photodegradation of gaseous benzene over P25 and the prepared TiO{sub 2} nanoballs was monitored by an in situ infrared technique. The results demonstrated that the prepared TiO{sub 2} nanoballs in anatase form were more active than commercial P25 in photocatalytic oxidation of gaseous benzene. The promoted activity of the hydrothermal-treated TiO{sub 2} is attributed to the increasing specific surface area and larger band gap induced by the reduced crystallite size. The spectra of FTIR indicated that weakly adsorbed phenol was formed as the reaction progress. Hydroxyl groups on the surface of TiO{sub 2} nanoballs are able to react with photo-produced phenol, which is then retained on the catalyst surface leading to the progressive deactivation of the catalyst in the gas-solid system.

  7. ITN Energy Systems Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNewTexas:HydrothermallyIFB Agro IndustriesISI Solar

  8. Sonochemical and hydrothermal synthesis of PbTe nanostructures with the aid of a novel capping agent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fard-Fini, Shahla Ahmadian; Salavati-Niasari, Masoud; Mohandes, Fatemeh

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • PbTe nanostructures were prepared with the aid of Schiff-base compound. • Sonochemical and hydrothermal methods were employed to fabricate PbTe nanostrucrues. • The effect of preparation parameters on the morphology of PbTe was investigated. - Abstract: In this work, a new Schiff-base compound derived from 1,8-diamino-3,6-dioxaoctane and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde marked as (2-HyNa)-(DaDo) was synthesized, characterized, and then used as capping agent for the preparation of PbTe nanostructures. To fabricate PbTe nanostructures, two different synthesis methods; hydrothermal and sonochemical routes, were applied. To further investigate, the effect of preparation parameters like reaction time and temperature in hydrothermal synthesis and sonication time in the presence of ultrasound irradiation on the morphology and purity of the final products was tested. The products were analyzed with the aid of SEM, TEM, XRD, FT-IR, and EDS. Based on the obtained results, it was found that pure cubic phased PbTe nanostructures have been obtained by hydrothermal and sonochemical approaches. Besides, SEM images showed that cubic-like and rod-like PbTe nanostructures have been formed by hydrothermal and sonochemical methods, respectively. Sonochemical synthesis of PbTe nanostructures was favorable, because the synthesis time of sonochemical method was shorter than that of hydrothermal method.

  9. Numerical-Model Investigation of the Hydrothermal Regime of a Straight-Through Shallow Cooling Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sokolov, A. S. [JSC 'VNIIG im. B. E. Vedeneeva' (Russian Federation)] [JSC 'VNIIG im. B. E. Vedeneeva' (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-15

    A mathematic model based on solution of hydrodynamics and heat-transfer equations by the finite-element method is constructed to predict the hydrothermal regime of a straight-through shallow cooling pond, which provides cooling circulating water to a repository of spent nuclear fuel. Numerical experiments made it possible to evaluate the influence exerted by wind conditions and flow rate of water in the river on the temperature of the circulating water.

  10. Short-time hydrothermal synthesis and delamination of ion exchangeable Mg/Ga layered double hydroxides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unal, Ugur [Department of Nano Science and Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Kumamoto University, Kurokami 2-39-1, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan)], E-mail: ugurunal@chem.kumamoto-u.ac.jp

    2007-09-15

    The hydrothermal synthesis of magnesium-gallium layered double hydroxides (Mg/Ga LDHs) was studied under static and agitated conditions. Not only well-crystallized and large-sized Mg/Ga LDHs having hexagonal morphology were obtained but also the reaction time was comparatively decreased from 24 to 2 h by means of agitation during hydrothermal synthesis. In static conditions, mainly GaOOH and magnesite phases were formed. The elemental analysis results show that the final Mg/Ga ratio is significantly different from the initial ratio. The reason was attributed to the difference in the hydrolytic behavior of Mg{sup 2+} and Ga{sup 3+}. Furthermore, the anion exchange studies with glycine, dodecyl sulfate, ferrocyanide and ferricyanide were performed to investigate the intercalation behavior of the anions into Mg/Ga LDHs. In addition, delamination of Mg/Ga LDHs was performed in formamide for the glycine exchanged forms. Large size of nanosheets thus obtained can be utilized in the fabrication of functional thin films. - Graphical abstract: Hydrothermal synthesis under agitation resulted in highly crystalline Mg/Ga LDHs slabs in a short time. The LDHs slabs were delaminated into two-dimensional nanosize sheets.

  11. Two-Dimensional Coordination Polymers with One-Dimensional Magnetic Chains: Hydrothermal Synthesis, Crystal Structure, and Magnetic and Thermal Properties of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jing

    commonly employed in the synthesis of numerous solid-state inorganic materials. ComparablyTwo-Dimensional Coordination Polymers with One-Dimensional Magnetic Chains: Hydrothermal Synthesis

  12. Mass Transfer Constraints On The Chemical Evolution Of An Active...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mass Transfer Constraints On The Chemical Evolution Of An Active Hydrothermal System, Valles Caldera, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  13. Magnetic flux jumps in textured Bi2Sr2CaCu2O8 A. Nabialek,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Niewczas, Marek

    and it was found to be well accounted for by the available theoretical models. The magnetic-field sweep rate and magnetic-field range where flux jumps occur suggesting a relationship between the two. The heat exchange with decreasing magnetic-field sweep rate. De- magnetizing effects are also shown to have a significant influence

  14. Deformation zone `jumps' in a young convergent setting; the Lengguru fold-and-thrust belt, New Guinea Island

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nicolas, Chamot-Rooke

    Deformation zone `jumps' in a young convergent setting; the Lengguru fold-and-thrust belt, New The Lengguru fold-and-thrust belt in West Papua (Indonesia) has all the characteristics of a young orogen buttress. The construction of these two wedges is younger than 11 Myr. The structures of the Lengguru belt

  15. Abrupt changes in the rate of Andean Plateau uplift from reversible jump Markov Chain Monte Carlo inversion of river profiles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shuster, David L.

    Abrupt changes in the rate of Andean Plateau uplift from reversible jump Markov Chain Monte Carlo form 19 February 2015 Accepted 21 February 2015 Available online 1 March 2015 Keywords: Andean uplift of surface uplift of the central Andean Plateau provides important boundary conditions for regional

  16. Effect of shockwave-induced density jump on laser plasma interactions in low-pressure ambient air

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tillack, Mark

    and Aerospace Engineering and the Center for Energy Research, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman significantly reduce laser energy absorbed in the solid plasma. The ionization of the density jump was confirmed , extreme ultraviolet lithography (EUVL) source 3 , and inertial fusion energy (IFE) 4 . During

  17. A Numerical Method for Pricing Electricity Derivatives for Jump-Diffusion Processes Based on Continuous Time Lattices

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Albanese, Claudio

    A Numerical Method for Pricing Electricity Derivatives for Jump-Diffusion Processes Based.tompaidis@mccombs.utexas.edu Corresponding author. Tel. 512-4715252, Fax 512-4710587. #12;A Numerical Method for Pricing Electricity method for pricing derivatives on electricity prices. The method is based on approximating the generator

  18. track 2: hydrothermal | geothermal 2015 peer review | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing ToolInternationalReport FY2014 -EnergyEnergy 1: systems analysis | geothermal 20152:

  19. Fluid origin, gas fluxes and plumbing system in the sediment-hosted Salton Sea Geothermal System (California, USA)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svensen, Henrik

    Fluid origin, gas fluxes and plumbing system in the sediment-hosted Salton Sea Geothermal System Available online 12 June 2011 Keywords: Salton Sea Geothermal System hydrothermal seeps gas and water geochemistry flux measurements mantle The Salton Sea Geothermal System (California) is an easily accessible

  20. Review and Assessment of Commercial Vendors/Options for Feeding and Pumping Biomass Slurries for Hydrothermal Liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berglin, Eric J.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2012-11-01

    The National Advanced Biofuels Consortium is working to develop improved methods for producing high-value hydrocarbon fuels. The development of one such method, the hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) process, is being led by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The HTL process uses a wet biomass slurry at elevated temperatures (i.e., 300 to 360°C [570 to 680°F]) and pressures above the vapor pressure of water (i.e., 15 to 20 MPa [2200 to 3000 psi] at these temperatures) to facilitate a condensed-phase reaction medium. The process has been successfully tested at bench-scale and development and testing at a larger scale is required to prove the viability of the process at production levels. Near-term development plans include a pilot-scale system on the order of 0.5 to 40 gpm, followed by a larger production-scale system on the order of 2000 dry metric tons per day (DMTPD). A significant challenge to the scale-up of the HTL process is feeding a highly viscous fibrous biomass wood/corn stover feedstock into a pump system that provides the required 3000 psi of pressure for downstream processing. In October 2011, PNNL began investigating commercial feed and pumping options that would meet these HTL process requirements. Initial efforts focused on generating a HTL feed and pump specification and then providing the specification to prospective vendors to determine the suitability of their pumps for the pilot-scale and production-scale plants. Six vendors were identified that could provide viable equipment to meet HTL feed and/or pump needs. Those six vendors provided options consisting three types of positive displacement pumps (i.e., diaphragm, piston, and lobe pumps). Vendors provided capabilities and equipment related to HTL application. This information was collected, assessed, and summarized and is provided as appendices to this report.

  1. Hydraulic jumps on an incline J E A N L U C T H I F F E A U L T1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    1 Hydraulic jumps on an incline J E A N ­ L U C T H I F F E A U L T1,2 AND A N D R E W B E L M O N rim resembling a parabola and reminiscent of a hydraulic jump. There appears to be little theory, and present a simple theory based on horizontal hydraulic jumps which accounts for the rise height and its

  2. Depletion, quantum jumps, and temperature measurements of ??Sr? ions in a linear Paul Trap

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richerme, Philip J

    2006-01-01

    This thesis describes the design and construction of two laser systems to probe the 674nm transition of ??Sr? ions in a linear Paul trap. The first laser system made use of a molecular transition in Iodine to stabilize the ...

  3. WAC - 173 - 220 - National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    WAC - 173 - 220 - National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System Permit Program Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Legal Document-...

  4. Geographic Information System At Nevada Test And Training Range...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geographic Information System At Nevada Test And Training Range Area (Sabin, Et Al., 2004) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  5. Introduction to Small-Scale Photovoltaic Systems (Including RETScreen...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Introduction to Small-Scale Photovoltaic Systems (Including RETScreen Case Study) (Webinar) Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Introduction to Small-Scale...

  6. Active System For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Central Japan Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Active System For Monitoring Volcanic Activity- A Case Study Of The...

  7. Geographic Information System At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geographic Information System At Fish Lake Valley Area (Deymonaz, Et Al., 2008) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic...

  8. Distributed Generation Study/Patterson Farms CHP System Using...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Patterson Farms CHP System Using Renewable Biogas < Distributed Generation Study Jump to: navigation, search Study Location Auburn, New York Site Description Agricultural Study...

  9. Montana Ground Water Pollution Control System Permit Application...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Montana Ground Water Pollution Control System Permit Application Forms Webpage Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Web Site: Montana Ground Water...

  10. National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) Geothermal Data Domain...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    National Geothermal Data System (NGDS) Geothermal Data Domain: Assessment of Geothermal Community Data Needs Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  11. Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range Region (Nash...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range Region (Nash & Johnson, 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic...

  12. Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005 - 2) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic...

  13. Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range Region (Blewitt...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geographic Information System At Nw Basin & Range Region (Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic...

  14. AFTER A Framework for electrical power sysTems vulnerability...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFTER A Framework for electrical power sysTems vulnerability identification, dEfense and Restoration (Smart Grid Project) (Ireland) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name AFTER A...

  15. AFTER A Framework for electrical power sysTems vulnerability...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFTER A Framework for electrical power sysTems vulnerability identification, dEfense and Restoration (Smart Grid Project) (France) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name AFTER A...

  16. AFTER A Framework for electrical power sysTems vulnerability...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFTER A Framework for electrical power sysTems vulnerability identification, dEfense and Restoration (Smart Grid Project) (United Kingdom) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name...

  17. AFTER A Framework for electrical power sysTems vulnerability...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFTER A Framework for electrical power sysTems vulnerability identification, dEfense and Restoration (Smart Grid Project) (Germany) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name AFTER A...

  18. AFTER A Framework for electrical power sysTems vulnerability...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFTER A Framework for electrical power sysTems vulnerability identification, dEfense and Restoration (Smart Grid Project) (Norway) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name AFTER A...

  19. AFTER A Framework for electrical power sysTems vulnerability...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFTER A Framework for electrical power sysTems vulnerability identification, dEfense and Restoration (Smart Grid Project) (Czech Republic) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name...

  20. AFTER A Framework for electrical power sysTems vulnerability...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFTER A Framework for electrical power sysTems vulnerability identification, dEfense and Restoration (Smart Grid Project) (Belgium) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name AFTER A...

  1. AFTER A Framework for electrical power sysTems vulnerability...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFTER A Framework for electrical power sysTems vulnerability identification, dEfense and Restoration (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name AFTER A Framework...

  2. Final Report: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Technology Phase II...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Final Report: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Technology Phase II: Animas Valley, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Final Report:...

  3. Electricity for road transport, flexible power systems and wind...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Electricity for road transport, flexible power systems and wind power (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Electricity for road transport, flexible power...

  4. Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with CO2 as Heat Transmission...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) with CO2 as Heat Transmission Fluid Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011. Project Title Enhanced...

  5. Fluid Imaging of Enhanced Geothermal Systems through Joint 3D...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fluid Imaging of Enhanced Geothermal Systems through Joint 3D Geophysical Inverse Modeling Geothermal Lab Call Project Jump to: navigation, search Last modified on July 22, 2011....

  6. Flex power perspectives of indirect power system control through...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Flex power perspectives of indirect power system control through dynamic power price (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Flex power perspectives of...

  7. Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Blewitt, Et Al., 2003) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  8. Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Coolbaugh, Et Al., 2005 - 2) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity:...

  9. Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geographic Information System At Central Nevada Seismic Zone Region (Laney, 2005) Jump to: navigation, search GEOTHERMAL ENERGYGeothermal Home Exploration Activity: Geographic...

  10. Hydrothermal alteration in research drill hole Y-2, Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bargar, K.E.; Beeson, M.H.

    1981-05-01

    Y-2, a US Geological Survey research diamond-drill hole in Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, was drilled to a depth of 157.4 meters. The hole penetrated interbedded siliceous sinter and travertine to 10.2 m, glacial sediments of the Pinedale Glaciation interlayered with pumiceous tuff from 10.2 to 31.7 m, and rhyolitic lavas of the Elephant Back flow of the Central Plateau Member and the Mallard Lake Member of the Pleistocene Plateau Rhyolite from 31.7 to 157.4 m. Hydrothermal alteration is pervasive in most of the nearly continuous drill core. Rhyolitic glass has been extensively altered to clay and zeolite minerals (intermediate heulandite, clinoptilolite, mordenite, montmorillonite, mixed-layer illite-montmorillonite, and illite) in addition to quartz and adularia. Numerous veins, vugs, and fractures in the core contain these and other minerals: silica minerals (opal, ..beta..-cristobalite, ..cap alpha..-cristobalite, and chalcedony), zeolites (analcime, wairakite, dachiardite, laumontite, and yugawaralite), carbonates (calcite and siderite), clay (kaolinite and chlorite), oxides (hematite, goethite, manganite, cryptomelane, pyrolusite, and groutite), and sulfides (pyrhotite and pyrite) along with minor aegirine, fluorite, truscottite, and portlandite. Interbedded travertine and siliceous sinter in the upper part of the drill core indicate that two distinct types of thermal water are responsible for precipitation of the surficial deposits, and further that the water regime has alternated between the two thermal waters more than once since the end of the Pinedale Glaciation (approx. 10,000 years B.P.). Alternation of zones of calcium-rich and sodium- and potassium-rich hydrothermal minerals also suggests that the calcium-rich and sodium- and potassium-rich hydrothermal minerals also suggests that the water chemistry in this drill hole varies with depth.

  11. Fabrication of hollow mesoporous NiO hexagonal microspheres via hydrothermal process in ionic liquid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Jinbo; School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, 250061, Jinan ; Wu, Lili; School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, 250061, Jinan ; Zou, Ke; School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, 250061, Jinan

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ni(OH){sub 2} precursors were synthesized in ionic liquid and water solution by hydrothermal method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NiO hollow microspheres were prepared by thermal treatment of Ni(OH){sub 2} precursors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NiO hollow microspheres were self-assembled by mesoporous cubic and hexagonal nanocrystals with high specific surface area. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mesoporous structure is stable at 773 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ionic liquid absorbed on the O-terminate surface of the crystals to form hydrogen bond and played key roles in determining the final shape of the NiO novel microstructure. -- Abstract: The novel NiO hexagonal hollow microspheres have been successfully prepared by annealing Ni(OH){sub 2}, which was synthesized via an ionic liquid-assisted hydrothermal method. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR). The results show that the hollow NiO microstructures are self-organized by mesoporous cubic and hexagonal nanocrystals. The mesoporous structure possessed good thermal stability and high specific surface area (ca. 83 m{sup 2}/g). The ionic liquid 1-butyl-3methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([Bmim][BF{sub 4}]) was found to play a key role in controlling the morphology of NiO microstructures during the hydrothermal process. The special hollow mesoporous architectures will have potential applications in many fields, such as catalysts, absorbents, sensors, drug-delivery carriers, acoustic insulators and supercapacitors.

  12. Seismic Evidence For A Hydrothermal Layer Above The Solid Roof Of The Axial

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS Report UrlNM-bRenewableSMUDSectional Model FlumeSeeo JumpMagma

  13. The Near-Surface Hydrothermal Regime of Long Valley Caldera | Open Energy

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJ AutomationTexas/Wind ResourcesProgram Jump to:Information

  14. A Hydrothermal Model of the Roosevelt Hot Springs Area, Utah, USA | Open

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton JumpProgram | OpenEnergyEvaluation | Open EnergyEnergy

  15. A Sr-Isotopic Comparison Between Thermal Waters, Rocks, And Hydrothermal

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand Dalton JumpProgram |Recent Exploration WellMountain, NevadaCalcites,

  16. Discernment of two opposing reports on the hydrological effects of a hydrothermal power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, J.M.

    1986-06-01

    Two evaluations to determine the hydrological effects of a 50-megawatt hydrothermal power plant in the Jemez Mountains give dramatically different results. One shows little effect; the other, a large one. The treatments agree on some thermal-zone water supplies to the Jemez River but not on the expected changes in these flows. The primary areas of disagreement appear to be the total volume of water in the reservoir and the movement of this water to the point of withdrawal. The author (a nonhydrologist) has compared these reports but leaves final judgment of the accuracy of either evaluation for some erudite hydrologists, as some experimental data and model development are needed.

  17. Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes Print Despite the

  18. Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes Print Despite

  19. Techno-Economic Analysis of Liquid Fuel Production from Woody Biomass via Hydrothermal Liquefaction (HTL) and Upgrading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Yunhua; Biddy, Mary J.; Jones, Susanne B.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2014-09-15

    A series of experimental work was conducted to convert woody biomass to gasoline and diesel range products via hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) and catalytic hydroprocessing. Based on the best available test data, a techno-economic analysis (TEA) was developed for a large scale woody biomass based HTL and upgrading system to evaluate the feasibility of this technology. In this system, 2000 dry metric ton per day woody biomass was assumed to be converted to bio-oil in hot compressed water and the bio-oil was hydrotreated and/or hydrocracked to produce gasoline and diesel range liquid fuel. Two cases were evaluated: a stage-of-technology (SOT) case based on the tests results, and a goal case considering potential improvements based on the SOT case. Process simulation models were developed and cost analysis was implemented based on the performance results. The major performance results included final products and co-products yields, raw materials consumption, carbon efficiency, and energy efficiency. The overall efficiency (higher heating value basis) was 52% for the SOT case and 66% for the goal case. The production cost, with a 10% internal rate of return and 2007 constant dollars, was estimated to be $1.29 /L for the SOT case and $0.74 /L for the goal case. The cost impacts of major improvements for moving from the SOT to the goal case were evaluated and the assumption of reducing the organics loss to the water phase lead to the biggest reduction in the production cost. Sensitivity analysis indicated that the final products yields had the largest impact on the production cost compared to other parameters. Plant size analysis demonstrated that the process was economically attractive if the woody biomass feed rate was over 1,500 dry tonne/day, the production cost was competitive with the then current petroleum-based gasoline price.

  20. Idaho On-Site Wastewater Systems Webpage | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNewTexas:HydrothermallyIFB Agro|How toProof ofOn-Site

  1. Hydrothermal synthesis of nanostructured zinc oxide and study of their optical properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moulahi, A.; Sediri, F.; Gharbi, N.

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanostructured ZnO were successfully obtained by a hydrothermal route. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inorganic precursor and molar ratio are key factors for morphology and particle size. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optical properties were also studied. -- Abstract: Nanostructured ZnO (nanorods, nanoshuttles) have been synthesized by hydrothermal approach using ZnCl{sub 2} or Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O as zinc sources and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as structure-directing agent. Techniques X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV-visible absorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy have been used to characterize the structure, morphology and composition of the nanostructured zinc oxide. The optical properties of the as-obtained materials were also studied and showing that it is possible to apply the ZnO nanoshuttles and nanorods on the UV filter, photocatalysis, and special optical devices.

  2. Sound field near hydrothermal vents on Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Little, S.A.; Stolzenbach, K.D.; Purdy, G.M.

    1990-08-10

    High-quality acoustic noise measurements were obtained by two hydrophones located 3 m and 40 m from an active hydrothermal vent on Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge, in an effort to determine the feasibility of monitoring hydrothermal vent activity through flow noise generation. Most of the measured noise field could be attributed to ambient ocean noise sources of microseisms, distant shipping, and weather, punctuated by local ships and biological sources. Long-period, low-velocity, water/rock interface waves were detected with high amplitudes which rapidly decayed with distance from the seafloor. Detection of vent signals was hampered by unexpected spatial nonstationarity due to the shadowing effects of the calders wall. No continuous vent signals were deemed significant based on a criterion of 90% probability of detection and 5% probability of false alarm. However, a small signal near 40 Hz, with a power level of 0.0001 Pa sq/Hz was noticed on two records taken within 3 m of the Inferno black smoker. The frequency of this signal is consistent with predictions, and the power level suggests the occurrence of jet noise amplification due to convected density inhomogeneities. Keywords: Seamounts; Flow noise; Underwater acoustics; Acoustic measurement; Geothermy/noise; Ocean ridges; Underwater sound signals; Reprints; North Pacific Ocean. (EDC).

  3. Pencil-like zinc oxide micro/nano-scale structures: Hydrothermal synthesis, optical and photocatalytic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moulahi, A.; Sediri, F.

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Zinc oxide micro/nanopencils have been synthesized hydrothermally. • Photocatalytic activity has been evaluated by the degradation of methylene blue under UV light irradiation. • ZnO nanopencils exhibit much higher photocatalytic activity than the commercial ZnO. - Abstract: Zinc oxide micro/nanopencils have been successfully synthesized by hydrothermal process using zinc acetate and diamines as structure-directing agents. The morphology, the structure, the crystallinity and the composition of the materials were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The optical properties of synthesized ZnO were investigated by UV–vis spectroscopy. The photocatalytic activity of the material has been evaluated by the degradation of methylene blue under UV irradiation. As a result, after the lapse of 150 min, around 82% bleaching was observed, with ZnO nanopencils yielding more photodegradation compared to that of commercial ZnO (61%)

  4. An Interior-Point Method for Long Term Scheduling of Large Scale Hydrothermal System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliveira, Aurélio R. L.

    that embraces time frames ranging from the long term energy hydroelectric resources control to electric of the reservoirs in order to maximize the hydroelectric production and, as a result, minimize the thermoelectric storage target. It should comprise a detailed representation of both: hydroelectric plants hydraulic

  5. Dynamics of hydrothermal seeps from the Salton Sea geothermal system (California, USA) constrained by temperature monitoring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Podladchikov, Yuri

    by temperature monitoring and time series analysis Henrik Svensen,1 Øyvind Hammer,1 Adriano Mazzini,1 Nathan by monitoring the temperature of two pools and two gryphons for 2180 h (90.8 days) in the period from December is evident from a second period of temperature monitoring of one of the pools from December 2007 to April

  6. Temporal Relations of Volcanism and Hydrothermal Systems in Two Areas of

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al., 2013) | Opensource History View NewsourceUsa, 1980-1994 | Open

  7. Geochemical Modeling of the Near-Surface Hydrothermal System Beneath the

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable UrbanKentucky: EnergyGateway EditOpen

  8. Mapping the Hydrothermal System Beneath the Western Moat of Long Valley

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas:Montezuma,Information MHKMHK5TransportManitouChange |Maplewood Park,Caldera Using

  9. Inferences On The Hydrothermal System Beneath The Resurgent Dome In Long

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View NewGuam:on Openei |sourceAnd CentralWorld BankTerms andValley

  10. Inferences On The Hydrothermal System Beneath The Resurgent Dome In Long

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View NewGuam:on Openei |sourceAnd CentralWorld BankTerms andValleyValley

  11. Quantum Jump Spectroscopy of a Single Electron in a New and Improved Apparatus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gabrielse, Gerald

    , Massachusetts September 2013 #12;©2013 - Joshua Charles Dorr All rights reserved. #12;Thesis advisor Author electrodynamics and the Standard Model of particle physics. This thesis describes the installation of a new . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 3.4 Helium Recovery System . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 4 Low

  12. Sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate-assisted synthesis through a hydrothermal reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sobhani, Azam; Salavati-Niasari, Masoud; Institute of Nano Science and Nano Technology, University of Kashan, Kashan, P.O. Box 87317–51167, Islamic Republic of Iran

    2012-08-15

    Graphical abstract: Reaction of a SeCl{sub 4} aqueous solution with a NiCl{sub 2}·6H{sub 2}O aqueous solution in presence of sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) as capping agent and hydrazine (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}·H{sub 2}O) as reductant, produces nanosized nickel selenide through a hydrothermal method. The effect of temperature, reaction time and amounts of reductant on the morphology, particle sizes of NiSe nanostructures has been investigated. Highlights: ? NiSe nanostructures were synthesized by hydrothermal method. ? A novel Se source was used to synthesize NiSe. ? SDBS as capping agent plays a crucial role on the morphology of products. ? A mixture of Ni{sub 3}Se{sub 2} and NiSe was prepared in the presence of 2 ml hydrazine. ? A pure phase of NiSe was prepared in the presence of 4 or 6 ml hydrazine. -- Abstract: The effects of the anionic surfactant on the morphology, size and crystallization of NiSe precipitated from NiCl{sub 2}·6H{sub 2}O and SeCl{sub 4} in presence of hydrazine (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}·H{sub 2}O) as reductant were investigated. The products have been successfully synthesized in presence of sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) as surfactant via an improved hydrothermal route. A variety of synthesis parameters, such as reaction time and temperature, capping agent and amount of reducing agent have a significant effect on the particle size, phase purity and morphology of the obtained products. The sample size became bigger with decreasing reaction temperature and increasing reaction time. In the presence of 2 ml hydrazine, the samples were found to be the mixture of Ni{sub 3}Se{sub 2} and NiSe. With increasing the reaction time and amount of hydrazine a pure phase of hexagonal NiSe was obtained. X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images indicate phase, particle size and morphology of the products. Chemical composition and purity of the products were characterized by X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Photoluminescence (PL) was used to study the optical properties of NiSe samples.

  13. Life-Cycle Analysis Results of Geothermal Systems in Comparison...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    hydrothermal flash, and hydrothermal binary technologies. lifecycleanalysisofgeothermalsystemsdraft.pdf More Documents & Publications Life-Cycle Analysis Results of...

  14. Life-Cycle Analysis Results of Geothermal Systems in Comparison...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    hydrothermal flash, and hydrothermal binary technologies. lifecycleanalysisofgeothermalsystems.pdf More Documents & Publications Life-Cycle Analysis Results of...

  15. Improvement of thermal properties of low-rank coals treated by hydrothermal process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, X.F.; Ohki, A.; Maeda, S.

    1999-07-01

    Australian low-rank coals, Loy Yang coal, Yallourn coal and Indonesian Adaro coal are hydrothermally treated at 200-350 C. The simultaneous TG/DTA is used to investigate the thermal properties, which include the volatile release profile under a nitrogen atmosphere and the burning profile under an air atmosphere. It is found that the temperature of volatile matter combustion (Ti1) of the hot water dried coals (upgraded coals) increases with heat treatment temperature (HTT), whereas the temperature of char combustion (Ti2), the temperature of maximum reaction (Tmax) and the temperature of char burn out (Tout) do not have large increase on the HTT. These results suggest that the HWD process can raise the volatile matter ignition temperature, resulting in improving the spontaneous ignition temperature, but it still maintains the original combustion behavior. Results from TG-DTA measurements are consistent with those determined by FTIR and solid state {sup 13}C CP/MAS NMR.

  16. Methods for sulfate removal in liquid-phase catalytic hydrothermal gasification of biomass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elliott, Douglas C; Oyler, James

    2013-12-17

    Processing of wet biomass feedstock by liquid-phase catalytic hydrothermal gasification must address catalyst fouling and poisoning. One solution can involve heating the wet biomass with a heating unit to a pre-treatment temperature sufficient for organic constituents in the feedstock to decompose, for precipitates of inorganic wastes to form, for preheating the wet feedstock in preparation for subsequent removal of soluble sulfate contaminants, or combinations thereof. Processing further includes reacting the soluble sulfate contaminants with cations present in the feedstock material to yield a sulfate-containing precipitate and separating the inorganic precipitates and/or the sulfate-containing precipitates out of the wet feedstock. Having removed much of the inorganic wastes and the sulfate contaminants that can cause poisoning and fouling, the wet biomass feedstock can be exposed to the heterogenous catalyst for gasification.

  17. Methods for sulfate removal in liquid-phase catalytic hydrothermal gasification of biomass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elliott, Douglas C; Oyler, James R

    2014-11-04

    Processing of wet biomass feedstock by liquid-phase catalytic hydrothermal gasification must address catalyst fouling and poisoning. One solution can involve heating the wet biomass with a heating unit to a pre-treatment temperature sufficient for organic constituents in the feedstock to decompose, for precipitates of inorganic wastes to form, for preheating the wet feedstock in preparation for subsequent removal of soluble sulfate contaminants, or combinations thereof. Processing further includes reacting the soluble sulfate contaminants with cations present in the feedstock material to yield a sulfate-containing precipitate and separating the inorganic precipitates and/or the sulfate-containing precipitates out of the wet feedstock. Having removed much of the inorganic wastes and the sulfate contaminants that can cause poisoning and fouling, the wet biomass feedstock can be exposed to the heterogeneous catalyst for gasification.

  18. Sources Of Chloride In Hydrothermal Fluids From The Valles Caldera, New

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing Capacity forSiliciumEnergy Inc JumpPennsylvania:Sound Beach, New|

  19. Airflow-terrain interactions through a mountain gap, with an example of eolian activity beneath an atmospheric hydraulic jump

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gaylord, D.R.; Dawson, P.J.

    1987-09-01

    The integration of atmospheric soundings from a fully instrumented aircraft with detailed sedimentary and geomorphic analyses of eolian features in the Ferris dune field of south-central Wyoming lends insight into the manner in which topography interacts with airflow to modify eolian activity. Topographically modified airflow results in zones of airflow deceleration, acceleration, and enhanced atmospheric turbulence, all of which influence the surface morphology and sedimentology. Extreme lateral confluence of prevailing airflow produces accelerated, unidirectional winds. These winds correlate with unusually continuous and elongate parabolic dunes that extend into a mountain gap (Windy Gap). Persistently heightened winds produced at the entrance to Windy Gap have resulted in a concentration of active sand dunes that lack slipfaces. Common development of a strongly amplified atmospheric wave analogous to a hydraulic jump in the gap contributes to the formation of a variety of eolian features that mantle the surface of Windy Gap and the Ferris dune field tail. Heightened, unidirectional winds in this zone promote grain-size segregation, the formation of elongated and aligned sand drifts, climbing and falling dunes, elongate scour streaks, and parabolic dunes that have low-angle (< 20/sup 0/) cross-stratification. Deflation of bedrock and loose sediment has been enhanced in the zone of maximum turbulence beneath the hydraulic jump.

  20. Application of smart grid in photovoltaic power systems, ForskEL...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Application of smart grid in photovoltaic power systems, ForskEL (Smart Grid Project) Jump to: navigation, search Project Name Application of smart grid in photovoltaic power...

  1. Selected data for low-temperature (less than 90{sup 0}C) geothermal systems in the United States: reference data for US Geological Survey Circular 892

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reed, M.J.; Mariner, R.H.; Brook, C.A.; Sorey, M.L.

    1983-12-15

    Supporting data are presented for the 1982 low-temperature geothermal resource assessment of the United States. Data are presented for 2072 geothermal sites which are representative of 1168 low-temperature geothermal systems identified in 26 States. The low-temperature geothermal systems consist of 978 isolated hydrothermal-convection systems, 148 delineated-area hydrothermal-convection systems, and 42 delineated-area conduction-dominated systems. The basic data and estimates of reservoir conditions are presented for each geothermal system, and energy estimates are given for the accessible resource base, resource, and beneficial heat for each isolated system.

  2. Please cite this article in press as: Ashley-Ross, M.A., et al., Jumping sans legs: does elastic energy storage by the vertebral column power terrestrial jumps in bony fishes? Zoology (2013), http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.zool.2013.10.005

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gibb, Alice C.

    2013-01-01

    energy storage by the vertebral column power terrestrial jumps in bony fishes? Zoology (2013), http sans legs: does elastic energy storage by the vertebral column power terrestrial jumps in bony fishes Flexion of the vertebral column is a fundamental aspect of locomotor movements in the vast majority

  3. Hydrothermal synthesis of nanocubes of sillenite type compounds for photovoltaic applications and solar energy conversion of carbon dioxide to fuels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Vaidyanathan; Murugesan, Sankaran

    2014-04-29

    The present invention relates to formation of nanocubes of sillenite type compounds, such as bismuth titanate, i.e., Bi.sub.12TiO.sub.20, nanocubes, via a hydrothermal synthesis process, with the resulting compound(s) having multifunctional properties such as being useful in solar energy conversion, environmental remediation, and/or energy storage, for example. In one embodiment, a hydrothermal method is disclosed that transforms nanoparticles of TiO.sub.2 to bismuth titanate, i.e., Bi.sub.12TiO.sub.20, nanocubes, optionally loaded with palladium nanoparticles. The method includes reacting titanium dioxide nanotubes with a bismuth salt in an acidic bath at a temperature sufficient and for a time sufficient to form bismuth titanate crystals, which are subsequently annealed to form bismuth titanate nanocubes. After annealing, the bismuth titanate nanocubes may be optionally loaded with nano-sized metal particles, e.g., nanosized palladium particles.

  4. Hydrothermal synthesis of flowerlike SnO{sub 2} nanorod bundles and their application for lithium ion battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen, Zhigang, E-mail: xh168688@126.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Qiannan Normal College for Nationalities, Duyun 558000 (China); Zheng, Feng, E-mail: fzheng@mail.csu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Yu, Hongchun; Jiang, Ziran [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Liu, Kanglian [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Qiannan Normal College for Nationalities, Duyun 558000 (China)

    2013-02-15

    SnO{sub 2} nanorod bundles were synthesized by hydrothermal method. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images showed that the as-prepared flowerlike SnO{sub 2} nanorod bundles consist of tetragonal nanorods with size readily tunable. Their electrochemical properties and application as anode for lithium-ion battery were evaluated by galvanostatic discharge–charge testing and cycle voltammetry. SnO{sub 2} nanorod flowers possess improved discharge capacity of 694 mA h g{sup ?1} up to 40th cycle at 0.1 C. - Highlights: ? The flowerlike SnO{sub 2} nanorod bundles were synthesized by hydrothermal method. ? SnO{sub 2} nanorod bundles with tunable size by controlling concentration of SnCl{sub 4}. ? A probable formation mechanism of SnO{sub 2} nanorod bundles has been proposed.

  5. Ion dynamics in nanocrystalline LiMnPO{sub 4} synthesised by novel template free hydrothermal approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vijayan, Lakshmi, E-mail: lakshmivijayan@gmail.com [St. Aloysius' College, Edathua, Alappuzha-689 573, Kerala (India); Cheruku, Rajesh; Govindaraj, G. [Department of Physics, School of Physical, Chemical and Applied Sciences, Pondicherry University, R.V. Nagar, Kalapet, Pondicherry -605 014 (India)

    2014-04-24

    A dense core rectangular shaped nanocrystalline LiMnPO{sub 4} material was synthesized by template free sucrose assisted hydrothermal synthesis. The material possess orthorhombic crystal structure with Pnma, space group having four formula units. The structural characterization was accomplished through X-ray diffraction, thermo gravimetry/differential thermal analysis. Morphology was identified by the SEM, VSM was used to verify the magnetic behavior of the material and electrical characterization was done through impedance spectroscopy and the results were reported.

  6. Xuping Xu and Panos J. Antsaklis, "An Approach to General Switched Linear Quadratic Optimal Control Problems with State Jumps," Proceedings of the 15th International Symposium on Mathematical Theory of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Antsaklis, Panos

    Control Problems with State Jumps," Proceedings of the 15th International Symposium on Mathematical Theory Control Problems with State Jumps," Proceedings of the 15th International Symposium on Mathematical Theory Control Problems with State Jumps," Proceedings of the 15th International Symposium on Mathematical Theory

  7. Hydrothermal Alteration and Past and Present Thermal Regimes in the Western

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNewTexas: EnergyHunterdonHutto,FuelEnergyGabbs Valley

  8. Hydrothermal Circulation At Mount St Helens Determined By Self-Potential

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNewTexas: EnergyHunterdonHutto,FuelEnergyGabbs

  9. An Oxygen Isotope Study Of Hydrothermal Alteration In The Lake City

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowaWisconsin: EnergyYork Jump to:Hempstead BiomassAmes,Operations at the

  10. Comparison of LiMnPO4 made by Combustion and Hydrothermal Syntheses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Jiajun; Doeff, Marca M.; Wang, Ruigang

    2008-05-15

    Among the olivine-structured metal phosphate family, LiMnPO{sub 4} exhibits a high discharge potential (4V), which is still compatible with common electrolytes, making it interesting for use in the next generation of Li ion batteries. The extremely low electronic conductivity of this material severely limits its electrochemical performance, however. One strategy to overcome this limitation is to make LiMnPO{sub 4} nanoparticulate to decrease the diffusion distance. Another is to add a carbon or other conductive coating in intimate contact with the nanoparticles of the main phase, as is commonly done with LiFePO{sub 4}. The electrochemical performance of LiFePO{sub 4} is highly dependent on the quality of the carbon coatings on the particles [1-2], among other variables. Combustion synthesis allows the co-synthesis of nanoparticles coated with carbon in one step. Hydrothermal synthesis is used industrially to make LiFePO{sub 4} cathode materials [3] and affords a good deal of control over purity, crystallinity, and particle size. A wide range of olivine-structured materials has been successfully prepared by this technique [4], including LiMnPO{sub 4} in this study. In this paper, we report on the new synthesis of nano-LiMnPO{sub 4} by a combustion method. The purity is dependent upon the conditions used for synthesis, including the type of fuel and precursors that are chosen. The fuel to nitrate ratio influences the combustion temperature, which determines the type and amount of carbon found in the LiMnPO{sub 4} composites. This can further be modified by use of carbon structural modifiers added during a subsequent (optional) calcination step. Figure 1 shows a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image of the spherical nano-sized LiMnPO{sub 4} particles typically formed by combustion synthesis. The average particle size is around 30 nm, in agreement with values obtained by the Rietveld refinement of XRD patterns. The small size of the particles cause the peak broadening evident in the pattern of combustion formed LiMnPO{sub 4}, shown in Figure 2. Figure 2 also shows a pattern of hydrothermally prepared LiMnPO{sub 4}, which is sub-micron in size. In this presentation, we will show how the crystallographic parameters, particle size, particle morphology, and carbon content and structure impact the electrochemical properties of the LiMnPO{sub 4}/C composites produced by these methods.

  11. Comparison of LiMnPO4 made by Combustion and Hydrothermal Syntheses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Jiajun; Doeff, Marca M.; Wang, Ruigang

    2008-10-12

    Among the olivine-structured metal phosphate family, LiMnPO{sub 4} exhibits a high discharge potential (4V), which is still compatible with common electrolytes, making it interesting for use in the next generation of Li ion batteries. The extremely low electronic conductivity of this material severely limits its electrochemical performance, however. One strategy to overcome this limitation is to make LiMnPO{sub 4} nanoparticulate to decrease the diffusion distance. Another is to add a carbon or other conductive coating in intimate contact with the nanoparticles of the main phase, as is commonly done with LiFePO{sub 4}. The electrochemical performance of LiFePO{sub 4} is highly dependent on the quality of the carbon coatings on the particles, among other variables. Combustion synthesis allows the co-synthesis of nanoparticles coated with carbon in one step. Hydrothermal synthesis is used industrially to make LiFePO{sub 4} cathode materials and affords a good deal of control over purity, crystallinity, and particle size. A wide range of olivine-structured materials has been successfully prepared by this technique, including LiMnPO{sub 4} in this study. In this paper, we report on the new synthesis of nano-LiMnPO{sub 4} by a combustion method. The purity is dependent upon the conditions used for synthesis, including the type of fuel and precursors that are chosen. The fuel to nitrate ratio influences the combustion temperature, which determines the type and amount of carbon found in the LiMnPO{sub 4} composites. This can further be modified by use of carbon structural modifiers added during a subsequent (optional) calcination step. Figure 1 shows a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image of the spherical nano-sized LiMnPO{sub 4} particles typically formed by combustion synthesis. The average particle size is around 30 nm, in agreement with values obtained by the Rietveld refinement of XRD patterns. The small size of the particles cause the peak broadening evident in the pattern of combustion formed LiMnPO{sub 4}, shown in Figure 2. Figure 2 also shows a pattern of hydrothermally prepared LiMnPO{sub 4}, which is sub-micron in size. In this presentation, we will show how the crystallographic parameters, particle size, particle morphology, and carbon content and structure impact the electrochemical properties of the LiMnPO{sub 4}/C composites produced by these methods.

  12. Hydrothermal growth and morphology evolution of CePO{sub 4} aggregates by a complexing method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma Lin [Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Chen Weixiang [Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)], E-mail: weixiangchen@css.zju.edu.cn; Zheng Yifan [Institute of Industrial Catalysis, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China); Xu Zhude [Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2008-11-03

    A facile hydrothermal route assisted by Na{sub 2}H{sub 2}EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid disodium) has been successfully developed to prepare uniform cerium phosphate (CePO{sub 4}) aggregates with different morphologies, such as peanut-like and spindle-like. It was found that the as-prepared uniform CePO{sub 4} aggregates were constructed with many nearly parallel aligned nanorods. The molar ratio of EDTA/Ce{sup 3+}, solution pH and reaction time had great influences on the morphologies and sizes of the CePO{sub 4} samples. In our process of synthesis, Na{sub 2}H{sub 2}EDTA played important roles as complexing reagent and inducing agent on the formation of CePO{sub 4} aggregates. The possible growth mechanism for CePO{sub 4} aggregates was presented. Ce{sub 0.9}Tb{sub 0.1}PO{sub 4} aggregates with different morphologies were also prepared and their photoluminescence properties were characterized.

  13. Textural properties of synthetic nano-calcite produced by hydrothermal carbonation of calcium hydroxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montes-Hernandez, German; Charlet, L; Tisserand, Delphine; Renard, F

    2008-01-01

    The hydrothermal carbonation of calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) at high pressure of CO2 (initial PCO2 1/4 55 bar) and moderate to high temperature (30 and 90 1C) was used to synthesize fine particles of calcite. This method allows a high carbonation efficiency (about 95% of Ca(OH)2-CaCO3 conversion), a significant production rate (48 kg/m3 h) and high purity of product (about 96%). However, the various initial physicochemical conditions have a strong influence on the crystal size and surface area of the synthesized calcite crystals. The present study is focused on the estimation of the textural properties of synthesized calcite (morphology, specific surface area, average particle size, particle size distribution and particle size evolution with reaction time), using Rietveld refinements of X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) measurements, and scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations. This study demonstrate that the pressure, the temperatu...

  14. Multi-jump magnetic switching in ion-beam sputtered amorphous Co{sub 20}Fe{sub 60}B{sub 20} thin films

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Raju, M.; Chaudhary, Sujeet; Pandya, D. K.

    2013-08-07

    Unconventional multi-jump magnetization reversal and significant in-plane uniaxial magnetic anisotropy (UMA) in the ion-beam sputtered amorphous Co{sub 20}Fe{sub 60}B{sub 20}(5–75 nm) thin films grown on Si/amorphous SiO{sub 2} are reported. While such multi-jump behavior is observed in CoFeB(10 nm) film when the magnetic field is applied at 10°–20° away from the easy-axis, the same is observed in CoFeB(12.5 nm) film when the magnetic field is 45°–55° away from easy-axis. Unlike the previous reports of multi-jump switching in epitaxial films, their observance in the present case of amorphous CoFeB is remarkable. This multi-jump switching is found to disappear when the films are crystallized by annealing at 420 °C. The deposition geometry and the energy of the sputtered species appear to intrinsically induce a kind of bond orientation anisotropy in the films, which leads to the UMA in the as-grown amorphous CoFeB films. Exploitation of such multi-jump switching in amorphous CoFeB thin films could be of technological significance because of their applications in spintronic devices.

  15. Chemical and isotopic kinetics of sulfate reduction by organic matter under hydrothermal conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaiser, C.J.

    1988-01-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of nonbacterial sulfate reduction by organic matter in geologic environments. Sulfate is reduced by dextrose under acidic conditions at temperatures of 230-270 C. Reaction products include sulfide and organic-sulfur compounds; sulfite, thiosulfate and elemental sulfur were not detected. The rate law for the initial one- or two-electron reduction of sulfate at 250C is first-order in bisulfate and about one-half-order in initial dextrose concentration, and shows a very strong dependence on pH. The kinetics of sulfate reduction by fructose at 250C are virtually the same. The lack of sulfate reduction by formaldehyde, methanol, ethanol and acetic acid at 250 C indicates that the reducing power of dextrose and fructose cannot be attributed to carbonyl, carboxyl or hydroxyl functional groups. The form of the rate law for sulfate reduction by dextrose and the presence of an induction period rather suggest that the initial reduction of sulfate occurs with free radicals derived from the thermal decomposition of the hexoses or their alteration products. The inferred sulfate-reduction reaction mechanism suggest that aqueous sulfate may be reduced to sulfide in geologic environments such as deep sedimentary basins. The observed acid-catalysis of the reaction in the laboratory may be supplanted by clay-mineral catalysis in geologic environments. Sulfur isotopes are fractionated during the reduction of sulfate by dextrose under hydrothermal conditions. Computer simulations of the isotopic evolution of the experiments suggest that sulfate-sulfide isotopic exchange largely controls the isotopic composition of sulfate and sulfide. The extent of isotopic fractionation due solely to sulfate reduction thus cannot be determined from the experiments

  16. Realization of single-termination SrTiO{sub 3} (100) surfaces by a microwave-induced hydrothermal process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Velasco-Davalos, Ivan; Thomas, Reji; Ruediger, Andreas, E-mail: ruediger@emt.inrs.ca [Centre Énergie, Matériaux et Télécommunications, INRS, 1650 Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Québec J3X1S2 (Canada)] [Centre Énergie, Matériaux et Télécommunications, INRS, 1650 Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Québec J3X1S2 (Canada)

    2013-11-11

    A microwave-induced hydrothermal etching of SrTiO{sub 3} (100) single crystal surfaces in deionized water and subsequent annealing in oxygen atmosphere results in single-terminated and atomically flat terraces for pure and niobium-doped substrates as confirmed through one unit-cell step height and uniform phase by atomic force microscopy. This process that requires 3?min of moderate microwave radiation completely avoids the use of hydrofluoric acid (HF) and related point defects due to fluorine in the crystal surface. The advantages of a safe, inexpensive, and environmentally neutral process hold promise to replace the existing standard protocol for substrate preparation based on buffered HF.

  17. Modeling Proton Jumps in HY Zeolite: Effects of Acid Site Heterogeneity Usha Viswanathan, Justin T. Fermann, Leanna K. Toy, Scott M. Auerbach,*,,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Auerbach, Scott M.

    Modeling Proton Jumps in HY Zeolite: Effects of Acid Site Heterogeneity Usha Viswanathan, Justin T; In Final Form: September 21, 2007 We have computed the total mean rate coefficient for proton transfer in bare H-Y zeolite, for comparison with NMR experiments and previous calculations. We computed proton

  18. Jump start your career with an MS degree at Northwestern, with an emphasis in energy and sustainability. This program is for

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bustamante, Fabián E.

    to move into the increasingly critical energy/sustainability field. Dedicated, intensive and handsEfficientTechnology)* ME499ProjectsInEnergySystemsandSustainability* Contact Dr.Manohar Kulkarni, Assistant ChairJump start your career with an MS degree at Northwestern, with an emphasis in energy

  19. Energy Automation Systems Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbH JumpEllenville, NewLtd EIL JumpAutomation Systems Inc Jump to:

  20. Star Energy Systems | Open Energy Information

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren) Jump to:SpillDavid,EnergybyBiomass Jump to:Systems Jump to:

  1. Plurion Systems Inc | Open Energy Information

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg,Energy LLC JumpPhono SolarPlexus Sol Jump to:Plurion Systems

  2. SunSystem Srl | Open Energy Information

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  3. Trinity Thermal Systems | Open Energy Information

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  4. Aperion Energy Systems | Open Energy Information

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAandAmminex A S Jump to:Angola onAperion Energy Systems Jump to:

  5. Ambient Control Systems | Open Energy Information

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    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LIST OFAMERICA'S FUTURE.EnergyWoodenDateSA JumpSolar PV JumpControl Systems Jump

  6. Hydrothermal Synthesis and Structural Characterization of Novel Zn-Triazole-Benzenedicarboxylate Frameworks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Hyunsoo; Moureau, David M.; Parise, John B.

    2008-10-03

    Three new metal-organic coordination polymers were synthesized hydrothermally using Zn2+ ion, 1,2,4-triazole, and 1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid (BDC): Zn5(H2O)2(C2H2N3)4(C8H4O4)3 {center_dot} 3.9H2O (1), Zn2(C2H2N3)2(C2H3N3)(C8H4O4) {center_dot} 2.5H2O (2), and Zn4(H2O)2(C2H2N3)4(C8H4O4)2 {center_dot} 14H2O (3). Their crystal structures were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Their thermal properties were examined by thermogravimetric analysis. Structure 1 crystallizes in the monoclinic P21/n space group with a = 10.192(2) {angstrom}, b = 17.764(4) {angstrom}, c = 24.437(5) {angstrom}, {beta} = 91.19(3){sup o}, and V = 4423.3(15) {angstrom}3. Structure 2 crystallizes in the triclinic P space group with a = 7.797(2) {angstrom}, b = 10.047(2) {angstrom}, c = 13.577(3) {angstrom}, {alpha} = 110.18(3){sup o}, {beta} = 105.46(3){sup o}, {gamma} = 93.90(3){sup o}, and V = 947.0(3) {angstrom}3. Structure 3 crystallizes in monoclinic P21/n space group with a = 13.475(3) {angstrom}, b = 26.949(5) {angstrom}, c = 13.509(3) {angstrom}, {beta} = 95.18(3){sup o}, and V = 4885.7(17) {angstrom}3. In structure 1, the units of the triazole-Zn polyhedra are linked by BDC in a zigzag fashion to create the stacking of phenyl groups along the a axis. In structure 2, both triazole and BDC bridge Zn polyhedra in the (011) plane, resulting in the eight-membered channels along the a axis. In the case of structure 3, the BDC links the Zn polyhedra along the b axis to form a pillared open framework. This structure is the most porous of the compounds presented in this work.

  7. Electronic structure and magnetic properties of FeWO{sub 4} nanocrystals synthesized by the microwave-hydrothermal method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Almeida, M.A.P. [INCTMN-DQ-Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Sao Carlos, P.O. Box 676, 13565-905, SP (Brazil)] [INCTMN-DQ-Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Sao Carlos, P.O. Box 676, 13565-905, SP (Brazil); Cavalcante, L.S., E-mail: laeciosc@bol.com.br [INCTMN-Universidade Estadual, Paulista, P.O. Box 355, 14801-907, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Morilla-Santos, C.; Filho, P.N. Lisboa [MAv-Universidade Estadual, Paulista, P.O. Box 473, 17033-360, Bauru, SP (Brazil)] [MAv-Universidade Estadual, Paulista, P.O. Box 473, 17033-360, Bauru, SP (Brazil); Beltran, A.; Andres, J.; Gracia, L. [Department de Quimica Fisica i Analitica, Universitat Jaume I, E-12071 Castello (Spain)] [Department de Quimica Fisica i Analitica, Universitat Jaume I, E-12071 Castello (Spain); Longo, E. [INCTMN-DQ-Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Sao Carlos, P.O. Box 676, 13565-905, SP (Brazil) [INCTMN-DQ-Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Sao Carlos, P.O. Box 676, 13565-905, SP (Brazil); INCTMN-Universidade Estadual, Paulista, P.O. Box 355, 14801-907, Araraquara, SP (Brazil)

    2012-11-15

    This communication reports that FeWO{sub 4} nanocrystals were successfully synthesized by the microwave-hydrothermal method at 443 K for 1 h. The structure and shape of these nanocrystals were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Rietveld refinement, and transmission electron microscopy. The experimental results and first principles calculations were combined to explain the electronic structure and magnetic properties. Experimental data were obtained by magnetization measurements for different applied magnetic fields. Theoretical calculations revealed that magnetic properties of FeWO{sub 4} nanocrystals can be assigned to two magnetic orderings with parallel or antiparallel spins in adjacent chains. These factors are crucial to understanding of competition between ferro- and antiferromagnetic behavior. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Monophasic FeWO{sub 4} nanocrystals were synthesized by the microwave-hydrothermal method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rietveld refinement and clusters model for monoclinic structure Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic properties of FeWO{sub 4} nanocrystals at different temperatures.

  8. Hydrothermal synthesis of Mn vanadate nanosheets and visible-light photocatalytic performance for the degradation of methyl blue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pei, L.Z. Xie, Y.K.; Pei, Y.Q.; Jiang, Y.X.; Yu, H.Y.; Cai, Z.Y.

    2013-07-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Mn vanadate nanosheets have been synthesized by simple hydrothermal process. • The formation of Mn vanadate nanosheets can be controlled by growth conditions. • Mn vanadate nanosheets exhibit good photocatalytic activities for methyl blue. - Abstract: Mn vanadate nanosheets have been synthesized via a facile hydrothermal route using ammonium metavanadate and Mn acetate as the raw materials, polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) as the surfactant. X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows that the Mn vanadate nanosheets are composed of monoclinic MnV{sub 2}O{sub 6} phase. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation indicates that the nanosheets have the average thickness of about 50 nm, length of 2–10 ?m and width of 800 nm to 2 ?m. The growth process of the Mn vanadate nanosheets has also been discussed based on the analysis of the roles of the growth conditions on the formation of the Mn vanadate nanosheets. The nanosheets show good photocatalytic activities for the degradation of methylene blue (MB) under visible light irradiation. About 72.96% MB can be degraded after visible light irradiation for 1 h over 10 mg Mn vanadate nanosheets in 10 mL MB solution with the concentration of 10 mg L{sup ?1}.

  9. Study concerning the utilization of the ocean spreading center environment for the conversion of biomass to a liquid fuel. (Includes Appendix A: hydrothermal petroleum genesis). [Supercritical water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steverson, M.; Stormberg, G.

    1985-01-01

    This document contains a report on the feasibility of utilizing energy obtained from ocean spreading centers as process heat for the conversion of municipal solid wastes to liquid fuels. The appendix contains a paper describing hydrothermal petroleum genesis. Both have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (DMC)

  10. The Krafla Geothermal System. A Review of Geothermal Research...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    The Krafla Geothermal System. A Review of Geothermal Research and Revision of the Conceptual Model Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: The...

  11. The Bureau of Land Management's Well Information System (WIS...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Bureau of Land Management's Well Information System (WIS) How-To Guide Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library PermittingRegulatory Guidance - Guide...

  12. TRACING FLUID SOURCES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM USING FLUID...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    TRACING FLUID SOURCES IN THE COSO GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM USING FLUID-INCLUSION GAS CHEMISTRY Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings:...

  13. Development of a plan to implement enhanced geothermal system...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Development of a plan to implement enhanced geothermal system (EGS) in the animas valley, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report:...

  14. A Technology Assessment System Of The Alternative Energy Sources...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    A Technology Assessment System Of The Alternative Energy Sources (Sun And Wind) For Rural Communities In Mexico Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  15. A Q-switched Ho:YAG laser assisted nanosecond time-resolved T-jump transient mid-IR absorbance spectroscopy with high sensitivity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wei Hua

    dynamical structures and the folding/unfolding kinetics of proteins in solution. A home-built setup of T is composed of a Q-switched Cr, Tm, Ho:YAG laser with an output wavelength at 2.09 µm as the T-jump heating source, and a continuous working CO laser tunable from 1580 to 1980 cm-1 as the IR probe. The results

  16. Synthesis of ZnO nanorod–nanosheet composite via facile hydrothermal method and their photocatalytic activities under visible-light irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tan, Wai Kian; Abdul Razak, Khairunisak; Lockman, Zainovia; Kawamura, Go; Muto, Hiroyuki; Matsuda, Atsunori

    2014-03-15

    ZnO composite films consisting of ZnO nanorods and nanosheets were prepared by low-temperature hydrothermal processing at 80 °C on seeded glass substrates. The seed layer was coated on glass substrates by sol–gel dip-coating and pre-heated at 300 °C for 10 min prior to hydrothermal growth. The size of the grain formed after pre-heat treatment was ?40 nm. A preferred orientation seed layer at the c-axis was obtained, which promoted vertical growth of the ZnO nanorod arrays and formation of the ZnO nanosheets. X-ray diffraction patterns and high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM) images confirmed that the ZnO nanorods and nanosheets consist of single crystalline and polycrystalline structures, respectively. Room temperature photoluminescence spectra of the ZnO nanorod–nanosheet composite films exhibited band-edge ultraviolet (UV) and visible emission (blue and green) indicating the formation of ZnO crystals with good crystallinity and are supported by Raman scattering results. The formation of one-dimensional (1D) ZnO nanorod arrays and two-dimensional (2D) ZnO nanosheet films using seeded substrates in a single low-temperature hydrothermal step would be beneficial for realization of device applications that utilize substrates with limited temperature stability. The ZnO nanorods and nanosheets composite structure demonstrated higher photocatalytic activity during degradation of aqueous methylene blue under visible-light irradiation. -- Graphical abstract: Schematic illustration of ZnO nanorod–nanosheet composite structure formation by hydrothermal at low-temperature of 80 °C against time. Highlights: • Novel simultaneous formation of ZnO nanorods and nanosheets composite structure. • Facile single hydrothermal step formation at low-temperature. • Photoluminescence showed ultraviolet and visible emission. • Feasible application on substrates with low temperature stability. • Improved photocatalytic activity under visible-light irradiation.

  17. Approximate bisimulation for a class of stochastic hybrid systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pappas, George J.

    , target tracking, robotics, and power systems [35]. The field of stochastic hybrid systems is a veryApproximate bisimulation for a class of stochastic hybrid systems (Invited Paper) Agung Julius of stochastic hybrid systems, namely, the jump linear stochastic systems (JLSS). The idea is based

  18. 1256 IEEE TRANSACTIONS ON POWER SYSTEMS, VOL. 18, NO. 4, NOVEMBER 2003 Short-Term Hydrothermal Generation Scheduling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Catholic University of Chile (Universidad Católica de Chile)

    , and economic load dispatch. Considering a scheduling horizon period of a week, hourly generation schedules

  19. Experimental and theoretical investigation of the production of HCl and some metal chlorides in magmatic/hydrothermal systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The theoretical analysis is given for calculating the composition of the aqueous vapor and the saline brine (hydrosaline liquid) present at run pressure and temperature in the experiment. The mixture of aqueous vapor and brine is homogenized upon quench. The method for calculating the concentration of HCl and NaCl in the coexisting aqueous vapor and brine is shown.

  20. Identification of chemoautotrophic microorganisms from a diffuse flow hydrothermal vent at EPR 9° north using ¹³C DNA stable isotope probing and catalyzed activated reporter deposition-fluorescence in situ hybridization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richberg, Kevin Patrick

    2010-01-01

    At deep-sea hydrothermal vents chemolithoautotrophic microbes mediate the transfer of geothermal chemical energy to higher trophic levels. To better understand these underlying processes and the organisms catalyzing them, ...

  1. Socovoltaic Systems | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter Battery TechnologySocovoltaic Systems Jump to: navigation, search

  2. Vitex Systems | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThin FilmUnitedVairexVertVillageVitex Systems Jump to: navigation,

  3. Altergy Systems | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand DaltonSolarOpen5All HomeAlphakat GmbH JumpAlsoAltamountAltergy Systems

  4. NRG Systems | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII Jump to: navigation, searchsourceEnergyTexas:NGEN Partners LLCIWindSystems Jump

  5. Life-cycle analysis results of geothermal systems in comparison to other power systems.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, J. L.; Clark, C. E.; Han, J.; Wang, M.; Energy Systems

    2010-10-11

    A life-cycle energy and greenhouse gas emissions analysis has been conducted with Argonne National Laboratory's expanded Greenhouse Gases, Regulated Emissions, and Energy Use in Transportation (GREET) model for geothermal power-generating technologies, including enhanced geothermal, hydrothermal flash, and hydrothermal binary technologies. As a basis of comparison, a similar analysis has been conducted for other power-generating systems, including coal, natural gas combined cycle, nuclear, hydroelectric, wind, photovoltaic, and biomass by expanding the GREET model to include power plant construction for these latter systems with literature data. In this way, the GREET model has been expanded to include plant construction, as well as the usual fuel production and consumption stages of power plant life cycles. For the plant construction phase, on a per-megawatt (MW) output basis, conventional power plants in general are found to require less steel and concrete than renewable power systems. With the exception of the concrete requirements for gravity dam hydroelectric, enhanced geothermal and hydrothermal binary used more of these materials per MW than other renewable power-generation systems. Energy and greenhouse gas (GHG) ratios for the infrastructure and other life-cycle stages have also been developed in this study per kilowatt-hour (kWh) of electricity output by taking into account both plant capacity and plant lifetime. Generally, energy burdens per energy output associated with plant infrastructure are higher for renewable systems than conventional ones. GHG emissions per kWh of electricity output for plant construction follow a similar trend. Although some of the renewable systems have GHG emissions during plant operation, they are much smaller than those emitted by fossil fuel thermoelectric systems. Binary geothermal systems have virtually insignificant GHG emissions compared to fossil systems. Taking into account plant construction and operation, the GREET model shows that fossil thermal plants have fossil energy use and GHG emissions per kWh of electricity output about one order of magnitude higher than renewable power systems, including geothermal power.

  6. Response to"Analysis of the Treatment, by the U.S. Department of Energy, of the FEP Hydrothermal Activity in the Yucca Mountain Performance Assessment" by Yuri Dublyansky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houseworth, J.E.; Hardin, E.

    2008-11-17

    This paper presents a rebuttal to Dublyansky (2007), which misrepresents technical issues associated with hydrothermal activity at the proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository and their importance to the long-term performance of the repository. In this paper, questions associated with hydrothermal activity are reviewed and the justification for exclusion of hydrothermal activity from performance assessment is presented. The hypothesis that hydrothermal upwelling into the present-day unsaturated zone has occurred at Yucca Mountain is refuted by the unambiguous evidence that secondary minerals and fluid inclusions in the unsaturated zone formed in an unsaturated environment from downward percolating meteoric waters. The thermal history at Yucca Mountain, inferred from fluid inclusion and isotopic data, is explained in terms of the tectonic extensional environment and associated silicic magmatism. The waning of tectonic extension over millions of years has led to the present-day heat flux in the Yucca Mountain region that is below average for the Great Basin. The long time scales of tectonic processes are such that any effects of a resumption of extension or silicic magmatism on hydrothermal activity at Yucca Mountain over the 10,000-year regulatory period would be negligible. The conclusion that hydrothermal activity was incorrectly excluded from performance assessment as asserted in Dublyansky (2007) is contradicted by the available technical and regulatory information.

  7. Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}–CNTs nanocomposites: Inorganic dispersant assisted hydrothermal synthesis and application in lithium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Qixun, E-mail: qxguo@xmu.edu.cn; Guo, Pengfei; Li, Juntao, E-mail: jtli@xmu.edu.cn; Yin, Hao; Liu, Jie; Xiao, Feilong; Shen, Daoxiang; Li, Ning

    2014-05-01

    Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}–CNTs nanocomposites with a particle size of ?80 nm have been synthesized through an organic-free hydrothermal synthesis strategy by using Sn(OH){sub 6}{sup 2?} as an inorganic dispersant, and served as anode materials of lithium ion batteries. Nano-sized and micro-sized Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} without CNTs have also been prepared for comparison. The cycle performances of the as-obtained Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} are highly size-dependent. The Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}–CNTs nanocomposites can deliver reversible discharge capacity of ?700 mA h/g at a current density of 50 mA/g after 50 cycles. The discharge capacity of the micro-sized Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} decreased to 171 mA h/g after 50 cycles. Our work not only provides new insights into the inorganic dispersant assisted hydrothermal synthesis of metal oxides nanocrystals but also gives guidance for finding new nanocomposites as anode materials of lithium ion batteries. - Graphical abstract: Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}–CNTs nanocomposites have been prepared through an inorganic dispersant assisted hydrothermal synthesis strategy, and served as anode materials of lithium ion batteries with enhanced performance. - Highlights: • Sn(OH){sub 6}{sup 2?} is a good inorganic dispersant for the hydrothermal synthesis of nano Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. • The cycle performances of nano Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} anode are much better than that of micro Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} anode. • Compositing CNTs can enhance the cycle performances of nano Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} anode.

  8. Mixed random walks with a trap in scale-free networks including nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor jumps

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Zhongzhi; Sheng, Yibin

    2015-01-01

    Random walks including non-nearest-neighbor jumps appear in many real situations such as the diffusion of adatoms and have found numerous applications including PageRank search algorithm, however, related theoretical results are much less for this dynamical process. In this paper, we present a study of mixed random walks in a family of fractal scale-free networks, where both nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor jumps are included. We focus on trapping problem in the network family, which is a particular case of random walks with a perfect trap fixed at the central high-degree node. We derive analytical expressions for the average trapping time (ATT), a quantitative indicator measuring the efficiency of the trapping process, by using two different methods, the results of which are consistent with each other. Furthermore, we analytically determine all the eigenvalues and their multiplicities for the fundamental matrix characterizing the dynamical process. Our results show that although next-nearest-neighb...

  9. Effect of hydrothermal condition on the formation of multi-component oxides of Ni-based metallic glass under high temperature water near the critical point

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kim, J. S.; Kim, S. Y.; Kim, D. H.; Ott, R. T.; Kim, H. G.; Lee, M. H.

    2015-07-01

    The specific feature of multi-component oxides synthesized by hydrothermal process under high temperature (633 K) and highly pressurized water (18.9 MPa) near critical point. Effects of hydrothermal processing duration times 24 hours and 72 hours, respectively, on the oxide formation of the Ni59Zr20Ti16Si2Sn3 metallic glass synthesized by powder metallurgy process were characterized by X-ray diffractometer, differential scanning calorimeter along with the particle size, morphology and crystalline phase of the oxides. The crystallization of the needle-shape NiTiO3, ZrTiO4 and ZrSnO4 ternary oxide phases observed on the surface of metallic glass at below glass transition temperature and the morphology of oxide phasesmore »changed to plate-shape around 2 ?m in diameter by the increase processing time. This hydrothermal processing in subcritical water provides accelerated dense metal oxide crystals due to the reaction medium being at higher pressure than conventional oxidation processing.« less

  10. Hydrothermal synthesis and characteristics of 3-D hydrated bismuth oxalate coordination polymers with open-channel structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Xinxiang; Cao Yanning; Zhang Hanhui Chen Yiping; Chen Xuehuan; Chai Xiaochuan

    2008-05-15

    Two new 3-D porous bismuth coordination polymers, (C{sub 5}NH{sub 6}){sub 2}[Bi{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 4}].2H{sub 2}O 1 and (NH{sub 4})[Bi(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2}].3H{sub 2}O 2, have been hydrothermally synthesized and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound 1 crystallizes in the monoclinic symmetry, P2{sub 1}/c space group with a=10.378(2) A, b=17.285(3) A, c=16.563(5) A, {alpha}=90 deg., {beta}=119.66(2) deg., {gamma}=90 deg., V=2581.8(10) A{sup 3}, Z=4, R{sub 1}=0.0355 and wR{sub 2}=0.0658 for unique 4713 reflections I >2{sigma}(I). Compound 2 crystallizes in the tetragonal symmetry, I4{sub 1}/amd space group with a=11.7026(17) A, b=11.7026(17) A, c=9.2233(18) A, {alpha}=90 deg., {beta}=90 deg., {gamma}=90 deg., V=1263.1(4) A{sup 3}, Z=32, R{sub 1}=0.0208 and wR{sub 2}=0.0518 for unique 359 reflections I> 2{sigma}(I). Compounds 1 and 2 are 3-D open-framework structures with a 6{sup 6} uniform net, which consist of honeycomb-like layers connected to each other by oxalate units. While different guest molecules fill in their cavities of honeycomb-like layers, study of ultrasonic treatment on 2 indicates the replacement of NH{sub 4}{sup +} by K{sup +} on potassium ion exchange. Thermogravimetric analysis indicates that the open-channel frameworks are thermally stable up to 200 deg. C, and other characterizations are also described by elemental analysis, IR and ultraviolet-visible diffuse reflectionintegral spectrum (UV-Vis DRIS). - Graphical abstract: Two novel 3-D extended porous coordination polymers have been synthesized by hydrothermal method. Both compounds are 3-D open-framework structures with a 6{sup 6} uniform net, which consist of honeycomb-like layers connected to each other by oxalate units. While different guest molecules fill in their cavities of honeycomb-like layers. Study of ultrasonic treatment on 2 indicates the replacement of NH{sub 4}{sup +} by K{sup +} on potassium ion exchange.

  11. Microwave-hydrothermal synthesis of nanostructured Na-birnessites and phase transformation by arsenic(III) oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dias, Anderson [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto, 35400-000 Ouro Preto, MG (Brazil)], E-mail: anderson_dias@iceb.ufop.br; Sa, Rodrigo G.; Spitale, Matheus C.; Athayde, Maycon; Ciminelli, Virginia S.T. [DEMET, UFMG, Rua Espirito Santo 35, Sala 206, 30160-030 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2008-06-03

    Microwave-hydrothermal synthesis was employed to produce Na-birnessites. Crystalline, single-phase materials were obtained at temperatures as low as 120 deg. C and times as short as 1 min. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize the structural features of the nanostructured powders. Birnessites possessed a monoclinic structure in space group C2/m with nine Raman-active bands, all of which were observed for the first time due to optimized acquisition of the spectroscopic data. The highly reactive materials produced were submitted to sorption experiments with As(III). An oxidative precipitation occurred with the production of Mn(II) arsenate at higher arsenic concentrations. In addition, the formation of hausmannite (Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}) was confirmed by X-ray diffraction and Raman analyses of the reacted solid phase. The observed 14 Raman-active modes were adjusted according to the tetragonal I4{sub 1}/amd space group for hausmannite. An additional band related to the breathing mode of the arsenate was observed, leading to the conclusion that adsorption onto hausmannite takes place in addition to the oxidative precipitation of manganese arsenate.

  12. Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Rock-Water Interactions In Hot Dry Rock Geothermal Systems- Field Investigations Of In Situ Geochemical Behavior Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  13. Tss4U BV formerly Holecsol R S Renewable Energy Systems and Shell...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    and Shell Solar Energy Jump to: navigation, search Name: Tss4U BV (formerly Holecsol, R&S Renewable Energy Systems and Shell Solar Energy) Place: Veldhoven, Netherlands Zip:...

  14. Analysis of the Impact of Fuel Cell Vehicles on Energy Systems...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Analysis of the Impact of Fuel Cell Vehicles on Energy Systems in the Transportation Sector in Japan Jump to: navigation, search Tool Summary LAUNCH TOOL Name: Analysis of the...

  15. Near-Surface imaging of a hydrogeothermal system at Mount Princeton...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Near-Surface imaging of a hydrogeothermal system at Mount Princeton, Colorado using 3D seismic, self-potential, and dc resistivity data Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  16. Recovery Act. Development and Validation of an Advanced Stimulation Prediction Model for Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutierrez, Marte

    2013-12-31

    This research project aims to develop and validate an advanced computer model that can be used in the planning and design of stimulation techniques to create engineered reservoirs for Enhanced Geothermal Systems. The specific objectives of the proposal are to; Develop a true three-dimensional hydro-thermal fracturing simulator that is particularly suited for EGS reservoir creation; Perform laboratory scale model tests of hydraulic fracturing and proppant flow/transport using a polyaxial loading device, and use the laboratory results to test and validate the 3D simulator; Perform discrete element/particulate modeling of proppant transport in hydraulic fractures, and use the results to improve understand of proppant flow and transport; Test and validate the 3D hydro-thermal fracturing simulator against case histories of EGS energy production; and Develop a plan to commercialize the 3D fracturing and proppant flow/transport simulator. The project is expected to yield several specific results and benefits. Major technical products from the proposal include; A true-3D hydro-thermal fracturing computer code that is particularly suited to EGS; Documented results of scale model tests on hydro-thermal fracturing and fracture propping in an analogue crystalline rock; Documented procedures and results of discrete element/particulate modeling of flow and transport of proppants for EGS applications; and Database of monitoring data, with focus of Acoustic Emissions (AE) from lab scale modeling and field case histories of EGS reservoir creation.

  17. Hydrothermal coupling in a self-affine rough fracture A. Neuville,* R. Toussaint, and J. Schmittbuhl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmittbuhl, Jean

    - thermics is an intensively developing field. Deep enhanced geothermal systems EGSs are based on the energy the hydraulic flow and subse- quently to enhance the thermal exchange. Fracture roughness might, in the opposite as an ellipse or a poly- hedron. This is the case in most fracture network models used for geothermal 10

  18. Neutron imaging for geothermal energy systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bingham, Philip R; Anovitz, Lawrence {Larry} M; Polsky, Yarom

    2013-01-01

    Geothermal systems extract heat energy from the interior of the earth using a working fluid, typically water. Three components are required for a commercially viable geothermal system: heat, fluid, and permeability. Current commercial electricity production using geothermal energy occurs where the three main components exist naturally. These are called hydrothermal systems. In the US, there is an estimated 30 GW of base load electrical power potential for hydrothermal sites. Next generation geothermal systems, named Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS), have an estimated potential of 4500 GW. EGSs lack in-situ fluid, permeability or both. As such, the heat exchange system must be developed or engineered within the rock. The envisioned method for producing permeability in the EGS reservoir is hydraulic fracturing, which is rarely practiced in the geothermal industry, and not well understood for the rocks typically present in geothermal reservoirs. High costs associated with trial and error learning in the field have led to an effort to characterize fluid flow and fracturing mechanisms in the laboratory to better understand how to design and manage EGS reservoirs. Neutron radiography has been investigated for potential use in this characterization. An environmental chamber has been developed that is suitable for reproduction of EGS pressures and temperatures and has been tested for both flow and precipitations studies with success for air/liquid interface imaging and 3D reconstruction of precipitation within the core.

  19. Development of Hydrothermal Liquefaction and Upgrading Technologies for Lipid-Extracted Algae Conversion to Liquid Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Yunhua; Albrecht, Karl O.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Hallen, Richard T.; Jones, Susanne B.

    2013-10-01

    Bench-scale tests were performed for lipid-extracted microalgae (LEA) conversion to liquid fuels via hydrotreating liquefaction (HTL) and upgrading processes. Process simulation and economic analysis for a large-scale LEA HTL and upgrading system were developed based on the best available test results. The system assumes an LEA feed rate of 608 dry metric ton/day and that the feedstock is converted to a crude HTL bio-oil and further upgraded via hydrotreating and hydrocracking to produce liquid hydrocarbon fuels, mainly alkanes. Performance and cost results demonstrate that HTL would be an effective option to convert LEA to liquid fuel. The liquid fuels annual yield was estimated to be 26.9 million gallon gasoline-equivalent and the overall energy efficiency at higher heating value basis was estimated to be 69.5%. The minimum fuel selling price (MFSP) was estimated to be $0.75/L with LEA feedstock price at $33.1 metric ton at dry basis and 10% internal rate of return. A sensitivity analysis indicated that the largest effects to production cost would come from the final products yields and the upgrading equipments cost. The impact of plant scale on MFSP was also investigated.

  20. Topologically novel copper molybdate phases based on 3,4'-dipyridylketone: Hydrothermal synthesis, structural characterization, and magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montney, Matthew R. [Lyman Briggs College and Department of Chemistry, E-30 Holmes Hall, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48825 (United States); LaDuca, Robert L. [Lyman Briggs College and Department of Chemistry, E-30 Holmes Hall, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48825 (United States)], E-mail: laduca@msu.edu

    2008-04-15

    Hydrothermal treatment of CuCl{sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O, MoO{sub 3}, and 3,4'-dipyridylketone (3,4'-dpk) in 1:1:2 mole ratio afforded the new mixed metal oxide phases [Cu{sub 2}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2}(3,4'-dpk)(H{sub 2}O)] (1) or [Cu{sub 4}(3,4'-dpk){sub 4}(Mo{sub 8}O{sub 26})] (2), depending on the pH of the initial reaction mixture. Compound 1 possesses unique one-dimensional (1-D) [Cu{sub 2}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)]{sub n} ribbons constructed from the linkage of {l_brace}Cu{sup II}{sub 4}O{sub 6}{r_brace} tetrameric units through isolated [MoO{sub 4}]{sup 2-} tetrahedra. These ribbons in turn are connected into a two-dimensional (2-D) coordination polymer structure by tethering 3,4'-dpk ligands. Compound 2, containing monovalent copper ions, manifests an unprecedented 'X-rail' 1-D extended structure with (6{sup 2}8){sub 4}(6{sup 6}) topology formed from the bracketing of discrete [{beta}-Mo{sub 8}O{sub 26}]{sup 4-} anions by four [Cu{sup I}(3,4{sup '}-dpk)]{sub n}{sup n+} chains. The variable temperature magnetic susceptibility behavior of 1 was fit to a linear tetramer model, with g=2.03(3), J{sub 1}=25.8(7) cm{sup -1} and J{sub 2}=-46(1) cm{sup -1}. Antiferromagnetic inter-tetramer interactions (zJ'=-0.21(3) cm{sup -1}) were also evident. Crystallographic data: 1 monoclinic, P2{sub 1}/c, a=10.3911(11) A, b=6.9502(6) A, c=22.958(2) A, {beta}=100.658(7){sup o}, V=1629.5(3) A{sup 3}, R{sub 1}=0.1256, and wR{sub 2}=0.2038; 2 triclinic, P1-bar,a=10.9000(3) A, b=11.7912(4) A, c=13.5584(4) A, {alpha}=102.482(2){sup o}, {beta}=102.482(2){sup o}, {gamma}=117.481(2){sup o}, V=1450.98(8) A{sup 3}, R{sub 1}=0.0428, and wR{sub 2}=0.0630. - Graphical abstract: [Cu{sub 2}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2}(3,4'-dpk)(H{sub 2}O)] (1, 3,4'-dpk=3,4'-dipyridylketone) and [Cu{sub 4}(3,4'-dpk){sub 4}(Mo{sub 8}O{sub 26})] (2) have been prepared by hydrothermal methods. 1 possesses 1-D [Cu{sub 2}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)]{sub n} ribbons containing magnetically interacting {l_brace}Cu{sub 4}O{sub 6}{r_brace} tetramers. The ribbons are connected into 2-D by 3,4'-dpk ligands. The reduced phase 2 manifests an unprecedented 1-D 'X-rail' chain motif.

  1. Electrostatic charging of jumping droplets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miljkovic, Nenad

    With the broad interest in and development of superhydrophobic surfaces for self-cleaning, condensation heat transfer enhancement and anti-icing applications, more detailed insights on droplet interactions on these surfaces ...

  2. Artificial leaf jumps developmental hurdle

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room News Publications TraditionalWithAntiferromagneticInexpensive 2- toArthur J. NozikSeptember

  3. Energy Department Addresses Largest Gathering of Geothermal Energy...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    to commercial readiness, including conventional hydrothermal technology and Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) - which significantly expands conventional hydrothermal resources by...

  4. Sustainable Transport Systems STS | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren)Model forTechnologies Ltd Jump to:PowerSystems STS Jump to:

  5. Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbH JumpEllenville, NewLtdEnergypedia JumpEnhanced Geothermal Systems

  6. Expert Solar Systems | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbH JumpEllenville,PowerEvaporative CoolersExosun Sas JumpSolar Systems

  7. Quixotic Systems Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource HistoryPotentialRuralUtilityScalePVGeneration JumpPublic UtilityQuintas Energy Jump to:Quixotic Systems Inc

  8. Energy Conservation Systems Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:of theClimateElgin,Wind UKEnergiefeld1 Jump to:Systems Inc

  9. OsComp Systems | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg, Oregon:OGEProjects/DefinitionsOrchidxOsComp Systems Jump to:

  10. Sunpower Systems Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter BatterySolarfinMarketMember Corp JumpSunfilm AGSunovationSystems Inc

  11. Tri Power Systems Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop IncIowa (Utility Company) Jump to: navigation,Power Systems Inc Jump to:

  12. ArKion Systems | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAandAmminex A S Jump to:AngolaEnergyAqua QuietaAquebogue, NewArKion Systems

  13. Advanced Fuel Cell Systems | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAand DaltonSolar Energy LLCAdema Technologies IncFuel Cell Systems Jump to:

  14. Amtech Systems Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EAandAmminex A S Jump to: navigation, search Name:Amrit BioAmtech Systems

  15. Bio Energy Systems LLC | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental JumpInformation BeaufortBentMichigan:Greece)DaddyInformationSystems LLC Jump

  16. Montana Sustainable Building Systems | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII Jump to: navigation, searchsource History ViewMoe WindJump to:VistaLandSystems

  17. California Wind Systems | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButte County, California: EnergyNatural Resources Agency JumpSystems Jump to:

  18. Perpetual Energy Systems | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII JumpQuarterly Smart GridNorthInformation 8thPerformSystems Jump to:

  19. Methane and methanol oxidation in supercritical water: Chemical kinetics and hydrothermal flame studies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steeper, R.R.

    1996-01-01

    Supercritical water oxidation (SCWO) is an emerging technology for the treatment of wastes in the presence of a large concentration of water at conditions above water`s thermodynamic critical point. A high-pressure, optically accessible reaction cell was constructed to investigate the oxidation of methane and methanol in this environment. Experiments were conducted to examine both flame and non-flame oxidation regimes. Optical access enabled the use of normal and shadowgraphy video systems for visualization, and Raman spectroscopy for in situ measurement of species concentrations. Flame experiments were performed by steadily injecting pure oxygen into supercritical mixtures of water and methane or methanol at 270 bar and at temperatures from 390 to 510{degrees}C. The experiments mapped conditions leading to the spontaneous ignition of diffusion flames in supercritical water. Above 470{degrees}C, flames spontaneously ignite in mixtures containing only 6 mole% methane or methanol. This data is relevant to the design and operation of commercial SCWO processes that may be susceptible to inadvertent flame formation. Non-flame oxidation kinetics experiments measured rates of methane oxidation in supercritical water at 270 bar and at temperatures from 390 to 442{degrees}C. The initial methane concentration was nominally 0.15 gmol/L, a level representative of commercial SCWO processes. The observed methane concentration histories were fit to a one-step reaction rate expression indicating a reaction order close to two for methane and zero for oxygen. Experiments were also conducted with varying water concentrations (0 to 8 gmol/L) while temperature and initial reactant concentrations were held constant. The rate of methane oxidation rises steadily with water concentration up to about 5 gmol/L and then abruptly falls off at higher concentrations.

  20. Hydrothermal | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Improved geochemical techniques to estimate reservoir temperatures and processes Remote Sensing High-resolution remote sensing data and reliable automated processing...

  1. Hydrothermal Resources Fact Sheet

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nA Guide to TappingWORKof71 Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Successone of theResources

  2. Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) well construction technology evaluation report.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Capuano, Louis, Jr.; Huh, Michael; Swanson, Robert; Raymond, David Wayne; Finger, John Travis; Mansure, Arthur James; Polsky, Yarom; Knudsen, Steven Dell

    2008-12-01

    Electricity production from geothermal resources is currently based on the exploitation of hydrothermal reservoirs. Hydrothermal reservoirs possess three ingredients critical to present day commercial extraction of subsurface heat: high temperature, in-situ fluid and high permeability. Relative to the total subsurface heat resource available, hydrothermal resources are geographically and quantitatively limited. A 2006 DOE sponsored study led by MIT entitled 'The Future of Geothermal Energy' estimates the thermal resource underlying the United States at depths between 3 km and 10 km to be on the order of 14 million EJ. For comparison purposes, total U.S. energy consumption in 2005 was 100 EJ. The overwhelming majority of this resource is present in geological formations which lack either in-situ fluid, permeability or both. Economical extraction of the heat in non-hydrothermal situations is termed Enhanced or Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS). The technologies and processes required for EGS are currently in a developmental stage. Accessing the vast thermal resource between 3 km and 10 km in particular requires a significant extension of current hydrothermal practice, where wells rarely reach 3 km in depth. This report provides an assessment of well construction technology for EGS with two primary objectives: (1) Determining the ability of existing technologies to develop EGS wells. (2) Identifying critical well construction research lines and development technologies that are likely to enhance prospects for EGS viability and improve overall economics. Towards these ends, a methodology is followed in which a case study is developed to systematically and quantitatively evaluate EGS well construction technology needs. A baseline EGS well specification is first formulated. The steps, tasks and tools involved in the construction of this prospective baseline EGS well are then explicitly defined by a geothermal drilling contractor in terms of sequence, time and cost. A task and cost based analysis of the exercise is subsequently conducted to develop a deeper understanding of the key technical and economic drivers of the well construction process. Finally, future research & development recommendations are provided and ranked based on their economic and technical significance.

  3. High resolution FT-ICR mass spectral analysis of bio-oil and residual water soluble organics produced by hydrothermal liquefaction of the marine microalga Nannochloropsis salina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sudasinghe, Nilusha; Dungan, Barry; Lammers, Peter; Albrecht, Karl O.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Hallen, Richard T.; Schaub, Tanner

    2014-03-01

    We report a detailed compositional characterization of a bio-crude oil and aqueous by-product from hydrothermal liquefaction of Nannochloropsis salina by direct infusion Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) in both positive- and negative-ionization modes. The FT-ICR MS instrumentation approach facilitates direct assignment of elemental composition to >7000 resolved mass spectral peaks and three-dimensional mass spectral images for individual heteroatom classes highlight compositional diversity of the two samples and provide a baseline description of these materials. Aromatic nitrogen compounds and free fatty acids are predominant species observed in both the bio-oil and aqueous fraction. Residual organic compounds present in the aqueous fraction show distributions that are slightly lower in both molecular ring and/or double bond value and carbon number relative to those found in the bio-oil, albeit with a high degree of commonality between the two compositions.

  4. A National-Scale Comparison of Resource and Nutrient Demands for Algae-Based Biofuel Production by Lipid Extraction and Hydrothermal Liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venteris, Erik R.; Skaggs, Richard; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Coleman, Andre M.

    2014-03-01

    Algae’s high productivity provides potential resource advantages over other fuel crops. However, demand for land, water, and nutrients must be minimized to avoid impacts on food production. We apply our national-scale, open-pond, growth and resource models to assess several biomass to fuel technological pathways based on Chlorella. We compare resource demands between hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) and lipid extraction (LE) to meet 1.89E+10 and 7.95E+10 L yr-1 biofuel targets. We estimate nutrient demands where post-fuel biomass is consumed as co-products and recycling by anaerobic digestion (AD) or catalytic hydrothermal gasification (CHG). Sites are selected through prioritization based on fuel value relative to a set of site-specific resource costs. The highest priority sites are located along the Gulf of Mexico coast, but potential sites exist nationwide. We find that HTL reduces land and freshwater consumption by up to 46% and saline groundwater by around 70%. Without recycling, nitrogen (N) and phosphorous (P) demand is reduced 33%, but is large relative to current U.S. agricultural consumption. The most nutrient-efficient pathways are LE+CHG for N and HTL+CHG for P (by 42%). Resource gains for HTL+CHG are offset by a 344% increase in N consumption relative to LE+CHG (with potential for further recycling). Nutrient recycling is essential to effective use of alternative nutrient sources. Modeling of utilization availability and costs remains, but we find that for HTL+CHG at the 7.95E+10 L yr-1 production target, municipal sources can offset 17% of N and 40% of P demand and animal manures can generally meet demands.

  5. Flower-like nanostructure MNb{sub 2}O{sub 6} (M = Mn, Zn) with high surface area: Hydrothermal synthesis and enhanced photocatalytic performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Xue; Jing, Yan; Yang, Jia [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Ju, Jing [College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Cong, Rihong [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Gao, Wenliang, E-mail: gaowl@cqu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Yang, Tao, E-mail: taoyang@cqu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • MNb{sub 2}O{sub 6} was prepared by a mild two-step hydrothermal method. • Their flower-like nanostructure morphology was studied by SEM and TEM. • High BET surface areas for MnNb{sub 2}O{sub 6} (?50 m{sup 2}/g) and ZnNb{sub 2}O{sub 6} (?100 m{sup 2}/g). • Band gap energies were estimated by UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectra. • Photocatalytic activities were evaluated under UV-light irradiation. - Abstract: Nano-scaled MNb{sub 2}O{sub 6} (M = Mn, Zn) was successfully synthesized via a two-step hydrothermal method. It is important to control the exact pH of the reaction solution in order to obtain pure products. The as-prepared samples both crystallize in the columbite structure. Interestingly, the products possess a flower-like morphology in a pseudo-six-fold symmetry, which is in fact arrayed by two-dimensional nanosheets. Their surface areas (51 m{sup 2}/g for MnNb{sub 2}O{sub 6} and 103 m{sup 2}/g for ZnNb{sub 2}O{sub 6}) are about 25–50 times of those prepared by solid state reaction. UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectra show the nano-scaled sample has a stronger absorption and a narrower band gap than its bulk form. The estimated band gap energies are 2.70 eV (MnNb{sub 2}O{sub 6}) and 3.77 eV (ZnNb{sub 2}O{sub 6}), respectively. The nano-scaled ZnNb{sub 2}O{sub 6} exhibits a double enhancement of photocatalytic activity in the decolorization of methylene blue than bulk ZnNb{sub 2}O{sub 6}.

  6. Crustal-scale degassing due to magma system destabilisation and magma-gas decoupling at Soufrière Hills Volcano, Montserrat

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher, T. E.; Blundy, J.; Cashman, K.; Cole, P.; Edmonds, M.; Smith, P. J.; Sparks, R. S. J.; Stinton, A.

    2015-06-11

    are consistent with internal modifications to the mush system, such as melt and gas migration from one level to another, but without discharge to the surface. Uranium-series isotope data indicate long crustal residence times of the andesite magma (105... for hydrothermal ore formation associated with arc volcanoes. Porphyry copper deposits are widely viewed as giant sulfur anomalies (Hunt, 1977) and are therefore likely to be related in origin to the excess sulfur phenomenon of arc volcanoes (Wallace, 2005...

  7. Energy Control Systems Engineering Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbH JumpEllenville, NewLtd EIL JumpAutomation Systems IncConsultControl

  8. Biogreen Energy Systems Pvt Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar Energy LLC Jump to:Greece:BajoBelpowerBiocar JumpSuedBiogreen Energy Systems

  9. ICeL Systems Corp | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA JumpDuimen RiverScoringUtilities Comm JumpImagingICFICeL Systems

  10. SBA Hydro Systems Pvt Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc Jump to:Newberg,EnergyEastCarbon Development | OpenGmbH JumpSBA Hydro Systems

  11. Sharp Amenity System Co Ltd | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter Battery Technology Co Ltd JumpInformationSJMERI |Amenity System

  12. Sonnen Systeme Projektgesellschaft mbH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoop Inc JumpHeter BatterySolarfin Jump to:Solkar SolarSongtao GuangheSysteme

  13. HyEnergy Systems Inc | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View NewGuam: Energyarea,Magazine JumpEnergyHyEnergy Systems Inc Jump to:

  14. Integrated Dense Array and Transect MT Surveying at Dixie Valley...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Dixie Valley Geothermal Area, Nevada- Structural Controls, Hydrothermal Alteration and Deep Fluid Sources Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  15. Effect of calcination temperature on structural and photocatalyst properties of nanofibers prepared from low-cost natural ilmenite mineral by simple hydrothermal method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpraditpan, Athapon; Wirunmongkol, Thanakorn; Pavasupree, Sorapong; Pecharapa, Wisanu

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Nanofibers were prepared from low-cost ilmenite mineral via simple hydrothermal. • High photocatalyst nanofibers were prepared via post heat treatment method. • The nanofibers calcined at 100–700 °C for 2 h maintained nanofiber structure. • The calcined nanofibers at 400 °C showed the highest photocatalytic activity. - Abstract: Titanate nanofibers were synthesized via the hydrothermal method (120 °C for 72 h) using natural ilmenite mineral (FeTiO{sub 3}) as the starting material. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescent (XRF), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) for specific surface area. The nanofibers were 20–90 nm in diameter and 2–7 ?m in length. The as-synthesized nanofibers calcined at 300–400 °C showed TiO{sub 2} (B) whereas the nanofibers calcined at 500 °C revealed a mixture of two phases of TiO{sub 2} (B) and anatase. The nanofibers calcined at high temperature of 600–1000 °C showed a mixture of tri-crystalline of anatase, rutile, and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The rutile phase increased with increasing calcination temperature. The nanofibers calcined at 300–700 °C maintained their structure while the morphology of the nanofibers calcined at 800–1000 °C transformed into submicron rod-like structure. This increase of calcination temperature led to the phase transformation from thermodynamically metastable anatase to the most stable form of rutile phase. The crystallite size of prepared samples increased with increasing calcination temperature. Interestingly, with increasing calcination temperature, the absorption edge of the prepared samples shows an obvious shift to visible light region due to the change of crystallite phase and increased crystallite size. Therefore, the band gap energy of the prepared samples became narrower with increasing calcination temperature. Furthermore, the photocatalytic activity of the nanofibers calcined at 400 °C for 2 h was found to be not merely higher than those of the commercially available TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles powders (P-25, JRC-01, and JRC-03) but also the highest of all the samples in this study.

  16. Saft Power Systems | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, NewMichigan:Roxbury,RushS.KSPARQLSacketsSafetyPower Systems Jump

  17. Co-hydrolysis of hydrothermal and dilute acid pretreated Populus slurries to support development of a high-throughput pretreatment system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Studer, Michael H; Brethauer, Simone; DeMartini, Jaclyn D; McKenzie, Heather L; Wyman, Charles E

    2011-01-01

    process samples. National Renewable Energy Laboratory, NREL/at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory for approxi-the standard National Renewable Energy Laboratory method [

  18. EIS-0066: The Role of Bonneville Power Administration in the Pacific Northwest Power Supply System- including its Participation in a Hydro-Thermal Power Program

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) prepared this EIS to examine the environmental impacts of the Pacific Northwest Power Planning and Conservation Act, which will foster regional electric power planning in the four Northwest states, as well as increase BPA’s authority to address future power needs.

  19. In situ hydrothermal growth of hierarchical ZnO nanourchin for high-efficiency dye-sensitized solar cells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cao, Guozhong

    2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. 1. Instruction One-dimensional (1D) nanostructured metal oxides functional materials for applications in photocatalysis, gas sensors, electrochromic devices, light-emitting diodes, field emitters, and energy conversion and storage systems [1e10]. Among these applications, 1D

  20. Fluctuations of work in nearly adiabatically driven open quantum systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Suomela; J. Salmilehto; I. G. Savenko; T. Ala-Nissila; M. Möttönen

    2015-03-27

    We extend the quantum jump method to nearly adiabatically driven open quantum systems in a way that allows for an accurate account of the external driving in the system-environment interaction. Using this framework, we construct the corresponding trajectory-dependent work performed on the system and derive the integral fluctuation theorem and the Jarzynski equality for nearly adiabatic driving. We show that such identities hold as long as the stochastic dynamics and work variable are consistently defined. We numerically study the emerging work statistics for a two-level quantum system and find that the conventional diabatic approximation is unable to capture some prominent features arising from driving such as the continuity of the probability density of work. Our results reveal the necessity of using accurate expressions for the drive-dressed heat exchange in future experiments probing jump time distributions.

  1. Megtec Systems | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland: Energy Resources Jump to:Electric Coop,Smw importMeeme,MeetsolarMegtec Systems

  2. Methane clathrates in the Solar System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mousis, Olivier; Holm, Nils G; Bouquet, Alexis; Waite, Jack Hunter; Geppert, Wolf Dietrich; Picaud, Sylvain; Aikawa, Yuri; Ali-Dib, Mohamad; Charlou, Jean-Luc; Rousselot, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    We review the reservoirs of methane clathrates that may exist in the different bodies of the Solar System. Methane was formed in the interstellar medium prior to having been embedded in the protosolar nebula gas phase. This molecule was subsequently trapped in clathrates that formed from crystalline water ice during the cooling of the disk and incorporated in this form in the building blocks of comets, icy bodies, and giant planets. Methane clathrates may play an important role in the evolution of planetary atmospheres. On Earth, the production of methane in clathrates is essentially biological, and these compounds are mostly found in permafrost regions or in the sediments of continental shelves. On Mars, methane would more likely derive from hydrothermal reactions with olivine-rich material. If they do exist, martian methane clathrates would be stable only at depth in the cryosphere and sporadically release some methane into the atmosphere via mechanisms that remain to be determined.

  3. Hydrothermal Liquefaction Oil and Hydrotreated Product from Pine Feedstock Characterized by Heteronuclear Two-Dimensional NMR Spectroscopy and FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sudasinghe, Nilusha; Cort, John R.; Hallen, Richard T.; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Schaub, Tanner

    2014-12-01

    Hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) crude oil and hydrotreated product from pine tree farm waste (forest product residual, FPR) have been analyzed by direct infusion electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FT-ICR MS) in both positive- and negative-ionization modes and high-resolution twodimensional heteronuclear 1H-13C NMR spectroscopy. FT-ICR MS resolves thousands of compounds in complex oils and provides unparalleled compositional details for individual molecules for identification of compound class (heteroatom content), type (number of rings plus double bonds to carbon or double bond equivalents (DBE) and carbon number (degree of alkylation). Heteronuclear 1H-13C NMR spectroscopy provides one-bond and multiple-bond correlations between pairs of 1H and 13C chemical shifts that are characteristic of different organic functional groups. Taken together this information provides a picture of the chemical composition of these oils. Pyrolysis crude oil product from pine wood was characterized for comparison. Generally, pyrolysis oil is comprised of a more diverse distribution of heteroatom classes with higher oxygen number relative to HTL oil as shown by both positive- and negative-ion ESI FT-ICR MS. A total of 300 N1, 594 O1 and 267 O2 compounds were observed as products of hydrotreatment. The relative abundance of N1O1, N1O2, N1O3, N2, N2O1, N2O2 and O3 compounds are reduced to different degrees after hydrotreatment and other higher heteroatom containing species (O4-O10, N1O4, N1O5 and N2O3) are completely removed by hydrotreatment.

  4. Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) R&D Program: Monitoring EGS-Related Research

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McLarty, Lynn; Entingh, Daniel; Carwile, Clifton

    2000-09-29

    This report reviews technologies that could be applicable to Enhanced Geothermal Systems development. EGS covers the spectrum of geothermal resources from hydrothermal to hot dry rock. We monitored recent and ongoing research, as reported in the technical literature, that would be useful in expanding current and future geothermal fields. The literature review was supplemented by input obtained through contacts with researchers throughout the United States. Technologies are emerging that have exceptional promise for finding fractures in nonhomogeneous rock, especially during and after episodes of stimulation to enhance natural permeability.

  5. Hydrothermal alteration of organic matter in uranium ores, Elliot Lake, Canada: Implications for selected organic-rich deposits

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mossman, D.J. [Mount Allison Univ., Sackville (Canada)] [Mount Allison Univ., Sackville (Canada); Nagy, B. [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson (United States)] [Univ. of Arizona, Tucson (United States); Davis, D.W. [Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)] [Royal Ontario Museum, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    1993-07-01

    Organic matter in the uraniferous Matinenda Formation, Elliot Lake, is preserved in the forms of syngenetic kerogen and solid bitumen as it is in many of the Oklo uranium deposits and in the Witwatersrand gold-uranium ores. The Elliot Lake kerogen is a vitrinite-like material considered to be remnants of the Precambrian cyanobacterial mats. The kerogen at Elliot Lake has reflectances (in oil) ranging from 2.63-7.31% RO{sub max}, high aromaticity, relatively low (0.41-0.60) atomic H/C ratios, and it contains cryptocrystalline graphite. Bitumen, present primarily as dispersed globules (up to 0.5 mm dia.), has reflectances from 0.72-1.32% RO{sub max}, atomic H/C ratios of 0.71-0.81, and is somewhat less aromatic than the kerogen. Overall similarity in molecular compositions indicates that liquid bitumen was derived from kerogen by processes similar to hydrous pyrolysis. The carbon isotopic composition of kerogen ({minus}15.62 to {minus}24.72%), and the now solid bitumen ({minus}25.91 to {minus}33.00%) are compatible with these processes. Despite having been subjected to several thermal episodes, ca. 2.45 Ga old kerogen of microbiological origin here survived as testimony of the antiquity of life on Earth. U-Pb isotopic data from discrete kerogen grains at Elliot Lake form a scattered array intersecting concordia at 2130 {+-} 100 Ma, correspond to the Nipissing event. U-Pb systems were totally reset by this event. Uranium and lead show subsequently partial mobility, the average of which is indicated by the lower concordia intersect of 550 {+-} 260 Ma. The migrated bitumen contains virtually no uranium and thorium but has a large excess of {sup 206}Pb, which indicates that the once liquid bitumen must have acted as a sink for mobile intermediate decay products of {sup 238}U. Emplacement of the Nipissing diabase may have been responsible for producing the bitumen and, indirectly, for its enrichment in {sup 206}Pb as a result of outgassing of {sup 222}Rn.

  6. Rapid microwave hydrothermal synthesis of ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} with high photocatalytic activity toward aromatic compounds in air and dyes in liquid water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun Meng; Li Danzhen; Zhang Wenjuan; Chen Zhixin; Huang Hanjie; Li Wenjuan; He Yunhui; Fu Xianzhi

    2012-06-15

    ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} was synthesized from Ga(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and ZnCl{sub 2} via a rapid and facile microwave-assisted hydrothermal method. The photocatalytic properties of the as-prepared ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} were evaluated by the degradation of pollutants in air and aqueous solution under ultraviolet (UV) light illumination. The results demonstrated that ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} had exhibited efficient photocatalytic activities higher than that of commercial P25 (Degussa Co.) in the degradation of benzene, toluene, and ethylbenzene, respectively. In the liquid phase degradation of dyes (methyl orange, Rhodamine B, and methylene blue), ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} has also exhibited remarkable activities higher than that of P25. After 32 min of UV light irradiation, the decomposition ratio of methyl orange (10 ppm, 150 mL) over ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} (0.06 g) was up to 99%. The TOC tests revealed that the mineralization ratio of MO (10 ppm, 150 mL) was 88.1% after 90 min of reaction. A possible mechanism of the photocatalysis over ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} was also proposed. - Graphical abstract: In the degradation of RhB under UV light irradiation, ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} had exhibited efficient photo-activity, and after only 24 min of irradiation the decomposition ratio was up to 99.8%. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A rapid and facile M-H method to synthesize ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} photocatalyst. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The photocatalyst exhibits high activity toward benzene and dyes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The catalyst possesses more surface hydroxyl sites than TiO{sub 2} (P25). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deep oxidation of different aromatic compounds and dyes over catalyst.

  7. Reliable appropriate topology design for multiple-processor systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chou, C.P.

    1987-01-01

    A Shift and Replace Graph which is a very appropriate candidate for the topology of a multiple-processor system is a function of two positive integers r and m, and is denoted as SRF(r,m). Pradhan and Reddy proved that the node connectivity of SRG(r,m) is at least r and also give a routing algorithm which generally requires 2m jumps if the number of node failures is no larger than r - 1. Later, Esfahanian and Hakimi proved that SRG(r,m) has maximum node connectivity 2r - 2 and give routing algorithms which require: (1) at most m + 3 + log/sub r/m jumps if 3 + log/sub r/m does not exceed m and the number of node failures is at most r - 1; (2) at most m + 5 + log/sub r/m jumps if 4 + log/sub r/m less than or equal to m and the number of node failures if less than or equal to 2r - 3; (3) all the other situations require no more than 2m jumps. By modifying the SRG(r,m), it is first proved that node connectivity of SRG(r,m) can be increased to: (1) 2r - 1 when r = 2, m = 2, and (2) 2r when (r = 2, m > 2) or (r > 2, m greater than or equal to 2, m greater than or equal to 2). The routing algorithms are also given for the modified SRG (r,m), which require at most 2m + 3 jumps when the number of node failures is less than or equal to 2r - 1.

  8. Convective heat transport in geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lippmann, M.J.; Bodvarsson, G.S.

    1986-08-01

    Most geothermal systems under exploitation for direct use or electrical power production are of the hydrothermal type, where heat is transferred essentially by convection in the reservoir, conduction being secondary. In geothermal systems, buoyancy effects are generally important, but often the fluid and heat flow patterns are largely controlled by geologic features (e.g., faults, fractures, continuity of layers) and location of recharge and discharge zones. During exploitation, these flow patterns can drastically change in response to pressure and temperature declines, and changes in recharge/discharge patterns. Convective circulation models of several geothermal systems, before and after start of fluid production, are described, with emphasis on different characteristics of the systems and the effects of exploitation on their evolution. Convective heat transport in geothermal fields is discussed, taking into consideration (1) major geologic features; (2) temperature-dependent rock and fluid properties; (3) fracture- versus porous-medium characteristics; (4) single- versus two-phase reservoir systems; and (5) the presence of noncondensible gases.

  9. Hydrothermal alkali metal recovery process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolfs, Denise Y. (Houston, TX); Clavenna, Le Roy R. (Baytown, TX); Eakman, James M. (Houston, TX); Kalina, Theodore (Morris Plains, NJ)

    1980-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by treating them with a calcium or magnesium-containing compound in the presence of water at a temperature between about 250.degree. F. and about 700.degree. F. and in the presence of an added base to establish a pH during the treatment step that is higher than would otherwise be possible without the addition of the base. During the treating process the relatively high pH facilitates the conversion of water-insoluble alkali metal compounds in the alkali metal residues into water-soluble alkali metal constituents. The resultant aqueous solution containing water-soluble alkali metal constituents is then separated from the residue solids, which consist of the treated particles and any insoluble materials formed during the treatment step, and recycled to the gasification process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. Preferably, the base that is added during the treatment step is an alkali metal hydroxide obtained by water washing the residue solids produced during the treatment step.

  10. Hydrothermal Alteration | Open Energy Information

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  11. Hydrothermal Reservoirs | Open Energy Information

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  12. Hydrothermal Projects | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof Energy ServicesContractingManagement »Hydrogen and Fuel

  13. Hydrothermal Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFinancial OpportunitiesDepartment ofScienceHow MuchResearch

  14. Toner, B.M., M.A. Marcus, K.J. Edwards, O. Rouxel, and C.R. German. 2012. Measuring the form of iron in hydrothermal plume particles. Oceanography 25(1):209212, http://dx.doi.org/10.5670/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the form of iron in hydrothermal plume particles. Oceanography 25(1):209­212, http://dx.doi.org/10 in Oceanography, Volume 25, Number 1, a quarterly journal of The Oceanography Society. Copyright 2012 by The Oceanography Society. All rights reserved. USAGE Permission is granted to copy this article for use in teaching

  15. Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) R&D Program: US Geothermal Resources Review and Needs Assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Entingh, Dan; McLarty, Lynn

    2000-11-30

    The purpose of this report is to lay the groundwork for an emerging process to assess U.S. geothermal resources that might be suitable for development as Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS). Interviews of leading geothermists indicate that doing that will be intertwined with updating assessments of U.S. higher-quality hydrothermal resources and reviewing methods for discovering ''hidden'' hydrothermal and EGS resources. The report reviews the history and status of assessment of high-temperature geothermal resources in the United States. Hydrothermal, Enhanced, and Hot Dry Rock resources are addressed. Geopressured geothermal resources are not. There are three main uses of geothermal resource assessments: (1) They inform industry and other interest parties of reasonable estimates of the amounts and likely locations of known and prospective geothermal resources. This provides a basis for private-sector decisions whether or not to enter the geothermal energy business at all, and for where to look for useful resources. (2) They inform government agencies (Federal, State, local) of the same kinds of information. This can inform strategic decisions, such as whether to continue to invest in creating and stimulating a geothermal industry--e.g., through research or financial incentives. And it informs certain agencies, e.g., Department of Interior, about what kinds of tactical operations might be required to support such activities as exploration and leasing. (3) They help the experts who are performing the assessment(s) to clarify their procedures and data, and in turn, provide the other two kinds of users with a more accurate interpretation of what the resulting estimates mean. The process of conducting this assessment brings a spotlight to bear on what has been accomplished in the domain of detecting and understanding reservoirs, in the period since the last major assessment was conducted.

  16. A highly coercive carbon nanotube coated with Ni{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocrystals synthesized by chemical precipitation-hydrothermal process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao Huiqun; Zhu Meifang Li Yaogang; Liu Jianhong; Ni Zhuo; Qin Zongyi

    2007-11-15

    Novel magnetic composites (Ni{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-MWCNTs) of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) coated with Ni{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocrystals were synthesized by chemical precipitation-hydrothermal process. The composites were characterized by X-ray powder diffractometer (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Moessbauer spectroscopy (MS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and selected area electron diffraction (SAED), etc. A temperature of about 200 deg. C was identified to be an appropriate hydrothermal condition to obtain Ni{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-MWCNTs, being lower than the synthesis temperature of a single-phase Ni{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocrystals. The sizes of Ni{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} in the composites were smaller than those of Ni{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocrystals in single phase. The composites exhibited more superparamagnetic than Ni{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocrystals in their relaxation behaviors. The magnetic properties measured by a vibrating sample magnetometer showed that the composites had a high coercive field of 386.0 Oe at room temperature, higher than those of MWCNT and Ni{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocrystals. - Graphical abstract: Novel magnetic composites (Ni{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-MWCNTs) of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) coated with Ni{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocrystals were synthesized by chemical precipitation-hydrothermal process. The composites had a high coercive field of 386.0 Oe, higher than those of MWCNT and Ni{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocrystals.

  17. Rupture Dynamics of Strike-Slip Faults with Stepovers: From Conceptually Simplified to Realistically Complex Fault Systems 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Zaifeng

    2014-05-05

    . The coupling effect of those two effects has also been studied. The possible correlation between the slip gradient nearby the first fault end and the ability of the rupture to jump over the structure stepover in the strike-slip fault system has been verified...

  18. United Solar Systems | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-EnhancingEt Al.,Turin, New York:Power Company Jump to: navigation, search Name:Systems

  19. EcoSystem Corporation | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, AlabamaETEC GmbH Jump to:Providence, RhodeEchols County,EU (Smart GridEcoSystem

  20. REpower Systems AG | Open Energy Information

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  1. Northern Power Systems | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

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  2. Dynamic Boosting Systems | Open Energy Information

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  3. Energy Systems International | Open Energy Information

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  4. Energy Systems Network ESN | Open Energy Information

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  5. Wind to Power Systems | Open Energy Information

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  6. A123 Systems | Open Energy Information

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  7. Lilliputian Systems Inc | Open Energy Information

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  8. Membrane Bioreactor Systems | OpenEI Community

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  9. Alternative Fuel Systems Ltd | Open Energy Information

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  10. Bio Fuel Systems BFS | Open Energy Information

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  11. Floating Production Systems | OpenEI Community

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  12. Borrego Solar Systems Inc | Open Energy Information

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  13. Durra Building Systems | Open Energy Information

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  14. Cheng Power Systems | Open Energy Information

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  15. The role of convective geothermal systems in the generation, migration, and entrapment of oil

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hulen, J.B. [Univ. of Utah Research Institute, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1995-06-01

    Modern convective geothermal systems (for example, at Yellowstone National Park) and their fossil equivalents, epithermal mineral deposits (like McLaughlin, California) have traditionally been considered poor petroleum prospects. The concentrated heat which drives these systems is commonly viewed as a negative influence: in other words, any oil initially present in or generated by these systems is quickly degraded to a useless carbonaceous residue. This is true in extreme cases, but numerous examples from the Great Basin, the northern California Coast Ranges, and elsewhere suggest that under certain circumstances, geothermal systems can efficiently generate, transport, and entrap significant quantities of producible petroleum. B.R.T. Simoneit has shown that oil can be hydrothermally generated in an {open_quotes} instant{close_quotes} of geologic time. It follows, then, that away from geothermal systems` high-temperature centers (or in wholly moderate-temperature systems), the encompassing shallow thermal anomalies can distill large volumes of oil from otherwise immature hydrocarbon source rocks. Transport of this newly-generated oil is enhanced by the buoyant upwelling of heated aqueous fluid. Porosity for oil transport and storage is created or increased by hydrothermal dissolution of rock-forming or secondary silicates and carbonates. Finally, geothermal {open_quotes}self-sealing{close_quotes} -- the deposition of secondary minerals (especially silica and clay) at the margins of a system -- can provide a very effective hydrocarbon seal. Lee Allison has noted the coincidence of igneous intrusions and oil reservoirs in Nevada. It is suggested that here and elsewhere, both igneous-related and amagmatic geothermal systems in otherwise favorable settings should be viewed as prime petroleum exploration targets.

  16. Electrical resistivity and magnetic investigations of the geothermal systems in the Rotorua area, New Zealand

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bibby, H.M. ); Dawson, G.B.; Rayner, H.H.; Bennie, S.L.; Bromley, C.J. )

    1992-04-01

    This paper reports that electrical and magnetic data are used in an investigation of a 450 km{sup 2} region in order to delineate the Rotorua City Geothermal system and determine its relationship with other geothermal systems in the region. Three distinct regions of low ({lt}30 Omega m) apparent resistivity are delineated. The southern of these outlines the Rotorua City Geothermal System which has an area of about 18 km{sup 2}, with the northern third covered by Lake Rotorua. The boundary of the system is characterized by a rapid lateral change in apparent resistivity which can be modeled as a single, near vertical zone in which the distance between hot and cold water is very narrow. Magnetic properties also change in the vicinity of the discontinuity in some areas, consistent with hydrothermal alteration having destroyed the magnetite in the rocks of the geothermal system. Hot water is believed to be rising, driven by buoyancy forces across the whole of the low resistivity region. There is some indication, particularly in the south, that the boundary between hot and cold fluids dips away from the field. A second low resistivity zone (the East Lake Rotorua anomaly) with an area of about 8 km{sup 2}, is believed to outline a second independent geothermal system, with surface manifestations on Mokoia Island, and on the eastern shore of the lake. High heat flow in lake bottom sediments, and a reduction in magnetic signature over this region supports this conclusion. A third resistivity low under the west of Lake Rotorua has no associated thermal features and is believed to be a fossil hydrothermal system. There is no apparent relationship between the location of the geothermal systems and the Rotorua caldera. The aeromagnetic measurements have delineated several highly magnetic bodies which cannot be linked with surface geology. These are believed to be caused by buried rhyolite dome complexes at shallow depth.

  17. Investigation of the hydrothermal crystallisation of the perovskite solid solution NaCe{sub 1?x}La{sub x}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 6} and its defect chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harunsani, Mohammad H.; Woodward, David I.; Peel, Martin D.; Ashbrook, Sharon E.; Walton, Richard I.

    2013-11-15

    Perovskites of nominal composition NaCe{sub 1?x}La{sub x}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 6} (0?x?1) crystallise directly under hydrothermal conditions at 240 °C. Raman spectroscopy shows distortion from the ideal cubic structure and Rietveld analysis of powder X-ray and neutron diffraction reveals that the materials represent a continuous series in rhombohedral space group R3-bar c. Ce L{sub III}-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy shows that while the majority of cerium is present as Ce{sup 3+} there is evidence for Ce{sup 4+}. The paramagnetic Ce{sup 3+} affects the chemical shift and line width of {sup 23}Na MAS NMR spectra, which also show with no evidence for A-site ordering. {sup 2}H MAS NMR of samples prepared in D{sub 2}O shows the inclusion of deuterium, which IR spectroscopy shows is most likely to be as D{sub 2}O. The deuterium content is highest for the cerium-rich materials, consistent with oxidation of some cerium to Ce{sup 4+} to provide charge balance of A-site water. - Graphical abstract: A multi-element A-site perovskite crystallises directly from aqueous, basic solutions at 240 °C; while the paramagnetic effect of Ce{sup 3+} on the {sup 23}Na NMR shows a homogeneous solid-solution, the incorporation of A-site water is also found from {sup 2}H NMR and IR, with oxidation of some cerium to charge balance proved by XANES spectroscopy. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Direct hydrothermal synthesis allows crystallisation of a perovskite solid-solution. • XANES spectroscopy shows some oxidation of Ce{sup 3+} to Ce{sup 4+}. • The paramagnetism of Ce{sup 3+} shifts and broadens the {sup 23}Na solid-state NMR. • The perovskite materials incorporate water as an A-site defect.

  18. W.E.T. Automotive Systems | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EISTJThin FilmUnitedVairexVertVillageVitex SystemsE.T. Automotive Systems

  19. Development of Models to Simulate Tracer Behavior in Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Mark D.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Reimus, P. W.; Newell, D.; Watson, Tom B.

    2010-06-01

    A recent report found that power and heat produced from engineered (or enhanced) geothermal systems (EGSs) could have a major impact on the United States while incurring minimal environmental impacts. EGS resources differ from high-grade hydrothermal resources in that they lack sufficient temperature distributions, permeability/porosity, fluid saturation, or recharge of reservoir fluids. Therefore, quantitative characterization of temperature distributions and the surface area available for heat transfer in EGS is necessary for commercial development of geothermal energy. The goal of this project is to provide integrated tracer and tracer interpretation tools to facilitate this characterization. Modeling capabilities are being developed as part of this project to support laboratory and field testing to characterize engineered geothermal systems in single- and multi-well tests using tracers. The objective of this report is to describe the simulation plan and the status of model development for simulating tracer tests for characterizing EGS.

  20. Ten New and Updated Multi-planet Systems, and a Survey of Exoplanetary Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. T. Wright; S. Upadhyay; G. W. Marcy; D. A. Fischer; Eric B. Ford; John Asher Johnson

    2009-03-02

    We present the latest velocities for 10 multi-planet systems, including a re-analysis of archival Keck and Lick data, resulting in improved velocities that supersede our previously published measurements. We derive updated orbital fits for ten Lick and Keck systems, including two systems (HD 11964, HD 183263) for which we provide confirmation of second planets only tentatively identified elsewhere, and two others (HD 187123, and HD 217107) for which we provide a major revision of the outer planet's orbit. We compile orbital elements from the literature to generate a catalog of the 28 published multiple-planet systems around stars within 200 pc. From this catalog we find several intriguing patterns emerging: - Including those systems with long-term radial velocity trends, at least 28% of known planetary systems appear to contain multiple planets. - Planets in multiple-planet systems have somewhat smaller eccentricities than single planets. - The distribution of orbital distances of planets in multi-planet systems and single planets are inconsistent: single-planet systems show a pile-up at P ~ 3 days and a jump near 1 AU, while multi-planet systems show a more uniform distribution in log-period. In addition, among all planetary systems we find: - There may be an emerging, positive correlation between stellar mass and giant-planet semi-major axis. - Exoplanets more massive than Jupiter have eccentricities broadly distributed across 0 < e < 0.5, while lower-mass exoplanets exhibit a distribution peaked near e = 0.