Sample records for hydrothermal outflow fracture

  1. Structural Settings Of Hydrothermal Outflow- Fracture Permeability...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    deposits along fault zones can potentially provide a tool for studying fault-zone evolution. Authors Daniel Curewitz and Jeffrey A. Karson Published Journal Journal of...

  2. Structural Settings Of Hydrothermal Outflow- Fracture Permeability

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to:Ezfeedflag JumpID-f <Maintained By Fault Propagation And Interaction | Open Energy

  3. The Hydrothermal Outflow Plume of Valles Caldera, New Mexico...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    to mixed fluids flowing in the hydrothermal plume. However, isotopic data, borehole data, basic geology, and inverse relations between temperature and chloride content at...

  4. Hydro-thermal flow in a rough fracture EC Contract SES6-CT-2003-502706

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmittbuhl, Jean

    Hydro-thermal flow in a rough fracture EC Contract SES6-CT-2003-502706 PARTICIPANT ORGANIZATION NAME: CNRS Synthetic 2nd year report Related with Work Package............ HYDRO-THERMAL FLOW in the influence of a realistic geometry of the fracture on its hydro-thermal response. Several studies have

  5. Fracture Propagation Driven by Fluid Outflow from a Low-permeability Reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gor, Gennady Yu

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fracturing of the caprock during CO2 storage in deep saline aquifers can lead to leakage. Estimation of the rate of fracture propagation allows one to assess the leakage risk. Here we propose an analytical model for calculating the length of the fracture, which propagates due to the fluid outflow from a low-permeability aquifer. We present a self-similar solution of the pressure diffusion equation in the system of reservoir and fracture, allowing us to get the analytical expression for the fracture length as a function of time. We calculate the evolution of the fracture length for a characteristic aquifer. We show that the analytical solution provides an estimate from below for the fracture length, since the driving force for propagation grows with elevation.

  6. Mechanical and transport properties of rocks at high temperatures and pressures. Task II: fracture permeability of crystalline rocks as a function of temperature, pressure, and hydrothermal alteration

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The primary objective is to measure and understand the variation of the fracture permeability of quartzite subjected to hydrothermal conditions. Pore fluids will consist of distilled water and aqueous Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/ solutions at temperatures to 250/sup 0/C, fluid pressures to 20 MPa and effective normal stresses to 70 MPa. Fluid flow rates will be controllable to rates at least as small as 0.2 ml/day (approx. 4 fracture volumes). Experiments are designed to assess what role, if any, pressure solution may play at time scales of those of the experiments (less than or equal to 2 weeks). Secondary objectives are: (1) continue simulated fracture studies, incorporating inelastic deformation into model and characterize the nature of inelastic deformation occurring on loaded tensile fractures in quartzite; (2) continue dissolution experiment, with emphasis on dissolution modification of tensile fracture surfaces on quartzite; and (3) study natural fractures in a quartzite exhibiting hydrothermal dissolution features.

  7. Altered Tectonic and Hydrothermal Breccias in Corehole VC-1,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    origin. Hydrothermal breccias and associated crackle zones or stockworks created by hydraulic fracturing can provide significant secondary permeability, as demonstrated by their...

  8. Mapping Hydrothermal Upwelling and Outflow Zones: Preliminary...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Results from Two-Meter Temperature Data and Geologic Analysis at Lee Allen Springs and Salt Wells Basin Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  9. Enhanced heat transfer in partially-saturated hydrothermal systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bixler, N.E.; Carrigan, C.R.

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The role of capillarity is potentially important for determining heat transfer in hydrothermal regions. Capillarity allows mixing of phases in liquid/vapor systems and results in enhanced two-phase convection. Comparisons involving a numerical model with capillarity and analytical models without indicate that heat transfer can be enhanced by about an order of magnitude. Whether capillarity can be important for a particular hydrothermal region will depend on the nature of mineral precipitation as well as pore and fracture size distributions.

  10. Mapping Hydrothermal Upwelling and Outflow Zones: Preliminary Results from

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are beingZealand Jump to: navigation, searchOfRose Bend < MHKconvertersourcesource History View

  11. Metallicity and Quasar Outflows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Huiyuan; Yuan, Weimin; Wang, Tinggui

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Correlations are investigated of the outflow strength of quasars, as measured by the blueshift and asymmetry index (BAI) of the CIV line (Wang et al. 2011), with intensities and ratios of broad emission lines, based on composite quasar spectra built from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey. We find that most of the line ratios of other ions to CIV prominently increases with BAI. These behaviors can be well understood in the context of increasing metallicity with BAI. The strength of dominant coolant, CIV line, decreases and weak collisionally excited lines increase with gas metallicity as a result of the competition between different line coolants. Using SiIV+OIV]/CIV as an indicator of gas metallicity, we present, for the first time, a strong correlation between the metallicitiy and the outflow strength of quasars over a wide range of 1.7 to 6.9 times solar abundance. Our result implies that the metallicity plays an important role in the formation of quasar outflows, likely via affecting outflow acceleration. This ...

  12. Anisotropic Outflows and IGM Enrichment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hugo Martel; Matthew M. Pieri; Cedric Grenon

    2006-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We have designed an analytical model for the evolution of anisotropic galactic outflows. These outflows follow the path of least resistance, and thus travel preferentially into low-density regions, away from cosmological structures where galaxies form. We show that anisotropic outflows can significantly enrich low-density systems with metals.

  13. Protostellar outflow-driven turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher D. Matzner

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Protostellar outflows crisscross the regions of star cluster formation, stirring turbulence and altering the evolution of the forming cluster. We model the stirring of turbulent motions by protostellar outflows, building on an observation that the scaling law of supersonic turbulence implies a momentum cascade analogous to the energy cascade in Kolmogorov turbulence. We then generalize this model to account for a diversity of outflow strengths, and for outflow collimation, both of which enhance turbulence. For a single value of its coupling coefficient the model is consistent with turbulence simulations by Li & Nakamura and, plausibly, with observations of the NGC 1333 cluster-forming region. Outflow-driven turbulence is strong enough to stall collapse in cluster-forming regions for several crossing times, relieving the mismatch between star formation and turbulent decay rates. The predicted line-width-size scaling implies radial density indices between -1 and -2 for regions supported by outflow-driven turbulence, with a tendency for steeper profiles in regions that are more massive or have higher column densities.

  14. Methods and apparatus for catalytic hydrothermal gasification...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Methods and apparatus for catalytic hydrothermal gasification of biomass Re-direct Destination: Continuous processing of wet biomass feedstock by catalytic hydrothermal...

  15. Hydrothermal Liquefaction of Biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2010-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrothermal liquefaction technology is describes in its relationship to fast pyrolysis of biomass. The scope of work at PNNL is discussed and some intial results are presented. HydroThermal Liquefaction (HTL), called high-pressure liquefaction in earlier years, is an alternative process for conversion of biomass into liquid products. Some experts consider it to be pyrolysis in solvent phase. It is typically performed at about 350 C and 200 atm pressure such that the water carrier for biomass slurry is maintained in a liquid phase, i.e. below super-critical conditions. In some applications catalysts and/or reducing gases have been added to the system with the expectation of producing higher yields of higher quality products. Slurry agents ('carriers') evaluated have included water, various hydrocarbon oils and recycled bio-oil. High-pressure pumping of biomass slurry has been a major limitation in the process development. Process research in this field faded away in the 1990s except for the HydroThermal Upgrading (HTU) effort in the Netherlands, but has new resurgence with other renewable fuels in light of the increased oil prices and climate change concerns. Research restarted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in 2007 with a project, 'HydroThermal Liquefaction of Agricultural and Biorefinery Residues' with partners Archer-Daniels-Midland Company and ConocoPhillips. Through bench-scale experimentation in a continuous-flow system this project investigated the bio-oil yield and quality that could be achieved from a range of biomass feedstocks and derivatives. The project was completed earlier this year with the issuance of the final report. HydroThermal Liquefaction research continues within the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium with the effort focused at PNNL. The bench-scale reactor is being used for conversion of lignocellulosic biomass including pine forest residue and corn stover. A complementary project is an international collaboration with Canada to investigate kelp (seaweed) as a biomass feedstock. The collaborative project includes process testing of the kelp in HydroThermal Liquefaction in the bench-scale unit at PNNL. HydroThermal Liquefaction at PNNL is performed in the hydrothermal processing bench-scale reactor system. Slurries of biomass are prepared in the laboratory from whole ground biomass materials. Both wet processing and dry processing mills can be used, but the wet milling to final slurry is accomplished in a stirred ball mill filled with angle-cut stainless steel shot. The PNNL HTL system, as shown in the figure, is a continuous-flow system including a 1-litre stirred tank preheater/reactor, which can be connected to a 1-litre tubular reactor. The product is filtered at high-pressure to remove mineral precipitate before it is collected in the two high-pressure collectors, which allow the liquid products to be collected batchwise and recovered alternately from the process flow. The filter can be intermittently back-flushed as needed during the run to maintain operation. By-product gas is vented out the wet test meter for volume measurement and samples are collected for gas chromatography compositional analysis. The bio-oil product is analyzed for elemental content in order to calculate mass and elemental balances around the experiments. Detailed chemical analysis is performed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and 13-C nuclear magnetic resonance is used to evaluate functional group types in the bio-oil. Sufficient product is produced to allow subsequent catalytic hydroprocessing to produce liquid hydrocarbon fuels. The product bio-oil from hydrothermal liquefaction is typically a more viscous product compared to fast pyrolysis bio-oil. There are several reasons for this difference. The HTL bio-oil contains a lower level of oxygen because of more extensive secondary reaction of the pyrolysis products. There are less amounts of the many light oxygenates derived from the carbohydrate structures as they have been further reacted to phenolic Aldol condensation products. The bio-oil

  16. Hydraulic Fracturing (Vermont)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Vermont prohibits hydraulic fracturing or the collection, storage, or treatment of wastewater from hydraulic fracturing

  17. Hydrothermal Processing of Wet Wastes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 3A—Conversion Technologies III: Energy from Our Waste—Will we Be Rich in Fuel or Knee Deep in Trash by 2025? Hydrothermal Processing of Wet Wastes James R. Oyler, President, Genifuel Corporation

  18. DRILLED HYDROTHERMAL ENERGY Drilling for seawater

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    DRILLED HYDROTHERMAL ENERGY Drilling for seawater An "ALL of the ABOVE" Approach to Ocean Thermal-Arsène d'Arsonval in 1881 conceptualized producing electricity from ocean temperature difference DRILLED HYDROTHERMAL ENERGY BACKGROUND #12;DRILLED HYDROTHERMAL ENERGY BACKGROUND French Inventor Georges Claude

  19. Outflow Driven Turbulence in Molecular Clouds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jonathan J. Carroll; Adam Frank; Eric G. Blackman; Andrew J. Cunningham; Alice C. Quillen

    2008-05-30T23:59:59.000Z

    In this paper we explore the relationship between protostellar outflows and turbulence in molecular clouds. Using 3-D numerical simulations we focus on the hydrodynamics of multiple outflows interacting within a parsec scale volume. We explore the extent to which transient outflows injecting directed energy and momentum into a sub-volume of a molecular cloud can be converted into random turbulent motions. We show that turbulence can readily be sustained by these interactions and show that it is possible to broadly characterize an effective driving scale of the outflows. We compare the velocity spectrum obtained in our studies to that of isotropically forced hydrodynamic turbulence finding that in outflow driven turbulence a power law is indeed achieved. However we find a steeper spectrum (beta ~ 3) is obtained in outflow driven turbulence models than in isotropically forced simulations (beta ~ 2). We discuss possible physical mechanisms responsible for these results as well and their implications for turbulence in molecular clouds where outflows will act in concert with other processes such as gravitational collapse.

  20. Accretion and plasma outflow from dissipationless discs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sergei Bogovalov; Stanislav Kelner

    2008-09-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider an extreme case of disc accretion onto a gravitating centre when the viscosity in the disc is negligible. The angular momentum and the rotational energy of the accreted matter is carried out by a magnetized wind outflowing from the disc. The outflow of matter from the disc occurs due to the Blandford & Payne(1982) centrifugal mechanism. The disc is assumed to be cold. Accretion and outflow are connected by the conservation of the energy, mass and the angular momentum. The basic properties of the outflow, angular momentum flux and energy flux per particle in the wind, do not depend on the details of the structure of the accretion disc. In the case of selfsimilar accretion/outflow, the dependence of the rate of accretion $\\dot M$ in the disc depends on the disc radius $r$ on the law $\\dot M \\sim r^{{1\\over2(\\alpha^2-1)}}$, where $\\alpha$ is a dimensionless Alfvenic radius. In the case of $\\alpha \\gg 1$, the accretion in the disc is provided by very weak matter outflow from the disc and the outflow predominantly occurs from the very central part of the disc. The solution obtained in the work provides mechanism which transforms the gravitational energy of the accreted matter into the energy of the outflowing wind with efficiency close to 100%. The final velocity can essentially exceed Kepler velocity at the site of the wind launch. This mechanism allows us to understand the nature of the astrophysical objects with low luminosity discs and energetic jet-like outflows.

  1. METHOD DEVELOPMENT FOR DETERMINING THE HYDRAULIC CONDUCTIVITY OF FRACTURED POROUS MEDIA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dixon, K.

    2013-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Plausible, but unvalidated, theoretical model constructs for unsaturated hydraulic conductivity of fractured porous media are currently used in Performance Assessment (PA) modeling for cracked saltstone and concrete (Flach 2011). The Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has expressed concern about the lack of model support for these assumed Moisture Characteristic Curves (MCC) data, as noted in Requests for Additional Information (RAIs) PA-8 and SP-4 (Savannah River Remediation, LLC, 2011). The objective of this task was to advance PA model support by developing an experimental method for determining the hydraulic conductivity of fractured cementitious materials under unsaturated conditions, and to demonstrate the technique on fractured saltstone samples. The task was requested through Task Technical Request (TTR) HLW-SSF-TTR-2012-0016 and conducted in accordance with Task Technical & Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) SRNL-TR-2012-00090. Preliminary method development previously conducted by Kohn et al. (2012) identified transient outflow extraction as the most promising method for characterizing the unsaturated properties of fractured porous media. While the research conducted by Kohn et al. (2012) focused on fractured media analogs such as stacked glass slides, the current task focused directly on fractured saltstone. For this task, four sample types with differing fracture geometries were considered: 1) intact saltstone, 2) intact saltstone with a single saw cut, smooth surface fracture, 3) micro-fractured saltstone (induced by oven drying), and 4) micro-fractured saltstone with a single, fully-penetrating, rough-surface fracture. Each sample type was tested initially for saturated hydraulic conductivity following method ASTM D 5084 using a flexible wall permeameter. Samples were subsequently tested using the transient outflow extraction method to determine cumulative outflow as a function of time and applied pressure. Of the four sample types tested, two yielded datasets suitable for analysis (sample types 3 and 4). The intact saltstone sample (sample type 1) did not yield any measureable outflow over the pressure range of the outflow test (0-1000 cm H{sub 2}O). This was expected because the estimated air entry pressure for intact saltstone is on the order of 100,000 cm H{sub 2}O (Dixon et al., 2009). The intact saltstone sample with a single saw cut smooth surface fracture (sample type 2) did not produce useable data because the fracture completely drained at less than 10 cm H{sub 2}O applied pressure. The cumulative outflow data from sample types 3 and 4 were analyzed using an inverse solution of the Richard’s equation for water flow in variably saturated porous media. This technique was implemented using the computer code Hydrus-1D (Šim?nek et al., 2008) and the resulting output included the van Genuchten-Mualem water retention and relative permeability parameters and predicted saturated hydraulic conductivity (Van Genuchten, 1980; Van Genuchten et al., 1991). Estimations of relative permeability and saturated conductivity are possible because the transient response of the sample to pressure changes is recorded during the multi-step outflow extraction test. Characteristic curves were developed for sample types 3 and 4 based on the results of the transient outflow method and compared to that of intact saltstone previously reported by Dixon et al. (2009). The overall results of this study indicate that the outflow extraction method is suitable for measuring the hydraulic properties of micro-fractured porous media. The resulting cumulative outflow data can be analyzed using the computer code Hydrus-1D to generate the van Genuchten curve fitting parameters that adequately describe fracture drainage. The resulting characteristic curves are consistent with blended characteristic curves that combine the behaviors of low pressure drainage associated with fracture flow with high pressure drainage from the bulk saltstone matrix.

  2. Hydraulic fracturing-1

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book contains papers on hydraulic fracturing. Topics covered include: An overview of recent advances in hydraulic fracturing technology; Containment of massive hydraulic fracture; and Fracturing with a high-strength proppant.

  3. Bipolar Outflows and the Evolution of Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam Frank

    1998-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Hypersonic bipolar outflows are a ubiquitous phenomena associated with both young and highly evolved stars. Observations of Planetary Nebulae, the nebulae surrounding Luminous Blue Variables such as $\\eta$ Carinae, Wolf Rayet bubbles, the circumstellar environment of SN 1987A and Young Stellar Objects all revealed high velocity outflows with a wide range of shapes. In this paper I review the current state of our theoretical understanding of these outflows. Beginning with Planetary Nebulae considerable progress has been made in understanding bipolar outflows as the result of stellar winds interacting with the circumstellar environment. In what has been called the "Generalized Wind Blown Bubble" (GWBB) scenario, a fast tenuous wind from the central star expands into a ambient medium with an aspherical (toroidal) density distribution. Inertial gradients due to the gaseous torus quickly lead to an expanding prolate or bipolar shell of swept-up gas bounded by strong shock waves. Numerical simulations of the GWBB scenario show a surprisingly rich variety of gasdynamical behavior, allowing models to recover many of the observed properties of stellar bipolar outflows including the development of collimated supersonic jets. In this paper we review the physics behind the GWBB scenario in detail and consider its strengths and weakness. Alternative models involving MHD processes are also examined. Applications of these models to each of the principle classes of stellar bipolar outflow (YSO, PNe, LBV, SN87A) are then reviewed. Outstanding issues in the study of bipolar outflows are considered as are those questions which arise when the outflows are viewed as a single class of phenomena occuring across the HR diagram.

  4. Numerical Investigation of Interaction Between Hydraulic Fractures and Natural Fractures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Wenxu

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydraulic fracturing of a naturally-fractured reservoir is a challenge for industry, as fractures can have complex growth patterns when propagating in systems of natural fractures in the reservoir. Fracture propagation near a natural fracture (NF...

  5. The Hydrothermal Outflow Plume of Valles Caldera, New Mexico, and a

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov YouKizildere IRaghuraji Agro Industries PvtStratosolarTharaldson Ethanol LLC Jump to:Uncertainty of GHGComparison with

  6. Hydrothermal Exploration Best Practices and Geothermal Knowledge...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    on Openei Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Hydrothermal Exploration Best Practices and Geothermal Knowledge Exchange on Openei...

  7. Stratigraphy, Structure, Hydrothermal Alteration and Ore Mineralizatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Mexico- a Detailed Overview Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Stratigraphy, Structure, Hydrothermal Alteration and Ore Mineralization...

  8. Hydrothermal alteration mineral mapping using hyperspectral imagery...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in Dixie Valley, Nevada Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Hydrothermal alteration mineral mapping using hyperspectral...

  9. Drill-back studies examine fractured, heated rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wollenberg, H.A.; Flexser, S.; Myer, L.R.

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To investigate the effects of heating on the mineralogical, geochemical, and mechanical properties of rock by high-level radioactive waste, cores are being examined from holes penetrating locations where electric heaters simulated the presence of a waste canister, and from holes penetration natural hydrothermal systems. Results to date indicate the localized mobility and deposition of uranium in an open fracture in heated granitic rock, the mobility of U in a breccia zone in an active hydrothermal system in tuff, and the presence of U in relatively high concentration in fracture-lining material in tuff. Mechanical -- property studies indicate that differences in compressional- and shear-wave parameters between heated and less heated rock can be attributed to differences in the density of microcracks. Emphasis has shifted from initial studies of granitic rock at Stripa, Sweden to current investigations of welded tuff at the Nevada Test Site. 7 refs., 8 figs.

  10. The lifecycle of powerful AGN outflows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christian R. Kaiser; Philip N. Best

    2006-11-07T23:59:59.000Z

    During the course of this conference, much evidence was presented that points to an intimate connection between the energetic outflows driven by AGN and the energy budget and quite possibly also the evolution of their gaseous environments. However, it is still not clear if and how the AGN activity is triggered by the cooling gas, how long the activity lasts for and how these effects give rise to the observed distribution of morphologies of the outflows. In this contribution we concentrate on the high radio luminosity end of the AGN population. While most of the heating of the environmental gas may be due to less luminous and energetic outflows, these more powerful objects have a very profound influence on their surroundings. We will describe a simple model for powerful radio galaxies and radio-loud quasars that explains the dichotomy of their large-scale radio morphologies as well as their radio luminosity function.

  11. The lifecycle of powerful AGN outflows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kaiser, C R; Kaiser, Christian R.; Best, Philip N.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the course of this conference, much evidence was presented that points to an intimate connection between the energetic outflows driven by AGN and the energy budget and quite possibly also the evolution of their gaseous environments. However, it is still not clear if and how the AGN activity is triggered by the cooling gas, how long the activity lasts for and how these effects give rise to the observed distribution of morphologies of the outflows. In this contribution we concentrate on the high radio luminosity end of the AGN population. While most of the heating of the environmental gas may be due to less luminous and energetic outflows, these more powerful objects have a very profound influence on their surroundings. We will describe a simple model for powerful radio galaxies and radio-loud quasars that explains the dichotomy of their large-scale radio morphologies as well as their radio luminosity function.

  12. Possible Origin of Improved High Temperature Performance of Hydrotherm...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Origin of Improved High Temperature Performance of Hydrothermally Aged CuBeta Zeolite Catalysts. Possible Origin of Improved High Temperature Performance of Hydrothermally Aged...

  13. Relations Of Ammonium Minerals At Several Hydrothermal Systems...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Minerals At Several Hydrothermal Systems In The Western Us Abstract Ammonium bound to silicate and sulfate minerals has recently been located at several major hydrothermal systems...

  14. Fracture Properties From Seismic Scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burns, Daniel R.

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fractures scatter seismic energy and this energy can be analyzed to provide information about fracture

  15. Seismic characterization of fractures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    JM Carcione

    2014-06-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Seismic characterization of fractures. José M. Carcione, OGS, Italy. Fractured geological formations are generally represented with a stress-strain relation.

  16. OVERBURDEN PRESSURE AFFECTS FRACTURE APERTURE

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schechter, David S.

    OVERBURDEN PRESSURE AFFECTS FRACTURE APERTURE AND FRACTURE PERMEABILITY IN A FRACTURED RESERVOIR are in integrated reservoir study, reservoir charac- terization, naturally fractured reservoirs, waterflooding in Hydraulically and Naturally Fractured Reservoirs." His research areas include experimental analysis

  17. Anisotropic Outflows and Enrichment of the Intergalactic Medium

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthew M. Pieri; Hugo Martel; Cedric Grenon

    2006-11-17T23:59:59.000Z

    We have developed an analytical model for the evolution of anisotropic galactic outflows. These outflows follow the path of least resistance, and thus travel preferentially into low-density regions, away from cosmological structures where galaxies form. We show that anisotropic outflows can significantly enrich low-density systems, while reducing the enrichment of overdense regions.

  18. Biomass reforming processes in hydrothermal media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Andrew A

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    While hydrothermal technologies offer distinct advantages in being able to process a wide variety of biomass feedstocks, the composition of the feedstock will have a large effect on the processing employed. This thesis ...

  19. Hydrothermal industrialization: direct heat development. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A description of hydrothermal resources suitable for direct applications, their associated temperatures, geographic distribution and developable capacity are given. An overview of the hydrothermal direct-heat development infrastructure is presented. Development activity is highlighted by examining known and planned geothermal direct-use applications. Underlying assumptions and results for three studies conducted to determine direct-use market penetration of geothermal energy are discussed.

  20. Fracture-Flow-Enhanced Solute Diffusion into Fractured Rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Ye, Ming; Sudicky, E.A.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Naturally Fractured Reservoirs, Society of Petroleumresources from fractured reservoirs (e.g. , Warren and Root,Reservoir Engineering Stanford University, Stanford, California, January 28-30, 2008 SGP-TR-185 FRACTURE-FLOW-ENHANCED SOLUTE DIFFUSION INTO FRACTURED

  1. Recent advances in hydraulic fracturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gidley, J.L.

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This book is a reference to the application of significant technological advances in hydraulic fracturing. It features illustrative problems to demonstrate specific applications of advanced technologies. Chapters examine pretreatment formation evaluation, rock mechanics and fracture geometry, 2D and 3D fracture-propagation models, propping agents and fracture conductivity, fracturing fluids and additives, fluid leakoff, flow behavior, proppant transport, treatment design, well completions, field implementation, fracturing-pressure analysis, postfracture formation evaluation, fracture azimuth and geometry determination, and economics of fracturing.

  2. High velocity impact fracture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Teng, Xiaoqing

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An in-depth understanding of dynamic ductile fracture is one of the most important steps to improve the survivability of critical structures such as the lost Twin Towers. In the present thesis, the macroscopic fracture ...

  3. An outflow boundary condition and algorithm for incompressible two ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    S. Dong

    2014-03-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Feb 22, 2014 ... [8] S. Dong, G.E. Karniadakis, C. Chryssostomidis, A robust and accurate outflow boundary condition for incompressible flow simulations on ...

  4. Neutrino-Driven Mass Loading of GRMHD Outflows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Amir Levinson

    2006-10-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A GRMHD model of disk outflows with neutrino-driven mass ejection is presented. The model is used to calculate the structure of the outflow in the sub-slow magnetosonic region and the mass loading of the outflow, under conditions anticipated in the central engines of gamma-ray bursts. It is concluded that magnetic launching of ultra-relativistic polar outflows is in principle possible along low inclination field lines (with respect to the symmetry axis), provided the neutrino luminosity is sufficiently low, $L_\

  5. Occurrence Frequency of CO Outflows in Massive Protostellar Candidates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kee-Tae Kim; S. E. Kurtz

    2006-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We mapped 12 massive protostellar candidates in the CO J=2-1 line, which in combination with Zhang et al. (2005) completes an unbiased survey of outflows for all 48 sources with l>50^o in a sample of 101 massive protostellar candidates. We detected outflows in 10 sources, implying 88% occurrence frequency of outflows for the 48 sources. This supports the conclusion of previous studies that bipolar outflows are an integral component in the formation process of massive stars. The vast majority of the observed outflows are much more massive (>10~Mo) and energetic (>100~Mo~km/s) than outflows from low-mass protostars. They also have large mass outflow rates (>2x10^{-4}~Mo/yr), suggesting large (~1x10^{-4}~Mo/yr) accretion rates sufficient to overcome radiation pressure of the central massive protostars. We compared the frequency distribution of collimation factors of 40 massive outflows including those of this study with that of 36 low-mass outflows from the literature, and found NO significant difference between the two. All these results are consistent with the suggestion that massive stars form through accretion as do low-mass stars but with much higher accretion rates.

  6. aqueous outflow facility: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    systems. Z. Paragi; I. Fejes; R. C. Vermeulen; R. T. Schilizzi; R. E. Spencer; A. M. Stirling 2002-07-03 82 Protostellar outflows with Smoothed Particle Magnetohydrodynamics...

  7. aqueous humor outflow: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    systems. Z. Paragi; I. Fejes; R. C. Vermeulen; R. T. Schilizzi; R. E. Spencer; A. M. Stirling 2002-07-03 103 Protostellar outflows with Smoothed Particle Magnetohydrodynamics...

  8. The Political History of Hydraulic Fracturing’s Expansion Across the West

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forbis, Robert E.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Political History of Hydraulic Fracturing’s Expansion AcrossPolitical History of Hydraulic Fracturing’s Expansion Acrosss use of the hydraulic fracturing development process.

  9. IC5063: AGN driven outflow of warm and cold gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Morganti; J. Holt; L. Saripalli; T. A. Oosterloo; C. N. Tadhunter

    2007-10-05T23:59:59.000Z

    We present new ATCA 17- and 24-GHz radio images and ESO-NTT optical spectra of the radio-loud Seyfert galaxy IC5063, the first galaxy in which a fast (~ 600 km/s) outflow of neutral hydrogen was discovered. The new radio data confirm the triple radio structure with a central core and two resolved radio lobes. This implies that the previously detected fast outflow of neutral gas is occurring off-nucleus, near a radio lobe about 0.5 kpc from the core. The ionised gas shows complex kinematics in the region co-spatial with the radio emission. Broad and blueshifted (~ 500 km/s) emission is observed in the region of the radio lobe, at the same location as the blueshifted HI absorption. The velocity of the ionised outflow is similar to the one found in HI. The first order correspondence between the radio and optical properties suggests that the outflow is driven by the interaction between the radio jet and the ISM. Despite the high outflow velocities, no evidence is found for the ionisation of the gas being due to fast shocks in the region of the outflow, indicating that photoionisation from the AGN is likely to be the dominant ionisation mechanism. The outflow rate of the warm (ionised) gas is small compared to that of the cold gas. The mass outflow rate associated with the HI is in the same range as for ``mild'' starburst-driven superwinds in ULIRGs. However, in IC5063, the AGN-driven outflow appears to be limited to the inner kpc region of the galaxy. The kinetic power associated with the HI outflow is a small fraction (a few x 10^-4) of the Eddington luminosity of the galaxy but is a significant fraction (~ 0.1) of the nuclear bolometric luminosity. In IC5063, the outflows may have sufficient kinetic power to have a significant impact on the evolution of the ISM in the host galaxy.

  10. Simulating galactic outflows with kinetic supernova feedback

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Claudio Dalla Vecchia; Joop Schaye

    2008-05-07T23:59:59.000Z

    Feedback from star formation is thought to play a key role in the formation and evolution of galaxies, but its implementation in cosmological simulations is currently hampered by a lack of numerical resolution. We present and test a sub-grid recipe to model feedback from massive stars in cosmological smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations. The energy is distributed in kinetic form among the gas particles surrounding recently formed stars. The impact of the feedback is studied using a suite of high-resolution simulations of isolated disc galaxies embedded in dark halos with total mass 10^{10} and 10^{12} Msol/h. We focus in particular on the effect of pressure forces on wind particles within the disc, which we turn off temporarily in some of our runs to mimic a recipe that has been widely used in the literature. We find that this popular recipe gives dramatically different results because (ram) pressure forces on expanding superbubbles determine both the structure of the disc and the development of large-scale outflows. Pressure forces exerted by expanding superbubbles puff up the disc, giving the dwarf galaxy an irregular morphology and creating a galactic fountain in the massive galaxy. Hydrodynamic drag within the disc results in a strong increase of the effective mass loading of the wind for the dwarf galaxy, but quenches much of the outflow in the case of the high-mass galaxy.

  11. Power spectra of outflow-driven turbulence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moraghan, Anthony; Yoon, Suk-Jin

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the power spectra of outflow-driven turbulence through high-resolution three-dimensional isothermal numerical simulations where the turbulence is driven locally in real-space by a simple spherical outflow model. The resulting turbulent flow saturates at an average Mach number of ~2.5 and is analysed through density and velocity power spectra, including an investigation of the evolution of the solenoidal and compressional components. We obtain a shallow density power spectrum with a slope of ~-1.2 attributed to the presence of a network of localised dense filamentary structures formed by strong shock interactions. The total velocity power spectrum slope is found to be ~-2.0, representative of Burgers shock dominated turbulence model. The density weighted velocity power spectrum slope is measured as ~-1.6, slightly less than the expected Kolmogorov scaling value (slope of -5/3) found in previous works. The discrepancy may be caused by the nature of our real space driving model and we suggest ther...

  12. Giant Molecular Outflows Powered by Protostars in L1448

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. A. Wolf-Chase; M. Barsony; J. O'Linger

    2000-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We present sensitive, large-scale maps of the CO J=1-0 emission of the L1448 dark cloud. These maps were acquired using the On-The-Fly capability of the NRAO 12-meter telescope. CO outflow activity is seen in L1448 on parsec-scales for the first time. Careful comparison of the spatial and velocity distribution of our high-velocity CO maps with previously published optical and near-infrared images and spectra has led to the identification of six distinct CO outflows. We show the direct link between the heretofore unknown, giant, highly-collimated, protostellar molecular outflows and their previously discovered, distant optical manifestations. The outflows traced by our CO mapping generally reach the projected cloud boundaries. Integrated intensity maps over narrow velocity intervals indicate there is significant overlap of blue- and red-shifted gas, suggesting the outflows are highly inclined with respect to the line-of-sight, although the individual outflow position angles are significantly different. The velocity channel maps also show that the outflows dominate the CO line cores as well as the high-velocity wings. The magnitude of the combined flow momenta, as well as the combined kinetic energy of the flows, are sufficient to disperse the 50 solar mass NH3 cores in which the protostars are currently forming, although some question remains as to the exact processes involved in redirecting the directionality of the outflow momenta to effect the complete dispersal of the parent cloud.

  13. Bipolar molecular outflows driven by hydromagnetic protostellar winds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher D. Matzner; Christopher F. McKee

    1999-09-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We demonstrate that magnetically-collimated protostellar winds will sweep ambient material into thin, radiative, momentum-conserving shells whose features reproduce those commonly observed in bipolar molecular outflows. We find the typical position-velocity and mass-velocity relations to occur in outflows in a wide variety of ambient density distributions, regardless of the time histories of their driving winds.

  14. THE TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE OF SOLAR ACTIVE REGION OUTFLOWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warren, Harry P.; Ugarte-Urra, Ignacio; Young, Peter R.; Stenborg, Guillermo [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2011-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Spectroscopic observations with the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on Hinode have revealed large areas of high-speed outflows at the periphery of many solar active regions. These outflows are of interest because they may connect to the heliosphere and contribute to the solar wind. In this paper, we use slit rasters from EIS in combination with narrowband slot imaging to study the temperature dependence and morphology of an outflow region and show that it is more complicated than previously thought. Outflows are observed primarily in emission lines from Fe XI to Fe XV. Observations at lower temperatures (Si VII), in contrast, show bright fan-like structures that are dominated by inflows. These data also indicate that the morphology of the outflows and the fans is different, outflows are observed in regions where there is no emission in Si VII. This suggests that the fans, which are often associated with outflows in studies involving imaging data, are not directly related to the active region outflows.

  15. The BGU/CERN solar hydrothermal reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertolucci, Sergio; Caspers, Fritz; Garb, Yaakov; Gross, Amit; Pauletta, Stefano

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a novel solar hydrothermal reactor (SHR) under development by Ben Gurion University (BGU) and the European Organization for Nuclear Research CERN. We describe in broad terms the several novel aspects of the device and, by extension, of the niche it occupies: in particular, enabling direct off-grid conversion of a range of organic feedstocks to sterile useable (solid, liquid) fuels, nutrients, products using only solar energy and water. We then provide a brief description of the high temperature high efficiency panels that provide process heat to the hydrothermal reactor, and review the basics of hydrothermal processes and conversion taking place in this. We conclude with a description of a simulation of the pilot system that will begin operation later this year.

  16. Characterization of advanced preprocessed materials (Hydrothermal)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rachel Emerson; Garold Gresham

    2012-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The initial hydrothermal treatment parameters did not achieve the proposed objective of this effort; the reduction of intrinsic ash in the corn stover. However, liquid fractions from the 170°C treatments was indicative that some of the elements routinely found in the ash that negatively impact the biochemical conversion processes had been removed. After reviewing other options for facilitating ash removal, sodium-citrate (chelating agent) was included in the hydrothermal treatment process, resulting in a 69% reduction in the physiological ash. These results indicated that chelation –hydrothermal treatment is one possible approach that can be utilized to reduce the overall ash content of feedstock materials and having a positive impact on conversion performance.

  17. Calibrated Hydrothermal Parameters, Barrow, Alaska, 2013

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Atchley, Adam; Painter, Scott; Harp, Dylan; Coon, Ethan; Wilson, Cathy; Liljedahl, Anna; Romanovsky, Vladimir

    A model-observation-experiment process (ModEx) is used to generate three 1D models of characteristic micro-topographical land-formations, which are capable of simulating present active thaw layer (ALT) from current climate conditions. Each column was used in a coupled calibration to identify moss, peat and mineral soil hydrothermal properties to be used in up-scaled simulations. Observational soil temperature data from a tundra site located near Barrow, AK (Area C) is used to calibrate thermal properties of moss, peat, and sandy loam soil to be used in the multiphysics Advanced Terrestrial Simulator (ATS) models. Simulation results are a list of calibrated hydrothermal parameters for moss, peat, and mineral soil hydrothermal parameters.

  18. Reconnection outflow generated turbulence in the solar wind

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vörös, Z; Semenov, V S; Zaqarashvili, T V; Bruno, R; Khodachenko, M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Petschek-type time-dependent reconnection (TDR) and quasi-stationary reconnection (QSR) models are considered to understand reconnection outflow structures and the features of the associated locally generated turbulence in the solar wind. We show that the outflow structures, such as discontinuites, Kelvin-Helmholtz (KH) unstable flux tubes or continuous space filling flows cannot be distinguished from one-point WIND measurements. In both models the reconnection outflows can generate more or less spatially extended turbulent boundary layers (TBDs). The structure of an unique extended reconnection outflow is investigated in detail. The analysis of spectral scalings and break locations show that reconnection outflows can control the local field and plasma conditions which may play in favor of one or another turbulent dissipation mechanisms with their characteristic scales and wavenumbers.

  19. Self-potential observations during hydraulic fracturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Jeffrey R.; Glaser, Steven D.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    potential measurements during hydraulic fracturing of BunterMonitoring during hydraulic fracturing using the TG-2 well,fracture processes in hydraulic fracturing, Quarterly Report

  20. Correlation of hydrothermal sericite composition with permeability...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    zones and temperature. The wells studied intersect rhyolitic dikes and sills in the fractured granitic and dioritic basement rocks which serve as the reservoir for the...

  1. Thermal Fracturing of Geothermal Wells and the Effects of Borehole Orientation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hals, Kjetil M D

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An enhanced geothermal system (EGS) expands the potential of geothermal energy by enabling the exploitation of regions that lack conventional hydrothermal resources. The EGS subsurface system is created by engineering enhanced flow paths between injection and production wells. Hydraulic stimulation of existing fracture networks has been successfully achieved for unconventional geothermal resources. More recently proposed concepts increase the use of drilled wellbores in hard rock to connect the injection and production wells. The present work investigates the long-term thermal effects of deviated geothermal wellbores and studies how the cooling of the borehole wall results in thermally induced tensile fractures. The results show that induced fractures are created by a combination of in situ and thermal stresses, and that the extent to which thermally induced tensile wall fractures are created largely depends on how the wellbores are oriented with respect to the pre-existing stresses of the reservoir. If the s...

  2. Simulation of Hydraulic Fractures and their Interactions with Natural Fractures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sesetty, Varahanaresh

    2012-10-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling the stimulated reservoir volume during hydraulic fracturing is important to geothermal and petroleum reservoir stimulation. The interaction between a hydraulic fracture and pre-existing natural fractures exerts significant control...

  3. TEMPORAL VARIATIONS OF FRACTURE DIRECTIONS AND FRACTURE DENSITIES...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OF SHEAR-WAVE SPLITTING Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: TEMPORAL VARIATIONS OF FRACTURE DIRECTIONS AND FRACTURE...

  4. Evaluation of the relationship between fracture conductivity, fracture fluid production, and effective fracture length

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lolon, Elyezer P.

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Low-permeability gas wells often produce less than predicted after a fracture treatment. One of the reasons for this is that fracture lengths calculated after stimulation are often less than designed lengths. While actual fracture lengths may...

  5. Evaluation of the relationship between fracture conductivity, fracture fluid production, and effective fracture length 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lolon, Elyezer P.

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Low-permeability gas wells often produce less than predicted after a fracture treatment. One of the reasons for this is that fracture lengths calculated after stimulation are often less than designed lengths. While actual fracture lengths may...

  6. Advection-Dominated Accretion with Infall and Outflows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thomas Beckert

    2000-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We present self-similar solutions for advection-dominated accretion flows with radial viscous force in the presence of outflows from the accretion flow or infall. The axisymmetric flow is treated in variables integrated over polar sections and the effects of infall and outflows on the accretion flow are parametrised for possible configurations compatible with the self-similar solution. We investigate the resulting accretion flows for three different viscosity laws and derive upper limits on the viscosity parameter alpha. In addition, we find a natural connection to non-rotating and spherical accretion with turbulent viscosity, which is assumed to persist even without differential rotation. Positive Bernoulli numbers for advection-dominated accretion allow a fraction of the gas to be expelled in an outflow and the upper limit on the viscosity predicts that outflows are inevitable for equations of state close to an ideal gas.

  7. MISALIGNMENT OF MAGNETIC FIELDS AND OUTFLOWS IN PROTOSTELLAR CORES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hull, Charles L. H.; Plambeck, Richard L.; Bower, Geoffrey C.; Heiles, Carl; Meredith Hughes, A. [Astronomy Department and Radio Astronomy Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720-3411 (United States); Bolatto, Alberto D.; Jameson, Katherine; Mundy, Lee; Pound, Marc W. [Astronomy Department and Laboratory for Millimeter-wave Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Carpenter, John M.; Lamb, James W.; Pillai, Thushara [Department of Astronomy, California Institute of Technology, 1200 E. California Blvd., MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Crutcher, Richard M.; Hakobian, Nicholas S.; Kwon, Woojin; Looney, Leslie W. [Department of Astronomy, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1002 W Green Street, Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Fiege, Jason D.; Franzmann, Erica [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3T 2N2 (Canada); Houde, Martin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON N6A 3K7 (Canada); Matthews, Brenda C., E-mail: chat@astro.berkeley.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria, 3800 Finnerty Rd., Victoria, BC V8P 5C2 (Canada); and others

    2013-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results of {lambda}1.3 mm dust-polarization observations toward 16 nearby, low-mass protostars, mapped with {approx}2.''5 resolution at CARMA. The results show that magnetic fields in protostellar cores on scales of {approx}1000 AU are not tightly aligned with outflows from the protostars. Rather, the data are consistent with scenarios where outflows and magnetic fields are preferentially misaligned (perpendicular), or where they are randomly aligned. If one assumes that outflows emerge along the rotation axes of circumstellar disks, and that the outflows have not disrupted the fields in the surrounding material, then our results imply that the disks are not aligned with the fields in the cores from which they formed.

  8. Ultra-fast outflows (aka UFOs) from AGNs and QSOs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappi, M; Giustini, M

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the last decade, strong observational evidence has been accumulated for the existence of massive, high velocity winds/outflows (aka Ultra Fast Outflows, UFOs) in nearby AGNs and in more distant quasars. Here we briefly review some of the most recent developments in this field and discuss the relevance of UFOs for both understanding the physics of accretion disk winds in AGNs, and for quantifying the global amount of AGN feedback on the surrounding medium.

  9. HOT ELECTROMAGNETIC OUTFLOWS. II. JET BREAKOUT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Russo, Matthew [Department of Physics, University of Toronto, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 1A7 (Canada); Thompson, Christopher [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, 60 St. George Street, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada)

    2013-08-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We consider the interaction between radiation, matter, and a magnetic field in a compact, relativistic jet. The entrained matter accelerates outward as the jet breaks out of a star or other confining medium. In some circumstances, such as gamma-ray bursts (GRBs), the magnetization of the jet is greatly reduced by an advected radiation field while the jet is optically thick to scattering. Where magnetic flux surfaces diverge rapidly, a strong outward Lorentz force develops and radiation and matter begin to decouple. The increase in magnetization is coupled to a rapid growth in Lorentz factor. We take two approaches to this problem. The first examines the flow outside the fast magnetosonic critical surface, and calculates the flow speed and the angular distribution of the radiation field over a range of scattering depths. The second considers the flow structure on both sides of the critical surface in the optically thin regime, using a relaxation method. In both approaches, we find how the terminal Lorentz factor and radial profile of the outflow depend on the radiation intensity and optical depth at breakout. The effect of bulk Compton scattering on the radiation spectrum is calculated by a Monte Carlo method, while neglecting the effects of internal dissipation. The peak of the scattered spectrum sits near the seed peak if radiation pressure dominates the acceleration, but is pushed to a higher frequency if the Lorentz force dominates. The unscattered seed radiation can form a distinct, low-frequency component of the spectrum, especially if the magnetic Poynting flux dominates.

  10. Dominant Nuclear Outflow Driving Mechanisms in Powerful Radio Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dan Batcheldor; Clive Tadhunter; Joanna Holt; Raffaella Morganti; Christopher P. O'Dea; David J. Axon; Anton Koekemoer

    2007-02-20T23:59:59.000Z

    In order to identify the dominant nuclear outflow mechanisms in Active Galactic Nuclei, we have undertaken deep, high resolution observations of two compact radio sources (PKS 1549-79 and PKS 1345+12) with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) aboard the Hubble Space Telescope. Not only are these targets known to have powerful emission line outflows, but they also contain all the potential drivers for the outflows: relativistic jets, quasar nuclei and starbursts. ACS allows the compact nature (nuclear position angles of both the optical emission line and radio data. There is no evidence for bi-conical emission line features on the large-scale and there is a divergance in the relative position angles of the optical and radio structure. This enables us to exclude starburst driven outflows. However, we are unable to clearly distinguish between radiative AGN wind driven outflows and outflows powered by relativistic radio jets. The small scale bi-conical features, indicative of such mechanisms could be below the resolution limit of ACS, especially if aligned close to the line of sight. In addition, there may be offsets between the radio and optical nuclei induced by heavy dust obscuration, nebular continuum or scattered light from the AGN.

  11. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biddy, Mary J.; Davis, Ryan; Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua

    2013-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates the feasibility of using whole wet microalgae as a feedstock for conversion via hydrothermal liquefaction. Technical barriers and key research needs have been assessed in order for the hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range blendstocks.

  12. Colorado's hydrothermal resource base: an assessment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pearl, R.H.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    As part of its effort to more accurately describe the nations geothrmal resource potential, the US Department of Energy/Division of Geothermal Energy contracted with the Colorado Geological survey to appraise the hydrothermal (hot water) geothermal resources of Colorado. Part of this effort required that the amount of energy that could possibly be contained in the various hydrothermal systems in Colorado be estimated. The findings of that assessment are presented. To make these estimates the geothermometer reservoir temperatures estimated by Barrett and Pearl (1978) were used. In addition, the possible reservoir size and extent were estimated and used. This assessment shows that the total energy content of the thermal systems in Colorado could range from 4.872 x 10{sup 15} BTU's to 13.2386 x 10{sup 15} BTU's.

  13. Hydrothermal reaction of fly ash. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, P.W.

    1994-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    The reactions which occur when fly ash is treated under hydrothermal conditions were investigated. This was done for the following primary reasons. The first of these is to determine the nature of the phases that form to assess the stabilities of these phases in the ambient environment and, finally, to assess whether these phases are capable of sequestering hazardous species. The second reason for undertaking this study was whether, depending on the composition of the ash and the presence of selected additives, it would be possible under hydrothermal conditions to form compounds which have cementitious properties. Formation of four classes of compounds, which bracket likely fly ash compositional ranges, were selected for study. The classes are calcium silicate hydrates, calcium selenates, and calcium aluminosulfates, and silicate-based glasses. Specific compounds synthesized were determined and their stability regions assessed. As part of stability assessment, the extent to which selected hazardous species are sequestered was determined. Finally, the cementing properties of these compounds were established. The results obtained in this program have demonstrated that mild hydrothermal conditions can be employed to improve the reactivity of fly ash. Such improvements in reactivity can result in the formation of monolithic forms which may exhibit suitable mechanical properties for selected applications as building materials. If the ashes involved are considered hazardous, the mechanical properties exhibited indicated the forms could be handled in a manner which facilitates their disposal.

  14. RADIATION TRANSPORT FOR EXPLOSIVE OUTFLOWS: OPACITY REGROUPING

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wollaeger, Ryan T. [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin, Madison 1500 Engineering Drive, 410 ERB, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Van Rossum, Daniel R., E-mail: wollaeger@wisc.edu, E-mail: daan@flash.uchicago.edu [Flash Center for Computational Science, Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2014-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Implicit Monte Carlo (IMC) and Discrete Diffusion Monte Carlo (DDMC) are methods used to stochastically solve the radiative transport and diffusion equations, respectively. These methods combine into a hybrid transport-diffusion method we refer to as IMC-DDMC. We explore a multigroup IMC-DDMC scheme that in DDMC, combines frequency groups with sufficient optical thickness. We term this procedure ''opacity regrouping''. Opacity regrouping has previously been applied to IMC-DDMC calculations for problems in which the dependence of the opacity on frequency is monotonic. We generalize opacity regrouping to non-contiguous groups and implement this in SuperNu, a code designed to do radiation transport in high-velocity outflows with non-monotonic opacities. We find that regrouping of non-contiguous opacity groups generally improves the speed of IMC-DDMC radiation transport. We present an asymptotic analysis that informs the nature of the Doppler shift in DDMC groups and summarize the derivation of the Gentile-Fleck factor for modified IMC-DDMC. We test SuperNu using numerical experiments including a quasi-manufactured analytic solution, a simple 10 group problem, and the W7 problem for Type Ia supernovae. We find that opacity regrouping is necessary to make our IMC-DDMC implementation feasible for the W7 problem and possibly Type Ia supernova simulations in general. We compare the bolometric light curves and spectra produced by the SuperNu and PHOENIX radiation transport codes for the W7 problem. The overall shape of the bolometric light curves are in good agreement, as are the spectra and their evolution with time. However, for the numerical specifications we considered, we find that the peak luminosity of the light curve calculated using SuperNu is ?10% less than that calculated using PHOENIX.

  15. active hydrothermal systems: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mars: channelslocatedalongthe margins of impactcrater Farmer, Jack D. 7 Interconnected hydro-thermal systems Models, methods, and applications Computer Technologies and...

  16. Robust optimization based self scheduling of hydro-thermal Genco ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alireza Soroudi

    2013-12-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Dec 29, 2013 ... Abstract: This paper proposes a robust optimization model for optimal self scheduling of a hydro-thermal generating company. The proposed ...

  17. active hydrothermal system: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Mars: channelslocatedalongthe margins of impactcrater Farmer, Jack D. 7 Interconnected hydro-thermal systems Models, methods, and applications Computer Technologies and...

  18. Development of a Hydrothermal Spallation Drilling System for EGS

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objective: Build and demonstrate a working prototype hydrothermal spallation drilling unit that will accelerate commercial deployment of EGS as a domestic energy resource.

  19. assisted hydrothermal synthesis: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    de 155 Dynamics of hydrothermal seeps from the Salton Sea geothermal system (California, USA) constrained by temperature monitoring Geosciences Websites Summary: Dynamics...

  20. Hydrothermal Alteration and Past and Present Thermal Regimes...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Hydrothermal Alteration and Past and Present Thermal Regimes in the Western Moat of Long Valley Caldera Abstract...

  1. GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    RIVER GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM, IDAHO Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER...

  2. Characterization of past hydrothermal fluids in the Humboldt...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    studies of core samples Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Characterization of past hydrothermal fluids in the Humboldt...

  3. A Helium Isotope Perspective On The Dixie Valley, Nevada, Hydrothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Helium Isotope Perspective On The Dixie Valley, Nevada, Hydrothermal System Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A Helium Isotope...

  4. Development of a Hydrothermal Spallation Drilling System for...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    in the laboratory. Hydrothermal spallation drilling creates boreholes using a focused jet of superheated water, separating individual grains ("spalls") from the rock surface...

  5. Inferences On The Hydrothermal System Beneath The Resurgent Dome...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Usa, From Recent Pumping Tests And Geochemical Sampling Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Inferences On The Hydrothermal System...

  6. Oxygen And Carbon Isotope Ratios Of Hydrothermal Minerals From...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Oxygen And Carbon Isotope Ratios Of Hydrothermal Minerals From Yellowstone Drill Cores Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Oxygen...

  7. Hydrothermal Heat Discharge In The Cascade Range, Northwestern...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    United States Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Hydrothermal Heat Discharge In The Cascade Range, Northwestern United States...

  8. apparent hydrothermal vents: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    HYDROTHERMAL ENERGY Drilling for seawater An "ALL of the ABOVE" Approach to Ocean Thermal Energy Ted Jagusztyn - Cotherm of America Corp - Honolulu OTEC Symposium - September...

  9. Suspensions in hydraulic fracturing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, S.N. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States)

    1996-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    Suspensions or slurries are widely used in well stimulation and hydraulic fracturing processes to enhance the production of oil and gas from the underground hydrocarbon-bearing formation. The success of these processes depends significantly upon having a thorough understanding of the behavior of suspensions used. Therefore, the characterization of suspensions under realistic conditions, for their rheological and hydraulic properties, is very important. This chapter deals with the state-of-the-art hydraulic fracturing suspension technology. Specifically it deals with various types of suspensions used in well stimulation and fracturing processes, their rheological characterization and hydraulic properties, behavior of suspensions in horizontal wells, review of proppant settling velocity and proppant transport in the fracture, and presently available measurement techniques for suspensions and their merits. Future industry needs for better understanding of the complex behavior of suspensions are also addressed. 74 refs., 21 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Outflows and Jets from Collapsing Magnetized Cloud Cores

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robi Banerjee; Ralph E. Pudritz

    2005-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Star formation is usually accompanied by outflow phenomena. There is strong evidence that these outflows and jets are launched from the protostellar disk by magneto-rotational processes. Here, we report on our three dimensional, adaptive mesh, magneto-hydrodynamic simulations of collapsing, rotating, magnetized Bonnor-Ebert-Spheres whose properties are taken directly from observations. In contrast to the pure hydro case where no outflows are seen, our present simulations show an outflow from the protodisk surface at ~ AU and a jet at ~ 0.07 AU after a strong toroidal magnetic field build up. The large scale outflow, which extends up to ~ AU at the end of our simulation, is driven by toroidal magnetic pressure (spring), whereas the jet is powered by magneto-centrifugal force (fling). At the final stage of our simulation these winds are still confined within two respective shock fronts. Furthermore, we find that the jet-wind and the disk-anchored magnetic field extracts a considerable amount of angular momentum from the protostellar disk. The initial spin of our cloud core was chosen high enough to produce a binary system. We indeed find a close binary system (separation ~ 3 R_sol) which results from the fragmentation of an earlier formed ring structure. The magnetic field strength in these protostars reaches ~ 3 kG and becomes about 3 G at 1 AU from the center in agreement with recent observational results.

  11. FRACTURING FLUID CHARACTERIZATION FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Subhash Shah

    2000-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydraulic fracturing technology has been successfully applied for well stimulation of low and high permeability reservoirs for numerous years. Treatment optimization and improved economics have always been the key to the success and it is more so when the reservoirs under consideration are marginal. Fluids are widely used for the stimulation of wells. The Fracturing Fluid Characterization Facility (FFCF) has been established to provide the accurate prediction of the behavior of complex fracturing fluids under downhole conditions. The primary focus of the facility is to provide valuable insight into the various mechanisms that govern the flow of fracturing fluids and slurries through hydraulically created fractures. During the time between September 30, 1992, and March 31, 2000, the research efforts were devoted to the areas of fluid rheology, proppant transport, proppant flowback, dynamic fluid loss, perforation pressure losses, and frictional pressure losses. In this regard, a unique above-the-ground fracture simulator was designed and constructed at the FFCF, labeled ''The High Pressure Simulator'' (HPS). The FFCF is now available to industry for characterizing and understanding the behavior of complex fluid systems. To better reflect and encompass the broad spectrum of the petroleum industry, the FFCF now operates under a new name of ''The Well Construction Technology Center'' (WCTC). This report documents the summary of the activities performed during 1992-2000 at the FFCF.

  12. Self-potential observations during hydraulic fracturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, J R; Glaser, Steven D

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    potential measurements during hydraulic fracturing of BunterSP response during hydraulic fracturing. Citation: Moore, J.observations during hydraulic fracturing, J. Geophys. Res. ,

  13. Can a fractured caprock self-heal?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Elkhoury, JE; Elkhoury, JE; Detwiler, RL; Ameli, P

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    characterization of fractured reservoirs. J. Geophys. Eng.fractured carbonates caused by flow of CO 2 -rich brine under reservoirreservoirs. We present results from two experiments in fractured

  14. Hydrothermally grown nanostructured WO films and their electrochromic characteristics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Demir, Hilmi Volkan

    Hydrothermally grown nanostructured WO 3 films and their electrochromic characteristics.1088/0022-3727/43/28/285501 Hydrothermally grown nanostructured WO3 films and their electrochromic characteristics Zhihui Jiao1 , Xiao Wei and their electrochromic characteristics. Plate-like monoclinic WO3 nanostructures were grown directly on fluorine

  15. Magnetic Reconnection with Asymmetry in the Outflow Direction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Murphy, N A; Cassak, P A

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic reconnection with asymmetry in the outflow direction occurs in the Earth's magnetotail, coronal mass ejections, flux cancellation events, astrophysical disks, spheromak merging experiments, and elsewhere in nature and the laboratory. A control volume analysis is performed for the case of steady antiparallel magnetic reconnection with asymmetric downstream pressure, which is used to derive scaling relations for the outflow velocity from each side of the current sheet and the reconnection rate. Simple relationships for outflow velocity are presented for the incompressible case and the case of symmetric downstream pressure but asymmetric downstream density. Asymmetry alone is not found to greatly affect the reconnection rate. The flow stagnation point and magnetic field null do not coincide in a steady state unless the pressure gradient is negligible at the flow stagnation point.

  16. CORONAL MASS EJECTION INDUCED OUTFLOWS OBSERVED WITH HINODE/EIS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin, M.; Ding, M. D.; Chen, P. F.; Fang, C. [Department of Astronomy, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Imada, S. [National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-8588 (Japan)], E-mail: dmd@nju.edu.cn, E-mail: shinsuke.imada@nao.ac.jp

    2009-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the outflows associated with two halo coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that occurred on 2006 December 13 and 14 in NOAA 10930, using the Hinode/EIS observations. Each CME was accompanied by an EIT wave and coronal dimmings. Dopplergrams in the dimming regions are obtained from the spectra of seven EIS lines. The results show that strong outflows are visible in the dimming regions during the CME eruption at different heights from the lower transition region to the corona. It is found that the velocity is positively correlated with the photospheric magnetic field, as well as the magnitude of the dimming. We estimate the mass loss based on height-dependent EUV dimmings and find it to be smaller than the CME mass derived from white-light observations. The mass difference is attributed partly to the uncertain atmospheric model, and partly to the transition region outflows, which refill the coronal dimmings.

  17. Hydrothermally Deposited Rock | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onYou are now leaving Energy.gov You are now leaving Energy.gov You are8COaBulkTransmissionSitingProcess.pdfGetecGtel JumpCounty, Texas: EnergyHy9Moat of Long Valley CalderaHydrothermally

  18. SCATTERED EMISSION FROM z {approx} 1 GALACTIC OUTFLOWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Martin, Crystal L.; Pancoast, Anna [Department of Physics, University of California, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States); Shapley, Alice E.; Kornei, Katherine A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90025 (United States); Coil, Alison L. [Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, CA 92093 (United States); Murray, Norman, E-mail: cmartin@physics.ucsb.edu [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, 60 St. George Street, University of Toronto, Toronto, ON M5S 3H8 (Canada)

    2013-06-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Mapping Mg II resonance emission scattered by galactic winds offers a means to determine the spatial extent and density of the warm outflow. Using Keck/LRIS spectroscopy, we have resolved scattered Mg II emission to the east of 32016857, a star-forming galaxy at z = 0.9392 with an outflow. The Mg II emission from this galaxy exhibits a P-Cygni profile, extends further than both the continuum and [O II] emission along the eastern side of the slit, and has a constant Doppler shift along the slit which does not follow the velocity gradient of the nebular [O II] emission. Using the Sobolev approximation, we derive the density of Mg{sup +} ions at a radius of 12-18 kpc in the outflow. We model the ionization correction and find that much of the outflowing Mg is in Mg{sup ++}. We estimate that the total mass flux could be as large as 330-500 M{sub Sun} yr{sup -1}, with the largest uncertainties coming from the depletion of Mg onto grains and the clumpiness of the warm outflow. We show that confining the warm clouds with a hot wind reduces the estimated mass flux of the warm outflow and indicates a mass-loading factor near unity in the warm phase alone. Based on the high blue luminosities that distinguish 32016857 and TKRS 4389, described by Rubin et al., from other galaxies with P-Cygni emission, we suggest that, as sensitivity to diffuse emission improves, scattering halos may prove to be a generic property of star-forming galaxies at intermediate redshifts.

  19. THE ANATOMY OF THE YOUNG PROTOSTELLAR OUTFLOW HH 211

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tappe, A.; Forbrich, J.; Lada, C. J. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, MS-72, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Martin, S. [European Southern Observatory, Alonso de Cordova 3107, Vitacura, Casilla 19001, Santiago 19 (Chile); Yuan, Y., E-mail: atappe@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States)

    2012-05-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We present Spitzer Space Telescope 5-36 {mu}m mapping observations toward the southeastern lobe of the young protostellar outflow HH 211. The southeastern terminal shock of the outflow shows a rich mid-infrared spectrum including molecular emission lines from OH, H{sub 2}O, HCO{sup +}, CO{sub 2}, H{sub 2}, and HD. The spectrum also shows a rising infrared continuum toward 5 {mu}m, which we interpret as unresolved emission lines from highly excited rotational levels of the CO v = 1-0 fundamental band. This interpretation is supported by a strong excess flux observed in the Spitzer/IRAC 4-5 {mu}m channel 2 image compared to the other IRAC channels. The extremely high critical densities of the CO v = 1-0 ro-vibrational lines and a comparison to H{sub 2} and CO excitation models suggest jet densities larger than 10{sup 6} cm{sup -3} in the terminal shock. We also observed the southeastern terminal outflow shock with the Submillimeter Array and detected pure rotational emission from CO 2-1, HCO{sup +} 3-2, and HCN 3-2. The rotationally excited CO traces the collimated outflow backbone as well as the terminal shock. HCN traces individual dense knots along the outflow and in the terminal shock, whereas HCO{sup +} solely appears in the terminal shock. The unique combination of our mid-infrared and submillimeter observations with previously published near-infrared observations allow us to study the interaction of one of the youngest known protostellar outflows with its surrounding molecular cloud. Our results help us to understand the nature of some of the so-called green fuzzies (Extended Green Objects), and elucidate the physical conditions that cause high OH excitation and affect the chemical OH/H{sub 2}O balance in protostellar outflows and young stellar objects. In an appendix to this paper, we summarize our Spitzer follow-up survey of protostellar outflow shocks to find further examples of highly excited OH occurring together with H{sub 2}O and H{sub 2}.

  20. Investigation of Created Fracture Geometry through Hydraulic Fracture Treatment Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ahmed, Ibraheem 1987-

    2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Successful development of shale gas reservoirs is highly dependent on hydraulic fracture treatments. Many questions remain in regards to the geometry of the created fractures. Production data analysis from some shale gas wells quantifies a much...

  1. Reservoir fracture characterizations from seismic scattered waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Xinding

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurements of fracture parameters, such as fracture orientation, fracture density and fracture compliance, in a reservoir is very important for field development and exploration. Traditional seismic methods for ...

  2. ARE MOLECULAR OUTFLOWS AROUND HIGH-MASS STARS DRIVEN BY IONIZATION FEEDBACK?

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peters, Thomas; Klessen, Ralf S. [Institut fuer Theoretische Astrophysik, Universitaet Heidelberg, Zentrum fuer Astronomie, Albert-Ueberle-Str. 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Klaassen, Pamela D. [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Strasse 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark [Department of Astrophysics, American Museum of Natural History, 79th Street at Central Park West, New York, NY 10024-5192 (United States); Banerjee, Robi, E-mail: tpeters@physik.uzh.ch [Hamburger Sternwarte, Gojenbergsweg 112, D-21029 Hamburg (Germany)

    2012-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The formation of massive stars exceeding 10 M {sub Sun} usually results in large-scale molecular outflows. Numerical simulations, including ionization, of the formation of such stars show evidence for ionization-driven molecular outflows. Here we examine whether the outflows seen in these models reproduce the observations. We compute synthetic ALMA and CARMA maps of CO emission lines of the outflows, and compare their signatures to existing single-dish and interferometric data. We find that the ionization-driven models can only reproduce weak outflows around high-mass star-forming regions. We argue that expanding H II regions probably do not represent the dominant mechanism for driving observed outflows. We suggest instead that observed outflows are driven by the collective action of the outflows from the many lower-mass stars that inevitably form around young massive stars in a cluster.

  3. Fracture induced anisotropy in viscoelastic media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    santos,,,

    ... seismology and mining. Fractures constitute the sources of earthquakes, and hydrocarbon and geothermal reservoirs are mainly composed of fractured rocks.

  4. Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Project objective: Make Seismic...

  5. Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal Systems; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for...

  6. Fracture prediction in metal sheets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lee, Young-Woong

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most important failure modes of thin-walled structures is fracture. Fracture is predominantly tensile in nature and, in most part, is operated by the physical mechanisms of void nucleation, growth, and linkage. ...

  7. PROTOSTELLAR OUTFLOW HEATING IN A GROWING MASSIVE PROTOCLUSTER

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Ke; Wu Yuefang; Zhang Huawei [Department of Astronomy, School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Zhang Qizhou [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Li Huabai, E-mail: kwang@cfa.harvard.edu [Max-Planck Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2012-02-15T23:59:59.000Z

    The dense molecular clump P1 in the infrared dark cloud complex G28.34+0.06 harbors a massive protostellar cluster at its extreme youth. Our previous Submillimeter Array observations revealed several jet-like CO outflows emanating from the protostars, indicative of intense accretion and potential interaction with ambient natal materials. Here, we present the Expanded Very Large Array spectral line observations toward P1 in the NH{sub 3} (J,K) = (1,1), (2,2), (3,3) lines, as well as H{sub 2}O and class I CH{sub 3}OH masers. Multiple NH{sub 3} transitions reveal the heated gas widely spread in the 1 pc clump. The temperature distribution is highly structured; the heated gas is offset from the protostars, and morphologically matches the outflows very well. Hot spots of spatially compact, spectrally broad NH{sub 3} (3,3) emission features are also found coincident with the outflows. A weak NH{sub 3} (3,3) maser is discovered at the interface between an outflow jet and the ambient gas. These findings suggest that protostellar heating may not be effective in suppressing fragmentation during the formation of massive cores.

  8. Nucleosynthesis in the Outflow from Gamma Ray Burst Accretion Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Surman; G. C. McLaughlin; W. R. Hix

    2005-09-13T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the nucleosynthesis products that are produced in the outflow from rapidly accreting disks. We find that the type of element synthesis varies dramatically with the degree of neutrino trapping in the disk and therefore the accretion rate of the disk. Disks with relatively high accretion rates such as 10 M_solar/s can produce very neutron rich nuclei that are found in the r process. Disks with more moderate accretion rates can produce copious amounts of Nickel as well as the light elements such as Lithium and Boron. Disks with lower accretion rates such as 0.1 M_solar/s produce large amounts of Nickel as well as some unusual nuclei such as Ti-49, Sc-45, Zn-64, and Mo-92. This wide array of potential nucleosynthesis products is due to the varying influence of electron neutrinos and antineutrinos emitted from the disk on the neutron-to-proton ratio in the outflow. We use a parameterization for the outflow and discuss our results in terms of entropy and outflow acceleration.

  9. Satellite observations of Mexico City pollution outflow from the Tropospheric Emissions Spectrometer (TES)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Satellite observations of Mexico City pollution outflow from the Tropospheric Emissions 12 November 2008 Keyword: Mega-city pollution TES O3­CO correlation INTEX-B Mexico city a b s t r a c regions were used to examine Mexico City pollution outflow on a regional scale. The pollution outflow from

  10. A physically based numerical approach for modeling fracture-matrix interaction in fractured reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Pruess, Karsten

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of naturally fractured reservoirs with uniform fracturefor naturally fractured reservoirs, SPE-11688, Presented atflow simulations in fractured reservoirs, Report LBL- 15227,

  11. Evaluation and Effect of Fracturing Fluids on Fracture Conductivity in Tight Gas Reservoirs Using Dynamic Fracture Conductivity Test 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Correa Castro, Juan

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    EVALUATION AND EFFECT OF FRACTURING FLUIDS ON FRACTURE CONDUCTIVITY IN TIGHT GAS RESERVOIRS USING DYNAMIC FRACTURE CONDUCTIVITY TEST A Thesis by JUAN CARLOS CORREA CASTRO Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A... in Tight Gas Reservoirs Using Dynamic Fracture Conductivity Test Copyright 2011 Juan Carlos Correa Castro EVALUATION AND EFFECT OF FRACTURING FLUIDS ON FRACTURE CONDUCTIVITY IN TIGHT GAS RESERVOIRS USING DYNAMIC FRACTURE CONDUCTIVITY TEST A...

  12. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction: 2014 State of Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Anderson, Daniel; Hallen, Richard T.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Elliott, Douglas C.

    2014-07-30T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the base case yields and operating conditions for converting whole microalgae via hydrothermal liquefaction and upgrading to liquid fuels. This serves as the basis against which future technical improvements will be measured.

  13. Seismic Evidence For A Hydrothermal Layer Above The Solid Roof...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    enhanced hydrothermal activity at the sea floor seems to be associated with a fresh supply of magma in the crust from the mantle. The presence of the solid floor indicates...

  14. Rational control of hydrothermal nanowire synthesis and its applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joo, Jaebum

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrothermal nanowire synthesis is a rapidly emerging nanowire discipline that enables low temperature growth and batch process. It has a major impact on the development of novel energy conversion devices, high density ...

  15. Fluid Inclusion Gas Compositions From An Active Magmatic-Hydrothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    An Active Magmatic-Hydrothermal System- A Case Study Of The Geysers Geothermal Field, Usa Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article:...

  16. Self-excited hydrothermal waves in evaporating sessile drops 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sefiane K.; Moffat J.R.; Matar O.K.; Craster R.V.

    2008-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Pattern formation driven by the spontaneous evaporation of sessile drops of methanol, ethanol, and FC-72 using infrared thermography is observed and, in certain cases, interpreted in terms of hydrothermal waves. Both methanol and ethanol drops...

  17. RESEARCH Open Access The fate of lignin during hydrothermal

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    , heteronuclear single quantum coherence NMR, compositional analysis, and gas chromatography­mass spectrometry of aromatic monomers point strongly to depolymerization and condensation being primary mechanisms for lignin during pretreatment. Keywords: Condensation, Depolymerization, Flowthrough pretreatment, Hydrothermal

  18. Base hydrolysis and hydrothermal processing of PBX-9404

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Flesner, R.L.; Spontarelli, T.; Dell`Orco, P.C.; Sanchez, J.A.

    1994-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Base hydrolysis in combination with hydrothermal processing has been proposed as an environmentally acceptable alternative to open burning/open detonation for degradation and destruction of high explosives. In this report, the authors examine gaseous and aqueous products of base hydrolysis of the HMX-based plastic bonded explosive, PBX-9404. They also examined products from the subsequent hydrothermal treatment of the base hydrolysate. The gases produced from hydrolysis of PBX-9404 are ammonia, nitrous oxide, and nitrogen. Major aqueous products are sodium formate, acetate, nitrate, and nitrite, but not all carbon products have been identified. Hydrothermal processing of base hydrolysate destroyed up to 98% of the organic carbon in solution, and higher destruction efficiencies are possible. Major gas products detected from hydrothermal processing were nitrogen and nitrous oxide.

  19. Methods to enhance the characteristics of hydrothermally prepared slurry fuels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Chris M. (Shakopee, MN); Musich, Mark A. (Grand Forks, ND); Mann, Michael D. (Thompson, ND); DeWall, Raymond A. (Grand Forks, ND); Richter, John J. (Grand Forks, ND); Potas, Todd A. (Plymouth, MN); Willson, Warrack G. (Fairbanks, AK)

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Methods for enhancing the flow behavior and stability of hydrothermally treated slurry fuels. A mechanical high-shear dispersion and homogenization device is used to shear the slurry fuel. Other improvements include blending the carbonaceous material with a form of coal to reduce or eliminate the flocculation of the slurry, and maintaining the temperature of the hydrothermal treatment between approximately 300.degree. to 350.degree. C.

  20. Discovery of superthermal hydroxyl (OH) in the HH211 outflow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    A. Tappe; C. J. Lada; J. H. Black; A. A. Muench

    2008-05-12T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a 5-37 micron infrared spectrum obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope toward the southeastern lobe of the young protostellar outflow HH211. The spectrum shows an extraordinary sequence of OH emission lines arising in highly excited rotational levels up to an energy E/k~28200K above the ground level. This is, to our knowledge, by far the highest rotational excitation of OH observed outside Earth. The spectrum also contains several pure rotational transitions of H2O (v=0), H2 (v=0) S(0) to S(7), HD (v=0) R(3) to R(6), and atomic fine-structure lines of [Fe II], [Si II], [Ne II], [S I], and [Cl I]. The origin of the highly excited OH emission is most likely the photodissociation of H2O by the UV radiation generated in the terminal outflow shock of HH211.

  1. Discovery of superthermal hydroxyl (OH) in the HH211 outflow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tappe, A; Black, J H; Muench, A A

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a 5-37 micron infrared spectrum obtained with the Spitzer Space Telescope toward the southeastern lobe of the young protostellar outflow HH211. The spectrum shows an extraordinary sequence of OH emission lines arising in highly excited rotational levels up to an energy E/k~28200K above the ground level. This is, to our knowledge, by far the highest rotational excitation of OH observed outside Earth. The spectrum also contains several pure rotational transitions of H2O (v=0), H2 (v=0) S(0) to S(7), HD (v=0) R(3) to R(6), and atomic fine-structure lines of [Fe II], [Si II], [Ne II], [S I], and [Cl I]. The origin of the highly excited OH emission is most likely the photodissociation of H2O by the UV radiation generated in the terminal outflow shock of HH211.

  2. Method for fracturing silicon-carbide coatings on nuclear-fuel particles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Turner, Lloyd J. (Oak Ridge, TN); Willey, Melvin G. (Knoxville, TN); Tiegs, Sue M. (Lenoir City, TN); Van Cleve, Jr., John E. (Kingston, TN)

    1982-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This invention is a device for fracturing particles. It is designed especially for use in "hot cells" designed for the handling of radioactive materials. In a typical application, the device is used to fracture a hard silicon-carbide coating present on carbon-matrix microspheres containing nuclear-fuel material, such as uranium or thorium compounds. To promote remote control and facilitate maintenance, the particle breaker is pneumatically operated and contains no moving parts. It includes means for serially entraining the entrained particles on an anvil housed in a leak-tight chamber. The flow rate of the gas is at a value effecting fracture of the particles; preferably, it is at a value fracturing them into product particulates of fluidizable size. The chamber is provided with an outlet passage whose cross-sectional area decreases in the direction away from the chamber. The outlet is connected tangentially to a vertically oriented vortex-flow separator for recovering the product particulates entrained in the gas outflow from the chamber. The invention can be used on a batch or continuous basis to fracture the silicon-carbide coatings on virtually all of the particles fed thereto.

  3. Fracture Modeling and Flow Behavior in Shale Gas Reservoirs Using Discrete Fracture Networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ogbechie, Joachim Nwabunwanne

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Gen and NFflow) for fracture modeling of a shale gas reservoir and also studies the interaction of the different fracture properties on reservoir response. The most important results of the study are that a uniform fracture network distribution and fracture...

  4. Procedure for estimating fracture energy from fracture surface roughness

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Williford, Ralph E. (Kennewick, WA)

    1989-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fracture energy of a material is determined by first measuring the length of a profile of a section through a fractured surface of the material taken on a plane perpendicular to the mean plane of that surface, then determining the fractal dimensionality of the surface. From this, the yield strength of the material, and the Young's Modulus of that material, the fracture energy is calculated.

  5. Diagnostics of a Subsurface Radial Outflow From a Sunspot

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    D. C. Braun; Y. Fan; C. Lindsey; S. M. Jefferies

    1996-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    We measure the mean frequencies of acoustic waves propagating toward and away from a sunspot employing a spot-centered Fourier-Hankel decomposition of p-mode amplitudes as measured from a set of observations made at the South Pole in 1991. We demonstrate that there is a significant frequency shift between the inward and outward traveling waves which is consistent with the Doppler effect of a radial outflow from the sunspot. For p-modes of temporal frequencies of 3 mHz it is observed that the frequency shift decreases slightly with spatial frequency, for modes with degree l between 160 to 600. From the l dependence of the frequency shift, we infer that the mean radial outflow within the observed annular region (which extends between 30 and 137 Mm from the spot) increases nearly linearly with depth, reaching a magnitude of about 200 m/s at a depth of 20 Mm. This outflow exhibits properties similar to flows recently reported by Lindsey, et al. (1996) using spatially sensitive local helioseismic techniques.

  6. A RECONNECTION-DRIVEN RAREFACTION WAVE MODEL FOR CORONAL OUTFLOWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bradshaw, S. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Rice University, Houston, TX 77005 (United States); Aulanier, G. [LESIA, Observatoire de Paris, CNRS, UPMC, Universite Paris Diderot, 5 place Jules Janssen, 92190 Meudon (France); Del Zanna, G., E-mail: stephen.bradshaw@rice.edu [DAMTP, Centre for Mathematical Sciences, Wilberforce Road, Cambridge, CB3 0WA (United Kingdom)

    2011-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We conduct numerical experiments to determine whether interchange reconnection at high altitude coronal null points can explain the outflows observed as blueshifts in coronal emission lines at the boundaries between open and closed magnetic field regions. In this scenario, a strong, post-reconnection pressure gradient forms in the field-aligned direction when dense and hot, active region core loops reconnect with neighboring tenuous and cool, open field lines. We find that the pressure gradient drives a supersonic outflow and a rarefaction wave develops in both the open and closed post-reconnection magnetic field regions. We forward-model the spectral line profiles for a selection of coronal emission lines to predict the spectral signatures of the rarefaction wave. We find that the properties of the rarefaction wave are consistent with the observed velocity versus temperature structure of the corona in the outflow regions, where the velocity increases with the formation temperature of the emission lines. In particular, we find excellent agreement between the predicted and observed Fe XII 195.119 A spectral line profiles in terms of the blueshift (10 km s{sup -1}), full width at half-maximum (83 mA) and symmetry. Finally, we find that T{sub i} < T{sub e} in the open field region, which indicates that the interchange reconnection scenario may provide a viable mechanism and source region for the slow solar wind.

  7. Numerical simulation of hydraulic fracturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Warner, Joseph Barnes

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    ~ared that the results of such treatments were not always adequately described by the two-dimensional models. With recent advances in hydraulic fracturing and computing technology, attempts have been made to formulate more realistic fracture models. These three...NUMERICAL SIMULATION OF HYDRAULIC FRACTURING A Thesis by JOSEPH BARNES WARNER Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas A&M University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE May 1987 Maj or Subj ect...

  8. BTEX biodegradation in fractured shale

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O`Cleirigh, D.; Coryea, H. [Roy F. Weston, Inc., Austin, TX (United States); Christopher, M.; Vaughn, C. [Roy F. Weston, Inc., Houston, TX (United States)

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    A petroleum hydrocarbon groundwater plume was identified at a Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) facility in Oklahoma. The affected area had an average BTEX concentration of 3.8 mg/L. Previous aquifer tests indicated preferential groundwater flow paths resulting from natural fractures present in the aquifer formation (primarily shale). A pneumatic fracturing pilot study was performed to evaluate the technology`s effectiveness in creating a more isotropic aquifer. As part of the study, pre-fracture/post-fracture pump tests were performed. Pre-fracture and post-fracture graphs confirmed the study`s hypothesis that pneumatic fracturing would eliminate preferential flow paths and increase groundwater yield. Based on the successful pneumatic fracturing test, an area within the petroleum hydrocarbon plume was fractured and a pilot-scale biodegradation system was operated for four months. The remediation system provided groundwater circulation amended with nutrients and oxygen. Results of the study indicated a significant decrease in BTEX concentrations between the injection well and the observation wells. By Day 113, the benzene concentration (0.044 mg/L) at one of the observation wells was less than the desired state cleanup goal of 0.05 mg/L.

  9. Fracture model for cemented aggregates

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Zubelewicz, Aleksander; Thompson, Darla G.; Ostoja-Starzewski, Martin; Ionita, Axinte; Shunk, Devin; Lewis, Matthew W.; Lawson, Joe C.; Kale, Sohan; Koric, Seid

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A mechanisms-based fracture model applicable to a broad class of cemented aggregates and, among them, plastic-bonded explosive (PBX) composites, is presented. The model is calibrated for PBX 9502 using the available experimental data under uniaxial compression and tension gathered at various strain rates and temperatures. We show that the model correctly captures inelastic stress-strain responses prior to the load peak and it predicts the post-critical macro-fracture processes, which result from the growth and coalescence of micro-cracks. In our approach, the fracture zone is embedded into elastic matrix and effectively weakens the material's strength along the plane of the dominant fracture.

  10. Interferometric hydrofracture microseism localization using neighboring fracture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poliannikov, Oleg V.

    2011-05-19T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydraulic fracturing is the process of injecting high-pressure fluids into a reservoir to induce fractures and thus improve reservoir productivity. Microseismic event localization is used to locate created fractures. ...

  11. Interferometric hydrofracture microseism localization using neighboring fracture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poliannikov, Oleg V.

    Hydraulic fracturing is the process of injecting high-pressure fluids into a reservoir to induce fractures and thus improve reservoir productivity. Microseismic event localization is used to locate created fractures. ...

  12. Fracture compliance estimation using borehole tube waves

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakku, Sudhish Kumar

    We tested two models, one for tube-wave generation and the other for tube-wave attenuation at a fracture intersecting a borehole that can be used to estimate fracture compliance, fracture aperture, and lateral extent. In ...

  13. YSO Jets and Molecular Outflows: Tracing the History of Star Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adam Frank

    1998-04-29T23:59:59.000Z

    Collimated outflows from Young Stellar Objects (YSOs) can be seen as tracers of the accretion powered systems which drive them. In this paper I review some theoretical and observational aspects of YSO outflows through the prism of questions relating to the protostellar source. The issue I address is: can collimated outflows be used as ``fossils'' allowing the history of protostellar evolution to be recovered? Answering this question relies on accurately identifying where theoretical tools and observational diagnostics converge to provide unique solutions of the protostellar physics. I discuss potential links between outflow and source including the time and direction variability of jets, the jet/molecular outflow connection, and the the effect of magnetic fields. I also discuss models of the jet/outflow collimation mechanism.

  14. Exploring the physicochemical processes that govern hydraulic fracture through laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Belmonte A; Connelly P

    ) containing model boreholes as an analog to hydraulic fracturing with various fracture-driving fluids. The

  15. K-Ar Dates Of Hydrothermal Clays From Core Hole Vc-2B, Valles...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Ar Dates Of Hydrothermal Clays From Core Hole Vc-2B, Valles Caldera, New Mexico And Their Relation To Alteration In A Large Hydrothermal System Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI...

  16. Reproductive traits of pioneer gastropod species colonizing deep-see hydrothermal vents after an eruption

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bayer, Skylar (Skylar Rae)

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The colonization dynamics and life histories of pioneer species are vital components in understanding the early succession of nascent hydrothermal vents. The reproductive ecology of pioneer species at deep-sea hydrothermal ...

  17. Distal transport of dissolved hydrothermal iron in the deep South Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzsimmons, Jessica N.

    Until recently, hydrothermal vents were not considered to be an important source to the marine dissolved Fe (dFe) inventory because hydrothermal Fe was believed to precipitate quantitatively near the vent site. Based on ...

  18. Verification of numerical models for hydrothermal plume water through field measurements at TAG

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wichers, Sacha

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrothermal vents discharge superheated, mineral rich water into our oceans, thereby providing a habitat for exotic chemosynthetic biological communities. Hydrothermal fluids are convected upwards until they cool and reach ...

  19. Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Principal Investigator: John H. Queen Hi-Q Geophysical Inc. Track Name: Seismicity and Reservoir Fracture...

  20. Estimation of fracture flow parameters through numerical analysis of hydromechanical pressure pulses

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cappa, F.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    an Engineered Fractured Geothermal Reservoir. Example of theinteractions in a fractured carbonate reservoir inferredwithin a shallow fractured carbonate reservoir. Fracture

  1. Spectral Evidence for Widespread Galaxy Outflows at z>4

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brenda Frye; Tom Broadhurst; Narciso Benitez

    2001-12-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We present discovery spectra of a sample of eight lensed galaxies at high redshift, 3.7outflow velocity of interstellar gas. Local starburst galaxies show similar behavior, associated with obvious gas outflows. We also find a trend of increasing equivalent width of Ly-alpha emission with redshift, which may be a genuine evolutionary effect towards younger stellar populations at high redshift with less developed stellar continua. No obvious emission is detected below the Lyman limit in any of our spectra, nor in deep U or B-band images. The UV continua are reproduced well by early B-stars, although some dust absorption would allow a fit to hotter stars. After correcting for the lensing, we derive small physical sizes for our objects, ~0.5-5 kpc/h for a flat cosmology with Omega_m=0.3, Omega_Lambda=0.7. The lensed images are only marginally resolved in good seeing despite their close proximity to the critical curve, where large arcs are visible and hence high magnifications of up to ~20x are inferred. Two objects show a clear spatial extension of the Ly-alpha emission relative to the continuum starlight, indicating a ``breakout'' of the gas. The sizes of our galaxies together with their large gas motion suggests that outflows of gas are common at high redshift and associated with galaxy formation.

  2. Relative Permeability of Fractured Rock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Mark D. Habana

    2002-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Contemporary understanding of multiphase flow through fractures is limited. Different studies using synthetic fractures and various fluids have yielded different relative permeability-saturation relations. This study aimed to extend the understanding of multiphase flow by conducting nitrogen-water relative permeability experiments on a naturally-fractured rock from The Geysers geothermal field. The steady-state approach was used. However, steady state was achieved only at the endpoint saturations. Several difficulties were encountered that are attributed to phase interference and changes in fracture aperture and surface roughness, along with fracture propagation/initiation. Absolute permeabilities were determined using nitrogen and water. The permeability values obtained change with the number of load cycles. Determining the absolute permeability of a core is especially important in a fractured rock. The rock may change as asperities are destroyed and fractures propagate or st rain harden as the net stresses vary. Pressure spikes occurred in water a solute permeability experiments. Conceptual models of an elastic fracture network can explain the pressure spike behavior. At the endpoint saturations the water relative permeabilities obtained are much less than the nitrogen gas relative permeabilities. Saturations were determined by weighing and by resistivity calculations. The resistivity-saturation relationship developed for the core gave saturation values that differ by 5% from the value determined by weighing. Further work is required to complete the relative permeability curve. The steady-state experimental approach encountered difficulties due to phase interference and fracture change. Steady state may not be reached until an impractical length of time. Thus, unsteady-state methods should be pursued. In unsteady-state experiments the challenge will be in quantifying rock fracture change in addition to fluid flow changes.

  3. Variability of the NGC 1333 IRAS 4A Outflow: Molecular Hydrogen and Silicon Monoxide Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minho Choi; Klaus W. Hodapp; Masahiko Hayashi; Kentaro Motohara; Soojong Pak; Tae-Soo Pyo

    2006-04-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The NGC 1333 region was observed in the H2 1-0 S(1) line. The H2 images cover a 5' x 7' region around IRAS 4. Numerous H2 emission features were detected. The northeast-southwest bipolar outflow driven by IRAS 4A was studied by combining the H2 images with SiO maps published previously. The SiO-H2 outflows are continuous on the southwestern side but show a gap on the northeastern side. The southwestern outflow lobe curves smoothly, and the position angle increases with the distance from the driving source. The base and the outer tip of the northeastern outflow lobe are located at positions opposite to the corresponding parts of the southwestern lobe. This point-symmetry suggests that the outflow axis may be drifting or precessing clockwise in the plane of the sky and that the cause of the axis drift may be intrinsic to the outflow engine. The axis drift model is supported by the asymmetric lateral intensity profile of the SiO outflow. The axis drift rate is about 0.011 deg yr-1. The middle part of the northeastern outflow does not exactly follow the point symmetry because of the superposition of two different kinds of directional variability: the axis drift of the driving source and the deflection by a dense core. The axis drift model provides a good explanation for the large deflection angle of the northeastern outflow. Other H2 emission features around the IRAS 4 region are discussed briefly. Some of them are newly found outflows, and some are associated with outflows already known before.

  4. Hydrocarbon anomaly in soil gas as near-surface expressions of upflows and outflows in geothermal systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ong, H.L.; Higashihara, M.; Klusman, R.W.; Voorhees, K.J.; Pudjianto, R.; Ong, J

    1996-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    A variety of hydrocarbons, C1 - C12, have been found in volcanic gases (fumarolic) and in geothermal waters and gases. The hydrocarbons are thought to have come from products of pyrolysis of kerogen in sedimentary rocks or they could be fed into the geothermal system by the recharging waters which may contain dissolved hydrocarbons or hydrocarbons extracted by the waters from the rocks. In the hot geothermal zone, 300°+ C, many of these hydrocarbons are in their critical state. It is thought that they move upwards due to buoyancy and flux up with the upflowing geothermal fluids in the upflow zones together with the magmatic gases. Permeability which could be provided by faults, fissures, mini and micro fractures are thought to provide pathways for the upward flux. A sensitive technique (Petrex) utilizing passive integrative adsorption of the hydrocarbons in soil gas on activated charcoal followed by desorption and analysis of the hydrocarbons by direct introduction mass spectrometry allows mapping of the anomalous areas. Surveys for geothermal resources conducted in Japan and in Indonesia show that the hydrocarbon anomaly occur over known fields and over areas strongly suspected of geothermal potential. The hydrocarbons found and identified were n-paraffins (C7-C9) and aromatics (C7-C8). Detection of permeable, i.e. active or open faults, parts of older faults which have been reactivated, e.g. by younger intersecting faults, and the area surrounding these faulted and permeable region is possible. The mechanism leading to the appearance of the hydrocarbon in the soil gas over upflow zones of the geothermal reservoir is proposed. The paraffins seems to be better pathfinders for the location of upflows than the aromatics. However the aromatics may, under certain circumstances, give better indications of the direction of the outflow of the geothermal system. It is thought that an upflow zone can be defined when conditions exist where the recharging waters containing the hydrocarbons feed into the geothermal kitchen. The existence of open and active faults, fissures, mini and micro fractures allow sufficient permeability for the gases to flux up and express themselves at the surface as hydrocarbon anomaly in the soil gas. When any of the requirements is absent, i.e. in the absence of the recharging waters, hydrocarbons, temperature, or permeability, no anomaly can be expected. It assumes a dynamic convective system, i.e. recharging waters, upflow and outflow. The anomalies however can define to a certain extent, regions of geothermal upflow, buoyant transport of gases, and frequently down-gradient of cooling waters.

  5. An Oxygen Isotope Study Of Hydrothermal Alteration In The Lake...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    the highly fractured Eureka Graben, southwest of the caldera, was probably the principal source of recharge groundwater for the Lake City system. (2) Fluid flow within the caldera...

  6. Impacts of pure shocks in the BHR71 bipolar outflow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gusdorf, Antoine; Anderl, Sibylle; Eisloeffel, Jochen; Codella, Claudio; Gomez-Ruiz, Arturo; Graf, Urs; Kristensen, Lars; Leurini, Silvia; Parise, Berengere; Requena-Torres, Migel; Ricken, Oliver; Guesten, Rolf

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    During the formation of a star, material is ejected along powerful jets that impact the ambient material. This outflow regulates star formation by e.g. inducing turbulence and heating the surrounding gas. Understanding the associated shocks is therefore essential to the study of star formation. We present comparisons of shock models with CO, H2, and SiO observations in a 'pure' shock position in the BHR71 bipolar outflow. These comparisons provide an insight into the shock and pre-shock characteristics, and allow us to understand the energetic and chemical feedback of star formation on Galactic scales. New CO (Jup = 16, 11, 7, 6, 4, 3) observations from the shocked regions with the SOFIA and APEX telescopes are presented and combined with earlier H2 and SiO data (from the Spitzer and APEX telescopes). The integrated intensities are compared to a grid of models that were obtained from a magneto-hydrodynamical shock code which calculates the dynamical and chemical structure of these regions combined with a radi...

  7. Massive disk outflows mediated by extreme magnetic fields

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shiber, Sagiv; Soker, Noam

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We argue that magnetic fields amplified within a very high accretion-rate disk around main sequence stars can lead to the formation of massive bipolar outflows that can remove most of the disk's mass and energy. This efficient directional removal of energy and mass allows the high accretion-rate disk to be built. We construct thick disks where the magnetic fields are amplified by an Alpha-Omega dynamo in the disk, bringing the fluctuating components of the magnetic field to be much stronger than the large-scale component. By examining the possible activity of the magnetic fields we conclude that main sequence stars can accrete mass at very high rates, up to 0.01Mo/yr for solar type stars, and up to 1Mo/yr for very massive stars. Such energetic outflows can account for the powering of some eruptive objects, such as merging main sequence stars, major eruptions of luminous blue variables, such as the Great Eruption of Eta Carinae, and other intermediate luminosity optical transients (ILOTs; Red Novae; Red Transi...

  8. Probing T Tauri Accretion and Outflow with 1 Micron Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Suzan Edwards; William Fischer; Lynne Hillenbrand; John Kwan

    2006-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In a high dispersion 1 micron survey of 39 classical T Tauri stars veiling is detected in 80%, and He I 10830 and Pgamma line emission in 97% of the stars. On average, the 1 micron veiling exceeds the level expected from previously identified sources of excess emission, suggesting the presence of an additional contributor to accretion luminosity in the star-disk interface region. Strengths of both lines correlate with veiling, and at Pgamma there is a systematic progression in profile morphology with veiling. He I 10830 has an unprecedented sensitivity to inner winds, showing blueshifted absorption below the continuum in 71% of the CTTS compared to 0% at pgamma. This line is also sensitive to magnetospheric accretion flows, with redshifted absorption below the continuum found in 47% of the CTTS compared to 24% at Pgamma. The blueshifted absorption at 10830 shows considerable diversity in its breadth and penetration depth into the continuum, indicating that a range of inner wind conditions exist in accreting stars. We interpret the broadest and deepest blue absorptions as formed from scattering of the 1 micron continuum by outflowing gas whose full acceleration region envelopes the star, suggesting radial outflow from the star. In contrast, narrow blue absorption with a range of radial velocities more likely arises via scattering of the 1 micron continuum by a wind emerging from the inner disk. Both stellar and disk winds are accretion powered since neither is seen in non-accreting WTTS and among the CTTS helium strength correlates with veiling.

  9. Feedback from Protostellar Outflows in Star and Star Cluster Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christopher D. Matzner

    2000-07-13T23:59:59.000Z

    Magnetic stresses collimate protostellar winds into a common distribution of force with angle. Sweeping into the ambient medium, such winds drive bipolar molecular outflows whose properties are insensitive to the distribution of ambient gas and to the details of how the wind is launched, and how its intensity varies over time. Moreover, these properties are in accord with the commonly observed features of outflows. This model is simple enough to permit a quantitative study of the feedback effects from low-mass star formation. It predicts the rate at which star-forming gas is ejected by winds, and hence the efficiency with which stars form. Applied to individual star formation, it relates the stellar initial mass function to the distribution of pre-stellar cores. Applied to cluster formation, it indicates whether the resulting stellar system will remain gravitationally bound. Using the energy injection and mass ejection implied by this model, we investigate the dynamical evolution of a molecular clump as a stellar cluster forms within it. This depends critically on the rate at which turbulence decays: it may involve equilibrium star formation (slow decay), overstable oscillations, or collapse (fast decay).

  10. Filaments, Collapse and Outflows in Massive Star Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robi Banerjee; Ralph E. Pudritz

    2008-07-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We present results from our numerical simulations of collapsing massive molecular cloud cores. These numerical calculations show that massive stars assemble quickly with mass accretion rates exceeding 10^-3 Msol/yr and confirm that the mass accretion during the collapsing phase is much more efficient than predicted by selfsimilar collapse solutions, dM/dt ~ c^3/G. We find that during protostellar assembly out of a non-turbulent core, the mass accretion reaches 20 - 100 c^3/G. Furthermore, we explore the self-consistent structure of bipolar outflows that are produced in our three dimensional magnetized collapse simulations. These outflows produce cavities out of which radiation pressure can be released, thereby reducing the limitations on the final mass of massive stars formed by gravitational collapse. Additional enhancement of the mass accretion rate comes from accretion along filaments that are built up by supersonic turbulent motions. Our numerical calculations of collapsing turbulent cores result in mass accretion rates as high as 10^-2 Msol/yr.

  11. ULTRAFAST OUTFLOWS: GALAXY-SCALE ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEUS FEEDBACK

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wagner, A. Y.; Umemura, M. [Center for Computational Sciences, University of Tsukuba, 1-1-1 Tennodai, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8577 (Japan); Bicknell, G. V., E-mail: ayw@ccs.tsukuba.ac.jp [Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, ACT 2611 (Australia)

    2013-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We show, using global three-dimensional grid-based hydrodynamical simulations, that ultrafast outflows (UFOs) from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) result in considerable feedback of energy and momentum into the interstellar medium (ISM) of the host galaxy. The AGN wind interacts strongly with the inhomogeneous, two-phase ISM consisting of dense clouds embedded in a tenuous, hot, hydrostatic medium. The outflow floods through the intercloud channels, sweeps up the hot ISM, and ablates and disperses the dense clouds. The momentum of the UFO is primarily transferred to the dense clouds via the ram pressure in the channel flow, and the wind-blown bubble evolves in the energy-driven regime. Any dependence on UFO opening angle disappears after the first interaction with obstructing clouds. On kpc scales, therefore, feedback by UFOs operates similarly to feedback by relativistic AGN jets. Negative feedback is significantly stronger if clouds are distributed spherically rather than in a disk. In the latter case, the turbulent backflow of the wind drives mass inflow toward the central black hole. Considering the common occurrence of UFOs in AGNs, they are likely to be important in the cosmological feedback cycles of galaxy formation.

  12. The Water Vapor Abundance in Orion KL Outflows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. Cernicharo; J. R. Goicoechea; F. Daniel; M. R. Lerate; M. J. Barlow; B. M. Swinyard; E. van Dishoeck; T. L. Lim; S. Viti; J. Yates

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the detection and modeling of more than 70 far-IR pure rotational lines of water vapor, including the 18O and 17O isotopologues, towards Orion KL. Observations were performed with the Long Wavelength Spectrometer Fabry-Perot (LWS/FP; R~6800-9700) on board the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) between ~43 and ~197 um. The water line profiles evolve from P-Cygni type profiles (even for the H2O18 lines) to pure emission at wavelengths above ~100 um. We find that most of the water emission/absorption arises from an extended flow of gas expanding at 25+-5 kms^-1. Non-local radiative transfer models show that much of the water excitation and line profile formation is driven by the dust continuum emission. The derived beam averaged water abundance is 2-3x10^-5. The inferred gas temperature Tk=80-100 K suggests that: (i) water could have been formed in the "plateau" by gas phase neutral-neutral reactions with activation barriers if the gas was previously heated (e.g. by shocks) to >500 K and/or (ii) H2O formation in the outflow is dominated by in-situ evaporation of grain water-ice mantles and/or (iii) H2O was formed in the innermost and warmer regions (e.g. the hot core) and was swept up in ~1000 yr, the dynamical timescale of the outflow.

  13. Slator Ranch fracture optimization study

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ventura, J.L.

    1985-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Las Ovejas (Lobo) field in Zapata County, TX, is being developed actively. The field was discovered on Tenneco Oil EandP's Slator Ranch lease with the successful completion of the Sanchez-O'Brien Vaquillas Ranch Well 1. Tenneco operates all of the 17,712-acre (71 678 X 10/sup 3/-m/sup 2/) lease (with the exception of a 320-acre (1295 X 10/sup 3/-m/sup 2/) tract assigned to the Vaquillas Ranch Well 1) and has successfully completed five wells in the Lobo field subsequent to the discovery well. The Lobo interval in the Slator Ranch area is a tight gas sand, and all these wells require fracture stimulation. Because a successful fracture is essential for a good Lobo completion and because hydraulic fracturing represents a significant portion of the completed well cost, it is important to optimize this phase of the completion. The purpose of this study was to determine the following for Slator Ranch Lobo completions: an optimum fracture length as a function of permeability; whether wells should be tailed-in with bauxite, or fractured with all bauxite or sand (if an optimum tail-in does exist, to determine the optimum tail-in for a fixed fracture length as a function of permeability); the drainage area and abandonment pressure for Slator Ranch Well 2; the effect of compression on reserves; and closure pressure as a function of time and distance along the fracture for Slator Ranch Well 2.

  14. Transport pathways for Asian pollution outflow over the Pacific: Interannual and seasonal variations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Hongyu

    is frontal lifting ahead of southeastward-moving cold fronts (the leading edge of cold surges) and transport with the cold fronts to promote the transport of Chinese pollution to the free troposphere. Outflow of seasonalTransport pathways for Asian pollution outflow over the Pacific: Interannual and seasonal

  15. Acid Fracture and Fracture Conductivity Study of Field Rock Samples 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Underwood, Jarrod

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    carbonate reservoir were labeled A through F to protect proprietary information included in this research. A 2% potassium chloride solution was used for the acid system and fracture conductivity measurements to prevent clay swelling. Injection temperature...

  16. Optimization of fracture treatment designs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rueda, Jose Ignacio

    1992-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    using the type curves published by Holditch et al2O. n f H r lic Fracture Pro a ation imula or In 1955, the first model to simulate the propagation of a vertical hydraulic fracture was developed by Khristianovitch and Zheltov O (K-Z model). This two... . . . . 93 97 LIST OF TABLES Table Page 5. I Reservoir and well data for base case example 54 5. 2 Fracture design data for base case example . 54 5. 3 Economic data for base case example . . 54 5. 4 Comparison of the methods used in STIMOP and LPOP...

  17. Neutrino Interactions in the Outflow from Gamma-Ray Burst Accretion Disks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    R. Surman; G. C. McLaughlin

    2004-07-09T23:59:59.000Z

    We examine the composition of matter as it flows away from gamma ray burst accretion disks, in order to determine what sort of nucleosynthesis may occur. Since there is a large flux of neutrinos leaving the surface of the disk, the electron fraction of the outflowing material will change due to charged current neutrino interactions. We calculate the electron fraction in the wind using detailed neutrino fluxes from every point on the disk and study a range of trajectories and outflow conditions for several different accretion disk models. We find that low electron fractions, conducive to making r-process elements, only appear in outflows from disks with high accretion rates that have a significant region both of trapped neutrinos and antineutrinos. Disks with lower accretion rates that have only a significant region of trapped neutrinos can have outflows with very high electron fractions, whereas the lowest accretion rate disks with little trapping have outflow electrons fractions of closer to one half.

  18. Interconnected hydro-thermal systems Models, methods, and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Interconnected hydro-thermal systems Models, methods, and applications Magnus Hindsberger Kgs. Lyngby 2003 IMM-PHD-2003-112 Interconnected hydro-thermalsystems #12;Technical University of Denmark 45882673 reception@imm.dtu.dk www.imm.dtu.dk IMM-PHD-2003-112 ISSN 0909-3192 #12;Interconnected hydro

  19. The Effects of Hydrothermal Agingon a Commercial Cu SCR Catalyst

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    * Model Cu-Zeolite SCR Catalyst Cu-SSZ-13 (SiAl 2 12), Cu-ZSM-5 (SiAl 2 30) Cu-beta (SiAl 2 38), Cu-Y(SiAl 2 5.2) * Hydrothermal Aging 10% H 2 O in air, 800 o C,...

  20. Hydro-Thermal Scheduling (HTS) 1.0 Introduction

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McCalley, James D.

    1 Hydro-Thermal Scheduling (HTS) 1.0 Introduction From an overall systems view, the single most, relative to that of thermal plants, are very small. There are three basic types of hydroelectric plants;2 Pump-storage This kind of hydro plant is a specialized reservoir-type plant which has capability to act

  1. POWER SCHEDULING IN A HYDRO-THERMAL SYSTEM UNDER UNCERTAINTY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Römisch, Werner

    POWER SCHEDULING IN A HYDRO-THERMAL SYSTEM UNDER UNCERTAINTY C.C. Car e1, M.P. Nowak2, W. Romisch2 Forschungsgemeinschaft. leads to a tremendous increase in the complex- ity of the traditional power optimization mod- els-burning) thermal units, pumped-storage hydro plants and delivery con- tracts and describe an optimization model

  2. POWER SCHEDULING IN A HYDROTHERMAL SYSTEM UNDER UNCERTAINTY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Römisch, Werner

    POWER SCHEDULING IN A HYDRO­THERMAL SYSTEM UNDER UNCERTAINTY C.C. Carøe 1 , M.P. Nowak 2 , W. R in the complex­ ity of the traditional power optimization mod­ els. The remedy we propose is decomposition which­storage hydro plants and delivery con­ tracts and describe an optimization model for its least­cost operation

  3. Nucleosynthesis in the outflows associated with accretion disks of Type II collapsars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Indrani Banerjee; Banibrata Mukhopadhyay

    2013-09-04T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate nucleosynthesis inside the outflows from gamma-ray burst (GRB) accretion disks formed by the Type II collapsars. In these collapsars, massive stars undergo core collapse to form a proto-neutron star initially and a mild supernova explosion is driven. The supernova ejecta lack momentum and subsequently this newly formed neutron star gets transformed to a stellar mass black hole via massive fallback. The hydrodynamics and the nucleosynthesis in these accretion disks has been studied extensively in the past. Several heavy elements are synthesized in the disk and much of these heavy elements are ejected from the disk via winds and outflows. We study nucleosynthesis in the outflows launched from these disks by using an adiabatic, spherically expanding outflow model, to understand which of these elements thus synthesized in the disk survive in the outflow. While studying this we find that many new elements like isotopes of titanium, copper, zinc etc. are present in the outflows. 56Ni is abundantly synthesized in most of the cases in the outflow which implies that the outflows from these disks in a majority of cases will lead to an observable supernova explosion. It is mainly present when outflow is considered from the He-rich, 56Ni/54Fe rich zones of the disks. However, outflow from the Si-rich zone of the disk remains rich in silicon. Although, emission lines of many of these heavy elements have been observed in the X-ray afterglows of several GRBs by Chandra, BeppoSAX, XMM-Newton etc., Swift seems to have not detected these lines yet.

  4. NUCLEOSYNTHESIS IN THE OUTFLOWS ASSOCIATED WITH ACCRETION DISKS OF TYPE II COLLAPSARS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Banerjee, Indrani; Mukhopadhyay, Banibrata, E-mail: indrani@physics.iisc.ernet.in, E-mail: bm@physics.iisc.ernet.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012 (India)

    2013-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate nucleosynthesis inside the outflows from gamma-ray burst (GRB) accretion disks formed by the Type II collapsars. In these collapsars, massive stars undergo core collapse to form a proto-neutron star initially, and a mild supernova (SN) explosion is driven. The SN ejecta lack momentum, and subsequently this newly formed neutron star gets transformed to a stellar mass black hole via massive fallback. The hydrodynamics and the nucleosynthesis in these accretion disks have been studied extensively in the past. Several heavy elements are synthesized in the disk, and much of these heavy elements are ejected from the disk via winds and outflows. We study nucleosynthesis in the outflows launched from these disks by using an adiabatic, spherically expanding outflow model, to understand which of these elements thus synthesized in the disk survive in the outflow. While studying this, we find that many new elements like isotopes of titanium, copper, zinc, etc., are present in the outflows. {sup 56}Ni is abundantly synthesized in most of the cases in the outflow, which implies that the outflows from these disks in a majority of cases will lead to an observable SN explosion. It is mainly present when outflow is considered from the He-rich, {sup 56}Ni/{sup 54}Fe-rich zones of the disks. However, outflow from the Si-rich zone of the disk remains rich in silicon. Although emission lines of many of these heavy elements have been observed in the X-ray afterglows of several GRBs by Chandra, BeppoSAX, XMM-Newton, etc., Swift seems to have not yet detected these lines.

  5. Fracture of aluminum naval structures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Galanis, Konstantinos, 1970-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Structural catastrophic failure of naval vessels due to extreme loads such as underwater or air explosion, high velocity impact (torpedoes), or hydrodynamic loads (high speed vessels) is primarily caused by fracture. ...

  6. Sensitivity analysis of fracture scattering

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Xinding, S.M. Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use a 2-D finite difference method to numerically calculate the seismic response of a single finite fracture in a homogeneous media. In our experiments, we use a point explosive source and ignore the free surface effect, ...

  7. FRACTURE STIMULATION IN ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    FRACTURE STIMULATION IN ENHANCED GEOTHERMAL SYSTEMS A REPORT SUBMITTED TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (Principal Advisor) #12;#12;v Abstract Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS) are geothermal reservoirs formed

  8. Seismic anisotropy of fractured rock

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. Schoenberg, C. M. Sayers

    2000-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    of seismic anisotropy to determine the orientation of fracture sets is of ... this assumption of noninteraction does not imply that the ... conventional (2-subscript) condensed 6 x 6 matrix notation,. 11. 6, while ... have simple physical interpretations.

  9. Estimation of fracture compliance from tubewaves generated at a fracture intersecting a borehole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakku, Sudhish Kumar

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Understanding fracture compliance is important for characterizing fracture networks and for inferring fluid flow in the subsurface. In an attempt to estimate fracture compliance in the field, we developed a new model to ...

  10. Powerful Outflows and Feedback from Active Galactic Nuclei

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    King, Andrew

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) represent the growth phases of the supermassive black holes in the center of almost every galaxy. Powerful, highly ionized winds, with velocities $\\sim 0.1- 0.2c$ are a common feature in X--ray spectra of luminous AGN, offering a plausible physical origin for the well known connections between the hole and properties of its host. Observability constraints suggest that the winds must be episodic, and detectable only for a few percent of their lifetimes. The most powerful wind feedback, establishing the $M -\\sigma$ relation, is probably not directly observable at all. The $M - \\sigma$ relation signals a global change in the nature of AGN feedback. At black hole masses below $M-\\sigma$ feedback is confined to the immediate vicinity of the hole. At the $M-\\sigma$ mass it becomes much more energetic and widespread, and can drive away much of the bulge gas as a fast molecular outflow.

  11. Stochastic Modeling of a Fracture Network in a Hydraulically Fractured Shale-Gas Reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mhiri, Adnene

    2014-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    : ? Uniform distribution of heterogeneities that cause a variation of geomechanical properties such as: — In-situ stress — Fracture initiation pressure — Elastic moduli (Shear modulus and Poisson’s ratio) ? No interaction with natural fractures: — Natural... that are dynamically created due to the change in the geomechanical properties in the vicinity of the primary fracture these are referred to as secondary fractures and are thought to be orthogonal to primary fractures. ? The fractures that originate due...

  12. INTERPRETATION OF A HYDRAULIC FRACTURING EXPERIMENT, MONTICELLO, SOUTH CAROLINA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Narasimhan, T.N.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Letters INTERPRETATION OF A HYDRAULIC FRACTURING EXPERIMENT,12091 INTERPRETATION OF A HYDRAULIC FRACTURING EXPERIMENT,transient data from a hydraulic fracturing experiment have

  13. Elastic properties of saturated porous rocks with aligned fractures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2003-12-02T23:59:59.000Z

    This unexpected result is caused by the wave-induced flow of fluids between pores and fractures. ..... For non-fractured rock setting fracture weaknesses. DN and ...

  14. GMINC - A MESH GENERATOR FOR FLOW SIMULATIONS IN FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruess, K.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Flow in Naturally Fractured Reservoirs, Society of Petroleumfor Naturally Fractured Reservoirs, paper SPE-11688,Determining Naturally Fractured Reservoir Properties by Well

  15. Analysis of flow behavior in fractured lithophysal reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Jianchun; Bodvarsson, G.S.; Wu, Yu-Shu

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    R. , 1980. Naturally Fractured Reservoirs, Petroleum, Tulsa,bounded naturally fractured reservoirs. Soc. Pet. Eng. J.test in a naturally fractured reservoir. J. Pet. Tech. 1295–

  16. Tracer Testing for Estimating Heat Transfer Area in Fractured Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruess, Karsten; van Heel, Ton; Shan, Chao

    2004-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Heat Flow in Fractured Reservoirs, SPE Advanced TechnologyTransfer Area in Fractured Reservoirs Karsten Pruess 1 , Tonbehavior arises in fractured reservoirs. As cold injected

  17. asymmetric hydraulic fracture: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from the fractured shale 17 RPSEA UNCONVENTIONAL GAS CONFERENCE 2012: Geology, the Environment, Hydraulic Fracturing Engineering Websites Summary: Fracturing Experiment Overview...

  18. advanced hydraulic fracturing: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    from the fractured shale 18 RPSEA UNCONVENTIONAL GAS CONFERENCE 2012: Geology, the Environment, Hydraulic Fracturing Engineering Websites Summary: Fracturing Experiment Overview...

  19. Multiwell experiment: Fracturing experiments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Warpinski, N.R.; Sattler, A.R.; Branagan, P.T.; Cipolla, C.

    1987-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Because of the complexity of the stimulation, no conventional analyses were useful, so we decided to concentrate on the minifrac to provide important fracture parameters. The minifrac was conducted in an identical manner to the pressure-up and pad stages of the stimulation. Figure 1 shows two initial pressure-history match calculations that were performed to model the minifrac. We found that the pressure behavior could not be matched with any normal behavior. Examining the field pressure data, we see that the interesting feature is the sudden flattening in the pressure at a level 1050 psi above the closure stress during pumping and the rapid drop to this same level at shut-in, after which the pressure decreases much more slowly. We first tried to match this behavior using enhanced height growth. While height growth can flatten the pressure during pumping, it also causes a very slow pressure decline at shut-in. We also tried additional leakoff height as height grew, but this could not flatten the pressure as much as needed. Finally, we tried an accelerated leakoff condition above 1050 psi. We did this by increasing the leakoff coefficient by a constant factor above some threshold value. To keep the results smooth and code convergent, we actually linearly phased in the increased leakoff between 1000 and 1100 psi. The final result of these calculations is shown in Figure 2; a factor of 50 increase in the leakoff coefficient was required to match the data for pressures above 1050 psi.

  20. Uncertainty in the maximum principal stress estimated from hydraulic fracturing Measurements due to the presence of the induced fracture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rutqvist, Jonny; Tsang, Chin-fu; Stephansson, Ove

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    reopening during hydraulic fracturing stress determinations.Laboratory study of hydraulic fracturing pressure data?Howevaluation of hydraulic fracturing stress measurement

  1. Variability of the NGC 1333 IRAS 4A Outflow: Molecular Hydrogen and Silicon Monoxide Images

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Choi, M; Hayashi, M; Motohara, K; Pak, S; Pyo, T S; Choi, Minho; Hodapp, Klaus W.; Hayashi, Masahiko; Motohara, Kentaro; Pak, Soojong; Pyo, Tae-Soo

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The NGC 1333 region was observed in the H2 1-0 S(1) line. The H2 images cover a 5' x 7' region around IRAS 4. Numerous H2 emission features were detected. The northeast-southwest bipolar outflow driven by IRAS 4A was studied by combining the H2 images with SiO maps published previously. The SiO-H2 outflows are continuous on the southwestern side but show a gap on the northeastern side. The southwestern outflow lobe curves smoothly, and the position angle increases with the distance from the driving source. The base and the outer tip of the northeastern outflow lobe are located at positions opposite to the corresponding parts of the southwestern lobe. This point-symmetry suggests that the outflow axis may be drifting or precessing clockwise in the plane of the sky and that the cause of the axis drift may be intrinsic to the outflow engine. The axis drift model is supported by the asymmetric lateral intensity profile of the SiO outflow. The axis drift rate is about 0.011 deg yr-1. The middle part of the northea...

  2. A SEARCH FOR 95 GHz CLASS I METHANOL MASERS IN MOLECULAR OUTFLOWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gan, Cong-Gui; Chen, Xi; Shen, Zhi-Qiang [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan RD, Shanghai 200030 (China)] [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan RD, Shanghai 200030 (China); Xu, Ye; Ju, Bing-Gang, E-mail: cggan@shao.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Radio Astronomy, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)] [Key Laboratory of Radio Astronomy, Chinese Academy of Sciences (China)

    2013-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We have observed a sample of 288 molecular outflow sources including 123 high-mass and 165 low-mass sources in order to search for class I methanol masers at the 95 GHz transition and to investigate the relationship between outflow characteristics and class I methanol maser emission with the Purple Mountain Observatory 13.7 m radio telescope. Our survey detected 62 sources with 95 GHz methanol masers above a 3{sigma} detection limit, which includes 47 high-mass sources and 15 low-mass sources. Therefore, the detection rate is 38% for high-mass outflow sources and 9% for low-mass outflow sources, suggesting that class I methanol masers are relatively easily excited in high-mass sources. There are 37 newly detected 95 GHz methanol masers (including 27 high-mass and 10 low-mass sources), 19 of which are newly identified (i.e., first identification) class I methanol masers (including 13 high-mass and 6 low-mass sources). A statistical analysis of the distributions of maser detections with the outflow parameters reveals that the maser detection efficiency increases with the outflow properties (e.g., mass, momentum, kinetic energy, mechanical luminosity of outflows, etc.). Systematic investigations of the relationships between the intrinsic luminosity of methanol masers and the outflow properties (including mass, momentum, kinetic energy, bolometric luminosity, and mass-loss rate of the central stellar sources) indicate a positive correlation. This further supports the theory that class I methanol masers are collisionally pumped and associated with shocks when outflows interact with the surrounding ambient medium.

  3. Parsec-Scale Herbig-Haro Outflows from Intermediate Mass Stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fiona McGroarty; Tom Ray; John Bally

    2003-11-04T23:59:59.000Z

    While there are many parsec-scale Herbig-Haro (HH) outflows known to be driven by low-mass young stars, few are associated with their intermediate mass counterparts. Here we present the discovery of five such bipolar outflows. Of these, LkHalpha 198, 1548C27 IRS1, LkHalpha 233 and LkHalpha 234 were previously known to possess small-scale HH flows, while no such activity was observed before near IRAS 19395+2313. The largest of the newly discovered outflows are seen in the vicinity of LkHalpha 234 and 1548C27 IRS1, and stretch (in projection) 8pc and 7.5pc respectively. LkHalpha 233 which was previously known to power a spectroscopically detected small-scale (< 10'') jet is now seen to drive a 3pc outflow and LkHalpha 198 is shown here to power a 2pc outflow. Two HH objects in the vicinity of IRAS 19395+2313 lead us to suggest that it may also be responsible for a 5pc outflow. In total, 27 new HH objects/complexes were discovered. Examination of these parsec-scale outflows show that they have similar lengths, morphologies, and dynamical timescales as those from low-mass sources. Many appear to have blown out of the parent cloud, suggesting that their total lengths are much greater than optically observed. The degree of collimation of these outflows is similar to those from low-mass sources suggesting that the transition to more poorly-collimated outflows must occur at higher masses than the sources observed here.

  4. Natural alteration in the cooling Topopah Spring tuff, Yucca Mountain, Nevada, as an analog to a waste-repository hydrothermal regime

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Levy, S.; Valentine, G.

    1993-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Studies of natural hydrothermal alteration in the cooling Topopah Spring tuff suggest a useful ``self-analog`` predictor of fluid-rock interactions within the thermal regime imposed by a potential nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. This tuff has the advantages of representative rock types and appropriate spatial distribution of lithologic features. The cooling history of the tuff spanned the temperature range for any proposed repository thermal load, and the unsaturated-zone hydrologic conditions of the natural alteration would have been similar to existing conditions. A site at northeastern Yucca Mountain, with a prominent vertical fracture zone, has been selected for natural analog studies. The cooling of the tuff and the movement of water in the fracture zone and adjacent matrix will be modeled with the finite element code FEHNM, capable of simulating flow through porous and fractured media using a dual porosity-dual permeability continuum model, with heat transfer and two-phase (vapor and liquid) processes fully accounted for.

  5. Fracture characterization and estimation of fracture porosity of naturally fractured reservoirs with no matrix porosity using stochastic fractal models

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Tae Hyung

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Determining fracture characteristics at the laboratory scale is a major challenge. It is known that fracture characteristics are scale dependent; as such, the minimum sample size should be deduced in order to scale to reservoir dimensions. The main...

  6. Instabilities during liquid migration into superheated hydrothermal systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzgerald, Shaun D.; Woods, Andrew W.

    1995-01-26T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydrothermal systems typically consist of hot permeable rock which contains either liquid or liquid and saturated steam within the voids. These systems vent fluids at the surface through hot springs, fumaroles, mud pools, steaming ground and geysers. They are simultaneously recharged as meteoric water percolates through the surrounding rock or through the active injection of water at various geothermal reservoirs. In a number of geothermal reservoirs from which significant amounts of hot fluid have been extracted and passed through turbines, superheated regions of vapor have developed. As liquid migrates through a superheated region of a hydrothermal system, some of the liquid vaporizes at a migrating liquid-vapor interface. Using simple physical arguments, and analogue laboratory experiments we show that, under the influence of gravity, the liquid-vapor interface may become unstable and break up into fingers.

  7. Hydrothermal Processing of Macroalgal Feedstocks in Continuous-Flow Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Hart, Todd R.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Rotness, Leslie J.; Roesijadi, Guritno; Zacher, Alan H.; Magnuson, Jon K.

    2014-02-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Wet macroalgal slurries can be converted into a biocrude by hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL). High levels of carbon conversion to gravity-separable oil product were accomplished at relatively low temperature (350 ?C) in a pressurized (sub-critical liquid water) environment (20 MPa). As opposed to earlier work in batch reactors reported by others, direct oil recovery was achieved without the use of a solvent and biomass trace mineral components were removed by processing steps so that they did not cause processing difficulties. In addition, catalytic hydrothermal gasification was effectively applied for HTL byproduct water cleanup and fuel gas production from water soluble organics. As a result, high conversion of macroalgae to liquid and gas fuel products was found with low levels of organic contamination in byproduct water. Both process steps were accomplished in continuous-flow reactor systems such that design data for process scale-up was generated.

  8. Hydrothermal system in Southern Grass Valley, Pershing County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Welch, A.H.; Sorey, M.L.; Olmsted, F.H.

    1981-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Southern Grass Valley is a fairly typical extensional basin in the Basin and Range province. Leach Hot Springs, in the southern part of the valley, represents the discharge end of an active hydrothermal flow system with an estimated deep aquifer temperature of 163 to 176/sup 0/C. Results of geologic, hydrologic, geophysical and geochemical investigations are discussed in an attempt to construct an internally consistent model of the system.

  9. Three Models for Water ooding in a Naturally Fractured Petroleum ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    THREE MODELS FOR WATERFLOODING IN A NATURALLY. FRACTURED ... 1. Introduction. For the purposes of this paper a naturally fractured reservoir.

  10. Method for directional hydraulic fracturing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Swanson, David E. (West St. Paul, MN); Daly, Daniel W. (Crystal, MN)

    1994-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A method for directional hydraulic fracturing using borehole seals to confine pressurized fluid in planar permeable regions, comprising: placing a sealant in the hole of a structure selected from geologic or cemented formations to fill the space between a permeable planar component and the geologic or cemented formation in the vicinity of the permeable planar component; making a hydraulic connection between the permeable planar component and a pump; permitting the sealant to cure and thereby provide both mechanical and hydraulic confinement to the permeable planar component; and pumping a fluid from the pump into the permeable planar component to internally pressurize the permeable planar component to initiate a fracture in the formation, the fracture being disposed in the same orientation as the permeable planar component.

  11. Hydrothermal processing of Hanford tank wastes: Process modeling and control

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Currier, R.P. [comp.

    1994-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    In the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) hydrothermal process, waste streams are first pressurized and heated as they pass through a continuous flow tubular reactor vessel. The waste is maintained at reaction temperature of 300--550 C where organic destruction and sludge reformation occur. This report documents LANL activities in process modeling and control undertaken in FY94 to support hydrothermal process development. Key issues discussed include non-ideal flow patterns (e.g. axial dispersion) and their effect on reactor performance, the use and interpretation of inert tracer experiments, and the use of computational fluid mechanics to evaluate novel hydrothermal reactor designs. In addition, the effects of axial dispersion (and simplifications to rate expressions) on the estimated kinetic parameters are explored by non-linear regression to experimental data. Safety-related calculations are reported which estimate the explosion limits of effluent gases and the fate of hydrogen as it passes through the reactor. Development and numerical solution of a generalized one-dimensional mathematical model is also summarized. The difficulties encountered in using commercially available software to correlate the behavior of high temperature, high pressure aqueous electrolyte mixtures are summarized. Finally, details of the control system and experiments conducted to empirically determine the system response are reported.

  12. Aqueous geochemistry of the Thermopolis hydrothermal system, southern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, U.S.A.

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kaszuba, John P. [University of Wyoming; Sims, Kenneth W.W. [University of Wyoming; Pluda, Allison R.

    2014-03-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Thermopolis hydrothermal system is located in the southern portion of the Bighorn Basin, in and around the town of Thermopolis, Wyoming. It is the largest hydrothermal system in Wyoming outside of Yellowstone National Park. The system includes hot springs, travertine deposits, and thermal wells; published models for the hydrothermal system propose the Owl Creek Mountains as the recharge zone, simple conductive heating at depth, and resurfacing of thermal waters up the Thermopolis Anticline.

  13. Hydrothermal metamorphism and low-temperature alteration on the Mid-Atlantic ridge

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peron, Philippe Raymond

    1978-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    occur to form hydrated rocks. Oxygen isotopic data from hydrothermally metamorphosed rocks show that hydrothermal fluids are derived from a low g 0 source such as sea- 18 water rather than the higher $0 source typical for mantle-derived water... inferred hydrothermal fluid vent sites. The style of alteration of these rocks ranges from weathering at ambient ocean floor temperatures to metamorphism at greenshist facies conditions, The alteration products associated with the weathered ba- salts...

  14. Acoustic Character Of Hydraulic Fractures In Granite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paillet, Frederick I.

    1983-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydraulic fractures in homogeneous granitic rocks were logged with conventional acoustic-transit-time, acoustic-waveform, and acoustic-televiewer logging systems. Fractured intervals ranged in depth from 45 to 570m. and ...

  15. A Global Model for Fracture Falloff Analysis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marongiu-Porcu, Matteo

    2014-10-29T23:59:59.000Z

    The reservoir permeability is an essential input for the optimum design of modern hydraulic fracture treatments, which are undeniably the crucial technology involved in the development of tight and/or unconventional gas reservoirs. The fracture...

  16. Fluid Flow Simulation in Fractured Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sarkar, Sudipta

    2002-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this study is to analyze fluid flow in fractured reservoirs. In most petroleum reservoirs, particularly carbonate reservoirs and some tight sands, natural fractures play a critical role in controlling fluid ...

  17. Self-potential observations during hydraulic fracturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Moore, Jeffrey R.; Glaser, Steven D.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    during hydraulic fracturing Moore and Glaser, in press JGR,press JGR, B – 2006JB004373 where m is the average hydraulichydraulic fracturing with water. Moore and Glaser, in press

  18. Surrogate-based optimization of hydraulic fracturing in pre-existing fracture networks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lu, Zhiming

    Surrogate-based optimization of hydraulic fracturing in pre-existing fracture networks Mingjie Chen Keywords: Hydraulic fracturing Fractal dimension Surrogate model Optimization Global sensitivity a b s t r a c t Hydraulic fracturing has been used widely to stimulate production of oil, natural gas

  19. MAGNETIC FIELD STRUCTURE IN A HIGH-MASS OUTFLOW/DISK SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Beuther, H. [Max-Planck-Institute for Astronomy, Koenigstuhl 17, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Vlemmings, W. H. T. [Argelander Institute for Astronomy, University of Bonn, Auf dem Huegel 71, 53121 Bonn (Germany); Rao, R. [Academia Sinica, Institute of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Van der Tak, F. F. S., E-mail: beuther@mpia.d, E-mail: wouter@astro.uni-bonn.d, E-mail: rrao@sma.hawaii.ed, E-mail: vdtak@sron.n [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Landleven 12, 9747 AD Groningen (Netherlands)

    2010-11-20T23:59:59.000Z

    To characterize the magnetic field structure of the outflow and core region within a prototypical high-mass star-forming region, we analyzed polarized CO(3-2)-for the first time observed with the Submillimeter Array-as well as 880 {mu}m submillimeter continuum emission from the high-mass outflow/disk system IRAS 18089-1732. Both emission features with polarization degrees at a few percent level indicate that the magnetic field structure is largely aligned with the outflow/jet orientation from small core scales to larger outflow scales. Although quantitative estimates are crude, the analysis indicates that turbulent energy dominates over magnetic energy. The data also suggest a magnetic field strength increase from the lower-density envelope to the higher-density core.

  20. agn accretion-disk outflows: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    initial dipole, the field direction in the stellar wind is opposite to that in the disk wind. The maximum speed of the outflow is about the Keplerian speed at the inner disk...

  1. accretion-disk outflows ii: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    field direction in the stellar wind is opposite to that in the disk wind. The maximum speed of the outflow is about the Keplerian speed at the inner disk radius. With the chosen...

  2. The role of impeller outflow conditions on the performance and stability of airfoil vaned radial diffusers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Everitt, Jonathan (Jonathan Neil)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis quantifies the relative importance of the impeller outflow angle, Mach number, non-uniformity and unsteadiness on diffuser performance, through diffuser experiments in a compressor stage and in a swirling flow ...

  3. Wave Propagation in Fractured Poroelastic Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seismic wave propagation through fractures and cracks is an important subject in exploration and production geophysics, earthquake seismology and mining.

  4. The Development of a Hydrothermal Method for Slurry Feedstock Preparation for Gasification Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Wei

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Comingled Biomass and Coal Slurries with HydrothermalCo-Mingled Biomass and Coal Slurries with Different Water tocomingled biomass and coal slurry with a high carbon content

  5. Metatranscriptomics reveal differences in in situ energy and nitrogen metabolism among hydrothermal vent snail symbionts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanders, J. G.

    Despite the ubiquity of chemoautotrophic symbioses at hydrothermal vents, our understanding of the influence of environmental chemistry on symbiont metabolism is limited. Transcriptomic analyses are useful for linking ...

  6. A Sr-Isotopic Comparison Between Thermal Waters, Rocks, And Hydrotherm...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Sr-Isotopic Comparison Between Thermal Waters, Rocks, And Hydrothermal Calcites, Long Valley Caldera, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  7. A Simple Model for Estimating Water Balance and Salinity of Reservoirs and Outflow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Miyamoto, S; Yuan, F; Anand, Shilpa

    2010-08-23T23:59:59.000Z

    on flow and salinity of the stream and the floodplains. The first part deals with water and salt balance in reservoirs. The primary purpose of the model is to predict outflow salinity from the reservoir storage and inflow information in advance... management strategy, yet the method to predict outflow salinity has not been adequately examined. The study reported here examined the water and salt balance in a reservoir using a two-layer model. This model assumes that inflow blends with the storage...

  8. Discrete fracture modeling for fractured reservoirs using Voronoi grid blocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gross, Matthew Edward

    2007-09-17T23:59:59.000Z

    or pseudofracture groups modeled in their own grid blocks. Discrete Fracture Modeling (DFN) is still a relatively new field, and most research on it up to this point has been done with Delaunay tessellations. This research investigates an alternative approach using...

  9. Prompt optical emission from residual collisions in GRB outflows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhuo Li; Eli Waxman

    2008-01-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The prompt gamma-ray emission in gamma-ray bursts is believed to be produced by internal shocks within a relativistic unsteady outflow. The recent detection of prompt optical emission accompanying the prompt gamma-ray emission appears to be inconsistent with this model since the out flowing plasma is expected to be highly optically thick to optical photons. We show here that fluctuations in flow properties on short, ~ 1 ms, time scale, which drive the gamma-ray producing collisions at small radii, are expected to lead to "residual" collisions at much larger radii, where the optical depth to optical photons is low. The late residual collisions naturally account for the relatively bright optical emission. The apparent simultaneity of gamma-ray and optical emission is due to the highly relativistic speed with which the plasma expands. Residual collisions may also account for the X-ray emission during the early "steep decline" phase, where the radius is inferred to be larger than the gamma-ray emission radius. Finally, we point out that inverse-Compton emission from residual collisions at large radii is expected to contribute significantly to the emission at high energy, and may therefore "smear" the pair production spectral cut-off.

  10. Pulse Structure of Hot Electromagnetic Outflows with Embedded Baryons

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Christopher

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gamma-ray bursts (GRBs) show a dramatic pulse structure that requires bulk relativistic motion, but whose physical origin has remained murky. We focus on a hot, magnetized jet that is emitted by a black hole and interacts with a confining medium. Strongly relativistic expansion of the magnetic field, as limited by a corrugation instability, may commence only after it forms a thin shell. Then the observed $T_{90}$ burst duration is dominated by the curvature delay, and null periods arise from angular inhomogeneities, not the duty cycle of the engine. We associate the $O(1)$ s timescale observed in the pulse width distribution of long GRBs with the collapse of the central 2.5-3$M_\\odot$ of a massive stellar core. A fraction of the baryons are shown to be embedded in the magnetized outflow by the hyper-Eddington radiation flux; they strongly disturb the magnetic field after the compactness drops below $\\sim 4\\times 10^3(Y_e/0.5)^{-1}$. The high-energy photons so created have a compressed pulse structure. Delayed...

  11. Relativistic outflow from two thermonuclear shell flashes on neutron stars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zand, Jean in 't; Cavecchi, Yuri

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the exceptionally short (32-41 ms) precursors of two intermediate-duration thermonuclear X-ray bursts observed with RXTE from the neutron stars in 4U 0614+09 and 2S 0918-549. They exhibit photon fluxes that surpass those at the Eddington limit later in the burst by factors of 2.6 to 3.1. We are able to explain both the short duration and the super-Eddington flux by mildly relativistic outflow velocities of 0.1$c$ to 0.3$c$ subsequent to the thermonuclear shell flashes on the neutron stars. These are the highest velocities ever measured from any thermonuclear flash. The precursor rise times are also exceptionally short: about 1 ms. This is inconsistent with predictions for nuclear flames spreading laterally as deflagrations and suggests detonations instead. This is the first time that a detonation is suggested for such a shallow ignition column depth ($y_{\\rm ign}$ = 10$^{10}$ g cm$^{-2}$). The detonation would possibly require a faster nuclear reaction chain, such as bypassing the alpha-capture on $^...

  12. Hydraulic Fracture: multiscale processes and moving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peirce, Anthony

    Hydraulic Fracture: multiscale processes and moving interfaces Anthony Peirce Department Mitchell (UBC) · Ed Siebrits (SLB, Houston) #12;2 Outline · What is a hydraulic fracture? · Scaling Fluid Proppant #12;6 An actual hydraulic fracture #12;7 HF experiment (Jeffrey et al CSIRO) #12;8 1D

  13. Hydraulic Fracture: multiscale processes and moving

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peirce, Anthony

    Hydraulic Fracture: multiscale processes and moving interfaces Anthony Peirce Department Siebrits (SLB, Houston) #12;2 Outline · What is a hydraulic fracture? · Mathematical models of hydraulic fracture · Scaling and special solutions for 1-2D models · Numerical modeling for 2-3D problems

  14. RATE DECLINE ANALYSIS FOR NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    RATE DECLINE ANALYSIS FOR NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS A REPORT SUBMITTED TO THE DEPARTMENT analylsiis for constant pressure production in a naturally fractured reservoir is presented. The solution, the Warren and Root model which assumes fracturing is perfectly unifom, provides an upper bound of reservoir

  15. Regulation of Hydraulic Fracturing in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kammen, Daniel M.

    APRIL 2013 Regulation of Hydraulic Fracturing in California: A WAsteWAteR And WAteR QuAlity Pe | Regulation of Hydraulic Fracturing in California Wheeler Institute for Water Law & Policy Center for Law #12;Regulation of Hydraulic Fracturing in California | 3Berkeley law | wheeler InstItute for water law

  16. Fractured shale reservoirs: Towards a realistic model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hamilton-Smith, T. [Applied Earth Science, Lexington, KY (United States)

    1996-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fractured shale reservoirs are fundamentally unconventional, which is to say that their behavior is qualitatively different from reservoirs characterized by intergranular pore space. Attempts to analyze fractured shale reservoirs are essentially misleading. Reliance on such models can have only negative results for fractured shale oil and gas exploration and development. A realistic model of fractured shale reservoirs begins with the history of the shale as a hydrocarbon source rock. Minimum levels of both kerogen concentration and thermal maturity are required for effective hydrocarbon generation. Hydrocarbon generation results in overpressuring of the shale. At some critical level of repressuring, the shale fractures in the ambient stress field. This primary natural fracture system is fundamental to the future behavior of the fractured shale gas reservoir. The fractures facilitate primary migration of oil and gas out of the shale and into the basin. In this process, all connate water is expelled, leaving the fractured shale oil-wet and saturated with oil and gas. What fluids are eventually produced from the fractured shale depends on the consequent structural and geochemical history. As long as the shale remains hot, oil production may be obtained. (e.g. Bakken Shale, Green River Shale). If the shale is significantly cooled, mainly gas will be produced (e.g. Antrim Shale, Ohio Shale, New Albany Shale). Where secondary natural fracture systems are developed and connect the shale to aquifers or to surface recharge, the fractured shale will also produce water (e.g. Antrim Shale, Indiana New Albany Shale).

  17. Time-dependent and outflow boundary conditions for Dissipative Particle Dynamics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lei Huan [Division of Applied Mathematics, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912 (United States); Fedosov, Dmitry A. [Division of Applied Mathematics, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912 (United States); Institut fuer Festkoerperforschung, Forschungszentrum Juelich, 52425 Juelich (Germany); Karniadakis, George Em, E-mail: George_Karniadakis@brown.ed [Division of Applied Mathematics, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912 (United States)

    2011-05-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose a simple method to impose both no-slip boundary conditions at fluid-wall interfaces and at outflow boundaries in fully developed regions for Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) fluid systems. The procedure to enforce the no-slip condition is based on a velocity-dependent shear force, which is a generalized force to represent the presence of the solid-wall particles and to maintain locally thermodynamic consistency. We show that this method can be implemented in both steady and time-dependent fluid systems and compare the DPD results with the continuum limit (Navier-Stokes) results. We also develop a force-adaptive method to impose the outflow boundary conditions for fully developed flow with unspecified outflow velocity profile or pressure value. We study flows over the backward-facing step and in idealized arterial bifurcations using a combination of the two new boundary methods with different flow rates. Finally, we explore the applicability of the outflow method in time-dependent flow systems. The outflow boundary method works well for systems with Womersley number of O(1), i.e. when the pressure and flowrate at the outflow are approximately in-phase.

  18. Theory of Bipolar Outflows from High-Mass Young Stellar Objects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arieh Konigl

    1999-03-11T23:59:59.000Z

    There is a growing number of observational indicators for the presence of bipolar outflows in massive, young stellar objects that are still accreting mass as part of their formation process. In particular, there is evidence that the outflows from these objects can attain higher velocities and kinetic luminosities than their lower-mass counterparts. Furthermore, the higher-mass objects appear to smoothly continue the correlation found in T Tauri stars between outflow and accretion signatures, and in several cases there are direct clues to the existence of a circumstellar disk from optical and infrared imaging and spectroscopy as well as from millimeter-wavelength interferometry. These results suggest that the disk-outflow connection found in low-mass pre-main-sequence stars extends to more massive objects, and that a similar physical mechanism may drive the outflows in both cases. I examine the observational basis for this hypothesis and consider how the commonly invoked centrifugally driven wind models of bipolar outflows in low-mass stars would be affected by the various physical processes (such as photoionization, photoevaporation, radiation pressure, and stellar wind ram pressure) that operate in higher-mass stars. I then list some of the interesting questions that one could hope to address as this young field of research continues to develop.

  19. MAGNETIC RECONNECTION ALONG QUASI-SEPARATRIX LAYERS AS A DRIVER OF UBIQUITOUS ACTIVE REGION OUTFLOWS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Baker, D.; Van Driel-Gesztelyi, L.; Murray, M. J. [University College London, Mullard Space Science Laboratory, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking, Surrey RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); Mandrini, C. H. [Instituto de AstronomIa y fisica del Espacio, CONICET-UBA, CC. 67, Suc. 28, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Demoulin, P. [Observatoire de Paris, LESIA, UMR 8109 (CNRS), Meudon-Principal Cedex (France)

    2009-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hinode's EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) has discovered ubiquitous outflows of a few to 50 km s{sup -1} from active regions (ARs). These outflows are most prominent at the AR boundary and appear over monopolar magnetic areas. They are linked to strong non-thermal line broadening and are stronger in hotter EUV lines. The outflows persist for at least several days. Using Hinode EIS and X-Ray Telescope observations of AR 10942 coupled with magnetic modeling, we demonstrate that the outflows originate from specific locations of the magnetic topology where field lines display strong gradients of magnetic connectivity, namely quasi-separatrix layers (QSLs), or in the limit of infinitely thin QSLs, separatrices. We found the strongest AR outflows to be in the vicinity of QSL sections located over areas of strong magnetic field. We argue that magnetic reconnection at QSLs separating closed field lines of the AR and either large-scale externally connected or 'open' field lines is a viable mechanism for driving AR outflows which are likely sources of the slow solar wind.

  20. Geomechanical Simulation of Fluid-Driven Fractures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Makhnenko, R.; Nikolskiy, D.; Mogilevskaya, S.; Labuz, J.

    2012-11-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The project supported graduate students working on experimental and numerical modeling of rock fracture, with the following objectives: (a) perform laboratory testing of fluid-saturated rock; (b) develop predictive models for simulation of fracture; and (c) establish educational frameworks for geologic sequestration issues related to rock fracture. These objectives were achieved through (i) using a novel apparatus to produce faulting in a fluid-saturated rock; (ii) modeling fracture with a boundary element method; and (iii) developing curricula for training geoengineers in experimental mechanics, numerical modeling of fracture, and poroelasticity.

  1. RESEARCH PROGRAM ON FRACTURED PETROLEUM RESERVOIRS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Abbas Firoozabadi

    2002-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    Numerical simulation of water injection in discrete fractured media with capillary pressure is a challenge. Dual-porosity models in view of their strength and simplicity can be mainly used for sugar-cube representation of fractured media. In such a representation, the transfer function between the fracture and the matrix block can be readily calculated for water-wet media. For a mixed-wet system, the evaluation of the transfer function becomes complicated due to the effect of gravity. In this work, they use a discrete-fracture model in which the fractures are discretized as one dimensional entities to account for fracture thickness by an integral form of the flow equations. This simple step greatly improves the numerical solution. Then the discrete-fracture model is implemented using a Galerkin finite element method. The robustness and the accuracy of the approach are shown through several examples. First they consider a single fracture in a rock matrix and compare the results of the discrete-fracture model with a single-porosity model. Then, they use the discrete-fracture model in more complex configurations. Numerical simulations are carried out in water-wet media as well as in mixed-wet media to study the effect of matrix and fracture capillary pressures.

  2. Interaction between Injection Points during Hydraulic Fracturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hals, Kjetil M D

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a model of the hydraulic fracturing of heterogeneous poroelastic media. The formalism is an effective continuum model that captures the coupled dynamics of the fluid pressure and the fractured rock matrix and models both the tensile and shear failure of the rock. As an application of the formalism, we study the geomechanical stress interaction between two injection points during hydraulic fracturing (hydrofracking) and how this interaction influences the fracturing process. For injection points that are separated by less than a critical correlation length, we find that the fracturing process around each point is strongly correlated with the position of the neighboring point. The magnitude of the correlation length depends on the degree of heterogeneity of the rock and is on the order of 30-45 m for rocks with low permeabilities. In the strongly correlated regime, we predict a novel effective fracture-force that attracts the fractures toward the neighboring injection point.

  3. Fracture permeability and seismic wave scattering--Poroelastic linear-slip interface model for heterogeneous fractures

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakagawa, S.; Myer, L.R.

    2009-06-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Schoenberg's Linear-slip Interface (LSI) model for single, compliant, viscoelastic fractures has been extended to poroelastic fractures for predicting seismic wave scattering. However, this extended model results in no impact of the in-plane fracture permeability on the scattering. Recently, we proposed a variant of the LSI model considering the heterogeneity in the in-plane fracture properties. This modified model considers wave-induced, fracture-parallel fluid flow induced by passing seismic waves. The research discussed in this paper applies this new LSI model to heterogeneous fractures to examine when and how the permeability of a fracture is reflected in the scattering of seismic waves. From numerical simulations, we conclude that the heterogeneity in the fracture properties is essential for the scattering of seismic waves to be sensitive to the permeability of a fracture.

  4. SiO Outflow Signatures Toward Massive Young Stellar Objects with Linearly Distributed Methanol Masers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    J. M. De Buizer; R. O. Redman; S. N. Longmore; J. Caswell; P. A. Feldman

    2008-10-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Methanol masers are often found in linear distributions, and it has been hypothesized that these masers are tracing circumstellar accretion disks around young massive stars. However, recent observations in H2 emission have shown what appear to be outflows at similar angles to the maser distribution angles, not perpendicular as expected in the maser-disk scenario. The main motivation behind the observations presented here is to determine from the presence and morphology of an independent outflow tracer, namely SiO, if there are indeed outflows present in these regions and if they are consistent or inconsistent with the maser-disk hypothesis. For ten sources with H2 emission we obtained JCMT single dish SiO (6-5) observations to search for the presence of this outflow indicator. We followed up those observations with ATCA interferometric mapping of the SiO emission in the (2-1) line in six sources. The JCMT observations yielded a detection in the SiO (6-5) line in nine of the ten sources. All of the sources with bright SiO lines display broad line wings indicative of outflow. A subset of the sources observed with the JCMT have methanol maser velocities significantly offset from their parent cloud velocities, supporting the idea that the masers in these sources are likely not associated with circumstellar disks. The ATCA maps of the SiO emission show five of the six sources do indeed have SiO outflows. The spatial orientations of the outflows are not consistent with the methanol masers delineating disk orientations. Overall, the observations presented here seem to provide further evidence against the hypothesis that linearly distributed methanol masers generally trace the orientations of circumstellar disks around massive young stars.

  5. ILLITE-SMECTITE MIXED-LAYER MINERALS IN HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF VOLCANIC ROCKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    1 ILLITE-SMECTITE MIXED-LAYER MINERALS IN HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF VOLCANIC ROCKS: II. ONE-D HRTEM structure images of hydrothermal I-S mixed-layer minerals The person to whom correspondence manuscript, published in "Clays and Clay Minerals 53 (2005) 440-451" DOI : 10.1346/CCMN.2005.0530502 hal

  6. Numerical models of caldera deformation: Effects of multiphase and multicomponent hydrothermal fluid flow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Numerical models of caldera deformation: Effects of multiphase and multicomponent hydrothermal studies addressing the effects of multiphase flow on crustal mechanics have been attempted. Recent numerical simulations of multiphase (liquid-gas), multicomponent (H2O­CO2) hydrothermal fluid flow

  7. Acid Fracture and Fracture Conductivity Study of Field Rock Samples

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Underwood, Jarrod

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    (Black and Hower 1965). Clays consist of negatively charged aluminosilicate layers kept together by cations. The most characteristic property is their ability to adsorb water between the layers, resulting in strong repulsive forces and clay expansion... chemicals used in water fracturing such as friction reducers, fluid-loss additives, and surfactants (Black and Hower 1965). The samples used in this study had significant clay-like content. To prevent swelling, a 2% KCl solution was used throughout...

  8. A SYSTEMATIC SEARCH FOR MOLECULAR OUTFLOWS TOWARD CANDIDATE LOW-LUMINOSITY PROTOSTARS AND VERY LOW LUMINOSITY OBJECTS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schwarz, Kamber R.; Shirley, Yancy L. [Steward Observatory, 933 N. Cherry Ave., Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Dunham, Michael M. [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States)

    2012-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a systematic single-dish search for molecular outflows toward a sample of nine candidate low-luminosity protostars and 30 candidate very low luminosity objects (VeLLOs; L{sub int} {<=} 0.1 L{sub Sun }). The sources are identified using data from the Spitzer Space Telescope cataloged by Dunham et al. toward nearby (D < 400 pc) star-forming regions. Each object was observed in {sup 12}CO and {sup 13}CO J = 2 {yields} 1 simultaneously using the sideband separating ALMA Band-6 prototype receiver on the Heinrich Hertz Telescope at 30'' resolution. Using five-point grid maps, we identify five new potential outflow candidates and make on-the-fly maps of the regions surrounding sources in the dense cores B59, L1148, L1228, and L1165. Of these new outflow candidates, only the map of B59 shows a candidate blue outflow lobe associated with a source in our survey. We also present larger and more sensitive maps of the previously detected L673-7 and the L1251-A-IRS4 outflows and analyze their properties in comparison to other outflows from VeLLOs. The accretion luminosities derived from the outflow properties of the VeLLOs with detected CO outflows are higher than the observed internal luminosity of the protostars, indicating that these sources likely had higher accretion rates in the past. The known L1251-A-IRS3 outflow is detected but not re-mapped. We do not detect clear, unconfused signatures of red and blue molecular wings toward the other 31 sources in the survey indicating that large-scale, distinct outflows are rare toward this sample of candidate protostars. Several potential outflows are confused with the kinematic structure in the surrounding core and cloud. Interferometric imaging is needed to disentangle large-scale molecular cloud kinematics from these potentially weak protostellar outflows.

  9. Acoustic Emission in a Fluid Saturated Hetergeneous Porous Layer with Application to Hydraulic Fracture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nelson, J.T.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    responses during hydraulic fracturing, and aid developmentFracture Monitoring Hydraulic fracturing is a method forfluids" used for hydraulic fracturing, the above frequencies

  10. OUTFLOWS FROM EVOLVED STARS: THE RAPIDLY CHANGING FINGERS OF CRL 618

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Balick, Bruce [Department of Astronomy, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195-1580 (United States); Huarte-Espinosa, Martin [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY 14627 (United States); Frank, Adam; Gomez, Thomas [Astronomy Department, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78731-2330 (United States); Alcolea, Javier [Observatorio Astronomico Nacional (IGN), E-28014 Madrid (Spain); Corradi, Romano L. M. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Vinkovic, Dejan, E-mail: balick@uw.edu, E-mail: martinHE@pas.rochester.edu, E-mail: afrank@pas.rochester.edu, E-mail: gomezt@astro.as.utexas.edu, E-mail: j.alcolea@oan.es, E-mail: rcorradi@iac.es, E-mail: vinkovic@pmfst.hr [Physics Department, University of Split, Teslina 12/III, HR-21000 Split (Croatia)

    2013-07-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Our ultimate goal is to probe the nature of the collimator of the outflows in the pre-planetary nebula CRL 618. CRL 618 is uniquely suited for this purpose owing to its multiple, bright, and carefully studied finger-shaped outflows east and west of its nucleus. We compare new Hubble Space Telescope images to images in the same filters observed as much as 11 yr ago to uncover large proper motions and surface brightness changes in its multiple finger-shaped outflows. The expansion age of the ensemble of fingers is close to 100 yr. We find strong brightness variations at the fingertips during the past decade. Deep IR images reveal a multiple ring-like structure of the surrounding medium into which the outflows propagate and interact. Tightly constrained three-dimensional hydrodynamic models link the properties of the fingers to their possible formation histories. We incorporate previously published complementary information to discern whether each of the fingers of CRL 618 are the results of steady, collimated outflows or a brief ejection event that launched a set of bullets about a century ago. Finally, we argue on various physical grounds that fingers of CRL 618 are likely to be the result of a spray of clumps ejected at the nucleus of CRL 618 since any mechanism that form a sustained set of unaligned jets is unprecedented.

  11. 6.7GHz Methanol Maser Associated Outflows: An evolutionary sequence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Villiers, H M; Thompson, M A; Urquhart, J S; Breen, S L; Burton, M G; Ellingsen, S P; Fuller, G A; Pestalozzi, M; Voronkov, M A; Ward-Thompson, D

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We present a continuing study of a sample 44 molecular outflows, observed in 13CO lines, closely associated with 6.7GHz methanol masers, hence called Methanol Maser Associated Outflows (MMAOs). We compare MMAO properties with those of outflows from other surveys in the literature. In general, MMAOs follow similar trends, but show a deficit in number at low masses and momenta, with a corresponding higher fraction at the high end of the distributions. A similar trend is seen for the dynamical timescales of MMAOs. We argue that the lack of relatively low mass and young flows in MMAOs is due to the inherent selection-bias in the sample, i.e. its direct association with 6.7GHz methanol masers. This implies that methanol masers must switch on after the onset of outflows (hence accretion), and not before a sufficient abundance of methanol is liberated from icy dust mantles. Consequently the average dynamical age of MMAOs is older than for the general population of molecular outflows. We propose an adjusted evolution...

  12. AGN feedback: galactic-scale outflows driven by radiation pressure on dust

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ishibashi, W

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Galaxy-scale outflows, which are thought to provide the link connecting the central black hole to its host galaxy, are now starting to be observed. However, the physical origin of the mechanism driving the observed outflows, whether due to energy-driving or radiation-driving, is still debated; and in some cases, it is not clear whether the central source is an active galactic nucleus (AGN) or a nuclear starburst. Here we study the role of radiation pressure on dust in driving galactic-scale AGN outflows, and analyse the dynamics of the outflowing shell as a function of the underlying physical parameters. We show that high-velocity outflows ($\\gtrsim$1000 km/s) with large momentum flux ($\\gtrsim 10 L/c$) can be obtained, by taking into account the effects of radiation trapping. In particular, the high observed values of the momentum boosts can be reproduced, provided that the shell is initially optically thick to the reprocessed infrared radiation. Alternatively, the inferred measurements of the momentum flux ...

  13. Multi-wavelength spectroscopy of the bipolar outflow from Cepheus E

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    M. D. Smith; D. Froebrich; J. Eislöffel

    2003-04-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Cepheus E is the site of an exceptional example of a protostellar outflow with a very young dynamical age and extremely high near infrared luminosity. We combine molecular spectroscopic data from the submillimeter to the near infrared in order to interpret the rotational excitation of CO and the ro-vibrational excitation of H2. We conclude that C-type shocks with a paraboloidal bow shock geometry can simultaneously explain all the molecular excitations. Extinction accounts for the deviation of the column densities from local thermodynamic equilibrium. A difference in the extinction between the red and blue-shifted outflow lobes may account for the measured flux difference. The outflow is deeply embedded in a clump of density 10^5cm^-3, yet a good fraction of atomic hydrogen, about 40%, is required to explain the excitation and statistical equilibrium. We propose that this atomic component arises, self-consistently, from the dissociated gas at the apex of the leading bow shocks and the relatively long molecule reformation time. At least 20 bow shocks are required in each lobe, although these may be sub-divided into smaller bows and turbulent shocked regions. The total outflow mechanical power and cooling amounts to over 30L_\\odot, almost half the source's bolometric luminosity. Nevertheless, only about 6% of the clump mass has been set in outward motion by the outflow, allowing a collapse to continue.

  14. In Situ Type Study of Hydrothermally Prepared Titanates and Silicotitanates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clearfield,A.; Tripathi, A.; Medvedev, D.; Celestian, A.; Parise, J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most vexing problems facing the nuclear industry and countries with nuclear weapons is the safe disposal of the generated nuclear waste. Huge quantities of nuclear waste arising from weapons manufacture are stored at the Hanford and Savannah River sites in the USA. The general method of remediation involves the removal of Cs-137, Sr-90 and actinides from a huge quantity of salts, principally NaNO{sub 3}, organics and complexing agents. It has been found that a sodium silicotitanate is able to remove Cs{sup +} selectively from the waste and certain sodium titanates remove Sr{sup 2+} and actinides. These compounds have been prepared by ex-situ hydrothermal methods. We have studied the In situ growth of these materials at the National Synchrotron Light Source, Brookhaven National Laboratory. In addition we will describe the mechanism of ion exchange in the titanosilicate as observed by In situ methods and how the combination of these techniques coupled with an intimate knowledge of the structure of the solids is helping to solve the remediation process. In general, the In situ method allows the investigator to follow the nucleation and crystal growth or phase transformations occurring in hydrothermal reactions.

  15. Apparatus and method for monitoring underground fracturing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warpinski, Norman R. (Albuquerque, NM); Steinfort, Terry D. (Tijeras, NM); Branagan, Paul T. (Las Vegas, NV); Wilmer, Roy H. (Las Vegas, NV)

    1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for measuring deformation of a rock mass around the vicinity of a fracture, commonly induced by hydraulic fracturing is provided. To this end, a well is drilled offset from the proposed fracture region, if no existing well is present. Once the well is formed to a depth approximately equal or exceeding the depth of the proposed fracture, a plurality of inclinometers, for example tiltmeters, are inserted downhole in the well. The inclinometers are located both above and below the approximate depth of the proposed fracture. The plurality of inclinometers may be arranged on a wireline that may be retrieved from the downhole portion of the well and used again or, alternatively, the inclinometers may be cemented in place. In either event, the inclinometers are used to measure the deformation of the rock around the induced fracture.

  16. Apparatus and method for monitoring underground fracturing

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Warpinski, N.R.; Steinfort, T.D.; Branagan, P.T.; Wilmer, R.H.

    1999-08-10T23:59:59.000Z

    An apparatus and method for measuring deformation of a rock mass around the vicinity of a fracture, commonly induced by hydraulic fracturing is provided. To this end, a well is drilled offset from the proposed fracture region, if no existing well is present. Once the well is formed to a depth approximately equal or exceeding the depth of the proposed fracture, a plurality of inclinometers, for example tiltmeters, are inserted downhole in the well. The inclinometers are located both above and below the approximate depth of the proposed fracture. The plurality of inclinometers may be arranged on a wireline that may be retrieved from the downhole portion of the well and used again or, alternatively, the inclinometers may be cemented in place. In either event, the inclinometers are used to measure the deformation of the rock around the induced fracture. 13 figs.

  17. Investigation of the effect of gel residue on hydraulic fracture conductivity using dynamic fracture conductivity test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marpaung, Fivman

    2008-10-10T23:59:59.000Z

    conductivity is created when proppant slurry is pumped into a hydraulic fracture in low permeability rock. Unlike conventional fracture conductivity tests in which proppant is loaded into the fracture artificially, we pump proppant/ fracturing fluid slurries... different or special methods for completion, stimulation, and/or production techniques to retrieve the resource. Natural gas from coal or coal bed methane, tight gas sands, shale gas, and gas hydrates are all examples of unconventional gas reservoirs...

  18. I N F I N I T E CONDUCTIVITY FRACTURE NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIR

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    I N F I N I T E CONDUCTIVITY FRACTURE I N A NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIR A REPORT SUBMITTED How& #12;ABSTRACT This r e p o r t describes t h e behavior of a n a t u r a l l y fractured r e s e r v o i r when a well is producing a t constant rate through an i n f i n i t e conductivity fracture

  19. Method of fracturing a geological formation

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Johnson, James O. (2679-B Walnut, Los Alamos, NM 87544)

    1990-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An improved method of fracturing a geological formation surrounding a well bore is disclosed. A relatively small explosive charge is emplaced in a well bore and the bore is subsequently hydraulically pressurized to a pressure less than the formation breakdown pressure and preferably greater than the fracture propagation pressure of the formation. The charge is denoted while the bore is so pressurized, resulting in the formation of multiple fractures in the surrounding formation with little or no accompanying formation damage. Subsequent hydraulic pressurization can be used to propagate and extend the fractures in a conventional manner. The method is useful for stimulating production of oil, gas and possibly water from suitable geologic formations.

  20. Regional Analysis And Characterization Of Fractured Aquifers...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Regional Analysis And Characterization Of Fractured Aquifers In The Virginia Blue Ridge And Piedmont Provinces Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  1. Wave Propagation in Fractured Poroelastic Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2014-06-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Wave Propagation in Fractured. Poroelastic Media. WCCM, Barcelona, Spain, July 2014. Juan E. Santos,. 1. 1. Instituto del Gas y del Petr´oleo (IGPUBA), UBA,

  2. Fracturing technology poised for rapid advancement

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Von Flatern, R.

    1993-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper summarizes the advances and current status of hydraulic fracturing and the industry's ability to design and predict the results. Although modeling techniques have improved over the years, there still is no model which can be considered very reliable. The paper considers alternatives to help improve the reliability of these models such as on-site quality control. This quality control aspect entails the site-specific tailoring of a fracturing fluid to be better suited for the target fracturing zone environment and adjusting the fluid properties accordingly. It also entails various methods for fluid injection and placement of propping agents. Some future trends in hydraulic fracturing are also discussed.

  3. Fracture permeability and seismic wave scattering ŒPoroelastic ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seiji Nakagawa

    2010-02-03T23:59:59.000Z

    Jun 18, 2010 ... The new model contains fracture permeability in the plan-parallel direction. ... Division of Chemical Sciences of the U.S. Department of Energy ...

  4. Geothermal: Sponsored by OSTI -- Fracture Characterization in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Fracture Characterization in Enhanced Geothermal Systems by Wellbore and Reservoir Analysis Geothermal Technologies Legacy Collection HelpFAQ | Site Map | Contact Us | Admin Log...

  5. Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    5 4.5.2 Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal Systems Presentation Number: 022 Investigator: Queen, John (Hi-Q Geophysical Inc.) Objectives: To develop...

  6. Microseismic Tracer Particles for Hydraulic Fracturing

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The trend toward production of hydrocarbons from unconventional reservoirs (tight gas, shale oilgas) has caused a large increase in the use of hydraulic fracture stimulation of...

  7. The Role of Acidizing in Proppant Fracturing in Carbonate Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Densirimongkol, Jurairat

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    in fracture conductivity and unsuccessful stimulation treatment. In early years, because of the increase in the success of proppant fracturing, proppant partial monolayer has been put forward as a method that helps generate the maximum fracture conductivity...

  8. Seismic characterization of fractured reservoirs using 3D double beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Yingcai

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We propose an efficient target-oriented method to characterize seismic properties of fractured reservoirs: the spacing between fractures and the fracture orientation. We use both singly scattered and multiply scattered ...

  9. Efficient Double-Beam Characterization for Fractured Reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Yingcai

    We proposed an efficient target-oriented method to characterize seismic properties of fractured reservoirs: the spacing between fractures and the fracture orientation. Based on the diffraction theory, the scattered wave ...

  10. Incorporating Rigorous Height Determination into Unified Fracture Design

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pitakbunkate, Termpan

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    to find the maximum productivity index for a given proppant amount. Then, the dimensionless fracture conductivity index corresponding to the maximum productivity index can be computed. The penetration ration, the fracture length, and the propped fracture...

  11. Studying Hydraulic Fracturing through Time-variant Seismic Anisotropy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liu, Qifan

    2013-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    . Studying seismic anisotropy by shear wave splitting can help us better understand the relationship between hydraulic fracturing and fracture systems. Shear wave splitting can be caused by fracturing and also can naturally take place in most sedimentary...

  12. Ductile fracture modeling : theory, experimental investigation and numerical verification

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xue, Liang, 1973-

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The fracture initiation in ductile materials is governed by the damaging process along the plastic loading path. A new damage plasticity model for ductile fracture is proposed. Experimental results show that fracture ...

  13. INJECTION AND THERMAL BREAKTHROUGH IN FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    injection into a fractured reservoir system. A reservoirIn the case of fractured reservoirs, Equations (25) and (26)c ww q a >> For fractured reservoirs, the former expression

  14. Laboratory-scale fracture conductivity created by acid etching 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pournik, Maysam

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Success of acid fracturing treatment depends greatly on the created conductivity under closure stress. In order to have sufficient conductivity, the fracture face must be non-uniformly etched while the fracture strength maintained to withstand...

  15. Variation in sericite composition from fracture zones within...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    relict microcline. In this hydrothermal sericite there is an increase in interlayer K, octahedral Mg + Fetotal and tetrahedral Al with increasing temperature between 215...

  16. Hydrothermal research and development assessment. Task Force report: projections for direct-heat applications

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Low and moderate temperature hydrothermal resources suitable for direct-heat applications have been identified in 37 states. The extent to which three resources might be used over the next 20 years were evaluated and the probable impact of Federal programs on hydrothermal resource utilization was assessed. The use types that comprise the bulk of the market were determined. Representative firms and municipalities were interviewed to determine their willingness to use hydrothermal energy, and to determine the investment decision criteria that would influence their actions. (MHR)

  17. Comparative assessment of five potential sites for hydrothermal magma systems: geochemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    White, A.F.

    1980-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A brief discussion is given of the geochemical objectives and questions that must be addressed in such an evaluation. A summary of the currently published literature that is pertinent in answering these questions is presented for each of the five areas: The Geysers-Clear Lake region, Long Valley, Rio Grand Rift, Roosevelt Hot Springs, and the Salton Trough. The major geochemical processes associated with proposed hydrothermal sites are categorized into three groups for presentation: geochemistry of magma and associated volcanic rocks, geochemistry of hydrothermal solutions, and geochemistry of hydrothermal alteration. (MHR)

  18. Field-Scale Effective Matrix Diffusion Coefficient for Fractured Rock: Results From Literature Survey

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhou, Quanlin; Liu, Hui Hai; Molz, Fred J.; Zhang, Yingqi; Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Dispersed fluid flow in fractured reservoirs: An analysis ofa hydraulically fractured granite geothermal reservoir, Soc.

  19. Aligned vertical fractures, HTI reservoir symmetry, and Thomsen seismic anisotropy parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berryman, James G.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    seismic parameters for fractured reservoirs when the crackin a naturally fractured gas reservoir, The Leading Edge,

  20. Numerical Modeling of Fracture Permeability Change in Naturally Fractured Reservoirs Using a Fully Coupled Displacement Discontinuity Method.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tao, Qingfeng

    2010-07-14T23:59:59.000Z

    finite difference method to solve the fluid flow in fractures, a fully coupled displacement discontinuity method to build the global relation of fracture deformation, and the Barton-Bandis model of fracture deformation to build the local relation...

  1. Methods and apparatus for catalytic hydrothermal gasification of biomass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Butner, Robert Scott; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Zacher, Alan H.; Hart, Todd R.

    2012-08-14T23:59:59.000Z

    Continuous processing of wet biomass feedstock by catalytic hydrothermal gasification must address catalyst fouling and poisoning. One solution can involve heating the wet biomass with a heating unit to a temperature sufficient for organic constituents in the feedstock to decompose, for precipitates of inorganic wastes to form, for preheating the wet feedstock in preparation for subsequent separation of sulfur contaminants, or combinations thereof. Treatment further includes separating the precipitates out of the wet feedstock, removing sulfur contaminants, or both using a solids separation unit and a sulfur separation unit, respectively. Having removed much of the inorganic wastes and the sulfur that can cause poisoning and fouling, the wet biomass feedstock can be exposed to the heterogeneous catalyst for gasification.

  2. active fracture model: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    porosity of naturally fractured reservoirs with no matrix porosity using stochastic fractal models Texas A&M University - TxSpace Summary: Determining fracture characteristics...

  3. Detecting Fractures Using Technology at High Temperatures and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Detecting Fractures Using Technology at High Temperatures and Depths - Geothermal Ultrasonic Fracture Imager (GUFI); 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Detecting...

  4. Images of Fracture Sustainability Test on Stripa Granite

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tim Kneafsey

    2014-05-11T23:59:59.000Z

    Images of the Stripa Granite core before and after the fracture sustainability test. Photos of fracture faces of Stripa Granite core.

  5. Detecting Fractures Using Technology at High Temperatures and...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    7 4.4.1 Detecting Fractures Using Technology at High Temperatures and Depths - Geothermal Ultrasonic Fracture Imager (GUFI) Presentation Number: 015 Investigator: Patterson, Doug...

  6. Images of Fracture Sustainability Test on Stripa Granite

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Tim Kneafsey

    Images of the Stripa Granite core before and after the fracture sustainability test. Photos of fracture faces of Stripa Granite core.

  7. acetabular internal fracture: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    stiness and uid ow L Lafayette, IN 47907-1397, USA Accepted 7 October 1999 Abstract Fracture specic stiness and uid ow through a single fracture under...

  8. age fracture mechanics: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    stiness and uid ow L Lafayette, IN 47907-1397, USA Accepted 7 October 1999 Abstract Fracture specic stiness and uid ow through a single fracture under...

  9. alloys fracture mechanics: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    stiness and uid ow L Lafayette, IN 47907-1397, USA Accepted 7 October 1999 Abstract Fracture specic stiness and uid ow through a single fracture under...

  10. applying fracture mechanics: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    stiness and uid ow L Lafayette, IN 47907-1397, USA Accepted 7 October 1999 Abstract Fracture specic stiness and uid ow through a single fracture under...

  11. advanced fracture characterization: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    stiness and uid ow L Lafayette, IN 47907-1397, USA Accepted 7 October 1999 Abstract Fracture specic stiness and uid ow through a single fracture under...

  12. Identification of MHF Fracture Planes and Flow Paths- a Correlation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    flow paths. We applied this technique to seismic data collected during a massive hydraulic fracturing (MHF) treatment and found that the fracture planes determined by the...

  13. Fracture Evolution Following a Hydraulic Stimulation within an...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Evolution Following a Hydraulic Stimulation within an EGS Reservoir Fracture Evolution Following a Hydraulic Stimulation within an EGS Reservoir Fracture Evolution Following a...

  14. Monitoring of Fracture Cri0cal Steel Bridges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Minnesota, University of

    #12;Monitoring of Fracture Cri0cal Steel Bridges: Acous0c Emission Sensors system on other fracture cri0cal steel bridges #12;Project Impact #12;Thank

  15. Characterizing Fractures in the Geysers Geothermal Field by Micro...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Characterizing Fractures in the Geysers Geothermal Field by Micro-seismic Data, Using Soft Computing, Fractals, and Shear Wave Anisotropy Characterizing Fractures in the Geysers...

  16. Joint inversion of electrical and seismic data for Fracture char...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Joint inversion of electrical and seismic data for Fracture char. and Imaging of Fluid Flow in Geothermal Systems Joint inversion of electrical and seismic data for Fracture char....

  17. Sulfur gas geochemical detection of hydrothermal systems. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rouse, G.E.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine whether a system of exploration using sulfur gases was capable of detecting convecting hydrothermal systems. Three surveying techniques were used at the Roosevelt Hot Springs KGRA in Utah. These were (a) a sniffing technique, capable of instantaneous determinations of sulfur gas concentration, (b) an accumulator technique, capable of integrating the sulfur gas emanations over a 30 day interval, and (c) a method of analyzing the soils for vaporous sulfur compounds. Because of limitations in the sniffer technique, only a limited amount of surveying was done with this method. The accumulator and soil sampling techniques were conducted on a 1000 foot grid at Roosevelt Hot Springs, and each sample site was visited three times during the spring of 1980. Thus, three soil samples and two accumulator samples were collected at each site. The results are shown as averages of three soil and two accumulator determinations of sulfur gas concentrations at each site. Soil surveys and accumulator surveys were conducted at two additional KGRA's which were chosen based on the state of knowledge of these hydrothermal systems and upon their differences from Roosevelt Hot Springs in an effort to show that the exploration methods would be effective in detecting geothermal reservoirs in general. The results at Roosevelt Hot Springs, Utah show that each of the three surveying methods was capable of detecting sulfur gas anomalies which can be interpreted to be related to the source at depth, based on resistivity mapping of that source, and also correlatable with major structural features of the area which are thought to be controlling the geometry of the geothermal reservoir. The results of the surveys at Roosevelt did not indicate that either the soil sampling technique or the accumulator technique was superior to the other.

  18. Modeling of Acid Fracturing in Carbonate Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Al Jawad, Murtada s

    2014-06-05T23:59:59.000Z

    equations are used to draw 3D velocity and pressure profiles. Part of the fluid diffuses or leaks off into the fracture walls and dissolves part of the fracture face according to the chemical reaction below. 2H^(+)(aq) + CO((2-)/3) ? H_(2 )CO_(3)(aq) ? CO...

  19. Accounting for Remaining Injected Fracturing Fluid 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yannan

    2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The technology of multi-stage fracturing of horizontal wells made the development of shale gas reservoirs become greatly successful during the past decades. A large amount of fracturing fluid, usually from 53,000 bbls to 81,400 bbls, is injected...

  20. Accounting for Remaining Injected Fracturing Fluid

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Yannan

    2013-12-06T23:59:59.000Z

    The technology of multi-stage fracturing of horizontal wells made the development of shale gas reservoirs become greatly successful during the past decades. A large amount of fracturing fluid, usually from 53,000 bbls to 81,400 bbls, is injected...

  1. Fracture of synthetic diamond M. D. Droty

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritchie, Robert

    of synthetic polycrystalline diamond make it a promising material for many structural applications studies on the fracture toughness of polycrystalline diamond,29 primarily due to the difficultiesFracture of synthetic diamond M. D. Droty Ctystallume, 3506 Bassett Street, Santa Clara, California

  2. Finite Conductivity Fractures in Elliptical Coordinates

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    TO THE DEPARTMENT OF PETROLEUM ENGINEERING AND THE COMMITTEE ON GRADUATE STUDIES OF STANFORD UNIVERSITY IN PARTIAL well performance. Indeed, a large number of wells, which could not otherwise be operated economically, it is important that means be available to evaluate fracture effectiveness. The most widely used tool in fracture

  3. Quantifying AGN-Driven Metal-Enhanced Outflows in Chemodynamical Simulations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Philip

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We show the effects of AGN-driven outflows on the ejection of heavy elements using our cosmological simulations, where super-massive black holes originate from the first stars. In the most massive galaxy, we have identified two strong outflows unambiguously driven by AGN feedback. These outflows have a speed greater than $\\sim 8000$ km\\,s$^{-1}$ near the AGN, and travel out to a half Mpc with $\\sim 3000$ km\\,s$^{-1}$. These outflows remove the remaining gas ($\\sim 3$ per cent of baryons) and significant amounts of metals ($\\sim 2$ per cent of total produced metals) from the host galaxy, chemically enriching the circumgalactic medium (CGM) and the intergalactic medium (IGM). 17.6 per cent of metals from this galaxy, and 18.4 per cent of total produced metals in the simulation, end up in the CGM and IGM, respectively. The metallicities of the CGM and IGM are higher with AGN feedback, while the mass--metallicity relation of galaxies is not affected very much. We also find `selective' mass-loss where iron is more...

  4. Biomass burning emission inventory with daily resolution: Application to aircraft observations of Asian outflow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Paul

    Biomass burning emission inventory with daily resolution: Application to aircraft observations for biomass burning using AVHRR satellite observations of fire activity corrected for data gaps and scan angle biomass burning in SE Asia was a major contributor to the outflow of Asian pollution observed in TRACE

  5. On the thermodynamic boundary conditions of a solidifying mushy layer with outflow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rees Jones, David W.; Worster, M. Grae

    2014-11-27T23:59:59.000Z

    –207. Thermodynamic boundary conditions with outflow 11 Beckermann, C. & Wang, C.Y. 1995 Multiphase/-scale modeling of alloy solidification. In Annual Reviews of Heat Transfer (ed. C. L. Tien), vol. 6, pp. 115–198. Begell House. Conroy, D. & Worster, M. G. 2006 Mush...

  6. Title of Dissertation: Outflows in Infrared-Luminous Galaxies: Absorption-Line Spectroscopy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gruner, Daniel S.

    Abstract Title of Dissertation: Outflows in Infrared-Luminous Galaxies: Absorption performed a survey of over 100 infrared-luminous galaxies in or- der to address the exact frequency galaxies, and their proper- ties in the most luminous starburst and active galaxies. Most of our sample

  7. The effect of drier outflow temperature on rumen protein degradability and intestinal digestibility of rumen-

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    of rumen- undegraded protein of dehydrated grass and lucerne ZM Kowalski PMP Pisulewski2 JL Peyraud J was to determine the effect of drier outflow temperature (123, 133, 143 and 153°C) on dehydrated grass and lucerne and increased ADIN % N in dehydrated grass. These tendencies were not seen for dehydrated lucerne. Temperature

  8. Chemical Abundances in AGN Environment: X-Ray/UV Campaign on the MRK 279 Outflow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nahum Arav; Jack R. Gabel; Kirk T. Korista; Jelle S. Kaastra; Gerard A. Kriss; Ehud Behar; Elisa Costantini; C. Martin Gaskell; Ari Laor; Nalaka Kodituwakku; Daniel Proga; Masao Sako; Jennifer E. Scott; Katrien C. Steenbrugge

    2006-11-29T23:59:59.000Z

    We present the first reliable determination of chemical abundances in an AGN outflow. The abundances are extracted from the deep and simultaneous FUSE and HST/STIS observations of Mrk 279. This data set is exceptional for its high signal-to-noise, unblended doublet troughs and little Galactic absorption contamination. These attributes allow us to solve for the velocity-dependent covering fraction, and therefore obtain reliable column densities for many ionic species. For the first time we have enough such column densities to simultaneously determine the ionization equilibrium and abundances in the flow. Our analysis uses the full spectral information embedded in these high-resolution data. Slicing a given trough into many independent outflow elements yields the extra constraints needed for a physically meaningful abundances determination. We find that relative to solar the abundances in the Mrk 279 outflow are (linear scaling): carbon 2.2+/-0.7, nitrogen 3.5+/-1.1 and oxygen 1.6+/-0.8. Our UV-based photoionization and abundances results are in good agreement with the independent analysis of the simultaneous Mrk 279 X-ray spectra. This is the best agreement between the UV and X-ray analyses of the same outflow to date.

  9. Measurements of Outflow Velocities in On-Disk Plumes from EIS Hinode Observations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fu, Hui; Li, Bo; Huang, Zhenghua; Jiao, Fangran; Mou, Chaozhou

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The contribution of plumes to the solar wind has been subject to hot debate in the past decades. The EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode provides a unique means to deduce outflow velocities at coronal heights via direct Doppler shift measurements of coronal emission lines. Such direct Doppler shift measurements were not possible with previous spectrometers. We measure the outflow velocity at coronal heights in several on-disk long-duration plumes, which are located in coronal holes and show significant blue shifts throughout the entire observational period. In one case, a plume is measured 4 hours apart. The deduced outflow velocities are consistent, suggesting that the flows are quasi-steady. Furthermore, we provide an outflow velocity profile along the plumes, finding that the velocity corrected for the line-of-sight effect can reach 10 km s$^{-1}$ at 1.02 $R_{\\odot}$, 15 km s$^{-1}$ at 1.03 $R_{\\odot}$, and 25 km s$^{-1}$ at 1.05 $R_{\\odot}$. This clear signature of steady acceleration, combined...

  10. Improved quantification of Chinese carbon fluxes using CO2//CO correlations in Asian outflow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Palmer, Paul

    increases in Chinese anthropogenic CO2 emissions and would also imply a further reduction of the Chinese budget including, in particular, Chinese emissions. The CO2/CO emission ratio varies with the sourceImproved quantification of Chinese carbon fluxes using CO2//CO correlations in Asian outflow

  11. Hydraulic fracturing slurry transport in horizontal pipes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Shah, S.N.; Lord, D.L. (Halliburton Services (US))

    1990-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Horizontal-well activity has increased throughout the industry in the past few years. To design a successful hydraulic fracturing treatment for horizontal wells, accurate information on the transport properties of slurry in horizontal pipe is required. Limited information exists that can be used to estimate critical deposition and resuspension velocities when proppants are transported in horizontal wells with non-Newtonian fracturing gels. This paper presents a study of transport properties of various hydraulic fracturing slurries in horizontal pipes. Flow data are gathered in three transparent horizontal pipes with different diameters. Linear and crosslinked fracturing gels were studied, and the effects of variables--e.g., pipe size; polymer-gelling-agent concentration; fluid rheological properties; crosslinking effects; proppant size, density, and concentrations; fluid density; and slurry pump rate--on critical deposition and resuspension velocities were investigated. Also, equations to estimate the critical deposition and resuspension velocities of fracturing gels are provided.

  12. Methodologies and new user interfaces to optimize hydraulic fracturing design and evaluate fracturing performance for gas wells 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, Wenxin

    2006-04-12T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents and develops efficient and effective methodologies for optimal hydraulic fracture design and fracture performance evaluation. These methods incorporate algorithms that simultaneously optimize all of ...

  13. Geochemistry of deep-sea hydrothermal vent fluids from the Mid-Cayman Rise, Caribbean Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDermott, Jill Marie

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis examines the controls on organic, inorganic, and volatile species distributions in hydrothermal fluids venting at Von Damm and Piccard, two recently discovered vent fields at the ultra slow spreading Mid-Cayman ...

  14. Laboratory and field-based investigations of subsurface geochemical processes in seafloor hydrothermal systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reeves, Eoghan

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This thesis presents the results of four discrete investigations into processes governing the organic and inorganic chemical composition of seafloor hydrothermal fluids in a variety of geologic settings. Though Chapters 2 ...

  15. Use of fracture surface features to improve core description and fracture interpretation in Niobrara and Gallup formations, Colorado and New Mexico

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ward, B.J.; Petrusak, R.L.; Kulander, B.R. (Amoco Production Co. Research, Tulsa, OK (USA))

    1989-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Niobrara formation in the Denver basin and the Gallup formation in the eastern San Juan Basin are very fine-grained, low-permeability reservoirs. Natural fracturing provides essential reservoir permeability. When natural and induced fractures are correctly identified in core, understanding of key fractured reservoir characteristics such as fracture spacing, fracture intensity, and fracture size improves greatly. For example, the Gallup has a significant amount of non-mineralized natural fractures which are generally difficult to identify in core as natural. If these fractures are misidentified as induced, fracture intensity may be underestimated and fracture spacing may be overestimated. Diagnostic fracture surface features are very well developed in the Gallup and Niobrara. Proper identification of induced fractures and nonmineralized natural fractures is done by examining these fracture surface features under oblique illumination. The Niobrara cores that were examined provide excellent examples of induced fractures. These cores have predominately mineral-filled and slickened natural fractures. Fracture surface features on the non-mineralized fractures positively identify these fractures as induced and demonstrate that nonmineralized natural fractures are a minor component of the reservoir. The Gallup cores provide excellent examples of the diagnostic surface features of natural fractures. Fractured intervals up to 20 ft long have been recovered in Gallup core. Multiple individual fractures which comprise the larger fractured intervals are identified using fracture surface morphology. This type of detailed fracture description improves evaluations of fractured reservoir quality in the Gallup formation.

  16. Rare earth oxide fluoride nanoparticles and hydrothermal method for forming nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fulton, John L. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; Hoffmann, Markus M. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA

    2001-11-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A hydrothermal method for forming nanoparticles of a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine has been discovered. Nanoparticles comprising a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine are also described. These nanoparticles can exhibit excellent refractory properties as well as remarkable stability in hydrothermal conditions. The nanoparticles can exhibit excellent properties for numerous applications including fiber reinforcement of ceramic composites, catalyst supports, and corrosion resistant coatings for high-temperature aqueous solutions.

  17. Rare Earth Oxide Fluoride Nanoparticles And Hydrothermal Method For Forming Nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fulton, John L. (Richland, WA); Hoffmann, Markus M. (Richland, WA)

    2003-12-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A hydrothermal method for forming nanoparticles of a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine has been discovered. Nanoparticles comprising a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine are also described. These nanoparticles can exhibit excellent refractory properties as well as remarkable stability in hydrothermal conditions. The nanoparticles can exhibit excellent properties for numerous applications including fiber reinforcement of ceramic composites, catalyst supports, and corrosion resistant coatings for high-temperature aqueous solutions.

  18. Possible Origin of Improved High Temperature Performance of Hydrothermally Aged Cu/Beta Zeolite Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peden, Charles HF; Kwak, Ja Hun; Burton, Sarah D.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Kim, Do Heui; Lee, Jong H.; Jen, H. W.; Cavattaio, Giovanni; Cheng, Yisun; Lambert, Christine

    2012-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The hydrothermal stability of Cu/beta NH3 SCR catalysts are explored here. In particular, this paper focuses on the interesting ability of this catalyst to maintain and even enhance high-temperature performance for the "standard" SCR reaction after modest (900 °C, 2 hours) hydrothermal aging. Characterization of the fresh and aged catalysts was performed with an aim to identify possible catalytic phases responsible for the enhanced high temperature performance. XRD, TEM and 27Al NMR all showed that the hydrothermally aging conditions used here resulted in almost complete loss of the beta zeolite structure between 1 and 2 hours aging. While the 27Al NMR spectra of 2 and 10 hour hydrothermally-aged catalysts showed significant loss of a peak associated with tetrahedrally-coordinated Al species, no new spectral features were evident. Two model catalysts, suggested by these characterization data as possible mimics of the catalytic phase formed during hydrothermal aging of Cu/beta, were prepared and tested for their performance in the "standard" SCR and NH3 oxidation reactions. The similarity in their reactivity compared to the 2 hour hydrothermally-aged Cu/beta catalyst suggests possible routes for preparing multi-component catalysts that may have wider temperature windows for optimum performance than those provided by current Cu/zeolite catalysts.

  19. Fracture-resistant lanthanide scintillators

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Doty, F. Patrick (Livermore, CA)

    2011-01-04T23:59:59.000Z

    Lanthanide halide alloys have recently enabled scintillating gamma ray spectrometers comparable to room temperature semiconductors (<3% FWHM energy resolutions at 662 keV). However brittle fracture of these materials upon cooling hinders the growth of large volume crystals. Efforts to improve the strength through non-lanthanide alloy substitution, while preserving scintillation, have been demonstrated. Isovalent alloys having nominal compositions of comprising Al, Ga, Sc, Y, and In dopants as well as aliovalent alloys comprising Ca, Sr, Zr, Hf, Zn, and Pb dopants were prepared. All of these alloys exhibit bright fluorescence under UV excitation, with varying shifts in the spectral peaks and intensities relative to pure CeBr.sub.3. Further, these alloys scintillate when coupled to a photomultiplier tube (PMT) and exposed to .sup.137Cs gamma rays.

  20. High Energy Gas Fracturing Test

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schulte, R.

    2001-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    The Rocky Mountain Oilfield Testing Center (RMOTC) has recently completed two tests of a high-energy gas fracturing system being developed by Western Technologies of Crossville, Tennessee. The tests involved the use of two active wells located at the Naval Petroleum Reserve No. 3 (NPR-3), thirty-five miles north of Casper, Wyoming (See Figure 1). During the testing process the delivery and operational system was enhanced by RMOTC, Western Technologies, and commercial wireline subcontractors. RMOTC has assisted an industrial client in developing their technology for high energy gas fracturing to a commercial level. The modifications and improvements implemented during the technology testing process are instrumental in all field testing efforts at RMOTC. The importance of well selection can also be critical in demonstrating the success of the technology. To date, significant increases in well productivity have been clearly proven in well 63-TPX-10. Gross fluid production was initially raised by a factor of three. Final production rates increased by a factor of six with the use of a larger submersible pump. Well productivity (bbls of fluid per foot of drawdown) increased by a factor of 15 to 20. The above results assume that no mechanical damage has occurred to the casing or cast iron bridge plug which could allow well production from the Tensleep ''B'' sand. In the case of well 61-A-3, a six-fold increase in total fluid production was seen. Unfortunately, the increase is clouded by the water injection into the well that was necessary to have a positive fluid head on the propellant tool. No significant increase in oil production was seen. The tools which were retrieved from both 63-TPX-10 and 61-A-3 indicated a large amount of energy, similar to high gram perforating, had been expended downhole upon the formation face.

  1. Coupling schemes for modeling hydraulic fracture propagation using the XFEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peirce, Anthony

    Coupling schemes for modeling hydraulic fracture propagation using the XFEM Elizaveta Gordeliy of hydraulic fractures in an elastic medium. With appropriate enrichment, the XFEM resolves the Neumann(h) accuracy. For hydraulic fracture problems with a lag separating the uid front from the fracture front, we

  2. Calibration of hydraulic and tracer tests in fractured media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Politècnica de Catalunya, Universitat

    Calibration of hydraulic and tracer tests in fractured media represented by a DFN Model L. D. Donado, X. Sanchez-Vila, E. Ruiz* & F. J. Elorza** * Enviros Spain S.L. ** UPM #12;Fractured Media Water flows through fractures (matrix basically impervious ­ though relevant to transport) Fractures at all

  3. Evaluation and Effect of Fracturing Fluids on Fracture Conductivity in Tight Gas Reservoirs Using Dynamic Fracture Conductivity Test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Correa Castro, Juan

    2011-08-08T23:59:59.000Z

    make necessary continuous efforts to reduce costs and improve efficiency in all aspects of drilling, completion and production techniques. Many of the recent improvements have been in well completions and hydraulic fracturing. Thus, the main goal of a...

  4. Three dimensional geologic modeling of a fractured reservoir, Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Luthy, S.T.; Grover, G.A. [Saudi Aramco, Dhahran (Saudi Arabia)

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A geological assessment of a large carbonate reservoir in Saudi Arabia shows that it is a Type 2 fractured reservoir in which fractures provide the essential permeability. Intercrystalline microporosity, found within the basinally deposited mudstones and wackestones, is the dominant porosity type. Near-vertical, east-west-oriented extension fractures are preferentially localized in low-to-moderate porosities associated with stylolites. Porosity/fracture density relationships, combined with the results of structural curvature mapping, yielded a 3-dimensional model of fracture density. Fracture permeability and fracture porosity distributions were generated by integrating fracture density modeling results with average fracture aperture information derived from well test data. Dramatic differences exist between matrix- and fracture-related porosity, permeability models that help explain observed production behavior within the field. These models are being used by reservoir and simulation engineers for daily reservoir management, history matching, and long-term development drilling planning.

  5. 3-D description of fracture surfaces and stress-sensitivity analysis for naturally fractured reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhang, S.Q.; Jioa, D.; Meng, Y.F.; Fan, Y.

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Three kinds of reservoir cores (limestone, sandstone, and shale with natural fractures) were used to study the effect of morphology of fracture surfaces on stress sensitivity. The cores, obtained from the reservoirs with depths of 2170 to 2300 m, have fractures which are mated on a large scale, but unmated on a fine scale. A specially designed photoelectric scanner with a computer was used to describe the topography of the fracture surfaces. Then, theoretical analysis of the fracture closure was carried out based on the fracture topography generated. The scanning results show that the asperity has almost normal distributions for all three types of samples. For the tested samples, the fracture closure predicted by the elastic-contact theory is different from the laboratory measurements because plastic deformation of the aspirates plays an important role under the testing range of normal stresses. In this work, the traditionally used elastic-contact theory has been modified to better predict the stress sensitivity of reservoir fractures. Analysis shows that the standard deviation of the probability density function of asperity distribution has a great effect on the fracture closure rate.

  6. Percutaneous Vertebroplasty for Osteoporotic Compression Fracture: Multivariate Study of Predictors of New Vertebral Body Fracture

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Komemushi, Atsushi, E-mail: kome64@yo.rim.or.jp; Tanigawa, Noboru; Kariya, Shuji; Kojima, Hiroyuki; Shomura, Yuzo [Kansai Medical University, Department of Radiology (Japan); Komemushi, Sadao [Kinki University, Schoool of Agriculture (Japan); Sawada, Satoshi [Kansai Medical University, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2006-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Purpose. To investigate the risk factors and relative risk of new compression fractures following vertebroplasty. Methods. Initially, we enrolled 104 consecutive patients with vertebral compression fractures caused by osteoporosis. A total of 83 of the 104 patients visited our hospital for follow-up examinations for more than 4 weeks after vertebroplasty. Logistic regression analysis of the data obtained from these 83 patients was used to determine relative risks of recurrent compression fractures, using 13 different factors. Results. We identified 59 new fractures in 30 of the 83 patients: 41 new fractures in vertebrae adjacent to treated vertebrae; and 18 new fractures in vertebrae not adjacent to treated vertebrae. New fractures occurred in vertebrae adjacent to treated vertebrae significantly more frequently than in vertebrae not adjacent to treated vertebrae. Only cement leakage into the disk was a significant predictor of new vertebral body fracture after vertebroplasty (odds ratio = 4.633). None of the following covariates were associated with increased risk of new fracture: age, gender, bone mineral density, the number of vertebroplasty procedures, the number of vertebrae treated per procedure, the cumulative number of vertebrae treated, the presence of a single untreated vertebra between treated vertebrae, the presence of multiple untreated vertebrae between treated vertebrae, the amount of bone cement injected per procedure, the cumulative amount of bone cement injected, cement leakage into the soft tissue around the vertebra, and cement leakage into the vein.

  7. Caldera processes and magma-hydrothermal systems continental scientific drilling program: thermal regimes, Valles caldera research, scientific and management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goff, F.; Nielson, D.L. (eds.)

    1986-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Long-range core-drilling operations and initial scientific investigations are described for four sites in the Valles caldera, New Mexico. The plan concentrates on the period 1986 to 1993 and has six primary objectives: (1) study the origin, evolution, physical/chemical dynamics of the vapor-dominated portion of the Valles geothermal system; (2) investigate the characteristics of caldera fill and mechanisms of caldera collapse and resurgence; (3) determine the physical/chemical conditions in the heat transfer zone between crystallizing plutons and the hydrothermal system; (4) study the mechanism of ore deposition in the caldera environment; (5) develop and test high-temperature drilling techniques and logging tools; and (6) evaluate the geothermal resource within a large silicic caldera. Core holes VC-2a (500 m) and VC-2b (2000 m) are planned in the Sulphur Springs area; these core holes will probe the vapor-dominated zone, the underlying hot-water-dominated zone, the boiling interface and probable ore deposition between the two zones, and the deep structure and stratigraphy along the western part of the Valles caldera fracture zone and resurgent dome. Core hole VC-3 will involve reopening existing well Baca number12 and deepening it from 3.2 km (present total depth) to 5.5 km, this core hole will penetrate the deep-crystallized silicic pluton, investigate conductive heat transfer in that zone, and study the evolution of the central resurgent dome. Core hole VC-4 is designed to penetrate deep into the presumably thick caldera fill in eastern Valles caldera and examine the relationship between caldera formation, sedimentation, tectonics, and volcanism. Core hole VC-5 is to test structure, stratigraphy, and magmatic evolution of pre-Valles caldera rocks, their relations to Valles caldera, and the influences of regional structure on volcanism and caldera formation.

  8. Universal asymptotic umbrella for hydraulic fracture modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linkov, Aleksandr M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper presents universal asymptotic solution needed for efficient modeling of hydraulic fractures. We show that when neglecting the lag, there is universal asymptotic equation for the near-front opening. It appears that apart from the mechanical properties of fluid and rock, the asymptotic opening depends merely on the local speed of fracture propagation. This implies that, on one hand, the global problem is ill-posed, when trying to solve it as a boundary value problem under a fixed position of the front. On the other hand, when properly used, the universal asymptotics drastically facilitates solving hydraulic fracture problems (both analytically and numerically). We derive simple universal asymptotics and comment on their employment for efficient numerical simulation of hydraulic fractures, in particular, by well-established Level Set and Fast Marching Methods.

  9. Gas condensate damage in hydraulically fractured wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adeyeye, Adedeji Ayoola

    2004-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Company. The well was producing a gas condensate reservoir and questions were raised about how much drop in flowing bottomhole pressure below dewpoint would be appropriate. Condensate damage in the hydraulic fracture was expected to be of significant...

  10. Geomechanical review of hydraulic fracturing technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arop, Julius Bankong

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydraulic fracturing as a method for recovering unconventional shale gas has been around for several decades. Significant research and improvement in field methods have been documented in literature on the subject. The ...

  11. Fracture induced anisotropy in viscoelastic media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    santos,,,

    pp = 28 MPa, Z. ?1. N. = (14.4+3.6i) GPa, Z. ?1. T. = (21 + 2.6i) GPa,. We consider a set of equispaced fractures with L = 1 cm and 80 % binary fractal variations ...

  12. Multiphase flow in fractured porous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Firoozabadi, A.

    1995-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The major goal of this research project was to improve the understanding of the gas-oil two-phase flow in fractured porous media. In addition, miscible displacement was studied to evaluate its promise for enhanced recovery.

  13. Dynamic Fracture Toughness of Polymer Composites

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Harmeet Kaur

    2012-02-14T23:59:59.000Z

    bar with required instrumentation to obtain load-history and initiation of crack propagation parameters followed by finite element analysis to determine desired dynamic properties. Single edge notch bend(SENB) type geometry is used for Mode-I fracture...

  14. Infiltration and Seepage Through Fractured Welded Tuff

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    T.A. Ghezzehei; P.F. Dobson; J.A. Rodriguez; P.J. Cook

    2006-06-20T23:59:59.000Z

    The Nopal I mine in Pena Blanca, Chihuahua, Mexico, contains a uranium ore deposit within fractured tuff. Previous mining activities exposed a level ground surface 8 m above an excavated mining adit. In this paper, we report results of ongoing research to understand and model percolation through the fractured tuff and seepage into a mined adit both of which are important processes for the performance of the proposed nuclear waste repository at Yucca Mountain. Travel of water plumes was modeled using one-dimensional numerical and analytical approaches. Most of the hydrologic properly estimates were calculated from mean fracture apertures and fracture density. Based on the modeling results, we presented constraints for the arrival time and temporal pattern of seepage at the adit.

  15. Anomalous transport through porous and fractured media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kang, Peter Kyungchul

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Anomalous transport, understood as the nonlinear scaling with time of the mean square displacement of transported particles, is observed in many physical processes, including contaminant transport through porous and fractured ...

  16. Hydrothermal Methods as a New Way of Actinide Phosphate Preparation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clavier, Nicolas [Institut de Chimie Separative de Marcoule, CNRS UMR 5257, Bagnols / Ceze, 30207 (France); Dacheux, Nicolas [Groupe de Radiochimie, IPNO - Bat. 100, Univ. Paris-Sud, Orsay, 91406 (France); Wallez, Gilles; Quarton, Michel [Chimie de la matiere condensee, Univ. Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, CNRS UMR 7574, 4 Place Jussieu, Paris, 75005 (France)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Precipitation processes driven in hydrothermal conditions were applied to the preparation of phosphate-based ceramics. In particular, three systems composed by a crystallized precursor linked with a high temperature compound were examined: M(OH)PO{sub 4} / M{sub 2}O(PO{sub 4}){sub 2} (M = Th, U), MPO{sub 4} 0.5 H{sub 2}O / MPO{sub 4} (M = La - Dy), and Th{sub 2-x/2}An{sub x/2}(PO{sub 4}){sub 2}(HPO{sub 4}) H{sub 2}O / {beta}-Th{sub 4-x}An{sub x}(PO{sub 4}){sub 4}P{sub 2}O{sub 7} (M = U, Np, Pu). A significant improvement of several physico-chemical properties of the powders, especially in the sintering capability and the homogeneity of the final solids, was evidenced when starting from the precursors. Furthermore, these phases were also found to control the solubility of lanthanides and actinides during leaching experiments when reaching the saturation conditions in the solution. (authors)

  17. Hydrothermal Synthesis and Structure of Neptunium(V) Oxide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Forbes, Tori Z. [Department of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN, 46556 (United States); Burns, Peter C.; Soderholm, L. [Department of Civil Engineering and Geological Sciences, University of Notre Dame, 156 Fitzpatrick Hall, Notre Dame, IN, 46556 (United States)]|[Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL, 60439 (United States); Skanthakumar, S. [Chemistry Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL, 60439 (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Single crystals of Np{sub 2}O{sub 5} have been synthesized by low-temperature hydrothermal reaction of a (NpO{sub 2}){sup +} stock solution with natural calcite crystals. The structure of Np{sub 2}O{sub 5} was solved by direct methods and refined on the basis of F{sup 2} for all unique data collected on a Bruker X-ray diffractometer equipped with an APEX II CCD detector. Np{sub 2}O{sub 5} is monoclinic, space group P2/c, with a = 8.168(2) A, b = 6.584(1) A, c = 9.3130(2) A, {beta} = 116.01(1) deg., V = 449.8(2) A{sup 3}, and Z = 1. The structure contains chains of edge-sharing neptunyl pentagonal bi-pyramids linked into sheets through cation-cation interactions with distorted neptunyl square bi-pyramids. Additional cation-cation interactions connect the sheets into a three-dimensional framework. The formation of Np{sub 2}O{sub 5} on the surface of calcite crystals has important implications for the precipitation of isolated neptunyl phases in natural aqueous systems. (authors)

  18. Coprecipitation-assisted hydrothermal synthesis of PLZT hollow nanospheres

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Renqiang [The Aeronautic Key Laboratory for Smart Materials and Structures, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China)] [The Aeronautic Key Laboratory for Smart Materials and Structures, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Zhu, Kongjun, E-mail: kjzhu@nuaa.edu.cn [The Aeronautic Key Laboratory for Smart Materials and Structures, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China)] [The Aeronautic Key Laboratory for Smart Materials and Structures, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China); Qiu, Jinhao; Bai, Lin; Ji, Hongli [The Aeronautic Key Laboratory for Smart Materials and Structures, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China)] [The Aeronautic Key Laboratory for Smart Materials and Structures, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing 210016 (China)

    2010-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Lanthanum-modified lead zirconate titanate Pb{sub 1-x}La{sub x}(Zr{sub 1-y}Ti{sub y})O{sub 3} (PLZT) hollow nanospheres have been successfully prepared via a template-free hydrothermal method using the well-mixed coprecipitated precursors and the KOH mineralizer. The structure, composition, and morphology of the PLZT hollow nanospheres were characterized by XRD (X-ray diffraction), ICP (inductive coupled plasma emission spectrometer), FTIR (Fourier transform infrared spectra), TG/DTA (thermogravimetric analysis and differential thermal analysis), TEM (transmission electron microscopy) and SEAD (selected area diffraction). The results show that the composition and the morphology control of the PLZT products are determined by the KOH concentration. The PLZT hollow nanospheres with uniform size of about 4 nm were synthesized in the presence of 5 M KOH. The crystalline nanoparticles can be prepared at dilute KOH, in contrast to the amorphous powders prepared at concentrated KOH. Formation mechanisms of the PLZT hollow nanospheres are also discussed.

  19. Radio Flares of Compact Binary Mergers: the Effect of Non-Trivial Outflow Geometry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Margalit, Ben

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The next generation gravitational waves (GW) detectors are most sensitive to GW emitted by compact (neutron star/black hole) binary mergers. If one of those is a neutron star the merger will also emit electromagnetic radiation via three possible channels: Gamma-ray bursts and their (possibly orphan) afterglows (Eichler et al. 1989), Li-Paczynski Macronovae (Li & Paczynski 1998) and radio flares (Nakar & Piran 2011). This accompanying electromagnetic radiation is vitally important in confirming the GW detections (Kochanek & Piran 1993). It could also reveal a wealth of information regarding the merger and will open a window towards multi-messenger astronomy. Identifying and characterizing these counterparts is therefore of utmost importance. In this work we explore late time radio flares emitted by the dynamically ejected outflows. We build upon previous work and consider the effect of the outflow's non-trivial geometry. Using an approximate method we estimate the radio light-curves for several eje...

  20. Feedback and its Feedback Effect on Feedback: Photoionization Suppression and its Impact on Galactic Outflows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Matthew M. Pieri; Hugo Martel

    2007-05-02T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that radiative feedback due to reionization has a pronounced effect on the extent of mechanical feedback due to galactic outflows. The photoionization of the Intergalactic Medium (IGM) suppresses low-mass galaxy formation by photoheating the gas and limiting atomic line cooling. The number of low-mass galaxies is central for the enrichment of the IGM as these objects have the capacity to enrich a significant fraction (by volume) of the Universe. We use a modified version of our galactic outflow model, combined with a simple criterion for suppression, to investigate the potential impact upon the IGM. We find that this suppression strongly reduces the enrichment of the IGM and is sensitive to the reionization history. We also investigate the contribution of halos of different masses with varying degrees of suppression.

  1. Power-law scaling of asymmetries in viscous flow with PT-symmetric inflow and outflow

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Huidan; Yu; Xi Chen; Yousheng Xu; Yogesh N. Joglekar

    2014-10-13T23:59:59.000Z

    In recent years, open systems with balanced loss and gain, that are invariant under the combined parity and time-reversal ($\\mathcal{PT}$) operations, have been studied via asymmetries of their solutions. They represent systems as diverse as coupled optical waveguides and electrical or mechanical oscillators. We numerically investigate the asymmetries of incompressible viscous flow in two and three dimensions with "balanced" inflow-outflow ($\\mathcal{PT}$-symmetric) configurations. By introducing configuration-dependent classes of asymmetry functions in velocity, kinetic energy density, and vorticity fields, we find that the flow asymmetries exhibit power-law scaling with a single exponent in the laminar regime with the Reynolds number ranging over four decades. We show that such single-exponent scaling is expected for small Reynolds numbers, although its robustness at large values of Reynolds numbers is unexpected. Our results imply that $\\mathcal{PT}$-symmetric inflow-outflow configurations provide a hitherto unexplored avenue to tune flow properties.

  2. Formation of Compact Stellar Clusters by High-Redshift Galaxy Outflows I: Nonequillibrium Coolant Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gray, William J

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use high-resolution three-dimensional adaptive mesh refinement simulations to investigate the interaction of high-redshift galaxy outflows with low-mass virialized clouds of primordial composition. While atomic cooling allows star formation in objects with virial temperatures above $10^4$ K, "minihaloes" below this threshold are generally unable to form stars by themselves. However, these objects are highly susceptible to triggered star formation, induced by outflows from neighboring high-redshift starburst galaxies. Here we conduct a study of these interactions, focusing on cooling through non-equilibrium molecular hydrogen (H$_2$) and hydrogen deuteride (HD) formation. Tracking the non-equilibrium chemistry and cooling of 14 species and including the presence of a dissociating background, we show that shock interactions can transform minihaloes into extremely compact clusters of coeval stars. Furthermore, these clusters are all less than $\\approx 10^6 M_\\odot,$ and they are ejected from their parent dark...

  3. Keck High-Resolution Spectroscopy of Outflows in Infrared Luminous Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    David S. Rupke; Sylvain Veilleux

    2005-09-05T23:59:59.000Z

    Several recent studies have determined that large quantities of neutral gas are outflowing from the nuclei of almost all infrared-luminous galaxies. These measurements show that winds in infrared-luminous galaxies play a significant role in the evolution of galaxies and the intergalactic medium at redshifts z > 1, when infrared-luminous galaxies dominated the star formation rate of the universe. These conclusions rely on moderate resolution spectra (FWHM > 65 km/s) of the NaI D absorption line and the assumption that there are no unresolved, saturated velocity components. For the first time, we present high resolution spectra (FWHM = 13 km/s) of massive, infrared-luminous galaxies. The five galaxies in our sample are known to host outflows on the basis of previous observations. With the present observations, all NaI D velocity components are resolved with tau(NaI D1 5896 A) luminous galaxies have been measured correctly by previous studies.

  4. STRONG MOLECULAR HYDROGEN EMISSION AND KINEMATICS OF THE MULTIPHASE GAS IN RADIO GALAXIES WITH FAST JET-DRIVEN OUTFLOWS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guillard, P.

    Observations of ionized and neutral gas outflows in radio galaxies (RGs) suggest that active galactic nucleus (AGN) radio jet feedback has a galaxy-scale impact on the host interstellar medium, but it is still unclear how ...

  5. Surface circulation in the Gulf of Cadiz: 2. Inflow-outflow coupling and the Gulf of Cadiz slope

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brest, Université de

    that of the atmospheric forcing in driving the upper slope currents. The Mediteranean outflow forces a surface open ocean filaments con- touring Cape St. Vincent and penetrating eastward into the warmer GoC waters that suggest

  6. Fracture Conductivity of the Eagle Ford Shale

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guzek, James J

    2014-07-25T23:59:59.000Z

    , and rock geomechanical properties. Therefore, optimizing conductivity by tailoring a well’s fracturing treatment to local reservoir characteristics is important to the oil and gas industry for economic reasons. The roots of hydraulic fracturing can... of the formation. Sahoo et al. (2013) identified that mineralogy, hydrocarbon filled porosity, and total organic content are most prominent parameters that control Eagle Ford well productivity. Mineral composition determines several geomechanical properties...

  7. Poroelastic response of orthotropic fractured porous media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berryman, J.G.

    2010-12-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An algorithm is presented for inverting either laboratory or field poroelastic data for all the drained constants of an anisotropic (specifically orthotropic) fractured poroelastic system. While fractures normally weaken the system by increasing the mechanical compliance, any liquids present in these fractures are expected to increase the stiffness somewhat, thus negating to some extent the mechanical weakening influence of the fractures themselves. The analysis presented quantifies these effects and shows that the key physical variable needed to account for the pore-fluid effects is a factor of (1 - B), where B is Skempton's second coe#14;fficient and satisfies 0 {<=} #20; B < 1. This scalar factor uniformly reduces the increase in compliance due to the presence of communicating fractures, thereby stiffening the fractured composite medium by a predictable amount. One further goal of the discussion is to determine how many of the poroelastic constants need to be known by other means in order to determine the rest from remote measurements, such as seismic wave propagation data in the field. Quantitative examples arising in the analysis show that, if the fracture aspect ratio a{sub f} ~ 0.1 and the pore fluid is liquid water, then for several cases considered Skempton's B ~ 0:9, so the stiffening effect of the pore-liquid reduces the change in compliance due to the fractures by a factor 1-B ~ 0.1, in these examples. The results do however depend on the actual moduli of the unfractured elastic material, as well as on the pore-liquid bulk modulus, so these quantitative predictions are just examples, and should not be treated as universal results. Attention is also given to two previously unremarked poroelastic identities, both being useful variants of Gassmann's equations for homogeneous -- but anisotropic -- poroelasticity. Relationships to Skempton's analysis of saturated soils are also noted. The paper concludes with a discussion of alternative methods of analyzing and quantifying fluid-substitution behavior in poroelastic systems, especially for those systems having heterogeneous constitution.

  8. FRACTURE TOUGHNESS VARIABILITY IN F82H

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gelles, David S.; Sokolov, M.

    2003-09-03T23:59:59.000Z

    The fracture toughness database for F82H displays some anomalous behavior. Metallographic examination reveals banding in the center of 25 mm thick F82H plate, which is more evident in transverse section. The banding is shown to arise because some grains are etched on a very fine scale whereas the remainder is etched more strongly and better delineates the martensite lath structure. However, the banding found does not provide explanation for the anomalous fracture toughness behavior.

  9. TRITIUM EFFECTS ON WELDMENT FRACTURE TOUGHNESS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Morgan, M; Michael Tosten, M; Scott West, S

    2006-07-17T23:59:59.000Z

    The effects of tritium on the fracture toughness properties of Type 304L stainless steel and its weldments were measured. Fracture toughness data are needed for assessing tritium reservoir structural integrity. This report provides data from J-Integral fracture toughness tests on unexposed and tritium-exposed weldments. The effect of tritium on weldment toughness has not been measured until now. The data include tests on tritium-exposed weldments after aging for up to three years to measure the effect of increasing decay helium concentration on toughness. The results indicate that Type 304L stainless steel weldments have high fracture toughness and are resistant to tritium aging effects on toughness. For unexposed alloys, weldment fracture toughness was higher than base metal toughness. Tritium-exposed-and-aged base metals and weldments had lower toughness values than unexposed ones but still retained good toughness properties. In both base metals and weldments there was an initial reduction in fracture toughness after tritium exposure but little change in fracture toughness values with increasing helium content in the range tested. Fracture modes occurred by the dimpled rupture process in unexposed and tritium-exposed steels and welds. This corroborates further the resistance of Type 304L steel to tritium embrittlement. This report fulfills the requirements for the FY06 Level 3 milestone, TSR15.3 ''Issue summary report for tritium reservoir material aging studies'' for the Enhanced Surveillance Campaign (ESC). The milestone was in support of ESC L2-1866 Milestone-''Complete an annual Enhanced Surveillance stockpile aging assessment report to support the annual assessment process''.

  10. Supernova-Driven Outflows in NGC 7552: A Comparison of H-alpha and UV Tracers

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wood, Corey M; Calzetti, Daniela; Leitherer, Claus; Chisholm, John; Gallagher, John S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We investigate the supernova-driven galactic wind of the barred spiral galaxy NGC 7552, using both ground-based optical nebular emission lines and far-ultraviolet absorption lines measured with the Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Origins Spectrograph. We detect broad (~300 km/s) blueshifted (-40 km/s) optical emission lines associated with the galaxy's kpc-scale star-forming ring. The broad line kinematics and diagnostic line ratios suggest that the H-alpha emission comes from clouds of high density gas entrained in a turbulent outflow. We compare the H-alpha emission line profile to the UV absorption line profile measured along a coincident sight line and find significant differences. The maximum blueshift of the H-alpha-emitting gas is ~290 km/s, whereas the UV line profile extends to blueshifts upwards of 1000 km/s. The mass outflow rate estimated from the UV is roughly nine times greater than that estimated from H-alpha. We argue that the H-alpha emission traces a cluster-scale outflow of dense, low velocit...

  11. OBSERVATIONS OF MOLECULAR OUTFLOW IN CAR 291.6-01.9

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Saul, M. [School of Physics, University of New South Wales, NSW 2052 (Australia); Saul, L., E-mail: msaul@phys.unsw.edu.au, E-mail: luke.saul@space.unibe.ch [Physics Institute, University of Bern, Bern CH-3012 (Switzerland)

    2012-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We report the first observations of a dense molecular gas nebula and bipolar outflow in Car 291.6-01.9, showing characteristics of an embedded young stellar object (YSO). Using the Mopra radio telescope near Coonabarabaran, Australia, we image the kinematic structure of several emission features to examine physical properties within a molecular clump of mass {approx}3.2 {+-} 0.6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 3} M{sub Sun} in which a stellar cluster may be forming. Motivated by acquiring a more thorough understanding of star formation we ask what may have initiated collapse in the clump; observed outflow alignment is suggestive of {approx}1.0 pc distant massive star HD 308280 radiative-driven compression as a formation trigger for the dense core. An outflow derived age of <10{sup 6} years, together with significant C{sup 18}O and SO core depletion, support the case for the core as the host of an extremely YSO cluster.

  12. Wind from black hole accretion disk as the driver of a molecular outflow in a galaxy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tombesi, F; Veilleux, S; Reeves, J N; Gonzalez-Alfonso, E; Reynolds, C S

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Powerful winds driven by active galactic nuclei (AGN) are often invoked to play a fundamental role in the evolution of both supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and their host galaxies, quenching star formation and explaining the tight SMBH-galaxy relations. Recent observations of large-scale molecular outflows in ultra-luminous infrared galaxies (ULIRGs) have provided the evidence to support these studies, as they directly trace the gas out of which stars form. Theoretical models suggest an origin of these outflows as energy-conserving flows driven by fast AGN accretion disk winds. Previous claims of a connection between large-scale molecular outflows and AGN activity in ULIRGs were incomplete because they were lacking the detection of the putative inner wind. Conversely, studies of powerful AGN accretion disk winds to date have focused only on X-ray observations of local Seyferts and a few higher redshift quasars. Here we show the clear detection of a powerful AGN accretion disk wind with a mildly relativistic ...

  13. Delayed outflows from black hole accretion tori following neutron star binary coalescence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodrigo Fernández; Brian D. Metzger

    2013-07-16T23:59:59.000Z

    Expulsion of neutron-rich matter following the merger of neutron star (NS) binaries is crucial to the radioactively-powered electromagnetic counterparts of these events and to their relevance as sources of r-process nucleosynthesis. Here we explore the long-term (viscous) evolution of remnant black hole accretion disks formed in such mergers by means of two-dimensional, time-dependent hydrodynamical simulations. The evolution of the electron fraction due to charged-current weak interactions is included, and neutrino self-irradiation is modeled as a lightbulb that accounts for the disk geometry and moderate optical depth effects. Over several viscous times (~1s), a fraction ~10% of the initial disk mass is ejected as a moderately neutron-rich wind (Y_e ~ 0.2) powered by viscous heating and nuclear recombination, with neutrino self-irradiation playing a sub-dominant role. Although the properties of the outflow vary in time and direction, their mean values in the heavy-element production region are relatively robust to variations in the initial conditions of the disk and the magnitude of its viscosity. The outflow is sufficiently neutron-rich that most of the ejecta forms heavy r-process elements with mass number A >130, thus representing a new astrophysical source of r-process nucleosynthesis, distinct from that produced in the dynamical ejecta. Due to its moderately high entropy, disk outflows contain a small residual fraction ~1% of helium, which could produce a unique spectroscopic signature.

  14. A deep near-infrared survey toward the Aquila molecular cloud - I. Molecular hydrogen outflows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Miaomiao; Wang, Hongchi; Sun, Jia; Wang, Min; Jiang, Zhibo; Anathipindika, Sumedh

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We have performed an unbiased deep near-infrared survey toward the Aquila molecular cloud with a sky coverage of ~1 deg2. We identified 45 molecular hydrogen emission-line objects(MHOs), of which only 11 were previously known. Using the Spitzer archival data we also identified 802 young stellar objects (YSOs) in this region. Based on the morphology and the location of MHOs and YSO candidates, we associate 43 MHOs with 40 YSO candidates. The distribution of jet length shows an exponential decrease in the number of outflows with increasing length and the molecular hydrogen outflows seem to be oriented randomly. Moreover, there is no obvious correlation between jet lengths, jet opening angles, or jet H2 1-0 S(1) luminosities and spectral indices of the possible driving sources in this region. We also suggest that molecular hydrogen outflows in the Aquila molecular cloud are rather weak sources of turbulence, unlikely to generate the observed velocity dispersion in the region of survey.

  15. HYDRAULIC FRACTURING AND OVERCORING STRESS MEASUREMENTS IN A DEEP BOREHOLE AT THE STRIPA TEST MINE, SWEDEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Doe, T.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    u l y 2 , 1 9 8 1 HYDRAULIC FRACTURING AND OVERCORING STRESSI nun LBL-12478 HYDRAULIC FRACTURING AND OVERCORING STRESSthe calculated stress. n HYDRAULIC FRACTURING EQUIPMENT AND

  16. A triple-continuum pressure-transient model for a naturally fractured vuggy reservoir

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2007-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    simulation of naturally fractured reservoirs, Water Resour.model for fissured fractured reservoir, Soc. Pet. Eng. J. ,behavior of naturally fractured reservoirs, Soc. Pet. Eng.

  17. THE STATE OF THE ART OF NUMERICAL MODELING OF THERMOHYDROLOGIC FLOW IN FRACTURED ROCK MASSES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wang, J.S.Y.

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    flow in naturally fractured reservoirs: Proceedings, 2ndliquid-dominated, fractured reservoir over a twenty- yeardrawdown. (c) Fractured Reservoir: The double-porosity

  18. An Analytical Solution for Slug-Tracer Tests in Fractured Reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shan, Chao; Pruess, Karsten

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Tracer Tests in Fractured Reservoirs Chao Shan and Karstenof chemicals or heat in fractured reservoirs is stronglyin a water-saturated fractured reservoir. The solution shows

  19. Aligned vertical fractures, HTI reservoir symmetry, and Thomsen seismic anisotropy parameters for polar media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Berryman, James G.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    waves in such fractured reservoirs (Hsu and Schoenberg,i.e. , for cracked/fractured reservoirs), the vertical phasemore closely. FRACTURED RESERVOIRS AND CRACK-INFLUENCE

  20. Upscaling solute transport in naturally fractured porous media with the continuous time random walk method

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Geiger, S.

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    behavior of naturally fractured reservoirs. SPE Journal, R.the Bristol Channel fractured reservoir analogue (a), ?uidfor naturally fractured reservoirs. These simulations are

  1. Brief Guide to the MINC-Method for Modeling Flow and Transport in Fractured Media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pruess editor, K.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simulating Naturally Fractured Reservoirs Using a SubdomainModels of Naturally Fractured Reservoirs, In Situ, 15, (2),for Naturally Fractured Reservoirs, papr,r SPE-11688,

  2. Effects of non-condensible gases on fluid recovery in fractured geothermal reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bodvarsson, Gudmundur S.; Gaulke, Scott

    1986-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Simu- lations in Fractured Reservoirs,” Lawrence Berkeleyfrom a twctphase fractured reservoir. T h e results obtainedRecovery in Fractured Geothermal Reservoirs Gudmundur S.

  3. Modeling interfacial fracture in Sierra.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, Arthur A.; Ohashi, Yuki; Lu, Wei-Yang; Nelson, Stacy A. C.; Foulk, James W.,; Reedy, Earl David,; Austin, Kevin N.; Margolis, Stephen B.

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report summarizes computational efforts to model interfacial fracture using cohesive zone models in the SIERRA/SolidMechanics (SIERRA/SM) finite element code. Cohesive surface elements were used to model crack initiation and propagation along predefined paths. Mesh convergence was observed with SIERRA/SM for numerous geometries. As the funding for this project came from the Advanced Simulation and Computing Verification and Validation (ASC V&V) focus area, considerable effort was spent performing verification and validation. Code verification was performed to compare code predictions to analytical solutions for simple three-element simulations as well as a higher-fidelity simulation of a double-cantilever beam. Parameter identification was conducted with Dakota using experimental results on asymmetric double-cantilever beam (ADCB) and end-notched-flexure (ENF) experiments conducted under Campaign-6 funding. Discretization convergence studies were also performed with respect to mesh size and time step and an optimization study was completed for mode II delamination using the ENF geometry. Throughout this verification process, numerous SIERRA/SM bugs were found and reported, all of which have been fixed, leading to over a 10-fold increase in convergence rates. Finally, mixed-mode flexure experiments were performed for validation. One of the unexplained issues encountered was material property variability for ostensibly the same composite material. Since the variability is not fully understood, it is difficult to accurately assess uncertainty when performing predictions.

  4. Evaluation of acid fracturing based on the "acid fracture number" concept

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alghamdi, Abdulwahab

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    ................................................................................................. 29 4.2.1 Initial Pad Volume ........................................................................... 29 4.2.2 Acid Strength and Volume...............................................................30 V... stages of pad fluids and acids.11 The reaction of HCl with carbonate formations is fast, especially at high temperatures. This means that the acid will not be able to penetrate deeply down the fracture, which may affect the outcome of acid fracturing...

  5. A Physically Based Approach for Modeling Multiphase Fracture-Matrix Interaction in Fractured Porous Media

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wu, Yu-Shu; Pan, Lehua; Pruess, Karsten

    2004-03-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Modeling fracture-matrix interaction within a complex multiple phase flow system is a key issue for fractured reservoir simulation. Commonly used mathematical models for dealing with such interactions employ a dual- or multiple-continuum concept, in which fractures and matrix are represented as overlapping, different, but interconnected continua, described by parallel sets of conservation equations. The conventional single-point upstream weighting scheme, in which the fracture relative permeability is used to represent the counterpart at the fracture-matrix interface, is the most common scheme by which to estimate flow mobility for fracture-matrix flow terms. However, such a scheme has a serious flaw, which may lead to unphysical solutions or significant numerical errors. To overcome the limitation of the conventional upstream weighting scheme, this paper presents a physically based modeling approach for estimating physically correct relative permeability in calculating multiphase flow between fractures and the matrix, using continuity of capillary pressure at the fracture-matrix interface. The proposed approach has been implemented into two multiphase reservoir simulators and verified using analytical solutions and laboratory experimental data. The new method is demonstrated to be accurate, numerically efficient, and easy to implement in dual- or multiple-continuum models.

  6. Fractured: Experts examine the contentious issue of hydraulic fracturing water use

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wythe, Kathy

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of Fracture Fluid Performance in Oil Shale with Surfactant Additives by X-Ray Tomography Methods (Crisman Institute: Schechter) Re-Use of Produced Waters as Hydraulic Fracturing Fluids (Crisman Institute: Nasr-El-Din) In a joint House Commi#20;ee...

  7. The Hydrothermal Chemistry of Gold, Arsenic, Antimony, Mercury and Silver

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bessinger, Brad; Apps, John A.

    2003-03-23T23:59:59.000Z

    A comprehensive thermodynamic database based on the Helgeson-Kirkham-Flowers (HKF) equation of state was developed for metal complexes in hydrothermal systems. Because this equation of state has been shown to accurately predict standard partial molal thermodynamic properties of aqueous species at elevated temperatures and pressures, this study provides the necessary foundation for future exploration into transport and depositional processes in polymetallic ore deposits. The HKF equation of state parameters for gold, arsenic, antimony, mercury, and silver sulfide and hydroxide complexes were derived from experimental equilibrium constants using nonlinear regression calculations. In order to ensure that the resulting parameters were internally consistent, those experiments utilizing incompatible thermodynamic data were re-speciated prior to regression. Because new experimental studies were used to revise the HKF parameters for H2S0 and HS-1, those metal complexes for which HKF parameters had been previously derived were also updated. It was found that predicted thermodynamic properties of metal complexes are consistent with linear correlations between standard partial molal thermodynamic properties. This result allowed assessment of several complexes for which experimental data necessary to perform regression calculations was limited. Oxygen fugacity-temperature diagrams were calculated to illustrate how thermodynamic data improves our understanding of depositional processes. Predicted thermodynamic properties were used to investigate metal transport in Carlin-type gold deposits. Assuming a linear relationship between temperature and pressure, metals are predicted to predominantly be transported as sulfide complexes at a total aqueous sulfur concentration of 0.05 m. Also, the presence of arsenic and antimony mineral phases in the deposits are shown to restrict mineralization within a limited range of chemical conditions. Finally, at a lesser aqueous sulfur concentration of 0.01 m, host rock sulfidation can explain the origin of arsenic and antimony minerals within the paragenetic sequence.

  8. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Algal Biomass to Hydrocarbons: Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction and Upgrading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua; Anderson, Daniel B.; Hallen, Richard T.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Hart, Todd R.; Butcher, Mark G.; Drennan, Corinne; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Davis, Ryan; Kinchin, Christopher

    2014-03-20T23:59:59.000Z

    This report provides a preliminary analysis of the costs associated with converting whole wet algal biomass into primarily diesel fuel. Hydrothermal liquefaction converts the whole algae into an oil that is then hydrotreated and distilled. The secondary aqueous product containing significant organic material is converted to a medium btu gas via catalytic hydrothermal gasification.

  9. The potential for photosynthesis in hydrothermal vents: a new avenue for life in the Universe?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Perez, Noel; Martin, Osmel; Leiva-Mora, Michel

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform a quantitative assessment for the potential for photosynthesis in hydrothermal vents in the deep ocean. The photosynthetically active radiation in this case is from geothermal origin: the infrared thermal radiation emitted by hot water, at temperatures ranging from 473 up to 673 K. We find that at these temperatures the photosynthetic potential is rather low in these ecosystems for most known species. However, species which a very high efficiency in the use of light and which could use infrared photons till 1300nm, could achieve good rates of photosynthesis in hydrothermal vents. These organisms might also thrive in deep hydrothermal vents in other planetary bodies, such as one of the more astrobiologically promising Jupiter satellites: Europa.

  10. Benefit-cost analysis of DOE's Current Federal Program to increase hydrothermal resource utilization. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-12-10T23:59:59.000Z

    The impact of DOE's Current Federal Program on the commercialization of hydrothermal resources between 1980 and 2000 is analyzed. The hydrothermal resources of the United States and the types of DOE activities used to stimulate the development of these resources for both electric power and direct heat use are described briefly. The No Federal Program and the Current Federal Program are then described in terms of funding levels and the resultant market penetration estimates through 2000. These market penetration estimates are also compared to other geothermal utilization forecasts. The direct benefits of the Current Federal Program are next presented for electric power and direct heat use applications. An analysis of the external impacts associated with the additional hydrothermal resource development resulting from the Current Federal Program is also provided. Included are environmental effects, national security/balance-of-payments improvements, socioeconomic impacts and materials requirements. A summary of the analysis integrating the direct benefits, external impacts and DOE program costs concludes the report.

  11. Hydrothermally treated coals for pulverized coal injection. Technical progress report, April 1995--June 1995

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walsh, D.E.; Rao, P.D.; Ogunsola, O.; Lin, H.K.

    1995-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This project is investigating the suitability of hydrothermally dried low-rank coals for pulverized fuel injection into blast furnaces in order to reduce coke consumption. Coal samples from the Beluga coal field and Usibelli Coal Mine, Alaska, are being used for the study. Crushed coal samples were hydrothermally treated at three temperatures, 275, 300 and 325{degrees}C, for residence times ranging from 10 to 120 minutes. Products have been characterized to determine their suitability for pulverized coal injection. Characterization includes proximate and ultimate analyses, vitrinite reflectance, TGA reactivity and thermochemical modeling. A literature survey has been conducted.

  12. Hydrothermal alteration at the Panorama Formation, North Pole Dome, Pilbara Craton, Western Australia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Adrian J; Walter, Malcolm R

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An airborne hyperspectral remote sensing dataset was obtained of the North Pole Dome region of the Pilbara Craton in October 2002. It has been analyzed for indications of hydrothermal minerals. Here we report on the identification and mapping of hydrothermal minerals in the 3.459 Ga Panorama Formation and surrounding strata. The spatial distribution of a pattern of subvertical pyrophyllite rich veins connected to a pyrophyllite rich palaeohorizontal layer is interpreted to represent the base of an acid-sulfate epithermal system that is unconformably overlain by the stromatolitic 3.42 Ga Strelley Pool Chert.

  13. Case studies of low-to-moderate temperature hydrothermal energy development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-10-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Six development projects are examined that use low- (less than 90/sup 0/C (194/sup 0/F)) to-moderate (90 to 150/sup 0/C (194 to 302/sup 0/F)) temperature geothermal resources. These projects were selected from 22 government cost-shared projects to illustrate the many facets of hydrothermal development. The case studies describe the history of this development, its exploratory methods, and its resource definition, as well as address legal, environmental, and institutional constraints. A critique of procedures used in the development is also provided and recommendations for similar future hydrothermal projects are suggested.

  14. Hydrothermal formation of Clay-Carbonate alteration assemblages in the Nili Fossae region of Mars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Adrian J; Baldridge, Alice M; Crowley, James K; Bridges, Nathan T; Thomson, Bradley J; Marion, Giles M; Filho, Carlos R de Souza; Bishop, Janice L

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) has returned observations of the Nili Fossae region indicating the presence of Mg- carbonate in small (characterize these carbonate-bearing units. We applied absorption band mapping techniques to investigate a range of possible phyllosilicate and carbonate minerals that could be present in the Nili Fossae region. We also describe a clay-carbonate hydrothermal alteration mineral assemblage in the Archean Warrawoona Group of Western Australia that is a potential Earth analog to the Nili Fossae carbonate-bearing rock units. We discuss the geological and biological implications for hydrothermal processes on Noachian Mars.

  15. Enhanced performance of wearable piezoelectric nanogenerator fabricated by two-step hydrothermal process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qiu, Yu; Lei, Jixue; Yin, Bing; Zhang, Heqiu; Ji, Jiuyu; Hu, Lizhong, E-mail: lizhongh@dlut.edu.cn [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); The Key Laboratory for Micro/Nano Technology and System of Liaoning Province, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Yang, Dechao [Department of Electronic Engineering, Dalian Neusoft University of Information, Dalian 116024 (China); Bian, Jiming; Liu, Yanhong; Zhao, Yu; Luo, Yingmin [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2014-03-17T23:59:59.000Z

    A simple two-step hydrothermal process was proposed for enhancing the performance of the nanogenerator on flexible and wearable terylene-fabric substrate. With this method, a significant enhancement in output voltage of the nanogenerator from ?10?mV to 7?V was achieved, comparing with the one by conventional one-step process. In addition, another advantage with the devices synthesized by two-step hydrothermal process was that their output voltages are only sensitive to strain rather than strain rate. The devices with a high output voltage have the ability to power common electric devices and will have important applications in flexible electronics and wearable devices.

  16. A robust method for fracture orientation and density detection from seismic scattered energy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fang, Xinding

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The measurements of fracture parameters, such as fracture orientation, fracture density and fracture compliance, in a reservoir is very important for field development and exploration. Traditional seismic methods for ...

  17. Experimental analysis of the extension to shear fracture transition in Berea Sandstone

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bobich, Jennifer Kay

    2005-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    and follows Coulomb behavior; however, the angle between the fracture surface and ??1 increases continuously with Pc. Fracture surfaces characteristic of the extension to shear fracture transition appear as linked, stepped extension fractures; the length...

  18. Reservoir Fracture Mapping using Microearthquakes: Austin Chalk, Giddings Field, TX and 76 Field, Clinton Co., KY.

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    SPE 36651 Reservoir Fracture Mapping using Microearthquakes: Austin Chalk, Giddings Field, TX and enhanced recovery, production operations in fracture- dominated oil and gas reservoirs. Borehole geophones to study reservoir fracture systems. Methods currently applied to study fracture systems include tilt

  19. Pressure analysis of the hydromechanical fracture behaviour in stimulated tight sedimentary geothermal reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wessling, S.

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    cooling of the fracture surfaces results in a significant opening of the fracture, which would influence the rate of geothermal

  20. IPIRG programs - advances in pipe fracture technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilkowski, G.; Olson, R.; Scott, P. [Batelle, Columbus, OH (United States)

    1997-04-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper presents an overview of the advances made in fracture control technology as a result of the research performed in the International Piping Integrity Research Group (IPIRG) program. The findings from numerous experiments and supporting analyses conducted to investigate the behavior of circumferentially flawed piping and pipe systems subjected to high-rate loading typical of seismic events are summarized. Topics to be discussed include; (1) Seismic loading effects on material properties, (2) Piping system behavior under seismic loads, (3) Advances in elbow fracture evaluations, and (4) {open_quotes}Real{close_quotes} piping system response. The presentation for each topic will be illustrated with data and analytical results. In each case, the state-of-the-art in fracture mechanics prior to the first IPIRG program will be contrasted with the state-of-the-art at the completion of the IPIRG-2 program.

  1. Simulated evolution of fractures and fracture networks subject to thermal cooling: A coupled discrete element and heat conduction model

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Hai; Plummer, Mitchell; Podgorney, Robert

    2013-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Advancement of EGS requires improved prediction of fracture development and growth during reservoir stimulation and long-term operation. This, in turn, requires better understanding of the dynamics of the strongly coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) processes within fractured rocks. We have developed a physically based rock deformation and fracture propagation simulator by using a quasi-static discrete element model (DEM) to model mechanical rock deformation and fracture propagation induced by thermal stress and fluid pressure changes. We also developed a network model to simulate fluid flow and heat transport in both fractures and porous rock. In this paper, we describe results of simulations in which the DEM model and network flow & heat transport model are coupled together to provide realistic simulation of the changes of apertures and permeability of fractures and fracture networks induced by thermal cooling and fluid pressure changes within fractures. Various processes, such as Stokes flow in low velocity pores, convection-dominated heat transport in fractures, heat exchange between fluid-filled fractures and solid rock, heat conduction through low-permeability matrices and associated mechanical deformations are all incorporated into the coupled model. The effects of confining stresses, developing thermal stress and injection pressure on the permeability evolution of fracture and fracture networks are systematically investigated. Results are summarized in terms of implications for the development and evolution of fracture distribution during hydrofracturing and thermal stimulation for EGS.

  2. Hydraulic Fracture Monitoring: A Jonah Field Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Seher, T.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydraulic fracturing involves the injection of a fluid to fracture oil and gas reservoirs, and thus increase their permeability. The process creates numerous microseismic events, which can be used to monitor subsurface ...

  3. Fractional Diffusion Modeling of Electromagnetic Induction in Fractured Rocks

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ge, Jianchao

    2014-08-11T23:59:59.000Z

    -2 km, a zone where pores and fractures over various length scales are highly complicated. Spatial confinement of fluid or electric charge transport by the fractal geometry gives rise to interesting dynamic processes within the pore space and fractures...

  4. Gaseous Detonation-Driven Fracture of Tubes Tong Wa Chao

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    never asked for anything back. First is Professor Wolfgang Knauss, who guided me in the solid to be consistent with fracture under mixed-mode loading. High-speed movies of the fracture events and blast wave

  5. Laboratory-scale fracture conductivity created by acid etching

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pournik, Maysam

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    the closure stress. While there have been several experimental studies conducted on acid fracturing, most of these have not scaled experiments to field conditions and did not account for the effect of rock weakening and etching pattern. Hence, acid fracture...

  6. Development and testing of an advanced acid fracture conductivity apparatus

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zou, ChunLei

    2006-08-16T23:59:59.000Z

    wells. Acid fracturing is a standard practice to increase the production rate and to improve ultimate recovery in carbonate reservoirs. There have been successful cases in most carbonate reservoirs around the world. However acid fracture performance...

  7. Fracture characterization from seismic measurements in a borehole

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bakku, Sudhish Kumar

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fracture characterization is important for optimal recovery of hydrocarbons. In this thesis, we develop techniques to characterize natural and hydraulic fractures using seismic measurements in a borehole. We first develop ...

  8. Stochastic multiscale models for fracture analysis of functionally graded materials

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rahman, Sharif

    Chakraborty, Sharif Rahman * Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, College of Engineering three multiscale models, including sequential, invasive, and concurrent models, for fracture analysis-intensity factors or accurate probability of fracture initiation. The concurrent multiscale model is sufficiently

  9. FRACTURE AND HYDROLOGY DATA FROM FIELD STUDIES AT STRIPA, SWEDEN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gale, J.E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    An Approach to the Fracture Hydrology at Stripa, PreliminaryRocks. On Recent Trends in Hydrology, Special PublicationsDE86 013586 W FRACTURE AND HYDROLOGY DATA FROM FIELD STUDIES

  10. Finite Difference Modeling of Seismic Responses to Intersecting Fracture Sets

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chi, Shihong

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fractured reservoir characterization is becoming increasingly important for the petroleum industry. Currentmethods for this task are developed based on effectivemedia theory, which assumes the cracks or fractures in a ...

  11. Effects of subsurface fracture interactions on surface deformation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jerry, Ruel (Ruel Valentine)

    2013-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Although the surface deformation resulting from the opening of a single fracture in a layered elastic half-space resembles the observed deformation at the InSalah site, it seems unlikely that only a single fracture is ...

  12. Analysis of Scattered Signal to Estimate Reservoir Fracture Parameters

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grandi, Samantha K.

    We detect fracture corridors and determine their orientation and average spacing based on an analysis of seismic coda in the frequency-wave number (f-k ) domain. Fracture corridors have dimensions similar to seismic ...

  13. Seismic characterization of fractured reservoirs by focusing Gaussian beams

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zheng, Yingcai

    Naturally fractured reservoirs occur worldwide, and they account for the bulk of global oil production. The most important impact of fractures is their influence on fluid flow. To maximize oil production, the characterization ...

  14. On equivalence of thinning fluids used for hydraulic fracturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Linkov, Alexander

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The paper aims to answer the question: if and how non-Newtonian fluids may be compared in their mechanical action when used for hydraulic fracturing? By employing the modified formulation of the PKN problem we obtain its simple analytical solutions in the cases of perfectly plastic and Newtonian fluids. Since the results for shear thinning fluids are intermediate between those for these cases, the obtained equation for the fracture length suggests a criterion of the equivalence of various shear thinning fluids for the problem of hydraulic fractures. We assume fluids equivalent in their hydrofracturing action, when at a reference time they produce fractures of the same length. The equation for the fracture length translates the equivalence in terms of the hydraulic fracture length and treatment time into the equivalence in terms of the properties of a fracturing fluid (behavior and consistency indices). Analysis shows that the influence of the consistency and behavior indices on the fracture length, particle v...

  15. Fracture Evolution Following a Hydraulic Stimulation within an EGS Reservoir

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. This project will provide the first ever formal evaluation of fracture and fracture flow evolution in an EGS reservoir following a hydraulic stimulation.

  16. Experimental Study of Acid Fracture Conductivity of Austin Chalk Formation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nino Penaloza, Andrea

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    to those in actual acid fracture treatments. After acid etching, fracture conductivity is measured at different closure stresses. This research work presents a systematic study to investigate the effect of temperature, rock-acid contact time and initial...

  17. Model for Fracturing Fluid Flowback and Characterization of Flowback Mechanisms

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Song, Bo

    2014-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    A large volume of fracturing fluid that may include slick water and various sorts of additives is injected into shale formations along with proppant to create hydraulic fractures which define a stimulated shale volume a shale gas well will actually...

  18. Effectiveness of microseismic monitoring for optimizing hydraulic fracturing in California

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alampi, Ann M

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydraulic fracturing has fundamentally changed the oil and gas industry in the past 10 years. Bakersfield, California provides a unique case study because steam injection, a type of hydraulic fracturing, has been used there ...

  19. Fracture Characterization from Scattered Energy: A Case Study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Grandi, Samantha K.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We use 3D surface seismic data to determine the presence and the preferred orientation of fracture corridors in a field. The Scattering Index method is proving to be a robust tool for detecting and mapping fracture corridors. ...

  20. How can we use one fracture to locate another?

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poliannikov, Oleg V.

    2011-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydraulic fracturing is an important tool that helps extract fluids from the subsurface. It is critical in applications ranging from enhanced oil recovery to geothermal energy pro-duction. As the goal of fracturing is to ...

  1. Mechanistic fracture criteria for the failure of human cortical bone

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nalla, Ravi K.; Kinney, John H.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2002-12-13T23:59:59.000Z

    A mechanistic understanding of fracture in human bone is critical to predicting fracture risk associated with age and disease. Despite extensive work, a mechanistic framework for describing how the underlying microstructure affects the failure mode in bone is lacking.

  2. Experimental Study of Acid Fracture Conductivity of Austin Chalk Formation 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Nino Penaloza, Andrea

    2013-05-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Acid fracture conductivity and the effect of key variables in the etching process during acid fracturing can be assessed at the laboratory scale. This is accomplished by using an experimental apparatus that simulates acid injection fluxes comparable...

  3. A Bayesian framework for fracture characterization from surface seismic data

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zamanian, S. Ahmad

    2012-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We describe a methodology for quantitatively characterizing the fractured nature of a hydrocarbon or geothermal reservoir from surface seismic data under a Bayesian inference framework. Fractures provide pathways for fluid ...

  4. On the fracture toughness of advanced materials

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Launey, Maximilien E.; Ritchie, Robert O.

    2008-11-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Few engineering materials are limited by their strength; rather they are limited by their resistance to fracture or fracture toughness. It is not by accident that most critical structures, such as bridges, ships, nuclear pressure vessels and so forth, are manufactured from materials that are comparatively low in strength but high in toughness. Indeed, in many classes of materials, strength and toughness are almost mutually exclusive. In the first instance, such resistance to fracture is a function of bonding and crystal structure (or lack thereof), but can be developed through the design of appropriate nano/microstructures. However, the creation of tough microstructures in structural materials, i.e., metals, polymers, ceramics and their composites, is invariably a compromise between resistance to intrinsic damage mechanisms ahead of the tip of a crack (intrinsic toughening) and the formation of crack-tip shielding mechanisms which principally act behind the tip to reduce the effective 'crack-driving force' (extrinsic toughening). Intrinsic toughening is essentially an inherent property of a specific microstructure; it is the dominant form of toughening in ductile (e.g., metallic) materials. However, for most brittle (e.g., ceramic) solids, and this includes many biological materials, it is largely ineffective and toughening conversely must be developed extrinsically, by such shielding mechanisms as crack bridging. From a fracture mechanics perspective, this results in toughening in the form of rising resistance-curve behavior where the fracture resistance actually increases with crack extension. The implication of this is that in many biological and high-strength advanced materials, toughness is developed primarily during crack growth and not for crack initiation. This is an important realization yet is still rarely reflected in the way that toughness is measured, which is invariably involves the use of single-value (crack-initiation) parameters such as the fracture toughness K{sub Ic}.

  5. A Thermoelastic Hydraulic Fracture Design Tool for Geothermal Reservoir Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ahmad Ghassemi

    2003-06-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Geothermal energy is recovered by circulating water through heat exchange areas within a hot rock mass. Geothermal reservoir rock masses generally consist of igneous and metamorphic rocks that have low matrix permeability. Therefore, cracks and fractures play a significant role in extraction of geothermal energy by providing the major pathways for fluid flow and heat exchange. Thus, knowledge of conditions leading to formation of fractures and fracture networks is of paramount importance. Furthermore, in the absence of natural fractures or adequate connectivity, artificial fracture are created in the reservoir using hydraulic fracturing. At times, the practice aims to create a number of parallel fractures connecting a pair of wells. Multiple fractures are preferred because of the large size necessary when using only a single fracture. Although the basic idea is rather simple, hydraulic fracturing is a complex process involving interactions of high pressure fluid injections with a stressed hot rock mass, mechanical interaction of induced fractures with existing natural fractures, and the spatial and temporal variations of in-situ stress. As a result it is necessary to develop tools that can be used to study these interactions as an integral part of a comprehensive approach to geothermal reservoir development, particularly enhanced geothermal systems. In response to this need we have set out to develop advanced thermo-mechanical models for design of artificial fractures and rock fracture research in geothermal reservoirs. These models consider the significant hydraulic and thermo-mechanical processes and their interaction with the in-situ stress state. Wellbore failure and fracture initiation is studied using a model that fully couples poro-mechanical and thermo-mechanical effects. The fracture propagation model is based on a complex variable and regular displacement discontinuity formulations. In the complex variable approach the displacement discontinuities are defined from the numerical solution of a complex hypersingular integral equation written for a given fracture configuration and loading. The fracture propagation studies include modeling interaction of induced fractures with existing discontinuities such as faults and joints. In addition to the fracture propagation studies, two- and three-dimensional heat extraction solution algorithms have been developed and used to estimate heat extraction and the variations of the reservoir stress with cooling. The numerical models have been developed in a user-friendly environment to create a tool for improving fracture design and investigating single or multiple fracture propagation in rock.

  6. GRB 081007 AND GRB 090424: THE SURROUNDING MEDIUM, OUTFLOWS, AND SUPERNOVAE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jin Zhiping; Covino, Stefano; Fugazza, Dino; Melandri, Andrea; Campana, Sergio; D'Avanzo, Paolo [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera, via Emilio Bianchi 46, I-23807 Merate (Italy); Della Valle, Massimo [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, Salita Moiariello, 16, I-80131 Napoli (Italy); Ferrero, Patrizia [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias (IAC), E-38200 La Laguna, Tenerife (Spain); Malesani, Daniele; Fynbo, Johan P. U.; Hjorth, Jens [Dark Cosmology Centre, Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Juliane Maries Vej 30, DK-2100 Copenhagen O (Denmark); Pian, Elena [Scuola Normale Superiore di Pisa, Piazza dei Cavalieri 7, I-56126 Pisa (Italy); Salvaterra, Ruben [INAF-IASF Milano, via E. Bassini 15, I-20133 Milano (Italy); Bersier, David [Astrophysics Research Institute, Liverpool John Moores University, Egerton Wharf, Birkenhead CH41 1LD (United Kingdom); Cano, Zach [Centre for Astrophysics and Cosmology, Science Institute, University of Iceland, Reykjavik (Iceland); Castro-Tirado, Alberto J.; Gorosabel, Javier [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia (IAA-CSIC), Glorieta de la Astronomia s/n, E-18008 Granada (Spain); Gomboc, Andreja [Mathematics and Physics, University of Ljubljana, Jadranska ulica 19, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Guidorzi, Cristiano [Department of Physics, University of Ferrara, via Saragat 1, I-44122 Ferrara (Italy); Haislip, Joshua B., E-mail: jin@pmo.ac.cn [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC 27599 (United States); and others

    2013-09-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We discuss the results of the analysis of multi-wavelength data for the afterglows of GRB 081007 and GRB 090424, two bursts detected by Swift. One of them, GRB 081007, also shows a spectroscopically confirmed supernova, SN 2008hw, which resembles SN 1998bw in its absorption features, while the maximum magnitude may be fainter, up to 0.7 mag, than observed in SN 1998bw. Bright optical flashes have been detected in both events, which allows us to derive solid constraints on the circumburst-matter density profile. This is particularly interesting in the case of GRB 081007, whose afterglow is found to be propagating into a constant-density medium, yielding yet another example of a gamma-ray burst (GRB) clearly associated with a massive-star progenitor which did not sculpt the surroundings with its stellar wind. There is no supernova component detected in the afterglow of GRB 090424, likely due to the brightness of the host galaxy, comparable to the Milky Way. We show that the afterglow data are consistent with the presence of both forward- and reverse-shock emission powered by relativistic outflows expanding into the interstellar medium. The absence of optical peaks due to the forward shock strongly suggests that the reverse-shock regions should be mildly magnetized. The initial Lorentz factor of outflow of GRB 081007 is estimated to be {Gamma} {approx} 200, while for GRB 090424 a lower limit of {Gamma} > 170 is derived. We also discuss the prompt emission of GRB 081007, which consists of just a single pulse. We argue that neither the external forward-shock model nor the shock-breakout model can account for the prompt emission data and suggest that the single-pulse-like prompt emission may be due to magnetic energy dissipation of a Poynting-flux-dominated outflow or to a dissipative photosphere.

  7. Compartmentalization analysis using discrete fracture network models

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    La Pointe, P.R.; Eiben, T.; Dershowitz, W. [Golder Associates, Redmond, VA (United States); Wadleigh, E. [Marathon Oil Co., Midland, TX (United States)

    1997-08-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper illustrates how Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) technology can serve as a basis for the calculation of reservoir engineering parameters for the development of fractured reservoirs. It describes the development of quantitative techniques for defining the geometry and volume of structurally controlled compartments. These techniques are based on a combination of stochastic geometry, computational geometry, and graph the theory. The parameters addressed are compartment size, matrix block size and tributary drainage volume. The concept of DFN models is explained and methodologies to compute these parameters are demonstrated.

  8. Fracture Toughness Prediction for MWCNT Reinforced Ceramics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Henager, Charles H.; Nguyen, Ba Nghiep

    2013-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    This report describes the development of a micromechanics model to predict fracture toughness of multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT) reinforced ceramic composites to guide future experimental work for this project. The modeling work described in this report includes (i) prediction of elastic properties, (ii) development of a mechanistic damage model accounting for matrix cracking to predict the composite nonlinear stress/strain response to tensile loading to failure, and (iii) application of this damage model in a modified boundary layer (MBL) analysis using ABAQUS to predict fracture toughness and crack resistance behavior (R-curves) for ceramic materials containing MWCNTs at various volume fractions.

  9. Seismic velocity and Q anisotropy in fractured poroelastic media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Introduction. Seismic wave propagation through fractures is an important subject in hydrocarbon exploration geophysics, mining and reservoir characterization ...

  10. Experimental and Analytical Research on Fracture Processes in ROck

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Herbert H.. Einstein; Jay Miller; Bruno Silva

    2009-02-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Experimental studies on fracture propagation and coalescence were conducted which together with previous tests by this group on gypsum and marble, provide information on fracturing. Specifically, different fracture geometries wsere tested, which together with the different material properties will provide the basis for analytical/numerical modeling. INitial steps on the models were made as were initial investigations on the effect of pressurized water on fracture coalescence.

  11. LOCAL STUDY OF ACCRETION DISKS WITH A STRONG VERTICAL MAGNETIC FIELD: MAGNETOROTATIONAL INSTABILITY AND DISK OUTFLOW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bai, Xue-Ning; Stone, James M., E-mail: xbai@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Peyton Hall, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States)

    2013-04-10T23:59:59.000Z

    We perform three-dimensional, vertically-stratified, local shearing-box ideal MHD simulations of the magnetorotational instability (MRI) that include a net vertical magnetic flux, which is characterized by midplane plasma {beta}{sub 0} (ratio of gas to magnetic pressure). We have considered {beta}{sub 0} = 10{sup 2}, 10{sup 3}, and 10{sup 4}, and in the first two cases the most unstable linear MRI modes are well resolved in the simulations. We find that the behavior of the MRI turbulence strongly depends on {beta}{sub 0}: the radial transport of angular momentum increases with net vertical flux, achieving {alpha} {approx} 0.08 for {beta} = 10{sup 4} and {alpha} {approx}> 1.0 for {beta}{sub 0} = 100, where {alpha} is the height-integrated and mass-weighted Shakura-Sunyaev parameter. A critical value lies at {beta}{sub 0} {approx} 10{sup 3}: for {beta}{sub 0} {approx}> 10{sup 3}, the disk consists of a gas pressure dominated midplane and a magnetically dominated corona. The turbulent strength increases with net flux, and angular momentum transport is dominated by turbulent fluctuations. The magnetic dynamo that leads to cyclic flips of large-scale fields still exists, but becomes more sporadic as net flux increases. For {beta}{sub 0} {approx}< 10{sup 3}, the entire disk becomes magnetically dominated. The turbulent strength saturates, and the magnetic dynamo is fully quenched. Stronger large-scale fields are generated with increasing net flux, which dominates angular momentum transport. A strong outflow is launched from the disk by the magnetocentrifugal mechanism, and the mass flux increases linearly with net vertical flux and shows sign of saturation at {beta}{sub 0} {approx}< 10{sup 2}. However, the outflow is unlikely to be directly connected to a global wind: for {beta}{sub 0} {approx}> 10{sup 3}, the large-scale field has no permanent bending direction due to dynamo activities, while for {beta}{sub 0} {approx}< 10{sup 3}, the outflows from the top and bottom sides of the disk bend towards opposite directions, inconsistent with a physical disk wind geometry. Global simulations are needed to address the fate of the outflow.

  12. Predicting hip fracture type with cortical bone mapping (CBM) in the Osteoporotic Fractures in Men (MrOS) study

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Treece, Graham M.; Gee, Andrew H.; Tonkin, Carol; Ewing, Susan K.; Cawthon, Peggy M.; Black, Dennis M.; Poole, Kenneth E. S.; Osteoporotic Fractures in Men Study

    2015-03-18T23:59:59.000Z

    Hip fracture risk is known to be related to material properties of the proximal femur, but fracture prediction studies adding richer quantitative computed tomography (QCT) measures to dual energy X-ray (DXA)-based methods have shown limited...

  13. Hydraulic Fractures: multiscale phenomena, asymptotic and numerical solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peirce, Anthony

    Hydraulic Fractures: multiscale phenomena, asymptotic and numerical solutions SANUM Conference (UMN) Eduard Siebrits (SLB) #12;2 Outline · Examples of hydraulic fractures · Governing equations well stimulation Fracturing Fluid Proppant #12;5 Quarries #12;6 Magma flow Tarkastad #12;7 Model EQ 1

  14. Hydraulic Fractures: multiscale phenomena, asymptotic and numerical solutions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peirce, Anthony

    Hydraulic Fractures: multiscale phenomena, asymptotic and numerical solutions CSIRO CSS TCP Detournay (UMN) Eduard Siebrits (SLB) #12;2 Outline · Examples of hydraulic fractures · Governing equations well stimulation Fracturing Fluid Proppant #12;5 Quarries #12;6 Magma flow Tarkastad #12;7 Model EQ 1

  15. Role of seepage forces on hydraulic fracturing and failure patterns

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    Role of seepage forces on hydraulic fracturing and failure patterns Alexander Rozhko Thesis September 2007 #12;ii Role of seepage forces on hydraulic fracturing and failure patterns Abstract. The mechanical role of seepage forces on hydraulic fracturing and failure patterns was studied both

  16. Creation and Impairment of Hydraulic Fracture Conductivity in Shale Formations 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Junjing

    2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-stage hydraulic fracturing is the key to the success of many shale gas and shale oil reservoirs. The main objectives of hydraulic fracturing in shale are to create artificial fracture networks that are conductive for oil and gas flow...

  17. Poroelastic modeling of fracture-seismic wave interaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nakagawa, Seiji

    2008-08-15T23:59:59.000Z

    Rock containing a compliant, fluid-filled fracture can be viewed as one case of heterogeneous poroelastic media. When this fracture is subjected to seismic waves, a strong contrast in the elastic stiffness between the fracture itself and the background can result in enhanced grain-scale local fluid flow. Because this flow--relaxing the pressure building up within the fracture--can increase the dynamic compliance of the fracture and change energy dissipation (attenuation), the scattering of seismic waves can be enhanced. Previously, for a flat, infinite fracture, we derived poroelastic seismic boundary conditions that describe the relationship between a finite jump in the stress and displacement across a fracture, expressed as a function of the stress and displacement at the boundaries. In this paper, we use these boundary conditions to determine frequency-dependent seismic wave transmission and reflection coefficients. Fluid-filled fractures with a range of mechanical and hydraulic properties are examined. From parametric studies, we found that the hydraulic permeability of a fracture fully saturated with water has little impact on seismic wave scattering. In contrast, the seismic response of a partially water-saturated fracture and a heterogeneous fracture filled with compliant liquid (e.g., supercritical CO{sub 2}) depended on the fracture permeability.

  18. MODELING OF NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS BY FORMAL HOMOGENIZATION TECHNIQUES*

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Douglas Jr., Jim

    MODELING OF NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS BY FORMAL HOMOGENIZATION TECHNIQUES* Todd Arbogast,y Jim in naturally fractured reservoirs. A single component in a single phase and two-component mis- cible. porous medium, double porosity, fractured reservoir, homogenization. yDepartment of Mathematics, Purdue

  19. ESTIMATION OF MATRIX BLOCK SIZE DISTRIBUTION IN NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    ESTIMATION OF MATRIX BLOCK SIZE DISTRIBUTION IN NATURALLY FRACTURED RESERVOIRS A Report Submitted;2 ABSTRACT Interporosity flow in a naturslly fractured reservoir is modelled by a new formulation of the distribution. Thus, observed pressure response from fractured reservoirs can be analysed to obtain the matrix

  20. EFFECTS OF WATER INJECTION INTO FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    SGP-TR-57 SGP-TR-57 EFFECTS OF WATER INJECTION INTO FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS: A SUMMARY INTO FRACTURED GEOTHERMAL RESERVOIRS A SUMMARY OP EXPERImCE WORtDWIDE Roland N. Horne Stanford University ABSTRACT Reinjection of water i n t o fractured geothermal reservoirs holds potential both f o r

  1. HYDRAULIC STIMULATION OF NATURAL FRACTURES AS REVEALED BY INDUCED MICROEARTHQUAKES,

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -1- HYDRAULIC STIMULATION OF NATURAL FRACTURES AS REVEALED BY INDUCED MICROEARTHQUAKES, CARTHAGE, December, 2001 Manuscript # 01066 LAUR# 01-1204 #12;Hydraulic Stimulation of Natural Fractures -2- ABSTRACT We have produced a high-resolution microseismic image of a hydraulic fracture stimulation

  2. Modeling Turbulent Hydraulic Fracture Near a Free Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling Turbulent Hydraulic Fracture Near a Free Surface Victor C. Tsai Seismological Laboratory consider a hydraulic fracture problem in which the crack grows parallel to a free surface, subject to fully components. wall Wall shear stress. ^· Non-dimensionalized ·. 1 Introduction Hydraulic fracture has been

  3. Modeling Turbulent Hydraulic Fracture Near a Free Surface

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Modeling Turbulent Hydraulic Fracture Near a Free Surface Victor C. Tsai Seismological Laboratory consider a hydraulic fracture problem in which the crack grows parallel to a free surface, subject to fully components. ^· Non-dimensionalized ·. 1 Introduction Hydraulic fracture has been studied for many years

  4. Estimating Major and Minor Natural Fracture Patterns in Gas

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Estimating Major and Minor Natural Fracture Patterns in Gas Shales Using Production Data Razi Identification of infill drilling locations has been challenging with mixed results in gas shales. Natural fractures are the main source of permeability in gas shales. Natural fracture patterns in shale has a random

  5. Creation and Impairment of Hydraulic Fracture Conductivity in Shale Formations

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Zhang, Junjing

    2014-07-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Multi-stage hydraulic fracturing is the key to the success of many shale gas and shale oil reservoirs. The main objectives of hydraulic fracturing in shale are to create artificial fracture networks that are conductive for oil and gas flow...

  6. Dynamics and storage of brine in mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wilcock, William

    Dynamics and storage of brine in mid-ocean ridge hydrothermal systems Fabrice J. Fontaine1 and brine phases. Time series of vent temperature and salinity (chlorinity) show that some black-smoker vent below seawater for over a decade, which raises important questions concerning the fate of brines

  7. Hydrothermal method of synthesis of rare-earth tantalates and niobates

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Nyman, May D; Rohwer, Lauren E.S.; Martin, James E

    2012-10-16T23:59:59.000Z

    A hydrothermal method of synthesis of a family of rare-earth Group 5 oxides, where the Group 5 oxide is a niobate or tantalate. The rare-earth Group 5 oxides can be doped with suitable emitter ions to form nanophosphors.

  8. Hydrothermal Phase Relations Among Uranyl Minerals at the Nopal I Analog Site

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murphy, William M. [Geological and Environmental Sciences, California State University, Chico, CA, 95929 (United States)

    2007-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Uranyl mineral paragenesis at Nopal I is an analog of spent fuel alteration at Yucca Mountain. Petrographic studies suggest a variety of possible hydrothermal conditions for uranium mineralization at Nopal I. Calculated equilibrium phase relations among uranyl minerals show uranophane stability over a broad range of realistic conditions and indicate that uranyl mineral variety reflects persistent chemical potential heterogeneity. (author)

  9. ILLITE-SMECTITE MIXED-LAYER MINERALS IN HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF VOLCANIC ROCKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    1 ILLITE-SMECTITE MIXED-LAYER MINERALS IN HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF VOLCANIC ROCKS: I. ONE-layer minerals The person to whom correspondence and page proofs should be sent: Atsuyuki Inoue Department-00107011,version1-5Dec2007 Author manuscript, published in "Clays and Clay Minerals 53 (2005) 423-439" DOI

  10. Carbon geochemistry of serpentinites in the Lost City Hydrothermal System (30N, MAR)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Massif (Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 30°N) was exam- ined to characterize carbon sources and speciation in oceanic. The speciation of carbon de- pends on the chemical and physical conditions prevailing in the reservoir, and itsCarbon geochemistry of serpentinites in the Lost City Hydrothermal System (30°N, MAR) Ade

  11. Mantle helium reveals Southern Ocean hydrothermal venting Gisela Winckler,1,2

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Winckler, Gisela

    Click Here for Full Article Mantle helium reveals Southern Ocean hydrothermal venting Gisela the distribution of helium isotopes along an oceanic transect at 67°S to identify previously unobserved provided by the helium isotope anomaly with independent hydrographic information from the Southern Ocean

  12. The stability of aqueous nickel(II) chloride complexes in hydrothermal solutions: Results of UVVisible

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    The stability of aqueous nickel(II) chloride complexes in hydrothermal solutions: Results of UV of aqueous nickel chloride complexes is important for understanding and quantitatively evaluating nickel for dissolved nickel in perchlorate, triflic acid and sodium chloride solutions at temperatures up to 250 °C

  13. Synthesis of ZrO{sub 2} nanoparticles by hydrothermal treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Machmudah, Siti, E-mail: machmudah@chem-eng.its.ac.id; Widiyastuti, W., E-mail: machmudah@chem-eng.its.ac.id; Prastuti, Okky Putri, E-mail: machmudah@chem-eng.its.ac.id; Nurtono, Tantular, E-mail: machmudah@chem-eng.its.ac.id; Winardi, Sugeng, E-mail: machmudah@chem-eng.its.ac.id [Chemical Engineering Department, Sepuluh Nopember Institute of Technology, Surabaya 60111 (Indonesia); Wahyudiono,; Kanda, Hideki; Goto, Motonobu [Department of Chemical Engineering, Nagoya University, Nagoya 464-8603 (Japan)

    2014-02-24T23:59:59.000Z

    Zirconium oxide (zirconia, ZrO{sub 2}) is the most common material used for electrolyte of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Zirconia has attracted attention for applications in optical coatings, buffer layers for growing superconductors, thermal-shield, corrosion resistant coatings, ionic conductors, and oxygen sensors, and for potential applications including transparent optical devices and electrochemical capacitor electrodes, fuel cells, catalysts, and advanced ceramics. In this work, zirconia particles were synthesized from ZrCl{sub 4} precursor with hydrothermal treatment in a batch reactor. Hydrothermal treatment may allow obtaining nanoparticles and sintered materials with controlled chemical and structural characteristics. Hydrothermal treatment was carried out at temperatures of 150 – 200°C with precursor concentration of 0.1 – 0.5 M. Zirconia particles obtained from this treatment were analyzed by using SEM, PSD and XRD to characterize the morphology, particle size distribution, and crystallinity, respectively. Based on the analysis, the size of zirconia particles were around 200 nm and it became smaller with decreasing precursor concentration. The increasing temperature caused the particles formed having uniform size. Zirconia particles formed by hydrothermal treatment were monoclinic, tetragonal and cubic crystal.

  14. An Interior-Point Method for Long Term Scheduling of Large Scale Hydrothermal System

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oliveira, Aurélio R. L.

    The operational planning of hydrothermal power systems aims to provide an economic and reliable operational policy hydro plants in the same cascade and the nonlinear nature of thermal costs and hydro generation of the hydroelectric plants, using deterministic optimization tools to compute the optimal operation decision

  15. PRIMAL AND DUAL METHODS FOR UNIT COMMITMENT IN A HYDRO-THERMAL POWER SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Römisch, Werner

    PRIMAL AND DUAL METHODS FOR UNIT COMMITMENT IN A HYDRO-THERMAL POWER SYSTEM R. Gollmer1 , A. Moller comprising thermal and pumped-storage hydro units a large-scale mixed-integer optimization model is developed aims at the cost optimal scheduling of on/o decisions and output levels for generating units. The power

  16. Hydrothermal synthesis, off-axis electron holography and magnetic properties of Fe3O4 nanoparticles

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E.

    properties investigated using off-axis electron holography and more conventional rock magnetism techniqueHydrothermal synthesis, off-axis electron holography and magnetic properties of Fe3O4 nanoparticles measurements. 1. Introduction The ability of a rock to reliably record the geomagnetic field depends

  17. Surfactant-Assisted Hydrothermal Synthesis of Single Phase Pyrite FeS2 Nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wadia, Cyrus; Wu, Yue; Gul, Sheraz; Volkman, Steven; Guo, Jinghua; Alivisatos, Paul

    2009-03-27T23:59:59.000Z

    Iron pyrite nanocrystals with high purity have been synthesized through a surfactant-assisted hydrothermal reaction under optimum pH value. These pyrite nanocrystals represent a new group of well-defined nanoscale structures for high-performance photovoltaic solar cells based on non-toxic and earth abundant materials.

  18. Hydrothermal venting in magma deserts: The ultraslow-spreading Gakkel and Southwest Indian Ridges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Langmuir, Charles H.

    and direct cooling of the upper mantle, and nonmagmatic heat supplied by exothermic serpentinization of spreading rate, establish a robust linear trend (Fs = 0.98 + 0.015us), implying that the long-term heat supply is the first-order control on the global distribution of hydrothermal activity. Normalizing Fs

  19. Energy for biologic sulfate reduction in a hydrothermally formed ocean on Europa

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rhoads, James

    Energy for biologic sulfate reduction in a hydrothermally formed ocean on Europa Mikhail Y. Zolotov, chemical energy is suggested as a more likely source for oceanic life [Jakosky and Shock, 1998; Mc of chemical energy in the ocean [e.g., McCollom, 1999; Kargel et al., 2000; Chyba and Phillips, 2001; Schulze

  20. OVI Asymmetry and an Accelerated Outflow in an Obscured Seyfert: FUSE and HST STIS Spectroscopy of Markarian533

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Prajval Shastri; John Hutchings; Jayant Murthy; Mark Whittle; Beverley J. Wills

    2006-03-31T23:59:59.000Z

    We present far-ultraviolet spectra of the Seyfert2 galaxy Mrk533 obtained with FUSE. These spectra show narrow asymmetrical OVI 1032,1038 emission lines with stronger wings shortward of the peak wavelength, but the degree of asymmetry of these wings in velocity is much lower than that of the wings of the lines of lower ionization. In the combined OVI profile there are marginal indications of local absorptions in the outflow. The CIII 977 line is seen weakly with a similar profile, but with very low signal to noise. These FUV spectra are among the first for a Seyfert of type2, i.e., a purportedly obscured Seyfert. The HST STIS spectral image of Mrk533 allows delineation of the various components of the outflow, and we infer that the outflow is accelerated. We discuss the results in terms of nuclear geometry and kinematics.

  1. Interference Fracturing: Non-Uniform Distributions of Perforation Clusters that Promote Simultaneous Growth of Multiple Hydraulic Fractures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peirce, Anthony

    Simultaneous Growth of Multiple Hydraulic Fractures A.P. Peirce, University of British Columbia and A.P. Bunger in horizontal well stimulation is the generation of hydraulic fractures (HFs) from all perforation clusters shadowing" that refers to suppression of some hydraulic fractures by the compressive stresses exerted

  2. Identifying Best Practices in Hydraulic Fracturing Using

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    . Treating Rate Medina Treating Pressure Medina Production Remaining Gas Ultimate Gas Gas Months Prod Gas Medina and Whirlpool sands of southwest New York State are considered to be tight gas sands. Most wells, are fractured upon completion to provide economic amounts of gas. #12;SPE 72385 BACKGROUND A dataset

  3. Investigation of the effect of gel residue on hydraulic fracture conductivity using dynamic fracture conductivity test

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Marpaung, Fivman

    2009-05-15T23:59:59.000Z

    ) ............................................................................ 51 Figure B.9: Fracture Conductivity Behavior (Polymer Concentration = 50 lb/Mgal and Gas Rate = 0.5 slm) ............................................................................ 52 Figure B.10: Fracture Conductivity Behavior (Polymer... documented in API RP-61 (1989). The recommended conditions and procedure for the test includes loading a known proppant concentration (generally 2 lb/ft2) uniformly between two steel pistons at ambient temperature, maintaining closure stress for 15 minutes...

  4. Collapse of magnetized hypermassive neutron stars in general relativity: Disk evolution and outflows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Branson C. Stephens; Yuk Tung Liu; Stuart L. Shapiro

    2008-02-01T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the evolution in axisymmetry of accretion disks formed self-consistently through collapse of magnetized hypermassive neutron stars to black holes. Such stars can arise following the merger of binary neutron stars. They are differentially rotating, dynamically stable, and have rest masses exceeding the mass limit for uniform rotation. However, hypermassive neutron stars are secularly unstable to collapse due to MHD-driven angular momentum transport. The rotating black hole which forms in this process is surrounded by a hot, massive, magnetized torus and a magnetic field collimated along the spin axis. This system is a candidate for the central engine of a short-hard gamma-ray burst (GRB). Our code integrates the coupled Einstein-Maxwell-MHD equations and is used to follow the collapse of magnetized hypermassive neutron star models in full general relativity until the spacetime settles down to a quasi-stationary state. We then employ the Cowling approximation, in which the spacetime is frozen, to track the subsequent evolution of the disk. This approximation allows us to greatly extend the disk evolutions and study the resulting outflows, which may be relevant to the generation of a GRB. We find that outflows are suppressed when a stiff equation of state is assumed for low density disk material and are sensitive to the initial magnetic field configuration.

  5. Massive star formation via high accretion rates and early disk-driven outflows

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Robi Banerjee; Ralph E. Pudritz

    2006-12-22T23:59:59.000Z

    We present an investigation of massive star formation that results from the gravitational collapse of massive, magnetized molecular cloud cores. We investigate this by means of highly resolved, numerical simulations of initial magnetized Bonnor-Ebert-Spheres that undergo collapse and cooling. By comparing three different cases - an isothermal collapse, a collapse with radiative cooling, and a magnetized collapse - we show that massive stars assemble quickly with mass accretion rates exceeding 10^-3 Msol/yr. We confirm that the mass accretion during the collapsing phase is much more efficient than predicted by selfsimilar collapse solutions, i.e. dM/dt ~ c^3/G. We find that during protostellar assembly the mass accretion reaches 20 - 100 c^3/G. Furthermore, we determined the self-consistent structure of bipolar outflows that are produced in our three dimensional magnetized collapse simulations. These outflows produce cavities out of which radiation pressure can be released, thereby reducing the limitations on the final mass of massive stars formed by gravitational collapse. Moreover, we argue that the extraction of angular momentum by disk-threaded magnetic fields and/or by the appearance of bars with spiral arms significantly enhance the mass accretion rate, thereby helping the massive protostar to assemble more quickly.

  6. The Influence of Galactic Outflows on the Formation of Nearby Dwarf Galaxies

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Evan Scannapieco; Andrea Ferrara; Tom Broadhurst

    2000-04-20T23:59:59.000Z

    We show that the gas in growing density perturbations is vulnerable to the influence of winds outflowing from nearby collapsed galaxies that have already formed stars. This suggests that the formation of nearby galaxies with masses less than 10^9 solar masses is likely to be suppressed, irrespective of the details of galaxy formation. An impinging wind may shock heat the gas of a nearby perturbation to above the virial temperature, thereby mechanically evaporating the gas, or the baryons may be stripped from the perturbation entirely if they are accelerated to above the escape velocity. We show that baryonic stripping is the most effective of these two processes, because shock-heated clouds that are too large to be stripped are able to radiatively cool within a sound-crossing time, limiting evaporation. The intergalactic medium temperatures and star-formation rates required for outflows to have a significant influence on the formation of low-mass galaxies are consistent with current observations, but may soon be examined directly via associated distortions in the cosmic microwave background, and with near-infrared observations from the Next Generation Space Telescope, which may detect the supernovae from early-forming stars.

  7. The Launching of Cold Clouds by Galaxy Outflows I: Hydrodynamic Interactions with Radiative Cooling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Scannapieco, Evan

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    To better understand the nature of the multiphase material found in outflowing galaxies, we study the evolution of cold clouds embedded in flows of hot and fast material. Using a suite of adaptive-mesh refinement simulations that include radiative cooling, we investigate both cloud mass loss and cloud acceleration under the full range of conditions observed in galaxy outflows. The simulations are designed to track the cloud center of mass, enabling us to study the cloud evolution at long disruption times. For supersonic flows, a Mach cone forms around the cloud, which damps the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability but also establishes a streamwise pressure gradient that stretches the cloud apart. If time is expressed in units of the cloud crushing time, both the cloud lifetime and the cloud acceleration rate are independent of cloud radius, and we find simple scalings for these quantities as a function of the Mach number of the external medium. A resolution study suggests that our simulations have sufficient resoluti...

  8. OUTFLOWS AND DARK BANDS AT ARCADE-LIKE ACTIVE REGION CORE BOUNDARIES

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Scott, J. T.; Martens, P. C. H.; Tarr, L. [Department of Physics, Montana State University, Bozeman, MT 59717 (United States)

    2013-03-10T23:59:59.000Z

    Observations from the EUV Imaging Spectrometer (EIS) on board Hinode have revealed outflows and non-thermal line broadening in low intensity regions at the edges of active regions (ARs). We use data from Hinode's EIS, Solar Dynamic Observatory's Atmospheric Imaging Assembly and Helioseismic and Magnetic Imager, and the Transition Region and Coronal Explorer instrument to investigate the boundaries of arcade-like AR cores for NOAA ARs 11112, 10978, and 9077. A narrow, low intensity region that is observed at the core's periphery as a dark band shows outflows and increased spectral line broadening. This dark band is found to exist for days and appears between the bright coronal loop structures of different coronal topologies. We find a case where the dark band region is formed between the magnetic field from emerging flux and the field of the pre-existing flux. A magnetic field extrapolation indicates that this dark band is coincident with the spine lines or magnetic separatrices in the extrapolated field. This occurs over unipolar regions where the brightened coronal field is separated in connectivity and topology. This separation does not appear to be infinitesimal and an initial estimate of the minimum distance of separation is found to be Almost-Equal-To 1.5-3.5 Mm.

  9. Outflows from accretion disks formed in neutron star mergers: effect of black hole spin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rodrigo Fernández; Daniel Kasen; Brian D. Metzger; Eliot Quataert

    2014-10-09T23:59:59.000Z

    The accretion disk that forms after a neutron star merger is a source of neutron-rich ejecta. The ejected material contributes to a radioactively-powered electromagnetic transient, with properties that depend sensitively on the composition of the outflow. Here we investigate how the spin of the black hole remnant influences mass ejection on the thermal and viscous timescales. We carry out two-dimensional, time-dependent hydrodynamic simulations of merger remnant accretion disks including viscous angular momentum transport and approximate neutrino self-irradiation. The gravity of the spinning black hole is included via a pseudo-Newtonian potential. We find that a disk around a spinning black hole ejects more mass, up to a factor of several, relative to the non-spinning case. The enhanced mass loss is due to energy release by accretion occurring deeper in the gravitational potential, raising the disk temperature and hence the rate of viscous heating in regions where neutrino cooling is ineffective. The mean electron fraction of the outflow increases moderately with BH spin due to a highly-irradiated (though not neutrino-driven) wind component. While the bulk of the ejecta is still very neutron-rich, thus generating heavy r-process elements, the leading edge of the wind contains a small amount of Lanthanide-free material. This component can give rise to a ~1 day blue optical `bump' in a kilonova light curve, even in the case of prompt BH formation, which may facilitate its detection.

  10. ESTABLISHING A CONNECTION BETWEEN ACTIVE REGION OUTFLOWS AND THE SOLAR WIND: ABUNDANCE MEASUREMENTS WITH EIS/HINODE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brooks, David H. [College of Science, George Mason University, 4400 University Drive, Fairfax, VA 22030 (United States); Warren, Harry P., E-mail: dhbrooks@ssd5.nrl.navy.mil [Space Science Division, Naval Research Laboratory, Washington, DC 20375 (United States)

    2011-01-20T23:59:59.000Z

    One of the most interesting discoveries from Hinode is the presence of persistent high-temperature high-speed outflows from the edges of active regions (ARs). EUV imaging spectrometer (EIS) measurements indicate that the outflows reach velocities of 50 km s{sup -1} with spectral line asymmetries approaching 200 km s{sup -1}. It has been suggested that these outflows may lie on open field lines that connect to the heliosphere, and that they could potentially be a significant source of the slow speed solar wind. A direct link has been difficult to establish, however. We use EIS measurements of spectral line intensities that are sensitive to changes in the relative abundance of Si and S as a result of the first ionization potential (FIP) effect, to measure the chemical composition in the outflow regions of AR 10978 over a 5 day period in 2007 December. We find that Si is always enhanced over S by a factor of 3-4. This is generally consistent with the enhancement factor of low FIP elements measured in situ in the slow solar wind by non-spectroscopic methods. Plasma with a slow wind-like composition was therefore flowing from the edge of the AR for at least 5 days. Furthermore, on December 10 and 11, when the outflow from the western side was favorably oriented in the Earth direction, the Si/S ratio was found to match the value measured a few days later by the Advanced Composition Explorer/Solar Wind Ion Composition Spectrometer. These results provide strong observational evidence for a direct connection between the solar wind, and the coronal plasma in the outflow regions.

  11. A Triple-Porosity Model for Fractured Horizontal Wells

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Alahmadi, Hasan Ali H.

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    . The model consists of three contiguous porous media: the matrix, less permeable micro-fractures and more permeable macro-fractures. Only the macro-fractures produce to the well while they are fed by the micro-fractures only. Consequently, the matrix feeds... the micro-fractures only. Therefore, the flow is sequential from one medium to the other. Four sub-models are derived based on the interporosity flow assumption between adjacent media, i.e., pseudosteady state or transient flow assumption. These are fully...

  12. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1996-09-30T23:59:59.000Z

    The focus of this report was on preparing data and modules for Piceance Basin-wide fracture prediction. A review of the geological data input and automated history reconstruction approach was made. Fluid pressure data analysis and preliminary basin simulations were carried out. These activities are summarized briefly below and reviewed in more detail in Appendices A-E. Appendix D is a review of the fluid pressure data and its implications for compartmentation. Preliminary fracture prediction computations on generic basins are presented in Appendix E; these were carried out as part of our code testing activities. The results of these two Appendices are the beginning of what will be the basis of the model testing; fluid pressures are directly comparable with the model predictions and are a key element of fracture nucleation and presentation. We summarize the tectonic and sedimentary history of the Piceance Basin based on our automated history reconstruction and published interpretations. The narrative and figures provide the basic material we have quantified for our CIRF.B basin simulator input. This data supplements our existing well data interpretation approach. It provides an independent check of the automated sedimentary/subsidence history reconstruction module. Fluid pressure data was gathered and analyzed. This data serves two functions. Fluid pressure distribution across the basin provides a quantitative test as it is a direct prediction of CIRF.B. Furthermore, fluid pressure modifies effective stress. It thereby enters fracture nucleation criteria and fracture extension rate and aperture laws. The pressure data is presented in Appendix Din terms of overpressure maps and isosurfaces.

  13. Advanced hydraulic fracturing methods to create in situ reactive barriers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Murdoch, L. [FRX Inc., Cincinnati, OH (United States)]|[Clemson Univ., SC (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences; Siegrist, B.; Meiggs, T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)] [and others

    1997-12-31T23:59:59.000Z

    This article describes the use of hydraulic fracturing to increase permeability in geologic formations where in-situ remedial action of contaminant plumes will be performed. Several in-situ treatment strategies are discussed including the use of hydraulic fracturing to create in situ redox zones for treatment of organics and inorganics. Hydraulic fracturing methods offer a mechanism for the in-situ treatment of gently dipping layers of reactive compounds. Specialized methods using real-time monitoring and a high-energy jet during fracturing allow the form of the fracture to be influenced, such as creation of assymmetric fractures beneath potential sources (i.e. tanks, pits, buildings) that should not be penetrated by boring. Some examples of field applications of this technique such as creating fractures filled with zero-valent iron to reductively dechlorinate halogenated hydrocarbons, and the use of granular activated carbon to adsorb compounds are discussed.

  14. Feasibility of a borehole VHF radar technique for fracture mapping

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chang, H.T.

    1984-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Experiments were conducted to establish the feasibility of a downhole high-frequency electromagnetic technique for location of fractures in the vicinity of boreholes. An existing flame-cut slot in granite was filled with salt water to simulate a brine-filled fracture. A transmitter consisting of a phased dual-dipole array arranged to provide a directional signal toward the fracture was installed in a borehole opposite the fracture. A receiver operated at 30 to 300 MHz was also located in the same borehole. The radar returns from the simulated fracture were detectable in boreholes located at distances of up to 12 meters from the fracture. These results indicate for the first time the feasibility of a downhole VHF radar for use in a single borehole for detection of fractures located away from the borehole.

  15. Mechanical Behavior of Small-Scale Channels in Acid-etched Fractures

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Deng, Jiayao

    2011-02-22T23:59:59.000Z

    .) ............................................................................................................. 30 Fig. 2.4 Width profile of a fracture?s cross-section. ..................................................... 34 Fig. 2.5 Fracture?s cross-section approximated by an ellipse. ..................................... 35 Fig. 2.6 Fracture... profile scanned in the lab. .................................................................... 57 Fig. 3.5 Width profiles of fracture surfaces under closure stress 1,000 psi. ................ 58 Fig. 3.6 Width profiles of fracture surfaces...

  16. Geochemical tracers of processes affecting the formation of seafloor hydrothermal fluids and deposits in the Manus back-arc basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craddock, Paul R

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Systematic differences in trace element compositions (rare earth element (REE), heavy metal, metalloid concentrations) of seafloor vent fluids and related deposits from hydrothermal systems in the Manus back-arc basin ...

  17. Biotic and abiotic interactions of deep-sea hydrothermal vent-endemic fish on the East Pacific Rise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buckman, Kate Lynn

    2009-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A study of the ecology of fish endemic to hydrothermal vents on the East Pacific Rise was undertaken utilizing a variety of techniques, focusing on the bythitid Thermichthys hollisi. Stable isotope and gut content analyses ...

  18. Microbial Manganese(II) oxidation : biogeochemistry of a deep-sea hydrothermal plume, enzymatic mechanism, and genomic perspectives

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dick, Gregory J.

    2006-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    2738. Cowen J. P. and Bruland K. W. (1985) Metal depositsLanding W. M. and Bruland K. W. (1987) The contrastingopen ocean (Landing and Bruland, 1987) or some hydrothermal

  19. Spatial and temporal population genetics at deep-sea hydrothermal vents along the East Pacific Rise and Galápagos Rift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fusaro, Abigail Jean

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ecological processes at deep-sea hydrothermal vents on fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges are punctuated by frequent physical disturbance. Larval dispersal among disjunct vent sites facilitates the persistence of sessile ...

  20. The Coupling of the Numerical Heat Transfer Model of the Pauzhetka Hydrothermal System (Kamchatka, USSR) with Hydroisotopic Data

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kiryukhin, A.V.; Sugrobov, V.M.

    1986-01-21T23:59:59.000Z

    The application of the two-dimensional numerical heat-transfer model to the Pauzhetka hydrothermal system allowed us to establish that: (1) a shallow magma body with the anomalous temperature of 700-1000 C and with a volume of 20-30 km{sup 3} may be a heat source for the formation of the Pauzhetka hydrothermal system. (2) The water feeding source of the Pauzhetka hydrothermal system may be meteoric waters which are infiltrated at an average rate of 5-10 kg/s {center_dot} km{sup 2}. The coupling of the numerical heat-transfer model with hydroisotopic data (D,T,{sup 18}O) obtained from the results of testing of exploitation wells, rivers and springs is the basis to understand more clearly the position of recharge areas and the structure of water flows in the hydrothermal system.

  1. Characterization of fracture networks for fluid flow analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Long, J.C.S.; Billaux, D.; Hestir, K.; Majer, E.L.; Peterson, J.; Karasaki, K.; Nihei, K.; Gentier, S.; Cox, L.

    1989-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The analysis of fluid flow through fractured rocks is difficult because the only way to assign hydraulic parameters to fractures is to perform hydraulic tests. However, the interpretation of such tests, or ''inversion'' of the data, requires at least that we know the geometric pattern formed by the fractures. Combining a statistical approach with geophysical data may be extremely helpful in defining the fracture geometry. Cross-hole geophysics, either seismic or radar, can provide tomograms which are pixel maps of the velocity or attenuation anomalies in the rock. These anomalies are often due to fracture zones. Therefore, tomograms can be used to identify fracture zones and provide information about the structure within the fracture zones. This structural information can be used as the basis for simulating the degree of fracturing within the zones. Well tests can then be used to further refine the model. Because the fracture network is only partially connected, the resulting geometry of the flow paths may have fractal properties. We are studying the behavior of well tests under such geometry. Through understanding of this behavior, it may be possible to use inverse techniques to refine the a priori assignment of fractures and their conductances such that we obtain the best fit to a series of well test results simultaneously. The methodology described here is under development and currently being applied to several field sites. 4 refs., 14 figs.

  2. Evidence for feedback in action from the molecular gas content in the z~1.6 outflowing QSO XID2028

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brusa, M; Cresci, G; Mainieri, V; Sargent, M T; Perna, M; Santini, P; Vito, F; Marconi, A; Merloni, A; Lutz, D; Piconcelli, E; Lanzuisi, G; Maiolino, R; Rosario, D; Daddi, E; Bongiorno, A; Fiore, F; Lusso, E

    2015-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Gas outflows are believed to play a pivotal role in shaping galaxies, as they regulate both star formation and black hole growth. Despite their ubiquitous presence, the origin and the acceleration mechanism of such powerful and extended winds is not yet understood. Direct observations of the cold gas component in objects with detected outflows at other wavelengths are needed to assess the impact of the outflow on the host galaxy interstellar medium (ISM). We observed with the Plateau de Bure Interferometer an obscured quasar at z~1.5, XID2028, for which the presence of an ionised outflow has been unambiguously signalled by NIR spectroscopy. The detection of CO(3-2) emission in this source allows us to infer the molecular gas content and compare it to the ISM mass derived from the dust emission. We then analyze the results in the context of recent insights on scaling relations, which describe the gas content of the overall population of star-forming galaxies at a similar redshifts. The Star formation efficienc...

  3. Test particle simulations of the effect of moving DLs on ion outflow in the auroral downward-current region

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Berkeley, University of

    and dynamic simulations. This configuration greatly changes the mechanism of the ion outflow in the downward ionosphere or from the ambipolar electric field formed by enhanced electron temperatures from. In auroral upward current regions, the ions can be accelerated by parallel electric fields (Ek). Other

  4. EVOLUTION OF TRACE GASES AND AEROSOLS IN THE MEXICO CITY POLLUTION OUTFLOW DURING A LONG RANGE TRANSPORT EVENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    EVOLUTION OF TRACE GASES AND AEROSOLS IN THE MEXICO CITY POLLUTION OUTFLOW DURING A LONG RANGE, NY www.bnl.gov ABSTRACT Significant chemical and physical processing of the Mexico City (MC) pollutants is expected to occur as they are advected downwind over a period of several hours to days

  5. Mars outflow channels: A reappraisal of the estimation of water flow velocities from water depths, regional slopes, and channel floor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Head III, James William

    of estimating water flow velocities in Martian outflow channels using equations based on the Darcy of the Manning equation should be replaced by the modern form or, preferably, by the Darcy-Weisbach equation channel systems on Mars have relied widely on various versions of the Manning equation. This has led

  6. Permeability and Dispersion Coefficients in Rocks with Fracture Network - 12140

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lee, C.K.; Htway, M.Z. [Handong Global University, 3 Namsong-ri, Heunghae-eub, Buk-gu, Pohang, Kyungbuk, 791-708 (Korea, Republic of); Yim, S.P. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, P.O.Box 150, Yusong, Daejon, 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Fluid flow and solute transport are considered for a rock medium with a fracture network with regard to the effective permeability and the dispersion coefficients. To investigate the effects of individual fractures a three-fracture system is chosen in which two are parallel and the third one connects the two at different angles. Specifically the micro-cell boundary-value problems(defined through multiple scale analysis) are solved numerically by using finite elements to calculate the permeability and dispersion coefficients. It is shown that the permeability depends significantly on the pattern of the fracture distribution and the dispersion coefficient is influenced by both the externally imposed pressure gradient (which also reflects the flow field) and the direction of the gradient of solute concentration on the macro-scale. From the calculations of the permeability and dispersion coefficients for solute in a rock medium with a fracture network the following conclusions are drawn. 1. The permeability of fractured medium depends on the primary orientation of the fracture network and is influenced by the connecting fractures in the medium. 2. The cross permeability, e.g., permeability in the direction normal to the direction of the external pressure gradient is rather insensitive to the orientation of the fracture network. 3. Calculation of permeability is most efficiently achieved with optimal discretization across individual fractures and is rather insensitive to the discretization along the fracture.. 4. The longitudinal dispersion coefficient Dxx of a fractured medium depends on both the macro-scale concentration gradient and the direction of the flow (pressure gradient). Hence both features must be considered when investigating solute transport in a fractured medium. (authors)

  7. Impact fracture behavior of HT9 duct

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, F.H. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Ferritic alloys are known to undergo a ductile-brittle transition as the test temperature is decreased. This inherent problem has limited their applications to reactor component materials subjected to low neutron exposures. However, the excellent resistance to void swelling exhibited by these alloys has led to choosing the materials as candidate materials for fast and fusion reactor applications. Despite the ductile-brittle transition problem, results show that the materials exhibit superior resistance to fracture under very high neutron fluences at irradiation temperatures above 380{degrees}C. Impact testing on FFTF duct sections of HT9 indicates that HT9 ducts have adequate fracture toughness at much higher temperatures for handling operations at room temperature and refueling operations.

  8. Naturally fractured tight gas reservoir detection optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1999-06-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Building upon the partitioning of the Greater Green River Basin (GGRB) that was conducted last quarter, the goal of the work this quarter has been to conclude evaluation of the Stratos well and the prototypical Green River Deep partition, and perform the fill resource evaluation of the Upper Cretaceous tight gas play, with the goal of defining target areas of enhanced natural fracturing. The work plan for the quarter of November 1-December 31, 1998 comprised four tasks: (1) Evaluation of the Green River Deep partition and the Stratos well and examination of potential opportunity for expanding the use of E and P technology to low permeability, naturally fractured gas reservoirs, (2) Gas field studies, and (3) Resource analysis of the balance of the partitions.

  9. SWIFT J164449.3+573451: A PLUNGING EVENT WITH A POYNTING-FLUX-DOMINATED OUTFLOW

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gao Weihong, E-mail: gaoweihong@njnu.edu.cn [Department of Physics and Institute of Theoretical Physics, Nanjing Normal University, Nanjing 210046 (China); Key Laboratory of Dark Matter and Space Astronomy, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Nanjing 210008 (China)

    2012-12-20T23:59:59.000Z

    Swift J164449+573451 is a peculiar outburst which is most likely powered by the tidal disruption of a star by a massive black hole. Within the tidal disruption scenario, we show that the periastron distance is considerably smaller than the disruption radius and the outflow should be launched mainly via magnetic activities (e.g., the Blandford-Znajek process), otherwise the observed long-lasting X-ray afterglow emission satisfying the relation L{sub X}{proportional_to} M-dot cannot be reproduced, where L{sub X} is the X-ray luminosity and M-dot is the accretion rate. We also suggest that L{sub X}{proportional_to} M-dot may hold in the quick decline phase of gamma-ray bursts.

  10. Accretion of Chaplygin gas upon black holes: Formation of faster outflowing winds

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ritabrata Biswas; Subenoy Chakraborty; Tarun Deep Saini; Banibrata Mukhopadhyay

    2011-01-24T23:59:59.000Z

    We study the accretion of modified Chaplygin gas upon different types of black hole. Modified Chaplygin gas is one of the best candidates for a combined model of dark matter and dark energy. In addition, from a field theoretical point of view the modified Chaplygin gas model is equivalent to that of a scalar field having a self-interacting potential. We formulate the equations related to both spherical accretion and disc accretion, and respective winds. The corresponding numerical solutions of the flow, particularly of velocity, are presented and are analyzed. We show that the accretion-wind system of modified Chaplygin gas dramatically alters the wind solutions, producing faster winds, upon changes in physical parameters, while accretion solutions qualitatively remain unaffected. This implies that modified Chaplygin gas is more prone to produce outflow which is the natural consequence of the dark energy into the system.

  11. Lisburne Formation fracture characterization and flow modeling

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Karpov, Alexandre Valerievich

    2001-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    lead to exponential distrtbutions; multiplicatory processes as they occur in breakage lead 10 to lognormal distributions; and continuity of the process from smallest to largest sizes produces hyperbolic (fractal) distributions. However, a rigorous... of fractures on related outcrops was in the range of 1, 6-1. 8. Brock (1971) stated an important rule of thumb of fractal studies: the linearity on the double logarithmic plot should extend over at least two or three orders of naagnitude ol particle size...

  12. Bipolar outflows as a repulsive gravitational phenomenon -- Azimuthally Symmetric Theory of Gravitation (II)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    G. G. Nyambuya

    2010-10-18T23:59:59.000Z

    This paper is part of a series on the Azimuthally Symmetric Theory of Gravitation (ASTG) which is built on Laplace-Poisson's well known equation. We show herein that the emergent equations from the ASTG, under some critical conditions determined by the spin, do possess repulsive gravitational fields in the polar regions of the gravitating body in question. This places the ASTG on an interesting pedestal to infer the origins of outflows as a repulsive gravitational phenomenon. Outflows are a ubiquitous phenomenon found in star forming systems and their true origin is a question yet to be settled. Given the current thinking on their origin, the direction that the present paper takes is nothing short of an asymptotic break from conventional wisdom; at the very least, it is a complete paradigm shift because gravitation is not at all associated with this process, but rather it is thought to be an all-attractive force that only tries to squash matter together onto a single point. Additionally, we show that the emergent Azimuthally Symmetric Gravitational Field from the ASTG strongly suggests a solution to the supposed Radiation Problem that is thought to be faced by massive stars in their process of formation. That is, at about 8-10Msun radiation from the nascent star is expected to halt the accretion of matter. We show that in-falling material will fall onto the equatorial disk and from there, this material will be channeled onto the forming star via the equatorial plane, thus accretion of mass continues well past the value of about 8-10Msun, albeit via the disk. Along the equatorial plane, the net force (with the radiation force included) on any material there-on right up to the surface of the star is directed toward the forming star, hence accretion of mass by the nascent star is un-hampered.

  13. FRACTURE FAILURE CRITERIA OF SOFC PEN STRUCTURE

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Qu, Jianmin

    2007-04-30T23:59:59.000Z

    Thermal stresses and warpage of the PEN are unavoidable due to the temperature changes from the stress-free sintering temperature to room temperature and mismatch of the coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) of various layers in the PEN structures of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) during the PEN manufacturing process. In the meantime, additional mechanical stresses will also be created by mechanical flattening during the stack assembly process. The porous nature of anode and cathode in the PEN structures determines presence of the initial flaws and crack on the interfaces of anode/electrolyte/cathode and in the interior of the materials. The sintering/assembling induced stresses may cause the fracture failure of PEN structure. Therefore, fracture failure criteria for SOFC PEN structures is developed in order to ensure the structural integrity of the cell and stack of SOFC. In this paper, the fracture criteria based on the relationship between the critical energy release rate and critical curvature and maximum displacement of the warped cells caused by the temperature changes as well as mechanical flattening process is established so that possible failure of SOFC PEN structures may be predicted deterministically by the measurement of the curvature and displacement of the warped cells.

  14. Effects of oxygen on fracturing fluids

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walker, M.L.; Shuchart, C.E.; Yaritz, J.G.; Norman, L.R.

    1995-11-01T23:59:59.000Z

    The stability of polysaccharide gels at high temperature is limited by such factors as pH, mechanical degradation, and oxidants. Oxygen is unavoidably placed in fracturing fluids through dissolution of air. To prevent premature degradation of the fracturing fluid by this oxidant, oxygen scavengers are commonly used. In this paper, the effects of oxygen and various oxygen scavengers on gel stability will be presented. Mechanical removal of oxygen resulted in surprisingly stable fracturing gels at 275 F. However, chemical removal of oxygen gave mixed results. Test data from sodium thiosulfate, sodium sulfite, and sodium erythorbate used as oxygen scavengers/gel stabilizers showed that the efficiency of oxygen removal from gels did not directly coincide with the viscosity retention of the gel, and large excesses of additives were necessary to provide optimum gel stabilization. The inability of some oxygen scavengers to stabilize the gel was the result of products created from the interaction of oxygen with the oxygen scavenger, which in turn, produced species that degraded the gel. The ideal oxygen scavenger should provide superior gel stabilization without creating detrimental side reaction products. Of the materials tested, sodium thiosulfate appeared to be the most beneficial.

  15. Development of an analytical solution for thermal single-well injection-withdrawal tests in horizontally fractured reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Jung, Y.

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Transfer Area in Fractured Reservoirs, paper presented attests in horizontally fractured reservoirs Yoojin Jung Earthtests in horizontally fractured reservoirs where fluid flow

  16. Use of TOUGHREACT to Simulate Effects of Fluid Chemistry on Injectivity in Fractured Geothermal Reservoirs with High Ionic Strength Fluids

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Xu, Tianfu; Zhang, Guoxiang; Pruess, Karsten

    2005-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    swelling in a fractured geothermal reservoir, Proceedings ofon Injectivity in Fractured Geothermal Reservoirs with Highdry rock and hot fractured rock reservoirs in a sustainable

  17. Mesoscale Characterization of Coupled Hydromechanical Behavior of a Fractured Porous Slope in Response to Free Water-Surface Movement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guglielmi, Y.

    2008-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    of these effects in fractured reservoirs, at an intermediateinteractions in a fractured carbonate reservoir inferredis a mesoscale fractured carbonate reservoir (30 m × 30 m ×

  18. Numerical simulation of single-phase and multiphase non-Darcy flow in porous and fractured reservoirs

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Yu-Shu

    2000-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    flow simulations in fractured reservoirs, Report LBL-15227,behavior of naturally fractured reservoirs, Soc. Pet. Eng.Flow in Porous and Fractured Reservoirs Yu-Shu Wu Earth

  19. Hydrothermal synthesis and electrochemical performance of NiO microspheres with different nanoscale building blocks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang Ling; Hao Yanjing; Zhao Yan [College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Lai Qiongyu, E-mail: laiqy5@hotmail.co [College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China); Xu Xiaoyun [College of Chemistry, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064 (China)

    2010-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    NiO microspheres were successfully obtained by calcining the Ni(OH){sub 2} precursor, which were synthesized via the hydrothermal reaction of nickel chloride, glucose and ammonia. The products were characterized by TGA, XRD and SEM. The influences of glucose and reaction temperature on the morphologies of NiO samples were investigated. Moreover, the possible growth mechanism for the spherical morphology was proposed. The charge/discharge test showed that the as-prepared NiO microspheres composed of nanoparticles can serve as an ideal electrode material for supercapacitor due to the spherical hollow structure. -- Graphical Abstract: Fig. 5 is the SEM image of NiO that was prepared in the different hydrothermal reaction temperatures. It showed that reaction temperature played a crucial role for the morphology of products.

  20. The long lives of giant clumps and the birth of outflows in gas-rich galaxies at high redshift

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bournaud, Frédéric; Renaud, Florent; Daddi, Emanuele; Duc, Pierre-Alain; Elbaz, David; Gabor, Jared M.; Juneau, Stéphanie; Kraljic, Katarina; Le Floch', Emeric [CEA, IRFU/SAp, F-91191 Gif-Sur-Yvette (France); Perret, Valentin; Amram, Philippe; Epinat, Benoit [Aix Marseille Université, CNRS, LAM (Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Marseille), F-13388 Marseille (France); Dekel, Avishai [Center for Astrophysics and Planetary Science, Racah Institute of Physics, The Hebrew University, Jerusalem 91904 (Israel); Elmegreen, Bruce G. [IBM Research Division, T.J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Elmegreen, Debra M. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Vassar College, Poughkeepsie, NY 12604 (United States); Teyssier, Romain [Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Zurich, CH-8057 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2014-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Star-forming disk galaxies at high redshift are often subject to violent disk instability, characterized by giant clumps whose fate is yet to be understood. The main question is whether the clumps disrupt within their dynamical timescale (?50 Myr), like the molecular clouds in today's galaxies, or whether they survive stellar feedback for more than a disk orbital time (?300 Myr) in which case they can migrate inward and help building the central bulge. We present 3.5-7 pc resolution adaptive mesh refinement simulations of high-redshift disks including photoionization, radiation pressure, and supernovae feedback. Our modeling of radiation pressure determines the mass loading and initial velocity of winds from basic physical principles. We find that the giant clumps produce steady outflow rates comparable to and sometimes somewhat larger than their star formation rate, with velocities largely sufficient to escape the galaxy. The clumps also lose mass, especially old stars, by tidal stripping, and the stellar populations contained in the clumps hence remain relatively young (?200 Myr), as observed. The clumps survive gaseous outflows and stellar loss, because they are wandering in gas-rich turbulent disks from which they can reaccrete gas at high rates compensating for outflows and tidal stripping, overall keeping realistic and self-regulated gaseous and stellar masses. The outflow and accretion rates have specific timescales of a few 10{sup 8} yr, as opposed to rapid and repeated dispersion and reformation of clumps. Our simulations produce gaseous outflows with velocities, densities, and mass loading consistent with observations, and at the same time suggest that the giant clumps survive for hundreds of Myr and complete their migration to the center of high-redshift galaxies. These long-lived clumps are gas-dominated and contain a moderate mass fraction of stars; they drive inside-out disk evolution, thickening, spheroid growth, and fueling of the central black hole.

  1. Numerical-Model Investigation of the Hydrothermal Regime of a Straight-Through Shallow Cooling Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sokolov, A. S. [JSC 'VNIIG im. B. E. Vedeneeva' (Russian Federation)] [JSC 'VNIIG im. B. E. Vedeneeva' (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-15T23:59:59.000Z

    A mathematic model based on solution of hydrodynamics and heat-transfer equations by the finite-element method is constructed to predict the hydrothermal regime of a straight-through shallow cooling pond, which provides cooling circulating water to a repository of spent nuclear fuel. Numerical experiments made it possible to evaluate the influence exerted by wind conditions and flow rate of water in the river on the temperature of the circulating water.

  2. Hydrothermal synthesis, characterization and up/down-conversion luminescence of barium rare earth fluoride nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jia, Li-Ping; Zhang, Qiang [Department of Chemistry, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse (Tongji University) (China); Yan, Bing, E-mail: byan@tongji.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse (Tongji University) (China)

    2014-07-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Graphical abstract: Lanthanide ions doped bare earth rare earth fluoride nanocrystals are synthesized by hydrothermal technology and characterized. The down/up-conversion luminescence of them are discussed. - Highlights: • Mixed hydrothermal system H{sub 2}O–OA (EDA)–O-A(LO-A) is used for synthesis. • Barium rare earth fluoride nanocrystals are synthesized comprehensively. • Luminescence for down-conversion and up-conversion are obtained for these systems. - Abstract: Mixed hydrothermal system H{sub 2}O–OA (EDA)–O-A(LO-A) is developed to synthesize barium rare earth fluorides nanocrystals (OA = oleylamine, EDA = ethylenediamine, O-A = oleic acid and LO-A = linoleic acid). They are presented as BaREF{sub 5} (RE = Ce, Pr, Nd, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Y, Tm, Lu) and Ba{sub 2}REF{sub 7} (RE = La, Sm, Ho, Er, Yb). The influence of reaction parameters (rare earth species, hydrothermal system and temperature) is checked on the phase and shape evolution of the fluoride nanocrystals. It is found that reaction time and temperature of these nanocrystals using EDA (180 °C, 6 h) is lower than those of them using OA (220 °C, 10 h). The photoluminescence properties of these fluorides activated by some rare earth ions (Nd{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}) are studied, and especially up-conversion luminescence of the four fluoride nanocrystal systems (Ba{sub 2}LaF{sub 7}:Yb, Tm(Er), Ba{sub 2}REF{sub 7}:Yb, Tm(Er) (RE = Gd, Y, Lu)) is observed.

  3. Comparative assessment of five potential sites for hydrothermal-magma systems: energy transport

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hardee, H.C.

    1980-09-01T23:59:59.000Z

    A comparative assessment of five sites is being prepared as part of a Continental Scientific Drilling Program (CSDP) review of thermal regimes for the purpose of scoping areas for future research and drilling activities. This background report: discusses the various energy transport processes likely to be encountered in a hydrothermal-magma system, reviews related literature, discusses research and field data needs, and reviews the sites from an energy transport viewpoint. At least three major zones exist in the magma-hydrothermal transport system: the magma zone, the hydrothermal zone, and the transition zone between the two. Major energy transport questions relate to the nature and existence of these zones and their evolution with time. Additional energy transport questions are concerned with the possible existence of critical state and super-critical state permeable convection in deep geothermal systems. A review of thermal transport models emphasizes the fact that present transport models and computational techniques far outweigh the scarcity and quality of deep field data.

  4. Fracture testing of Edwards limestone: a statistical treatment 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Redding, David Earl

    1993-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Parameters. . 21 8. Goodness-of-Fit Statistic (Alpha) for Rubber Fracture Testing of Edwards Limestone. . 9. Sum of Square Residuals for Predicted Geometry vs. Base Geometry. . 38 10. Residuals in Sigma Theta Maximum at the Median Probability Value... for Predicted Geometry vs. Base Geometry. . 38 LIST OF FIGURES Figure 1. Rubber Fracture Test Geometry. Page 2. Hollow Brass Cylinder Calibration. 13 3. Sigma Theta Max vs. Volume. . 18 4A. Cumulative Probability vs. Sigma Theta Max. Rubber Fracture...

  5. apophyseal ring fractures: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    system 4 2 Ring solutions Kolokolnikov, Theodore 90 Self-potential observations during hydraulic fracturing University of California eScholarship Repository Summary: hydraulic...

  6. ankle joint fractures: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    for hydrocarbon production, control and manipulation of water supplies events induced by hydraulic fracturing. The effect of a thin weak elastic layer was investigated by Jones...

  7. adjacent compression fractures: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    12;MRCM New Approach Multiple Stankewitz, Rich 140 Self-potential observations during hydraulic fracturing University of California eScholarship Repository Summary: hydraulic...

  8. arch fracture intraoperatively: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    formation determined. Szymczak, P 2009-01-01 149 Self-potential observations during hydraulic fracturing University of California eScholarship Repository Summary: hydraulic...

  9. acute compression fracture: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    12;MRCM New Approach Multiple Stankewitz, Rich 112 Self-potential observations during hydraulic fracturing University of California eScholarship Repository Summary: hydraulic...

  10. acetabular fracture fixation: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    knowledge about the po... Wilke, C O 2002-01-01 104 Self-potential observations during hydraulic fracturing University of California eScholarship Repository Summary: hydraulic...

  11. apophyseal ring fracture: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    system 4 2 Ring solutions Kolokolnikov, Theodore 90 Self-potential observations during hydraulic fracturing University of California eScholarship Repository Summary: hydraulic...

  12. Imaging, Characterizing, and Modeling of Fracture Networks and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    code (modeling at the reservoir scale) - CFD: NETL's computational fluid dynamics code (modeling at the fracture scale) * Develop fat-ray double-difference tomography...

  13. Evaluation of subsurface fracture geometry using fluid pressure...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    subsurface fracture geometry using fluid pressure response to solid earth tidal strain Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Evaluation of...

  14. SciTech Connect: CRACK TIP PLASTICITY AND FRACTURE INITIATION...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    N50000* --Metals, Ceramics, & Other Materials; CRACKS; FRACTURE PROPERTIES; METALS BUILDING MATERIALSfracture of metal, crack tip plasticity and initiation criteria for;...

  15. Aligned fractures modeled as boundary conditions within saturated ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2015-03-30T23:59:59.000Z

    e di Geofisica Sperimentale, OGS. SUMMARY. Fractures in a fluid-saturated poroelastic -Biot- medium are very thin, compliant and highly permeable layers.

  16. Fractured reservoirs: An analysis of coupled elastodynamic and ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Daley, T., Schoenberg, M., Rutqvist, J., and Nihei, K.

    2006-08-28T23:59:59.000Z

    Aug 28, 2006 ... pliance and fluid-permeability tensors of a layer containing closely spaced ...... Coupled thermo-hydromechanical processes of fractured media.

  17. Finding Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Seismic Survey DOE Geothermal Peer Review 2010 - Presentation. Project summary: Drilling into large aperture open fractures (LAFs) typically yield production wells with...

  18. Finding Large Aperture Fractures in Geothermal Resource Areas...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    3-D mapping of Large Aperture Fractures (LAF's) * Budget: 679,000 - Phase 2: Drilling - January-December, 2011. * Task 4: Stepout drilling from existing production wells....

  19. AN APPROACH TO THE FRACTURE HYDROLOGY AT STRIPA: PRELIMINARY RESULTS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gale, J.E.

    2010-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Geochemistry and Isotope Hydrology of Groundwaters in theAN APPROACH TO THE FRACTURE HYDROLOGY AT STRIPA: PRELIMINARYGeochemistry and Isotope Hydrology of Groundwaters in the

  20. Detection and Characterization of Natural and Induced Fractures...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    of Enhanced Geothermal Systems Project objectives: Combine geophysical methods for reservoir and fracture characterization with rock physics measurements made under in-situ...

  1. Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Creation in Enhanced...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Geothermal Systems (EGS); 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Fracture Characterization in Enhanced Geothermal Systems by Wellbore and Reservoir Analysis; 2010...

  2. Tracer Methods for Characterizing Fracture Stimulation in Enhanced...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Geothermal Systems; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Fracture Characterization in Enhanced Geothermal Systems by Wellbore and Reservoir Analysis; 2010...

  3. Fracture Characterization in Enhanced Geothermal Systems by Wellbore...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Characterization in Enhanced Geothermal Systems by Wellbore and Reservoir Analysis; 2010 Geothermal Technology Program Peer Review Report Fracture Characterization in Enhanced...

  4. Reservoir-Scale Fracture Permeability in the Dixie Valley, Nevada...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Nevada, Geothermal Field Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Paper: Reservoir-Scale Fracture Permeability in the Dixie Valley,...

  5. Characterization of subsurface fracture patterns in the Coso...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    microearthquake seismorgrams Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: Characterization of subsurface fracture patterns in the...

  6. Characterization Of Fracture Patterns In The Geysers Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Patterns In The Geysers Geothermal Reservoir By Shear-Wave Splitting Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Report: Characterization Of Fracture...

  7. Characterizing Fractures in the Geysers Geothermal Field by Micro...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Geothermal Field by Micro-seismic Data, Using Soft Computing, Fractals, and Shear Wave Anisotropy Characterizing Fractures in the Geysers Geothermal Field by Micro-seismic...

  8. Integrated 3D Acid Fracturing Model for Carbonate Reservoir Stimulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Xi

    2014-06-23T23:59:59.000Z

    workflow is illustrated in Figure 3.3. The approach starts with a fracture simulator, which uses a geomechanical model, to calculate fracture width during the pad injection. A hydraulic fracture is created at the defined injection condition. Next, we... be directly found from the output of Fracpro. Table 3.1 shows an output file example from Fracpro for a fracture geometry at the end of a pad injection. The geometry data is restored in an “.fpx” file, named “PROJECT_NAME.fpx” and can be read using any text...

  9. alternate fracture toughness: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    specic stiness and uid ow L Lafayette, IN 47907-1397, USA Accepted 7 October 1999 Abstract Fracture specic stiness and uid ow through a single...

  10. arrest fracture toughness: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    specic stiness and uid ow L Lafayette, IN 47907-1397, USA Accepted 7 October 1999 Abstract Fracture specic stiness and uid ow through a single...

  11. advanced fracturing technology: Topics by E-print Network

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    specic stiness and uid ow L Lafayette, IN 47907-1397, USA Accepted 7 October 1999 Abstract Fracture specic stiness and uid ow through a single...

  12. Advanced Hydraulic Fracturing Technology for Unconventional Tight Gas Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Stephen Holditch; A. Daniel Hill; D. Zhu

    2007-06-19T23:59:59.000Z

    The objectives of this project are to develop and test new techniques for creating extensive, conductive hydraulic fractures in unconventional tight gas reservoirs by statistically assessing the productivity achieved in hundreds of field treatments with a variety of current fracturing practices ranging from 'water fracs' to conventional gel fracture treatments; by laboratory measurements of the conductivity created with high rate proppant fracturing using an entirely new conductivity test - the 'dynamic fracture conductivity test'; and by developing design models to implement the optimal fracture treatments determined from the field assessment and the laboratory measurements. One of the tasks of this project is to create an 'advisor' or expert system for completion, production and stimulation of tight gas reservoirs. A central part of this study is an extensive survey of the productivity of hundreds of tight gas wells that have been hydraulically fractured. We have been doing an extensive literature search of the SPE eLibrary, DOE, Gas Technology Institute (GTI), Bureau of Economic Geology and IHS Energy, for publicly available technical reports about procedures of drilling, completion and production of the tight gas wells. We have downloaded numerous papers and read and summarized the information to build a database that will contain field treatment data, organized by geographic location, and hydraulic fracture treatment design data, organized by the treatment type. We have conducted experimental study on 'dynamic fracture conductivity' created when proppant slurries are pumped into hydraulic fractures in tight gas sands. Unlike conventional fracture conductivity tests in which proppant is loaded into the fracture artificially; we pump proppant/frac fluid slurries into a fracture cell, dynamically placing the proppant just as it occurs in the field. From such tests, we expect to gain new insights into some of the critical issues in tight gas fracturing, in particular the roles of gel damage, polymer loading (water-frac versus gel frac), and proppant concentration on the created fracture conductivity. To achieve this objective, we have designed the experimental apparatus to conduct the dynamic fracture conductivity tests. The experimental apparatus has been built and some preliminary tests have been conducted to test the apparatus.

  13. Dispersed Fluid Flow in Fractured Reservoirs- an Analysis of...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Distributions Abstract A methodology for analyzing the internal flow characteristics of a fractured geothermal reservoir using tracer-determined residence time distribution curves...

  14. Analysis Of Macroscopic Fractures In Granite In The Hdr Geothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    nearly parallel to the maximum horizontal stress. In this favorable situation, hydraulic injections will tend both to reactivate natural fractures at low pressures, and to...

  15. 1112323-danimer-abstract-hydraulic-fractures | netl.doe.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Oil Recovery Deepwater Tech Methane Hydrate Field Demo of Eco-Friendly Propped Hydraulic Fractures 11123-23 Primary Performer DaniMer Scientific, LLC (Bainbridge, GA)...

  16. Finite element modeling of hydraulic fracturing in 3D

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-03-22T23:59:59.000Z

    Mar 22, 2013 ... Gautier. A.. Touzelet. S.: Tracer testing of the geothermal heat ex- ... R.: A field demonstra- tion of hydraulic fracturing for solid waste diposal—.

  17. Joint inversion of electrical and seismic data for Fracture char...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    Joint inversion of electrical and seismic data for Fracture char. and Imaging of Fluid Flow in Geothermal Systems Michael Batzle, PI Colorado School of Mines Track Name: Fluid...

  18. Imaging, Characterizing, and Modeling of Fracture Networks and...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project title: Stimulation at Desert Peak and Bradys reservoirs: modeling with the coupled THM code FEHM Seismic Fracture Characterization Methods for Enhanced Geothermal Systems...

  19. Modeling Acid Transport and Non-Uniform Etching in a Stochastic Domain in Acid Fracturing

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mou, Jianye

    2010-10-12T23:59:59.000Z

    distributions and do not consider the contribution of channels to the conductivity. An acid fracture conductivity correlation needs the average fracture width at zero closure stress. Existing correlations calculate average fracture width using dissolved rock...

  20. Imaging Hydraulic Fractures: Source Location Uncertainty Analysis At The UPRC Carthage Test Site

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Yingping

    1996-01-01T23:59:59.000Z

    Hydraulic fracturing is a useful tool for enhancing gas and oil production. High-resolution seismic imaging of the fracture geometry and fracture growth process is the key in determining optimal spacing and location of ...