National Library of Energy BETA

Sample records for hydrothermal gea development

  1. Category:GEA Development Phases | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX ECoopButte County,Camilla, Georgia: Energy014771°,NorthCLEANElkins, WVFOAFFlowGEA

  2. GEA Heat Exchangers GEA Searle Cooler and Condensing Unit Ranges

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Frandsen, Søren

    process cooling, combined heat and power installations and air-conditioning equip- ment for hospitalsGEA Heat Exchangers GEA Searle Cooler and Condensing Unit Ranges Top-level engineering solutions,Eurovent verification and many more. GEA is one of the longest established and principal manufacturers of heat exchange

  3. Hydrothermal industrialization: direct heat development. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-05-01

    A description of hydrothermal resources suitable for direct applications, their associated temperatures, geographic distribution and developable capacity are given. An overview of the hydrothermal direct-heat development infrastructure is presented. Development activity is highlighted by examining known and planned geothermal direct-use applications. Underlying assumptions and results for three studies conducted to determine direct-use market penetration of geothermal energy are discussed.

  4. CanGEA Fifth Annual Geothermal Conference Presentation - Mapping...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    CanGEA Fifth Annual Geothermal Conference Presentation - Mapping & Database Workshop CanGEA Fifth Annual Geothermal Conference Presentation - Mapping & Database Workshop Mapping...

  5. GEA Refrigeration Technologies / GEA Refrigeration Germany GmbH Wolfgang Dietrich / Dr. Ole Fredrich

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Technologies3 Achema 2012 // heat pumps using ammonia Industrial demand on heat in Germany Heatdemandin Fredrich GEA Grasso heat pumps using ammonia ­ the megawatt range #12;GEA Refrigeration Technologies2 Achema 2012 // heat pumps using ammonia Heat pumps using ammonia ­ a sustainable choice How to improve

  6. GEA Honors Geothermal Leaders | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,Executive Compensation References: FARWashers | Department of Energy toGEA

  7. GEA Geothermal Summit Presentation Â… Lauren Boyd

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing ToolInternationalReport FY2014 -EnergyEnergy 1: systems analysis O F4May,!1 =GEA

  8. Development of a Hydrothermal Spallation Drilling System for EGS

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objective: Build and demonstrate a working prototype hydrothermal spallation drilling unit that will accelerate commercial deployment of EGS as a domestic energy resource.

  9. GEA Development Phases | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable Urban TransportFortistarFuelCellsEtcSilicon Co Ltd JumpCaldemon

  10. Development of a Hydrothermal Spallation Drilling System for...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Spallation Drilling System for EGS Project Type Topic 1 Recovery Act: Enhanced Geothermal Systems Component Research and DevelopmentAnalysis Project Type Topic 2 Drilling...

  11. An Online Tutor for Astronomy: The GEAS Self-Review Library

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Vogt, Nicole P

    2015-01-01

    We introduce an interactive online resource for use by students and college instructors in introductory astronomy courses. The General Education Astronomy Source (GEAS) online tutor guides students developing mastery of core astronomical concepts and mathematical applications of general astronomy material. It contains over 12,000 questions, with linked hints and solutions. Students who master the material quickly can advance through the topics, while under-prepared or hesitant students can focus on questions on a certain topic for as long as needed, with minimal repetition. Students receive individual accounts for study and course instructors are provided with overview tracking information, by time and by topic, for entire cohorts of students. Diagnostic tools support self-evaluation and close collaboration between instructor and student, even for distance learners. An initial usage study shows clear trends in performance which increase with study time, and indicates that distance learners using these materia...

  12. Hydrothermal Processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2011-03-11

    This chapter is a contribution to a book on Thermochemical Conversion of Biomass being edited by Prof. Robert Brown of Iowa State University. It describes both hydrothermal liquefaction and hydrothermal gasification of biomass to fuels.

  13. Hydrothermal Resources Fact Sheet

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy

    2012-08-31

    This two-page fact sheet provides an overview of hydrothermal resources and hydrothermal reservoir creation and operation.

  14. Process Development for Hydrothermal Liquefaction of Algae Feedstocks in a Continuous-Flow Reactor

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Hart, Todd R.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Rotness, Leslie J.; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Zacher, Alan H.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Hallen, Richard T.; Holladay, Johnathan E.

    2013-10-01

    Wet algae slurries can be converted into an upgradeable biocrude by hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL). High levels of carbon conversion to gravity-separable biocrude product were accomplished at relatively low temperature (350 ?C) in a continuous-flow, pressurized (sub-critical liquid water) environment (20 MPa). As opposed to earlier work in batch reactors reported by others, direct oil recovery was achieved without the use of a solvent and biomass trace components were removed by processing steps so that they did not cause process difficulties. High conversions were obtained even with high slurry concentrations of up to 35 wt% of dry solids. Catalytic hydrotreating was effectively applied for hydrodeoxygenation, hydrodenitrogenation, and hydrodesulfurization of the biocrude to form liquid hydrocarbon fuel. Catalytic hydrothermal gasification was effectively applied for HTL byproduct water cleanup and fuel gas production from water soluble organics, allowing the water to be considered for recycle of nutrients to the algae growth ponds. As a result, high conversion of algae to liquid hydrocarbon and gas products was found with low levels of organic contamination in the byproduct water. All three process steps were accomplished in bench-scale, continuous-flow reactor systems such that design data for process scale-up was generated.

  15. Development of Hydrothermal Liquefaction and Upgrading Technologies for Lipid-Extracted Algae Conversion to Liquid Fuels

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Yunhua; Albrecht, Karl O.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Hallen, Richard T.; Jones, Susanne B.

    2013-10-01

    Bench-scale tests were performed for lipid-extracted microalgae (LEA) conversion to liquid fuels via hydrotreating liquefaction (HTL) and upgrading processes. Process simulation and economic analysis for a large-scale LEA HTL and upgrading system were developed based on the best available test results. The system assumes an LEA feed rate of 608 dry metric ton/day and that the feedstock is converted to a crude HTL bio-oil and further upgraded via hydrotreating and hydrocracking to produce liquid hydrocarbon fuels, mainly alkanes. Performance and cost results demonstrate that HTL would be an effective option to convert LEA to liquid fuel. The liquid fuels annual yield was estimated to be 26.9 million gallon gasoline-equivalent and the overall energy efficiency at higher heating value basis was estimated to be 69.5%. The minimum fuel selling price (MFSP) was estimated to be $0.75/L with LEA feedstock price at $33.1 metric ton at dry basis and 10% internal rate of return. A sensitivity analysis indicated that the largest effects to production cost would come from the final products yields and the upgrading equipments cost. The impact of plant scale on MFSP was also investigated.

  16. Hydrothermal Liquefaction of Biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2010-12-10

    Hydrothermal liquefaction technology is describes in its relationship to fast pyrolysis of biomass. The scope of work at PNNL is discussed and some intial results are presented. HydroThermal Liquefaction (HTL), called high-pressure liquefaction in earlier years, is an alternative process for conversion of biomass into liquid products. Some experts consider it to be pyrolysis in solvent phase. It is typically performed at about 350 C and 200 atm pressure such that the water carrier for biomass slurry is maintained in a liquid phase, i.e. below super-critical conditions. In some applications catalysts and/or reducing gases have been added to the system with the expectation of producing higher yields of higher quality products. Slurry agents ('carriers') evaluated have included water, various hydrocarbon oils and recycled bio-oil. High-pressure pumping of biomass slurry has been a major limitation in the process development. Process research in this field faded away in the 1990s except for the HydroThermal Upgrading (HTU) effort in the Netherlands, but has new resurgence with other renewable fuels in light of the increased oil prices and climate change concerns. Research restarted at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in 2007 with a project, 'HydroThermal Liquefaction of Agricultural and Biorefinery Residues' with partners Archer-Daniels-Midland Company and ConocoPhillips. Through bench-scale experimentation in a continuous-flow system this project investigated the bio-oil yield and quality that could be achieved from a range of biomass feedstocks and derivatives. The project was completed earlier this year with the issuance of the final report. HydroThermal Liquefaction research continues within the National Advanced Biofuels Consortium with the effort focused at PNNL. The bench-scale reactor is being used for conversion of lignocellulosic biomass including pine forest residue and corn stover. A complementary project is an international collaboration with Canada to investigate kelp (seaweed) as a biomass feedstock. The collaborative project includes process testing of the kelp in HydroThermal Liquefaction in the bench-scale unit at PNNL. HydroThermal Liquefaction at PNNL is performed in the hydrothermal processing bench-scale reactor system. Slurries of biomass are prepared in the laboratory from whole ground biomass materials. Both wet processing and dry processing mills can be used, but the wet milling to final slurry is accomplished in a stirred ball mill filled with angle-cut stainless steel shot. The PNNL HTL system, as shown in the figure, is a continuous-flow system including a 1-litre stirred tank preheater/reactor, which can be connected to a 1-litre tubular reactor. The product is filtered at high-pressure to remove mineral precipitate before it is collected in the two high-pressure collectors, which allow the liquid products to be collected batchwise and recovered alternately from the process flow. The filter can be intermittently back-flushed as needed during the run to maintain operation. By-product gas is vented out the wet test meter for volume measurement and samples are collected for gas chromatography compositional analysis. The bio-oil product is analyzed for elemental content in order to calculate mass and elemental balances around the experiments. Detailed chemical analysis is performed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and 13-C nuclear magnetic resonance is used to evaluate functional group types in the bio-oil. Sufficient product is produced to allow subsequent catalytic hydroprocessing to produce liquid hydrocarbon fuels. The product bio-oil from hydrothermal liquefaction is typically a more viscous product compared to fast pyrolysis bio-oil. There are several reasons for this difference. The HTL bio-oil contains a lower level of oxygen because of more extensive secondary reaction of the pyrolysis products. There are less amounts of the many light oxygenates derived from the carbohydrate structures as they have been further reacted to phenolic Aldol condensation products. The bio-oil

  17. Geothermal reservoirs in hydrothermal convection systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sorey, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    Geothermal reservoirs commonly exist in hydrothermal convection systems involving fluid circulation downward in areas of recharge and upwards in areas of discharge. Because such reservoirs are not isolated from their surroundings, the nature of thermal and hydrologic connections with the rest of the system may have significant effects on the natural state of the reservoir and on its response to development. Conditions observed at numerous developed and undeveloped geothermal fields are discussed with respect to a basic model of the discharge portion of an active hydrothermal convection system. Effects of reservoir development on surficial discharge of thermal fluid are also delineated.

  18. Direct use of hydrothermal energy: a review of environmental aspects

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    O'Banion, K.; Layton, D.

    1981-08-28

    The potential environmental impacts of the exploration, development, and production of hydrothermal geothermal energy for direct use applications are reviewed and evaluated. Mitigation strategies and research and development needs are included. (MHR)

  19. The BGU/CERN solar hydrothermal reactor

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bertolucci, Sergio; Caspers, Fritz; Garb, Yaakov; Gross, Amit; Pauletta, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    We describe a novel solar hydrothermal reactor (SHR) under development by Ben Gurion University (BGU) and the European Organization for Nuclear Research CERN. We describe in broad terms the several novel aspects of the device and, by extension, of the niche it occupies: in particular, enabling direct off-grid conversion of a range of organic feedstocks to sterile useable (solid, liquid) fuels, nutrients, products using only solar energy and water. We then provide a brief description of the high temperature high efficiency panels that provide process heat to the hydrothermal reactor, and review the basics of hydrothermal processes and conversion taking place in this. We conclude with a description of a simulation of the pilot system that will begin operation later this year.

  20. Catalytic Hydrothermal Gasification of Biomass

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.

    2008-05-06

    A recent development in biomass gasification is the use of a pressurized water processing environment in order that drying of the biomass can be avoided. This paper reviews the research undertaken developing this new option for biomass gasification. This review does not cover wet oxidation or near-atmospheric-pressure steam-gasification of biomass. Laboratory research on hydrothermal gasification of biomass focusing on the use of catalysts is reviewed here, and a companion review focuses on non-catalytic processing. Research includes liquid-phase, sub-critical processing as well as super-critical water processing. The use of heterogeneous catalysts in such a system allows effective operation at lower temperatures, and the issues around the use of catalysts are presented. This review attempts to show the potential of this new processing concept by comparing the various options under development and the results of the research.

  1. Rational control of hydrothermal nanowire synthesis and its applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joo, Jaebum

    2010-01-01

    Hydrothermal nanowire synthesis is a rapidly emerging nanowire discipline that enables low temperature growth and batch process. It has a major impact on the development of novel energy conversion devices, high density ...

  2. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    order for the hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel-, and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks. Whole Algae Hydrothermal...

  3. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Biddy, Mary J.; Davis, Ryan; Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua

    2013-03-31

    In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates the feasibility of using whole wet microalgae as a feedstock for conversion via hydrothermal liquefaction. Technical barriers and key research needs have been assessed in order for the hydrothermal liquefaction of microalgae to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range blendstocks.

  4. Hydrothermal Processing of Wet Wastes

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 3A—Conversion Technologies III: Energy from Our Waste—Will we Be Rich in Fuel or Knee Deep in Trash by 2025? Hydrothermal Processing of Wet Wastes James R. Oyler, President, Genifuel Corporation

  5. POWER SCHEDULING IN A HYDRO-THERMAL SYSTEM UNDER UNCERTAINTY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Römisch, Werner

    POWER SCHEDULING IN A HYDRO-THERMAL SYSTEM UNDER UNCERTAINTY C.C. Car e1, M.P. Nowak2, W. Romisch2 and pumped-storage hydro units is developed. For its compu- tational solution two di erent decompo- sition-burning) thermal units, pumped-storage hydro plants and delivery con- tracts and describe an optimization model

  6. Hydrothermal Exploration Best Practices and Geothermal Knowledge...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Knowledge Exchange on Openei Abstract Though exploring for hydrothermal resources is not new, advances in exploration technologies and the pursuit of less visible resources have...

  7. Stratigraphy, Structure, Hydrothermal Alteration and Ore Mineralizatio...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Stratigraphy, Structure, Hydrothermal Alteration and Ore Mineralization Encountered in CSDP (Continental Scientific Drilling Program) Corehole VC-2A, Sulphur Springs Area, Valles...

  8. Structural Settings Of Hydrothermal Outflow- Fracture Permeability...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    long-lived hydrothermal flow despite potential clogging of fractures due to mineral precipitation. As fault systems evolve, propagation, interaction, and linkage of fault segments...

  9. Hydrothermal System | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View NewGuam:on Openei | Open Energy InformationHydrothermal System

  10. Instabilities during liquid migration into superheated hydrothermal systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fitzgerald, Shaun D.; Woods, Andrew W.

    1995-01-26

    Hydrothermal systems typically consist of hot permeable rock which contains either liquid or liquid and saturated steam within the voids. These systems vent fluids at the surface through hot springs, fumaroles, mud pools, steaming ground and geysers. They are simultaneously recharged as meteoric water percolates through the surrounding rock or through the active injection of water at various geothermal reservoirs. In a number of geothermal reservoirs from which significant amounts of hot fluid have been extracted and passed through turbines, superheated regions of vapor have developed. As liquid migrates through a superheated region of a hydrothermal system, some of the liquid vaporizes at a migrating liquid-vapor interface. Using simple physical arguments, and analogue laboratory experiments we show that, under the influence of gravity, the liquid-vapor interface may become unstable and break up into fingers.

  11. Supply of geothermal power from hydrothermal sources: A study of the cost of power in 20 and 40 years

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Petty, S. (Petty (Susan) Consulting, Solano Beach, CA (United States)); Livesay, B.J. (Livesay Consultants, Inc., Encinitas, CA (United States)); Long, W.P. (Carlin Gold Co., Inc., Grass Valley, CA (United States)); Geyer, J. (Geyer (John) and Associates, Vancouver, WA (United States))

    1992-11-01

    This study develops estimates for the amount of hydrothermal geothermal power that could be on line in 20 and 40 years. This study was intended to represent a snapshot'' in 20 and 40 years of the hydrothermal energy available for electric power production should a market exist for this power. This does not represent the total or maximum amount of hydrothermal power, but is instead an attempt to estimate the rate at which power could be on line constrained by the exploration, development and support infrastructure available to the geothermal industry, but not constrained by the potential market for power.

  12. Biomass reforming processes in hydrothermal media

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Peterson, Andrew A

    2009-01-01

    While hydrothermal technologies offer distinct advantages in being able to process a wide variety of biomass feedstocks, the composition of the feedstock will have a large effect on the processing employed. This thesis ...

  13. Correlation of hydrothermal sericite composition with permeability...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    of aqueous species in the geothermal fluids were combined with activity phase diagrams accounting for hydrothermal sericite compositions to determine a pH of 6.1 for the...

  14. GEA Group | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable Urban TransportFortistarFuelCellsEtcSilicon Co Ltd JumpCaldemonGroup Jump

  15. GEA | OpenEI Community

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:ofEnia SpAFlexStock Co LtdWiegand GmbH Jump to:

  16. OpenEI Community - GEA

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsourceII Jump to:InformationInformationOorjaen The EnergyInvitationFOA aimedTeam!

  17. Reconnaissance of the hydrothermal resources of Utah

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rush, F.E.

    1983-01-01

    Geologic factors in the Basin and Range province in Utah are more favorable for the occurrence of geothermal resources than in other areas on the Colorado Plateaus or in the Middle Rocky Mountains. These geologic factors are principally crustal extension and crustal thinning during the last 17 million years. Basalts as young as 10,000 years have been mapped in the area. High-silica volcanic and intrusive rocks of Quaternary age can be used to locate hydrothermal convection systems. Drilling for hot, high-silica, buried rock bodies is most promising in the areas of recent volcanic activity. Southwestern Utah has more geothermal potential than other parts of the Basin and Range province in Utah. The Roosevelt Hot Springs area, the Cove Fort-Sulphurdale area, and the area to the north as far as 60 kilometers from them probably have the best potential for geothermal development for generation of electricity. Other areas with estimated reservoir temperatures greater than 150/sup 0/C are Thermo, Monroe, Red Hill (in the Monroe-Joseph Known Geothermal Resource Area), Joseph Hot Springs, and the Newcastle area. The rates of heat and water discharge are high at Crater, Meadow, and Hatton Hot Springs, but estimated reservoir temperatures there are less than 150/sup 0/C. Additional exploration is needed to define the potential in three additional areas in the Escalante Desert. 28 figs., 18 tabs.

  18. Benefit-cost analysis of DOE's Current Federal Program to increase hydrothermal resource utilization. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1981-12-10

    The impact of DOE's Current Federal Program on the commercialization of hydrothermal resources between 1980 and 2000 is analyzed. The hydrothermal resources of the United States and the types of DOE activities used to stimulate the development of these resources for both electric power and direct heat use are described briefly. The No Federal Program and the Current Federal Program are then described in terms of funding levels and the resultant market penetration estimates through 2000. These market penetration estimates are also compared to other geothermal utilization forecasts. The direct benefits of the Current Federal Program are next presented for electric power and direct heat use applications. An analysis of the external impacts associated with the additional hydrothermal resource development resulting from the Current Federal Program is also provided. Included are environmental effects, national security/balance-of-payments improvements, socioeconomic impacts and materials requirements. A summary of the analysis integrating the direct benefits, external impacts and DOE program costs concludes the report.

  19. The Effects of Hydrothermal Agingon a Commercial Cu SCR Catalyst...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrothermal Agingon a Commercial Cu SCR Catalyst Examines the effect of hydrothermal aging on the Nox reduction over a commercial Cu-zeolite SCR catalyst. deer11lee.pdf More...

  20. Calibrated Hydrothermal Parameters, Barrow, Alaska, 2013

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Atchley, Adam; Painter, Scott; Harp, Dylan; Coon, Ethan; Wilson, Cathy; Liljedahl, Anna; Romanovsky, Vladimir

    A model-observation-experiment process (ModEx) is used to generate three 1D models of characteristic micro-topographical land-formations, which are capable of simulating present active thaw layer (ALT) from current climate conditions. Each column was used in a coupled calibration to identify moss, peat and mineral soil hydrothermal properties to be used in up-scaled simulations. Observational soil temperature data from a tundra site located near Barrow, AK (Area C) is used to calibrate thermal properties of moss, peat, and sandy loam soil to be used in the multiphysics Advanced Terrestrial Simulator (ATS) models. Simulation results are a list of calibrated hydrothermal parameters for moss, peat, and mineral soil hydrothermal parameters.

  1. Calibrated Hydrothermal Parameters, Barrow, Alaska, 2013

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Atchley, Adam; Painter, Scott; Harp, Dylan; Coon, Ethan; Wilson, Cathy; Liljedahl, Anna; Romanovsky, Vladimir

    2015-01-29

    A model-observation-experiment process (ModEx) is used to generate three 1D models of characteristic micro-topographical land-formations, which are capable of simulating present active thaw layer (ALT) from current climate conditions. Each column was used in a coupled calibration to identify moss, peat and mineral soil hydrothermal properties to be used in up-scaled simulations. Observational soil temperature data from a tundra site located near Barrow, AK (Area C) is used to calibrate thermal properties of moss, peat, and sandy loam soil to be used in the multiphysics Advanced Terrestrial Simulator (ATS) models. Simulation results are a list of calibrated hydrothermal parameters for moss, peat, and mineral soil hydrothermal parameters.

  2. Hydrothermal stability of high silica zeolites 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Young, David

    1988-01-01

    This thesis concerns the hydrothermal stability of two zeolite molecular sieves with the MFI structure, ZSM-5 and its 'aluminium free' form silicalite. Silicalite was synthesised from low pH alkali metal free aqueous gels at 95°C and characterised...

  3. Products of an Artificially Induced Hydrothermal System at Yucca Mountain

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    S. Levy

    2000-08-07

    Studies of mineral deposition in the recent geologic past at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, address competing hypotheses of hydrothermal alteration and deposition from percolating groundwater. The secondary minerals being studied are calcite-opal deposits in fractures and lithophysal cavities of ash-flow tuffs exposed in the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF), a 7.7-km tunnel excavated by the Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project within Yucca Mountain. An underground field test in the ESF provided information about the minerals deposited by a short-lived artificial hydrothermal system and an opportunity for comparison of test products with the natural secondary minerals. The heating phase lasted nine months, followed by a nine-month cooling period. Natural pore fluids were the only source of water during the thermal test. Condensation and reflux of water driven away from the heater produced fluid flow in certain fractures and intersecting boreholes. The mineralogic products of the thermal test are calcite-gypsum aggregates of less than 4-micrometer crystals and amorphous silica as glassy scale less than 0.2 mm thick and as mounds of tubules with diameters less than 0.7 micrometers. The minute crystal sizes of calcite and gypsum from the field test are very different from the predominantly coarser calcite crystals (up to cm scale) in natural secondary-mineral deposits at the site. The complex micrometer-scale textures of the amorphous silica differ from the simple forms of opal spherules and coatings in the natural deposits, even though some natural spherules are as small as 1 micrometer. These differences suggest that the natural minerals, especially if they were of hydrothermal origin, may have developed coarser or simpler forms during subsequent episodes of dissolution and redeposition. The presence of gypsum among the test products and its absence from the natural secondary-mineral assemblage may indicate a higher degree of evaporation during the test than during the deposition of natural calcite-opal deposits.

  4. PRIMAL AND DUAL METHODS FOR UNIT COMMITMENT IN A HYDRO-THERMAL POWER SYSTEM

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Römisch, Werner

    PRIMAL AND DUAL METHODS FOR UNIT COMMITMENT IN A HYDRO-THERMAL POWER SYSTEM R. Gollmer1 , A. Moller comprising thermal and pumped-storage hydro units a large-scale mixed-integer optimization model is developed hydro units. The variable ut i 2 f0;1g; i = 1;:::;I;t = 1;:::;T indicates whether the thermal unit i

  5. Hydro unit commitment in hydro-thermal optimization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Li, C.; Hsu, E.; Svoboda, A.J.; Tseng, C.; Johnson, R.B. [Pacific Gas and Electric Co., San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1997-05-01

    In this paper the authors develop a model and technique for solving the combined hydro and thermal unit commitment problem, taking into full account the hydro unit dynamic constraints in achieving overall economy of power system operation. The combined hydrothermal unit commitment problem is solved by a decomposition and coordination approach. Thermal unit commitment is solved using a conventional Lagrangian relaxation technique. The hydro system is divided into watersheds, which are further broken down into reservoirs. The watersheds are optimized by Network Flow Programming (NFP). Priority-list-based Dynamic Programming is used to solve the Hydro Unit Commitment (HUC) problem at the reservoir level. A successive approximation method is used for updating the marginal water values (Lagrange multipliers) to improve the hydro unit commitment convergence, due to the large size and multiple couplings of water conservation constraints. The integration of the hydro unit commitment into the existing Hydro-Thermal Optimization (HTO) package greatly improves the quality of its solution in the PG and E power system.

  6. Hydrothermally Deposited Rock | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNewTexas:Hydrothermally Deposited Rock Jump to: navigation,

  7. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing ToolInternationalReport FY2014 -Energy Costs by IncreasingWhole Algae Hydrothermal

  8. Hydrothermal Exploration Data Gap Analysis Update

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:FinancingPetroleum12,ExecutiveFinancingR Walls -Hydro-PacHydronic Systems:TechnologyHydrothermal

  9. Hydrothermal Resources Fact Sheet | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof Energy ServicesContractingManagement »Hydrogen and FuelHydrothermal

  10. Hydrothermal reaction of fly ash. Final report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, P.W.

    1994-12-31

    The reactions which occur when fly ash is treated under hydrothermal conditions were investigated. This was done for the following primary reasons. The first of these is to determine the nature of the phases that form to assess the stabilities of these phases in the ambient environment and, finally, to assess whether these phases are capable of sequestering hazardous species. The second reason for undertaking this study was whether, depending on the composition of the ash and the presence of selected additives, it would be possible under hydrothermal conditions to form compounds which have cementitious properties. Formation of four classes of compounds, which bracket likely fly ash compositional ranges, were selected for study. The classes are calcium silicate hydrates, calcium selenates, and calcium aluminosulfates, and silicate-based glasses. Specific compounds synthesized were determined and their stability regions assessed. As part of stability assessment, the extent to which selected hazardous species are sequestered was determined. Finally, the cementing properties of these compounds were established. The results obtained in this program have demonstrated that mild hydrothermal conditions can be employed to improve the reactivity of fly ash. Such improvements in reactivity can result in the formation of monolithic forms which may exhibit suitable mechanical properties for selected applications as building materials. If the ashes involved are considered hazardous, the mechanical properties exhibited indicated the forms could be handled in a manner which facilitates their disposal.

  11. Fluid Inclusion Gas Compositions From An Active Magmatic-Hydrothermal...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Fluid Inclusion Gas Compositions From An Active Magmatic-Hydrothermal System- A Case Study Of The Geysers Geothermal Field, Usa Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference...

  12. The Hydrothermal Outflow Plume of Valles Caldera, New Mexico...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    are parents to mixed fluids flowing in the hydrothermal plume. However, isotopic data, borehole data, basic geology, and inverse relations between temperature and chloride...

  13. Hydrothermal Heat Discharge In The Cascade Range, Northwestern...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    United States Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Hydrothermal Heat Discharge In The Cascade Range, Northwestern United States...

  14. GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    GEOLOGY AND HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF THE RAFT RIVER GEOTHERMAL SYSTEM, IDAHO Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Conference Proceedings: GEOLOGY...

  15. New Evidence On The Hydrothermal System In Long Valley Caldera...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Hydrothermal System In Long Valley Caldera, California, From Wells, Fluid Sampling, Electrical Geophysics, And Age Determinations Of Hot-Spring Deposits Jump to: navigation,...

  16. Altered Tectonic and Hydrothermal Breccias in Corehole VC-1,...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    origin. Hydrothermal breccias and associated crackle zones or stockworks created by hydraulic fracturing can provide significant secondary permeability, as demonstrated by...

  17. Temporal Relations of Volcanism and Hydrothermal Systems in Two...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Geology, 1989 DOI Not Provided Check for DOI availability: http:crossref.org Online Internet link for Temporal Relations of Volcanism and Hydrothermal Systems in Two Areas of...

  18. Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Volatiles in hydrothermal fluids- A mass spectrometric study of fluid inclusions from active geothermal systems Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  19. An Overview of Hydrothermal Alteration and Vein Mineralization...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Overview of Hydrothermal Alteration and Vein Mineralization in Continental Scientific Drilling Program Core Hole VC-2B, Valles Caldera, New Mexico Jump to: navigation, search...

  20. Robust optimization based self scheduling of hydro-thermal Genco ...

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dec 29, 2013 ... Abstract: This paper proposes a robust optimization model for optimal self scheduling of a hydro-thermal generating company. The proposed ...

  1. Chemical structure and properties of low-rank coals treated by hydrothermal process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ohki, A.; Xie, X.F.; Nakajima, Tsunenori; Maeda, Shigeru [Kagoshima Univ., Korimoto, Kagoshima (Japan). Dept. of Applied Chemistry and Chemical Engineering

    1998-12-31

    Several methods for upgrading low-rank coals, in which the hygroscopicity is irreversibly reduced into a level for high-rank coals, have been developed. A hydrothermal treatment of coal, such as hot water drying (HWD), is one of the most promising upgrading methods. The HWD method involves a treatment of low-rank coals under high temperature (300-350 C) and high pressure (80-180 kg/cm{sup 2}). Two low-rank coals, Loy Yang coal and Yallourn coal were hydrothermally treated at 150--350 C. The chemical structure and properties of these treated coals have been examined. The analysis of coal includes hygroscopicity, elemental analysis, the content of oxygenic functional groups measured by chemical analysis, FTIR analysis, CP/MAS {sup 13}C NMR analysis, specific surface area, maceral composition, and vitrinite reflectance. When the low-rank coals are hydrothermally treated, the hygroscopicity of coal remarkably decreases. The content of carboxyl group in coal greatly decreases as heat treatment temperature (HTT) is raised. The difference in carboxyl group content in the 350 C-treated coal between from the chemical analysis and from {sup 13}C NMR and FTIR analyses is explained. From these results, the change in chemical structure and properties of coal during the hydrothermal treatment is discussed.

  2. Hydrology of Hydrothermal Systems in the Long Valley Caldera Hydrothermal activity in the Long Valley Caldera has had many different periods in its history of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polly, David

    the temperatures of the hydrothermal fluid. The geothermal systems and hydrothermal systems have been documented that the temperatures would be extremely high, akin to Yellowstone. But what they found were temperatures much lower). Hydrothermal Systems Summary Geothermal systems and the hydrothermal systems are an occurrence that happens

  3. Hydrothermal synthesis of hexagonal magnesium hydroxide nanoflakes

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wang, Qiang, E-mail: qwchem@gmail.com [Laboratory for Micro-sized Functional Materials and College of Elementary Education, Capital Normal University, Beijing 100048 (China); Li, Chunhong [National Laboratory for Superconductivity, Institute of Physics and Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Guo, Ming [Laboratory for Micro-sized Functional Materials and College of Elementary Education, Capital Normal University, Beijing 100048 (China); Sun, Lingna [ShenZhen Key Laboratory of Functional Polymer, College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shenzhen University, Shenzhen 518060 (China); Hu, Changwen [Key Laboratory of Cluster Science of Ministry of Education of China, The Institute for Chemical Physics and Department of Chemistry, Beijing Institute of Technology, Beijing 100081 (China)

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: Hexagonal Mg(OH){sub 2} nanoflakes were synthesized via hydrothermal method in the presence of PEG-20,000. Results show that PEG-20,000 plays an important role in the formation of this kind of nanostructure. The SAED patterns taken from the different positions on a single hexagonal Mg(OH){sub 2} nanoflake yielded different crystalline structures. The structure of the nanoflakes are polycrystalline and the probable formation mechanism of Mg(OH){sub 2} nanoflakes is discussed. - Highlights: • Hexagonal Mg(OH){sub 2} nanoflakes were synthesized via hydrothermal method. • PEG-20,000 plays an important role in the formation of hexagonal nanostructure. • Mg(OH){sub 2} nanoflakes show different crystalline structures at different positions. • The probable formation mechanism of hexagonal Mg(OH){sub 2} nanoflakes was reported. - Abstract: Hexagonal magnesium hydroxide (Mg(OH){sub 2}) nanoflakes were successfully synthesized via hydrothermal method in the presence of the surfactant polyethylene glycol 20,000 (PEG-20,000). Results show that PEG-20,000 plays an important role in the formation of this kind of nanostructure. The composition, morphologies and structure of the Mg(OH){sub 2} nanoflakes were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), and selected area electron diffraction (SAED). The SAED patterns taken from the different positions on a single hexagonal Mg(OH){sub 2} nanoflake show different crystalline structures. The structure of the nanoflakes are polycrystalline and the probable formation mechanism of Mg(OH){sub 2} nanoflakes is discussed. Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) analysis were performed to investigate the porous structure and surface area of the as-obtained nanoflakes.

  4. Hydrothermal Liquefaction Treatment Preliminary Hazard Analysis Report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lowry, Peter P.; Wagner, Katie A.

    2015-08-31

    A preliminary hazard assessment was completed during February 2015 to evaluate the conceptual design of the modular hydrothermal liquefaction treatment system. The hazard assessment was performed in 2 stages. An initial assessment utilizing Hazard Identification and Preliminary Hazards Analysis (PHA) techniques identified areas with significant or unique hazards (process safety-related hazards) that fall outside of the normal operating envelope of PNNL and warranted additional analysis. The subsequent assessment was based on a qualitative What-If analysis. This analysis was augmented, as necessary, by additional quantitative analysis for scenarios involving a release of hazardous material or energy with the potential for affecting the public.

  5. ILLITE-SMECTITE MIXED-LAYER MINERALS IN HYDROTHERMAL ALTERATION OF VOLCANIC ROCKS

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Boyer, Edmond

    diagenesis, low-grade metamorphism, contact metamorphism and hydrothermal alteration. Despite extensive

  6. Self-excited hydrothermal waves in evaporating sessile drops 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sefiane K.; Moffat J.R.; Matar O.K.; Craster R.V.

    2008-08-01

    Pattern formation driven by the spontaneous evaporation of sessile drops of methanol, ethanol, and FC-72 using infrared thermography is observed and, in certain cases, interpreted in terms of hydrothermal waves. Both ...

  7. Hydrothermal Alteration and Past and Present Thermal Regimes...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Long Valley Caldera Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: Hydrothermal Alteration and Past and Present Thermal Regimes in the Western...

  8. Spatial And Temporal Geochemical Trends In The Hydrothermal System...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    analysis also suggests that it might be more feasible to detect large-scale heating or cooling of the hydrothermal system by tracking changes in gas and steam flux than by...

  9. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction: 2014 State of Technology

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Anderson, Daniel; Hallen, Richard T.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Elliott, Douglas C.

    2014-07-30

    This report describes the base case yields and operating conditions for converting whole microalgae via hydrothermal liquefaction and upgrading to liquid fuels. This serves as the basis against which future technical improvements will be measured.

  10. Seismic Evidence For A Hydrothermal Layer Above The Solid Roof...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Seismic Evidence For A Hydrothermal Layer Above The Solid Roof Of The Axial Magma Chamber At The Southern East Pacific Rise Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd...

  11. Hydrothermal vents of Yellowstone Lake, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaplinski, M.A.; Morgan, P. (Northern Arizona Univ., Flagstaff, AZ (United States). Geology Dept.)

    1993-04-01

    Hydrothermal vent systems within Yellowstone Lake are located within the Yellowstone caldera in the northeastern and West Thumb sections of the lake. The vent systems lie within areas of extremely high geothermal gradients (< 1,000 C/km) in the lake sediments and occur as clusters of individual vents that expel both hydrothermal fluids and gas. Regions surrounding the vents are colonized by unique, chemotropic biologic communities and suggest that hydrothermal input plays an important role in the nutrient dynamics of the lake's ecosystem. The main concentration of hydrothermal activity occurs in the northeast region of the main lake body in a number of locations including: (1) along the shoreline from the southern edge of Sedge Bay to the inlet of Pelican Creek; (2) the central portion of the partially submerged Mary Bay phreatic explosion crater, within deep (30--50 m) fissures; (3) along the top of a 3 km long, steep-sided ridge that extends from the southern border of Mary Bay, south-southeast into the main lake basin; and (4) east of Stevenson Island along the lower portion of the slope (50--107 m) into the lake basin, within an anastomosing series of north to northwest trending, narrow troughs or fissures. Hydrothermal vents were also located within, and surrounding the West Thumb of Yellowstone Lake, with the main concentration occurring the offshore of the West Thumb and Potts Geyser Basin. Hydrothermal vents in Yellowstone Lake occur along fractures that have penetrated the lake sediments or along the tops of ridges and near shore areas. Underneath the lake, rising hydrothermal fluids encounter a semi-permeable cap of lake sediments. Upwardly convecting hydrothermal fluid flow may be diverted by the impermeable lake sediments along the buried, pre-existing topography. These fluids may continue to rise along topography until fractures are encountered, or the lake sediment cover is thinned sufficiently to allow egress of the fluids.

  12. Methods to enhance the characteristics of hydrothermally prepared slurry fuels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Anderson, Chris M. (Shakopee, MN); Musich, Mark A. (Grand Forks, ND); Mann, Michael D. (Thompson, ND); DeWall, Raymond A. (Grand Forks, ND); Richter, John J. (Grand Forks, ND); Potas, Todd A. (Plymouth, MN); Willson, Warrack G. (Fairbanks, AK)

    2000-01-01

    Methods for enhancing the flow behavior and stability of hydrothermally treated slurry fuels. A mechanical high-shear dispersion and homogenization device is used to shear the slurry fuel. Other improvements include blending the carbonaceous material with a form of coal to reduce or eliminate the flocculation of the slurry, and maintaining the temperature of the hydrothermal treatment between approximately 300.degree. to 350.degree. C.

  13. Hydrothermally altered and fractured granite as an HDR reservoir in the EPS-1 borehole, Alsace,

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Genter, A.; Traineau, H.

    1992-01-01

    As part of the European Hot Dry Rocks Project, a second exploration borehole, EPS-1, has been cored to a depth of 2227 m at Soultz-sous-Forets (France). The target was a granite beginning at 1417 m depth, overlain by post-Paleozoic sedimentary cover. Structural analysis and petrographic examination of the 800-m porphyritic granite core, have shown that this rock has undergone several periods of hydrothermal alteration and fracturing. More than 3000 natural structures were recorded, whose distribution pattern shows clusters where low-density fracture zones (less than 1 per meter) alternate with zones of high fracture density (more than 20 per meter). Vein alteration, ascribed to paleohydrothermal systems, developed within the hydrothermally altered and highly fractured zones, transforming primary biotite and plagioclase into clay minerals. One of these zones at 2.2 km depth produced a hot-water outflow during coring, indicating the existence of a hydrothermal reservoir. Its permeability is provided by the fracture network and by secondary porosity of the granitic matrix resulting from vein alteration. This dual porosity in the HDR granite reservoir must be taken into account in the design of the heat exchanger, both for modeling the water-rock interactions and for hydraulic testing.

  14. Hydrothermal synthesis, characterization and up/down-conversion luminescence of barium rare earth fluoride nanocrystals

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jia, Li-Ping; Zhang, Qiang [Department of Chemistry, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse (Tongji University) (China); Yan, Bing, E-mail: byan@tongji.edu.cn [Department of Chemistry, Tongji University, Shanghai 200092 (China); State Key Laboratory of Pollution Control and Resource Reuse (Tongji University) (China)

    2014-07-01

    Graphical abstract: Lanthanide ions doped bare earth rare earth fluoride nanocrystals are synthesized by hydrothermal technology and characterized. The down/up-conversion luminescence of them are discussed. - Highlights: • Mixed hydrothermal system H{sub 2}O–OA (EDA)–O-A(LO-A) is used for synthesis. • Barium rare earth fluoride nanocrystals are synthesized comprehensively. • Luminescence for down-conversion and up-conversion are obtained for these systems. - Abstract: Mixed hydrothermal system H{sub 2}O–OA (EDA)–O-A(LO-A) is developed to synthesize barium rare earth fluorides nanocrystals (OA = oleylamine, EDA = ethylenediamine, O-A = oleic acid and LO-A = linoleic acid). They are presented as BaREF{sub 5} (RE = Ce, Pr, Nd, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Y, Tm, Lu) and Ba{sub 2}REF{sub 7} (RE = La, Sm, Ho, Er, Yb). The influence of reaction parameters (rare earth species, hydrothermal system and temperature) is checked on the phase and shape evolution of the fluoride nanocrystals. It is found that reaction time and temperature of these nanocrystals using EDA (180 °C, 6 h) is lower than those of them using OA (220 °C, 10 h). The photoluminescence properties of these fluorides activated by some rare earth ions (Nd{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+}, Tb{sup 3+}) are studied, and especially up-conversion luminescence of the four fluoride nanocrystal systems (Ba{sub 2}LaF{sub 7}:Yb, Tm(Er), Ba{sub 2}REF{sub 7}:Yb, Tm(Er) (RE = Gd, Y, Lu)) is observed.

  15. QER- Comment of Geotherman Energy Association (GEA)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hi the Geothermal Energy Association would like to submit the attached comments for the 2014 QER process. Thanks,

  16. SaGea | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page onRAPID/Geothermal/Exploration/ColoradoRemsenburg-Speonk, NewMichigan:Roxbury,RushS.KSPARQL QueryinformeFacility |

  17. GEA Industry Briefing | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nA Guide to Tapping intoandMinimal Cost2-95) DATE OFGEA geothermal

  18. Development of a Hydrothermal Spallation Drilling System for EGS Geothermal

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTIONRobertsdale, Alabama (UtilityInstrumentsArea (DOE GTP) Jump to: navigation,SystemMEQ in EGSProject |

  19. Hydrothermal corrosion of SiC in LWR coolant environments in...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    Article: Hydrothermal corrosion of SiC in LWR coolant environments in the absence of irradiation Citation Details In-Document Search Title: Hydrothermal corrosion of SiC in LWR...

  20. Distal transport of dissolved hydrothermal iron in the deep South Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fitzsimmons, Jessica N.

    Until recently, hydrothermal vents were not considered to be an important source to the marine dissolved Fe (dFe) inventory because hydrothermal Fe was believed to precipitate quantitatively near the vent site. Based on ...

  1. Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes Print Wednesday, 29 April 2009 00:00...

  2. Discernment of two opposing reports on the hydrological effects of a hydrothermal power plant

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, J.M.

    1986-06-01

    Two evaluations to determine the hydrological effects of a 50-megawatt hydrothermal power plant in the Jemez Mountains give dramatically different results. One shows little effect; the other, a large one. The treatments agree on some thermal-zone water supplies to the Jemez River but not on the expected changes in these flows. The primary areas of disagreement appear to be the total volume of water in the reservoir and the movement of this water to the point of withdrawal. The author (a nonhydrologist) has compared these reports but leaves final judgment of the accuracy of either evaluation for some erudite hydrologists, as some experimental data and model development are needed.

  3. Hydro-thermal flow in a rough fracture EC Contract SES6-CT-2003-502706

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Toussaint, Renaud

    Hydro-thermal flow in a rough fracture EC Contract SES6-CT-2003-502706 PARTICIPANT ORGANIZATION NAME: CNRS Synthetic 2nd year report Related with Work Package............ HYDRO-THERMAL FLOW in the influence of a realistic geometry of the fracture on its hydro-thermal response. Several studies have

  4. Hydrothermal venting of greenhouse gases triggering Early Jurassic global warming

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Svensen, Henrik

    Hydrothermal venting of greenhouse gases triggering Early Jurassic global warming Henrik Svensen a carbon cycle. The event lasted for approximately 200,000 years and was manifested by a global warming, and the Toarcian global warming. © 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved. Keywords: climate change; Toarcian

  5. Interconnected hydro-thermal systems Models, methods, and applications

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Interconnected hydro-thermal systems Models, methods, and applications Magnus Hindsberger Kgs. Lyngby 2003 IMM-PHD-2003-112 Interconnected hydro-thermalsystems #12;Technical University of Denmark 45882673 reception@imm.dtu.dk www.imm.dtu.dk IMM-PHD-2003-112 ISSN 0909-3192 #12;Interconnected hydro

  6. Hydrothermal Resources Fact Sheet | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    The Dixie Valley Geothermal Plant in Nevada produces 60 MW of electricity. A Roadmap for Strategic Development of Geothermal Exploration Technologies Federal Interagency...

  7. Hydrothermal Processing of Macroalgal Feedstocks in Continuous-Flow Reactors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Hart, Todd R.; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Rotness, Leslie J.; Roesijadi, Guritno; Zacher, Alan H.; Magnuson, Jon K.

    2014-02-18

    Wet macroalgal slurries can be converted into a biocrude by hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL). High levels of carbon conversion to gravity-separable oil product were accomplished at relatively low temperature (350 ?C) in a pressurized (sub-critical liquid water) environment (20 MPa). As opposed to earlier work in batch reactors reported by others, direct oil recovery was achieved without the use of a solvent and biomass trace mineral components were removed by processing steps so that they did not cause processing difficulties. In addition, catalytic hydrothermal gasification was effectively applied for HTL byproduct water cleanup and fuel gas production from water soluble organics. As a result, high conversion of macroalgae to liquid and gas fuel products was found with low levels of organic contamination in byproduct water. Both process steps were accomplished in continuous-flow reactor systems such that design data for process scale-up was generated.

  8. Hydrothermal synthesis and characterization of zirconia based catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Caillot, T. Salama, Z.; Chanut, N.; Cadete Santos Aires, F.J.; Bennici, S.; Auroux, A.

    2013-07-15

    In this work, three equimolar mixed oxides ZrO{sub 2}/CeO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2}, ZrO{sub 2}/La{sub 2}O{sub 3} and a reference ZrO{sub 2} have been synthesized by hydrothermal method. The structural and surface properties of these materials have been fully characterized by X-ray diffraction, transmission electron microscopy, surface area measurement, chemical analysis, XPS, infrared spectroscopy after adsorption of pyridine and adsorption microcalorimetry of NH{sub 3} and SO{sub 2} probe molecules. All investigated mixed oxides are amphoteric and possess redox centers on their surface. Moreover, hydrothermal synthesis leads to catalysts with higher surface area and with better acid–base properties than classical coprecipitation method. Both Lewis and Brønsted acid sites are present on the surface of the mixed oxides. Compared to the other samples, the ZrO{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2} material appears to be the best candidate for further application in acid–base catalysis. - Graphical abstract: Mesoporous amorphous phase with a high surface area of titania zirconia mixed oxide obtained by hydrothermal preparation. - Highlights: • Three zirconia based catalysts and a reference were prepared by hydrothermal synthesis. • Mixed oxides present larger surface areas than the reference ZrO{sub 2}. • ZrO{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2} catalyst presents a mesoporous structure with high surface area. • ZrO{sub 2}/TiO{sub 2} catalyst presents simultaneously strong acidic and basic properties.

  9. Hydrothermal Exploration Data Gap Analysis Update | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE:Financing Tool Fits the Bill FinancingDepartmentDatabase| Department ofHydropowerHydrothermal

  10. Aqueous geochemistry of the Thermopolis hydrothermal system, southern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, U.S.A.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaszuba, John P. [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Dept. of Geology and Geophysics; Sims, Kenneth W.W. [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). School of Energy Resources; Pluda, Allison R. [Univ. of Wyoming, Laramie, WY (United States). Wyoming High-Precision Isotope Lab.

    2014-03-01

    The Thermopolis hydrothermal system is located in the southern portion of the Bighorn Basin, in and around the town of Thermopolis, Wyoming. It is the largest hydrothermal system in Wyoming outside of Yellowstone National Park. The system includes hot springs, travertine deposits, and thermal wells; published models for the hydrothermal system propose the Owl Creek Mountains as the recharge zone, simple conductive heating at depth, and resurfacing of thermal waters up the Thermopolis Anticline.

  11. Aqueous geochemistry of the Thermopolis hydrothermal system, southern Bighorn Basin, Wyoming, U.S.A.

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kaszuba, John P.; Sims, Kenneth W.W.; Pluda, Allison R.

    2014-06-01

    The Thermopolis hydrothermal system is located in the southern portion of the Bighorn Basin, in and around the town of Thermopolis, Wyoming. It is the largest hydrothermal system in Wyoming outside of Yellowstone National Park. The system includes hot springs, travertine deposits, and thermal wells; published models for the hydrothermal system propose the Owl Creek Mountains as the recharge zone, simple conductive heating at depth, and resurfacing of thermal waters up the Thermopolis Anticline.

  12. A Sr-Isotopic Comparison Between Thermal Waters, Rocks, And Hydrotherm...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Caldera, California Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library Journal Article: A Sr-Isotopic Comparison Between Thermal Waters, Rocks, And Hydrothermal...

  13. K-Ar Dates Of Hydrothermal Clays From Core Hole VC-2B, Valles...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    However, the range of ages obtained from illites in Permian sands and pebbles and from Precambrian crystalline rocks indicates that Valles hydrothermal activity is overwhelming...

  14. Metatranscriptomics reveal differences in in situ energy and nitrogen metabolism among hydrothermal vent snail symbionts

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sanders, J. G.

    Despite the ubiquity of chemoautotrophic symbioses at hydrothermal vents, our understanding of the influence of environmental chemistry on symbiont metabolism is limited. Transcriptomic analyses are useful for linking ...

  15. Evaluation of hydrothermal resources of North Dakota. Phase III final technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harris, K.L.; Howell, F.L.; Wartman, B.L.; Anderson, S.B.

    1982-08-01

    The hydrothermal resources of North Dakota were evaluated. This evaluation was based on existing data on file with the North Dakota Geological Survey (NDGS) and other state and federal agencies, and field and laboratory studies conducted. The principal sources of data used during the study were WELLFILE, the computer library of oil and gas well data developed during the Phase I study, and WATERCAT, a computer library system of water well data assembled during the Phase II study. A field survey of the shallow geothermal gradients present in selected groundwater observation holes was conducted. Laboratory determinations of the thermal conductivity of core samples were done to facilitate heat-flow calculations on those holes-of-convenience cased.

  16. Hydrothermal coupling in a rough fracture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Neuville, A; Schmittbuhl, J; Neuville, Am\\'{e}lie; Toussaint, Renaud; Schmittbuhl, Jean

    2006-01-01

    Heat exchange during laminar flow is studied at the fracture scale on the basis of the Stokes equation. We used a synthetic aperture model (a self-affine model) that has been shown to be a realistic geometrical description of the fracture morphology. We developed a numerical modelling using a finite difference scheme of the hydrodynamic flow and its coupling with an advection/conduction description of the fluid heat. As a first step, temperature within the surrounding rock is supposed to be constant. Influence of the fracture roughness on the heat flux through the wall, is estimated and a thermalization length is shown to emerge. Implications for the Soultz-sous-For\\^{e}ts geothermal project are discussed.

  17. Hydrothermal alteration mineral mapping using hyperspectral imagery in

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View NewGuam:on Openei | Open Energy InformationHydrothermal

  18. Aalborg Universitet Hydrothermal Processing of Lignin for Bio-Crude Production

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Rosendahl, Lasse

    Aalborg Universitet Hydrothermal Processing of Lignin for Bio-Crude Production Grigoras, Ionela.aau.dk on: juli 04, 2015 #12;Hydrothermal Processing of Lignin for Bio-crude Production Ionela F. Grigoras) per day, and with an oil production capacity questioned constantly, together with the increasing CO2

  19. A new hydrothermal scenario for the 2006 Lusi eruption, Indonesia. Insights from gas geochemistry

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mazzini, Adriano

    acquired a wide set of data of molecular and isotopic composition of gas sampled in several Lusi vents, in the surrounding mud volcanoes, in the closest natural gas field (Wunut), and in the hydrothermal ventsA new hydrothermal scenario for the 2006 Lusi eruption, Indonesia. Insights from gas geochemistry

  20. Depth determinations of shallow hydrothermal systems by self-potential and multi-scale wavelet tomography

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Williams-Jones, Glyn

    to significantly enhance our ability to locate geothermal systems and monitor active volcanoes. © 2010 Elsevier BDepth determinations of shallow hydrothermal systems by self-potential and multi-scale wavelet studies, the depth of the hydrothermal system is always required, but rarely known via traditional

  1. POWER MANAGEMENT IN A HYDRO-THERMAL SYSTEM UNDER UNCERTAINTY BY LAGRANGIAN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Römisch, Werner

    POWER MANAGEMENT IN A HYDRO-THERMAL SYSTEM UNDER UNCERTAINTY BY LAGRANGIAN RELAXATION NICOLE GR power in a hydro-thermal system under uncertainty in load, inflow to reservoirs and prices for fuel to successive decom- position into single thermal and hydro unit subproblems that are solved by dynamic

  2. Impact-induced hydrothermal activity on early Mars Oleg Abramov and David A. Kring

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abramov, Oleg

    Impact-induced hydrothermal activity on early Mars Oleg Abramov and David A. Kring Lunar time for colonization of impact-induced hydrothermal systems by thermophilic organisms, provided they existed on early Mars. The habitable volume reaches a maximum of 6,000 km3 8,500 years after the impact

  3. Discovery of new hydrothermal vent sites in Branseld Strait, G.P. Klinkhammer aY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keller, Randall A

    ¨ Pierre et Marie Curie, 4 Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris, France Received 24 January 2001; accepted 1 October 2001 Abstract We carried out a search for hydrothermal vents in the Central Basin of Bransfield Strait of dredges. Hydrothermal plumes over Hook Ridge at the eastern end of the basin are confined to the E ridge

  4. Hydrothermal synthesis of hydroxyapatite nanorods using pyridoxal-5?-phosphate as a phosphorus source

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Xin-Yu; Zhu, Ying-Jie, E-mail: y.j.zhu@mail.sic.ac.cn; Lu, Bing-Qiang; Chen, Feng; Qi, Chao; Zhao, Jing; Wu, Jin

    2014-07-01

    Graphical abstract: Hydroxyapatite nanorods are synthesized using biocompatible biomolecule pyridoxal-5?-phosphate as a new organic phosphorus source by the hydrothermal method. - Highlights: • Hydrothermal synthesis of hydroxyapatite nanorods is reported. • Biocompatible pyridoxal-5?-phosphate is used as an organic phosphorus source. • This method is simple, surfactant-free and environmentally friendly. - Abstract: Hydroxyapatite nanorods are synthesized by the hydrothermal method using biocompatible biomolecule pyridoxal-5?-phosphate (PLP) as a new organic phosphorus source. In this method, PLP biomolecules are hydrolyzed to produce phosphate ions under hydrothermal conditions, and these phosphate ions react with pre-existing calcium ions to form hydroxyapatite nanorods. The effects of experimental conditions including hydrothermal temperature and time on the morphology and crystal phase of the products are investigated. This method is simple, surfactant-free and environmentally friendly. The products are characterized by X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and thermogravimetric (TG) analysis.

  5. Characterizing Microbial Community and Geochemical Dynamics at Hydrothermal Vents Using Osmotically Driven Continuous Fluid Samplers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robidart, Julie C.; Callister, Stephen J.; Song, Peng F.; Nicora, Carrie D.; Wheat, Charles G.; Girguis, Peter R.

    2013-05-07

    Microbes play a key role in mediating all aquatic biogeochemical cycles, and ongoing efforts are aimed at better understanding the relationships between microbial phylogenetic and physiological diversity, and habitat physical and chemical characteristics. Establishing such relationships is facilitated by sampling and studying microbiology and geochemistry at the appropriate spatial and temporal scales, to access information on the past and current environmental state that contributes to observed microbial abundances and activities. A modest number of sampling systems exist to date, few of which can be used in remote, harsh environments such as hydrothermal vents, where the ephemeral nature of venting underscores the necessity for higher resolution sampling. We have developed a robust, continuous fluid sampling system for co-registered microbial and biogeochemical analyses. The osmosis-powered bio-osmosampling system (BOSS) use no electricity, collects fluids with daily resolution or better, can be deployed in harsh, inaccessible environments and can sample fluids continuously for up to five years. Here we present a series of tests to examine DNA, RNA and protein stability over time, as well as material compatability, via lab experiments. We also conducted two field deployments at deep-sea hydrothermal vents to assess changes in microbial diversity and protein expression as a function of the physico-chemical environment. Our data reveal significant changes in microbial community composition co-occurring with relatively modest changes in the geochemistry. These data additionally provide new insights into the distribution of an enigmatic sulfur oxidizing symbiont in its free-living state. Data from the second deployment reveal differences in the representation of peptides over time, underscoring the utility of the BOSS in meta-proteomic studies. In concert, these data demonstrate the efficacy of this approach, and illustrate the value of using this method to study microbial and geochemical phenomena.

  6. Characterization and catalytic properties of hydrothermally dealuminated MCM-22

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Meriaudeau, P.; Tuan, V.A.; Nghiem, V.T.; Ha, V.T. [IRC/NCRS, Villeurbanne (France)] [IRC/NCRS, Villeurbanne (France); Lefevbre, F. [Univ. Claude Bernard, Villeurbanne (France)] [Univ. Claude Bernard, Villeurbanne (France)

    1999-07-25

    Zeolite MCM-22 was recently patented as a useful catalyst for alkylation and isomerization reactions and for conversion of methanol or olefins to hydrocarbons. MCM-22 has been synthesized and dealuminated by hydrothermal treatments. The resulting solids were characterized by different techniques in order to know how the acid properties of the dealuminated solids were modified. It appears that the number of acid sites was decreased by hydrothermal treatments but the acid strength was not modified. Nondealuminated and dealuminated solids were used in the n-octane hydroconversion. Results suggested that for both types of solids the hydroisomerization is mainly occurring in the 10-membered ring (MR) channels whereas the hydrocracking is mainly coming from acid sites located in 12-membered ring channels. According to the observed distribution of monobranched isomers, MCM-22 shows some ``shape-selective`` character typical of the pentasil family, whereas, according to the absolute yield of isopentane in the hydrocracked products at low hydrocracking conversions, MCM-22 behaves more like a 12 MR zeolite.

  7. Methods and apparatus for catalytic hydrothermal gasification of biomass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elliott, Douglas C.; Butner, Robert Scott; Neuenschwander, Gary G.; Zacher, Alan H.; Hart, Todd R.

    2012-08-14

    Continuous processing of wet biomass feedstock by catalytic hydrothermal gasification must address catalyst fouling and poisoning. One solution can involve heating the wet biomass with a heating unit to a temperature sufficient for organic constituents in the feedstock to decompose, for precipitates of inorganic wastes to form, for preheating the wet feedstock in preparation for subsequent separation of sulfur contaminants, or combinations thereof. Treatment further includes separating the precipitates out of the wet feedstock, removing sulfur contaminants, or both using a solids separation unit and a sulfur separation unit, respectively. Having removed much of the inorganic wastes and the sulfur that can cause poisoning and fouling, the wet biomass feedstock can be exposed to the heterogeneous catalyst for gasification.

  8. Laboratory and field-based investigations of subsurface geochemical processes in seafloor hydrothermal systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reeves, Eoghan

    2010-01-01

    This thesis presents the results of four discrete investigations into processes governing the organic and inorganic chemical composition of seafloor hydrothermal fluids in a variety of geologic settings. Though Chapters 2 ...

  9. Hydrothermal growth of single crystals of the quantum magnets: Clinoatacamite, paratacamite, and herbertsmithite

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Müller, Peter

    In this report, we describe crystal growth technology and characterizations of clinoata- camite, paratacamiteHydrothermal growth of single crystals of the quantum magnets: Clinoatacamite, paratacamite and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139, USA 2 Department

  10. Geochemistry of deep-sea hydrothermal vent fluids from the Mid-Cayman Rise, Caribbean Sea

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McDermott, Jill Marie

    2015-01-01

    This thesis examines the controls on organic, inorganic, and volatile species distributions in hydrothermal fluids venting at Von Damm and Piccard, two recently discovered vent fields at the ultra slow spreading Mid-Cayman ...

  11. Rare earth oxide fluoride nanoparticles and hydrothermal method for forming nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fulton, John L. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA; Hoffmann, Markus M. (Richland, WA) [Richland, WA

    2001-11-13

    A hydrothermal method for forming nanoparticles of a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine has been discovered. Nanoparticles comprising a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine are also described. These nanoparticles can exhibit excellent refractory properties as well as remarkable stability in hydrothermal conditions. The nanoparticles can exhibit excellent properties for numerous applications including fiber reinforcement of ceramic composites, catalyst supports, and corrosion resistant coatings for high-temperature aqueous solutions.

  12. Rare Earth Oxide Fluoride Nanoparticles And Hydrothermal Method For Forming Nanoparticles

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Fulton, John L. (Richland, WA); Hoffmann, Markus M. (Richland, WA)

    2003-12-23

    A hydrothermal method for forming nanoparticles of a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine has been discovered. Nanoparticles comprising a rare earth element, oxygen and fluorine are also described. These nanoparticles can exhibit excellent refractory properties as well as remarkable stability in hydrothermal conditions. The nanoparticles can exhibit excellent properties for numerous applications including fiber reinforcement of ceramic composites, catalyst supports, and corrosion resistant coatings for high-temperature aqueous solutions.

  13. Possible Origin of Improved High Temperature Performance of Hydrothermally Aged Cu/Beta Zeolite Catalysts

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Peden, Charles HF; Kwak, Ja Hun; Burton, Sarah D.; Tonkyn, Russell G.; Kim, Do Heui; Lee, Jong H.; Jen, H. W.; Cavattaio, Giovanni; Cheng, Yisun; Lambert, Christine

    2012-04-30

    The hydrothermal stability of Cu/beta NH3 SCR catalysts are explored here. In particular, this paper focuses on the interesting ability of this catalyst to maintain and even enhance high-temperature performance for the "standard" SCR reaction after modest (900 °C, 2 hours) hydrothermal aging. Characterization of the fresh and aged catalysts was performed with an aim to identify possible catalytic phases responsible for the enhanced high temperature performance. XRD, TEM and 27Al NMR all showed that the hydrothermally aging conditions used here resulted in almost complete loss of the beta zeolite structure between 1 and 2 hours aging. While the 27Al NMR spectra of 2 and 10 hour hydrothermally-aged catalysts showed significant loss of a peak associated with tetrahedrally-coordinated Al species, no new spectral features were evident. Two model catalysts, suggested by these characterization data as possible mimics of the catalytic phase formed during hydrothermal aging of Cu/beta, were prepared and tested for their performance in the "standard" SCR and NH3 oxidation reactions. The similarity in their reactivity compared to the 2 hour hydrothermally-aged Cu/beta catalyst suggests possible routes for preparing multi-component catalysts that may have wider temperature windows for optimum performance than those provided by current Cu/zeolite catalysts.

  14. Hydrothermal growth and morphology evolution of CePO{sub 4} aggregates by a complexing method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Ma Lin [Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China); Chen Weixiang [Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)], E-mail: weixiangchen@css.zju.edu.cn; Zheng Yifan [Institute of Industrial Catalysis, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China); Xu Zhude [Department of Chemistry, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou 310027 (China)

    2008-11-03

    A facile hydrothermal route assisted by Na{sub 2}H{sub 2}EDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid disodium) has been successfully developed to prepare uniform cerium phosphate (CePO{sub 4}) aggregates with different morphologies, such as peanut-like and spindle-like. It was found that the as-prepared uniform CePO{sub 4} aggregates were constructed with many nearly parallel aligned nanorods. The molar ratio of EDTA/Ce{sup 3+}, solution pH and reaction time had great influences on the morphologies and sizes of the CePO{sub 4} samples. In our process of synthesis, Na{sub 2}H{sub 2}EDTA played important roles as complexing reagent and inducing agent on the formation of CePO{sub 4} aggregates. The possible growth mechanism for CePO{sub 4} aggregates was presented. Ce{sub 0.9}Tb{sub 0.1}PO{sub 4} aggregates with different morphologies were also prepared and their photoluminescence properties were characterized.

  15. Physical properties of upper oceanic crust: Ocean Drilling Program Hole 801C and the waning of hydrothermal circulation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Abrams, Lewis J.

    alteration continues, at a decreasing rate, throughout the lifetime of oceanic crust. INDEX TERMS: 3015 Marine Geology and Geophysics: Heat flow (benthic) and hydrothermal processes; 7220 Seismology: Oceanic, decreased porosity and permeability, and oxidation of magnetic minerals [e.g., Jacobson, 1992]. Hydrothermal

  16. Process Design and Economics for the Conversion of Algal Biomass to Hydrocarbons: Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction and Upgrading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jones, Susanne B.; Zhu, Yunhua; Anderson, Daniel B.; Hallen, Richard T.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Albrecht, Karl O.; Hart, Todd R.; Butcher, Mark G.; Drennan, Corinne; Snowden-Swan, Lesley J.; Davis, Ryan; Kinchin, Christopher

    2014-03-20

    This report provides a preliminary analysis of the costs associated with converting whole wet algal biomass into primarily diesel fuel. Hydrothermal liquefaction converts the whole algae into an oil that is then hydrotreated and distilled. The secondary aqueous product containing significant organic material is converted to a medium btu gas via catalytic hydrothermal gasification.

  17. Hydrothermal formation of Clay-Carbonate alteration assemblages in the Nili Fossae region of Mars

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Adrian J; Baldridge, Alice M; Crowley, James K; Bridges, Nathan T; Thomson, Bradley J; Marion, Giles M; Filho, Carlos R de Souza; Bishop, Janice L

    2014-01-01

    The Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM) has returned observations of the Nili Fossae region indicating the presence of Mg- carbonate in small (characterize these carbonate-bearing units. We applied absorption band mapping techniques to investigate a range of possible phyllosilicate and carbonate minerals that could be present in the Nili Fossae region. We also describe a clay-carbonate hydrothermal alteration mineral assemblage in the Archean Warrawoona Group of Western Australia that is a potential Earth analog to the Nili Fossae carbonate-bearing rock units. We discuss the geological and biological implications for hydrothermal processes on Noachian Mars.

  18. Enhanced performance of wearable piezoelectric nanogenerator fabricated by two-step hydrothermal process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Qiu, Yu; Lei, Jixue; Yin, Bing; Zhang, Heqiu; Ji, Jiuyu; Hu, Lizhong, E-mail: lizhongh@dlut.edu.cn [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); The Key Laboratory for Micro/Nano Technology and System of Liaoning Province, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Yang, Dechao [Department of Electronic Engineering, Dalian Neusoft University of Information, Dalian 116024 (China); Bian, Jiming; Liu, Yanhong; Zhao, Yu; Luo, Yingmin [School of Physics and Optoelectronic Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2014-03-17

    A simple two-step hydrothermal process was proposed for enhancing the performance of the nanogenerator on flexible and wearable terylene-fabric substrate. With this method, a significant enhancement in output voltage of the nanogenerator from ?10?mV to 7?V was achieved, comparing with the one by conventional one-step process. In addition, another advantage with the devices synthesized by two-step hydrothermal process was that their output voltages are only sensitive to strain rather than strain rate. The devices with a high output voltage have the ability to power common electric devices and will have important applications in flexible electronics and wearable devices.

  19. Job 4459300 Ref.No. Prepd. CHP/GEA

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    inspection of boilers exceeding 500 kW: State Energy Inspection District heating sector Min. of Economy

  20. GEA Caldemon formerly known as Caldemon Iberica | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View New PagesSustainable Urban TransportFortistarFuelCellsEtcSilicon Co Ltd JumpCaldemon formerly

  1. GEA Wiegand GmbH | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIX E LISTStar2-0057-EA Jump to:ofEnia SpAFlexStock Co LtdWiegand GmbH Jump to: navigation,

  2. GEA Geothermal Summit Presentation Â… Lauren Boyd | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nA Guide to Tapping intoandMinimal Cost2-95) DATE OFGEA geothermal energy

  3. The Geothermal Technologies Office Congratulates this Year's GEA Honors

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious RankADVANCEDInstallers/ContractorsPhotovoltaicsState of Pennsylvania U.S.The First Five YearsTheResearch

  4. Rheological study of comingled biomass and coal slurries with hydrothermal pretreatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wei He; Chan S. Park; Joseph M. Norbeck [University of California, Riverside, CA (United States). Bourns College of Engineering Center for Environmental Research and Technology

    2009-09-15

    Gasification of comingled biomass and coal feedstock is an effective means of reducing the net life cycle greenhouse gas emissions in the coal gasification process while maintaining its inherent benefits of abundance and high-energy density. However, feeding a comingled biomass and coal feedstock into a pressurized gasification reactor poses a technical problem. Conventional dry feeding systems, such as lock hoppers and pressurized pneumatic transport, are complex and operationally expensive. A slurry formation of comingled biomass and coal feedstock can be easily fed into the gasification reactor but, in normal conditions, only allows for a small portion of biomass in the mixture. This is a consequence of the hydroscopic and hydrophilic nature of the biomass. The College of Engineering Center for Environmental Research and Technology (CE-CERT) at the University of California, Riverside, has developed a process producing high solid content biomass-water slurry using a hydrothermal pretreatment process. In this paper, the systematic investigation of the rheological properties (e.g., shear rate, shear stress, and viscosity) of coal-water slurries, biomass-water slurries, and comingled biomass and coal-water slurries is reported. The solid particle size distribution in the slurry and the initial solid/water ratio were investigated to determine the impact on shear rate and viscosity. This was determined using a rotational rheometer. The experimental results show that larger particle size offers better pumpability. The presence of a high percentage of biomass in solid form significantly decreases slurry pumpability. It is also shown that the solid loading of the biomass-water slurry can be increased to approximately 35 wt % with viscosity of less than 0.7 Pa.s after the pretreatment process. The solid loading increased to approximately 45 wt % when the biomass is comingled with coal. 18 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Senate Energy Committee Passes New Geothermal Legislation | Department...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    "These two measures will support exploration drilling, expand geothermal research into heating uses, and expedite leasing and development," remarked GEA Executive Director Karl...

  6. Carbon geochemistry of serpentinites in the Lost City Hydrothermal System (30N, MAR)

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gilli, Adrian

    Massif (Mid-Atlantic Ridge, 30°N) was exam- ined to characterize carbon sources and speciation in oceanic. The speciation of carbon de- pends on the chemical and physical conditions prevailing in the reservoir, and itsCarbon geochemistry of serpentinites in the Lost City Hydrothermal System (30°N, MAR) Ade

  7. Improvement of Hydrothermal Stability of Mesoporous Silica Using Salts: Reinvestigation for Time-Dependent Effects

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kim, Ji Man

    compounds with aqueous solutions of hydrogen peroxide.5 However, the structure of the TiMCM-41 is reported and Center for Molecular Science, Korea AdVanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon 305-701, Korea of hydrothermal stability of mesoporous silica using salts solutions (Ryoo, R.; Jun, S. J. Phys. Chem. B 1997, 101

  8. Hydrothermal changes related to earthquake activity at Mud Volcano, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pitt, A.M.; Hutchinson, R.A.

    1982-04-10

    The Mud Volcano hydrothermal area in Yellowstone National Park is near the intersection of a 20-km-long zone of northeast trending normal faults with the eastern resurgent dome within the 600,000-year-odd Yellowstone caldera. Recent crustal uplift along the northeast trending axis of the caldera is at a maximum (700 mm since 1923) near the Mud Volcano area. From 1973 through April 1978, less than 10 earthquakes (largest M 2.4) were located within 3 km of the Mud Volcano area. In May 1978, earthquakes began occurring beneath the hydrothermal area at depths of 1 to 5 km. The seismic activity continued until the end of November with intense swarms (100 events per hour) occurring on October 23 and November 7. The largest event (M 3.1) occured on November 14 and at least 8 events were M 2.5 or larger. In December 1978, heat flux in the Mud Volcano hydrothermal features began increasing along a 2-km-long northeast trending zone. Existing mud cauldrons became more active, new mud cauldrons and fumeroles were formed, and vegetation (primarily lodgepole pine) was killed by increased soil temperature. The increase in heat flux continued through July 1979 then gradually declined, reaching the early 1978 level by June 1980. The spatial and temporal association of earthquakes and increased hydrothermal activity at Mud Volcano suggests that the seismic activity expanded preexisting fracture systems, premitting increased fluid flow from depths of several kilometers.

  9. Hydrothermal method of synthesis of rare-earth tantalates and niobates

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nyman, May D; Rohwer, Lauren E.S.; Martin, James E

    2012-10-16

    A hydrothermal method of synthesis of a family of rare-earth Group 5 oxides, where the Group 5 oxide is a niobate or tantalate. The rare-earth Group 5 oxides can be doped with suitable emitter ions to form nanophosphors.

  10. Investigation of Lignin Deposition on Cellulose During Hydrothermal Pretreatment, Its Effect on

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    Investigation of Lignin Deposition on Cellulose During Hydrothermal Pretreatment, Its Effect on Cellulose Hydrolysis, and Underlying Mechanisms Hongjia Li,1,2,4 Yunqiao Pu,3,4 Rajeev Kumar,1,2,4 Arthur J to form droplets that deposit on the cellulose surface and retard enzymatic digestion of cellulose

  11. Textured catalysts, methods of making textured catalysts, and methods of catalyzing reactions conducted in hydrothermal conditions

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Werpy, Todd [West Richland, WA; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA

    2003-12-30

    A textured catalyst having a hydrothermally-stable support, a metal oxide and a catalyst component is described. Methods of conducting aqueous phase reactions that are catalyzed by a textured catalyst are also described. The invention also provides methods of making textured catalysts and methods of making chemical products using a textured catalyst.

  12. Silicic magma petrogenesis in Iceland by remelting of hydrothermally altered crust based on oxygen isotope diversity

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bindeman, Ilya N.

    Silicic magma petrogenesis in Iceland by remelting of hydrothermally altered crust based on oxygen, University of Iceland, 101 Reykjavik, Iceland; 6 Laboratoire Magmas et Volcans, CNRS-Universite´ Blaise rocks (e.g. Gillis and Coogan, 2002; Jonasson, 2007; Wanless et al., 2010). Iceland represents the only

  13. Synthesis of ZrO{sub 2} nanoparticles by hydrothermal treatment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Machmudah, Siti Widiyastuti, W. Prastuti, Okky Putri Nurtono, Tantular Winardi, Sugeng; Wahyudiono,; Kanda, Hideki; Goto, Motonobu

    2014-02-24

    Zirconium oxide (zirconia, ZrO{sub 2}) is the most common material used for electrolyte of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Zirconia has attracted attention for applications in optical coatings, buffer layers for growing superconductors, thermal-shield, corrosion resistant coatings, ionic conductors, and oxygen sensors, and for potential applications including transparent optical devices and electrochemical capacitor electrodes, fuel cells, catalysts, and advanced ceramics. In this work, zirconia particles were synthesized from ZrCl{sub 4} precursor with hydrothermal treatment in a batch reactor. Hydrothermal treatment may allow obtaining nanoparticles and sintered materials with controlled chemical and structural characteristics. Hydrothermal treatment was carried out at temperatures of 150 – 200°C with precursor concentration of 0.1 – 0.5 M. Zirconia particles obtained from this treatment were analyzed by using SEM, PSD and XRD to characterize the morphology, particle size distribution, and crystallinity, respectively. Based on the analysis, the size of zirconia particles were around 200 nm and it became smaller with decreasing precursor concentration. The increasing temperature caused the particles formed having uniform size. Zirconia particles formed by hydrothermal treatment were monoclinic, tetragonal and cubic crystal.

  14. Preliminary conceptual design for the destruction of organic/ferrocyanide constituents in the Hanford tank waste with low-temperature hydrothermal processing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Schmidt, A.J.; Jones, E.O.; Orth, R.J.; Cox, J.L.; Elmore, M.E.; Neuenschwander, G.G.; Hart, T.R. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Meng, C.D. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1993-05-01

    Hydrothermal processing (HTP) is a thermal-chemical processing method that can be employed to destroy organic and ferrocyanide constituents in Hanford tank waste by using the abundant existing oxidants in the tank waste such as nitrite and nitrate. Use-temperature HTP effectively destroys organics at temperatures from 250{degree}C to 400{degree}C to eliminate safety hazards and improve further processing. This proposal describes a conceptual design of a low-temperature HTP system (including a preliminary flow diagram and plot plan, equipment descriptions and sizes, utility requirements, and costs); the experimental work supporting this effort at Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL); the reaction chemistry and kinetics; the technical maturity of the process; and a preliminary assessment of maintenance, operation, and safety of a system. Nitrate destruction using organic reductants is also described. The low-temperature hydrothermal program at PNL was initiated in January 1993. It is part of an overall program to develop organic destruction technologies, which was originally funded by Hanford`s Tank Waste Remediation System program and then was transferred to the Initial Pretreatment (IPM) project. As described in the document, low-temperature HTP (1) meets or exceeds system requirements in organic, ferrocyanide, and nitrate destruction, and processing rate; (2) is technically mature with little additional technology development required; (3) is a simple process with good operational reliability; (4) is flexible and can be easily integrated in the system; (5) has reasonable costs and utility requirements; and (6) is safe and environmentally-benign.

  15. Ecological and Geochemical Aspects of Terrestrial Hydrothermal Systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Forrest, Matthew James

    exploitation of nearby geothermal energy resources. Dixieexploitation of nearby geothermal energy resources. In Napachange (USFWS, 2009), geothermal energy development (BLM,

  16. Chars produced by slow pyrolysis and hydrothermal carbonization vary in carbon sequestration potential and greenhouse gases emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malghani, S; Malghani, S; Gleixner, G; Trumbore, SE

    2013-01-01

    of slow and fast pyrolysis biochar on soil C and N turnoverpyrolysis and hydrothermal carbonisation of corn stover. Soilmatter. Slow pyrolysis char is more stable in soil and had

  17. Geochemical tracers of processes affecting the formation of seafloor hydrothermal fluids and deposits in the Manus back-arc basin

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Craddock, Paul R

    2009-01-01

    Systematic differences in trace element compositions (rare earth element (REE), heavy metal, metalloid concentrations) of seafloor vent fluids and related deposits from hydrothermal systems in the Manus back-arc basin ...

  18. Biotic and abiotic interactions of deep-sea hydrothermal vent-endemic fish on the East Pacific Rise

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Buckman, Kate Lynn

    2009-01-01

    A study of the ecology of fish endemic to hydrothermal vents on the East Pacific Rise was undertaken utilizing a variety of techniques, focusing on the bythitid Thermichthys hollisi. Stable isotope and gut content analyses ...

  19. Spatial and temporal population genetics at deep-sea hydrothermal vents along the East Pacific Rise and Galápagos Rift

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fusaro, Abigail Jean

    2008-01-01

    Ecological processes at deep-sea hydrothermal vents on fast-spreading mid-ocean ridges are punctuated by frequent physical disturbance. Larval dispersal among disjunct vent sites facilitates the persistence of sessile ...

  20. Chars produced by slow pyrolysis and hydrothermal carbonization vary in carbon sequestration potential and greenhouse gases emissions

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Malghani, S; Gleixner, G; Trumbore, SE

    2013-01-01

    of biochar from fast pyrolysis and gasi?cation systems.Effects of slow and fast pyrolysis biochar on soil C and Ncarbonaceous products obtained by pyrolysis and hydrothermal

  1. Sonochemical and hydrothermal synthesis of PbTe nanostructures with the aid of a novel capping agent

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Fard-Fini, Shahla Ahmadian; Salavati-Niasari, Masoud; Mohandes, Fatemeh

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • PbTe nanostructures were prepared with the aid of Schiff-base compound. • Sonochemical and hydrothermal methods were employed to fabricate PbTe nanostrucrues. • The effect of preparation parameters on the morphology of PbTe was investigated. - Abstract: In this work, a new Schiff-base compound derived from 1,8-diamino-3,6-dioxaoctane and 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde marked as (2-HyNa)-(DaDo) was synthesized, characterized, and then used as capping agent for the preparation of PbTe nanostructures. To fabricate PbTe nanostructures, two different synthesis methods; hydrothermal and sonochemical routes, were applied. To further investigate, the effect of preparation parameters like reaction time and temperature in hydrothermal synthesis and sonication time in the presence of ultrasound irradiation on the morphology and purity of the final products was tested. The products were analyzed with the aid of SEM, TEM, XRD, FT-IR, and EDS. Based on the obtained results, it was found that pure cubic phased PbTe nanostructures have been obtained by hydrothermal and sonochemical approaches. Besides, SEM images showed that cubic-like and rod-like PbTe nanostructures have been formed by hydrothermal and sonochemical methods, respectively. Sonochemical synthesis of PbTe nanostructures was favorable, because the synthesis time of sonochemical method was shorter than that of hydrothermal method.

  2. The Development of a Hydrothermal Method for Slurry Feedstock Preparation for Gasification Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Affairs, Carbon and coal gasification: science andand B.F. Towler, Coal Gasification and Its Applications .Coal Chars , in Coal Gasification . 1974, AMERICAN CHEMICAL

  3. The Development of a Hydrothermal Method for Slurry Feedstock Preparation for Gasification Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Slurry transport using centrifugal pumps . 2006: Springer.at 450psi by a centrifugal pump. Q Q-HTP H-SLUR HYDRO MIXERbiomass slurry in a centrifugal pump and a membrane pump,

  4. The Development of a Hydrothermal Method for Slurry Feedstock Preparation for Gasification Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Wei

    2011-01-01

    spark-ignition engines. Renewable Energy, 2005. 30 (11): p.in an SI engine. Renewable Energy, 2004. 29 (7): p. 1181-G.N. and M.K. Ghosal, Renewable energy resources: basic

  5. The Development of a Hydrothermal Method for Slurry Feedstock Preparation for Gasification Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Wei

    2011-01-01

    G.N. and M.K. Ghosal, Renewable energy resources: basicJ.A. , A Realizable Renewable Energy Future. Science, 1999.p. Maczulak, A. , Renewable Energy: Sources and Methods .

  6. The Development of a Hydrothermal Method for Slurry Feedstock Preparation for Gasification Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Wei

    2011-01-01

    of any fluid; ? = 1 for Newtonian laminar flow of fluid; andfor laminar flow of power law fluid, ? is determined by the

  7. The Development of a Hydrothermal Method for Slurry Feedstock Preparation for Gasification Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Wei

    2011-01-01

    of Char. Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, 2003.Jerry. Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, 2000.Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research, 2005. 44 (13):

  8. The Development of a Hydrothermal Method for Slurry Feedstock Preparation for Gasification Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Wei

    2011-01-01

    and J. Ahrenfeldt, Handbook biomass gasification . 2005: BTGAllen, S.G. , et al. , Biomass Gasification in SupercriticalHydrogen production by biomass gasification in supercritical

  9. The Development of a Hydrothermal Method for Slurry Feedstock Preparation for Gasification Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Higman, C. and M. Burgt, Gasification . 2003: Elsevier/Gulfand N.P. Cheremisinoff, Gasification technologies: a primerbiomass (part 3): gasification technologies. Bioresource

  10. The Development of a Hydrothermal Method for Slurry Feedstock Preparation for Gasification Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Wei

    2011-01-01

    et al. , The effect of coal properties on the viscosity ofthe feedstock properties of coal and biomass are given in55 2.2.1 Rheological Properties of Coal-Biomass-

  11. The Development of a Hydrothermal Method for Slurry Feedstock Preparation for Gasification Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Wei

    2011-01-01

    was calculated according to ASME code by: (Eq. 5.1) And theaccordance to ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, Section

  12. The Development of a Hydrothermal Method for Slurry Feedstock Preparation for Gasification Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Tech. Carrier Torrefaction Biomass energy 200°C -300°C, a)ability to boost biomass energy density thru hydrothermalcomponents of biomass and stored energy of biomass [8-10].

  13. The Development of a Hydrothermal Method for Slurry Feedstock Preparation for Gasification Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Wei

    2011-01-01

    of low sulfur, ultra low sulfur and biodiesel blends in a DIbiofuels produced have ultra-low sulfur levels thanks to thefuels; 5. It contains ultra-low sulfur level and could meet

  14. The Development of a Hydrothermal Method for Slurry Feedstock Preparation for Gasification Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Wei

    2011-01-01

    biomass gasification/pyrolysis: An overview. Renewable andfor the Study of Biomass Pyrolysis Chemistry at High HeatingA. Ganesh, and K.C. Khilar, Pyrolysis characteristics of

  15. The Development of a Hydrothermal Method for Slurry Feedstock Preparation for Gasification Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Wei

    2011-01-01

    those of untreated biomass feedstocks; 3. Evaluation of theconcentration in biomass feedstocks [165]. Level of Volatileto carbon ratio when biomass feedstocks are mixed to form a

  16. The Development of a Hydrothermal Method for Slurry Feedstock Preparation for Gasification Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Wei

    2011-01-01

    mixtures. 1. Effects of coal type, loading and particletype of thermochemical technology recently being commercialized in China with coal

  17. The Development of a Hydrothermal Method for Slurry Feedstock Preparation for Gasification Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Wei

    2011-01-01

    production processes, such as gasification, favor a continuousProcess Configuration..119 Fig 5.2 Continuous Slurry Production

  18. The Development of a Hydrothermal Method for Slurry Feedstock Preparation for Gasification Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Wei

    2011-01-01

    that may arise with gasification biomass feedstocks. 1.2and J. Ahrenfeldt, Handbook biomass gasification . 2005: BTGM. Sciazko, Co-gasification of biomass and coal for methanol

  19. The Development of a Hydrothermal Method for Slurry Feedstock Preparation for Gasification Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Wei

    2011-01-01

    source of energy before industrialization and is still an important fuel today for cooking and home heating

  20. The Development of a Hydrothermal Method for Slurry Feedstock Preparation for Gasification Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Wei

    2011-01-01

    at a dual fluidised bed gasifier: Impacts of operationsources using Sasol-Lurgi gasifiers. International Journalscale Sasol-Lurgi FBDB gasifier. Fuel, 2008. 87 (13-14): p.

  1. The Development of a Hydrothermal Method for Slurry Feedstock Preparation for Gasification Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    He, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Partial oxidation of sewage sludge . 1991: US. Pimenova, N.rheological properties of sewage sludge and corn stovemunicipal solid or sewage sludge) and refuse derived fuel (

  2. Numerical-Model Investigation of the Hydrothermal Regime of a Straight-Through Shallow Cooling Pond

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sokolov, A. S. [JSC 'VNIIG im. B. E. Vedeneeva' (Russian Federation)] [JSC 'VNIIG im. B. E. Vedeneeva' (Russian Federation)

    2013-11-15

    A mathematic model based on solution of hydrodynamics and heat-transfer equations by the finite-element method is constructed to predict the hydrothermal regime of a straight-through shallow cooling pond, which provides cooling circulating water to a repository of spent nuclear fuel. Numerical experiments made it possible to evaluate the influence exerted by wind conditions and flow rate of water in the river on the temperature of the circulating water.

  3. Hydrothermal systems on Mars:an assessment of present evidence

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Farmer, Jack D.

    , and as a possible origin for iron oxide-rich spectralunits on the floorsof somerifted basins (chasmata of methods developed by the mining industry to look for similar deposits on Earth. But Earth

  4. Short-time hydrothermal synthesis and delamination of ion exchangeable Mg/Ga layered double hydroxides

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unal, Ugur [Department of Nano Science and Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Kumamoto University, Kurokami 2-39-1, Kumamoto 860-8555 (Japan)], E-mail: ugurunal@chem.kumamoto-u.ac.jp

    2007-09-15

    The hydrothermal synthesis of magnesium-gallium layered double hydroxides (Mg/Ga LDHs) was studied under static and agitated conditions. Not only well-crystallized and large-sized Mg/Ga LDHs having hexagonal morphology were obtained but also the reaction time was comparatively decreased from 24 to 2 h by means of agitation during hydrothermal synthesis. In static conditions, mainly GaOOH and magnesite phases were formed. The elemental analysis results show that the final Mg/Ga ratio is significantly different from the initial ratio. The reason was attributed to the difference in the hydrolytic behavior of Mg{sup 2+} and Ga{sup 3+}. Furthermore, the anion exchange studies with glycine, dodecyl sulfate, ferrocyanide and ferricyanide were performed to investigate the intercalation behavior of the anions into Mg/Ga LDHs. In addition, delamination of Mg/Ga LDHs was performed in formamide for the glycine exchanged forms. Large size of nanosheets thus obtained can be utilized in the fabrication of functional thin films. - Graphical abstract: Hydrothermal synthesis under agitation resulted in highly crystalline Mg/Ga LDHs slabs in a short time. The LDHs slabs were delaminated into two-dimensional nanosize sheets.

  5. Two-Dimensional Coordination Polymers with One-Dimensional Magnetic Chains: Hydrothermal Synthesis, Crystal Structure, and Magnetic and Thermal Properties of

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jing

    commonly employed in the synthesis of numerous solid-state inorganic materials. ComparablyTwo-Dimensional Coordination Polymers with One-Dimensional Magnetic Chains: Hydrothermal Synthesis

  6. Review and Assessment of Commercial Vendors/Options for Feeding and Pumping Biomass Slurries for Hydrothermal Liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Berglin, Eric J.; Enderlin, Carl W.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2012-11-01

    The National Advanced Biofuels Consortium is working to develop improved methods for producing high-value hydrocarbon fuels. The development of one such method, the hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) process, is being led by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL). The HTL process uses a wet biomass slurry at elevated temperatures (i.e., 300 to 360°C [570 to 680°F]) and pressures above the vapor pressure of water (i.e., 15 to 20 MPa [2200 to 3000 psi] at these temperatures) to facilitate a condensed-phase reaction medium. The process has been successfully tested at bench-scale and development and testing at a larger scale is required to prove the viability of the process at production levels. Near-term development plans include a pilot-scale system on the order of 0.5 to 40 gpm, followed by a larger production-scale system on the order of 2000 dry metric tons per day (DMTPD). A significant challenge to the scale-up of the HTL process is feeding a highly viscous fibrous biomass wood/corn stover feedstock into a pump system that provides the required 3000 psi of pressure for downstream processing. In October 2011, PNNL began investigating commercial feed and pumping options that would meet these HTL process requirements. Initial efforts focused on generating a HTL feed and pump specification and then providing the specification to prospective vendors to determine the suitability of their pumps for the pilot-scale and production-scale plants. Six vendors were identified that could provide viable equipment to meet HTL feed and/or pump needs. Those six vendors provided options consisting three types of positive displacement pumps (i.e., diaphragm, piston, and lobe pumps). Vendors provided capabilities and equipment related to HTL application. This information was collected, assessed, and summarized and is provided as appendices to this report.

  7. Development Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Programme 2007 - 2010 The aim of the Timber Development Programme (TDP) is "to contribute to the sustainable development to underpin sustainable forest management and support economic growth and employment acrossDevelopment Timber Development Programme 2007 - 2010 #12;2 | Timber Development Programme 2007

  8. POWER SCHEDULING IN A HYDROTHERMAL SYSTEM UNDER UNCERTAINTY

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Römisch, Werner

    POWER SCHEDULING IN A HYDRO­THERMAL SYSTEM UNDER UNCERTAINTY C.C. Carøe 1 , M.P. Nowak 2 , W. R: A multi­stage stochastic pro­ gramming model for power scheduling un­ der uncertainty in a generation system comprising thermal and pumped­storage hydro units is developed. For its compu­ tational solution

  9. The boron isotope systematics of the Yellowstone National Park (Wyoming) hydrothermal system: A reconnaissance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Palmer, M.R. (Bristol Univ. (England)); Sturchio, N.C. (Argonne National Lab., IL (USA))

    1990-10-01

    Boron concentrations and isotope compositions have been measured in fourteen hot spring waters, two drill hole waters, an unaltered rhyolite flow, and hydrothermally altered rhyolite from the geothermal system in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming. The samples are representative of the major thermal areas within the park and span the range of fluid types. For the fluids, the B concentrations range from 0.043-2.69 mM/kg, and the {delta}{sup 11}B values range from {minus}9.3 to +4.4{per thousand}. There is no relationship between the dissolved B concentrations or isotope compositions with the concentration of any major element (other than Cl) or physical property. Each basin is characterized by a restricted range in B/Cl ratios and {delta}{sup 11}B values. Hot spring waters from the Norris Basin, Upper Geyser Basin, Calcite Springs, and Clearwater have {delta}{sup 11}B values close to that of unaltered rhyolite ({minus}5.2{per thousand}) and are interpreted to have derived their B from this source. Waters from Mammoth Hot Springs, Sheepeater, and Rainbow Springs have lower {delta}{sup 11}B values close to {minus}8{per thousand}. These lower values may reflect leaching of B from sedimentary rocks outside the Yellowstone caldera, but they are similar to the {delta}{sup 11}B value of hydrothermally altered rhyolite ({minus}9.7{per thousand}). Hence, the light boron isotope compositions recorded in these hot spring waters may reflect leaching of previously deposited hydrothermal minerals. Cooler springs along the Yellowstone River just outside the park boundary have lower B concentrations and higher {delta}{sup 11}B values that may reflect mixing with shallow meteoric water.

  10. Hydrothermal alteration in research drill hole Y-2, Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bargar, K.E.; Beeson, M.H.

    1981-05-01

    Y-2, a US Geological Survey research diamond-drill hole in Lower Geyser Basin, Yellowstone National Park, was drilled to a depth of 157.4 meters. The hole penetrated interbedded siliceous sinter and travertine to 10.2 m, glacial sediments of the Pinedale Glaciation interlayered with pumiceous tuff from 10.2 to 31.7 m, and rhyolitic lavas of the Elephant Back flow of the Central Plateau Member and the Mallard Lake Member of the Pleistocene Plateau Rhyolite from 31.7 to 157.4 m. Hydrothermal alteration is pervasive in most of the nearly continuous drill core. Rhyolitic glass has been extensively altered to clay and zeolite minerals (intermediate heulandite, clinoptilolite, mordenite, montmorillonite, mixed-layer illite-montmorillonite, and illite) in addition to quartz and adularia. Numerous veins, vugs, and fractures in the core contain these and other minerals: silica minerals (opal, ..beta..-cristobalite, ..cap alpha..-cristobalite, and chalcedony), zeolites (analcime, wairakite, dachiardite, laumontite, and yugawaralite), carbonates (calcite and siderite), clay (kaolinite and chlorite), oxides (hematite, goethite, manganite, cryptomelane, pyrolusite, and groutite), and sulfides (pyrhotite and pyrite) along with minor aegirine, fluorite, truscottite, and portlandite. Interbedded travertine and siliceous sinter in the upper part of the drill core indicate that two distinct types of thermal water are responsible for precipitation of the surficial deposits, and further that the water regime has alternated between the two thermal waters more than once since the end of the Pinedale Glaciation (approx. 10,000 years B.P.). Alternation of zones of calcium-rich and sodium- and potassium-rich hydrothermal minerals also suggests that the calcium-rich and sodium- and potassium-rich hydrothermal minerals also suggests that the water chemistry in this drill hole varies with depth.

  11. Fabrication of hollow mesoporous NiO hexagonal microspheres via hydrothermal process in ionic liquid

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhao, Jinbo; School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, 250061, Jinan ; Wu, Lili; School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, 250061, Jinan ; Zou, Ke; School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shandong University, 250061, Jinan

    2011-12-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ni(OH){sub 2} precursors were synthesized in ionic liquid and water solution by hydrothermal method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NiO hollow microspheres were prepared by thermal treatment of Ni(OH){sub 2} precursors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NiO hollow microspheres were self-assembled by mesoporous cubic and hexagonal nanocrystals with high specific surface area. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mesoporous structure is stable at 773 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The ionic liquid absorbed on the O-terminate surface of the crystals to form hydrogen bond and played key roles in determining the final shape of the NiO novel microstructure. -- Abstract: The novel NiO hexagonal hollow microspheres have been successfully prepared by annealing Ni(OH){sub 2}, which was synthesized via an ionic liquid-assisted hydrothermal method. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), field emission scanning electron microscope (FE-SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), N{sub 2} adsorption-desorption and Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FTIR). The results show that the hollow NiO microstructures are self-organized by mesoporous cubic and hexagonal nanocrystals. The mesoporous structure possessed good thermal stability and high specific surface area (ca. 83 m{sup 2}/g). The ionic liquid 1-butyl-3methylimidazolium tetrafluoroborate ([Bmim][BF{sub 4}]) was found to play a key role in controlling the morphology of NiO microstructures during the hydrothermal process. The special hollow mesoporous architectures will have potential applications in many fields, such as catalysts, absorbents, sensors, drug-delivery carriers, acoustic insulators and supercapacitors.

  12. Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes Print Despite the

  13. Preservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservation of Fe(II) by Carbon-Rich Matrices in Hydrothermal Plumes Print Despite

  14. Techno-Economic Analysis of Liquid Fuel Production from Woody Biomass via Hydrothermal Liquefaction (HTL) and Upgrading

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Yunhua; Biddy, Mary J.; Jones, Susanne B.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Schmidt, Andrew J.

    2014-09-15

    A series of experimental work was conducted to convert woody biomass to gasoline and diesel range products via hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) and catalytic hydroprocessing. Based on the best available test data, a techno-economic analysis (TEA) was developed for a large scale woody biomass based HTL and upgrading system to evaluate the feasibility of this technology. In this system, 2000 dry metric ton per day woody biomass was assumed to be converted to bio-oil in hot compressed water and the bio-oil was hydrotreated and/or hydrocracked to produce gasoline and diesel range liquid fuel. Two cases were evaluated: a stage-of-technology (SOT) case based on the tests results, and a goal case considering potential improvements based on the SOT case. Process simulation models were developed and cost analysis was implemented based on the performance results. The major performance results included final products and co-products yields, raw materials consumption, carbon efficiency, and energy efficiency. The overall efficiency (higher heating value basis) was 52% for the SOT case and 66% for the goal case. The production cost, with a 10% internal rate of return and 2007 constant dollars, was estimated to be $1.29 /L for the SOT case and $0.74 /L for the goal case. The cost impacts of major improvements for moving from the SOT to the goal case were evaluated and the assumption of reducing the organics loss to the water phase lead to the biggest reduction in the production cost. Sensitivity analysis indicated that the final products yields had the largest impact on the production cost compared to other parameters. Plant size analysis demonstrated that the process was economically attractive if the woody biomass feed rate was over 1,500 dry tonne/day, the production cost was competitive with the then current petroleum-based gasoline price.

  15. Hydrothermal synthesis of nanostructured zinc oxide and study of their optical properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moulahi, A.; Sediri, F.; Gharbi, N.

    2012-03-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanostructured ZnO were successfully obtained by a hydrothermal route. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inorganic precursor and molar ratio are key factors for morphology and particle size. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optical properties were also studied. -- Abstract: Nanostructured ZnO (nanorods, nanoshuttles) have been synthesized by hydrothermal approach using ZnCl{sub 2} or Zn(NO{sub 3}){sub 2}{center_dot}6H{sub 2}O as zinc sources and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide as structure-directing agent. Techniques X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), UV-visible absorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and Raman spectroscopy have been used to characterize the structure, morphology and composition of the nanostructured zinc oxide. The optical properties of the as-obtained materials were also studied and showing that it is possible to apply the ZnO nanoshuttles and nanorods on the UV filter, photocatalysis, and special optical devices.

  16. A genetic algorithm for solving the unit commitment problem of a hydro-thermal power system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rudolf, A.; Bayrleithner, R.

    1999-11-01

    The paper presents a two layer approach to solve the unit commitment problem of a hydro-thermal power system. The first layer uses a genetic algorithm (GA) to decide the on/off status of the units. The second layer uses a non-linear programming formulation solved by a Lagrangian relaxation to perform the economic dispatch while meeting all plant and system constraints. In order to deal effectively with the constraints of the problem and prune the search space of the GA in advance, the difficult minimum up/down-time constraints of thermal generation units and the turbine/pump operating constraint of storage power stations are embedded in the binary strings that are coded to represent the on/off-states of the generating units. The other constraints are handled by integrating penalty costs into the fitness function. In order to save execution time, the economic dispatch is only performed if the given unit commitment schedule is able to meet the load balance, energy, and begin/end level constraints. The proposed solution approach was tested on a real scaled hydro-thermal power system over a period of a day in half-hour time-steps for different GA-parameters. The simulation results reveal that the features of easy implementation, convergence within an acceptable execution time, and highly optimal solution in solving the unit commitment problem can be achieved.

  17. Ionic liquid assisted hydrothermal fabrication of hierarchically organized ?-AlOOH hollow sphere

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tang, Zhe; Liu, Yunqi; Li, Guangci; Hu, Xiaofu; Liu, Chenguang

    2012-11-15

    Highlights: ? The ?-AlOOH hollow spheres were synthesized via an ionic liquid-assisted hydrothermal treatment. ? Ionic liquid plays an important role in the morphology of the product. ? Ionic liquid can be easily removed from the product and reused in next experiment. ? A “aggregation–solution–recrystallization” formation mechanism may occur in the system. -- Abstract: Hierarchically organized ?-AlOOH hollow spheres with nanoflake-like porous surface texture have been successfully synthesized via an ionic liquid-assisted hydrothermal synthesis method in citric acid monohydrate (CAMs). It was found that ionic liquid [bmim]{sup +}Cl{sup ?} played an important role in the morphology of the product due to its strong interactions with reaction particles. The samples were characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). The results show that the product has narrow particle size distribution (500–900 nm particle diameter range), high specific surface area (240.5 m{sup 2}/g) and large pore volume (0.61 cm{sup 3}/g). The corresponding ?-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} hollow spheres can be obtained by calcining it at 550 °C for 3 h. The proposed formation mechanism and other influencing factors of the ?-AlOOH hollow sphere material, such as reaction temperature, reaction duration, CAMs and urea, have also been investigated.

  18. Sound field near hydrothermal vents on Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge. Technical report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Little, S.A.; Stolzenbach, K.D.; Purdy, G.M.

    1990-08-10

    High-quality acoustic noise measurements were obtained by two hydrophones located 3 m and 40 m from an active hydrothermal vent on Axial Seamount, Juan de Fuca Ridge, in an effort to determine the feasibility of monitoring hydrothermal vent activity through flow noise generation. Most of the measured noise field could be attributed to ambient ocean noise sources of microseisms, distant shipping, and weather, punctuated by local ships and biological sources. Long-period, low-velocity, water/rock interface waves were detected with high amplitudes which rapidly decayed with distance from the seafloor. Detection of vent signals was hampered by unexpected spatial nonstationarity due to the shadowing effects of the calders wall. No continuous vent signals were deemed significant based on a criterion of 90% probability of detection and 5% probability of false alarm. However, a small signal near 40 Hz, with a power level of 0.0001 Pa sq/Hz was noticed on two records taken within 3 m of the Inferno black smoker. The frequency of this signal is consistent with predictions, and the power level suggests the occurrence of jet noise amplification due to convected density inhomogeneities. Keywords: Seamounts; Flow noise; Underwater acoustics; Acoustic measurement; Geothermy/noise; Ocean ridges; Underwater sound signals; Reprints; North Pacific Ocean. (EDC).

  19. Faults and gravity anomalies over the East Mesa hydrothermal-geothermal system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goldstein, N.E.; Carle, S.

    1986-05-01

    Detailed interpretations of gravity anomalies over geothermal systems may be extremely useful for mapping the fracture or fault systems that control the circulation of the thermal waters. This approach seems to be particularly applicable in areas like the Salton Trough where reactions between the thermal waters and the porous sediments produce authigenic-hydrothermal minerals in sufficient quantity to cause distinct gravity anomalies at the surface. A 3-D inversion of the residual Bouguer gravity anomaly over the East Mesa geothermal field was made to examine the densified volume of rock. We show that the data not only resolve a north-south and an intersecting northwest structure, but that it may be possible to distinguish between the active present-day hydrothermal system and an older and cooler part of the system. The densified region is compared spatially to self-potential, thermal and seismic results and we find a good concordance between the different geophysical data sets. Our results agree with previous studies that have indicated that the main feeder fault recharging the East Mesa reservoir dips steeply to the west.

  20. Pencil-like zinc oxide micro/nano-scale structures: Hydrothermal synthesis, optical and photocatalytic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Moulahi, A.; Sediri, F.

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Zinc oxide micro/nanopencils have been synthesized hydrothermally. • Photocatalytic activity has been evaluated by the degradation of methylene blue under UV light irradiation. • ZnO nanopencils exhibit much higher photocatalytic activity than the commercial ZnO. - Abstract: Zinc oxide micro/nanopencils have been successfully synthesized by hydrothermal process using zinc acetate and diamines as structure-directing agents. The morphology, the structure, the crystallinity and the composition of the materials were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Raman spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The optical properties of synthesized ZnO were investigated by UV–vis spectroscopy. The photocatalytic activity of the material has been evaluated by the degradation of methylene blue under UV irradiation. As a result, after the lapse of 150 min, around 82% bleaching was observed, with ZnO nanopencils yielding more photodegradation compared to that of commercial ZnO (61%)

  1. Mineral formation and redox-sensitive trace elements in a near-surface hydrothermal alteration system

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gehring, A.U.; Schosseler, P.M.; Weidler, P.G.

    1999-07-01

    A recent hydrothermal mudpool at the southwestern slope of the Rincon de la Vieja volcano in Northwest Costa Rica exhibits an argillic alteration system formed by intense interaction of sulfuric acidic fluids with wall rock materials. Detailed mineralogical analysis revealed an assemblage with kaolinite, alunite, and opal-C as the major mineral phases. Electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR) showed 3 different redox-sensitive cations associated with the mineral phases, Cu{sup +} is structure-bound in opal-C, whereas VO{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+} are located in the kaolinite structure. The location of the redox-sensitive cations in different minerals of the assemblage is indicative of different chemical conditions. The formation of the alteration products can be described schematically as a 2-step process. In a first step alunite and opal-C were precipitated in a fluid with slightly reducing conditions and a low chloride availability. The second step is characterized by a decrease in K{sup +} activity and subsequent formation of kaolinite under weakly oxidizing to oxidizing redox conditions as indicated by structure-bound VO{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+}. The detection of paramagnetic trace elements structure-bound in mineral phases by EPR provide direct information about the prevailing redox conditions during alteration and can, therefore, be used as additional insight into the genesis of the hydrothermal, near-surface system.

  2. Caldera processes and magma-hydrothermal systems continental scientific drilling program: thermal regimes, Valles caldera research, scientific and management plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goff, F.; Nielson, D.L. (eds.)

    1986-05-01

    Long-range core-drilling operations and initial scientific investigations are described for four sites in the Valles caldera, New Mexico. The plan concentrates on the period 1986 to 1993 and has six primary objectives: (1) study the origin, evolution, physical/chemical dynamics of the vapor-dominated portion of the Valles geothermal system; (2) investigate the characteristics of caldera fill and mechanisms of caldera collapse and resurgence; (3) determine the physical/chemical conditions in the heat transfer zone between crystallizing plutons and the hydrothermal system; (4) study the mechanism of ore deposition in the caldera environment; (5) develop and test high-temperature drilling techniques and logging tools; and (6) evaluate the geothermal resource within a large silicic caldera. Core holes VC-2a (500 m) and VC-2b (2000 m) are planned in the Sulphur Springs area; these core holes will probe the vapor-dominated zone, the underlying hot-water-dominated zone, the boiling interface and probable ore deposition between the two zones, and the deep structure and stratigraphy along the western part of the Valles caldera fracture zone and resurgent dome. Core hole VC-3 will involve reopening existing well Baca number12 and deepening it from 3.2 km (present total depth) to 5.5 km, this core hole will penetrate the deep-crystallized silicic pluton, investigate conductive heat transfer in that zone, and study the evolution of the central resurgent dome. Core hole VC-4 is designed to penetrate deep into the presumably thick caldera fill in eastern Valles caldera and examine the relationship between caldera formation, sedimentation, tectonics, and volcanism. Core hole VC-5 is to test structure, stratigraphy, and magmatic evolution of pre-Valles caldera rocks, their relations to Valles caldera, and the influences of regional structure on volcanism and caldera formation.

  3. Sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate-assisted synthesis through a hydrothermal reaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sobhani, Azam; Salavati-Niasari, Masoud; Institute of Nano Science and Nano Technology, University of Kashan, Kashan, P.O. Box 87317–51167, Islamic Republic of Iran

    2012-08-15

    Graphical abstract: Reaction of a SeCl{sub 4} aqueous solution with a NiCl{sub 2}·6H{sub 2}O aqueous solution in presence of sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) as capping agent and hydrazine (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}·H{sub 2}O) as reductant, produces nanosized nickel selenide through a hydrothermal method. The effect of temperature, reaction time and amounts of reductant on the morphology, particle sizes of NiSe nanostructures has been investigated. Highlights: ? NiSe nanostructures were synthesized by hydrothermal method. ? A novel Se source was used to synthesize NiSe. ? SDBS as capping agent plays a crucial role on the morphology of products. ? A mixture of Ni{sub 3}Se{sub 2} and NiSe was prepared in the presence of 2 ml hydrazine. ? A pure phase of NiSe was prepared in the presence of 4 or 6 ml hydrazine. -- Abstract: The effects of the anionic surfactant on the morphology, size and crystallization of NiSe precipitated from NiCl{sub 2}·6H{sub 2}O and SeCl{sub 4} in presence of hydrazine (N{sub 2}H{sub 4}·H{sub 2}O) as reductant were investigated. The products have been successfully synthesized in presence of sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) as surfactant via an improved hydrothermal route. A variety of synthesis parameters, such as reaction time and temperature, capping agent and amount of reducing agent have a significant effect on the particle size, phase purity and morphology of the obtained products. The sample size became bigger with decreasing reaction temperature and increasing reaction time. In the presence of 2 ml hydrazine, the samples were found to be the mixture of Ni{sub 3}Se{sub 2} and NiSe. With increasing the reaction time and amount of hydrazine a pure phase of hexagonal NiSe was obtained. X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) images indicate phase, particle size and morphology of the products. Chemical composition and purity of the products were characterized by X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). Photoluminescence (PL) was used to study the optical properties of NiSe samples.

  4. Effects of glacial ice on subsurface temperatures of hydrothermal systems in Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming: Fluid-inclusion evidence

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bargar, K.E.; Fournier, R.O. (Geological Survey, Menlo Park, CA (USA))

    1988-12-01

    Hydrothermal quartz and fluorite crystals containing liquid-rich fluid inclusions (coexisting vapor-rich fluid inclusions were not observed) were found in drill cores from eight relatively shallow research holes drilled by the US Geological Survey in and near major geyser basins of Yellowstone National Park. Homogenization temperatures (T{sub h}) for mostly secondary fluid inclusions show variations in temperature that have occurred at give depths since precipitation of the host minerals. Within major hydrothermal upflow zones, fluid-inclusion T{sub h} values all were found to be equal to or higher (commonly 20-50 C and up to 155 C higher) than present temperatures at the depths sampled. During periods when thick glacial ice covered the Yellowstone National Park region, pore-fluid pressures in the underlying rock were increased in proportion to the weight of the overlying column of ice. Accordingly, theoretical reference boiling-point curves that reflect the maximum temperature attainable in a hot-water geothermal system at a given depth were elevated, and temperatures within zones of major hydrothermal upflow (drill holes Y-2, Y-3, Y-6, Y-11, Y-13, and upper part of Y-5) increased. The thicknesses of ice required to elevate boiling-point curves sufficiently to account for the observed fluid-inclusion T{sub h} values are within the ranges estimated by glacial geologic studies. At the margins of major hydrothermal upflow zones (drill holes Y-4 and Y-9), fluid-inclusion T{sub h} values at given depths range from 57 C lower to about the same as the current temperature measurements because of a previous decrease in the rate of discharge of warm water and/or an increase in the rate of recharge of cold water into the hydrothermal system.

  5. Eruptive history and petrochemistry of the Bulusan volcanic complex: Implications for the hydrothermal system and volcanic hazards of Mt. Bulusan, Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Delfin, F.G. Jr.; Panem, C.C.; Defant, M.J.

    1993-10-01

    Two contrasting conceptual models of the postcaldera magmatic system of the Bulusan volcanic complex are constructed on the basis of a synthesis of volcanological, petrochemical, and petrologic data. These models predict that hydrothermal convection below the complex will occur either in discrete, structurally-focused zones or over a much broader area. Both models, however, agree that hydrothermal fluids at depth will be highly acidic and volcanic-related. Future ash-fall eruptions and mudflows are likely to affect the area previously chosen for possible drilling. Such risks, combined with the expected acidic character of the hydrothermal system, argue against drilling into this system.

  6. A core hole into the hydrothermal system of the Long Valley caldera

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wollenberg, H.; White, A.; Flexser, S.; Sorey, M.; Farrar, C.

    1987-03-01

    To investigate the present-day hydrothermal system, the ''Shady Rest'' hole was continuously cored 715m into the southwestern moat of the Long Valley caldera. The hole intersected 100m of glacial till and 300m of postcaldera rhyolite before entering the welded Bishop Tuff and bottoming in that unit. A sharp temperature rise over the upper 350m, and near-isothermal conditions below reflect the presence of approx.200/sup 0/C water moving through open, calcite-lined fractures in silicified Early Rhyolite and Bishop Tuff. The depth to the Bishop is the shallowest encountered in holes in the caldera, and the temperatures measured are among the hottest observed in wells drilled within the caldera.

  7. Improvement of thermal properties of low-rank coals treated by hydrothermal process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xie, X.F.; Ohki, A.; Maeda, S.

    1999-07-01

    Australian low-rank coals, Loy Yang coal, Yallourn coal and Indonesian Adaro coal are hydrothermally treated at 200-350 C. The simultaneous TG/DTA is used to investigate the thermal properties, which include the volatile release profile under a nitrogen atmosphere and the burning profile under an air atmosphere. It is found that the temperature of volatile matter combustion (Ti1) of the hot water dried coals (upgraded coals) increases with heat treatment temperature (HTT), whereas the temperature of char combustion (Ti2), the temperature of maximum reaction (Tmax) and the temperature of char burn out (Tout) do not have large increase on the HTT. These results suggest that the HWD process can raise the volatile matter ignition temperature, resulting in improving the spontaneous ignition temperature, but it still maintains the original combustion behavior. Results from TG-DTA measurements are consistent with those determined by FTIR and solid state {sup 13}C CP/MAS NMR.

  8. Methods for sulfate removal in liquid-phase catalytic hydrothermal gasification of biomass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elliott, Douglas C; Oyler, James

    2013-12-17

    Processing of wet biomass feedstock by liquid-phase catalytic hydrothermal gasification must address catalyst fouling and poisoning. One solution can involve heating the wet biomass with a heating unit to a pre-treatment temperature sufficient for organic constituents in the feedstock to decompose, for precipitates of inorganic wastes to form, for preheating the wet feedstock in preparation for subsequent removal of soluble sulfate contaminants, or combinations thereof. Processing further includes reacting the soluble sulfate contaminants with cations present in the feedstock material to yield a sulfate-containing precipitate and separating the inorganic precipitates and/or the sulfate-containing precipitates out of the wet feedstock. Having removed much of the inorganic wastes and the sulfate contaminants that can cause poisoning and fouling, the wet biomass feedstock can be exposed to the heterogenous catalyst for gasification.

  9. Methods for sulfate removal in liquid-phase catalytic hydrothermal gasification of biomass

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Elliott, Douglas C; Oyler, James R

    2014-11-04

    Processing of wet biomass feedstock by liquid-phase catalytic hydrothermal gasification must address catalyst fouling and poisoning. One solution can involve heating the wet biomass with a heating unit to a pre-treatment temperature sufficient for organic constituents in the feedstock to decompose, for precipitates of inorganic wastes to form, for preheating the wet feedstock in preparation for subsequent removal of soluble sulfate contaminants, or combinations thereof. Processing further includes reacting the soluble sulfate contaminants with cations present in the feedstock material to yield a sulfate-containing precipitate and separating the inorganic precipitates and/or the sulfate-containing precipitates out of the wet feedstock. Having removed much of the inorganic wastes and the sulfate contaminants that can cause poisoning and fouling, the wet biomass feedstock can be exposed to the heterogeneous catalyst for gasification.

  10. The role of oxalic acid on the dissolution of granitic sand: an experimental investigation in a hydrothermal flow-through system 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Reed, Christy Lynn

    1990-01-01

    THE ROLE OF OXALIC ACID ON THE DISSOLUTION OF GRANITIC SAND: AN EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION IN A HYDROTHERMAL FLOW-THROUGH SYSTEM A Thesis by CHRISTY LYNN REED Submitted to the Office of Graduate Studies of Texas A&M University in partial... fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1990 Major Subject: Geology THE ROLE OF OXALIC ACID ON THE DISSOLUTION OF GRANITIC SAND: AN EXPERIMENTAL INVESTIGATION IN A HYDROTHERMAL FLOW-THROUGH SYSTEM A Thesis...

  11. Hydrothermal synthesis of nanocubes of sillenite type compounds for photovoltaic applications and solar energy conversion of carbon dioxide to fuels

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Subramanian, Vaidyanathan; Murugesan, Sankaran

    2014-04-29

    The present invention relates to formation of nanocubes of sillenite type compounds, such as bismuth titanate, i.e., Bi.sub.12TiO.sub.20, nanocubes, via a hydrothermal synthesis process, with the resulting compound(s) having multifunctional properties such as being useful in solar energy conversion, environmental remediation, and/or energy storage, for example. In one embodiment, a hydrothermal method is disclosed that transforms nanoparticles of TiO.sub.2 to bismuth titanate, i.e., Bi.sub.12TiO.sub.20, nanocubes, optionally loaded with palladium nanoparticles. The method includes reacting titanium dioxide nanotubes with a bismuth salt in an acidic bath at a temperature sufficient and for a time sufficient to form bismuth titanate crystals, which are subsequently annealed to form bismuth titanate nanocubes. After annealing, the bismuth titanate nanocubes may be optionally loaded with nano-sized metal particles, e.g., nanosized palladium particles.

  12. Hydrothermal synthesis of flowerlike SnO{sub 2} nanorod bundles and their application for lithium ion battery

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wen, Zhigang, E-mail: xh168688@126.com [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Qiannan Normal College for Nationalities, Duyun 558000 (China); Zheng, Feng, E-mail: fzheng@mail.csu.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); State Key Laboratory of Powder Metallurgy, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Yu, Hongchun; Jiang, Ziran [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Central South University, Changsha 410083 (China); Liu, Kanglian [Department of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Qiannan Normal College for Nationalities, Duyun 558000 (China)

    2013-02-15

    SnO{sub 2} nanorod bundles were synthesized by hydrothermal method. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy images showed that the as-prepared flowerlike SnO{sub 2} nanorod bundles consist of tetragonal nanorods with size readily tunable. Their electrochemical properties and application as anode for lithium-ion battery were evaluated by galvanostatic discharge–charge testing and cycle voltammetry. SnO{sub 2} nanorod flowers possess improved discharge capacity of 694 mA h g{sup ?1} up to 40th cycle at 0.1 C. - Highlights: ? The flowerlike SnO{sub 2} nanorod bundles were synthesized by hydrothermal method. ? SnO{sub 2} nanorod bundles with tunable size by controlling concentration of SnCl{sub 4}. ? A probable formation mechanism of SnO{sub 2} nanorod bundles has been proposed.

  13. Luminescent nanocrystals in the rare-earth niobate–zirconia system formed via hydrothermal method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hirano, Masanori Dozono, Hayato

    2013-08-15

    Luminescent nanocrystals based on the rare-earth niobates (Ln{sub 3}NbO{sub 7}, Ln=Y, Eu) and zirconia (ZrO{sub 2}) that were composed of 50 mol% Ln{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} and 50 mol% ZrO{sub 2}, were hydrothermally formed as cubic phase under weakly basic conditions at 240 °C. The lattice parameter of the as-prepared nanoparticles corresponding to the composition of Y{sub 3?x}Eu{sub x}NbO{sub 7}–4ZrO{sub 2} that was estimated as a single phase of cubic gradually increased as the content of europium x increased. The existence of small absorbance peaks at 395 and 466 nm corresponding to the Eu{sup 3+7}F{sub 0}?{sup 5}L{sub 6}, and {sup 7}F{sub 0}?{sup 5}D{sub 2} excitation transition, respectively, was clearly observed in the diffuse reflectance spectra of the as-prepared samples containing europium. The optical band gap of the as-prepared samples was in the range from 3.5 to 3.7 eV. The photoluminescence spectra of the as-prepared nanocrystals containing europium showed orange and red luminescences with main peaks at 590 and 610 nm, corresponding to {sup 5}D{sub 0}?{sup 7}F{sub 1} and {sup 5}D{sub 0}?{sup 7}F{sub 2} transitions of Eu{sup 3+}, respectively, under excitation at 395 nm Xe lamp. The emission intensity corresponding to {sup 5}D{sub 0}?{sup 7}F{sub 2} transition increased as heat-treatment temperature rose from 800 to 1200 °C. - Graphical abstract: This graphical abstract shows the excitation and emission spectra and a transmission electron microscopy image of nanocrystals (with composition based on the rare-earth niobates (Ln{sub 3}NbO{sub 7}, Ln=Y, Eu) and zirconia (ZrO{sub 2}) that were composed of 50 mol% Ln{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} and 50 mol% ZrO{sub 2}) formed via hydrothermal route. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Nanocrystals composed of 50 mol% Y{sub 3?x}Eu{sub x}NbO{sub 7} and 50 mol% ZrO{sub 2} was directly formed. • The nanocrystals were hydrothermally formed under weakly basic conditions at 240 °C. • The Y{sub 3}NbO{sub 7} showed an UV-blue and broad-band emission under excitation at 240 nm. • The emission is originated from the niobate octahedral group [NbO{sub 6}]{sup 7?}. • The nanocrystals showed orange and red luminescences ({sup 5}D{sub 0}?{sup 7}F{sub 1} and {sup 5}D{sub 0}?{sup 7}F{sub 2} , Eu{sup 3+})

  14. Behavior of nuclear waste elements during hydrothermal alteration of glassy rhyolite in an active geothermal system: Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sturchio, N.C.; Seitz, M.G.

    1984-12-31

    The behavior of a group of nuclear waste elements (U, Th, Sr, Zr, Sb, Cs, Ba, and Sm) during hydrothermal alteration of glassy rhyolite is investigated through detailed geochemical analyses of whole rocks, glass and mineral separates, and thermal waters. Significant mobility of U, Sr, Sb, Cs, and Ba is found, and the role of sorption processes in their observed behavior is identified. Th, Zr, and Sm are relatively immobile, except on a microscopic scale. 9 references, 2 figures, 2 tables.

  15. Ion dynamics in nanocrystalline LiMnPO{sub 4} synthesised by novel template free hydrothermal approach

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Vijayan, Lakshmi, E-mail: lakshmivijayan@gmail.com [St. Aloysius' College, Edathua, Alappuzha-689 573, Kerala (India); Cheruku, Rajesh; Govindaraj, G. [Department of Physics, School of Physical, Chemical and Applied Sciences, Pondicherry University, R.V. Nagar, Kalapet, Pondicherry -605 014 (India)

    2014-04-24

    A dense core rectangular shaped nanocrystalline LiMnPO{sub 4} material was synthesized by template free sucrose assisted hydrothermal synthesis. The material possess orthorhombic crystal structure with Pnma, space group having four formula units. The structural characterization was accomplished through X-ray diffraction, thermo gravimetry/differential thermal analysis. Morphology was identified by the SEM, VSM was used to verify the magnetic behavior of the material and electrical characterization was done through impedance spectroscopy and the results were reported.

  16. Development and Validation of an Advanced Stimulation Prediction Model for Enhanced Geothermal Systems (EGS)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: Develop a true 3D hydro-thermal fracturing and proppant flow/transport simulator that is particularly suited for EGS reservoir creation. Perform laboratory scale model tests of hydraulic fracturing and proppant flow/transport using a polyaxial loading device, and use the laboratory results to test and validate the 3D simulator.

  17. Comparison of LiMnPO4 made by Combustion and Hydrothermal Syntheses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Jiajun; Doeff, Marca M.; Wang, Ruigang

    2008-05-15

    Among the olivine-structured metal phosphate family, LiMnPO{sub 4} exhibits a high discharge potential (4V), which is still compatible with common electrolytes, making it interesting for use in the next generation of Li ion batteries. The extremely low electronic conductivity of this material severely limits its electrochemical performance, however. One strategy to overcome this limitation is to make LiMnPO{sub 4} nanoparticulate to decrease the diffusion distance. Another is to add a carbon or other conductive coating in intimate contact with the nanoparticles of the main phase, as is commonly done with LiFePO{sub 4}. The electrochemical performance of LiFePO{sub 4} is highly dependent on the quality of the carbon coatings on the particles [1-2], among other variables. Combustion synthesis allows the co-synthesis of nanoparticles coated with carbon in one step. Hydrothermal synthesis is used industrially to make LiFePO{sub 4} cathode materials [3] and affords a good deal of control over purity, crystallinity, and particle size. A wide range of olivine-structured materials has been successfully prepared by this technique [4], including LiMnPO{sub 4} in this study. In this paper, we report on the new synthesis of nano-LiMnPO{sub 4} by a combustion method. The purity is dependent upon the conditions used for synthesis, including the type of fuel and precursors that are chosen. The fuel to nitrate ratio influences the combustion temperature, which determines the type and amount of carbon found in the LiMnPO{sub 4} composites. This can further be modified by use of carbon structural modifiers added during a subsequent (optional) calcination step. Figure 1 shows a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image of the spherical nano-sized LiMnPO{sub 4} particles typically formed by combustion synthesis. The average particle size is around 30 nm, in agreement with values obtained by the Rietveld refinement of XRD patterns. The small size of the particles cause the peak broadening evident in the pattern of combustion formed LiMnPO{sub 4}, shown in Figure 2. Figure 2 also shows a pattern of hydrothermally prepared LiMnPO{sub 4}, which is sub-micron in size. In this presentation, we will show how the crystallographic parameters, particle size, particle morphology, and carbon content and structure impact the electrochemical properties of the LiMnPO{sub 4}/C composites produced by these methods.

  18. Comparison of LiMnPO4 made by Combustion and Hydrothermal Syntheses

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen, Jiajun; Doeff, Marca M.; Wang, Ruigang

    2008-10-12

    Among the olivine-structured metal phosphate family, LiMnPO{sub 4} exhibits a high discharge potential (4V), which is still compatible with common electrolytes, making it interesting for use in the next generation of Li ion batteries. The extremely low electronic conductivity of this material severely limits its electrochemical performance, however. One strategy to overcome this limitation is to make LiMnPO{sub 4} nanoparticulate to decrease the diffusion distance. Another is to add a carbon or other conductive coating in intimate contact with the nanoparticles of the main phase, as is commonly done with LiFePO{sub 4}. The electrochemical performance of LiFePO{sub 4} is highly dependent on the quality of the carbon coatings on the particles, among other variables. Combustion synthesis allows the co-synthesis of nanoparticles coated with carbon in one step. Hydrothermal synthesis is used industrially to make LiFePO{sub 4} cathode materials and affords a good deal of control over purity, crystallinity, and particle size. A wide range of olivine-structured materials has been successfully prepared by this technique, including LiMnPO{sub 4} in this study. In this paper, we report on the new synthesis of nano-LiMnPO{sub 4} by a combustion method. The purity is dependent upon the conditions used for synthesis, including the type of fuel and precursors that are chosen. The fuel to nitrate ratio influences the combustion temperature, which determines the type and amount of carbon found in the LiMnPO{sub 4} composites. This can further be modified by use of carbon structural modifiers added during a subsequent (optional) calcination step. Figure 1 shows a transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image of the spherical nano-sized LiMnPO{sub 4} particles typically formed by combustion synthesis. The average particle size is around 30 nm, in agreement with values obtained by the Rietveld refinement of XRD patterns. The small size of the particles cause the peak broadening evident in the pattern of combustion formed LiMnPO{sub 4}, shown in Figure 2. Figure 2 also shows a pattern of hydrothermally prepared LiMnPO{sub 4}, which is sub-micron in size. In this presentation, we will show how the crystallographic parameters, particle size, particle morphology, and carbon content and structure impact the electrochemical properties of the LiMnPO{sub 4}/C composites produced by these methods.

  19. Radium-thorium disequilibrium and zeolite-water ion exchange in a Yellowstone hydrothermal environment

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sturchio, N.C.; Bohlke, J.K. (Argonne National Laboratory, IL (USA)); Binz, C.M. (Loras College, Dubuque, IA (USA))

    1989-05-01

    Whole rock samples of hydrothermally altered Biscuit Basin rhyolite from Yellowstone drill cores Y-7 and Y-8 were analyzed for {sup 226}Ra and {sup 230}Th to determine the extent of radioactive disequilibrium and its relation to the rates and mechanisms of element transport in the shallow portion of an active hydrothermal system. The ({sup 226}Ra/{sup 230}Th) activity ratios range from 0.73 to 1.46 and are generally correlated with Th-normalized Ba concentrations (Ba{sub N}). Compositions of clinoptilolite and mordenite in these samples are consistent with ion exchange equilibrium between zeolites and coexisting thermal waters. Average K{sup Ba}{sub d mineral-water} values are 1.0 {center dot} 10{sup 5} mL/g for clinoptilolite and 1.4 {center dot} 10{sup 4} mL/g for mordenite. Apparent diffusivities through matrix porosity estimated for R and Ba range from {approximately}10{sup {minus}12} to {approximately}10{sup {minus}10} cm{sup 2} s{sup {minus}1} in thoroughly zeolitic rhyolite; these rates of diffusion are too low to account for the observed distance scale of ({sup 226}Ra/{sup 230}Th) disequilibrium. The correlated values of ({sup 226}Ra/{sup 230}Th) disequilibrium and Ba{sub N} represent zeolite-water ion exchange equilibrium that is caused by porous flow of water through the rock matrix and by the relatively rapid diffusion of cations within the zeolite lattices. A water flux of at least {approximately}2.5 (cm{sup 3}{sub water}/cm{sup 3}{sub rock}) yr{sup {minus}1} is required to produce measurable ({sup 226}Ra/{sup 230}Th) disequilibrium, whereas at least {approximately}23 (cm{sup 3}{sub water}/cm{sup 3}{sub rock}) yr{sup {minus}1} is required for the sample exhibiting the most extreme ({sup 226}Ra/{sup 230}Th) disequilibrium; these fluxes are much higher than those that can be inferred from net mass transfers of stable species.

  20. Sulfur geochemistry of hydrothermal waters in Yellowstone National Park. 1: The origin of thiosulfate in hot spring waters

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Xu, Y.; Schoonen, M.A.A. [SUNY, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Dept. of Geosciences] [SUNY, Stony Brook, NY (United States). Dept. of Geosciences; Nordstrom, D.K.; Cunningham, K.M.; Ball, J.W. [Geological Survey, Boulder, CO (United States). Water Resources Div.] [Geological Survey, Boulder, CO (United States). Water Resources Div.

    1998-12-01

    Thiosulfate (S{sub 2}O{sub 3}{sup 2{minus}}), polythionate (S{sub x}O{sub 6}{sup 2{minus}}), dissolved sulfide (H{sub 2}S), and sulfate (SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}}) concentrations in thirty-nine alkaline and acidic springs in Yellowstone National Park (YNP) were determined. The analyses were conducted on site, using ion chromatography for thiosulfate, polythionate, and sulfate, and using colorimetry for dissolved sulfide. Thiosulfate was detected at concentrations typically less than 2 {micro}mol/L in neutral and alkaline chloride springs with low sulfate concentrations (Cl{sup {minus}}/SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} > 25). The thiosulfate concentration levels are about one to two orders of magnitude lower than the concentration of dissolved sulfide in these springs. In most acid sulfate and acid sulfate-chloride springs (Cl{sup {minus}}/SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} < 10), thiosulfate concentrations were also typically lower than 2 {micro}mol/L. However, in some chloride springs enriched with sulfate (Cl{sup {minus}}/SO{sub 4}{sup 2{minus}} between 10 and 25), thiosulfate was found at concentrations ranging from 9 to 95 {micro}mol/L, higher than the concentrations of dissolved sulfide in these waters. Polythionate was detected only in Cinder Pool, Norris Geyser basin, at concentrations up to 8 {micro}mol/L, with an average S-chain-length from 4.1 to 4.9 sulfur atoms. The results indicate that no thiosulfate occurs in the deeper parts of the hydrothermal system. Thiosulfate may form, however, from (1) hydrolysis of native sulfur by hydrothermal solutions in the shallower parts (<50 m) of the system, (2) oxidation of dissolved sulfide upon mixing of a deep hydrothermal water with aerated shallow groundwater, and (3) the oxidation of dissolved sulfide by dissolved oxygen upon discharge of the hot spring. Upon discharge of a sulfide-containing hydrothermal water, oxidation proceeds rapidly as atmospheric oxygen enters the water. The transfer of oxygen is particularly effective if the hydrothermal discharge is turbulent and has a large surface area.

  1. Petrology and geochemistry of Alto Peak, a vapor-cored hydrothermal system, Leyte Province, Philippines

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Reyes, A.G.; Giggenbach, W.F.; Saleras, J.R.M.; Salonga, N.D.; Vergara, M.C.

    1993-10-01

    Based on detailed petrological information on secondary mineral assemblages and the composition of fluids trapped in inclusions and discharged from five wells, the Alto Peak geothermal field was found to represent a combined vapor and liquid-dominated system. A central core or chimney, with a diameter of about 1 km, a height of some 3 km and occupied by a high gas vapor (1.1 to 5.6 molal CO{sub 2}), is surrounded by an envelope of intermediate salinity water (7,000 mg/kg Cl) with temperatures between 250 and 350 C. The transition from purely vapor-dominated to liquid-dominated zones takes place via two-phase zones occupied by fluid mixtures of highly variable compositions. Much of the lower temperature, mature neutral pH Cl water is likely to have formed during an earlier stage in the evolution of the system. High temperatures of > 300 C, and associated alteration, are limited to wells AP-1D and the lower parts of AP-2D and are ascribed to re-heating by recent magmatic intrusions. The isotopic composition of the well discharges suggests that they contain some 40 to 50% of magmatic water. Alto Peak is considered a typical example of hydrothermal systems associated with many dormant volcanoes.

  2. Textural properties of synthetic nano-calcite produced by hydrothermal carbonation of calcium hydroxide

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Montes-Hernandez, German; Charlet, L; Tisserand, Delphine; Renard, F

    2008-01-01

    The hydrothermal carbonation of calcium hydroxide (Ca(OH)2) at high pressure of CO2 (initial PCO2 1/4 55 bar) and moderate to high temperature (30 and 90 1C) was used to synthesize fine particles of calcite. This method allows a high carbonation efficiency (about 95% of Ca(OH)2-CaCO3 conversion), a significant production rate (48 kg/m3 h) and high purity of product (about 96%). However, the various initial physicochemical conditions have a strong influence on the crystal size and surface area of the synthesized calcite crystals. The present study is focused on the estimation of the textural properties of synthesized calcite (morphology, specific surface area, average particle size, particle size distribution and particle size evolution with reaction time), using Rietveld refinements of X-ray diffraction (XRD) spectra, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) measurements, and scanning electron microscope (SEM) and transmission electron microscope (TEM) observations. This study demonstrate that the pressure, the temperatu...

  3. Recovery Act. Development and Validation of an Advanced Stimulation Prediction Model for Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gutierrez, Marte

    2013-12-31

    This research project aims to develop and validate an advanced computer model that can be used in the planning and design of stimulation techniques to create engineered reservoirs for Enhanced Geothermal Systems. The specific objectives of the proposal are to; Develop a true three-dimensional hydro-thermal fracturing simulator that is particularly suited for EGS reservoir creation; Perform laboratory scale model tests of hydraulic fracturing and proppant flow/transport using a polyaxial loading device, and use the laboratory results to test and validate the 3D simulator; Perform discrete element/particulate modeling of proppant transport in hydraulic fractures, and use the results to improve understand of proppant flow and transport; Test and validate the 3D hydro-thermal fracturing simulator against case histories of EGS energy production; and Develop a plan to commercialize the 3D fracturing and proppant flow/transport simulator. The project is expected to yield several specific results and benefits. Major technical products from the proposal include; A true-3D hydro-thermal fracturing computer code that is particularly suited to EGS; Documented results of scale model tests on hydro-thermal fracturing and fracture propping in an analogue crystalline rock; Documented procedures and results of discrete element/particulate modeling of flow and transport of proppants for EGS applications; and Database of monitoring data, with focus of Acoustic Emissions (AE) from lab scale modeling and field case histories of EGS reservoir creation.

  4. Chemical and isotopic kinetics of sulfate reduction by organic matter under hydrothermal conditions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kaiser, C.J.

    1988-01-01

    This study investigated the feasibility of nonbacterial sulfate reduction by organic matter in geologic environments. Sulfate is reduced by dextrose under acidic conditions at temperatures of 230-270 C. Reaction products include sulfide and organic-sulfur compounds; sulfite, thiosulfate and elemental sulfur were not detected. The rate law for the initial one- or two-electron reduction of sulfate at 250C is first-order in bisulfate and about one-half-order in initial dextrose concentration, and shows a very strong dependence on pH. The kinetics of sulfate reduction by fructose at 250C are virtually the same. The lack of sulfate reduction by formaldehyde, methanol, ethanol and acetic acid at 250 C indicates that the reducing power of dextrose and fructose cannot be attributed to carbonyl, carboxyl or hydroxyl functional groups. The form of the rate law for sulfate reduction by dextrose and the presence of an induction period rather suggest that the initial reduction of sulfate occurs with free radicals derived from the thermal decomposition of the hexoses or their alteration products. The inferred sulfate-reduction reaction mechanism suggest that aqueous sulfate may be reduced to sulfide in geologic environments such as deep sedimentary basins. The observed acid-catalysis of the reaction in the laboratory may be supplanted by clay-mineral catalysis in geologic environments. Sulfur isotopes are fractionated during the reduction of sulfate by dextrose under hydrothermal conditions. Computer simulations of the isotopic evolution of the experiments suggest that sulfate-sulfide isotopic exchange largely controls the isotopic composition of sulfate and sulfide. The extent of isotopic fractionation due solely to sulfate reduction thus cannot be determined from the experiments

  5. Anaerobic oxidation of short-chain alkanes in hydrothermal sediments: potential influences on sulfur cycling and microbial diversity

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Adams, MM; Hoarfrost, AL; Bose, A; Joye, SB; Girguis, PR

    2013-05-14

    Short-chain alkanes play a substantial role in carbon and sulfur cycling at hydrocarbon-rich environments globally, yet few studies have examined the metabolism of ethane (C-2), propane (C-3), and butane (C-4) in anoxic sediments in contrast to methane (C-1). In hydrothermal vent systems, short-chain alkanes are formed over relatively short geological time scales via thermogenic processes and often exist at high concentrations. The sediment-covered hydrothermal vent systems at Middle Valley (MV Juan de Fuca Ridge) are an ideal site for investigating the anaerobic oxidation of C-1-C-4 alkanes, given the elevated temperatures and dissolved hydrocarbon species characteristic of these metalliferous sediments. We examined whether MV microbial communities oxidized C-1-C-4 alkanes under mesophilic to thermophilic sulfate-reducing conditions. Here we present data from discrete temperature (25, 55, and 75 degrees C) anaerobic batch reactor incubations of MV sediments supplemented with individual alkanes. Co-registered alkane consumption and sulfate reduction (SR) measurements provide clear evidence for C-1-C-4 alkane oxidation linked to SR over time and across temperatures. In these anaerobic batch reactor sediments, 16S ribosomal RNA pyrosequencing revealed that Deltaproteobacteria, particularly a novel sulfate-reducing lineage, were the likely phylotypes mediating the oxidation of C-2-C-4 alkanes. Maximum C-1-C-4 alkane oxidation rates occurred at 55 degrees C, which reflects the mid-core sediment temperature profile and corroborates previous studies of rate maxima for the anaerobic oxidation of methane (AOM). Of the alkanes investigated, C-3 was oxidized at the highest rate over time, then C-4, C-2, and C-1, respectively. The implications of these results are discussed with respect to the potential competition between the anaerobic oxidation of C-2-C(4)alkanes with AOM for available oxidants and the influence on the fate of C-1 derived from these hydrothermal systems.

  6. Environmental impacts during geothermal development: Some examples from Central America

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Goff, S.; Goff, F.

    1997-04-01

    The impacts of geothermal development projects are usually positive. However, without appropriate monitoring plans and mitigation actions firmly incorporated into the project planning process, there exists the potential for significant negative environmental impacts. The authors present five examples from Central America of environmental impacts associated with geothermal development activities. These brief case studies describe landslide hazards, waste brine disposal, hydrothermal explosions, and air quality issues. Improved Environmental Impact Assessments are needed to assist the developing nations of the region to judiciously address the environmental consequences associated with geothermal development.

  7. Realization of single-termination SrTiO{sub 3} (100) surfaces by a microwave-induced hydrothermal process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Velasco-Davalos, Ivan; Thomas, Reji; Ruediger, Andreas, E-mail: ruediger@emt.inrs.ca [Centre Énergie, Matériaux et Télécommunications, INRS, 1650 Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Québec J3X1S2 (Canada)] [Centre Énergie, Matériaux et Télécommunications, INRS, 1650 Lionel-Boulet, Varennes, Québec J3X1S2 (Canada)

    2013-11-11

    A microwave-induced hydrothermal etching of SrTiO{sub 3} (100) single crystal surfaces in deionized water and subsequent annealing in oxygen atmosphere results in single-terminated and atomically flat terraces for pure and niobium-doped substrates as confirmed through one unit-cell step height and uniform phase by atomic force microscopy. This process that requires 3?min of moderate microwave radiation completely avoids the use of hydrofluoric acid (HF) and related point defects due to fluorine in the crystal surface. The advantages of a safe, inexpensive, and environmentally neutral process hold promise to replace the existing standard protocol for substrate preparation based on buffered HF.

  8. Dominica Grants Geothermal Exploration and Development License...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Energy Needs Geothermal Home About the Geothermal Technologies Office Enhanced Geothermal Systems Hydrothermal Resources Low-Temperature & Coproduced Resources Systems...

  9. Geothermal Energy Growth Continues, Industry Survey Reports

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    A survey released by the Geothermal Energy Association (GEA) shows continued growth in the number of new geothermal power projects under development in the United States, a 20% increase since January of this year.

  10. Geothermal Industry Applauds Congressional Action on Tax Legislation...

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    of U.S. companies who support the expanded use of geothermal energy and are developing geothermal Resources worldwide for electrical power generation and direct-heat uses. GEA...

  11. Hydrothermal Synthesis and Structural Characterization of Novel Zn-Triazole-Benzenedicarboxylate Frameworks

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Park, Hyunsoo; Moureau, David M.; Parise, John B.

    2008-10-03

    Three new metal-organic coordination polymers were synthesized hydrothermally using Zn2+ ion, 1,2,4-triazole, and 1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid (BDC): Zn5(H2O)2(C2H2N3)4(C8H4O4)3 {center_dot} 3.9H2O (1), Zn2(C2H2N3)2(C2H3N3)(C8H4O4) {center_dot} 2.5H2O (2), and Zn4(H2O)2(C2H2N3)4(C8H4O4)2 {center_dot} 14H2O (3). Their crystal structures were determined by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Their thermal properties were examined by thermogravimetric analysis. Structure 1 crystallizes in the monoclinic P21/n space group with a = 10.192(2) {angstrom}, b = 17.764(4) {angstrom}, c = 24.437(5) {angstrom}, {beta} = 91.19(3){sup o}, and V = 4423.3(15) {angstrom}3. Structure 2 crystallizes in the triclinic P space group with a = 7.797(2) {angstrom}, b = 10.047(2) {angstrom}, c = 13.577(3) {angstrom}, {alpha} = 110.18(3){sup o}, {beta} = 105.46(3){sup o}, {gamma} = 93.90(3){sup o}, and V = 947.0(3) {angstrom}3. Structure 3 crystallizes in monoclinic P21/n space group with a = 13.475(3) {angstrom}, b = 26.949(5) {angstrom}, c = 13.509(3) {angstrom}, {beta} = 95.18(3){sup o}, and V = 4885.7(17) {angstrom}3. In structure 1, the units of the triazole-Zn polyhedra are linked by BDC in a zigzag fashion to create the stacking of phenyl groups along the a axis. In structure 2, both triazole and BDC bridge Zn polyhedra in the (011) plane, resulting in the eight-membered channels along the a axis. In the case of structure 3, the BDC links the Zn polyhedra along the b axis to form a pillared open framework. This structure is the most porous of the compounds presented in this work.

  12. Electronic structure and magnetic properties of FeWO{sub 4} nanocrystals synthesized by the microwave-hydrothermal method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Almeida, M.A.P. [INCTMN-DQ-Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Sao Carlos, P.O. Box 676, 13565-905, SP (Brazil)] [INCTMN-DQ-Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Sao Carlos, P.O. Box 676, 13565-905, SP (Brazil); Cavalcante, L.S., E-mail: laeciosc@bol.com.br [INCTMN-Universidade Estadual, Paulista, P.O. Box 355, 14801-907, Araraquara, SP (Brazil); Morilla-Santos, C.; Filho, P.N. Lisboa [MAv-Universidade Estadual, Paulista, P.O. Box 473, 17033-360, Bauru, SP (Brazil)] [MAv-Universidade Estadual, Paulista, P.O. Box 473, 17033-360, Bauru, SP (Brazil); Beltran, A.; Andres, J.; Gracia, L. [Department de Quimica Fisica i Analitica, Universitat Jaume I, E-12071 Castello (Spain)] [Department de Quimica Fisica i Analitica, Universitat Jaume I, E-12071 Castello (Spain); Longo, E. [INCTMN-DQ-Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Sao Carlos, P.O. Box 676, 13565-905, SP (Brazil) [INCTMN-DQ-Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos, Sao Carlos, P.O. Box 676, 13565-905, SP (Brazil); INCTMN-Universidade Estadual, Paulista, P.O. Box 355, 14801-907, Araraquara, SP (Brazil)

    2012-11-15

    This communication reports that FeWO{sub 4} nanocrystals were successfully synthesized by the microwave-hydrothermal method at 443 K for 1 h. The structure and shape of these nanocrystals were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Rietveld refinement, and transmission electron microscopy. The experimental results and first principles calculations were combined to explain the electronic structure and magnetic properties. Experimental data were obtained by magnetization measurements for different applied magnetic fields. Theoretical calculations revealed that magnetic properties of FeWO{sub 4} nanocrystals can be assigned to two magnetic orderings with parallel or antiparallel spins in adjacent chains. These factors are crucial to understanding of competition between ferro- and antiferromagnetic behavior. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Monophasic FeWO{sub 4} nanocrystals were synthesized by the microwave-hydrothermal method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rietveld refinement and clusters model for monoclinic structure Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Magnetic properties of FeWO{sub 4} nanocrystals at different temperatures.

  13. Hydrothermal synthesis of Mn vanadate nanosheets and visible-light photocatalytic performance for the degradation of methyl blue

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pei, L.Z. Xie, Y.K.; Pei, Y.Q.; Jiang, Y.X.; Yu, H.Y.; Cai, Z.Y.

    2013-07-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Mn vanadate nanosheets have been synthesized by simple hydrothermal process. • The formation of Mn vanadate nanosheets can be controlled by growth conditions. • Mn vanadate nanosheets exhibit good photocatalytic activities for methyl blue. - Abstract: Mn vanadate nanosheets have been synthesized via a facile hydrothermal route using ammonium metavanadate and Mn acetate as the raw materials, polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) as the surfactant. X-ray diffraction (XRD) shows that the Mn vanadate nanosheets are composed of monoclinic MnV{sub 2}O{sub 6} phase. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) observation indicates that the nanosheets have the average thickness of about 50 nm, length of 2–10 ?m and width of 800 nm to 2 ?m. The growth process of the Mn vanadate nanosheets has also been discussed based on the analysis of the roles of the growth conditions on the formation of the Mn vanadate nanosheets. The nanosheets show good photocatalytic activities for the degradation of methylene blue (MB) under visible light irradiation. About 72.96% MB can be degraded after visible light irradiation for 1 h over 10 mg Mn vanadate nanosheets in 10 mL MB solution with the concentration of 10 mg L{sup ?1}.

  14. Study concerning the utilization of the ocean spreading center environment for the conversion of biomass to a liquid fuel. (Includes Appendix A: hydrothermal petroleum genesis). [Supercritical water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Steverson, M.; Stormberg, G.

    1985-01-01

    This document contains a report on the feasibility of utilizing energy obtained from ocean spreading centers as process heat for the conversion of municipal solid wastes to liquid fuels. The appendix contains a paper describing hydrothermal petroleum genesis. Both have been indexed separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base. (DMC)

  15. A New Type of Two-Dimensional Metal Coordination Systems: Hydrothermal Synthesis and Properties of the First Oxalate-bpy Mixed-Ligand Framework

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Li, Jing

    A New Type of Two-Dimensional Metal Coordination Systems: Hydrothermal Synthesis and Properties, 290 °C; II, 340 °C; III, 350 °C; and IV, 290 °C). Introduction Investigation of novel inorganic-organic hybrid framework assemblies represents one of the most active areas of materials science and chemical

  16. Synthesis of ZnO nanorod–nanosheet composite via facile hydrothermal method and their photocatalytic activities under visible-light irradiation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Tan, Wai Kian; Abdul Razak, Khairunisak; Lockman, Zainovia; Kawamura, Go; Muto, Hiroyuki; Matsuda, Atsunori

    2014-03-15

    ZnO composite films consisting of ZnO nanorods and nanosheets were prepared by low-temperature hydrothermal processing at 80 °C on seeded glass substrates. The seed layer was coated on glass substrates by sol–gel dip-coating and pre-heated at 300 °C for 10 min prior to hydrothermal growth. The size of the grain formed after pre-heat treatment was ?40 nm. A preferred orientation seed layer at the c-axis was obtained, which promoted vertical growth of the ZnO nanorod arrays and formation of the ZnO nanosheets. X-ray diffraction patterns and high-resolution transmission electron microscope (HR-TEM) images confirmed that the ZnO nanorods and nanosheets consist of single crystalline and polycrystalline structures, respectively. Room temperature photoluminescence spectra of the ZnO nanorod–nanosheet composite films exhibited band-edge ultraviolet (UV) and visible emission (blue and green) indicating the formation of ZnO crystals with good crystallinity and are supported by Raman scattering results. The formation of one-dimensional (1D) ZnO nanorod arrays and two-dimensional (2D) ZnO nanosheet films using seeded substrates in a single low-temperature hydrothermal step would be beneficial for realization of device applications that utilize substrates with limited temperature stability. The ZnO nanorods and nanosheets composite structure demonstrated higher photocatalytic activity during degradation of aqueous methylene blue under visible-light irradiation. -- Graphical abstract: Schematic illustration of ZnO nanorod–nanosheet composite structure formation by hydrothermal at low-temperature of 80 °C against time. Highlights: • Novel simultaneous formation of ZnO nanorods and nanosheets composite structure. • Facile single hydrothermal step formation at low-temperature. • Photoluminescence showed ultraviolet and visible emission. • Feasible application on substrates with low temperature stability. • Improved photocatalytic activity under visible-light irradiation.

  17. Materials Data on Na5GeAs3 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    DOE Data Explorer [Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)]

    Kristin Persson

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  18. Materials Data on Na5GeAs3 (SG:14) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kristin Persson

    2014-11-02

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  19. CanGEA Fifth Annual Geothermal Conference Presentation - Mapping & Database Workshop

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i n c i p a lCarib Energy (USA) LLCAdministrationAward-LNG - OrderI've

  20. CanGEA Fifth Annual Geothermal Conference Presentation - Mapping & Database

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment|Marketing, LLCEfficiencyCOP 21: The06 AuditAuditofAltergy hadWorkshop |

  1. The dynamics of silica deposition in fractures: Oxygen isotope ratios in hydrothermal silica from Yellowstone drill core Y-13

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sturchio, N.C.; Keith, T.E.C.; Muehlenbachs, K.

    1988-01-01

    The delta/sup 18/O values of 22 samples of hydrothermal chalcedony and quartz from Y-13 drill core range from /minus/7.5 to /minus/1.3/per thousand/. Most samples could not be in mineral-water isotopic equilibrium under present conditions. Fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures in quartz indicate precipitation at or above temperatures measured during drilling. Most silica appears to have precipitated from water enriched in /sup 18/O relative to present thermal water. Inferred /sup 18/O enrichments are too large in many cases to be explained by boiling and steam separation. The apparent /sup 18/O enrichment in thermal water may represent a transient dynamic effect that occurs when new fractures open, as disequilibrium increases and the local system is temporarily perturbed. This interpretation is consistent with the observed sequence of mineral deposition and delta/sup 18/O within individual fractures. 32 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Geothermal power development in Hawaii. Volume I. Review and analysis

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1982-06-01

    The history of geothermal exploration in Hawaii is reviewed briefly. The nature and occurrences of geothermal resources are presented island by island. An overview of geothermal markets is presented. Other topies covered are: potential markets of the identified geothermal areas, well drilling technology, hydrothermal fluid transport, overland and submarine electrical transmission, community aspects of geothermal development, legal and policy issues associated with mineral and land ownership, logistics and infrastructure, legislation and permitting, land use controls, Regulation 8, Public Utilities Commission, political climate and environment, state plans, county plans, geothermal development risks, and business planning guidelines.

  3. Identification of chemoautotrophic microorganisms from a diffuse flow hydrothermal vent at EPR 9° north using ¹³C DNA stable isotope probing and catalyzed activated reporter deposition-fluorescence in situ hybridization

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Richberg, Kevin Patrick

    2010-01-01

    At deep-sea hydrothermal vents chemolithoautotrophic microbes mediate the transfer of geothermal chemical energy to higher trophic levels. To better understand these underlying processes and the organisms catalyzing them, ...

  4. Economics of Developing Hot Stratigraphic Reservoirs

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Greg Mines; Hillary Hanson; Rick Allis; Joseph Moore

    2014-09-01

    Stratigraphic geothermal reservoirs at 3 – 4 km depth in high heat-flow basins are capable of sustaining 100 MW-scale power plants at about 10 c/kWh. This paper examines the impacts on the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) of reservoir depth and temperature, reservoir productivity, and drillhole/casing options. For a reservoir at 3 km depth with a moderate productivity index by hydrothermal reservoir standards (about 50 L/s/MPa, 5.6 gpm/psi), an LCOE of 10c/kWh requires the reservoir to be at about 200°C. This is the upper temperature limit for pumps. The calculations assume standard hydrothermal drilling costs, with the production interval completed with a 7 inch liner in an 8.5 inch hole. If a reservoir at 4 km depth has excellent permeability characteristics with a productivity index of 100 L/s/MPa (11.3 gpm/psi), then the LCOE is about 11 c/kWh assuming the temperature decline rate with development is not excessive (< 1%/y, with first thermal breakthrough delayed by about 10 years). Completing wells with modest horizontal legs (e.g. several hundred meters) may be important for improving well productivity because of the naturally high, sub-horizontal permeability in this type of reservoir. Reducing the injector/producer well ratio may also be cost-effective if the injectors are drilled as larger holes.

  5. Response to"Analysis of the Treatment, by the U.S. Department of Energy, of the FEP Hydrothermal Activity in the Yucca Mountain Performance Assessment" by Yuri Dublyansky

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Houseworth, J.E.; Hardin, E.

    2008-11-17

    This paper presents a rebuttal to Dublyansky (2007), which misrepresents technical issues associated with hydrothermal activity at the proposed Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository and their importance to the long-term performance of the repository. In this paper, questions associated with hydrothermal activity are reviewed and the justification for exclusion of hydrothermal activity from performance assessment is presented. The hypothesis that hydrothermal upwelling into the present-day unsaturated zone has occurred at Yucca Mountain is refuted by the unambiguous evidence that secondary minerals and fluid inclusions in the unsaturated zone formed in an unsaturated environment from downward percolating meteoric waters. The thermal history at Yucca Mountain, inferred from fluid inclusion and isotopic data, is explained in terms of the tectonic extensional environment and associated silicic magmatism. The waning of tectonic extension over millions of years has led to the present-day heat flux in the Yucca Mountain region that is below average for the Great Basin. The long time scales of tectonic processes are such that any effects of a resumption of extension or silicic magmatism on hydrothermal activity at Yucca Mountain over the 10,000-year regulatory period would be negligible. The conclusion that hydrothermal activity was incorrectly excluded from performance assessment as asserted in Dublyansky (2007) is contradicted by the available technical and regulatory information.

  6. In situ ore formation experiment: Amino acids and amino sugars trapped in artificial chimneys on deep-sea hydrothermal systems at Suiyo Seamount, Izu-Bonin Arc, Pacific Ocean

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Takano,; Marumo,; K.,; Ebashi,; T.,; Gupta,; P., L; Kawahata,; H.,; Kobayashi,; K.,; Yamagishi,; A.,; Kuwabara,; T,

    2013-01-01

    The present study reports on the bio-organic composition of a deep-sea venting hydrothermal system originating from arc volcanism; the origin of the particulates in hydrothermal fluids from the Suiyo Seamount in the southern Izu-Bonin (Ogasawara) Arc is discussed with regard to amino compounds. Chimney samples on deep-sea hydrothermal systems and core samples at Suiyo Seamount were determined for amino acids, and occasionally amino sugars. Two types of chimney samples were obtained from active hydrothermal systems by submersible vehicles: one was natural chimney (NC) on a hydrothermal natural vent; the other was artificial chimneys (AC), mainly formed by the growth and deposition of sulfide-rich particulate components in a Kuwabara-type in situ incubator (KI incubator). Total hydrolyzed amino acids (THAA) and hydrolyzed hexosamines (HA) in AC ranged from 10.7 nmol/g to 64.0 nmol/g and from 0 nmol/g to 8.1 nmol/g, respectively, while THAA in hydrothermally altered core samples ranged from 26.0 nmol/g to 107.4 ...

  7. Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}–CNTs nanocomposites: Inorganic dispersant assisted hydrothermal synthesis and application in lithium ion batteries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Guo, Qixun, E-mail: qxguo@xmu.edu.cn; Guo, Pengfei; Li, Juntao, E-mail: jtli@xmu.edu.cn; Yin, Hao; Liu, Jie; Xiao, Feilong; Shen, Daoxiang; Li, Ning

    2014-05-01

    Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}–CNTs nanocomposites with a particle size of ?80 nm have been synthesized through an organic-free hydrothermal synthesis strategy by using Sn(OH){sub 6}{sup 2?} as an inorganic dispersant, and served as anode materials of lithium ion batteries. Nano-sized and micro-sized Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} without CNTs have also been prepared for comparison. The cycle performances of the as-obtained Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} are highly size-dependent. The Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}–CNTs nanocomposites can deliver reversible discharge capacity of ?700 mA h/g at a current density of 50 mA/g after 50 cycles. The discharge capacity of the micro-sized Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} decreased to 171 mA h/g after 50 cycles. Our work not only provides new insights into the inorganic dispersant assisted hydrothermal synthesis of metal oxides nanocrystals but also gives guidance for finding new nanocomposites as anode materials of lithium ion batteries. - Graphical abstract: Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}–CNTs nanocomposites have been prepared through an inorganic dispersant assisted hydrothermal synthesis strategy, and served as anode materials of lithium ion batteries with enhanced performance. - Highlights: • Sn(OH){sub 6}{sup 2?} is a good inorganic dispersant for the hydrothermal synthesis of nano Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}. • The cycle performances of nano Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} anode are much better than that of micro Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} anode. • Compositing CNTs can enhance the cycle performances of nano Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} anode.

  8. Face-selective electrostatic control of hydrothermal zinc oxide nanowire synthesis

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Joo, Jaebum

    Rational control over the morphology and the functional properties of inorganic nanostructures has been a long-standing goal in the development of bottom-up device fabrication processes. We report that the geometry of ...

  9. Effect of hydrothermal condition on the formation of multi-component oxides of Ni-based metallic glass under high temperature water near the critical point

    DOE Public Access Gateway for Energy & Science Beta (PAGES Beta)

    Kim, J. S.; Kim, S. Y.; Kim, D. H.; Ott, R. T.; Kim, H. G.; Lee, M. H.

    2015-07-01

    The specific feature of multi-component oxides synthesized by hydrothermal process under high temperature (633 K) and highly pressurized water (18.9 MPa) near critical point. Effects of hydrothermal processing duration times 24 hours and 72 hours, respectively, on the oxide formation of the Ni59Zr20Ti16Si2Sn3 metallic glass synthesized by powder metallurgy process were characterized by X-ray diffractometer, differential scanning calorimeter along with the particle size, morphology and crystalline phase of the oxides. The crystallization of the needle-shape NiTiO3, ZrTiO4 and ZrSnO4 ternary oxide phases observed on the surface of metallic glass at below glass transition temperature and the morphology of oxide phasesmore »changed to plate-shape around 2 ?m in diameter by the increase processing time. This hydrothermal processing in subcritical water provides accelerated dense metal oxide crystals due to the reaction medium being at higher pressure than conventional oxidation processing.« less

  10. Hydrothermal synthesis and characteristics of 3-D hydrated bismuth oxalate coordination polymers with open-channel structure

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chen Xinxiang; Cao Yanning; Zhang Hanhui Chen Yiping; Chen Xuehuan; Chai Xiaochuan

    2008-05-15

    Two new 3-D porous bismuth coordination polymers, (C{sub 5}NH{sub 6}){sub 2}[Bi{sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 4}].2H{sub 2}O 1 and (NH{sub 4})[Bi(C{sub 2}O{sub 4}){sub 2}].3H{sub 2}O 2, have been hydrothermally synthesized and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound 1 crystallizes in the monoclinic symmetry, P2{sub 1}/c space group with a=10.378(2) A, b=17.285(3) A, c=16.563(5) A, {alpha}=90 deg., {beta}=119.66(2) deg., {gamma}=90 deg., V=2581.8(10) A{sup 3}, Z=4, R{sub 1}=0.0355 and wR{sub 2}=0.0658 for unique 4713 reflections I >2{sigma}(I). Compound 2 crystallizes in the tetragonal symmetry, I4{sub 1}/amd space group with a=11.7026(17) A, b=11.7026(17) A, c=9.2233(18) A, {alpha}=90 deg., {beta}=90 deg., {gamma}=90 deg., V=1263.1(4) A{sup 3}, Z=32, R{sub 1}=0.0208 and wR{sub 2}=0.0518 for unique 359 reflections I> 2{sigma}(I). Compounds 1 and 2 are 3-D open-framework structures with a 6{sup 6} uniform net, which consist of honeycomb-like layers connected to each other by oxalate units. While different guest molecules fill in their cavities of honeycomb-like layers, study of ultrasonic treatment on 2 indicates the replacement of NH{sub 4}{sup +} by K{sup +} on potassium ion exchange. Thermogravimetric analysis indicates that the open-channel frameworks are thermally stable up to 200 deg. C, and other characterizations are also described by elemental analysis, IR and ultraviolet-visible diffuse reflectionintegral spectrum (UV-Vis DRIS). - Graphical abstract: Two novel 3-D extended porous coordination polymers have been synthesized by hydrothermal method. Both compounds are 3-D open-framework structures with a 6{sup 6} uniform net, which consist of honeycomb-like layers connected to each other by oxalate units. While different guest molecules fill in their cavities of honeycomb-like layers. Study of ultrasonic treatment on 2 indicates the replacement of NH{sub 4}{sup +} by K{sup +} on potassium ion exchange.

  11. Microwave-hydrothermal synthesis of nanostructured Na-birnessites and phase transformation by arsenic(III) oxidation

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dias, Anderson [Departamento de Quimica, Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto, 35400-000 Ouro Preto, MG (Brazil)], E-mail: anderson_dias@iceb.ufop.br; Sa, Rodrigo G.; Spitale, Matheus C.; Athayde, Maycon; Ciminelli, Virginia S.T. [DEMET, UFMG, Rua Espirito Santo 35, Sala 206, 30160-030 Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2008-06-03

    Microwave-hydrothermal synthesis was employed to produce Na-birnessites. Crystalline, single-phase materials were obtained at temperatures as low as 120 deg. C and times as short as 1 min. X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy were used to characterize the structural features of the nanostructured powders. Birnessites possessed a monoclinic structure in space group C2/m with nine Raman-active bands, all of which were observed for the first time due to optimized acquisition of the spectroscopic data. The highly reactive materials produced were submitted to sorption experiments with As(III). An oxidative precipitation occurred with the production of Mn(II) arsenate at higher arsenic concentrations. In addition, the formation of hausmannite (Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4}) was confirmed by X-ray diffraction and Raman analyses of the reacted solid phase. The observed 14 Raman-active modes were adjusted according to the tetragonal I4{sub 1}/amd space group for hausmannite. An additional band related to the breathing mode of the arsenate was observed, leading to the conclusion that adsorption onto hausmannite takes place in addition to the oxidative precipitation of manganese arsenate.

  12. Transport and Defect Mechanisms in Cuprous Delafossites. 1. Comparison of Hydrothermal and

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Poeppelmeier, Kenneth R.

    flat-panel displays, ultraviolet light emitting diodes, heterojunctions for solar cells, and all- oxide are utilized in a variety of commercial applications, such as flat-panel displays, photovoltaic devices there are no commercially viable p-type TCOs. The development of a high figure-of-merit p-type TCO would enable improved

  13. Hydrothermal coupling in a self-affine rough fracture A. Neuville,* R. Toussaint, and J. Schmittbuhl

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schmittbuhl, Jean

    - thermics is an intensively developing field. Deep enhanced geothermal systems EGSs are based on the energy the hydraulic flow and subse- quently to enhance the thermal exchange. Fracture roughness might, in the opposite as an ellipse or a poly- hedron. This is the case in most fracture network models used for geothermal 10

  14. Topologically novel copper molybdate phases based on 3,4'-dipyridylketone: Hydrothermal synthesis, structural characterization, and magnetic properties

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Montney, Matthew R. [Lyman Briggs College and Department of Chemistry, E-30 Holmes Hall, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48825 (United States); LaDuca, Robert L. [Lyman Briggs College and Department of Chemistry, E-30 Holmes Hall, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48825 (United States)], E-mail: laduca@msu.edu

    2008-04-15

    Hydrothermal treatment of CuCl{sub 2}.2H{sub 2}O, MoO{sub 3}, and 3,4'-dipyridylketone (3,4'-dpk) in 1:1:2 mole ratio afforded the new mixed metal oxide phases [Cu{sub 2}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2}(3,4'-dpk)(H{sub 2}O)] (1) or [Cu{sub 4}(3,4'-dpk){sub 4}(Mo{sub 8}O{sub 26})] (2), depending on the pH of the initial reaction mixture. Compound 1 possesses unique one-dimensional (1-D) [Cu{sub 2}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)]{sub n} ribbons constructed from the linkage of {l_brace}Cu{sup II}{sub 4}O{sub 6}{r_brace} tetrameric units through isolated [MoO{sub 4}]{sup 2-} tetrahedra. These ribbons in turn are connected into a two-dimensional (2-D) coordination polymer structure by tethering 3,4'-dpk ligands. Compound 2, containing monovalent copper ions, manifests an unprecedented 'X-rail' 1-D extended structure with (6{sup 2}8){sub 4}(6{sup 6}) topology formed from the bracketing of discrete [{beta}-Mo{sub 8}O{sub 26}]{sup 4-} anions by four [Cu{sup I}(3,4{sup '}-dpk)]{sub n}{sup n+} chains. The variable temperature magnetic susceptibility behavior of 1 was fit to a linear tetramer model, with g=2.03(3), J{sub 1}=25.8(7) cm{sup -1} and J{sub 2}=-46(1) cm{sup -1}. Antiferromagnetic inter-tetramer interactions (zJ'=-0.21(3) cm{sup -1}) were also evident. Crystallographic data: 1 monoclinic, P2{sub 1}/c, a=10.3911(11) A, b=6.9502(6) A, c=22.958(2) A, {beta}=100.658(7){sup o}, V=1629.5(3) A{sup 3}, R{sub 1}=0.1256, and wR{sub 2}=0.2038; 2 triclinic, P1-bar,a=10.9000(3) A, b=11.7912(4) A, c=13.5584(4) A, {alpha}=102.482(2){sup o}, {beta}=102.482(2){sup o}, {gamma}=117.481(2){sup o}, V=1450.98(8) A{sup 3}, R{sub 1}=0.0428, and wR{sub 2}=0.0630. - Graphical abstract: [Cu{sub 2}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2}(3,4'-dpk)(H{sub 2}O)] (1, 3,4'-dpk=3,4'-dipyridylketone) and [Cu{sub 4}(3,4'-dpk){sub 4}(Mo{sub 8}O{sub 26})] (2) have been prepared by hydrothermal methods. 1 possesses 1-D [Cu{sub 2}(MoO{sub 4}){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O)]{sub n} ribbons containing magnetically interacting {l_brace}Cu{sub 4}O{sub 6}{r_brace} tetramers. The ribbons are connected into 2-D by 3,4'-dpk ligands. The reduced phase 2 manifests an unprecedented 1-D 'X-rail' chain motif.

  15. A Roadmap for Strategic Development of Geothermal Exploration Technologies

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Phillips, Benjamin R.; Ziagos, John; Thorsteinsson, Hildigunnur; Hass, Eric

    2013-02-13

    Characterizing productive geothermal systems is challenging yet critical to identify and develop an estimated 30 gigawatts electric (GWe) of undiscovered hydrothermal resources in the western U.S. This paper, undertaken by the U.S. Department of Energy’s Geothermal Technologies Office (GTO), summarizes needs and technical pathways that target the key geothermal signatures of temperature, permeability, and fluid content, and develops the time evolution of these pathways, tying in past and current GTO exploration Research and Development (R&D) projects. Beginning on a five-year timescale and projecting out to 2030, the paper assesses technologies that could accelerate the confirmation of 30 GWe. The resulting structure forms the basis for a Geothermal Exploration Technologies Roadmap, a strategic development plan to help guide GTO R&D investments that will lower the risk and cost of geothermal prospect identification. This roadmap is currently open for public comment. Send your comments to geothermal@ee.doe.gov.

  16. Low-temperature hydrothermal synthesis of the three-layered sodium cobaltite P3-Na{sub x}CoO{sub 2} (x ? 0.60)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Miclau, M.; Bokinala, K.; Miclau, N.

    2014-06-01

    Highlights: • We report direct synthesis of the high temperature stable phase, P3-Na{sub 0.6}CoO{sub 2}. • The hydrothermal synthesis of P3-Na{sub 0.6}CoO{sub 2} involves one step and low temperature. • The yield diagram for Na–Co–H{sub 2}O system has been builded up to 250 °C. • We propose a formation mechanism of P3-Na{sub 0.6}CoO{sub 2} phase using the unit cell theory. • The thermal stability of P3-Na{sub 0.6}CoO{sub 2} has been investigated by means of HT-XRD. - Abstract: In order to obtain the layered sodium cobalt oxide materials by hydrothermal synthesis, the yield diagram for Na–Co–H{sub 2}O system has been built and studied. In the same time, the well-known data of Co–H{sub 2}O system have been extended at 250 °C in basic solution. We had first synthesized directly the high temperature stable phase, P3-Na{sub 0.6}CoO{sub 2} by a one-step low-temperature hydrothermal method. The rhombohedral structure of P3-Na{sub 0.6}CoO{sub 2} has been determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and the purity of phases has been confirmed by XPS. The thermal stability of P3-Na{sub 0.6}CoO{sub 2} has been investigated by means of high temperature X-ray diffraction in 298–873 K range and when the temperature has reached 723 K, the completely transformation of P3-Na{sub 0.6}CoO{sub 2} in the rhombohedral stable phase ?-NaCoO{sub 2} (space group R-3m) was observed. Also, a formation mechanism of P3-Na{sub 0.6}CoO{sub 2} phase using the unit cell theory in the hydrothermal process was proposed.

  17. FTIR study of the photocatalytic degradation of gaseous benzene over UV-irradiated TiO{sub 2} nanoballs synthesized by hydrothermal treatment in alkaline solution

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Zhu, Zhengru [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering and State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemical, School of Environmental Sciences and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering and State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemical, School of Environmental Sciences and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Li, Xinyong, E-mail: xyli@dlut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering and State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemical, School of Environmental Sciences and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering and State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemical, School of Environmental Sciences and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Zhao, Qidong; Qu, Zhenping; Hou, Yang; Zhao, Ling [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering and State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemical, School of Environmental Sciences and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China)] [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering and State Key Laboratory of Fine Chemical, School of Environmental Sciences and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Liu, Shaomin [Department of Chemical Engineering, Curtin University of Technology, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia)] [Department of Chemical Engineering, Curtin University of Technology, Perth, WA 6845 (Australia); Chen, Guohua [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)] [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Clear Water Bay, Kowloon (Hong Kong)

    2010-12-15

    In this study, photocatalysts of TiO{sub 2} nanoballs were obtained via a hydrothermal treating of commercial P25 in alkaline solution, and then characterized with SEM, XRD, BET and surface photovoltage spectroscopy techniques. The UV-assisted photodegradation of gaseous benzene over P25 and the prepared TiO{sub 2} nanoballs was monitored by an in situ infrared technique. The results demonstrated that the prepared TiO{sub 2} nanoballs in anatase form were more active than commercial P25 in photocatalytic oxidation of gaseous benzene. The promoted activity of the hydrothermal-treated TiO{sub 2} is attributed to the increasing specific surface area and larger band gap induced by the reduced crystallite size. The spectra of FTIR indicated that weakly adsorbed phenol was formed as the reaction progress. Hydroxyl groups on the surface of TiO{sub 2} nanoballs are able to react with photo-produced phenol, which is then retained on the catalyst surface leading to the progressive deactivation of the catalyst in the gas-solid system.

  18. Hydrothermal | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Improved geochemical techniques to estimate reservoir temperatures and processes Remote Sensing High-resolution remote sensing data and reliable automated processing...

  19. Hydrothermal Resources Fact Sheet

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nA Guide to TappingWORKof71 Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Successone of theResources

  20. Co-hydrolysis of hydrothermal and dilute acid pretreated Populus slurries to support development of a high-throughput pretreatment system

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Studer, Michael H; Brethauer, Simone; DeMartini, Jaclyn D; McKenzie, Heather L; Wyman, Charles E

    2011-01-01

    process samples. National Renewable Energy Laboratory, NREL/at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory for approxi-the standard National Renewable Energy Laboratory method [

  1. High resolution FT-ICR mass spectral analysis of bio-oil and residual water soluble organics produced by hydrothermal liquefaction of the marine microalga Nannochloropsis salina

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sudasinghe, Nilusha; Dungan, Barry; Lammers, Peter; Albrecht, Karl O.; Elliott, Douglas C.; Hallen, Richard T.; Schaub, Tanner

    2014-03-01

    We report a detailed compositional characterization of a bio-crude oil and aqueous by-product from hydrothermal liquefaction of Nannochloropsis salina by direct infusion Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) in both positive- and negative-ionization modes. The FT-ICR MS instrumentation approach facilitates direct assignment of elemental composition to >7000 resolved mass spectral peaks and three-dimensional mass spectral images for individual heteroatom classes highlight compositional diversity of the two samples and provide a baseline description of these materials. Aromatic nitrogen compounds and free fatty acids are predominant species observed in both the bio-oil and aqueous fraction. Residual organic compounds present in the aqueous fraction show distributions that are slightly lower in both molecular ring and/or double bond value and carbon number relative to those found in the bio-oil, albeit with a high degree of commonality between the two compositions.

  2. A National-Scale Comparison of Resource and Nutrient Demands for Algae-Based Biofuel Production by Lipid Extraction and Hydrothermal Liquefaction

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Venteris, Erik R.; Skaggs, Richard; Wigmosta, Mark S.; Coleman, Andre M.

    2014-03-01

    Algae’s high productivity provides potential resource advantages over other fuel crops. However, demand for land, water, and nutrients must be minimized to avoid impacts on food production. We apply our national-scale, open-pond, growth and resource models to assess several biomass to fuel technological pathways based on Chlorella. We compare resource demands between hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) and lipid extraction (LE) to meet 1.89E+10 and 7.95E+10 L yr-1 biofuel targets. We estimate nutrient demands where post-fuel biomass is consumed as co-products and recycling by anaerobic digestion (AD) or catalytic hydrothermal gasification (CHG). Sites are selected through prioritization based on fuel value relative to a set of site-specific resource costs. The highest priority sites are located along the Gulf of Mexico coast, but potential sites exist nationwide. We find that HTL reduces land and freshwater consumption by up to 46% and saline groundwater by around 70%. Without recycling, nitrogen (N) and phosphorous (P) demand is reduced 33%, but is large relative to current U.S. agricultural consumption. The most nutrient-efficient pathways are LE+CHG for N and HTL+CHG for P (by 42%). Resource gains for HTL+CHG are offset by a 344% increase in N consumption relative to LE+CHG (with potential for further recycling). Nutrient recycling is essential to effective use of alternative nutrient sources. Modeling of utilization availability and costs remains, but we find that for HTL+CHG at the 7.95E+10 L yr-1 production target, municipal sources can offset 17% of N and 40% of P demand and animal manures can generally meet demands.

  3. Flower-like nanostructure MNb{sub 2}O{sub 6} (M = Mn, Zn) with high surface area: Hydrothermal synthesis and enhanced photocatalytic performance

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Huang, Xue; Jing, Yan; Yang, Jia [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Ju, Jing [College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Cong, Rihong [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Gao, Wenliang, E-mail: gaowl@cqu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China); Yang, Tao, E-mail: taoyang@cqu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400044 (China)

    2014-03-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • MNb{sub 2}O{sub 6} was prepared by a mild two-step hydrothermal method. • Their flower-like nanostructure morphology was studied by SEM and TEM. • High BET surface areas for MnNb{sub 2}O{sub 6} (?50 m{sup 2}/g) and ZnNb{sub 2}O{sub 6} (?100 m{sup 2}/g). • Band gap energies were estimated by UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectra. • Photocatalytic activities were evaluated under UV-light irradiation. - Abstract: Nano-scaled MNb{sub 2}O{sub 6} (M = Mn, Zn) was successfully synthesized via a two-step hydrothermal method. It is important to control the exact pH of the reaction solution in order to obtain pure products. The as-prepared samples both crystallize in the columbite structure. Interestingly, the products possess a flower-like morphology in a pseudo-six-fold symmetry, which is in fact arrayed by two-dimensional nanosheets. Their surface areas (51 m{sup 2}/g for MnNb{sub 2}O{sub 6} and 103 m{sup 2}/g for ZnNb{sub 2}O{sub 6}) are about 25–50 times of those prepared by solid state reaction. UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectra show the nano-scaled sample has a stronger absorption and a narrower band gap than its bulk form. The estimated band gap energies are 2.70 eV (MnNb{sub 2}O{sub 6}) and 3.77 eV (ZnNb{sub 2}O{sub 6}), respectively. The nano-scaled ZnNb{sub 2}O{sub 6} exhibits a double enhancement of photocatalytic activity in the decolorization of methylene blue than bulk ZnNb{sub 2}O{sub 6}.

  4. Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    150 Sustainable Development Sustainable Development Degree options BSc or MA (Single Honours Degree) Sustainable Development Contributing Schools Biology; Chemistry; Computer Science; Geography & Geosciences within Sustainable Development, then you should apply for the MA degree; if you are most interested

  5. Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brierley, Andrew

    ) Sustainable Development Contributing Schools Biology; Chemistry; Computer Science; Geography & Geosciences enquiries Dr Emilia Ferraro, Department of Geography & Sustainable Development E: gg. Resources Very few universities currently offer undergraduate degrees in Sustainable Development. Uniquely

  6. Career Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The career development objective is to produce better employees and maximizing employee potential. DOE Leadership & Career Development Programs can help provide employees with the skills and...

  7. Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) Model Geothermal User Reference Guide

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Johnson, C.; Augustine, C.; Goldberg, M.

    2012-09-01

    The Geothermal Jobs and Economic Development Impact (JEDI) model, developed through the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), is an Excel-based user-friendly tools that estimates the economic impacts of constructing and operating hydrothermal and Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) power generation projects at the local level for a range of conventional and renewable energy technologies. The JEDI Model Geothermal User Reference Guide was developed to assist users in using and understanding the model. This guide provides information on the model's underlying methodology, as well as the parameters and references used to develop the cost data utilized in the model. This guide also provides basic instruction on model add-in features, operation of the model, and a discussion of how the results should be interpreted.

  8. Effect of calcination temperature on structural and photocatalyst properties of nanofibers prepared from low-cost natural ilmenite mineral by simple hydrothermal method

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Simpraditpan, Athapon; Wirunmongkol, Thanakorn; Pavasupree, Sorapong; Pecharapa, Wisanu

    2013-09-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Nanofibers were prepared from low-cost ilmenite mineral via simple hydrothermal. • High photocatalyst nanofibers were prepared via post heat treatment method. • The nanofibers calcined at 100–700 °C for 2 h maintained nanofiber structure. • The calcined nanofibers at 400 °C showed the highest photocatalytic activity. - Abstract: Titanate nanofibers were synthesized via the hydrothermal method (120 °C for 72 h) using natural ilmenite mineral (FeTiO{sub 3}) as the starting material. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray fluorescent (XRF), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Brunauer–Emmett–Teller (BET) for specific surface area. The nanofibers were 20–90 nm in diameter and 2–7 ?m in length. The as-synthesized nanofibers calcined at 300–400 °C showed TiO{sub 2} (B) whereas the nanofibers calcined at 500 °C revealed a mixture of two phases of TiO{sub 2} (B) and anatase. The nanofibers calcined at high temperature of 600–1000 °C showed a mixture of tri-crystalline of anatase, rutile, and Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}. The rutile phase increased with increasing calcination temperature. The nanofibers calcined at 300–700 °C maintained their structure while the morphology of the nanofibers calcined at 800–1000 °C transformed into submicron rod-like structure. This increase of calcination temperature led to the phase transformation from thermodynamically metastable anatase to the most stable form of rutile phase. The crystallite size of prepared samples increased with increasing calcination temperature. Interestingly, with increasing calcination temperature, the absorption edge of the prepared samples shows an obvious shift to visible light region due to the change of crystallite phase and increased crystallite size. Therefore, the band gap energy of the prepared samples became narrower with increasing calcination temperature. Furthermore, the photocatalytic activity of the nanofibers calcined at 400 °C for 2 h was found to be not merely higher than those of the commercially available TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles powders (P-25, JRC-01, and JRC-03) but also the highest of all the samples in this study.

  9. Development of Models to Simulate Tracer Behavior in Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Mark D.; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Reimus, P. W.; Newell, D.; Watson, Tom B.

    2010-06-01

    A recent report found that power and heat produced from engineered (or enhanced) geothermal systems (EGSs) could have a major impact on the United States while incurring minimal environmental impacts. EGS resources differ from high-grade hydrothermal resources in that they lack sufficient temperature distributions, permeability/porosity, fluid saturation, or recharge of reservoir fluids. Therefore, quantitative characterization of temperature distributions and the surface area available for heat transfer in EGS is necessary for commercial development of geothermal energy. The goal of this project is to provide integrated tracer and tracer interpretation tools to facilitate this characterization. Modeling capabilities are being developed as part of this project to support laboratory and field testing to characterize engineered geothermal systems in single- and multi-well tests using tracers. The objective of this report is to describe the simulation plan and the status of model development for simulating tracer tests for characterizing EGS.

  10. Program Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Atencio, Julian J.

    2014-05-01

    This presentation covers how to go about developing a human reliability program. In particular, it touches on conceptual thinking, raising awareness in an organization, the actions that go into developing a plan. It emphasizes evaluating all positions, eliminating positions from the pool due to mitigating factors, and keeping the process transparent. It lists components of the process and objectives in process development. It also touches on the role of leadership and the necessity for audit.

  11. Hydrothermal Liquefaction Oil and Hydrotreated Product from Pine Feedstock Characterized by Heteronuclear Two-Dimensional NMR Spectroscopy and FT-ICR Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sudasinghe, Nilusha; Cort, John R.; Hallen, Richard T.; Olarte, Mariefel V.; Schmidt, Andrew J.; Schaub, Tanner

    2014-12-01

    Hydrothermal liquefaction (HTL) crude oil and hydrotreated product from pine tree farm waste (forest product residual, FPR) have been analyzed by direct infusion electrospray ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (ESI FT-ICR MS) in both positive- and negative-ionization modes and high-resolution twodimensional heteronuclear 1H-13C NMR spectroscopy. FT-ICR MS resolves thousands of compounds in complex oils and provides unparalleled compositional details for individual molecules for identification of compound class (heteroatom content), type (number of rings plus double bonds to carbon or double bond equivalents (DBE) and carbon number (degree of alkylation). Heteronuclear 1H-13C NMR spectroscopy provides one-bond and multiple-bond correlations between pairs of 1H and 13C chemical shifts that are characteristic of different organic functional groups. Taken together this information provides a picture of the chemical composition of these oils. Pyrolysis crude oil product from pine wood was characterized for comparison. Generally, pyrolysis oil is comprised of a more diverse distribution of heteroatom classes with higher oxygen number relative to HTL oil as shown by both positive- and negative-ion ESI FT-ICR MS. A total of 300 N1, 594 O1 and 267 O2 compounds were observed as products of hydrotreatment. The relative abundance of N1O1, N1O2, N1O3, N2, N2O1, N2O2 and O3 compounds are reduced to different degrees after hydrotreatment and other higher heteroatom containing species (O4-O10, N1O4, N1O5 and N2O3) are completely removed by hydrotreatment.

  12. Development Tools

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home Room NewsInformation Current HAB Packet HanfordDOEDanielDeSmall BusinessDeveloperDevelopingTools

  13. Rapid microwave hydrothermal synthesis of ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} with high photocatalytic activity toward aromatic compounds in air and dyes in liquid water

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sun Meng; Li Danzhen; Zhang Wenjuan; Chen Zhixin; Huang Hanjie; Li Wenjuan; He Yunhui; Fu Xianzhi

    2012-06-15

    ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} was synthesized from Ga(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} and ZnCl{sub 2} via a rapid and facile microwave-assisted hydrothermal method. The photocatalytic properties of the as-prepared ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} were evaluated by the degradation of pollutants in air and aqueous solution under ultraviolet (UV) light illumination. The results demonstrated that ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} had exhibited efficient photocatalytic activities higher than that of commercial P25 (Degussa Co.) in the degradation of benzene, toluene, and ethylbenzene, respectively. In the liquid phase degradation of dyes (methyl orange, Rhodamine B, and methylene blue), ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} has also exhibited remarkable activities higher than that of P25. After 32 min of UV light irradiation, the decomposition ratio of methyl orange (10 ppm, 150 mL) over ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} (0.06 g) was up to 99%. The TOC tests revealed that the mineralization ratio of MO (10 ppm, 150 mL) was 88.1% after 90 min of reaction. A possible mechanism of the photocatalysis over ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} was also proposed. - Graphical abstract: In the degradation of RhB under UV light irradiation, ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} had exhibited efficient photo-activity, and after only 24 min of irradiation the decomposition ratio was up to 99.8%. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A rapid and facile M-H method to synthesize ZnGa{sub 2}O{sub 4} photocatalyst. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The photocatalyst exhibits high activity toward benzene and dyes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The catalyst possesses more surface hydroxyl sites than TiO{sub 2} (P25). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deep oxidation of different aromatic compounds and dyes over catalyst.

  14. Software Developers

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Because SEED will provide a common, open-source data framework, software developers will be able to write applications that access the data in a consistent way (with proper permissions), or build functionalities onto the SEED platform in a replicable way.

  15. Monitoring and Modeling Fluid Flow in a Developing EGS Reservoir

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Project objectives: Better understand and model fluid injection into a tight reservoir on the edges of a hydrothermal field. Use seismic data to constrain geomechanical/hydrologic/thermal model of reservoir.

  16. Chemical and isotopic characteristics of the coso east flank hydrothermal fluids: implications for the location and nature of the heat source

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Christenson, B.W.; Kennedy, B.M.; Adams, M.C.; Bjornstad, S.C.; Buck, C.

    2007-01-01

    phase conditions in the Coso EGS project. Proceedings 29 thField: Implications for EGS development. Proceedings 30 thcould assist with future EGS developments within the East

  17. Hydrothermal alkali metal recovery process

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Wolfs, Denise Y. (Houston, TX); Clavenna, Le Roy R. (Baytown, TX); Eakman, James M. (Houston, TX); Kalina, Theodore (Morris Plains, NJ)

    1980-01-01

    In a coal gasification operation or similar conversion process carried out in the presence of an alkali metal-containing catalyst wherein solid particles containing alkali metal residues are produced, alkali metal constituents are recovered from the particles by treating them with a calcium or magnesium-containing compound in the presence of water at a temperature between about 250.degree. F. and about 700.degree. F. and in the presence of an added base to establish a pH during the treatment step that is higher than would otherwise be possible without the addition of the base. During the treating process the relatively high pH facilitates the conversion of water-insoluble alkali metal compounds in the alkali metal residues into water-soluble alkali metal constituents. The resultant aqueous solution containing water-soluble alkali metal constituents is then separated from the residue solids, which consist of the treated particles and any insoluble materials formed during the treatment step, and recycled to the gasification process where the alkali metal constituents serve as at least a portion of the alkali metal constituents which comprise the alkali metal-containing catalyst. Preferably, the base that is added during the treatment step is an alkali metal hydroxide obtained by water washing the residue solids produced during the treatment step.

  18. Hydrothermal System | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNewTexas: EnergyHunterdonHutto,FuelEnergyGabbsequal to

  19. Hydrothermal System | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNewTexas: EnergyHunterdonHutto,FuelEnergyGabbsequal

  20. Hydrothermal Alteration | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View NewGuam:

  1. Hydrothermal Reservoirs | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION J APPENDIXsource History View NewGuam:on Openei | Open Energy Information

  2. Hydrothermal Projects | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof Energy ServicesContractingManagement »Hydrogen and Fuel

  3. Hydrothermal Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuels Data CenterFinancial OpportunitiesDepartment ofScienceHow MuchResearch

  4. Toner, B.M., M.A. Marcus, K.J. Edwards, O. Rouxel, and C.R. German. 2012. Measuring the form of iron in hydrothermal plume particles. Oceanography 25(1):209212, http://dx.doi.org/10.5670/

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    the form of iron in hydrothermal plume particles. Oceanography 25(1):209­212, http://dx.doi.org/10 in Oceanography, Volume 25, Number 1, a quarterly journal of The Oceanography Society. Copyright 2012 by The Oceanography Society. All rights reserved. USAGE Permission is granted to copy this article for use in teaching

  5. A highly coercive carbon nanotube coated with Ni{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocrystals synthesized by chemical precipitation-hydrothermal process

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Cao Huiqun; Zhu Meifang Li Yaogang; Liu Jianhong; Ni Zhuo; Qin Zongyi

    2007-11-15

    Novel magnetic composites (Ni{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-MWCNTs) of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) coated with Ni{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocrystals were synthesized by chemical precipitation-hydrothermal process. The composites were characterized by X-ray powder diffractometer (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectrometer (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Moessbauer spectroscopy (MS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and selected area electron diffraction (SAED), etc. A temperature of about 200 deg. C was identified to be an appropriate hydrothermal condition to obtain Ni{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-MWCNTs, being lower than the synthesis temperature of a single-phase Ni{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocrystals. The sizes of Ni{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} in the composites were smaller than those of Ni{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocrystals in single phase. The composites exhibited more superparamagnetic than Ni{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocrystals in their relaxation behaviors. The magnetic properties measured by a vibrating sample magnetometer showed that the composites had a high coercive field of 386.0 Oe at room temperature, higher than those of MWCNT and Ni{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocrystals. - Graphical abstract: Novel magnetic composites (Ni{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-MWCNTs) of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) coated with Ni{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocrystals were synthesized by chemical precipitation-hydrothermal process. The composites had a high coercive field of 386.0 Oe, higher than those of MWCNT and Ni{sub 0.5}Zn{sub 0.5}Fe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nanocrystals.

  6. Nozzle development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Dodge, F.T.; Dodge, L.G.; Johnson, J.E.

    1989-06-01

    The objective of this program has been the development of experimental techniques and data processing procedures to allow for the characterization of multi-phase fuel nozzles using laboratory tests. Test results were to be used to produce a single value coefficient-of-performance that would predict the performance of the fuel nozzles independent of system application. Several different types of fuel nozzles capable of handling multi-phase fuels have been characterized for: (a) fuel flow rate versus delivery pressure, (b) fuel-air ratio throughout the fuel spray or plume and the effective cone angle of the injector, and (c) fuel drop- or particle-size distribution as a function of fluid properties. Fuel nozzles which have been characterized on both single-phase liquids and multi-phase liquid-solid slurries include a variable-film-thickness nozzle, a commercial coal-water slurry (CWS) nozzle, and four diesel injectors of different geometries (tested on single-phase fluids only). Multi-phase mixtures includes CWS with various coal loadings, surfactant concentrations, and stabilizer concentrations, as well as glass-bead water slurries with stabilizing additives. Single-phase fluids included glycerol-water mixtures to vary the viscosity over a range of 1 to 1500 cP, and alcohol-water mixtures to vary the surface tension from about 22 to 73 dyne/cm. In addition, tests were performed to characterize straight-tube gas-solid nozzles using two differences size distributions of glass beads in air. Standardized procedures have been developed for processing measurements of spray drop-size characteristics and the overall cross-section average drop or particle size. 43 refs., 60 figs., 7 tabs.

  7. Investigation of the hydrothermal crystallisation of the perovskite solid solution NaCe{sub 1?x}La{sub x}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 6} and its defect chemistry

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Harunsani, Mohammad H.; Woodward, David I.; Peel, Martin D.; Ashbrook, Sharon E.; Walton, Richard I.

    2013-11-15

    Perovskites of nominal composition NaCe{sub 1?x}La{sub x}Ti{sub 2}O{sub 6} (0?x?1) crystallise directly under hydrothermal conditions at 240 °C. Raman spectroscopy shows distortion from the ideal cubic structure and Rietveld analysis of powder X-ray and neutron diffraction reveals that the materials represent a continuous series in rhombohedral space group R3-bar c. Ce L{sub III}-edge X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy shows that while the majority of cerium is present as Ce{sup 3+} there is evidence for Ce{sup 4+}. The paramagnetic Ce{sup 3+} affects the chemical shift and line width of {sup 23}Na MAS NMR spectra, which also show with no evidence for A-site ordering. {sup 2}H MAS NMR of samples prepared in D{sub 2}O shows the inclusion of deuterium, which IR spectroscopy shows is most likely to be as D{sub 2}O. The deuterium content is highest for the cerium-rich materials, consistent with oxidation of some cerium to Ce{sup 4+} to provide charge balance of A-site water. - Graphical abstract: A multi-element A-site perovskite crystallises directly from aqueous, basic solutions at 240 °C; while the paramagnetic effect of Ce{sup 3+} on the {sup 23}Na NMR shows a homogeneous solid-solution, the incorporation of A-site water is also found from {sup 2}H NMR and IR, with oxidation of some cerium to charge balance proved by XANES spectroscopy. Display Omitted - Highlights: • Direct hydrothermal synthesis allows crystallisation of a perovskite solid-solution. • XANES spectroscopy shows some oxidation of Ce{sup 3+} to Ce{sup 4+}. • The paramagnetism of Ce{sup 3+} shifts and broadens the {sup 23}Na solid-state NMR. • The perovskite materials incorporate water as an A-site defect.

  8. Hydrothermally Stable, Sulfur-Tolerant Platinum-Based Oxidation Catalysts via Surface Modification of SiO2 with TiO2 and ZrO2

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    This study demonstrates the feasibility of developing highly stable, sulfur-tolerant oxidation catalysts that use less Pt via surface modification of silica supports with transition metal oxides.

  9. National Geothermal Data System: Case Studies on Exploration and Development of Potential Geothermal Sites Through Distributed Data Sharing

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Anderson, Arlene; Allison, Lee; Richard, Steve; Caudill-Daugherty, Christy; Patten, Kim

    2014-09-29

    The NGDS released version 1 of the system on April 30, 2014 using the US Geoscience Information Network (USGIN) as its data integration platform. NGDS supports the 2013 Open Data Policy, and as such, the launch was featured at the 2014 Energy Datapalooza. Currently, the NGDS features a comprehensive user interface for searching and accessing nearly 41,000 documents and more than 9 million data points shared by scores of data providers across the U.S. The NGDS supports distributed data sharing, permitting the data owners to maintain the raw data that is made available to the consumer. Researchers and industry have been utilizing the NGDS as a mechanism for promoting geothermal development across the country, from hydrothermal to ground source heat pump applications. Case studies in geothermal research and exploration from across the country are highlighted.

  10. Development of Models to Simulate Tracer Tests for Characterization of Enhanced Geothermal Systems

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Williams, Mark D.; Reimus, Paul; Vermeul, Vincent R.; Rose, Peter; Dean, Cynthia A.; Watson, Tom B.; Newell, D.; Leecaster, Kevin; Brauser, Eric

    2013-05-01

    A recent report found that power and heat produced from enhanced (or engineered) geothermal systems (EGSs) could have a major impact on the U.S energy production capability while having a minimal impact on the environment. EGS resources differ from high-grade hydrothermal resources in that they lack sufficient temperature distribution, permeability/porosity, fluid saturation, or recharge of reservoir fluids. Therefore, quantitative characterization of temperature distributions and the surface area available for heat transfer in EGS is necessary for the design and commercial development of the geothermal energy of a potential EGS site. The goal of this project is to provide integrated tracer and tracer interpretation tools to facilitate this characterization. This project was initially focused on tracer development with the application of perfluorinated tracer (PFT) compounds, non-reactive tracers used in numerous applications from atmospheric transport to underground leak detection, to geothermal systems, and evaluation of encapsulated PFTs that would release tracers at targeted reservoir temperatures. After the 2011 midyear review and subsequent discussions with the U.S. Department of Energy Geothermal Technology Program (GTP), emphasis was shifted to interpretive tool development, testing, and validation. Subsurface modeling capabilities are an important component of this project for both the design of suitable tracers and the interpretation of data from in situ tracer tests, be they single- or multi-well tests. The purpose of this report is to describe the results of the tracer and model development for simulating and conducting tracer tests for characterizing EGS parameters.

  11. Comparison of microwaves to fluidized sand baths for heating tubular reactors for hydrothermal and dilute acid batch pretreatment of corn stover

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Riverside, University of

    heated pretreatment led to faster xylan, lignin, and acetyl removal as well as ear- lier xylan technology was developed in 1940's driven by military needs and was later intro- duced into civilian markets

  12. Ecosystems and Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tufford, Dan

    1999-01-01

    Ecosystems and Sustainable Development Editors: J.L. Uso,Ecosystems and Sustainable Development. Southhampton, UK:ISBN: 1-85312-502-4. Sustainable development research is a

  13. Psychology of Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Milfont, Taciano Lemos

    2003-01-01

    to achieve sustainable development: economic, environmental,Psychology of Sustainable Development By Peter Schmuck andPsychology of Sustainable Development. Norwell, MA: Kluwer

  14. The National Energy Strategy - The role of geothermal technology development: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1990-01-01

    Each year the Geothermal Division of the US Department of Energy conducts an in-depth review of its entire geothermal R D program. The conference serves several purposes: a status report on current R D activities, an assessment of progress and problems, a review of management issues, and a technology transfer opportunity between DOE and the US geothermal industry. Topics in this year's conference included Hydrothermal Energy Conversion Technology, Hydrothermal Reservoir Technology, Hydrothermal Hard Rock Penetration Technology, Hot Dry Rock Technology, Geopressured-Geothermal Technology and Magma Energy Technology. Each individual paper has been cataloged separately.

  15. Hydrothermal synthesis and crystal structure of a new inorganic/organic hybrid of scandium sulfate: (H{sub 2}en)Sc{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 4}.(H{sub 2}O){sub 0.72}

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Lu Jianjiang [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)]. E-mail: j.lu@anl.gov; Schlueter, John A. [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Geiser, Urs [Materials Science Division, Argonne National Laboratory, 9700 S Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States)

    2006-05-15

    The first organically templated layered structure of scandium sulfate, (H{sub 2}en)Sc{sub 2}(SO{sub 4}){sub 4}.(H{sub 2}O){sub 0.72}, (en=ethylenediamine) was synthesized by a hydrothermal method and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction. In the title compound, scandium ions are bridged by sulfate groups with a ratio of 1:2 into a 4{sub 3}{sup 6} layer structure. These layers are parallel packed and separated from each other by ethylenediammonium dications and water molecules. The title compound crystallizes in the monoclinic space group P2/c, with cell parameters a=8.5966(13)A, b=5.1068(8)A, c=18.847(3)A, {beta}=91.210(3){sup o}, V=827.2(2)A{sup 3} and Z=2. Refinement gave R{sub 1}[I>2{sigma}(I)]=0.0354 and wR{sub 2}[I>2{sigma}(I)]=0.0878. Thermogravimetric analysis indicates that this material is thermally stable to above 400 deg. C.

  16. Individual Development and Excutive Development Plan Resources

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    According to OPM, an individual development plan (IDP) is a tool to assist employees in career and personal development. Its primary purpose is to help employees reach short and long-term career...

  17. RESEARCH & DEVELOPMENT TO PREPARE AND CHARACTERIZE ROBUST COAL/BIOMASS MIXTURES FOR DIRECT CO-FEEDING INTO GASIFICATION SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Felix, Larry; Farthing, William; Hoekman, S. Kent

    2014-12-31

    This project was initiated on October 1, 2010 and utilizes equipment and research supported by the Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, under Award Number DE- FE0005349. It is also based upon previous work supported by the Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory, under Award Numbers DOE-DE-FG36-01GOl1082, DE-FG36-02G012011 or DE-EE0000272. The overall goal of the work performed was to demonstrate and assess the economic viability of fast hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) for transforming lignocellulosic biomass into a densified, friable fuel to gasify like coal that can be easily blended with ground coal and coal fines and then be formed into robust, weather-resistant pellets and briquettes. The specific objectives of the project include: • Demonstration of the continuous production of a uniform densified and formed feedstock from loblolly pine (a lignocellulosic, short rotation woody crop) in a hydrothermal carbonization (HTC) process development unit (PDU). • Demonstration that finely divided bituminous coal and HTC loblolly pine can be blended to form 90/10 and 70/30 weight-percent mixtures of coal and HTC biomass for further processing by pelletization and briquetting equipment to form robust weather resistant pellets and/or briquettes suitable for transportation and long term storage. • Characterization of the coal-biomass pellets and briquettes to quantify their physical properties (e.g. flow properties, homogeneity, moisture content, particle size and shape), bulk physical properties (e.g. compressibility, heat transfer and friability) and assess their suitability for use as fuels for commercially-available coal gasifiers. • Perform economic analyses using Aspen-based process simulations to determine the costs for deploying and operating HTC processing facilities for the production of robust coal/biomass fuels suitable for fueling commercially-available coal-fired gasifiers. This Final Project Scientific/Technical Report discusses and documents the project work required to meet each of these objectives.

  18. New Fission-Product Waste Forms: Development and Characterization

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Alexandra Navrotsky

    2010-07-30

    Research performed on the program “New Fission Product Waste Forms: Development and Characterization,” in the last three years has fulfilled the objectives of the proposal which were to 1) establish ceramic waste forms for disposing of Cs, Sr and minor actinides, 2) fully characterize the phase relationships, structures and thermodynamic and kinetic stabilities of promising waste forms, 3) establish a sound technical basis for understanding key waste form properties, such as melting temperatures and aqueous durability, based on an in-depth understanding of waste form structures and thermochemistry, and 4) establish synthesis, testing, scaleup and commercialization routes for wasteform implementation through out in-kind collaborations. In addition, since Cs and Sr form new elements by radioactive decay, the behavior and thermodynamics of waste forms containing different proportions of Cs, Sr and their decay products were discovered using non-radioactive analogues. Collaborations among researchers from three institutions, UC Davis, Sandia National Laboratories, and Shott Inc., were formed to perform the primary work on the program. The unique expertise of each of the members in the areas of waste form development, structure/property relationships, hydrothermal and high temperature synthesis, crystal/glass production, and thermochemistry was critical to program success. In addition, collaborations with the Brigham Young Univeristy, Ben Gurion University, and Los Alamos National Laboratory, were established for standard entropies of ceramic waste forms, sol-gel synthesis, and high temperature synthesis. This work has had a significant impact in a number of areas. First, the studies of the thermodynamic stability of the mineral analogues provided an important technical foundation for assessment the viability of multicomponent oxide phases for Cs and Sr removal. Moreover, the thermodynamic data discovered in this program established information on the reaction pathways for the potential reaction products. The phase equilibria and thermodynamics involving the intermediates in the decay process in this program will assist in selection of the best process for Cs or Sr immobilization. In addition, data from the study can be used to develop engineering solutions for potential process upsets. Second, the glass – crystal stability of multicomponent oxide phases that were representative silicates on this program is highly distinguishable for mother compounds and decay products, thus providing a fundamental understanding on the separate effects from chemistry and from radiation. Finally, we have developed a foundation for understanding chemistry-structure-energetics relationships in titanosilicates that can be used to develop more effective materials.

  19. Clean development mechanism: Perspectives from developing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sari, Agus P.; Meyers, Stephen

    1999-06-01

    This paper addresses the political acceptability and workability of CDM by and in developing countries. At COP-3 in Kyoto in 1997, the general position among developing countries changed from strong rejection of joint implementation to acceptance of CDM. The outgrowth of CDM from a proposal from Brazil to establish a Clean Development Fund gave developing countries a sense of ownership of the idea. More importantly, establishing support for sustainable development as a main goal for CDM overcame the resistance of many developing countries to accept a carbon trading mechanism. The official acceptance of CDM is not a guarantee of continued acceptance, however. Many developing countries expect CDM to facilitate a substantial transfer of technology and other resources to support economic growth. There is concern that Annex I countries may shift official development assistance into CDM in order to gain carbon credits, and that development priorities could suffer as a result. Some fear that private investments could be skewed toward projects that yield carbon credits. Developing country governments are wary regarding the strong role of the private sector envisioned for CDM. Increasing the awareness and capacity of the private sector in developing countries to initiate and implement CDM projects needs to be a high priority. While private sector partnerships will be the main vehicle for resource transfer in CDM, developing country governments want to play a strong role in overseeing and guiding the process so that it best serves their development goals. Most countries feel that establishment of criteria for sustainable development should be left to individual countries. A key issue is how CDM can best support the strengthening of local capacity to sustain and replicate projects that serve both climate change mitigation and sustainable development objectives.There is support among developing countries for commencing CDM as soon as possible. Since official commencement must await the entry into force of the Kyoto Protocol, many developing countries support the establishment of an Interim Phase starting in 2000, with possible retroactive crediting once the Protocol enters into force.

  20. Essays in Development Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hicks, Joan Hamory

    2009-01-01

    Handbook of Development Economics, Volume I (pp. 713-762).Journal of Development Economics, 81, 80-96. Behrman, JereJournal of Development Economics, 79, 349-373. Dercon,

  1. Training and Organizational Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    Training and Organizational Development Contact: Ellen Audley Assistant, 491-1376, Ellen coordinates training and development opportunities for personal and professional growth for Colorado State. Customized training and organizational development consulting services are also available. Class Locations

  2. Training and Organizational Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    Training and Organizational Development Contact: Ellen Audley Assistant, 491-1376, Ellen coordinates training and development opportunities for personal and professional growth for Colorado State. Customized training and organizational development consulting services are also available. Class Location

  3. Training and Organizational Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Training and Organizational Development Contact: Ellen Audley Assistant, (970) 491-1376, Ellen 1 of 5 This office coordinates training and development opportunities for personal and professional and state classified personnel. Customized training and orga- nizational development consulting services

  4. Training and Organizational Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Training and Organizational Development Contact: Ellen Audley Assistant, (970) 491-1376, Ellen training and development opportunities for personal and professional growth for Colorado State University training and organiza- tional development consulting services are also available. Class Location: Johnson

  5. Training and Organizational Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stephens, Graeme L.

    Training and Organizational Development Contact: Ellen Audley Assistant, 491-1376, Ellen training and development opportunities for personal and professional growth for Colorado State University training and organizational development consulting services are also available. Class Location: Johnson

  6. What is Community Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Taylor, Greg

    2009-04-01

    This publication offers a practical definition of community development for county Extension educators. It also offers examples of goals and objectives for various resource development areas in a community. A list of community development...

  7. Geothermal Program Review VII: proceedings. DOE Research and Development for the Geothermal Marketplace

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1989-01-01

    Each year the Geothermal Technology Division of the US Department of Energy conducts an indepth review of its entire geothermal R and D program. The 2--3 day conference serves several purposes: a status report on current R and D activities, an assessment of progress and problems, a review of management issues, and a technology transfer opportunity between DOE and the US geothermal industry. This year's conference, Program Review 7, was held in San Francisco on March 21--23, 1989. As indicated by its title, ''DOE Research and Development for the Geothermal Marketplace'', Program Review 7 emphasized developing technologies, concepts, and innovations having potential for commercial application in the foreseeable future. Program Review 7 was comprised of eight sessions including an opening session and a special presentation on the ''Role of Geothermal Energy in Minimizing Global Environmental Problems.'' The five technical sessions covered GTD-sponsored R and D in the areas of hydrothermal (two sessions), hot dry rock, geopressured, and magma. Presentations were made by the relevant field researchers, and sessions were chaired by the appropriate DOE Operations Office Geothermal Program Manager. The technical papers and commentary of invited speakers contained in these Proceedings have been compiled in the order in which they were presented at Program Review 7.

  8. NITINOL ENGINE DEVELOPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banks, Ridgway

    2013-01-01

    20, 1976 LBL-5293 NITINOL ENGINE DEVELOPMENT Ridgway Banksof California. NITINOL ENGINE DEVELOPMENT Ridgway Banks andof practical heat engines based on this phenomenon is

  9. Clean Energy Development Fund

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    Vermont's Clean Energy Development Fund (CEDF) was established in 2005 to promote the development and deployment of cost-effective and environmentally sustainable electric power and thermal...

  10. ORISE: Web Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Web Development As computer-based applications become increasingly popular for the delivery of health care training and information, the need for Web development in support of...

  11. NITINOL ENGINE DEVELOPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Banks, Ridgway

    2013-01-01

    16-20, 1976 LBL-5293 NITINOL ENGINE DEVELOPMENT RidgwayUniversity of California. NITINOL ENGINE DEVELOPMENT Ridgwaynickel-titanium alloy "55-Nitinol." Details of the current

  12. Developing Alaskan Sustainable Housing

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE)

    The Association of Alaska Housing Authorities is holding a 3-day training event for housing development professionals titled Developing Alaskan Sustainable Housing (DASH). This is a unique...

  13. The Role of Low-Angle Extensional Tectonics, Flat Fracture Domains, and Gravity Slides in Hydrothermal and EGS Resources of the Western United States

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joseph Moore

    2011-08-24

    The Steamboat Springs geothermal system provides the most dramatic example of subhorizontal thermal-fluid aquifers in crystalline rock in the Basin and Range, but this is by no means an isolated case. Similar but more diffuse subhorizontal permeability has been reported at Roosevelt Hot Springs and Cove-Fort Sulphurdale, Utah; and a km-scale gravity-slide block channels injectate at Dixie Valley, Nevada. During the course of this phase of the project 2543 reports including text, figures and large format enclosures, 1428 maps, and 698 well logs were scanned. The information is stored in a Microsoft Access Database on the Geothermal Server. Detailed geologic cross sections of the Desert Peak geothermal field were developed to identify the structural controls on the geothermal system and locate possible fluid flow paths. The results of this work were published by Lutz and others (2009, Appendix 1) in the Stanford Reservoir Engineering Conference Proceedings.

  14. for the future DEVELOPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Birmingham, University of

    . Metallurgy and Materials development continues The iconic building before refurbishment The welcoming new

  15. Options for developing countries in mining development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Walrond, G.W.; Kumar, R.

    1985-01-01

    This book is a study of the issues that developing countries face in planning and implementing mineral development, taking as case studies Botswana, Sierra Leone, Zambia, Tanzania, Malaysia, Papua New Guinea and the developed states of Quebec and Western Australia. The authors consider the major aspects of the matter including organization and administration; regulation; taxation and surplus distribution; the dynamics of such instruments as royalty, rent resource tax and capital allowances under various cost/price scenarios; and selected mining agreements and their key provisions. They stress throughout the need for foreign investment while maximizing the economic benefits reaped from exhaustible resources.

  16. Hanford Site Development Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rinne, C.A.; Curry, R.H.; Hagan, J.W.; Seiler, S.W.; Sommer, D.J. ); Yancey, E.F. )

    1990-01-01

    The Hanford Site Development Plan (Site Development Plan) is intended to guide the short- and long-range development and use of the Hanford Site. All acquisition, development, and permanent facility use at the Hanford Site will conform to the approved plan. The Site Development Plan also serves as the base document for all subsequent studies that involve use of facilities at the Site. This revision is an update of a previous plan. The executive summary presents the highlights of the five major topics covered in the Site Development Plan: general site information, existing conditions, planning analysis, Master Plan, and Five-Year Plan. 56 refs., 67 figs., 31 tabs.

  17. Internet Polling Development Report 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Klima, P.; Lockhart, D.; Haberl, J. S.

    2001-01-01

    This is the final report which documents the development of Internet-based data logger polling. The project consists of two main tasks: the development of automated polling procedures that can be launched remotely with no operator input...

  18. Intel Architecture Software Developer's

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dinda, Peter A.

    Intel Architecture Software Developer's Manual Volume 1: Basic Architecture NOTE: The Intel Architecture Software Developer's Manual consists of three volumes: Basic Architecture, Order Number 243190 sustaining applications. Intel may make changes to specifications and product descriptions at any time

  19. Developing a Marketing Plan 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bevers, Stan; Waller, Mark L.; Amosson, Stephen H.; McCorkle, Dean

    2009-03-02

    Developing a good marketing plan will help you identify and quantify costs, set price goals, determine potential price outlook, examine production and price risk, and develop a strategy for marketing your crop. This publication describes...

  20. Essays in development economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keniston, Daniel Eben

    2011-01-01

    Chapter 1 looks at the empirical estimation of the welfare impacts of bargaining. Bargaining for retail goods is common in developing countries, but rare in the developed world. The welfare implications of this difference ...

  1. Essays in Development Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Keats, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Discontinuity Designs in Economics," Journal of EconomicJournal of Development Economics 87(1): 57-75. [21] Ozier,Journal of Development Economics 94, 151-163. [9] Delavande,

  2. RELAP-7 Development

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    During the second quarter, the Reactor team drafted software development guidance documents and a software quality assurance plan.

  3. Gammasphere software development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piercey, R.B.

    1993-01-01

    Activities of the nuclear physics group are described. Progress was made in organizing the Gammasphere Software Working Group, establishing a nuclear computing facility, participating in software development at Lawrence Berkeley, developing a common data file format, and adapting the ORNL UPAK software to run at Gammasphere. A universal histogram object was developed that defines a file format and provides for an objective-oriented programming model. An automated liquid nitrogen fill system was developed for Gammasphere (110 Ge detectors comprise the sphere).

  4. 2013 Nuclear Workforce Development ...

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Nuclear Workforce Development Day Tuesday, October 22, 2013 Nuclear Medicine Topics: Pathways of Practice in Nuclear Medicine Radiopharmacy Patient Care ...

  5. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2004-10-31

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts. In addition to analysis of domestic policies and programs, this project will include the development of a U.S.-Brazil Biodiesel Pilot Project. The purpose of this effort is to promote and facilitate the commercialization of biodiesel and bioenergy production and demand in Brazil.

  6. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2005-04-30

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts. In addition to analysis of domestic policies and programs, this project will include the development of a U.S.-Brazil Biodiesel Pilot Project. The purpose of this effort is to promote and facilitate the commercialization of biodiesel and bioenergy production and demand in Brazil.

  7. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2005-01-31

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts. In addition to analysis of domestic policies and programs, this project will include the development of a U.S.-Brazil Biodiesel Pilot Project. The purpose of this effort is to promote and facilitate the commercialization of biodiesel and bioenergy production and demand in Brazil.

  8. DEVELOPING STATE POLICIES SUPPORTIVE OF BIOENERGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kathryn Baskin

    2004-07-28

    Working within the context of the Southern States Biobased Alliance (SSBA) and with officials in each state, the Southern States Energy Board (SSEB) is identifying bioenergy-related policies and programs within each state to determine their impact on the development, deployment or use of bioenergy. In addition, SSEB will determine which policies have impacted industry's efforts to develop, deploy or use biobased technologies or products. As a result, SSEB will work with the Southern States Biobased Alliance to determine how policy changes might address any negative impacts or enhance positive impacts. In addition to analysis of domestic policies and programs, this project will include the development of a U.S.-Brazil Biodiesel Pilot Project. The purpose of this effort is to promote and facilitate the commercialization of biodiesel and bioenergy production and demand in Brazil.

  9. performance development and compensation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dennett, Daniel

    · ProvidinginputtothePerformanceReviewprocess. Human Resources serves as a resource for school/division leadershipperformance development and compensation programs @WorkGuidebook #12;4 | Tufts University Human performance development program Tufts Competencies 5 The @Work Performance Development and Compensation Cycle

  10. Mechanisms in Plant Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hake, Sarah

    2013-08-21

    This meeting has been held every other year for the past twenty-two years and is the only regularly held meeting focused specifically on plant development. Topics covered included: patterning in developing tissues; short and long distance signaling; differentiation of cell types; the role of epigenetics in development; evolution; growth.

  11. Scienceandthe DevelopingWorld

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -quality research and to provide education in order to promote science in the developing world. As we celebrate our to evolve in response to a changing world, initiating efforts where new priorities--and new potential and supporting science in the developing world. 2 New Research Areas: Develop new research areas

  12. Coated Conductor Technology Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Coated Conductor Technology Development Roadmap Priority Research & Development Activities Leading for Electric Systems Program Prepared by: Energetics, Incorporated #12;Coated Conductor Development Roadmap of high-quality, low-cost coated conductors that will lead to industrial-scale commercial manufacturing

  13. Sandia Energy - Advanced Research & Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    & Development Home Stationary Power Energy Conversion Efficiency Solar Energy Photovoltaics Advanced Research & Development Advanced Research & DevelopmentCoryne...

  14. The developer`s competitive advantage

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    DeLugo, E.M. Jr. [Ridgewood Power Corp., NJ (United States)

    1994-09-01

    When developers seek funding for power projects today, they are entering a financial market that is well versed in the risk and reward characteristics of independent power projects. Over the past several years, a high demand for project funding, combined with a variety of well-publicized fiascoes has caused many investors and lenders to adopt a more cautious posture toward leveraged ventures.

  15. Essays in Development Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bazzi, Samuel Ali

    are weak,” Review of Economics and Statistics, 2004, 86,Essays in Development Economics A dissertation submitted indegree Doctor of Philosophy in Economics by Samuel Ali Bazzi

  16. Laboratory Directed Research & Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ohta, Shigemi

    ......................................................................5 Photovoltaics: Nanostructure, Solvent Annealing and Performance..............................................7 Solar Energy Source Evaluation for Smart Grid Development of a Collaborative NREL, BNL, LDRD........................................................................17

  17. Synergizing in Cyberinfrastructure Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bietz, Matthew J.; Baumer, Eric P.; Lee, Charlotte P.

    2010-01-01

    relationships with grantees to develop new collaborations (approach potential grantees directly and work with them towith and among its grantees. The project was designed around

  18. Raman spectroscopic investigations of hydrothermal solutions

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yang, M.M.

    1988-01-01

    There is still very little information about the stoichiometries, structures and stabilities of metal complexes at high temperatures and pressures. Raman spectroscopy is ideally suited to probe and study concentrated electrolyte solutions at the molecular level. This thesis includes the design and construction of a Raman cell operable up to 300C and 15MPa. In order to obtain quantitative thermodynamic information from Raman spectroscopic measurements, a chemically inert internal standard must be used. Perchlorate is commonly used for this purpose at low temperatures, but it may be unstable at high temperatures and its explosive properties make it undesirable. A new preferred internal standard; trifluoromethanesulfonic acid is introduced and its spectra p to 300C discussed. The use of this compound as a high temperature internal standard enabled stepwise stability constants of zinc-bromo complexes to be determined. Although bromide is not an important ligand in geologic systems, its chemical similarity to chloride can provide insights into the study of zinc-chloro species which do not have very informative Raman spectra. The importance of organic ligands in geologic settings such as the Mississippi-Valley Type Pb-Zn sulfide deposits is now being realized. Chapter four presents the first high temperature spectroscopic measurements of lead and zinc acetate aqueous solutions. Not only do these studies verify the stability of lead and zinc acetate complexes up to 250 C but they also show that the type of complex formed is a function of pH, metal-ligand ratio and temperature, thus having important implications for zoning of Pb-Zn sulfide deposits.

  19. The fate of lignin during hydrothermal pretreatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trajano, Heather L; Engle, Nancy L; Foston, Marcus; Ragauskas, Arthur J; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Wyman, Charles E

    2013-01-01

    followed by a dioxane water extraction, while Trajano et al.water, limited condensation reactions for both substrates, as evidenced by greater lignin extraction

  20. Hydrothermal alteration mineral mapping using hyperspectral imagery...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    cross-cutting faults indicate a high probability of recenthot fluid escape. Authors T. Kennedy-Bowdoin, B. A. Martini, E. A. Silver and W. L. Pickles Published Journal...

  1. The fate of lignin during hydrothermal pretreatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trajano, Heather L; Engle, Nancy L; Foston, Marcus; Ragauskas, Arthur J; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Wyman, Charles E

    2013-01-01

    straw pretreated for bioethanol production. Biotechnologyof woody biomass for bioethanol production. Bioresources

  2. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway Biddy...

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    MICROALGAL-DERIVED BIOFUEL; HYDROCARBON FUEL; BIOMASS TECHNOLOGIES OFFICE; NATIONAL RENEWABLE ENERGY LABORATORY; PACIFIC NORTHWEST NATIONAL LABORATORY; Bioenergy MICROALGAE;...

  3. Mapping Hydrothermal Upwelling and Outflow Zones: Preliminary...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Results from Two-Meter Temperature Data and Geologic Analysis at Lee Allen Springs and Salt Wells Basin Jump to: navigation, search OpenEI Reference LibraryAdd to library...

  4. Basement Structure and Implications for Hydrothermal Circulation...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    than along the axis of a single dike. Gravity modeling and subsurface data from deep geothermal wells indicate that the floor of the caldera is segmented into a number of...

  5. Comparison Of Hydrothermal Alteration Of Carboniferous Carbonate...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    With Outcrops From The Socorro Caldera, New Mexico Abstract Continental Scientific Drilling Program (CSDP) drill hole VC-2B (total depth 1761.7 m (5780 ft); maximum...

  6. Catalytic Hydrothermal Gasification of Wet Biomass Feedstock

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2006-04-01

    Industries and municipalities generate substantial amounts of biomass as high-moisture waste streams, such as animal manure, food processing sludge, stillage from ethanol production, and municipal wastewater sludge.

  7. Organic geochemical biosignatures in alkaline Hydrothermal ecosystems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Bradley, Alexander Smith

    2008-01-01

    The 13C content of microbial products are controlled by many factors, including the 13C content of the growth substrate, growth rate, the flux of carbon through various parts of the biochemical network, and the isotopic ...

  8. Adventive Hydrothermal Circulation On Stromboli Volcano (Aeolian...

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    Resistivity Tomography (ERT), Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR), Self-Potential (SP), CO2 soil diffuse degassing and soil temperature surveys. This complementary data set revealed...

  9. The fate of lignin during hydrothermal pretreatment

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Trajano, Heather L; Engle, Nancy L; Foston, Marcus; Ragauskas, Arthur J; Tschaplinski, Timothy J; Wyman, Charles E

    2013-01-01

    pretreated for bioethanol production. Biotechnology forwoody biomass for bioethanol production. Bioresources 2011,

  10. Whole Algae Hydrothermal Liquefaction Technology Pathway

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Available electronically at http:www.osti.govbridge Available for a processing fee to U.S. Department of Energy and its contractors, in paper, from: U.S. Department of...

  11. Stratigraphy, Structure, Hydrothermal Alteration and Ore Mineralization

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page| Open Energy Information Serbia-Enhancing CapacityVectren) JumpandStereoNewCreek Formation Grabens,

  12. Hydrothermally Altered Rock | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History View NewTexas: Energy Resources JumpNewTexas:

  13. Other Hydrothermal Alteration Products | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio Program | OpenWisconsin:New York: EnergyOssian,OtayVehicles

  14. Other Hydrothermal Deposits | Open Energy Information

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QAsource History ViewMayo, Maryland:NPIProtectio Program | OpenWisconsin:New York: EnergyOssian,OtayVehiclesOther

  15. Structural Settings Of Hydrothermal Outflow- Fracture Permeability

    Open Energy Info (EERE)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on QA:QA J-E-1 SECTION JEnvironmental Jump to:EA EIS ReportEurope GmbHSoloPageBeforeCreek WindInsulated Panel

  16. Production of Advanced Biofuels via Liquefaction - Hydrothermal

    Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefield MunicipalTechnical Report:Speeding access toSmall Reactor forPatents -SciTech

  17. Hydrothermal Success Stories | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirleyEnergyTher i nA Guide to TappingWORKof71 Hydrogen and Fuel Cells Successone of

  18. Hydrothermal Photo Library | Department of Energy

    Broader source: Energy.gov (indexed) [DOE]

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of Natural GasAdjustmentsShirley Ann JacksonDepartment ofOffice ofofWindUpcomingcanGridDoesHydrogen is a versatileleadFORO

  19. Hydrothermal Success Stories | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative Fuelsof Energy ServicesContractingManagement »Hydrogen and

  20. Technical Assistance to Developers

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rockward, Tommy; Borup, Rodney L.; Garzon, Fernando H.; Mukundan, Rangachary; Spernjak, Dusan

    2012-07-17

    This task supports the allowance of technical assistance to fuel-cell component and system developers as directed by the DOE. This task includes testing of novel materials and participation in the further development and validation of single cell test protocols. This task also covers technical assistance to DOE Working Groups, the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (USCAR) and the USCAR/DOE Driving Research and Innovation for Vehicle efficiency and Energy sustainability (U.S. Drive) Fuel Cell Technology Team. Assistance includes technical validation of new fuel cell materials and methods, single cell fuel cell testing to support the development of targets and test protocols, and regular advisory participation in other working groups and reviews. This assistance is made available to PEM fuel cell developers by request and DOE Approval. The objectives are to: (1) Support technically, as directed by DOE, fuel cell component and system developers; (2) Assess fuel cell materials and components and give feedback to developers; (3) Assist the DOE Durability Working Group with the development of various new material durability Testing protocols; and (4) Provide support to the U.S. Council for Automotive Research (USCAR) and the USCAR/DOE Fuel Cell Technology Team. FY2012 specific technical objectives are: (1) Evaluate novel MPL materials; (2) Develop of startup/ shutdown protocol; (3) Test the impact of hydrophobic treatment on graphite bi-polar plates; (4) Perform complete diagnostics on metal bi-polar plates for corrosion; and (5) Participate and lead efforts in the DOE Working Groups.

  1. Wind Economic Development (Postcard)

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    2011-08-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy's Wind Powering America initiative provides information on the economic development benefits of wind energy. This postcard is a marketing piece that stakeholders can provide to interested parties; it will guide them to the economic development benefits section on the Wind Powering America website.

  2. Developments in Human Communication

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Thompson, Michael

    CMST 1B03 Developments in Human Communication: Part & Present Amanda Etches-Johnson Mills Research in Human Communication Session Outline 1. Finding Books Using MORRIS 2. Finding Journal Articles using: Developments in Human Communication What is MORRIS anyway? · MORRIS is McMaster's library catalogue · Shows

  3. Introducing Web Application Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ding, Wei

    Introducing Web Application Development Instructor: Dr Wei Ding Development Instructor: Dr.Wei Ding Fall 2009 1CS 437/637 Database-BackedWeb Sites andWeb Services Introduction: Internet vs. World Wide Web Internet is an interconnected network of thousands ofInternet is an interconnected network

  4. Sun Academic Developer Program

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Davenport, James

    Sun Academic Developer Program Kim Jones Vice President Government, Education & Health Care Sun Microsystems, Inc. FY08 Campus Ambassador Programme Your Name Here Sun Microsystems, Inc. #12;2 FY08 Campus Ambassador Programme #12;3 Sun Academic Developer Initiative On-Campus Events and Contests Open Source

  5. Aggressive development plans

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    McCandless, D.H.

    1993-11-01

    Hydropower developments are capital-intensive, are subject to uncertainty in water availability, and have a somewhat higher construction-cost risk than thermal projects. However, a developer who selects an attractive site, arranges a good financial package, and designs and constructs a well-conceived hydropower project can earn an attractive long-term return while providing a dependable, low-cost source of energy to consumers. In the Philippines, many attractive hydropower sites are now available. As demonstrated by the attendance at the US Trade and Development Agency-sponsored Symposium on Power Development and Investment Opportunities in the Philippines, in Washington, D.C., on Sept. 21 and 22, 1993, there is a growing interest in private hydropower. Following its successful record in implementing thermal private power developments, the Philippines now offers many attractive opportunities to exploit its tremendous potential in the hydropower sector.

  6. Liga developer apparatus system

    DOE Patents [OSTI]

    Boehme, Dale R. (Pleasanton, CA); Bankert, Michelle A. (San Francisco, CA); Christenson, Todd R. (Albuquerque, NM)

    2003-01-01

    A system to fabricate precise, high aspect ratio polymeric molds by photolithograpic process is described. The molds for producing micro-scale parts from engineering materials by the LIGA process. The invention is a developer system for developing a PMMA photoresist having exposed patterns comprising features having both very small sizes, and very high aspect ratios. The developer system of the present invention comprises a developer tank, an intermediate rinse tank and a final rinse tank, each tank having a source of high frequency sonic agitation, temperature control, and continuous filtration. It has been found that by moving a patterned wafer, through a specific sequence of developer/rinse solutions, where an intermediate rinse solution completes development of those portions of the exposed resist left undeveloped after the development solution, by agitating the solutions with a source of high frequency sonic vibration, and by adjusting and closely controlling the temperatures and continuously filtering and recirculating these solutions, it is possible to maintain the kinetic dissolution of the exposed PMMA polymer as the rate limiting step.

  7. Microsystem product development.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Polosky, Marc A.; Garcia, Ernest J.

    2006-04-01

    Over the last decade the successful design and fabrication of complex MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical Systems), optical circuits and ASICs have been demonstrated. Packaging and integration processes have lagged behind MEMS research but are rapidly maturing. As packaging processes evolve, a new challenge presents itself, microsystem product development. Product development entails the maturation of the design and all the processes needed to successfully produce a product. Elements such as tooling design, fixtures, gages, testers, inspection, work instructions, process planning, etc., are often overlooked as MEMS engineers concentrate on design, fabrication and packaging processes. Thorough, up-front planning of product development efforts is crucial to the success of any project.

  8. Microsystem Product Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Polosky, M -A

    2007-01-01

    Over the last decade the successful design and fabrication of complex MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical Systems), optical circuits and ASICs have been demonstrated. Packaging and integration processes have lagged behind MEMS research but are rapidly maturing. As packaging processes evolve, a new challenge presents itself, microsystem product development. Product development entails the maturation of the design and all the processes needed to successfully produce a product. Elements such as tooling design, fixtures, gages, testers, inspection, work instructions, process planning, etc., are often overlooked as MEMS engineers concentrate on design, fabrication and packaging processes. Thorough, up-front planning of product development efforts is crucial to the success of any project.

  9. Sustainable Development Conference

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    The event drew more that 1,000 participants and speakers, including the presidents of Liberia, Malta and Rwanda; the First Lady of Panama; and U.N. Sustainable Development...

  10. Political elites and development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Querubín Borrero, Pablo

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation consists of three essays on the behavior of political elites and their effect on economic development. The first two chapters focus on political dynasties in the Philippines while the third chapter analyzes ...

  11. Essays on development finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Fischer, Gregory M. (Gregory Mark)

    2008-01-01

    This thesis consists of three essays that examine investment choices in less developed countries. Chapter 1 examines how the structure of existing microfinance contracts may discourage risky but high-expected return ...

  12. Essays on development economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ruthbah, Ummul Hasanath

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation is a collection of three independent papers in empirical development economics. The first chapter studies the effect of a family planning program in Bangladesh, which successfully reduced fertility, on ...

  13. Acquisition Career Development Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2004-04-19

    This Order establishes training and certification requirements and career development programs under the Acquisition Career Development (ACD) Program for DOE and NNSA acquisition workforce. The acquisition workforce includes contracting, purchasing, personal property management, program management, Contracting Officers and Contracting Officer Representatives. The ACD Program implements the Office of Federal Procurement Policy (OFPP) requirements, Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) requirements, Federal Acquisition Reform Act (FARA) requirements, and the objectives of Executive Order (E.O.) 129231, Federal Procurement Reform, dated 10-13-1994. This order cancels DOE O 361.1, Acquisition Career Development Program, dated 11-10-99, AND Acquisition Letter 2003-05, Personal Property Management Career Development, Training, and Certification Program, dated 9-10-03. Cancels DOE O 361.1 Chg 2. Canceled by DOE O 361.1B.

  14. Arthropod Growth & Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Brown, Christopher A.

    pathways in insects Ametabolous insects resemble small adults at hatching, lacking only fully developed, a stadium 1st instar may not always be the one to emerge from egg In nearly all terrestrial arthropods

  15. Sustaining development in Detroit

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Resnick, Noah Samuel, 1977-

    2004-01-01

    The intent of this thesis is to propose a strategy for stabilizing and increasing the disparate pieces of development that form the traces of the once great industrial city of Detroit. It focuses primarily on Fordism as a ...

  16. Training and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    California at Santa Cruz, University of

    Training and Development Administration Assistant Vice Chancellor Lori Castro VC Business Senior Manager Conflict Resolution Nancy Heischman Training Coordinator Vacant Principal Technical Training Consultant Frank Widman Health Care Facilitator / Interim Benefits Manager Frank Trueba Disability

  17. Development of Portable Detectors

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between UT-Battelle, LLC (the “Contractor”) and Sense Holdings, Inc. (the “Participant”) was for the development of hand-held detectors with high sensitivity and selectivity for the detection of explosives, toxic industrial chemicals and materials, and other materials of interest for security applications. The two parties built a series of demonstration and prototype handheld sensors based upon micoelectromechanical systems (MEMS) with electronic readout.

  18. Acquisition Career Development Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2003-06-13

    To set forth requirements and responsibilities for the Department of Energy (DOE) Acquisition Career Development (ACD) Program, which implements Office of Federal Procurement Policy (OFPP) requirements, Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) requirements, Federal Acquisition Reform Act (FARA) requirements, and the career development objectives of Executive Order (E.O.) 12931. Change 1 approved 12-20-2001. Change 2 approved 06-13-03. Cancels DOE O 361.1 Chg 1. Canceled by DOE O 361.1A.

  19. Acquisition Career Development Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-12-20

    To set forth requirements and responsibilities for the Department of Energy (DOE) Acquisition Career Development (ACD) Program, which implements Office of Federal Procurement Policy (OFPP) requirements, Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) requirements, Federal Acquisition Reform Act (FARA) requirements, and the career development objectives of Executive Order (E.O.) 12931. Change 1 approved 12-20-2001. Cancels DOE O 361.1. Canceled by DOE O 361.1 Chg 2.

  20. Review: Theories of Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Laberge, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Review: Theories of Sustainable Development Edited By JudithTheories of Sustainable Development. Abingdon: Routledge,Routledge Studies in Sustainable Development. Theories of

  1. Sustainable Development Summer Intern Report 2013 Sustainable Development Summer Intern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sustainable Development Summer Intern Report 2013 Sustainable Development Summer Intern Final amongst university's invested in sustainable development. Our small but mighty size allows us to build through positive sustainable practices. As the Sustainable Development Summer Intern I am fortunate enough

  2. Sustainable Development Summer Intern Report 2010 Sustainable Development Summer Intern

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sustainable Development Summer Intern Report 2010 1 Sustainable Development Summer Intern Final of Bishop's University. The role of the Sustainable Development Summer Intern (SDSI) is to coordinate and organize sustainable development information and activities during the summer months. Ensuring

  3. Emergency Response Guideline Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Gary D. Storrick

    2007-09-30

    Task 5 of the collaborative effort between ORNL, Brazil, and Westinghouse for the International Nuclear Energy Research Initiative entitled “Development of Advanced Instrumentation and Control for an Integrated Primary System Reactor” focuses on operator control and protection system interaction, with particular emphasis on developing emergency response guidelines (ERGs). As in the earlier tasks, we will use the IRIS plant as a specific example of an integrated primary system reactor (IPSR) design. The present state of the IRIS plant design – specifically, the lack of a detailed secondary system design – precludes establishing detailed emergency procedures at this time. However, we can create a structure for their eventual development. This report summarizes our progress to date. Section 1.2 describes the scope of this effort. Section 2 compares IPSR ERG development to the recent AP1000 effort, and identifies three key plant differences that affect the ERGs and control room designs. The next three sections investigate these differences in more detail. Section 3 reviews the IRIS Safety-by-Design™ philosophy and its impact on the ERGs. Section 4 looks at differences between the IRIS and traditional loop PWR I&C Systems, and considers their implications for both control room design and ERG development. Section 5 examines the implications of having one operating staff control multiple reactor units. Section 6 provides sample IRIS emergency operating procedures (EOPs). Section 7 summarizes our conclusions.

  4. Economic Development | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Economic Development Carbon Fiber Cluster Strategy Additive Manufacturing Cluster Strategy Entrepreneurial Development Programs Oak Ridge Science and Technology Park Economic...

  5. Power Systems Development Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Southern Company Services

    2009-01-31

    In support of technology development to utilize coal for efficient, affordable, and environmentally clean power generation, the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF), located in Wilsonville, Alabama, has routinely demonstrated gasification technologies using various types of coals. The PSDF is an engineering scale demonstration of key features of advanced coal-fired power systems, including a Transport Gasifier, a hot gas particulate control device, advanced syngas cleanup systems, and high-pressure solids handling systems. This final report summarizes the results of the technology development work conducted at the PSDF through January 31, 2009. Twenty-one major gasification test campaigns were completed, for a total of more than 11,000 hours of gasification operation. This operational experience has led to significant advancements in gasification technologies.

  6. Graphite Technology Development Plan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    W. Windes; T. Burchell; M.Carroll

    2010-10-01

    The Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) will be a helium-cooled High Temperature Gas Reactor (HTGR) with a large graphite core. Graphite physically contains the fuel and comprises the majority of the core volume. Graphite has been used effectively as a structural and moderator material in both research and commercial high-temperature gas-cooled reactors. This development has resulted in graphite being established as a viable structural material for HTGRs. While the general characteristics necessary for producing nuclear grade graphite are understood, historical “nuclear” grades no longer exist. New grades must be fabricated, characterized, and irradiated to demonstrate that current grades of graphite exhibit acceptable non-irradiated and irradiated properties upon which the thermomechanical design of the structural graphite in NGNP is based. This Technology Development Plan outlines the research and development (R&D) activities and associated rationale necessary to qualify nuclear grade graphite for use within the NGNP reactor.

  7. Hydropower research and development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    NONE

    1997-03-01

    This report is a compilation of information on hydropower research and development (R and D) activities of the Federal government and hydropower industry. The report includes descriptions of on-going and planned R and D activities, 1996 funding, and anticipated future funding. Summary information on R and D projects and funding is classified into eight categories: fish passage, behavior, and response; turbine-related; monitoring tool development; hydrology; water quality; dam safety; operations and maintenance; and water resources management. Several issues in hydropower R and D are briefly discussed: duplication; priorities; coordination; technical/peer review; and technology transfer/commercialization. Project information sheets from contributors are included as an appendix.

  8. Cities and Sustainable Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    . The information and communications revolution has spawned the idea of the "smart city," which places the relevant technologies at the heart of systems that collect and respond to information: smart power grids, smartCities and Sustainable Development By: Jeffrey D. Sachs NOV 25, 2013 NEW YORK ­ Tacloban

  9. JAGUAR developer's manual.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Chan, Ethan

    2011-06-01

    JAGUAR (JAva GUi for Applied Research) is a Java software tool providing an advanced text editor and graphical user interface (GUI) to manipulate DAKOTA (Design Analysis Kit for Optimization and Terascale Applications) input specifications. This document focuses on the technical background necessary for a developer to understand JAGUAR.

  10. Accelerator Development @ Daresbury Laboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    -injectors ­ Superconducting RF acceleration ­ Cryogenic systems ­ Advanced diagnostics ­ Free Electron Lasers ­ Photon beam radioisotopes. 2 Treatment & Diagnostics #12;Basic Accelerator Configuration 3 Beam Source Low Energy Capture electron beam technology development. 4 Booster Compressor IR-FEL Photoinjector Laser Linac Acceleration

  11. Developing hydropower overseas

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Smith, W.B. (Benham-Holway Power Group, Tulsa, OK (United States))

    1991-10-01

    This article examines how the National Hydropower Association (NHA) has found ways to support its members who desire to expand their business programs to foreign markets through participation in a wide range of government programs. The topics of the article include the market in developing countries, the certificate of review, products and services, and domestic and international competition.

  12. ECH Technology Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Temkin, Richard

    2014-12-24

    Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) is needed for plasma heating, current drive, plasma stability control, and other applications in fusion energy sciences research. The program of fusion energy sciences supported by U. S. DOE, Office of Science, Fusion Energy Sciences relies on the development of ECH technology to meet the needs of several plasma devices working at the frontier of fusion energy sciences research. The largest operating ECH system in the world is at DIII-D, consisting of six 1 MW, 110 GHz gyrotrons capable of ten second pulsed operation, plus two newer gyrotrons. The ECH Technology Development research program investigated the options for upgrading the DIII-D 110 GHz ECH system. Options included extending present-day 1 MW technology to 1.3 – 1.5 MW power levels or developing an entirely new approach to achieve up to 2 MW of power per gyrotron. The research consisted of theoretical research and designs conducted by Communication and Power Industries of Palo Alto, CA working with MIT. Results of the study would be validated in a later phase by research on short pulse length gyrotrons at MIT and long pulse / cw gyrotrons in industry. This research follows a highly successful program of development that has led to the highly reliable, six megawatt ECH system at the DIII-D tokamak. Eventually, gyrotrons at the 1.5 megawatt to multi-megawatt power level will be needed for heating and current drive in large scale plasmas including ITER and DEMO.

  13. International Policy International Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Watson, Andrew

    Research Strategy 2006-2009 International Policy Energy Adaptation International Development Coasts Change Research. Our strategy builds upon our previous work on integrated assessment, energy, adaptation of time. In this spirit, the Centre reconfirms its vision statement: "The Tyndall Centre is the UK network

  14. Renewable Energy Economic Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Renewable Energy Economic Development Dick Sheehy & Nate Monosoff, CH2M HILL March, 2010 #12;Contents 1. Who is CH2M HILL? 2. Why Do We Need Renewables? 3. Where Is The Wind Blowing? 4. Where Is The Sun Shining? 5. How To Catch Some Rays? 6. Renewable Related 2 Proprietary & Confidential #12;Where

  15. Leadership Development Readings

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Leadership Development Readings is a comprehensive list of more than 700 ECQ-related leadership readings organized by ECQ intended to assist all current and aspiring government leaders’ efforts to broaden their organizational and management experience and expand their knowledge in the five Executive Core Qualifications as well as Fundamental Competencies.

  16. Developing the Environmental Health

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Developing the Environmental Health Workforce Direct from CDC's Environmental Health Services Branch CAPT Michael E. Herring, R.E.H.S., M.P.H. Editor's note: NEHA strives to provide up-to-date and relevant information on environmental health and to build part- nerships

  17. Energy Efficiency Project Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    IUEP

    2004-03-01

    The International Utility Efficiency Partnerships, Inc. (IUEP) has been a leader among the industry groups that have supported voluntary initiatives to promote international energy efficiency projects and address global climate change. The IUEP maintains its leadership by both supporting international greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction projects under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and by partnering with U.S. and international organizations to develop and implement strategies and specific energy efficiency projects. The goals of the IUEP program are to (1) provide a way for U.S. industry to maintain a leadership role in international energy efficiency infrastructure projects; (2) identify international energy project development opportunities to continue its leadership in supporting voluntary market-based mechanisms to reduce GHG emissions; and (3) demonstrate private sector commitment to voluntary approaches to global climate issues. The IUEP is dedicated to identifying, promoting, managing, and assisting in the registration of international energy efficiency projects that result in demonstrated voluntary reductions of GHG emissions. This Final Technical Report summarizes the IUEP's work in identifying, promoting, managing, and assisting in development of these projects and IUEP's effort in creating international cooperative partnerships to support project development activities that develop and deploy technologies that (1) increase efficiency in the production, delivery and use of energy; (2) increase the use of cleaner, low-carbon fuels in processing products; and (3) capture/sequester carbon gases from energy systems. Through international cooperative efforts, the IUEP intends to strengthen partnerships for energy technology innovation and demonstration projects capable of providing cleaner energy in a cost-effective manner. As detailed in this report, the IUEP met program objectives and goals during the reporting period January 1, 2001 through December 31, 2002. At the request of the DOE, we have also included in this report additional activities during the reporting period January, 1999 through January, 2001. This additional information had been reported earlier in the Final Technical Reports that summarized activities undertaken in those earlier periods.

  18. e+ e- Factory Developments

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, Michael; /SLAC

    2010-08-26

    The impressive performance of current (KEKB) and recent (PEP-II) B-Factory colliders has increased interest in developing even higher luminosity B-factories. Two new designs are being developed (SuperKEKB and SuperB). Both designs plan to deliver a luminosity in the range of 1 x 10{sup 36} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1}, nearly 100 times the present B-factory level. Achieving this high luminosity requires high-current beams and short bunch lengths and/or a new way of colliding the beams. The SuperB design employs a crabbed magnetic waist with a large crossing angle and the SuperKEKB design is looking at crab cavities with high-current beams and/or a travelling focus. I describe the designs being studied to achieve the high luminosity needed for the next generation of B-Factories.

  19. ADVANCED SORBENT DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    1998-06-16

    The overall objective of this program was to develop regenerable sorbents for use in the temperature range of 343 to 538 C (650 to 1000 F) to remove hydrogen sulfide (H{sub 2}S) from coal-derived fuel gases in a fluidized-bed reactor. The goal was to develop sorbents that are capable of reducing the H{sub 2}S level in the fuel gas to less than 20 ppmv in the specified temperature range and pressures in the range of 1 to 20 atmospheres, with chemical characteristics that permit cyclic regeneration over many cycles without a drastic loss of activity, as well as physical characteristics that are compatible with the fluidized bed application.

  20. Update on INSIGHTS Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Listed; Eric Burgett

    2011-09-01

    INSIGHTS is a transformational separate effects testing capability to perform in situ irradiation studies and characterization of the microscale behavior of nuclear fuel materials under a wide variety of in-pile conditions. Separate effects testing including growth, irradiation, and monitoring of these materials, and encompasses the full science based approach for fuels development from the nanoscale to the mesoscale behavior of the sample material and other defects driven by the modeling and simulation efforts of INL.

  1. Issue Development sheet Example

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    ISSUE DEVELOPMENT SHEET INFORMATION ONLY The information provided below indicates that a potential concern for finding has been identified. Please provide any objective evidence you may have that could either alleviate the concern or eliminate the finding. If no objective evidence is available/can be provided by the end of this audit (at the scheduled end of field work), this information will be included in the audit report and reported as a concern or an audit finding as appropriate.

  2. Acquisition Career Development Program

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    1999-11-10

    The Order implements the Department's Acquisition Career Development program, mandatory for professionals in the GS-1102 and 1105 occupational procurement series, as well as others with significant procurement responsibilities. The Order also ensures that members of the acquisition workforce are aware of and adhere to the mandatory training and certification requirements. Cancels Acquisition Letter 98-06. Canceled by DOE O 361.1 Chg 1.

  3. Developing the Business of Technology

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Finley Jr., Russell L.

    -a-Company Find-a-Company vs. #12;Business Model What Combination of Business Activities? Research ProductDeveloping the Business of Technology #12;Developing the Business of Technology Universities Business Development Year 1 Year 2 Year 3 Year 4 Product Development Business Development Naïve Planning

  4. Central DevelopmentCentral Development LaboratoryLaboratory

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Groppi, Christopher

    efficiencyImprove production efficiency Develop InP amplifiers forDevelop InP amplifiers for bands down to 1

  5. NOx Sensor Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Woo, L Y; Glass, R S

    2010-11-01

    NO{sub x} compounds, specifically NO and NO{sub 2}, are pollutants and potent greenhouse gases. Compact and inexpensive NO{sub x} sensors are necessary in the next generation of diesel (CIDI) automobiles to meet government emission requirements and enable the more rapid introduction of more efficient, higher fuel economy CIDI vehicles. Because the need for a NO{sub x} sensor is recent and the performance requirements are extremely challenging, most are still in the development phase. Currently, there is only one type of NO{sub x} sensor that is sold commercially, and it seems unlikely to meet more stringent future emission requirements. Automotive exhaust sensor development has focused on solid-state electrochemical technology, which has proven to be robust for in-situ operation in harsh, high-temperature environments (e.g., the oxygen stoichiometric sensor). Solid-state sensors typically rely on yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) as the oxygen-ion conducting electrolyte and then target different types of metal or metal-oxide electrodes to optimize the response. Electrochemical sensors can be operated in different modes, including amperometric (a current is measured) and potentiometric (a voltage is measured), both of which employ direct current (dc) measurements. Amperometric operation is costly due to the electronics necessary to measure the small sensor signal (nanoampere current at ppm NO{sub x} levels), and cannot be easily improved to meet the future technical performance requirements. Potentiometric operation has not demonstrated enough promise in meeting long-term stability requirements, where the voltage signal drift is thought to be due to aging effects associated with electrically driven changes, both morphological and compositional, in the sensor. Our approach involves impedancemetric operation, which uses alternating current (ac) measurements at a specified frequency. The approach is described in detail in previous reports and several publications. Briefly, impedancemetric operation has shown the potential to overcome the drawbacks of other approaches, including higher sensitivity towards NO{sub x}, better long-term stability, potential for subtracting out background interferences, total NO{sub x} measurement, and lower cost materials and operation. Past LLNL research and development efforts have focused on characterizing different sensor materials and understanding complex sensing mechanisms. Continued effort has led to improved prototypes with better performance, including increased sensitivity (to less than 5 ppm) and long-term stability, with more appropriate designs for mass fabrication, including incorporation of an alumina substrate with an imbedded heater. Efforts in the last year to further improve sensor robustness have led to successful engine dynamometer testing with prototypes mounted directly in the engine manifold. Previous attempts had required exhaust gases to be routed into a separate furnace for testing due to mechanical failure of the sensor from engine vibrations. A more extensive cross-sensitivity study was also undertaken this last year to examine major noise factors including fluctuations in water, oxygen, and temperature. The quantitative data were then used to develop a strategy using numerical algorithms to improve sensor accuracy. The ultimate goal is the transfer of this technology to a supplier for commercialization. Due to the recent economic downturn, suppliers are demanding more comprehensive data and increased performance analysis before committing their resources to take the technology to market. Therefore, our NO{sub x} sensor work requires a level of technology development more thorough and extensive than ever before. The objectives are: (1) Develop an inexpensive, rapid-response, high-sensitivity and selective electrochemical sensor for oxides of nitrogen (NO{sub x}) for compression-ignition, direct-injection (CIDI) exhaust gas monitoring; (2) Explore and characterize novel, effective sensing methodologies based on impedance measurements and designs and manufacturing metho

  6. Product development practices that matter

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gupta, Nisheeth

    2010-01-01

    Product Development consists of activities to transforms a market opportunity and technological innovation into successful products. Several waves of improvements in technological innovation and product development have ...

  7. Developer Resources | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Library EPA: Developer Resources EPA: Data Finder EPA: eGrid Electricity Generation Environmental Impact Data Labor: Developer Tools NOAA: Climate Data Energy Department EIA:...

  8. Advanced Integrated Systems Technology Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    2013-01-01

    Renewable Energy Technologies Transportation Advanced Integrated Systems Technology Development is the final report for the Advanced Integrated Systems Technology Development project (

  9. Conservation and economic development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, M.J.

    1992-05-01

    This oral presentation is about the Espanola Power Savers Project which involves both the utility and for the community. I`m going to spend much of my time today discussing why this project makes sense for the community, but I would like to start with a brief word about why community-based conservation makes sense for utilities. A number of reasons are listed to show why conservation is today`s energy resource of choice. But if, for a moment, we take that as a given and ask why community-based conservation programs are the right way to develop that resource, the answer is simple: They work!

  10. Conservation and economic development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Sullivan, M.J.

    1992-05-01

    This oral presentation is about the Espanola Power Savers Project which involves both the utility and for the community. I'm going to spend much of my time today discussing why this project makes sense for the community, but I would like to start with a brief word about why community-based conservation makes sense for utilities. A number of reasons are listed to show why conservation is today's energy resource of choice. But if, for a moment, we take that as a given and ask why community-based conservation programs are the right way to develop that resource, the answer is simple: They work

  11. Photonics Research and Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Pookpanratana, Sujitra; Shlayan, Neveen; Venkat, Rama; Das, Bisjwajit; Boehm, Bob; Heske, Clemens; Fraser, Donald; Moustakas, Theodore

    2010-01-15

    During the period August 2005 through October 2009, the UNLV Research Foundation (UNLVRF), a non-profit affiliate of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas (UNLV), in collaboration with UNLVâ??s Colleges of Science and Engineering; Boston University (BU); Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); and Sunlight Direct, LLC, has managed and conducted a diverse and comprehensive research and development program focused on light-emitting diode (LED) technologies that provide significantly improved characteristics for lighting and display applications. This final technical report provides detailed information on the nature of the tasks, the results of the research, and the deliverables. It is estimated that about five percent of the energy used in the nation is for lighting homes, buildings and streets, accounting for some 25 percent of the average homeâ??s electric bill. However, the figure is significantly higher for the commercial sector. About 60 percent of the electricity for businesses is for lighting. Thus replacement of current lighting with solid-state lighting technology has the potential to significantly reduce this nationâ??s energy consumption â?? by some estimates, possibly as high as 20%. The primary objective of this multi-year R&D project has been to develop and advance lighting technologies to improve national energy conversion efficiencies; reduce heat load; and significantly lower the cost of conventional lighting technologies. The UNLVRF and its partners have specifically focused these talents on (1) improving LED technologies; (2) optimizing hybrid solar lighting, a technology which potentially offers the benefits of blending natural with artificial lighting systems, thus improving energy efficiency; and (3) building a comprehensive academic infrastructure within UNLV which concentrates on photonics R&D. Task researchers have reported impressive progress in (1) the development of quantum dot laser emitting diodes (QDLEDs) which will ultimately improve energy efficiency and lower costs for display and lighting applications (UNLV College of Engineering); (2) advancing green LED technology based on the Indium-Gallium-Nitride system (BU), thus improving conversion efficiencies; (3) employing unique state-of-the-art X-ray, electron and optical spectroscopies with microscopic techniques to learn more about the electronic structure of materials and contacts in LED devices (UNLV College of Science); (4) establishing a UNLV Display Lighting Laboratory staffed with a specialized team of academic researchers, students and industrial partners focused on identifying and implementing engineering solutions for lighting display-related problems; and (5) conducting research, development and demonstration for HSL essential to the resolution of technological barriers to commercialization.

  12. Agricultural Market Development Abroad. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Kirby, James E.; McNeely, John G.

    1965-01-01

    for the repeal of the Smoot-Hawley Act in 1934 vith the passage of the Reciprocal Trade Agreement .kt. This new act marked a beginning of a liberal 1 ~rade policy based on reciprocal trade agreements. The Trade Expansion Act of 1962 was the culmin- ation... of organizations with which FAS entered into planning and (5) research in the physical sciences as Italian market development activities. a broad and cautious generalization to include al- l moft any type of study of the physical sciences. not 1. The ~ational...

  13. WINDExchange: Workforce Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity ofkandz-cm11 Outreach Home RoomPreservationBio-Inspired SolarAbout /Two0 -UsingHeatInformationDevelopment Resources

  14. SRNL LDRD - Developed Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power AdministrationRobust, High-Throughput Analysis of Protein1-0845*RV6 Commercial value of4Developed Technologies

  15. Economic Development - SRSCRO

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantity of NaturalDukeWakefieldSulfateSciTechtail.Theory ofDid you not find what you wereDisclaimersMailEconomic Development As the

  16. Exciting new PDSF developments

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submitKansasCommunitiesof Energy8) Wigner HomeExampleDevelopments UsingExciting

  17. Department of Development Sociology Development Sociology Minor Application

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Chen, Tsuhan

    - Rethinking Global Development DSOC 3240 ­ Environment and Society DSOC 3311 - Environmental Governance DSOC

  18. MARSAME Develop A Survey Design 4 DEVELOP A SURVEY DESIGN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    MARSAME Develop A Survey Design 4 DEVELOP A SURVEY DESIGN 4.1 Introduction Once a decision rule has been developed, a disposition survey can be designed for the impacted materials and equipment (M costly and time-consuming development of redundant survey designs. The evaluation of existing SOPs

  19. Inter-American Development Bank Sustainable Development Department

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Inter-American Development Bank Sustainable Development Department Environment Division Forest Correa Pertti Veijalainen Harri Ahveninen Inter-American Development Bank Washington, D.C. Sustainable. At the IDB the work was supervised by Kari Keipi of the Sustainable Development Department (SDS). Bank staff

  20. Downhole Fluid Analyzer Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Bill Turner

    2006-11-28

    A novel fiber optic downhole fluid analyzer has been developed for operation in production wells. This device will allow real-time determination of the oil, gas and water fractions of fluids from different zones in a multizone or multilateral completion environment. The device uses near infrared spectroscopy and induced fluorescence measurement to unambiguously determine the oil, water and gas concentrations at all but the highest water cuts. The only downhole components of the system are the fiber optic cable and windows. All of the active components--light sources, sensors, detection electronics and software--will be located at the surface, and will be able to operate multiple downhole probes. Laboratory testing has demonstrated that the sensor can accurately determine oil, water and gas fractions with a less than 5 percent standard error. Once installed in an intelligent completion, this sensor will give the operating company timely information about the fluids arising from various zones or multilaterals in a complex completion pattern, allowing informed decisions to be made on controlling production. The research and development tasks are discussed along with a market analysis.

  1. Eltron Research & Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evenson, Carl; Mackay, Richard; Faull, John

    2014-03-01

    This topical report covers technical work conducted under contract DE-FC26-05NT42469 between FY06 Q1 through FY14 Q2. The project evolved through several budget periods, budget revisions and continuation applications. This report covers work performed under the “base” program. In 2010 ARRA funding was added to the project. A separate report covering the ARRA portion of the project was submitted to DOE. The original project was focused on research and development for scale-up of hydrogen separation membrane for a FutureGen type power plant. The work included membrane testing and evaluation of metal alloy flat plates vs. tubes and metal membranes vs. cermet membranes. In addition, economic analysis and process modeling was performed. The original project team included CoorsTek, NORAM, and Praxair. In FY10Q2 a continuation application was filed for conducting a scale-up test at Eastman Chemical. In this part of the project a Subscale Engineering Prototype (SEP) membrane skid was designed, fabricated, and operated on a gasified coal slip-stream on Eastman’s site in Kingsport, TN. Following operation, the project was reorganized and a second continuation application with a new statement of work was initiated in FY12Q1. Finally, based on DOE’s decision not to proceed with a Process Development Unit (PDU) field test, a third continuation application and statement of work was initiated in FY13Q1 to close out the project.

  2. Advanced Hydrogen Turbine Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Joesph Fadok

    2008-01-01

    Siemens has developed a roadmap to achieve the DOE goals for efficiency, cost reduction, and emissions through innovative approaches and novel technologies which build upon worldwide IGCC operational experience, platform technology, and extensive experience in G-class operating conditions. In Phase 1, the technologies and concepts necessary to achieve the program goals were identified for the gas turbine components and supporting technology areas and testing plans were developed to mitigate identified risks. Multiple studies were conducted to evaluate the impact in plant performance of different gas turbine and plant technologies. 2015 gas turbine technologies showed a significant improvement in IGCC plant efficiency, however, a severe performance penalty was calculated for high carbon capture cases. Thermodynamic calculations showed that the DOE 2010 and 2015 efficiency targets can be met with a two step approach. A risk management process was instituted in Phase 1 to identify risk and develop mitigation plans. For the risks identified, testing and development programs are in place and the risks will be revisited periodically to determine if changes to the plan are necessary. A compressor performance prediction has shown that the design of the compressor for the engine can be achieved with additional stages added to the rear of the compressor. Tip clearance effects were studied as well as a range of flow and pressure ratios to evaluate the impacts to both performance and stability. Considerable data was obtained on the four candidate combustion systems: diffusion, catalytic, premix, and distributed combustion. Based on the results of Phase 1, the premixed combustion system and the distributed combustion system were chosen as having the most potential and will be the focus of Phase 2 of the program. Significant progress was also made in obtaining combustion kinetics data for high hydrogen fuels. The Phase 1 turbine studies indicate initial feasibility of the advanced hydrogen turbine that meets the aggressive targets set forth for the advanced hydrogen turbine, including increased rotor inlet temperature (RIT), lower total cooling and leakage air (TCLA) flow, higher pressure ratio, and higher mass flow through the turbine compared to the baseline. Maintaining efficiency with high mass flow Syngas combustion is achieved using a large high AN2 blade 4, which has been identified as a significant advancement beyond the current state-of-the-art. Preliminary results showed feasibility of a rotor system capable of increased power output and operating conditions above the baseline. In addition, several concepts were developed for casing components to address higher operating conditions. Rare earth modified bond coat for the purpose of reducing oxidation and TBC spallation demonstrated an increase in TBC spallation life of almost 40%. The results from Phase 1 identified two TBC compositions which satisfy the thermal conductivity requirements and have demonstrated phase stability up to temperatures of 1850 C. The potential to join alloys using a bonding process has been demonstrated and initial HVOF spray deposition trials were promising. The qualitative ranking of alloys and coatings in environmental conditions was also performed using isothermal tests where significant variations in alloy degradation were observed as a function of gas composition. Initial basic system configuration schematics and working system descriptions have been produced to define key boundary data and support estimation of costs. Review of existing materials in use for hydrogen transportation show benefits or tradeoffs for materials that could be used in this type of applications. Hydrogen safety will become a larger risk than when using natural gas fuel as the work done to date in other areas has shown direct implications for this type of use. Studies were conducted which showed reduced CO{sub 2} and NOx emissions with increased plant efficiency. An approach to maximize plant output is needed in order to address the DOE turbine goal for 20-30% reduction o

  3. Ripeness sensor development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1992-11-01

    About 20--25% of the total production of fruits and vegetables in the USA must be discarded after harvest About 25--30% of this loss is the result of over-ripening and this loss represents about 8.39 [times] 10[sup 12] BTU of invested energy every year. This invested energy could be saved by non-destructive ripeness sensing. Sweetness is an important indicator of fruit quality and highly correlated with ripeness in most fruits. Research to develop a non-destructive fruit ripeness sensor has been conducted in the Agricultural Engineering Department at Purdue University. It is based on [sup 1]H-MR (proton Magnetic Resonance). A first generation prototype of the ripeness sensor based on [sup 1]H-MR was built and tested with. Results show that the sensor can discriminate small fruit (0.75 in diameter or smaller) differing in sugar content by 6%. This prototype can separate the fruit into at least two groups: one ripe and the other not ripe. The estimated cost for such a ripeness sensor is around $4,000. The signal sensitivity of the prototype can be improved to enable it to differentiate between fruits varying in sugar content by only 1 or 2% by using water peak suppression techniques to recover relatively weak sugar resonance signals in intact fruits, modifying circuits to eliminate noise, leakage and distortion of input/output signals, improving the magnetic console to get a higher magnetic field and better homogeneity, and designing a probe to achieve a higher signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio. As research continues a second generation ripeness sensor will be developed which will incorporate many of the improvements and which will be suitable for commercial use. Additional research will allow application of the technique to a wider range of fruit sizes (from blueberries to watermelons). This report describes estimated energy savings, feasibility studies, development of the initial prototype, and preliminary evaluation of the first generation prototype.

  4. Breakthrough Vehicle Development - Fuel Cells

    Fuel Cell Technologies Publication and Product Library (EERE)

    Document describing research and development program for fuel cell power systems for transportation applications.

  5. Process Development for Nanostructured Photovoltaics

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2011-05-31

    Fact sheet describing low-cost nanofabrication method to develop nanostructured, dye-sensitized solar cells

  6. RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ACTIVITIES IN

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Hasýrcý, Vasýf

    COOPERATION DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMMES FOR CENTERS (MGEP) 35 INITIATIVE FOR RENEWABLE ENERGY, ECOSYSTEMS BY THE MINISTRY OF DEVELOPMENT 14 RESEARCH INFRASTRUCTURE DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS 15 NATIONAL AND INTERNATIONAL-going research and development projects in METU, excluding the projects supported within BAP (Scientific Research

  7. Alloys in energy development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Frost, B.R.T.

    1984-02-01

    The development of new and advanced energy systems often requires the tailoring of new alloys or alloy combinations to meet the novel and often stringent requirements of those systems. Longer life at higher temperatures and stresses in aggressive environments is the most common goal. Alloy theory helps in achieving this goal by suggesting uses of multiphase systems and intermediate phases, where solid solutions were traditionally used. However, the use of materials under non-equilibrium conditions is now quite common - as with rapidly solidified metals - and the application of alloy theory must be modified accordingly. Under certain conditions, as in a reactor core, the rate of approach to equilibrium will be modified; sometimes a quasi-equilibrium is established. Thus an alloy may exhibit enhanced general diffusion at the same time as precipitate particles are being dispersed and solute atoms are being carried to vacancy sinks. We are approaching an understanding of these processes and can begin to model these complex systems.

  8. Advanced servomanipulator development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Kuban, D.P.

    1985-01-01

    The Advanced Servomanipulator (ASM) System consists of three major components: the ASM slave, the dual arm master controller (DAMC) or master, and the control system. The ASM is remotely maintainable force-reflecting servomanipulator developed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as part of the Consolidated Fuel Reprocessing Program. This new manipulator addresses requirements of advanced nuclear fuel reprocessing with emphasis on force reflection, remote maintainability, reliability, radiation tolerance, and corrosion resistance. The advanced servomanipulator is uniquely subdivided into remotely replaceable modules which will permit in situ manipulator repair by spare module replacement. Manipulator modularization and increased reliability are accomplished through a force transmission system that uses gears and torque tubes. Digital control algorithms and mechanical precision are used to offset the increased backlash, friction, and inertia resulting from the gear drives. This results in the first remotely maintainable force-reflecting servomanipulator in the world.

  9. Policy and IT Standards Development Process Development ApprovalInitiation

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    New Mexico, University of

    Policy and IT Standards Development Process Development ApprovalInitiation Main Campus Health Sciences Audit Academic, Technology, Project, Legal or Administrative Need IT Standard or UNM Policy? Policy Office convenes committee, vetting process with stakeholders and groups Campus Executives, Regents

  10. Power Systems Development Facility

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    None

    2003-07-01

    This report discusses Test Campaign TC12 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Gasifier train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (SW) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Gasifier is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed reactor designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier using a particulate control device (PCD). While operating as a gasifier, either air or oxygen can be used as the oxidant. Test run TC12 began on May 16, 2003, with the startup of the main air compressor and the lighting of the gasifier start-up burner. The Transport Gasifier operated until May 24, 2003, when a scheduled outage occurred to allow maintenance crews to install the fuel cell test unit and modify the gas clean-up system. On June 18, 2003, the test run resumed when operations relit the start-up burner, and testing continued until the scheduled end of the run on July 14, 2003. TC12 had a total of 733 hours using Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. Over the course of the entire test run, gasifier temperatures varied between 1,675 and 1,850 F at pressures from 130 to 210 psig.

  11. Developing product platforms:analysis of the development process

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Roveda, Marco

    1999-12-08

    Several authors have highlighted the importance of companies enhancing their new product development process through a multiproduct

  12. About | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    risks and costs of development and exploration Lower levelized cost of electricity (LCOE) to 6 centskWh by 2020 Accelerate development of 30 GWe of undiscovered hydrothermal...

  13. GEOGRAPHY 288: POPULATION, ENVIRONMENT, AND DEVELOPMENT IN THE DEVELOPING WORLD

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lopez-Carr, David

    literature and 2) students receive feedback towards the improved development of their own research projectsGEOGRAPHY 288: POPULATION, ENVIRONMENT, AND DEVELOPMENT IN THE DEVELOPING WORLD Winter 2005 Class@geog.ucsb.edu phone: 4219 Office: Ellison 5714 Office hours: M 11-12; W 1-2 . NATURE OF THE COURSE This seminar

  14. IEED Tribal Energy Development to Build Tribal Energy Development Capacity

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Assistant Secretary - Indian Affairs for the U.S. Department of the Interior, through the Office of Indian Energy and Economic Development, is soliciting grant proposals from Indian tribes to build tribal capacity for energy resource development or management under the Department of the Interior's (DOl's) Tribal Energy Development Capacity (TEDC) grant program.

  15. POWER SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2002-11-01

    This report discusses test campaign GCT4 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) transport reactor train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The transport reactor is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed reactor designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier using one of two possible particulate control devices (PCDs). The transport reactor was operated as a pressurized gasifier during GCT4. GCT4 was planned as a 250-hour test run to continue characterization of the transport reactor using a blend of several Powder River Basin (PRB) coals and Bucyrus limestone from Ohio. The primary test objectives were: Operational Stability--Characterize reactor loop and PCD operations with short-term tests by varying coal-feed rate, air/coal ratio, riser velocity, solids-circulation rate, system pressure, and air distribution. Secondary objectives included the following: Reactor Operations--Study the devolatilization and tar cracking effects from transient conditions during transition from start-up burner to coal. Evaluate the effect of process operations on heat release, heat transfer, and accelerated fuel particle heat-up rates. Study the effect of changes in reactor conditions on transient temperature profiles, pressure balance, and product gas composition. Effects of Reactor Conditions on Synthesis Gas Composition--Evaluate the effect of air distribution, steam/coal ratio, solids-circulation rate, and reactor temperature on CO/CO{sub 2} ratio, synthesis gas Lower Heating Value (LHV), carbon conversion, and cold and hot gas efficiencies. Research Triangle Institute (RTI) Direct Sulfur Recovery Process (DSRP) Testing--Provide syngas in support of the DSRP commissioning. Loop Seal Operations--Optimize loop seal operations and investigate increases to previously achieved maximum solids-circulation rate.

  16. Tools for dynamic model development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Schaber, Spencer Daniel

    2014-01-01

    For this thesis, several tools for dynamic model development were developed and analyzed. Dynamic models can be used to simulate and optimize the behavior of a great number of natural and engineered systems, from the ...

  17. Herty Advanced Materials Development Center

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Session 1-B: Advancing Alternative Fuels for the Military and Aviation Sector Breakout Session 1: New Developments and Hot Topics Jill Stuckey, Acting Director, Herty Advanced Materials Development Center

  18. Automotive Component Product Development Enhancement

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    de Weck, Olivier L.

    Automotive Component Product Development Enhancement Through Multi-Attribute System Design Engineering Systems Division #12;Automotive Component Product Development Enhancement Through Multi of Science in Engineering and Management February 2005 ABSTRACT Automotive industry is facing a tough period

  19. Mechanisms of brain ventricle development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Lowery, Laura Anne

    2008-01-01

    The brain ventricles are a conserved system of fluid-filled cavities within the brain that form during the earliest stages of brain development. Abnormal brain ventricle development has been correlated with neurodevelopmental ...

  20. Tracing the magmatic/hydrothermal transition in regional low-strain zones: The role of magma dynamics in strain localization at pluton roof, implications for intrusion-related gold

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Paris-Sud XI, Université de

    dynamics in strain localization at pluton roof, implications for intrusion-related gold deposits Eric features of a granite-pluton roof; large-scale dykes and a network of gold veins are intensively developed in this roof, recording a succession of mechanical instabilities. Our gravity survey underlines the presence

  1. Water use in the development and operation of geothermal power plants.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Clark, C. E.; Harto, C. B.; Sullivan, J. L.; Wang, M. Q. (Energy Systems); ( EVS)

    2010-09-17

    Geothermal energy is increasingly recognized for its potential to reduce carbon emissions and U.S. dependence on foreign oil. Energy and environmental analyses are critical to developing a robust set of geothermal energy technologies. This report summarizes what is currently known about the life cycle water requirements of geothermal electric power-generating systems and the water quality of geothermal waters. It is part of a larger effort to compare the life cycle impacts of large-scale geothermal electricity generation with other power generation technologies. The results of the life cycle analysis are summarized in a companion report, Life Cycle Analysis Results of Geothermal Systems in Comparison to Other Power Systems. This report is divided into six chapters. Chapter 1 gives the background of the project and its purpose, which is to inform power plant design and operations. Chapter 2 summarizes the geothermal electricity generation technologies evaluated in this study, which include conventional hydrothermal flash and binary systems, as well as enhanced geothermal systems (EGS) that rely on engineering a productive reservoir where heat exists but water availability or permeability may be limited. Chapter 3 describes the methods and approach to this work and identifies the four power plant scenarios evaluated: a 20-MW EGS plant, a 50-MW EGS plant, a 10-MW binary plant, and a 50-MW flash plant. The two EGS scenarios include hydraulic stimulation activities within the construction stage of the life cycle and assume binary power generation during operations. The EGS and binary scenarios are assumed to be air-cooled power plants, whereas the flash plant is assumed to rely on evaporative cooling. The well field and power plant design for the scenario were based on simulations using DOE's Geothermal Economic Technology Evaluation Model (GETEM). Chapter 4 presents the water requirements for the power plant life cycle for the scenarios evaluated. Geology, reservoir characteristics, and local climate have various effects on elements such as drilling rate, the number of production wells, and production flow rates. Over the life cycle of a geothermal power plant, from construction through 30 years of operation, plant operations is where the vast majority of water consumption occurs. Water consumption refers to the water that is withdrawn from a resource such as a river, lake, or non-geothermal aquifer that is not returned to that resource. For the EGS scenarios, plant operations consume between 0.29 and 0.72 gal/kWh. The binary plant experiences similar operational consumption, at 0.27 gal/kWh. Far less water, just 0.01 gal/kWh, is consumed during operations of the flash plant because geofluid is used for cooling and is not replaced. While the makeup water requirements are far less for a hydrothermal flash plant, the long-term sustainability of the reservoir is less certain due to estimated evaporative losses of 14.5-33% of produced geofluid at operating flash plants. For the hydrothermal flash scenario, the average loss of geofluid due to evaporation, drift, and blowdown is 2.7 gal/kWh. The construction stage requires considerably less water: 0.001 gal/kWh for both the binary and flash plant scenarios and 0.01 gal/kWh for the EGS scenarios. The additional water requirements for the EGS scenarios are caused by a combination of factors, including lower flow rates per well, which increases the total number of wells needed per plant, the assumed well depths, and the hydraulic stimulation required to engineer the reservoir. Water quality results are presented in Chapter 5. The chemical composition of geofluid has important implications for plant operations and the potential environmental impacts of geothermal energy production. An extensive dataset containing more than 53,000 geothermal geochemical data points was compiled and analyzed for general trends and statistics for typical geofluids. Geofluid composition was found to vary significantly both among and within geothermal fields. Seven main chemical constituents were found to

  2. Development of MP3 Technologies

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    Development of MP3 Technologies Impact of Basic Research on Innovation - Edited excerpts from American Competitiveness Initiative, February 2006...

  3. Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cole, Daniel H.

    2008-01-01

    Climate Change, Adaptation, and Development Daniel H. Cole*THE COSTS OF CLIMATE CHANGE . ADAPTATIONCONVENTION ON CLIMATE CHANGE . IV. A.

  4. Gammasphere software development. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piercey, R.B.

    1993-05-01

    Activities of the nuclear physics group are described. Progress was made in organizing the Gammasphere Software Working Group, establishing a nuclear computing facility, participating in software development at Lawrence Berkeley, developing a common data file format, and adapting the ORNL UPAK software to run at Gammasphere. A universal histogram object was developed that defines a file format and provides for an objective-oriented programming model. An automated liquid nitrogen fill system was developed for Gammasphere (110 Ge detectors comprise the sphere).

  5. OFFICE OF SUPPLIER DIVERSITY DEVELOPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Pittendrigh, Barry

    OFFICE OF SUPPLIER DIVERSITY DEVELOPMENT STRATEGIC PLAN JESSE MOORE, MANAGER August, 2005 Mission Statement Provide leadership and develop relationships that will result in Purdue's campus' supplier base is a recognized national leader in developing a diverse supplier base. All staff involved with purchasing

  6. POWER SYSTEMS DEVELOPMENT FACILITY

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Unknown

    2002-05-01

    This report discusses test campaign GCT3 of the Halliburton KBR transport reactor train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (Siemens Westinghouse) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The transport reactor is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed reactor designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier using one of two possible particulate control devices (PCDs). The transport reactor was operated as a pressurized gasifier during GCT3. GCT3 was planned as a 250-hour test run to commission the loop seal and continue the characterization of the limits of operational parameter variations using a blend of several Powder River Basin coals and Bucyrus limestone from Ohio. The primary test objectives were: (1) Loop Seal Commissioning--Evaluate the operational stability of the loop seal with sand and limestone as a bed material at different solids circulation rates and establish a maximum solids circulation rate through the loop seal with the inert bed. (2) Loop Seal Operations--Evaluate the loop seal operational stability during coal feed operations and establish maximum solids circulation rate. Secondary objectives included the continuation of reactor characterization, including: (1) Operational Stability--Characterize the reactor loop and PCD operations with short-term tests by varying coal feed, air/coal ratio, riser velocity, solids circulation rate, system pressure, and air distribution. (2) Reactor Operations--Study the devolatilization and tar cracking effects from transient conditions during transition from start-up burner to coal. Evaluate the effect of process operations on heat release, heat transfer, and accelerated fuel particle heat-up rates. Study the effect of changes in reactor conditions on transient temperature profiles, pressure balance, and product gas composition. (3) Effects of Reactor Conditions on Syngas Composition--Evaluate the effect of air distribution, steam/coal ratio, solids circulation rate, and reactor temperature on CO/CO{sub 2} ratio, H{sub 2}/converted carbon ratio, gasification rates, carbon conversion, and cold and hot gas efficiencies. Test run GCT3 was started on December 1, 2000, with the startup of the thermal oxidizer fan, and was completed on February 1, 2001. This test was conducted in two parts; the loop seal was commissioned during the first part of this test run from December 1 through 15, which consisted of hot inert solids circulation testing. These initial tests provided preliminary data necessary to understand different parameters associated with the operation and performance of the loop seal. The loop seal was tested with coal feed during the second part of the test run and additional data was gathered to analyze reactor operations and to identify necessary modifications to improve equipment and process performance. In the second part of GCT3, the gasification portion of the test, from January 20 to February 1, 2001, the mixing zone and riser temperatures were varied between 1,675 and 1,825 F at pressures ranging from 200 to 240 psig. There were 306 hours of solid circulation and 184 hours of coal feed attained in GCT3.

  7. Recent Developments in SHERPA

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Archibald, Jennifer; Gleisberg, Tanju; Hoeche, Stefan; Krauss, Frank; Schonherr, Marek; Schumann, Steffen; Siegert, Frank; Winter, Jan; /Fermilab

    2011-11-15

    Some recent QCD-related developments in the SHERPA event generator are presented. In the past decades, event generators such as PYTHIA [1, 2] and HERWIG [3, 4] have been central for nearly all physics analyses at particle physics experiments at the high-energy frontier. This will also hold true at the LHC, where a large number of interesting signals for new particles or new phenomena (the Higgs boson or any other manifestation of the mechanism behind electro-weak symmetry breaking, supersymmetry, extra dimensions etc.) is hampered by a plethora of severe, sometimes overwhelming backgrounds. Nearly all of them are largely influenced by QCD. Therefore it seems fair to say that the success of the LHC in finding new physics may very well depend on a deep and detailed understanding of old physics, like QCD. Examples for this include, among others, the central-jet veto for the vector boson fusion channel for Higgs production or topologies, where gauge bosons emerge in association with many jets, a background for many search channels. In a reflection on increased needs by the experimental community, aiming at higher precision, incorporation of new physics models and so on, the work horses of old have undergone serious renovation efforts, resulting in new, improved versions of the respective codes, namely PYTHIA8 [5] and HERWIG++ [6]. In addition a completely new code, SHERPA [7], has been constructed and is in the process of maturing. The status of this code is the topic of this contribution. SHERPA's hallmark property is the inclusion of higher-order tree-level QCD contributions, leading to an improved modelling of jet production. They are introduced through a full-fledged matrix element generator, AMEGIC++ [8], which is capable of generating matrix elements and corresponding phase space mappings for processes with multi-particle final states in various models, including the Standard Model, anomalous gauge triple and quadruple couplings according to [9, 10], the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model with Feynman rules from [11], the ADD-model of extra dimensions [12, 13], and a model with an extra U(1) singlet coupling to the Higgs boson only [14]. The code has been thoroughly tested and validated [15]. This code, however, is limited, especially in the treatment of many ({ge} 6) external QCD particles. Therefore, in the near future, SHERPA will incorporate another, new matrix element generator, COMIX, which is based on Berends-Giele recursion relations [16] and color-dressing [17] rather than color-ordering. In Tabs. 1 and 2 some example cross sections for gg {yields} ng at fixed energies and pp {yields} b{bar b} + n jets obtained with this program are exhibited and compared to those from other programs. In addition, concerning the calculation of higher-order matrix elements and cross sections, there have been first steps towards an automation of such calculations at truly next-to leading order accuracy. They manifest themselves in the implementation of a procedure [19] to fully automatically construct and evaluate Catani-Seymour dipole subtraction terms [20] for the real part of such NLO calculations. The results from the matrix element calculations are merged with the subsequent parton shower through the formalism of [21, 22]. The results of its implementation in SHERPA [23] has recently been compared with other algorithms [24]. Although there remains some dispute about the theoretical equivalence of the different approaches, the overall results show satisfying agreement with each other, such that they can be used with confidence for data analysis.

  8. Research, Development, Demonstration, and Deployment | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Research, Development, Demonstration, and Deployment Research, Development, Demonstration, and Deployment The Bioenergy Technologies Office's research, development, demonstration,...

  9. Project Management Career Development Program | Department of...

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    You are here Home Operational Management Certifications and Professional Development Project Management Career Development Program Project Management Career Development...

  10. Transaction Costs, Information Technology and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Nirvikar

    2004-01-01

    Transaction Costs, Information Technology and Development 1.Transaction Costs, Information Technology and DevelopmentTransaction Costs, Information Technology and Development *

  11. Transaction Costs, Information Technology and Development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Singh, Nirvikar

    2004-01-01

    Transaction Costs, Information Technology and Development 1.Transaction Costs, Information Technology and DevelopmentTransaction Costs, Information Technology and Development

  12. Pompano subsea development -- Testing program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Nelson, R.; Berger, R.; Tyer, C.

    1996-12-31

    System reliability is essential for the economic success of any subsea oil and gas development. Testing programs can be developed to prove system reliability while still adhering to cost and schedule constraints. This paper describes a three-tiered equipment testing program that was employed for the Pompano Phase 2 subsea system. Program objectives, test descriptions, procedure development and test execution are discussed in detail. Lessons learned throughout the tests are also presented.

  13. MPAS-Ocean Development Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Jacobsen, Douglas W.; Ringler, Todd D.; Petersen, Mark R.; Jones, Philip W.; Maltrud, Mathew E.

    2012-06-13

    The Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS) is a modeling framework developed jointly between NCAR and LANL, built to allow core developers to: rapidly develop new dynamical cores, and leverage improvements made to shared codes. MPAS-Ocean (MPAS-O) is a functioning ocean model capable of high resolution, or highly vairable resolution simulations. The first MPAS-O publication is expected by the end of the year.

  14. Climate change: comparative impact on developing and developed countries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Climate change: comparative impact on developing and developed countries PAUL CHINOWSKY1 , CAROLYN. In these projections, climate change is a global issue with potential impacts for every country. However, the relative levels to determine the relative impact of climate change in the context of a single infrastructure

  15. ME2801 Planning -Developing a Venture Planning -Developing a Venture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arvestad, Lars

    models for business process analysis develop and argue for a business/business model Kursens huvudsakliga to independently: identify a feasible business idea evaluate market opportunities for the idea in terms of market discuss and critically assess the steps necessary for realizing the business. develop and write a complete

  16. ME2801 Planning -Developing a Venture Planning -Developing a Venture

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Arvestad, Lars

    advanced models for business process analysis - Develop and argue for a complete business model Kursens to be able to independently: - Identify a feasible business idea - Perform a market analysis of a business idea - Discuss and critically assess the necessary steps for realizing a business idea - Develop

  17. Laboratory Directed Research and Development

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-04-30

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) requirements for laboratory directed research and development (LDRD) while providing the laboratory director broad flexibility for program implementation

  18. Illinois Coal Development Program (Illinois)

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Illinois Coal Development Program seeks to advance promising clean coal technologies beyond research and towards commercialization. The program provides a 50/50 match with private industry...

  19. Economic Development | ornl.gov

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    security categories at the 2010 GVC hosted by ORNL March 24-26. The competition, in its fourth year, attracts students developing new technologies and venture investors with...

  20. Renewable Natural Gas- Developer Perspective

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Breakout Session 3-C: Renewable Gaseous FuelsRenewable Natural Gas - Developer PerspectiveDavid Ross, Managing Director, MultiGen International, LLC

  1. Developing Alaskan Sustainable Housing Training

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Hosted by the Association of Alaska Housing Authorities (AAHA), this three-day training event covers strategies and technical issues related to sustainable housing development.

  2. Laboratory Directed Research and Development

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) requirements for laboratory directed research and development (LDRD) while providing the laboratory director broad flexibility for program implementation.

  3. Geothermal Research and Development Programs

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    Here you'll find links to laboratories, universities, and colleges conducting research and development (R&D) in geothermal energy technologies.

  4. International Development Activities and Opportunities

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    sustainability. MDG-8 Develop a global partnership for development. #12;Scotland's Strengths Water Environmental primary education. MDG-6 Combat HIV/Aids, Malaria and other diseases. MDG-7 Ensure environmental Sustainability Energy Health Results Themes Cross-cutting issues: - Partnership & People - Governance - Climate

  5. Energy and Development Gordon Mackenzie

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Energy and Development Gordon Mackenzie Energy Programme Coordinator UNEP Risø Centre #12;Energy · Nordic Arctic energy network #12;African Rural Energy Enterprise Development - AREED ENDA MFC KITE TaTEDO CEEEZ E+Co Africa E+Co NJ UNEP Paris URC UN Foundation Sida Others Demonstrating that needed energy

  6. Water and Development Milind Sohoni

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Sohoni, Milind

    Water and Development Milind Sohoni www.cse.iitb.ac.in/sohoni email: sohoni scientists on how water appears as a development need, its basic scientific and engineering processes NGOs, or want to pursue the study of the sector as a researcher. Our focus is largely on drinking water

  7. Risk perception in developing countries

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Wilbanks, T.J.; Rayner, S.F.

    1985-02-15

    The paper briefly reviews: (1) what risk perception means to most people in developing countries; (2) some of the modern-technology-related risks to which people in these countries are exposed; and (3) some research evidence about risk perception that gives hints about how such perceptions will evolve in developing countries. (ACR)

  8. Real Estate Development Company Description

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Dahl, David B.

    Real Estate Development Company Description: The largest specialty family footwear retailer America, the Caribbean and South America. Short Project Name: Competitive Analysis - Real Estate Positions to assist them in making recommendations for how our company should develop its real estate strategy

  9. INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF DEVELOPMENT ISSUES

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    INTERNATIONAL JOURNAL OF DEVELOPMENT ISSUES VOL. 4 · No. 2 December 2005 CONTENTS Jeffrey D. Sachs-97 and the Bulgarian currency board 95 #12;#12;International Journal of Development Issues Vol. 4, No. 2 (2005) 1 Science, University of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia. #12;J.D. Sachs /International Journal

  10. Foreign Fishery Developments Mexico's Fisheries

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Foreign Fishery Developments Mexico's Fisheries and Their Development The Mexican Government has Mexico to increase its food imports. The rapidly growing fishing industry has been one of Mexico's few Program (1977- 82) has already resulted in a substantial- ly increased catch of fish and shellfish. Mexico

  11. Research and Economic Development at

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    ; · Negotiates and accepts awards on behalf of The Regents; · Processes award accounts; · Provides post-award non@ucr.edu · Manages UCR's intellectual property, license agreements, option agreements, equity agreements, material of inventions developed by UCR faculty, develops the licensing strategy for UCR intellectual property

  12. Spring 2014 Organization Development & Training

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Wu, Shin-Tson

    Spring 2014 Organization Development & Training Catalog University of Central Florida Office of Organization Development & Training 3280 Progress Drive Orlando, FL 32826-2912 (407) 823-0440 February 7, 2014 Volume 2, Number 3 The current Catalog is published at http://www.hr.ucf.edu/web/training

  13. Surface Water Development in Texas. 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    McNeely, John G.; Lacewell, Ronald D.

    1977-01-01

    ................................. 30 Appendix Tables .......................................... 32 ......... Appendix A: Major Conservation Storage Reservoirs 40 endix B: Water Development Board Policy ............... 41 eferences ............................................... 43... of acre-feet. In Texas, 95 percent of the total conservation storage capacity is concentrated in 63 reservoirs. The Texas Water Development Board has not provided a published figure on average annual yield of surface water from these reservoirs...

  14. GEOTHERMAL ENERGY DEVELOPMENT Paul Kruger

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Stanford University

    SGP-TR 9 * GEOTHERMAL ENERGY DEVELOPMENT Paul Kruger C i v i l Engineering Department Stanford on an aggressive program t o develop its indigenous resources of geothermal energy. For more than a decade, geothermal energy has been heralded as one of the more promising forms of energy a l t e r n a t e t o o i l

  15. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A.P.Evans; K.E. Redinger; M.J. Holmes

    1998-04-01

    The objective of the Advanced Emissions Control Development Program (AECDP) is to develop practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of air toxics from coal-fired boilers. Ideally, the project aim is to effectively control air toxic emissions through the use of conventional flue gas cleanup equipment such as electrostatic precipitators (ESPS), fabric filters (baghouse), and wet flue gas desulfurization. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate and hydrogen chloride. Following the construction and evaluation of a representative air toxics test facility in Phase I, Phase II focused on the evaluation of mercury and several other air toxics emissions. The AECDP is jointly funded by the United States Department of Energy's Federal Energy Technology Center (DOE), the Ohio Coal Development Office within the Ohio Department of Development (oCDO), and Babcock& Wilcox-a McDermott company (B&W).

  16. Water-related constraints to the development of geothermal electric generating stations

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Robertson, R.C.; Shepherd, A.D.; Rosemarin, C.S.; Mayfield, M.W.

    1981-06-01

    The water-related constraints, which may be among the most complex and variable of the issues facing commercialization of geothermal energy, are discussed under three headings: (1) water requirements of geothermal power stations, (2) resource characteristics of the most promising hydrothermal areas and regional and local water supply situations, and (3) legal issues confronting potential users of water at geothermal power plants in the states in which the resource areas are located. A total of 25 geothermal resource areas in California, New Mexico, Oregon, Idaho, Utah, Hawaii, and Alaska were studied. Each had a hydrothermal resource temperature in excess of 150/sup 0/C (300/sup 0/F) and an estimated 30-year potential of greater than 100-MW(e) capacity.

  17. Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent BondingMeeting |DesignCommunities Reviewed June 2011

  18. Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Homesum_a_epg0_fpd_mmcf_m.xls" ,"Available from WebQuantityBonneville Power Administration would like submit theCovalent BondingMeeting |DesignCommunities Reviewed June 2011magnetic field

  19. Analyzing the private development model for university real estate development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Gerrity, James F., IV (James Francis)

    2009-01-01

    Universities within the Unites States have long been active in the real estate development market surrounding their respective campuses. However, beginning with the baby boom in the late 1950s, colleges have begun expanding ...

  20. North Dakota Energy Workforce Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Carter, Drake

    2014-12-29

    Bismarck State College, along with its partners (Williston State College, Minot State University and Dickinson State University), received funding to help address the labor and social impacts of rapid oilfield development in the Williston Basin of western North Dakota. Funding was used to develop and support both credit and non-credit workforce training as well as four major symposia designed to inform and educate the public; enhance communication and sense of partnership among citizens, local community leaders and industry; and identify and plan to ameliorate negative impacts of oil field development.

  1. Lower Sioux Wind Feasibility & Development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Minkel, Darin

    2012-04-01

    This report describes the process and findings of a Wind Energy Feasibility Study (Study) conducted by the Lower Sioux Indian Community (Community). The Community is evaluating the development of a wind energy project located on tribal land. The project scope was to analyze the critical issues in determining advantages and disadvantages of wind development within the Community. This analysis addresses both of the Community's wind energy development objectives: the single turbine project and the Commerical-scale multiple turbine project. The main tasks of the feasibility study are: land use and contraint analysis; wind resource evaluation; utility interconnection analysis; and project structure and economics.

  2. Business Development Executive (BDE) Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Rice, E.J. "Woody"; Frederick, W. James

    2005-12-05

    The IPST BDE (Institute of Paper Science and Technology Business Development Executive) program was initiated in 1997 to make the paper industry better aware of the new manufacturing technologies being developed at IPST for the U.S. pulp and paper industry's use. In April 2000, the BDE program management and the 20 BDEs, all retired senior level industry manufacturing and research executives, were asked by Ms. Denise Swink of OIT at DOE to take the added responsibility of bringing DOE developed energy conservation technology to the paper industry. This project was funded by a DOE grant of $950,000.

  3. Developing visual associations through filmmaking 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Shetti, Vishwanand Venkatesh

    2008-10-10

    ................................................ vii 1.INTRODUCTION: THE CONCEPTION OF DISCRETION.............. 1 2. INSPIRATION................................................ 5 3.CHOICES.................................................... 9 4.CREATING THE ROADMAP....................................... 11 5.TRAVERSING THE ROADMAP.................................. 12 6.DEVELOPING A HISTORY...................................... 13 7.WITHHOLDING EVENTS....................................... 14 8.COMPREHENSION...

  4. Laboratory Directed Research and Development

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2015-10-22

    To establish Department of Energy (DOE) requirements for laboratory directed research and development (LDRD) while providing the laboratory director broad flexibility for program implementation. Supersedes DOE O 413.2B.

  5. Laboratory Directed Research and Development

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2001-01-08

    To establish the Department's, including the NNSA's, requirements for laboratory-directed research and development (LDRD) while providing the laboratory director broad flexibility for program implementation. Cancels DOE O 413.2. Canceled by DOE O 413.2B.

  6. National Laboratory Impacts and Developments

    Broader source: Energy.gov [DOE]

    The Technology-to-Market program supports U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) initiatives that make access to laboratory-developed technologies and capabilities easier and increase partnerships with the clean energy private sector.

  7. Portable code development in C

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Brown, S.A.

    1990-11-06

    With a new generation of high performance computers appearing around us on a time scale of months, a new challenge for developers of simulation codes is to write and maintain production codes that are both highly portable and maximally efficient. My contention is that C is the language that is both best suited to that goal and is widely available today. GLF is a new code written mainly in C which is intended to have all of the XRASER physics and run on any platform of interest. It demonstrates the power of the C paradigm for code developers and flexibility and ease of use for the users. Three fundamental problems are discussed: the C/UNIX development environment; the supporting tools and libraries which handle data and graphics portability issues; and the advantages of C in numerical simulation code development.

  8. ORISE: Instructional Design and Development

    Broader source: All U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office Webpages (Extended Search)

    simulations Self-paced tutorials Guided instructions Point-of-use job aids and just-in-time training Full-function exercises and drills Instructional Design and Development...

  9. Laboratory Directed Research and Development

    Broader source: Directives, Delegations, and Requirements [Office of Management (MA)]

    2006-04-19

    The Order establishes DOE requirements and responsibilities for laboratory directed research and development while providing laboratory directors with broad flexibility for program implementation. Cancels DOE O 413.2A. Admin Chg 1, 1-31-11.

  10. Essays on development and finance

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Cole, Shawn (Shawn Allen)

    2005-01-01

    This thesis is a collection of three empirical essays on economic development and finance. Chapter 1 examines how politicians influence the lending decisions of government owned- banks, particularly whether government ...

  11. ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION

    Office of Legacy Management (LM)

    .' :h I : ' ENERGY RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION WASHINGTON, D.C. 20545 October 24, 1975 :.. ,. Memo to Piles' CARNEGIE-MELLON SC&RCCYCLOTRON On October 23, 1975, W....

  12. Essays in Empirical Development Economics

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ozier, Owen Whitfield

    2010-01-01

    story,” Journal of Development Economics, 91(1), 128–139.Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, 58(4), 450–474.to Learn,” Review of Economics and Statistics, 91(3), 437–

  13. Developing energy efficient filtering systems

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Azzopardi, L.

    Azzopardi,L. Vanderbauwhede,W. Moadeli,M. Proceedings of the 32nd international ACM SIGIR conference on Research and development in information retrieval (SIGIR09) pp 664-665 ACM

  14. Essays in climate and development

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Guerrero Compeán, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    This dissertation is a collection of three essays on environmental policy and empirical development economics, unified in their underlying inquiry of the welfare effects of climate in Mexico. The first chapter presents ...

  15. Energy Research, Development and Demonstration 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Ray, R. R., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    projects and submission of energy-related proposals to federal agencies. The section is staffed by a manager, three engineers, and secretarial personnel. The rules adopted by TENRAC for administering development grants establish the following funding...

  16. Development projects: Secondary school, Arnold 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Anonymous

    This BULLETIN describes a secondary school at Arnold, Nottinghamshire, designed by the Development Group of the Architects and Building Branch of the Ministry of Education in collaboration with the Local Education Authority. It was the sixth...

  17. Laboratory directed research and development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1991-11-15

    The purposes of Argonne's Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) Program are to encourage the development of novel concepts, enhance the Laboratory's R D capabilities, and further the development of its strategic initiatives. Among the aims of the projects supported by the Program are establishment of engineering proof-of-principle''; development of an instrumental prototype, method, or system; or discovery in fundamental science. Several of these project are closely associated with major strategic thrusts of the Laboratory as described in Argonne's Five Year Institutional Plan, although the scientific implications of the achieved results extend well beyond Laboratory plans and objectives. The projects supported by the Program are distributed across the major programmatic areas at Argonne. Areas of emphasis are (1) advanced accelerator and detector technology, (2) x-ray techniques in biological and physical sciences, (3) advanced reactor technology, (4) materials science, computational science, biological sciences and environmental sciences. Individual reports summarizing the purpose, approach, and results of projects are presented.

  18. Houston Low Impact Development Competition 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Adair, R.

    2011-01-01

    ?ve always done it? is more and more counterproductive ? For local government, the costs of keeping pace with inevitable results of traditional development is major burden ? Change is inevitable ? Leadership role is better than the alternative... Impact Development ? Treats rainwater as a resource rather than a waste product ? Mimics nature to achieve our goals ? Clean, infiltrate, store, use it where it hits the ground ? Restores, protects, promotes natural habitat, water resources ?It...

  19. JSF AND VISUAL WEB DEVELOPMENT

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Liang, Y. Daniel

    JSF AND VISUAL WEB DEVELOPMENT CHAPTER 41 Objectives To explain what JSF is (§41.1). To create/16/09 10:18 AM Page 41­1 #12;41­2 Chapter 41 JSF and Visual Web Development 41.1 Introduction The use of servlets, introduced in Chapter 39, is the foundation of the Java Web technology. It is a primitive way

  20. Private development of artificial reefs 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Burns, Arthur Allen

    1978-01-01

    PRIVATE DEVFLOPMENT OF ARTIFICIAL REEFS A Thesis ARTHUR ALLEN BURNS, JR. Submitted to the Graduate College of Texas ARM University in partial fulfillment of the requirement for the degree of MASTER OF SCIENCE December 1978 Major Subject...: Management PRIVATE DEVELOPMENT OF ARTIFICIAL REEFS A Thesis by ARTHUR ALLEN BURNS, JR. Approved as to style and content by: irman o t e Committee { ead o the Depa tment ~Member Memb e- December 1978 12409Ei'7 ABSTRACT Private Development...

  1. Gammasphere software development. Progress report

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Piercey, R.B.

    1994-01-01

    This report describes the activities of the nuclear physics group at Mississippi State University which were performed during 1993. Significant progress has been made in the focus areas: chairing the Gammasphere Software Working Group (SWG); assisting with the porting and enhancement of the ORNL UPAK histogramming software package; and developing standard formats for Gammasphere data products. In addition, they have established a new public ftp archive to distribute software and software development tools and information.

  2. Nigeria: Energy for sustainable development

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Eleri, E.O. [Fridtjof Nansen Inst., Oslo (Norway)

    1993-12-31

    Though an essentially contested concept, it is safe to acknowledge that the attainment of sustainable development requires that the growth and well-being of present generations are brought about in such ways that the ability of future people to meet their own needs will not be compromised. The availability of safe and sound energy as a factor of production is a key element in such a development process. Despite the abundance of energy resources, acute shortages of energy services have become endemic in Nigeria. This paper reassesses the common proposition that energy has fueled growth and development in Nigeria by its role as the chief source of state revenue and through its input into economic activities in the country. It is argued here, however, that conventional energy management in Nigeria has tended to create development flaws of its own. The article is divided into six sections: 1st, a general account of the energy and development linkages in Nigeria; 2nd, the failures of these linkages are assessed; 3rd, policy initiatives are considered that would be reconcilable to the nation`s sustainable development; 4th, the present reform agenda, its inadequacies and barriers are surveyed; 5th, the achievement of sustainable development, it is argued, will demand the re-institutionalization of the political economy of the energy sector in Nigeria, which will depend largely on the resolution of the dilemmas and conflicts in the country`s broader political and economic reforms; and 6th, an outlook is suggested for future policy development.

  3. Why Cogeneration Development Projects Fail 

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Greenwood, R. W.

    1987-01-01

    ENERATION DEVElDHmNT PROJECTS FAIL RALPH w. GRBBtMX>D Regional Manager Bbasco Services Incorporated Houston, Texas ABSTRACT Cogeneration projects that are organized by developers fail to reach fruition for reasons other than the basic economical... here to discuss those additional problems unique to small projects. A developnent project is defined as one where a third party, the developer, provides preliminary econanic options, licensing, business structure, financing, detailed engineering...

  4. Technology Development | Department of Energy

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    AFDC Printable Version Share this resource Send a link to EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page to someone by E-mail Share EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Facebook Tweet about EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Twitter Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Google Bookmark EERE: Alternative Fuels Data Center Home Page on Delicious Rank EERE: Alternative FuelsofProgram: Report15 MeetingDevelopment Technology Development OE supports a

  5. Guide to Sustainable Development and Environmental Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mirza, Umar Karim

    2002-01-01

    Development and Environmental Policy By Natalia MirovitskayaDevelopment and Environmental Policy. Durham, NC: DukeDevelopment and Environmental Policy is a work by 25

  6. Manufacturing Research and Development | Department of Energy

    Office of Environmental Management (EM)

    Manufacturing Research and Development Manufacturing Research and Development The Fuel Cell Technologies Office's manufacturing research and development (R&D) activity improves...

  7. Developing Secure Power Systems Professional Competence: Alignment...

    Energy Savers [EERE]

    Developing Secure Power Systems Professional Competence: Alignment and Gaps in Workforce Development Programs - Phase 2 (JulyAugust 2013) Developing Secure Power Systems...

  8. Guide to Sustainable Development and Environmental Policy

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Mirza, Umar Karim

    2002-01-01

    Review: Guide to Sustainable Development and EnvironmentalEds. ). Guide to Sustainable Development and EnvironmentalThe Guide to Sustainable Development and Environmental

  9. The Green Cathedral: Sustainable Development of Amazonia

    E-Print Network [OSTI]

    Tobin, R. James

    1994-01-01

    The Green Cathedral: Sustainable Development of Amazonia R.The Green Cathedral: Sustainable Development of Amazonia. (Ais between sustainable and unsustainable development of the

  10. Research & Development Roadmap: Next-Generation Appliances |...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Research & Development Roadmap: Next-Generation Appliances Research & Development Roadmap: Next-Generation Appliances The Research and Development (R&D) Roadmap for Next-Generation...

  11. Hydrogen Storage Research and Development Activities | Department...

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Hydrogen Storage Research and Development Activities Hydrogen Storage Research and Development Activities DOE's hydrogen storage research and development (R&D) activities are aimed...

  12. Superconducting magnet development in Japan

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Yasukochi, K.

    1983-05-01

    The present state of R and D works on the superconducting magnet and its applications in Japan are presented. On electrical rotating machines, 30 MVA superconducting synchronous rotary condenser (Mitsubishi and Fuji) and 50 MVA generator are under construction. Two ways of ship propulsion by superconducting magnets are developing. A superconducting magnetically levitated and linear motor propelled train ''MAGLEV'' was developed by the Japan National Railways (JNR). The superconducting magnet development for fusion is the most active field in Japan. The Cluster Test program has been demonstrated on a 10 T Nb/sub 3/Sn coil and the first coil of Large Coil Task in IEA collaboration has been constructed and the domestic test was completed in JAERI. These works are for the development of toroidal coils of the next generation tokamak machine. R and D works on superconducting ohmic heating coil are in progress in JAERI and ETL. The latter group has constructed 3.8 MJ pulsed coil. A high ramp rate of changing field in pulsed magnet, 200 T/s, has been tested successfully. High Energy Physics Laboratory (KEK) are conducting active works. The superconducting ..mu.. meson channel and ..pi.. meson channel have been constructed and are operating successfully. KEK has also a project of big accelerator named ''TRISTAN'', which is similar to ISABELLE project of BNL. Superconducting synchrotron magnets are developed for this project. The development of superconducting three thin wall solenoid has been started. One of them, CDF, is progressing under USA-Japan collaboration.

  13. EERE PowerPoint 97-2004 Template: Green Version

    Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) Indexed Site

    Project objective * Like all projects in this track, the global intent is to lower the cost of geothermal wells - Necessary for Hydrothermal EGS and Low Temp * Development...

  14. Hualapai Tribal Utility Development Project

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Hualapai Tribal Nation

    2008-05-25

    The first phase of the Hualapai Tribal Utility Development Project (Project) studied the feasibility of establishing a tribally operated utility to provide electric service to tribal customers at Grand Canyon West (see objective 1 below). The project was successful in completing the analysis of the energy production from the solar power systems at Grand Canyon West and developing a financial model, based on rates to be charged to Grand Canyon West customers connected to the solar systems, that would provide sufficient revenue for a Tribal Utility Authority to operate and maintain those systems. The objective to establish a central power grid over which the TUA would have authority and responsibility had to be modified because the construction schedule of GCW facilities, specifically the new air terminal, did not match up with the construction schedule for the solar power system. Therefore, two distributed systems were constructed instead of one central system with a high voltage distribution network. The Hualapai Tribal Council has not taken the action necessary to establish the Tribal Utility Authority that could be responsible for the electric service at GCW. The creation of a Tribal Utility Authority (TUA) was the subject of the second objective of the project. The second phase of the project examined the feasibility and strategy for establishing a tribal utility to serve the remainder of the Hualapai Reservation and the feasibility of including wind energy from a tribal wind generator in the energy resource portfolio of the tribal utility (see objective 2 below). It is currently unknown when the Tribal Council will consider the implementation of the results of the study. Objective 1 - Develop the basic organizational structure and operational strategy for a tribally controlled utility to operate at the Tribe’s tourism enterprise district, Grand Canyon West. Coordinate the development of the Tribal Utility structure with the development of the Grand Canyon West Power Project construction of the power infrastructure at Grand Canyon West. Develop the maintenance and operations capacity necessary to support utility operations. Develop rates for customers on the Grand Canyon West “mini-grid” sufficient for the tribal utility to be self-sustaining. Establish an implementation strategy for tribal utility service at Grand Canyon West Objective 2 - Develop a strategy for tribal utility takeover of electric service on the Reservation. Perform a cost analysis of Reservation electrical service. Develop an implementation strategy for tribal takeover of Reservation electrical service. Examine options and costs associated with integration of the Tribe’s wind resources.

  15. OSPREY Model Development Status Update

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Veronica J Rutledge

    2014-04-01

    During the processing of used nuclear fuel, volatile radionuclides will be discharged to the atmosphere if no recovery processes are in place to limit their release. The volatile radionuclides of concern are 3H, 14C, 85Kr, and 129I. Methods are being developed, via adsorption and absorption unit operations, to capture these radionuclides. It is necessary to model these unit operations to aid in the evaluation of technologies and in the future development of an advanced used nuclear fuel processing plant. A collaboration between Fuel Cycle Research and Development Offgas Sigma Team member INL and a NEUP grant including ORNL, Syracuse University, and Georgia Institute of Technology has been formed to develop off gas models and support off gas research. Georgia Institute of Technology is developing fundamental level model to describe the equilibrium and kinetics of the adsorption process, which are to be integrated with OSPREY. This report discusses the progress made on expanding OSPREY to be multiple component and the integration of macroscale and microscale level models. Also included in this report is a brief OSPREY user guide.

  16. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. P. Evans

    1998-12-03

    McDermott Technology, Inc. (MTI) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using the Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and the inorganic species, hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

  17. Advanced Emission Control Development Program.

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Evans, A.P.

    1997-12-31

    Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using B&W`s new Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and the inorganic species hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

  18. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    M. J. Holmes

    1998-12-03

    McDermott Technology, Inc. (MTI) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using the Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

  19. Advanced Emissions Control Development Program

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    A. P. Evans

    1998-12-03

    Babcock & Wilcox (B&W) is conducting a five-year project aimed at the development of practical, cost-effective strategies for reducing the emissions of hazardous air pollutants (commonly called air toxics) from coal-fired electric utility plants. The need for air toxic emissions controls may arise as the U. S. Environmental Protection Agency proceeds with implementation of Title III of the Clean Air Act Amendment (CAAA) of 1990. Data generated during the program will provide utilities with the technical and economic information necessary to reliably evaluate various air toxics emissions compliance options such as fuel switching, coal cleaning, and flue gas treatment. The development work is being carried out using B&W?s new Clean Environment Development Facility (CEDF) wherein air toxics emissions control strategies can be developed under controlled conditions, and with proven predictability to commercial systems. Tests conducted in the CEDF provide high quality, repeatable, comparable data over a wide range of coal properties, operating conditions, and emissions control systems. Development work to date has concentrated on the capture of mercury, other trace metals, fine particulate, and the inorganic species hydrogen chloride and hydrogen fluoride.

  20. HTS Wire Development Workshop: Proceedings

    SciTech Connect (OSTI)

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The 1994 High-Temperature Superconducting Wire Development Workshop was held on February 16--17 at the St. Petersburg Hilton and Towers in St. Petersburg, Florida. The meeting was hosted by Florida Power Corporation and sponsored by the US Department of Energy`s Superconductivity Program for Electric Power Systems. The meeting focused on recent high-temperature superconducting wire development activities in the Department of Energy`s Superconductivity Systems program. The meeting opened with a general discussion on the needs and benefits of superconductivity from a utility perspective, the US global competitiveness position, and an outlook on the overall prospects of wire development. The meeting then focused on four important technology areas: Wire characterization: issues and needs; technology for overcoming barriers: weak links and flux pinning; manufacturing issues for long wire lengths; and physical properties of HTS coils. Following in-depth presentations, working groups were formed in each technology area to discuss the most important current research and development issues. The working groups identified research areas that have the potential for greatly enhancing the wire development effort. These areas are discussed in the summary reports from each of the working groups. This document is a compilation of the workshop proceedings including all general session presentations and summary reports from the working groups.